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Sample records for pruritic maculopapular rash

  1. Oxcarbazepine Induced Maculopapular Rash - A Case Report

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    Biswas, Arunava; Mitra, Ritabrata; Sen, Sukanta; Pal, Agnik; Tripathi, Santanu Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Unlike carbamazepine, newer anti epileptic drug like oxcarbazepine, reports fewer side effects. In this report we describe a case of oxcarbazepine induced maculopapular rash probably happened because of a drug interaction with isoniazid, and a brief review of the existing literature is presented herewith. A 40-year-old male patient received oxcarbazepine 300mg twice daily along with other anti-tubercular drugs including isoniazid (300mg) once daily since two days. Extensive cutaneous rash wit...

  2. Oxcarbazepine induced maculopapular rash - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Arunava; Mitra, Ritabrata; Sen, Sukanta; Pal, Agnik; Tripathi, Santanu Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Unlike carbamazepine, newer anti epileptic drug like oxcarbazepine, reports fewer side effects. In this report we describe a case of oxcarbazepine induced maculopapular rash probably happened because of a drug interaction with isoniazid, and a brief review of the existing literature is presented herewith. A 40-year-old male patient received oxcarbazepine 300mg twice daily along with other anti-tubercular drugs including isoniazid (300mg) once daily since two days. Extensive cutaneous rash with intense itching developed which subsided on discontinuation of oxcarbazepine. This case highlights the fact that there is a potential possibility of drug-drug interaction between oxcarbazepine and isoniazid and concomitant use of these two drugs should better be avoided during clinical practice.

  3. Ibrutinib-associated skin toxicity: a case of maculopapular rash in a 79-year old Caucasian male patient with relapsed Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia and review of the literature

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    Anders Bisgaard Jensen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Waldenstrom's macroglobulinamia (WM is a rare malignant lymphoproliferative disorder, characterized by monoclonal IgM paraproteinemia and neoplastic proliferation of malignant lymphoplasmacytoid cells in the bone marrow. Traditionally, WM has been treated with modalities similar to those used in the management of other indolent lymphomas. Just recently, based on impressive clinical trial results in heavily pretreated WM patients, a new Bruton Tyrosine Kinase-inhibitor, Ibrutinib, has been approved for the treatment of this disorder. As the use of Ibrutinib in WM outside clinical trials is still limited, only few clinical reports illustrating treatment side effects are currently available. Here we review the current literature specific on Ibrutinib-associated rash in hematologic patients, and report on an elderly patient with WM, who developed a red maculopapular non-pruritic rash 12 weeks after starting Ibrutinib therapy. Without modifications of the ongoing Ibrutinib schedule, the rash regressed within two weeks of treatment with topical steroidcontaining dermatological compounds.

  4. Etiology of maculopapular rash in measles and rubella suspected patients from Belarus.

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    Marina A Yermalovich

    Full Text Available As a result of successful implementation of the measles/rubella elimination program, the etiology of more and more double negative cases remains elusive. The present study determined the role of different viruses as causative agents in measles or rubella suspected cases in Belarus. A total of 856 sera sent to the WHO National Laboratory between 2009 and 2011 were tested for specific IgM antibodies to measles virus (MV, rubella virus (RV and human parvovirus B19 (B19V. The negatives were further investigated for antibodies to enterovirus (EV and adenovirus (AdV. Children of up to 3 years were tested for IgM antibodies to human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6. A viral etiology was identified in 451 (52.7% cases, with 6.1% of the samples being positive for MV; 2.6% for RV; 26.2% for B19V; 9.7% for EV; 4.6% for AdV; and 3.6% for HHV6. Almost all measles and rubella cases occurred during limited outbreaks in 2011 and nearly all patients were at least 15 years old. B19V, EV and AdV infections were prevalent both in children and adults and were found throughout the 3 years. B19V occurred mainly in 3-10 years old children and 20-29 years old adults. EV infection was most common in children up to 6 years of age and AdV was confirmed mainly in 3-6 years old children. HHV6 infection was mostly detected in 6-11 months old infants. Laboratory investigation of measles/rubella suspected cases also for B19V, EV, AdV and HHV6 allows diagnosing more than half of all cases, thus strengthening rash/fever disease surveillance in Belarus.

  5. Pruritic nodular secondary syphilis in a 61-year-old man with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira-López, Roger; Bertolín-Colilla, Marta; Martín-Ezquerra, Gemma; Pujol, Ramon M

    2017-06-01

    The typical finding in secondary syphilis stage is a generalized non-pruritic maculopapular eruption. We report a case of secondary syphilis in an HIV-infected patient presenting with pruritic crusted nodules showing numerous eosinophils on the histopathological examination.

  6. A Rejang River rash

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    Jean-Li Lim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A 30-year-old Iban woman presented to a rural primary healthcare clinic located along the Batang Rejang in Sarawak. She had a 2-day history of rash, which started over her trunk and later spread to her face and limbs. What started out as individual erythematous maculopapular spots later coalesced to form larger raised blotches. The rash was extremely pruritic and affected her sleep, and hence her visit. The rash was preceded by high grade, persistent fever that was temporarily relieved by paracetamol. She also complained of malaise, arthralgia and myalgia. Her appetite had been poor since the onset of the fever. She lived in a long house at the edge of the jungle. Although she did not have a history of going into the jungle to forage, she went regularly to the river to wash clothes. Clinically, she appeared lethargic and had bilateral conjunctival injection. Her left anterior cervical lymph nodes were palpable. There were erythematous macules measuring 5 to 15 mm distributed over her whole body but predominantly over the chest and abdominal region (Figure 1. An unusual skin lesion was discovered at the right hypochondriac region. This lesion resembled a cigarette burn with a necrotic centre (Figure 2. There was no evidence of hepato-splenomegaly. Examination of the other systems was unremarkable. On further questioning, the patient admitted being bitten by a ‘kutu babi’ or mite 3 days before the onset of her fever.

  7. Fever and rash.

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    Schlossberg, D

    1996-03-01

    The combination of fever and rash comprises an extensive differential diagnosis. Many of the causes of this presentation are life-threatening. In this article, rashes are categorized as petechial, maculopapular, vesicular, erythematous, and urticarial. Each type of rash is then divided into infectious etiologies, both treatable and nontreatable, and noninfectious etiologies. It is usually possible to arrive at a workable differential diagnosis when clinical, historical, and epidemiologic factors are considered.

  8. Rash Decisions: An Approach to Dangerous Rashes Based on Morphology.

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    Santistevan, Jamie; Long, Brit; Koyfman, Alex

    2017-04-01

    Rash is a common complaint in the emergency department. Many causes of rash are benign; however, some patients may have a life-threatening diagnosis. This review will present an algorithmic approach to rashes, focusing on life-threatening causes of rash in each category. Rash is common, with a wide range of etiologies. The differential is broad, consisting of many conditions that are self-resolving. However, several conditions associated with rash are life threatening. Several keys can be utilized to rapidly diagnose and manage these deadly rashes. Thorough history and physical examination, followed by consideration of red flags, are essential. This review focuses on four broad categories based on visual and tactile characteristic patterns of rashes: petechial/purpuric, erythematous, maculopapular, and vesiculobullous. Rashes in each morphologic group will be further categorized based on clinical features such as the presence or absence of fever and distribution of skin lesions. Rashes can be divided into petechial/purpuric, erythematous, maculopapular, and vesiculobullous. After this differentiation, the presence of fever and systemic signs of illness should be assessed. Through the breakdown of rashes into these classes, emergency providers can ensure deadly conditions are considered. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Diaper Rash

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    ... if it’s wet. Babies often urinate right after falling asleep.) You can apply diaper rash ointment or ... him/her from getting diaper rash? Should I leave my baby’s diaper off while he/she is ...

  10. Clindamycin-induced Maculopapular Exanthema with Preferential Involvement of Striae Distensae: A Koebner phenomenon?

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    Monteagudo, Benigno; Cabanillas, Miguel; Iriarte, Pilar; Ramírez-Santos, Aquilina; León-Muinos, Elvira; González-Vilas, Daniel; Suárez-Amor, Óscar

    2018-04-01

    Clindamycin is a lincomycin-derived antibiotic useful for the treatment of anaerobic and Gram-positive aerobic bacterial infections. Cutaneous adverse reactions are usually maculopapular exanthemas, although hypersensitivity syndrome, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome have also been reported (1). We report the case of a patient with a maculopapular rash triggered by clindamycin who developed cutaneous lesions on striae distensae (SD). A 47-year-old woman was referred to our clinic for pruritic cutaneous lesions which had started 6 days earlier. Her past clinical history included hypertension, hypothyroidism, hyperuricemia, cholecystectomy, caesarean section, and endometriosis-related abdominal surgery, and she was taking levothyroxine, allopurinol, imidapril, and omeprazole. The skin rash first developed on her neck and back on the 3rd day of clindamycin oral treatment (300 mg every 6 hours), which was prescribed as antibiotic prophylaxis for a tooth implant. General malaise (but not fever) was also reported. Physical examination revealed an erythematous maculopapular eruption symmetrically distributed on the neck, abdomen, and back (Figure 1, A), with isolated lesions involving the proximal upper and lower limbs (Figure 1, B). There was a striking vertical distribution of skin lesions along the SD on the lateral sides of the abdomen (Figure 1, C). No mucosal involvement was found, and laboratory studies showed no abnormalities. Clindamycin withdrawal was followed by prescription of a course of oral deflazacort, starting at 30 mg daily and tapering down during a 9-day period. On the 5th day of treatment, the rash had almost cleared with minimal desquamation (Figure 1, D). Eight weeks after clearance of the skin rash, informed consent was obtained in order to perform an allergological evaluation of clindamycin, including prick and intradermal (ID) tests on the forearm and patch tests on the upper back (2). For patch testing

  11. Evaluating the febrile patient with a rash.

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    McKinnon, H D; Howard, T

    2000-08-15

    The differential diagnosis for febrile patients with a rash is extensive. Diseases that present with fever and rash are usually classified according to the morphology of the primary lesion. Rashes can be categorized as maculopapular (centrally and peripherally distributed), petechial, diffusely erythematous with desquamation, vesiculobullous-pustular and nodular. Potential causes include viruses, bacteria, spirochetes, rickettsiae, medications and rheumatologic diseases. A thorough history and a careful physical examination are essential to making a correct diagnosis. Although laboratory studies can be useful in confirming the diagnosis, test results often are not available immediately. Because the severity of these illnesses can vary from minor (roseola) to life-threatening (meningococcemia), the family physician must make prompt management decisions regarding empiric therapy. Hospitalization, isolation and antimicrobial therapy often must be considered when a patient presents with fever and a rash.

  12. A brucellosis case presenting with vesicular and maculopapular rash and febrile neutropenia

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    Selmin Dirgen Çaylak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is a systemic disease in which all kind of tissues and organs can be affected. Brucellosis may present with different symptoms and symptoms are non-specific. A broad spectrum of clinical manifestations can be seen, therefore diagnosis can be difficult. Cutaneous complications and febrile neutropenia have been rarely reported. Here, a rare brucellosis case was reported that he applied with fever, skin eruption and neutropenia. We emphasized that especially in endemic areas brucellosis should always be kept on mind in the differential diagnosis of patient with skin eruption and febril neutropenia.J Microbiol Infect Dis 2014;4(1: 39-41

  13. Poison Ivy Rash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poison ivy rash Overview Poison ivy rash is caused by an allergic reaction to an oily resin called urushiol (u-ROO-she-ol). This oil is in the leaves, stems and roots of poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac. Wash your ...

  14. Fever with Rashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soman, Letha

    2018-07-01

    Fever with rashes is one of the commonest clinical problems a general practitioner or pediatrician has to face in day-to-day clinical practice. It can be a mild viral illness or a life-threatening illness like meningococcemia or Dengue hemorrhagic fever or it can be one with a lifelong consequence like Kawasaki disease. It is very important to arrive at a clinical diagnosis as early as possible with the minimum investigational facilities. The common causes associated with fever and rashes are infections, viral followed by other infections. There can be so many non-infectious causes also for fever and rashes like auto immune diseases, drug allergies etc. The type of rashes, their appearance in relation to the fever and pattern of spread to different parts of body and the disappearance, all will help in making a diagnosis. Often the diagnosis is clinical. In certain situations laboratory work up becomes essential.

  15. Clinical significance of skin rash in dengue fever: A focus on discomfort, complications, and disease outcome.

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    Huang, Hsin-Wei; Tseng, Han-Chi; Lee, Chih-Hung; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Lin, Shang-Hung

    2016-07-01

    To assess whether the cutaneous features in patients with dengue fever are associated with abnormal blood biochemistry, complications, and poor disease outcome. Forty five patients with dengue fever were identified at a medical center in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, from September to November 2014. All cases were exclusively caused by type 1 dengue virus. Patients were classified into two groups, based on the presence or absence of skin rash, and their rash was subclassified into maculopapular, morbilliform, and petechial types. Clinical symptoms, laboratory data, disease outcome, and complications were compared between the two groups. Thirty two patients with dengue fever developed skin rash (SP group, n = 32) while the rest of 13 did not (SN group, n = 13). The patient numbers in the maculopapular, morbilliform, and petechial group were 4, 21, and 7, respectively. The SP group was younger (P = 0.001), experienced more pruritus (P = 0.008) and more swollen palms/soles (P = 0.015) than the SN group. However, the SN group had greater genital mucosa involvement (P = 0.008), higher platelet transfusion rate (P = 0.003), and lower hemoglobin and hematocrit levels (P = 0.030) than the SP group. Patients with morbilliform lesions had a higher incidence of palm/sole swelling, less genital mucosal involvement, and a lower platelet transfusion rate than did patients with maculopapular or petechial lesions. Cutaneous manifestations provide an important clue to dengue fever. In patients with dengue fever, those with skin rash tend to have itching and swelling of the palms/soles, however, those without skin rash tend to have more complications and poor disease outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Hainan Medical College. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Rashes: The Itchy Truth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... while it's healing. Allergic contact dermatitis is a rash caused by contact with an allergen (say: AL-ur-jun). An ... when you'll be going outside. For allergic dermatitis or irritant contact dermatitis, try to avoid that substance. If you ...

  17. What is that rash?

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    Speirs, Lynne; McVea, Steven; Little, Rebecca; Bourke, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    A healthy 15-month-old girl presented to the emergency department with a 24-hour history of fever and rash. The initial blanching rash developed into non-blanching areas with associated leg swelling. She had received no recent medications, had no known drug allergies and no unwell contacts.On examination, she was feverish at 38.6°C, capillary refill time was <2 s with warm peripheries, heart rate 169 bpm and blood pressure 94/59 mm Hg. A palpable purpuric rash was evident on all four limbs and face (figure 1) although the trunk was spared. Her legs were tense and oedematous to the knee.edpract;103/1/25/EDPRACT2016311782F1F1EDPRACT2016311782F1Figure 1Rash at presentation.Initial investigations: Haemoglobin level: 131 g/L, white cell count: 16.6×10 9 /L, neutrophils: 11.1×10 9 /L and platelets: 407×10 9 /LCoagulation screen: normalC reactive protein level: 20 mg/LLactate level: 1.7 mmol/LIntravenous ceftriaxone was commenced following blood culture and meningococcal PCR. The following day, while remaining systemically well, she developed a vesicular rash on her trunk and back (figure 2).edpract;103/1/25/EDPRACT2016311782F2F2EDPRACT2016311782F2Figure 2Vesicular rash. What is the diagnosis? Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP)Meningococcal septicaemiaAcute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy (AHOI)Vasculitic urticariaGianotti-Crosti syndromeWhat further investigation is required? Check viral serology including Epstein-Barr virus and hepatitis B virusComplement levels and autoimmune screenSkin biopsyLumbar puncture and audiologyNo further investigationHow should this child be managed? Complete 7 days of ceftriaxone treatmentOral aciclovirOral steroidsRegular follow-up with urinalysis and blood pressure monitoringStop antibiotics if cultures were negative at 48 hours and discharge Answers are on page ▪▪. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Poison ivy - oak - sumac rash

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    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000027.htm Poison ivy - oak - sumac rash To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Poison ivy, oak, and sumac are plants that commonly ...

  19. Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome associated with use of phenytoin, divalproex sodium, and phenobarbital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizendine, Christina E; Naik, Paras J

    2013-03-15

    A probable case of drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) associated with consecutive use of three medications for seizure control is reported. A 36-year-old woman was treated at a community hospital for a mild fever (37.9°C) and diffuse raised maculopapular rash with erythema. Three weeks previously, she had been diagnosed with a seizure disorder and initiated on phenytoin (dose unknown) at that time; about two weeks later, she developed a rash, prompting a switch from phenytoin to extended-release divalproex sodium 250 mg orally twice daily. During the week after discontinuation of phenytoin, the rash was improving, but about five days after the initiation of divalproex therapy, she had worsening rash and pruritus requiring urgent treatment; the divalproex was discontinued, and phenobarbital 30 mg three times daily was initiated for continued seizure control. Despite the discontinuation of phenytoin and divalproex, the patient's hepatic function worsened over five days, and phenobarbital therapy was discontinued. With continued deterioration of the patient's condition to fulminant hepatic failure, a transfer to a liver transplant facility was arranged. The use of the adverse reaction probability scale of Naranjo et al. in this case yielded a score of 8, indicating a probable relationship between DRESS and the serial use of phenytoin, divalproex, and phenobarbital. After receiving phenytoin for treatment of seizure disorder, a 36-year-old woman developed a fever and maculopapular rash with erythema. This reaction continued even after drug therapy was switched to extended-release divalproex and then phenobarbital. The patient's liver function deteriorated despite discontinuation of all seizure medications.

  20. Rash caused by Oryctes nasicornis.

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    Veraldi, Stefano; Fanoni, Daniele; Nazzaro, Gianluca

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of rash caused by crushing of a male of Oryctes nasicornis (Linnaeus 1758) (Coleoptera, "http:// it. wikipedia. org/ wiki/ Scarabaeidae" \\o "Scarabaeidae" Scarabaeidae), popularly known as "European rhinoceros beetle", on the skin of an Italian tourist who developed the reaction during a trip to Turkey. The rash appeared one hour after the crushing of the insect on the skin. The patient was observed one day later, when she returned to Italy. To our knowledge, no similar cases have been reported in the literature. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Two family members with a syndrome of headache and rash caused by human parvovirus B19

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    Antonio Carlos M. Pereira

    Full Text Available Human parvovirus B19 infection can cause erythema infectiosum (EI and several other clinical presentations. Central nervous system (CNS involvement is rare, and only a few reports of encephalitis and aseptic meningitis have been published. Here, we describe 2 cases of B19 infection in a family presenting different clinical features. A 30 year old female with a 7-day history of headache, malaise, myalgias, joint pains, and rash was seen. Physical examination revealed a maculopapular rash on the patient's body, and arthritis of the hands. She completely recovered in 1 week. Two days before, her 6 year old son had been admitted to a clinic with a 1-day history of fever, headache, abdominal pain and vomiting. On admission, he was alert, and physical examination revealed neck stiffness, Kerning and Brudzinski signs, and a petechial rash on his trunk and extremities. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis was normal. He completely recovered in 5 days. Acute and convalescent sera of both patients were positive for specific IgM antibody to B19. Human parvovirus B19 should be considered in the differential diagnosis of aseptic meningitis, particularly during outbreaks of erythema infectiosum. The disease may mimic meningococcemia and bacterial meningitis.

  2. Ron Rash: One Foot in Eden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Thomas Ærvold

    2010-01-01

    An analysis of Ron Rash's novel One Foot in Eden, focusing on his attachment to place and his depiction of the internal conflicts between farmers and townspeople in a small Appalachian community. Rash depicts the contemporary Southerner’s struggle to maintain his or her roots in a time of rapid...

  3. Southern Tick-Associated Rash Illness (STARI)

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    ... described in humans following bites of the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum . The rash may be accompanied ... of Vector-Borne Diseases (DVBD) Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs ...

  4. Skin rash during treatment with generic itraconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vuono, Antonio; Palleria, Caterina; Scicchitano, Francesca; Squillace, Aida; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Gallelli, Luca

    2014-04-01

    Generic drugs have the same active substance, the same pharmaceutical form, the same therapeutic indications and a similar bioequivalence with the reference medicinal product (branded). Although a similar efficacy is postulated, some cases of clinical inefficacy during treatment with generic formulations have been reported. In this case, we describe a woman with onychomycosis that developed a skin rash during treatment with a generic formulation of itraconazole. Drug administration and its re-challenge confirmed the association between itraconazole and skin rash. Both Naranjo probability scale and World Health Organization causality assessment scale documented a probable association between generic-itraconazole and skin rash. The switch from generic formulation to brand one induced an improvement of symptoms. Since we are unable to evaluate the role of each excipient in the development of skin rash, we cannot rule out their involvement. However, more data are necessary to better define the similarities or differences between branded and generic formulations.

  5. Genetic variation in CFH predicts phenytoin-induced maculopapular exanthema in European-descent patients.

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    McCormack, Mark; Gui, Hongsheng; Ingason, Andrés; Speed, Doug; Wright, Galen E B; Zhang, Eunice J; Secolin, Rodrigo; Yasuda, Clarissa; Kwok, Maxwell; Wolking, Stefan; Becker, Felicitas; Rau, Sarah; Avbersek, Andreja; Heggeli, Kristin; Leu, Costin; Depondt, Chantal; Sills, Graeme J; Marson, Anthony G; Auce, Pauls; Brodie, Martin J; Francis, Ben; Johnson, Michael R; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Striano, Pasquale; Coppola, Antonietta; Zara, Federico; Kunz, Wolfram S; Sander, Josemir W; Lerche, Holger; Klein, Karl Martin; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Krenn, Martin; Gudmundsson, Lárus J; Stefánsson, Kári; Krause, Roland; Shear, Neil; Ross, Colin J D; Delanty, Norman; Pirmohamed, Munir; Carleton, Bruce C; Cendes, Fernando; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Liao, Wei-Ping; O'Brien, Terence J; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Cherny, Stacey; Kwan, Patrick; Baum, Larry; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L

    2018-01-23

    To characterize, among European and Han Chinese populations, the genetic predictors of maculopapular exanthema (MPE), a cutaneous adverse drug reaction common to antiepileptic drugs. We conducted a case-control genome-wide association study of autosomal genotypes, including Class I and II human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles, in 323 cases and 1,321 drug-tolerant controls from epilepsy cohorts of northern European and Han Chinese descent. Results from each cohort were meta-analyzed. We report an association between a rare variant in the complement factor H-related 4 ( CFHR4 ) gene and phenytoin-induced MPE in Europeans ( p = 4.5 × 10 -11 ; odds ratio [95% confidence interval] 7 [3.2-16]). This variant is in complete linkage disequilibrium with a missense variant (N1050Y) in the complement factor H ( CFH ) gene. In addition, our results reinforce the association between HLA-A*31:01 and carbamazepine hypersensitivity. We did not identify significant genetic associations with MPE among Han Chinese patients. The identification of genetic predictors of MPE in CFHR4 and CFH, members of the complement factor H-related protein family, suggest a new link between regulation of the complement system alternative pathway and phenytoin-induced hypersensitivity in European-ancestral patients. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Skin rash and arthritis a simplified appraisal of less common associations.

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    Cozzi, A; Doria, A; Gisondi, P; Girolomoni, G

    2014-06-01

    Skin and joint manifestations are part of the clinical spectrum of many disorders. Well-known associations include psoriatic arthritis and arthritis associated with autoimmune connective tissue diseases. This review focuses on less common associations where skin lesions can provide easily accessible and valuable diagnostic clues, and directly lead to the specific diagnosis or limit the list of possibilities. This may also affect health care resources as diagnostic tests are often low-specific, highly expensive and poorly available. This group of diseases can be divided into two subsets, based on the presence/absence of fever, and then further classified according to elementary skin lesions (macular, urticarial, maculo-papular, vesico-bullous, pustular, petechial and nodular). In most instances joint involvement occurs as peripheral migrating polyarthritis. Erythematosus macular or urticarial rashes occur in most febrile disorders such as monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes, Schnitzler's syndrome, Still's disease and rheumatic fever and afebrile diseases as urticarial vasculitis. Pustular rash may be observed in chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) and pyogenic arthritis with pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome (both febrile) as well as in Behcet's disease and Synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis syndrome (both non-febrile). Papular lesions are typical of secondary syphilis, sarcoidosis, interstitial granulomatous dermatitis, papular petechial of cutaneous small-vessel vasculitis and nodular lesions of polyarteritis nodosa and multicentric reticulohistiocytosis all of which are afebrile. Differential diagnosis includes infections and drug reactions which may mimic several of these conditions. To biopsy the right skin lesion at the right time it is essential to obtain relevant histological information. © 2013 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  7. Amoxicillin rash in patients with infectious mononucleosis: evidence of true drug sensitization.

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    Ónodi-Nagy, Katinka; Kinyó, Ágnes; Meszes, Angéla; Garaczi, Edina; Kemény, Lajos; Bata-Csörgő, Zsuzsanna

    2015-01-01

    It hasn't been clearly understood yet whether sensitization to antibiotics, the virus itself or transient loss of drug tolerance due to the virus, is responsible for the development of maculopapular exanthems following amoxicillin intake in patients with infectious mononucleosis. We aimed to examine whether sensitization to penicillin developed among patients with skin rash following amoxicillin treatment within infectious mononucleosis. Ten patients were investigated for drug sensitization by lymphocyte transformation test and six patients were further tested by prick-, intradermal and patch tests employing the penicillin's main antigens. Lymphocyte transformation test showed negative results with amoxicillin, while one patient had positive reaction to cefixime. Six patients with suspected sensitization to amoxicillin were then investigated by in vivo tests. Prick tests were negative in all six patients, but the intradermal tests showed positive reactions in four patients. Our data demonstrate that in vitro testing is not sensitive enough in determining drug sensitization to penicillin. In vivo tests should be performed to detect sensitization and indeed with skin tests our results confirmed that sensitization to aminopenicillin may develop within infectious mononucleosis.

  8. Red, Itchy Rash? Get the Skinny on Dermatitis

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    ... Subscribe April 2012 Print this issue Red, Itchy Rash? Get the Skinny on Dermatitis En español Send us your comments You’ve probably had a rash at some point or another, whether from poison ...

  9. Skin rash during treatment with generic itraconazole

    OpenAIRE

    De Vuono, Antonio; Palleria, Caterina; Scicchitano, Francesca; Squillace, Aida; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Gallelli, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Generic drugs have the same active substance, the same pharmaceutical form, the same therapeutic indications and a similar bioequivalence with the reference medicinal product (branded). Although a similar efficacy is postulated, some cases of clinical inefficacy during treatment with generic formulations have been reported. In this case, we describe a woman with onychomycosis that developed a skin rash during treatment with a generic formulation of itraconazole. Drug administration and its re...

  10. Transverse myelitis associated with an itchy rash and hyperckemia: neuromyelitis optica associated with dermatitis herpetiformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Anand; Rathnasabapathi, Devipriya; Elsone, Liene; Mutch, Kerry; Terlizzo, Monica; Footitt, David; Jacob, Anu

    2014-05-01

    Neuromyelitis optica is associated with severe neurodisability if not recognized and treated promptly. Several autoimmune disorders are associated with this condition and may vary in their presentation. It is essential that clinicians are aware of the uncommon presenting features of neuromyelitis optica and associated autoimmune conditions. A 53-year-old woman presented with nausea and vomiting and was noted to have an asymptomatic elevated creatinine kinase level, which improved with conservative management. She had a history of iron-deficiency anemia due to long-standing celiac disease that was managed with a gluten-free diet. She then presented with recurrent transverse myelitis and a vesicobullous rash over her arms and feet that was pruritic and excoriating. Skin biopsy results confirmed a clinical diagnosis of dermatitis herpetiformis and antibody test findings against aquaporin-4 were positive, leading to a diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. She was treated with methylprednisolone sodium succinate, plasma exchange, and azathioprine and has remained in remission. This report highlights the association of neuromyelitis optica with dermatitis herpetiformis, which can present even without clinical features of celiac disease. Nausea, vomiting, and asymptomatic hyperCKemia should be recognized as rare presenting features of neuromyelitis optica.

  11. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency presenting as a rash.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Crushell, Ellen

    2012-09-01

    We report on the case of a 2-year-old girl recently diagnosed with Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency who originally presented in the neonatal period with a distinctive rash. At 11 weeks of age she developed seizures, she had acquired microcephaly and developmental delay. The rash deteriorated dramatically following commencement of phenobarbitone; both rash and seizures abated following empiric introduction of pyridoxine and folinic acid as treatment of possible vitamin responsive seizures. We postulate that phenobarbitone in combination with MTHFR deficiency may have caused her rash to deteriorate and subsequent folinic acid was helpful in treating the rash and preventing further acute neurological decline as commonly associated with this condition.

  12. Hyperactivation of JAK1 tyrosine kinase induces stepwise, progressive pruritic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Takuwa; Fukada, Toshiyuki; Nishida, Keigo; Nakayama, Manabu; Matsuda, Masashi; Miura, Ikuo; Dainichi, Teruki; Fukuda, Shinji; Kabashima, Kenji; Nakaoka, Shinji; Bin, Bum-Ho; Kubo, Masato; Ohno, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Takanori; Ohara, Osamu; Koseki, Haruhiko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Yoshida, Hisahiro

    2016-06-01

    Skin homeostasis is maintained by the continuous proliferation and differentiation of epidermal cells. The skin forms a strong but flexible barrier against microorganisms as well as physical and chemical insults; however, the physiological mechanisms that maintain this barrier are not fully understood. Here, we have described a mutant mouse that spontaneously develops pruritic dermatitis as the result of an initial defect in skin homeostasis that is followed by induction of a Th2-biased immune response. These mice harbor a mutation that results in a single aa substitution in the JAK1 tyrosine kinase that results in hyperactivation, thereby leading to skin serine protease overexpression and disruption of skin barrier function. Accordingly, treatment with an ointment to maintain normal skin barrier function protected mutant mice from dermatitis onset. Pharmacological inhibition of JAK1 also delayed disease onset. Together, these findings indicate that JAK1-mediated signaling cascades in skin regulate the expression of proteases associated with the maintenance of skin barrier function and demonstrate that perturbation of these pathways can lead to the development of spontaneous pruritic dermatitis.

  13. Demodex gatoi -associated contagious pruritic dermatosis in cats - a report from six households in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajaniemi Riitta-Liisa

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Demodex gatoi is unique among demodectic mites. It possesses a distinct stubby appearance, and, instead of residing in the hair follicles, it dwells in the keratin layer of the epidermis, causing a pruritic and contagious skin disease in cats. Little is known of the occurrence of D. gatoi in Europe or control of D. gatoi infestation. Case presentation We describe D. gatoi in 10 cats, including five Cornish Rex, two Burmese, one Exotic, one Persian and one Siamese, living in six multi-cat households in different locations in Finland containing 21 cats in total. Intense pruritus was the main clinical sign. Scaling, broken hairs, alopecia and self-inflicted excoriations were also observed. Diagnosis was based on finding typical short-bodied demodectic mites in skin scrapings, skin biopsies or on tape strips. Other pruritic skin diseases, such as allergies and dermatophytoses, were ruled out. In one household, despite finding several mites on one cat, all six cats of the household remained symptomless. Amitraz used weekly at a concentration of 125-250 ppm for 2-3 months, proved successful in three households, 2% lime sulphur weekly dips applied for six weeks in one household and peroral ivermectin (1 mg every other day for 10 weeks in one household. Previous trials in four households with imidacloprid-moxidectin, selamectin or injected ivermectin given once or twice a month appeared ineffective. Conclusion D. gatoi-associated dermatitis is an emerging contagious skin disease in cats in Finland. Although pruritus is common, some cats may harbour the mites without clinical signs. In addition, due to translucency of the mites and fastidious feline grooming habits, the diagnosis may be challenging. An effective and convenient way to treat D. gatoi infestations has yet to emerge.

  14. RASH D - A mercury programme for neutron shielding calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendall, D.E.

    1962-08-01

    An improved version of an earlier neutron shielding programme (RASH B) is described. The new programme is also written in Mercury Autocode and solves a set of multigroup diffusion equations in one dimension. It differs from RASH B in that distributed source terms may be introduced into all the groups if required. Some other improvements are also included. (author)

  15. Not all that rashes is measles:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, S. A.; Mustafa, O. A.

    1998-01-01

    Measles is a major cause of infant mortality in third world countries, leading to approximately one million deaths each year. The WHO aims to globally eradicate measles virus at the beginning of the next century, which will need a major effort in particular in countries like Sudan. To achieve goal epidemiological studies I am needed to estimate the magnitude of the problem for which accurate diagnostic test are needed. We therefore conducted a study in El hag Yousif area (population 500 000) in Khartoum North where measles is prevalent despite vaccination effort by EPI. We studied the accuracy of the WHO criteria for clinical diagnosis in comparison with laboratory diagnosis during a one-year period. A total of 145 under five suspected measles cases were identified by active, case finding and examined. 111 cases fully complied with the WHO criteria for diagnosis of clinical measles. Out of 103 clinical measles cases, tested using prototype rapid measles test IgM Elisa and Pcr, 77(75%) were measles positive. A battery of virus test was run on 21 sera out of the 26(25%) measles negatives: Herpes virus-6, Epstein-Bar and Dengue viruses were detected in five, one and one case, respectively. It was concluded that one out of every four cases diagnosed by the clinical as measles rash is probably caused by other viruses. (Author)

  16. Pruritic Vesicular Eruption on the Lower Legs in a Diabetic Female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Riad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old diabetic female presented with highly pruritic vesicles and excoriated lesions over the anterior aspect of both lower legs. The lesions were recurrent over the last two years. She received a lot of medications with partial response. Hb A1c was 10.8% (normal up to 7%. CBC showed microcytic, hypochromic anemia. Serum zinc, folate, IgE, TSH and T4 were all within normal ranges. Biopsy showed epidermal separation secondary to keratinocyte necrosis and minimal monocytic, perivascular infiltrate. Direct immunofluorescence was negative for intraepidermal and subepidremal deposition of immunoglobulin. The dermis was positive for mucin deposition stainable by both PAS and Alcian blue while it was negative for Congo red and APC immunoperoxidase staining for amyloid material. In conclusion, the case was diagnosed as bullosis diabeticorum by distinctive clinical and pathological features and after exclusion of other possible differentials. Pruritus was partially controlled by topical potent steroid and the case was resolved spontaneously after eight months.

  17. DRUG REACTION WITH HERBAL SUPPLEMENT: A POSSIBLE CASE OF DRUG INDUCED LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AZIZ NA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 24-year-old lady presented with four days history of fever, non-pruritic rash, ankle pain and swelling. She had consumed herbal supplement five days before the onset of symptoms. Examinations revealed erythematous maculo-papular lesions of varying sizes on sun exposed areas. Patient was suspected to have Drug Induced Lupus Erythematosus (DILE and subsequently symptoms subsided rapidly on withholding the herbal medication.

  18. Effectiveness of the nursing programme 'Coping with itch': a randomized controlled study in adults with chronic pruritic skin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Os-Medendorp, H; Ros, W J G; Eland-de Kok, P C M; Kennedy, C; Thio, B H; van der Schuur-van der Zande, A; Grypdonck, M H F; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C A F M

    2007-06-01

    The nursing programme 'Coping with Itch' aims at reducing itch and at helping patients with chronic pruritic skin diseases cope with itch. The programme consists of educational and cognitive behavioural interventions. Dermatology nurses carry out the programme, which supplements standard medical treatment given by a dermatologist, in individual sessions at a nurse clinic organized by the dermatology outpatient department. To evaluate the effectiveness of the nursing programme 'Coping with Itch' in patients with chronic pruritic skin diseases. A randomized controlled study was carried out. Patients with chronic pruritic skin diseases were randomly assigned to the intervention group or the control group. The intervention group received standard care from a dermatologist and nursing care according to the programme 'Coping with Itch' for a mean of 2.9 visits. The control group received usual care from a dermatologist. Data collection took place at baseline, at 3 months (t1) and at 9 months (t2) after baseline. Most visits to the nurse clinic took place during the first 3 months of the study. Main outcome measures were the frequency and intensity of itching and scratching, itch-related coping, and skin-related and general psychosocial morbidity. Secondary outcome measures were the number of visits to the dermatologist and the use of medication and ointments. Mann-Whitney tests and analyses of covariance were used to analyse differences between the two groups. Data on 29 patients in the intervention group and 36 patients in the control group were used in the analyses. A trend to significance (P = 0.07) was shown in the difference between the two groups in the frequency of itching and scratching at t1. A significant difference (P = 0.04) was shown between the two groups in catastrophizing and helpless itch-related coping at t1. No significant differences were revealed at t2 between the groups. Patients in the intervention group visited the dermatologist significantly less

  19. Erlotinib-induced rash spares previously irradiated skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lips, Irene M.; Vonk, Ernest J.A.; Koster, Mariska E.Y.; Houwing, Ronald H.

    2011-01-01

    Erlotinib is an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor prescribed to patients with locally advanced or metastasized non-small cell lung carcinoma after failure of at least one earlier chemotherapy treatment. Approximately 75% of the patients treated with erlotinib develop acneiform skin rashes. A patient treated with erlotinib 3 months after finishing concomitant treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer is presented. Unexpectedly, the part of the skin that had been included in his previously radiotherapy field was completely spared from the erlotinib-induced acneiform skin rash. The exact mechanism of erlotinib-induced rash sparing in previously irradiated skin is unclear. The underlying mechanism of this phenomenon needs to be explored further, because the number of patients being treated with a combination of both therapeutic modalities is increasing. The therapeutic effect of erlotinib in the area of the previously irradiated lesion should be assessed. (orig.)

  20. Use of Accelerometer Activity Monitors to Detect Changes in Pruritic Behaviors: Interim Clinical Data on 6 Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Wernimont

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Veterinarians and pet owners have limited ability to assess pruritic behaviors in dogs. This pilot study assessed the capacity of the Vetrax® triaxial accelerometer to measure these behaviors in six dogs with pruritus likely due to environmental allergens. Dogs wore the activity monitor for two weeks while consuming their usual pet food (baseline, then for eight weeks while consuming a veterinary-exclusive pet food for dogs with suspected non-food-related skin conditions (Hill’s Prescription Diet® Derm DefenseTM Canine dry food. Veterinarians and owners completed questionnaires during baseline, phase 1 (days 1–28 and phase 2 (days 29–56 without knowledge of the activity data. Continuous 3-axis accelerometer data was processed using proprietary behavior recognition algorithms and analyzed using general linear mixed models with false discovery rate-adjusted p values. Veterinarian-assessed overall clinical signs of pruritus were significantly predicted by scratching (β 0.176, p = 0.008, head shaking (β 0.197, p < 0.001 and sleep quality (β −0.154, p < 0.001, while owner-assessed quality of life was significantly predicted by scratching (β −0.103, p = 0.013 and head shaking (β −0.146, p < 0.001. Among dogs exhibiting pruritus signs eating the veterinary-exclusive food, the Vetrax® sensor provided an objective assessment of clinically relevant pruritic behaviors that agreed with owner and veterinarian reports.

  1. A non-travel related rash in a traveler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith A. Sacco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 45-year-old man was admitted for investigation of a symmetric lower limb rash associated with recurrent fever for two weeks following a hiking trip in Italy and Greece. He was treated for sepsis secondary to lower limb cellulitis with no clinical improvement and subsequently diagnosed with Streptococcus gallolyticus endocarditis mediating an infectious vasculitis.

  2. An unusual case of sepsis and petechial rash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Christina

    2017-05-01

    This article describes a man who presented to the ED in acute distress with signs and symptoms of sepsis, pneumonia, and a new petechial rash on his chest. He was eventually diagnosed with Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Aggressive treatment of sepsis and timely administration of empiric antibiotics were lifesaving in this situation.

  3. Shampoo-clay heals diaper rash faster than calendula officinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Mahmoudi, Mansoreh; Mashaiekhi, Mahdi

    2014-06-01

    Diaper rash is one of the most common skin disorders of infancy and childhood. Some studies have shown that Shampoo-clay was effective to treat chronic dermatitis. Then, it is supposed that it may be effective in diaper rash; however, no published studies were found in this regard. This study aimed to compare the effects of Shampoo-clay (S.C) and Calendula officinalis (C.O) to improve infantile diaper rash. A randomized, double blind, parallel controlled, non-inferiority trial was conducted on 60 outpatient infants referred to health care centers or pediatric clinics in Khomein city and diagnosed with diaper rash. Patients were randomly assigned into two treatment groups including S.C group (n = 30) and C.O group (n = 30) by using one to one allocation ratio. The rate of complete recovery in three days was the primary outcome. Data was collected using a checklist and analyzed using t-test, Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests and risk ratio. Totally, 93.3% of lesions in the S.C group healed in the first 6 hours, while this rate was 40% in C.O group (P < 0.001). The healing ratio for improvement in the first 6 hours was 7 times more in the S.C group. In addition, 90% of infants in the SC group and 36.7% in the C.O group were improved completely in the first 3 days (P < 0.001). S.C was effective to heal diaper rash, and also had faster effects compared to C.O.

  4. Rat-bite fever presenting with rash and septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanechorn Na Ayuthaya, Rajyani; Niumpradit, Nucha

    2005-11-01

    Rat-bite fever is an uncommon disease known for its endemicity to occur worldwide. Although most patients tend to develop mild symptoms with improvement from conventional antibiotics, it can progress with severe complications with a mortality rate as high as 13% without proper treatment. The authors report a complicated case of rat bite-fever involving a 61-year old woman who presented with fever petechial rash, and septic arthritis following a rat bite. Initially, multiple antibiotics were administered but were not effective. As a consequence, invasive procedures such as arthrotomy and joint debridement were done and prolonged antibiotic was administered until clinical resolution. Since many cases do not have a history of rat bite and may present with fever, rashes, and arthritis it is essential to distinguish it from other diseases. Here, the authors will provide details on the etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management to aid prompt detection and treatment of the disease.

  5. Antibiotic-Induced Rash in Patients With Infectious Mononucleosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Dennis F; Ramos, Carroll L

    2017-02-01

    To provide an extensive review of case reports, epidemiological data, and the underlying mechanism of antibiotic-induced skin rash in patients with concurrent infectious mononucleosis (IM). A MEDLINE literature search inclusive of the dates 1946 to June 2016 was performed using the search terms anti-bacterial agents and infectious mononucleosis. EMBASE (1980 to June 2016) was searched using the terms mononucleosis and antibiotic agent and drug eruption. References of all relevant articles were reviewed for additional citations and information. We selected English-language, primary literature, review articles, and mechanistic articles that addressed antibiotic-induced skin rash in patients with concurrent IM. We assessed all case reports available for causality utilizing a modified Naranjo nomogram specifically designed for this subject. We assembled the available epidemiological data into tables to identify trends in incidence rates over the years. We identified 17 case reports of antibiotic-associated rash in patients with IM. The median Naranjo score was 6 (range = 1 to 8). The top 3 reported drugs were ampicillin, azithromycin, and amoxicillin. Incidence of this adverse effect was higher in the 1960s (55.6%, 45%, and 33%) than in 2013 (33% and 15%). The mechanism most commonly proposed is a transient virus-mediated immune alteration that sets the stage for loss of antigenic tolerance and the development of a reversible, delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction to the antibiotic. A reassessment of the long-held belief of the high incidence (80%-100%) of antibiotic-induced skin rash in patients with IM seems prudent. Additional studies will be necessary to clarify this issue.

  6. Nappy (diaper) rash: what else besides irritant contact dermatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Vânia Oliveira; Robl, Renata; Uber, Marjorie; Abagge, Kerstin Taniguchi; Marinoni, Leide Parolin; Presa, Juliana Gomes Loyola

    2015-08-01

    Nappy (diaper) rash is a common cutaneous disorder of infancy, and diverse dermatoses may affect this region. To perform a differential diagnosis can be challenging. We present four cases to emphasise the importance of clinical diagnosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Hydroxyzine induced pancytopenia and petechial rashes: a rare complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihsan Ates

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyzine is used as an additional treatment both in symptomatic treatment of anxiety and stress caused by psychoneurosis and in organic diseases which anxiety appeared. It is used to treat pruritis caused by histamine and such allergic cases like chronic urticaria because of antihistaminic effect, atopic and contact dermatitis. In this case report, that widespread milimetric petechial rashes in all body and deep pancytopnia development is seen in a patient using hydroxyzine tablet because of pruritis at joints is disscussed. [J Contemp Med 2016; 6(3.000: 234-234

  8. Recognising haemorrhagic rash in children with fever: a survey of parents' knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurel, M; Dubos, F; Motte, B; Pruvost, I; Leclerc, F; Martinot, A

    2011-07-01

    Early recognition and treatment of meningococcal disease improves its outcome. Haemorrhagic rash is one of the most specific signs that parents can learn to recognise. To determine the percentage of parents able to recognise a haemorrhagic rash and perform the tumbler test. 123 parents of children consulting for mild injuries were interviewed about the significance and recognition of haemorrhagic rash in febrile children. Although 88% of parents undressed their children when they were febrile, it was never to look specifically for a skin rash. Only 7% (95% CI 3% to 12%) were able to recognise a petechial rash and knew the tumbler test. Information campaigns about the significance of haemorrhagic rash and about the tumbler test are needed.

  9. Mononucleosis-like drug rash: An interesting case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshma T Vishnani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS is a rare adverse effect of the commonly prescribed drug dapsone. We present a case of a 35-year-old male who was referred to us from the gastroenterologist with complaints of rash, nausea, vomiting, and jaundice since 2 days with a provisional differential diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis or viral exanthema. On enquiry patient gave history of taking dapsone a week prior for refractory urticaria. After thorough investigations we diagnosed him with DHS. This syndrome occurs in a relatively small proportion of patients, but it is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. The reason for presenting this case is to remind physicians of the unpredictability and potential severity of this reaction which makes it a major concern in clinical practice.

  10. Seizure freedom after lamotrigine rash: a peculiar phenomenon in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakisaka, Yosuke; Jin, Kazutaka; Kato, Kazuhiro; Iwasaki, Masaki; Nakasato, Nobukazu

    2014-01-01

    A 57-year-old right-handed woman with a history of left frontal lobe stroke had experienced episodes of language-expression difficulty followed by paraphasia lasting for approximately 30 seconds two years earlier. She was diagnosed with left frontal lobe epilepsy, and a lamotrigine regimen was initiated. This treatment had to be stopped five weeks after initiation because she developed a rash, and her drug lymphocyte stimulation test result was positive. Interestingly, she has since remained seizure free without requiring any antiepileptic medications. This adult case with a peculiar clinical course provides support for the hypothesis of immunomodulation process involvement in epilepsy, a phenomenon that was previously mainly seen in pediatric patients.

  11. Incidence of rash after amoxicillin treatment in children with infectious mononucleosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chovel-Sella, Aluma; Ben Tov, Amir; Lahav, Einat; Mor, Orna; Rudich, Hagit; Paret, Gideon; Reif, Shimon

    2013-05-01

    "Ampicillin rash," a phenomenon unique to patients with Epstein-Barr virus acute infectious mononucleosis (AIM) treated with ampicillin, was first reported in the 1960s. The incidence was estimated as being between 80% and 100%, and the figures have not been reviewed since those first accounts. We sought to establish the current incidence of rash associated with antibiotic treatment among children with AIM. A retrospective study of all hospitalized children diagnosed as having AIM based upon positive Epstein-Barr virus serology in 2 pediatric tertiary medical centers in Israel. Of the 238 children who met the study entry criteria during the study period, 173 were treated with antibiotics. Fifty-seven (32.9%) of the subjects treated with antibiotics had a rash during their illness compared with 15 (23.1%) in untreated patients (P = .156; not significant). Amoxicillin was associated with the highest incidence of antibiotic-induced rash occurrence (29.5%, 95% confidence interval: 18.52-42.57), but significantly lower than the 90% rate reported for ampicillin in past studies. Age, gender, ethnicity, and atopic or allergic history were not associated with the development of rash after antibiotic exposure. Among the laboratory data, only increased white blood cell counts were more prevalent among subjects who did not develop an antibiotic-induced rash. The incidence of rash in pediatric patients with AIM after treatment with the current oral aminopenicillin (amoxicillin) is much lower than originally reported.

  12. Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms: Two Emergency Department Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Tsyrulnik, Alina; Landman, Adam B.

    2011-01-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) is a rare, severe adverse drug event that appears with a generalized rash, fevers, and dysfunction of 1 or more organ systems. We describe 2 patients (1 adult and 1 pediatric) seen in the emergency department with DRESS, and review the clinical presentations, potential complications, and management of DRESS. Although rare, it can be associated with significant morbidity, including liver failure and death, and should be considered in th...

  13. Generalized petechial rashes in children during a parvovirus B19 outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonson, M Bruce; Riedesel, Erica L; Williams, Gary P; Demuri, Gregory P

    2010-04-01

    Human parvovirus B19 infection is associated not only with erythema infectiosum (fifth disease) but also, rarely, with purpuric or petechial rashes. Most reports of these atypical rashes describe sporadic cases with skin lesions that have distinctively focal distributions. During a community outbreak of fifth disease, we investigated a cluster of illnesses in children with generalized petechial rashes to determine whether parvovirus was the causative agent and, if so, to describe more fully the clinical spectrum of petechial rashes that are associated with this virus. Systematic evaluation was conducted by general pediatricians of children with petechial rashes for evidence of acute parvovirus infection. During the outbreak, acute parvovirus infection was confirmed in 13 (76%) of 17 children who were evaluated for petechial rash. Confirmed case patients typically had mild constitutional symptoms, and most (11 [85%] of 13) had fever. Petechiae were typically dense and widely distributed; sometimes accentuated in the distal extremities, axillae, or groin; and usually absent from the head/neck. Most case patients had leukopenia, and several had thrombocytopenia. Parvovirus immunoglobulin M was detected in 8 (73%) of 11 acute-phase serum specimens, and immunoglobulin G was detectable only in convalescent specimens. Parvovirus DNA was detected in all 7 tested serum specimens, including 2 acute-phase specimens that were immunoglobulin M-negative. All case patients had brief, uncomplicated illnesses, but 6 were briefly hospitalized and 1 underwent a bone marrow examination. Two case patients developed erythema infectiosum during convalescence. During an outbreak of fifth disease, parvovirus proved to be a common cause of petechial rash in children, and this rash was typically more generalized than described in case reports. Associated clinical features, hematologic abnormalities, and serologic test results are consistent with a viremia-associated illness that is distinct

  14. Lamotrigine rechallenge after a skin rash. A combined study of open cases and a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrani Azcurra, Daniel J L

    2013-01-01

    To determine the safety of lamotrigine rechallenge after a first episode of skin rash in bipolar patients. An open cases prospective study was conducted with patients who, developed a skin rash when first treated with lamotrigine, were refractory to other treatments, and were offered lamotrigine rechallenge using a different dose titration. Additionally a review was performed on previous skin rash management strategies and lamotrigine rechallenge reports. Every 3 out of 10 lamotrigine rechallenge patients required drug interruption due to persistent rash. One of them was potentially serious and resolved by stopping the lamotrigine. The review of available literature identified several lamotrigine rechallenge studies with rates of positive results varying between 70% and 87% depending on the study. No patient developed Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis after rechallenge. The rate of rash was higher when rechallenge began between 4 weeks from initial rash (19% vs. 7%, P=.001) and decreased when first rash showed no potentially serious signs (0% vs.19%, P=.01). Rechallenge is a viable option after a benign lamotrigine-induced rash, and can even be rechallenged after rash with greater precautions when there exists one or two potentially serious signs. In cases of more serious rash there are no reliable data available on rechallenge safety and it may pose a significant risk. In those cases rechallenge should better be avoided between 4 weeks from first rash. Copyright © 2011 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Ibrutinib-Associated Skin Toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders; Stausbøl-Grøn, Birgitte; Riber-Hansen, Rikke

    2017-01-01

    in the management of other indolent lymphomas. Just recently, based on impressive clinical trial results in heavily pretreated WM patients, a new Bruton Tyrosine Kinase-inhibitor, Ibrutinib, has been approved for the treatment of this disorder. As the use of Ibrutinib in WM outside clinical trials is still limited......, only few clinical reports illustrating treatment side effects are currently available. Here we review the current literature specific on Ibrutinib-associated rash in hematologic patients, and report on an elderly patient with WM, who developed a red maculopapular non-pruritic rash 12 weeks after...... starting Ibrutinib therapy. Without modifications of the ongoing Ibrutinib schedule, the rash regressed within two weeks of treatment with topical steroid-containing dermatological compounds....

  16. Azithromycin-induced rash in a patient of infectious mononucleosis - a case report with review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Indranil; Mondal, Somnath; Sen, Sukanta; Tripathi, Santanu Kumar; Banerjee, Gautam

    2014-08-01

    Antibiotic induced skin rash in setting of infectious mononucleosis is often encountered in clinical practice. However, macrolides like azithromycin are considered relatively safe and till date only two cases of azithromycin induced rash in setting of infectious mononucleosis have been reported. The following report illustrates the case of a 23-year-old man suffering from infectious mononucleosis who exhibited a generalized cutaneous rash following treatment with azithromycin. Using the Naranjo ADR probability scale, this case of acute onset rash following azithromycin administration was found to be in 'probable' category. The mechanism of antibiotic-induced rash in patients suffering from infectious mononucleosis is incompletely understood. It has been suggested that the rash could result from virus mediated immunomodulation or due to altered drug metabolism. The report calls for cautious use of antibiotics in the setting of suspected viral infections like infectious mononucleosis as injudicious use might increase the risk of deleterious skin reactions and increase the cost of healthcare.

  17. Rash related to use of scented products. A questionnaire study in the Danish population. Is the problem increasing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J D; Andersen, T F; Thomsen, L K

    2000-01-01

    . Further, it was determined whether risk of self-reported 1st-time rash from scented products had increased during the past 15 years compared to the preceding period. The sample consisted of 1537 persons, 801 female and 736 male, above the age of 15 years. The participants were interviewed person......-to-person to obtain a general health profile, and in this connection, questions were asked concerning rash related to the use of scented products. 28.6% (440/1537) had on some occasion experienced rash from scented products, 10.6% had experienced rash within the year prior to interview. A multivariate analysis showed...... that women had a significantly increased risk of reporting rash from scented products compared to men (odds ratio: 1.56, pyears had a significantly increased risk of reporting rash from scented products compared to older age groups...

  18. MRI diagnosis of muscle denervation from herpes zoster with discordant distribution of the skin rash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Amit; Sundaram, Murali [Cleveland Clinic, Section of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Imaging Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States); Winalski, Carl S. [Cleveland Clinic, Section of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Imaging Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States); Cleveland Clinic, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Herpes zoster is a common disorder characterized by a painful rash along a dermatome caused by reactivation of the varicella zoster virus (VZV). Muscle denervation injury from motor involvement is an uncommon phenomenon. Discordant distribution of the skin rash and motor nerve involvement, presenting as a skin rash in one body part and muscle weakness or pain from nerve involvement in another body part is an even more uncommonly reported finding. We present an unusual case of muscle denervation injury resulting from motor involvement of a peripheral nerve by VZV diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging with cutaneous manifestations in a different dermatomal distribution. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no similar case reported in the English radiology literature. We suggest that whenever a radiologist notices MRI findings suggesting denervation injury and a cause not readily identified, VZV-related denervation injury should be included in the differential diagnosis, especially in an older immunocompromised patient. (orig.)

  19. Rash, disseminated intravascular coagulation and legionella: Episode 10 and a rewind into the past

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth M. Thalanayar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is the most common cause of legionellosis and is one of the organisms causing atypical pneumonia. We report the presentation of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC and skin rash in a single case of severe Legionella pneumonia. The unique clinical presentation of a diffuse rash diagnosed as purpura fulminans and the unpredictable variations encountered during the diagnostic work-up of the case make this write-up crucial. This article synthesizes all reported cases of L. pneumonia associated with cutaneous manifestations as well as cases presenting with DIC. Furthermore, this manuscript illustrates the correlation between cutaneous and coagulopathic manifestations, and morbidity and mortality from L. pneumonia.

  20. Mothers Knowledge and Home Management ofNappy Rash in Port ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    2006-10-10

    Oct 10, 2006 ... Mothers Knowledge and Home Management ofNappy Rash in Port Harcourt, Nigeria ... of nappy-wearing babies at any given time. It is not a disease but just an ..... soap/detergent, time saving, better containment of faecal ...

  1. The “Pearls” of Multidisciplinary Team: Conquering the Uncommon Rosette Rash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Verma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Linear IgA disease of childhood (LAD also known as chronic bullous disease of childhood is an autoimmune disease with IgA deposition at the basement membrane zone leading to a vesiculobullous rash. It has a clinical appearance which frequently is described as resembling “strings of pearls” or rosette-like. Diagnosis is usually clinical but sometimes biopsy is required. Dapsone is widely considered to be the first line therapy in the treatment of LAD. A 5-year-old girl presented with 4-day history of a widespread painful rash and pyrexia. The rash transformed into painful blisters. A recent contact with chickenpox was present. She remained apyrexial but hemodynamically stable and was treated as chickenpox patient with secondary infection. Due to persistent symptoms after repeated attendance she was reviewed by Dermatology team and diagnosed with linear IgA disease also known as chronic bullous disease of childhood. This was based on the presence of blistering rash with rosette appearance and string of pearl lesions. The clinical features of LAD can be difficult to distinguish from more common skin infections. Benefiting from the experience of other multidisciplinary teams can sometimes be a game changer and can lead to the correct diagnosis and treatment.

  2. The management of fever and petechiae: making sense of rash decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogan, P A; Raffles, A

    2000-12-01

    In a retrospective and prospective audit of 55 children presenting to the paediatric assessment unit of a district general hospital with fever and petechial rash, 9% had significant bacterial sepsis. The "ILL criteria" (irritability, lethargy, low capillary refill) for the management of children with fever and petechiae are proposed.

  3. Rash after measles vaccination: laboratory analysis of cases reported in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Maria I

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The clinical differential diagnosis of rash due to viral infections is often difficult, and misdiagnosis is not rare, especially after the introduction of measles and rubella vaccination. A study to determine the etiological diagnosis of exanthema was carried out in a group of children after measles vaccination. METHODS: Sera collected from children with rash who received measles vaccine were reported in 1999. They were analyzed for IgM antibodies against measles virus, rubella virus, human parvovirus B19 (HPV B19 using ELISA commercial techniques, and human herpes virus 6 (HHV 6 using immunofluorescence commercial technique. Viremia for each of those viruses was tested using a polimerase chain reaction (PCR. RESULTS: A total of 17 cases of children with exanthema after measles immunization were reported in 1999. The children, aged 9 to 12 months (median 10 months, had a blood sample taken for laboratory analysis. The time between vaccination and the first rash signs varied from 1 to 60 days. The serological results of those 17 children suspected of measles or rubella infection showed the following etiological diagnosis: 17.6% (3 in 17 HPV B19 infection; 76.5% (13 in 17 HHV 6 infection; 5.9% (1 in 17 rash due to measles vaccine. CONCLUSIONS: The study data indicate that infection due to HPV B19 or HHV 6 can be misdiagnosed as exanthema due to measles vaccination. Therefore, it is important to better characterize the etiology of rash in order to avoid attributing it incorrectly to measles vaccine.

  4. Rash after measles vaccination: laboratory analysis of cases reported in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria I Oliveira

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The clinical differential diagnosis of rash due to viral infections is often difficult, and misdiagnosis is not rare, especially after the introduction of measles and rubella vaccination. A study to determine the etiological diagnosis of exanthema was carried out in a group of children after measles vaccination. METHODS: Sera collected from children with rash who received measles vaccine were reported in 1999. They were analyzed for IgM antibodies against measles virus, rubella virus, human parvovirus B19 (HPV B19 using ELISA commercial techniques, and human herpes virus 6 (HHV 6 using immunofluorescence commercial technique. Viremia for each of those viruses was tested using a polimerase chain reaction (PCR. RESULTS: A total of 17 cases of children with exanthema after measles immunization were reported in 1999. The children, aged 9 to 12 months (median 10 months, had a blood sample taken for laboratory analysis. The time between vaccination and the first rash signs varied from 1 to 60 days. The serological results of those 17 children suspected of measles or rubella infection showed the following etiological diagnosis: 17.6% (3 in 17 HPV B19 infection; 76.5% (13 in 17 HHV 6 infection; 5.9% (1 in 17 rash due to measles vaccine. CONCLUSIONS: The study data indicate that infection due to HPV B19 or HHV 6 can be misdiagnosed as exanthema due to measles vaccination. Therefore, it is important to better characterize the etiology of rash in order to avoid attributing it incorrectly to measles vaccine.

  5. Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus Presenting as Acute Orbital Myositis Preceding a Skin Rash: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Ha Yeun; Cho, Seong Whi [Dept. of Radiology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Hun [Dept. of Neurology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Herpes zoster ophthalmicus, in which orbital symptoms and signs appear before the onset of a skin rash, is very rare. We experienced such a case and therefore report on it via magnetic resonance imaging. A 48-year-old man with pain and swelling of left eye and headache presented 2 days before onset of a zoster skin rash. On orbit-al MRI, edematous thickening of the left lateral rectus muscle with high signal intensity was revealed. After contrast injection, the lateral rectus muscle demonstrated heterogenous enhancement. Also, diffuse contrast enhancement was noted at left preseptal space, lacrimal gland and periorbital soft tissue. The man was treated with antiviral agents and prednisolone. Two weeks later, he recovered from the skin manifestations and most of the orbital manifestations except for the diplopia and restricted lateral movement.

  6. Metabolic alkalosis secondary to baking soda treatment of a diaper rash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, J; Hogg, R J

    1981-06-01

    A 4-month-old infant was seen with hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis that was associated with prior application of liberal amounts of sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) to a diaper rash. After exclusion of other etiologies of the infant's acid-base disturbance, a complete resolution occurred following discontinuation of the baking soda applications. This case report provides a reminder of the significant side effects that may result from the excessive use of a seemingly harmless household substance.

  7. Predictive Value of Early Skin Rash in Cetuximab-Based Therapy of Advanced Biliary Tract Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubovszky, Gábor; Budai, Barna; Ganofszky, Erna; Horváth, Zsolt; Juhos, Éva; Madaras, Balázs; Nagy, Tünde; Szabó, Eszter; Pintér, Tamás; Tóth, Erika; Nagy, Péter; Láng, István; Hitre, Erika

    2018-04-01

    Randomized trials in advanced biliary tract cancer (BTC) did not show benefit of cetuximab addition over chemotherapy. This is probably due to the lack of predictive biomarkers. The aim of this study was to explore possible predictive factors. Between 2009 and 2014, 57 patients were treated in 3-week cycles with cetuximab (250 mg/m 2 /week, loading dose: 400 mg/m 2 ), gemcitabine (1000 mg/m 2 on day 1 and 8), and capecitabine (1300 mg/m 2 /day on days 1-14). The objective response rate (ORR), progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) and the adverse events (AEs) were evaluated. An exploratory analysis was performed to find possible predictive factors on clinicopathological characteristics, routine laboratory parameters and early AEs, which occurred within 2 months from the beginning of treatment. The ORR was 21%. The median PFS and OS were 34 (95% CI: 24-40) and 54 (43-67) weeks, respectively. The most frequent AEs were skin toxicities. In univariate analysis performance status, previous stent implantation, thrombocyte count at the start of therapy, early neutropenia and skin rash statistically significantly influenced the ORR, PFS and/or OS. In multivariate Cox regression analysis only normal thrombocyte count at treatment start and early acneiform rash were independent markers of longer survival. In patients showing early skin rash compared to the others the median PFS was 39 vs. 13 weeks and the median OS was 67 vs. 26 weeks, respectively. It is suggested that early skin rash can be used as a biomarker to select patients who would benefit from the treatment with cetuximab plus chemotherapy.

  8. Erlotinib augmentation with dapsone for rash mitigation and increased anti-cancer effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, R E

    2015-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib has failed in many ways to be as potent in the anti-cancer role as pre-clinical studies would have suggested. This paper traces some aspects of this failure to a compensatory erlotinib-mediated increase in interleukin-8. Many other-but not all- cancer chemotherapeutic cytotoxic drugs also provoke a compensatory increase in a malignant clone's interleukin-8 synthesis. Untreated glioblastoma and other cancer cells themselves natively synthesize interleukin-8. Interleukin-8 has tumor growth promoting, mobility and metastasis formation enhancing, effects as well as pro-angiogenesis effects. The old sulfone antibiotic dapsone- one of the very first antibiotics in clinical use- has demonstrated several interleukin-8 system inhibiting actions. Review of these indicates dapsone has potential to augment erlotinib effectiveness. Erlotinib typically gives a rash that has recently been proven to come about via an erlotinib triggered up-regulated keratinocyte interleukin-8 synthesis. The erlotinib rash shares histological features reminiscent of typical neutrophilic dermatoses. Dapsone has an established therapeutic role in current treatment of other neutrophilic dermatoses. Thus, dapsone has potential to both improve the quality of life in erlotinib treated patients by amelioration of rash as well as to short-circuit a growth-enhancing aspect of erlotinib when used in the anti-cancer role.

  9. Heat Rash

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids and Teens Pregnancy and Childbirth Women Men Seniors Your Health Resources Healthcare Management End-of-Life Issues Insurance & Bills Self Care Working With Your Doctor Drugs, Procedures & Devices Over-the- ...

  10. Azithromycin-Induced Rash in a Patient of Infectious Mononucleosis – A Case Report with Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Somnath; Sen, Sukanta; Tripathi, Santanu Kumar; Banerjee, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic induced skin rash in setting of infectious mononucleosis is often encountered in clinical practice. However, macrolides like azithromycin are considered relatively safe and till date only two cases of azithromycin induced rash in setting of infectious mononucleosis have been reported. The following report illustrates the case of a 23-year-old man suffering from infectious mononucleosis who exhibited a generalized cutaneous rash following treatment with azithromycin. Using the Naranjo ADR probability scale, this case of acute onset rash following azithromycin administration was found to be in ‘probable’ category. The mechanism of antibiotic-induced rash in patients suffering from infectious mononucleosis is incompletely understood. It has been suggested that the rash could result from virus mediated immunomodulation or due to altered drug metabolism. The report calls for cautious use of antibiotics in the setting of suspected viral infections like infectious mononucleosis as injudicious use might increase the risk of deleterious skin reactions and increase the cost of healthcare. PMID:25302218

  11. Occupational trichloroethylene hypersensitivity syndrome: human herpesvirus 6 reactivation and rash phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamijima, Michihiro; Wang, Hailan; Yamanoshita, Osamu; Ito, Yuki; Xia, Lihua; Yanagiba, Yukie; Chen, Cishan; Okamura, Ai; Huang, Zhenlie; Qiu, Xinxiang; Song, Xiangrong; Cai, Tingfeng; Liu, Lili; Ge, Yichen; Deng, Yingyu; Naito, Hisao; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Tohyama, Mikiko; Li, Laiyu; Huang, Hanlin; Nakajima, Tamie

    2013-12-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an industrial solvent which can cause severe generalized dermatitis, i.e., occupational TCE hypersensitivity syndrome. Reactivation of latent human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6) can occur in such patients, which has made TCE known as a causative chemical of drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS). This study aimed to clarify HHV6 status, cytokine profiles and their association with rash phenotypes in patients with TCE hypersensitivity syndrome. HHV6 DNA copy numbers, anti-HHV6 antibody titers, and cytokines were measured in blood prospectively sampled 5-7 times from 28 hospitalized patients with the disease. The patients (19 had exfoliative dermatitis (ED) and 9 had non-ED type rash) generally met the diagnostic criteria for DIHS. Viral reactivation defined as increases in either HHV6 DNA (≥100 genomic copies/10(6) peripheral blood mononuclear cells) or antibody titers was identified in 24 (89%) patients. HHV6 DNA, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-5, IL-6 and IL-10 concentrations were remarkably higher in the patients than in the healthy workers (p<0.01). Positive correlations between HHV6 DNA, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6 and IL-10 were significant (p<0.05) except for that between HHV6 DNA and IFN-γ. An increase in HHV6 DNA was positively associated with an increase in TNF-α on admission (p<0.01). HHV6 DNA, the antibody titers, TNF-α and IL-10 concentrations were significantly higher in ED than in the non-ED type (p<0.05). Reactivated HHV6 and the increased cytokines could be biomarkers of TCE hypersensitivity syndrome. The higher-level reactivation and stronger humoral responses were associated with ED-type rash. Copyright © 2013 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cephalhematoma and petechial rashes associated with acute parvovirus B19 infection: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Masato; Shiozawa, Ryosuke; Hangai, Mayumi; Takita, Junko; Kitanaka, Sachiko

    2013-10-07

    Parvovirus B19 can cause petechial rashes in the acute phase of illness as well as erythema infectiosum (fifth disease) during convalescence. This petechial rash is often called "gloves and socks" syndrome because of the typical distribution of the eruption. However, involvement of other sites (e.g., intertriginous area) and generalized involvement have been recently recognized. We report here a patient with parvovirus-associated petechiae and cephalhematoma. The patient was a previously healthy 10-year-old boy. There was a family history of fatal bleeding; his sister died of intracranial bleeding with an uncertain cause at the age of 5 months. The patient was admitted to our hospital because of sudden onset of cephalhematoma associated with fever. He reported that he had no recent head trauma but that he massaged his scalp on the day before admission. On admission, his temperature was 38.8°C; otherwise, he was in a stable condition. Besides cephalhematoma, petechial rashes were present on his trunk and limbs. The initial laboratory tests were essentially normal, including platelet count and coagulation tests. Expanded laboratory tests were repeated to explore the etiology of his skin hemorrhage, all of which indicated that hematological disorders were unlikely. His symptoms subsided spontaneously over the next few days and he was discharged uneventfully. Anti-parvovirus IgM titer was elevated during hospitalization and typical erythema infectiosum was seen approximately 1 week after discharge. During 6 months follow-up, he remained stable without recurrence of a hemorrhagic episode. Finally, we concluded that his cephalhematoma was responsible for acute parvoviral infection. This is believed to be the first report describing a possible association between parvovirus B19 infection and cephalhematoma. Parvovirus B19 infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of children who present with unexplained hemorrhage such as cephalhematoma or petechiae.

  13. A 30-Year-Old Man with HIV, Fever, and a Rash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Shah

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients who present with papular rashes have a wide differential diagnosis particularly in the setting of immune compromise. A 30-year-old male diagnosed with HIV since 2009, never on antiretroviral therapy, with a nadir CD4 count of 333 cells/mm3 and a current viral load of 44,300 copies/mL, presented with a diffuse monomorphic papular eruption that began on his trunk and extremities and subsequently spread to the penis and scrotum, sparing the distal acral sites. A thorough infectious workup revealed a positive rapid plasma reagin (RPR and varicella IgM and IgG antibodies. Interestingly, the patient had been diagnosed and treated for syphilis in the past with a recent downtrending RPR drawn prior to hospitalization. Repeat RPR was elevated and a preliminary histopathology report demonstrated folliculocentric inflammation with lymphocytes, plasma cells, and polymorphonuclear leukocyte predominance supported the diagnosis of syphilis. After receiving intramuscular penicillin G benzathine, he developed intermittent fevers and new papules. Intravenous (IV acyclovir was initiated for presumed disseminated varicella given his positive varicella-zoster virus IgM and IgG. However, final pathology results revealed a large spirochete burden. The fevers and rash progression were attributed to the development of a Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction. IV acyclovir was discontinued and he completed a course of intramuscular penicillin G benzathine. He was also given a course of doxycycline for rectal chlamydia which was diagnosed during hospitalization.

  14. The Association Between Skin Rashes and Work Environment, Personal Protective Equipment, and Hygiene Practices Among Female Farmworkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kristina; Baker, Brenda; Tovar, Antonio; Economos, Eugenia; Williams, Bryan; McCauley, Linda

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess work-related hygiene practices and the frequency and location of skin rashes due to cutaneous contact with crop-associated materials (e.g., pesticides) for female nursery and fernery workers in Central Florida. A cross-sectional, community-based participatory research study of 237 female nursery and fernery workers between the ages of 19 and 43 years with significant cutaneous contact with foliage crops was conducted using a self-report questionnaire and a skin rash chart assessment tool. Of the 237 farmworkers surveyed, 37.1% ( n = 88) reported a rash on at least one area of their bodies. Women who were pregnant during the study were 4.7 times more likely to report more than 30% total body surface area (TBSA) covered by rash compared with non-pregnant fernery workers ( p = .045; 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.04, 21.35]). Further research is needed to better understand the development of skin rashes among farmworkers, to generate effective prevention strategies.

  15. Rash related to use of scented products. A questionnaire study in the Danish population. Is the problem increasing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J D; Andersen, T F; Thomsen, L K

    2000-01-01

    . Further, it was determined whether risk of self-reported 1st-time rash from scented products had increased during the past 15 years compared to the preceding period. The sample consisted of 1537 persons, 801 female and 736 male, above the age of 15 years. The participants were interviewed person......Fragrances are used in many types of cosmetic and household products, which are an important part of everyday life in modern society. The aim of the current investigation was to describe the frequency of self-reported rash due to scented products in a random sample of the adult Danish population...

  16. A 25-Year-Old Male with Orogenital Ulcers, Rash, and Difficulty Swallowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren N. Ko

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A 25-year-old otherwise healthy male presented with new-onset odynophagia, rash, and orogenital ulcers. Despite treatment with antibiotics for presumed bacterial pharyngitis, the patient remained symptomatic, with abnormal vital signs and laboratory values. Upon dermatology consultation and histopathologic correlation, he was diagnosed with Behçet disease. Behçet disease is a rare rheumatologic condition that presents with recurrent oral ulcers and varying degrees of ophthalmic, neurologic, cardiac, and vascular disease. Given its protean nature, the treatment of Behçet disease is tailored to the patient's presentation and severity of organ involvement. Following treatment with colchicine and prednisone, the patient's symptoms improved rapidly.

  17. Rash with DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System Use in Bilateral Reduction Mammoplasty: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knackstedt, R W; Dixon, J A; O'Neill, P J; Herrera, F A

    2015-01-01

    Background. Bilateral reduction mammoplasty is a common plastic surgery procedure that can be complicated by unfavorable scar formation along incision sites. Surgical adhesives can be utilized as an alternative or as an adjunct to conventional suture closures to help achieve good wound tension and provide an adequate barrier with excellent cosmesis. The recently introduced DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System Skin Closure System combines the skin adhesive 2-octyl cyanoacrylate with a self-adhering polyester-based mesh. Proposed benefits of wound closure with DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System, used with or without sutures, include its watertight seal, easy removal, microbial barrier, even distribution of tension, and reduction in wound closure time. Although allergic reactions to 2-octyl cyanoacrylate have been reported, few allergic reactions to DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System have been noted in the literature. This case series describes three patients who experienced an allergic reaction to DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System after undergoing elective bilateral reduction mammoplasties at our institution to further explore this topic. Methods. Retrospective chart review of bilateral reduction mammoplasty patients who received DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System dressing at our institution was performed. Results. Three patients were identified as having a rash in reaction to DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System after bilateral reduction mammoplasty. All three patients required systemic steroid treatment to resolve the rash. One patient was identified as having a prior adhesive reaction. Conclusions. DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System has demonstrated its efficacy in optimizing scar healing and appearance. However, as we demonstrate these three allergic reactions to DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System, caution must be utilized in its usage, namely, in patients with a prior adhesive allergy and in sites where moisture or friction may be apparent.

  18. Rash with DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System Use in Bilateral Reduction Mammoplasty: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. W. Knackstedt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bilateral reduction mammoplasty is a common plastic surgery procedure that can be complicated by unfavorable scar formation along incision sites. Surgical adhesives can be utilized as an alternative or as an adjunct to conventional suture closures to help achieve good wound tension and provide an adequate barrier with excellent cosmesis. The recently introduced DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System Skin Closure System combines the skin adhesive 2-octyl cyanoacrylate with a self-adhering polyester-based mesh. Proposed benefits of wound closure with DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System, used with or without sutures, include its watertight seal, easy removal, microbial barrier, even distribution of tension, and reduction in wound closure time. Although allergic reactions to 2-octyl cyanoacrylate have been reported, few allergic reactions to DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System have been noted in the literature. This case series describes three patients who experienced an allergic reaction to DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System after undergoing elective bilateral reduction mammoplasties at our institution to further explore this topic. Methods. Retrospective chart review of bilateral reduction mammoplasty patients who received DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System dressing at our institution was performed. Results. Three patients were identified as having a rash in reaction to DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System after bilateral reduction mammoplasty. All three patients required systemic steroid treatment to resolve the rash. One patient was identified as having a prior adhesive reaction. Conclusions. DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System has demonstrated its efficacy in optimizing scar healing and appearance. However, as we demonstrate these three allergic reactions to DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System, caution must be utilized in its usage, namely, in patients with a prior adhesive allergy and in sites where moisture or friction may

  19. Validity of genito-urinary discharges, genital ulcers and genital rashes as indicators of seroincident HSV-2 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eziyi Iche Kalu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the validity of vaginal discharges, urethral discharges, genital rashes, and painful genital ulcers as indicators of early detection of incident herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2 infection among pregnant women in Benin metropolis. Methods: Participants were antenatal clinic attendees of University of Benin Teaching Hospital and Central Hospital, Benin. Baseline sociodemographic, obstetric and HSV-2 serological data were collected. The HSV-2-seronegative returned for a repeat HSV-2 antibody assay before delivery date. Data on incidence of genital rashes, abnormal vaginal discharges, painful genital ulcers and urethral discharges were collected. Results: The sensitivities of abnormal vaginal discharges, genital rashes, urethral discharges and painful genital ulcers were 82.3%, 70.6%, 41.2% and 28.6% respectively; while their positive-predictive values were 53.8%, 60.0%, 58.3% and 66.7% respective. All the symptoms had >95% specificities and 95% negative-predictive values for seroincident HSV-2 infection. Conclusions: Abnormal vaginal discharge, genital rashes, urethral discharges and genital ulcers are valid indicators of seroincident HSV-2 infection and could be useful in formulation of screening tools in resource-limited settings.

  20. Autoimmune Neurological Conditions Associated With Zika Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeny Acosta-Ampudia

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is an emerging flavivirus rapidly spreading throughout the tropical Americas. Aedes mosquitoes is the principal way of transmission of the virus to humans. ZIKV can be spread by transplacental, perinatal, and body fluids. ZIKV infection is often asymptomatic and those with symptoms present minor illness after 3 to 12 days of incubation, characterized by a mild and self-limiting disease with low-grade fever, conjunctivitis, widespread pruritic maculopapular rash, arthralgia and myalgia. ZIKV has been linked to a number of central and peripheral nervous system injuries such as Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS, transverse myelitis (TM, meningoencephalitis, ophthalmological manifestations, and other neurological complications. Nevertheless, mechanisms of host-pathogen neuro-immune interactions remain incompletely elucidated. This review provides a critical discussion about the possible mechanisms underlying the development of autoimmune neurological conditions associated with Zika virus infection.

  1. Clinical and Laboratory evaluation of measleslike rash in children and young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewien Klaus Eberhard

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A clinical and laboratory evaluation of 11 children and young adults with measleslike rash was done during the measles outbreak in the Greater São Paulo Metropolitan area at the end of 1996 and spread over the country during 1997. Measles was laboratory confirmed in 07 patients by specific IgM detection in acute serum specimens using an IgM-capture EIA, by specific IgG seroconversion in serum pairs, and by reverse transcription PCR and virus isolation in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Clinical presentations were not always classic; one of the 07 cases had received measles vaccine and corresponded to modified clinical case of measles. The 4 remaining cases were negative for measles and were diagnosed as exanthem subitum (2 cases, scarlet fever and Kawasaki disease. The present study reinforces the view that clinical features alone are not sufficient for establishing an accurate diagnosis in the post-vaccine era, and a surveillance system based on sensitive laboratory results is needed so that it can confirm IgM-negative measles cases.

  2. An Unrecognized Rash Progressing to Lyme Carditis: Important Features and Recommendations Regarding Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shawn; Singla, Montish

    2016-01-01

    We present a case report of 46-year-old man with no medical history, who complained of extreme fatigue, near-syncope, and palpitations. He initially presented in complete heart block. A transvenous pacemaker was placed in the emergency department, and he was started empirically on Ceftriaxone for Lyme disease. He was admitted and over the course of the next few days, his rhythm regressed to Mobitz type I first-degree atrioventricular block and then to normal sinus rhythm. This case report highlights some important features regarding Lyme carditis, a rare presentation of early disseminated Lyme disease (seen in a few weeks to months after the initial tick bite). In 25%-30% of patients, the characteristic targetoid rash may not be seen, a likely culprit of the disease not being detected early and progressing to disseminated disease. The most common cardiac complaint of Lyme disease is palpitations, occurring in 6.6% of patients, which may not accurately reflect progression into disseminated Lyme disease because it is a nonspecific finding. Conduction abnormality, occurring in 1.8% of patients, is a more specific finding of Borrelia invading cardiac tissue. Finally, this case report highlights a recommendation that patients with confirmed Lyme disease or those presenting with cardiac abnormalities or symptoms who have an atypical profile for a cardiac event should be screened with a 12-lead electrocardiogram, Lyme serology, and be considered for antibiotic therapy with the possibility of temporary pacing.

  3. Metabolic differentiation of early Lyme disease from southern tick-associated rash illness (STARI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molins, Claudia R; Ashton, Laura V; Wormser, Gary P; Andre, Barbara G; Hess, Ann M; Delorey, Mark J; Pilgard, Mark A; Johnson, Barbara J; Webb, Kristofor; Islam, M Nurul; Pegalajar-Jurado, Adoracion; Molla, Irida; Jewett, Mollie W; Belisle, John T

    2017-08-16

    Lyme disease, the most commonly reported vector-borne disease in the United States, results from infection with Borrelia burgdorferi. Early clinical diagnosis of this disease is largely based on the presence of an erythematous skin lesion for individuals in high-risk regions. This, however, can be confused with other illnesses including southern tick-associated rash illness (STARI), an illness that lacks a defined etiological agent or laboratory diagnostic test, and is coprevalent with Lyme disease in portions of the eastern United States. By applying an unbiased metabolomics approach with sera retrospectively obtained from well-characterized patients, we defined biochemical and diagnostic differences between early Lyme disease and STARI. Specifically, a metabolic biosignature consisting of 261 molecular features (MFs) revealed that altered N -acyl ethanolamine and primary fatty acid amide metabolism discriminated early Lyme disease from STARI. Development of classification models with the 261-MF biosignature and testing against validation samples differentiated early Lyme disease from STARI with an accuracy of 85 to 98%. These findings revealed metabolic dissimilarity between early Lyme disease and STARI, and provide a powerful and new approach to inform patient management by objectively distinguishing early Lyme disease from an illness with nearly identical symptoms. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  4. An epidemiological investigation into an outbreak of rash illness among methadone maintenance clients in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAnulty, Jeremy M; Jauncey, Marianne E; Monger, Claire K; Hailstone, Susan T; Alam, Noore K M; Mannes, Trish F; Capon, Adam G; Irvine, Katie; Armstrong, Paul K; Kaldor, John M

    2007-05-01

    In late 2004, NSW Health received several reports of a serious desquamating rash among clients of the methadone program. We sought to identify the extent and likely cause of this outbreak. We initiated active surveillance for cases throughout Australia, a survey of dosing points in NSW, and a case control study of clients receiving methadone syrup (MS) at two clinics. Between October 2004 and March 2005, 388 cases were identified, largely in NSW. The dosing point survey found almost all cases were clients prescribed MS (attack rate 4.5%). In multivariate analysis of data from dosing points that dispensed MS, use of take away doses or location of the dosing point in greater western Sydney were associated with illness. In the case control study, MS injection, use of street MS, high doses of MS, frequent takeaway doses, or use of benzodiazepines were associated with illness. Testing found no abnormality in associated batches of MS. Batches of MS temporally associated with the outbreak were quarantined from use and the outbreak subsided. While a direct causal link could not be established, available evidence suggests that a contaminant may have caused the outbreak. Epidemiological analyses are important for assessing concerns about product safety following marketing approval.

  5. [Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome induced by carbamazepine: Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Jorge Alonso; Ortega, Mayra Alexandra; Sánchez, Isaura Pilar; Pacheco, José Armando

    2017-06-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a hypersensitivity reaction associated with a variety of drugs, mainly anticonvulsants, which is characterized by systemic symptoms and erythematous lesions, common to other toxicodermas. It is an uncommon clinical entity that requires a high suspicion by clinical staff given its varied initial presentation, and the fact that symptoms can overlap with those of other adverse cutaneous reactions to drugs. Without early diagnosis and appropriate treatment, mortality increases.We report the case of a 22-year-old patient with impaired neurodevelopment who received treatment with carbamazepine. Two months later he presented with general symptoms and skin erythematous lesions that began on his trunk. The patient received outpatient care with antihistamines and antipyretics without an appropriate response. His case progressed with increased skin lesions and systemic symptoms that met the diagnostic criteria for DRESS syndrome. He was hospitalized and received medical treatment according to recommended guidelines. The patient's condition improved as his symptoms and associated complications resolved. He was discharged with gradual clearing of the steroid therapy.

  6. A 6-year-old girl with fever, rash, and increased intracranial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravish, Matthew E; Krowchuk, Daniel P; Zapadka, Michael; Shetty, Avinash K

    2013-08-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a well-described, potentially lethal, tick-borne zoonotic infection and has very effective therapy. However, the diagnosis might not be made early enough, often leading to worse outcomes. Our aim was to discuss the diagnostic dilemmas facing the physician when evaluating patients with suspected RMSF. We report a case of RMSF in a 6-year-old girl who presented to our hospital with a 7-day history of fever, headache, and a petechial rash. After blood cultures were obtained, the patient was treated empirically with doxycycline, vancomycin, and ceftriaxone. During the next 24 h, her clinical status worsened, with acute onset of altered mental status, posturing, and fixed and dilated pupils. A computed tomography scan of the brain demonstrated diffuse cerebral edema with evidence of tonsillar herniation. She died 24 h after admission. A serum specimen tested positive for immunoglobulin G to Rickettsia rickettsii at a titer of 128 dilutions, confirming recent infection. We present this case to raise awareness of RMSF in patients who present with a nonspecific febrile illness in tick-endemic areas in the United States. Early diagnosis and treatment with doxycycline before day 5 of illness is essential and can prevent morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. MEDICAL PRACTICE IN CHILDREN PRESENTING FEVER WITH PETECHIAL RASH TO AN EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrascu-Biris, Ioana; Chirita-Emandi, Adela; Lambert, Imelda; Marginean, Otilia; Sharif, Farhana

    2016-01-01

    The association of fever and petechiae in children is one of the most alarming findings for a paediatrician. To quickly distinguish between benign and life-threatening conditions is challenging in many cases. We aimed to evaluate the clinical practice of children presenting with fever and petechiae as initial symptoms. 41 patients (age 3 months-11 years) presenting with fever and petechiae were identified in an Emergency Paediatric Assessment Unit over a period of 9 months. General data, symptoms and signs were assessed for each patient. The work-up consisted in: complete blood count, inflammatory tests, coagulation tests, Monospot test, nasopharyngeal rapid tests, blood culture, and cerebrospinal fluid culture where appropriate. Most children were 6 mg/l was poorly correlated with serious illness. The following variables were strongly associated with serious illness: ill appearance, shivering, lethargy, back rigidity, ESR>50 mm/h and prolonged capillary refill time. 59% (24/41) of children were treated with antibiotics, however, at discharge 42%(10/24) of them, did not have a work-up suggestive for a bacterial illness. Screening for low prevalence but high morbidity conditions, as the meningococcal disease, with an extensive work-up is time and resource consuming and may lead to unmotivated antibiotic use. Larger studies are needed to change the emergency practice for management of fever and rash.

  8. Smart Rash Driver System via Internet of Things (IoT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheau Tong Kong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nearly half a million accidents on Malaysians road occur in 2015. The aim of this research is to detect car speed, capture the photo of the speeding car and then transfer the data like car speed, date and time, location and lane number to an online database. A distance sensor is used to measure the distance range between two points on the road. The ESP8266 NodeMCU will be the control unit to process the data and calculate the speed with the formula of speed equal to distance over time. The ESP8266 NodeMCU is also a Wi-Fi module to help in transferring data via IoT to an online database. The Google spreadsheet acted as an online database and will receive all the data if detected a speeding car. In conclusion, the Smart Rash Driver System is successfully invented and able to detect vehicle speed, capture the photo of over speed vehicle and save it to the SD card and lastly transfer all data via IoT to the Google Spreadsheet. This invention will be able to help to decrease the road accident rate efficiently.

  9. Dose escalation to rash for erlotinib plus gemcitabine for metastatic pancreatic cancer: the phase II RACHEL study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cutsem, E; Li, C-P; Nowara, E; Aprile, G; Moore, M; Federowicz, I; Van Laethem, J-L; Hsu, C; Tham, C K; Stemmer, S M; Lipp, R; Zeaiter, A; Fittipaldo, A; Csutor, Z; Klughammer, B; Meng, X; Ciuleanu, T

    2014-11-25

    This phase II, open-label, randomised study evaluated whether patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer receiving erlotinib/gemcitabine derived survival benefits from increasing the erlotinib dose. After a 4-week run-in period (gemcitabine 1000 mg m(-2) once weekly plus erlotinib 100 mg per day), patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer who developed grade 0/1 rash were randomised to receive gemcitabine plus erlotinib dose escalation (150 mg, increasing by 50 mg every 2 weeks (maximum 250 mg); n=71) or gemcitabine plus standard-dose erlotinib (100 mg per day; n=75). The primary end point was to determine whether overall survival (OS) was improved by increasing the erlotinib dose. Secondary end points included progression-free survival (PFS), incidence of grade ⩾2 rash, and safety. Erlotinib dose escalation induced grade ⩾2 rash in 29 out of 71 (41.4%) patients compared with 7 out of 75 (9.3%) patients on standard dose. Efficacy was not significantly different in the dose-escalation arm compared with the standard-dose arm (OS: median 7.0 vs 8.4 months, respectively, hazard ratio (HR), 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88-1.80; P=0.2026; PFS: median 3.5 vs 4.5 months, respectively, HR, 1.09, 95% CI: 0.77-1.54; P=0.6298). Incidence of adverse events was comparable between randomised arms. The erlotinib dose-escalation strategy induced rash in some patients; there was no evidence that the higher dose translated into increased benefit.

  10. Another Look at Impulsivity: A Meta- Analytic Review Comparing Specific Dispositions to Rash Action in their Relationship to Bulimic Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Sarah; Smith, Gregory T.; Cyders, Melissa A.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in personality theory indicate that there are distinct constructs that dispose individuals to rash action and risky behavior, as opposed to one broad trait of impulsivity. Two are emotion based, two represent deficits in conscientiousness, and one is sensation seeking. Previous studies of impulsivity and its relationship to bulimia nervosa have yielded mixed findings. The authors applied this advance in personality theory to the study of bulimia nervosa (BN) to test the hypothesis that the emotion-based disposition of negative urgency (the tendency to act rashly when distressed) relates most strongly to BN symptoms. A meta analysis of 50 articles indicated the following. Negative urgency had by far the largest effect size (weighted r = .38), followed by sensation seeking (weighted r = .16); lack of planning (weighted r = .16) and lack of persistence (weighted r = .08). Methodological moderators of the effect of distinct traits on BN symptoms were the use of scales that precisely measured one construct as opposed to general impulsivity scales that measured several constructs, clinical vs. non-clinical samples, and whether or not the personality scale was translated from its original language or not. Negative urgency appears especially important for BN; more broadly, researchers should consider the role of emotion-based dispositions to rash acts in their risk theories. PMID:18848741

  11. Clinical impact of minocycline on afatinib-related rash in patients with non-small cell lung cancer harboring epidermal growth factor receptor mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Ayano; Ozawa, Yuichi; Koda, Keigo; Akahori, Daisuke; Koyauchi, Takashi; Amano, Yusuke; Kakutani, Takuya; Sato, Yoshiko; Hasegawa, Hirotsugu; Matsui, Takashi; Yokomura, Koshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2018-03-01

    The management of skin toxicity is crucial for efficient afatinib treatment, but the role of tetracycline class antibiotics (TCs) in managing these rashes is relatively unknown. We reviewed the clinical records of patients who were administered afatinib for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer harboring epidermal growth factor receptor mutations between October 2014 and November 2016. Twenty-five patients, who received TCs for the management of afatinib-related skin disorders, were enrolled. Minocycline was administered orally to participants. Afatinib-related toxic effects, such as rash, diarrhea, and paronychia, were observed in 92%, 92%, and 40% of cases, respectively. Although 24% of diarrhea and 4% of paronychia cases were rated grade 3 or higher, no severe cases of rash were observed during afatinib treatment. Of the 18 afatinib dose reductions, 14 (78%), three (17%), and one (6%) resulted from diarrhea, paronychia, and stomatitis, respectively; no patients required a dose reduction because of rash. When minocycline treatment started, 21 patients (84%) had a rash of grade 1 or less, and three patients had a grade 2 rash. A response to afatinib was observed in 18 patients (72%) and the median duration of afatinib administration was 501 days. An adverse event related to minocycline (grade 1 nausea) was observed in one patient. A large proportion of the study patients started minocycline before grade 2 rash development and the severity of afatinib-related rash was lower than that previously reported. Oral TCs may be beneficial, especially if started early. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Respiratory Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Successful oral desensitization against skin rash induced by alectinib in a patient with anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive lung adenocarcinoma: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasawa, Masayuki; Kubotaa, Masaru; Harada, Shinya; Niwa, Hideyuki; Kusuhara, Seiichiro; Kasajima, Masashi; Hiyoshi, Yasuhiro; Ishihara, Mikiko; Igawa, Satoshi; Masuda, Noriyuki

    2016-09-01

    Alectinib has been approved for the treatment of patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement-positive advanced non-small cell lung cancer. In terms of adverse effects, the occurrence of a severe skin rash induced by alectinib is reportedly rare, compared with the occurrence of skin rash induced by epithelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs). In the present case report, a 76-year-old woman with ALK-positive lung adenocarcinoma experienced disease progression after undergoing first-line chemotherapy. Subsequently, alectinib was administered as a second-line therapy. However, she discontinued alectinib therapy after 11days because of the occurrence of an alectinib-induced skin rash. Since the skin rash improved within one week, we attempted to perform oral desensitization to alectinib. The patient has not shown any recurrence of the rash or disease progression for 7 months since the successful oral desensitization to alectinib. Here, we describe the first case of successful oral desensitization against a skin rash induced by alectinib in a patient with ALK-positive lung adenocarcinoma. Desensitization to overcome adverse effects and to enable sustained treatment with alectinib should be considered in patients who develop alectinib sensitivities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Human leukocyte antigen genotypes and trial of desensitization in patients with oxcarbazepine-induced skin rash: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bolyun; Yu, Hee Joon; Kang, Eun-Suk; Lee, Munhyang; Lee, Jeehun

    2014-08-01

    Skin rash associated with specific antiepileptic drugs occurs not infrequently and it usually necessitates discontinuation of the causative drugs. An alternative strategy is to desensitize the individual to the offending drug. We checked the human leukocyte antigen genotypes and conducted a pilot study to investigate the usefulness and safety of desensitization in pediatric patients with skin rash associated with oxcarbazepine. We enrolled 19 patients with epilepsy who had discontinued oxcarbazepine because of skin rash despite an initial good response and then became refractory to other antiepileptic drugs along with an individual with paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia with a similar situation. High-resolution HLA-A and -B genotyping was performed to investigate the genetic risk. The desensitization began with 0.1 mg daily reaching 120 mg on the thirty-first day. Thereafter, the dose was increased at a rate of 12 mg/day. Nineteen patients completed the desensitization protocol to a target dosage over 2-5 months. Five patients developed itching and erythema during desensitization, but the symptoms disappeared after withholding a dose increment transiently. There were no human leukocyte antigen genotypes relevant to aromatic antiepileptic drug-induced severe hypersensitivity reactions. The seizure frequency was reduced to less than at baseline in 18 individuals. This study demonstrated 95% efficacy, including 42% seizure-free patients and the favorable tolerability of desensitization to oxcarbazepine in patients with intractable epilepsy and one patient with paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia. Screening for sensitive human leukocyte antigen types and exclusion of severe hypersensitivity reactions should precede desensitization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Neisseria lactamica Causing a Lung Cavity and Skin Rash in a Renal Transplant Patient: First Report from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Hamid Changal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neisseria lactamica, a commensal, has been very rarely reported to cause diseases in immunocompromised hosts. In medical literature, there is only one report of a cavitatory lung lesion caused by it. The patient was a kidney transplant recipient. Neisseria lactamica was found to be the cause of his pulmonary cavity and a desquamating rash on feet. With the rapidly spreading medical advance, more and more patients are getting organ transplants, so the population of immunocompromised people is on the rise. We expect more sinister and less expected organisms to cause diseases in patients who have organ transplants.

  15. Distribution of erlotinib in rash and normal skin in cancer patients receiving erlotinib visualized by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Meiko; Hayashi, Mitsuhiro; Mizutani, Yu; Takenaka, Kei; Imamura, Yoshinori; Chayahara, Naoko; Toyoda, Masanori; Kiyota, Naomi; Mukohara, Toru; Aikawa, Hiroaki; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Hamada, Akinobu; Minami, Hironobu

    2018-04-06

    The development of skin rashes is the most common adverse event observed in cancer patients treated with epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as erlotinib. However, the pharmacological evidence has not been fully revealed. Erlotinib distribution in the rashes was more heterogeneous than that in the normal skin, and the rashes contained statistically higher concentrations of erlotinib than adjacent normal skin in the superficial skin layer (229 ± 192 vs. 120 ± 103 ions/mm 2 ; P = 0.009 in paired t -test). LC-MS/MS confirmed that the concentration of erlotinib in the skin rashes was higher than that in normal skin in the superficial skin layer (1946 ± 1258 vs. 1174 ± 662 ng/cm 3 ; P = 0.028 in paired t -test). The results of MALDI-MSI and LC-MS/MS were well correlated (coefficient of correlation 0.879, P distribution of erlotinib in the skin tissue was visualized using non-labeled MALDI-MSI. Erlotinib concentration in the superficial layer of the skin rashes was higher than that in the adjacent normal skin. We examined patients with advanced pancreatic cancer who developed skin rashes after treatment with erlotinib and gemcitabine. We biopsied both the rash and adjacent normal skin tissues, and visualized and compared the distribution of erlotinib within the skin using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI). The tissue concentration of erlotinib was also measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with laser microdissection.

  16. Placebo-controlled phase II study of vitamin K3 cream for the treatment of cetuximab-induced rash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Kaalund, Inger; Clemmensen, Ole; Overgaard, Jens; Pfeiffer, Per

    2017-07-01

    Cetuximab inhibits the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and papulopustular eruptions is a frequent side effect. Vitamin K3 (menadione) has preclinically shown to be a potential activator of the EGFR by phosphorylating the receptor (pEGFR). The present randomised study investigated the effect of a vitamin K3 cream on cetuximab-induced rash. Thirty patients were included in this double-blinded placebo-controlled trial. Patients receiving cetuximab 500 mg/m 2 every second week plus chemotherapy for metastatic cancer were included. In each patient, vitamin K3 cream and placebo were applied twice daily on two separate areas of the skin of minimum 10 × 10 cm for up to 2 months. Papulopustular eruptions were evaluated clinically and monitored by clinical photos. Skin biopsies, from ten patients taken before and after 1 month of treatment from each treatment area, were stained for EGFR and pEGFR. Application of vitamin K3 cream twice daily during treatment with cetuximab did not reduce the number of papulopustular eruptions, and this was independent of the use of systemic tetracycline. No significant changes in the staining of EGFR or pEGFR were observed in the skin of the vitamin K3-treated area compared to the placebo area. The present data do not support any clinical or immunohistochemical benefit of using vitamin K3 cream for cetuximab-induced rash.

  17. Rash impulsiveness and reward sensitivity in relation to risky drinking by university students: potential roles of frontal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyvers, Michael; Duff, Helen; Basch, Vanessa; Edwards, Mark S

    2012-08-01

    Two forms of impulsivity, rash impulsiveness and reward sensitivity, have been proposed to reflect aspects of frontal lobe functioning and promote substance use. The present study examined these two forms of impulsivity as well as frontal lobe symptoms in relation to risky drinking by university students. University undergraduates aged 18-26years completed the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11), Sensitivity to Punishment and Sensitivity to Reward Questionnaire (SPSRQ), Frontal Systems Behavior Scale (FrSBe), and a demographics questionnaire assessing age, gender, and age of onset of weekly drinking (AOD). AUDIT-defined harmful drinkers reported earlier AOD and scored higher on BIS-11, the Sensitivity to Reward (SR) scale of the SPSRQ, and the Disinhibition and Executive Dysfunction scales of the FrSBe compared to lower risk groups. Differences remained significant after controlling for duration of alcohol exposure. Path analyses indicated that the influence of SR on AUDIT was mediated by FrSBe Disinhibition, whereas the influence of BIS-11 on AUDIT was mediated by both Disinhibition and Executive Dysfunction scales of the FrSBe. Findings tentatively suggest that the influence of rash impulsiveness on drinking may reflect dysfunction in dorsolateral prefrontal and orbitofrontal systems, whereas the influence of reward sensitivity on drinking may primarily reflect orbitofrontal dysfunction. Irrespective of the underlying functional brain systems involved, results appear to be more consistent with a pre-drinking trait interpretation than effects of alcohol exposure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Placebo-controlled phase II study of vitamin K3 cream for the treatment of cetuximab-induced rash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Kaalund, Inger; Clemmensen, Ole

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Cetuximab inhibits the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and papulopustular eruptions is a frequent side effect. Vitamin K3 (menadione) has preclinically shown to be a potential activator of the EGFR by phosphorylating the receptor (pEGFR). The present randomised study investigated...... the effect of a vitamin K3 cream on cetuximab-induced rash. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty patients were included in this double-blinded placebo-controlled trial. Patients receiving cetuximab 500 mg/m2 every second week plus chemotherapy for metastatic cancer were included. In each patient, vitamin K3 cream...... stained for EGFR and pEGFR. RESULTS: Application of vitamin K3 cream twice daily during treatment with cetuximab did not reduce the number of papulopustular eruptions, and this was independent of the use of systemic tetracycline. No significant changes in the staining of EGFR or pEGFR were observed...

  19. Correlation Between the Severity of Cetuximab-Induced Skin Rash and Clinical Outcome for Head and Neck Cancer Patients: The RTOG Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bar-Ad, Voichita, E-mail: voichita.bar-ad@jefferson.edu [Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Zhang, Qiang [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Harari, Paul M. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Axelrod, Rita [Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Rosenthal, David I. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Trotti, Andy [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Jones, Christopher U. [Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, California (United States); Garden, Adam S. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Song, Guobin [Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Foote, Robert L. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Raben, David [University of Colorado Comprehensive Cancer Center, Denver, Colorado (United States); Shenouda, George [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Spencer, Sharon A. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Harris, Jonathan [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the severity of cetuximab-induced skin rash and its correlation with clinical outcome and late skin toxicity in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with chemoradiation therapy and cetuximab. Methods and Materials: Analysis included patients who received loading dose and ≥1 cetuximab dose concurrent with definitive chemoradiation therapy (70 Gy + cisplatin) or postoperative chemoradiation therapy (60-66 Gy + docetaxel or cisplatin). Results: Six hundred two patients were analyzed; 383 (63.6%) developed grade 2 to 4 cetuximab rash. Patients manifesting grade 2 to 4 rash had younger age (P<.001), fewer pack-years smoking history (P<.001), were more likely to be males (P=.04), and had p16-negative (P=.04) oropharyngeal tumors (P=.003). In univariate analysis, grade 2 to 4 rash was associated with better overall survival (hazard ratio [HR] 0.58, P<.001) and progression-free survival (HR 0.75, P=.02), and reduced distant metastasis rate (HR 0.61, P=.03), but not local-regional failure (HR 0.79, P=.16) relative to grade 0 to 1 rash. In multivariable analysis, HRs for overall survival, progression-free survival, distant metastasis, and local-regional failure were, respectively, 0.68 (P=.008), 0.85 (P=.21), 0.64 (P=.06), and 0.89 (P=.48). Grade ≥2 rash was associated with improved survival in p16-negative patients (HR 0.28 [95% confidence interval 0.11-0.74]) but not in p16-positive patients (HR 1.10 [0.42-2.89]) (P=.05 for interaction). Twenty-five percent of patients with grade 2 to 4 acute in-field radiation dermatitis experienced grade 2 to 4 late skin fibrosis, versus 14% of patients with grade 0 to 1 acute in-field radiation dermatitis (P=.002). Conclusion: Grade 2 to 4 cetuximab rash was associated with better survival, possibly due to reduction of distant metastasis. This observation was noted mainly in p16-negative patients. Grade 2 to 4 acute in-field radiation dermatitis was associated with higher rate of

  20. Correlation between the severity of cetuximab-induced skin rash and clinical outcome for head and neck cancer patients: The XXXX experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Ad, Voichita; Zhang, Qiang (Ed); Harari, Paul M.; Axelrod, Rita; Rosenthal, David I.; Trotti, Andy; Jones, Christopher U.; Garden, Adam S.; Song, Guobin; Foote, Robert L.; Raben, David; Shenouda, George; Spencer, Sharon A.; Harris, Jonathan; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the present study was to evaluate severity of cetuximab-induced skin rash and its correlation with clinical outcome and late skin toxicity in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with chemoradiotherapy and cetuximab. Materials & Methods Analysis included patients who received loading dose and ≥ 1cetuximab dose concurrent with definitive chemoradiotherapy (70Gy + cisplatin) or postoperative chemoradiotherapy (60–66Gy + docetaxel or cisplatin). Results Six hundred two patients were analyzed; 383 (63.6%) developed Grade 2–4 cetuximab rash. Patients manifesting Grade 2–4 rash had younger age (p<0.001), fewer pack-years smoking history (p<0.001), were more likely to be males (p=0.04), and had p16-negative (p=0.04) oropharyngeal tumors (p=0.003). In univariate analysis, Grade 2–4 rash was associated with better overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio [HR] 0.58, p<0.001) and progression-free survival (PFS) (HR 0.75, p=0.02), and reduced distant metastasis (DM) rate (HR 0.61, p=0.03), but not local-regional failure (LRF) (HR 0.79, p=0.16) relative to Grade 0–1 rash. In multivariable analysis, HRs for OS, PFS, DM, and LRF were 0.68 (p=0.008), 0.85 (p=0.21), 0.64 (p=0.06), and 0.89 (p=0.48). Grade ≥2 rash was associated with improved survival in p16 negative patients (HR 0.28 (0.11–0.74)) but not in p16 positive patients (HR 1.10 (0.42–2.89)) (p=0.05 for interaction). Twenty-five percent of patients with Grade 2–4 acute in-field radiation dermatitis experienced Grade 2–4 late skin fibrosis vs. 14% of patients with Grade 0–1 acute in-field radiation dermatitis (p=0.002). Conclusion Grade 2–4 cetuximab rash was associated with better survival possibly due to reduction of distant metastasis. This observation was noted mainly in p16 negative patients. Grade 2–4 acute in-field radiation dermatitis was associated with higher rate of late Grade 2–4 skin fibrosis. PMID:27212198

  1. [Rash and fever illness caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 needs to be distinguished from hand, foot and mouth disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shuang-Li; Liu, Jian-Feng; Sun, Qiang; Li, Jing; Li, Xiao-Lei; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Ying; Wen, Xiao-Yun; Yan, Dong-Mei; Huang, Guo-Hong; Zhang, Bao-Min; Zhang, Bo; An, Hong-Qiu; Li, Hui; Xu, Wen-Bo

    2013-06-01

    An epidemic of rash and fever illnesses suspected of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) occurred in Gansu Province of China in 2008, laboratory tests were performed in order to identify the pathogen that caused this epidemic. Eight clinical specimens collected from the 4 patients (each patient has throat swab and herpes fluid specimens) with rash and febrile illness, were inoculated onto RD and HEp-2 cells for virus isolation, and the viral nucleic acid was then extracted with the positive virus isolates, the dual-channel real-time reverse transcript-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to detect the nucleic acid of human enterovirus (HEV) in the viral isolates at the same time. For the viral isolates with the negative results of HEV, a sequence independent single primer amplification technique (SISPA) was used for "unknown pathogen" identification. Totally, 6 viral isolates were identified as herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Comprehensive analyses results of the clinical manifestations of the patients, epidemiological findings and laboratory test indicated that this epidemic of rash and febrile illness was caused by HSV-1. The differences among the gG region of 6 HSV-1 isolates at nucleotide level and amino acid level were all small, and the identities were up to 98. 8% and 97.9%, respectively, showing that this outbreak was caused by only one viral transmission chain of HSV-1. HSV-1 and other viruses that cause rash and febrile illnesses need differential diagnosis with HFMD. The etiology of rash and febrile illness is sometimes difficult to distinguish from the clinical symptoms and epidemiological data, the laboratory diagnosis is therefore critical.

  2. Prognostic implications of active discoid lupus erythematosus and malar rash at the time of diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus: Results from a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drucker, A M; Su, J; Mussani, F; Siddha, S K; Gladman, D D; Urowitz, M B

    2016-04-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) may have prognostic implications for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We aimed to determine the impact of discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) and malar rash on SLE disease activity. Data were analyzed from the Toronto Lupus Clinic prospective cohort study. We compared SLE patients with active DLE or malar rash at SLE diagnosis to SLE patients who never developed CLE. Outcomes were assessed at one and five years, including Adjusted Mean Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 (AMS). A total of 524 SLE patients (284 without CLE, 65 with DLE, and 175 with malar rash) were included. Mean AMS scores in patients without CLE at one and five years were 5.96 ± 5.06 and 4.00 ± 3.52, which did not differ significantly from scores at one (6.93 ± 5.31, p = 0.17) and five years (4.29 ± 2.62, p = 0.63) in the DLE group. In patients with malar rash, AMS scores at one (8.30 ± 6.80, p < 0.001) and five years (5.23 ± 3.06, p = 0.004) were higher than controls without CLE. Malar rash may be a marker of more severe systemic disease over time, while DLE has no significant impact on general SLE disease activity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Twenty-six-week oral carcinogenicity study of 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol in CB6F1-rasH2 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoung-Seok; Park, Sang-Jin; Kim, Yong-Bum; Han, Ji-Seok; Jeong, Eun Ju; Son, Hwa-Young; Moon, Kyoung-Sik

    2017-01-01

    The carcinogenic potential of 3-monochloro-1,2-propanediol (3-MCPD) was evaluated in a short-term carcinogenicity testing study using CB6F1 rasH2-Tg (rasH2-Tg) mice. 3-MCPD is found in many foods and food ingredients as a result of storage or processing and is regarded as a carcinogen since it is known to induce Leydig cell and kidney tumors in rats. Male and female rasH2-Tg mice were administered 3-MCPD once daily by oral gavage at doses of 0, 10, 20, and 40 mg/kg body weight (bw) per day for 26 weeks. As a positive control, N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) was administered as a single intraperitoneal injection (75 mg/kg). In 3-MCPD-treated mice, there was no increase in the incidence of neoplastic lesions compared to the incidence in vehicle control mice. However, 3-MCPD treatment resulted in an increased incidence of tubular basophilia in the kidneys and germ cell degeneration in the testes, with degenerative germ cell debris in the epididymides of males at 20 and 40 mg/kg bw per day. In 3-MCPD-treated females, vacuolation of the brain and spinal cord was observed at 40 mg/kg bw per day; however, only one incidence of vacuolation was observed in males. Forestomach and cutaneous papilloma and/or carcinoma and lymphoma were observed in most rasH2 mice receiving MNU treatment. We concluded that 3-MCPD did not show carcinogenic potential in the present study using rasH2-Tg mice. The findings of this study suggest that the carcinogenic potential of 3-MCPD is species specific.

  4. Pityriasis Rosea: A rash that should be recognized by the primary care physician. Study of 30 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor López-Carrera

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pityriasis rosea is an acute disseminated rash of unknown etiology and prolonged duration, characterized by erythematous- squamous plaques. Despite having an ostentatious clinical picture for both the patient and family, it is self-limited and usually resolves without sequelae. Pityriasis rosea is often erroneously diagnosed as mycosis and given unnecessary treatment. Objective: To describe the clinical and demographical features of pity- riasis rosea in a group of Mexican pediatric patients. Patients and methods: Retrospective and descriptive study in which the clinical and demographic features of patients attended at the department of dermatology of the National Institute of Pediatrics with diagnosis of pityriasis rosea within a ten year period were analysed. Results: Thirty patients with pityriasis rosea, with a frequency of 3.6 per 1000 dermatological patients. Pityriasis rosea was more frequent in females with a ratio of 1.5 to 1 and a mean age of 10 years. More than half of the patients (56% had an atypical presentation, and biopsy was mandatory in 7 patients to establish the final diagnosis. Conclusions: The knowledge of the clinical features of pityriasis rosea by primary care physicians will prevent from unnecessary work-up and treatments.

  5. The intra-oceanic Cretaceous (~ 108 Ma) Kata-Rash arc fragment in the Kurdistan segment of Iraqi Zagros suture zone: Implications for Neotethys evolution and closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sarmad A.; Ismail, Sabah A.; Nutman, Allen P.; Bennett, Vickie C.; Jones, Brian G.; Buckman, Solomon

    2016-09-01

    The Kata-Rash arc fragment is an allochthonous thrust-bound body situated near Penjween, 100 km northeast of Sulymannia city, Kurdistan Region, within the Iraqi portion of the Zagros suture zone. It forms part of the suprasubduction zone 'Upper Allochthon' terranes (designated as the Gimo-Qandil Group), which is dominated by calc-alkaline andesite and basaltic-andesite, rhyodacite to rhyolite, crosscut by granitic, granodioritic, and dioritic dykes. Previously, rocks of the Kata-Rash arc fragment were interpreted as a part of the Eocene Walash volcanic group. However, SHRIMP zircon U-Pb dates on them of 108.1 ± 2.9 Ma (Harbar volcanic rocks) and 107.7 ± 1.9 Ma (Aulan intrusion) indicate an Albian-Cenomanian age, which is interpreted as the time of igneous crystallisation. The Aulan intrusion zircons have initial εHf values of + 8.6 ± 0.2. On a Nb/Yb-Th/Yb diagram, all Kata-Rash samples fall within the compositional field of arc-related rocks, i.e. above the mid-ocean-ridge basalt (MORB)-ocean island basalt (OIB) mantle array. Primitive-mantle-normalised trace-element patterns for the Kata-Rash samples show enrichment in the large ion lithophile elements and depletion in the high-field-strength elements supporting their subduction-related character. Low Ba/La coupled with low La/Yb and Hf/Hf* 3000 km continuity of Cretaceous arc activity (Oman to Cyprus), that consumed Neotethyian oceanic crust between Eurasia and the Gondwanan fragment Arabia.

  6. A review of the treatment options for skin rash induced by EGFR-targeted therapies: Evidence from randomized clinical trials and a meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocvirk, Janja; Heeger, Steffen; McCloud, Philip; Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Agents targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are amongst the most extensively used of the targeted agents in the therapy of some of the most common solid tumors. Although they avoid many of the classic side effects associated with cytotoxic chemotherapy, they are associated with unpleasant cutaneous toxicities which can affect treatment compliance and impinge on patient quality of life. To date, despite a plethora of consensus recommendations, expert opinions and reviews, there is a paucity of evidence-based guidance for the management of the skin rash that occurs in the treatment of patients receiving EGFR-targeted therapies. A literature search was conducted as a first step towards investigating not only an evidence-based approach to the management of skin rash, but also with a view to designing future randomized trials. The literature search identified seven randomized trials and a meta-analysis was conducted using the data from four of these trials involving oral antibiotics. The meta-analysis of the data from these four trials suggests that prophylactic antibiotics might reduce the relative risk of severe rash associated with EGFR-targeted agents by 42–77%. Vitamin K cream was also identified as having a potential role in the management EGFR-targeted agent induced rash. This review and meta-analysis clearly identify the need for further randomized studies of the role of oral antibiotics in this setting. The results of the ongoing randomized trials of the topical application of vitamin K cream plus or minus doxycycline and employing prophylactic versus reactive strategies are eagerly awaited

  7. Skin rash in patients treated with neoadjuvant erlotinib (Tarceva in resectable non-small cell lung cancer: Predictor for tumor response and survival?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Gool MH

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Skin rash during treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI has been reported to be predictive for response and survival in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate whether skin rash during treatment (as a biomarker in a preoperative setting was related to response and survival. Methods: This study was designed as an open-label phase II trial (also known as M06NEL. Patients received preoperative erlotinib (Tarceva 150 mg once daily for 3 weeks. Skin toxicity during treatment was analysed in relation to metabolic and histopathological response, overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS. Results: In total 59 patients (25 male, 34 female were eligible for analysis. In 39 patients (66% skin toxicity occurred. According to National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (NCICTC, Grade 1 toxicity was seen in 15 patients (25%, Grade 2 in 19 patients (32% and Grade 3 in five patients (8%. None of the patients showed skin toxicity Grade 4 and 5. The median follow up was 74 months. Thirty-six patients (61% were alive at time of analysis. Twenty-seven patients (46% showed disease progression during follow up. Hazard ratios (HR indicated lower risk of death (HR = 0.66, 95%CI: 0.29 - 1.50 and progression (HR = 0.64, 0.30 - 1.36, although in this small group results were not significant. Skin rash did not adequately predict response. Conclusions: In this neoadjuvant setting with limited treatment time in patients with early stage NSCLC, skin rash was not associated with response and survival and cannot be used as an early biomarker.

  8. First Aid: Rashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & ... avoid sunburn . If your child tends to get eczema flare-ups, avoid harsh soaps. Reviewed by: Steven ...

  9. Impact of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA mutations, PTEN, AREG, EREG expression and skin rash in ≥ 2 line cetuximab-based therapy of colorectal cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacharenia Saridaki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the predictive significance of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA mutational status, AREG- EREG mRNA expression, PTEN protein expression and skin rash in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC patients treated with cetuximab containing salvage chemotherapy.Primary tumors from 112 mCRC patients were analyzed. The worst skin toxicity during treatment was recorded.KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA mutations were present in 37 (33%, 8 (7.2% and 11 (9.8% cases, respectively, PTEN was lost in 21 (19.8% cases, AREG and EREG were overexpressed in 48 (45% and 51 (49% cases. In the whole study population, time to tumor progression (TTP and overall survival (OS was significantly lower in patients with KRAS (p = 0.001 and p = 0.026, respectively or BRAF (p = 0.001 and p<0.0001, respectively mutant tumors, downregulation of AREG (p = 0.018 and p = 0.013, respectively or EREG (p = 0.002 and p = 0.004, respectively and grade 0-1 skin rash (p<0.0001 and p<0.0001, respectively. In KRAS wt patients TTP and OS was significantly lower in patients with BRAF (p = 0.0001 and p<0.0001, respectively mutant tumors, downregulation of AREG (p = 0.021 and p = 0.004, respectively or EREG (p = 0.0001 and p<0.0001, respectively and grade 0-1 skin rash (p<0.0001 and p<0.0001, respectively. TTP was significantly lower in patients with PIK3CA mutations (p = 0.01 or lost PTEN (p = 0.002. Multivariate analysis revealed KRAS (Hazard Ratio [HR] 4.3, p<0.0001, BRAF mutation (HR: 5.1, p<0.0001, EREG low expression (HR: 1.6, p = 0.021 and absence of severe/moderate skin rash (HR: 4.0, p<0.0001 as independent prognostic factors for decreased TTP. Similarly, KRAS (HR 2.9, p = 0.01, BRAF mutation (HR: 3.0, p = 0.001, EREG low expression (HR: 1.7, p = 0.021, absence of severe/moderate skin rash (HR: 3.7, p<0.0001 and the presence of undifferantited tumours (HR: 2.2, p = 0.001 were revealed as independent prognostic factors for decreased OS.These results underscore that KRAS-BRAF mutations and EREG

  10. Travelers' Health: Rickettsial (Spotted and Typhus Fevers) and Related Infections (Anaplasmosis and Ehrlichiosis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rickettsioses are accompanied by a maculopapular, vesicular, or petechial rash or sometimes an eschar at the site of the tick bite. African tick-bite fever is typically milder than some other rickettsioses, but ...

  11. Hydralazine-induced anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive renal vasculitis presenting with a vasculitic syndrome, acute nephritis and a puzzling skin rash: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keasberry Justin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis has been associated with many drugs and it is a relatively rare side effect of the antihypertensive drug hydralazine. The diagnosis and management of patients who have anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis may be challenging because of its relative infrequency, variability of clinical expression and changing nomenclature. The spectrum of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis is wide and can be fatal. This case documents a 62-year-old woman who presented with hydralazine-induced anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive renal vasculitis with a puzzling cutaneous rash. Case presentation We report a rare case of hydralazine-induced anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis in a 62-year-old Caucasian woman who presented with a vasculitic syndrome with a sore throat, mouth ulcers and otalgia after several months of constitutional symptoms. She then proceeded to develop a rash over her right lower limb. Clinically, the rash had features to suggest Sweet’s syndrome, but also had some appearances consistent with embolic phenomena and did not have the appearance of palpable purpure usually associated with cutaneous vasculitis. Differential diagnoses were hydralazine-associated Sweet’s syndrome, streptococcal-induced cutaneous eruption or an unrelated contact dermatitis. A midstream urine sample detected glomerular blood cells in the setting of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive renal vasculitis and Streptococcus pyogenes bacteremia. A renal biopsy revealed a pauci-immune, focally necrotizing glomerulonephritis with small crescents. Her skin biopsy revealed a heavy neutrophil infiltrate involving the full thickness of the dermis with no evidence of a leucocytoclastic vasculitis, but was non-specific. She was initially commenced on intravenous lincomycin for her bloodstream infection and subsequently

  12. An unusual recurrence of pruritic creeping eruption after treatment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-08-13

    Aug 13, 2015 ... However, an unusual recurrence of the disease in a Ghanaian male after standard treatment was observed ... dog or cat hookworm is not an unusual disease. However ... mistaken for fungal infections or inflammatory skin disorders. Indeed .... drug include dizziness, nausea, vomiting and intestinal cramps.

  13. Comparative and non-comparative studies of the efficacy and tolerance of tioconazole cream 1% versus another imidazole and/or placebo in neonates and infants with candidal diaper rash and/or impetigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, D L; Kashin, P; Jevons, S

    1987-01-01

    Eleven open multicentre studies were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of tioconazole cream 1% as a treatment for diaper rash with or without fungal (Candida) involvement, or impetigo in neonates and infants. In the dermal candidiasis/diaper rash group, 320 patients had either tioconazole (n = 220), a comparative imidazole (n = 43), or vehicle cream (n = 57) applied to the affected area twice daily. Twenty-one impetigo patients had only tioconazole cream 1% applied three times daily to lesions. The overall cure rate (patients with both clinical and mycological cure) at the end of treatment for tioconazole treated patients was 78%, for the comparative imidazole group it was 76% and for vehicle cream it was 39%. At the long-term follow-up evaluation approximately 6 weeks after treatment for patients with diaper rash, the overall cure rate was about the same in both tioconazole- and comparative imidazole-treated patients (87% and 90%, respectively), and 14% in patients using vehicle cream. Side-effects were coincident with disease symptoms and consisted primarily of erythema localized to the treatment area; they occurred in 5.4% (13/241) of the patients who received tioconazole and in 21% (9/43) of the patients who received comparative imidazole (econazole or miconazole). No side-effects were reported in this open study for the 57 patients who used vehicle cream. The results of these studies show that tioconazole cream 1% is safe and effective for the treatment of neonates and infants with dermal candidiasis, diaper rash and impetigo.

  14. La Verbena azul en el tratamiento del niño con salpullido The blue Verbena to treat the child with rash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Galiano Piquet

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: la miliaria es una enfermedad inflamatoria de la piel, usualmente conocida como salpullido, es muy frecuente en niños pequeños sobre todo en los meses de verano. Objetivo: valorar la eficacia de la infusión de Verbena azul en el control de la miliaria común. Métodos: se realizó un ensayo clínico fase II, a partir de la preparación de una infusión de hojas frescas o secas molidas, que se vertieron en 12 litros de agua hirviente, se tapó y se separó del fuego después de añadirle la planta, se dejó reposar y se coló. Fue aplicada tibia en todo el cuerpo durante 21 días, en dos secciones, al levantarse, y en la tarde luego del baño diario. El estudio se realizó en 30 lactantes de raza blanca, que acudieron con esta patología a la consulta de Medicina Natural y Tradicional, en el consultorio 6 del poblado de Altagracia, en el periodo entre junio del 2004 y junio del 2005, los cuales pertenecían al Policlínico Comunitario Docente "Carlos J. Finlay" de la Ciudad de Camagüey. Los datos se recogieron mediante una encuesta, confeccionada de acuerdo con los objetivos planteados en la investigación. Resultados: el grupo más afectado fue el de 3 a 6 meses, todos los pacientes fueron blancos, no se encontraron diferencias significativas en cuanto al sexo. La variedad clínica más frecuente fue la cristalina, y los meses en que más se presentó fueron entre junio y agosto. Conclusiones: este tratamiento presentó una alta eficacia en el control de la sintomatología de la miliaria común; se curaron 9 de cada 10 pacientes.Introduction: miliaria is an skin inflammatory disease known as rash and is very frequent in small children mainly during summer months. Objective: assessing the efficacy of the infusion of blue Verbena in controlling common heat rash. Methods: a phase II clinical trial was conducted from the preparation of an infusion of fresh leaves or dry grinded poured out in 12 liters of boiling water, was covered

  15. Rash - child under 2 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to air dry as long as is practical. Launder cloth diapers in mild soap and rinse well. ... J. Dermatology. In: Engorn B, Flerlage J, eds. Johns Hopkins: The Harriet Lane Handbook . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  16. Diaper Rash: How to Treat

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Registration General information Housing & travel Education Exhibit hall Mobile app 2019 Annual Meeting Derm Exam Prep Course ... SkinPAC State societies Scope of practice Truth in advertising NP/PA laws Action center Public and patients ...

  17. Netherton′s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M L Khatri

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available A 6 year old Libyan boy had diffuse erythema at birth and later developed pruritic, maculo-papular, papular, circinat c, double-edge, scaly lesions, suggestive of ichthyosis linearis circumflexa (ILC.Hisscalp hair were brittle and sparse with partial patchy alopecia, showing change of trichorrhexis invaginata, these -associations being characteristic of Netherton′s syndrome. The boy had slightly stunted growth; a feature which has not been recorded in previously reported cases.

  18. Available studies fail to provide strong evidence of increased risk of diarrhea mortality due to measles in the period 4-26 weeks after measles rash onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Bianca D; Black, Robert E

    2017-11-07

    Measles vaccination effectiveness studies showed dramatic decreases in all-cause mortality in excess of what would be expected from the prevention of measles disease alone. This invited speculation that measles infection may increase the risk of diarrhea morbidity and mortality subsequent to the acute phase of the disease. The aim of the present systematic review is to summarize the existing evidence in the publically available literature pertaining to the putative causal link between measles and diarrhea in the period 4-26 weeks following measles rash onset. We searched the PubMed, Embase, Open Grey and Grey Literature Report databases for relevant literature using broad search terms. Prospective, retrospective and case-control studies in low- and middle-income countries involving children under five wherein relevant evidence were presented were included. Data were extracted from the articles and summarized. Fifty abstracts retrieved through the database searches met the initial screening criteria. Twelve additional documents were identified by review of the references of the documents found in the initial searches. Six documents representing five unique studies that presented evidence relevant to the research question were found. Four of the included studies took place in Bangladesh. One of the included studies took place in Sudan. Some measles vaccine effectiveness studies show lower diarrhea morbidity and mortality among the vaccinated. However, children who received vaccine may have differed in important ways from children who did not, such as health service utilization. Additionally, cohort studies following unvaccinated children showed no difference in diarrhea morbidity and mortality between cases and controls more than 4 weeks after measles rash onset. One study showed some evidence that severe measles may predispose children to gastroenteritis, but was not able to show a corresponding increase in the risk of diarrhea mortality. The available evidence

  19. Preventive effect of kampo medicine (hangeshashin-to, TJ-14 plus minocycline against afatinib-induced diarrhea and skin rash in patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiki M

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Masao Ichiki,1 Hiroshi Wataya,2 Kazuhiko Yamada,3 Nobuko Tsuruta,4 Hiroaki Takeoka,1 Yusuke Okayama,1 Jun Sasaki,1 Tomoaki Hoshino3 1Department of Respiratory Medicine, Clinical Research Institute, National Hospital Organization, Kyushu Medical Center, 2Division of Internal Medicine, Saiseikai Fukuoka General Hospital, Fukuoka City, 3Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kurume University, Kurume City, 4Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hamanomachi Hospital, Fukuoka City, Fukuoka, Japan Purpose: Diarrhea and oral mucositis induced by afatinib can cause devastating quality of life issues for patients undergoing afatinib treatment. Several studies have shown that hangeshashin-to (TJ-14 might be useful for chemotherapy-induced diarrhea and oral mucositis. In this study, we investigated the prophylactic effects of TJ-14 for afatinib-induced diarrhea and oral mucositis and minocycline for afatinib-induced skin rash.Patients and methods: First- and second-generation epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors have become the standard first-line treatment in patients with EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer. The incidence of diarrhea was higher with afatinib than with gefitinib, and we conducted a single-arm Phase II study with afatinib. Patients who had previously undergone treatment with afatinib were ineligible. Both TJ-14 (7.5 g/day and minocycline (100 mg/day were administered simultaneously from the start of afatinib administration. The primary end point was the incidence of ≥ grade 3 (G3 diarrhea (increase of ≥7 stools/day over baseline during the first 4 weeks of treatment. The secondary end points were the incidence of ≥ G3 oral mucositis (severe pain interfering with oral intake and ≥ G3 skin toxicity (severe or medically significant but not immediately life-threatening.Results: A total of 29 patients (nine men and 20 women; median age, 66

  20. A 28-day oral gavage toxicity study of 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) in CB6F1-non-Tg rasH2 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoung-Seok; Park, Sang-Jin; Kim, Yong-Bum; Han, Ji-Seok; Jeong, Eun-Ju; Moon, Kyoung-Sik; Son, Hwa-Young

    2015-12-01

    3-Monochloro-1,2-propanediol (3-MCPD) is a well-known contaminant of foods containing hydrolyzed vegetable protein. However, limited toxicity data are available for the risk assessment of 3-MCPD and its carcinogenic potential is controversial. To evaluate the potential toxicity and determine the dose levels for a 26-week carcinogenicity test using Tg rasH2 mice, 3-MCPD was administered once daily by oral gavage at doses of 0, 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg body weight (b.w.)/day for 28 days to male and female CB6F1-non-Tg rasH2 mice (N = 5 males and females per dose). The standard toxicological evaluations were conducted during the in-life and post-mortem phase. In the 100 mg/kg b.w./day group, 3 males and 1 female died during the study and showed clinical signs such as thin appearance and subdued behavior accompanied by significant decreases in mean b.w. Microscopy revealed tubular basophilia in the kidneys, exfoliated degenerative germ cells in the lumen of the seminiferous tubule of the testes, vacuolation in the brain, axonal degeneration of the sciatic nerve, and cardiomyopathy in the 100, ≥25, ≥50, 100, and 100 mg/kg b.w./day groups, respectively. In conclusion, 3-MCPD's target organs were the kidneys, testes, brain, sciatic nerve, and heart. The "no-observed-adverse-effect level" (NOAEL) of 3-MCPD was ≤25 and 25 mg/kg b.w./day in males and females, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Rash after measles vaccination: laboratory analysis of cases reported in São Paulo, Brazil Exantema após vacinação do sarampo: análise laboratorial de casos notificados em São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria I Oliveira

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The clinical differential diagnosis of rash due to viral infections is often difficult, and misdiagnosis is not rare, especially after the introduction of measles and rubella vaccination. A study to determine the etiological diagnosis of exanthema was carried out in a group of children after measles vaccination. METHODS: Sera collected from children with rash who received measles vaccine were reported in 1999. They were analyzed for IgM antibodies against measles virus, rubella virus, human parvovirus B19 (HPV B19 using ELISA commercial techniques, and human herpes virus 6 (HHV 6 using immunofluorescence commercial technique. Viremia for each of those viruses was tested using a polimerase chain reaction (PCR. RESULTS: A total of 17 cases of children with exanthema after measles immunization were reported in 1999. The children, aged 9 to 12 months (median 10 months, had a blood sample taken for laboratory analysis. The time between vaccination and the first rash signs varied from 1 to 60 days. The serological results of those 17 children suspected of measles or rubella infection showed the following etiological diagnosis: 17.6% (3 in 17 HPV B19 infection; 76.5% (13 in 17 HHV 6 infection; 5.9% (1 in 17 rash due to measles vaccine. CONCLUSIONS: The study data indicate that infection due to HPV B19 or HHV 6 can be misdiagnosed as exanthema due to measles vaccination. Therefore, it is important to better characterize the etiology of rash in order to avoid attributing it incorrectly to measles vaccine.OBJETIVO: O diagnóstico diferencial de doenças exantemáticas causadas por vírus é geralmente difícil, e equívocos não são raros, especialmente depois da introdução da vacina contra o sarampo e a rubéola. Um estudo laboratorial foi conduzido com o objetivo de estabelecer o diagnóstico etiológico de casos de exantema em crianças que receberam a vacina contra o sarampo. MÉTODOS: Soros de casos de exantema em crianças que

  2. A cross-sectional study of cutaneous drug reactions in a private ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-07-20

    Jul 20, 2011 ... in a private dental college and government medical ... Materials and Methods: The study was carried out in the department of Oral and Maxillofacial surgery in a Private dental ... maculopapular rash, all other skin reactions were observed more ... status of lesions on withdrawal of drug, associated mucosal.

  3. Serological and virological characterization of clinically diagnosed cases of measles in suburban Khartoum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.S. el Mubarak; H.G.M. Niesters (Bert); S.A. Ibrahim; R.L. de Swart (Rik); E.E. Zijlstra (Edward); T.F. Wild (Thomas Fabian); O.A. Mustafa; H.W. Vos (Helma); M.M. Mukhtar; J. Groen (Jan); A.M. El-Hassan (Ahmed Mohamed); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); M.W.G. van de Bildt (Marco)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractMeasles continues to be a major childhood disease in terms of global morbidity and mortality. In the main areas of its endemicity the only available means of diagnosis are based on clinical criteria: the presence of a maculopapular rash and fever accompanied by cough,

  4. The sunny side of lime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaak, Marjolijn S W; Martens, Herm; Hassing, Robert-Jan; van Beek-Nieuwland, Yvonne; van Genderen, Perry J J

    2012-01-01

    A 26-year-old woman was affected with a maculopapular rash because of a jellyfish sting on her right leg while surfing in Indonesia. A locally-prepared liniment was applied on the affected skin. She presented with hyperpigmented linear tracks that she noted a few days later. © 2012 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  5. Pityriasis rosea. Appearance and distribution of macules aid diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnath, Bernard; Hussain, Nasir; Bevin, Mary

    2003-05-01

    A 40-year-old man presented with a 1-week history of a diffuse pruritic rash. The patient denied having had fever, chills, or a recent respiratory infection. He could not recall having an initial patch. Physical examination revealed numerous small, scaly patches on his trunk (figure 1). The rash spared the palms of his hands and soles of his feet as well as the distal extremities.

  6. A Life Threatening Rash, an Unexpected Cause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiraj Jain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 74-year-old man with purpura fulminans and altered sensorium following an acute febrile illness. Intensive sepsis management was to no avail, until institution of doxycycline therapy following confirmation of scrub typhus. Empirical doxycycline needs to be considered in endemic areas for patients presenting with purpura fulminans.

  7. Skin Rashes Due to Bed-Wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cares Peers Support Ask the Doctor My Food Coach Nutrition Dialysis Patient & Family Resources Emergency Resources A ... State Charity Registration Disclosures © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc., 30 East 33rd Street, New York, NY 10016, ...

  8. Hot Tub Rash (Pseudomonas Dermatitis/Folliculitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Swimmers Make a Healthy Splash! Mobile Apps Podcasts Posters Social Media Library Stories Videos/TV Partner Materials ... site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel file Audio/Video file Apple ...

  9. "Hot Tub Rash" and "Swimmer's Ear" (Pseudomonas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facts About “Hot Tub Rash” and “Swimmer’s Ear” (Pseudomonas) What is Pseudomonas and how can it affect me? Pseudomonas (sue-doh- ... a major cause of infections commonly known as “hot tub rash” and “swimmer’s ear.” This germ is ...

  10. The sweet Christmas rash (case series)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyldenløve, Mette; Nepper-Christensen, Steen; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2013-01-01

    Christmas tree hypersensitivity is a rare condition, which has so far obtained scarce attention in the medical literature. We present two clinical cases of hypersensitivity associated with Christmas tree exposure, a 51-year-old woman with allergic contact dermatitis and a 41-year-old man...... with allergic rhinitis. The female patient had a positive patch test reaction to colophony, and the male patient had a positive skin prick test reaction to alternaria mould. Both were successfully advised to avoid prolonged exposure to Christmas trees and buy artificial trees for Christmas....

  11. Photos of Slapped-Cheek Rash

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parvovirus B19 and Fifth Disease Note: Javascript is disabled or ... this page: About CDC.gov . Parvovirus Home About Parvovirus B19 Fifth Disease Pregnancy and Fifth Disease Photos of ...

  12. Acute cholestatic hepatitis along with agranulocytosis: A rare side ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aplastic anemia, vasculitis and cholestatic hepatitis. The most common adverse effect is a maculo- papular pruritic rash, at times accompanied by fever.[2] Adverse reaction of these thioamides occurs in 3–12% of treated patients. Agranulocytosis and cholestatic hepatitis together is an extremely rare idiosyncratic side effect ...

  13. Toxic epidermal necrolysis due to concomitant use of lamotrigine and valproic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhjot Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-epileptic drugs can be associated with a wide spectrum of cutaneous adverse reactions ranging from simple maculopapular rashes to more severe and life threatening reactions like Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis. These rashes are well documented with older antiepileptic drugs like phenytoin, phenobarbitone and carbamazapine. Lamotrigine is a newer, unrelated antiepileptic drug that causes skin rashes in 3-10% of new users. Higher starting dose or rapid escalation, concurrent treatment with valproic acid, and a previous history of a rash with other antiepileptic drugs are well recognized risk factors for lamotrigine related serious rashes. We report two patients with toxic epidermal necrolysis, resulting from concomitant use of lamotrigine and valproic acid. It is emphasized that clinicians adhere to the recommended dosage guidelines and adopt a slow dose titration when initiating treatment with lamotrigine.

  14. Multiple Primary Merkel Cell Carcinomas Presenting as Pruritic, Painful Lower Leg Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Blumenthal

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC is a rare and highly aggressive neuroendocrine tumor of the skin which almost exclusively presents as a solitary tumor. It is most often seen on sun-exposed regions, historically almost exclusively on the head and neck, with only rare case reports on the extremities. Although recent studies have shown increased incidence with up to 20% on the extremities, here we present one of these rare emerging presentations, with the addition of a unique treatment option. Our patient is an 80-year-old male with a 3-month history of multiple raised, rapidly enlarging tumors on the right ankle. Two separate biopsies were performed and demonstrated sheets and clusters of small blue cells filling the dermis with scant cytoplasm, dusty chromatin, and nuclear molding. Subsequent immunohistochemical stains confirmed the diagnosis of multiple primary MCC. Despite the characteristic immunohistochemical profile of primary MCC, the possibility of a metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma from an alternate primary site was entertained, given his unusual clinical presentation. A complete clinical workup including CT scans of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed no evidence of disease elsewhere. Instead of amputation, the patient opted for nonsurgical treatment with radiation therapy alone, resulting in a rapid and complete response. This case represents an unusual presentation of primary MCC and demonstrates further evidence that radiation as monotherapy is an effective local treatment option for inoperable MCC.

  15. Multiple Primary Merkel Cell Carcinomas Presenting as Pruritic, Painful Lower Leg Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Laura; VandenBoom, Timothy; Melian, Edward; Peterson, Anthony; Hutchens, Kelli A.

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and highly aggressive neuroendocrine tumor of the skin which almost exclusively presents as a solitary tumor. It is most often seen on sun-exposed regions, historically almost exclusively on the head and neck, with only rare case reports on the extremities. Although recent studies have shown increased incidence with up to 20% on the extremities, here we present one of these rare emerging presentations, with the addition of a unique treatment option. Our patient is an 80-year-old male with a 3-month history of multiple raised, rapidly enlarging tumors on the right ankle. Two separate biopsies were performed and demonstrated sheets and clusters of small blue cells filling the dermis with scant cytoplasm, dusty chromatin, and nuclear molding. Subsequent immunohistochemical stains confirmed the diagnosis of multiple primary MCC. Despite the characteristic immunohistochemical profile of primary MCC, the possibility of a metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma from an alternate primary site was entertained, given his unusual clinical presentation. A complete clinical workup including CT scans of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed no evidence of disease elsewhere. Instead of amputation, the patient opted for nonsurgical treatment with radiation therapy alone, resulting in a rapid and complete response. This case represents an unusual presentation of primary MCC and demonstrates further evidence that radiation as monotherapy is an effective local treatment option for inoperable MCC. PMID:26594171

  16. Multiple Primary Merkel Cell Carcinomas Presenting as Pruritic, Painful Lower Leg Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Blumenthal; Timothy VandenBoom; Edward Melian; Anthony Peterson; Kelli A. Hutchens

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and highly aggressive neuroendocrine tumor of the skin which almost exclusively presents as a solitary tumor. It is most often seen on sun-exposed regions, historically almost exclusively on the head and neck, with only rare case reports on the extremities. Although recent studies have shown increased incidence with up to 20% on the extremities, here we present one of these rare emerging presentations, with the addition of a unique treatment option. Our p...

  17. Pruritic and Nociceptive Sensations and Dysesthesias From a Spicule of Cowhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMotte, R. H.; Shimada, S. G.; Green, B. G.; Zelterman, D.

    2009-01-01

    Although the trichomes (spicules) of a pod of cowhage (Mucuna pruriens) are known to evoke a histamine-independent itch that is mediated by a cysteine protease, little is known of the itch and accompanying nociceptive sensations evoked by a single spicule and the enhanced itch and pain that can occur in the surrounding skin. The tip of a single spicule applied to the forearm of 45 subjects typically evoked 1) itch accompanied by nociceptive sensations (NS) of pricking/stinging and, to a lesser extent, burning, and 2) one or more areas of cutaneous dysesthesia characterized by hyperknesis (enhanced itch to pricking) with or without alloknesis (itch to stroking) and/or hyperalgesia (enhanced pricking pain). Itch could occur in the absence of NS or one or more dysesthesias but very rarely the reverse. The peak magnitude of sensation was positively correlated for itch and NS and increased (exhibited spatial summation) as the number of spicules was increased within a spatial extent of 6 cm but not 1 cm. The areas of dysesthesia did not exhibit spatial summation. We conclude that itch evoked by a punctate chemical stimulus can co-exist with NS and cutaneous dysesthesias as may occur in clinical pruritus. However, cowhage itch was not always accompanied by NS or dysesthesia nor was a momentary change in itch necessarily accompanied by a similar change in NS or vice versa. Thus there may be separate neural coding mechanisms for itch, nociceptive sensations, and each type of dysesthesia. PMID:19144738

  18. Defective Priming of CD4+ T Cell Responses During Pre-patent Schistosome Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-26

    maculopapular rash [11]. Symptoms of acute infection are usually not seen in residents of endemic areas, likely because of desensitization developed in...secreting proteolytic enzymes and enter the circulation after a few days [11]. They migrate through the capillaries of the lung and after approximately...highlighting the potential for resistance [34]. However, there are limitations to chemotherapeutic control, including the expense of the drug itself

  19. The First Case of Zika Virus Isolated from a Japanese Patient Who Returned to Japan from Fiji in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Masakatsu; Ogawa, Tomoko; Nishijima, Haruna; Yamamoto, Kojiro; Hotta, Chiemi; Akita, Mamiko; Tajima, Shigeru; Saijo, Masayuki

    2017-09-25

    Outbreaks of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in tropical and subtropical regions are a cause of worldwide concern and represent a public health emergency. ZIKV was isolated from a 17-year-old patient with fever and maculopapular rash. The patient returned to Japan from the Republic of Fiji in late April 2016. The complete genome sequence of the ZIKV isolate (ZIKV/Hu/S36/Chiba/2016), which might be the first strain to be isolated in Japan, was identified and reported.

  20. Syphilitic hepatitis: An uncommon manifestation of a common disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukriti Baveja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis being first manifestation of secondary syphilis is rare. Here in we report a case of 39 years old male who was being treated for hepatitis and presented to us subsequently with itchy maculopapular rash. Venereal disease research laboratory (VDRL titre was 1:16. Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay (TPHA was positive. He was treated with intramuscular Benzathine Penicillin. His hepatitis improved rapidly.

  1. Rat bite fever without fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehle, P; Dubuis, O; So, A; Dudler, J

    2003-09-01

    Rat bite fever is a rarely reported acute febrile bacterial illness caused by Streptobacillus moniliformis or Spirillum minus following a rat bite. It is classically characterised by abrupt onset of fever with rigors, myalgias, headache, and the appearance of a generalised maculopapular petechial skin rash. Polyarthritis complicates the course of the disease in up to 50% of infected patients, and numerous hurdles can make the diagnosis particularly difficult in the absence of fever or rash, as in the present case. A high degree of awareness is necessary to make the correct diagnosis in such cases. Diagnosis has important prognostic implications as the disease is potentially lethal, but easily treatable.

  2. Cutaneous manifestations of spotted fever rickettsial infections in the Central Province of Sri Lanka: a descriptive study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosala Weerakoon

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Characteristic skin lesions play a key role in clinical diagnosis of spotted fever group rickettsioses and this study describes these cutaneous manifestations along with basic histological features.Study was conducted at Medical Unit, Teaching Hospital, Peradeniya, from November 2009 to October 2011, where a prospective data base of all rickettsial infections is maintained. Confirmation of diagnosis was made when IgM and IgG immunofluorescent antibody titre of 1/32 and >1/256 respectively. Of the 210 clinical cases, 134 had cutoff antibody titers for Rickettsia conorii antigen for confirmation. All these 134 patients had fever and skin rash, and of them 132(98% had discrete maculopapular rash while eight (6% had fern leaf type skin necrosis. Eight patients (6% had healed tick bite marks. Average size of a skin lesion was 5 mm and rash involved 52% of body surface, distributed mainly in limbs and back of the chest. Generally the facial and leg skin was slightly oedematous particularly in old aged patients. Sixteen patients (12% had pain and swelling of ankle joints where swelling extended to feet and leg. Biopsies from skin rash of six patients showed evidence of cutaneous vasculitis and of them, 247 bp region of the 17-kDa spotted fever group specific protein antigen was amplified using PCR.A discrete maculopapular rash and occasional variations such as fern leaf shape necrosis and arthritis are found in spotted fever group. Histology found vasculitis as the pathology of these lesions.

  3. A Unique Case of Acute Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis Secondary to Primary Varicella Zoster Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Imam, Syed F; Lodhi, Omair ul haq; Fatima, Zainab; Nasim, Saneeya; Malik, Waseem T; Saleem, Muhammad Sabih

    2017-01-01

    Primary varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection, predominantly in the pediatric population, presents with pyrexia and a classic pruritic vesicular rash. In adults, although less common, it is more severe and linked to more complications. Neurological complications, which account for less than 1% of all VZV complications, include meningitis, encephalitis, arterial vasculopathy, and venous thrombosis. We present a case of a 39-year-old male who developed extensive cerebral venous sinus thrombosi...

  4. Antipsychotic-associated psoriatic rash - a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bujor, Camelia-Eugenia; Vang, Torkel; Nielsen, Jimmi

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antipsychotics are a heterogeneous group of drugs. Although, antipsychotics have been used for years, unexpected side effects may still occur. With this case report we focus on a possible association between psoriasis and antipsychotics. Data on the patient's course of psychiatric...... disease, onset of psoriasis and its evolution were extracted from the patient's medical files. CASE PRESENTATION: We present a case of a 21-year-old female diagnosed with schizophrenia. She was initially treated with quetiapine, and later switched to aripiprazole due to weight gain. After initiation...

  5. Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms without skin rash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasidharanpillai, Sarita; Binitha, Manikoth P; Manikath, Neeraj; Janardhanan, Anisha K

    2015-01-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or drug hypersensitivity syndrome is considered as a severe cutaneous adverse drug reaction which is most commonly precipitated by aromatic anticonvulsants, lamotrigine, dapsone, allopurinol, minocycline, and salazopyrin. Its clinical manifestations are often variable. On rare occasions, it can present with only systemic involvement without any cutaneous features. A complete drug history is of paramount importance in making an early diagnosis. We report the case of a male patient who presented with fever, lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and hepatitis, 2 weeks after starting salazopyrin. The presence of atypical lymphocytes in the peripheral smear was indicative of a viral infection or a hematological dyscrasia. Bone marrow examination revealed a normocellular marrow with an increase in eosinophil precursors. Investigations for the common causes for fever and hepatitis were negative. The presence of eosinophilia, the temporal relationship of the symptoms with the initiation of treatment with salazopyrin, and the marked improvement on withdrawal of the drug along with the administration of systemic corticosteroids, were features consistent with the diagnosis of DRESS. With the incidence of this condition showing a rising trend, it is important for the clinician to be aware of its variable manifestations, as a delay in diagnosis and treatment can be fatal.

  6. Costs and cost-effectiveness of the nursing programme 'Coping with itch' for patients with chronic pruritic skin disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Os-Medendorp, H.; Guikers, C. L. H.; Eland-de Kok, P. C. M.; Ros, W. J. G.; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C. A. F. M.; Buskens, E.

    Background Itch, a major symptom of many skin diseases, has a great impact on quality of life. The nursing programme 'Coping with itch' aims at reducing itch and at helping patients to cope with itch. Objectives To explore costs and cost-effectiveness of the programme. Methods A randomized

  7. Severe cutaneous reaction to cetuximab with possible association with the use of over-the-counter skin care products in a patient with oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waris, Waris; Naik, Seeta; Idrees, Imran; Taha, Hesham; Camosino, Linda; Mehrishi, Anshu; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2009-01-01

    The management of locally advanced head and neck cancer remains a challenge to most oncologists and their patients. Treatment with epithelial growth factor receptor inhibitors (EGFRIs) is associated with a good response. Cetuximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody directed against epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), in combination with radiation therapy is indicated for the treatment of locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Although a mild acneiform skin rash (Grade 1, 2) is very common in these patients, severe rash (Grade 3) is uncommon. A 61-year-old African American man with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer was treated with cetuximab and radiation. He developed a sudden flare-up of a skin rash after the 5th cycle of cetuximab following use of over-the-counter (OTC) skin care remedies. The rash manifested with severe maculopapular eruption and erythematous rash, along with desquamation and exfoliation of the skin, mainly on the face and neck area. The patient denied any extraordinary sun exposure. Cetuximab and radiation therapy were held for 1 week and the rash was treated with doxycycline, diphenhydramine, and continued use of natural emollient (Vaseline petroleum jelly). After 1 week, a dramatic improvement of the facial rash was noticed. Our report describes a sudden flare-up of a skin rash (Grade 3) after the 5th cycle of cetuximab following use of OTC skin care remedies, which was unusual for this patient, suggesting a possible relation to the therapy. Skin crucially depends on EGFR for its normal function and becomes extremely sensitive during cetuximab therapy. Topical OTC acne and dry skin remedies can suddenly change the mild acneiform rash into severe skin toxicity associated with marked desquamation and exfoliation. Avoidance of further skin damage caused by topical applications and the use of doxycycline and diphenhydramine show a significant success in the management of skin toxicity.

  8. Cutaneous cytomegalovirus infection in a child with hyper IgE and specific defects in antibody response to protein vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Fallah

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus (CMV infection is a common opportunistic systemic infection in immunocompromised patients, but skin involvement is rare. Herein, we report a 10 year-old girl from consanguineous parents who was referred to our center because of disseminated maculopapular rash. She had history of upper and lower respiratory tract infections. In immunological studies, increased serum IgE level and decreased responses to tetanus and diphtheria were detected. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR examination of bronchoalveolar lavage and serum sample revealed the presence of CMV. Early diagnosis of cutaneous CMV and appropriate treatment are the key actions in management of patients with underlying immunodeficiencies to avoid further complications.

  9. Cutaneous larva migrans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Wieczorek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction . Cutaneous larva migrans (CLM is a tropical zoonosis, caused by parasites, usually Ancylostoma braziliense. Humans are an accidental host. Polish patients with CLM are usually tourists visiting tropical and subtropical countries. The first symptoms do not always appear as creeping eruptions, which complicates the diagnosis. Objective. To present the case of a man with CLM after returning from Thailand to Poland and associated diagnostic difficulties. Case report. We present a case of a 28-year-old man who returned to Poland from Thailand. The first symptoms appeared as disseminated pruritic papules. No improvement after treatment with corticosteroids and antihistamines was observed. The diagnosis was established after the appearance of serpentine erythemas and improvement after albendazole therapy. Conclusions. In the case of returnees from exotic countries suffering from raised, pruritic rashes, and no improvement after treatment with corticosteroids and antihistamines, parasitic etiology should be considered.

  10. Investigation of measles IgM-seropositive cases of febrile rash illnesses in the absence of documented measles virus transmission, State of São Paulo, Brazil, 2000-2004 Investigação dos casos de doenças febris exantemáticas com IgM reagente contra o sarampo na ausência de transmissão documentada do vírus do sarampo, Estado de São Paulo, 2000-2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Helena Ciccone

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: To review measles IgM-positive cases of febrile rash illnesses in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, over the five-year period following interruption of measles virus transmission. METHODS: We reviewed 463 measles IgM-positive cases of febrile rash illness in the State of São Paulo, from 2000 to 2004. Individuals vaccinated against measles INTRODUÇÃO: Revisar os casos de doenças febris exantemáticas com IgM reagente contra o sarampo, no Estado de São Paulo, Brasil, durante os cinco anos seguidos a interrupção da transmissão do vírus do sarampo. MÉTODOS: Nós revisamos 463 casos de doenças febris exantemáticas com IgM reagente contra o sarampo, no Estado de São Paulo, Brasil, de 2000 a 2004. Indivíduos vacinados contra o sarampo 56 dias antes da coleta de amostra foram considerados expostos à vacina. Soros da fase aguda e de convalescença foram testados para a evidência de infecção de sarampo, rubéola, parvovírus B19 e herpes vírus 6. Na ausência de soroconversão para imunoglobulina G contra o sarampo, casos com IgM reagente contra o sarampo foram considerados falsos positivos em pessoas com evidência de outras infecções virais. RESULTADOS: Entre as 463 pessoas com doenças febris exantemáticas que testaram positivo para anticorpos IgM contra o sarampo durante o período, 297 (64% pessoas foram classificadas como expostas à vacina. Entre os 166 casos não expostos à vacina, 109 (66% foram considerados falsos positivos baseado na ausência de soroconversão, dos quais 21 (13% tiveram evidência de infecção por vírus da rubéola, 49 (30% parvovírus B19 e 28 (17% infecção por herpes vírus humano 6. CONCLUSÕES: Após a interrupção da transmissão do vírus do sarampo é necessária exaustiva investigação dos casos com IgM reagente contra o sarampo, especialmente dos casos não expostos à vacina. Testes laboratoriais para etiologias das doenças febris exantemáticas ajudam na interpreta

  11. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Panama: a cluster description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribaldos, Maribel; Zaldivar, Yamitzel; Bermudez, Sergio; Samudio, Franklyn; Mendoza, Yaxelis; Martinez, Alexander A; Villalobos, Rodrigo; Eremeeva, Marina E; Paddock, Christopher D; Page, Kathleen; Smith, Rebecca E; Pascale, Juan Miguel

    2011-10-13

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a tick-borne infection caused by Rickettsia rickettsii. We report a cluster of fatal cases of RMSF in 2007 in Panama, involving a pregnant woman and two children from the same family.  The woman presented with a fever followed by respiratory distress, maculopapular rash, and an eschar at the site from which a tick had been removed.  She died four days after disease onset.  This is the second published report of an eschar in a patient confirmed by PCR to be infected with R. rickettsii.  One month later, the children presented within days of one another with fever and rash and died three and four days after disease onset. The diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemistry, PCR and sequencing of the genes of R. rickettsii in tissues obtained at autopsy. 

  12. Allergic contact dermatitis induced by zinc pyrithione in shampoo: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wei Hsieh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Shampoo-induced allergic contact dermatitis is difficult to diagnose clinically because it can involve multiple and variable areas where the shampoo flows. Zinc pyrithione is a common active agent in medicated shampoo that is known to have good anti-dandruff and antifungal effects. Despite its low risk of sensitization, cases of allergic contact dermatitis still occur because of the popularity of such products. We report a 33-year-old man who developed pruritic rash on his scalp, face, neck, and hands after using a new shampoo containing zinc pyrithione. A patch test revealed a positive reaction to zinc pyrithione and personal shampoo containing zinc pyrithione.

  13. Pattern of drug eruptions in a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, Z.; Nadeem, N.; Aman, S.; Kazmi, A.H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: An adverse drug reaction is unintentional which occurs at doses used for prophylaxis, diagnosis or treatment. Objectives: To determine the frequency of various cutaneous drug eruptions that occur in patients in a tertiary care hospital setting. Patients and Methods: All patients with cutaneous drug eruptions seen at the Dermatology Department of Mayo Hospital, Lahore, over 6 months were enrolled and the pattern of drug eruptions like urticaria, angioedema, fixed drug eruption, maculopapular rash, erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis etc. were recorded, along with drugs that caused it. Results:A total of 160 patients (86 males, 74 females) were included in the study. Mean age of patients was 30.7+-15.4 years. Major eruptions were fixed drug eruption (21.3%) followed by urticaria without angioedema (10%), maculopapular rash (9.3%), lichenoid drug eruption (8.7%), acneiform drug eruption (7.5%), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (6.9%), vesiculobullous eruption (5.6%), erythema multiforme and eczematous eruption (5% each). Common drugs causing eruptions were sulfonamides (16.3%), followed by NSAIDs (14.4%), herbal and homeopathic medications (12.5%), penicillins (9.3%), tetracyclines (8.7%), antituberculous drugs, cephalosporins and antiepileptics (6.3% each). Conclusion: Fixed drug eruption and urticaria without angioedema were commonest eruptions while, sulfonamides and NSAIDs were the major causative drugs. Policy message: Reporting of adverse drug reactions is not done in Pakistan and needs to be done in each hospital. (author)

  14. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions: clinical pattern and causative agents--a 6 year series from Chandigarh, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma V

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study the different clinical spectrum of cutaneous adverse drug reactions (ADR and to determine the causative drugs. MATERIALS & METHODS: A prospective, hospital based study was carried out over a period of 6 years recording various cutaneous ADR. RESULTS: A total of 500 patients with cutaneous ADR were enrolled in the study. The most common types of cutaneous ADR patterns were maculopapular rash (34.6%, fixed drug eruption (FDE (30% and urticaria (14%. The drugs most often incriminated for the various cutaneous ADR were antimicrobials (42.6%, anticonvulsants (22.2% and NSAIDs (18%. Anticonvulsants were implicated in 41.6% of maculopapular rashes. Sulfonamides accounted for 43.3% and NSAIDs for 30.7% of FDE. Urticaria was caused mainly by NSAIDs(24.3% and penicillins(20%. Anticonvulsants were responsible for 43.8% of life-threatening toxic epidermal necrolysis and Stevens Johnson syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical pattern and drugs causing cutaneous ADR are similar to those observed in other countries except for minor variations. Cutaneous ADR patterns and the drugs causing various reactions are changing every year, which may be due to the emergence of newer molecules and changing trends in the use of drugs.

  15. Normocomplementaemic Urticarial Vasculitis in a 19-Month-Old Girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Williams

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urticaria is common in children. Urticarial vasculitis (UV is a potentially more serious, rare variant. The youngest reported case was 12 months of age. A systemically well, 19-month-old girl presented with her mother who was concerned about the development of a rash. On presentation, the child had normal vital signs, was alert, and was well and playing with toys. There was a widespread urticarial rash (raised, pruritic, and erythematous that was most apparent on the trunk with minimal rash on the legs. Overlying this urticarial rash in a similar distribution was a blotchy, palpable purpuric rash and associated hyperpigmentation. Investigations revealed a normal level of haemoglobin, white cells, platelets, and electrolytes. Renal function, international normalised ratio, and activated partial thromboplastin time were all normal. There was no blood or protein in the urine. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was mildly elevated at 19 mm/hour. Complement results (including C1q obtained later were normal. This case is striking not only because of the rarity of UV in children but also due to the unique diagnostic and prognostic challenges that it raises.

  16. Perinatal Chicken Pox (Varicella Zoster Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Annagur

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chickenpox is due to infection with the varicella zoster virus (VZV, a human alphaherpervirus found worldwide. Classically, the cinical disease is a febrile illness with a pruritic vesicular rash. Maternal chickenpox between 5 days before delivery to 2 days after delivery (perinatal varicella can cause severe and even fatal illness in the newborn. A 7-day old girl baby presented on day 4 of postnatal with the complaints of widespread vesicular rash and non-suckling. Mother of the baby also had a similar eruption four day prior to delivery, which was clinically characteristic of varicella. Considering history and clinical presentation, a diagnosis of perinatal chickenpox was considered and the baby was treated with acyclovir which she responded and recovered. Herein, the clinical feasures and treatment of chickenpox infection in the perinatal period have been emphasized with this case report. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 311-314

  17. Red man syndrome caused by vancomycin powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahama, Yasunori; VanBeek, Marta J; Greenlee, Jeremy D W

    2018-04-01

    Red man syndrome (RMS) is a well-known hypersensitivity reaction caused by intravenous administration of vancomycin, with symptoms ranging from flushing, erythematous rash, pruritus, mild to profound hypotension, and even cardiac arrest. RMS has not previously been described from local application of vancomycin powder in a surgical wound, a technique increasingly utilized for infection prophylaxis in many surgical disciplines including neurosurgery. We describe the first reported case of RMS as a result of local intra-wound application of vancomycin powder for infection prophylaxis. A 73-year-old male with a history of Parkinson's disease underwent 2-stage deep brain stimulation implantation surgeries. Vancomycin powder was applied locally in the surgical wounds for infection prophylaxis during both of the surgeries. The patient developed a well-demarcated, geometric erythematous pruritic rash following the second surgery that was clinically diagnosed as RMS and resolved without sequelae. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Preprotachykinin A is expressed by a distinct population of excitatory neurons in the mouse superficial spinal dorsal horn including cells that respond to noxious and pruritic stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Mecinas, Maria; Bell, Andrew M; Marin, Alina; Taylor, Rebecca; Boyle, Kieran A; Furuta, Takahiro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Polgár, Erika; Todd, Andrew J

    2017-03-01

    The superficial dorsal horn, which is the main target for nociceptive and pruritoceptive primary afferents, contains a high density of excitatory interneurons. Our understanding of their roles in somatosensory processing has been restricted by the difficulty of distinguishing functional populations among these cells. We recently defined 3 nonoverlapping populations among the excitatory neurons, based on the expression of neurotensin, neurokinin B, and gastrin-releasing peptide. Here we identify and characterise another population: neurons that express the tachykinin peptide substance P. We show with immunocytochemistry that its precursor protein (preprotachykinin A, PPTA) can be detected in ∼14% of lamina I-II neurons, and these are concentrated in the outer part of lamina II. Over 80% of the PPTA-positive cells lack the transcription factor Pax2 (which determines an inhibitory phenotype), and these account for ∼15% of the excitatory neurons in this region. They are different from the neurotensin, neurokinin B, or gastrin-releasing peptide neurons, although many of them contain somatostatin, which is widely expressed among superficial dorsal horn excitatory interneurons. We show that many of these cells respond to noxious thermal and mechanical stimuli and to intradermal injection of pruritogens. Finally, we demonstrate that these cells can also be identified in a knock-in Cre mouse line (Tac1), although our findings suggest that there is an additional population of neurons that transiently express PPTA. This population of substance P-expressing excitatory neurons is likely to play an important role in the transmission of signals that are perceived as pain and itch.

  19. What's in a Rash? Viral Exanthem Versus CBRNE Exposure: Teleconsultation Support for Two Special Forces Soldiers With Diffuse Rash in an Austere Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Howard D; Butterfield, Samuel; Maddry, Joseph; Powell, Douglas; Vasios, William N; Yun, Heather; Ferraro, David; Pamplin, Jeremy C

    2018-01-01

    Review clinical thought process and key principles for diagnosing weaponized chemical and biologic injuries. Clinical Context: Special Operation Forces (SOF) team deployed in an undisclosed, austere environment. Organic Expertise: Two SOF Soldiers with civilian EMT-Basic certification. Closest Medical Support: Mobile Forward Surgical Team (2 hours away); medical consults available by e-mail, phone, or video-teleconsultation. Earliest Evacuation: Earliest military evacuation from country 12-24 hours. With teleconsultation, patients departed to Germany as originally scheduled without need for Medical Evacuation. 2018.

  20. Clinicopathologic review of 19 patients with systemic candidiasis with skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Gee Young; Lee, Hae Woong; Chang, Sung Eun; Moon, Kee Chan; Lee, Mi Woo; Choi, Jee Ho; Koh, Jai Kyoung

    2005-07-01

    A diagnosis of systemic candidiasis is often delayed or missed owing to the absence of sensitive, specific, and timely diagnostic tools. Skin lesions are not common, but they can help to rapidly establish a diagnosis. We report on a 14-year experience of systemic candidiasis with skin lesions in our institution. We report the prevalence, clinical findings, histologic findings, etiologic Candida species, underlying conditions, treatment modalities, and outcomes of the cases and compare them with the previous reports. We reviewed the medical records and laboratory data of patients diagnosed with systemic candidiasis from June 1989 to September 2002 at Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. We thoroughly reviewed the data on those patients with characteristic skin lesions. We included the cases in which Candida organisms were either shown or cultured from the skin. We also included the patients who had developed the characteristic rash at the onset of infection if there was no other possible explanation for the rash. Of 53 documented systemic candidiasis cases, 19 (35.8%) had the characteristic skin lesions. Fifteen patients (78.9%) had hematologic problems and were neutropenic. The skin lesions were a maculopapular or nodular rash and plaques. In addition to the trunk and proximal extremities, the rash also involved the face and distal extremities. The rashes were mostly purpuric, not consistently associated with underlying thrombocytopenia but also associated with underlying vascular damage as a result of Candida organisms. The underlying vascular damage also caused intraepidermal necrotic and vesicular change. One case of transepidermal elimination of organisms was newly found. The most common causative species was Candida tropicalis in the 19 patients with skin lesions, in contrast with Candida albicans in a total of 53 patients. The mortality rate was 84.2%. The prevalence of systemic candidiasis-associated skin lesions may be higher than previously reported

  1. Clinical features and seasonality of parechovirus infection in an Asian subtropical city, Hong Kong.

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    Grace P K Chiang

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of human parechovirus (HPeV in Asia remains obscure. We elucidated the prevalence, seasonality, type distribution and clinical presentation of HPeV among children in Hong Kong.A 24-month prospective study to detect HPeV in children ≤36 months hospitalized for acute viral illnesses.2.3% of the 3911 children examined had HPeV infection, with most (87.5% concentrated in September-January (autumn-winter. 81.3% were HPeV1 and 12.5% were HPeV4, while HPeV3 was rare (2.5%. HPeV was a probable cause of the disease in 47.7% (42/88, mostly self-limiting including acute gastroenteritis, upper respiratory tract infection and maculopapular rash. A neonate developed severe sepsis-like illness with HPeV3 as the only pathogen detected. A high proportion (60.0% of children coinfected with HPeV and other respiratory virus(es had acute bronchiolitis or pneumonia. Six children with HPeV coinfections developed convulsion / pallid attack. Most rash illnesses exhibited a generalized maculopapular pattern involving the trunk and limbs, and were more likely associated with HPeV4 compared to other syndrome groups (36.4% vs. 3.1%, p = 0.011.In Hong Kong, HPeV exhibits a clear seasonality (autumn-winter and was found in a small proportion (2.3% of young children (≤36 months admitted with features of acute viral illnesses. The clinical presentation ranged from mild gastroenteritis, upper respiratory tract infection and febrile rash to convulsion and severe sepsis-like illness. HPeV3, which is reported to associate with more severe disease in neonates, is rare in Hong Kong. HPeV coinfection might associate with convulsion and aggravate other respiratory tract infections.

  2. Carbamazepine-Induced Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalli, Saadia; Barret, Pierre; Villier, Céline; Bussières, Jean-François

    2011-01-01

    A 15-year-old adolescent was admitted to the hospital for management of a generalized pruritic skin rash, which had appeared 10 days prior to admission. Carbamazepine (CBZ) and insulin were initiated 44 and 23 days prior to the onset of the skin rash (day 44), respectively. Clinical examination showed bluish lesions on the tongue and bilateral keratoconjunctivitis. His skin was very erythematous and pruritic without edema and covered with hundreds of nonfollicular pustules mainly on the trunk and skin folds. Laboratory assessment revealed leukocytosis, hypereosinophilia, and thrombocytopenia. A sample of superficial pus from a pustule on the trunk showed a significant number of leukocytes as well as a significant number of Staphylococcus aureus and Lancefield Group B β-hemolytic streptococci strains. An abdominal skin biopsy revealed acute to subacute folliculocentric spongiotic dermatitis with subcorneal pustules. All of these observations were consistent with a diagnosis of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). Although we could not exclude with certainty the role of insulin initiated on day 21 and discontinued on day 55 with substitution to oral metformin and repaglinide, no cases of AGEP have ever been published with insulin, and skin lesions were not related to injection sites. This article describes a probable case of CBZ-induced acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis in a 15-year-old adolescent. PMID:22477826

  3. Analyzing Process Quality of Early Childhood Education with Many Facet Rash Measurement Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basturk, Ramazan; Isikoglu, Nesrin

    2008-01-01

    Quality of early childhood education institutions specifically, dimensions of process quality should be evaluated. Purpose of this study is to analyze process quality of early childhood education by using many-facet Rasch measurement model (MFRM). In this study, data were collected from twelve early childhood education institutions by four…

  4. Rash with DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System Use in Bilateral Reduction Mammoplasty: A Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    R. W. Knackstedt; J. A. Dixon; P. J. O’Neill; F. A. Herrera

    2015-01-01

    Background. Bilateral reduction mammoplasty is a common plastic surgery procedure that can be complicated by unfavorable scar formation along incision sites. Surgical adhesives can be utilized as an alternative or as an adjunct to conventional suture closures to help achieve good wound tension and provide an adequate barrier with excellent cosmesis. The recently introduced DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System Skin Closure System combines the skin adhesive 2-octyl cyanoacrylate with a self-ad...

  5. May 2015 pulmonary case of the month: pneumonia with a rash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. History of Present Illness: A 77-year-old man underwent a thoracic CT scan for follow up of a known thoracic aneurysm. However, he had been feeling tired for about a week with a cough, night sweats and fever. He had no shortness of breath, wheezing or known history of lung disease. Past Medical History, Social History and Family History: He has a history of hypertension and a known thoracic aortic aneurysm. There was a surgical repair of his right clavicle after a motor vehicle accident. He is single and has lived in Arizona for over 50 years. He just returned from a trip to California where he visited Disneyland. He does not smoke. Family history is noncontributory. Current Medications: dutasteride, levothyroxine, atorvastatin. Physical Examination: His physical examination was reported as unremarkable. SpO2 was 95% on room air. Which of the following is appropriate at this time? 1. Begin empiric antibiotics; 2. ...

  6. October 2014 critical care case of the month: a skin rash in the ICU

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    Raschke RA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Abstract truncated after first page. History of Present Illness: A 28 year old man was admitted to an outside hospital with an ethylene glycol overdose in an apparent suicide attempt. At that time the patient was delirious and vomiting. He had a severe metabolic acidosis and a creatinine of 2.1 mg/dL. He was intubated, a nasogastric tube was placed, and he was transferred to the toxicology service. PMH, FH, SH: There was no significant past medical history. Family history was noncontributory. He was a nonsmoker who recently had a fight with his girlfriend prompting the suicide attempt. Physical Examination: Vital signs were stable and he was sedated and nasally intubated receiving mechanical ventilation. There were no other significant findings on physical examination. Which of the following can be used for ethylene glycol poisoning? 1. Ethanol; 2. Fomezipole; 3. Hemodialysis; 4. Pyridoxine; 5. All of the above ...

  7. A Teenager With Sacroileitis, Rash and Fever Caused by Streptobacillus moniliformis Bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Navneet K; Craft, David; Crook, Tonya; Dossett, John

    2016-12-01

    We report a rare case of sacroileitis in a teenager resulting from Streptobacillus moniliformis bacteremia, identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight. We discuss the challenges of making this diagnosis and review the literature on rat bite fever.

  8. Mucocutaneous Leishmaniasis/HIV Coinfection Presented as a Diffuse Desquamative Rash

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    Guilherme Almeida Rosa da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is an infectious disease that is endemic in tropical areas and in the Mediterranean. This condition spreads to 98 countries in four continents, surpassing 12 million infected individuals, with 350 million people at risk of infection. This disease is characterized by a wide spectrum of clinical syndromes, caused by protozoa of the genus Leishmania, with various animal reservoirs, such as rodents, dogs, wolves, foxes, and even humans. Transmission occurs through a vector, a sandfly of the genus Lutzomyia. There are three main clinical forms of leishmaniasis: visceral leishmaniasis, cutaneous leishmaniasis, and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis. The wide spectrum of nonvisceral forms includes: localized cutaneous leishmaniasis, a papular lesion that progresses to ulceration with granular base and a large framed board; diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis; mucocutaneous leishmaniasis, which can cause disfiguring and mutilating injuries of the nasal cavity, pharynx, and larynx. Leishmaniasis/HIV coinfection is considered an emerging problem in several countries, including Brazil, where, despite the growing number of cases, a problem of late diagnosis occurs. Clinically, the cases of leishmaniasis associated with HIV infection may demonstrate unusual aspects, such as extensive and destructive lesions. This study aims to report a case of mucocutaneous leishmaniasis/HIV coinfection with atypical presentation of diffuse desquamative eruption and nasopharyngeal involvement.

  9. Congenital Cutaneous Candidiasis: Prompt Systemic Treatment Is Associated With Improved Outcomes in Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, David A; Coggins, Sarah A; Zanelli, Santina A; Weitkamp, Jörn-Hendrik

    2017-05-15

    Congenital cutaneous candidiasis (CCC) is a challenging diagnosis due to various rash presentations. Inadequate early treatment is associated with high rates of dissemination and death. The effects of early diagnosis, dermatologic presentation, and antifungal treatment on outcomes are lacking. CCC cases were reviewed from 2 academic neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) from 2004 to 2015. We defined CCC as a diffuse rash involving the body, extremities, face or scalp, and/or funisitis, presenting in the first week (≤7 days), with identification of Candida species from skin or mucous membrane cultures, and/or by culture or staining of the placenta or umbilical cord. CCC occurred in 0.1% of all NICU admissions (21 of 19 303) and 0.6% of infants <1000 grams birth weight. Median gestational age of CCC infants was 26 3/7 (range, 23 0/7-40 4/7) weeks. Skin findings were commonly present on the day of birth [median (range): 0 (0-6) days], appearing most frequently as a desquamating, maculopapular, papulopustular, and/or erythematous diffuse rash. When systemic antifungal therapy was started empirically at the time of rash presentation and continued for a median (interquartile range) of 14 (14-15) days, all patients survived and none developed dissemination. Delaying systemic treatment, exclusive use of nystatin, and treating for <10 days was associated with Candida bloodstream dissemination. CCC is an invasive infection that presents as a diffuse rash in preterm and term infants. Prompt systemic antifungal treatment at the time of skin presentation for ≥14 days prevents dissemination and Candida-related mortality. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. First Imported Case of Zika Virus Infection into Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hee-Chang; Park, Wan Beom; Kim, Uh Jin; Chun, June Young; Choi, Su-Jin; Choe, Pyoeng Gyun; Jung, Sook-In; Jee, Youngmee; Kim, Nam-Joong; Choi, Eun Hwa; Oh, Myoung-Don

    2016-07-01

    Since Zika virus has been spreading rapidly in the Americas from 2015, the outbreak of Zika virus infection becomes a global health emergency because it can cause neurological complications and adverse fetal outcome including microcephaly. Here, we report clinical manifestations and virus isolation findings from a case of Zika virus infection imported from Brazil. The patient, 43-year-old Korean man, developed fever, myalgia, eyeball pain, and maculopapular rash, but not neurological manifestations. Zika virus was isolated from his semen, and reverse-transcriptase PCR was positive for the virus in the blood, urine, and saliva on the 7th day of the illness but was negative on the 21st day. He recovered spontaneously without any neurological complications. He is the first case of Zika virus infection in Korea imported from Brazil.

  11. Dengue retinochoroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbara, Khalid

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne infection caused by a flavivirus. I describe the ocular findings observed in two patients infected with dengue virus who presented with acute onset of loss of vision preceded by febrile illness, malaise, generalized fatigue headache, and maculopapular rash. Ophthalmologic evaluation in each patient revealed a normal anterior segment. Vitreous cells were noted in one patient. Ophthalmoscopy revealed multiple foci of retinochoroiditis, vasculitis, cotton-wool spots, and retinal hemorrhages. The healing of the lesion showed discrete atrophic and pigmented retinochoroiditic scars. Fluorescein angiography displayed early hypofluorescence and late hyperfluorescence suggestive of leakage. The healed scars showed late staining. The serologic testing showed elevated IgG antibodies, and one had high IgM antibodies to dengue virus. Ocular findings of dengue fever consist of multifocal areas of retinochoroiditis and may lead to loss of vision. In Saudi Arabia, dengue fever should be considered in the differential diagnosis of multifocal chorioretinal lesions and retinal vasculitis.

  12. Leprosy, a Pleitropic infectious disease: a challenging diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal El Meniawy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report of 22-year-old man who was suffering from epididymo-orchitis for more than 2 years. Several months after the onset of the condition, the patient developed bilateral upper-limb and lower-limb numbness and tingling sensation with hypothesia, which was further complicated by nonhealing foot ulcer, arthralgia, and generalized maculopapular skin rash. The patient was initially managed as rheumatoid arthritis associated with vasculitis, which was later diagnosed as lepromatous leprosy. Musculoskeletal complaints are not exclusive to only autoimmune diseases; it can also be observed in several disorders, such as infectious diseases. It is challenging for any physician to properly diagnose patients with leprosy as differentiating leprosy from other systemic rheumatic disease is pivotal.

  13. Atypical desquamation in a 2.5-year-old boy with Kawasaki disease: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib, Ali; Fazel, Ali; Nabavizadeh, Seyed Hesamedin; Alyasin, Sohaila; Kashef, Sara

    2017-02-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a vasculitis that mostly affects children under 5 years of age. This article presents a 2.5-year-old boy who presented with 6 days of fever, generalized maculopapular rash, bilateral non-exudative conjunctivitis, cracked lips, right cervical lymphadenopathy, erythematous extremities, and perianal desquamation. Laboratory studies showed leukocytosis and sterile pyuria. Because diagnosis of KD was proved, oral acetylsalicylic acid with the anti-inflammatory dose and intravenous immunoglobulin were started for him. On the seventh day of admission time, he developed desquamation and erythema on the site of his right cervical lymphadenopathy as well as periungual scaling. About three weeks after starting the treatment, scaling of the cervical lymphadenopathy and periungual area stopped. Echocardiography was performed for him three times: at the time of diagnosis, four weeks, and 6 months later and revealed normal coronary arteries. We report this sign, desquamation on the site of cervical lymphadenopathy, as a new finding.

  14. Neurological manifestations of Chikungunya and Zika infections

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    Talys J. Pinheiro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The epidemics of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV and Zika virus (ZIKV infections have been considered the most important epidemiological occurrences in the Americas. The clinical picture of CHIKV infection is characterized by high fever, exanthema, myalgia, headaches, and arthralgia. Besides the typical clinical picture of CHIKV, atypical manifestations of neurological complications have been reported: meningo-encephalitis, meningoencephalo-myeloradiculitis, myeloradiculitis, myelitis, myeloneuropathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome and others. The diagnosis is based on clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory criteria. The most common symptoms of ZIKV infection are skin rash (mostly maculopapular, fever, arthralgia, myalgia, headache, and conjunctivitis. Some epidemics that have recently occurred in French Polynesia and Brazil, reported the most severe conditions, with involvement of the nervous system (Guillain-Barré syndrome, transverse myelitis, microcephaly and meningitis. The treatment for ZIKV and CHIKV infections are symptomatic and the management for neurological complications depends on the type of affliction. Intravenous immunoglobulin, plasmapheresis, and corticosteroid pulse therapy are options.

  15. OUTBREAK OF ZIKA VIRUS DISEASE AND ITS COMPLICATIONS

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    Gabriela S. Tsankova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is an arbovirus from Flaviviridae family, genus Flavivirus. Like most of the viruses which belong to the Flavivirus genus, it replicates in and is transmitted by mosquitoes. Unlike other arbovirus infections including dengue and chikungunya, Zika virus causes a relatively mild disease. The most common symptoms of ZIKV are mild fever, arthralgia, myalgia, headache, asthenia, abdominal pain, oedema, lymphadenopathy, retro-orbital pain, conjunctivitis, and cutaneous maculopapular rash, which last for several days to a week. Although 80% of the cases with ZIKV are asymptomatic, severe complications such as microcephalia and GBS may be observed. This explains why ZIKV is more dangerous that it was thought to be and why it rapidly evolves in unexpected challenge for the international and national public health authorities.

  16. Phenobarbital-induced DRESS: a lichenoïd picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaabane, Amel; Ben Fadhel, Najah; Chadli, Zohra; Ben Fredj, Nadia; Boughattas, Naceur A; Aouam, Karim

    2014-12-01

    We describe, the first case of phenobarbital-induced DRESS syndrome presenting as a lichenoïd eruption. A 49-year-old man had received phenobarbital for a cerebral metastasis. Twenty-five days later, he developed a purplish skin eruption, odynophagia, oral mucosal erosion and fever. Physical examination revealed a cervical lymphadenopathy and facial edema associated to a diffuse violaceous maculo-papular itchy rash. Laboratory findings showed a 1200/mm³ eosinophil's cell count. Alanine aminotransferase was 169 IU/l. Lactate dehydrogenase and creatinine phosphokinase were at 768 and 90 IU/l, respectively. All symptoms resolved completely five weeks after phenobarbital withdrawal. Few days later, the patient died because of a cardio-respiratory arrest.

  17. Unilateral Laterothoracic Exanthem – Asymmetric Periflexural Exanthem of Childhood – a Case Report and Literature Review

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    Prćić Sonja

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Unilateral laterothoracic exanthem (ULE, or asymmetric periflexural exanthem of childhood (APEC, is an uncommon skin eruption that usually occurs in childhood, with unilateral distribution and self limiting course. The etiology of ULE is unknown, but viral cause is suspected. We report a case of ULE in a 4-year-old girl, that was associated with parvo virus B19 infection, and a brief selected literature review. The patient presented with unilateral maculopapular rash on the left side of the body which was asymptomatic and resolved spontaneously within 5 weeks. The clinical diagnosis of ULE may be precise, ruling out a broad spectrum of differential diagnosis, and prevent unnecessary examinations, whereas the patient is informed about the benign self-limiting nature of ULE.

  18. Flinders Island spotted fever rickettsioses caused by "marmionii" strain of Rickettsia honei, Eastern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Nathan B; Stenos, John; Graves, Stephen R; Faa, Antony G; Cox, G Erika; Dyer, John R; Boutlis, Craig S; Lane, Amanda M; Shaw, Matthew D; Robson, Jennifer; Nissen, Michael D

    2007-04-01

    Australia has 4 rickettsial diseases: murine typhus, Queensland tick typhus, Flinders Island spotted fever, and scrub typhus. We describe 7 cases of a rickettsiosis with an acute onset and symptoms of fever (100%), headache (71%), arthralgia (43%), myalgia (43%), cough (43%), maculopapular/petechial rash (43%), nausea (29%), pharyngitis (29%), lymphadenopathy (29%), and eschar (29%). Cases were most prevalent in autumn and from eastern Australia, including Queensland, Tasmania, and South Australia. One patient had a history of tick bite (Haemaphysalis novaeguineae). An isolate shared 99.2%, 99.8%, 99.8%, 99.9%, and 100% homology with the 17 kDa, ompA, gltA, 16S rRNA, and Sca4 genes, respectively, of Rickettsia honei. This Australian rickettsiosis has similar symptoms to Flinders Island spotted fever, and the strain is genetically related to R. honei. It has been designated the "marmionii" strain of R. honei, in honor of Australian physician and scientist Barrie Marmion.

  19. Common allergies do not influence the prevalence of cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions to antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosak, Magdalena; Porębski, Grzegorz; Słowik, Agnieszka; Turaj, Wojciech

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to establish whether the presence of common allergies increases the risk of drug-related hypersensitivity reactions among patients with epilepsy treated with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). We studied 753 patients with epilepsy seen in tertiary outpatient epilepsy clinic. We obtained data related to epilepsy type, past and ongoing treatment with AEDs, occurrence of maculopapular exanthema or more serious cutaneous adverse reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome - SJS) and their characteristics. We noted an occurrence of allergic reactions unrelated to treatment with AED, including rash unrelated to AED, bronchial asthma, persistent or seasonal allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, rash after specific food and other allergic reactions. There were 61 cases of AED-related cutaneous hypersensitivity reaction (including 3 cases of SJS) noted in association with 2319 exposures to AEDs (2.63%) among 55 out of 753 patients (7.3%). Cutaneous hypersensitivity reaction to AED was most commonly noted after lamotrigine (12.1%), carbamazepine (5.4%) and oxcarbazepine (4.1%). Prevalence of allergic reactions unrelated to AED was similar between patients with and without AED-related cutaneous hypersensitivity reaction (rash unrelated to AED: 16.4% vs. 10.2%; bronchial asthma: 1.8% vs. 0.1%; persistent allergic rhinitis: 7.3% vs. 10.2%; seasonal allergic rhinitis: 7.3% vs. 11.7%; atopic dermatitis: 0 vs. 0.7%; rash after specific food: 5.4% vs. 6.4%; other allergic reactions: 5.4% vs. 5.2%, respectively; P>0.1 for each difference). Presence of common allergies is not a significant risk factor for AED-related cutaneous hypersensitivity reaction among patients with epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Corrigendum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Jakubowski, T.L., Perron, T.J., and Teixeira, E. (2015). Rashes in school: Can they stay, or should they go? NASN School Nurse, 30(5): 274-282. (Original DOI: 10.1177/1942602X15596815)In the September 2015 issue of NASN School Nurse, the images for Lyme Disease and Spider bites were reversed. The correct order appears below.spnas;31/1/61/TABLE11942602X15621761T1table1-1942602X15621761Table 5.Bites/Stings in ChildrenDiagnosis(Bites, Stings, cutaneous infestations)Rash DescriptionSigns and SymptomsStay in School or Go Home?PhotoLyme Disease (Borrelia burgdorferi)Transmitted by deer tickErythema rash when present, "Bull's eye rash" distinct red borders with central clearing.Rash at site of bite but can have multiple rashesFever, joint pain, malaise, headache, single swollen joint usually knee usually accompany the rash.Not Contagious: Can stay at school.Incubation: 1-32 days median is 11 days. April through October with more than 50% of the cases presenting in June and July.Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) Rickettial infection transmitted by wood ticks.Characteristic spotted rash, maculopapular and sometimes petechial rash.Triad of fever, rash, and history of tick exposure, headache, vomiting, sore throatNot Contagious: Can stay at school.Rash initially appears on wrists and ankles and spreads to trunk within hours. Palms of hands and soles of feet are also involved.Incubation: Average time frame one week. Can range 2-14 days. August through September highest prevalence.Scabies(Mites)Papules and burrows, excoriation secondary to scratching.Intense itching especially at night. Commonly seen between the fingers and toes.Is Contagious: Should go home.Skin-to-skin contact. Mites can remain alive for > 2 days on clothing and bedding.Incubation: 4-6 weeksIf the child had it previously 1-4 days.*Can return to school with medical clearance.Bee stingsLocalized swelling, redness. If allergic can spread rapidly. Raised pink wheel.Pain, redness, swelling, hives if allergic

  1. Long-term pubic dermatitis diagnosed as white piedra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landero, James

    2017-12-01

    The case of a 58-year-old man with a pruritic rash involving the pubic area that had been undiagnosed for 30 years is presented. At least 15 different primary care physicians and dermatologists evaluated the patient during this time period. Multiple treatments were unsuccessful and a definitive diagnosis was not rendered. Wood lamp evaluation of the pubic area revealed hair shaft concretions that were confirmed on histologic evaluation to be white piedra (WP). The patient was successfully treated with topical ketoconazole and the eruption completely resolved. Our case raises awareness of the use of Wood lamp and dermoscopy to evaluate for parasitic infections of the pubic hair shafts when nonspecific dermatitis presents in this area.

  2. March 2013 critical care case of the month: beware the escargot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas AR

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. History of Present Illness A 29 year old woman presented to the Phoenix VA Medical Center with complaints of headache and diffuse generalized weakness most pronounced in the lower extremities. She also noted recent fecal and urinary incontinence, abdominal pain, back pain, numbness in the feet and a non pruritic skin rash on the trunk. Onset of symptoms was about 2 weeks prior to her presentation. Since her symptoms began she had seen in multiple local emergency departments for these same complaints as they worsened and was discharged home in each case with suspected viral syndrome. PMH, SH, FH She had no allergies and her past medical history was only significant for post- traumatic stress disorder. She has had no major surgery in her life so far and her family history was not contributory to her current presentation. She smokes marijuana for recreational purposes and drinks alcohol socially. She was …

  3. Zika emergence in the French Territories of America and description of first confirmed cases of Zika virus infection on Martinique, November 2015 to February 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daudens-Vaysse, Elise; Ledrans, Martine; Gay, Noellie; Ardillon, Vanessa; Cassadou, Sylvie; Najioullah, Fatiha; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Rousset, Dominique; Herrmann, Cécile; Cesaire, Raymond; Maquart, Marianne; Flusin, Olivier; Matheus, Séverine; Huc-Anaïs, Patricia; Jaubert, Josiane; Criquet-Hayot, Anne; Hoen, Bruno; Djossou, Felix; Locatelli-Jouans, Corinne; Blateau, Alain; McKenzie, Anne-Marie; Melin, Mathilde; Saint-Martin, Patrick; Dorléans, Frédérique; Suivant, Claudine; Carvalho, Luisiane; Petit-Sinturel, Marion; Andrieu, Audrey; Noël, Harold; Septfons, Alexandra; Gallay, Anne; Paty, Marie-Claire; Filleul, Laurent; Cabié, André

    2016-07-14

    Following of the emergence of Zika virus in Brazil in 2015, an epidemiological surveillance system was quickly implemented in the French overseas Territories of America (FTA) according to previous experience with dengue and chikungunya and has detected first cases of Zika. General practitioners and medical microbiologists were invited to report all clinically suspected cases of Zika, laboratory investigations were systematically conducted (RT-PCR). On 18 December, the first autochthonous case of Zika virus infection was confirmed by RT-PCR on French Guiana and Martinique, indicating introduction of Zika virus in FTA. The viral circulation of Zika virus was then also confirmed on Guadeloupe and Saint-Martin. We report here early findings on 203 confirmed cases of Zika virus infection identified by RT-PCR or seroneutralisation on Martinique Island between 24 November 2015 and 20 January 2016. All cases were investigated. Common clinical signs were observed (maculopapular rash, arthralgia, fever, myalgia and conjunctival hyperaemia) among these patients, but the rash, the foundation of our case definition, may be absent in a significant proportion of patients (16%). These results are important for the implementation of a suspected case definition, the main tool for epidemiological surveillance, in territories that may be affected by ZIKV emergence, including Europe. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2016.

  4. Hypersensitivity Reaction Associated with Abacavir Therapy in an Indian HIV Patient - A Case Report.

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    Janardhanan, Manju; Amberkar V, Mohan Babu; Vidyasagar, Sudha; Kumari K, Meena; Holla, Sadhana N

    2014-09-01

    The most important and unique adverse effect of abacavir (ABC) is fatal hypersensitivity reaction (HSR). The objective of this report is to describe a case of ABC induced HSR that occurred in an Indian HIV patient during treatment. Although this adverse effect is not uncommon, it is perhaps underreported or has never been reported so far in an Indian case scenario. A 44-year-old known case of HIV-1 was admitted in view of his worsening condition and very low CD4 cell counts 3 cells/μL. He was on anti-retroviral therapy since three years but not regular. On the basis of treatment failure, non-compliance and progressive low CD4 counts, the anti HIV regime was switched over to abacavir 600 mg+ atazanavir/ ritonavir 300mg/100mg Two weeks after ABC therapy he presented with maculopapular rash, headache and signs of hepatic damage (serum AST, ALP and ALT increased to 3-4 fold) suggestive of hypersensitivity reaction. As we know discontinuation of the drug is the ultimate litmus test to confirm diagnosis of drug induced adverse reaction. We did confirm ABC induced HSR by de-challenge wherein, rash disappeared within 2-3 days and LFT came back to normal within 5 days. However, no rechallenge was done. HSR was more in favour of ABC because atazanavir failed to produce any similar reaction after re-challenge.

  5. Patterns of adverse drug reaction signals in NAFDAC Pharmacovigilance activities from September to November, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awodele, Olufunsho; Ibrahim, Ali; Orhii, Paul

    2016-03-16

    Adverse drug reaction signals are reported information on possible causal relationships between an adverse event and a drug. The National Pharmacovigilance Centre (NPC) in Nigeria has over 3,000 reported adverse drug reaction cases which have been adequately entered into the ADR data bank. Data mining of ADR reports from September to November, 2014 were carried out in this present study with the intention to describe the pattern of ADRs and generate possible signals. A total of about 100 reported cases with arrays of adverse drug reactions were reported between September and November, 2014 and the data were analyzed using SPSS version 17. Efavirenz/Tenofovir/Lamivudine combination was the highest reported drugs (24.2%) while efavirenz alone was reported in 8 times (8.8%) and HIV (63.3%) was the highest reported indication of drug use. Efavirenz caused central nervous system adverse reactions as revealed in the ADRs analyses. Zidovudine/Lamivudine/Nevirapine combination in concomitant use with Cotrimoxazole were reported 8 times with generalized maculopapular rashes on the trunk with some area of hyper pigmentation with intense itching documented twice and big/swollen rashes all over the faces. Zidovudine was also reported four times to cause severe anaemia. More surveillance is advocated so as to ascertain the consistency of the observed ADRs and thereafter establish appropriate signals.

  6. Successful drug desensitization in patients with delayed-type allergic reactions to anti-tuberculosis drugs

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    Krittaecho Siripassorn

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the outcomes of anti-tuberculosis drug desensitization. Methods: This was a retrospective study. Inclusion criteria were as follows: age >18 years, documented tuberculosis infection, a previous cutaneous allergic reaction to anti-tuberculosis drugs, and having undergone drug desensitization between January 2003 and March 2014. The definition of allergic reaction to anti-tuberculosis drugs included (1 a temporal relationship between drug use and the allergic reaction; (2 improvement in the allergic reaction after drug withdrawal; (3 recurrence of the allergic reaction after reintroduction of only the offending drug; and (4 absence of other causes. Results: A total of 19 desensitization procedures were performed. The drugs used for these procedures were isoniazid (n = 7, rifampicin (n = 6, or ethambutol (n = 6. Of note, severe allergic reactions (Stevens–Johnson syndrome (n = 4, erythema multiforme (n = 3, and drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic syndrome (n = 1 were included. All patients underwent resolution of the previous allergic reactions before desensitization. The median duration of desensitization was 18 days. The success rate was 78.9%. The allergic reactions following failed desensitization were not severe; most were maculopapular rashes. Conclusions: The desensitization protocol for anti-tuberculosis drugs was associated with a high success rate, and the individuals who failed desensitization experienced mild allergic reactions. Keywords: Desensitization, Antituberculosis, Steven-Johnson syndrome, Allergic drug reaction, Tolerance induction, Drug allergy

  7. Miliaria-rash after neutropenic fever and induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia Miliária 'rash' após neutropenia febril e quimioterapia de indução para a leucemia mielóide aguda

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    Tuyet A Nguyen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Miliaria is a disorder of the eccrine sweat glands which occurs in conditions of increased heat and humidity. It can be associated with persistent febrile states as well as with certain drugs. We presented a 40 year-old female with myelodysplastic syndrome and progression to acute myelogenous leukemia who was admitted to the hospital for chemotherapy induction. The patient was treated with idarubicin and cytarabine. She became pancytopenic and developed neutropenic fever and was started on vancomycin and cefepime, but was persistently febrile with night sweats. Five days into her fevers, she developed diffuse, nonpruritic and fragile vesicles together with drenching nightsweats. The patient's exanthem was diagnosed as Miliaria crystallina, most probably induced by neutropenic fever and idarubucin exposureMiliária é uma desordem das glândulas sudoríparas écrinas, que ocorre em condições de aumento de calor e umidade. Miliária pode ser associada com estados febris persistentes bem como com certos medicamentos. Apresentamos o caso de uma mulher de 40 anos com síndrome mielodisplásica e progressão para leucemia mielóide aguda que foi admitida no hospital para quimioterapia de indução. A paciente foi tratada com idarrubicina e citarabina. Ela se tornou pancitopênica e desenvolveu neutropenia febril. Iniciou tratamento com vancomicina e cefepime, mas a febre com sudorese noturna continou. Cinco dias depois a paciente desenvolveu vesículas difusas, não pruríticas e frágeis juntamente com a persistência de sudorese noturna. O exantema do paciente foi diagnosticado como Miliária cristalina, provavelmente induzida por neutropenia febril e exposição a idarubucin

  8. Evaluation of Seasonal, ANN, and Hybrid Models in Modeling Urban Water Consumption A Case Study of Rash City

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    Seyed Nematollah Mousavi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Forecasting future water consumption in cities to plan for the required capacities in urban water supply systems (including water transmission networks and water treatment facilities depends on the application of behavioral models of uban water consumption. Being located in the North-South corridor, Rasht City is assuming a new role to play in the national economy as a foreign trade center. It will, thus, be necessary to review its present urban infrastructure in order to draft the required infrastructural development plans for meeting the city’s future water demands. The three Seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (SARIMA, Artificial Neural Network (ANN, and SARIMABP approaches were employed in present study to model and forecast Rasht urban water consumption using monthly time series for the period 2001‒2008 of urban water consumption in Rasht. The seasonal unit root test was applied to develop the relevant SARIMA model. Results showed that all the seasonal and non-seasonal unit roots are present in all the frequencies in the monthly time series for Rasht urban water consumption. Using a proper filter, the SAIMA patterns were estimated. In a second stage the SARIMA output was used to determine the ANN output and the hybrid SARIMABP structure was accordingly constructed. The values for Rasht urban water consumption predicted by the three models indicated the superiority of the SARIMABP hybrid model as evidenced by the forecast error index of 0.41% obtained for this model. The other two models of SARIMA and ANN were, however, found to yield acceptable results for urban water managers since the forecasting error recorded for them was below 1%.

  9. Hepatitis C Eradication and Improvement of Cryoglobulinemia-Associated Rash and Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis with Interferon and Ribavirin after Kidney Transplantation

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    Marilyn Zeman

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Postrenal transplant hepatitis C is increasing in frequency due to the high prevalence of hepatitis C among patients with renal failure. Despite this, there is still no standard hepatitis C treatment available for renal transplanted recipients. Combination antiviral hepatitis C therapy, the standard of care in the nontransplant population, is generally avoided because of documented renal graft rejection secondary to interferon treatment. A case of a male patient with postrenal transplant hepatitis C, which was associated with cryoglobulinemia and glomerulonephritis of the graft, is presented. He was treated with standard interferon with ribavirin. Sustained viral clearance was achieved despite ongoing evidence of cryoglobulinemia. Renal function, which had been deteriorating before treatment, improved as evidenced by the stabilization of serum creatinine and marked improvement of proteinuria. In conclusion, in selected patients, combination antiviral therapy may still be a viable option postrenal transplant.

  10. A Retrospective Study of Epidemiological and Clinical Patterns of ACDRs in Goa Medical College over a 6 Year Period

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    Rakhi Ghodge

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adverse Cutaneous Drug Reactions (ACDRs account for 3% of all hospitalizations. The spectrum of drug reactions can be varied from mild to life threatening forms. Since the diagnosis of ACDR is purely clinical, early and prompt identification and withdrawal of drug (s is life saving for the patient. Aim and Objectives: To study the epidemiological and common clinical patterns and drugs causing ACDRs in tertiary care hospital of Goa Medical College, Goa over a 6 year period. Material and Methods:This was a retrospective study conducted over a period of 6 years. The medical records were analyzed for demographic profiles, morphology of drug eruptions, common groups of drugs involved, presence of co-morbid factors, systemic and mucosal involvement, common haematological abnormalities encountered, time interval between drug intake and onset of rash and mortality. Results: Our study population had 256 patients and the age group of 21-40 years was commonly affected. Maculopapular rash followed by angioedema were the commonest morphology of drug rash patterns encountered in our study. The time interval between consumption of drugs and onset of ACDR varied with interval of 1-7 days being the commonest group in having 158 (61.7% patients. Antibiotics followed by anticonvulsants and antiretrovirals were the commonest groups of drugs causing ACDR. We found that significant proportion of our patients had haematological, renal and hepatic system involvement. Conclusion: Early identification and withdrawal of the culprit drug remains the cornerstone in prevention of mortalities in ACDRs. A prior knowledge about the reaction patterns and common offending drugs in the population by the treating physician cannot be overemphasized.

  11. Measles outbreak in adults: A changing epidemiological pattern

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    Swati Bajaj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thirty-one cases of fever with rash were reported among students of a college in Pune, India, from March to May 2014. The clinical profile was similar to that of measles and 7 of them tested positive for measles-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM. An outbreak of measles was declared, and epidemiological investigation was carried out to assess the situation and suggest preventive measures. Methods: An epidemiological case sheet filled for each case to identify the source and likely contacts. Medical and administrative authorities were sensitized about the increase in incidence and clustering of cases. A surveillance system was set up for detection of new cases and follow-up of contacts. Throat swabs and blood samples from 12 cases were tested by ELISA method for commonly occurring viral exanthematous fevers to confirm the diagnosis and 7 were positive for measles-specific IgM antibody. Preventive measures were advised to control the outbreak. Results: A total of 31 cases of fever with rashes were reported among students of a college in Pune, India, during the months of March–May 2014. Most of the students were in the age group of 18–24 years. Samples from 12 cases were sent for testing and 7 tested positive for measles-specific IgM antibodies. Seven cases were epidemiologically linked to a lab-confirmed case. All cases had fever, maculopapular rash, and sore throat and gave a history of vaccination for measles in childhood. Conclusion: An epidemiological investigation was carried out for outbreak of measles in a young adult population of college students from Pune. It is reported that, with increase in overall coverage of vaccination, there is a rise in incidence of measles in vaccinated individuals. The age profile also shifts to higher age groups. Investigation of such outbreaks provides an opportunity to identify high-risk groups, changes in measles epidemiology and weaknesses in the routine immunization programs.

  12. Dermatologic adverse events associated with chemotherapy and targeted anticancer therapy

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    Maria Kowalska

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapeutic agents and drugs used for targeted tumor therapy often cause undesirable side effects of the skin which typically are toxic cutaneous reactions (toxicity grade 1 to 4. The first group of drugs that cause toxicities affecting the skin are inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. They cause a variety of skin changes (PRIDE syndrome, which are mainly manifested by papulopustular rash, also referred to as acneiform rash, occurring in 44–74% of patients. Another drug which causes cutaneous toxicities is inhibitor of CTLA4 (cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4, which is represented by ipilimumab, used in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. The most common dermatological adverse event, observed in 40–64% of patients receiving ipilimumab, is generalized maculopapular rash with pruritus and dry skin, and in some cases vitiligo is also observed. BRAF and MEK inhibitors introduced for the treatment of advanced melanoma also cause skin rashes. BRAF inhibitors also affecting the proliferation of keratinocytes stimulate hypertrophic changes and cause the whole spectrum of lesions from benign and keratoacanthoma to squamous cell carcinoma. A hedgehog pathway inhibitor (vismodegib is used for the treatment of metastatic basal cell carcinoma. The most common adverse events it causes are reversible alopecia and dysgeusia, but it can also cause the development of keratoacanthoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Among the most common side effects of chemotherapy and targeted therapy are toxic changes within the hands and feet (hand-foot skin reaction – HFSR that early manifest as a neurological symptoms (numbness, paresthesia, and skin symptoms (erythematous swelling changes, blisters, hyperkeratosis occur later. Anti-cancer drugs can also cause serious skin diseases such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS, toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN and DRESS (drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, whose course and prognosis

  13. Adult Kawasaki's disease with myocarditis, splenomegaly, and highly elevated serum ferritin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Burke A; Pherez, Francisco M; Alexiadis, Varvara; Gagos, Marios; Strollo, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Kawasaki's disease is a disease of unknown cause. The characteristic clinical features of Kawasaki's disease are fever> or =102 degrees F for> or =5 days accompanied by a bilateral bulbar conjunctivitis/conjunctival suffusion, erythematous rash, cervical adenopathy, pharyngeal erythema, and swelling of the dorsum of the hands/feet. Kawasaki's disease primarily affects children and is rare in adults. In children, Kawasaki's disease is more likely to be associated with aseptic meningitis, coronary artery aneurysms, and thrombocytosis. In adult Kawasaki's disease, unilateral cervical adenopathy, arthritis, conjunctival suffusion/conjunctivitis, and elevated serum transaminases (serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase [SGOT]/serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase [SGPT]) are more likely. Kawasaki's disease in adults may be mimicked by other acute infections with fever and rash, that is, group A streptococcal scarlet fever, toxic shock syndrome (TSS), and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF). Because there are no specific tests for Kawasaki's disease, diagnosis is based on clinical criteria and the syndromic approach. In addition to rash and fever, scarlet fever is characterized by circumoral pallor, oropharyngeal edema, Pastia's lines, and peripheral eosinophilia, but not conjunctival suffusion, splenomegaly, swelling of the dorsum of the hands/feet, thrombocytosis, or an elevated SGOT/SGPT. In TSS, in addition to rash and fever, there is conjunctival suffusion, oropharyngeal erythema, and edema of the dorsum of the hands/feet, an elevated SGOT/SGPT, and thrombocytopenia. Patients with TSS do not have cervical adenopathy or splenomegaly. RMSF presents with fever and a maculopapular rash that becomes petechial, first appearing on the wrists/ankles after 3 to 5 days. RMSF is accompanied by a prominent headache, periorbital edema, conjunctival suffusion, splenomegaly, thrombocytopenia, an elevated SGOT/SGPT, swelling of the dorsum of the hands/feet, but not oropharyngeal

  14. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions in a tertiary care teaching hospital in India: An intensive monitoring study

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    Sejal Thakkar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The epidemiological data based on intensive monitoring studies are limited for the cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADRs in terms of incidence. Most of earlier Indian studies focused only on types and causative drugs of CADRs. Aim: The aim of this study is to analyze the CADRs with reference to the incidence, its subgroup analysis, causative drugs, and other clinical characteristics in Indian population. Methodology: Intensive monitoring study was carried out over a period of 3 years in the dermatology outpatient and inpatient department. CADRs due to only systematically administered drugs were considered. The WHO definition for CADR, the WHO causality definitions, modified Schumock and Thornton's criteria for preventability, and International Conference on Harmonisation E2A guidelines for seriousness were considered. Incidence was expressed in percentage and its 95% confidence interval. The incidence was analyzed on basis of characteristics of study population and CADRs. Results: A total of 171 CADRs were observed from 37,623 patients. The CADR incidence was 0.45% (95% CI: 0.39–0.53. The incidence did not significantly differ in different age groups and gender. Commonly observed CADRs were maculopapular rash (23.98%, urticaria (21.64%, and fixed drug eruptions (FDEs (18.13%. Antimicrobials (35.18% and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs were suspected in all common CADRs. Anti-infective and NSAIDs were most commonly suspected drugs in overall CADRs, maculopapular rash, urticaria, FDEs, and erythema multiforme. The exact nature of drugs remained inaccessible in one-fourth cases due to use of the over-the-counter self-medications. The incidence of preventable and serious and fatal CADRs was 0.08% (95% CI: 0.05–0.11, 0.04% (95% CI: 0.02–0.06, and 0.003% (95% CI: 0.000–0.001, respectively. Conclusion: Ethnic characteristics should be considered while interpreting incidence from the international studies. The

  15. Cutaneous manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus in a tertiary referral center

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    Kole Alakes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease with multiorgan involvement. The skin is the second most commonly affected organ. SLE with skin lesions can produce considerable morbidity resulting from painful skin lesions, alopecia, disfigurement, etc. Skin lesions in patients with lupus may be specific (LE specific or may be non specific (LE non specific. Acute cutaneous LE (Lupus specific has a strong association with systemic disease and non-specific skin lesions always indicate disease activity for which patients present to rheumatologists and internists. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the cutaneous manifestations of SLE is essential for most efficient management. Aims: The aims of this study were to evaluate the patterns and prevalence of skin lesions in patients with SLE and to assess the relationship between skin lesions and other systemic involvement. Materials and Methods: At the Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, IPGME&R in Kolkata, 150 patients with SLE fulfilling the clinical and laboratory criteria of the American Rheumatology Association (updated 1982 were examined and followed-up for cutaneous manifestations between January 2002 and January 2007. Results: Skin lesions were important clinical features. About 45 patients (30% presented with skin lesions although all patients had skin lesions during the follow-up period. Skin changes noted were as follows: Lupus specific lesions: malar rash in 120 patients (80%, photosensitive dermatitis in 75 patients (50%, generalized maculopapular rash in 40 patients (26.67%, discoid rash in 30 patients (20%, subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE in 5 patients (3.34%, lupus profundus in 5 patients (3.34%. The lupus non-specific lesions were non-scarring alopecia in 130 patients (86.67%, oral ulcers in 85 patients (56.67%, vasculitic lesions in 50 patients (33.34%, bullous lesions in 15 patients (10%, Raynaud′s phenomenon in 10 patients (6

  16. Clinical features and phylogenetic analysis of Coxsackievirus A9 in Northern Taiwan in 2011

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    Huang Yi-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coxsackievirus A9 (CA9 was one of the most prevalent serotype of enteroviral infections in Taiwan in 2011. After several patient series were reported in the 1960s and 1970s, few studies have focused on the clinical manifestations of CA9 infections. Our study explores and deepens the current understanding of CA9. Methods We analyzed the clinical presentations of 100 culture-proven CA9-infected patients in 2011 by reviewing their medical records and depicted the CA9 phylogenetic tree. Results Of the 100 patients with culture-proven CA9 infections, the mean (SD age was 4.6 (3.4 years and the male to female ratio was 1.9. For clinical manifestations, 96 patients (96% had fever and the mean (SD duration of fever was 5.9 (3.4 days. Sixty one patients (61% developed a skin rash, and the predominant pattern was a generalized non-itchy maculopapular rash without vesicular changes. While most patients showed injected throat, oral ulcers were found in only 19 cases (19%, among whom, 6 were diagnosed as herpangina. Complicated cases included: aseptic meningitis (n=8, bronchopneumonia (n=6, acute cerebellitis (n=1, and polio-like syndrome (n=1. Phylogenetic analysis for current CA9 strains is closest to the CA9 isolate 27-YN-2008 from the border area of mainland China and Myanmar. Conclusions The most common feature of CA9 during the 2011 epidemic in Taiwan is generalized febrile exanthema rather than herpangina or hand, foot, and mouth disease. Given that prolonged fever and some complications are possible, caution should be advised in assessing patients as well as in predicting the clinical course.

  17. Zika virus:A review of literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saeed; Reza; Jamali; Moghadam; Samaneh; Bayrami; Sepideh; Jamali; Moghadam; Raheleh; Golrokhi; Fatemeh; Golsoorat; Pahlaviani; SeyedAhmad; SeyedAlinaghi

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus(ZIKV) has two lineages:African and Asian.Mosquito-borne flaviviruses are thought to replicate initially in dendritic cells and then spread to lymph nodes and the blood stream.Risk for infection through blood transfusion,sexual practices and perinatal transmission exists.The possible routes of perinatal transmission are during delivery,breastfeeding and by close contact between the mother and her newborn.Also,mucocutaneous exposures to the virus by infected blood or monkey bite,organ transplantation or hemodialysis are the other routes of ZIKV transmission.There are two types of ZIKV infection;Zika fever and congenital infection.Clinical presentation of Zika fever varies from asymptomatic infections to a self-limiting febrile disease with low grade fever,conjunctivitis,maculopapular rash,headache,retro-orbital pain and arthritis/arthralgia with periarticular edema,myalgia,vertigo,vomiting and asthenia.This clinical feature could be mistaken for dengue or chikungunya fevers.Microcephaly is the most important and frequently reported clinical picture of suspected congenital Zika syndrome.Laboratory tests are needed for diagnosis of ZIKV infection,because there is no known pathognomonic clinical,biochemical or radiological features.RT-PCR is the most wellliked assay.Serum samples are tested by immunoglobulin G ELISA with ZIKV antigen.Samples are also tested by immunoglobulin M ELISA.There is no certified vaccine or therapeutic medication.In asymptomatic or uncomplicated patients,treatment is not necessary.

  18. Zika virus:A review of literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saeed Reza Jamali Moghadam; Samaneh Bayrami; Sepideh Jamali Moghadam; Raheleh Golrokhi; Fatemeh Golsoorat Pahlaviani; SeyedAhmad SeyedAlinaghi

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has two lineages:African and Asian. Mosquito-borne flaviviruses are thought to replicate initially in dendritic cells and then spread to lymph nodes and the blood stream. Risk for infection through blood transfusion, sexual practices and perinatal transmission exists. The possible routes of perinatal transmission are during delivery, breastfeeding and by close contact between the mother and her newborn. Also, muco-cutaneous exposures to the virus by infected blood or monkey bite, organ transplantation or hemodialysis are the other routes of ZIKV transmission. There are two types of ZIKV infection;Zika fever and congenital infection. Clinical presentation of Zika fever varies from asymptomatic infections to a self-limiting febrile disease with low grade fever, conjunctivitis, maculopapular rash, headache, retro-orbital pain and arthritis/arthralgia with periarticular edema, myalgia, vertigo, vomiting and asthenia. This clinical feature could be mistaken for dengue or chikungunya fevers. Microcephaly is the most important and frequently reported clinical picture of suspected congenital Zika syndrome. Labo-ratory tests are needed for diagnosis of ZIKV infection, because there is no known pathognomonic clinical, biochemical or radiological features. RT-PCR is the most well-liked assay. Serum samples are tested by immunoglobulin G ELISA with ZIKV antigen. Samples are also tested by immunoglobulin M ELISA. There is no certified vaccine or therapeutic medication. In asymptomatic or uncomplicated patients, treatment is not necessary.

  19. Rituximab Therapy for Severe Cutaneous Leukocytoclastic Angiitis Refractory to Corticosteroids, Cellcept and Cyclophosphamide

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    Kamel El-Reshaid

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We report our clinical experience with rituximab in the treatment of 2 patients with idiopathic cutaneous angiitis who relapsed after treatment with high-dose corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide. A 39-year-old woman and a 51-year-old man presented with ulcerating maculopapular rash in both lower limbs which relapsed 6 months after treatment with a combination of high-dose corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide. After treatment with 2 g of rituximab, the first patient has still been in clinical remission for 32 months while the second has finished 28 months. Interestingly, CD19 which had dropped to 0.5% 8 months later in both patients. Despite that, our patients are still in clinical remission. No significant side effects were noted during infusions and up to the period of follow-up. In conclusion, rituximab is a useful and safe agent in the treatment of idiopathic cutaneous angiitis refractory to conventional therapy. Clinical remission persists years after improvement of B-cell suppression.

  20. Scrub Typhus: An Emerging Threat

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    Chakraborty, Sayantani; Sarma, Nilendu

    2017-01-01

    Scrub typhus is caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi (formerly Rickettsia) and is transmitted to humans by an arthropod vector of the Trombiculidae family (Leptotrombidium deliense and L. akamushi). It is the most common re-emerging Rickettsial infection in India and many other South East Asian countries. In fact, scrub typhus is confined geographically to the Asia Pacific region, a billion people are at risk and nearly a million cases are reported every year. Scrub typhus appears particularly to be distributed in the tsutsugamushi triangle which is distributed over a very wide area of 13 million km2 bound by Japan in the east, through China, the Philippines, tropical Australia in the south, and west through India, Pakistan, possibly to Tibet to Afghanistan, and southern parts of the USSR in the north. Eschar is the characteristic lesion that starts as a vesicular lesion at the site of mite feeding. Later, an ulcer forms with black necrotic center and an erythematous border along with regional lymphadenopathy. Other features are fever, maculopapular rash starting from the trunk, and spreading to the limbs. It may affect the central nervous system, cardiovascular system, renal, respiratory, and gastrointestinal systems. Serious complication in the form of myocarditis, pneumonia, meningoencephalitis, acute renal failure, gastrointestinal bleeding, and even acute respiratory distress syndrome may develop. Tetracycline or chloramphenicol remains the main stay of therapy. PMID:28979009

  1. Infeção Aguda pelo Vírus da Imunodeficiência Humana 1: uma janela de oportunidade

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    Eunice Oliveira

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of acute infection by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1 is a challenge, being essential a high degree of suspicion to achieve the diagnosis, particularly in the absence of an apparent epidemiological context. The authors present a case of a 52 years old woman with a clinical picture suggestive of infectious mononucleosis, associated with nausea, vomiting and diarrhea with one week of evolution. The patient denied sexual activity, injection drug use or blood transfusions. Physical examination pointed out the presence of prostration, ulcerative lesions of the oral cavity, sore throat, maculopapular rash and bilateral cervical lymphadenopathies. Laboratory studies showed bicytopenia, citocolestase pattern, increased lactate dehydrogenase and lipase. After etiological investigation it was assumed the diagnosis of acute HIV-1 infection with acute pancreatitis in this context. After the beginning of the antiretroviral therapy there was complete resolution of symptoms. The authors pretend to show that acute retroviral syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mononucleosis like syndrome, the relevance of 4th generation tests as well as the role of antiretroviral therapy in the acute infection.

  2. A case of human monocytic ehrlichiosis in Serbia

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    Arsić Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ehrlichiosis is a bacterial zoonosis transmitted by hematophagous arthropods - ticks. In humans, it occurs as monocytic, granulocytic, and ewingii ehrlichiosis. Pathological process is based on parasitic presence of Ehrlichia organisms within peripheral blood cells - monocytes and granulocytes. Case Outline. Fifty-two year old patient was admitted to hospital due to high fever of over 40°C that lasted two days, accompanied with chills, muscle aches, malaise, loss of appetite, headache, confusion, breathing difficulties, and mild dry cough. The history suggested tick bite that occurred seven days before the onset of disease. Doxycycline was introduced and administered for 14 days, causing the disease to subside. Indirect immunofluorescence assay was used to analyze three serum samples obtained from this patient for Ehrlichia chaffeensis antibodies, and peripheral blood smear was evaluated for the presence of Ehrlichia and Ehrlichia aggregation into morulae. Conclusion. Ehrlichiosis should be considered in each case where there is a history of tick bite together with the clinical picture (high fever, chills, muscle aches, headache, generalized weakness and malaise, and possible maculopapular rash. The presence of Ehrlichia chaffeensis antibodies was confirmed in a patient with the history of tick bite, appropriate clinical picture and indirect immunofluorescence assay. This confirmed the presence of human monocytotropic ehrlichiosis, a disease that is uncommonly identified in our country.

  3. Clinical role of Cefixime in community-acquired infections.

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    Dreshaj, Sh; Doda-Ejupi, T; Tolaj, I Q; Mustafa, A; Kabashi, S; Shala, N; Geca, Nj; Aliu, A; Daka, A; Basha, N

    2011-01-01

    Cefixime is an oral third generation cephalosporin, frequently used in respiratory tract infections (RTI) in the pediatric population. However, in some publications cefixime has demonstrated poor efficacy against staphylococci and streptococci. of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of cefixime in the treatment of community-acquired infections in a country where parenteral third generation cephalosporins have been used for a long time. The present study was designed to assess the clinical efficacy, bacteriological eradication rates and tolerability of cefixime in children with community-acquired upper RTI (URTI), lower RTI (LRTI) and uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI). The study was prospective, open, and included 89 patients, from 6 months to 28 years, of both sexes, with the diagnosis of community-acquired URTI, LRTI and UTI. The treatment with cefixime was successful in 30/30 (100%) patients suffering from acute otitis media (AOM), in 10/12 (83.3%) with acute sinusitis, in 12/12 patients (100%) with pneumonia, in 31/35 (88.57) with uncomplicated UTI. The antibiotic was well tolerated. In 10 days treatment we recorded one case (1.3%) with acute gastroenteritis and two cases (2.6%) of maculopapular rash. Side-effects were transient and disappeared after finishing therapy in all three of the cases. Community-acquired infections, such as AOM, LRTI and UTI, caused by susceptible pathogens, can be treated with cefixime, as a good choice for a successful clinical response.

  4. Infectious mononucleosis-like syndrome probably attributable to Coxsackie A virus infection.

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    Cunha, Burke A; Mickail, Nardeen; Petelin, Andrew P

    2012-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis (IM) is a clinical syndrome most often attributable to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Characteristic clinical features of EBV IM include bilateral upper lid edema, exudative or nonexudative pharyngitis, bilateral posterior cervical adenopathy, and splenomegaly ± maculopapular rash. Laboratory features of EBV IM include atypical lymphocytes and elevated levels of serum transaminases. Leukopenia and thrombocytopenia are not uncommon. The syndrome of IM may also be attributable to other infectious diseases, eg, cytomegalovirus (CMV), human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6), or Toxoplasma gondii. Less commonly, viral hepatitis, leptospirosis, brucellosis, or parvovirus B(19) may present as an IM-like infection. To the best of our knowledge, only 2 cases of IM-like infections attributable to Coxsackie B viruses (B(3) and B(4)) have been reported. We present the first reported case of an IM-like syndrome with sore throat, fatigue, atypical lymphocytes, and elevated levels of serum transaminases likely due to Coxsackie A in an immunocompetent adult. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Regorafenib for advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors following imatinib and sunitinib treatment: a subgroup analysis evaluating Japanese patients in the phase III GRID trial.

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    Komatsu, Yoshito; Doi, Toshihiko; Sawaki, Akira; Kanda, Tatsuo; Yamada, Yasuhide; Kuss, Iris; Demetri, George D; Nishida, Toshirou

    2015-10-01

    The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled GRID trial tested the oral multikinase inhibitor regorafenib in 199 patients with advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) following failure of at least imatinib and sunitinib, and showed a significant improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) versus placebo [hazard ratio (HR) 0.27; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.19-0.39; p regorafenib 160 mg once daily with matching placebo, in combination with best supportive care. The primary study endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS); safety was evaluated through the incidence of adverse events (AEs). Seventeen Japanese patients were randomized to regorafenib (n = 12) or placebo (n = 5). Patient demographics were consistent with those of the overall study population. PFS was significantly longer with regorafenib than placebo (HR 0.08; 95 % CI 0.02-0.45; p = 0.000164). Centrally assessed disease control rates were 58 % and 20 % in the regorafenib and placebo groups, respectively (p = 0.080796). Treatment-related adverse events (AEs) were reported in all regorafenib-treated patients and 60 % of placebo recipients; the most frequent AE was hand-foot skin reaction (HFSR) (92 % versus 20 %, respectively). Regorafenib showed efficacy and a manageable safety profile in Japanese patients with advanced GIST, consistent with the overall GRID study population. AEs, such as HFSR and maculopapular rash, were observed more frequently in Japanese patients. Although dose modification was frequently reported, only one patient with hepatic failure discontinued regorafenib because of AEs.

  6. Metal Allergy and Systemic Contact Dermatitis: An Overview

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    Yoko Yoshihisa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Contact dermatitis is produced by external skin exposure to an allergen, but sometimes a systemically administered allergen may reach the skin and remain concentrated there with the aid of the circulatory system, leading to the production of systemic contact dermatitis (SCD. Metals such as nickel, cobalt, chromium, and zinc are ubiquitous in our environment. Metal allergy may result in allergic contact dermatitis and also SCD. Systemic reactions, such as hand dermatitis or generalized eczematous reactions, can occur due to dietary nickel or cobalt ingestion. Zinc-containing dental fillings can induce oral lichen planus, palmoplantar pustulosis, and maculopapular rash. A diagnosis of sensitivity to metal is established by epicutaneous patch testing and oral metal challenge with metals such as nickel, cobalt, chromium, and zinc. In vitro tests, such as the lymphocyte stimulating test (LST, have some advantages over patch testing to diagnose allergic contact dermatitis. Additionally, the determination of the production of several cytokines by primary peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures is a potentially promising in vitro method for the discrimination of metal allergies, including SCD, as compared with the LST.

  7. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy caused by Kikuchi–Fujimoto disease resulting in death: first case report in Turkey

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    Uslu E

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Emine Uslu,1 Sibel Gurbuz,2 Abdulsamet Erden,1 Fatma Aykas,1 Hatice Karagoz,1 Samet Karahan,1 Hatice Karaman,3 Ali Cetinkaya,1 Deniz Avci1 1Internal Medicine Department, 2Infection Disease Department, 3Clinical Pathology Department, Kayseri Training and Research Hospital, Kayseri, Turkey Abstract: Kikuchi disease, also called Kikuchi–Fujimoto disease or Kikuchi's histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis, is a rare, benign condition of unknown cause, usually characterized by cervical lymphadenopathy and fever. The diagnosis is based on histopathology. Our patient was a woman with bilateral cervical lymphadenopathy, fever, chest and abdominal pain, fatigue, maculopapular rash on her face, trunk, and upper and lower extremities. Immunological and rheumatological tests were negative. We took a cervical lymph node biopsy that showed a proliferative and necrotizing process centered in the paracortex characterized by patchy circumscribed or confluent areas of necrosis associated with karyorrhexis, and was remarkable by the absence of granulocytes and the paucity of plasma cells. These findings confirmed the diagnosis of Kikuchi's disease. The patient's hemoglobin values decreased, and the peripheral blood smear revealed schistocytes. Blood tests showed raised D-dimer, activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, and international normalized ratio with decreased fibrinogen. The patient's condition quickly worsened and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy eventually developed. Her initial management consisted of a corticosteroid and hydroxychloroquine. Keywords: disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, Kikuchi–Fujimoto disease, necrotizing lymphadenitis

  8. Trichloroethylene hypersensitivity syndrome: a disease of fatal outcome.

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    Jung, Hyun Gul; Kim, Hyung Hun; Song, Bong Gun; Kim, Eun Jin

    2012-01-01

    Trichloroethylene is commonly used as an industrial solvent and degreasing agent. The clinical features of acute and chronic intoxication with trichloroethylene are well-known and have been described in many reports, but hypersensitivity syndrome caused by trichloroethylene is rarely encountered. For managing patients with trichloroethylene hypersensitivity syndrome, avoiding trichloroethylene and initiating glucocorticoid have been generally accepted. Generally, glucocorticoid had been tapered as trichloroethylene hypersensitivity syndrome had ameliorated. However, we encountered a typical case of trichloroethylene hypersensitivity syndrome refractory to high dose glucocorticoid treatment. A 54-year-old Korean man developed jaundice, fever, red sore eyes, and generalized erythematous maculopapular rashes. A detailed history revealed occupational exposure to trichloroethylene. After starting intravenous methylprednisolone, his clinical condition improved remarkably, but we could not reduce prednisolone because his liver enzyme and total bilirubin began to rise within 2 days after reducing prednisolone under 60 mg/day. We recommended an extended admission for complete recovery, but the patient decided to leave the hospital against medical advice. The patient visited the emergency department due to pneumonia and developed asystole, which did not respond to resuscitation.

  9. Zika Virus: Common Questions and Answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igbinosa, Irogue I; Rabe, Ingrid B; Oduyebo, Titilope; Rasmussen, Sonja A

    2017-04-15

    Since local mosquito-borne transmission of Zika virus was first reported in Brazil in early 2015, the virus has spread rapidly, with active transmission reported in at least 61 countries and territories worldwide, including the United States. Zika virus infection during pregnancy is a cause of microcephaly and other severe brain anomalies. The virus is transmitted primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes mosquito, but other routes of transmission include sexual, mother-to-fetus during pregnancy, mother-to-infant at delivery, laboratory exposure, and, possibly, transfusion of blood products. Most persons with Zika virus infection are asymptomatic or have only mild symptoms; hospitalizations and deaths are rare. When symptoms are present, maculopapular rash, fever, arthralgia, and conjunctivitis are most common. Zika virus testing is recommended for persons with possible exposure (those who have traveled to or live in an area with active transmission, or persons who had sex without a condom with a person with possible exposure) if they have symptoms consistent with Zika virus disease. Testing is also recommended for pregnant women with possible exposure, regardless of whether symptoms are present. Treatment is supportive, and no vaccine is currently available. The primary methods of prevention include avoiding bites of infected Aedes mosquitoes and reducing the risk of sexual transmission. Pregnant women should not travel to areas with active Zika virus transmission, and men and women who are planning to conceive in the near future should consider avoiding nonessential travel to these areas. Condoms can reduce the risk of sexual transmission.

  10. Cutaneous expression of systemic candidiasis.

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    Pedraz, J; Delgado-Jiménez, Y; Pérez-Gala, S; Nam-Cha, S; Fernández-Herrera, J; García-Diez, A

    2009-01-01

    Skin lesions associated with Candida septicaemia occur only in a minority of patients, who are usually immunocompromised, but they can help to establish a diagnosis rapidly. The lesions form a characteristic maculopapular or nodular rash at the onset of the infection. We report three cases of systemic candidiasis (SC) with cutaneous manifestations in immunocompromised patients. In these patients, the lesions started as asymptomatic or slightly pruriginous macules, papules or nodules localized on the trunk and extremities. The patients' general condition was very poor and they presented a high fever at the onset of the illness. Candida spp. were isolated from blood in all cases, and histology showed yeasts in two of them. Most of the lesions resolved with antifungal treatment. The diagnosis of SC is often delayed or missed because of the absence of useful diagnostic tools, the varying clinical manifestations and the frequent negativity (50-75%) of blood cultures for Candida. Fluconazole is the treatment of choice for Candida albicans, but treatment response is unknown for other Candida spp., which may require treatment with amphotericin B.

  11. Neonatal Listeriosis

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    Shih-Yu Chen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In Western developed countries, Listeria monocytogenes is not an uncommon pathogen in neonates. However, neonatal listeriosis has rarely been reported in Taiwan. We describe two cases collected from a single medical institute between 1990 and 2005. Case 1 was a male premature baby weighing 1558 g with a gestational age of 31 weeks whose mother had fever with chills 3 days prior to delivery. Generalized maculopapular rash was found after delivery and subtle seizure developed. Both blood and cerebrospinal fluid culture collected on the 1st day yielded L. monocytogenes. In addition, he had ventriculitis complicated with hydrocephalus. Neurologic development was normal over 1 year of follow-up after ventriculoperitoneal shunt operation. Case 2 was a 28-weeks' gestation male premature baby weighing 1180 g. Endotracheal intubation and ventilator support were provided after delivery due to respiratory distress. Blood culture yielded L. monocyto-genes. Cerebrospinal fluid showed pleocytosis but the culture was negative. Brain ultrasonography showed ventriculitis. Sudden deterioration with cyanosis and bradycardia developed on the 8th day and he died on the same day. Neonatal listeriosis is uncommon in Taiwan, but has significant mortality and morbidity. Early diagnosis of perinatal infection relies on high index of suspicion in perinatal health care professionals. [J Formos Med Assoc 2007;106(2:161-164

  12. Hypersensitivity Reaction and Tolerance Induction to Ethambutol

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    Josefina Rodrigues Cernadas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis remains the leading cause of death worldwide from any infectious agent and the alarming increase in the annual incidence of new cases has been described as a global emergency. Mycobacterium infection requires simultaneous administration of multiple drugs. Although the majority of treatment courses progress with minor side effects, adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs occur in about 5% of treated patients and can be responsible for cessation or switching the therapy. Both nonimmediate (mostly maculopapular rash and immediate reactions (urticarial reactions have been described with these drugs. The main problem is the occurrence of reactions while the patient is on treatment with multiple drugs. The diagnosis of the culprit drug is mostly based on stopping all medication, followed by the reintroduction of each drug with a time interval of four to five days. An alternative drug should be the first approach if it is equally effective. Most of the times, none of the alternative drugs are as effective as the culprit. If this is the case, a desensitization procedure should be performed. The authors describe a case of a woman with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC infection, to whom treatment with ethambutol was crucial to recovery, and present a modified desensitization protocol to this drug.

  13. Evaluation of cutaneous drug reactions in patients visiting out patient departments of Indira Gandhi Government Medical College and Hospital (IGGMC and H, Nagpur

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    Sachin Hiware

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To detect cutaneous drug reactions through spontaneous reporting system in IGGMCand H, Nagpur and analyze them using standard assessment scales. Materials and Methods: An observational, prospective study was performed in patients attending dermatology OPD of IGGMC and H, Nagpur from 1 st June 05 to 31 st May 09. Patients were examined for cutaneous drug reactions (CDRs by spontaneous Adverse Drug Reaction reporting system. Results: Among 2693 total ADRs reported, 872 (33.04% were CDRs. Antimicrobials (55.5% were the main drugs involved followed by NSAIDs (18.56% and steroids (12.61%. Maculopapular rash (37.73% followed by fixed drug eruption (17.2% and urticaria (14.56% were the most frequently observed CDRs. The common drugs causing CDRs were cotrimoxazole (20.41%, topical steroids (betamethasone, ibuprofen (7.91%, ampicillin (6.54%, diclofenac (4.7% and iron dextran (3.44%. Conclusion : It was observed that commonly used drugs like antibiotics and NSAIDs lead to maximum number of CDRs. Hence strict vigilance is required while using them. This study provides a database of ADRs due to common drugs, which will help clinicians in safe use of these drugs.

  14. Clinical Manifestations and Outcomes of Rickettsia australis Infection: A 15-Year Retrospective Study of Hospitalized Patients

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    Adam Stewart

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Queensland tick typhus (QTT; Rickettsia australis is an important cause of community-acquired acute febrile illness in eastern Australia. Cases of QTT were identified retrospectively from 2000 to 2015 at five sites in Northern Brisbane through a pathology database. Those included had a fourfold rise in spotted fever group (SFG-specific serology, a single SFG-specific serology ≥ 256 or SFG-specific serology ≥ 128 with a clinically consistent illness. Cases were excluded on the basis of clinical unlikelihood of QTT infection. Thirty-six cases were included. Fever was found in 34/36 (94% patients. Rash occurred in 83% of patients with maculopapular being the dominant morphology (70%. Thrombocytopenia, lymphopenia, and raised transaminases were common and occurred in 58%, 69%, and 89% of patients, respectively. Thirty-one of 36 (86% patients received antibiotic therapy (usually doxycycline and the time to correct antibiotic (from admission ranged from 3 to 120 h (mean 45.5 h. Four of 36 (11% required intensive care unit (ICU admission for severe sepsis and end-organ support. There were no deaths. QTT has a wide range of clinical and laboratory features. Early and appropriate antimicrobial therapy is important and may prevent severe disease. Further prospective studies are required to identify factors associated with severe infection and sepsis.

  15. Flinders Island Spotted Fever Rickettsioses Caused by “marmionii” Strain of Rickettsia honei, Eastern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Nathan B.; Graves, Stephen R.; Faa, Antony G.; Cox, G. Erika; Dyer, John R.; Boutlis, Craig S.; Lane, Amanda M.; Shaw, Matthew D.; Robson, Jennifer; Nissen, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    Australia has 4 rickettsial diseases: murine typhus, Queensland tick typhus, Flinders Island spotted fever, and scrub typhus. We describe 7 cases of a rickettsiosis, with an acute onset and symptoms of fever (100%), headache (71%), arthralgia (43%), myalgia (43%), cough (43%), maculopapular/petechial rash (43%), nausea (29%), pharyngitis (29%), lymphadenopathy (29%), and eschar (29%). Cases were most prevalent in autumn and from eastern Australia, including Queensland, Tasmania, and South Australia. One patient had a history of tick bite (Haemaphysalis novaeguineae). An isolate shared 99.2%, 99.8%, 99.8%, 99.9%, and 100% homology with the 17 kDa, ompA, gltA, 16S rRNA, and Sca4 genes, respectively, of Rickettsia honei. This Australian rickettsiosis has similar symptoms to Flinders Island spotted fever, and the strain is genetically related to R. honei. It has been designated the “marmionii” strain of R. honei, in honor of Australian physician and scientist Barrie Marmion. PMID:17553271

  16. Acute localized exanthem due to Coxsackievirus A4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Francesco; Ciccarese, Giulia; Gariazzo, Lodovica; Cioni, Margherita; Parodi, Aurora

    2017-09-01

    Enteroviruses are the leading cause of exanthems in children, especially during summer and autumn. Enterovirus infections may occur in epidemics or small outbreaks. A 30-year-old woman presented with a three-day history of an erythematous maculopapular skin rash with petechiae localized exclusively under the nipple of the right breast. The skin eruption was associated with an erythematous-petechial enanthem. The patient complained of low-grade fever, headache, asthenia, sore throat and arthromyalgias. IgM (1:128) and IgG (1:640) antibodies against Coxsackievirus A4 were detected by the virus neutralization test. Reverse transcriptase real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay detected enterovirus RNA in the patient's plasma and faeces. Diagnosis of an acute localized exanthem due to Coxsachievirus A4 was performed. Skin lesions improved in seven days and completely cleared in two weeks without any systemic or topical treatment. Physicians should be aware of the possibility that enteroviruses may determine localized skin eruptions in addition to hand-foot-mouth disease and atypical exanthems. Viral infections should be considered in the differential diagnosis of localized dermatitis especially when the skin eruption is associated with enanthems and with systemic symptoms.

  17. KIT D816V Positive Acute Mast Cell Leukemia Associated with Normal Karyotype Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Marta; Teixeira, Maria Dos Anjos; Casais, Cláudia; Mesquita, Vanessa; Seabra, Patrícia; Cabral, Renata; Palla-García, José; Lau, Catarina; Rodrigues, João; Jara-Acevedo, Maria; Freitas, Inês; Vizcaíno, Jose Ramón; Coutinho, Jorge; Escribano, Luis; Orfao, Alberto; Lima, Margarida

    2018-01-01

    Mast cell (MC) leukemia (MCL) is extremely rare. We present a case of MCL diagnosed concomitantly with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML). A 41-year-old woman presented with asthenia, anorexia, fever, epigastralgia, and diarrhea. She had a maculopapular skin rash, hepatosplenomegaly, retroperitoneal adenopathies, pancytopenia, 6% blast cells (BC) and 20% MC in the peripheral blood, elevated lactate dehydrogenase, cholestasis, hypoalbuminemia, hypogammaglobulinemia, and increased serum tryptase (184  μ g/L). The bone marrow (BM) smears showed 24% myeloblasts, 17% promyelocytes, and 16% abnormal toluidine blue positive MC, and flow cytometry revealed 12% myeloid BC, 34% aberrant promyelocytes, a maturation blockage at the myeloblast/promyelocyte level, and 16% abnormal CD2-CD25+ MC. The BM karyotype was normal, and the KIT D816V mutation was positive in BM cells. The diagnosis of MCL associated with AML was assumed. The patient received corticosteroids, disodium cromoglycate, cladribine, idarubicin and cytosine arabinoside, high-dose cytosine arabinoside, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The outcome was favorable, with complete hematological remission two years after diagnosis and one year after HSCT. This case emphasizes the need of an exhaustive laboratory evaluation for the concomitant diagnosis of MCL and AML, and the therapeutic options.

  18. Histamine poisoning from insect consumption: an outbreak investigation from Thailand.

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    Chomchai, Summon; Chomchai, Chulathida

    2018-02-01

    Insect consumption is a common practice in the Asian culture and all over the world. We are reporting an outbreak investigation of histamine poisoning from ingestion of fried insects. On 24 July 2014, a group of students at a seminar presented to Angthong Provincial Hospital, Thailand, with pruritic rash after ingesting snacks consisting of fried insects from a vendor. We initiated an outbreak investigation with retrospective cohort design and collected samples of remaining foods for analyses. Attack rates, relative risks and their confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Out of 227 students, 28 developed illnesses that were consistent with our case definition which included, flushing, pruritus, urticarial rashes, headache, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dyspnea and bronchospasm. Two children were hospitalized for progressive bronchospasm overnight without serious complications. The types of food ingested included a lunch that was provided at the seminar for all students and snacks that 41 students bought from the only vendor in the vicinity. The snacks included fried grasshoppers, silkworm pupae, common green frogs, bamboo borers, crickets and meat balls. The attack rates were highest (82.6 and 85.0%) among students who ingested fried grasshoppers and silkworm pupae and lowest (4.4 and 5.3%) among those who did not ingest them, with relative risk of 18.7 (95% CI 9.6-36.4) for grasshoppers and 16.0 (95% CI 8.8-29.3) for silkworm pupae. Histamine concentrations in the fried grasshoppers and silkworm pupae were 9.73 and 7.66 mg/100g, respectively. Through epidemiological analysis and laboratory confirmation, we have illustrated that histamine poisoning can occur from ingestion of fried insects. We postulate that histidine, which is present in high concentration in grasshoppers and silkworm pupae, is decarboxylated by bacteria to histamine, a heat stable toxin. The ingestion of histamine is responsible for the clinical pictures being reported.

  19. Evidence assessments and guideline recommendations in Lyme disease: the clinical management of known tick bites, erythema migrans rashes and persistent disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Daniel J; Johnson, Lorraine B; Maloney, Elizabeth L

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with Lyme disease were developed by the International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society (ILADS). The guidelines address three clinical questions – the usefulness of antibiotic prophylaxis for known tick bites, the effectiveness of erythema migrans treatment and the role of antibiotic retreatment in patients with persistent manifestations of Lyme disease. Healthcare providers who evaluate and manage patients with Lyme disease are the intended users of the new ILADS guidelines, which replace those issued in 2004 (Exp Rev Anti-infect Ther 2004;2:S1–13). These clinical practice guidelines are intended to assist clinicians by presenting evidence-based treatment recommendations, which follow the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. ILADS guidelines are not intended to be the sole source of guidance in managing Lyme disease and they should not be viewed as a substitute for clinical judgment nor used to establish treatment protocols. PMID:25077519

  20. Dermatitis irritativa del pañal: Tratamiento local con productos barrera y calidad de vida Diaper rash: Local treatment with barrier products and quality of life

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    Justo Rueda López

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Los trastornos cutáneos son derivados, en la mayoría de las ocasiones, de agresiones continuas por elementos externos que tiene como respuesta reacciones como la pérdida de lípidos epidérmicos por efecto de la humedad, cambios en el pH cutáneo (alcalinización y aumento del coeficiente de fricción (denudación junto al desequilibrio de la flora saprofita de la piel, que se traducen en procesos irritativos y en un aumento de la infecciones fúngicas y bacterianas en la zona expuesta a humedad. Dada la importancia de evaluar la calidad de vida de los pacientes con dermatitis que son tratados con productos barrera no irritantes (PBNI se ha desarrollado un estudio multicéntrico, con el objetivo de evaluar los aspectos relacionados con la mejora en la calidad de cuidados a pacientes tratados con Cavilon® que presentaban dermatitis por incontinencia mediante la escala ESCLI. Los pacientes incluidos en el estudio fueron 25. Los resultados muestran una mejora importante de los aspectos evaluados mediante la escala ESCLI sobre la evolución de la dermatitis. Esta escala valora aspectos como el área afectada por el enrojecimiento y la severidad, presentan una reversión del 47% de los casos. La denudación de la piel en la zona del pañal desaparece en el 56% de los casos y la severidad de la denudación que presenta una mejoría del 47%. La valoración del dolor en la zona de incontinencia se reduce en un 76% en la zona de incontinencia y en un 73% al realizar la limpieza de la zona. Las conclusiones del presente estudio ponen de manifiesto que la aplicación de productos formadores de una película barrera no irritante (PBNI en los pacientes que presentan dermatitis por incontinencia representa una alternativa a los tratamientos convencionales como son las cremas o ungüentos de óxido de cinc o pastas al agua. La reversión y reducción de la dermatitis es un aspecto que presenta una mejoría importante. Los resultados obtenidos que podemos relacionar con la calidad de vida o más concretamente con la mejora del dolor son destacables.The skin disorders are derived in most cases continuous injuries by external factors that have how responses the loss of epidermal lipids by the effect of moisture, derived of changes in skin pH (alkalinization, an increased coefficient of friction (denudation and the imbalance of the saprophytic flora of the skin, give how a result an increase to the irritative processes and the fungal and bacterian infections in the area exposed to moisture. Given the importance of assessing the quality of life of patients with dermatitis who are treated with No Sting Barrier Film (NSBF CavilonTM has developed a multicenter study, in order to evaluate the related to improving the quality of care that patients Incontinence Dermatitis with ESCLI scale. Patients included in the study were 25. The results show a significant improvement aspects ESCLI assessed by the scale of the evolution of the dermatitis. This scale assesses aspects such as the area affected by the redness and severity. Show a reversal 47% of cases. The denudation of the skin in the diaper area disappears in 56% of cases and the severity of the denudation which has a 47% improvement. The assessment of pain in the area of incontinence, is reduced by 76% in the area of incontinence and a 73% when cleaning the area. The findings of this study prove indicates that the application of forming products of a No Sting Barrier Film (NSBF in patients with incontinence dermatitis is an alternative to conventional treatments such as creams or ointments or zinc oxide paste water. The reversal and reduction of dermatitis is an aspect that has improved important. The results that we can relate to quality of life or longer specifically with the improvement of pain are significant.

  1. Blueberry muffin rash, hyperbilirubinemia, and hypoglycemia: a case of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn due to anti-Kp(a).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumbaugh, J E; Morgan, S; Beck, J C; Zantek, N; Kearney, S; Bendel, C M; Roberts, K D

    2011-05-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn occurs when maternal IgG antibodies cross the placenta and cause hemolysis of fetal red blood cells. Kp(a) is a low frequency red blood cell antigen that has rarely been implicated in hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. The few reported cases attributed to anti-Kp(a) have typically had minimal clinical consequences. We report a critically ill neonate who presented with purpura, respiratory failure, severe liver dysfunction, hyperbilirubinemia, hypoglycemia and anemia. This case report broadens the spectrum of neonatal disease associated with anti-Kp(a), addresses the evaluation of hemolysis with liver failure in a neonate, and emphasizes the importance of screening for antibodies to low frequency red blood cell antigens in suspected hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn.

  2. Evidence assessments and guideline recommendations in Lyme disease: the clinical management of known tick bites, erythema migrans rashes and persistent disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Daniel J; Johnson, Lorraine B; Maloney, Elizabeth L

    2014-09-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with Lyme disease were developed by the International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society (ILADS). The guidelines address three clinical questions - the usefulness of antibiotic prophylaxis for known tick bites, the effectiveness of erythema migrans treatment and the role of antibiotic retreatment in patients with persistent manifestations of Lyme disease. Healthcare providers who evaluate and manage patients with Lyme disease are the intended users of the new ILADS guidelines, which replace those issued in 2004 (Exp Rev Anti-infect Ther 2004;2:S1-13). These clinical practice guidelines are intended to assist clinicians by presenting evidence-based treatment recommendations, which follow the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. ILADS guidelines are not intended to be the sole source of guidance in managing Lyme disease and they should not be viewed as a substitute for clinical judgment nor used to establish treatment protocols.

  3. Síndrome CINCA: um diagnóstico diferencial da artrite idiopática juvenil CINCA syndrome: a differential diagnosis of the juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Erica Naomi Naka

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome CINCA (crônico-infantil-neurológica-cutâneaarticular é uma enfermidade inflamatória multissistêmica rara, de início no período neonatal e caracterizada por febre, exantema cutâneo, envolvimento articular e do sistema nervoso central. É também conhecida pela literatura médica norte-americana como NOMID (doença multissistêmica inflamatória de início neonatal. Relatamos o caso de uma criança de 3 anos de idade admitida em nosso serviço com história de febre e exantema cutâneo desde o período neonatal. Apresentou crises convulsivas no sexto mês de vida e artrite simétrica de joelhos desde o nono mês. Na admissão, mostrava-se toxemiada, pálida, com um exantema maculopapular generalizado e artrite de joelhos e tornozelos. Apresentava ainda retardo de crescimento e desenvolvimento. Achados laboratoriais incluíram anemia, leucocitose, trombocitose, níveis elevados de proteína C reativa e meningite asséptica no exame do liquor. Os outros exames foram negativos. Os achados radiográficos dos joelhos, quadris e tornozelos foram anormais. A criança recebeu tratamento com antiinflamatório não hormonal, corticosteróide e metotrexato, com melhora apenas da dor e da febre. A etiologia da síndrome CINCA permanece desconhecida e nenhum tratamento tem se mostrado eficaz. Essa doença deve ser distinguida da forma sistêmica da artrite idiopática juvenil (AIJ, o principal diagnóstico diferencial.CINCA syndrome (chronic-infantile-neurological-cutaneousarticular is a rare multisystemic inflammatory disease with neonatal onset characterized by fever, skin rash, articular, and central nervous system involvement. This syndrome is known in the North American medical literature as infantile onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID. We describe the case of a 3-yearold child admitted in our service with fever and skin rash since the neonatal period. She presented seizures at 6 months-old and bilateral arthritis of the

  4. Fatal toxic epidermal necrolysis associated with minoxidil.

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    Karaoui, Lamis R; Chahine-Chakhtoura, Corinne

    2009-04-01

    Minoxidil is a direct-acting peripheral vasodilator for the treatment of symptomatic hypertension, or refractory hypertension associated with target organ damage, that is not manageable with a diuretic and two other antihypertensive drugs. The most frequent adverse events associated with minoxidil include hypertrichosis and cardiovascular events related to its powerful antihypertensive effect, and less frequently, rashes, bullous eruptions, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS). Evidence suggests that SJS and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are variants of a single disease with common causes and mechanisms, but differing severities. Epidermal detachment is mild in SJS, moderate in overlap SJS-TEN, and severe (> 30% of body surface area) in TEN. We describe a case of minoxidil-associated SJS that evolved into fatal TEN. A 69-year-old African-American woman with a history of chronic kidney disease was admitted to the hospital for a cerebrovascular accident and uncontrolled hypertension. On hospital day 12, oral minoxidil was added to her drug regimen. On day 23, she developed a maculopapular rash on her face that gradually diffused to her chest and back. Vesicles and papular lesions extended to her extremities and mucosal membranes; results of a skin biopsy revealed SJS. A positive Nikolsky's sign (blisters spread on application of pressure) was detected. On days 27-31, diffuse bullae developed with rash exacerbation. Skin detachment exceeded 30% and was consistent with TEN. The patient died on day 39. An evaluation of the causality and time course suggested that minoxidil was the most likely culpable drug, with a Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale score indicating that the likelihood of the association was possible (score of 3). The mechanism of this reaction has not been well elucidated. It may be related to an impaired clearance of the minoxidil metabolite, or an immune stimulation resulting in apoptosis and epidermis destruction. To our knowledge, this

  5. Slow desensitization of imatinib-induced nonimmediate reactions and dynamic changes of drug-specific CD4+CD25+CD134+ lymphocytes.

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    Klaewsongkram, Jettanong; Thantiworasit, Pattarawat; Sodsai, Pimpayao; Buranapraditkun, Supranee; Mongkolpathumrat, Pungjai

    2016-11-01

    Imatinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor indicated for the treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and certain neoplastic diseases; however, nonimmediate adverse reactions are common. To describe the process of imatinib slow desensitization in patients who experienced nonimmediate reactions to imatinib and the dynamic change in drug-specific CD4 + CD25 + CD134 + T-lymphocyte percentages. Five patients diagnosed as having GISTs and with a recent history of imatinib-induced nonimmediate reactions (maculopapular exanthema with eosinophilia, exfoliative dermatitis, palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia, and drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) were desensitized using a slow desensitization protocol. The reintroduced imatinib dosage was stepped up every week starting from 10 mg/d and increasing to 25, 50, 75, 100, 150, 200, and 300 mg/d until the target dose of 400 mg/d was achieved. Prednisolone of up to 30 mg/d was allowed if allergic reactions recurred. The percentages of CD4 + CD25 + CD134 + T cells present after incubating peripheral blood mononuclear cells with imatinib, at baseline and after successful desensitization, were analyzed using flow cytometric analysis. By using a slow desensitization technique, all patients were able to receive 400 mg/d of imatinib, and prednisolone was gradually tapered off. The percentages of imatinib-induced CD4 + CD25 + CD134 + T cells decreased from a mean (SD) of 11.3% (6.5%) and 13.4% (7.3%) at baseline to 3.2% (0.7%) and 3.0% (1.1%) after successful desensitization, when stimulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells with 1 and 2 μM of imatinib, respectively. Slow desensitization is a helpful procedure in treating patients with imatinib-induced nonimmediate reactions other than simple maculopapular exanthema. The reduced percentages of imatinib-induced CD4 + CD25 + CD134 + T cells in these patients may be associated with immune tolerance. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

  6. Herpes zoster infection of the face: A case report with review of literature

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    Seetharamiah Sunder Raj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Varicella zoster virus (VZV is a DNA virus and a member of the alpha herpes viridae family, causing both primary and recurrent infection. Herpes zoster (HZ, commonly called shingles, is a distinctive syndrome caused by reactivation of VZV. This reactivation occurs when immunity to VZV declines because of aging or immune-suppression. HZ can occur at any age but most commonly affects the elderly population. HZ may affect any sensory ganglia and its cutaneous nerve. Most of the infections affect dermatomes of T3 to L2, but approximately 13% of the patients present with infections involving any of the three branches of the trigeminal nerve. Prodromal symptoms include neuropathic pain, headache, malaise, and disrupted sleep. HZ causes pruritic, localized, vesicular rash which usually appears unilaterally in the distribution of one or more adjacent sensory nerves accompanied by neuropathic pain in the affected dermatome. This is a case report of HZ infection in a 55-year-old male patient who was managed with comprehensive medical treatment.

  7. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis: A window to systemic Churg Strauss syndrome

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    Sudhir V Medhekar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A twenty year old male presented with purpuric lesions with chronic painful ulcers over the lower extremities and a recurrent pruritic rash on the trunk for 10 years. He was diagnosed as idiopathic leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV after investigations failed to reveal a systemic association. He was treated with immunosuppressants at each visit with partial remission. In 2004, he was diagnosed with bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis. In his recent admission, he showed necrotic ulcers on legs and extensive shiny, truncal micropapules. Examination revealed maxillary sinus tenderness and loss of sensation on the medial aspect of the left lower limb. Biopsy of ulcer and the micropapules showed the presence of extravascular eosinophils, while hematological investigations showed peripheral eosinophilia of 18%, raised serum Immunoglobulin E (IgE, Anti nuclear antibody (ANA positivity and negative antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA. Radiography confirmed maxillary sinusitis, nerve conduction studies revealed mononeuritis of the anterior tibial nerve and pulmonary function tests (PFT were normal. Clinical examination and investigations pointed towards the diagnosis of Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS. This report highlights the development of full-blown CSS over a period of 12 years in a patient initially diagnosed as idiopathic LCV, emphasizing the need for regular follow-up of resistant and recurrent cases of LCV.

  8. Flame figures in linear IgA bullous dermatosis: a novel histopathologic finding.

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    Fulton, E; Jan, F; Zimarowski, M J

    2017-11-15

    Linear IgA bullous dermatosis (LABD) is an autoimmune subepidermal blistering disease usually with a neutrophil rich inflammatory infiltrate, and characterized by linear IgA deposition at the basement membrane zone (BMZ), and neutrophil predominant dermal inflammation. We report a case of LABD with numerous eosinophils and flame figure formation, a unique histopathologic finding not previously reported. A 69-year-old woman presented with a rapidly progressive, intensely pruritic rash over forearms, breasts, axillae, hips, and thighs. Thelesions were comprised of annular vesicles and bullae with hemorrhagic crusts and erosions. The clinical differential diagnosis included bullous pemphigoid(BP), LABD, and epidermolysis bullosa aquisita (EBA). A biopsy from a bullous plaque on the wrist revealed a subepidermal blister with neutrophils and numerous eosinophils with flame figure formation.Direct immunofluorescent (DIF) microscopy revealed linear deposition of IgA at the BMZ. Although unusual, the combined findings supported a diagnosis of LABD. Increased eosinophils may be associated with drug-induced LABD and may explain the numerous eosinophils in our case. It is important to be aware of this finding as the pathology may easily be misdiagnosed as BP, or possibly bullousWells syndrome. This case emphasizes that combined clinical, pathologic, and DIF findings are essential in the diagnosis of bullous dermatoses.

  9. A Unique Case of Acute Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis Secondary to Primary Varicella Zoster Virus Infection.

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    Imam, Syed F; Lodhi, Omair Ul Haq; Fatima, Zainab; Nasim, Saneeya; Malik, Waseem T; Saleem, Muhammad Sabih

    2017-09-16

    Primary varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection, predominantly in the pediatric population, presents with pyrexia and a classic pruritic vesicular rash. In adults, although less common, it is more severe and linked to more complications. Neurological complications, which account for less than 1% of all VZV complications, include meningitis, encephalitis, arterial vasculopathy, and venous thrombosis. We present a case of a 39-year-old male who developed extensive cerebral venous sinus thrombosis following primary VZV infection. Venous thrombosis in VZV has been suggested to be caused by autoantibodies against protein S, pre-existing hypercoagulability, or endothelial damage. The patient was acutely managed using intravenous acyclovir and heparin. Long-term anticoagulation therapy with warfarin was continued after discharge. We concluded that clinicians should be aware of the rare complications of this common pathology so that a timely diagnosis can be made, followed by prompt management. Further studies need to be done to better understand acute cerebral venous sinus thrombosis secondary to VZV.

  10. Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever

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    ... heart rate), lymphadenopathy (enlarged lymph nodes), and a petechial rash (a rash caused by bleeding into the ... heart rate), lymphadenopathy (enlarged lymph nodes), and a petechial rash (a rash caused by bleeding into the ...

  11. Isolated pulmonary veno-occlusive disease and pulmonary arterial thrombosis in systemic sclerosis – a lethal combination

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    Arun Jeevagan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Arun JeevaganGeneral Medicine, Ipswich NHS Hospital, UKBackground: Isolated pulmonary hypertension secondary to systemic sclerosis is not uncommon. Our patient with systemic sclerosis presented with a very aggressive form of pulmonary hypertension due to a lethal combination of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD and pulmonary arterial thrombosis. This combined presentation has never before been reported in medical literature.Case report: A 75-year-old woman with a 4-month history of atypical chest pains was admitted with a 3-week history of worsening symptoms of shortness of breath, reduced exercise tolerance, and bilateral pitting edema. On examination she had thickened skin in her hands, telangiectasia on her face, maculopapular rash in her legs, raised jugular venous pressure, and bilateral pitting edema. Her autoimmune profile revealed positive anticentromere antibodies, and her echocardiogram showed right ventricular systolic pressure of 91 mmHg. She also had renal impairment secondary to hypoperfusion. A diagnosis of isolated pulmonary hypertension secondary to limited systemic sclerosis was made. As she was clinically improving on slow diuretic infusion and awaiting transfer to a specialist center for management of pulmonary hypertension, our patient died due to cardiopulmonary arrest. Her postmortem revealed that she died of a combination of PVOD and pulmonary arteriopathy due to thrombosis.Conclusion: This is clearly a unique case both in presentation and difficulty of management. Pulmonary vasodilators used in therapy of pulmonary arteriopathy can be detrimental in patients with PVOD. There is no definitive investigation, curative treatment, or management, that exists for a combination of PVOD and pulmonary arteriopathy due to thrombosis secondary to systemic sclerosis.Keywords: pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, pulmonary arterial hypertension, systemic sclerosis, pulmonary arteriopathy with thrombosis

  12. Fatal hypersensitivity reaction to an oral spray of flurbiprofen: a case report.

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    Calapai, G; Imbesi, S; Cafeo, V; Ventura Spagnolo, E; Minciullo, P L; Caputi, A P; Gangemi, S; Milone, L

    2013-08-01

    Safety of the anti-inflammatory drug flurbiprofen is comparable with that of other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs of the propionic acid class, which are commonly associated with gastrointestinal and renal side effects. Here we report a case of a fatal hypersensitivity reaction to an oral spray of flurbiprofen taken for sore throat. A 29-year-old man came to the emergency care unit reporting sore throat with an intense burning sensation associated with fever. Pharyngotonsillitis was diagnosed, and local treatment with oral flurbiprofen spray was prescribed. Immediately after using the spray, the patient experienced a severe reaction characterized by serious dyspnoea, followed by death. The cause of death was heart failure with acute asphyxia from oedema of the glottis. The cause of death was concluded to be hypersensitivity to flurbiprofen spray. Oral propionic acid derivatives have been associated with a relatively high frequency of allergic reactions. However, allergy to flurbiprofen has rarely been documented. Scientific literature reports two relevant cases of hypersensitivity reaction to flurbiprofen: in one case, a patient presented with a maculopapular rash 48 h after having taken oral flurbiprofen followed by angio-oedema and hypotension. In another case, a single oral dose of flurbiprofen caused itching and swelling around the eyes, redness and increased lacrimation. We describe, for the first time, a fatal case of hypersensitivity reaction to flurbiprofen oral spray. Hypersensitivity reactions to flurbiprofen are infrequent; however, health professionals should be aware of potential adverse reactions, even during topical administration as oral spray. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Multiple primary syphilis on the lip, nipple-areola and penis: An immunohistochemical examination of Treponema pallidum localization using an anti-T. pallidum antibody.

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    Fukuda, Hidetsugu; Takahashi, Misaki; Kato, Keiichi; Oharaseki, Toshiaki; Mukai, Hideki

    2015-05-01

    Primary syphilis caused by Treponema pallidum usually develops after sexual contact as an initial solitary sclerosis or hard chancre in the genital region. We describe a case of primary syphilis at three sites in genital and extragenital regions of a man who had sex with men. A 29-year-old man visited our hospital for skin lesions on his lower lip, nipple-areola and penis. A positive syphilis serological test for rapid plasma reagin had a titer of 1:16; the patient also tested positive for specific antibodies against T. pallidum, with a cut-off index of 39.0. Histopathological examination of a nipple-areola biopsy specimen revealed a thickened epidermis and dense infiltration of inflammatory cells extending from the upper dermal layers to the deep dermis. The inflammatory cells were composed of abundant lymphocytes, plasma cells, histiocytes and neutrophils. Immunohistochemical staining for T. pallidum using an anti-T. pallidum antibody showed numerous spirochetes in the lower portion of the epidermis, scattered inside inflammatory cell infiltrate and perivascular sites throughout the dermis. Based on these findings, the patient was diagnosed with primary syphilis. Treatment with oral amoxicillin hydrate was started. Five days after starting treatment, a diffuse maculopapular rash (syphilitic roseola) occurred on his trunk and extremities. Perivascular cuffing due to T. pallidum was present throughout the dermis in the biopsy specimen of a localized lesion of primary syphilis. Moreover, syphilitic roseola, which indicates generalized dissemination of T. pallidum, developed during the course of treatment for primary syphilis. Therefore, we considered perivascular cuffing to be indicative of the dissemination phase. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  14. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Diagnosis and Management of Hypersensitivity Reactions to Contrast Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado Ingelmo, A; Doña Diaz, I; Cabañas Moreno, R; Moya Quesada, M C; García-Avilés, C; García Nuñez, I; Martínez Tadeo, J I; Mielgo Ballesteros, R; Ortega-Rodríguez, N; Padial Vilchez, M A; Sánchez-Morillas, L; Vila Albelda, C; Moreno Rodilla, E; Torres Jaén, M J

    2016-01-01

    The objective of these guidelines is to ensure efficient and effective clinical practice. The panel of experts who produced this consensus document developed a research protocol based on a review of the literature. The prevalence of allergic reactions to iodinated contrast media (ICM) is estimated to be 1:170 000, that is, 0.05%-0.1% of patients undergoing radiologic studies with ICM (more than 75 million examinations per year worldwide). Hypersensitivity reactions can appear within the first hour after administration (immediate reactions) or from more than 1 hour to several days after administration (nonimmediate or delayed reactions). The risk factors for immediate reactions include poorly controlled bronchial asthma, concomitant medication (eg, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, ß-blockers, and proton-pump inhibitors), rapid administration of the ICM, mastocytosis, autoimmune diseases, and viral infections. The most common symptoms of immediate reactions are erythema and urticaria with or without angioedema, which appear in more than 70% of patients. Maculopapular rash is the most common skin feature of nonimmediate reactions (30%-90%). Skin and in vitro tests should be performed for diagnosis of both immediate and nonimmediate reactions. The ICM to be administered will therefore be chosen depending on the results of these tests, the ICM that induced the reaction (when known), the severity of the reaction, the availability of alternative ICM, and the information available on potential ICM cross-reactivity. Another type of contrast media, gadolinium derivatives, is used used for magnetic resonance imaging. Although rare, IgE-mediated reactions to gadolinium derivatives have been reported.

  15. Is the drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS due to human herpesvirus 6 infection or to allergy-mediated viral reactivation? Report of a case and literature review

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    Borgia Guglielmo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome (DIHS is a severe and rare systemic reaction triggered by a drug (usually an antiepileptic drug. We present a case of DISH and we review studies on the clinical features and treatment of DIHS, and on its pathogenesis in which two elements (Herpesvirus infection and the drug interact with the immune system to trigger such a syndrome that can lead to death in about 20% of cases. Case presentation We report the case of a 26-year old woman with fever, systemic maculopapular rash, lymphadenopathy, hepatitis and eosinophilic leukocytosis. She had been treated with antibiotics that gave no benefit. She was taking escitalopram and lamotrigine for a bipolar disease 30 days before fever onset. Because the patient's general condition deteriorated, betamethasone and acyclovir were started. This treatment resulted in a mild improvement of symptoms. Steroids were rapidly tapered and this was followed with a relapse of fever and a worsening of laboratory parameters. Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 DNA was positive as shown by PCR. Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome (DIHS was diagnosed. Symptoms regressed on prednisone (at a dose of 50 mg/die that was tapered very slowly. The patient recovered completely. Conclusions The search for rare causes of fever led to complete resolution of a very difficult case. As DIHS is a rare disease the most relevant issue is to suspect and include it in differential diagnosis of fevers of unknown origin. Once diagnosed, the therapy is easy (steroidal administration and often successful. However our case strongly confirms that attention should be paid on the steroidal tapering that should be very slow to avoid a relapse.

  16. Mayaro virus: the jungle flu

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    Izurieta RO

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ricardo O Izurieta,1 David A DeLacure,1 Andres Izurieta,2 Ismael A Hoare,1 Miguel Reina Ortiz,1,3 1Department of Global Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 2Department of Computer Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 3Fundación Raíces, Esmeraldas, Ecuador Abstract: Mayaro fever is an emerging acute viral disease endemic in Central and South America. Mayaro virus (MAYV is classified in the Semliki Forest virus antigenic complex and shares similarities with the alphavirus Chikungunya virus and the flavivirus Dengue virus. MAYV is an arbovirus transmitted by Haemagogus janthinomys, with competence also demonstrated in Aedes aegypti, Aedes scapularis, and Anopheles quadrimaculatus. Outbreaks and small epidemics of Mayaro fever have occurred in several countries in northern South America and the Caribbean. In addition, travel-associated cases have been reported in European nationals returning from endemic areas. Clinical features of Mayaro fever include fever, chills, persistent arthralgia, retro-orbital pain, maculopapular rash, itching, dizziness, and, rarely, lymphadenopathy. Methods of control for MAYV are similar to those used for other sylvatic arboviruses. Although MAYV was discovered as long ago as the 1950s and continues to be prevalent in the tropical areas of the Americas, it remains neglected and under-studied. This paper provides a thorough and current review of the published MAYV literature ranging from its original description to modern outbreaks, and from the basic virus characteristics to the clinical and epidemiological aspects of this disease. Keywords: Mayaro virus, emerging arbovirus, dengue-like virus, arthrogenic virus

  17. Zika virus infection during pregnancy and microcephaly occurrence: a review of literature and Brazilian data.

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    De Carvalho, Newton Sérgio; De Carvalho, Beatriz Freitas; Fugaça, Cyllian Arias; Dóris, Bruna; Biscaia, Evellyn Silverio

    2016-01-01

    In November of 2015, the Ministry of Health of Brazil published an announcement confirming the relationship between Zika virus and the microcephaly outbreak in the Northeast, suggesting that infected pregnant women might have transmitted the virus to their fetuses. The objectives of this study were to conduct a literature review about Zika virus infection and microcephaly, evaluate national and international epidemiological data, as well as the current recommendations for the health teams. Zika virus is an arbovirus, whose main vector is the Aedes sp. The main symptoms of the infection are maculopapular rash, fever, non-purulent conjunctivitis, and arthralgia. Transmission of this pathogen occurs mainly by mosquito bite, but there are also reports via the placenta. Microcephaly is defined as a measure of occipto-frontal circumference being more than two standard deviations below the mean for age and gender. The presence of microcephaly demands evaluation of the patient, in order to diagnose the etiology. Health authorities issued protocols, reports and notes concerning the management of microcephaly caused by Zika virus, but there is still controversy about managing the cases. The Ministry of Health advises notifying any suspected or confirmed cases of children with microcephaly related to the pathogen, which is confirmed by a positive specific laboratory test for the virus. The first choice for imaging exam in children with this malformation is transfontanellar ultrasound. The most effective way to control this outbreak of microcephaly probably caused by this virus is to combat the vector. Since there is still uncertainty about the period of vulnerability of transmission via placenta, the use of repellents is crucial throughout pregnancy. More investigations studying the consequences of this viral infection on the body of newborns and in their development are required. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. An epidemiological and clinical analysis of cutaneous adverse drug reactions seen in a tertiary hospital in Johor, Malaysia

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    Siew-Eng Choon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence, clinical patterns, and causative drugs of cutaneous adverse drug reactions (cADR vary among the different populations previously studied. Aim: To determine the prevalence, the clinical patterns of drug eruptions, and the common drugs implicated, particularly in severe cADR such as Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN and drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS in our population. Methods: We analyzed the database established for all cADR seen by the department of Dermatology from January 2001 till December 2010. Results: A total of 362 cADR were seen among 42 170 new clinic attendees, yielding an incidence rate of 0.86%. The most common reaction pattern seen was maculopapular eruption (153 cases followed by SJS/TEN (110 cases and DRESS (34 cases. Antibiotics was the most commonly implicated drug group (146 cases followed by anticonvulsants (81 cases and antigout drugs (50 cases. The most frequently implicated drug was allopurinol (50 cases. Carbamazepine, allopurinol, and cotrimoxazole were the three main causative drugs of SJS/TEN accounting for 21.8%, 20.9%, and 12.7%, respectively, of the 110 cases seen, whereas DRESS was mainly caused by allopurinol (15 cases. Mortality rates for TEN, SJS, and DRESS were 28.6%, 2.2%, and 5.9%, respectively Conclusions: The low rate of cADR with a high proportion of severe reactions observed in this study was probably due to referral bias. Otherwise, the reaction patterns and drugs causing cADR in our population were similar to those seen in other countries. Carbamazepine, allopurinol, and cotrimoxazole were the three main causative drugs of SJS/TEN in our population.

  19. An epidemiological and clinical analysis of cutaneous adverse drug reactions seen in a tertiary hospital in Johor, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choon, Siew-Eng; Lai, Nai-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence, clinical patterns, and causative drugs of cutaneous adverse drug reactions (cADR) vary among the different populations previously studied. To determine the prevalence, the clinical patterns of drug eruptions, and the common drugs implicated, particularly in severe cADR such as Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) and drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) in our population. We analyzed the database established for all cADR seen by the department of Dermatology from January 2001 till December 2010. A total of 362 cADR were seen among 42 170 new clinic attendees, yielding an incidence rate of 0.86%. The most common reaction pattern seen was maculopapular eruption (153 cases) followed by SJS/TEN (110 cases) and DRESS (34 cases). Antibiotics was the most commonly implicated drug group (146 cases) followed by anticonvulsants (81 cases) and antigout drugs (50 cases). The most frequently implicated drug was allopurinol (50 cases). Carbamazepine, allopurinol, and cotrimoxazole were the three main causative drugs of SJS/TEN accounting for 21.8%, 20.9%, and 12.7%, respectively, of the 110 cases seen, whereas DRESS was mainly caused by allopurinol (15 cases). Mortality rates for TEN, SJS, and DRESS were 28.6%, 2.2%, and 5.9%, respectively. The low rate of cADR with a high proportion of severe reactions observed in this study was probably due to referral bias. Otherwise, the reaction patterns and drugs causing cADR in our population were similar to those seen in other countries. Carbamazepine, allopurinol, and cotrimoxazole were the three main causative drugs of SJS/TEN in our population.

  20. Zika virus infections in pregnancy: epidemics and case management

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    Fatih sahiner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus is an RNA virus belonging to the Flaviviridae family, and is primarily transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. Only a small number of cases had been described until 2007 when the first major Zika virus outbreak occurred on Yap Island, Micronesia. Approximately 80% of people infected with Zika virus do not exhibit any symptoms. Symptomatic infections are generally moderate and characterized by acute onset of fever, maculopapular rash, arthralgia, or conjunctivitis. The virus has recently attracted a broad interest due to the emerging cases of microcephaly that are possibly associated with mothers infected by the Zika virus during pregnancy, and the regional increases in the incidence of Guillain-Barre syndrome during the epidemic periods. Although the relationship between Zika virus infection and these abnormalities is not obviously understood yet, Zika virus testing is recommended for infants with microcephaly or intracranial calcifications whose mothers were potentially infected with the Zika virus during pregnancy. Every day, new reports are being published about the outbreaks associated with this virus; nevertheless, no new cases of this virus have been reported in Turkey. Despite this, we cannot currently exclude the possibility of the encounter with the virus because of the presence of Aedes mosquitoes, which are responsible for the spread of the virus, are prevalent in Turkey, and an increasing number of travel-related cases are being reported from different countries. In the light of the current knowledge on this virus, this review aims to discuss the course of Zika virus infections in detail, especially congenital infection, and presenting current information about the case management and preventive measures. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(1.000: 143-151

  1. Characterization of Lethal Zika Virus Infection in AG129 Mice.

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    Matthew T Aliota

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV typically causes a mild and self-limiting illness known as Zika fever, which often is accompanied by maculopapular rash, headache, and myalgia. During the current outbreak in South America, ZIKV infection during pregnancy has been hypothesized to cause microcephaly and other diseases. The detection of ZIKV in fetal brain tissue supports this hypothesis. Because human infections with ZIKV historically have remained sporadic and, until recently, have been limited to small-scale epidemics, neither the disease caused by ZIKV nor the molecular determinants of virulence and/or pathogenicity have been well characterized. Here, we describe a small animal model for wild-type ZIKV of the Asian lineage.Using mice deficient in interferon α/β and Ɣ receptors (AG129 mice, we report that these animals were highly susceptible to ZIKV infection and disease, succumbing within seven to eight days. Rapid viremic dissemination was observed in visceral organs and brain; but only was associated with severe pathologies in the brain and muscle. Finally, these results were consistent across challenge routes, age of mice, and inoculum doses. These data represent a mouse model for ZIKV that is not dependent on adapting ZIKV to intracerebral passage in mice.Foot pad injection of AG129 mice with ZIKV represents a biologically relevant model for studying ZIKV infection and disease development following wild-type virus inoculation without the requirement for adaptation of the virus or intracerebral delivery of the virus. This newly developed Zika disease model can be exploited to identify determinants of ZIKV virulence and reveal molecular mechanisms that control the virus-host interaction, providing a framework for rational design of acute phase therapeutics and for vaccine efficacy testing.

  2. THE PROSPECTIVE OBSERVATIONAL STUDY ON CUTANEOUS ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS TO CHEMOTHERAPY

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    Prakash Mani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION There are a wide spectrum of adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDRs varying from transient maculopapular rash to fatal toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN. With the advent of newer and targeted therapy in the field of dermatology, the pattern of cutaneous adverse drug eruptions and the drugs responsible for them keep changing every year. Hence, this study was undertaken to ascertain the clinical spectrum of ACDRs and the causative drugs, in a tertiary care centre in South India. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was a prospective, observational study conducted in Department of Medical Oncology, Government Rajaji Hospital, Madurai Medical College, Madurai during the period of March 2015 - August 2015 (6 months. Severity of the reaction was assessed using CTCAE (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events scale version 4.1. Causality of the drug was assessed using Naranjo Causality Assessment Scale. The scale was calculated first for the regimen and then for individual drugs separately. The adverse events with score of 6 or more (probable and definite adverse events were taken for the study. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION The overall incidence of ACDRs found in this study was 85%. Alopecia was the commonest ACDR occurring in 51.6% of patients. Nail pigmentation and supravenous pigmentation were the next common ACDRs, recorded in 35% and 16% of patients respectively. Imatinib caused generalised hypopigmentation in 40% of patients. Bleomycin induced, flagellate erythema and pigmentation in 17% of patients and stomatitis was seen in 11% of patients. Acneiform eruptions were recorded with erlotinib and gefitinib therapy. Supravenous pigmentation was common with 5-fluorouracil and docetaxel, occurring in 53% & 48% respectively. Newer targeted therapies like EGFR (Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors recorded low incidence of ACDRs like alopecia as against conventional antineoplastic agents. The cancer chemotherapeutic drugs are associated

  3. Factors contributing to measles transmission during an outbreak in Kamwenge District, Western Uganda, April to August 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsubuga, Fred; Bulage, Lilian; Ampeire, Immaculate; Matovu, Joseph K B; Kasasa, Simon; Tanifum, Patricia; Riolexus, Alex Ario; Zhu, Bao-Ping

    2018-01-08

    In April 2015, Kamwenge District, western Uganda reported a measles outbreak. We investigated the outbreak to identify potential exposures that facilitated measles transmission, assess vaccine effectiveness (VE) and vaccination coverage (VC), and recommend prevention and control measures. For this investigation, a probable case was defined as onset of fever and generalized maculopapular rash, plus ≥1 of the following symptoms: Coryza, conjunctivitis, or cough. A confirmed case was defined as a probable case plus identification of measles-specific IgM in serum. For case-finding, we reviewed patients' medical records and conducted in-home patient examination. In a case-control study, we compared exposures of case-patients and controls matched by age and village of residence. For children aged 9 m-5y, we estimated VC using the percent of children among the controls who had been vaccinated against measles, and calculated VE using the formula, VE = 1 - OR M-H , where OR M-H was the Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio associated with having a measles vaccination history. We identified 213 probable cases with onset between April and August, 2015. Of 23 blood specimens collected, 78% were positive for measles-specific IgM. Measles attack rate was highest in the youngest age-group, 0-5y (13/10,000), and decreased as age increased. The epidemic curve indicated sustained propagation in the community. Of the 50 case-patients and 200 controls, 42% of case-patients and 12% of controls visited health centers during their likely exposure period (OR M-H  = 6.1; 95% CI = 2.7-14). Among children aged 9 m-5y, VE was estimated at 70% (95% CI: 24-88%), and VC at 75% (95% CI: 67-83%). Excessive crowding was observed at all health centers; no patient triage-system existed. The spread of measles during this outbreak was facilitated by patient mixing at crowded health centers, suboptimal VE and inadequate VC. We recommended emergency immunization campaign targeting children <5y in

  4. Epidemiological and clinical features of erythema infectiosum in children in Novi Sad from 2000 to 2009

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    Prćić Sonja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Erythema infectiosum (EI is a common childhood illness, caused by human parvovirus B19. It occurs sporadically or in epidemics and is characterized by mild constitutional symptoms and a blotchy or maculopapular lacy rash on the cheeks (slapped-cheek spreading primarily to the extremities and trunk. The aim of our study was to analyse the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of erythema infectiosum in children. Methods. This study included 88 children observed in the Department of Dermatology of the Institute for Child and Youth Health Care of Vojvodina, in Novi Sad, during the period January 2000-December 2009. We compared the data about the clinical characteristics during and after the outbreak of EI observed from December 2001 to September 2002. The data were retrieved from the hospital database. Results. During the study period, EI was detected in 88 children (44 females and 44 males, 0.213% of the total number of 4 1345 children observed in the Department of Dermatology. An outbreak of erythema infectiosum was observed from December 2001 to September 2002, with the peak frequency in April and May 2002 and 39 diagnosed cases, and stable number of cases from 2005 to 2009 (a total of 49 diagnosed cases. The average age of infected children was 7.59 ± 3.339. Eleven (12.5% children were referred from primary care pediatricians with the diagnosis of urticaria or rash of allergic origin. The most constant clinical sign was reticular exanthema on the limbs, present in 100% of the cases, followed by 89.77% of cheek erythema. Pruritus was present in 9.09% of the children, mild constitutional symptoms in 5.68% and palpable lymph glands in 3.41% of the children. In all the cases the course of the disease was without complications. Conclusion. The results of this study confirm the presence of EI (the fifth disease in our area with a mild course in the majority of patients. Since the diagnosis of EI is usually based on clinical

  5. Immune-Related Adverse Events Associated with Anti-PD-1/PD-L1 Treatment for Malignancies: A Meta-Analysis

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    Peng-Fei Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment of cancers with programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1 pathway inhibitors can lead to immune-related adverse events (irAEs, which could be serious and even fetal. Therefore, clinicians should be aware of the characteristics of irAEs associated with the use of such drugs.Methods: The MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were searched to find potential studies using the following strategies: anti-PD-1/PD-L1 treatment; irAEs; and cancer. R© package Meta was used to pool incidence.Results: Forty-six studies representing 12,808 oncologic patients treated with anti-PD-1/PD-L1 agents were included in the meta-analysis. The anti-PD-1/PD-L1 agents included nivolumab, pembrolizumab, atezolizumab, durvalumab, avelumab, and BMS-936559. The tumor types were melanomas, Hodgkin lymphomas, urothelial carcinomas, breast cancers, non-small cell lung cancers, renal cell carcinomas (RCC, colorectal cancers, and others. We described irAEs according to organ systems, namely, the skin (pruritus, rash, maculopapular rash, vitiligo, and dermatitis, endocrine system (hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, hypophysitis, thyroiditis, and adrenal insufficiency, digestive system (colitis, diarrhea, pancreatitis, and increased AST/ALT/bilirubin, respiratory system (pneumonitis, lung infiltration, and interstitial lung disease, and urinary system (increased creatinine, nephritis, and renal failure. In patients treated with the PD-1 signaling inhibitors, the overall incidence of irAEs was 26.82% (95% CI, 21.73–32.61; I2, 92.80 in any grade and 6.10% (95% CI, 4.85–7.64; I2, 52.00 in severe grade, respectively. The development of irAEs was unrelated to the dose of anti-PD-1/PD-L1 agents. The incidence of particular irAEs varied when different cancers were treated with different drugs. The incidence of death due to irAEs was around 0.17%.Conclusion: The occurrence of irAEs was organ-specific and related to drug and tumor types.

  6. [RECOMMENDATION FOR EVALUATION AND TREATMENT OF CHRONIC URTICARIA - THE ISRAELI ASSOCIATION FOR ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY].

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    Levin Agmon, Nancy; Kessel, Aharon; Maoz Segal, Ramit; Rottem, Menachem; Tal, Yuval; Confino-Cohen, Ronit; Tobi, Elias

    2017-06-01

    Chronic urticaria is a disease manifested by a pruritic rash lasting longer than 6 weeks that may severely affect quality of life and daily function. Chronic urticaria can be further divided into chronic spontaneous urticaria which appears without a trigger and chronic inducible urticaria which evolves following distinct physical triggers. These two clinical manifestations could coexist in the same patient. The pathogenesis of chronic urticaria is not fully elucidated, although it is considered an autoimmune disease in at least 50% patients that produce auto- IgG antibodies targeted against the high affinity Fc receptor and to a lesser extent against IgE itself. Auto-antibodies associated with different autoimmune diseases can be detected such as those directed at thyroid proteins. Urticaria tends to spontaneously resolve in 50% of patients within the first year while others will suffer from it for a much longer period of time. The treatment of chronic urticaria has dramatically progressed in the last decade, enabling reduction of systemic corticosteroid use which has been the cornerstone of treatment in the past. The recommended treatment for chronic urticaria is currently based on a stepwise approach that enables achieving disease control with a reasonably good quality of life. The first step of the treatment ladder consists of selective, new generation, anti-H1 histamine blockers, which do not cross the blood brain barrier, starting from the recommended dose (first line) and increasing up to four-fold (second line). The third line of treatment is the addition of immune modulators such as leukotriene receptor blockers (Singulair), anti-IgE biological therapy (Xolair), or cyclosporine. In this review we present the updates and considerations arising during evaluation and treatment of chronic urticaria. The need for specific tests, immunologist/allergologist evaluation, as well as treatment modalities taking into consideration the large body of evidence that has

  7. Hutchinson’s Sign

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    Lawrence Lau

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 30-year-old African American male presents with two days of gradually worsening vesicular pruritic rash over the left naris, left upper lip, and inferior to medial epicanthus, initially noted just on the upper lip the night before. By the next day it had spread to the nose and cheek. Patient denies any fever, pain, discharge from the rash, ear or nose, or changes in vision. He denies exposure to any new hygiene products, household cleaning products, recent outdoor activities, travel, or insect bites. Past medical history significant for a childhood varicella infection. Patient works for a moving company, and had an episode of heat exhaustion at work one week prior to onset. Denies alcohol or drug abuse. Significant findings: The unilateral distribution of vesicular lesions over the patient’s left naris, cheek, and upper lip are consistent with Herpes zoster reactivation with Hutchinson’s sign. Hutchinson’s sign is a herpes zoster vesicle present on the tip or side of the nose.1 It reflects zoster involvement of the 1st branch of the trigeminal nerve, and is concerning for herpes zoster ophthalmicus.1 Herpes zoster vesicles may present as papular lesions or macular vesicles on an erythematous base.2,3 Emergent diagnosis must be made to prevent long-term visual sequelae.4 Discussion: The history of a childhood viral exanthem, specifically a past varicella infection, helps direct the diagnosis.2 Herpes zoster ophthalmicus is an ophthalmological emergency and results from viral reactivation within the V1 branch of CN V, leading to direct ocular involvement.1 Symptoms of ocular involvement include red eye, blurry vision, eye pain or photophobia.1 If left untreated, corneal ulceration, scarring, perforation, glaucoma, cataracts, and blindness may occur.1 Fluorescein staining with slit lamp examination will show a characteristic “dendritic ulcer” within the epithelial layer of the cornea.1 Treatment is generally

  8. An outbreak of Psoroptic mange infestation and its management in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One cow exhibited non-pruritic, widespread alopecia all over its body and appeared to recover after being treated with injectable ivermectin acaricide. Subsequently, an outbreak of severe non-pruritic alopecia ensued in the buffalo herd at the onset of winter May 2013. Laboratory diagnosis confirmed Psoroptes mites ...

  9. Eritema infeccioso: un exantema infantil a considerar en la práctica diaria Fifth disease or infectious erythema: a childhood rash to consider in the daily medical practice

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    AD Pérez-Elizondo

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso de un escolar con febrícula y leve ataque del estado general, quien desarrolla una erupción maculosa en mejillas, pocos días después un exantema en "encaje" o reticulado en tronco posterior y parte proximal de extremidades inferiores, compatible con la quinta enfermedad y confirmado por la morfología lesional característica y la inmuno-serología (IgM.We present a five years old child with a mild fever and malaise, a maculoedematous eruption on cheeks and a "lace" exanthema located on posterior aspect of the trunk and lower limbs, developed after a few days. A fifth disease was diagnosticated based on characteristic morphological presentation and immunoserological studies.

  10. [Reactivation of herpes zoster infection by varicella-zoster virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvjetković, D; Jovanović, J; Hrnjaković-Cvjetković, I; Brkić, S; Bogdanović, M

    1999-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in varicella-zoster virus in the middle of the twentieth century. Virus isolation in 1958 had made it possible to find out the complete DNA sequence of the varicella-zoster virus. Molecular identify of the causative agents of varicella and shingles had been proved. ETIOPATHOGENESIS AND HISTOPATHOLOGY: Varicella-zoster virus is a member of the Herpesviridae family. After primary infection which results in varicella, the virus becomes latent in the cerebral or posterior root ganglia. Some of these individuals develop shingles after several decades because of virus reactivation. It is caused by decline of cellular immune response. Circumstances such as old age, hard work, using of steroids or malignancies contribute to the appearance of shingles. Histopathological findings include degenerative changes of epithelial cells such as ballooning, multinucleated giant cells and eosinophilic intranuclear inclusions. Shingles occur sporadically, mainly among the elderly who have had varicella. There is no seasonal appearance of shingles. Individuals suffering from shingles may be sometimes contagious for susceptible children because of enormous amount of virus particles in vesicle fluid. Clinically, shingles is characterized at first by pain or discomfort in involved dermatome, usually without constitutional symptoms. Local edema and erythema appear before developing of rash. Maculopapular and vesicular rash evolves into crusts. The most commonly involved ganglia are: lumbar, thoracic, sacral posterior root ganglia, then geniculate ganglion of the VIIth cranial nerve and the trigeminal ganglion. The most common complication, postherpetic neuralgia, may last for as long as two or three weeks, sometimes even one year or more. Other complications that may be seen in shingles, but more rarely, are ocular (keratitis, iridocyclitis, secondary glaucoma, loss of sight), neurological (various motor neuropathies, encephalitis, Guillain-Barre syndrome

  11. Identify-Isolate-Inform: A Tool for Initial Detection and Management of Zika Virus Patients in the Emergency Department

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    Kristi L. Koenig

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available First isolated in 1947 from a monkey in the Zika forest in Uganda, and from mosquitoes in the same forest the following year, Zika virus has gained international attention due to concerns for infection in pregnant women potentially causing fetal microcephaly. More than one million people have been infected since the appearance of the virus in Brazil in 2015. Approximately 80% of infected patients are asymptomatic. An association with microcephaly and other birth defects as well as Guillain-Barre Syndrome has led to a World Health Organization declaration of Zika virus as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern in February 2016. Zika virus is a vector-borne disease transmitted primarily by the Aedes aegypti mosquito. Male to female sexual transmission has been reported and there is potential for transmission via blood transfusions. After an incubation period of 2-7 days, symptomatic patients develop rapid onset fever, maculopapular rash, arthralgia, and conjunctivitis, often associated with headache and myalgias. Emergency department (ED personnel must be prepared to address concerns from patients presenting with symptoms consistent with acute Zika virus infection, especially those who are pregnant or planning travel to Zika-endemic regions, as well as those women planning to become pregnant and their partners. The identify-isolate-inform (3I tool, originally conceived for initial detection and management of Ebola virus disease patients in the ED, and later adjusted for measles and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, can be adapted for real-time use for any emerging infectious disease. This paper reports a modification of the 3I tool for initial detection and management of patients under investigation for Zika virus. Following an assessment of epidemiologic risk, including travel to countries with mosquitoes that transmit Zika virus, patients are further investigated if clinically indicated. If after a rapid evaluation, Zika or other

  12. Detection of β-lactoglobulin in human breast-milk 7 days after cow milk ingestion.

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    Matangkasombut, Ponpan; Padungpak, Savitree; Thaloengsok, Sasikanya; Kamchaisatian, Wasu; Sasisakulporn, Cherapat; Jotikasthira, Wanlapa; Benjaponpitak, Suwat; Manuyakorn, Wiparat

    2017-08-01

    β-lactoglobulin (BLG), a major allergen in cow milk (CM) can be detected in human breast-milk (BM) and is associated with exacerbation of symptoms in breastfed infants with cow milk protein allergy (CMPA). Currently, it is not known how long lactating mothers who consume dairy products need to withhold breastfeeding. To elucidate the kinetics of BLG in BM after maternal ingestion of a single dose of CM. Nineteen lactating mothers, four of whom had infants with CMPA, were instructed to avoid CM for 7 days before ingesting a single dose of CM and to continue to withhold CM thereafter throughout the study period. BLG was measured by ELISA in BM from 15 mothers of healthy infants before and at 3, 6 and 24 h, and 3 and 7 days after CM ingestion. Four pairs of mothers and CMPA infants were enrolled for BM challenge after the mothers had ingested CM. After CM ingestion, the level of BLG in BM increased significantly from 0.58 ng/ml (0.58 g/L) (IQR 0.38-0.88) to a peak level of 1.23 ng/ml (IQR 1.03-2.29), p < 0.001. The BLG level on day 3 (1.15 ng/ml, IQR 0.89-1.45) and day 7 (1.08 ng/ml (IQR 0.86-1.25) after CM ingestion was significantly higher than baseline (p = 0.01 and p = 0.001, respectively). BLG was detected in all BM samples from the four mothers of CMPA infants after CM ingestion, and the level was not different from that in the mothers of the 15 healthy infants. Three of the four CMPA infants developed symptoms such as maculopapular rash and hypersecretion in the airways after BM challenge. BLG can be detected in BM up to 7 days after CM ingestion. Lactating mothers should suspend breastfeeding to CMPA infants more than 7 days after CM ingestion.

  13. Understanding Zika virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, John S

    2017-01-01

    This article describes what pediatric healthcare professionals should know about Zika virus (ZIKV). ZIKV is classified as an arthropod-borne, single-stranded RNA virus of the Flaviviridae family and genus Flavivirus. ZIKV is not new. The virus was first discovered almost 70 years ago in Uganda. The first isolate of the virus was found in rhesus monkeys in the Zika Forrest, hence the nomenclature. The primary route of ZIKV transmission to humans is through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito-primarily Aedes aegypti. When the mosquito bites individuals infected with the virus, mosquitos then become the vector of transmitting the infection to others. Women can also pass ZIKV to their fetus during pregnancy and at the time of delivery. ZIKV can also be transmitted through sexual activity from an individual who is infected with the virus to his or her partners. It is estimated that approximately 18% of individuals infected with ZIKV will go on to develop symptoms. When symptoms develop, it is usually within 3-12 days, although this may vary. Most often, symptoms are mild and self-limited. The most common symptoms are fever, arthralgia, maculopapular rash, and conjunctivitis lasting up to seven days. Less frequent symptoms include headache, vertigo, myalgia, vomiting, and diarrhea. At present, there is no vaccine available to prevent ZIKV and no specific antiviral treatment. Supportive care consisting of rest, hydration, analgesics, antihistamines, and antipyretics is recommended as needed. Given that there is no vaccine or treatment for ZIKV, considerable efforts must be focused on prevention. One of the most effective ways of preventing ZIKV infection is through avoiding mosquito bites, especially when traveling to or residing in areas where transmission is present. Precautions should include wearing appropriate attire with the objective of having as little skin exposed as possible, use of screens for windows and doors, and use of insect repellent. What is

  14. Association of HLA genotypes with phenobarbital hypersensitivity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuyakorn, Wiparat; Mahasirimongkol, Surakameth; Likkasittipan, Plernpit; Kamchaisatian, Wasu; Wattanapokayakit, Sukanya; Inunchot, Wimala; Visudtibhan, Anannit; Wichukchinda, Nuanjun; Benjaponpitak, Suwat

    2016-10-01

    Phenobarbital hypersensitivity is one of the common drug hypersensitivity syndromes in children. Clinical symptoms of phenobarbital hypersensitivity vary from maculopapular rashes (MPs) to severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions (SCARs) including drug reactions with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). Drug hypersensitivity has been demonstrated to be associated with variations in the HLA genotypes. This study was to investigate the association between the variations of HLA genotypes and phenobarbital hypersensitivity in Thai children. The cases were Thai children, between 0 and 18 years of age, who were diagnosed with phenobarbital hypersensitivity, which included SCARs and MPs. The control patients were Thai children of a corresponding age who had taken phenobarbital for at least 12 weeks without any hypersensitivity reaction. Blood samples were collected for HLA genotyping by using a reverse-sequence-specific oligonucleotide (SSO) probes method. The carrier rates of HLA alleles were compared between 47 cases (27 SCARs and 20 MPs) and 54 controls. The carrier rates of HLA-A*01:01 and HLA-B*13:01 were significantly higher in the phenobarbital-induced SCARs than in the tolerant controls (18.5% vs. 1.85%, p = 0.01, odds ratio [OR] 11.66, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21-578.19; 37.04% vs. 11.11%, p = 0.009, OR 4.60, 95%CI 1.29-17.98). There was a trend of a higher carrier rate of HLA-C*06:02 in the phenobarbital-induced SCARs when compared with those in the tolerant controls (29.63% vs. 11.11%, p = 0.059, OR 3.31, 95% CI 0.88-13.31). In contrast to the phenobarbital-induced SCARs, only the HLA-A*01:01 carrier rate in the phenobarbital-induced MPs was significantly higher than those in the tolerant controls (20% vs. 1.85%, p = 0.017, OR 12.69, 95% CI 1.15-661.62). An association between phenobarbital hypersensitivity and HLA-A*01:01 and HLA-B*13:01 has been demonstrated in Thai children

  15. Enfermedad injerto contra huesped: sus manifestaciones bucales

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    Claudia Marcela Hernández Cancino

    Full Text Available La enfermedad injerto contra huésped es la principal complicación que sufren los pacientes que han recibido trasplante alogénico. Se produce como consecuencia de una reacción inflamatoria exagerada mediada por los linfocitos del donante y estimulada por aquellos tejidos que han sido lesionados por la enfermedad de base, por las infecciones previas o por el tratamiento de acondicionamiento. El diagnóstico es clínico e histopatológico. Los pacientes presentan rash maculopapular pruriginoso y doloroso que puede extenderse por toda la superficie corporal, fiebre, vómito, náuseas, diarrea y anorexia. En la mucosa bucal se observan erosiones ulceradas, extremamente dolorosas y pueden ser la primera o la única manifestación detectable clínicamente de esta enfermedad. El objetivo es presentar un caso de enfermedad de injerto contra huésped. Se trata de una mujer de 54 años de edad con linfoma no-Hodgking, que recibió tratamiento con quimioterapia, radioterapia y trasplante de células madre hematopoyéticas en el 2009. Tres meses después, presentó lesiones en la piel diagnosticadas como enfermedad injerto contra huésped y tratadas con corticoesteroides, a los seis meses fue remitida al odontólogo porque se quejaba de ardor en la boca, xerostomía y dificultad para masticar, tenía úlceras en la mucosa bucal y en la lengua. En la ocasión recibió tratamiento con corticoesteroides, clorhexidina, orientaciones de higiene bucal y controles clínicos permanentes. Aunque existen protocolos para la prevención y el tratamiento de la enfermedad injerto contra el huésped, su frecuencia ha aumentado en los últimos años debido al incremento en el número de trasplantes. Por esta razón, es fundamental que el odontólogo forme parte del grupo multidisciplinario que asiste al paciente y que esté familiarizado con los signos y síntomas de esta enfermedad en la mucosa bucal, pues las manifestaciones clínicas pueden ser las únicas para

  16. Características clínico-epidemiológicas da doença Lyme-símile em crianças Epidemiological characteristics of Lyme-like disease in children

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    Saulo Duarte Passos

    2009-01-01

    C (58.3% with a duration of 1 to 3 days. Erythema was maculo-papular (40%, urticaria-like (25% and scarlatiniform (16.7%, occurring predominately on the trunk (60%. There were no primary clinical evidences of Lyme-simile disease in the patients under study. The sensitivity and specificity of the clinical diagnosis as opposed to the laboratory diagnosis was zero. There was no initial clinical suspicion of the disease in the 10 cases studied and followed up for two years that showed no evidence of cardiologic or neurological complications. This is the first study of Lyme-simile in Brazilian children. CONCLUSION: Prevalence of Lyme-simile disease was low, and it was not remembered at the initial diagnosis of those with skin rash. However, practical knowledge is necessary, demanding increased medical attention.

  17. Macular amyloidosis and hypothyroidism

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    Chopra Adarsh

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A 53 year old woman presented with extensive pruritic hyperpigmented macules in interscapular area and extremities of four years duration.She was an established case of hypothyroidism on treatment for last four years.

  18. Pruritus in Female Patients

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    Julien Lambert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pruritus is a frequent symptom in many dermatological diseases. In this review we want to focus on not only itch problems specific to women, namely, pruritic vulvodermatoses, but also the specific pruritic dermatoses of pregnancy. The specific characteristics of the vulva and the hormonal changes during the different age periods make these dermatoses very particular. It seems that vulvar diseases are still underdiagnosed and undertreated. Pruritic vulvar diseases have a huge impact on quality of life. The most common pruritic diseases will be discussed, such as atopic and contact dermatitis, psoriasis, lichen sclerosis, lichen planus, and infectious vulvaginitis. We focus on the diagnostic issue of these diseases and will consider the general principles of therapy.

  19. Recreational and occupational field exposure to freshwater cyanobacteria – a review of anecdotal and case reports, epidemiological studies and the challenges for epidemiologic assessment

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    Webb Penelope M

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cyanobacteria are common inhabitants of freshwater lakes and reservoirs throughout the world. Under favourable conditions, certain cyanobacteria can dominate the phytoplankton within a waterbody and form nuisance blooms. Case reports and anecdotal references dating from 1949 describe a range of illnesses associated with recreational exposure to cyanobacteria: hay fever-like symptoms, pruritic skin rashes and gastro-intestinal symptoms are most frequently reported. Some papers give convincing descriptions of allergic reactions while others describe more serious acute illnesses, with symptoms such as severe headache, pneumonia, fever, myalgia, vertigo and blistering in the mouth. A coroner in the United States found that a teenage boy died as a result of accidentally ingesting a neurotoxic cyanotoxin from a golf course pond. This death is the first recorded human fatality attributed to recreational exposure to cyanobacteria, although uncertainties surround the forensic identification of the suspected cyanotoxin in this case. We systematically reviewed the literature on recreational exposure to freshwater cyanobacteria. Epidemiological data are limited, with six studies conducted since 1990. Statistically significant increases in symptoms were reported in individuals exposed to cyanobacteria compared to unexposed counterparts in two Australian cohort studies, though minor morbidity appeared to be the main finding. The four other small studies (three from the UK, one Australian did not report any significant association. However, the potential for serious injury or death remains, as freshwater cyanobacteria under bloom conditions are capable of producing potent toxins that cause specific and severe dysfunction to hepatic or central nervous systems. The exposure route for these toxins is oral, from ingestion of recreational water, and possibly by inhalation. A range of freshwater microbial agents may cause acute conditions that present with

  20. Manifestações mucocutâneas da dengue Mucocutaneous manifestations of dengue

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    Omar Lupi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Dengue é doença viral sistêmica que ocorre de forma epidêmica em áreas tropicais e subtropicais da Ásia, Américas e África. O vírus da dengue pertence ao gênero Flavivirus e à família Flaviviridae (arbovírus do grupo B. Aedes aegypti é o principal vetor e verdadeiro reservatório. A febre na dengue clássica persiste por período de dois a cinco dias com cefaléia intensa, mialgia, artralgia e dor retro-orbital. Alterações cutâneas incluem diversos achados como erupção morbiliforme que pode ser pruriginosa e que gera descamação residual, algumas manifestações hemorrágicas discretas como epistaxe, petéquias e sangramento gengival. Extravasamento capilar de plasma é responsável pela hemoconcentração e trombocitopenia observadas e que caracterizam a dengue hemorrágica. Manifestações cutâneas da dengue hemorrágica incluem lesões hemorrágicas disseminadas como petéquias e equimoses, mas também instabilidade hemodinâmica com pulso filiforme, pressão arterial convergente, extremidades frias, confusão mental e choque.Dengue fever is a systemic viral disease that occurs epidemically in tropical and subtropical regions of Asia, Americas and Africa. The dengue virus belongs to the genus Flavivirus of the family Flaviviridae (group B arbovirus. Aedes aegypti is the major vector and the true reservoir for the virus. Classic dengue fever lasts for two-five days, with severe headache, intense myalgia, arthralgia and retro-orbital pain. Cutaneous alterations include several findings such as a diffuse morbilliform rash that may be pruritic and heals with desquamation, and minor bleeding phenomena such as epistaxis, petechiae, and gingival bleeding. Diffuse capillary leakage of plasma is responsible for the hemoconcentration and thrombocytopenia that characterize dengue hemorrhagic fever. Cutaneous manifestations of dengue hemorrhagic fever include many disseminated hemorrhagic lesions such as petechiae and ecchymoses, but

  1. "'The Natural World Is the Most Universal of Languages'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Thomas Ærvold

    2007-01-01

    Interview med den amerikanske forfatter Ron Rash. Rash taler bl.a. om de forskellige temaer i sine værker, om forholdet til naturen, og regionale fordomme i USA og om sine skrivevaner. Udgivelsesdato: Winter...

  2. Roman Chamomile

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eczema, frostbite, diaper rash, bedsores (decubitus ulcers), and hemorrhoids. Roman chamomile is sometimes mixed with other herbs ... gums. Liver and gallbladder problems. Frostbite. Diaper rash. Hemorrhoids. Other conditions. More evidence is needed to rate ...

  3. Rickettsialpox

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 15 days after coming in contact with the bacteria. Other symptoms may include: Discomfort in bright light ( photophobia ) Fever and chills Muscle pain Rash that looks like chickenpox Sweating The rash is not painful and ...

  4. Febrile urticaria in a family: uncommon manifestation of a common disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vishal; Singhal, Mayank; Sharma, Alka; Kumar, Vivek

    2012-12-15

    Cutaneous manifestations are uncommon with malaria. These include urticaria, purpura fulminans, and petechial rash. We report on a series of three patients from a single family who had an urticarial rash with fever that was subsequently diagnosed to be caused by malaria. Urticarial rash has been previously reported with both falciparum and vivax malaria infections. Although the exact pathogenesis is not clear urticarial rash might be related with IgE mediated mast cell degranulation.

  5. Metabolic complications in the small intestine syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora, Rafael; Orozco, Reynaldo

    2000-01-01

    Metabolic complications in the syndrome of small intestine is presented in a patient of masculine sex, 27 years old, who consulted for a square of inflammation gingival, migraine, fever, anorexia and adinamia for three days, followed by maculopapular-eritematose eruption for 8 days, coincident with the ampicillin ingestion, and later on severe abdominal pain and diarrhea

  6. HLA-A*3101 and carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity reactions in Europeans.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCormack, Mark

    2011-03-24

    Carbamazepine causes various forms of hypersensitivity reactions, ranging from maculopapular exanthema to severe blistering reactions. The HLA-B*1502 allele has been shown to be strongly correlated with carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS-TEN) in the Han Chinese and other Asian populations but not in European populations.

  7. Regorafenib plus best supportive care versus placebo plus best supportive care in Asian patients with previously treated metastatic colorectal cancer (CONCUR): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Qin, Shukui; Xu, Ruihua; Yau, Thomas C C; Ma, Brigette; Pan, Hongming; Xu, Jianming; Bai, Yuxian; Chi, Yihebali; Wang, Liwei; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Bi, Feng; Cheng, Ying; Le, Anh Tuan; Lin, Jen-Kou; Liu, Tianshu; Ma, Dong; Kappeler, Christian; Kalmus, Joachim; Kim, Tae Won

    2015-06-01

    than it was with placebo (hazard ratio 0·55, 95% CI 0·40-0·77, one-sided p=0·00016; median overall survival 8·8 months [95% CI 7·3-9·8] in the regorafenib group vs 6·3 months [4·8-7·6] in the placebo group). Drug-related adverse events occurred in 132 (97%) of 136 regorafenib recipients and 31 (46%) of 68 placebo recipients. The most frequent grade 3 or higher regorafenib-related adverse events were hand-foot skin reaction (22 [16%] of 136 patients in the regorafenib group vs none in the placebo group), hypertension (15 [11%] vs two [3%] of 68 patients in the placebo group), hyperbilirubinaemia (nine [7%] vs one [1%]), hypophosphataemia (nine [7%] vs none), alanine aminotransferase concentration increases (nine [7%] vs none), aspartate aminotransferase concentration increases (eight [6%] vs none), lipase concentration increases (six [4%] vs one [1%]), and maculopapular rash (six [4%] vs none). Drug-related serious adverse events occurred in 12 (9%) patients in the regorafenib group and three (4%) in the placebo group. This phase 3 trial is the second to show an overall survival benefit with regorafenib compared with placebo in patients with treatment-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer, substantiating the role of regorafenib as an important treatment option for patients whose disease has progressed after standard treatments. In this trial, preceding standard treatments did not necessarily include targeted treatments. Adverse events were generally consistent with the known safety profile of regorafenib in this setting. Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Prophylactic platelet transfusion plus supportive care versus supportive care alone in adults with dengue and thrombocytopenia: a multicentre, open-label, randomised, superiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lye, David C; Archuleta, Sophia; Syed-Omar, Sharifah F; Low, Jenny G; Oh, Helen M; Wei, Yuan; Fisher, Dale; Ponnampalavanar, Sasheela S L; Wijaya, Limin; Lee, Linda K; Ooi, Eng-Eong; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Lum, Lucy C; Tambyah, Paul A; Leo, Yee-Sin

    2017-04-22

    5·34]; relative risk 0·81 [95% CI 0·56 to 1·17]; p=0·16). 13 adverse events occurred in the transfusion group and two occurred in the control group (5·81% [-4·42 to 16·01]; 6·26 [1·43 to 27·34]; p=0·0064). Adverse events that were possibly, probably, or definitely related to transfusion included three cases of urticaria, one maculopapular rash, one pruritus, and one chest pain, as well as one case each of anaphylaxis, transfusion-related acute lung injury, and fluid overload that resulted in serious adverse events. No death was reported. In adult patients with dengue and thrombocytopenia, prophylactic platelet transfusion was not superior to supportive care in preventing bleeding, and might be associated with adverse events. National Medical Research Council, Singapore. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Testing for Zika virus infection in pregnancy: key concepts to deal with an emerging epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppes, Catherine; Rac, Martha; Dunn, James; Versalovic, James; Murray, Kristy O; Suter, Melissa A; Sanz Cortes, Magda; Espinoza, Jimmy; Seferovic, Maxim D; Lee, Wesley; Hotez, Peter; Mastrobattista, Joan; Clark, Steven L; Belfort, Michael A; Aagaard, Kjersti M

    2017-03-01

    Zika virus is an emerging mosquito-borne (Aedes genus) arbovirus of the Flaviviridae family. Following epidemics in Micronesia and French Polynesia during the past decade, more recent Zika virus infection outbreaks were first reported in South America as early as May 2013 and spread to now 50 countries throughout the Americas. Although no other flavivirus has previously been known to cause major fetal malformations following perinatal infection, reports of a causal link between Zika virus and microcephaly, brain and ocular malformations, and fetal loss emerged from hard-hit regions of Brazil by October 2015. Among the minority of infected women with symptoms, clinical manifestations of Zika virus infection may include fever, headache, arthralgia, myalgia, and maculopapular rash; however, only 1 of every 4-5 people who are infected have any symptoms. Thus, clinical symptom reporting is an ineffective screening tool for the relative risk assessment of Zika virus infection in the majority of patients. As previously occurred with other largely asymptomatic viral infections posing perinatal transmission risk (such as HIV or cytomegalovirus), we must develop and implement rapid, sensitive, and specific screening and diagnostic testing for both viral detection and estimation of timing of exposure. Unfortunately, despite an unprecedented surge in attempts to rapidly advance perinatal clinical testing for a previously obscure arbovirus, there are several ongoing hindrances to molecular- and sonographic-based screening and diagnosis of congenital Zika virus infection. These include the following: (1) difficulty in estimating the timing of exposure for women living in endemic areas and thus limited interpretability of immunoglobulin M serologies; (2) cross-reaction of immunoglobulin serologies with other endemic flaviruses, such as dengue; (3) persistent viremia and viruria in pregnancy weeks to months after primary exposure; and (4) fetal brain malformations and anomalies

  10. Canine and feline atopic dermatitis: a review of the diagnostic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, C A

    2001-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis is an inherited pruritic skin disease in dogs and cats. This pruritic skin condition is due to the animal having an allergic reaction to environmental allergens. The environmental allergens that an individual dog or cat is allergic to are specific for that individual animal. Management options for affected dogs and cats include identification of the offending environmental allergens and subsequent avoidance of that allergen, or allergen-specific immunotherapy. Several diagnostic tests are available to veterinarians to try to identify these allergens. The pros and cons of each of these diagnostic tests will be addressed.

  11. Urticaria and angioedema – more than just skin deep! | Holtzhausen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urticaria and angioedema are characterized by pruritic hives and sometimes swelling of deeper mucocutaneous layers. Urticaria is caused by release of histamine and other mediators from mast cells. A cut-off of six weeks distinguishes acute and chronic forms, as these seem to differ regarding etiological and response ...

  12. Bowen's disease: report of a case in a Nigerian man | Yahya | West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bowen's disease (cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in situ), like other cancers of the skin, is rare in black people – to our knowledge, only about 43 cases have been published in the medical literature. We report a 59-year old Nigerian man who presented with a five-year history of a mildly pruritic, slowly enlarging ...

  13. Case for diagnosis. Actinic prurigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daldon, Patricia Erica Christofoletti; Pascini, Mirella; Correa, Mariane

    2010-01-01

    A 13-year-old black boy had pruritic papular and nodular lesions on his forearms associated to edema of the lower lip, photophobia, conjunctivitis and pterygium. Skin biopsy of the lower lip revealed acanthosis, spongiosis with dermal perivascular mononuclear cell infiltration composed by lymphocytes, plasma cells and eosinophils consistent with actinic prurigo. Lesions improved considerably with the use of thalidomide 100mg/ day.

  14. Recombinant culicoides obsoletus complex allergens stimulate antigen-specific T cells on insect bite hypersensitive Shetland ponies in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenbroeks, C.; Meide, van der N.M.A.; Willemse, T.; Rutten, V.; Tijhaar, E.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ponies may suffer from Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH), an allergic IgE-mediated pruritic skin disorder, induced by allergens from biting midges of the Culicoides spp. Hypothesis/Objectives To determine whether recombinant Culicoides obsoletus allergens are able to activate T cells of

  15. Seasonal differences in cytokine expression in the skin of Shetland ponies suffering from insect bite hypersensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenbroeks, C.; Meide, van der N.M.A.; Zaiss, D.M.W.; Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, M.M.S.; Lugt, van der J.J.; Smak, J.; Rutten, V.P.M.G.; Willemse, T.

    2013-01-01

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) in horses is a seasonal, IgE-mediated, pruritic skin disorder primarily caused by Culicoides spp. We hypothesize that a mixed Th2/Th1-type immune status, off season, alters into Th2-dominated immune reactivity in the skin of IBH-affected ponies in the IBM season.

  16. ETFAD/EADV Eczema task force 2015 position paper on diagnosis and treatment of atopic dermatitis in adult and paediatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wollenberg, A; Oranje, A; Deleuran, M; Simon, D; Szalai, Z; Kunz, B; Svensson, A; Barbarot, S; von Kobyletzki, L; Taieb, A; de Bruin-Weller, M; Werfel, T; Trzeciak, M; Vestergard, C; Ring, J; Darsow, U

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a clinically defined, highly pruritic, chronic inflammatory skin disease of children and adults. The diagnosis is made using evaluated clinical criteria. Disease activity is best measured with a composite score assessing both objective signs and subjective symptoms, such as

  17. The Many Faces of Meningococcal Disease: A Case Series and Review of Presentations and Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    United States. Classic findings include headache, fevers , and a petechial rash that begins on the lower extremities with a predilection for areas of...cough and sore throat, but no headache or fevers . He reported to the medical clinic at 9:00 a.m., 6 hours after the rash began. He was in acute...meningitidis septicemia (meningococcemia). Case 2 A 22-year-old active-duty female developed fevers , headaches, confusion, and a rash on her

  18. Smallpox vaccination and adverse reactions. Guidance for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cono, Joanne; Casey, Christine G; Bell, David M

    2003-02-21

    persons aged or = 60% alcohol immediately after they touch their vaccination site or change their vaccination site bandages. Used bandages should be placed in sealed plastic bags and can be disposed of in household trash. Smallpox vaccine adverse reactions are diagnosed on the basis of clinical examination and history, and certain reactions can be managed by observation and supportive care. Adverse reactions that are usually self-limited include fever, headache, fatigue, myalgia, chills, local skin reactions, nonspecific rashes, erythema multiforme, lymphadenopathy, and pain at the vaccination site. Other reactions are most often diagnosed through a complete history and physical and might require additional therapies (e.g., VIG, a first-line therapy and cidofovir, a second-line therapy). Adverse reactions that might require further evaluation or therapy include inadvertent inoculation, generalized vaccinia (GV), eczema vaccinatum (EV), progressive vaccinia (PV), postvaccinial central nervous system disease, and fetal vaccinia. Inadvertent inoculation occurs when vaccinia virus is transferred from a vaccination site to a second location on the vaccinee or to a close contact. Usually, this condition is self-limited and no additional care is needed. Inoculations of the eye and eyelid require evaluation by an ophthalmologist and might require therapy with topical antiviral or antibacterial medications, VIG, or topical steroids. GV is characterized by a disseminated maculopapular or vesicular rash, frequently on an erythematous base, which usually occurs 6-9 days after first-time vaccination. This condition is usually self-limited and benign, although treatment with VIG might be required when the patient is systemically ill or found to have an underlying immunocompromising condition. Infection-control precautions should be used to prevent secondary transmission and nosocomial infection. EV occurs among persons with a history of atopic dermatitis (eczema), irrespective of

  19. Myocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causes a mild rash, usually in children (fifth disease); and herpes simplex virus. Gastrointestinal infections (echoviruses), mononucleosis (Epstein-Barr virus) and German measles (rubella) also can cause ...

  20. Metoclopramide Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the jaw or neck speech problems depression thinking about harming or killing yourself fever muscle stiffness confusion fast, slow, or irregular heartbeat sweating seizures rash hives swelling ...

  1. Pediatric Viral Exanthema: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Jafar Saffar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Context Many diseases caused by viral agents are associated with fever and cutaneous manifestations. Viral exanthema is a widespread nonspecific skin rash, commonly characterized by generalized eruption of erythematous macules and papular lesions. Although these rashes are mostly benign and self-limited, some may be serious and life-threatening. Differentiation between severe and benign types is clinically important and life-saving. Evidence Acquisition In this narrative review, electronic databases, including Google Scholar, Science Direct, PubMed (including Medline, Web of Science, Scientific Information Database, and Scopus, were searched. We conducted a narrative review of papers published on pediatric viral exanthema during 2000 - 2016. The used keywords included “viral exanthema”, “fever”, and “skin rash”. Articles on skin rash, caused by drug reactions or nonviral exanthema, were excluded. Results Different viral agents can cause different types of skin reactions. Cutaneous manifestations and skin rashes can be categorized, based on the form of the rash (macular, papular, vesicular, blistery, petechial, and purpuric or the general term, which denotes illnesses such as measles-like morbilliform rash, rubella or rubelliform rash, and scarlatiniform rash, a scarlet-fever like infection. Conclusions Based on the findings, a systematic approach relying on accurate history-taking and analysis of epidemiological cues and rash characteristics is of great significance.

  2. Disseminated cryptococcosis and fluconazole resistant oral candidiasis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothavade, Rajendra J; Oberai, Chetan M; Valand, Arvind G; Panthaki, Mehroo H

    2010-10-28

    Disseminated cryptococcosis and recurrent oral candidiasis was presented in a-heterosexual AIDS patient. Candida tropicalis (C.tropicalis) was isolated from the oral pseudomembranous plaques and Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans) was isolated from maculopapular lesions on body parts (face, hands and chest) and body fluids (urine, expectorated sputum, and cerebrospinal fluid). In vitro drug susceptibility testing on the yeast isolates demonstrated resistance to fluconazole acquired by C. tropicalis which was a suggestive possible root cause of recurrent oral candidiasis in this patient.

  3. Eritroblastozis fetalise bağlı Blueberry muffin bulgusu

    OpenAIRE

    CANPOLAT1, Filiz; 2, Fuat Emre CANPOLAT; 3, Hasan TEZER; 1, Fatma ESK?O?LU

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Blueberry Muffin sign due to erythroblastosis fetalis Blueberry muffin sign is a cutaneous manifestation characterized by widespread reddish-blue maculopapular lesions. The eruptions are often generalized but favor the trunk, head, and neck. Blueberry muffin skin lesions are manifestations of dermal haematopoiesis and are associated with both intra-uterine infections and hematological disorders with chronic and severe anaemia. TORCH (toxoplasmosis, rubella, cytomegalo-virus, he...

  4. Rat bite fever in a pet lover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, B B; Paller, A S; Katz, B Z

    1998-02-01

    Rat-bite fever is an uncommon bacterial illness resulting from infection with Streptobacillus moniliformis that is often transmitted by the bite of a rat. The cutaneous findings in rat-bite fever are nonspecific but have been described as maculopapular or petechial. We describe a 9-year-old girl with acrally distributed hemorrhagic pustules, fever, and arthralgias. Diagnosis was delayed because of difficulty in identifying the pathologic organism. She was successfully treated with 10 days of ceftriaxone.

  5. Dynamic Interplay between Varicelloviruses and their Primate Hosts : Dynamische Wisselwerking tussen Varicellovirussen en hun Primaten Gastheer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J.D. Ouwendijk (Werner )

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a ubiquitous human alphaherpesvirus (αHHV). Most individuals become infected with VZV during childhood typically resulting in generalized vesicular skin rash, although a minority of individuals will not develop evident skin rash. During

  6. Hepatit A geçiren hastada akut ürtiker ve Guillain-Barre like sendromun birlikteliği

    OpenAIRE

    GERENLİ, Nelgin Esenrodoplu; GÜVEN, Feray; UYGUR, Nihan; AKYÜZ, Ümit; SAY, Aysu

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis A infection (HAV) may present with extrahepatic manifestations rather than causing typical hepatitis. These are: urticarial rash, vasculitis, arthritis, transient arthralgia, hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, cryoglobulinemia, . Guillain-Barre Syndrome and polymyositis. We report a case of 4.5 years old boy with a rare association of acute HAV infection and urticarial rash accompanied by Guillain-Barre like Syndrome.

  7. Erythromycin and Sulfisoxazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency, yellowing of the skin or eyes, colitis, or stomach problems.tell your doctor if you ... rash If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: severe skin rash itching hives difficulty breathing or swallowing wheezing ...

  8. Herpes zoster: klinik, diagnostik og behandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Kristian; Rønholt, Finn; Gerstoft, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is a painful vesicular rash localized to one dermatome. Post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) is persistent pain three months after the rash started. In recent years several Cochrane reviews and clinical studies on how to treat HZ and PHN have been published. These studies show...

  9. Suid-Afrikaanse Tydskrif vu Geneeskund South African Medical Jo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and a punctate morbiHiform rash on the neck and upper chest. AP. showed a scratch on ... DESENSITIZATION AND TREATMENT. 659 ... erythematous, macular and papular rashes (compare the case ... in sensitivity occurs with increasing age, and fresh antigenic ... and will thus contribute, to the prevention of disease here.

  10. Sarcoptic mange in raccoons in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Scott D; Cooley, Thomas M; Murphy, Alice; Cosgrove, Melinda K; King, Betty A

    2004-04-01

    Sarcoptic mange is a cause of pruritic skin disease in domestic dogs and a wide range of wildlife species. We describe sarcoptic mange in free-ranging raccoons (Procyon lotor). Three adult raccoons from upper Wayne County, Michigan (USA), were captured, killed, and submitted for diagnostic evaluation. The animals were intensely pruritic, and two had advanced alopecic and crusting lesions over their dorsum and hind limbs. Skin scrapings and skin biopsies revealed crusting and hyperkeratotic dermatitis with high numbers of Sarcoptes scabiei adults, larvae, nymphs, and eggs. These raccoons were not otherwise debilitated, with minimal internal parasites, good body condition, and no evidence of infectious bacterial or viral diseases. Because sarcoptic mange is highly contagious and affects many species, including humans, transiently, it is important that wildlife biologists and rehabilitators include sarcoptic mange in their differential list for raccoons exhibiting pruritus and alopecia.

  11. [Sarcoptic mange: report of an outbreak in a family and their pet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, José L; Budnik, Isolda; Peña, Anamaría; Canales, Marilena; Concha, Mónica; López, Javier

    2014-02-01

    Scabies caused by the genus Sarcoptes scabiei var canis is a prevalent infection in dogs and affects abandoned, malnourished and overcrowded animals, causing hair loss and an intensely pruritic crusting dermatitis. In humans the manifestation is a self-limiting pruritic dermatitis, but persistent cases are described. An outbreak of sarcoptic mange is reported in a family group (seven people, including a 5 month infant and his mother). The infective source was their own house dog who was taken from the street. The diagnosis was confirmed by the detection of mites and eggs in the acarotest of the dog and mites of S. scabei in the infant. Sarcoptic mange should be suspected in individuals with allergic dermatitis who have contact with dogs. Treatment in humans is usually symptomatic and may need miticides if the infection persists. The control of the disease requires an appropriate pet treatment.

  12. Psychosomatic factors in pruritus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tey, Hong Liang; Wallengren, Joanna; Yosipovitch, Gil

    2013-01-01

    Pruritus and psyche are intricately and reciprocally related, with psychophysiological evidence and psychopathological explanations helping us to understand their complex association. Their interaction may be conceptualized and classified into 3 groups: pruritic diseases with psychiatric sequelae, pruritic diseases aggravated by psychosocial factors, and psychiatric disorders causing pruritus. Management of chronic pruritus is directed at treating the underlying causes and adopting a multidisciplinary approach to address the dermatologic, somatosensory, cognitive, and emotional aspects. Pharmcotherapeutic agents that are useful for chronic pruritus with comorbid depression and/or anxiety comprise selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, mirtazapine, tricyclic antidepressants (amitriptyline and doxepin), and anticonvulsants (gabapentin, pregabalin); the role of neurokinin receptor-1 antagonists awaits verification. Antipsychotics are required for treating itch and formication associated with schizophrenia and delusion of parasitosis (including Morgellons disease). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Morgellons Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ohn, Jungyoon; Park, Seon Yong; Moon, Jungyoon; Choe, Yun Seon; Kim, Kyu Han

    2017-01-01

    Morgellons disease is a rare disease with unknown etiology. Herein, we report the first case of Morgellons disease in Korea. A 30-year-old woman presented with a 2-month history of pruritic erythematous patches and erosions on the arms, hands, and chin. She insisted that she had fiber-like materials under her skin, which she had observed through a magnifying device. We performed skin biopsy, and observed a fiber extruding from the dermal side of the specimen. Histopathological examination sho...

  14. The Role of Wet Wrap Therapy in Skin Disorders - A literature Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rosa Marie; Thyssen, Jacob P; Maibach, Howard I

    2015-01-01

    Wet wrap therapy, based on skin application of a double layer of tubular bandages or gauze with a moist first inner layer and a dry second outer layer, is utilized to treat various pruritic conditions, in particular severe and refractory atopic dermatitis. This review, by literature search...... may trigger increased lamellar body secretion resulting in recovery of the damaged intercellular lipid laminar structure. Otherwise, little investigation on mechanisms exists....

  15. Case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    25 août 2015 ... Dans nos régions, une solution d'hydroxyde de potassium est régulièrement utilisée en application sur la peau comme traitement traditionnel dans le but de traiter un prurit ou une éruption cutanée. .... and 2.5% potassium hydroxide solution for molluscum contagiosum in children. Cutan Ocul Toxicol. 2014.

  16. Actinic prurigo in Scandinavian adolescent successfully treated with cyclosporine A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan C. Sitek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Actinic prurigo is a pruritic sun-induced dermatosis classified among the immunologically mediated photodermatoses. The disease is a well-known entity among Native Americans and in Central and South America, however rare in Caucasians with only a few reports from Australia, Britain and France. We report the first case of actinic prurigo in a Scandinavian patient, responding favorably to systemic treatment with cyclosporine A.

  17. Actinic Prurigo in Scandinavian Adolescent Successfully Treated with Cyclosporine A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitek, Jan C

    2017-03-13

    Actinic prurigo is a pruritic sun-induced dermatosis classified among the immunologically mediated photodermatoses. The disease is a well-known entity among Native Americans and in Central and South America, however rare in Caucasians with only a few reports from Australia, Britain and France. We report the first case of actinic prurigo in a Scandinavian patient, responding favorably to systemic treatment with cyclosporine A.

  18. Palmar and plantar lichen planus: a case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Velez, Ana Maria Abreu; Howard, Michael S; Pereyo, Neville

    2015-01-01

    AbstractPalmoplantar lichen planus is an uncommon dermatosis. We present a case of 38-year-old Caucasian male with a history of pruritic, scaly lesions on the right plantar foot. Physical examination revealed whitish plaques and numerous spiny hyperkeratotic papules and focal scaling. A biopsy demonstrated orthohyperkeratosis and acanthosis of the epidermis. Immunohistochemical staining revealed positivity within the epidermis and/or lichenoid infiltrate with CD3, CD8, CD45, CD68, myeloid his...

  19. Bee Venom Phospholipase A2 Alleviate House Dust Mite-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions by the CD206 Mannose Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Dasom Shin; Won Choi; Hyunsu Bae

    2018-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by highly pruritic, erythematous, and eczematous skin plaques. We previously reported that phospholipase A2 (PLA2) derived from bee venom alleviates AD-like skin lesions induced by 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) and house dust mite extract (Dermatophagoides farinae extract, DFE) in a murine model. However, the underlying mechanisms of PLA2 action in actopic dermatitis remain unclear. In this study, we showed that PLA...

  20. First report of acariasis by Caparinia tripilis in African hedgehogs, (Atelerix albiventris), in Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, Andrés; Troyo, Adriana; Calderón-Arguedas, Olger

    2013-01-01

    The African hedgehog is one of the newly imported exotic pets which have been observed with increasing regularity in veterinary clinics in Costa Rica. Despite their popularity, information about their diseases is scarce. Within skin diseases of hedgehogs, mange caused by Capariniaspp. is a common diagnosis in other countries. Two adult African hedgehogs, one male and one female, were brought to a private clinic in Heredia, Costa Rica, with chronic pruritic dermatitis, scabs, nearly complete l...

  1. First report of acariasis by Caparinia tripilis in African hedgehogs, (Atelerix albiventris), in Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira,Andrés; Troyo,Adriana; Calderón-Arguedas,Olger

    2013-01-01

    The African hedgehog is one of the newly imported exotic pets which have been observed with increasing regularity in veterinary clinics in Costa Rica. Despite their popularity, information about their diseases is scarce. Within skin diseases of hedgehogs, mange caused by Caparinia spp. is a common diagnosis in other countries. Two adult African hedgehogs, one male and one female, were brought to a private clinic in Heredia, Costa Rica, with chronic pruritic dermatitis, scabs, nearly complete ...

  2. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Antibiotics against Eosinophilic Pustular Folliculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Ono

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis (EPF is a chronic intractable pruritic dermatosis. Although indomethacin is generally effective against EPF and considered as a first-line therapy, quite a few patients with indomethacin still suffer from the symptoms. Among other therapeutic options, some antibiotics have been reported to be effective; however, there has been no epidemiological description regarding oral antibiotics use in patients with EPF. In this study, we investigated the frequency of antibiotics use and the effectiveness in patients with EPF.

  3. Dermatophytosis due to Microsporum nanum infection in a canine

    OpenAIRE

    Marilia Avila Valandro; João Paulo da Exaltação Pascon; Maria Lígia de Arruda Mistieri; Irina Lubeck

    2017-01-01

    Miscrosporum nanum is a dermatophyte found in swine that causes non-pruritic lesions with desquamation, alopecia, and circular characteristics. M. nanum infection in dogs is rare and poorly understood in terms of its epidemiological and clinical features, and its therapeutic response. The present report describes a case of dermatophytosis due to M. nanum in a Dogo Argentino breed of dog that was used for wild boar hunting. The dermatophytosis presented with hypotrichosis, erythema, and non-pr...

  4. GAMBARAN KLINIK DAN LATAR BELAKANG PASIEN DENGAN DIAGNOSIS KLNIK SEBAGAI LICHEN PLANUS DI POLI PENYAKIT MULUT RSCM DAN RSGM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Tjahjani Sumantri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Lichen planys is disorder of the skin and mucous membrane that presenting pruritic, purple and polygonal papules. Oral lesions may persist for years and with clinical appearance that sometimes very ocnfusing. In most cases, oral lesions are present as white, reticulated or natelike areas involving the mucosa. These lesions are characteristic and called Wickham's striae. This paper presented some cases with lesions that resembled oral lichen planus.

  5. Case series

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    22 août 2013 ... Le lien avec le virus du papillome humain (VPH), quoique fortement soupçonné, n'est pas confirmé [3]. D'un point de vue clinique, le cancer de la vulve se présente sous forme d'une masse, d'une plaque, d'un ulcère, d'un nodule, du prurit, des saignements et des pertes vaginales post ménopausiques, ...

  6. Pemphigoid gestationis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sävervall, Christine; Sand, Freja Lærke; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2017-01-01

    Many skin diseases can occur in pregnant women. However, a few pruritic dermatological conditions are unique to pregnancy, including pemphigoid gestationis (PG). As PG is associated with severe morbidity for pregnant women and carries fetal risks, it is important for the clinician to quickly reco...... recognize this disease and refer it for dermatological evaluation and treatment. Herein, we review the pathogenesis, clinical characteristics, and management of PG....

  7. Erythema multiforme and Stevens-Johnson syndrome following radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki

    2007-01-01

    Erythema multiforme (EM) and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) are thought to be hypersensitivity syndromes with various causes, and radiotherapy might be one of the causes of these syndromes. We herein report two cases of EM/SJS following radiotherapy. The first case was a 63-year-old woman with breast cancer. At the end of postoperative radiotherapy with 60 Gy, severe pruritic erythema appeared in the irradiated area and spread over the whole body. She was diagnosed with EM by a skin biopsy. The second case was a 77-year-old woman with uterine cervical cancer who underwent postoperative radiotherapy. At a dose of 30.6 Gy, pruritic redness appeared in the irradiated area and the precordial region, and it became widespread rapidly with polymorphic transformation. Although without any histological confirmation, SJS was strongly suspected because of her pruritic conjunctivitis. Because both patients were given medicines during irradiation, radiotherapy may not be the only cause of EM/SJS. However, it should be noted that radiotherapy might trigger EM/SJS. (author)

  8. Reiter's disease in a 8-year-old boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Kapoor

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An 8-year-old male child presented with complaints of pain abdomen and appearance of rashes all over the body, with pain and swelling of the left knee joint. The child was a known case of developmental delay with seizure disorder, and the rashes had appeared just after starting oral valproate. On examination, the child appeared well except for the rashes and local swelling with decreased range of motion in the left knee joint. Redness around the urethral meatus was also noted. Skin biopsy revealed features suggestive of reactive arthritis. The child responded well to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

  9. Dermatology case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Lacerda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To report a case of uncharacteristic presentation of Parvovirus B19. This virus causes some atypical cutaneous rash such as papular-purpuric “gloves and socks” syndrome which is a rare entity, self-limited and resolves spontaneously to cure. Case Report: Authors describe a case of a six-year-old boy who went to the Emergency Department with a cutaneous rash initially on a finger and then mouth, hands and feet followed by fever. He fully recovered without sequelae. Conclusions: It is important to consider this agent as a possible responsible for atypical purpuric rash.

  10. Exanthema after a stress Tc-99m sestamibi study: continue with a rest sestamibi study?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesse, Birger; Vinberg, Niels; Mosbech, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Purpose:  A mild allergic reaction assumed to be caused by injection of Tc-99m sestamibi for a stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is presented. We want to discuss the risk involved in completing the MPI with another sestamibi injection, and the precautions and possible treatment in case...... of a further reaction. Material and methods:  A patient experienced a maculo-papular exanthema, i.e. a mild, probably allergic, adverse event (AE) after a stress MPI including administration of a dose of Tc-99m sestamibi. A rest MPI was needed to decide whether coronary bypass surgery should be performed...

  11. Dress Syndrome - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kremić Zorana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS syndrome is an adverse drug-induced reaction that occurs most commonly after exposure to drugs, most frequently anticonvulsants, sulfa derivates, antidepressants, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and antimicrobials. We present a 61-year-old male, with a generalized maculopapular exanthema on the trunk, face, extremities, palms, soles, palate, and fever (38°C. His medical history was notable for generalized epilepsy, treated with carbamazepine during 1 month. The diagnosis of DRESS syndrome was confirmed by specific RegiSCAR criteria. In our case, skin eruptions were successfully treated with oral methylprednisolone, cephalexin, and topical corticosteroid ointment.

  12. Dandruff: How to Treat

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hair, and nail care Skin care Hair care / hair loss Injured skin Nail care Anti-aging skin care ... scalp problems Alopecia areata Dandruff: How to treat Hair loss Scalp psoriasis Itchy skin Painful skin / joints Rashes ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adults, the rashes typically occur on the wrists, ankles, and eyelids in addition to the bend of ... Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic ... Manual Consumer Version The University of Chicago Medicine World ...

  14. Schnitzlers syndrom er en diagnostisk udfordring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duhn, Pernille Hurup; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Nordin, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Schnitzler syndrome (SS) is a rare autoinflammatory disorder characterized by a chronic urticarial rash and a monoclonal immunoglobulin M gammopathy, accompanied by recurrent fever, lymphadenopathy, arthralgia or arthritis, hepato- or splenomegaly and elevated levels of markers of systemic...

  15. Celiac Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Table of Contents What are some of the symptoms of celiac disease? Some people with celiac disease may not feel ... skin rash with blisters slowed growth Why are celiac disease symptoms so varied? Researchers are studying the reasons celiac ...

  16. Symptoms and Causes of Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Symptoms & Causes of Celiac Disease What are the symptoms of celiac disease? Most people with celiac disease have one or ... the rash and no other symptoms. Why are celiac disease symptoms so varied? Symptoms of celiac disease vary from ...

  17. Cercarial Dermatitis (Swimmer's Itch) FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Parasites - Cercarial Dermatitis (also known as Swimmer's Itch) Note: Javascript is ... is swimmer’s itch? Swimmer’s itch, also called cercarial dermatitis, appears as a skin rash caused by an ...

  18. MS Disease-Modifying Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease-modifying therapies Approval: 2014 US; 2014 CAN Pregnancy Category C (see footnote, page 11) Rash, headache, fever, nasal congestion, nausea, urinary tract infection, fatigue, insomnia, upper respiratory tract infection, herpes viral ...

  19. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... after blisters form If you have Stevens-Johnson syndrome, several days before the rash develops you may experience: Fever Sore mouth and throat Fatigue Cough Burning eyes When to see a doctor Stevens-Johnson ...

  20. Myositis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myositis means inflammation of the muscles that you use to move your body. An injury, infection, or ... weakness, plus a skin rash. Other symptoms of myositis may include Fatigue after walking or standing Tripping ...

  1. Aloe

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the aloe plant. It is used in many skin care products. Aloe poisoning occurs when someone swallows this substance. ... Diarrhea Loss of vision Rash Severe abdominal pain Skin irritation Throat swelling (which may also cause breathing difficulty) Vomiting

  2. Leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Seniors, WomenTags: ancient infections, blindness, chronic granulomatous disease, chronic infection, hand and foot deformities, hansen's disease, infections, leprosy, mycobacterium, rashes, skin lesions, testicle damage November 1, 2009 Copyright © American ...

  3. Ribavirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... difficulty concentrating difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep memory loss rash dry, irritated, or itchy skin sweating ... is important to keep all medication out of sight and reach of children as many containers (such ...

  4. Pregnancy and Fifth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cheek Rash Parvovirus B19 and Other Illnesses References Pregnancy and Fifth Disease Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... half of pregnancy. Testing for Parvovirus B19 during Pregnancy A blood test for parvovirus B19 can show ...

  5. Organ Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are mild skin rashes, but others can be deadly, like fungal pneumonia. Because of this, it’s important ... the environment. Fungi live outdoors in soil, on plants, trees, and other vegetation. They are also on ...

  6. Hospitalized Patients and Fungal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are mild skin rashes, but others can be deadly, like fungal pneumonia. Because of this, it’s important ... the environment. Fungi live outdoors in soil, on plants, trees, and other vegetation. They are also on ...

  7. Cancer Patients and Fungal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are mild skin rashes, but others can be deadly, like fungal pneumonia. Because of this, it’s important ... the environment. Fungi live outdoors in soil, on plants, trees, and other vegetation. They are also on ...

  8. Diarrhea in infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rare diseases such as cystic fibrosis . Diarrhea Causes Dehydration Infants and young children under age 3 can ... as: Apple juice Milk Fried foods Full-strength fruit juice Preventing Diaper Rash Your baby might get ...

  9. 40 THE BIRD FLU CAMPAIGN IN KWARA STATE OF NIGERIA: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP-G61

    ineffective graphic messages are often a result of rash decision-making in the media ... induce attitude change in institutional advertising or purchase action in commercial ..... is no emphasis in terms of size to arrest attention to the poster.

  10. Infant Allergies and Food Sensitivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... limiting your intake of milk and dairy products, fish, eggs, peanuts, and other nuts during pregnancy and while breastfeeding. Monitor your baby carefully for skin rashes, breathing problems, unusual stools, or other allergic symptoms, and ...

  11. Orlistat

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you buy. When eating meat, poultry (chicken) or fish, eat only 2 or 3 ounces (55 or ... call your doctor immediately: hives rash itching difficulty breathing or swallowing severe or continuous stomach pain excessive ...

  12. Dandruff: How to Treat

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... World Dialogues in Dermatology JAAD Mohs AUC MyDermPath+ Psoriasis Patient education resources Practice Management Center Coding and ... areata Dandruff: How to treat Hair loss Scalp psoriasis Itchy skin Painful skin / joints Rashes Scaly skin ...

  13. Alprazolam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to noise or light; change in sense of smell; sweating; difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep; difficulty ... rash yellowing of the skin or eyes depression memory problems confusion problems with speech unusual changes in ...

  14. Personal Tracking Charts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... appetite Tingling in hands/feet Pain in hands/feet Rash Dry skin Dry mouth Hair loss Change in sight Change in sleep Change in sex drive Change in body shape Change in mental health Lack of concentration keeping ...

  15. Skin Condition Finder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SKIN CONDITIONS HEALTH TOPICS FOR PROFESSIONALS Rash and Skin Condition Finder 1 Select Age Group Infant Child ... Toe Toe Webspace Toe Nail CLOSE About the Skin Condition Finder Have a health question or concern? ...

  16. Yeast Infection Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cheese-like discharge Painful urination Redness in the vagina Yeast infection of the penis may cause: Redness Scaling Rash ... on the location of your symptoms: If a vaginal yeast infection is suspected , your health care provider will perform ...

  17. Fever: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a dry mouth, decreased or dark urine, or refusal to drink fluids Skin rashes Difficulty swallowing fluids Pain with urination or pain in the back When to seek emergency care Seek emergency medical care if your child has ...

  18. Childhood Vaccines: What They Are and Why Your Child Needs Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to have children. Rubella is also called the German measles. It causes a slight fever, a rash ... Childbirth Women Men Seniors Your Health Resources Healthcare Management End-of-Life Issues Insurance & Bills Self Care ...

  19. Severe rosacea: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Shirzadeh

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Rosacea can be extremely severe and disfiguring, and it can be misdiagnosed as the pathognomonic butterfly rash of LE. Demodex carriage in rosacea is consistent and may play a significant role in the severe forms.

  20. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... aging skin care Kids’ zone About skin: Your body's largest organ About hair: Not just on your ... bug bite, such as a rash, fever, or body aches, see your doctor or a board-certified ...

  1. Primaer HIV-infektion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C; Pedersen, B K

    1996-01-01

    Up to 70% of individuals with primary HIV infection will develop symptoms of an acute illness. The most common symptoms reported are fever, generalized lymphadenopathy, arthralgia and myalgia, headache, pharyngitis, enanthema, skin rash, diarrhoea, and mucocutaneous ulcerations. More rarely...

  2. Abatacept Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... called selective costimulation modulators (immunomodulators). It works by blocking the activity of T-cells, a type of ... hives skin rash itching swelling of the eyes, face, lips, tongue, or throat difficulty breathing or swallowing ...

  3. Tocilizumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 6 (IL-6) receptor inhibitors. It works by blocking the activity of interleukin-6, a substance in ... rash flushing hives itching swelling of the eyes, face, lips, tongue, throat, arms, hands, feet, ankles, or ...

  4. Naltrexone Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of medications called opiate antagonists. It works by blocking activity in the limbic system, a part of ... of breath hives rash swelling of the eyes, face, mouth, lips, tongue, or throat hoarseness difficulty swallowing ...

  5. Ondansetron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. It works by blocking the action of serotonin, a natural substance that ... loss rash hives itching swelling of the eyes, face, lips, tongue, throat, hands, feet, ankles, or lower ...

  6. Ondansetron Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. It works by blocking the action of serotonin, a natural substance that ... treatment: rash hives itching swelling of the eyes, face, lips, tongue, throat, hands, feet, ankles, or lower ...

  7. Siltuximab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of medications called monoclonal antibodies. It works by blocking the action of a natural substance that causes ... wheezing; dizziness or light-headedness; swelling of the face, lips, tongue or throat; rash; back pain; chest ...

  8. Vedolizumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medications called integrin receptor antagonists. It works by blocking the action of certain cells in the body ... after your infusion: rash; itching; swelling of the face, eyes, mouth, throat, tongue, or lips; difficulty breathing ...

  9. Apixaban

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medications called factor Xa inhibitors. It works by blocking the action of a certain natural substance that ... rash chest pain or tightness swelling of the face or tongue trouble breathing wheezing feeling dizzy or ...

  10. Eculizumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of medications called monoclonal antibodies. It works by blocking the activity of the part of the immune ... feeling faint; rash; hives; swelling of the eyes, face, lips, tongue, or throat; hoarseness; or difficulty breathing ...

  11. Etanercept Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tumor-necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors. It works by blocking the action of TNF, a substance in the ... skin rash hives itching swelling of the eyes, face, lips, tongue, throat, arms, hands, feet, ankles, or ...

  12. Belimumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of medications called monoclonal antibodies. It works by blocking the activity of a certain protein in people ... the infusion: rash; itching; hives; swelling of the face, eyes, mouth, throat, tongue, or lips; difficulty breathing ...

  13. Ruxolitinib

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of medications called kinase inhibitors. It works by blocking an enzyme that causes scar tissue to form ... sensitivity on one side of the body or face with painful rash or blisters appearing several days ...

  14. Healthy Family 2009: Protecting Toddlers and Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Healthy Family 2009 Protecting Toddlers and Teens Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table ... virus that causes a rash, cough, runny nose, eye irritation, and fever Mumps, a virus causing fever, ...

  15. New aspects in the clinical spectrum of neonatal lupus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurinaviciene, Rasa; Christesen, Henrik Thybo; Bygum, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal lupus erythematosus (NLE) is a rare, passively acquired autoimmune disease, caused by maternal autoantibodies. Characteristic clinical features of NLE are transient rash and congenital heart block (CHB), but also hematological abnormalities and hepatobiliary dysfunction may occur...

  16. Discoid lupus erythematosus exacerbated by X-ray irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eedy, D J; Corbett, J R

    1988-05-01

    The authors describe a patient, previously known to have discoid lupus erythematosus (LE) developing a LE rash in the precise distribution of radiation therapy given for the treatment of a bronchogenic neoplasm.

  17. Lupus, discoid on a child's face (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The round or disk shaped (discoid) rash of lupus produces red, raised patches with scales. The pores ( ... The majority (approximately 90%) of individuals with discoid lupus have only skin involvement as compared to more ...

  18. Discoid lupus erythematosus exacerbated by X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eedy, D.J.; Corbett, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The authors describe a patient, previously known to have discoid lupus erythematosus (LE) developing a LE rash in the precise distribution of radiation therapy given for the treatment of a bronchogenic neoplasm. (author)

  19. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contagious skin diseases Cosmetic treatments Dry / sweaty skin Eczema / dermatitis Hair and scalp problems Itchy skin Painful skin / joints Rashes Scaly skin Skin cancer Why see a board- ...

  20. Allergic Skin Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most common types are atopic dermatitis (often called eczema) and contact dermatitis. Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema) Eczema is a chronic ... contact with your skin, they may cause a rash called contact dermatitis. There are two kinds of contact dermatitis: ...

  1. Dandruff: How to Treat

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contagious skin diseases Cosmetic treatments Dry / sweaty skin Eczema / dermatitis Hair and scalp problems Itchy skin Painful skin / joints Rashes Scaly skin Skin cancer Why see a board- ...

  2. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contagious skin diseases Cosmetic treatments Dry / sweaty skin Eczema / dermatitis Hair and scalp problems Itchy skin Painful skin / joints Rashes Scaly skin Skin cancer Why see a board- ...

  3. Fifth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... because it was fifth in a list of historical classifications of common skin rash illnesses in children. ... back to work or for your child to return to school or a child care center. Healthcare ...

  4. Sinusitis in adults - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... any unused antibiotic pills you may have at home. Watch for common side effects of antibiotics, including: Skin rashes Diarrhea For women, yeast infection of the vagina (vaginitis) Stay Healthy to Avoid Sinus Infections Reduce stress and ...

  5. NJP VOLUME 40 No 4 Corrected

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2013-03-04

    Mar 4, 2013 ... lines for the treatment of malaria recommend the use of ... occurs 2 hours after oral intake reaching peak plasma concentration ... This rash was itchy and makes patient ... but no neurological deficits or hearing problems. The.

  6. Streptococcal Subdural Empyema as a Complication of Varicella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-month-old male infant who presented with a group A streptococcal subdural empyema on day 5 of a varicella skin rash is reported from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

  7. Smallpox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms most often occur about 12 to 14 days after you have been infected with the virus. They may include: Backache Delirium Diarrhea Excessive bleeding Fatigue High fever Malaise Raised pink rash, turns into sores that become crusty ...

  8. Sun Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun allergy Overview Sun allergy is a term often used to describe a number of conditions in which an itchy red rash occurs on skin that has been exposed to sunlight. The most common form of sun allergy is ...

  9. Hives (Urticaria) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cake Cause Hives? Going to School With Food Allergies Food Allergies Egg Allergy Learning About Allergies Help With Hives Rashes: The Itchy Truth Food Allergies Shellfish Allergy Allergies Hives (Urticaria) Serious Allergic Reactions ( ...

  10. Henoch-Schonlein purpura on an infant's legs (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children than adults and often occurs after an upper respiratory infection. It causes skin rashes that bleed into the skin (petechiae and purpura). Bleeding may also occur from the gastrointestinal tract and kidneys.

  11. Henoch-Schonlein purpura on an infant's foot (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children than adults and often occurs after an upper respiratory infection. It causes skin rashes that bleed into the skin (petechiae and purpura). Bleeding may also occur from the gastrointestinal tract and kidneys.

  12. Henoch-Schonlein purpura on the legs (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children than adults and often occurs after an upper respiratory infection. It causes skin rashes that bleed into the skin (petechiae and purpura). Bleeding may also occur from the gastrointestinal tract and kidneys.

  13. Skin Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & ... like these: skin rashes or conditions, such as eczema or psoriasis skin infections, such as staph diseases, ...

  14. Typhoid fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Typhoid fever is an infection that causes diarrhea and a rash . It is most commonly caused due to ... in their stools for years, spreading the disease. Typhoid fever is common in developing countries. Most cases in ...

  15. Parvovirus B19 and Other Illnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cheek Rash Parvovirus B19 and Other Illnesses References Parvovirus B19 and Other Illnesses Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... disease is the most common illness caused by parvovirus B19 infection. Learn More Parvovirus B19 infection can cause ...

  16. Fifth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvovirus B19; Erythema infectiosum; Slapped cheek rash ... Fifth disease is caused by human parvovirus B19. It often affects preschoolers or school-age children during the spring. The disease spreads through the fluids in the nose and mouth ...

  17. Eucalyptus oil overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liniments Diaper rash creams Inhalers to relieve nasal congestion Medicine for sore gums, mouth, and throat Mouthwashes ... IV) Medicines to treat symptoms Activated charcoal Laxative Tube through the nose into the stomach to wash ...

  18. Rocky Mountain spotted fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spotted fever on the foot Rocky Mountain spotted fever, petechial rash Antibodies Deer and dog tick References McElligott SC, Kihiczak GG, Schwartz RA. Rocky Mountain spotted fever and other rickettsial infections. In: Lebwohl MG, Heymann ...

  19. Isotretinoin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mouth, or nose nosebleeds changes in skin color peeling skin on the palms of the hands and soles ... red, swollen, itchy, or teary eyes fever rash peeling or blistering skin, especially on the legs, arms, or face sores ...

  20. Jellyfish stings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Atlantic and Physalia utriculus in the Pacific). Sea nettle ( Chrysaora quinquecirrha ), one of the most common jellyfish ... nose and watery eyes Swallowing difficulty Sweating SEA NETTLE Mild skin rash (with mild stings) Muscle cramps ...

  1. Tiagabine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a severe rash caused by taking a medication; status epilepticus (seizures following one another without a break); or ... taking tiagabine.you should know that seizures, including status epilepticus, have occurred in people without epilepsy who take ...

  2. Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptom in a Patient with Pneumonia and Hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hualiang; Wang, Limin; Ye, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome is an idiosyncratic drug reaction characterized by fever, skin eruption, lymph node enlargement, and internal organ involvement. We report a case of a patient with pneumonia who developed clinical manifestations of fever, rash, lymphadenopathy, hypereosinophilia, and visceral involvement (renal failure and eosinophilic pneumonitis) caused by methimazole. The patient improved remarkably with drug withdrawal. A high index of clinical suspicion is emphasized to facilitate prompt diagnosis of medication-related adverse effect and its discontinuation.

  3. A Modeling and Simulation Framework for Adverse Events in Erlotinib-Treated Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Ahmed Abbas; Frechen, Sebastian; Scheffler, Matthias; Zander, Thomas; Nogova, Lucia; Kocher, Martin; Jaehde, Ulrich; Wolf, Jürgen; Fuhr, Uwe

    2015-11-01

    Treatment with erlotinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor used for treating non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and other cancers, is frequently associated with adverse events (AE). We present a modeling and simulation framework for the most common erlotinib-induced AE, rash, and diarrhea, providing insights into erlotinib toxicity. We used the framework to investigate the safety of high-dose erlotinib pulses proposed to limit acquired resistance while treating NSCLC. Continuous-time Markov models were developed using rash and diarrhea AE data from 39 NSCLC patients treated with erlotinib (150 mg/day). Exposure and different covariates were investigated as predictors of variability. Rash was also tested as a survival predictor. Models developed were used in a simulation analysis to compare the toxicities of different regimens, including the previously mentioned pulsed strategy. Probabilities of experiencing rash or diarrhea were found to be highest early during treatment. Rash, but not diarrhea, was positively correlated with erlotinib exposure. In contrast with some common understandings, radiotherapy decreased transitioning to higher rash grades by 81% (p simulations predicted that the proposed pulsed regimen (1600 mg/week + 50 mg/day remaining week days) results in a maximum of 20% of the patients suffering from severe rash throughout the treatment course in comparison to 12% when treated with standard dosing (150 mg/day). In conclusion, the framework demonstrated that radiotherapy attenuates erlotinib-induced rash, providing an opportunity to use radiotherapy and erlotinib together, and demonstrated the tolerability of high-dose pulses intended to address acquired resistance to erlotinib.

  4. EVITA-a double-blind, vehicle-controlled, randomized phase II trial of vitamin K1 cream as prophylaxis for cetuximab-induced skin toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofheinz, R-D; Lorenzen, S; Trojan, J; Ocvirk, J; Ettrich, T J; Al-Batran, S-E; Schulz, H; Homann, N; Feustel, H-P; Schatz, M; Kripp, M; Schulte, N; Tetyusheva, M; Heeger, S; Vlassak, S; Merx, K

    2018-04-01

    Acne-like skin rash is a frequently occurring adverse event associated with drugs against the epidermal growth factor receptor. This randomized vehicle-controlled study investigated the addition of vitamin K1 cream to doxycycline in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with cetuximab. Patients receiving first-line cetuximab + FOLFIRI were randomly assigned to prophylactic treatment with doxycylin and vitamin K1 cream or doxycycline and the vehicle. The primary end point of the study was the incidence of grade ≥ 2 skin rash (NCI CTCAE version 4.02) during 8 weeks of skin treatment. Secondary end points comprised skin rash according to a more thorough tripartite skin toxicity score (WoMo), quality of life, efficacy, and compliance. The study had 80% power to show a 20% reduction of the incidence of grade ≥ 2 skin rash. A total of 126 patients were analyzed. The incidence of skin rash grade ≥ 2 was comparable between the arms. Likewise, no difference was seen in the WoMo score with respect to the percentage of skin affected. However, starting in week 5 and increasing over time patients treated with vitamin K1 cream had less severe rash and fewer fissures. Quality of life as well as efficacy and compliance with study medication and anticancer treatment was comparable in both arms. The primary end point of decreasing grade ≥ 2 skin rash was not met. However, using vitamin K1 cream as part of prophylactic treatment decreased the severity of acne-like skin rash according to WoMo, an alternative and more thorough skin toxicity scoring tool.

  5. Stress and decision making: the role of impulsive personality

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Richard Julian

    2017-01-01

    Stress, gender, and impulsive personality traits are each associated with altered decision making, but no studies have yet examined interactions between all of these factors. Impulsive personality can be parsed into five subtypes, consisting of Negative Urgency, the tendency to act rashly in the face of extreme negative emotion; Positive Urgency, the tendency to act rashly in the face of strong positive emotion; Lack of Premeditation, the tendency to insufficiently consider actions prior to t...

  6. Identification of risk products for fragrance contact allergy: a case-referent study based on patients' histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, J D; Andersen, T F; Kjøller, M; Veien, N; Avnstorp, C; Andersen, K E; Menné, T

    1998-06-01

    Fragrances are the first or second most common cause of contact allergy in dermatitis patients. The aim of this study was to identify risk products for fragrance contact allergy. The design was a case-control study with a case group of 78 fragrance-mix-positive eczema patients and two control groups, one consisting of 1,279 subjects selected as a random sample of the general population and the other consisting of 806 fragrance-mix-negative eczema patients. The identification of risk products was based on the patients' histories of rash to scented products. Analysis of the associations between first-time rash caused by different specified product categories and fragrance mix sensitivity was performed using logistic regression. It was found that first-time rash caused by deodorant sprays and/or perfumes were related to fragrance contact allergy in a comparison with both control groups. The risk (odds ratio) of being diagnosed as fragrance allergic was 2.3 to 2.9 greater in cases of a history of first-time rash to deodorant sprays and 3.3 to 3.4 greater in cases of a history of rash to perfumes than if no such history were present. First-time rash to cleansing agents, deodorant sticks, or hand lotions was also statistically significant but only in comparison with one of the control groups. Safety evaluation of fragrance materials used in perfumes and deodorant sprays should be performed with special attention.

  7. Mucocutaneous features of Chikungunya fever: a study from an outbreak in West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Ghosh, Sudip Kumar

    2008-11-01

    Chikungunya fever (CF) epidemic has recently re-emerged in India on a large scale affecting many parts of the country. We have reviewed the mucocutaneous manifestations of the disease in a number of cases. Twenty six serologically proven cases of CF with rash from the district of 24-Paraganas (North) in the eastern Indian state of West Bengal were subjected to detailed clinical study to investigate the chronology and evolution of mucocutaneous lesions, the type and distribution of the rash, and systemic changes. Most patients were in their 3rd and 4th decade (23% each). Males and females were equally affected. Most patients developed the rash concomitantly with the onset or during the febrile illness, but 5 (19.2%) developed rash after defervescence. Most (57.7%) patients developed rash within the first 2 days of fever. The upper limb was the most common site of first appearance of lesions. Morbilliform eruption was the most common type of lesion noted, followed by scaling, macular erythema, intertrigo, hypermelanosis, xerosis, excoriated papules, urticaria and petechial spots. Cutaneous lesions were generally asymptomatic but 5 (19.2%) patients had intense pruritus. Mucosal lesions were found in 4 (15.4%) patients. Moderate to marked joint involvement was universal. CF exanthem may have varying morphology. Since the disease is spreading widely in different parts of the world, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any acute febrile arthropathy with rash.

  8. HLA-A*31:01 and HLA-B*15:02 as genetic markers for carbamazepine hypersensitivity in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstutz, Ursula; Ross, Colin J.D.; Castro-Pastrana, Lucila I.; Rieder, Michael J.; Shear, Neil H.; Hayden, Michael R.; Carleton, Bruce C.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of hypersensitivity reactions including rare but life-threatening Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (HSS) limits the use of the anticonvulsant carbamazepine (CBZ). HLA-B*15:02 and HLA-A*31:01 have been identified as predictive genetic markers for CBZ hypersensitivity in Asian and European patients. To replicate these genetic associations in pediatric patients from North America with a diverse ethnic background, we investigated HLA-A*31:01 and HLA-B*15:02 in 42 children with CBZ hypersensitivity, and 91 CBZ-tolerant children from across Canada. HLA-A*31:01 was significantly associated with CBZ-HSS (odds ratio (OR): 26.4, p=0.0025) and maculopapular exanthems (OR: 8.6, p=0.0037), but not with CBZ-SJS. Conversely, HLA-B*15:02 was associated with CBZ-SJS (OR: 38.6, p=0.002), but not HSS and maculopapular exanthems. This study is the first to demonstrate the association of HLA-A*31:01 with CBZ hypersensitivity in children, providing important replication of this association and highlighting the importance of HLA-A*31:01 as a predictive biomarker across various ancestries. PMID:23588310

  9. Cowhage-induced itch as an experimental model for pruritus. A comparative study with histamine-induced itch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru D P Papoiu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Histamine is the prototypical pruritogen used in experimental itch induction. However, in most chronic pruritic diseases, itch is not predominantly mediated by histamine. Cowhage-induced itch, on the other hand, seems more characteristic of itch occurring in chronic pruritic diseases.We tested the validity of cowhage as an itch-inducing agent by contrasting it with the classical itch inducer, histamine, in healthy subjects and atopic dermatitis (AD patients. We also investigated whether there was a cumulative effect when both agents were combined.Fifteen healthy individuals and fifteen AD patients were recruited. Experimental itch induction was performed in eczema-free areas on the volar aspects of the forearm, using different itch inducers: histamine, cowhage and their combination thereof. Itch intensity was assessed continuously for 5.5 minutes after stimulus application using a computer-assisted visual analogue scale (COVAS.In both healthy and AD subjects, the mean and peak intensity of itch were higher after the application of cowhage compared to histamine, and were higher after the combined application of cowhage and histamine, compared to histamine alone (p<0.0001 in all cases. Itch intensity ratings were not significantly different between healthy and AD subjects for the same itch inducer used; however AD subjects exhibited a prolonged itch response in comparison to healthy subjects (p<0.001.Cowhage induced a more intense itch sensation compared to histamine. Cowhage was the dominant factor in itch perception when both pathways were stimulated in the same time. Cowhage-induced itch is a suitable model for the study of itch in AD and other chronic pruritic diseases, and it can serve as a new model for testing antipruritic drugs in humans.

  10. Reduction of severity of pruritus after elective caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia with subarachnoid morphine: a randomised comparison of prophylactic granisetron and ondansetron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, T; Ojo, R; Immani, S; Choroszczak, P; Carey, M

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of pruritus after elective caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia with subarachnoid morphine may be 60-100%, and is a common cause of maternal dissatisfaction. Ondansetron has been shown to reduce pruritus but the effect is short-lived. The objective of this randomized double-blind trial was to evaluate the anti-pruritic efficacy of granisetron compared with ondansetron. Eighty ASA I or II women undergoing elective caesarean section received spinal anaesthesia with 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine 10 mg, fentanyl 25 microg and preservative-free morphine 150 microg. After delivery of the baby and clamping of the umbilical cord, they were randomised to receive granisetron 3mg i.v. (group G) or ondansetron 8 mg i.v. (group O). The two groups were similar for age, gestational age, height and weight. According to visual analogue pruritus scores, patients in group G experienced less pruritus at 8h (P=0.003) and 24h (P=0.01). Fewer patients in group G (n=8) than group O (n=18) required rescue anti-pruritic medication (P=0.03). Satisfaction scores were also higher in group G than in group O (P=0.03). There was no difference in overall incidence of pruritus, nausea and vomiting, and visual analogue pain scores between the two groups. Administration of granisetron 3mg i.v. reduces the severity of pruritus and the use of rescue anti-pruritic medication, and improves satisfaction but does not reduce the overall incidence of pruritus in women who have received subarachnoid morphine 150 microg compared to ondansetron 8 mg i.v. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Reduction of severity of pruritus after elective caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia with subarachnoid morphine: a randomised comparison of prophylactic granisetron and ondansetron.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tan, T

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of pruritus after elective caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia with subarachnoid morphine may be 60-100%, and is a common cause of maternal dissatisfaction. Ondansetron has been shown to reduce pruritus but the effect is short-lived. The objective of this randomized double-blind trial was to evaluate the anti-pruritic efficacy of granisetron compared with ondansetron. METHODS: Eighty ASA I or II women undergoing elective caesarean section received spinal anaesthesia with 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine 10 mg, fentanyl 25 microg and preservative-free morphine 150 microg. After delivery of the baby and clamping of the umbilical cord, they were randomised to receive granisetron 3mg i.v. (group G) or ondansetron 8 mg i.v. (group O). RESULTS: The two groups were similar for age, gestational age, height and weight. According to visual analogue pruritus scores, patients in group G experienced less pruritus at 8h (P=0.003) and 24h (P=0.01). Fewer patients in group G (n=8) than group O (n=18) required rescue anti-pruritic medication (P=0.03). Satisfaction scores were also higher in group G than in group O (P=0.03). There was no difference in overall incidence of pruritus, nausea and vomiting, and visual analogue pain scores between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Administration of granisetron 3mg i.v. reduces the severity of pruritus and the use of rescue anti-pruritic medication, and improves satisfaction but does not reduce the overall incidence of pruritus in women who have received subarachnoid morphine 150 microg compared to ondansetron 8 mg i.v.

  12. Unilateral purpura annularis telangiectodes of majocchi in an elderly male: an atypical presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Apphia; Shuja, Fareesa; Chan, Audrey; Wasko, Carina

    2013-08-15

    Purpura annularis telangiectodes (PAT), also known as Majocchi purpura, is a rare form of pigmented purpuric dermatosis characterized by non-palpable red-brown, occasionally pruritic patches which progress to hyperpigmented halos. Purpura annularis telangiectodes usually presents in female adolescents as benign symmetric lesions with a predilection for the lower extremities. We present an atypical case of unilateral PAT in an elderly male. To our knowledge, our patient at 85-years-old is the oldest PAT and first unilateral purpura annularis telangiectodes case described in the literature.

  13. Morgellons Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohn, Jungyoon; Park, Seon Yong; Moon, Jungyoon; Choe, Yun Seon; Kim, Kyu Han

    2017-04-01

    Morgellons disease is a rare disease with unknown etiology. Herein, we report the first case of Morgellons disease in Korea. A 30-year-old woman presented with a 2-month history of pruritic erythematous patches and erosions on the arms, hands, and chin. She insisted that she had fiber-like materials under her skin, which she had observed through a magnifying device. We performed skin biopsy, and observed a fiber extruding from the dermal side of the specimen. Histopathological examination showed only mild lymphocytic infiltration, and failed to reveal evidence of any microorganism. The polymerase chain reaction for Borrelia burgdorferi was negative in her serum.

  14. Dermatitis caused by the tropical fowl mite Ornithonyssus bursa (Berlese (Acari: Macronyssidae: a case report in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Bohrer Mentz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We herein report human dermatitis caused by the tropical fowl mite Ornithonyssus bursa (Berlese. The cases occurred in an apartment in a residential district of Porto Alegre City, State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, where three members of the same family presented with pruritic lesions on the arms and legs. On inspecting the bathroom, several mites measuring approximately 1.0mm in length were observed coming from a nest of Rufous Hornero, Furnarius rufus (Gmelin. This is the first report of O. bursa in the urban area of Porto Alegre City, from a nest of F. rufus that bites humans.

  15. GUIDELINES OF CARE FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenfield, Lawrence F.; Tom, Wynnis L.; Chamlin, Sarah L.; Feldman, Steven R.; Hanifin, Jon M.; Simpson, Eric L.; Berger, Timothy G.; Bergman, James N.; Cohen, David E.; Cooper, Kevin D.; Cordoro, Kelly M.; Davis, Dawn M.; Krol, Alfons; Margolis, David J.; Paller, Amy S.; Schwarzenberger, Kathryn; Silverman, Robert A.; Williams, Hywel C.; Elmets, Craig A.; Block, Julie; Harrod, Christopher G.; Begolka, Wendy Smith; Sidbury, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, pruritic inflammatory dermatosis that affects up to 25% of children and 2–3% of adults. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in AD management and care, providing updated and expanded recommendations based on the available evidence. In this first of four sections, methods for diagnosis and monitoring of disease, outcomes measures for assessment and common clinical associations that affect patients with AD are discussed. Known risk factors for the development of disease are also reviewed. PMID:24290431

  16. Children with atopic dermatitis and frequent emollient use have increased urinary levels of low-molecular-weight phthalate metabolites and parabens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, L E K; Main, K M; Frederiksen, H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Parabens may be added to cosmetic and personal care products for preservation purposes. Low-molecular weight (LMW) phthalate diesters function as plasticizers, fixatives or solvents in such products, but may also be found in small quantities as contaminants from plastic containers...... whether the difference is explained by increased use of the specific emollients that are used to treat pruritic and inflamed skin, and/or whether the impaired skin barrier allows chemicals to penetrate more easily. Moreover, the putative toxicological burden is unknown....

  17. Malignant acanthosis nigricans: an early diagnostic clue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amjad, M.; Shah, A.A.; Bari, A.U.

    2010-01-01

    Acanthosis nigricans (AN) is characterized by velvety, hyper pigmented, verrucosus, symmetric and occasionally pruritic plaques along with papillomatous lesions which have a special predilection for neck, axillae, groin, umbilicu and mucosal regions. Rarely, it presents as a para neoplastic syndrome and prompts a thorough search for an internal malignancy. We present here a case of malignant acanthosis nigricans seen in an elderly patient who was found to have underlying adenocarcinoma of the lower end of esophagus. After diagnosing associated malignancy, he was referred for further evaluation and subsequent surgical resection of tumour. (author)

  18. Dermatomyositis, clinically presenting with cutaneous ulcers, with histopathologic evidence of perforating collagenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstein, Rachel; Martires, Kathryn; Christman, Mitalee; Terushkin, Vitaly; Meehan, Shane A; Seminara, Nicole; Golden, Brian D; Franks, Andrew G

    2016-12-15

    Dermatomyositis is a systemic, autoimmune diseasewith a variety of clinical features that often includemyositis and characteristic cutaneous findings. Asubset of patients with dermatomyositis developcutaneous ulcers, often in the setting of vasculitis orvasculopathy. We present a case of dermatomyositiswith cutaneous ulcers that show perforatingcollagenosis on histopathologic examination.Acquired reactive perforating collagenosistypically occurs in the setting of diabetes mellitus,chronic renal failure, and other pruritic conditions,and this case represents a rare association withdermatomyositis, which may ultimately be helpful inelucidating the pathophysiology of this perforatingdisorder.

  19. Eosinophilic dermatosis of hematologic malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martires, Kathryn; Callahan, Shields; Terushkin, Vitaly; Brinster, Nooshin; Leger, Marie; Soter, Nicholas A

    2016-12-15

    We report a 68-year-old woman with chroniclymphocytic leukemia, who developed numerous,pruritic, edematous, and vesicobullous skin lesionsof the face and extremities over the course of severalmonths. The diagnosis of eosinophilic dermatosis ofhematologic malignancy (EDHM) was made basedon the clinical history and histopathologic features.Owing to the possible link between EDHM and amore aggressive underlying CLL, she was startedagain on chemotherapy. This case serves as areminder that, although the precise pathogenesis ofEDHM remains unclear, the paraneoplastic disorderis the result of immune dysregulation. Patientswho develop EDHM should undergo prompthematologic/oncologic evaluation.

  20. Persistent Skin Reactions and Aluminium Hypersensitivity Induced by Childhood Vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salik, Elaha; Løvik, Ida; Andersen, Klaus E

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing awareness of reactions to vaccination that include persistent skin reactions. We present here a retrospective investigation of long-lasting skin reactions and aluminium hypersensitivity in children, based on medical records and questionnaires sent to the parents. In the 10-year...... period 2003 to 2013 we identified 47 children with persistent skin reactions caused by childhood vaccinations. Most patients had a typical presentation of persisting pruritic subcutaneous nodules. Five children had a complex diagnostic process involving paediatricians, orthopaedics and plastic surgeons...... treated with potent topical corticosteroids and disappeared slowly. Although we advised families to continue vaccination of their children, one-third of parents omitted or postponed further vaccinations....

  1. Role of Ca++ Influx via Epidermal TRP Ion Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    manuscript and helpful discussions. References 1. Burkhart, C. G., and Burkhart, H. R. (2003) Contact irritant dermatitis and anti-pruritic agents...E. (2013) TRPA1 controls inflammation and pruritogen responses in allergic contact dermatitis . FASEB J. 27, 3549–3563 64. Yoshioka, T., Imura, K...allergic   contact   dermatitis ,   including   contact   dermatitis   elicited  by  the  poison  ivy  allergen,  urushiol  [75,  126].     Similarly

  2. Perioperative Management of a Patient with Cold Urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Agbenyefia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cold urticaria consists of an allergic immune response to cold temperatures with symptoms ranging from pruritic wheals to life-threatening angioedema, bronchospasm, or anaphylactic shock. Adequate planning to maintain normothermia perioperatively is vital due to impaired hypothalamic thermoregulation and overall depression of sympathetic outflow during deep sedation and general anesthesia. This case report describes the successful perioperative management of a 45-year-old female with a history of cold urticaria undergoing a laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease and discusses how to appropriately optimize the care of these patients.

  3. Atopic Dermatitis: A Common Pediatric Condition and Its Evolution in Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Deepti

    2015-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic and pruritic inflammatory skin disorder that has a relapsing course and can affect any age group. Patients with AD have higher rates of other allergic disorders, mental health disorders, and skin infections. An important feature of AD for practitioners to recognize is that the clinical presentation varies by age from infancy into adulthood. The goals of treatment and management of AD focuses on restoring and maintaining the skin barrier function, minimizing inflammation, breaking the itch-scratch cycle, and treating possible external triggers and secondary infections that may propagate AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema): An Appraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Arthur L.

    1962-01-01

    Atopic (spontaneous) allergies and nonatopic (induced) allergies are often confused. The meaning of these terms is definite, but the occurrence of either (in a given individual) may depend upon his autonomic nervous system control. The evidence that allergens produce the cutaneous changes in atopic dermatitis is flimsy, and neurodermatitis would be a more appropriate term since the entity falls into that pattern of skin changes. Treatment carried out, from infancy sometimes to old age, consists of careful management of the patient in the physical and emotional spheres, avoidance of external irritation and the use of a multiplicity of anti-pruritic, anti-inflammatory and sedative agents. PMID:13955448

  5. Peeling skin syndrome associated with novel variant in FLG2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfares, Ahmed; Al-Khenaizan, Sultan; Al Mutairi, Fuad

    2017-12-01

    Peeling skin syndrome is a rare genodermatosis characterized by variably pruritic superficial generalized peeling of the skin with several genes involved until now little is known about the association between FLG2 and peeling skin syndrome. We describe multiple family members from a consanguineous Saudi family with peeling skin syndrome. Next Generation Sequencing identifies a cosegregating novel variant in FLG2 c.632C>G (p.Ser211*) as a likely etiology in this family. Here, we reported on the clinical manifestation of homozygous loss of function variant in FLG2 as a disease-causing gene for peeling skin syndrome and expand the dermatology findings. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Randomized double-blind trial of prophylactic topical Evozac® Calming Skin Spray for gefitinib-associated acne-like eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Yalan Wang,* Yunpeng Yang,* Jinxia Xu, Juan Yu, Xia Liu, Ruizhen Gao, Li Zhang State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: "Gefitinib" is a first-generation epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine-kinase inhibitor. More than half of patients receiving gefitinib develop acne-like eruption. Evozac® Calming Skin Spray (Evaux Laboratoires, Évaux-les-Bains, France is made of Évaux thermal spring water and commonly used for the treatment of dermatological toxicities caused by anti- epidermal growth factor receptor therapy. The aim of the study reported here was to test the effect of Evozac Calming Skin Spray on the prevention of rash in patients receiving gefitinib. Methods: Non-small-cell lung cancer patients preparing to initiate gefitinib therapy were randomly assigned to apply Evozac Calming Skin Spray or physiological saline to the face three times a day. The treatment was started on the same day as initiation of gefitinib therapy and continued for 4 weeks. Results: A total of 51 patients in the Evozac Calming Skin Spray group and 50 patients in the physiological saline group completed the study per the protocol. The number of facial lesions peaked at the end of 3 weeks in both groups. There were significantly fewer lesions in the Evozac Calming Skin Spray group than in the physiological saline group at the end of 1 week (0.25 versus [vs] 1.10, P=0.031 and 3 weeks (6.67 vs 12.26, P=0.022. Patients from the Evozac Calming Skin Spray group also developed fewer facial lesions at the end of 2 weeks and 4 weeks, however, the difference was not statistically significant. At the end of 4 weeks, fewer patients from the Evozac Calming Skin Spray group developed rash of grade 2 or greater severity (17.6% vs 36.0%, P=0.037, or experienced rash

  7. Graft-Versus-Host Disease after Liver Transplantation Complicated by Systemic Aspergillosis with Pancarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Romagnuolo

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD is a common complication after bone marrow transplantation, with characteristic rash and diarrhea being the most common features. After liver transplantation, however, this phenomenon is very rare. Most transplant patients are on a variety of medications, including immunosuppressants; therefore, the differential diagnosis of skin rash or diarrhea is broad. A 37-year-old man who underwent liver transplantation for primary biliary cirrhosis, and developed a rash and watery diarrhea, is presented. Skin and colonic biopsies confirmed acute GVHD. A pulse of intravenous steroids was given. The skin rash improved, but he developed pancytopenia. His course was complicated by central line infection, jugular and subclavian vein thrombosis, pseudomembranous colitis, recurrent bacteremia, cholestasis on total parenteral nutrition and cytomegalovirus infection. After the onset of pleuritic chest pain and clinical sepsis, spiral computed tomography scan of his chest and abdomen revealed septic infarcts in multiple organs. Despite empirical treatment with amphotericin B, he died of multiorgan dysfunction syndrome within 72 h. Autopsy revealed systemic aspergillosis with pancarditis, endocardial vegetations, and septic pulmonary, splenic, hepatic and renal infarcts. The pathogenesis and experience with this rare, but often fatal, complication of liver transplantation are reviewed. In contrast to GVHD after bone marrow transplantation, pancytopenia is common and liver dysfunction is rare. One should have a high level of suspicion in the liver transplant recipient presenting with rash and/or diarrhea.

  8. Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis in inflammatory linear verrucous epidermal nevus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Tayyebi Meibodi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis presents with perinuclear vacuolization of the keratinocytes in spinous and granular layers, keratinocytes with ill-defined limits, which leads to a reticulate appearance of the epidermis, an increased number of variously shaped and sized basophilic keratohyalin granules and the same sized eosinophilic trichohyalin granules, at any level of epidermis, mainly in the stratum granulosum, and compact hyperkeratosis. This minor reactive pathologic reaction pattern of skin is found in large variety of diseases. This paper is the first case report of such pattern in inflammatory linear verrucous epidermal nevus. Our case is of a 23-year-old man with pruritic verrucous lesions of trunk and extremities initiated since 13 years ago. Physical examination revealed white linear hyperkeratotic lesions, some of them on erythematous background and also classic epidermal nevus. No skeletal, ophthalmic, and nervous system involvement was detected. Microscopic study of pruritic verrucous lesions showed psoriasiform acanthosis, mild papillomatous, hyperkeratosis, and epidermolytic hyperkeratotic changes in hair follicles and acrosyrinx accompanied with moderate perivascular inflammation.

  9. The Demographics and Rates of Tattoo Complications, Regret, and Unsafe Tattooing Practices: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liszewski, Walter; Kream, Elizabeth; Helland, Sarah; Cavigli, Amy; Lavin, Bridget C; Murina, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Tattoos have become increasingly common in the United States; however, there are limited data on the rates of tattoo complications and tattoo regret. To determine the rates of infectious and allergic complications after tattooing, rates of tattoo regret, the perception of dermatologists among people with tattoos, and the demographics of people with tattoos. An 18-question cross-sectional survey was fielded in New Orleans in January 2015. Participants had to be at least 18 years old, have at least 1 tattoo, and reside within the United States. In total, 501 participants from 38 American states were enrolled. Of all participants, 3.2% had a history of an infected tattoo, 3.8% had a history of a painful tattoo, and 21.2% had a history of a pruritic tattoo; 16.2% of participants regret a current tattoo and 21.2% are interested in having 1 or more tattoos removed; 21.2% received a tattoo while intoxicated and 17.6% had a tattoo placed somewhere other than at a tattoo parlor; and 78.9% believe dermatologists are knowledgeable about the infectious and allergic complications of tattoos. Given the rates of pruritic tattoos and tattoo regret, there is an opportunity, and trust among people with tattoos, for dermatologists to manage these complications.

  10. Cutaneous xanthomas with concurrent demodicosis and dermatophytosis in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelnest, L J

    2001-07-01

    Multiple cutaneous xanthomas, associated with fasting hyperlipidaemia, are described in a 9-month-old domestic long-haired cat. A severely pruritic, papular, and crusting dermatitis affecting the head and neck, initially diagnosed as lesions of the eosinophilic granuloma complex, progressively developed on the head and pinnae. Pruritus was controlled with administration of prednisolone and chlorambucil. Repeat histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of cutaneous xanthoma and concurrent mild demodicosis. Marked fasting hypercholesterolaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia and transient hyperglycaemia were subsequently confirmed. Treatment for hyperlipidaemia and xanthomas with a low-fat diet (Hill's Feline r/d) and the previously unreported treatment for feline demodicosis of daily oral milbemycin were commenced. Multiple pink, alopecic plaques and papules gradually regressed, however pruritus recurred if immunosuppressive treatment was reduced, and well-demarcated areas of alopecia developed on the head, limbs and trunk, despite negative skin scrapings for demodex mites. Fungal culture of hair samples yielded Microsporum canis. All cutaneous lesions resolved with the addition of griseofulvin to the treatment regimen. Concurrent corneal ulceration and keratoconjunctivitis sicca ultimately resolved with treatment, including topical cyclosporin. Diabetes mellitus developed 6 months after resolution of skin lesions. No cutaneous or ocular abnormalities were present 6 months later with continued low-fat diet and insulin administration, although transient recurrence of papules and pruritus occurred after inadvertent access to a fatty meal. An underlying primary hyperlipidaemia was suspected, causing pruritic xanthomas. This may represent the first report of concurrent cutaneous xanthomas, demodicosis and dermatophytosis in a cat.

  11. Epidermotropic presentation by splenic B-cell lymphoma: The importance of clinical-pathologic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, Amin A; Carter, Joi B; Lansigan, Frederick; LeBlanc, Robert E

    2018-04-01

    There are exceedingly rare reports of patients with epidermotropic B-cell lymphomas. A subset presented with intermittent, variably pruritic papular eruptions and involvement of their spleens, peripheral blood and bone marrow at the time of diagnosis. Furthermore, some experienced an indolent course despite dissemination of their lymphomas. We report a 66-year-old woman with a 12-year history of intermittent eruptions of non-pruritic, salmon-colored papules on her torso and proximal extremities that occurred in winter and resolved with outdoor activity in spring. Skin biopsy revealed an epidermotropic B-cell lymphoma with a non-specific B-cell phenotype and heavy chain class switching with IgG expression. On workup, our patient exhibited mild splenomegaly and low-level involvement of her peripheral blood and bone marrow by a kappa-restricted B-cell population. A splenic B-cell lymphoma was diagnosed. Considering her longstanding history and absences of cytopenias, our patient has been followed without splenectomy or systemic therapy. Furthermore, the papules have responded dramatically to narrowband UVB. Our case and a review of similar rare reports aim to raise awareness among dermatopathologists and dermatologists of a clinically distinct and indolent subset of epidermotropic splenic lymphomas with characteristic clinical and histologic findings. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Diospyros lotus leaf and grapefruit stem extract synergistically ameliorate atopic dermatitis-like skin lesion in mice by suppressing infiltration of mast cells in skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Byoung Ok; Che, Denis Nchang; Yin, Hong Hua; Shin, Jae Young; Jang, Seon Il

    2017-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis, a chronic relapsing and pruritic inflammation of the skin also thought to be involved in, or caused by immune system destruction is an upsetting health problem due to its continuously increasing incidence especially in developed countries. Mast cell infiltration in atopic dermatitis skin lesions and its IgE-mediated activation releases various cytokines and chemokines that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. This study was aimed at investigating synergistic anti-inflammatory, anti-pruritic and anti-atopic dermatitis effects of Diospyros lotus leaf extract (DLE) and Muscat bailey A grapefruit stem extract (GFSE) in atopic dermatitis-like induced skin lesions in mice. Combinations of DLE and GFSE inhibited TNF-α and IL-6 production more than DLE or GFSE in PMA plus calcium ionophore A23187-activated HMC-1 cells. DLE and GFSE synergistically inhibited compound 48/80-induced dermal infiltration of mast cells and reduced scratching behavior than DLE or GFSE. Furthermore, DLE and GFSE synergistically showed a stronger ameliorative effect in skin lesions by reducing clinical scores; dermal infiltration of mast cells; ear and dorsal skin thickness; serum IgE and IL-4 production in atopic dermatitis-like mice. Collectively, these results suggest that DLE and GFSE synergistically exhibit anti-atopic dermatitis effects in atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Double-blinded, placebo-controlled study to evaluate an antipruritic shampoo for dogs with allergic pruritus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, J; Mueller, R S

    2012-07-28

    Shampoo therapy is frequently used on pruritic dogs. However, there are few double-blinded, placebo-controlled studies of this form of therapy. This randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study evaluated the efficacy of a commercial medicated shampoo (DermaTopic; Almapharm) containing chlorhexidine, lactoferrin, piroctone olamine, chitosan and essential fatty acids in 27 dogs with mild to moderate allergic pruritus without secondary skin infections. All dogs received shampoo therapy with either DermaTopic or a shampoo vehicle as placebo twice weekly for four weeks. The extent of pruritus was evaluated before the study and then on a daily basis by the owners using a visual analogue scale. Before beginning the treatment and after four weeks, the skin lesions were evaluated by an experienced clinician with a validated lesion score (Canine Atopic Dermatitis Extent and Severity Index - CADESI). The pruritus was reduced significantly by both DermaTopic and placebo. However, there was no significant difference between both groups. There was no statistically significant difference in the CADESI scores pre- and post-treatment in either group or between the two types of treatment. This study provides further evidence of the benefit of shampoo therapy for pruritic dogs.

  14. A prodigious lichen planus pigmentosus: The Wolf’s isotopic response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yugandar I, Shiva Kumar, Sai Prasad, Srilakshmi P, Akshaya N, Abhiram R, Sujalalitha K, Meghana GB

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Lichen planus is a pruritic, benign, papulosquamous, inflammatory dermatosis of unknown etiology that affects either or all of the skin, mucous membrane, hair and nail. In its classic form, it presents with violaceous, scaly, flat-topped, polygonal papules. A female patient aged 43 years with a history of pruritic eruptions for a period of one month over the right armpit and back of the right chest (C8, T1, T2, T3 Dermatomes. She had a history of herpes zoster in the same localization, which had been treated with topical and oral acyclovir two months prior to this visit. This variant may represent as an example of the Wolf’s isotopic response. We presented our case because of its rarity as a Dermatomal distribution of lichen planus pigmentosus (LPP and its appearance in the area of healed herpes zoster as an isotopic response. The case well highlights this unusual condition and represents the first case reported in Indian dermatology literature to our best of knowledge. The clinical and histological features of this case are described here.

  15. Dermatophytosis due to Microsporum nanum infection in a canine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Avila Valandro

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Miscrosporum nanum is a dermatophyte found in swine that causes non-pruritic lesions with desquamation, alopecia, and circular characteristics. M. nanum infection in dogs is rare and poorly understood in terms of its epidemiological and clinical features, and its therapeutic response. The present report describes a case of dermatophytosis due to M. nanum in a Dogo Argentino breed of dog that was used for wild boar hunting. The dermatophytosis presented with hypotrichosis, erythema, and non-pruritic desquamation in the back of the neck and chest area. The dermatophytosis was responsive to systemic treatment with itraconazole and topical (miconazole 2% for 60 days. Thus, we conclude that the practice of hunting wild boar should be considered as a possible source of infection of M. nanum in the reported dog. The M. nanum infection showed clinical features that were similar to the lesions observed in swine, except for the absence of the circular pattern, and showed a good clinical response to the therapy. Finally, M. nanum should be considered as an etiologic agent of dermatophytosis in dogs that in some manner have had direct contact with domestic or wild swine.

  16. Food hypersensitivity in 20 dogs with skin and gastrointestinal signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, S

    1995-12-01

    Canine food allergy can be defined as a nonseasonal, pruritic skin disorder of dogs that is associated with the ingestion of a substance found in the dog's diet. This study records the use of a proprietary dried fish, corn and soya-based diet for the investigation and maintenance of food allergic dogs when fed initially as a restricted allergen diet and then as a maintenance diet after challenge. All the dogs showed evidence of pruritic skin disease and in addition demonstrated gastrointestinal signs. These included the presence of faecal mucus and blood, tenesmus and increased faecal frequency; all the signs associated with colitis. Both cutaneous and gastrointestinal signs resolved when an elimination diet was fed and could be reproduced when the animal was appropriately challenged. Ten dogs were trialled on a home cooked diet of fish and potato and 10 dogs on the proprietary complete food. All the dogs were challenged to identify their food allergies. Nineteen of the dogs have subsequently been successfully maintained on the proprietary food.

  17. Bilateral Poly Implant Prothèse Implant Rupture: An Uncommon Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Mallon

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Summary: A woman in her 50s underwent delayed bilateral Poly Implant Prothèse implant reconstruction following mastectomy for breast cancer. Symptoms of implant rupture developed 43 months after surgery with an erythematous rash on her trunk. The rash then spread to her reconstructed breast mounds. Initial ultrasound scan and magnetic resonance imaging were normal; however, subsequent magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated left implant rupture only. In theater, following removal of both implants, both were found to be ruptured. The rash on her trunk resolved within 3 weeks in the postoperative period. Chemical analyses of silicone in both implants confirmed a nonauthorized silicone source; in addition, the chemical structure was significantly different between the left and right implant, perhaps explaining the variation in presentation.

  18. Allopurinol-induced Severe Hypersensitivity with Acute Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Hung Chen

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available A 62-year-old male was sent to the emergency room due to a high fever and generalized skin rash after taking allopurinol for 9 days. Physical examination was normal except for the generalized skin rash presenting with erythematous macules. Complete blood count showed leukocytosis with eosinophilia. Blood biochemistry showed impaired renal and hepatic function. Pathologic examination concluded that the skin rash was erythema multiforme. These findings met the diagnostic criteria for allopurinol-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (AHS. Our patient not only had the most common skin lesion but soon developed acute renal failure that required intermittent hemodialysis, despite rapid discontinuation of allopurinol and adequate hydration and steroid therapy. No other causes of acute renal failure were found. Renal impairment was the worst part of the patient's condition and he never completely recovered. AHS should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute renal and hepatic failure in patients with evidence of allergy and recent use of allopurinol.

  19. Redefining dermatomyositis: a description of new diagnostic criteria that differentiate pure dermatomyositis from overlap myositis with dermatomyositis features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyanov, Yves; Targoff, Ira N; Payette, Marie-Pier; Raynauld, Jean-Pierre; Chartier, Suzanne; Goulet, Jean-Richard; Bourré-Tessier, Josiane; Rich, Eric; Grodzicky, Tamara; Fritzler, Marvin J; Joyal, France; Koenig, Martial; Senécal, Jean-Luc

    2014-11-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) is a major clinical subset of autoimmune myositis (AIM). The characteristic DM rash (Gottron papules, heliotrope rash) and perifascicular atrophy at skeletal muscle biopsy are regarded as specific features for this diagnosis. However, new concepts are challenging the current definition of DM. A modified Bohan and Peter classification of AIM was proposed in which the core concept was the inclusion of the diagnostic significance of overlap connective tissue disease features. In this clinical classification, a DM rash in association with myositis in the absence of overlap features indicates a diagnosis of pure DM. However, overlap features in association with myositis allow a diagnosis of overlap myositis (OM), irrespective of the presence or absence of the DM rash. Perifascicular atrophy may be present in both pure DM and OM. Recently, the presence of perifascicular atrophy in myositis without a DM rash was proposed as diagnostic of a novel entity, adermatopathic DM. We conducted the present study to evaluate these new concepts to further differentiate pure DM from OM.Using the modified Bohan and Peter classification, we performed a follow-up study of a longitudinal cohort of 100 consecutive adult French Canadian patients with AIM, including 44 patients with a DM phenotype, defined as a DM rash, and/or DM-type calcinosis, and/or the presence of perifascicular atrophy on muscle biopsy. A detailed evaluation was performed for overlap features, the extent and natural history of the DM rash, adermatopathic DM, DM-specific and overlap autoantibodies by protein A immunoprecipitation on coded serum samples, and associations with cancer and survival.Two distinct subsets were identified in patients with a DM phenotype: pure DM (n = 24) and OM with DM features, or OMDM (n = 20). In pure DM, the DM rash was a dominant finding. It was the first disease manifestation, was always present at the time of myositis diagnosis, and was associated with a high

  20. How not to miss autoinflammatory diseases masquerading as urticaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krause, K; Grattan, C E; Bindslev-Jensen, C

    2012-01-01

    Urticarial skin reactions are one of the most frequent problems seen by allergists and clinical immunologists in daily practice. The most common reason for recurrent wheals is spontaneous urticaria. There are, however, several less common diseases that present with urticarial rash...... symptoms including recurrent fever attacks, arthralgia or arthritis and fatigue. Autoinflammatory diseases are often associated with a diagnostic delay of many years and do not respond to antihistamines and other treatments of urticaria. Also, the chronic inflammation may lead to long-term complications...... such as amyloidosis. It is therefore important not to miss these diseases when diagnosing and treating patients with chronic recurrent urticarial rash. Here, we present clinical clues and tips that can help to identify autoinflammatory disorders in patients presenting with chronic urticarial rash and discuss...

  1. Disseminated gonococcal infection: an unusual presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj Lohani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Gonococcus typically affects the mucosal surfaces but in rare cases can spread to bloodstream causing disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI. The usual presentation of DGI is rash, polyarthralgia, and tenosynovitis. We present the case of a 23-year-old female who presented to our hospital with pustular rash and tenosynovitis of hand and was sent home on Augmentin. Her symptoms worsened despite treatment and she presented back to the ED. On investigation, she was found to have DGI and was appropriately treated. DGI should be kept in mind in sexually active youngsters who have only one or two features of the classic triad of rash, tenosynovitis, and arthritis. Timely management and appropriate treatment of DGI is very important to avoid complications and morbidity.

  2. Neutralization of IL-8 prevents the induction of dermatologic adverse events associated with the inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Nannie; Houtkamp, Mischa; Schuurhuis, Danita H

    2012-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors are widely used in the treatment of cancer. EGFR-targeted treatment is known to be associated with a high incidence of dermatological adverse reactions, including papulopustular rash, which can be dose-limiting and may affect compliance to treatm......Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors are widely used in the treatment of cancer. EGFR-targeted treatment is known to be associated with a high incidence of dermatological adverse reactions, including papulopustular rash, which can be dose-limiting and may affect compliance......, characterized by acute follicular neutrophil-rich hair follicle inflammation, and thus mimicked adverse events induced by systemic administration of EGFR inhibitors. In this model, we tested the hypothesis that neutrophils, attracted by IL-8, play a central role in the observed rash. Indeed, concomitant local...

  3. Bullous Henoch–Schonlein purpura with involvement of face

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devdeep Mukherjee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Henoch–Schonlein purpura (HSP with facial involvement with bullous rashes are extremely rare. A 12-year-old boy presented with abdominal pain and features of arthritis. He also had multiple purpuric rashes over his lower limbs. Gradually, he developed bullous rashes which were seen on his legs and hands and progressed to involve the face. He was confirmed to be suffering from HSP from clinical presentation and skin biopsy. The child responded well to oral steroids. Bullous lesions may be seen in HSP. However, there is neither prognostic significance of this nor does it alter the management. Other causes of bullous lesions should be ruled out. As facial involvement is associated with renal and gastrointestinal involvement, these children should be monitored for sequelae.

  4. Dress syndrome with sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome and pneumomediastinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhas Prasun Giri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS syndrome reflects a serious hypersensitivity reaction to drugs, and is characterized by skin rash, fever, lymph node enlargement, and internal organ involvement. So far, numerous drugs such as sulfonamides, phenobarbital, sulfasalazine, carbamazepine, and phenytoin have been reported to cause DRESS syndrome. We report a case of a 10-year-old girl who developed clinical manifestations of fever, rash, lymphadenopathy, hypereosinophilia, and visceral involvement (hepatitis and pneumonitis after taking phenobarbital for seizures, with subsequent development of sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS and spontaneous air leak syndrome (pnemothorax and pneumomediastinum. She was put on steroids and various antibiotics and was ventilated, but ultimately succumbed to sepsis and pulmonary complications.

  5. TREATMENT POLICY OF PEDIATRICIANS AGAINST ACUTE AND CHRONIC ALLERGIC PATHOLOGIES IN CHILDREN. DESLORATADINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Vishneva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic rhinitis, bronchial asthma, chronic idiopathic nettle rash, atopic dermatitis have been characterized by a stable growth in the prevalence of the allergic pathology over the last several decades. A similar pathogenesis of allergic diseases makes it possible to regard them as different manifestations of a systemic allergic inflammation. Histamine is one of the main mediators of an allergic inflammation, therefore first-line medications (drug of choice in the treatment of an allergic pathology, first of all, rhinitis and chronic nettle rash, are second-generation blockers of Н1-receptors. The proposed article discusses the issues connected with the use of antihistamines for children.Key words: allergic rhinitis, bronchial asthma, nettle rash, atopic dermatitis, treatment, antihistamines, children.

  6. Clinical and epidemiological aspects of human parvovirus B19 infection in an urban area in Brazil (Niterói city area, State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Artimos de Oliveira

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to analyse the clinical and epidemiological data from human parvovirus B19 cases in a six-year study of rash diseases conduct in an urban area in Brazil (Niterói city area, State of Rio de Janeiro. A total of 673 patients with acute rash diseases were seen at two primary health care units and at a general hospital. A clotted blood sample was collected from all subjects at the time of consultation. Forty-nine per cent (330 cases of the patients were negative for dengue, rubella and measles IgM or for low avidity IgG to HHV-6. Of these 330, 105 (31.8% were identified as IgM positive to parvovirus B19 by using an antibody capture EIA. During the study period, three distinct peaks of parvovirus infection were detected, suggesting that the disease appears to cycle in approximately 4-5 years. B19 infection was characterized by variable combinations of fever, flu-like symptoms, arthropathy, and gastrointestinal symptoms. Frequency of fever and arthropathy was substantially higher in adults, 75% [chi2 (1 D.F. = 11.39, p = 0.0007] and 62.5% [chi2 (1 D.F. = 29.89, p = 0.0000], respectively. "Slapped-cheek" appearance and reticular or lace-like rash were seen in only 30.1% of the children. No adult presented this typical rash. The lack of the typical rash pattern in a large proportion of parvovirus B19 and the similarity of clinical manifestations to other rash diseases, specially to rubella, highlight the difficulty of diagnosing B19 infection on clinical grounds alone.

  7. The “Great Masquerader" Strikes Again: Secondary Syphilis Presentation with Erythema Multiforme (EM-Like Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Brom

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease known to present with highly variable manifestations, especially when left untreated. Patients who present to Internal Medicine Departments with fever and a rash are always a diagnostic challenge since mild viral diseases and life-threatening bacterial infections may manifest themselves similarly. In the following case presentation, we describe a patient with 1 month’s duration of fever and rash on the palms of the hand and soles of the feet, in the form of erythema multiforme (EM-like lesions. His disease was diagnosed as secondary syphilis, once again justifying its name: the “great masquerader".

  8. Acute sensorineural hearing loss and severe otalgia due to scrub typhus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Dong-Min

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scrub typhus is an acute febrile illness caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi. Case presentations We encountered a patient with sensorineural hearing loss complicating scrub typhus, and three patients with scrub typhus who complained of otalgia, which was sudden onset, severe, paroxysmal, intermittent yet persistent pain lasting for several seconds, appeared within 1 week after the onset of fever and rash. The acute sensorineural hearing loss and otalgia were resolved after antibiotic administration. Conclusion When patients in endemic areas present with fever and rash and have sensorineural hearing loss or otalgia without otoscopic abnormalities, clinicians should suspect scrub typhus and consider empirical antibiotic therapy.

  9. Heterogeneity of glucagonomas due to differential processing of proglucagon-derived peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Challis, Benjamin G; Albrechtsen, Nicolai J Wewer; Bansiya, Vishakha

    2015-01-01

    activities including critical roles in glucose and amino acid metabolism, energy homeostasis and gastrointestinal physiology.The clinical manifestations of proglucagon-expressing tumours may exhibit marked phenotypic variation due to the biochemical heterogeneity of their secreted peptide repertoire...... the rash. Case 2, a 48-year-old male presented with diabetes mellitus, diarrhoea, weight loss, nausea, vomiting and perineal rash due to a grade 1 metastatic pNET and hyperglucagonaemia. In both cases, plasma levels of all measured PGDPs were elevated and attenuated following SSA therapy. In case 1...

  10. [Case of acute pain of herpes zoster with preceding immobility of the shoulder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takekawa, Kimiko

    2012-07-01

    A 62-year-old-man treated for nephrotic syndrome with steroid developed acute pain of herpes zoster after immobility of the shoulder. Steroids might have suppressed the first symptoms of pain. But immobility probably appeared as VZV infection developing to spinal ventral root. Suprascapular nerve block was effective for severe pain of the right arm. Sympathetic nerve contained in suprascapular nerve might have been blocked. Sympathetically maintained pain may occur when primary afferent neurons are excited by inflammation due to VZV infection. Pain was abolished 17 weeks after the onset of rash using blocks three times and amitriptyrin and valproic acid. Immobility was resolved seven months after the onset of rash.

  11. Two cases of eczematid-like purpura of Doucas and Kapetanakis responsive to narrow band ultraviolet B treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadag, Ayse Serap; Bilgili, Serap Gunes; Onder, Sevda; Calka, Omer

    2013-04-01

    Eczematid-like purpura of Doucas and Kapetanakis is a type of pigmented purpuric dermatoses (PPDs) with eczematous changes in the purpuric surface. A 10-year-old male and a 44-year-old male patients were admitted to our clinics for itching and flaking of the skin rashes. Based on the clinical and histopathological evaluations, the rashes were identified as eczematid-like PPDs of Doucas and Kapetanakis. Both patients were treated with narrow band ultraviolet B. The lesions were remarkably regressed following the treatment. These cases reported due its rarity and good response to narrow band ultraviolet B. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Fatal Brazilian spotless fever caused by Rickettsia rickettsii in a dark-skinned patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexsandra Rodrigues de Mendonça Favacho

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Brazilian spotted fever (BSF is the most important and frequent rickettsial disease in Brazil. A fatal case of BSF is reported in a 32-year-old black man, who died of irreversible shock after five days of fever, severe headache and abdominal pain with no rash. Spleen, kidney and heart samples collected at autopsy were positive for Rickettsia rickettsii by PCR and sequencing. The authors emphasize the need for a high index of diagnostic suspicion for spotted fever in black patients. Absence of a skin rash should not dissuade clinicians from considering the possibility of BSF and initiating empirical therapy.

  13. Common skin problems in the community and primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Kirsty

    2014-10-01

    Skin problems can be hard to diagnose, leaving clinicians frustrated and patients incorrectly treated, but rashes and lesions can be markers of systemic disease and infections. However, by using simple history-taking and mnemonics, safety and correct diagnoses can be achieved. This article will consider some common problems encountered in primary and community care, issues that need to be excluded, resources that will help with diagnosis and some management guidelines. This is not an exhaustive guide, and advice should be sought from learned colleagues in specific cases. Pressure area care and the use of compression bandaging will not be discussed unless it is of relevance to the subject of rashes and lesions.

  14. Herpes Zoster Involving Penis and Scrotum: An Unusual Occurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arshad, A. R.; Alvi, K. Y.; Chaudhary, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster is an infectious vesicular skin rash in a dermatomal distribution caused by Varicella zoster virus. It occurs very uncommonly in sacral dermatomes. We describe a case with rash on penis and scrotum due to involvement of S2 dermatome in a young male. The disease followed an uneventful course and the patient recovered completely without any sequelae or complications. This case is being presented to highlight its unusual location and to discuss differentiation from another viral infection commonly seen at this site. (author)

  15. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and atypical Stevens-Johnson syndrome: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravin, Karen A; Rappaport, Lara D; Zuckerbraun, Noel S; Wadowsky, Robert M; Wald, Ellen R; Michaels, Marian M

    2007-04-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a common cause of community-acquired respiratory illness in the adolescent population. Stevens-Johnson syndrome is an extrapulmonary manifestation that has been associated with M. pneumoniae infections. Three adolescent males presented within a 1-month period with M. pneumoniae respiratory illnesses and severe mucositis but without the classic rash typical of Stevens-Johnson. Diagnosis was facilitated by the use of a polymerase chain reaction-based assay. This case series highlights the potential for M. pneumoniae-associated Stevens-Johnson syndrome to occur without rash and supports the use of polymerase chain reaction for early diagnosis.

  16. Rat-bite fever in children: case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojukwu, Ifeoma C; Christy, Cynthia

    2002-01-01

    We report 2 cases of rat-bite fever (RBF), a multisystem zoonosis, in children and review the literature. RBF is caused by I of 2 Gram-negative organisms: Streptobacillus moniliformis or, less commonly, Spirillum minus. Both of our cases developed in school-aged girls with a history of rat exposure who presented with a multisystem illness consisting of fever, petechial and purpuric rash, arthralgia and polyarthritis. Both responded promptly to antibiotic treatment. An additional 10 cases from a MEDLINE review (1960-2000) are reviewed. RBF must be included in the differential diagnosis of febrile patients with rashes and a history of exposure to rats.

  17. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever and Pregnancy: Four Cases from Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licona-Enriquez, Jesus David; Delgado-de la Mora, Jesus; Paddock, Christopher D; Ramirez-Rodriguez, Carlos Arturo; Candia-Plata, María Del Carmen; Hernández, Gerardo Álvarez

    2017-09-01

    We present a series of four pregnant women with Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) that occurred in Sonora, Mexico, during 2015-2016. Confirmatory diagnoses were made by polymerase chain reaction or serological reactivity to antigens of Rickettsia rickettsii by using an indirect immunofluorescence antibody assay. Each patient presented with fever and petechial rash and was treated successfully with doxycycline. Each of the women and one full-term infant delivered at 36 weeks gestation survived the infection. Three of the patients in their first trimester of pregnancy suffered spontaneous abortions. RMSF should be suspected in any pregnant woman presenting with fever, malaise and rash in regions where R. rickettsii is endemic.

  18. [Rocky mountain spotted fever: report of two cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Medina, Miguel Angel; Padilla-Zamudio, Guillermo; Solís-Gallardo, Lilia Patricia; Guevara-Tovar, Marcela

    2005-01-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is an acute febrile illness caused by infection with Ricketsia Rickettsii, characterized by the presence of petechial rash. Even though the etiology, clinical characteristics and availability of effective antibiotics are known, RMSF related deaths have a prevalence of 4%. In its early stages RMFS can resemble many others infectious conditions and the diagnosis can be difficult. The present paper reports two patients with RMSF; these cases underscore the importance of prompt diagnosis and appropriate antimicrobial therapy, and consider RMSF as a differential diagnosis in any patient who develops fever and rash in an endemic area.

  19. Herpes zoster involving penis and scrotum: an unusual occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Abdul Rehman; Alvi, Kamran Yousaf; Chaudhary, Ammad Akram

    2015-03-01

    Herpes zoster is an infectious vesicular skin rash in a dermatomal distribution caused by Varicella zoster virus. It occurs very uncommonly in sacral dermatomes. We describe a case with rash on penis and scrotum due to involvement of S2 dermatome in a young male. The disease followed an uneventful course and the patient recovered completely without any sequelae or complications. This case is being presented to highlight its unusual location and to discuss differentiation from another viral infection commonly seen at this site.

  20. Neurogenic bladder from occult herpes zoster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrock, J F; Walicke, P A; Swenson, M R

    1986-11-01

    Active infection with herpes zoster may cause acute urinary retention, especially when it involves sacral dermatomes. Although frank retention usually develops days to weeks after eruption of the typical rash, bladder incompetence infrequently develops first, raising concern over other, more ominous etiologies. In the case presented, rash appearance was delayed until six weeks after the initial onset of urinary retention, a much longer interval than previously reported. Occult herpes zoster infection should be considered in patients presenting with an acute neurogenic bladder of obscure cause.

  1. ADULT-ONSET STILL'S DISEASE: DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimma Mikhailovna Balabanova

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD, a rare multisystemic disease of unknown etiology that is referred to as seronegative rheumatoid arthritis. It presents the major manifestations of AOSD: long-term fever, arthritis or persistent arthralgias, maculopapular eruption, seronegativity for rheumatoid factor, neutrophilic leukocytosis, and disease onset after 16 years of age, as well as additional signs: lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, polyserositis, nasopharyngeal infection. It is noted that particular difficulties in the diagnosis of AOSD emerge when it is complicated by the hematophagocytic syndrome (HPS. The distinctive features of AOSD are the development of cutaneous and articular symptoms in practically 80% of patients and their absence in HPS. It is stated that of greater value in the diagnosis of HPS is examination of aspirate of the bone marrow than its biopsy. Most patients develop refractoriness to glucocorticoids and essential anti-inflammatory drugs. The positive results of using anakinra, rituximab, and tocilizumab are promising.

  2. ADULT-ONSET STILL'S DISEASE: DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimma Mikhailovna Balabanova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD, a rare multisystemic disease of unknown etiology that is referred to as seronegative rheumatoid arthritis. It presents the major manifestations of AOSD: long-term fever, arthritis or persistent arthralgias, maculopapular eruption, seronegativity for rheumatoid factor, neutrophilic leukocytosis, and disease onset after 16 years of age, as well as additional signs: lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, polyserositis, nasopharyngeal infection. It is noted that particular difficulties in the diagnosis of AOSD emerge when it is complicated by the hematophagocytic syndrome (HPS. The distinctive features of AOSD are the development of cutaneous and articular symptoms in practically 80% of patients and their absence in HPS. It is stated that of greater value in the diagnosis of HPS is examination of aspirate of the bone marrow than its biopsy. Most patients develop refractoriness to glucocorticoids and essential anti-inflammatory drugs. The positive results of using anakinra, rituximab, and tocilizumab are promising.

  3. A case study on successful ayurvedic management of a rare case of reiter's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishali Kuchewar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reiter's syndrome is a clinical syndrome of arthritis, urethritis, conjunctivitis, and mucocutaneous lesions. Skin and mucosal involvement is observed in about 10% of the cases. A 34-year-old male was brought in severe condition. He had red colored foul smelling maculopapular skin lesions all over body, swollen and painful knee and shoulder joints. History revealed that he was suffering from Reiter's syndrome since 2003. He used to get admitted between the months of February and May every year due to aggravation of symptoms. Every time he was treated with systemic antibiotics, corticosteroids, immunosuppressants and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. He was successfully treated with external application and internal medication with tikta (bitter and kaṣāya (astringent drugs. He got significant relief in skin lesions as well as joint pain and his quality of life was markedly improved. This case study demonstrates that Reiter's syndrome can be well managed with Ayurvedic medicines.

  4. [Dermatological features of auto-inflammatory recurrent fevers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudier, A; Mauvais, F-X; Bastard, P; Boussard, C; Jaoui, A; Koskas, V; Lecoq, E; Michel, A; Orcel, M-C; Truelle, P-E; Wohrer, D; Piram, M

    2018-02-01

    Auto-inflammatory diseases are characterized by unexplained and recurrent attacks of systemic inflammation often involving the skin, joints, or serosal membranes. They are due to a dysfunction or dysregulation of the innate immunity, which is the first line of defense against pathogens. Early recognition of these diseases by the clinician, especially by pediatricians encountering such pathologies in pediatric patients, is primordial to avoid complications. Skin manifestations, common in most auto-inflammatory diseases, are helpful for prompt diagnosis. After a brief physiopathological review, we will describe auto-inflammatory recurrent fevers by their main dermatological presentations: urticarial lesions, neutrophilic dermatoses, panniculitis, other maculopapular eruptions, dyskeratosis, skin vasculitis, and oral aphthous. We finally suggest a decision tree to help clinicians better target genetic exams in patients with recurrent fevers and dermatological manifestations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Immunological aspects of nonimmediate reactions to beta-lactam antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodilla, Esther Morena; González, Ignacio Dávila; Yges, Elena Laffond; Bellido, Francisco Javier Múñoz; Bara, María Teresa Gracia; Toledano, Félix Lorente

    2010-09-01

    beta-lactam antibiotics are the agents most frequently implied in immune drug adverse reactions. These can be classified as immediate or nonimmediate according to the time interval between the last drug administration and their onset. Mechanisms of immediate IgE-mediated reactions are widely studied and are therefore better understood. Nonimmediate reactions include a broad number of clinical entities like mild maculopapular exanthemas, the most common, and other less frequent but more severe reactions such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, acute exanthematic pustulosis or cytopenias. These nonimmediate reactions are mainly mediated by T cells but the precise underlying mechanisms are not well elucidated. This fact complicates the allergological evaluation of patients with this type of reaction and available tests have demonstrated poor sensitivity and specificity.

  6. Update on Mastocytosis (Part 2): Categories, Prognosis, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azaña, J M; Torrelo, A; Matito, A

    2016-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a term used to describe a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by clonal proliferation of mast cells in different organs. The organ most often affected is the skin. The World Health Organization classifies cutaneous mastocytosis into mastocytoma, maculopapular cutaneous mastocytosis, and diffuse mastocytosis. The systemic variants in this classification are as follows: indolent systemic mastocytosis (SM), aggressive SM, SM with an associated clonal hematological non-mast cell lineage disease, mast cell leukemia, mast cell sarcoma, and extracutaneous mastocytoma. The two latest systemic variants are rare. Although the course of disease is unpredictable in children, lesions generally resolve by early adulthood. In adults, however, the disease tends to persist. The goal of treatment should be to control clinical manifestations caused by the release of mast cell mediators and, in more aggressive forms of the disease, to reduce mast cell burden. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  7. Reações cutâneas desencadeadas por drogas Skin reactions to drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Regina Cavariani Silvares

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: Drogas podem desencadear reações adversas. As manifestações cutâneas são as mais comuns. OBJETIVO: Analisar as farmacodermias e relacionar as drogas envolvidas e os tipos de reações cutâneas mais freqüentes. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo e descritivo. Avaliados pacientes com diagnóstico inicial de farmacodermia internados na Enfermaria de Dermatologia, no período de janeiro de 1999 a junho de 2004. Incluídos no estudo os pacientes que confirmaram o diagnóstico de farmacodermia, com base em critérios clínicos e histopatológicos, após a análise dos prontuários. RESULTADOS: Tiveram diagnóstico inicial de farmacodermia 121 pacientes. Incluídos 43 pacientes, dos quais 51,2% eram do sexo feminino, e 86% da raça branca. Destes, 48,8% faziam uso de apenas uma medicação, sendo o grupo dos antibióticos o mais utilizado (20,9% e o principal responsável pela farmacodermia(33,3%. O segundo grupo de drogas mais envolvido foi o dos antiinflamatórios (16,7%, seguido pelo dos anticonvulsivantes (13%, e analgésicos/antipiréticos (13%. A forma clínica da erupção cutânea foi exantema maculopapular em 41,9% dos pacientes, eritrodermia em 25,6% e urticária em 23,3%. CONCLUSÃO: O exantema maculopapular foi a principal forma de reação cutânea desencadeada por drogas, e os antibióticos, os medicamentos que mais freqüentemente desencadearam essas reações.BACKGROUND: Drugs may trigger adverse reactions and skin manifestations are the most frequent ones. OBJECTIVE: To assess drug reactions and report the drugs involved and the most frequent types of skin reactions. METHODS: A retrospective and descriptive study. Data of inpatients at the Dermatology Ward with initial diagnosis of adverse drug reactions were evaluated from January 1999 to June 2004. Patients with confirmed diagnosis were included in the study based on clinical and histopathological criteria, after analysis of medical charts. RESULTS: Initial diagnosis

  8. Clinical features of 31 patients with systemic contact dermatitis due to the ingestion of Rhus (lacquer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S D; Lee, S W; Chun, J H; Cha, S H

    2000-05-01

    In Korea, Rhus has been used as a folk medicine to cure gastrointestinal diseases and as a health food. We review the clinicopathological and laboratory findings in patients with systemic contact dermatitis caused by intake of Rhus. We reviewed medical records and histopathological sections from 31 patients during a 10-year period. The male/female ratio was 1.4: 1 and the average age was 43.8 years (range 22-70). Ten patients (32%) had a known history of allergy to lacquer. Rhus was ingested to treat gastrointestinal problems including indigestion and gastritis (45%), and as a health food (39%), in cooked meat, in herbal medicine, or taken by inhalation. The patients developed skin lesions such as a maculopapular eruption (65%), erythema multiforme (EM, 32%), erythroderma (19%), pustules, purpura, weals and blisters. Erythroderma was very frequent in patients with a known history of allergy to lacquer, but maculopapular and EM-type eruptions were more frequently observed in those without a history of allergy. All patients experienced generalized or localized pruritus. Other symptoms included gastrointestinal problems (32%), fever (26%), chills and headache; many developed leucocytosis (70%) with neutrophilia (88%), while some showed toxic effects on liver and kidney. Fifty-nine per cent of patients observed cutaneous or general symptoms within a day after ingestion of Rhus. There was no difference in the time lag for symptoms to develop between patients allergic and not allergic to Rhus. All patients responded well to treatment with systemic steroids and antihistamines. Common histopathological findings were vascular dilatation, perivascular lymphohistiocytic infiltration, and extravasation of red blood cells in the upper dermis. Rhus lacquer should not be ingested in view of its highly allergic and toxic effects.

  9. Acute disseminated candidiasis with skin lesions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarana, M; Nucci, M

    2018-03-01

    Neutropenic patients developing acute disseminated candidiasis may present with skin lesions. To evaluate the epidemiology of acute disseminated candidiasis with skin lesions in neutropenic patients, taking into consideration changes caused by different prophylactic strategies. A systematic review of English-language articles found via PubMed (1963-2016) was performed. We asked the following questions: (a) What Candida species are more frequently involved in this syndrome? (b) Has antifungal prophylaxis changed the species causing skin lesions? (c) What are the typical patterns of skin lesions? (d) What is the frequency of skin lesions in neutropenic patients with candidaemia or acute disseminated candidiasis? (e) Has antifungal prophylaxis decreased the incidence of acute disseminated candidiasis with skin lesions? Among 183 studies, 33 were selected, reporting 100 cases of acute disseminated candidiasis with skin lesions in neutropenic patients. It occurred more frequently in the setting of induction therapy for de novo or relapsed acute leukaemia, and the most frequent Candida species were C. tropicalis (68%) and C. krusei (15%). Diffuse maculopapular lesions predominated in cases caused by C. tropicalis and nodular and papular lesions in cases caused by C. krusei. Prophylaxis with fluconazole was reported in six cases, C. krusei in five and C. ciferrii in one. The death rate was 45.4%. Two patterns were recognized: disseminated maculopapular lesions caused by C. tropicalis in patients not receiving fluconazole prophylaxis, occurring in 39% to 44% of neutropenic patients with acute disseminated candidiasis, and nodular lesions caused by C. krusei in patients receiving fluconazole prophylaxis, occurring less frequently. Copyright © 2017 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cutaneous manifestations in patients with mastocytosis: Consensus report of the European Competence Network on Mastocytosis; the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; and the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Karin; Escribano, Luis; Grattan, Clive; Brockow, Knut; Carter, Melody C; Alvarez-Twose, Ivan; Matito, Almudena; Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd; Siebenhaar, Frank; Lange, Magdalena; Niedoszytko, Marek; Castells, Mariana; Oude Elberink, Joanna N G; Bonadonna, Patrizia; Zanotti, Roberta; Hornick, Jason L; Torrelo, Antonio; Grabbe, Jürgen; Rabenhorst, Anja; Nedoszytko, Boguslaw; Butterfield, Joseph H; Gotlib, Jason; Reiter, Andreas; Radia, Deepti; Hermine, Olivier; Sotlar, Karl; George, Tracy I; Kristensen, Thomas K; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C; Yavuz, Selim; Hägglund, Hans; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Schwartz, Lawrence B; Triggiani, Massimo; Maurer, Marcus; Nilsson, Gunnar; Horny, Hans-Peter; Arock, Michel; Orfao, Alberto; Metcalfe, Dean D; Akin, Cem; Valent, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous lesions in patients with mastocytosis are highly heterogeneous and encompass localized and disseminated forms. Although a classification and criteria for cutaneous mastocytosis (CM) have been proposed, there remains a need to better define subforms of cutaneous manifestations in patients with mastocytosis. To address this unmet need, an international task force involving experts from different organizations (including the European Competence Network on Mastocytosis; the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; and the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology) met several times between 2010 and 2014 to discuss the classification and criteria for diagnosis of cutaneous manifestations in patients with mastocytosis. This article provides the major outcomes of these meetings and a proposal for a revised definition and criteria. In particular, we recommend that the typical maculopapular cutaneous lesions (urticaria pigmentosa) should be subdivided into 2 variants, namely a monomorphic variant with small maculopapular lesions, which is typically seen in adult patients, and a polymorphic variant with larger lesions of variable size and shape, which is typically seen in pediatric patients. Clinical observations suggest that the monomorphic variant, if it develops in children, often persists into adulthood, whereas the polymorphic variant may resolve around puberty. This delineation might have important prognostic implications, and its implementation in diagnostic algorithms and future mastocytosis classifications is recommended. Refinements are also suggested for the diagnostic criteria of CM, removal of telangiectasia macularis eruptiva perstans from the current classification of CM, and removal of the adjunct solitary from the term solitary mastocytoma. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Aids-related kaposi's sarcoma in a four year old child: the challenge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-04-01

    Apr 1, 2017 ... KS, endemic (African) KS and iatrogenic (transplanted- related) KS. ... mother so as to prevent mother to child transmission of. HIV. ... use, insect bite or allergy prior to onset of the rashes. ... but there was no history suggestive of sickle cell dis- ease. ... urine microscopy and renal function tests were within.

  12. Encephalitis associated with inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion due to chikungunya infection in Recife, State of Pernambuco, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Lucena-Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract The symptoms of chikungunya virus (CHIKV infection include fever, headache, muscle aches, skin rash, and polyarthralgia, characterized by intense pain, edema, and temporary functional impairment. This is the first report of encephalitis caused by CHIKV infection associated with an atypical presentation of syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, evolving to cognitive impairment and apraxia of speech.

  13. A Review on the Incidence, Interaction, and Future Perspective on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zika virus (ZIKV) belongs to the family Flaviviridae and genus Flavivirus. It is a single‑stranded positive‑sense ribonucleic acid (RNA) virus, has its origin traced to Zika forest in Uganda. Its infection leads to ZIKV fever, characterized by arthralgia, myalgia, rash, conjunctivitis, and asthenia. Clinical presentation of the infection ...

  14. Secondary syphilis in HIV infection - a diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panvelker V

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of secondary syphilis in HIV infection is being reported. The patient presented with skin rash only. VDRL was found to be negative and HIV testing was positive. He was treated for secondary syphilis with clinical response. Blood VDRL test was subsequently reported as reactive.

  15. Angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The clinical manifestations of KD include per- sistent fever, non-purulent conjunctivitis, diffuse muco- sal inflammation, polymorphous skin rashes, indurative angioedema of the hands and feet, and non-suppurative cervical lymphadenopathy3. In about 20% of patients vasculitis will lead to coronary artery lesions as detect-.

  16. Diagnosis of Scrub Typhus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koh, Gavin C. K. W.; Maude, Richard J.; Paris, Daniel H.; Newton, Paul N.; Blacksell, Stuart D.

    2010-01-01

    Scrub typhus is transmitted by trombiculid mites and is endemic to East and Southeast Asia and Northern Australia. The clinical syndrome classically consists of a fever, rash, and eschar, but scrub typhus also commonly presents as an undifferentiated fever that requires laboratory confirmation of

  17. Risk factors associated with severe scrub typhus in Shandong, northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luyan Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: This study indicates that improved diagnosis and timely treatment are important factors for the prevention of severe scrub typhus. When scrub typhus patients present with a rash, lymphadenopathy, or blood platelet count <100 × 109/l, clinicians should be alert to the appearance of severe complications.

  18. Characteristics of Male and Female Students Who Experienced Success or Failure in Their First College Science Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBoer, George E.

    1985-01-01

    Examined personality (persistence, future orientation, and the tendency toward reckless/rash behavior) and cognitive factors related to success or failure in college science courses. One finding noted is that both men and women were more apt to attribute their success to effort/ability, and their failure to the difficulty of a task. (JN)

  19. Biweekly cetuximab and irinotecan as second-line therapy in patients with gastro-esophageal cancer previously treated with platinum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoennemann, Katrine R; Bjerregaard, Jon K; Hansen, Tine P

    2011-01-01

    toxicities were: diarrhea (8%), fatigue (10%), neutropenia (16%), and febrile neutropenia (2%). CONCLUSION: Cetiri every two weeks is a convenient and well-tolerated second-line regimen in GEC patients. A promising effect was seen in patients with PS 0-1 and in patients who developed a rash....

  20. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015), Teigne favique traitée par la terbinafine chez un enfant de 11 ans ... Jarraya Anouar, Smaoui Mohamed, Abidi Sofiene, Zouari Jawhar, Elleuch Sahar, Kolsi Kamel. Vol 22, No 1 (2015), The “phantom” rash of Still's disease, Abstract PDF.

  1. A rare case of allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis caused by Alternaria alternata.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chowdhary, A.; Agarwal, K.; Randhawa, H.S.; Kathuria, S.; Gaur, S.N.; Najafzadeh, M.J.; Roy, P.; Arora, N.; Khanna, G.; Meis, J.F.G.M.

    2012-01-01

    A rare case of allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis (ABPM), caused by Alternaria alternata, is reported in an immunocompetent resident of Delhi. Her complaints included a generalized, urticarial skin rash and occasional pain in the right lower chest. Her differential count showed eosinophils, 22%;

  2. Leishmaniasis — Surprise from the East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Bogadelnikov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The clinical case of cutaneous leishmaniasis in a 4-year-old child is presented in the article. The child came to the Crimea from area where leishmaniasis is endemic — Republic of Uzbekistan. Clinical case is interesting for consideration in terms of differential diagnosis of specific rash.

  3. Method to manufacture superconducting layers on a tubular conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schatz, F.; Marx, K.H.; Rohner, P.

    1987-01-01

    A coated tape of Cu and Nb is first made. It is already corrugated and coiled. It is then immersed in Sn, where the intermetallic compound Nb 3 Sn is formed by diffusion in the annealing furnace, and is then rashly cooled with a protective gas. The thus manufactured stabilized superconductor can be economically produced in great length. (orig./MM) [de

  4. Zika virus infection acquired during brief travel to Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Jason C; Druce, Julian D; Leder, Karin

    2013-09-01

    Zika virus infection closely resembles dengue fever. It is possible that many cases are misdiagnosed or missed. We report a case of Zika virus infection in an Australian traveler who returned from Indonesia with fever and rash. Further case identification is required to determine the evolving epidemiology of this disease.

  5. Motivations for Self-Injury, Affect, and Impulsivity: A Comparison of Individuals with Current Self-Injury to Individuals with a History of Self-Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Julia; Peterson, Claire M.; Fischer, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Individuals who report nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) are characterized by the tendency to act rashly while experiencing distress (negative urgency), the tendency to act without thinking, and endorsement of both social and affect regulation motives for the behavior. However, very little research has identified characteristics that distinguish…

  6. 'Abd al-Rashid Ibrahim's Biographical Dictionary on Siberian Islamic Scholars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bustanov, A.K.

    2014-01-01

    This article is a publication of facsimiles and annotated English translations of two versions of a biographical dictionary of Siberian Islamic scholars. The work written by ‘Abd al-Rashīd Ibrāhīm deserves serious attention from scholars because it opens up a world of intellectual life among the

  7. AFRIMEDIC VOL. 2, NO. 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Buchi

    radiological imaging in the management of this condition is highlighted. Key Words: ... of abnormal increase in abdominal girth or skin rash on the mother ... Volume of 0.40, White Blood Cell count = 7 x 10 mm , differential .... In females, vaginal and uterine. 20 ... tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). They are ...

  8. Pseudomonas-follikulitis efter badning i spabad

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldall Pallesen, Kristine Appel; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Mørtz, Charlotte Gotthard

    2012-01-01

    . We describe a 23-year-old healthy woman who developed a pustular rash and general malaise after using a spa bath contaminated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Bacterial culture from a pustule confirmed Pseudomonas folliculitis and the patient was treated with ciprofloxacin with rapid good effect....

  9. Banerji, Sudangsu Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Banerji, Sudangsu Kumar D.Sc. (Presidency College, Calcutta), FNA 1934-35. Date of birth: 27 April 1893. Date of death: 10 August 1966. Specialization: Mathematical Physics, Geophysics, Meteorology Last known address: 3, Ramani Chatterjee Road, Rash Behari Avenue, Calcutta 700 029. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  10. Clinical patterns of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A single tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: Medical records of patients with a diagnosis of chronic arthritis with ... One patient had the typical rash of systemic onset JIA (Still's) and another had uveitis. ... corticosteroids and methotrexate were used in 16/68 (23.5%) patients and ...

  11. Food compounds inhibit Staphylococcus aureus bacteria and the toxicity of Staphylococcus Enterotoxin A (SEA) associated with atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atopic dermatitis or eczema is characterized by skin rashes and itching is an inflammatory disease that affects 10-20% of children and 1-3% of adults. Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are present on the skin of nearly all patients with atopic dermatitis. Antibiotics that suppress colonization of S. au...

  12. Measles: Information for Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as mumps and rubella. • Prevents your child from getting an uncomfortable rash and high fever from measles. • Keeps your child from missing school or childcare (and keeps you from missing work to care for your sick child). Is the MMR shot safe? Yes. The MMR shot is very safe, and it ...

  13. The 1992 tneasles epidetnic in Cape Town - a changing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In addition detailed clinical histories of 10 patients were collected via telephonic interviews of parents. The fol- lowing measles case defmitions were applied in this study: (z) definite case - high fever, generalised macu- lopapular rash for 3 or more days, and one or more of the following: coryza, cough, conjunctivitis and ...

  14. of Spirostachys africana complicated

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    C Scott, FCPaed (SA). Department of Paediatrics, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital and University of Cape Town. N P Khumalo, MB ChB, .... Jeung YJ, Lee JY, Oh MJ, Choi DC, Lee BJ. Comparison of the causes and clinical features of drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms and Stevens-Johnson ...

  15. family Vitaceae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    crystals were present in all the varieties, the shape of the stem, petiole, midrib, ... anatomically different as well as the presence of trichomes among the varieties. .... 16870 Afr. J. Biotechnol. B. A. C. Figure 5a. Vitis vinifera midrib, A- Tre rash ...

  16. 78 FR 22442 - Infant Formula: The Addition of Minimum and Maximum Levels of Selenium to Infant Formula and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-16

    ... brittleness and loss, gastrointestinal upsets, skin rash, garlic breath odor, fatigue, irritability, and... adult values on the basis of body weight and with a factor allowed for growth (Ref. 2). Although... infants 0 to 6 months of age is 750 milliliter (ml)/day; (2) a representative body weight for infants over...

  17. Time to Talk: 6 Things You Should Know about Dietary Supplements for Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stomach, skin irritation, and garlic taste, breath, and body odor. Only minor side effects are associated with MSM in humans including allergy, upset stomach, and skin rashes. ... that is naturally produced in the body and is often taken as a dietary supplement; ...

  18. Serological analysis and therapy in patients with early syphilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zhifen

    2000-01-01

    Sixty one patients with early syphilis were treated with benzathine penicillin under guide of serological analysis, the results showed that benzathine penicilline was able to cure indurated chancre and skin rashes in a month, flat condyloma in one and a half month, and PRP were all negative in 18 month

  19. Pain (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intravenous chemotherapy. Mucositis (sores or inflammation in the mouth or other parts of the digestive system ) caused by chemotherapy or targeted therapy. Skin pain, rash, or hand-foot syndrome (redness, tingling, or burning in the palms of the hands and/or ...

  20. Traditional use, antibacterial activity and antifungal activity of crude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fleshy leaves and roots of most species within the Aloe family are used in many traditional treatments (Mabberley, 1987). Traditional healers and indigenous people utilize mainly the leaf sap of this genus widely for the treatment of wounds, burns, rashes, itches, cracked lips and cracked skin (Cera et al., 1980).

  1. A multicentre study of 513 Danish patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. I. Disease manifestations and analyses of clinical subsets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Petersen, J; Ullman, S

    1998-01-01

    cluster (25%) all had malar rash and half were photosensitive. Follow-up showed that the patients of cluster 2 developed azotaemia, large proteinuria, arterial hypertension and myositis significantly more often than did the rest of the patients, but the mortality was not increased. The risk of developing...

  2. Morphoea with Myositis: A Rare Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Sommerlad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this case, we describe an unusual presentation of a young woman with a rash typical of morphoea (confirmed on biopsy, who went on to develop myositis in an atypical distribution. Although the association of myositis with diffuse systemic sclerosis is well described, the link with localised scleroderma (morphoea and myositis has not been described.

  3. A rare case of juvenile dermatomyositis and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali T Bharani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are rare group of systemic connective tissue diseases. The hallmark of these disorders is symmetrical chronic inflammation and weakness of proximal muscles. Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM is the most common inflammatory myositis in children. We describe a rare case of JDM in a 4-year-old female child who presented with characteristic cutaneous rash and proximal muscle weakness.

  4. Stopping Shingles (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Shingles, also known as herpes zoster, is a disease characterized by a painful skin rash, with blisters usually occurring on one side of the body. Each year, approximately one million people in the U.S. get the disease. In this podcast, Dr. Mark Pallansch discusses a newly approved vaccine to prevent shingles.

  5. Systemic lupus erythematosus with Reiter′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somani V

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available An HLA B 27 positive, 20 year old male presented with urethritis, joint pains, and conjunctivitis, followed by an erythematous rash over the butterfly area of the face, with high ANA titres. This case is reported because of the rarity of co-occurrence of SLE and Reiter′s disease in the same patient.

  6. Prevalence, perceived benefits and effectiveness of herbal medicine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2011-12-21

    Dec 21, 2011 ... hospice or palliative care service (Demmer, 2007). In the absence of effective ... most common herbal product used. It was reported that .... Vaginal discharge. 3. 51. 11.16. White spots in the mouth (oral thrush). 4. 51. 11.16. Skin rash. 5. 46. 10.06. Skin itch. 6. 38. 8.2. Respiratory problems. 7. 29. 6.79.

  7. Secondary syphilis presenting as vertigo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, A.U.; Mehmood, T.; Khan, B.; Malik, N.; Malik, K.Z.; Sukhera, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Syphilis is a chronic, systemic and sexually transmitted infectious disease affecting most of the organs in the body. A young African man presented with vertigo, unsteadiness of gait and a skin rash suggestive of secondary syphilis. Diagnosis was confirmed on serology and was treated with two shots of long-acting penicillin, following which his symptoms settled. (author)

  8. Rickettsial diseases in Haryana: not an uncommon entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, D; Garg, A; Singh, I; Tandon, C; Saini, R

    2009-04-01

    Rickettsioses have not been reported from the plains of North India and Haryana in particular. Here we are reporting three cases of scrub typhus and one cases of Indian tick typhus in the state of Haryana, all of which presented with fever and multi organ dysfunction, rash and without eschar. All were successfully treated with doxycycline.

  9. Swimmer's itch (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swimmer's itch is caused by parasites found in contaminated water. The parasite enters through the skin and a rash appears at the site of entry. In some tropical countries, the parasite found in the contaminated water is capable of producing a severe disease.

  10. Celiac Disease Diagnosis: Endoscopic Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the IgA antibody. DH is treated with a gluten-free diet and medication to control the rash, such as ... Drug treatment is short term, usually until the gluten-free diet starts to relieve symptoms. It is not necessary ...

  11. 75 FR 48715 - Proposed Vaccine Information Materials for Measles, Mumps, Rubella, and Varicella Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... consciousness, --Permanent brain damage. Note: The first dose of MMRV vaccine has been associated with rash and... Vaccine Information Materials for Measles, Mumps, Rubella, and Varicella Vaccines AGENCY: Centers for... comment period. SUMMARY: Under the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act (NCVIA) (42 U.S.C. 300aa-26), the...

  12. A case of vulval schistosomiasis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case Study. An 11-year-old girl, resident at Qandu,. Port St Johns, presented to her general practitioner (GP) in June 2006 with an itchy genital rash of one week's duration. There was no history of sexual abuse and she was in good general health. On examination, there were papules and nodules in the labia majora (Fig-.

  13. A case of granulomatous rosacea

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case Study: A case of granulomatous rosacea. 133. Vol 52 No 2. SA Fam Pract 2010. Clinical Quiz. A 49-year-old housewife had complained of an itchy facial rash for four years. She denied using steroid creams and skin lighteners. On examination, dark grey papules were found on her face, with some coalescing into ...

  14. 78 FR 33851 - Lung Cancer Patient-Focused Drug Development; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    ... effects could include nausea, loss of appetite fatigue, diarrhea, rash.) 4.3 How do you weigh potential benefits of these treatments versus the less common but serious risks associated with the treatments? (Examples of less common but serious risks are developing a hole in the stomach or intestine, liver failure...

  15. Complete coding sequence of Zika virus from Martinique outbreak in 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Piorkowski

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus is an Aedes-borne Flavivirus causing fever, arthralgia, myalgia rash, associated with Guillain–Barré syndrome and suspected to induce microcephaly in the fetus. We report here the complete coding sequence of the first characterized Caribbean Zika virus strain, isolated from a patient from Martinique in December, 2015.

  16. Rubella seromarkers and determinants of infection among tanzanian children and adolescents in prevaccination Era: Are we in the right track?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam M Mirambo

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The prevalence of specific rubella IgG antibodies in Tanzania is high and is associated with increase in age, absence of rash, and low SES. Results suggest a need to reconsider upper age limit for vaccination campaigns in developing countries. Screening and vaccinating women may be cost-effective campaign to prevent CRS in developing countries.

  17. Chickenpox

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a person's ears and mouth. The number of pox is different for everyone. Some people get just a few bumps; others are covered from head to toe. At first, the rash looks like pinkish dots that quickly develop a small blister on top (a blister is a bump ...

  18. Complete remission of severe idiopathic cold urticaria on interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (anakinra).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodar, E.J.; Simon, A.; Visser, M. de; Meer, J.W.M. van der

    2009-01-01

    A 62-year-old patient had suffered from severe cold intolerance with an urticarial rash and oropharyngeal angio-oedema upon cold exposure since early childhood. This could be provoked by the ice cube test and by exposure in a cold room. Her family history was negative, and she did not carry any

  19. Complete remission of severe idiopathic cold urticaria on interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (anakinra)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodar, E. J.; Simon, A.; de Visser, M.; van der Meer, J. W. M.

    2009-01-01

    A 62-year-old patient had suffered from severe cold intolerance with an urticarial rash and oropharyngeal angio-oedema upon cold exposure since early childhood. This could be provoked by the ice cube test and by exposure in a cold room. Her family history was negative, and she did not carry any

  20. Kaposi sarcoma appearing 20 year post renal transplant | Yassir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A kidney- transplanted Saudi patient presented with a skin rash for which he was treated as fungal infection .The patient developed these lesions 20 years after transplantation. The clinical picture was that of Kaposi\\'s sarcoma which was confirmed by histopathology .The patient developed these lesions after he was shifted ...