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Sample records for prudent prescribing education

  1. Educational Effectiveness, Target, and Content for Prudent Antibiotic Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Ro; Lee, Jung Hun; Kang, Lin-Woo; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2015-01-01

    Widespread antimicrobial use and concomitant resistance have led to a significant threat to public health. Because inappropriate use and overuse of antibiotics based on insufficient knowledge are one of the major drivers of antibiotic resistance, education about prudent antibiotic use aimed at both the prescribers and the public is important. This review investigates recent studies on the effect of interventions for promoting prudent antibiotics prescribing. Up to now, most educational efforts have been targeted to medical professionals, and many studies showed that these educational efforts are significantly effective in reducing antibiotic prescribing. Recently, the development of educational programs to reduce antibiotic use is expanding into other groups, such as the adult public and children. The investigation of the contents of educational programs for prescribers and the public demonstrates that it is important to develop effective educational programs suitable for each group. In particular, it seems now to be crucial to develop appropriate curricula for teaching medical and nonmedical (pharmacy, dentistry, nursing, veterinary medicine, and midwifery) undergraduate students about general medicine, microbial virulence, mechanism of antibiotic resistance, and judicious antibiotic prescribing. PMID:25945327

  2. European survey on principles of prudent antibiotic prescribing teaching in undergraduate students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pulcini, C; Wencker, F; Frimodt-Møller, N

    2015-01-01

    We surveyed European medical schools regarding teaching of prudent antibiotic prescribing in the undergraduate curriculum. We performed a cross-sectional survey in 13 European countries (Belgium, Croatia, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Serbia, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland...

  3. Health Alliance for Prudent Prescribing, Yield and Use of Antimicrobial Drugs in the Treatment of Respiratory Tract Infections (HAPPY AUDIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reutskiy Anatoliy

    2010-04-01

    treatment, posters for the waiting room, brochures to patients and implementation of point of care tests (Strep A and CRP to be used in the GPs'surgeries. To ensure public awareness of the risk of resistant bacteria, media campaigns targeting both professionals and the public will be developed and the results will be published and widely disseminated at a Working Conference hosted by the World Association of Family Doctors (WONCA-Europe at the end of the project period. Discussion HAPPY AUDIT is an EU-financed project with the aim of contributing to the battle against antibiotic resistance through quality improvement of GPs' diagnosis and treatment of RTIs through development of intervention programmes targeting GPs, parents of young children and healthy adults. It is hypothesized that the use of multifaceted strategies combining active intervention by GPs will be effective in reducing prescribing of unnecessary antibiotics for RTIs and improving the use of appropriate antibiotics in suspected bacterial infections.

  4. Health Alliance for prudent antibiotic prescribing in patients with respiratory tract infections (HAPPY AUDIT -impact of a non-randomised multifaceted intervention programme

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    Reutskiy Anatoliy

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive use of antibiotics is worldwide the most important reason for development of antimicrobial resistance. As antibiotic resistance may spread across borders, high prevalence countries may serve as a source of bacterial resistance for countries with a low prevalence. Therefore, bacterial resistance is an important issue with a potential serious impact on all countries. Initiatives have been taken to improve the quality of antibiotic prescribing in primary care, but only few studies have been designed to determine the effectiveness of multifaceted strategies across countries with different practice setting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a multifaceted intervention targeting general practitioners (GPs and patients in six countries with different health organization and different prevalence of antibiotic resistance. Methods GPs from two Nordic countries, two Baltic Countries and two Hispano-American countries registered patients with respiratory tract infections (RTIs in 2008 and 2009. After first registration they received individual prescriber feedback and they were offered an intervention programme that included training courses, clinical guidelines, posters for waiting rooms, patient brochures and access to point of care tests (Strep A and C-Reactive Protein. Antibiotic prescribing rates were compared before and after the intervention. Results A total of 440 GPs registered 47011 consultations; 24436 before the intervention (2008 and 22575 after the intervention (2009. After the intervention, the GPs significantly reduced the percentage of consultations resulting in an antibiotic prescription. In patients with lower RTI the GPs in Lithuania reduced the prescribing rate by 42%, in Russia by 25%, in Spain by 25%, and in Argentina by 9%. In patients with upper RTIs, the corresponding reductions in the antibiotic prescribing rates were in Lithania 20%, in Russia 15%, in Spain 9%, and in Argentina 5

  5. Health Alliance for prudent antibiotic prescribing in patients with Respiratory Tract Infections (HAPPY AUDIT) -impact of a non-randomised multifaceted intervention programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Lars; Munck, Anders; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Excessive use of antibiotics is worldwide the most important reason for development of antimicrobial resistance. As antibiotic resistance may spread across borders, high prevalence countries may serve as a source of bacterial resistance for countries with a low prevalence....... Therefore, bacterial resistance is an important issue with a potential serious impact on all countries. Initiatives have been taken to improve the quality of antibiotic prescribing in primary care, but only few studies have been designed to determine the effectiveness of multifaceted strategies across...

  6. Ensino obrigatório: “prudente é esperar-se do tempo o preciso remédio” - Compulsory education: “it is prudent to expect the precise remedy from the time”

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    Cíntia Borges de Almeida

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho procuramos debater o tema da obrigatoriedade do ensino em Minas Gerais e Mato Grosso, províncias que procuraram normatizar essa medida desde a primeira metade do século 19. Com isso, ancoramos o estudo nas contribuições dos estudos comparados e na análise dos discursos dos relatórios dos presidentes de uma província do sudeste e uma do oeste do Brasil. Por se tratar do exame de uma medida de alcance global, voltada para as multiplicidades, a pesquisa buscou dialogar com a concepção de governamentalidade, considerando o tema da escola obrigatória como necessidade e urgência voltada para gestão e homogeneização da população.Palavras-chave: obrigatoriedade do ensino, Minas Gerais, Mato Grosso. COMPULSORY EDUCATION: “IT IS PRUDENTE TO EXPECT THE PRECISE REMEDY FROM THE TIME”AbstractIn this current work, we sought to discuss the issue of compulsory education in Minas Gerais and Mato Grosso, Provinces that sought to standardize this step since the first half of the nineteenth century. With this, we will anchor the current study of contributions from comparative studies and discourse analysis of the chairmen's reports of a southeastern province and one in western Brazil. Because this fact is taking a measure of global reach, so, the current work is focused on the multiplicities. The research sought dialogue with the conception of governmentality, considering the subject of compulsory education as a necessity and urgency facing management and homogenization of the population.Key-words: compulsory education, Minas Gerais, Mato Grosso. ENSEÑANZA OBLIGATORIA: "PRUDENTE ES ESPERAR DEL TIEMPO EL PRECISO REMEDIO"ResumenEn este trabajo buscamos debatir el tema de la obligatoriedad de la enseñanza en Minas Gerais e Mato Grosso, Provincias que buscaron normar esa medida desde la primera mitad del siglo 19. Con eso, basamos el estudio en las contribuciones de los estudios comparados y en el análisis del discurso de

  7. Impact of an Educational Intervention on the Prescribing of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of an educational intervention on antimalarial prescribing among internal medicine residents at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital. Methods: A sample of residents was given blank prescription orders to write prescriptions for uncomplicated malaria. This was followed the next day by ...

  8. Educational Outreach to Opioid Prescribers: The Case for Academic Detailing.

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    Trotter Davis, Margot; Bateman, Brian; Avorn, Jerry

    2017-02-01

    Nonmedical use of opioid medications constitutes a serious health threat as the rates of addiction, overdoses, and deaths have risen in recent years. Increasingly, inappropriate and excessively liberal prescribing of opioids by physicians is understood to be a central part of the crisis. Public health officials, hospital systems, and legislators are developing programs and regulations to address the problem in sustained and systematic ways that both insures effective treatment of pain and appropriate limits on the availability of opioids. Three approaches have obtained prominence as means of avoiding excessive and inappropriate prescribing, including: providing financial incentives to physicians to change their clinical decision through pay-for-performance contracts, monitoring patient medications through Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs, and educational outreach to physicians. A promising approach to educational outreach to physicians is an intervention known as "academic detailing." It was developed in the 1980s to provide one-on-one educational outreach to physicians using similar methods as the pharmaceutical industry that sends "detailers" to market their products to physician practices. Core to academic detailing, however, is the idea that medical decisions should be based on evidence-based information, including managing conditions with updated assessment measures, behavioral, and nonpharmacological interventions. With the pharmaceutical industry spending billions of dollars to advertise their products, individual practitioners can have difficulty gathering unbiased information, especially as the number of approved medications grows each year. Academic detailing has successfully affected the management of health conditions, such as atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and recently, has targeted physicians who prescribe opioids. This article discusses the approach as a potentially effective preventative intervention to address the

  9. Social uses of prescribed school culture in the secondary education

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    Norberto Dallabrida

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to understand the social uses of prescribed school culture nationally in three secondary schools of Florianopolis in the 1950s. Focused on Colégio Catarinense, administered by the Jesuits and dedicated exclusively to men; the Colégio Coração de Jesus, run by the Sisters of Divine Providence and with female customers; and the State College Dias Velho, public, free and for boys and girls. According to Roger Chartier, educational institutions are considered to appropriate themselves of cultural goods in different and creative ways. This socio-historical analysis is based on written documents and testimonials of teachers and students who worked at or attended these schools.

  10. An educational and audit tool to reduce prescribing error in intensive care.

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    Thomas, A N; Boxall, E M; Laha, S K; Day, A J; Grundy, D

    2008-10-01

    To reduce prescribing errors in an intensive care unit by providing prescriber education in tutorials, ward-based teaching and feedback in 3-monthly cycles with each new group of trainee medical staff. Prescribing audits were conducted three times in each 3-month cycle, once pretraining, once post-training and a final audit after 6 weeks. The audit information was fed back to prescribers with their correct prescribing rates, rates for individual error types and total error rates together with anonymised information about other prescribers' error rates. The percentage of prescriptions with errors decreased over each 3-month cycle (pretraining 25%, 19%, (one missing data point), post-training 23%, 6%, 11%, final audit 7%, 3%, 5% (pprescriptions and error rates varied widely between trainees (data collection one; cycle two: range of prescriptions written: 1-61, median 18; error rate: 0-100%; median: 15%). Prescriber education and feedback reduce manual prescribing errors in intensive care.

  11. Exploring nurses' experiences of prescribing in secondary care: informing future education and practice.

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    Scrafton, Jane; McKinnon, John; Kane, Roslyn

    2012-07-01

    To explore the experiences of secondary care nurse prescribers to establish how prescribing is employed and what its benefits and disadvantages are perceived to be. Nurse prescribing has developed rapidly since it inception almost 20 years ago and there is a significant body of research evaluating its implementation in primary care. Recent expansion of non-medical prescribing rights has prompted nurses in secondary care establishments to become prescribers. Evaluation of nurse prescribing in this new environment is required, if practice is to be informed and advanced. The lack of such evaluations in the published literature was the impetus for this study. A cross-sectional qualitative study. A convenience sample of nurse prescribers was interviewed using a single broad question to prompt elaboration. Transcribed interviews were analysed using Colaizzi's procedural steps. Three main themes emerged from the analysis: motivations behind becoming a nurse prescriber; benefits and limitations of prescribing education and continuing professional development and prescribing in practice. Nurses felt nurse prescribing offers clear benefits in relation to patient care. Where nurses were not prescribing, finance arrangements between different NHS trusts appear to be a significant barrier to its successful implementation of prescribing in practice. Nurse prescribing is strongly believed to be the domain of the experienced nurse. There is a clear need for ongoing evaluation of all aspects of nurse prescribing. This paper makes key recommendations on the future development and delivery of programmes of education for nurse prescribers and for the delivery of safe and effective prescribing in practice. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. How to educate prescribers in antimicrobial stewardship practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pulcini, C.; Gyssens, I.C.J.

    2013-01-01

    Widespread antimicrobial use has compromised its value, leading to a crisis of antimicrobial resistance. A major cause of misuse is insufficient knowledge of prescribing of antimicrobials in many categories of professionals. An important principle of antimicrobial stewardship is avoiding selection

  13. Alliance for the Prudent Use of Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drugs can no longer cure infections and killer epidemics run rampant. The Alliance for the Prudent Use ... Vol. 32 No. 3: Public health threat agent: Salmonella APUA Highlights APUA Mailing List "Antibiotics are uniquely ...

  14. Beliefs and attitudes about prescribing opioids among healthcare providers seeking continuing medical education.

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    Hooten, W Michael; Bruce, Barbara K

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the beliefs and attitudes of healthcare providers about prescribing opioids for chronic pain. The setting was a continuing medical education conference that was specifically designed to deliver content about chronic pain and prescription opioids to providers without specialty expertise in pain medicine. Conference attendees with prescribing privileges were eligible to participate, including physicians, physician assistants, and advance practice nurses. Study participants completed a questionnaire using an electronic response system. Study participants completed a validated questionnaire that was specifically developed to measure the beliefs and attitudes of healthcare providers about prescribing opioids for chronic pain. The questionnaire was completed by 128 healthcare providers. The majority (58 percent) indicated that they were "likely" to prescribe opioids for chronic pain. A significant proportion of respondents had favorable beliefs and attitudes toward improvements in pain (p opioids. However, a significant proportion had negative beliefs and attitudes about medication abuse (p opioids could significantly increase the complexity of patient care and could unfavorably impact several administrative aspects of clinical practice. The beliefs and attitudes identified in this study highlight important educational gaps that exist among healthcare providers about prescribing opioids. Knowledge of these educational gaps could build the capacity of medical educators to develop targeted educational materials that could improve the opioid prescribing practices of healthcare providers.

  15. Improving quality of NSAID prescribing by internal medicine trainees with an educational intervention.

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    Naughton, Bruce J; Singh, Ranjit; Wisniewski, Angela M; Singh, Gurdev; Anderson, Diana R

    2010-10-01

    Prescribing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for older adults is a safety concern. Education innovations in postgraduate training designed to improve patient safety should comply with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). The objective is to evaluate a seven-component education program for internal medicine trainees designed to change prescribing practices while addressing ACGME competencies. Pretest, posttest data collection. The baseline chart review found that 28.7% (79/275) patients age 70 or older were prescribed NSAIDs. Approximately 1 year later, the proportion of patients prescribed NSAIDs had declined to 16.4% (30/183; p= .002). The proportion of patients prescribed NSAIDs in conjunction with a diuretic similarly declined from 13.6% (38/278) to 7% (13/187; p= .024). A systematically applied education program targeted to a specific prescribing pattern produced significant improvement among internal medicine trainees. This model may assist training programs in reducing polypharmacy, or in other areas of trainee practice.

  16. Evaluation of e-Bug, an educational pack, teaching about prudent antibiotic use and hygiene, in the Czech Republic, France and England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecky, Donna M; McNulty, Cliodna A M; Touboul, Pia; Herotova, Tereza Koprivova; Benes, Jirí; Dellamonica, Pierre; Verlander, Neville Q; Kostkova, Patty; Weinberg, Julius

    2010-12-01

    e-Bug, a junior and senior school educational programme to decrease the spread of infection and unnecessary antibiotic use, was developed and consisted of eight sections providing information on the spread, treatment and prevention of infection as well as basic information on microbes, both useful and harmful. Each section comprised teacher background information, lesson plans and an interactive student activity, and extension activities were also available for more able students. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of the e-Bug pack in improving children's knowledge in these key areas, when used within the National Curriculum in England, France and the Czech Republic. Junior (9-11 years) and senior (12-15 years) school classes were divided into either control or intervention groups for evaluation of the resource. Students were required to complete identical knowledge questionnaires at three timepoints (before, immediately after and 6 weeks after teaching), to assess knowledge change and retention. Teaching, using the e-Bug pack, was given by junior and senior school teachers. The junior e-Bug teaching pack demonstrated a significant improvement in student's knowledge in all sections and there was no significant decrease in student knowledge observed after a 6 week period. Knowledge improvement with the senior e-Bug pack varied between regions, although consistent improvement was observed for Gloucestershire (England) and Ostrava (Czech Republic). Although a success, modifications are required in both packs to further improve student knowledge and make the packs more appealing.

  17. Effect of a drug allergy educational program and antibiotic prescribing guideline on inpatient clinical providers' antibiotic prescribing knowledge.

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    Blumenthal, Kimberly G; Shenoy, Erica S; Hurwitz, Shelley; Varughese, Christy A; Hooper, David C; Banerji, Aleena

    2014-01-01

    Inpatient providers have varying levels of knowledge in managing patients with drug and/or penicillin (PCN) allergy. Our objectives were (1) to survey inpatient providers to ascertain their baseline drug allergy knowledge and preparedness in caring for patients with PCN allergy, and (2) to assess the impact of an educational program paired with the implementation of a hospital-based clinical guideline. We electronically surveyed 521 inpatient providers at a tertiary care medical center at baseline and again 6 weeks after an educational initiative paired with clinical guideline implementation. The guideline informed providers on drug allergy history taking and antibiotic prescribing for inpatients with PCN or cephalosporin allergy. Of 323 unique responders, 42% (95% CI, 37-48%) reported no prior education in drug allergy. When considering those who responded to both surveys (n = 213), we observed a significant increase in knowledge about PCN skin testing (35% vs 54%; P allergy over time (54% vs 80%; P allergy was severe significantly improved (77% vs 92%; P = .03). Other areas, including understanding absolute contraindications to receiving a drug again and PCN cross-reactivity with other antimicrobials, did not improve significantly. Inpatient providers have drug allergy knowledge deficits but are interested in tools to help them care for inpatients with drug allergies. Our educational initiative and hospital guideline implementation were associated with increased PCN allergy knowledge in several crucial areas. To improve care of inpatients with drug allergy, more research is needed to evaluate hospital policies and sustainable educational tools. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Political economy of prudent budgetary policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, F.

    2010-01-01

    The principles of tax smoothing and public debt management with stochastic shocks to future national income are extended for prudence. A prudent government deliberately underestimates future national income and the tax base, especially if the variance and persistence of shocks hitting the tax base

  19. Human factors perspective on the prescribing behavior of recent medical graduates: implications for educators

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    Gordon M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Morris Gordon,1,2 Ken Catchpole,3 Paul Baker1,41Faculty of Health and Social Care, University of Salford, Salford, UK; 2Department of Paediatrics, Fairfield General Hospital, Bury, UK; 3Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 4North Western Deanery, Manchester, UKBackground: Junior doctors are at high risk of involvement in medication errors. Educational interventions to enhance human factors and specifically nontechnical skills in health care are increasingly reported, but there is no work in the context of prescribing improvement to guide such education. We set out to determine the elements that influence prescribing from a human factors perspective by recent medical graduates and use this to guide education in this area.Methods: A total of 206 recent medical graduates of the North Western Foundation School were asked to describe their views on safety practices and behaviors. Free text data regarding prescribing behaviors were collected 1, 2, and 4 months after starting their posts. A 94.1% response rate was achieved. Qualitative analysis of data was completed using the constant comparison method. Five initial categories were developed, and the researchers subsequently developed thematic indices according to their understanding of the emerging content of the data. Further data were collected through group interviews 8–9 months into the placement to ensure thematic saturation.Results: Six themes were established at the axial coding level, ie, contributors to inappropriate prescribing, contributors to appropriate prescribing, professional responsibility, prescribing error, current practices, and methods for improvement of prescribing. Utilizing appropriate theoretical elements, we describe how recent medical graduates employ situational and error awareness to guide risk assessment.Conclusion: We have modeled the human factors of prescribing behavior by recent medical graduates. As these factors are related to

  20. Education: Perceiving the Disease and Prescribing the Remedy

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    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2007-01-01

    Modern thinkers chiefly identify development with materialistic and economic factors. Education is often measured and evaluated by the same standard: its material and economic impact on the individual and society. A moral balance is recommended to this excessively materialistic perspective. It is extremely difficult to unravel the complexities of…

  1. Effect of providing feedback and prescribing education on prescription writing: An intervention study.

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    Ajemigbitse, Adetutu A; Omole, Moses Kayode; Erhun, Wilson O

    2016-01-01

    Accurate medication prescribing important to avoid errors and ensure best possible outcomes. This is a report of assessment of the impact of providing feedback and educational intervention on prescribing error types and rates in routine practice. Doctors' prescriptions from selected wards in two tertiary hospitals in central Nigeria were prospectively reviewed for a 6-month period and assessed for errors; grouped into six categories. Intervention was by providing feedback and educational outreach on the specialty/departmental level at one hospital while the other acted as the control. Chi-squared statistics was used to compare prescribing characteristics pre- and post-intervention. At baseline, error rate was higher at the control site. At the intervention site, statistically significant reductions were obtained for errors involving omission of route of administration (P error rate post intervention (P = 0.984). Though House Officers and Registrars wrote most prescriptions, highest reduction in prescribing error rates post intervention was by the registrars (0.93% to 0.29%, P prescriptions that lacked essential details was common. Intervention resulted in modest changes. Routinely providing feedback and continuing prescriber education will likely sustain error reduction.

  2. Improving prescribing practices: A pharmacist-led educational intervention for nurse practitioner students.

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    Sabatino, Jennifer A; Pruchnicki, Maria C; Sevin, Alexa M; Barker, Elizabeth; Green, Christopher G; Porter, Kyle

    2017-05-01

    To assess impact of a pharmacist-led educational intervention on family nurse practitioner (FNP) students' prescribing skills, perception of preparedness to prescribe, and perception of pharmacist as collaborator. Prospective pre-post assessment of a 14-week educational intervention in an FNP program in the spring semester of 2014. Students participated in an online module of weekly patient cases and prescriptions emphasizing legal requirements, prescription accuracy, and appropriate therapy. A pharmacist facilitator provided formative feedback on students' submissions. Participants completed a matched assessment on prescription writing before and after the module, and a retrospective postsurvey then presurvey to collect perceptions. There was significant improvement in performance on error identification and demonstration of prescription elements from preassessment to postassessment (+17%, p medication use with improved recognition and avoidance of prescribing errors, although it did not result in competency. Exposure to pharmacist expertise in this area may encourage collaboration in practice. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  3. Education on prescribing for older patients in the Netherlands : a curriculum mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijsers, Carolina J P W; de Wit, Johanna E; Tichelaar, Jelle; Brouwers, Jacobus R B J; de Wildt, Dick J; de Vries, P G M; Jansen, Paul A F

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Pharmacology and pharmacotherapy education is being increasingly integrated in medical curricula, which might lead to a specific loss of knowledge in these subjects. This, in turn, could lead to harmful prescribing errors, especially in vulnerable older patients. METHODS: Teachers who

  4. O Trabalho Plurativo em Presidente Prudente

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    Sandro Mauro Guirro

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Atualmente, vêm ocorrendo mudanças no campo brasileiro, principalmente nas  propriedades localizadas próximas a malha urbana da cidade. Esse processo se verifica com mais intensidade em cidades como Campinas, Sorocaba, Jundiaí entre outras cidades próximas aos grandes centros urbanos. Em Presidente Prudente, esse processo dá sinais de existência em resposta à crise pela qual vem passando, sobretudo a pequena agricultura. Está-se diante da intensificação das mudanças de funções do trabalho inserido na lavra agrária.

  5. Effectiveness of a national approach to prescribing education for multiple disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Santosh; Buckley, Tom; Harnden, Chris; Koo, Michelle; Peterson, Gregory; Ryan, Anna; Tse, Justin; Westbury, Juanita; Zuo, Yeqin

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a national approach to prescribing education on health professional students' prescribing and therapeutics knowledge, across multiple disciplines. In a university examination setting, 83 medical, 40 pharmacy and 13 nurse practitioner students from three different universities completed a set of multiple choice questions (MCQs) before and after completing an online module from the National Prescribing Curriculum (NPC). To minimize overestimation of knowledge, students had to indicate the level of certainty for each answer on a three-point scale. MCQs were scored using a validated certainty-based marking scheme resulting in a composite score (maximum 30 and minimum -60). Students were asked to rate their perception of usefulness of the module. At the pre-module phase, there were no significant differences in the composite MCQ scores between the medical (9.0 ± 10.3), pharmacy (10.2 ± 10.6) and nurse practitioner (8.0 ± 10.7) students. The scores improved significantly for all groups at the post-module phase (P students (with no significant difference between the groups) found the NPC modules, post-module MCQs and feedback useful as a learning tool. A national online approach to prescribing education can improve therapeutics knowledge of students from multiple disciplines of health care and contribute towards streamlining interdisciplinary learning in medication management. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. How do physicians and trainers experience outcome-based education in "Rational prescribing"?

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    Esmaily, Hamideh M; Vahidi, Rezagoli; Fathi, Niaz Mousavian; Wahlström, Rolf

    2014-12-23

    Continuing medical education (CME) is compulsory in Iran, but has shown limitations in terms of educational style and format. Outcome-based education (OBE) has been proposed internationally to create links to physicians' actual practices. We designed an outcome-based educational intervention for general physicians in primary care (GPs). Positive outcomes on GPs' knowledge, skills and performance in the field of rational prescribing were found and have been reported.The specific purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of the GPs and trainers, who participated in the outcome-based education on rational prescribing. All nine trainers in the educational programme and 12 general physicians (out of 58) were invited to individual interviews four months after participation in the CME program. Semi-structured open-ended interviews were carried out. Qualitative content analysis was used to explore the text and to interpret meaning and intention. There was a widespread agreement that the programme improved the participants' knowledge and skills to a higher extent than previously attended programmes. Trainers emphasized the effect of outcome-based education on their educational planning, teaching and assessment methods, while the general physicians' challenges were how to adapt their learning in the real work environment considering social and economical barriers. Self-described attitudes and reported practice changed towards more rational prescribing. Outcome-based CME seems attractive and additionally useful for general physicians in Iran and could be an effective approach when creating CME programmes to improve general physicians' performance. Similar approaches could be considered in other contexts both regionally and globally.

  7. Smartphone apps to support hospital prescribing and pharmacology education: a review of current provision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffey, Faye; Brady, Richard R W; Maxwell, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Junior doctors write the majority of hospital prescriptions but many indicate they feel underprepared to assume this responsibility and around 10% of prescriptions contain errors. Medical smartphone apps are now widely used in clinical practice and present an opportunity to provide support to inexperienced prescribers. This study assesses the contemporary range of smartphone apps with prescribing or related content. Six smartphone app stores were searched for apps aimed at the healthcare professional with drug, pharmacology or prescribing content. Three hundred and six apps were identified. 34% appeared to be for use within the clinical environment in order to aid prescribing, 14% out with the clinical setting and 51% of apps were deemed appropriate for both clinical and non-clinical use. Apps with drug reference material, such as textbooks, manuals or medical apps with drug information were the commonest apps found (51%), followed by apps offering drug or infusion rate dose calculation (26%). 68% of apps charged for download, with a mean price of £14.25 per app and a range of £0.62-101.90. A diverse range of pharmacology-themed apps are available and there is further potential for the development of contemporary apps to improve prescribing performance. Personalized app stores may help universities/healthcare organizations offer high quality apps to students to aid in pharmacology education. Users of prescribing apps must be aware of the lack of information regarding the medical expertise of app developers. This will enable them to make informed choices about the use of such apps in their clinical practice. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Effect of educational outreach on general practice prescribing of antibiotics and antidepressants: A two-year randomised controlled trial

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    Enriquez-puga, Andres; Baker, Richard; Paul, Sanjoy; Villoro-Valdes, Renata

    2009-01-01

    Objective Prescribing of broad spectrum antibiotics and antidepressants in general practice often does not accord with guidelines. The aim was to determine the effectiveness of educational outreach in improving the prescribing of selected antibiotics and antidepressants, and whether the effect is sustained for two years. Design Single blind randomized trial. Setting Twenty-eight general practices in Leicestershire, England. Intervention Educational outreach visits were undertaken, tailored to barriers to change, 14 practices receiving visits for reducing selected antibiotics and 14 for improving antidepressant prescribing. Main outcome measures Number of items prescribed per 1000 registered patients for amoxicillin with clavulanic acid (co-amoxiclav) and quinolone antibiotics, and average daily quantities per 1000 patients for lofepramine and fluoxetine antidepressants, measured at the practice level for six-month periods over two years. Results There was no effect on the prescribing of co-amoxiclav, quinolones, or fluoxetine, but prescribing of lofepramine increased in accordance with the guidelines. The increase persisted throughout two years of follow-up. Conclusion A simple, group-level educational outreach intervention, designed to take account of identified barriers to change, can have a modest but sustained effect on prescribing levels. However, outreach is not always effective. The context in which change in prescribing practice is being sought, the views of prescribers concerning the value of the drug, or other unrecognised barriers to change may influence the effectiveness of outreach. PMID:19958063

  9. Trends in Antibiotic Prescribing in Adults in Dutch General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.B. Haeseker (Michiel); N.H.T.M. Dukers-Muijrers (Nicole); C.J.P.A. Hoebe (Christian); C.A. Bruggeman (Cathrien); J.W.L. Cals (Jochen); A. Verbon (Annelies)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Antibiotic consumption is associated with adverse drug events (ADE) and increasing antibiotic resistance. Detailed information of antibiotic prescribing in different age categories is scarce, but necessary to develop strategies for prudent antibiotic use. The aim of this

  10. Drug advertising, continuing medical education, and physician prescribing: a historical review and reform proposal.

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    Rodwin, Marc A

    2010-01-01

    Through the 1960s, many people claimed that drug advertising was educational and physicians often relied on it. Continuing Medical Education (CME) was developed to provide an alternative. However, because CME relied on grants, industry funders chose the subjects offered. Now policymakers worry that drug firms support CME to promote sales and that commercial support biases prescribing and fosters inappropriate drug use. A historical review reveals parallel problems between advertising and industry-funded CME. To preclude industry influence and improve CME, we should ensure independent funding by taxing medical industries, facilities and physicians. Independent public and professional authorities should create CME curricula. An independent agency should allocate all funds to educational institutions for approved curricula. © 2010 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  11. Multimedia educational interventions for consumers about prescribed and over-the-counter medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciciriello, Sabina; Johnston, Renea V; Osborne, Richard H; Wicks, Ian; deKroo, Tanya; Clerehan, Rosemary; O'Neill, Clare; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2013-04-30

    Health consumers increasingly want access to accurate, evidence-based information about their medications. Currently, education about medications (that is, information that is designed to achieve health or illness related learning) is provided predominantly via spoken communication between the health provider and consumer, sometimes supplemented with written materials. There is evidence, however, that current educational methods are not meeting consumer needs. Multimedia educational programs offer many potential advantages over traditional forms of education delivery. To assess the effects of multimedia patient education interventions about prescribed and over-the-counter medications in people of all ages, including children and carers. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 6), MEDLINE (1950 to June 2011), EMBASE (1974 to June 2011), CINAHL (1982 to June 2011), PsycINFO (1967 to June 2011), ERIC (1966 to June 2011), ProQuest Dissertation & Theses Database (to June 2011) and reference lists of articles. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs of multimedia-based patient education about prescribed or over-the-counter medications in people of all ages, including children and carers, if the intervention had been targeted for their use. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of included studies. Where possible, we contacted study authors to obtain missing information. We identified 24 studies that enrolled a total of 8112 participants. However, there was significant heterogeneity in the comparators used and the outcomes measured, which limited the ability to pool data. Many of the studies did not report sufficient information in their methods to allow judgment of their risk of bias. From the information that was reported, three of the studies had a high risk of selection bias and one was at high risk of bias due to lack of blinding of the outcome

  12. Promoting prudent antimicrobial use in the veterinary field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vibeke Frøkjær

    2013-01-01

    of prudent antimicrobial use in all sectors. Promoting prudent use has been a major concern of international organisations such as the WHO, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for years. The term ‘prudent’ implies both responsible use and continuing...... to reduce use, a strategy that may not always be appropriate in the clinical setting. In contrast, ‘responsible’ implies appropriate use whether or not this results in an overall reduction. Both prudent use and responsible use imply veterinary prescription of antimicrobials only when based on proper...

  13. An educational initiative in response to identified PrEP prescribing needs among PCPs in the Southern U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Meredith E; Seidelman, Jessica; Wu, Jiewei; Alexis, Kareem; McGee, Kara; Okeke, N Lance; Samsa, Gregory; McKellar, Mehri

    2017-10-03

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is an effective HIV prevention method, but many primary care physicians (PCPs) have not incorporated PrEP into practice. While PrEP may be a key strategy to reducing high HIV transmission rates in the southern US, knowledge about PrEP prescribing patterns among PCPs in this region is lacking. An online survey was sent to a large network of PCPs at an academic medical center in North Carolina in October 2015. The survey was repeated in September 2016, after an educational intervention that included on-site trainings at 14 PCP offices. Chi-square tests were used to compare PrEP prescribing patterns among providers. The initial survey was sent to 389 PCPs, with 115 (30%) responding. Of these, 78% reported seeing men who have sex with men (MSM). Only 17% had prescribed PrEP. The most frequently identified barrier was lack of knowledge (60%). When the survey was repeated after the educational initiative, 79 PCPs (20%) responded. Of these, 90% reported seeing MSM, and 35% had prescribed PrEP. PCPs who had attended a training were more likely to have prescribed PrEP (OR 4.84, CI 1.77-13.21). In conclusion, PrEP prescribing among PCPs in the southern US is low. A survey among PCPs identified lack of knowledge as a barrier to prescribing, motivating an institutional-wide educational campaign in response. Further efforts are needed to continue to raise awareness and educate PCPs in the South about PrEP.

  14. Overdose Education and Naloxone for Patients Prescribed Opioids in Primary Care: A Qualitative Study of Primary Care Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binswanger, Ingrid A; Koester, Stephen; Mueller, Shane R; Gardner, Edward M; Goddard, Kristin; Glanz, Jason M

    2015-12-01

    The rate of fatal unintentional pharmaceutical opioid poisonings has increased substantially since the late 1990s. Naloxone is an effective opioid antidote that can be prescribed to patients for bystander use in the event of an overdose. Primary care clinics represent settings in which large populations of patients prescribed opioids could be reached for overdose education and naloxone prescription. Our aim was to investigate the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about overdose education and naloxone prescription among clinical staff in primary care. This was a qualitative study using focus groups to elucidate both clinic-level and provider-level barriers and facilitators. Ten primary care internal medicine, family medicine and infectious disease/HIV practices in three large Colorado health systems. A focus group guide was developed based on behavioral theory. Focus group transcripts were coded for manifest and latent meaning, and analyzed for themes using a recursive approach that included inductive and deductive analysis. Themes emerged in four content areas related to overdose education and naloxone prescription: knowledge, barriers, benefits and facilitators. Clinical staff (N = 56) demonstrated substantial knowledge gaps about naloxone and its use in outpatient settings. They expressed uncertainty about who to prescribe naloxone to, and identified a range of logistical barriers to its use in practice. Staff also described fears about offending patients and concerns about increased risk behaviors in patients prescribed naloxone. When considering naloxone, some providers reflected critically and with discomfort on their own opioid prescribing. These barriers were balanced by beliefs that prescribing naloxone could prevent death and result in safer opioid use behaviors. Findings from these qualitative focus groups may not be generalizable to other settings. In addition to evidence gaps, logistical and attitudinal barriers will need to be addressed to enhance

  15. Impact of an educational intervention on steroid prescribing and dosing effect on patient outcomes in COPD exacerbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hope NH

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of patients affected by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and associated exacerbations has led to both rising hospital admissions and significant economic impact. Evidence-based guidelines have been formulated for COPD management recommending the use of low dose, oral corticosteroid therapy in the treatment of exacerbations. However, fewer than 50% of physicians’ prescribing practices appropriately reflect the published clinical guidelines on the use of systemic corticosteroids in these patients. Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a pharmacist-led educational intervention on prescribing practices and patient outcomes when using systemic corticosteroids in patients with COPD exacerbations. Methods. This retrospective case-control study included patients admitted to an inpatient family medicine service with a COPD exacerbation who received systemic corticosteroids. Two pharmacist-led educational interventions were delivered to prescribers to review current guidelines for managing COPD exacerbations with systemic corticosteroids. Patients were retrospectively identified over a three month span prior to and following the educational intervention. Data was collected via chart review to evaluate prescribing practices prior to and following the educational sessions. In addition, data was collected to evaluate the effects of an educational intervention on length of stay, adverse events, and cost of treatment.Results. A total of 23 pre-intervention patients and 18 post-intervention patients met inclusion criteria. After pharmacist-led interventions, guidelines were not more likely to be adhered to by prescribers when compared to guideline adherence in the pre-intervention patients. Because no statistically significant change in guideline adherence was observed, there was no impact on secondary outcomes.Conclusion. Pharmacist-led didactic educational interventions and guideline

  16. Hydration Behaviors Before and After an Educational and Prescribed Hydration Intervention in Adolescent Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle A.; Hetzler, Ronald K.; Wasson, Darcy; Wages, Jennifer J.; Stickley, Christopher; Kimura, Iris F.

    2012-01-01

    Context: The effectiveness of education in modifying hydration behaviors in adolescent athletes is unclear. Objective: To assess the hydration status and behaviors of female athletes before and after a 1-time educational intervention and prescribed hydration intervention in a warm, humid, tropical environment. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Non–air-conditioned gymnasium in a tropical environment (indoor wet bulb globe temperature  =  24.0 ± 0.2°C). Patient or Other Participants: Thirty-six female adolescent elite volleyball players (age  =  14.8 ± 0.8 years, height  =  168.2 ± 8.2 cm, mass  =  60.8 ± 9.0 kg, body mass index  =  21.7 ± 2.7, body surface area  =  1.65 ± 0.14 m2, body surface area to mass ratio  =  2.71 ± 0.18 m2·kg−1·10−2) participated. Intervention(s): Four observational periods consisting of 3 practices per observational period separated by 48 hours. The 4 periods included a control period, educational intervention, prescribed hydration intervention (PHI), and observational follow-up (OF-U). After the control period, an educational intervention consisting of a slide presentation was provided to the participants, followed by a week of observation. In the PHI, a precalculated volume of water based on individual sweat rate was consumed every 20 minutes during each 2-hour practice. During all other periods, participants consumed their fluid of choice ad libitum. The order of the treatment periods was not randomized and was the same for all participants. Main Outcome Measure(s): Prepractice to postpractice changes in body mass (ΔBM), percentage of body mass lost (%BML), urine specific gravity, urine color, urine osmolality, sweat rate, and volume of fluid consumed (Fvol). Results: The PHI was the only period during which participants maintained body mass (ΔBM  =  0.05 ± 1.3%); Fvol consumed was greatest during this time (Fvol  =  1.3 ± 0.4 L; F1,3  =  34.869, P ≤ .001). The ΔBM was

  17. Hydration behaviors before and after an educational and prescribed hydration intervention in adolescent athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle A; Hetzler, Ronald K; Wasson, Darcy; Wages, Jennifer J; Stickley, Christopher; Kimura, Iris F

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of education in modifying hydration behaviors in adolescent athletes is unclear. To assess the hydration status and behaviors of female athletes before and after a 1-time educational intervention and prescribed hydration intervention in a warm, humid, tropical environment. Cohort study. Non-air-conditioned gymnasium in a tropical environment (indoor wet bulb globe temperature = 24.0 ± 0.2°C). Patient or Other Participants: Thirty-six female adolescent elite volleyball players (age = 14.8 ± 0.8 years, height = 168.2 ± 8.2 cm, mass = 60.8 ± 9.0 kg, body mass index = 21.7 ± 2.7, body surface area = 1.65 ± 0.14 m(2), body surface area to mass ratio = 2.71 ± 0.18 m(2)·kg(-1)·10(-2)) participated. Four observational periods consisting of 3 practices per observational period separated by 48 hours. The 4 periods included a control period, educational intervention, prescribed hydration intervention (PHI), and observational follow-up (OF-U). After the control period, an educational intervention consisting of a slide presentation was provided to the participants, followed by a week of observation. In the PHI, a precalculated volume of water based on individual sweat rate was consumed every 20 minutes during each 2-hour practice. During all other periods, participants consumed their fluid of choice ad libitum. The order of the treatment periods was not randomized and was the same for all participants. Prepractice to postpractice changes in body mass (ΔBM), percentage of body mass lost (%BML), urine specific gravity, urine color, urine osmolality, sweat rate, and volume of fluid consumed (F(vol)). The PHI was the only period during which participants maintained body mass (ΔBM = 0.05 ± 1.3%); F(vol) consumed was greatest during this time (F(vol) = 1.3 ± 0.4 L; F(1,3) = 34.869, P ≤ .001). TheΔBM was less for the PHI (ΔBM = 0.05 ± 0.9 kg, %BML = 0.04 ± 1.3%) than the OF-U period (ΔBM = -0.7 ± 1.1 kg, %BML = -1.2 ± 1.9%; F(1,3) = 6.220, P

  18. Developing the first national antimicrobial prescribing and stewardship competences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashiru-Oredope, D; Cookson, B; Fry, C

    2014-11-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a national and worldwide threat to the future of healthcare. Educating both healthcare staff and the public in the prudent use of antimicrobials is an essential part of antimicrobial stewardship programmes that aim to contain and control resistance and preserve the usefulness of currently available antibiotics. Using current available evidence, regulatory documents and national antimicrobial stewardship guidance for primary and secondary care, five dimensions for antimicrobial prescribing and stewardship competences have been developed in England, through an independent multiprofessional group led by the Advisory Committee on Antimicrobial Resistance and Healthcare Associated Infection (ARHAI) of the Department of Health (England). They are designed to complement the generic competency framework for all prescribers from the UK National Prescribing Centre (now part of National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) and are relevant to all independent prescribers, including doctors, dentists and non-medical practitioners. The antimicrobial prescribing and stewardship competences published jointly by ARHAI and PHE in 2013 are believed to be the first of their kind. Implementation of these competences will be an important contribution to the delivery of the UK government's 5 year Antimicrobial Resistance Strategy. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Cultivating change door to door: Educational outreach to improve prescribing practices in rural veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaño, Macgregor; Bernardy, Nancy C; Sherrieb, Kathleen

    2017-01-01

    Clinical guidelines for the management of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) recommend against the use of benzodiazepines. Benzodiazepines and PTSD are both associated with addiction-related risks. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) prescribing trends show continued use of benzodiazepines and polysedative use in veterans with PTSD, particularly in rural areas. The authors examine the use of an educational intervention to improve pharmacologic management of veterans with PTSD in rural clinics. The VA Academic Detailing Service Informatics Toolset provides prescribing, demographic and risk factor data for veterans with PTSD treated at the White River Junction VA Medical Center (WRJ VA) and affiliated rural clinics in Vermont and New Hampshire. Individualized academic detailing visits were provided to clinicians identified by the informatics tool with the aim of increasing guideline-concordant care. Other educational efforts included traditional, didactic group education on evidence-based PTSD care and the development and dissemination of educational materials for clinicians and patients. Prescribing trends of benzodiazepines, off-label atypical antipsychotics, and prazosin were collected quarterly for 3 years (October 1, 2013, to September 30, 2016). Prescribing rates of benzodiazepines during the educational intervention decreased from 13% to 9.3%. Use of off-label atypical antipsychotics, a class of medications not recommended for PTSD, stayed relatively flat at about 10%. Prescribing of prazosin, a medication recommended for treatment of trauma nightmares, increased from 9.8% to 14.3%. Academic detailing and other educational programming appear to be effective for addressing gaps and lag in quality PTSD care and are associated with a positive trend of decreased benzodiazepine use. Efforts will continue, now with added focus on concurrent use of benzodiazepines and opioids and the use of off-label atypical antipsychotics in rural veterans with PTSD.

  20. Does educational intervention improve doctors’ knowledge and perceptions of generic medicines and their generic prescribing rate? A study from Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Azmi Hassali

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the impact of an educational intervention on doctors’ knowledge and perceptions towards generic medicines and their generic (international non-proprietary name prescribing practice. Methods: This is a single-cohort pre-/post-intervention pilot study. The study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital in Perak, Malaysia. All doctors from the internal medicine department were invited to participate in the educational intervention. The intervention consisted of an interactive lecture, an educational booklet and a drug list. Doctors’ knowledge and perceptions were assessed by using a validated questionnaire, while the international non-proprietary name prescribing practice was assessed by screening the prescription before and after the intervention. Results: The intervention was effective in improving doctors’ knowledge towards bioequivalence, similarity of generic medicines and safety standards required for generic medicine registration (p = 0.034, p = 0.034 and p = 0.022, respectively. In terms of perceptions towards generic medicines, no significant changes were noted (p > 0.05. Similarly, no impact on international non-proprietary name prescribing practice was observed after the intervention (p > 0.05. Conclusion: Doctors had inadequate knowledge and misconceptions about generic medicines before the intervention. Moreover, international non-proprietary name prescribing was not a common practice. However, the educational intervention was only effective in improving doctors’ knowledge of generic medicines.

  1. Focus on early-career GPs: qualitative evaluation of a multi-faceted educational intervention to improve antibiotic prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckx, Laura; Anthierens, Sibyl; Magin, Parker J; Morgan, Simon; McArthur, Lawrie; Yardley, Lucy; Dallas, Anthea; Little, Paul; van Driel, Mieke L

    2018-01-16

    We conducted an educational intervention emphasizing rational antibiotic prescribing in early-career General Practitioners (GP) in vocational training (trainees). The intervention consisted of an online introduction module, an online communication training module, face-to-face workshops, and cases to be discussed one-on-one by the trainee-supervisor dyad during regular scheduled education sessions. To explore the participants' experiences with the intervention. A qualitative study of 14 GP trainees and supervisors. Interviews followed a semi-structured interview guide, were transcribed and analysed using concurrent thematic analysis. Overall, the intervention was well received. Resources were not often used in practice, but GP trainees used the information in communicating with patients. The intervention improved trainees' confidence and provided new communication strategies, e.g. explicitly asking about patients' expectations and talking patients through the examination to form an overall clinical picture. Trainees seemed eager to learn and adapt their practice, whereas GP supervisors rather commented that the intervention was reinforcing. None of the participants reported prescribing conflicts between trainee and supervisor. However, most participants identified conflicts within the GP practice or with specialists: other doctors who prescribe more antibiotics perpetuate patients' ideas that antibiotics will fix everything, which in turn causes conflict with the patient and undermines attempts to improve antibiotic prescribing. The educational intervention was received positively. Early-career GPs thought it influenced their prescribing behaviour and improved their confidence in non-prescribing. Interventions that target teams (e.g. entire practice) could minimize conflict, ensure consistency of messages and support overall antibiotic stewardship in primary care.

  2. One Hundred Years of Research: Prudent Aspirations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Gene V.

    2016-01-01

    The statistical method "meta-analysis" is perhaps unique as a contribution to empirical inquiry of many types because it arose entirely within the practice of education research. In spite of its origins, meta-analysis has found its widest application and most important contributions in the field of medicine. Contrasting the success of…

  3. Prescribed Fire Education at Oklahoma State University: Training Our Future Pyros

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Weir

    2008-01-01

    The Rangeland Ecology and Management program at Oklahoma State University recognized the need for a practical, hands-on course designed for undergraduate and graduate students, with instruction on conducting prescribed fires for vegetation management, wildlife management, and livestock management. Two separate prescribed fire courses were initiated in the spring of...

  4. Antimicrobial prescribing in residential homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClean, Pamela; Tunney, Michael; Gilpin, Deirdre; Parsons, Carole; Hughes, Carmel

    2012-07-01

    Research in residential homes has been limited to date and the extent of systemic and topical antimicrobial prescribing is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate antimicrobial prescribing in residential homes in Northern Ireland (NI). Point prevalence studies (PPSs) were completed in November 2010 (PPS1) and April 2011 (PPS2) in 30 residential homes. Data were obtained from care plans, medication administration records and staff in relation to antimicrobial prescribing and facility and resident characteristics, and analysed descriptively. The point prevalence of systemic antimicrobial prescribing was 9.4% in PPS1 and 9.2% in PPS2 (range 0.0%-33.3% during both PPSs). Trimethoprim was the most commonly prescribed systemic antimicrobial and the main indication was the prevention of urinary tract infections. Almost 25% of systemic antimicrobials were prescribed at inappropriate doses. The point prevalence of topical antimicrobial prescribing was 6.4% (range 0.0%-22.2%) in PPS1 and 5.9% (range 0.0%-21.1%) in PPS2. The most commonly prescribed topical antimicrobials were chloramphenicol eye preparations in PPS1 and fusidic acid skin preparations in PPS2; treatment with these topical antimicrobials was generally prolonged. More than 25% of all systemic and 55% of all topical antimicrobials were initiated following telephone consultations as opposed to face-to-face consultations. The prevalence of systemic antimicrobial prescribing in residential homes in NI is relatively high compared with care homes (particularly nursing homes) in other countries. Systemic and topical antimicrobial prescribing is not always appropriate in terms of the doses prescribed and the duration of use. It is apparent that current strategies employed in NI are insufficient to ensure prudent antimicrobial prescribing within this environment.

  5. Smartphone apps to support hospital prescribing and pharmacology education: a review of current provision

    OpenAIRE

    Haffey, Faye; Brady, Richard R W; Maxwell, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Junior doctors write the majority of hospital prescriptions but many indicate they feel underprepared to assume this responsibility and around 10% of prescriptions contain errors. Medical smartphone apps are now widely used in clinical practice and present an opportunity to provide support to inexperienced prescribers. This study assesses the contemporary range of smartphone apps with prescribing or related content. Six smartphone app stores were searched for apps aimed at the healthcare prof...

  6. Achieving Prudent Dementia Care (Palliare: An International Policy and Practice Imperative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie Tolson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the provision of integrated advanced dementia care within seven European countries and critically reviews the potential contribution of the Prudent Healthcare perspective as a starting point for reform. Progressive efforts to innovate, promote quality and integrate care are tempered with the reality of resource constraints. Some policy makers in Europe and North America have turned their attention to the principles of Prudent Healthcare as a potential mechanism to maximise benefits for patients within available resources. As dementia progresses, living well requires increasing levels of support and care, people living with advanced dementia have complex health and social care needs, are highly dependent on others but are not yet at the terminal end stage of the condition. People with advanced dementia can benefit from a dementia specific palliative approach to care ('Palliare', that helps them to live the best life possible for the months and often years they live with advanced dementia. It is also highly desirable to align policy innovations with integrated palliative care practice models and the education of the dementia workforce to accelerate informed improvements in advanced dementia care. There may be some coherence, at least superficially between Prudent Healthcare and integrated palliative care models such as Palliare. It is argued that for successful implementation, both require practitioners to be equipped with knowledge and skills and be empowered to deliver high quality care often within impoverished care environments. Adoption of the prudent perspective will however require development of a repertoire of approaches to hear the voice or proxy voice of people living with advanced dementia and to commit to the development and implementation of new evidence for advanced dementia practice. Evidence informing this policy debate draws upon contemporary literature and policy and the findings from research activities

  7. A Quality Improvement Project to Improve Education Provided by Nurses to ED Patients Prescribed Opioid Analgesics at Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszak, Daria L; Mitchell, Ann M; Ren, Dianxu; Fennimore, Laura A

    2017-10-27

    The opioid crisis continues to take an unprecedented number of lives and is the top cause of injury death in the United States. The emergency department is a setting where patients with pain seek care and may be prescribed an opioid, yet many patients do not receive evidence-based education about taking their opioid safely. Like many communities across the country, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, has experienced an increased rate of opioid overdoses; from 2015-2016, the number of opioid-related overdose deaths in the county increased by 44%. This quality improvement project is the implementation of a nurse-delivered, evidence-based education initiative for patients prescribed an opioid in an emergency department. Nurses were briefly trained on opioid safety and patient education, then over 12 weeks, delivered the dual-modal (verbal and written) education with a patient teach-back to verify comprehension. Nurses who completed the project training on opioid safety and patient education had a statistically significant improvement in their knowledge. Patient satisfaction surveys showed 100% of patients reported clear understanding of how to take their pain medication, and out of the patients receiving the opioid pain education for the first time, 88.2% learned something new about how to safely take, store, or dispose of their pain medication. Improving the delivery of opioid prescription education at emergency department discharge will enhance patient knowledge and promote safety, which may help mitigate the opioid crisis by reducing the rate of opioid use disorder and accidental overdoses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Preferences for continuing education through existing electronic access for Australian nurse practitioners and its implication in prescribing potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Claire; Buckley, Thomas; Dunn, Sandra; Cashin, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about Australian Nurse Practitioners (NPs) perceptions of the importance of continuing education (CE), their preferred methods to undertake CE in relation to prescribing practices or their access to electronic resources at work. Nurse Practitioner access to computerised technology may increase their provision of resources, provide point of care technology, and increase opportunities to participate in CE. This paper aims to explore Australian NP preferences for continuing education and NP access to electronic mediums that may increase CE opportunities. A self-administered online survey was completed by 68 NPs from across Australia. The majority of respondents (93%) viewed CE to be very important and preferred methods of continuing education included receipt of information by email, and interactive online case studies. Respondents working in metropolitan areas had increased access to high speed Internet in comparison to NPs working in rural or remote areas, although this did not reach statistical significance (88% vs. 69%, p = 0.07). Significantly more NPs working in metropolitan areas had access to a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) than NPs working in rural or remote areas (44% vs. 6%, p = 0.003). This is the first national survey to report preference for CE and access to technology of NPs in Australia. Electronic technology can provide programmed support such as online learning and resources through computers and PDAs to maximise NP prescribing potential.

  9. Long term effectiveness on prescribing of two multifaceted educational interventions: results of two large scale randomized cluster trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Magrini

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Information on benefits and risks of drugs is a key element affecting doctors' prescribing decisions. Outreach visits promoting independent information have proved moderately effective in changing prescribing behaviours. OBJECTIVES: Testing the short and long-term effectiveness on general practitioners' prescribing of small groups meetings led by pharmacists. METHODS: Two cluster open randomised controlled trials (RCTs were carried out in a large scale NHS setting. Ad hoc prepared evidence based material were used considering a therapeutic area approach--TEA, with information materials on osteoporosis or prostatic hyperplasia--and a single drug oriented approach--SIDRO, with information materials on me-too drugs of 2 different classes: barnidipine or prulifloxacin. In each study, all 115 Primary Care Groups in a Northern Italy area (2.2 million inhabitants, 1737 general practitioners were randomised to educational small groups meetings, in which available evidence was provided together with drug utilization data and clinical scenarios. Main outcomes were changes in the six-months prescription of targeted drugs. Longer term results (24 and 48 months were also evaluated. RESULTS: In the TEA trial, one of the four primary outcomes showed a reduction (prescription of alfuzosin compared to tamsulosin and terazosin in benign prostatic hyperplasia: prescribing ratio -8.5%, p = 0.03. Another primary outcome (prescription of risedronate showed a reduction at 24 and 48 months (-7.6%, p = 0.02; and -9,8%, p = 0.03, but not at six months (-5.1%, p = 0.36. In the SIDRO trial both primary outcomes showed a statistically significant reduction (prescription of barnidipine -9.8%, p = 0.02; prescription of prulifloxacin -11.1%, p = 0.04, which persisted or increased over time. INTERPRETATION: These two cluster RCTs showed the large scale feasibility of a complex educational program in a NHS setting, and its potentially

  10. Drug prescribing data used in the assessment of general practitioners’ treatment of asthma and urinary tract infection – Experience from the European Drug Education Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Lagerløv

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available  ABSTRACTDescribing drug treatment given by general practitioners, and quantifying changes in their prescribingbehaviour due to educational intervention, were important parts of the method developed and appliedby the European Drug Education Project. Based on the physicians’ prescription data, individual patientswere defined as having either asthma or urinary tract infections. Prescribing indicators were establishedfor assessing the quality (acceptable or unacceptable of the drug treatment. The diagnose definitionsand prescribing indicators are discussed in more detail in relation to feeding back individual prescribingdata to educational groups of physicians to improve the quality of their drug therapy.

  11. Rationalising prescribing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadmann, Sarah; Bang, Lia Evi

    2015-01-01

    Initiatives in the name of 'rational pharmacotherapy' have been launched to alter what is seen as 'inappropriate' prescribing practices of physicians. Based on observations and interviews with 20 general practitioners (GPs) in 2009-2011, we explored how attempts to rationalise prescribing interact...... of GPs as a need for practice-relevant knowledge and argue that industry sales representatives are granted opportunity to access general practice because they understand this need of GPs....

  12. Interventions to improve antimicrobial prescribing of doctors in training: the IMPACT (IMProving Antimicrobial presCribing of doctors in Training) realist review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Geoff; Brennan, Nicola; Mattick, Karen; Pearson, Mark; Briscoe, Simon; Papoutsi, Chrysanthi

    2015-10-22

    Antimicrobial resistance has been described as a global crisis-more prudent prescribing is part of the solution. Behaviour change interventions are needed to improve prescribing practice. Presently, the literature documents that context impacts on prescribing decisions, yet insufficient evidence exists to enable researchers and policymakers to determine how local tailoring should take place. Doctors in training are an important group to study, being numerically the largest group of prescribers in UK hospitals. Unfortunately very few interventions specifically targeted this group. Our project aims to understand how interventions to change antimicrobial prescribing behaviours of doctors in training produce their effects. We will recruit a project stakeholder group to advise us throughout. We will synthesise the literature using the realist review approach-a form of theory-driven interpretive systematic review approach often used to make sense of complex interventions. Interventions to improve antimicrobial prescribing behaviours are complex-they are context dependent, have long implementation chains, multiple non-linear interactions, emergence and depend on human agency. Our review will iteratively progress through 5 steps: step 1--Locate existing theories; step 2--Search for evidence; step 3--Article selection; step 4--Extracting and organising data; and step 5--Synthesising the evidence and drawing conclusions. Data analysis will use a realist logic of analysis to describe and explain what works, for whom, in what circumstances, in what respects, how and why to improve antimicrobial prescribing behaviour of doctors in training. Ethical approval was not required for our review. Our dissemination strategy will be participatory and involve input from our stakeholder group. Tailored project outputs will be targeted at 3 audiences: (1) doctors in training; (2) clinical supervisors/trainers and medical educators; and (3) policy, decision makers, regulators and royal

  13. Prescribing Antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Kryger; Jepsen, Kim Sune

    2018-01-01

    The medical professions will lose an indispensable tool in clinical practice if even simple infections cannot be cured because antibiotics have lost effectiveness. This article presents results from an exploratory enquiry into “good doctoring” in the case of antibiotic prescribing at a time when...

  14. Prescribing procrastination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, George H.

    1979-01-01

    In his everyday work the family physician sees many patients whose problems have been diagnosed but for whom postponement of an active treatment plan is indicated. The physician must therefore prescribe procrastination in a carefully planned way. I describe some ideas and practical methods for doing this. PMID:529244

  15. Evaluating an undergraduate interprofessional education session for medical and pharmacy undergraduates on therapeutics and prescribing: the medical student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelvey, Bethany M; Coulman, Sion A; John, Dai N

    2016-01-01

    The current literature on undergraduate interprofessional education (IPE) for pharmacy and medical students highlights a range of positive outcomes, although to date IPE has focused predominantly on student views and experiences of IPE sessions with these opinions being sought at the end of the sessions. This study aimed to evaluate medical students' experiences of therapeutics and prescribing IPE, with pharmacy students, 1 year following the session. Following ethics committee approval, 3rd year medical students at Cardiff University were invited to participate using non-probability sampling. Topic guide development was informed by the literature and research team discussions, including a review of the materials used in the IPE session. Semi-structured one-to-one interviews explored experiences, prior to, during, and after the IPE session. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed thematically. Eighteen medical students were interviewed; 11 were females. Seven themes were identified, namely 1) refinement of pre-session preparation, 2) session value, 3) learning with a pharmacy student, 4) learning about a pharmacist, 5) learning from a pharmacy student, 6) importance and application of what was learnt into practice, and 7) suggestions for change. This study provides a valuable insight into medical students' experiences of a therapeutics and prescribing IPE session and emphasizes the value they placed on interaction with pharmacy students. Medical students were able to recall clear learning experiences from the IPE session that had taken place 12 months earlier, which itself is an indicator of the impact of the session on the students. Furthermore, they were able to describe how knowledge and skills learnt had been applied to subsequent learning activities. Those developing IPE sessions should consider the following: clarify professional roles in the session content, incorporate IPE as a series of activities, and use small groups of

  16. Opioid Overdose Education for Individuals Prescribed Opioids for Pain Management: Randomized Comparison of Two Computer-Based Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S. Huhn

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundOpioid overdose (OD rates in the United States have reached unprecedented levels. Current OD prevention strategies largely consist of distribution of naloxone and in-person trainings, which face obstacles to expedient, widespread dissemination. Web-based interventions have increased opioid-OD response knowledge in patients with opioid-use disorders; however, these interventions have not been tested in the larger population of individuals that are prescribed opioid analgesics. This study assessed a web-based intervention providing education across three knowledge domains: opioid effects, opioid-OD symptoms, and opioid-OD response.MethodsParticipants (N = 197 were adults recruited on Amazon Mechanical Turk from May to June 2017, who were prescribed an opioid medication for pain. Participants were randomly assigned to a Presentation (n = 97 intervention communicating relevant facts in each knowledge domain, or a Presentation + Mastery (n = 100 intervention including the same facts but requiring that participants respond correctly to ≥80% of embedded questions in each module before advancing. Participants completed the Brief Opioid Overdose Knowledge (BOOK measure before and after the interventions, and provided feedback on acceptability.ResultsBoth versions of the intervention resulted in significant pre to postintervention increases in BOOK scores across all knowledge domains (p < 0.001, with no significant knowledge differences between groups. The Presentation intervention took significantly less time to complete (p < 0.001 and was completed by significantly more participants than the Presentation + Mastery intervention (p < 0.001. Most participants rated both interventions as highly acceptable.ConclusionResults replicate a previous study (1 and suggest the web-based Presentation intervention may be a convenient, cost-effective method for disseminating crucial public health information for preventing

  17. Identifying outcome-based indicators and developing a curriculum for a continuing medical education programme on rational prescribing using a modified Delphi process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahidi Rezagoli

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continuing medical education (CME is compulsory for physicians in Iran. Recent studies in Iran show that modifications of CME elements are necessary to improve the effectiveness of the educational programmes. Other studies point to an inappropriate, even irrational drug prescribing. Based on a needs assessment study regarding CME for general physicians in the East Azerbaijan province in Iran, rational prescribing practice was recognized as a high priority issue. Considering different educational methods, outcome-based education has been proposed as a suitable approach for CME. The purpose of the study was to obtain experts' consensus about appropriate educational outcomes of rational prescribing for general physicians in CME and developing curricular contents for this education. Methods The study consisted of two phases: The first phase was conducted using a two-round Delphi consensus process to identify the outcome-based educational indicators regarding rational prescribing for general physicians in primary care (GPs. In the second phase the agreed indicators were submitted to panels of experts for assessment and determination of content for a CME program in the field. Results Twenty one learning outcomes were identified through a modified Delphi process. The indicators were used by the panels of experts and six educational topics were determined for the CME programme and the curricular content of each was defined. The topics were 1 Principles of prescription writing, 2 Adverse drug reactions, 3 Drug interactions, 4 Injections, 5 Antibiotic therapy, and 6 Anti-inflammatory agents therapy. One of the topics was not directly related to any outcome, raising a question about the need for a discussion on constructive alignment. Conclusions Consensus on learning outcomes was achieved and an educational guideline was designed. Before suggesting widespread use in the country the educational package should be tested in the CME

  18. Evaluating an undergraduate interprofessional education session for medical and pharmacy undergraduates on therapeutics and prescribing: the medical student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelvey BM

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bethany M Shelvey,1 Sion A Coulman,2 Dai N John2 1School of Medicine, 2School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, UK Background: The current literature on undergraduate interprofessional education (IPE for pharmacy and medical students highlights a range of positive outcomes, although to date IPE has focused predominantly on student views and experiences of IPE sessions with these opinions being sought at the end of the sessions. This study aimed to evaluate medical students’ experiences of therapeutics and prescribing IPE, with pharmacy students, 1 year following the session. Methods: Following ethics committee approval, 3rd year medical students at Cardiff University were invited to participate using non-probability sampling. Topic guide development was informed by the literature and research team discussions, including a review of the materials used in the IPE session. Semi-structured one-to-one interviews explored experiences, prior to, during, and after the IPE session. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed thematically. Results: Eighteen medical students were interviewed; 11 were females. Seven themes were identified, namely 1 refinement of pre-session preparation, 2 session value, 3 learning with a pharmacy student, 4 learning about a pharmacist, 5 learning from a pharmacy student, 6 importance and application of what was learnt into practice, and 7 suggestions for change. Conclusion: This study provides a valuable insight into medical students’ experiences of a therapeutics and prescribing IPE session and emphasizes the value they placed on interaction with pharmacy students. Medical students were able to recall clear learning experiences from the IPE session that had taken place 12 months earlier, which itself is an indicator of the impact of the session on the students. Furthermore, they were able to describe how knowledge and skills learnt had been applied to

  19. Prudent sperm use by leaf-cutter ant queens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Den Boer, Susanne Petronella A; Baer, Boris; Dreier, Stéphanie Agnès Jeanine

    2009-01-01

    In many species, females store sperm between copulation and egg fertilization, but the consequences of sperm storage and patterns of sperm use for female life history and reproductive success have not been investigated in great detail. In hymenopteran insect societies (ants, bees, wasps), reprodu......In many species, females store sperm between copulation and egg fertilization, but the consequences of sperm storage and patterns of sperm use for female life history and reproductive success have not been investigated in great detail. In hymenopteran insect societies (ants, bees, wasps......), reproduction is usually monopolized by one or relatively few queens, who mate only during a brief period early in life and store sperm for later use. The queens of some ants are particularly long-lived and have the potential to produce millions of offspring during their life. To do so, queens store many sperm...... cells, and this sperm must remain viable throughout the years of storage. Queens should also be under strong selection to use stored sperm prudently when fertilizing eggs. We used the leaf-cutter ant Atta colombica to investigate the dynamics of sperm use during egg fertilization. We show that queens...

  20. The role of prudent love in the practice of clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcum, James A

    2011-10-01

    Virtues are an important component in the practice of clinical medicine. Prudence or wisdom and charity or love are often viewed as crucial for virtuous practice. Generally, the two virtues are discussed separately, with no connection between them; however, a synergy exists between the two virtues as a compound virtue of prudent love in which the properties of the compound virtue transcend those of the individual virtues. To examine the nature of prudent love and to discuss its role in the practice of clinical medicine. Philosophical and conceptual analyses. Prudent love exhibits properties, which are the result of a synergistic interaction between the two individual virtues. Succinctly, prudent love synergism is an outcome of a particular structural relationship between the two virtues in which motivational love prompts the prudent clinician to acquire and utilize clinical competence, which then allows the loving clinician to take care of an individual patient's health care needs. In turn, the virtuous clinician's ability to meet those needs successfully feedbacks onto the motivation to satisfy them initially, thereby encouraging and enhancing the clinician to fulfil them even more prudently and lovingly, not only for the individual patient but also for other patients. The compound virtue of prudent love provides a comprehensive approach to practising medicine that meets not only the needs of patients but also fulfils the physician's sense as healer. Although challenges face teaching virtues in the medical curriculum, strategies are available for incorporating training in virtues into the curriculum. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. PERFIL DA OFERTA DE CARNE OVINA NO MUNÍCIPIO DE PRESIDENTE PRUDENTE-SP

    OpenAIRE

    Marilice Zundt; Ricardo Firett; Eduardo S. Martins de Souza; Daniela Titoneli Cardoso; Jose Luis de Lima Astolphi; Fabiola Cristine de Almeida Rego Grecco; Caliê Castilho

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research was to carry out a survey in the retail market of Presidente Prudente (SP), seeking to know the offer of sheep meat products, considering the type of establishment, meat cut, type of packaging, brand presence, Price / kg. We analyzed items of the sheep meat market available to consumers in the city of Presidente Prudente-SP, and for this purpose, information was obtained from 69 retail establishments, using non-probabilistic sampling for convenience....

  2. Changing doctor prescribing behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P.S.; Mäkelä, M.; Vermeulen, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this overview was to identify interventions that change doctor prescribing behaviour and to derive conclusions for practice and further research. Relevant studies (indicating prescribing as a behaviour change) were located from a database of studies maintained by the Cochrane Collabora......The aim of this overview was to identify interventions that change doctor prescribing behaviour and to derive conclusions for practice and further research. Relevant studies (indicating prescribing as a behaviour change) were located from a database of studies maintained by the Cochrane...... Collaboration on Effective Professional Practice. This register is kept up to date by searching the following databases for reports of relevant research: DHSS-DATA; EMBASE; MEDLINE; SIGLE; Resource Database in Continuing Medical Education (1975-1994), along with bibliographies of related topics, hand searching...... of key journals and personal contact with content area experts. Randomised controlled trials and non-equivalent group designs with pre- and post-intervention measures were included. Outcome measures were those used by the study authors. For each study we determined whether these were positive, negative...

  3. Antibiotic prescribing of village doctors for children under 15 years with upper respiratory tract infections in rural China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhixia; Zhan, Xingxin; Zhou, Hongjun; Sun, Fang; Zhang, Heng; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Liu, Qian; Li, Yingxue; Yan, Weirong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to explore the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of village doctors regarding the prescribing of antibiotics for children under 15 years with upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) in rural China. Twelve focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted in Xianning, a prefecture-level city in rural China, during December 2014. We conducted 6 FGDs with 35 village doctors, 3 with 13 primary caregivers (11 parents), and 3 with 17 directors of township hospitals, county-level health bureaus, county-level Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or county-level Chinese Food and Drug Administration offices. Audio records of the interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using the thematic analysis approach. Participants believed that unnecessary antibiotic prescribing for children under 15 years with The occurrence of URTIs was a problem in village clinics in rural China. The discussions revealed that most of the village doctors had inadequate knowledge and misconceptions about antibiotic use, which was an important factor in the unnecessary prescribing. Village doctors and directors reported that the doctors’ fear of complications, the primary caregivers’ pressure for antibiotic treatment, and the financial considerations of patient retention were the main factors influencing the decision to prescribe antibiotics. Most of the primary caregivers insisted on antibiotics, even when the village doctors were reluctant to prescribe them, and they preferred to go to see those village doctors who prescribed antibiotics. The interviewees also gave their opinions on what would be the most effective measures for optimizing antibiotic prescriptions; these included educational/training campaigns, strict regulations on antibiotic prescription, and improved supervision. Findings emphasized the need to improve the dissemination of information and training/education, and implement legislation on the rational use of antibiotics. And it

  4. 76 FR 68766 - Draft Blueprint for Prescriber Education for Long-Acting/Extended-Release Opioid Class-Wide Risk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... Opioid Class-Wide Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy; Availability; Request for Comments AGENCY... Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft document entitled ``Blueprint for Prescriber...-acting and extended-release brand name and generic products and are formulated with the active...

  5. Does a fall prevention educational programme improve knowledge and change exercise prescribing behaviour in health and exercise professionals? A study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiedemann, A; Sturnieks, D L; Hill, A-M; Lovitt, L; Clemson, L; Lord, S R; Harvey, L; Sherrington, C

    2014-11-19

    Falling in older age is a serious and costly problem. At least one in three older people fall annually. Although exercise is recognised as an effective fall prevention intervention, low numbers of older people engage in suitable programmes. Health and exercise professionals play a crucial role in addressing fall risk in older adults. This trial aims to evaluate the effect of participation in a fall prevention educational programme, compared with a wait-list control group, on health and exercise professionals' knowledge about fall prevention and the effect on fall prevention exercise prescription behaviour and confidence to prescribe the exercises to older people. A randomised controlled trial involving 220 consenting health and exercise professionals will be conducted. Participants will be individually randomised to an intervention group (n=110) to receive an educational workshop plus access to internet-based support resources, or a wait-list control group (n=110). The two primary outcomes, measured 3 months after randomisation, are: (1) knowledge about fall prevention and (2) self-perceived change in fall prevention exercise prescription behaviour. Secondary outcomes include: (1) participants' confidence to prescribe fall prevention exercises; (2) the proportion of people aged 60+ years seen by trial participants in the past month who were prescribed fall prevention exercise; and (3) the proportion of fall prevention exercises prescribed by participants to older people in the past month that comply with evidence-based guidelines. Outcomes will be measured with a self-report questionnaire designed specifically for the trial. The trial protocol was approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee, The University of Sydney, Australia. Trial results will be disseminated via peer reviewed journals, presentations at international conferences and participants' newsletters. Trial protocol was registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (Number

  6. Health Alliance for Prudent Prescribing, Yield and Use of Antimicrobial Drugs in the Treatment of Respiratory Tract Infections (HAPPY AUDIT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Lars; Munck, Anders; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente

    2010-01-01

    benefit. Several intervention initiatives have been taken to reduce the inappropriate use of antibiotics in primary health care, but the effectiveness of these interventions is only modest. Only few studies have been designed to determine the effectiveness of multifaceted strategies in countries....... The APO method will be used at a multinational level involving GPs from six countries with different cultural background and different organisation of primary health care. Research on the effect of the intervention will be performed by analysing audit registrations carried out before and after...... the intervention. The intervention includes training courses on management of RTIs, dissemination of clinical guidelines with recommendations for diagnosis and treatment, posters for the waiting room, brochures to patients and implementation of point of care tests (Strep A and CRP) to be used in the GPs...

  7. Antimicrobial agents are societal drugs: how should this influence prescribing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Paul; Gould, Ian M

    2006-01-01

    This paper is concerned with how those who prescribe antimicrobials should consider the wider repercussions of their actions. It is accepted that in an ecological system, pressure will cause evolution; this is also the case with antimicrobials, the result being the development of resistance and the therapeutic failure of drugs. To an extent, this can be ameliorated through advances by the pharmaceutical industry, but that should not stop us from critically appraising our use and modifying our behavior to slow this process down. Up to 50% of prescribing in human medicine and 80% in veterinary medicine and farming has been considered questionable. The Alliance for the Prudent Use of Antimicrobials (APUA) was approached by the WHO to review the situation. Their recommendations include decreasing the prescribing of antibacterials for nonbacterial infections. In the UK, there has been an initiative called "the path of least resistance". This encourages general practitioners to avoid prescribing or reduce the duration of prescriptions for conditions such as upper respiratory tract infections and uncomplicated urinary tract infections; this approach has been successful. Another recommendation is to reduce the prescribing of broad-spectrum antibacterials. In UK hospitals, the problems identified with the inappropriate use of antibacterials are insufficient training in infectious disease, difficulty in selecting empirical antibacterial therapy, poor use of available microbiological information, the fear of litigation and the fact that the majority of antibacterials are prescribed by the least experienced doctors. With close liaison between the laboratories and clinicians, and the development of local protocols, this can be addressed. Another recommendation is to tighten the use of antibacterial prophylaxis and to improve patient compliance. Through a combination of improved education for doctors and patients, and improved communication skills, these problems can be

  8. Irrational prescribing of over-the-counter (OTC) medicines in general practice: testing the feasibility of an educational intervention among physicians in five European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionis, Christos; Petelos, Elena; Shea, Sue; Bagiartaki, Georgia; Tsiligianni, Ioanna G; Kamekis, Apostolos; Tsiantou, Vasiliki; Papadakaki, Maria; Tatsioni, Athina; Moschandreas, Joanna; Saridaki, Aristoula; Bertsias, Antonios; Faresjö, Tomas; Faresjö, Ashild; Martinez, Luc; Agius, Dominic; Uncu, Yesim; Samoutis, George; Vlcek, Jiri; Abasaeed, Abobakr; Merkouris, Bodossakis

    2014-02-17

    Irrational prescribing of over-the-counter (OTC) medicines in general practice is common in Southern Europe. Recent findings from a research project funded by the European Commission (FP7), the "OTC SOCIOMED", conducted in seven European countries, indicate that physicians in countries in the Mediterranean Europe region prescribe medicines to a higher degree in comparison to physicians in other participating European countries. In light of these findings, a feasibility study has been designed to explore the acceptance of a pilot educational intervention targeting physicians in general practice in various settings in the Mediterranean Europe region. This feasibility study utilized an educational intervention was designed using the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB). It took place in geographically-defined primary care areas in Cyprus, France, Greece, Malta, and Turkey. General Practitioners (GPs) were recruited in each country and randomly assigned into two study groups in each of the participating countries. The intervention included a one-day intensive training programme, a poster presentation, and regular visits of trained professionals to the workplaces of participants. Reminder messages and email messages were, also, sent to participants over a 4-week period. A pre- and post-test evaluation study design with quantitative and qualitative data was employed. The primary outcome of this feasibility pilot intervention was to reduce GPs' intention to provide medicines following the educational intervention, and its secondary outcomes included a reduction of prescribed medicines following the intervention, as well as an assessment of its practicality and acceptance by the participating GPs. Median intention scores in the intervention groups were reduced, following the educational intervention, in comparison to the control group. Descriptive analysis of related questions indicated a high overall acceptance and perceived practicality of the intervention programme by GPs

  9. EDUCAÇÃO INTEGRAL: IMPASSES E PERSPECTIVAS DOS PROGRAMAS MAIS EDUCAÇÃO E CIDADESCOLA- PRESIDENTE PRUDENTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusta B. S. Oliveira Klebis

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available n the current context, government and civil society have been discussing commitments related to children´s and youths´ right to education, expressed in the increasing of the daily length of permanence in public schools, beyond the six hours a day. Thus, the main objective of this research is to bring to the debate the implications and challenges of the implementation of the Integral Education by municipalities. More specifically, it seeks: a to discuss the concept of integral education through the view of several authors; b to provide different experiences with integral education on the historical trajectory of Brazilian education; c to reflect on the importance of integral education to the development of subjects in its various dimensions; d to analyze the projects for integral education in the programs “Mais Educação”(linked to the Brazilian Ministry of Education and “Cidadescola” (of the municipality of Presidente Prudente. To develop this study, the methodology chosen was the bibliographical research, with a qualitative approach to the theoretical support of several authors, in addition to mining official documents on the programs analysed. We conclude that, although advances have been observed, it is still necessary to overcome many challenges to achieve the desired quality for an education that provides the human and social emancipation of public school students.

  10. Technology-enabled academic detailing: computer-mediated education between pharmacists and physicians for evidence-based prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kendall; Nguyen, Anne; Jarvis-Selinger, Sandra; Novak Lauscher, Helen; Cressman, Céline; Zibrik, Lindsay

    2013-09-01

    Academic detailing (AD) is the practice of specially trained pharmacists with detailed medication knowledge meeting with physicians to share best practices of prescribing. AD has demonstrated efficacy in positively influencing physicians' prescribing behavior. Nevertheless, a key challenge has been that physicians in rural and remote locations, or physicians who are time challenged, have limited ability to participate in face-to-face meetings with academic detailers, as these specially trained academic detailers are primarily urban-based and limited in numbers. To determine the feasibility of using information technologies to facilitate communication between academic detailers and physicians (known as Technology-Enabled Academic Detailing or TEAD) through a comparison to traditional face-to-face academic detailing (AD). Specifically, TEAD is compared to AD in terms of the ability to aid physicians in acquiring evidence-informed prescribing information on diabetes-related medications, measured in terms of time efficiency, satisfaction of both physicians and pharmacists, and quality of knowledge exchange. General Practitioner Physicians (n=105) and pharmacists (n=12) were recruited from across British Columbia. Pharmacists were trained to be academic detailers on diabetes medication usage. Physicians were assigned to one of four intervention groups to receive four academic detailing sessions from trained pharmacists. Intervention groups included: (1) AD only, (2) TEAD only, (3) TEAD crossed over to AD at midpoint, and (4) AD crossed over to TEAD at midpoint. Evaluation included physician-completed surveys before and after each session, pharmacist logs after each detailing session, interviews and focus groups with physicians and pharmacists at study completion, as well as a technical support log to record all phone calls and emails from physicians and pharmacists regarding any technical challenges during the TEAD sessions, or usage of the web portal. Because

  11. Entrepreneurship Education at Indian Industrial Training Institutes – A Case Study of the Prescribed, Adopted and Enacted Curriculum in and around Bangalore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Zenner

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available On the one hand, India is a growing economy that needs skilled labour, self-employed entrepreneurs and employees to tackle its economic and social challenges. On the other hand, India faces high unemployment rates, especially among young people. Graduates from industrial training institutes (ITIs in particular are often facing difficulties in pursuing self-employment. Entrepreneurship education is an essential element in preparing young people for self-employment. This paper analyses how and to what extent entrepreneurship education has been conceived and implemented in vocational schools in and around Bangalore to face these challenges. Methodologically the authors use a three-step approach following the theories of a `prescribed', `adopted' or `enacted' curriculum. Qualitative interviews are used for the analysis of the adopted and enacted curriculum. The authors conclude that whereas the prescribed curriculum includes several elements of entrepreneurship education and teacher's understanding is in line with the prescription, the understanding is seldom translated into input in the day-to-day teaching. The plausible reasons for this gap are discussed in this paper.

  12. Inappropriate prescribing: criteria, detection and prevention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Marie N

    2012-06-01

    Inappropriate prescribing is highly prevalent in older people and is a major healthcare concern because of its association with negative healthcare outcomes including adverse drug events, related morbidity and hospitalization. With changing population demographics resulting in increasing proportions of older people worldwide, improving the quality and safety of prescribing in older people poses a global challenge. To date a number of different strategies have been used to identify potentially inappropriate prescribing in older people. Over the last two decades, a number of criteria have been published to assist prescribers in detecting inappropriate prescribing, the majority of which have been explicit sets of criteria, though some are implicit. The majority of these prescribing indicators pertain to overprescribing and misprescribing, with only a minority focussing on the underprescribing of indicated medicines. Additional interventions to optimize prescribing in older people include comprehensive geriatric assessment, clinical pharmacist review, and education of prescribers as well as computerized prescribing with clinical decision support systems. In this review, we describe the inappropriate prescribing detection tools or criteria most frequently cited in the literature and examine their role in preventing inappropriate prescribing and other related healthcare outcomes. We also discuss other measures commonly used in the detection and prevention of inappropriate prescribing in older people and the evidence supporting their use and their application in everyday clinical practice.

  13. Impact of an educational module in antidepressant-naive patients prescribed antidepressants for depression: Pilot, proof-of-concept, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Annie P; Singh, Nagendra Madan; Nagarajaiah; Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2016-01-01

    Patients are educated about their illness and its treatment at the time of diagnosis. However, little is known about how much of this education is retained and how it influences knowledge about, attitudes toward, and experiences with medication in antidepressant-naive patients with depression. Antidepressant-naive outpatients with International Classification of Diseases-10 dysthymia or mild to moderate depression, who were advised antidepressant monotherapy, were randomized to control ( n = 22) or intervention ( n = 17) groups. Control patients received treatment as usual, and intervention patients received, in addition, a face-to-face, individualized, 10-min education session about the nature of depression, antidepressant treatment, efficacy and adverse effects of the prescribed drug, and plan of management. Knowledge about the illness and its treatment were assessed at baseline (before the educational intervention) and 6 weeks later. At follow-up, experiences with treatment were also evaluated. The study was double-blind. At baseline, patients had poor knowledge about their illness and its treatment (most patients could not even name their diagnosis); however, few held unfavorable attitudes toward their prescribed medicines. At follow-up, there were modest improvements in both sets of outcomes. There were no differences between intervention and control groups in knowledge and attitude outcomes at baseline and end-point. Drug compliance did not differ between groups. However, importantly, intervention patients experienced a significantly larger number of adverse events than controls (mean, 3.5 vs. 1.7, respectively). For ethical reasons, patients need to be educated about their illness and its treatment. However, such education may be a two-edged sword, with an increased nocebo effect as the most salient consequence. Failure to identify benefits in our study may have been the result of a Type 2 error. This study provides a wealth of information on a large number

  14. A solid grounding: prescribing skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkham, Deborah; Darbyshire, Daniel; Gordon, Morris; Agius, Steven; Baker, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Prescribing is an error-prone process for all doctors, from those who are newly qualified through to those at consultant level. Newly qualified doctors write the majority of in-patient prescriptions and therefore represent an opportunity for safety improvement. Attention to prescribing as a patient-safety issue and potential educational interventions to help improve the situation have been published, but offer little to inform educators why and how any interventions may succeed. In order to identify areas of good practice, and to provide evidence of areas requiring further investigation and innovation, we aimed to ascertain the full range of prescribing practices for final-year medical students and newly qualified doctors across a large geopolitical region of the UK. A questionnaire methodology was used. One questionnaire was sent to those responsible for final-year education, and a further, different questionnaire was sent to those responsible for the training of newly qualified doctors, asking about prescribing education in their locality. Questionnaires were sent to 15 hospitals in total. Prescribing is an error-prone process for all doctors Twelve hospitals contributed to final-year medical student data: a response rate of 80 per cent. A variety of methods, including student assistantship, pharmacist-led skills sessions and practical assessment, were offered to varying degrees. Free-text responses identified opportunities for different prescribing education and support. All 15 hospitals provided data on doctors' education, with interventions including e-learning, assessment and support from ward-based pharmacists. Current education focuses on the technical and knowledge-based paradigm of prescribing. Human factors and the impact of electronic prescribing should play a part in future developments in prescribing education. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Evaluating an undergraduate interprofessional education session for medical and pharmacy undergraduates on therapeutics and prescribing: the medical student perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Shelvey BM; Coulman SA; John DN

    2016-01-01

    Bethany M Shelvey,1 Sion A Coulman,2 Dai N John2 1School of Medicine, 2School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, UK Background: The current literature on undergraduate interprofessional education (IPE) for pharmacy and medical students highlights a range of positive outcomes, although to date IPE has focused predominantly on student views and experiences of IPE sessions with these opinions being sought at the end of the sessions. This study aimed to e...

  16. [The prescribing of dressings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucher, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Dressings must be prescribed as accurately as possible, whether the prescription is written by a nurse or by a doctor. The pharmacist is then able to dispense the exact product prescribed. Knowledge of the different classes of dressings and their indications ensures the adapted management of chronic and acute wounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Sanford Prescribed Fire Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott Conroy; Jim Saveland; Mark Beighley; John Shive; Joni Ward; Marcus Trujillo; Paul Keller

    2003-01-01

    The Dixie National Forest has a long-standing history of successfully implementing prescribed fire and suppression programs. The Forest's safety record has been exemplary. The Forest is known Region-wide for its aggressive and innovative prescribed fire program. In particular, the Dixie National Forest is recognized for its leadership in introducing landscape-...

  18. Non-medical prescribing in New Zealand: an overview of prescribing rights, service delivery models and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunandan, Rakhee; Tordoff, June; Smith, Alesha

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we aim to provide an updated source of information for nonmedical prescribing (NMP) in New Zealand (NZ). A variety of NZ sources were used to collect data: legislation, policy documents and information from professional and regulatory organizations, and education providers. In NZ, the legal categories for prescribers include authorized, designated, and delegated prescribers. Authorized prescribers include dentists, midwives, nurse practitioners, and optometrist prescribers. Designated prescribers include pharmacist prescribers, registered nurse prescribers, and dietitian prescribers. There are no delegated prescribers in NZ at this time. There is variation in the regulation, educational programmes and prescribing competencies used by the different prescribing health professionals involved in NMP in NZ. This update collates relevant information relating to NMP in NZ into one consolidated document and provides policy makers with a current overview of prescribing rights, service delivery models, training requirements, and prescribing competencies used for NMP in NZ. As NMP in NZ continues to expand and evolve, this paper will form a baseline for future NMP research in NZ. NZ needs to develop overarching NMP policy to enable consistency in the various aspects of NMP, thereby delivering a safe and sustainable NMP service in NZ.

  19. Medication errors: prescribing faults and prescription errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velo, Giampaolo P; Minuz, Pietro

    2009-06-01

    1. Medication errors are common in general practice and in hospitals. Both errors in the act of writing (prescription errors) and prescribing faults due to erroneous medical decisions can result in harm to patients. 2. Any step in the prescribing process can generate errors. Slips, lapses, or mistakes are sources of errors, as in unintended omissions in the transcription of drugs. Faults in dose selection, omitted transcription, and poor handwriting are common. 3. Inadequate knowledge or competence and incomplete information about clinical characteristics and previous treatment of individual patients can result in prescribing faults, including the use of potentially inappropriate medications. 4. An unsafe working environment, complex or undefined procedures, and inadequate communication among health-care personnel, particularly between doctors and nurses, have been identified as important underlying factors that contribute to prescription errors and prescribing faults. 5. Active interventions aimed at reducing prescription errors and prescribing faults are strongly recommended. These should be focused on the education and training of prescribers and the use of on-line aids. The complexity of the prescribing procedure should be reduced by introducing automated systems or uniform prescribing charts, in order to avoid transcription and omission errors. Feedback control systems and immediate review of prescriptions, which can be performed with the assistance of a hospital pharmacist, are also helpful. Audits should be performed periodically.

  20. PERFIL DA OFERTA DE CARNE OVINA NO MUNÍCIPIO DE PRESIDENTE PRUDENTE-SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilice Zundt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to carry out a survey in the retail market of Presidente Prudente (SP, seeking to know the offer of sheep meat products, considering the type of establishment, meat cut, type of packaging, brand presence, Price / kg. We analyzed items of the sheep meat market available to consumers in the city of Presidente Prudente-SP, and for this purpose, information was obtained from 69 retail establishments, using non-probabilistic sampling for convenience. There was presence of sheep meat in only 10% of the sampled establishments. Informal products were found in 90% of the butchers surveyed, while formal products were located in meat boutiques, hypermarkets and supermarkets. The most common cuts were: rib, shank and palette, with a frequency of 24.24%, 27.27% and 24.24%, respectively. Locals selling products with no provenance practice more affordable prices than establishments of origin, and sheep meat is made in a timid manner. It was observed that the cuts of first shank and paddle, followed by the rib were found in greater percentage. It is important to mention that the supply of sheep meat through informal slaughter was present in 90% of the butchers visited. In relation to the dissemination and promotion of sheep meat, the sites visited do not present marketing strategies, and new research should be carried out with more comprehensive markets in order to know better the regional marketKey words: market compound, meat cuts, sheep, retail

  1. The Missing Link in Donor Prescribed Educational Reforms: Lack of Ownership (The Case of the World Bank in Ethiopian Higher Education)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garomssa, Habtamu Diriba

    2016-01-01

    The World Bank (WB) as an international policy transfer and diffusion agent has been actively involved in orchestrating and driving Higher Education (HE) reforms globally. Such impact of the Bank has arguably, been more evident in the context of loan recipient countries. By using a hard mode of influence (financial), and more subtle or soft modes…

  2. Occupational Pension Funds (IORPs) & Sustainability: What does the Prudent Person Principle say?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horváthová, Alexandra; Feldthusen, Rasmus Kristian; Ulfbeck, Vibe Garf

    2017-01-01

    The European Union encourages individuals to save in private and occupational pension funds to complement their state saving-plans. Throughout their lives, employers directly sponsor occupational retirement saving plans, so individual employees may top up their future pensions. While the European...... to this principle, the fund - the future retirement for many - shall be managed with care, the skill of an expert, prudence and due diligence. Under this principle, the pension fund’s governing body is given a broad authority to invest the pension assets in a prudent fashion in light of the particular investment...... by the occupational pension funds in 2016, all funds are obliged to make only responsible, environmentally and socially beneficial investments....

  3. Autochthonous cases of Fasciola hepatica in Presidente Prudente region, São Paulo State, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Tostes Raimundo Alberto; Santarém Vamilton Álvares; Alberti Haroldo; Sanches Osimar de Carvalho

    2004-01-01

    O presente trabalho descreve, a partir da condenação de fígado de bovinos em matadouro, a ocorrência de fasciolose em uma propriedade na região de Presidente Prudente, São Paulo, com a confirmação de ovos de Fasciola hepatica em exame coproparasitológico e a presença de caramujos do gênero Lymnaea. Observou-se que a propriedade ofereceu condições favoráveis ao desenvolvimento do hospedeiro intermediário do parasito e ao surgimento de casos autóctones na região. A verificação desses casos deve...

  4. Prescribe to Prevent: Overdose Prevention and Naloxone Rescue Kits for Prescribers and Pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jamie K; Bratberg, Jeffrey P; Davis, Corey S; Green, Traci C; Walley, Alexander Y

    2016-01-01

    In March of 2015, the United States Department of Health and Human Services identified 3 priority areas to reduce opioid use disorders and overdose, which are as follows: opioid-prescribing practices; expanded use and distribution of naloxone; and expansion of medication-assisted treatment. In this narrative review of overdose prevention and the role of prescribers and pharmacists in distributing naloxone, we address these priority areas and present a clinical scenario within the review involving a pharmacist, a patient with chronic pain and anxiety, and a primary care physician. We also discuss current laws related to naloxone prescribing and dispensing. This review was adapted from the Prescribe to Prevent online continuing medical education module created for prescribers and pharmacists (http://www.opioidprescribing.com/naloxone_module_1-landing).

  5. Learning to prescribe – pharmacists' experiences of supplementary prescribing training in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutchinson Allen

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The introduction of non-medical prescribing for professions such as pharmacy and nursing in recent years offers additional responsibilities and opportunities but attendant training issues. In the UK and in contrast to some international models, becoming a non-medical prescriber involves the completion of an accredited training course offered by many higher education institutions, where the skills and knowledge necessary for prescribing are learnt. Aims: to explore pharmacists' perceptions and experiences of learning to prescribe on supplementary prescribing (SP courses, particularly in relation to inter-professional learning, course content and subsequent use of prescribing in practice. Methods A postal questionnaire survey was sent to all 808 SP registered pharmacists in England in April 2007, exploring demographic, training, prescribing, safety culture and general perceptions of SP. Results After one follow-up, 411 (51% of pharmacists responded. 82% agreed SP training was useful, 58% agreed courses provided appropriate knowledge and 62% agreed that the necessary prescribing skills were gained. Clinical examination, consultation skills training and practical experience with doctors were valued highly; pharmacology training and some aspects of course delivery were criticised. Mixed views on inter-professional learning were reported – insights into other professions being valued but knowledge and skills differences considered problematic. 67% believed SP and recent independent prescribing (IP should be taught together, with more diagnostic training wanted; few pharmacists trained in IP, but many were training or intending to train. There was no association between pharmacists' attitudes towards prescribing training and when they undertook training between 2004 and 2007 but earlier cohorts were more likely to be using supplementary prescribing in practice. Conclusion Pharmacists appeared to value their SP training and

  6. Candidate metrics for evaluating the impact of prescriber education on the safe use of extended-release/long-acting (ER/LA) opioid analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willy, Mary E; Graham, David J; Racoosin, Judith A; Gill, Rajdeep; Kropp, Garner F; Young, Jessica; Yang, Jeff; Choi, Joyce; MaCurdy, Thomas E; Worrall, Chris; Kelman, Jeffrey A

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to develop metrics to assess opioid prescribing behavior as part of the evaluation of the Extended-Release/Long-Acting (ER/LA) Opioid Analgesic Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS). Candidate metrics were selected using published guidelines, examined using sensitivity analyses, and applied to cross-sectional rolling cohorts of Medicare patients prescribed with extended-release oxycodone (ERO) between July 2, 2006 and July 1, 2011. Potential metrics included prescribing opioid-tolerant-only ER/LA opioid analgesics to non-opioid-tolerant patients, prescribing early fills to patients, and ordering drug screens. Proposed definitions for opioid tolerance were seven continuous days of opioid usage of at least 30 mg oxycodone equivalents, within the 7 days (primary) or 30 days (secondary) prior to first opioid-tolerant-only ERO prescription. Forty-four percent of opioid-tolerant-only ERO episodes met the primary opioid tolerance definition; 56% met the secondary definition. Fills were deemed "early" if a prescription was filled before 70% (primary) or 50% (secondary) of the prior prescription's days' supply was to be consumed. Five percent (primary) and 2% (secondary) of episodes had more than or equal to two early fills during treatment. At least one drug screen was billed in 14% of episodes. Stratified analyses indicated that older patients were less likely to be opioid tolerant at the time of the first opioid-tolerant-only ERO prescription. Investigators propose three metrics to monitor changes in prescribing behaviors for opioid analgesics that might be used to evaluate the ER/LA Opioid Analgesics REMS. Low frequencies of patients, particularly those >85 years, were likely to be opioid tolerant prior to receiving prescriptions for opioid-tolerant-only ERO. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Matrix with Prescribed Eigenvectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Faiz

    2011-01-01

    It is a routine matter for undergraduates to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a given matrix. But the converse problem of finding a matrix with prescribed eigenvalues and eigenvectors is rarely discussed in elementary texts on linear algebra. This problem is related to the "spectral" decomposition of a matrix and has important technical…

  8. Opioid Prescribing PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-07-06

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the July 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Higher opioid prescribing puts patients at risk for addiction and overdose. Learn what can be done about this serious problem.  Created: 7/6/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/6/2017.

  9. [Nurse prescribing in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissy, Stéphane

    2016-10-01

    While the ability to prescribe has long remained outside the scope of nursing practice in France, successive changes to legislation have resulted in the real activities of nurses in this field to be taken into account. This constitutes an evolution in the nursing profession from a legal perspective. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Efficacy of aerobic exercise and a prudent diet for improving selected lipids and lipoproteins in adults: A meta-analysis of andomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies addressing the effects of aerobic exercise and a prudent diet on lipid and lipoprotein concentrations in adults have reached conflicting conclusions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of aerobic exercise combined with a prudent diet on lipid and lipoprotein concentration...

  11. Efficacy of aerobic exercise and a prudent diet for improving selected lipids and lipoproteins in adults: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies addressing the effects of aerobic exercise and a prudent diet on lipid and lipoprotein concentrations in adults have reached conflicting conclusions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of aerobic exercise combined with a prudent diet on lipid and lipoprotein concentration...

  12. Training for prescribing in-office and home phototherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kathryn L; Huang, Karen E; Huang, William W; Feldman, Steven R

    2015-11-01

    One reason phototherapy use is lacking in the United States may be inadequate phototherapy education during dermatology training. The purpose of this study was to estimate the level of dermatology resident training with prescribing phototherapy and to see whether inadequate education may be contributing to the underuse of phototherapy in the United States. A questionnaire was developed to assess resident education and comfort with prescribing phototherapy from the resident perspective. Botulinum toxin and radiation therapy training were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. Responses were tabulated and comparisons made using Fisher's exact test and Cochran-Armitage trend test. A total of 88 residents responded. 42% and 81% of respondents reported not receiving didactic education on prescribing in-office and home phototherapy, respectively, compared to 13% for botulinum toxin and 91% for radiation therapy. 29% and 76% reported not being comfortable prescribing in-office and home phototherapy, respectively, compared to 36% for botulinum toxin and 91% for radiation therapy. Phototherapy education satisfaction was positively correlated with comfort of prescribing, and comfort prescribing was positively correlated with actual prescribing of phototherapy. Training for prescribing phototherapy is lacking. Augmenting phototherapy training may help make home phototherapy more accessible for patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Trends of contact lens prescribing in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Mera F; Bakkar, May; Gammoh, Yazan; Morgan, Philip

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate contact lens prescribing trends among optometrists in Jordan. Optometrists from 173 practices in Jordan were surveyed about prescribing contact lenses in their practice. Practitioners were required to record information for the last 10 patients that visited their practice. Demographic data such as age and gender was obtained for each patient. In addition, data relating to lens type, lens design, replacement methods and the care regime advised to each patient were recorded. Practitioners were required to provide information relating to their education and years of experience. The influence of education and experience with respect to lens prescribing trends was explored using linear regression models for the proportions of lens types fitted for patients. A total of 1730 contact lens fits were analyzed. The mean (±SD) age of lens wearers was 26.6 (±7.9) years, of whom 65% were female. Conventional hydrogel lenses were the most prescribed lenses, accounting for 60.3% of the fits, followed by silicone hydrogel lenses (31.3%), and rigid lenses (8.4%). In terms of lens design, spherical lenses appeared to be most commonly prescribed on monthly basis. Daily disposable lenses were second most prescribed lens modality, accounting for 20.4% of the study sample. Multi-purpose solution (MPS) was the preferred care regimen, with a prevalence of 88.1% reported in the study sample, compared to hydrogen peroxide (1-step and 2-step), which represented only 2.8% of the patients in this study. A relationship was established between the two educational groups for rigid lens prescribing (F=17.4, p<0.0001), while the experience of the optometrist was not a significant factor (F=0.4, p=0.54). This work has provides an up-to-date analysis of contact lens prescribing trends among optometrists in Jordan. Contact lens prescribing in terms of lens type, lens design, modality of wear and care regimen agree with global market trends with small variations. This report will help

  14. Prescribing by nurse practitioners: Insights from a New Zealand study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poot, Betty; Zonneveld, Rebecca; Nelson, Katherine; Weatherall, Mark

    2017-10-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) in New Zealand have been able to prescribe medicines since 2001; however, little is known about their prescribing practice. This study describes the NPs who prescribe community-dispensed medicines, the patients, and identifies the most frequently prescribed medications. A retrospective search of the Ministry of Health pharmaceutical collection was completed from 2013 to 2015. NP registration number, patient age, gender, deprivation index, and the name and date of dispensed medication, including the New Zealand pharmaceutical schedule therapeutic group, were identified. NPs prescribe a broad range of medications across all therapeutic groups with antibacterial and analgesics being the most commonly prescribed medicines. This is comparable to all prescribers in New Zealand and NPs in Australia. The majority of patients lived in the more deprived areas of New Zealand indicating that NPs are working in areas of greater health need. The majority of NPs registered in New Zealand prescribe medicines. Those in primary care prescribe the most medications. NPs prescribe a broad range of medicines across all drug therapeutic groups. The patients seen by NPs often live in the most deprived areas of New Zealand. Understanding prescribing patterns will help to inform curricular development and continuing education programs for NPs. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  15. PILL series. Prescribing health: exercise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Law, Kung How; How, Choon How; Ng, Chung Sien; Ng, Mark Chung Wai

    2013-01-01

    .... There is a call to shift the focus toward the primary prevention of these conditions. Clinicians will need to move beyond the comfort of prescribing pharmaceuticals and expand the scope to prescribing health, i.e. exercise...

  16. Characteristics of prescribers whose patients shop for opioids: results from a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda, M Soledad; Fife, Daniel; Berlin, Jesse A; Mastrogiovanni, Gregory; Yuan, Yingli

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of opioid shoppers in clinical practices and the relation between prescriber characteristics and the risk of having opioid shoppers. Describe the prevalence of opioid shoppers in prescribers' practices. Assess the relation between prescribers' characteristics and patient opioid shopping behavior. Retrospective cohort study using a large US retail prescription database. Patients with ≥1 opioid dispensing were followed 18 months. These patients' prescribers are the focus of the study. A patient was a "shopper" if he or she had opioid prescriptions written by ≥1 prescriber with ≥1 day of overlap filled at ≥3 pharmacies and a "heavy shopper" if he or she had ≥5 shopping episodes. The proportions of shoppers by prescriber and the proportion of prescribers with ≥1 shopper or heavy shopper were calculated. Among 858,290 opioid prescribers, most (87 percent) had no shoppers and 98 percent had no heavy shoppers. Prescribers who were aged 70-79 years, male, or who prescribed schedule II opioids had an increased likelihood of having shoppers. As the number of patients for whom a prescriber prescribed opioids increased, the proportion of shoppers also increased. Prescribers with 66 or more patients receiving opioids, who represented 25 percent of prescribers, prescribed for 82 percent of all shoppers. The great majority of opioid prescribers appear to have no shoppers in their practice. Any educational program will be more cost effective if targeted to prescribers of schedule II opioids with a large volume of patients requiring opioids.

  17. Nurse prescribing in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkowska-Bury, Monika; Więch, Paweł; Bazaliński, Dariusz; Marć, Małgorzata; Bartosiewicz, Anna; Januszewicz, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to identify and examine the differences in opinions held by health care professionals and the general public concerning the right to administer and prescribe medication which has been awarded to nurses and midwives in Poland. The study was conducted from December 1, 2014 to July 1, 2015, in randomly selected primary health care clinics, among 2227 individuals, including 849 subjects representing medical personnel of primary health care and 1378 patients receiving primary care services. The study used 2 versions of a questionnaire. The relationships were examined with χ2 test for independence and Kruskal–Wallis test. Health professionals do not believe the new rights awarded to nurses and midwives will reduce the waiting time for medical consultations (P Nurses’ qualifications for the new tasks were most highly rated by patients, whereas the least favorable opinion was expressed by doctors (P nurse prescribing it is necessary to develop a suitable strategy enabling implementation of the government's initiative and facilitating the process of taking up the new task by nurses. PMID:27537573

  18. [Prescribing spectacles to children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrt, O

    2011-04-01

    Refractive errors are the most common visual problem in children apart from squinting. Indications for spectacles include amblyopia prophylaxis and treatment, strabismus, myopia and reading disorders. Objective refraction by retinoscopy is the central part of prescribing spectacles to children. A slight under correction (maximum of 0.5 dpt in cases with and 1.0 dpt without squint) can be considered in hyperopia only. Myopia, astigmatism and anisometropia must be fully corrected. Any prescription must mention "MA=PD" and "plastic lenses" as well as "high bifocal" if needed. Information to the parents is essential for good compliance of spectacle wear. Step-by-step instructions and a list of possible errors will be given.

  19. Looking inside the black box: a theory-based process evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial of printed educational materials (the Ontario printed educational message, OPEM to improve referral and prescribing practices in primary care in Ontario, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemyre Louise

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomised controlled trials of implementation strategies tell us whether (or not an intervention results in changes in professional behaviour but little about the causal mechanisms that produce any change. Theory-based process evaluations collect data on theoretical constructs alongside randomised trials to explore possible causal mechanisms and effect modifiers. This is similar to measuring intermediate endpoints in clinical trials to further understand the biological basis of any observed effects (for example, measuring lipid profiles alongside trials of lipid lowering drugs where the primary endpoint could be reduction in vascular related deaths. This study protocol describes a theory-based process evaluation alongside the Ontario Printed Educational Message (OPEM trial. We hypothesize that the OPEM interventions are most likely to operate through changes in physicians' behavioural intentions due to improved attitudes or subjective norms with little or no change in perceived behavioural control. We will test this hypothesis using a well-validated social cognition model, the theory of planned behaviour (TPB that incorporates these constructs. Methods/design We will develop theory-based surveys using standard methods based upon the TPB for the second and third replications, and survey a subsample of Ontario family physicians from each arm of the trial two months before and six months after the dissemination of the index edition of informed, the evidence based newsletter used for the interventions. In the third replication, our study will converge with the "TRY-ME" protocol (a second study conducted alongside the OPEM trial, in which the content of educational messages was constructed using both standard methods and methods informed by psychological theory. We will modify Dillman's total design method to maximise response rates. Preliminary analyses will initially assess the internal reliability of the measures and use

  20. e-Learning initiatives to support prescribing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Simon; Mucklow, John

    2012-01-01

    Preparing medical students to prescribe is a major challenge of undergraduate education. They must develop an understanding of clinical pharmacology and acquire knowledge about drugs and therapeutics, as well as the skills to prescribe for individual patients in the face of multiple variables. The task of delivering the learning required to achieve these attributes relies upon limited numbers of teachers, who have increasingly busy clinical commitments. There is evidence that training is currently insufficient to meet the demands of the workplace. e-Learning provides an opportunity to improve the learning experience. The advantages for teachers are improved distribution of learning content, ease of update, standardization and tracking of learner activities. The advantages for learners are ease of access, greater interactivity and individual choice concerning the pace and mix of learning. Important disadvantages are the considerable resource required to develop e-Learning projects and difficulties in simulating some aspects of the real world prescribing experience. Pre-requisites for developing an e-Learning programme to support prescribing include academic expertise, institutional support, learning technology services and an effective virtual learning environment. e-Learning content might range from complex interactive learning sessions through to static web pages with links. It is now possible to simulate and provide feedback on prescribing decisions and this will improve with advances in virtual reality. Other content might include a student formulary, self-assessment exercises (e.g. calculations), a glossary and an on-line library. There is some evidence for the effectiveness of e-Learning but better research is required into its potential impact on prescribing. PMID:22509885

  1. e-Learning initiatives to support prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Simon; Mucklow, John

    2012-10-01

    Preparing medical students to prescribe is a major challenge of undergraduate education. They must develop an understanding of clinical pharmacology and acquire knowledge about drugs and therapeutics, as well as the skills to prescribe for individual patients in the face of multiple variables. The task of delivering the learning required to achieve these attributes relies upon limited numbers of teachers, who have increasingly busy clinical commitments. There is evidence that training is currently insufficient to meet the demands of the workplace. e-Learning provides an opportunity to improve the learning experience. The advantages for teachers are improved distribution of learning content, ease of update, standardization and tracking of learner activities. The advantages for learners are ease of access, greater interactivity and individual choice concerning the pace and mix of learning. Important disadvantages are the considerable resource required to develop e-Learning projects and difficulties in simulating some aspects of the real world prescribing experience. Pre-requisites for developing an e-Learning programme to support prescribing include academic expertise, institutional support, learning technology services and an effective virtual learning environment. e-Learning content might range from complex interactive learning sessions through to static web pages with links. It is now possible to simulate and provide feedback on prescribing decisions and this will improve with advances in virtual reality. Other content might include a student formulary, self-assessment exercises (e.g. calculations), a glossary and an on-line library. There is some evidence for the effectiveness of e-Learning but better research is required into its potential impact on prescribing. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. Radon and radon daughters' concentration in spring and wells waters from Presidente Prudente: preliminary results; Concentracao de Rn-222 e filhos em aguas provenientes de pocos e emergencias de agua da regiao de Presidente Prudente: resultados preliminares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osorio, Ana Maria Araya; Saenz, Carlos Alberto Tello [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FCT/UNESP), Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica Quimica e Biologia; Aguiar, Claudinei Rodrigues de [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), PR (Brazil); Pereira, Luiz Augusto Stuani [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-15

    This work presents the preliminary results about the concentration of radon and radon daughters in wells and springs water from Presidente Prudente. Six water samples were studied: three from well-water, two from springs water and one from potable water. For the determination of α-activity the samples were placed inside plastic containers where the CR-39 tracks detectors were outside the water. The track density of α-particles were measured by using optical microscopy. The results show that one sample from well-water presented higher concentration of radon and radon daughters than the other samples. (author)

  3. Does a fall prevention educational programme improve knowledge and change exercise prescribing behaviour in health and exercise professionals? A study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tiedemann, A; Sturnieks, D L; Hill, A-M; Lovitt, L; Clemson, L; Lord, S R; Harvey, L; Sherrington, C

    2014-01-01

    .... This trial aims to evaluate the effect of participation in a fall prevention educational programme, compared with a wait-list control group, on health and exercise professionals' knowledge about fall...

  4. Prescribers and pharmaceutical representatives: why are we still meeting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Melissa A; Keough, Mary Ellen; Baril, Joann L; Saccoccio, Laura; Mazor, Kathleen M; Ladd, Elissa; Von Worley, Ann; Gurwitz, Jerry H

    2009-07-01

    Research suggests that pharmaceutical marketing influences prescribing and may cause cognitive dissonance for prescribers. This work has primarily been with physicians and physician-trainees. Questions remain regarding why prescribers continue to meet with pharmaceutical representatives (PRs). To describe the reasons that prescribers from various health professions continue to interact with PRs despite growing evidence of the influence of these interactions. Multi-disciplinary focus groups with 61 participants held in practice settings and at society meetings. Most prescribers participating in our focus groups believe that overall PR interactions are beneficial to patient care and practice health. They either trust the information from PRs or feel that they are equipped to evaluate it independently. Despite acknowledgement of study findings to the contrary, prescribers state that they are able to effectively manage PR interactions such that their own prescribing is not adversely impacted. Prescribers describe few specific strategies or policies for these interactions, and report that policies are not consistently implemented with all members of a clinic or institution. Some prescribers perceive an inherent contradiction between academic centers and national societies receiving money from pharmaceutical companies, and then recommending restriction at the level of the individual prescriber. Prescribers with different training backgrounds present a few novel reasons for these meetings. Despite evidence that PR detailing influences prescribing, providers from several health professions continue to believe that PR interactions improve patient care, and that they can adequately evaluate and filter information presented to them by PRs. Focus group comments suggest that cultural change is necessary to break the norms that exist in many settings. Applying policies consistently, considering non-physician members of the healthcare team, working with trainees, restructuring

  5. Antibiotic prescribing in patients with acute rhinosinusitis is not in agreement with European recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lars Christian; Friis Christensen, Sarah; Cordoba Currea, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective. To assess the potential overprescribing in patients with acute rhinosinusitis across six countries with different antibiotic prescribing rates and different prevalence of antibiotic resistance. Design, setting and subjects. A cross-sectional study including GPs from two Nordic...... countries, two Baltic countries and two Hispano-American countries registered patients with respiratory tract infections (RTIs) during three weeks in January 2008 as part of the EU-funded project "Health Alliance for Prudent Prescribing, Yield And Use of antimicrobial Drugs In the Treatment of respiratory...... tract infections" (HAPPY AUDIT). Main outcome measures. Use of antibiotics for acute rhinosinusitis based on the recommendations in the European Position Paper on Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyps 2007 (EP3OS). Results. In total, 618 participating GPs registered 33 273 patients with RTI of whom 1150 (3...

  6. Western Dietary Pattern Increases, and Prudent Dietary Pattern Decreases, Risk of Incident Diverticulitis in a Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strate, Lisa L; Keeley, Brieze R; Cao, Yin; Wu, Kana; Giovannucci, Edward L; Chan, Andrew T

    2017-04-01

    Dietary fiber is implicated as a risk factor for diverticulitis. Analyses of dietary patterns may provide information on risk beyond those of individual foods or nutrients. We examined whether major dietary patterns are associated with risk of incident diverticulitis. We performed a prospective cohort study of 46,295 men who were free of diverticulitis and known diverticulosis in 1986 (baseline) using data from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. Each study participant completed a detailed medical and dietary questionnaire at baseline. We sent supplemental questionnaires to men reporting incident diverticulitis on biennial follow-up questionnaires. We assessed diet every 4 years using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Western (high in red meat, refined grains, and high-fat dairy) and prudent (high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains) dietary patterns were identified using principal component analysis. Follow-up time accrued from the date of return of the baseline questionnaire in 1986 until a diagnosis of diverticulitis, diverticulosis or diverticular bleeding; death; or December 31, 2012. The primary end point was incident diverticulitis. During 894,468 person years of follow-up, we identified 1063 incident cases of diverticulitis. After adjustment for other risk factors, men in the highest quintile of Western dietary pattern score had a multivariate hazard ratio of 1.55 (95% CI, 1.20-1.99) for diverticulitis compared to men in the lowest quintile. High vs low prudent scores were associated with decreased risk of diverticulitis (multivariate hazard ratio, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.60-0.91). The association between dietary patterns and diverticulitis was predominantly attributable to intake of fiber and red meat. In a prospective cohort study of 46,295 men, a Western dietary pattern was associated with increased risk of diverticulitis, and a prudent pattern was associated with decreased risk. These data can guide dietary interventions for the prevention of

  7. Survey on antimicrobial prescribing patterns in small animal veterinary practice in Emilia Romagna, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarossa, A; Rambaldi, J; Miraglia, V; Giunti, M; Diegoli, G; Zaghini, A

    2017-07-15

    This investigation provides for the first time a general view of the prescribing patterns of antimicrobials in small animal practice in Emilia Romagna, Italy. In the context of a project on antimicrobial resistance managed by the Regional Veterinary Service, veterinary clinicians were invited to voluntarily complete an online questionnaire. This was designed to gather information on antimicrobial prescribing practices and biosecurity measures and to understand the perception of the issue specific to this region of Italy. In total, 266 questionnaires correctly completed were collected. Although clinicians seemed to follow different approaches when using antimicrobials, the data analysis revealed a general awareness on resistance. Penicillins were the most commonly prescribed class, followed by (fluoro)quinolones and cephalosporins. Among those who use laboratory testing more or less frequently (microbiological analysis and susceptibility testing) to support their prescribing habits, only 7 per cent make a habit of always waiting for the results before starting the treatment. Seventy-eight per cent of the respondents declared the use of antimicrobials licensed for human beings. Biosecurity measures were carefully taken into account by the majority of the veterinarians. The results identified the antimicrobial classes that are commonly prescribed and highlighted that perioperative hygiene measures and the use of laboratory diagnosis are critical aspects that need to be emphasised in drawing up guidelines on the prudent use of these drugs in pets.

  8. Patient education combined in a music and habit-forming intervention for adherence to continuous positive airway (CPAP) prescribed for sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carol E; Dauz, Emily; Clements, Faye; Werkowitch, Marilyn; Whitman, Robert

    2009-02-01

    As many as 50% of patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea stop adhering to the prescribed medical treatment of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) within 1-3 weeks of onset. Thus, a theory-based intervention using music to support habit formation was designed to improve CPAP adherence at onset. The intervention materials included directions for CPAP nightly use, a diary for recording nightly use and writing about CPAP benefits or problems. In addition, an audiotape with softly spoken instructions for placing the CPAP mask comfortably, using deep breathing and muscle relaxation along with the slowly decreasing music tempo was provided to listen to at bedtime each night. Effects of this music intervention were tested in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of 97 patients with 53 males (55%) and 44 females (45%). Moderate to severe apnea/hyponea scores (per sleep laboratory data) and medical diagnosis of OSA were required for study inclusion. Compared to placebo controls, a greater proportion of experimental patients were adhering (chi(2)=14.67, pCPAP onset. There were no differences in CPAP adherence at 3 (X(2)=0.065, p=0.79) and 6 (X(2)=.118, p=0.73) months. Patients' diary data and satisfaction survey results indicated the intervention was rated as helpful and guided formation of a relaxing, habitual routine of CPAP nightly use. The intervention had a strong effect for improving adherence to CPAP at 1 month. Adherence at the onset of treatment is critical and the audio music intervention was easily administered. Other interventions that target problems interfering with longer-term CPAP adherence are needed.

  9. CONTAMINAÇÃO DE HORTALIÇAS POR ENTEROPARASITAS E SALMONELLA SPP. EM PRESIDENTE PRUDENTE, SÃO PAULO, BRASIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamilton Alvares Santarém

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of contamination of vegetables by infective forms of helminths and protozoa commercialized in the municipality of Presidente Prudente, São Paulo, Brazil. Samples of two varieties of lettuce and one of watercress, parsley, chives, and packets of parsley and chives were collected from 96 out of 121 commercial establishments registered in the municipality. Samples were washed with Extran MA 02 0.5% and the resulting fluid subjected to techniques of Baermann, Hoffmann and Faust, in order to recovery parasite. Bacterial culture for Salmonella spp. was performed following the steps of pre-enrichment, selective enrichment, plating and differential biochemical classification. It was observed that 33.06% of the samples were contaminated by parasitic structures. The highest contaminations were present in watercress (69.2% and parsley (47.6%, while the lowest occurred in chives (20.7% and lettuce (20.0%. The eggs of trichostrongylidae type were most often found in the samples. Giardia duodenalis cysts were recovered in 9.1% of the samples. Regarding the presence of Salmonella spp., only one strain was isolated in a sample of watercress (1.04%. It was conclude that there is a need for a health education campaign for farmers and vegetables merchants as well as for consumers, based on hygienic techniques, in order to reduce the risks of infection by infectious and parasitic agents during the ingestion of these foods.

  10. Alprazolam prescribing in Tasmania: a two-fold intervention designed to reduce inappropriate prescribing and concomitant opiate prescription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Stuart; Bruno, Raimondo; Sharpe, Mary; Tahmindjis, Alex

    2009-08-01

    The population rate of alprazolam prescribing in Tasmania has been more than double that of national rates. Serious adverse events have been observed through co-administration of opioid medications with alprazolam. A two-fold intervention, comprising GP education coupled with changes to prescribing regulations, was designed with the intention to decrease inappropriate prescribing of alprazolam and thereby reduce adverse outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of the intervention on prescribing rates. We measured the number of alprazolam prescriptions for the years prior to and the year following the intervention. Health Insurance Commission data were utilized to enable comparison of subsidized prescription rates for alprazolam in Tasmania, and compared with national data. Participants were registered medical practitioners in Tasmania who were potential prescribers of alprazolam. The interventions were three GP Education Meetings during June 2007, one in each of the major regions of Tasmania, regarding evidence-based interventions for panic disorder. Changes to regulatory procedures to minimize co-prescription of alprazolam with opioids was implemented in September 2007. A reduction in alprazolam prescribing in Tasmania occurred after the interventions. Education can be an effective strategy to influence prescribing behaviour of doctors. It is likely that this effect can be augmented by adoption of more stringent regulatory requirements.

  11. Bridging the gap: improving safe prescribing from university to workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Stephen; Wasson, Gemma

    2016-10-01

    One of the challenges for Foundation Year 1 junior doctors is to apply the theoretical pharmacology from their undergraduate years into practical prescribing. The EQUIP study in 2009 investigated the causes of prescribing errors by junior doctors. Respondents in the study reported deficiencies in their education for prescribing skills and error prevention. The study suggested more could be done during undergraduate education to link theory with practice. This article describes an initiative from a hospital clinical pharmacy team to address this gap in contextual prescribing skills. Final year medical students (FY0s) were allocated to the Belfast Trust for an 11 week placement. The Clinical Pharmacy team developed a 3 h FY0 workshop focusing on practical prescribing scenarios identified as high risk by local medicines safety teams. The workshops included simulated case studies requiring the FY0 student to discuss medicine use with patients, prescribe admission drug charts and use local guidelines to safely prescribe high risk medicines. Each student was assessed using direct observation of procedural skills (DOPS). Feedback was overwhelmingly positive. Students appreciated the practical elements of the workshop. Initially there was an over-reliance on written medication history without verbally engaging the patient. Following pharmacist feedback before the DOPS students demonstrated a clear improvement in patient communication. Feedback from the FY0 students also identified additional learning needs that formed the basis of further teaching.

  12. Prescribing and borderline personality disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanen, Andrew M; Thompson, Katherine N

    2016-01-01

    Summary Accurate diagnosis is fundamental to effective management of borderline personality disorder, but many patients remain undetected. The first-line management for borderline personality disorder is psychosocial treatment, not drugs. There are major prescribing hazards including polypharmacy, overdose and misuse. Drug treatment might be warranted for patients who have a co-occurring mental disorder such as major depression. If a drug is prescribed for borderline personality disorder, it should only be as an adjunct to psychosocial treatment. There should be clear and collaborative goals that are regularly reviewed with the patient. Use single drugs prescribed in limited quantities for a limited time. Stop drugs that are ineffective. PMID:27340322

  13. Prescribed burning: a topical issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bovio G

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Prescribed burning is a promising technique for the prevention of forest fires in Italy. The research deepened several ecological and operative aspects. However, legal issues need to be thoroughly investigated.

  14. Safe prescribing: a titanic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routledge, Philip A

    2012-10-01

    The challenge to achieve safe prescribing merits the adjective 'titanic'. The organisational and human errors leading to poor prescribing (e.g. underprescribing, overprescribing, misprescribing or medication errors) have parallels in the organisational and human errors that led to the loss of the Titanic 100 years ago this year. Prescribing can be adversely affected by communication failures, critical conditions, complacency, corner cutting, callowness and a lack of courage of conviction, all of which were also factors leading to the Titanic tragedy. These issues need to be addressed by a commitment to excellence, the final component of the 'Seven C's'. Optimal prescribing is dependent upon close communication and collaborative working between highly trained health professionals, whose role is to ensure maximum clinical effectiveness, whilst also protecting their patients from avoidable harm. Since humans are prone to error, and the environments in which they work are imperfect, it is not surprising that medication errors are common, occurring more often during the prescribing stage than during dispensing or administration. A commitment to excellence in prescribing includes a continued focus on lifelong learning (including interprofessional learning) in pharmacology and therapeutics. This should be accompanied by improvements in the clinical working environment of prescribers, and the encouragement of a strong safety culture (including reporting of adverse incidents as well as suspected adverse drug reactions whenever appropriate). Finally, members of the clinical team must be prepared to challenge each other, when necessary, to ensure that prescribing combines the highest likelihood of benefit with the lowest potential for harm. © 2012 The Author. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. Methods to reduce prescribing errors in elderly patients with multimorbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavan AH

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Amanda H Lavan, Paul F Gallagher, Denis O’Mahony Department of Geriatric Medicine, Cork University Hospital, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland Abstract: The global population of multimorbid older people is growing steadily. Multimorbidity is the principal cause of complex polypharmacy, which in turn is the prime risk factor for inappropriate prescribing and adverse drug reactions and events. Those who prescribe for older frailer multimorbid people are particularly prone to committing prescribing errors of various kinds. The causes of prescribing errors in this patient population are multifaceted and complex, including prescribers’ lack of knowledge of aging physiology, geriatric medicine, and geriatric pharmacotherapy, overprescribing that frequently leads to major polypharmacy, inappropriate prescribing, and inappropriate drug omission. This review examines the various ways of minimizing prescribing errors in multimorbid older people. The role of education in physician prescribers and clinical pharmacists, the use of implicit and explicit prescribing criteria designed to improve medication appropriateness in older people, and the application of information and communication-technology systems to minimize errors are discussed in detail. Although evidence to support any single intervention to prevent prescribing errors in multimorbid elderly people is inconclusive or lacking, published data support focused prescriber education in geriatric pharmacotherapy, routine application of STOPP/START (screening tool of older people’s prescriptions/screening tool to alert to right treatment criteria for potentially inappropriate prescribing, electronic prescribing, and close liaison between clinical pharmacists and physicians in relation to structured medication review and reconciliation. Carrying out a structured medication review aimed at optimizing pharmacotherapy in this vulnerable patient population presents a major challenge. Another

  16. Crescimento e estado nutricional de crianças e adolescentes de Presidente Prudente, São Paulo, Brasil Growth and nutritional status of children and adolescents in the city of Presidente Prudente, State of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Forte Freitas Júnior

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: avaliar peso, altura, índice de massa corporal (IMC e prevalência de sobrepeso e obesidade de crianças e adolescentes de Presidente Prudente, São Paulo, Brasil. MÉTODOS: foram avaliados 1327 jovens (692 masculino e 635 feminino com idade de 7 a 19 anos. Os dados foram coletados com o mesmo equipamento e seguindo procedimento padrão descrito na literatura. O teste t de Student para variáveis independentes foi utilizado para as comparações entre sexo (pOBJECTIVES: to evaluate the weight, height, and Body Mass Index (BMI of children and adolescents, in addition to the prevalence of overweight and obesity, in the city of Presidente Prudente, State of São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: a sample of 1327 subjects (692 male and 635 female aged 7-19 years were evaluated. The data were collected using the same equipment and following standard procedures described in literature. A Student's t test was used to compare independent variables (p<0.05. Percentiles were calculated using SPSS, version 10.0 and plotted using Minitab, version 14.0. The 85 and 95 percentiles were used for classification of overweight and obesity, and were analysed in relation to two more internationally accepted studies. RESULTS: the weight and height are higher than in other studies carried out in Brazil and similar to those in a number of developed countries. The BMI figures revealed a high prevalence of overweight, and obesity, mainly in the male group between 7 and 10 years. This prevalence was less marked in the female group, especially among adolescents. CONCLUSIONS: the growth of this sample is above that observed in other Brazilian regions, and comparable to some developed countries. However, the BMI indicates a high prevalence of overweight and obesity.

  17. Introduction to prescribed fires in Southern ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas A. Waldrop; Scott L. Goodrick

    2012-01-01

    This publication is a guide for resource managers on planning and executing prescribed burns in Southern forests and grasslands. It includes explanations of reasons for prescribed burning, environmental effects, weather, and techniques as well as general information on prescribed burning.

  18. Inappropriate prescribing in the elderly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, P

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Drug therapy is necessary to treat acute illness, maintain current health and prevent further decline. However, optimizing drug therapy for older patients is challenging and sometimes, drug therapy can do more harm than good. Drug utilization review tools can highlight instances of potentially inappropriate prescribing to those involved in elderly pharmacotherapy, i.e. doctors, nurses and pharmacists. We aim to provide a review of the literature on potentially inappropriate prescribing in the elderly and also to review the explicit criteria that have been designed to detect potentially inappropriate prescribing in the elderly. METHODS: We performed an electronic search of the PUBMED database for articles published between 1991 and 2006 and a manual search through major journals for articles referenced in those located through PUBMED. Search terms were elderly, inappropriate prescribing, prescriptions, prevalence, Beers criteria, health outcomes and Europe. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Prescription of potentially inappropriate medications to older people is highly prevalent in the United States and Europe, ranging from 12% in community-dwelling elderly to 40% in nursing home residents. Inappropriate prescribing is associated with adverse drug events. Limited data exists on health outcomes from use of inappropriate medications. There are no prospective randomized controlled studies that test the tangible clinical benefit to patients of using drug utilization review tools. Existing drug utilization review tools have been designed on the basis of North American and Canadian drug formularies and may not be appropriate for use in European countries because of the differences in national drug formularies and prescribing attitudes. CONCLUSION: Given the high prevalence of inappropriate prescribing despite the widespread use of drug-utilization review tools, prospective randomized controlled trials are necessary to identify useful interventions. Drug

  19. Prescribing tests must have curriculum support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemon TI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Rupali D Shah, Thomas I LemonSchool of Medicine, Cardiff University, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, WalesGordon, Catchpole and Baker1 have discussed and investigated a very interesting, currently relevant, subject in medical education; particularly with the introduction of the prescribing test for undergraduates trialled in the UK this year and set to become a fully-fledged part of the curriculum and assessment criteria for 2014 graduates.2 It would of course be of great interest to compare the themes discussed in this paper and see they how would compare to recent graduates in late 2014.View original paper by Gordon and colleagues.

  20. "Under the radar": nurse practitioner prescribers and pharmaceutical industry promotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, Elissa C; Mahoney, Diane Feeney; Emani, Srinivas

    2010-12-01

    To assess nurse practitioners' interactions with pharmaceutical industry promotional activities and their perception of information reliability and self-reported prescribing behaviors. Self-administered online survey. A nationally randomized sample of nurse practitioner prescribers was surveyed. Eligibility criteria included current clinical practice and licensure to prescribe medications in their state of practice. A total of 263 responses were analyzed. Almost all respondents (96%) reported regular contact with pharmaceutical sales representatives, and most (71%) reported receiving information on new drugs directly from pharmaceutical sales representatives some or most of the time. A large portion (66%) dispensed drug samples regularly to their patients, and 73% believed that samples were somewhat or very helpful in learning about new drugs. Eighty-one percent of respondents thought that it was ethically acceptable to give out samples to anyone, and 90% believed that it was acceptable to attend lunch and dinner events sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry. Almost half (48%) stated that they were more likely to prescribe a drug that was highlighted during a lunch or dinner event. Most respondents stated that it was ethically acceptable for speakers to be paid by industry. Nurse practitioner prescribers had extensive contact with pharmaceutical industry promotional activities such as pharmaceutical representative contact, receipt of drug samples, and regular attendance at industry-sponsored meal events and continuing education programs. They reported that industry interface with nurse practitioner prescribers in the form of sponsored meals, education events, and paid speakers was ethically acceptable.

  1. O Outro na Cidade: Deficiência, Acessibilidade e Saúde em Presidente Prudente-SP | The Other City: Disability, Accessibility and Health en Presidente Prudente-SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Cristina Alves

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false PT-BR X-NONE X-NONE Introdução: O acesso aos serviços de saúde pode ser visto como uma forma de compreensão dos processos de produção e reprodução dos espaços urbanos contemporâneos, especialmente, por que o uso e apropriação da cidade podem revelar inúmeras formas de exclusão e desigualdade social. Tal situação é ainda mais perceptível quando se trata de pessoas com algum tipo de deficiência, que precisam se locomover em busca da saúde pelo espaço urbano. O objetivo desta pesquisa é entender como se concretiza a mobilidade e a acessibilidade do portador de deficiência ao sistema de saúde de Presidente Prudente-SP, de forma a captar as estratégias e os contextos geográficos desses sujeitos. Para tanto, pretendemos discutir e analisar a deficiência do ponto de vista geográfico, além de basear o trabalho através da pesquisa qualitativa a respeito do acesso e acessibilidade tomando como referência a vida cotidiana das pessoas com deficiência(s moradoras de Presidente Prudente-SP. Ao fazermos este recorte temático, pretendemos demonstrar, portanto, que é possível uma compreensão mais clara das desigualdades de saúde-doença no espaço urbano, uma vez que os sujeitos representam e concebem tal espaço, de forma singular. Metodologia/Desenvolvimento: Publicações do Instituto de Geografia e Estatística (IBGE, com dados preliminares da amostra do Censo 2010, revelam que o Brasil conta com um índice de 23,9% de pessoas com deficiência, aproximadamente 45,6 milhões de pessoas. Em Presidente Prudente-SP, o número da população residente que possui alguma deficiência visual, auditiva, motora ou mental/intelectual investigadas, é de 21.4% de seus 207.610 habitantes. Ao fazer o mapeamento das deficiências para Presidente Prudente-SP, constata-se a existência de um maior contingente desta população nas áreas periféricas e longe dos estabelecimentos de saúde da cidade. Tais

  2. Prescribed performance synchronization for fractional-order chaotic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Heng; Li, Sheng-Gang; Sun, Ye-Guo; Wang, Hong-Xing

    2015-09-01

    In this paper the synchronization for two different fractional-order chaotic systems, capable of guaranteeing synchronization error with prescribed performance, is investigated by means of the fractional-order control method. By prescribed performance synchronization we mean that the synchronization error converges to zero asymptotically, with convergence rate being no less than a certain prescribed function. A fractional-order synchronization controller and an adaptive fractional-order synchronization controller, which can guarantee the prescribed performance of the synchronization error, are proposed for fractional-order chaotic systems with and without disturbances, respectively. Finally, our simulation studies verify and clarify the proposed method. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11401243 and 61403157), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Grant No. GK201504002), and the Natural Science Foundation for the Higher Education Institutions of Anhui Province of China (Grant No. KJ2015A256).

  3. Exercise prescription for chronic back or neck pain: who prescribes it? who gets it? What is prescribed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freburger, Janet K; Carey, Timothy S; Holmes, George M; Wallace, Andrea S; Castel, Liana D; Darter, Jane D; Jackman, Anne M

    2009-02-15

    To describe exercise prescription in routine clinical practice for individuals with chronic back or neck pain because, although current practice guidelines promote exercise for chronic back and neck pain, little is known about exercise prescription in routine care. We conducted a computer-assisted telephone survey of a representative sample of individuals (n = 684) with chronic back or neck pain who saw a physician, chiropractor, and/or physical therapist (PT) in the past 12 months. Individuals were asked about whether they were prescribed exercise, the amount of supervision received, and the type, duration, and frequency of the prescribed exercise. Descriptive and multivariable regression analyses were conducted. Of the 684 subjects, 48% were prescribed exercise. Of those prescribed exercise, 46% received the prescription from a PT, 29% from a physician, 21% from a chiropractor, and 4% from other. In multivariable analyses, seeing a PT or a chiropractor were the strongest predictors of exercise prescription. The likelihood of exercise prescription was increased in women, those with higher education, and those receiving worker's compensation. PTs were more likely to provide supervision and prescribe strengthening exercises compared with physicians and chiropractors, and were more likely to prescribe stretching exercises compared with physicians. Our findings suggest that exercise is being underutilized as a treatment for chronic back and neck pain and, to some extent, that the amount of supervision and types of exercises prescribed do not follow current practice guidelines. Exercise prescription provided by PTs appears to be most in line with current guidelines.

  4. Exercise Prescription for Chronic Back or Neck Pain: Who Prescribes It? Who Gets It? What is Prescribed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freburger, Janet K.; Carey, Timothy S.; Holmes, George M.; Wallace, Andrea S.; Castel, Liana D.; Darter, Jane D.; Jackman, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective While current practice guidelines promote exercise for chronic back and neck pain, little is known about exercise prescription in routine care. The objective of this study was to describe exercise prescription in routine clinical practice for individuals with chronic back or neck pain. Methods Computer-assisted telephone survey of a representative sample of individuals with chronic back or neck pain who saw a physician (MD), chiropractor (DC) and/or physical therapist (PT) in the past 12 months (n=684). Individuals were asked whether they were prescribed exercise, the amount of supervision received, and type, duration, and frequency of the prescribed exercise. Descriptive and multivariable regression analyses were conducted. Results 48% of subjects were prescribed exercise. Of those prescribed exercise, 46% received the prescription from a PT, 29% from an MD, 21% from a DC, and 4% from other. In multivariable analyses, seeing a PT or a DC were the strongest predictors of exercise prescription. Being female, more educated, and on worker’s compensation also increased the likelihood of exercise prescription. Relative to MDs and DCs, PTs were more likely to provide supervision and prescribe strengthening exercises. Relative to MDs, PTs were more likely to prescribe stretching exercises. Conclusions Our findings suggest that exercise is being underutilized as a treatment for chronic back and neck pain and, to some extent, that the amount of supervision and types of exercises prescribed do not follow current practice guidelines. Exercise prescription provided by PTs appears to be most in line with current guidelines. PMID:19177524

  5. Patient and prescriber determinants for the choice between amoxicillin and broader-spectrum antibiotics: a nationwide prescription-level analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blommaert, Adriaan; Coenen, Samuel; Gielen, Birgit; Goossens, Herman; Hens, Niel; Beutels, Philippe

    2013-10-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics, driven by antibiotic consumption, imposes a major threat to the effective treatment of bacterial infections. In addition to reducing the amount of antibiotics prescribed, avoiding broad-spectrum antibiotics could extend the lifetime of the current arsenal of antibiotic substances. Therefore, we documented prescriber and patient characteristics associated with the choice between amoxicillin and broader-spectrum alternatives (co-amoxiclav or moxifloxacin) in recent years in Belgium. Complete reimbursement claims data (2002-09) for antibiotic prescriptions in outpatient care, including patient and prescriber characteristics, were collected for both young children (1-5 years) and the adult population (30-60 years). A backwards selection procedure within generalized estimating equations retained the most relevant determinants. The age, gender and social category of the patient were found to be predictive of the extent to which amoxicillin was prescribed instead of the broader-spectrum alternatives, with female patients generally taking a higher proportion of amoxicillin than male patients. The age category of 40-44-year-old prescribers exhibited a preference for broad-spectrum antibiotics compared with both younger and older age groups. Significant interactions between the region and the prescriber's qualification (general practitioner or paediatrician) on the choice of antibiotic for children were found. Patient (age, gender and social category) and prescriber characteristics (age, gender, region and qualification) had an influence on whether amoxicillin or the alternative broad-spectrum antibiotics were prescribed. These findings should help policy makers to better target future campaigns to promote prudent prescribing of antibiotics.

  6. ELECTORAL PRESCRIBERS. WHO ARE THEY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin SASU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The decision to vote and choosing among the candidates is an extremely important one with repercussions on everyday life by determining, in global mode, its quality for the whole society. Therefore the whole process by which the voter decides becomes a central concern. Prescribers, supposed to have a big influence on the electoral market, are a component of the microenvironment political organizations. These are people who occupy important positions that can influence the behavior of others. In the political environment, prescribers are known under the name of "opinion formers", "opinion leaders", "mediators" (Beciu, 2009 or "influencers" (Keller and Berry, 2003 Weimann, 1994. This paper aims to review the central opinions on what is the influence prescribers, opinion makers on voting behavior, voting and decisions on whether and how they act?

  7. A study of antibiotic prescribing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaruseviciene, L.; Radzeviciene-Jurgute, R.; Jurgutis, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Globally, general practitioners (GPs) write more than 90% of all antibiotic prescriptions. This study examines the experiences of Lithuanian and Russian GPs in antibiotic prescription for upper respiratory tract infections, including their perceptions of when it is not indicated...... clinically or pharmacologically. Methods. 22 Lithuanian and 29 Russian GPs participated in five focus group discussions. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Results. We identified four main thematic categories: patients' faith in antibiotics as medication for upper respiratory tract infections......; patient potential to influence a GP's decision to prescribe antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections; impediments perceived by GPs in advocating clinically grounded antibiotic prescribing with their patients, and strategies applied in physician-patient negotiation about antibiotic prescribing...

  8. Factors that influence prescribing decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumock, Glen T; Walton, Surrey M; Park, Hayley Y; Nutescu, Edith A; Blackburn, Juan C; Finley, Jamie M; Lewis, Richard K

    2004-04-01

    Strategies to control the quality and cost of medication use are largely dependent on the ability to alter selection of medications. Previous models of prescribing behavior have focused on physicians. In the hospital setting, clinical pharmacists and formulary committee members are also key players in drug therapy decision-making. Differences between physicians, formulary committee members, and clinical pharmacists have not been compared. Knowledge of these differences could have importance in predicting the effectiveness of strategies designed to influence drug use in this setting. To describe and compare the opinions of physicians, clinical pharmacists, and formulary committee members with respect to key factors that influence medication prescribing in community hospitals. Physicians, clinical pharmacists, and formulary committee members were solicited to participate. A trained interviewer administered a standardized questionnaire designed to elicit opinions of participants regarding the importance of factors thought to influence drug prescribing. Responses were described using descriptive statistics, and differences between the groups were determined by post hoc analysis. A total of 150 individuals participated in the study. Safety, effectiveness, formulary status, and restrictions on prescribing were considered highly influential by all participants. Physicians rated the availability of drug samples and personal experience higher (more influential on prescribing) than clinical pharmacists and formulary committee members. Clinical pharmacists and formulary committee members rated the influence of recommendations by clinical pharmacists, prescribing guidelines, and cost or cost comparisons higher than physicians. Factors that were drug-related or that involved policy-related programs tended to be more influential than indirect factors. Those who seek to implement programs to alter medication use should recognize and employ factors that are most influential in the

  9. To prescribe codeine or not to prescribe codeine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Marc L; Wanat, Matthew A

    2014-09-01

    A recently published study in Pediatrics by Kaiser et al. (2014; Epub April 21, DOI: 10.1542/peds.2013-3171) reported that on average, over the past decade, children aged 3 to 17 were prescribed approximately 700,000 prescriptions for codeine-containing products each year in association with emergency department (ED) visits. Although, guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics issued warnings in 1997 and reaffirmed their concerns regarding the safety and effectiveness of codeine in 2006, it is still often prescribed for pain and cough associated with upper respiratory infection. With the impending rescheduling of hydrocodone combination products to Schedule II, physicians and mid-level prescribers may be compelled to prescribe codeine-containing products (e.g., with acetaminophen) due to reduced administrative burden and limits on Schedule II prescriptive authority for nurse practitioners and physician assistants in some states. This commentary expounds on the safety and effectiveness concerns of codeine, with a primary focus on patients in the ED setting.

  10. Psychologists' right to prescribe – should prescribing privileges be ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Current changes in legislation regarding prescription rights increase the possibility of non-medical practitioners being authorised to presctibe medication. There has been ongoing debate about granting psychologists in South Africa a limited right to prescribe (RTP) psychotropic medication. The main reasons advanced for ...

  11. Las estrategias internacionales y las campañas para promover el uso prudente de los antibióticos en los profesionales y los usuarios

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Campos, José; Pérez-Vázquez, María; Oteo, Jesús

    2010-01-01

    ... Las estrategias internacionales y las campañas para promover el uso prudente de los antibióticos en los profesionales y los usuarios José Campos *, María Pérez-Vázquez y Jesús Oteo Labo...

  12. Nurse prescribing: radicalism or tokenism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney, W; Tyrer, S; Brazier, M; Prayle, D

    1999-02-01

    The creation of The Medical Products (Prescription by Nurses, etc.) Act 1992 has been generally welcomed by the nursing profession. This article seeks to introduce a note of scepticism about the assumed motivations for its introduction through an analysis of various legal, ethical, economic and political dimensions. In reviewing the position of nursing vis-à-vis medicine it is argued that one of the ways that nursing has sought to improve its professional position is to take on work previously done by doctors, and nurse prescribing can be seen in the context of the concurrent de-regulation of medicines, allowing greater access to medicines and therefore greater consumer choice. This de-regulation stems from the liberation ideology of the previous Conservative government. Viewed in this way nurse prescribing, particularly with reference to the limited nature of the nursing formulary, can be seen to be anomalous. In the light of this analysis, the reasons generally put forward (notably in the Crown Report 1989) for the introduction of nurse prescribing could be seen to be peripheral to its real purpose. It is argued that the most convincing reasons for its introduction relate to the medical profession as a social institution. It is proposed that the three primary aims behind the introduction of nurse prescribing are: the saving of money; the transfer of routine medical work to nursing; and a challenge to the professional monolith of medicine.

  13. Automation bias in electronic prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyell, David; Magrabi, Farah; Raban, Magdalena Z; Pont, L G; Baysari, Melissa T; Day, Richard O; Coiera, Enrico

    2017-03-16

    Clinical decision support (CDS) in e-prescribing can improve safety by alerting potential errors, but introduces new sources of risk. Automation bias (AB) occurs when users over-rely on CDS, reducing vigilance in information seeking and processing. Evidence of AB has been found in other clinical tasks, but has not yet been tested with e-prescribing. This study tests for the presence of AB in e-prescribing and the impact of task complexity and interruptions on AB. One hundred and twenty students in the final two years of a medical degree prescribed medicines for nine clinical scenarios using a simulated e-prescribing system. Quality of CDS (correct, incorrect and no CDS) and task complexity (low, low + interruption and high) were varied between conditions. Omission errors (failure to detect prescribing errors) and commission errors (acceptance of false positive alerts) were measured. Compared to scenarios with no CDS, correct CDS reduced omission errors by 38.3% (p < .0001, n = 120), 46.6% (p < .0001, n = 70), and 39.2% (p < .0001, n = 120) for low, low + interrupt and high complexity scenarios respectively. Incorrect CDS increased omission errors by 33.3% (p < .0001, n = 120), 24.5% (p < .009, n = 82), and 26.7% (p < .0001, n = 120). Participants made commission errors, 65.8% (p < .0001, n = 120), 53.5% (p < .0001, n = 82), and 51.7% (p < .0001, n = 120). Task complexity and interruptions had no impact on AB. This study found evidence of AB omission and commission errors in e-prescribing. Verification of CDS alerts is key to avoiding AB errors. However, interventions focused on this have had limited success to date. Clinicians should remain vigilant to the risks of CDS failures and verify CDS.

  14. Prescribing and the core curriculum for tomorrow's doctors: BPS curriculum in clinical pharmacology and prescribing for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Sarah; Maxwell, Simon

    2012-10-01

    Prescribing is one of the commonest tasks expected of new doctors and is a complex process involving a mixture of knowledge, judgement and skills. Preparing graduates to be prescribers is one of the greatest challenges of modern undergraduate medical education and there is some evidence to suggest that training could be improved. The aims of this article are (i) to review some of the challenges of delivering effective prescribing education, (ii) to provide a clear statement of the learning outcomes in clinical pharmacology and prescribing that should be expected of all medical graduates and (iii) to describe a curriculum that might enable students to achieve these outcomes. We build on the previous curriculum recommendations of the British Pharmacological Society and take into account those of other key bodies, notably the General Medical Council. We have also reviewed relevant evidence from the literature and set our work in the context of recent trends in medical education. We divide our recommended learning objectives into four sections: principles of clinical pharmacology, essential drugs, essential therapeutic problems and prescribing skills. Although these will not necessarily be accepted universally we believe that they will help those who design and map undergraduate curricula to explore potential gaps and identify improvements. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. Appropriate prescribing in nursing homes demonstration project (APDP) study protocol: pragmatic, cluster-randomized trial and mixed methods process evaluation of an Ontario policy-maker initiative to improve appropriate prescribing of antipsychotics

    OpenAIRE

    Desveaux, Laura; Gomes, Tara; Tadrous, Mina; Jeffs, Lianne; Taljaard, Monica; Rogers, Jess; Bell, Chaim M.; Ivers, Noah M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Antipsychotic medications are routinely prescribed in nursing homes to address the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. Unfortunately, inappropriate prescribing of antipsychotic medications is common and associated with increased morbidity, adverse drug events, and hospitalizations. Multifaceted interventions can achieve a 12?20?% reduction in antipsychotic prescribing levels in nursing homes. Effective interventions have featured educational outreach and ongoing perf...

  16. Opioid therapy for chronic low back pain: prescribing considerations for advanced practice registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lall, Maureen Patricia

    2014-12-01

    Chronic low back pain is a common, disabling, and costly condition, and advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) must carefully evaluate patients before considering long-term opioid therapy as a management strategy. APRNs should refer patients suspected of having a serious condition, or identifiable etiology, for specialist evaluation, as many patients improve with physical therapy, interventional pain management procedures, or surgical intervention. For patients unresponsive to nonopioid treatment, APRNs with an understanding of opioids, and the experience to assess and manage the risks of opioid misuse, abuse, and diversion, may consider long-term opioid therapy as part of a multimodal management plan. Such prescribing necessitates careful patient selection; informed consent; prudent opioid dosing and titration; and monitoring for response to treatment, adverse effects, and aberrant drug-taking behavior. Treatment and regulatory guidelines can assist APRNs in providing safe and effective care to patients with chronic low back pain.

  17. A review of the factors influencing antimicrobial prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calbo, Esther; Alvarez-Rocha, Luis; Gudiol, Francisco; Pasquau, Juan

    2013-09-01

    There are multiple benefits of appropriate antimicrobial prescribing: it has a direct impact on clinical outcomes, avoids adverse effects, is cost effective and, perhaps most importantly, it helps to prevent the emergence of resistance. However, any physician can prescribe antibiotics, which is not the case with other clinically relevant drugs. There is great variability in the prescribing physician's (PP) training, motivation, workload and setting, including accessibility to infectious diseases consultants and/or diagnostic techniques, and therefore there is a high risk of inappropriate prescription. Many antibiotic prescribing errors occur around the selection and duration of treatment. This includes a low threshold for the indication of antibiotics, delayed initiation of treatment when indicated, limited knowledge of local antimicrobial resistance patterns by the PPs, errors in the final choice of dose, route or drug and a lack of de-escalation. Similarly, the prescription of prophylactic antibiotics to prevent surgical site infections, despite being commonly accepted, is suboptimal. Factors that may explain suboptimal use are related to the absence of well-defined protocols, poor knowledge of prophylactic protocols, miscommunication or disagreement between physicians, logistical problems, and a lack of audits. A proper understanding of the prescribing process can guide interventions to improve the PP's practices. Some of the potential interventions included in a stewardship program are education in antimicrobial prescribing, information on the local resistance patterns and accessibility to a qualified infectious diseases consultant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessment of antibiotic prescribing in Latvian general practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumpis Uga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Though general antibiotic consumption data is available, information on the actual patterns of prescribing antibiotics locally is difficult to obtain. An easy to use methodology was designed to assess ambulatory management of infections by Latvian general practitioners (GPs. Methods GPs were asked to record data in a patient data collection form for every patient that received antibiotics. Study period – (7 days one week in November, 2008. Data recorded included the following details: an antibiotic, the prescribed dose, dosing interval, route of administration combined with the demographic factors of the patient and clinical diagnosis based on a pre-defined list. Results Two hundred forty eight forms out of the 600 (41% were returned by post. Antibiotics were prescribed in 6.4% (1711/26803 of outpatient consultations. In total, 1763 antibiotics were prescribed during the study period. Ninety seven percent of the patients received monotherapy and only 47 (2.7% patients were prescribed two antibiotics. The most commonly prescribed antibiotics were amoxicillin (33.9% of prescribed, amoxicillin/clavulanate (18,7% and clarithromycin (7.6%. The most commonly treated indications were pharyngitis (29.8%, acute bronchitis (25.3% and rhinosinusitis (10.2%. Pneumonia was mostly treated with amoxicillin/clavulanate (25,7%, amoxicillin (15.7% and clarithromycin (19.3%. Conclusions Methodology employed provided useful additional information on ambulatory practice of prescribing antibiotics and could be used in further assessment studies. Educational interventions should be focused on treatment of acute pharyngitis and bronchitis in children and unnecessary use of quinolones in adults for uncomplicated urinary tract infection.

  19. Impact of Centor scores on determining antibiotic prescribing in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Joseph; Ally, Tasneem; Brugha, Rossa

    2017-05-08

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to establish the effect of incorporating Centor scoring into antibiotic prescribing in primary care in London, UK, before and after the introduction of an educational package and prescribing software tool. Design/methodology/approach A quality improvement project with analysis of all sore throat presentations in patients aged 3-14 years, in two phases. Phase 1 (retrospective): 1 January-31 December 2013, followed by an intervention (software tool/education package) and Phase 2 (prospective): 1 March 2014-28 February 2015. Findings In the initial analysis, 162 out of 202 (80.2 per cent) patients were prescribed antibiotics. Following the educational/software intervention, 191 out of 231 (82.7 per cent) patients were prescribed antibiotics ( p=0.56, χ(2) test). The mean Centor score decreased significantly following the education/software intervention (3.1 vs 2.7, plymphadenopathy>fever>absence of cough. Originality/value This is the first time a differential importance given by practitioners on individual Centor criteria has been described. With a low probability of bacterial infection, children with exudate or anterior lymphadenopathy almost always received antibiotics. This is interesting, since studies have previously found that the presence of tonsillar exudate had no significant association with culture-confirmed streptococcal tonsillitis.

  20. Non-medical prescribing versus medical prescribing for acute and chronic disease management in primary and secondary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Greg; George, Johnson; Maclure, Katie; Stewart, Derek

    2016-11-22

    outcomes to a random-effects model where clinical or statistical heterogeneity existed. We included 46 studies (37,337 participants); non-medical prescribing was undertaken by nurses in 26 studies and pharmacists in 20 studies. In 45 studies non-medical prescribing as a component of care was compared with usual care medical prescribing. A further study compared nurse prescribing supported by guidelines with usual nurse prescribing care. No studies were found with non-medical prescribing being undertaken by other health professionals. The education requirement for non-medical prescribing varied with country and location.A meta-analysis of surrogate markers of chronic disease (systolic blood pressure, glycated haemoglobin, and low-density lipoprotein) showed positive intervention group effects. There was a moderate-certainty of evidence for studies of blood pressure at 12 months (mean difference (MD) -5.31 mmHg, 95% confidence interval (CI) -6.46 to -4.16; 12 studies, 4229 participants) and low-density lipoprotein (MD -0.21, 95% CI -0.29 to -0.14; 7 studies, 1469 participants); we downgraded the certainty of evidence from high due to considerations of serious inconsistency (considerable heterogeneity), multifaceted interventions, and variable prescribing autonomy. A high-certainty of evidence existed for comparative studies of glycated haemoglobin management at 12 months (MD -0.62, 95% CI -0.85 to -0.38; 6 studies, 775 participants). While there appeared little difference in medication adherence across studies, a meta-analysis of continuous outcome data from four studies showed an effect favouring patient adherence in the non-medical prescribing group (MD 0.15, 95% CI 0.00 to 0.30; 4 studies, 700 participants). We downgraded the certainty of evidence for adherence to moderate due to the serious risk of performance bias. While little difference was seen in patient-related adverse events between treatment groups, we downgraded the certainty of evidence to low due to

  1. Diophantine approximation in prescribed degree

    OpenAIRE

    Schleischitz, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    We investigate approximation to a given real number by algebraic numbers and algebraic integers of prescribed degree. We deal with both best and uniform approximation, and highlight the similarities and differences compared with the intensely studied problem of approximation by algebraic numbers (and integers) of bounded degree. We establish the answer to a question of Bugeaud concerning approximation to transcendental real numbers by quadratic irrational numbers, and thereby we refine a resu...

  2. Prescribing patterns in premenstrual syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Paul W

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over 300 therapies have been proposed for premenstrual syndrome. To date there has been only one survey conducted in the UK of PMS treatments prescribed by GPs, a questionnaire-based study by the National Association of Premenstrual Syndrome in 1989. Since then, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors have been licensed for severe PMS/PMDD, and governmental recommendations to reduce the dosage of vitamin B6 (the first choice over-the-counter treatment for many women with PMS have been made. This study investigates the annual rates of diagnoses and prescribing patterns for premenstrual syndrome (1993–1998 within a computerised general practitioner database. Methods Retrospective survey of prescribing data for premenstrual syndrome between 1993–1998 using the General Practice Research Database for the West Midlands Region which contains information on 282,600 female patients Results Overall the proportion of women with a prescription-linked diagnosis of premenstrual syndrome has halved over the five years. Progestogens including progesterone were the most commonly recorded treatment for premenstrual syndrome during the whole study period accounting for over 40% of all prescriptions. Selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors accounted for only 2% of the prescriptions in 1993 but rose to over 16% by 1998, becoming the second most commonly recorded treatment. Vitamin B6 accounted for 22% of the prescriptions in 1993 but dropped markedly between 1997 and 1998 to 11%. Conclusions This study shows a yearly decrease in the number of prescriptions linked to diagnoses for premenstrual syndrome. Progestogens including progesterone, is the most widely prescribed treatment for premenstrual syndrome despite the lack of evidence demonstrating their efficacy.

  3. An evaluation of the appropriateness and safety of nurse and midwife prescribing in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Naughton, Corina

    2012-09-19

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical appropriateness and safety of nurse and midwife prescribing practice. BACKGROUND: The number of countries introducing nurse and midwife prescribing is increasing; however, concerns over patient safety remain. DESIGN: A multi-site documentation evaluation was conducted using purposeful and random sampling. The sample included 142 patients\\' records and 208 medications prescribed by 25 Registered Nurse Prescribers. METHODS: Data were extracted from patient and prescription records between March-May 2009. Two expert reviewers applied the modified Medication Appropriate Index tool (8 criteria) to each drug. The percentage of appropriate or inappropriate responses for each criterion was reported. Reviewer concordance was measured using the Cohen\\'s kappa statistic (inter-rater reliability). RESULTS: Nurse or midwife prescribers from eight hospitals working in seventeen different areas of practice were included. The reviewers judged that 95-96% of medicines prescribed were indicated and effective for the diagnosed condition. Criteria relating to dosage, directions, drug-drugs or disease-condition interaction, and duplication of therapy were judged appropriate in 87-92% of prescriptions. Duration of therapy received the lowest value at 76%. Overall, reviewers indicated that between 69 (reviewer 2)-80% (reviewer 1) of prescribing decisions met all eight criteria. CONCLUSION: The majority of nurse and midwife prescribing decisions were deemed safe and clinically appropriate. However, risk of inappropriate prescribing with the potential for drug errors was detected. Continuing education and evaluation of prescribing practice, especially related to drug and condition interactions, is required to maximize appropriate and safe prescribing.

  4. Electromyographic responses to prescribed mastication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemsley, E K; Defernez, M; Sprunt, J C; Smith, A C

    2003-04-01

    The aim was to understand between-volunteer differences in Electromyography (EMG) behaviour during chewing. EMG was used to record the electrical activity of the temporal and masseter muscles of volunteers, who carried out mastication movements by operating calibrated springs held between their incisors. The volunteers coordinated their jaw movements with the signal produced by a metronome, at four rates: 30, 60, 90 and 120 beats per minute (bpm). Raw data were analyzed to examine the distributions of the intervals between chews. For the highest prescribed chew rates, the volunteers' distributions were very similar. The distributions varied most for the 30 bpm data, suggesting that volunteers differed in their ability to carry out and maintain this prescribed chewing pattern. The data were Fourier transformed to give power spectra in the frequency domain. The low frequency (readings from each volunteer clustered together, and the clusters could be largely separated. Such grouping was found irrespective of whether data from each chew rate were analyzed separately or simultaneously. This indicated that within-volunteer variance, arising from the different chew rates as well as between-session variance, is lower than between-volunteer variance; even when individuals are asked to make jaw movements in the same prescribed manner, they can nevertheless be uniquely distinguished by their muscle activity as recorded by EMG.

  5. Safe disposal of prescribed medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, Phillip J; Hussainy, Safeera Y; George, Johnson; Kong, David Cm; Kirkpatrick, Carl Mj

    2015-06-01

    The National Return and Disposal of Unwanted Medicines Program provides a free and safe method for the disposal of unwanted and expired medicines. This stops drugs being dumped in landfill and waterways. An audit showed that over 600 tonnes of medicines are returned through the program. A substantial proportion of these medicines were still within their expiry dates. Salbutamol, insulin and frusemide are the most commonly discarded medicines. More than $2 million of public money is wasted each year. Hoarding and non-adherence to treatment contribute to waste. Health professionals may be able to help minimise waste by informing patients about the importance of completing prescribed courses of treatment, and discouraging them from hoarding medicines after reaching the safety net threshold on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme. Prescribe no more than the required quantity of medicines. When starting a new therapy, prescribe a minimal quantity in case the drug is unsuitable for the patient. Advise patients to return all unwanted medicines to a pharmacy for disposal.

  6. Pill side effects, continuation found similar whether self-prescribed or prescribed by doctor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-09-01

    In developing countries, especially Latin America, women obtain oral contraceptives without a physician's prescription. While these women experience more side effects, they have fewer accidental pregnancies than women who obtain the pills through a physician/prescription. A probability sample of 6692 Colombian women in Bogota were interviewed in 1974. Almost 1 in 20 of all women, and almost 1 in 13 of those married or living in a union, said they began using the pill on their own as their first method of contraception. The characteristics of the women without prescriptions were similar to those with, but self-prescribers were slightly older, had more children, and were less educated. 7 in 10 women of both groups continued pill use for 1 year; about 6 in 10 still used the pill after 2 years. Both groups gave side effects as their reason for discontinuation. The most frequently cited side effect was headache. None of the women reported the more serious complications, thrombophlebitis and thromboembolism. Women who did not begin with medical advice were less likely to seek it when they had side effects attributed to the pill. Half as many self-prescribers (24%), as users with a prescription (46%), reported visiting a private physician about side effects. 11% self-prescribers, compared with 25%, sought other professional help.

  7. Cambios en el uso de la terapia hormonal sustitutiva tras una intervención informativa dirigida a mujeres y prescriptores Changes in the use of hormone replacement therapy after an educational intervention aimed at women and prescribers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Mosquera Tenreiro

    2009-04-01

    from 1996 to 2003 (preintervention period. In 2004 and 2005, annual sales of HRT products and the percentage of women using HRT among the population aged 50-59 years were analyzed. To analyze trends in costs, we used the price of each product in pesetas until 2001 and in euros thereafter. Results: Sales of HRT increased until 2001. Total sales declined by 73.6% between 2001 and 2005. The decrease between 2004 and 2005 (49.1% was twice that observed between 2002 and 2003 (24.5%. An estimated 17.2% of women aged 50-59 years old were using HRT in 1996 compared with 4.1% in 2005. The total pharmaceutical cost related to HRT showed a similar decrease, although sales of Boltin® (tibolone increased by two-fold. Conclusions: Systematic and independent educational interventions aimed at women in the general population and prescribers are both effective and necessary. The HRT epidemic and its health costs, as well as the shift to tibolone prescription and the adverse effects of this drug, should be investigated nationwide.

  8. Características das ilhas de calor em cidades de porte médio: exemplos de Presidente Prudente (Brasil e Rennes (França Caractéristiques des îlots de chaleur urbains dans des villes de taille moyenne: exemples de Presidente Prudente (Brésil et Rennes (France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hervé Quenol

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo analisar e comparar as características térmicas do clima urbano em duas cidades de médio porte: Rennes (França e Presidente Prudente (Brasil, por meio de registros da temperatura do ar (pontos fixos e medidas itinerantes e dados térmicos de superfície obtidos pelo tratamento de imagens do satélite Landsat 7. Verificou-se o aumento das temperaturas, ligeiramente maiores em Rennes, do que em Presidente Prudente e a geração de ilhas de calor urbanas (ICU, decorrentes do processo de urbanização nas duas cidades.Cet article a pour objectif d’étudier les caractéristiques du climat dans deux villes moyennes (Rennes en France et Presidente Prudente au Brésil à partir de trois types de mesures de températures : des mesures réalisées dans des stations fixes, des mesures itinérantes et des données de températures de surface obtenues à partir d’images du satellite Landsat 7. On montre que l’augmentation des températures est légèrement plus importante à Rennes qu’à Presidente Prudente ainsi que le développement d’îlots de chaleur urbains (ICU résultant de l’extension de la tache urbaine des deux agglomérations.This paper aims to analyze and compare thermal characteristics of urban climate of two middle size cities: Rennes (France and Presidente Prudente (Brazil, by registering air temperature  (network pointes and mobile transect and surface data obtained by using Landsat7 satellite thermal images. Results shows that temperature grows faster in Rennes than Presidente Prudente and urban heat island generation (UHI by different cities urbanization processes.

  9. Medicare Provider Data - Part D Prescriber

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Part D Prescriber Public Use File (PUF) provides information on prescription drugs prescribed by individual physicians and other health care providers and paid...

  10. Nurse prescribing as an aspect of future role expansion: the views of Irish clinical nurse specialists.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lockwood, Emily B

    2008-10-01

    AIM: Nurses and midwives are expanding the scope of their professional practice, assuming additional responsibilities including the management and prescribing of medications. The aim of the study was to discover the attitudes of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) in Ireland to nurse prescribing and to examine perceived barriers to engaging in this aspect of future role expansion. BACKGROUND: The expansion of the nursing role in relation to nurse prescribing is an ongoing process and is subject to incremental iterations of legislation and professional policy. Nurse prescribing as an expanded role function has become a reality in many countries. Ireland has addressed the matter in a formal and systematic way through legislation. METHOD: A questionnaire was administered to a sample of 283 CNSs practising in a variety of care settings in Ireland. Attitudes were measured using Likert-type attitudinal scales, designed specifically for the study. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Findings indicate that the majority of clinical nurse specialists were positively disposed toward nurse prescribing as a future role expansion. The fear of litigation was identified as the most significant barrier to nurse prescribing. The majority of respondents equated nurse prescribing with increased autonomy and holistic care. The findings indicate that there is a need for further examination of the educational requirements of the CNS in relation to nurse prescribing. The legislative implications for nurse prescribing and fear of legal consequences need to be considered prior to any implementation of nurse prescribing. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: While senior clinicians are willing to embrace future role expansion in the area of nurse prescribing, their Nurse Managers should recognize that facilitation of nurse prescribing needs to address the legal and educational requirements for such activity. Failure to address these requirements can represent a barrier to role expansion. This paper offers

  11. SHORT COMMUNICATION Availability of prescribed medicines for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    monthly retirement pension. Only 27% (p-value=0.44) of elders received all medicines as per prescription. Majority of elder patients (39.7%) received 50% of prescribed medicines per prescription while 4.1% did not receive any medicine prescribed and only 1.4% received 80% of medicines prescribed. Results show that ...

  12. Reduction in antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections in Swedish primary care- a retrospective study of electronic patient records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrstrup, Mia; Beckman, Anders; Mölstad, Sigvard; Engström, Sven; Lannering, Christina; Melander, Eva; Hedin, Katarina

    2016-11-25

    sinusitis. Continuous evaluation of diagnosis linked prescribing data and feedback to doctors is essential in order to achieve a more prudent antibiotic use.

  13. Strategic opportunities for effective optimal prescribing and medication management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sketris, Ingrid S; Langille Ingram, Ethel M; Lummis, Heather L

    2009-01-01

    Canadians receive over 422 million prescriptions and spend over $26 billion annually on drugs. Yet, we do not systematically capture information on whether the right drugs reach the right people with the intended benefits, while avoiding unintended harm. It is important to identify and understand the effectiveness of approaches used to improve prescribing and medication use. To discuss the medication-use system, identify factors affecting prescribing, and assess effectiveness of interventions. A literature review was conducted using electronic databases, federal agencies', provincial health departments', health service delivery organizations' and Canadian health research organizations' websites, the Internet, and some hand searching. Interventions identified were categorized according to the Effective Practice and Organization of Care Group (EPOC) classification, with effectiveness based on the literature. Factors affecting prescribing relate to the patient and society, medication, prescriber, practice environment and organization, available information and other external factors. Interventions reported as generally effective are multi-faceted interventions, academic detailing, and reminders. Interventions reported as sometimes effective are audit and feedback or physician profiling, local opinion leaders, drug utilization review, and local consensus guidelines. Passive dissemination of educational materials is deemed generally ineffective. No single approach is appropriate for every prescribing problem, health professional prescriber practice or health care setting. Interventions to improve prescribing in community and institutional settings have variable effect sizes. Effectiveness is related to content, delivery mechanisms, intensity, intervention's context, and implementation environment. Even an intervention with a small effect size (research and evaluation is needed to determine how or why the interventions work and identify barriers to effective

  14. Compliance with the prescribed occlusion treatment for amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagge, Aldo; Nelson, Leonard B

    2017-09-01

    The present review article is an update on the current evidence about compliance to the prescribed occlusion treatment for amblyopia. In particular, the authors focus on the predictors and causes of noncompliance and possible interventions to increase it. Compliance with prescribed occlusion treatment is often challenging. Reported rates of compliance range widely from 49% to 87%. Objective monitoring of occlusion has opened up new research opportunities and allow the design of effective therapeutic regimens. Also, predictors and causes of noncompliance have been investigated and their knowledge may help the clinician to improved compliance with prescribed occlusion treatment for amblyopia. Although many of the studies assessing the effectiveness of interventions to increase compliance to patching treatment for amblyopia have many limitations, evidences support that use of educational supports, parents, and patient understanding on the importance of patching and written information should be considered to increase compliance with patching.

  15. Modifications made to the refractive result when prescribing spectacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrynchak, Patricia K; Mittelstaedt, Andrea M; Harris, Joel; Machan, Carolyn M; Irving, Elizabeth L

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how optometric practitioners modify the subjective refractive result when prescribing spectacles. Refractive data were gathered for patient visits at the School of Optometry, University of Waterloo, between January 2007 and January 2008. The entering prescription, subjective refraction, and exiting prescription were analyzed from 5001 records for patients aged ≥ 7 years. The refraction was modified to create the prescription in at least one eye in 45% of cases; specifically, 27% of cases for the sphere power, 18% for the cylinder power, 25% for the cylinder axis, and 21% for the add. Significant differences, defined as ≥ 0.50 D in sphere, cylinder, or add power or a change in axis of 15° for cylinders 2, were made in at least one eye in 17% of cases; specifically 9% of cases for the sphere power, 6% for the cylinder power, 6% for the cylinder axis, and 5% for the add. Spheres were more likely to be modified in the minus direction (weaker plus and stronger minus power) (18 vs. 11%), cylinder powers reduced (14 vs. 5%), and adds increased in power (12 vs. 8%). Modifications to create the exiting prescription were made to be closer or the same as the entering prescription 97% of the time. However, modifications were such that the entering prescription was duplicated exactly only 0.7% of the time. Optometric practitioners routinely modify the subjective refraction to create the prescription. Small modifications are common, whereas larger modifications are used more sparingly. Because there is a significant amount of clinical judgment involved in determining the refractive prescription, reliance on automated or subjective refraction alone would not be prudent.

  16. Oral morphine prescribing practices in severe cancer pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Barathi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nearly one million cancer patients in India need oral morphine for pain relief. Despite doctors prescribing oral morphine in our center, many cancer patients with severe pain found to be not facilitated with adequate pain relief. Aim: This audit was conducted to look at the "oral morphine prescribing practices for severe cancer pain" at a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: Twenty case files of patients, who were admitted with severe cancer pain, and receiving oral morphine were analyzed in pre- and posteducational session. Local standards were set to assess the adequacy of pain relief. Deficiency in achieving analgesia was found in preinterventional audit. A clinical audit was conducted before and after the educational session on oral morphine prescribing. The education for doctors and nurses focused on starting patients on morphine, titration, and administering rescue dose. Then local guidelines on oral morphine prescribing were circulated. And analysis of following factors were done following pre- and posteducational session: Pain intensity at the beginning of treatment, starting dose of morphine, increments in morphine dose, number of rescue doses given, and fall in pain intensity at the end of 1 week. The outcomes were compared with the standards. Results: Preintervention audit showed that only 50% of patients achieved adequate pain relief. Rescue dose was administered in only 20% of patients. While reaudit following the educational session showed that 80% of patients achieved adequate pain relief and 100% received rescue doses. Conclusion: Educational sessions have significant impact on improving oral morphine prescribing practice among doctors and nurses. It was found failing to administer regular as well as rescue doses resulted in inadequate pain relief in patients receiving oral morphine.

  17. General practitioners' experiences and perceptions of benzodiazepine prescribing: systematic review and meta-synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirdifield, Coral; Anthierens, Sibyl; Creupelandt, Hanne; Chipchase, Susan Y; Christiaens, Thierry; Siriwardena, Aloysius Niroshan

    2013-12-13

    Benzodiazepines are often prescribed long-term inappropriately. We aimed to systematically review and meta-synthesise qualitative studies exploring clinicians' experiences and perceptions of benzodiazepine prescribing to build an explanatory model of processes underlying current prescribing practices. We searched seven electronic databases for qualitative studies in Western primary care settings published in a European language between January 1990 and August 2011 analysing GP or practice nurse experiences of benzodiazepine prescribing. We assessed study quality using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme Checklist. We analysed findings using thematic synthesis. We included eight studies from seven countries published between 1993 and 2010. Benzodiazepine prescribing decisions are complex, uncomfortable, and demanding, taken within the constraints of daily general practice. Different GPs varied in the extent to which they were willing to prescribe benzodiazepines, and individual GPs' approaches also varied. GPs were ambivalent in their attitude towards prescribing benzodiazepines and inconsistently applied management strategies for their use. This was due to the changing context of prescribing, differing perceptions of the role and responsibility of the GP, variation in GPs' attitudes to benzodiazepines, perceived lack of alternative treatment options, GPs' perception of patient expectations and the doctor-patient relationship. GPs faced different challenges in managing initiation, continuation and withdrawal of benzodiazepines. We have developed a model which could be used to inform future interventions to improve adherence to benzodiazepine prescribing guidance and improve prescribing through education and training of professionals on benzodiazepine use and withdrawal, greater provision of alternatives to drugs, reflective practice, and better communication with patients.

  18. Prescribing Safety Assessment 2016: Delivery of a national prescribing assessment to 7343 UK final-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Simon R J; Coleman, Jamie J; Bollington, Lynne; Taylor, Celia; Webb, David J

    2017-10-01

    Newly graduated doctors write a large proportion of prescriptions in UK hospitals but recent studies have shown that they frequently make prescribing errors. The prescribing safety assessment (PSA) has been developed as an assessment of competence in relation to prescribing and supervising the use of medicines. This report describes the delivery of the PSA to all UK final-year medical students in 2016 (PSA2016). The PSA is a 2-hour online assessment comprising eight sections which cover various aspects of prescribing defined within the outcomes of undergraduate education identified by the UK General Medical Council. Students sat one of four PSA 'papers', which had been standard-set using a modified Angoff process. A total of 7343 final-year medical students in all 31 UK medical schools sat the PSA. The overall pass rate was 95% with the pass rates for the individual papers ranging from 93 to 97%. The PSA was re-sat by 261 students who had failed and 80% of those candidates passed. The internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) of the four papers ranged from 0.74 to 0.77 (standard error of measurement 4.13-4.24%). There was a statistically significant variation in performance between medical school cohorts (F = 32.6, P medical students were able to meet a prespecified standard of prescribing competence. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Specialist pediatric palliative care prescribing practices: A large 5-year retrospective audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuja Damani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a gradual increasing trend in childhood cancers in India and pediatric palliative care in India is an emerging specialty. Prescribing pain and symptom control drugs in children with cancer requires knowledge of palliative care formulary, dosing schedules, and prescription guidelines. This study is a retrospective audit of prescribing practices of a specialist palliative care service situated in a tertiary cancer center. Methods: A total of 1135 medication records of children receiving specialist pediatric palliative care services were audited for 5 years (2010-2014 to evaluate prescribing practices in children with advanced cancer. Results: A total of 51 types of drugs were prescribed with an average of 4.2 drugs per prescription. 66.9% of the prescriptions had paracetamol, and 33.9% of the prescriptions had morphine. Most common nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs prescribed was ibuprofen (23.9%, and more than 50% of the prescriptions had aperients. The most commonly prescribed aperient was a combination of liquid paraffin and sodium-picosulfate. Dexamethasone was prescribed in 51.9% of patients and in most cases this was part of oral chemotherapy regimen. Generic names in prescription were used only in 33% of cases, and adverse effects of the drugs were documented in only 9% of cases. In 25% of cases, noncompliance to the WHO prescription guidelines was seen, and patient compliance to prescription was seen in 40% of cases. Conclusions: Audit of the prescribing practices in specialist pediatric palliative care service shows that knowledge of pediatric palliative care formulary, rational drug use, dosing, and prescribing guidelines is essential for symptom control in children with advanced life-limiting illness. Noncompliance to WHO prescribing guidelines in one fourth of cases and using nongeneric names in two-thirds of prescription indicates poor prescribing practices and warrants prescriber education. Prescription

  20. Estudo da distribuição dos casos de Diabetes Mellitus em Presidente Prudente – SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. ORTEGA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    As complicações crônicas são as principais responsáveis pela morbimortalidade dos pacientes com Diabetes Mellitus. Sintomas depressivos estão relacionados a um controle glicêmico pior e conseqüente piora na qualidade de vida. O objetivo do presente estudo foi verificar a ocorrência do Diabetes Mellitus em uma Unidade Básica de Saúde do município de Presidente Prudente – SP, em indivíduos cadastrados no Programa Hiper/Dia do Serviço Municipal de Saúde local. Foi realizado um estudo descritivo, no período de outubro de 2003 a julho de 2004. Os dados foram obtidos através dos prontuários e questionário específicos, de 50 portadores de diabetes. A maioria dos pacientes era do sexo feminino, não tinha o ensino fundamental completo e a renda familiar inferior a cinco salários mínimos. A referência de ocorrência de depressão era de 24% e a dieta alimentar nunca era realizada por 76% dos pacientes. O tratamento farmacológico foi prescrito para 82% dos mesmos. Os medicamentos mais utilizados foram os hipoglicemiantes orais. A hemoglobina glicada foi realizada em 68% dos pacientes. Vinte e oito deles, faziam acompanhamento psicológico, representando 56% da amostra. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significante em relação a depressão e adesão ao tratamento (p= 0,40. Verificou-se associação não-significativa entre acompanhamento psicológico e controle glicêmico (p= 0,40, adesão à dieta alimentar (p= 0,37 e prática de atividade física (p= 0,77. Conclui-se que 24% dos pacientes apresentava depressão, a maioria não fazia dieta alimentar e a terapia medicamentosa foi prescrita para 82% deles. Palavras-chave: Diabetes Mellitus; depressão; índice glicêmico.

  1. South African medical students’ perceptions and knowledge about antibiotic resistance and appropriate prescribing: Are we providing adequate training to future prescribers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Wasserman,

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Education of medical students has been identified by the World Health Organization as an important aspect of antibiotic resistance (ABR containment. Surveys from high-income countries consistently reveal that medical students recognise the importance of antibiotic prescribing knowledge, but feel inadequately prepared and require more education on how to make antibiotic choices. The attitudes and knowledge of South African (SA medical students regarding ABR and antibiotic prescribing have never been evaluated. Objective. To evaluate SA medical students’ perceptions, attitudes and knowledge about antibiotic use and resistance, and the perceived quality of education relating to antibiotics and infection. Methods. This was a cross-sectional survey of final-year students at three medical schools, using a 26-item self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaires recorded basic demographic information, perceptions about antibiotic use and ABR, sources, quality, and usefulness of current education about antibiotic use, and questions to evaluate knowledge. Hard-copy surveys were administered during whole-class lectures. Results. A total of 289 of 567 (51% students completed the survey. Ninety-two percent agreed that antibiotics are overused and 87% agreed that resistance is a significant problem in SA – higher proportions than those who thought that antibiotic overuse (63% and resistance (61% are problems in the hospitals where they had worked (p<0.001. Most reported that they would appreciate more education on appropriate use of antibiotics (95%. Only 33% felt confident to prescribe antibiotics, with similar proportions across institutions. Overall, prescribing confidence was associated with the use of antibiotic prescribing guidelines (p=0.003, familiarity with antibiotic stewardship (p=0.012, and more frequent contact with infectious diseases specialists (p<0.001. There was an overall mean correct score of 50% on the knowledge

  2. Perceptions of Private College Teachers of Karachi about the Curriculum Prescribed by Sindh Bureau of Curriculum (BOC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syeda, Talat Jehan

    2015-01-01

    Curriculum at the college level is prescribed at provincial level to ensure a standardized education throughout. A prescribed curriculum aligns educational standards and maintains them to ensure teaching standards. In Pakistan the curriculum for intermediate students at both private and government colleges is designed and proposed by Sindh Bureau…

  3. Prescribing antibiotics in general practice:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Rikke Vognbjerg; Pedersen, Line Bjørnskov; Plejdrup Hansen, Malene

    -2019. The hypotheses and anticipated perspectives will be discussed at the conference. Conclusion This project will contribute with solid knowledge on diagnostic approaches for management of infections in Danish general practice. The results will create a base for targeted interventions aiming to optimize diagnostic......Objectives The majority of antibiotics are prescribed from general practice. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotics increases the risk of development of bacteria resistant to antibiotic treatment. In spite of guidelines aiming to minimize the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics we see an increase....... A questionnaire comprising a discrete choice experiment will allow us to investigate the relative importance of selected factors (e.g. microbiological diagnostics, point-of-care tests, patients' expectations) in the management of infectious diseases. Results This PhD project is scheduled to be carried out in 2016...

  4. Inappropriate prescribing in geriatric patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, Patrick J

    2012-02-03

    Inappropriate prescribing in older people is a common condition associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and financial costs. Medication use increases with age, and this, in conjunction with an increasing disease burden, is associated with adverse drug reactions. This review outlines why older people are more likely to develop adverse drug reactions and how common the problem is. The use of different tools to identify and measure the problem is reviewed. Common syndromes seen in older adults (eg, falling, cognitive impairment, sleep disturbance) are considered, and recent evidence in relation to medication use for these conditions is reviewed. Finally, we present a brief summary of significant developments in the recent literature for those caring for older people.

  5. Antibiotic prescribing for acute bronchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llor, Carl; Bjerrum, Lars

    2016-07-01

    Acute bronchitis is a self-limiting infectious disease characterized by acute cough with or without sputum but without signs of pneumonia. About 90% of cases are caused by viruses. Antibiotics for acute bronchitis have been associated with an approximately half-day reduction in duration of cough. However, at follow-up there are no significant differences in overall clinical improvement inpatients treated with antibiotics compared with those receiving placebo. Despite this, antibiotics are administered to approximately two thirds of these patients. This review discusses the reason for this antibiotic overprescription. Other therapies targeted to control symptoms have also demonstrated a marginal or no effect. Expert commentary: Clinicians should be aware of the marginal effectiveness of antibiotic therapy. Some strategies like the use of rapid tests, delayed prescribing of antibiotics and the use of leaflets for patients have been associated with a reduction of their unnecessary utilization.

  6. Proposals for registered nurse prescribing: perceptions and intentions of nurses working in primary health care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Jill

    2015-12-01

    In 2013, the Nursing Council of New Zealand consulted on a proposal for introduction of registered nurse (RN) prescribing at two levels (specialist and community) within the designated class of prescriber. The proposal builds on the success of the diabetes nurse specialist prescribing project and the experience of other countries where RN prescribing is well established. To describe the views and intentions of nurses who work in primary health care (PHC) settings about the two levels of RN prescribing proposed. The study involved a self-reported survey using a non-probability sample of RNs working in PHC settings (N=305). Quantitative and qualitative data were analysed descriptively. The respondents were experienced nurses. Overall, 82.3% expressed interest in becoming a community nurse prescriber, and 62.6% expressed interest in the specialist prescriber level. RN prescribing was expected to improve efficiency and access to medicines for high-needs populations, clarify accountability and improve nurses' autonomy. The education requirements for the specialist level were viewed as appropriate but too onerous for many. Requirements were viewed as inadequate for the community level. Concerns were raised about funding for education and support for RN prescribing roles. Nurses were positive about the proposals and see a potential to meet significant unmet health need. Nurses are already engaged in the provision of medicines to patients and prescribing authority would ensure they are suitably qualified to engage in these tasks. A clear policy platform will be needed if the proposed levels of RN prescribing are to be successfully implemented.

  7. Rational prescribing for acute bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, K

    1995-07-01

    Acute bronchiolitis is the commonest lower respiratory illness of infancy and early childhood, and it is usually associated with respiratory syncytial virus infection. In the majority of infants, the illness is self-limiting and hence management is directed at maintaining fluid intake, minimal handling and close observation. Children who develop apnoea, fatigue and/or feeding difficulties as well as progressive respiratory distress require hospital admission. Oxygen, intravenous fluids and minimal handling are the pillars of hospital management, and less than 1% of hospitalised infants require additional assisted ventilation. Pharmacological therapy of acute bronchiolitis is contentious. Sympathomimetics are the drugs most frequently used. Inhaled salbutamol (albuterol) has been associated with both positive and negative outcomes. Recent work suggests that nebulised racemic adrenaline (epinephrine) may be helpful in reducing respiratory distress, but further work is needed to confirm this finding. The use of the antiviral drug ribavirin (tribavirin) in acute bronchiolitis remains very contentious. The overwhelming majority of infants do not require the drug and debate remains as to its true effectiveness. The literature tends to support its use in patients with underlying heart or lung disease, but the drug may not be cost effective in this setting. However, the costs of ribavirin therapy could be reduced by the implementation of more rigid treatment guidelines. A reduction in the use of bronchodilators, antibiotics and corticosteroids would help to reduce the overall costs of management. To date, acute bronchiolitis has not lent itself to pharmacological treatment and prescribing should therefore be very strictly audited by clinicians.

  8. Prevalence and Predictors of Inappropriate Medications Prescribing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data analysis involved use of World Health Organization (WHO) prescribing indicators, Updated 2002 Beer's criteria and DRUG-REAX® system software package of MICROMEDEX (R) Healthcare Series to assess the prescribing pattern, identify potentially inappropriate medications and potential drug-drug interactions, ...

  9. Assessment of Rational Prescribing of Antihypertensive Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The study aimed to assess prescribing trends of antihypertensives and proportion of prescriptions containing irrational combinations of antihypertensives and co-prescribed drugs. Methods: Five hundred and fifty four prescriptions, containing antihypertensives, were collected prospectively over a period of twelve ...

  10. PRESCRIBING PATTERN OF NON-STEROIDAL ANTI ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-03-01

    Mar 1, 2015 ... and avoidance of drug interactions and contraindica- tions, there is obvious need for interventional measures or strategies to improve rational prescribing for some of the prescribers tailored towards rational prescription and use of drugs. Keywords: NSAID, Prescription, Outpatient, Adverse reaction, Aspirin.

  11. Cost Evaluation of Commonly Prescribed Antihypertensive Drugs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cost Evaluation of Commonly Prescribed Antihypertensive Drugs and the Pattern of Prescription among Doctors in the Lagos University Teaching Hospital. ... It was concluded that the prescribing of the new generation drugs i.e. Calcium channel blockers, ACE inhibitors with supposedly little or no metabolic side effects is a ...

  12. Medication prescribing practices of healthcare professionals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drug prescribing patterns of healthcare workers, including medical officers, nurses, and community health officers were assessed. Data were analyzed using WHO's drug use indicators, including average number of drugs per encounter, percentage of (drugs prescribed by generic name, encounter with an antibiotic ...

  13. Prevalence of indeterminate human immunodeficiency virus western blot results in pregnant women attended at a public hospital in Presidente Prudente, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremonezi, Denise; Mesquita, Paulo Eduardo de; Romão, Marisa Menezes; Prestes-Carneiro, Luiz Euribel

    2005-12-01

    The AIDS epidemic is spreading rapidly among women worldwide, offering increasing opportunities for vertical transmission of HIV. In Brazil, the prevalence of HIV infection among pregnant women is less than 1%. Therefore, the positive predictive value of an HIV EIA test tends to be lower than the more frequent indeterminate Western blot result. Pregnant women receiving antenatal care, from 2000 to 2004, at a public secondary hospital in the city of Presidente Prudente, São Paulo, Brazil, were systematically screened for HIV by means of two distinct EIA tests, in order to determine the prevalence of indeterminate Western blot results among pregnant women showing discordance in both HIV EIA tests and indirect immunofluorescence assay. Confirmatory indirect immunofluorescence was performed on material for all women with positive results in both EIA tests. Whenever there were positive results in EIA and IIA, the applicant was retested by the initial screening assay. Only those not showing concordance in results in EIA and IAA had a Western blot performed. The viral load was measured in pregnant women with positive or indeterminate Western blot results. Out of 9,786 sera, 105 (1.0%) were positive in the two HIV EIA screening tests, confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence. Among these women, Western blot was interpreted as indeterminate in 11 (0.1%) cases and their viral load was HIV indeterminate Western blots in pregnant women from Presidente Prudente and the surrounding region; none of these pregnant women had positive HIV viral loads.

  14. A INSERÇÃO DA ARQUITETURA MODERNA PAULISTA NO CENTRO HISTÓRICO DE PRESIDENTE PRUDENTE: O PAÇO MUNICIPAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geovana Gea Nogueira

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This research is part of a project under development in Urban Planning and Environment Department of the Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia (FCT of Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP, Campus of Presidente Prudente, named: "persistence in the urban space of the buildings of the Decade of 1940 in Presidente Prudente SP". This research develops the architectural inventory of old and new Municipal Palace. The first building of the Decade of 1940 with features of Art Deco, was replaced in the late 1960 by another modernist construction by Jorge Wilson, architect with strong influences from the work of Vilanova Artigas, master of modern architecture in São Paulo. The modernist building is of interest of preservation, as demonstrated by academic theses. Through the analysis of historical documentations, metric-lifting documentary, architectural conservation status, current photographic documentation and on-the-spot visits have allowed verification of designs designed and their social-spatial appropriation, in order to relate them with the theory of restoration to indicate the guidelines for the protection in their current urban context.

  15. Effect of a course-based intervention and effect of medical regulation on physicians’ opioid prescribing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, Meldon; Gomes, Tara; Juurlink, David N.; Manno, Michael; Wilson, Lynn; Mailis-Gagnon, Angela; Srivastava, Anita; Reardon, Rhoda; Dhalla, Irfan A.; Mamdani, Muhammad M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine the effects of an intensive 2-day course on physicians’ prescribing of opioids. Design Population-based retrospective observational study. Setting College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario (CPSO) in Toronto. Participants Ontario physicians who took the course between April 1, 2000, and May 30, 2008. Intervention A 2-day opioid-prescribing course with a maximum of 12 physician participants. Educational methods included didactic presentations, case discussions, and standardized patients. A detailed syllabus and office materials were provided. Main outcome measures Participants were matched with control physicians using specific variables. The primary outcome was the rate of opioid prescribing, expressed as milligrams of morphine equivalent per quarter. Results One hundred thirty-eight course participants (120 family physicians, 15 specialists, and 3 physicians whose status was uncertain) were eligible for analysis. Of these, 68.1% were self-referred and 31.9% were referred by the CPSO. Overall, among physicians referred by the CPSO, the rate of opioid prescribing decreased dramatically in the year before course participation compared with matched control physicians. The course had no added effect on the rate of physicians’ opioid prescribing in the subsequent 2 years. There was no statistically significant effect on the rate of opioid prescribing observed among the self-referred physicians. Among 15 of the self-referred physicians who, owing to the high quantities of opioids they prescribed, were not matched with control physicians, the rate of opioid prescribing decreased by 43.9% in the year following course completion. Conclusion Physicians markedly reduced the quantities of opioids they prescribed after medical regulators referred them to an opioid-prescribing course. The course itself did not lead to significant additional reductions; however, a subgroup of physicians who prescribed high quantities of opioids might have

  16. Continuing professional development needs of nursing and allied health professionals with responsibility for prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weglicki, Robert S; Reynolds, Julie; Rivers, Peter H

    2015-01-01

    Continuing professional development (CPD) for non-medical prescribers is recognised as being pivotal in maintaining up -to -date knowledge and skills influencing prescribing competence. This study was, therefore, designed to ascertain the aspirations, priorities and preferred mode of CPD for non-medical prescribers. Qualitative data were derived from semi-structured in-depth interviews and a focus group given by 16 allied health professionals working in primary and secondary care settings. A topic guide was used to cover clinical decision-making (including difficult decisions), legal aspects of prescribing and diagnostic issues. A content analysis of the verbatim transcripts enabled four key emerging themes to be identified, thus offering a basis for developing a greater understanding of the CPD needs of non-medical prescribers. The four key emerging themes identified are the following: Theme 1: "Personal anxiety undermining confidence to prescribe", Theme 2: "External barriers and other factors that exacerbate anxiety", Theme 3: "Need for support identified through coping strategies", and Theme 4: "Preferred mode or style of learning". The findings suggest that anxiety and lack of confidence in non-medical prescribing pose a significant challenge for CPD. Strategies that are most likely to improve prescribing confidence are through a blended learning approach. Local higher education and workplace employer collaboration is an appropriate step forward to achieve this. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Pediatricians' beliefs and prescribing patterns of adolescent contraception: a provider survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, K J; Gossett, D R; Fournier, M

    2013-12-01

    Teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection (STI) rates continue to be significant public health problems in the United States. While general pediatricians are in a unique position to improve these issues by addressing contraception with their adolescent patients, there are no data describing their current prescribing patterns. This study sought to elucidate the beliefs and prescribing patterns of general pediatricians and pediatrics residents and to distinguish whether these were affected by practice setting, level of training, or gender. General pediatricians and pediatrics residents affiliated with Lurie Children's Hospital in Chicago, IL, were asked to complete a survey regarding adolescent contraception. Questions were related to obtaining information about contraception, contraceptive counseling, knowledge of contraceptive methods, prescribing patterns of contraceptives, and concerns about individual contraceptive methods. 120 physicians of an eligible 411 physicians participated in this study (29%). 79% of participants had prescribed at least 1 contraceptive method. The most commonly prescribed method was oral contraceptive pills at 72%. We noted few differences in prescribing patterns based on above criteria. Numerous misconceptions existed among participants, including a high rate of concern about infertility with IUD use (29% among physicians who prescribed at least 1 method of contraception). General pediatricians can improve their rates of prescribing contraception to adolescents, and could utilize more of the approved methods. One way to do so may be to implement educational interventions among general pediatricians. Copyright © 2013 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Antibiotic prescribing practices by dentists: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najla Saeed Dar-Odeh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Najla Saeed Dar-Odeh1, Osama Abdalla Abu-Hammad1, Mahmoud Khaled Al-Omiri1, Ameen Sameh Khraisat1, Asem Ata Shehabi21Faculty of Dentistry, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan; 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Jordan, Amman, JordanAbstract: Antibiotics are prescribed by dentists for treatment as well as prevention of infection. Indications for the use of systemic antibiotics in dentistry are limited, since most dental and periodontal diseases are best managed by operative intervention and oral hygiene measures. However, the literature provides evidence of inadequate prescribing practices by dentists, due to a number of factors ranging from inadequate knowledge to social factors. Here we review studies that investigated the pattern of antibiotic use by dentists worldwide. The main defects in the knowledge of antibiotic prescribing are outlined. The main conclusion is that, unfortunately, the prescribing practices of dentists are inadequate and this is manifested by over-prescribing. Recommendations to improve antibiotic prescribing practices are presented in an attempt to curb the increasing incidence of antibiotic resistance and other side effects of antibiotic abuse.Keywords: over-prescribing, antimicrobial resistance, recommended practice, penicillin

  19. Prescribing Errors Involving Medication Dosage Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesar, Timothy S

    2002-01-01

    CONTEXT Prescribing errors involving medication dose formulations have been reported to occur frequently in hospitals. No systematic evaluations of the characteristics of errors related to medication dosage formulation have been performed. OBJECTIVE To quantify the characteristics, frequency, and potential adverse patient effects of prescribing errors involving medication dosage forms . DESIGN Evaluation of all detected medication prescribing errors involving or related to medication dosage forms in a 631-bed tertiary care teaching hospital. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Type, frequency, and potential for adverse effects of prescribing errors involving or related to medication dosage forms. RESULTS A total of 1,115 clinically significant prescribing errors involving medication dosage forms were detected during the 60-month study period. The annual number of detected errors increased throughout the study period. Detailed analysis of the 402 errors detected during the last 16 months of the study demonstrated the most common errors to be: failure to specify controlled release formulation (total of 280 cases; 69.7%) both when prescribing using the brand name (148 cases; 36.8%) and when prescribing using the generic name (132 cases; 32.8%); and prescribing controlled delivery formulations to be administered per tube (48 cases; 11.9%). The potential for adverse patient outcome was rated as potentially “fatal or severe” in 3 cases (0.7%), and “serious” in 49 cases (12.2%). Errors most commonly involved cardiovascular agents (208 cases; 51.7%). CONCLUSIONS Hospitalized patients are at risk for adverse outcomes due to prescribing errors related to inappropriate use of medication dosage forms. This information should be considered in the development of strategies to prevent adverse patient outcomes resulting from such errors. PMID:12213138

  20. Preparing to prescribe: How do clerkship students learn in the midst of complexity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Lucy; Yardley, Sarah; Norris, Ben; de Bruin, Anique; Tully, Mary P; Dornan, Tim

    2015-12-01

    Prescribing tasks, which involve pharmacological knowledge, clinical decision-making and practical skill, take place within unpredictable social environments and involve interactions within and between endlessly changing health care teams. Despite this, curriculum designers commonly assume them to be simple to learn and perform. This research used mixed methods to explore how undergraduate medical students learn to prescribe in the 'real world'. It was informed by cognitive psychology, sociocultural theory, and systems thinking. We found that learning to prescribe occurs as a dynamic series of socially negotiated interactions within and between individuals, communities and environments. As well as a thematic analysis, we developed a framework of three conceptual spaces in which learning opportunities for prescribing occur. This illustrates a complex systems view of prescribing education and defines three major system components: the "social space", where the environmental conditions influence or bring about a learning experience; the "process space", describing what happens during the learning experience; and the intra-personal "cognitive space", where the learner may develop aspects of prescribing expertise. This conceptualisation broadens the scope of inquiry of prescribing education research by highlighting the complex interplay between individual and social dimensions of learning. This perspective is also likely to be relevant to students' learning of other clinical competencies.

  1. Nurse practitioner prescribing: an international perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong J

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Jacqueline Fong,1,2 Thomas Buckley,2 Andrew Cashin3 1St George Hospital, Kogarah, 2Sydney Nursing School, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia; 3School of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW, Australia Background: Internationally, the delivery of care provided by nurses and midwives has undergone a significant change due to a variety of interrelated factors, including economic circumstances, a diminishing number of medical providers, the unavailability of adequate health care services in underserved and rural areas, and growing specialization among the professions. One solution to the challenges of care delivery has been the introduction of nurse practitioners (NPs and the authorization of NPs to prescribe medicines. Aim: The aim of this paper was to review the current international literature related to NP prescribing and compare the findings to the Australian context. The review focuses on literature from the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. Methods: Databases were searched from January 2000 to January 2015. The following keywords: “nurse practitioner”, “advanced nurse”, “advanced practice nurse”, “prescri*”, “Australia”, “United States America”, “UK”, “New Zealand”, “Canada”, “Europe”, “drug prescri*”, “prescri* authority”, and “prescri* legislation” were used. Findings: NPs tend to prescribe in differing contexts of practice to provide care in underserved populations and require good systems literacy to practice across complex systems. The key themes identified internationally related to NP prescribing relate to barriers to prescribing, confidence in prescribing, and the unique role of NPs in prescribing medicines, eg, the high prevalence of prescribing pain medicines in several countries, including Australia. Conclusion: Across all countries reviewed, there appears a need for further research into the organizational and

  2. The Ontario printed educational message (OPEM trial to narrow the evidence-practice gap with respect to prescribing practices of general and family physicians: a cluster randomized controlled trial, targeting the care of individuals with diabetes and hypertension in Ontario, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimshaw Jeremy

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are gaps between what family practitioners do in clinical practice and the evidence-based ideal. The most commonly used strategy to narrow these gaps is the printed educational message (PEM; however, the attributes of successful printed educational messages and their overall effectiveness in changing physician practice are not clear. The current endeavor aims to determine whether such messages change prescribing quality in primary care practice, and whether these effects differ with the format of the message. Methods/design The design is a large, simple, factorial, unblinded cluster-randomized controlled trial. PEMs will be distributed with informed, a quarterly evidence-based synopsis of current clinical information produced by the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Canada, and will be sent to all eligible general and family practitioners in Ontario. There will be three replicates of the trial, with three different educational messages, each aimed at narrowing a specific evidence-practice gap as follows: 1 angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, hypertension treatment, and cholesterol lowering agents for diabetes; 2 retinal screening for diabetes; and 3 diuretics for hypertension. For each of the three replicates there will be three intervention groups. The first group will receive informed with an attached postcard-sized, short, directive "outsert." The second intervention group will receive informed with a two-page explanatory "insert" on the same topic. The third intervention group will receive informed, with both the above-mentioned outsert and insert. The control group will receive informed only, without either an outsert or insert. Routinely collected physician billing, prescription, and hospital data found in Ontario's administrative databases will be used to monitor pre-defined prescribing changes relevant and specific to each replicate, following delivery of the educational messages. Multi

  3. Understanding the determinants of antimicrobial prescribing within hospitals: the role of "prescribing etiquette".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charani, E; Castro-Sanchez, E; Sevdalis, N; Kyratsis, Y; Drumright, L; Shah, N; Holmes, A

    2013-07-01

    There is limited knowledge of the key determinants of antimicrobial prescribing behavior (APB) in hospitals. An understanding of these determinants is required for the successful design, adoption, and implementation of quality improvement interventions in antimicrobial stewardship programs. Qualitative semistructured interviews were conducted with doctors (n = 10), pharmacists (n = 10), and nurses and midwives (n = 19) in 4 hospitals in London. Interviews were conducted until thematic saturation was reached. Thematic analysis was applied to the data to identify the key determinants of antimicrobial prescribing behaviors. The APB of healthcare professionals is governed by a set of cultural rules. Antimicrobial prescribing is performed in an environment where the behavior of clinical leaders or seniors influences practice of junior doctors. Senior doctors consider themselves exempt from following policy and practice within a culture of perceived autonomous decision making that relies more on personal knowledge and experience than formal policy. Prescribers identify with the clinical groups in which they work and adjust their APB according to the prevailing practice within these groups. A culture of "noninterference" in the antimicrobial prescribing practice of peers prevents intervention into prescribing of colleagues. These sets of cultural rules demonstrate the existence of a "prescribing etiquette," which dominates the APB of healthcare professionals. Prescribing etiquette creates an environment in which professional hierarchy and clinical groups act as key determinants of APB. To influence the antimicrobial prescribing of individual healthcare professionals, interventions need to address prescribing etiquette and use clinical leadership within existing clinical groups to influence practice.

  4. Seasonality and physician-related factors associated with antibiotic prescribing: A cross-sectional study in Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Safaeian

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: These findings showed the widespread use of antibiotics by general practitioners that was associated with the physicians′ gender, time since graduation and practice location and also season of prescribing. More researches are needed on other factors related to the overprescribing of antibiotics and they could be used to project educational programs for improvement of antibiotic prescribing quality in our country.

  5. Medicare Part D Prescriber Interactive Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has prepared a public data set, the Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data - Part D Prescriber Public...

  6. Prescribed fire monitoring protocol : Medicine Lake NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Initial Survey Instructions for prescribed fire monitoring at Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge. Instructions contain methods on data collection, an equipment...

  7. Efficacy of aerobic exercise and a prudent diet for improving selected lipids and lipoproteins in adults: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Susan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies addressing the effects of aerobic exercise and a prudent diet on lipid and lipoprotein concentrations in adults have reached conflicting conclusions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of aerobic exercise combined with a prudent diet on lipid and lipoprotein concentrations in adults. Methods Studies were located by searching nine electronic databases, cross-referencing, and expert review. Two independent reviewers selected studies that met the following criteria: (1 randomized controlled trials, (2 aerobic exercise combined with diet recommendations (saturated/trans fat intake less than 10% of total calories and cholesterol less than 300 mg/day and/or fiber intake ≥25 g/day in women and ≥35 grams per day in men, (3 intervention ≥4 weeks, (4 humans ≥18 years of age, (5 published studies, including dissertations and Master's theses, (6 studies published in any language, (7 studies published between January 1, 1955 and May 1, 2009, (8 assessment of one or more of the following lipid and lipoprotein concentrations: total cholesterol (TC, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, ratio of TC to HDL-C, non-HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C and triglycerides (TG. Two reviewers independently extracted all data. Random-effects models that account for heterogeneity and 95% confidence intervals were used to pool findings. Results Of the 1,401 citations reviewed, six studies representing 16 groups (8 intervention, 8 control and up to 559 men and women (282 intervention, 277 control met the criteria for analysis. Statistically significant intervention minus control reductions were found for TC (-15.5 mg/dl, 95% CI, -20.3 to -10.7, TC:HDL-C (-0.4 mg/dl, 95% CI, -0.7 to -0.2, LDL-C (-9.2 mg/dl, 95% CI, -12.7 to -5.8 and TG (-10.6 mg/dl, 95% CI, -17.2 to -4.0 but not HDL-C (-0.5 mg/dl, 95% CI, -4.0 to 3.1. Changes were equivalent to reductions of 7.5%, 6.6%, 7.2% and 18.2% respectively

  8. Drug prescribing practices for tuberculosis in Uzbekistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasker, E; Khodjikhanov, M; Usarova, S; Asamidinov, U; Yuldashova, U; van der Werf, M J; Uzakova, G; Veen, J

    2009-11-01

    Uzbekistan has had 100% DOTS coverage since 2005; however, the treatment success rate has remained at around 80% for the last 4 years. Surveys from the capital city of Tashkent and from western Uzbekistan have shown high levels of primary multidrug resistance. To assess treatment regimens prescribed for new cases of tuberculosis (TB), including the prescription of additional non-TB drugs, and the cost implications for the patient. We randomly sampled 30 clusters of seven new TB patients. Enrolled patients were interviewed and their medical records were reviewed. In general, the treatment regimens prescribed were correct; doses were high rather than low. Second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs were rarely prescribed. In addition to anti-tuberculosis drugs, patients were prescribed on average seven to eight non-TB drugs. The rationale for prescribing the non-TB drugs was, however, questionable. Patients incurred substantial costs for these drugs, some of which were not without risk. Prescriptions of anti-tuberculosis drugs for new TB patients are adequate; however, the practice of prescribing additional non-TB drugs needs to be reconsidered.

  9. General practitioners’ experiences and perceptions of benzodiazepine prescribing: systematic review and meta-synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Benzodiazepines are often prescribed long-term inappropriately. We aimed to systematically review and meta-synthesise qualitative studies exploring clinicians’ experiences and perceptions of benzodiazepine prescribing to build an explanatory model of processes underlying current prescribing practices. Methods We searched seven electronic databases for qualitative studies in Western primary care settings published in a European language between January 1990 and August 2011 analysing GP or practice nurse experiences of benzodiazepine prescribing. We assessed study quality using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme Checklist. We analysed findings using thematic synthesis. Results We included eight studies from seven countries published between 1993 and 2010. Benzodiazepine prescribing decisions are complex, uncomfortable, and demanding, taken within the constraints of daily general practice. Different GPs varied in the extent to which they were willing to prescribe benzodiazepines, and individual GPs’ approaches also varied. GPs were ambivalent in their attitude towards prescribing benzodiazepines and inconsistently applied management strategies for their use. This was due to the changing context of prescribing, differing perceptions of the role and responsibility of the GP, variation in GPs’ attitudes to benzodiazepines, perceived lack of alternative treatment options, GPs’ perception of patient expectations and the doctor-patient relationship. GPs faced different challenges in managing initiation, continuation and withdrawal of benzodiazepines. Conclusion We have developed a model which could be used to inform future interventions to improve adherence to benzodiazepine prescribing guidance and improve prescribing through education and training of professionals on benzodiazepine use and withdrawal, greater provision of alternatives to drugs, reflective practice, and better communication with patients. PMID:24330388

  10. Episódio de onda de frio em cidade de clima tropical: estudo de caso de Presidente Prudente, São Paulo (Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiago Barbosa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Presidente Prudente localiza-se no oeste do Estado de São Paulo (Sudeste do Brasil, região de confronto entre os sistemas atmosféricos tropicais e extratropicais. A cidade é conhecida como uma das mais quentes do Estado de São Paulo, devido ao registro de altas temperaturas em boa parte do ano. O objetivo do presente artigo foi o de analisar um episódio de onda de frio, que ocorreu entre os dias 12 a 18 de julho do ano de 2000 e trouxe diversas consequências para a população prudentina, ou seja, esses dias com temperaturas baixas propiciaram impactos na agricultura, no comércio e na saúde das pessoas.

  11. COMPREENSÃO E DISCUSSÃO DA TEMÁTICA SUSTENTABILIDADE: UMA REFLEXÃO A CERCA DA ATIVIDADE VAREJISTA NO MUNICÍPIO DE PRESIDENTE PRUDENTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Dias Firmino

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study it searched to present the analysis and discussion of as the great retail nets and wholesale situated in the city of Presidente Prudente they incorporate the sustainability in its strategies and which the relation of this incorporation with the social and enterprise responsibility of these companies. The employed methodology is about a exploratory, descriptive and analytical research, that used the research of field guided in the compilation of the sustainable products that three great retail nets possess in its portfolio. Finally, it stayed evident that the mobilization aiming at sustainable aspects is far from being the ideal. The net with bigger comprehensiveness of sustainable products has 64% approximately more item that the net with little products. A high number that is not perceivable to the consumer due to lack of prominence to these products, not bringing good results to the retailer.

  12. Casos autóctones de Fasciola hepatica na região de Presidente Prudente, São Paulo, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tostes Raimundo Alberto

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho descreve, a partir da condenação de fígado de bovinos em matadouro, a ocorrência de fasciolose em uma propriedade na região de Presidente Prudente, São Paulo, com a confirmação de ovos de Fasciola hepatica em exame coproparasitológico e a presença de caramujos do gênero Lymnaea. Observou-se que a propriedade ofereceu condições favoráveis ao desenvolvimento do hospedeiro intermediário do parasito e ao surgimento de casos autóctones na região. A verificação desses casos deve servir de alerta para as potenciais perdas econômicas advindas desse tipo de parasitismo.

  13. Luta pela terra e as confluências geográficas entre cidade e campo em Presidente Prudente (SP-BR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Vitor Ramos Silva

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Se a fronteira, na Geografia, por muito tempo conceituou-se como “separação”, este texto pretende entendê-la como espaço de “confluências”. Analisando o processo de luta pela terra no Pontal do Paranapanema (região oeste do estado de São Paulo, Brasil, mais especificamente o fluxo de trabalhadores da cidade de Presidente Prudente (SP em direção aos acampamentos da região, conclui-se que a separação não explica a coesão social existente entre esses dois espaços (cidade e campo. A metodologia utilizada mesclou a coleta de dados quantitativos com a realização de trabalhos de campo aos bairros estudados e aos acampamentos, com o uso de entrevistas semiestruturadas.

  14. A cross-sectional survey on the attitudes and interests of rural population towards expanded pharmacist prescribing in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Umair; Arief, Mohammad; Ahmad, Akram; Malik, Sadiqa; Gogoi, Lakhya Jyoti; Kalita, Manabendra; Saleem, Fahad; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad

    2017-04-01

    Background Shortage of qualified medical doctors and little or no access to basic medicines and medical facilities are the major rural health concerns in India. Expanding the role of pharmacists to provide prescribing services could improve rural health outcomes. Objective To assess the attitudes of rural population towards pharmacist prescribing and their interest in using expanded pharmacist prescribing services. Setting Rural population of Assam, India. Methods A descriptive, cross-sectional survey was conducted for a period of 2 months from March to April 2016 in the State of Assam, India. A multi-stage sampling was used to recruit (n = 410) eligible participants. Main outcome measure Rural population attitudes towards, and interests in using, pharmacist prescribing services. Results The attitudes of participants were generally positive towards pharmacist prescribing. A large proportion of participants (81.5%) agreed that pharmacists should have a prescribing role in rural India. Participants indicated their interest in using expanded pharmacist prescribing services, with greater interests in receiving medications in emergency situations (79.7%) and getting a treatment plan for their medical problem (75.6%). Participants with low income and tertiary education had better attitudes and showed more interest towards expanded pharmacist prescribing services (p < 0.05). Conclusions Most participants had positive attitudes towards pharmacist prescribing and were interested in using expanded pharmacist prescribing services.

  15. Nurse prescribing in Spain: The law and the curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Collado, Angel; Raurell-Torreda, Marta; Zabaleta-Del-Olmo, Edurne; Rascon-Hernan, Carolina; Homs-Romero, Erica

    2017-09-01

    In this cross-sectional study, we explored course content related to pharmacology and/or healthcare products and supplies in all nursing degree programs in Spain. Changes in nurse-prescribing legislation in Spain require that nurses take a certification course before prescribing over-the-counter products and medications. Using a cross-sectional descriptive study, between July and September 2014, the degree programs of all centers that offer a degree in nursing in Spain were examined, selecting those with course information available online. All centers offered at least one pharmacology course. One-third of the required courses had content related to pharmacology and healthcare products/supplies. The analysis showed that the course content and training received during the current nursing degree program provides the knowledge and skills needed to prescribe healthcare products/supplies and medications that do not now require a doctor's prescription, without the need for additional training and certification. It is essential that government regulation of nursing education be aligned with nursing competencies, curriculum standards, clinical practice, and evidence-based research to provide the maximum level of confidence for nursing professionals and their patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Prevalence of indeterminate human immunodeficiency virus western blot results in pregnant women attended at a public hospital in Presidente Prudente, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Cremonezi

    Full Text Available The AIDS epidemic is spreading rapidly among women worldwide, offering increasing opportunities for vertical transmission of HIV. In Brazil, the prevalence of HIV infection among pregnant women is less than 1%. Therefore, the positive predictive value of an HIV EIA test tends to be lower than the more frequent indeterminate Western blot result. Pregnant women receiving antenatal care, from 2000 to 2004, at a public secondary hospital in the city of Presidente Prudente, São Paulo, Brazil, were systematically screened for HIV by means of two distinct EIA tests, in order to determine the prevalence of indeterminate Western blot results among pregnant women showing discordance in both HIV EIA tests and indirect immunofluorescence assay. Confirmatory indirect immunofluorescence was performed on material for all women with positive results in both EIA tests. Whenever there were positive results in EIA and IIA, the applicant was retested by the initial screening assay. Only those not showing concordance in results in EIA and IAA had a Western blot performed. The viral load was measured in pregnant women with positive or indeterminate Western blot results. Out of 9,786 sera, 105 (1.0% were positive in the two HIV EIA screening tests, confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence. Among these women, Western blot was interpreted as indeterminate in 11 (0.1% cases and their viral load was <50 copies/mL. We found a prevalence of 0.1% HIV indeterminate Western blots in pregnant women from Presidente Prudente and the surrounding region; none of these pregnant women had positive HIV viral loads.

  17. Changes in opioid prescribing for chronic pain in Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Gary M; Fulton-Kehoe, Deborah; Turner, Judith A; Sullivan, Mark D; Wickizer, Thomas M

    2013-01-01

    To conduct a survey of primary care physicians and advanced registered nurse practitioners (ARNPs) in Washington State (WA) focused on changes in practice patterns and use of support tools in the prescription of opioids for the treatment of chronic noncancer pain (CNCP). A convenience sample of primary care providers in WA was obtained from diverse geographic regions and health care organizations. The web-based anonymous survey was conducted in March-August 2011. Among 856 provider respondents, 623 reported treating patients with CNCP and served as the analysis sample. Most providers (72%) reported concern about opioid overdose, addiction, dependence, or diversion. Only 25% indicated concern about regulatory scrutiny. Only a small proportion of providers overall (3.3%) reported that they had stopped prescribing opioids for CNCP, but twice as many ARNPs (5.8%) as physicians (MDs and osteopaths) (2.1%) reported this. A greater proportion of physicians (70.9%) than ARNPs (40.1%) reported familiarity with the Washington State opioid dosing guidelines. Physicians in a large health plan with substantial infrastructure support reported less concern about opioids compared with providers in other settings. Of providers in Spokane (the largest city in Eastern Washington), 45% reported very low capacity to access pain specialty consultation. The vast majority of providers reported a need to access more efficient, innovative means of support and education related to treating patients with CNCP, such as telemedicine consultation. Overall, prescribing providers in WA reported ongoing concerns regarding opioid use for CNCP, but those affiliated with a health care organization with opioid prescribing guidelines and access to pain consultation were less likely to report being concerned about opioid-related problems or to have discontinued prescribing opioids.

  18. Reduction in antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections in Swedish primary care- a retrospective study of electronic patient records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Tyrstrup

    2016-11-01

    in prescribing frequency, especially for acute bronchitis and sinusitis. Continuous evaluation of diagnosis linked prescribing data and feedback to doctors is essential in order to achieve a more prudent antibiotic use.

  19. Optimizing antibiotic prescribing in primary care settings in the UK: findings of a BSAC multi-disciplinary workshop 2009

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McNulty, Cliodna A M; Francis, Nick A

    2010-01-01

    ...) web site, produce primary care antibiotic prescribing guidance. A BSAC 2009 workshop aimed to discuss how guidance could be best translated into practice using public and professional educational programmes...

  20. Prescribing dialysate bicarbonate concentrations for hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineken, F G; Brady-Smith, M; Haynie, J; Van Stone, J C

    1988-01-01

    A rearranged equation of Sargent and Gotch (1) was used to determine dialysate bicarbonate concentrations for hemodialysis patients. Parameters in this equation include an estimate of the acid generated by each patient between treatments, an estimate for the dialyzer dialysance for bicarbonate, ultrafiltration rate, blood flow rate and a targeted mid-dialysis plasma bicarbonate concentration of 25 mEq/L. Nine patients were studied over a 35 week period to verify this method of determining each patient's dialysate bicarbonate concentration. Prescribed dialysate bicarbonate concentrations for the nine patients varied from 29 to 38 mEq/L with five patients having a prescribed value of 35 mEq/L. After a baseline period of five weeks, five patients switched from a 37 mEq/L acetate dialysate to their prescribed dialysate bicarbonate concentration. Four patients who had already been on bicarbonate dialysis at a concentration of 35 mEq/L were dialyzed with their prescribed dialysate bicarbonate concentrations. Patients were then followed for a study period of 30 weeks. The prescribed dialysate bicarbonate concentration resulted in more normal acid/base chemistries for both groups of patients. The results also demonstrate that chronic hemodialysis patients require individualization of dialysate bicarbonate concentrations.

  1. Physicians' beliefs and likelihood of prescribing opioid tamper-resistant formulations for chronic noncancer pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Dennis C; Dansie, Elizabeth J; Wilson, Hilary D; Moskovitz, Bruce; Kim, Myoung

    2014-04-01

    Tamper-resistant opioid formulations (TRFs) have recently been the target of active development in an effort to deter opioid misuse and abuse. To understand factors that are predictive of physicians' likelihoods of prescribing TRFs to patients with chronic noncancer pain (CNCP). A cross-sectional survey was conducted, utilizing a questionnaire of clinicians' attitudes and opinions about opioids for CNCP (Clinicians' Attitudes about Opioids Scale) to explore beliefs about and likelihood of prescribing TRFs. A nationally representative sample of 1,535 practicing physicians throughout the United States. A stepwise hierarchical multiple linear regression analysis was conducted to estimate if physician characteristics, opinions, or geographic region categorized according to state rates of mortality by drug overdose and milligrams of opioids prescribed by state were predictive of the likelihood of prescribing TRFs. Board certification in Pain Medicine and prescribing opioids to a higher volume of CNCP patients were significantly predictive of a reported likelihood of prescribing TRFs, in addition to concerns about possible misuse and abuse of opioids, beliefs in the effectiveness of opioids for CNCP, and greater satisfaction with education and training in pain management this set of factors accounted for 21% of the model variance. Rates of mortality by drug overdose and opioid prescription volume by location were not predictive of TRF usage. Reducing physician concerns about potential misuse and abuse of opioids through additional education in pain management and dissemination of information about the potential benefits and availability of TRFs should influence physicians' attitudes about and the adoption of TRFs. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Primary care clinicians' perceptions about antibiotic prescribing for acute bronchitis: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Patrick P; Businger, Alexandra C; Whaley, Lauren E; Gagne, Joshua J; Linder, Jeffrey A

    2014-12-12

    Clinicians prescribe antibiotics to over 65% of adults with acute bronchitis despite guidelines stating that antibiotics are not indicated. To identify and understand primary care clinician perceptions about antibiotic prescribing for acute bronchitis, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 13 primary care clinicians in Boston, Massachusetts and used thematic content analysis. All the participants agreed with guidelines that antibiotics are not indicated for acute bronchitis and felt that clinicians other than themselves were responsible for overprescribing. Barriers to guideline adherence included 6 themes: (1) perceived patient demand, which was the main barrier, although some clinicians perceived a recent decrease; (2) lack of accountability for antibiotic prescribing; (3) saving time and money; (4) other clinicians' misconceptions about acute bronchitis; (5) diagnostic uncertainty; and (6) clinician dissatisfaction in failing to meet patient expectations. Strategies to decrease inappropriate antibiotic prescribing included 5 themes: (1) patient educational materials; (2) quality reporting; (3) clinical decision support; (4) use of an over-the-counter prescription pad; and (5) pre-visit triage and education by nurses to prevent visits. Clinicians continued to cite patient demand as the main reason for antibiotic prescribing for acute bronchitis, though some clinicians perceived a recent decrease. Clinicians felt that other clinicians were responsible for inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and that better pre-visit triage by nurses could prevent visits and change patients' expectations.

  3. Social Adversity and Regional Differences in Prescribing of ADHD Medication for School-Age Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildemoes, Helle Wallach; Skovgaard, Anne Mette; Thielen, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To explore whether regional variations in the initiation of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medication among school-age children are explained by differences in sociodemographic composition and/or ADHD prescribing practice, especially in children who face social advers...... regional differences prevail in prescribing practices for children facing social adversity, indicating that local cultures shape the interpretation and handling of children with ADHD-like behaviors.......Objectives: To explore whether regional variations in the initiation of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medication among school-age children are explained by differences in sociodemographic composition and/or ADHD prescribing practice, especially in children who face social...... adversity (low parental education and single parenthood). Methods: A cohort of Danish school-age children (ages 5–17) without previous psychiatric conditions (N = 813,416) was followed during 2010–2011 for incident ADHD prescribing in the individual-level Danish registers. Register information was retrieved...

  4. Auditing GPs' prescribing habits : Cardiovascular prescribing frequently continues medication initiated by specialists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, C.S; van Diepen, N.M; de Jong-van den Berg, L T W

    Objective: To determine to what extent general practitioners' (GPs) prescribing behaviour is a result of repeat prescribing of medication which has been initiated by specialists. Method: During a 4-week period, pharmacists identified GPs' prescriptions for a large group of cardiovascular drugs.

  5. General Practitioners' intention to prescribe and prescribing patterns in selected European settings: The OTCSOCIOMED project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiantou, Vasiliki; Moschandreas, Joanna; Bertsias, Antonis; Papadakaki, Maria; Saridaki, Aristoula; Agius, Dominic; Alper, Zuleyha; Faresjo, Tomas; Klimkova, Martina; Martinez, Luc; Samoutis, George; Vlček, Jiří; Lionis, Christos

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore general practitioners' (GPs) prescribing intentions and patterns across different European regions using the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). A cross-sectional study was undertaken in selected geographically defined Primary Health Care areas in Cyprus, Czech Republic (CZ), France, Greece, Malta, Sweden and Turkey. Face-to-face interviews were conducted using a TPB-based questionnaire. The number of GP participants ranged from 39 to 145 per country. Possible associations between TPB direct measures (attitudes, subjective norms (SN) and perceived behavioral control (PBC)) and intention to prescribe were assessed by country. On average, GPs thought positively of, and claimed to be in control of, prescribing. Correlations between TPB explanatory measures and prescribing intention were weak, with TPB direct measures explaining about 25% of the variance in intention to prescribe in Malta and CZ but only between 3% and 5% in Greece, Sweden and Turkey. SN appeared influential in GPs from Malta; attitude and PBC were statistically significant in GPs from CZ. GPs' prescribing intentions and patterns differed across participating countries, indicating that country-specific interventions are likely to be appropriate. Irrational prescribing behaviors were more apparent in the countries where an integrated primary care system has still not been fully developed and policies promoting the rational use of medicines are lacking. Demand-side measures aimed at modifying GPs prescribing behavior are deemed necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Prescribing restrictions – a necessary strategy among some European countries to enhance future prescribing efficiency?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Godman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The unsustainable growth in pharmaceutical expenditure has resulted in multiple initiatives across Europe to lower prices of generics and enhance their utilisation. These include prescribing restrictions. However, there have been concerns with their impact on subsequent quality of care as well as their influence in reality. OBJECTIVES: (a Review the influence of prescribing restrictions and whether there are any differences depending on their nature and drug classes; (b Ascertain whether prescribing restrictions can be added to existing demand-side measures to further enhance prescribing efficiency; (c Whether they compromise subsequent quality of care. RESULTS: Prescribing restrictions have a variable impact on subsequent utilisation of patented protected products versus generics in a class, with their influence depending on the nature and follow-up of the restrictions rather than the class of drug. This is seen among the proton pump inhibitors, statins, and renin-angiotensin drugs. Prescribing restrictions can be successfully added to existing measures to further enhance prescribing efficiency, and do not appear to compromise subsequent quality of care. CONCLUSIONS: Prescribing restrictions can be a successful strategy as countries strive to maintain the European ideals for healthcare. However, care is needed when planning these programmes: else health authorities could be disappointed with their outcome.

  7. Pharmaceutical marketing research and the prescribing physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Jeremy A

    2007-05-15

    Surveillance of physicians' prescribing patterns and the accumulation and sale of these data for pharmaceutical marketing are currently the subjects of legislation in several states and action by state and national medical associations. Contrary to common perception, the growth of the health care information organization industry has not been limited to the past decade but has been building slowly over the past 50 years, beginning in the 1940s when growth in the prescription drug market fueled industry interest in understanding and influencing prescribing patterns. The development of this surveillance system was not simply imposed on the medical profession by the pharmaceutical industry but was developed through the interactions of pharmaceutical salesmen, pharmaceutical marketers, academic researchers, individual physicians, and physician organizations. Examination of the role of physicians and physician organizations in the development of prescriber profiling is directly relevant to the contemporary policy debate surrounding this issue.

  8. Nudging Guideline-Concordant Antibiotic Prescribing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, Daniella; Knight, Tara K.; Friedberg, Mark W.; Linder, Jeffrey A.; Goldstein, Noah J.; Fox, Craig R.; Rothfeld, Alan; Diaz, Guillermo; Doctor, Jason N.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE “Nudges” that influence decision making through subtle cognitive mechanisms have been shown to be highly effective in a wide range of applications, but there have been few experiments to improve clinical practice. OBJECTIVE To investigate the use of a behavioral “nudge” based on the principle of public commitment in encouraging the judicious use of antibiotics for acute respiratory infections (ARIs). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Randomized clinical trial in 5 outpatient primary care clinics. A total of 954 adults had ARI visits during the study timeframe: 449 patients were treated by clinicians randomized to the posted commitment letter (335 in the baseline period, 114 in the intervention period); 505 patients were treated by clinicians randomized to standard practice control (384 baseline, 121 intervention). INTERVENTIONS The intervention consisted of displaying poster-sized commitment letters in examination rooms for 12 weeks. These letters, featuring clinician photographs and signatures, stated their commitment to avoid inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for ARIs. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Antibiotic prescribing rates for antibiotic-inappropriate ARI diagnoses in baseline and intervention periods, adjusted for patient age, sex, and insurance status. RESULTS Baseline rates were 43.5% and 42.8% for control and poster, respectively. During the intervention period, inappropriate prescribing rates increased to 52.7% for controls but decreased to 33.7% in the posted commitment letter condition. Controlling for baseline prescribing rates, we found that the posted commitment letter resulted in a 19.7 absolute percentage reduction in inappropriate antibiotic prescribing rate relative to control (P = .02). There was no evidence of diagnostic coding shift, and rates of appropriate antibiotic prescriptions did not diminish over time. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Displaying poster-sized commitment letters in examination rooms decreased inappropriate

  9. Prescribing trends for sodium valproate in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sinéad; Bennett, Kathleen; Doherty, Colin P

    2016-03-01

    This study was undertaken to describe prescribing practice for the anti-convulsant drug (AED) Sodium Valproate (VPA) in an Irish population of woman of childbearing age during the period of the emergence of new data showing a high rate of developmental abnormalities in offspring of women who took VPA during pregnancy. All prescriptions dispensed from community pharmacies in Ireland between 2008 and 2013 inclusive were examined for women aged 16-44 years from all three drug reimbursement schemes in Ireland. Numbers of prescriptions and women on AEDs were identified, as was the rural/urban distribution of the drug along with co-prescribing of folic acid and the oral contraceptive pill. All data analysis was conducted using SAS v9.3. The rate of prescribing of VPA in Ireland declined slightly from 3.5/1000 per eligible population in 2008 to 3.14/1000 in 2013. While rates of prescribing fell for epilepsy, there appeared to be a rise in prescription for other indications of VPA. In 2013, co-prescription of folic acid or oral contraceptives was relatively low across all community schemes. Finally, an address distant from academic specialist centers predicted a higher exposure to VPA. Recently the European Medicine's Agency suggested that alternatives to VPA be considered before prescribing to women of childbearing age. Despite this, the rate of VPA prescribing in Ireland appears to be increasing for indications other than epilepsy. It may be necessary to improve the dissemination of information about the potential negative effects of VPA in this population. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evoking prescribed spike times in stochastic neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doose, Jens; Lindner, Benjamin

    2017-09-01

    Single cell stimulation in vivo is a powerful tool to investigate the properties of single neurons and their functionality in neural networks. We present a method to determine a cell-specific stimulus that reliably evokes a prescribed spike train with high temporal precision of action potentials. We test the performance of this stimulus in simulations for two different stochastic neuron models. For a broad range of parameters and a neuron firing with intermediate firing rates (20-40 Hz) the reliability in evoking the prescribed spike train is close to its theoretical maximum that is mainly determined by the level of intrinsic noise.

  11. Understanding the Determinants of Antimicrobial Prescribing Within Hospitals: The Role of “Prescribing Etiquette”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charani, E.; Castro-Sanchez, E.; Sevdalis, N.; Kyratsis, Y.; Drumright, L.; Shah, N.; Holmes, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. There is limited knowledge of the key determinants of antimicrobial prescribing behavior (APB) in hospitals. An understanding of these determinants is required for the successful design, adoption, and implementation of quality improvement interventions in antimicrobial stewardship programs. Methods. Qualitative semistructured interviews were conducted with doctors (n = 10), pharmacists (n = 10), and nurses and midwives (n = 19) in 4 hospitals in London. Interviews were conducted until thematic saturation was reached. Thematic analysis was applied to the data to identify the key determinants of antimicrobial prescribing behaviors. Results. The APB of healthcare professionals is governed by a set of cultural rules. Antimicrobial prescribing is performed in an environment where the behavior of clinical leaders or seniors influences practice of junior doctors. Senior doctors consider themselves exempt from following policy and practice within a culture of perceived autonomous decision making that relies more on personal knowledge and experience than formal policy. Prescribers identify with the clinical groups in which they work and adjust their APB according to the prevailing practice within these groups. A culture of “noninterference” in the antimicrobial prescribing practice of peers prevents intervention into prescribing of colleagues. These sets of cultural rules demonstrate the existence of a “prescribing etiquette,” which dominates the APB of healthcare professionals. Prescribing etiquette creates an environment in which professional hierarchy and clinical groups act as key determinants of APB. Conclusions. To influence the antimicrobial prescribing of individual healthcare professionals, interventions need to address prescribing etiquette and use clinical leadership within existing clinical groups to influence practice. PMID:23572483

  12. Out-Patient Prescribing Practices at Mbagathi District Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... number of drugs prescribed (1,506). Only 55.2% of total medicines prescribed were actually dispensed and the rest were out of stock. Conclusion: The prescribing practices in this study are not satisfactory, as suggested by polypharmacy, over prescription of antibiotics, prescribing by brand names and lack of awareness ...

  13. Decreasing paediatric prescribing errors in a district general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, A L; Britland, A; Naylor, R J

    2008-04-01

    In paediatric inpatients, medication errors occur as frequently as 1 in 4.2 drug orders, with up to 80% of these being prescribing errors. The children's unit of a district general hospital in West Yorkshire, UK. Prescribing errors and preventable adverse drug events (1) The introduction of a junior doctor prescribing tutorial. (2) The introduction of a bedside prescribing guideline. The introduction of the junior doctor prescribing tutorial decreased the prescribing errors by 46%. The introduction of a bedside prescribing guideline did not decrease prescribing errors but may have been helpful to those doctors unable to attend a prescribing tutorial. By investing time and providing appropriate written resources, we have been able to reduce our paediatric prescribing errors on the children's ward by almost half.

  14. Academic family medicine physicians' confidence and comfort with opioid analgesic prescribing for patients with chronic nonmalignant pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macerollo, Allison A; Mack, Donald O; Oza, Rupal; Bennett, Ian M; Wallace, Lorraine S

    2014-01-01

    To examine academic family medicine physicians' current practices, experiences, beliefs, level of concern about negative outcomes, and confidence and comfort when prescribing opioid analgesics for chronic nonmalignant pain management. Electronic cross-sectional survey. This study was part of the Council of Academic Family Medicine (CAFM) Educational Research Alliance omnibus survey of active academic US family physicians. Respondents completed survey items addressing their 1) sociodemographic and practice characteristics, 2) current opioid prescribing practices, 3) experiences and beliefs toward prescribing opioid analgesics for chronic nonmalignant pain management, 4) level of concern about negative opioid-related outcomes, and 5) confidence and comfort when prescribing opioid analgesics. The majority of the sample (n=491) were male (57.8 percent) with 84.1 percent identifying themselves as non-Hispanic white. Nearly all respondents (91.0 percent) reported currently prescribing opioids to patients with chronic nonmalignant pain. Most respondents reported being confident (88.4 percent) and comfortable (76.2 percent) in their prescribing for patients with chronic nonmalignant pain. Family physicians who were comfortable in their opioid prescribing skills were more likely to report satisfaction in prescribing opioids to patients with chronic pain (ρ=0.494, popioid prescribing skills were more likely to identify pain management as high priority (ρ=-0.287, popioid analgesics to patients with chronic nonmalignant pain. There was a strong inverse relationship between confidence regarding opioid prescription and concern about negative consequences. Similarly, comfort level was tied to increased satisfaction with the overall process of opioid prescription.

  15. [Nurse prescribing rights, the UK experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowskill, Dianne; Lymn, Joanne

    2016-10-01

    The United Kingdom has gradually introduced nurse prescribing. This authorisation is granted upon completion of a theoretical and practical training course. This evolution has been deemed to have had a positive impact twenty years after its implementation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. An investigation into the prescribing of analgesics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nervous system drugs. A high percentage (82.2%) of the analgesic agents dispensed were combination or polycomponent analgesics. The combination analgesic tablet, consisting of paracetamol, meprobamate, caffeine and codeine phosphate, was the most frequently prescribed central nervous system drug. This product.

  17. Prescribing Patterns of Methylphenidate and Atomoxetine for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for stimulants in adult ADHD is much smaller. Furthermore, the trials assessing efficacy of methylphenidate treatment in adults with ADHD, have shown ambiguous results. ADHD is increasingly being diagnosed in adult patients in South Africa but only few have focused on ADHD prescribing to patients of all age groups in ...

  18. Prescribing Patterns of Methylphenidate and Atomoxetine for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the prescribing pattern of methylphenidate and atomoxetine to patients with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in South Africa. Methods: A retrospective, cross-sectional pharmacoepidemiological study was conducted based on the data from a medical aid administrator in South Africa for ...

  19. Learning from escaped prescribed fire reviews [Abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne Black; Dave Thomas; James Saveland

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, the wildland fire community has developed a number of innovative methods for conducting a review following escape of a prescribed fire. The stated purpose been to identify methods that not only meet policy requirements, but to reduce future escapes. Implicit is the assumption that a review leads to learning. Yet, as organizational learning expert...

  20. Learning from escaped prescribed fire reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne E. Black; Dave Thomas; James Saveland; Jennifer D. Ziegler

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. wildland fire community has developed a number of innovative methods for conducting a review following escape of a prescribed fire (expanding on the typical regional or local reviews, to include more of a learning focus - expanded After Action Reviews, reviews that incorporate High Reliability Organizing, Facilitated Learning Analyses, etc). The stated purpose...

  1. Antimalarial Drugs for Pediatrics - Prescribing and Dispensing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To assess dispensing and prescribing practices with regard to antimalarial drugs for pediatrics in private pharmacies and public hospitals in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study that assessed the knowledge and practice of 200 drug dispensers in the private community ...

  2. Prescribing trends of antidepressants in bipolar depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarate, C A; Tohen, M; Baraibar, G; Kando, J C; Mirin, J

    1995-06-01

    This study utilizing pharmacoepidemiologic methods was undertaken to determine the prescribing patterns of antidepressants particularly in bipolar depression. From pharmacy records of the McLean Hospital, the number of patients receiving antidepressants and given electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) from June 1, 1987, to May 8, 1993, was determined. We later linked these data bases with patients who were diagnosed with DSM-III-R bipolar depression (296.5) during the same period of time. During the 6-year period, it was determined that 3829 inpatients had received tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), 2981 fluoxetine, 2603 trazodone, 809 bupropion, 743 monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), 592 stimulants, 588 sertraline, 48 paroxetine, and 894 ECT. There were significant increases over time in prescriptions of MAOIs compared with fluoxetine (chi 2 = 14.36, p = .006), and bupropion compared with TCAs (chi 2 = 6.45, p = .04). There was a trend for bupropion to be prescribed more over time compared with fluoxetine (chi 2 = 5.09, p = .08). There were no significant changes in the prescribing of other antidepressants or in the use of ECT. At our center, prescribing of bupropion and MAOIs in bipolar depression has increased significantly. This may be related to the reports in the literature of the low switch rates to mania with the use of these drugs.

  3. Prescribed burning in southwestern ponderosa pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen S Sackett; Sally M Haase; Michael G Harrington

    1996-01-01

    Prescribed burning is an effective way of restoring the fire process to ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) ecosystems of the Southwest. If used judiciously, fire can provide valuable effects for hazard reduction, natural regeneration, thinning, vegetation revitalization, and in general, better forest health. Relatively short burning...

  4. Drug prescribing practices for tuberculosis in Uzbekistan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasker, E.; Khodjikhanov, M.; Usarova, S.; Asamidinov, U.; Yuldashova, U.; van der Werf, M. J.; Uzakova, G.; Veen, J.

    2009-01-01

    Uzbekistan has had 100% DOTS coverage since 2005; however, the treatment success rate has remained at around 80% for the last 4 years. Surveys from the capital city of Tashkent and from western Uzbekistan have shown high levels of primary multidrug resistance. To assess treatment regimens prescribed

  5. BRIDGES .PRESCRIBED AT A NIGERIAN TEACHING HOSPITAL.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    significant differences between vital and pulp filled teeth that were crowned among the age groups (p> 0.05). The most frequently crowned tooth was the maxillary central incisor constituting 59.7 per cent. All-resin crowns were the most prescribed (59.2 per cent) followed by porcelain -fused-to-metal crowns (38. l per cent).

  6. Antidepressant prescribing in five European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbing-Karahagopian, V; Huerta, C; Souverein, P C

    2014-01-01

    TCAs in all except the German population. In the majority of countries we observed an increasing trend of antidepressant prescribing over time. Two different methods identifying recorded indications yielded different ranges of proportions of patients recorded with the specific indication (15-57% and 39...

  7. Prevalence of inappropriate prescribing in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnhøj, Lisbeth; Thirstrup, Steffen; Kristensen, Mogens Brandt

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of inappropriate prescribing in primary care in Copenhagen County, according to the Medication Appropriateness Index (MAI) and to identify the therapeutic areas most commonly involved. SETTING: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 212 elderly ( >65 years...

  8. Improving Interoperability in ePrescribing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åstrand, Bengt; Petersson, Göran

    2012-01-01

    Background The increased application of eServices in health care, in general, and ePrescribing (electronic prescribing) in particular, have brought quality and interoperability to the forefront. The application of standards has been put forward as one important factor in improving interoperability. However, less focus has been placed on other factors, such as stakeholders’ involvement and the measurement of interoperability. An information system (IS) can be regarded to comprise an instrument for technology-mediated work communication. In this study, interoperability refers to the interoperation in the ePrescribing process, involving people, systems, procedures and organizations. We have focused on the quality of the ePrescription message as one component of the interoperation in the ePrescribing process. Objective The objective was to analyze how combined efforts in improving interoperability with the introduction of the new national ePrescription format (NEF) have impacted interoperability in the ePrescribing process in Sweden, with the focus on the quality of the ePrescription message. Methods Consecutive sampling of electronic prescriptions in Sweden before and after the introduction of NEF was undertaken in April 2008 (pre-NEF) and April 2009 (post-NEF). Interoperability problems were identified and classified based on message format specifications and prescription rules. Results The introduction of NEF improved the interoperability of ePrescriptions substantially. In the pre-NEF sample, a total of 98.6% of the prescriptions had errors. In the post-NEF sample, only 0.9% of the prescriptions had errors. The mean number of errors was fewer for the erroneous prescriptions: 4.8 in pre-NEF compared to 1.0 in post-NEF. Conclusions We conclude that a systematic comprehensive work on interoperability, covering technical, semantical, professional, judicial and process aspects, involving the stakeholders, resulted in an improved interoperability of e

  9. Prescribing patterns for upper respiratory tract infections: a prescription-review of primary care practice in Kedah, Malaysia, and the implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezal, Rabiatul Salmi; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Alrasheedy, Alian A; Saleem, Fahad; Yusof, Faridah Aryani Md; Kamal, Mardhiyah; Mohd Din, Rosminah; Godman, Brian

    2015-01-01

    It is necessary to ascertain current prescribing of antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) to address potential overuse. A retrospective analysis was conducted of all prescriptions for URTIs among 10 public primary healthcare centers in Kedah, Malaysia, from 1 January to 31 March 2014. A total of 123,524 prescriptions were screened and analyzed. Of these, 7129 prescriptions were for URTI, with 31.8% (n = 2269) containing antibiotics. Macrolides were the most commonly prescribed antibiotic, constituting 61% (n = 1403) of total antibiotics prescribed. There was a statistically significant association between different prescribers and diagnoses (p = 0.001) and a weak positive trend suggesting family medicine specialists are more competent in antibiotic prescribing, followed by medical officers and assistant medical officers (τ = 0.122). Prescribing practices of some prescribers were inconsistent with current guidelines encouraging resistance development. National antimicrobial stewardship programs and further educational initiatives are ongoing in Malaysia to improve antibiotic use.

  10. Frequency of prescribing errors by medical residents in various training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey, Brooke Lynn; Bray, Whitney M; Gomez, Michael R; Condren, Michelle

    2015-06-01

    Medication errors are hazardous and costly. Children are at increased risk for medication errors because of weight-based dosing, limited FDA indications, and human calculation errors. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency and type of resident prescribing errors in a pediatric clinic and further compare error rates of residents in different training programs. Resident prescription error data from a pediatric clinic was collected for 5 months. Upon detection of an error, residents were notified/given feedback regarding the type of error, ways to remedy errors, and future prevention methods. Data were categorized based on medication involved, error type, and resident training program. The review included 2941 prescriptions, with the overall resident prescribing error rate being 5.88%. The pediatric resident error rate was 4%. Family medicine, internal medicine, and medicine/pediatrics had error rates of 11%, 8%, and 7%, respectively. The prescribing error rate showed a statistically significant difference with pediatrics compared with family medicine, internal medicine, and medicine/pediatrics (P medication error type was overdose, followed by unclear quantity. Among the medication classes, topical agents and antimicrobials were among the top prescribed. Numerous types of medication errors occur in a pediatric clinic. Prescribing errors take place among all medical trainees; however, medication error rates in the pediatric population may vary among resident specialty. Identifying the cause of prescribing errors will allow institutions to create educational programs tailored for safe medication use in children as well as systemwide changes for error reduction.

  11. Nurse prescribing of medicines in Western European and Anglo-Saxon countries: a systematic review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background A growing number of countries are introducing some form of nurse prescribing. However, international reviews concerning nurse prescribing are scarce and lack a systematic and theoretical approach. The aim of this review was twofold: firstly, to gain insight into the scientific and professional literature describing the extent to and the ways in which nurse prescribing has been realised or is being introduced in Western European and Anglo-Saxon countries; secondly, to identify possible mechanisms underlying the introduction and organisation of nurse prescribing on the basis of Abbott's theory on the division of professional labor. Methods A comprehensive search of six literature databases and seven websites was performed without any limitation as to date of publication, language or country. Additionally, experts in the field of nurse prescribing were consulted. A three stage inclusion process, consisting of initial sifting, more detailed selection and checking full-text publications, was performed independently by pairs of reviewers. Data were synthesized using narrative and tabular methods. Results One hundred and twenty-four publications met the inclusion criteria. So far, seven Western European and Anglo-Saxon countries have implemented nurse prescribing of medicines, viz., Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, Sweden, the UK and the USA. The Netherlands and Spain are in the process of introducing nurse prescribing. A diversity of external and internal forces has led to the introduction of nurse prescribing internationally. The legal, educational and organizational conditions under which nurses prescribe medicines vary considerably between countries; from situations where nurses prescribe independently to situations in which prescribing by nurses is only allowed under strict conditions and supervision of physicians. Conclusions Differences between countries are reflected in the jurisdictional settlements between the nursing and medical professions

  12. Antibiotic prescribing for the future: exploring the attitudes of trainees in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas, Anthea; van Driel, Mieke; van de Mortel, Thea; Magin, Parker

    2014-09-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a public health concern worldwide. A high proportion of antibiotics are prescribed in primary care, often for conditions where there is no evidence of benefit. Without a change in these prescribing patterns, resistance will persist as a significant problem in the future. Little is known about how trainees in general practice perceive and develop their prescribing. To explore the attitudes of trainees in general practice towards antibiotic use and resistance, and the perceived influences on their prescribing. A qualitative study of 17 vocational trainees in general practice (GP registrars) in both rural and urban areas in Australia employing semi-structured interviews and a focus group. Maximum variation purposive sampling of GP registrars from diverse backgrounds and training stages continued until thematic saturation was achieved. Topics of discussion included awareness of antibiotic resistance, use of evidence-based guidelines, and perceived influences on prescribing. Transcribed interviews were coded independently by two researchers. Data collection and analysis were concurrent and cumulative, using a process of iterative thematic analysis. Registrars were aware of the importance of evidence-based antibiotic prescribing and the impact of their decisions on resistance. Many expressed a sense of dissonance between their knowledge and behaviours. Contextual influences on their decisions included patient and system factors, diagnostic uncertainty, transitioning from hospital medicine, and the habits of, and relationship with, their supervisor. Understanding how trainees in general practice perceive and develop antibiotic prescribing habits will enable targeted educational interventions to be designed and implemented at a crucial stage in training, working towards ensuring appropriate antibiotic prescribing in the future. © British Journal of General Practice 2014.

  13. Using Classification and Regression Trees (CART) to Identify Prescribing Thresholds for Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Chris; Mortimer, Duncan; Dalziel, Kim; Heeley, Emma; Chalmers, John; Clarke, Philip

    2016-02-01

    Many guidelines for clinical decisions are hierarchical and nonlinear. Evaluating if these guidelines are used in practice requires methods that can identify such structures and thresholds. Classification and regression trees (CART) were used to analyse prescribing patterns of Australian general practitioners (GPs) for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Our aim was to identify if GPs use absolute risk (AR) guidelines in favour of individual risk factors to inform their prescribing decisions of lipid-lowering medications. We employed administrative prescribing information that is linked to patient-level data from a clinical assessment and patient survey (the AusHeart Study), and assessed prescribing of lipid-lowering medications over a 12-month period for patients (n = 1903) who were not using such medications prior to recruitment. CART models were developed to explain prescribing practice. Out-of-sample performance was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, and optimised via pruning. We found that individual risk factors (low-density lipoprotein, diabetes, triglycerides and a history of CVD), GP-estimated rather than Framingham AR, and sociodemographic factors (household income, education) were the predominant drivers of GP prescribing. However, sociodemographic factors and some individual risk factors (triglycerides and CVD history) only become relevant for patients with a particular profile of other risk factors. The ROC area under the curve was 0.63 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.60-0.64). There is little evidence that AR guidelines recommended by the National Heart Foundation and National Vascular Disease Prevention Alliance, or conditional individual risk eligibility guidelines from the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme, are adopted in prescribing practice. The hierarchy of conditional relationships between risk factors and socioeconomic factors identified by CART provides new insights into prescribing decisions

  14. Inappropriate prescribing and prescribing omissions among drug-related problems using STOPP-START criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdoorn, M.A.; Kwint, H.-F.; Faber, A.; L. Bouvy, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives: Medication review has been suggested as a way to prevent drug related problems (DRPs). Screening tools have been formulated to identify potentially inappropriate medicines (PIMs) and potential prescribing omissions (PPOs) respectively called Screening Tool of Older

  15. Drug Use Evaluation of Three Widely Prescribed Antibiotics in a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Mohammadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug utilization studies are helpful in understanding the current practice. We have conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the relevant use of a group of most commonly prescribed antibiotics in a teaching hospital in Iran.  The results of this study may be of help for clinicians to improve the patient care.Methods: Patients who received parenteral ceftazidim, vancomycin and amikacin from December2010 to May 2011 were enrolled in this study. Patient’s data including demographic, length of Hospital stay, drug allergy, first and final diagnosis were recorded in a predesigned data collection form. American Hospital Formulary Services (AHFS book were used as a reference for evaluation of study drug indication and dosing according to diagnosis and microbiological culture. Defined Daily Dose (DDD of each drug extracted from Anatomic and Therapeutic Chemical classification system (ATC/DDD and drug usage data evaluated by calculating the ratio of prescribed drug to its DDD.Results: The ratio of prescribed daily dose to DDD was 0.78, 0.95 and 0.86 for amikacin, ceftazidime and vancomycin respectively. Between amikacin group, 43 patients (86% received drug empirically, the number of empiric treatments for ceftazidim and vancomycin were 45(90% and 44 patients (88%. The renal function tests (Blood Urea Nitrogen, Serum Creatinin were evaluated in 56% of amikacin group, 64% in ceftazidime group and 78% in vancomycin group.Conclusion: The results of this study indicate the need to establish continuing medical education (CME courses for physicians to familiarize them with standards required to use and monitor these agents.

  16. ?Doing the right thing?: factors influencing GP prescribing of antidepressants and prescribed doses

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Chris F; Williams, Brian; MacGillivray, Stephen A.; Dougall, Nadine J.; Maxwell, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    Background Antidepressant prescribing continues to increase, with 5-16% of adults receiving antidepressants annually. Total prescribing growth is due in part to increased long-term use, greater selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI) use and the use of higher SSRI doses. Evidence does not support routine use of higher SSRI doses for depression treatment, and factors influencing the use of such doses are not well known. The aim of this study was to explore factors influencing GPs? use o...

  17. Prevalence, prescribed quantities, and trajectory of multiple prescriber episodes for benzodiazepines: A 2-year cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Yasuyuki; Shimizu, Sayuri; Matsumoto, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the use of multiple prescribers for benzodiazepines, which might reflect fragmented patient care and increases the risk of hospital admission for drug dependence or poisoning. Therefore, we aimed to identify the prevalence, prescribed quantities, and trajectory of multiple prescriber episodes for benzodiazepines. We conducted a 2-year cohort study of 1178,361 recipients aged 0-74 years using a large health insurance claims database in Japan. We quantified multiple prescriber episodes for benzodiazepines occurring in ambulatory care settings in a baseline and subsequent year by (1) counting the number of unique providers within a 12-month period, (2) calculating the maximum number of unique providers within a single month, and (3) identifying consecutive overlapping prescriptions of over 30 days duration. Among 58,314 patients with a benzodiazepine prescription during the baseline year, 282 (0.5%) filled prescriptions from four or more providers within a 12-month period, 439 (0.8%) filled prescriptions from three or more providers within a single month, and 757 (1.3%) filled consecutive overlapping prescriptions. The odds for multiple prescriber episodes were significantly higher among patients with multiple chronic conditions. Consecutive overlapping prescriptions had the best accuracy to detect patients with potentially questionable prescribed quantities as well as to predict those with multiple prescriber episodes in the subsequent year. These results highlight the need for pharmacists to increase their involvement in prescription oversight and for health insurance agencies to implement a prescription monitoring program to screen for patients with multiple prescriber episodes for benzodiazepines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sustained benefits of a community dietetics intervention designed to improve oral nutritional supplement prescribing practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennelly, S; Kennedy, N P; Corish, C A; Flanagan-Rughoobur, G; Glennon-Slattery, C; Sugrue, S

    2011-10-01

    Healthcare professionals working in the community do not always prescribe oral nutritional supplements (ONS) according to best practice guidelines for the management of malnutrition. The present study aimed to determine the impact of a community dietetics intervention on ONS prescribing practices and expenditure 1 year later. The intervention involved general practitioners (GPs), practice nurses, nurses in local nursing homes and community nurses. It comprised an education programme together with the provision of a new community dietetics service. Changes in health care professionals' nutrition care practices were determined by examining community dietetics records. ONS prescribing volume and expenditure on ONS were assessed using data from the Primary Care Reimbursement Service of the Irish Health Service Executive. Seven out of 10 principal GPs participated in the nutrition education programme. One year later, screening for malnutrition risk was better, dietary advice was provided more often, referral to the community dietetics service improved and ONS were prescribed for a greater proportion of patients at 'high risk' of malnutrition than before (88% versus 37%; P dietetics intervention improved ONS prescribing practices by GPs and nurses, in accordance with best practice guidelines, without increasing expenditure on ONS during the year after intervention. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2011 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  19. Influence of a systems-based approach to prescribing errors in a pediatric resident clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condren, Michelle; Honey, Brooke L; Carter, Sandra M; Ngo, Nelson; Landsaw, Jeremy; Bryant, Cheryl; Gillaspy, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    To measure the difference in prescribing error rates between 2 clinics, 1 with a system in place to reduce errors and 1 with no such system; to determine variables that affect the likelihood of prescription errors. This was a retrospective study at 2 university-based general pediatric clinics utilizing the same electronic medical record (EMR) system. Clinic 1 employed pharmacists who provided daily prescription review, provider feedback and education, and EMR customization to decrease errors. Clinic 2 had no systems in place for reducing prescribing errors. Prescriptions written by resident physicians over 2 months were identified and reviewed. A total of 1361 prescriptions were reviewed, 40.7% from clinic 1 and 59.3% from clinic 2. Errors were found in 201 prescriptions (14.8%). Clinics 1 and 2 had error rates of 11% and 17.5%, respectively (P = .0012). The odds of a prescription error at clinic 2 were 1.7 times the odds of a prescription error at clinic 1. Logistic regression identified clinic, nonpediatric resident, liquid dose forms, and younger patient age as significant predictors of prescription errors. Half of the errors could have been prevented with consistent use of a custom medication list within the EMR. We found 37% fewer prescribing errors in a clinic with systems in place for prescribing error detection and prevention. Pediatric clinics should explore systematic procedures for identifying, resolving, and providing education about prescribing errors to reduce patient risk. Copyright © 2014 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Identifying Pedagogy and Teaching Strategies for Achieving Nationally Prescribed Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delany, Clare; Kosta, Lauren; Ewen, Shaun; Nicholson, Patricia; Remedios, Louisa; Harms, Louise

    2016-01-01

    With the globalisation of university education, national frameworks are commonly used to prescribe standardised learning outcomes and achieve accountability. However, these frameworks are generally not accompanied by guiding pedagogy to support academics in adjusting their teaching practices to achieve the set outcomes. This paper reports the…

  1. Off-label baclofen prescribing practices among French alcohol specialists: results of a national online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Benjamin; Paille, François; Fleury, Benoit; Cottencin, Olivier; Benyamina, Amine; Aubin, Henri-Jean

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate, among alcohol specialists belonging to the Société Française d'Alcoologie (SFA), i.e., the French Alcohol Society, the proportion of physicians who prescribed off-label baclofen for alcohol use disorders (AUDs). The secondary objective was to depict the features of individual prescribing and monitoring practices. On-line survey among 484 French alcohol specialists. Physicians were asked whether they prescribed baclofen for AUDs. If they did not, the reasons for this choice were investigated. If they did, the features of the physician's prescribing practice were explored, including the number of patients treated, the mean and maximum doses, the monitoring precautions and the pharmacovigilance reporting. Participants were also asked about their empirical findings on HDB's efficacy and safety. In total, 302 physicians (response rate of 62.4%) participated in the survey. Data from 296 participants were analysed, representing 59.4% of all active prescribing physicians belonging to the SFA. HDB use was declared by 74.6% of participants (mean dose 109.5 ± 43.6 mg/d; maximum dose 188 ± 93.3 mg/d). However, 79.2% of prescribers had treated less than 30 patients, and 67.8% used HDB as a second-line medication. Although HDB was perceived as more efficacious than approved drugs by 54.3% of prescribers, it was also declared less safe by 62.8%. Nonetheless, 79.7% of prescribers had never filed any pharmacovigilance report. Non-prescribers (25.6%) were primarily deterred by the current lack of scientific data and official regulation. A majority of French alcohol specialists reported using HDB, although often on a limited number of their patients. HDB was considered efficacious but also potentially hazardous. Despite this, physicians reported minimal safety data to the health security system. While French health authorities are planning to draft a specific regulatory measure for framing off-label HDB prescribing practices, the sustained education of prescribers

  2. The Quality of Prescribing for Psychiatric Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soerensen, A L; Nielsen, L P; Poulsen, B K

    2014-01-01

    The Quality of Prescribing for Psychiatric PatientsSoerensen AL1,2, Nielsen LP3,4, Poulsen BK3, Lisby M3,5, Mainz J6,7 1Danish Center for Healthcare Improvements, Faculty of Social Sciences and Faculty of Health Sciences, Aalborg University, Denmark; 2University College of Northern Denmark; 3...... of PIP was assessed using four categories. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify possible predictive factors of PIP. RESULTS: The proportion of patients with one or more PIPs was 123/219(56%). “Interaction between drugs” was the most common category for potentially serious and potentially...... need to improve the quality in prescribing for psychiatric patients....

  3. The Quality of Prescribing for Psychiatric Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Poulsen, Birgitte Klindt

    2014-01-01

    The Quality of Prescribing for Psychiatric Patients Soerensen AL1,2, Nielsen LP3,4, Poulsen BK3, Lisby M3,5, Mainz J6,7 1Danish Center for Healthcare Improvements, Faculty of Social Sciences and Faculty of Health Sciences, Aalborg University, Denmark; 2University College of Northern Denmark; 3...... of PIP was assessed using four categories. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify possible predictive factors of PIP. RESULTS: The proportion of patients with one or more PIPs was 123/219(56%). “Interaction between drugs” was the most common category for potentially serious and potentially...... need to improve the quality in prescribing for psychiatric patients....

  4. Benzodiazepine prescribing in a Sydney teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, J B; Ryan, J; Fairbrother, G; O'Neill, K; Howes, L G

    1996-09-16

    To determine the pattern of benzodiazepine prescribing in hospital and at discharge in relation to prior benzodiazepine therapy. Patient interview within 48 hours of admission to determine benzodiazepine, alcohol and other psychotropic drug use before admission and review of medical records after discharge to document drugs prescribed in hospital and at discharge. Tertiary teaching hospital, January to August 1995. 1453 patients (mean age, 60 [SD, 19] years; 52.7% female) were interviewed; 277 patients (19.1%) were taking benzodiazepines regularly (one or more doses per week) before admission. Of these, 28.5% did not have benzodiazepine therapy continued while in hospital and 63.9% did not receive benzodiazepines at the time of discharge. Of the remaining 1176 patients (those not previously taking benzodiazepines), 277 (23.6%) were prescribed them for the first time in hospital and 5.3% received benzodiazepines at the time of discharge. Older age, female sex, marital status (single, divorced or widowed) and the use of antidepressants and Schedule 8 narcotic analgesics were all statistically significant predictors of benzodiazepine use before admission, but alcohol consumption was not. A substantial number of patients do not have their benzodiazepine therapy continued in hospital and at the time of discharge, and are thus at risk of developing benzodiazepine withdrawal syndromes, including delirium. A small but clinically significant number of patients who do not usually take benzodiazepines receive them at the time of discharge and may be at risk of becoming long term users.

  5. Determinants of prescribed drug use among pregnant women in Bahir Dar city administration, Northwest Ethiopia: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admasie, Chanie; Wasie, Belaynew; Abeje, Gedefaw

    2014-09-18

    Drug use during pregnancy may be dangerous to the fetus. There is high consumption of prescribed drugs among pregnant women. This condition may be much higher in developing countries. There is no sufficient evidence on prescribed drug use among pregnant women in Bahir Dar town. The aim of this study was to assess the level of prescribed drug use and associated factors among pregnant women attending antenatal care (ANC) service at government health centers in Bahir Dar city administration. Institution based cross sectional study was used. Data were collected from randomly selected 510 pregnant women. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16.0. Back ward stepwise logistic regression model was used and p-values pregnant women were included in the study of which 88.4% were prescribed at least one drug during pregnancy. Nearly 11% of the pregnant women were prescribed with drugs from category D or X of the US-FDA risk classification.Prescribed drug use among pregnant women was more likely when the pregnancy is wanted, (AOR = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.3 - 4.6), if the mother had maternal illness (AOR = 8.5, 95% CI: 5.4-13.4), when the educational level of ANC provider is diploma (AOR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.5-4.7) and when number of pregnancies is more (AOR =2.1, 95% CI: 1.3-3.3). Prescribed drug use including those with potential harm to the fetus during pregnancy was very high in Bahir Dar city administration. Prescribed drug use is more when the woman had illness, when the woman was multi gravida and when the educational level of ANC provider was low (diploma). It is important to upgrade providers' educational level and institute prevention of diseases like malaria to reduce the level of prescribed drug use during pregnancy.

  6. 20 CFR 404.1530 - Need to follow prescribed treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... English language) when determining if you have an acceptable reason for failure to follow prescribed... treatment is contrary to the established teaching and tenets of your religion. (2) The prescribed treatment...

  7. Ethical issues in the marketisation of education: the case for social ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    commodification of higher education in Uganda. It argues that in order to underscore ethical issues posed by educational markets particularly in the area of social justice, it is prudent to revisit the salient principles of social justice as well as the ideological ...

  8. What we know about the efficiency of higher education institutions: the best evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salerno, C.S.

    2003-01-01

    As higher education enrollments continue expanding, public funding is becoming increasingly scarce. In light of this, many policymakers have come to openly question whether higher education institutions are prudently using the financial resources they receive. Since the early 1990s this issue has

  9. Legal limitations for nurse prescribers in Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Geyer

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The nurse plays an important role in the delivery of primary health care services in South Africa. The primary purpose is to provide the public with access to safe competent basic health care and to achieve this, the nurse should be empowered to practice within legal and ethical boundaries. This paper explores and describes the limitations imposed by legislation on the nurse’s ability to prescribe treatment in the primary health care field. The focus is mainly on the Nursing Act, the Pharmacy Act and the Medicines and Related Substances Control Act which highlights a number of limitations. It is concluded that empowerment of the nurse should not only include addressing the legal boundaries for practice, but also education and training opportunities to equip them with the expert knowledge and skills that they need to render a quality health care service.

  10. Perspectives on prescribed fire in the south: does ethnicity matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siew Hoon Lim; J.M. Bowker; Cassandra Y. Johnson; H. Ken Cordell

    2009-01-01

    Using a household survey and regression methods, we assessed preferences for prescribed fire in the southern United States. We found that the majority of the respondents favored the use of prescribed fire. However, we observed pronounced racial variation in opinions on prescribed fire and its side effects. African Americans and Hispanics were less supportive and were...

  11. 69-74 A Retrospective Analysis of Prescribing Prac

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The mean number of drugs per prescription was. 2.1±0.5. The prevalence of generic, antibiotics and injections prescribing were 79.2%,. 54.7% and 28.3%, respectively. Drugs prescribed from Ethiopian essential drug list/formulary constituted 83.0%, which is far less than the ideal limit. Further, all the prescribing indicators ...

  12. Antiepileptic drug prescribing before, during and after pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charlton, Rachel; Garne, Ester; Wang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    (60/10 000; CI95 54-66%). In Denmark, Norway and the two UK databases lamotrigine was the most commonly prescribed AED; whereas in the Italian and Dutch databases, carbamazepine, valproate and phenobarbital were most frequently prescribed. Few women prescribed with AEDs in the 3 months before...

  13. Antibiotic Utilization and Prescribing Patterns in a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study of prescribing pattern seeks to monitor, evaluate and suggest a modification in prescriber's prescribing habits so as to make medical care rational and cost effective. Information about antibiotic use pattern is necessary for a constructive approach to problems that arise from multiple antibiotics available. To identify ...

  14. Information from pharmaceutical companies and the quality, quantity, and cost of physicians' prescribing: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurling, Geoffrey K; Mansfield, Peter R; Montgomery, Brett D; Lexchin, Joel; Doust, Jenny; Othman, Noordin; Vitry, Agnes I

    2010-10-19

    Pharmaceutical companies spent $57.5 billion on pharmaceutical promotion in the United States in 2004. The industry claims that promotion provides scientific and educational information to physicians. While some evidence indicates that promotion may adversely influence prescribing, physicians hold a wide range of views about pharmaceutical promotion. The objective of this review is to examine the relationship between exposure to information from pharmaceutical companies and the quality, quantity, and cost of physicians' prescribing. We searched for studies of physicians with prescribing rights who were exposed to information from pharmaceutical companies (promotional or otherwise). Exposures included pharmaceutical sales representative visits, journal advertisements, attendance at pharmaceutical sponsored meetings, mailed information, prescribing software, and participation in sponsored clinical trials. The outcomes measured were quality, quantity, and cost of physicians' prescribing. We searched Medline (1966 to February 2008), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970 to February 2008), Embase (1997 to February 2008), Current Contents (2001 to 2008), and Central (The Cochrane Library Issue 3, 2007) using the search terms developed with an expert librarian. Additionally, we reviewed reference lists and contacted experts and pharmaceutical companies for information. Randomized and observational studies evaluating information from pharmaceutical companies and measures of physicians' prescribing were independently appraised for methodological quality by two authors. Studies were excluded where insufficient study information precluded appraisal. The full text of 255 articles was retrieved from electronic databases (7,185 studies) and other sources (138 studies). Articles were then excluded because they did not fulfil inclusion criteria (179) or quality appraisal criteria (18), leaving 58 included studies with 87 distinct analyses. Data were extracted independently

  15. Information from Pharmaceutical Companies and the Quality, Quantity, and Cost of Physicians' Prescribing: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurling, Geoffrey K.; Mansfield, Peter R.; Montgomery, Brett D.; Lexchin, Joel; Doust, Jenny; Othman, Noordin; Vitry, Agnes I.

    2010-01-01

    Background Pharmaceutical companies spent $57.5 billion on pharmaceutical promotion in the United States in 2004. The industry claims that promotion provides scientific and educational information to physicians. While some evidence indicates that promotion may adversely influence prescribing, physicians hold a wide range of views about pharmaceutical promotion. The objective of this review is to examine the relationship between exposure to information from pharmaceutical companies and the quality, quantity, and cost of physicians' prescribing. Methods and Findings We searched for studies of physicians with prescribing rights who were exposed to information from pharmaceutical companies (promotional or otherwise). Exposures included pharmaceutical sales representative visits, journal advertisements, attendance at pharmaceutical sponsored meetings, mailed information, prescribing software, and participation in sponsored clinical trials. The outcomes measured were quality, quantity, and cost of physicians' prescribing. We searched Medline (1966 to February 2008), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970 to February 2008), Embase (1997 to February 2008), Current Contents (2001 to 2008), and Central (The Cochrane Library Issue 3, 2007) using the search terms developed with an expert librarian. Additionally, we reviewed reference lists and contacted experts and pharmaceutical companies for information. Randomized and observational studies evaluating information from pharmaceutical companies and measures of physicians' prescribing were independently appraised for methodological quality by two authors. Studies were excluded where insufficient study information precluded appraisal. The full text of 255 articles was retrieved from electronic databases (7,185 studies) and other sources (138 studies). Articles were then excluded because they did not fulfil inclusion criteria (179) or quality appraisal criteria (18), leaving 58 included studies with 87 distinct analyses

  16. Information from pharmaceutical companies and the quality, quantity, and cost of physicians' prescribing: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey K Spurling

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pharmaceutical companies spent $57.5 billion on pharmaceutical promotion in the United States in 2004. The industry claims that promotion provides scientific and educational information to physicians. While some evidence indicates that promotion may adversely influence prescribing, physicians hold a wide range of views about pharmaceutical promotion. The objective of this review is to examine the relationship between exposure to information from pharmaceutical companies and the quality, quantity, and cost of physicians' prescribing. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We searched for studies of physicians with prescribing rights who were exposed to information from pharmaceutical companies (promotional or otherwise. Exposures included pharmaceutical sales representative visits, journal advertisements, attendance at pharmaceutical sponsored meetings, mailed information, prescribing software, and participation in sponsored clinical trials. The outcomes measured were quality, quantity, and cost of physicians' prescribing. We searched Medline (1966 to February 2008, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970 to February 2008, Embase (1997 to February 2008, Current Contents (2001 to 2008, and Central (The Cochrane Library Issue 3, 2007 using the search terms developed with an expert librarian. Additionally, we reviewed reference lists and contacted experts and pharmaceutical companies for information. Randomized and observational studies evaluating information from pharmaceutical companies and measures of physicians' prescribing were independently appraised for methodological quality by two authors. Studies were excluded where insufficient study information precluded appraisal. The full text of 255 articles was retrieved from electronic databases (7,185 studies and other sources (138 studies. Articles were then excluded because they did not fulfil inclusion criteria (179 or quality appraisal criteria (18, leaving 58 included studies with 87 distinct

  17. Collaborative prescribing: a qualitative exploration of a role for pharmacists in mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Amanda; Crump, Keith; Lee, Monica; Li, Leigh; Patel, Ashna; Yang, Rachel; Zhao, Jenny; Jensen, Maree

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative prescribing has been proposed as an extension of practice for advanced pharmacist practitioners. A lack of research investigating how pharmacists might be most effective as prescribers in mental health was identified. To explore health professionals' and consumers' attitudes and beliefs that relate to the role of specialist mental health pharmacists working as collaborative prescribers within their advanced scope of practice in secondary care. Semistructured interviews were conducted with key informants in the New Zealand mental health sector. Participants were selected via a purposive sampling method, including health professionals (n=9) and consumers (n=3). NVivo software was used to analyze data, using a thematic analysis approach to develop a series of key themes from the interviews. Common themes were extracted, which were used to gather results and draw conclusions. The key findings include a widespread acknowledgment of the role of specialist pharmacists as collaborative prescribers in mental health and as integral members of the multidisciplinary team; however, consumers were unaware of pharmacists' role in secondary care. The role was seen to extend current practice particularly in medication management after assessment and diagnosis by a medical practitioner. Concerns regarding demonstrating competence, practitioner role/boundary confusion, insufficient training and workforce development, hesitancy by pharmacists to extend role, consumer awareness, and public perception of the traditional pharmacist role were identified. Solutions discussed included education by the profession; relationship building, training, and robust competency assessments; and a structured framework for implementing a collaborative prescribing model. This study suggests there was recognition and acceptance of the role that specialist pharmacist practitioners could play in contributing to the care of mental health consumers as collaborative prescribers; their medication

  18. Are specific initiatives required to enhance prescribing of generic atypical antipsychotics in Scotland?: International implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennie, M; Bishop, I; Godman, B; Barbui, C; Raschi, E; Campbell, S; Miranda, J; Gustafsson, L L

    2013-02-01

    National and regional authorities in Scotland have introduced multiple measures to appreciably enhance prescribing efficiency for the proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), statins and renin-angiotensin inhibitor drugs. Generic oral risperidone recently became available in Scotland; however, schizophrenia is a complex disease with advice from respected authorities suggesting that treatment should be individualised. To assess (i) changes in atypical antipsychotic drug (AAP) utilisation and expenditure following the availability of oral generic risperidone in Scotland; (ii) to determine (a) current INN prescribing rates for risperidone following generic availability and (b) decrease in expenditure/DDD for generic risperidone; (iii) to suggest additional measures that could possibly be introduced in Scotland to further enhance prescribing of generic AAPs; and (iv) to provide guidance to NHS Scotland as well as other European authorities on the implications. Retrospective observational study and an interrupted time series design. No appreciable change in the utilisation patterns of risperidone pre- and postgeneric availability. Appreciable INN prescribing averaged 93-98% of total oral risperidone. Generic risperidone was 84% below prepatent loss prices by study end, reducing annual expenditure for oral risperidone in 2010 by GB£3.19mn compared with prepatent loss situation. However, overall expenditure on AAPs increased by 42% from 2005 to 2010. As expected, there was no change in utilisation patterns for risperidone, although potential to influence prescribing patterns. Continued high INN prescribing suggests no problems with generic risperidone in practice. Costs will start to decrease as more AAPs lose their patents (olanzapine and quetiapine). There is the possibility to accelerate this reduction through educational activities. There is potential to realise some savings with generic AAPs. However, this is limited by the complexity of the disease area. Any measures

  19. Policies to enhance prescribing efficiency in Europe: findings and future implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian eGodman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: European countries need to learn from each other to address unsustainable increases in pharmaceutical expenditures. Objective: To assess the influence of the many supply and demand side initiatives introduced across Europe to enhance prescribing efficiency in ambulatory care. As a result provide future guidance to countries. Methods: Cross national retrospective observational study of utilisation (DDDs - Defined Daily Doses and expenditure (Euros and local currency of Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs and statins among 19 European countries and regions principally from 2001 to 2007. Demand side measures categorised under the ‘4Es’ – education engineering, economics and enforcement. Results: Instigating supply side initiatives to lower the price of generics combined with demand side measures to enhance their prescribing is important to maximise prescribing efficiency. Just addressing one component will limit potential efficiency gains. The influence of demand side reforms appears additive, with multiple initiatives typically having a greater influence on increasing prescribing efficiency than single measures apart from potentially ‘enforcement’. There are also appreciable differences in expenditure (€/1000 inhabitants/ year between countries. Countries that have not introduced multiple measures to counteract commercial pressures to enhance the prescribing of generics have seen expenditures up to ten fold or more greater than countries that have instigated multiple demand side measures, although in selected populations. Conclusions: There are considerable opportunities for European countries to enhance their prescribing efficiency, with countries already learning from each other. The 4E methodology allows European countries to concisely capture the range of current demand side measures and plan for the future knowing that initiatives can be additive to further enhance their prescribing efficiency.

  20. Soil heating and impact of prescribed burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoof, Cathelijne

    2016-04-01

    Prescribed burning is highly uncommon in the Netherlands, where wildfire awareness is increasing but its risk management does not yet include fuel management strategies. A major exception is on two military bases, that need to burn their fields in winter and spring to prevent wildfires during summer shooting practice. Research on these very frequent burns has so far been limited to effects on biodiversity, yet site managers and policy makers have questions regarding the soil temperatures reached during these burns because of potential impact on soil properties and soil dwelling fauna. In March 2015, I therefore measured soil and litter temperatures under heath and grass vegetation during a prescribed burn on military terrain in the Netherlands. Soil and litter moisture were sampled pre- and post-fire, ash was collected, and fireline intensity was estimated from flame length. While standing vegetation was dry (0.13 g water/g biomass for grass and 0.6 g/g for heather), soil and litter were moist (0.21 cm3/cm3 and 1.6 g/g, respectively). Soil heating was therefore very limited, with maximum soil temperature at the soil-litter interface remaining being as low as 6.5 to 11.5°C, and litter temperatures reaching a maximum of 77.5°C at the top of the litter layer. As a result, any changes in physical properties like soil organic matter content and bulk density were not significant. These results are a first step towards a database of soil heating in relation to fuel load and fire intensity in this temperate country, which is not only valuable to increase understanding of the relationships between fire intensity and severity, but also instrumental in the policy debate regarding the sustainability of prescribed burns.

  1. Medication prescribing in frail older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Ruth E; O'Mahony, M Sinead; Woodhouse, Kenneth W

    2013-03-01

    While some people remain fit and active as they grow older, others experience complex problems: disease, dependency and disability. Frailty is a term used to describe this latter group, capturing differences in health status among older people. Many frail older people have multiple chronic co-morbidities and functional impairments and, according to guidelines for the management of individual conditions, should be prescribed long lists of medications. However, older people (particularly those who are frail) are often excluded from drug trials, and treatment decisions are therefore based on evidence extrapolated from more robust patient groups with fewer physiological deficits. The risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) increases with increasing patient frailty, and polypharmacy has negative consequences above and beyond the risks of individual drugs. Increasing numbers of medications are associated with a higher likelihood of non-adherence and a significantly greater risk of ADRs. Older people taking five or more medications are at higher risk of delirium and falls, independent of medication indications. This is a short review of the different approaches to defining and measuring frailty. We summarise the factors contributing to ADRs in frail older people and describe the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics changes associated with ageing and frailty. By considering goals of care for frail older people, we explore how the appropriateness of medication prescribing for older people could be improved. Since all physicians are likely to provide care for this group of vulnerable patients, understanding the concept of frailty may help to optimise medication prescribing for older people. The incorporation of frailty measures into future clinical studies of drug effects and pharmacokinetics is important if we are to improve medication use and guide drug doses for fit and frail older people.

  2. Refining metformin prescribing in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayathissa, Sisira; Dixon, Paul; Bruce, Raymond; Reith, David

    2017-03-24

    Metformin is the mainstay of treatment of type 2 diabetes. However, there has been significant concern on prescribing metformin in patients with renal impairment as a result of metformin-associated lactic acidosis (MALA). Recent studies have cast doubt on the existence of MALA purely related to metformin use. Medsafe recently initiated changes to datasheet so lower doses of metformin could be used in patients with GFR down to 15ml/min. In this paper we outline the context and implications of this change.

  3. How to prescribe physical exercise in rheumatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Maddali Bongi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Physical exercise, aiming to improve range of movement, muscle strength and physical well being, lately substituted the immobilization previously prescribed in rheumatic diseases. International guidelines, recommendations of Scientific Societies, and structured reviews regard physical exercise as of pivotal importance in treating rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia syndrome, osteoporosis, and to be considered in connective tissue diseases. Therapeutic exercise should: aim to improve firstly local symptoms and then general health; respect the pain threshold; be a part of a treatment including pharmacological therapies and other rehabilitation techniques, be administered by skilled physiotherapist under the guide of a rheumatologist, be different according to different diseases, disease phases and patient expectations.

  4. When and why placebo-prescribing is acceptable and unacceptable: a focus group study of patients' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Felicity L; Aizlewood, Lizzi; Adams, Alison E M

    2014-01-01

    Surveys of doctors suggest that they use placebos and placebo effects clinically to help patients. However, patients' views are not well-understood. We aimed to identify when and why placebo-prescribing in primary care might be acceptable and unacceptable to patients. A purposive diverse sample of 58 English-speaking adults (18 men; aged 19-80 years) participated in 11 focus groups. Vignettes describing doctors prescribing placebos in primary care were used to initiate discussions. Data were analyzed inductively. Participants discussed diverse harms and benefits of placebo-prescribing for individual patients, carers, healthcare providers, and society. Two perspectives on placebo-prescribing were identified. First, the "consequentialist" perspective focused on the potential for beneficial outcomes of placebo-prescribing. Here, some participants thought placebos are beneficial and should be used clinically; they often invoked the power of the mind or mind-body interactions. Others saw placebos as ineffective and therefore a waste of time and money. Second, the "respecting autonomy" perspective emphasized the harms caused by the deceptive processes thought necessary for placebo-prescribing. Here, participants judged placebo-prescribing unacceptable because placebo-prescribers deceive patients, thus a doctor who prescribes placebos cannot be trusted and patients' autonomy is compromised. They also saw placebo-responders as gullible, which deterred them from trying placebos themselves. Overall, the word "placebo" was often thought to imply "ineffective"; some participants suggested alternative carefully chosen language that could enable doctors to prescribe placebos without directly lying to patients. Negative views of placebos derive from beliefs that placebos do not work and/or that they require deception by the doctor. Positive views are pragmatic in that if placebos work then any associated processes (e.g. mechanisms, deception) are deemed unimportant. Public

  5. General practitioners’ perceptions of public reporting of institution and individual medicine prescribing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Du

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Public reporting of institution- and individual-level performance data has recently become a popular topic in the health care field. This study (1 evaluated the perceptions of general practitioners on the public reporting of institutional and individual medicine prescribing data in primary care institutions, and (2 compared the difference among the perceptions of general practitioners on the dimensions of necessity, methodological rigor, and impact of public reporting medicine prescribing data. Methods We conducted a survey in 10 primary care institutions in Q city, Hubei province. General practitioners who hold prescribing license were eligible for this study; we surveyed all eligible general practitioners in July 2014. The survey instrument was developed based on previous studies and expert opinions. Paired t-test or nonparametric test was used to evaluate the difference in perceptions between the institutional and individual medicine prescribing data reporting. An analysis of variance test was used to analyze the score differences among the three dimensions (i.e., necessity, methodological rigor, and impact. Results A total of 154 general practitioners were surveyed in this study. No significant difference in the perceptions of general practitioners was observed between the institution- and individual-level medicine prescribing data reporting (p > 0.05. General practitioners have significantly different perceptions on the three dimensions of the institution- and individual-level data reporting (p < 0.05. Methodological rigor obtained the lowest score. Regarding the strategies to facilitate the medicine prescribing data reporting, over 80 % of general practitioners selected the items that disclose process measures and not outcome measures, as well as educate patients on data interpretation. Conclusion The perceptions of general practitioners between institution- and individual-level data reporting have no

  6. Drug prescribing pattern of interns at a government healthcare centre in northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehan, Harmeet Singh; Lal, Panna

    2002-01-01

    Prescribing habits of interns posted at a primary health centre for a period of 2 months (January 1994 and February 1994) were studied. Among the 1457 prescriptions collected, the average number of drugs per prescription was 2.47. The commonest groups of drugs prescribed were antibiotics (33.9%), analgesics and anti-inflammatories (17.0%), vitamins (13.0%), cough syrups (10.5%) and antihistamines (8.6%). The use of injectables was uncommon (0.9%). Most of the drugs prescribed were from the local drugs list of the centre (84.2%) consisting of 36 drugs. The list contained 20 drugs with proprietary names of which six were fixed-dose combinations. The local drug list needs modification. The proportion of drugs prescribed by generic name was 49.5%. As per Kunin's criteria, 57.9% of the antibiotics used were appropriate. Interns often forget to write the diagnosis (43%), signs and symptoms (50.2%), dosages and frequency of treatment. The result of this baseline study may be useful in promoting the education necessary in order to achieve the objectives of good prescribing.

  7. The effect of a short tutorial on the incidence of prescribing errors in pediatric emergency care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozer, Eran; Scolnik, Dennis; Macpherson, Alison; Rauchwerger, David; Koren, Gideon

    2006-01-01

    In the paediatric emergency department (ED) trainees are more likely to commit prescribing errors. To determine whether a short educational intervention reduces the incidence of prescribing errors among trainees in a pediatric ED. A prospective cohort study at the ED of a tertiary paediatric hospital. All fellows and residents arriving at the ED at the beginning of the academic year were invited to participate in a 30-minute tutorial focusing on appropriate methods for prescribing medications, followed by a written test. Eighteen days were selected randomly during July 2001. All the charts from these days were reviewed for medication errors. Two reviewers, blinded to whether or not a particular physician attended the tutorial, independently decided whether or not an error had occurred. The main outcome measure was the number of prescribing errors. Twenty-two trainees worked in the ED during July 2001. Of these, 13 trainees attended the tutorial. Eight hundred and ninety nine orders given by trainees were evaluated. We identified 66 (12.4%) errors in 533 orders given by those who attended tutorial, and 46 (12.7%) errors in 363 orders given by those who did not attend tutorial. The adjusted odds of a medication error was not significantly different between those who did not attend the tutorial and those who did (OR: 1.07 95% CI: 0.66-1.70). A short tutorial, followed by a written test, administered to trainees before entering their rotation in the paediatric ED, did not appear to reduce prescribing errors.

  8. Civilian primary care prescribing psychologist in an army medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, David S

    2012-12-01

    The present article discusses the integration of a civilian prescribing psychologist into a primary care clinic at Madigan Army Medical Center. A description of the role of the prescribing psychologist in this setting is provided. The author asserts that integrating prescribing psychology into primary care can improve patient access to skilled behavioral health services including psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic treatment. Potential benefits to the primary care providers (PCPs) working in primary care clinics are discussed. The importance of collaboration between the prescribing psychologist and PCP is emphasized. Initial feedback indicates that integration of a prescribing psychologist into primary care has been well received in this setting.

  9. Guidelines for prescribing optical correction in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wutthiphan, Sorot

    2005-11-01

    As the eye grows, the axial length increases while the cornea and lens flatten. High refractive errors which are common in the neonatal period, reduce rapidly during the first year of life through the process called emmetropization. The possibility that long-term full- time glasses wear may impede emmetropization must be considered. Hyperopia greater than 5.00 diopters (D) in young children is associated with an increased risk of amblyopia and strabismus, therefore optical correction should be prescribed. When hyperopia is associated with esotropia, full correction of the cycloplegic refractive error should be prescribed. Myopia greater than 8.00 D and astigmatism greater than 2.50 D are common causes of isometropic amblyopia. Patients with hyperopic anisometropia with as little as l D difference between the eyes may develop amblyopia while the difference should reach 3-4 D for myopic anisometropia to develop amblyopia. Full cycloplegic refractive difference between two eyes should be given to the anisometropic child in spite of age, strabismus and degree of anisometropia. Myopia control is the attempt to slow the rate of progression of myopia such as cycloplegic agents, plus lenses at near, and rigid contact lenses.

  10. Drug administration error related to computerized prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Garlantezec, P; Aupée, O; Alméras, D; Lefeuvre, L; Souleau, B; Sgarioto, A; Bohand, X

    2010-12-01

    One of the main reasons for the implementation of computer-based prescribing was to reduce medication errors. However, the risk has not fallen to zero and new kinds of errors have been detected. the following case relates one of these medication errors involving a preparation of vincristine. This antineoplastic drug was injected to a patient via a subcutaneous route of administration instead of an intravenous bolus injection. consequently, a cutaneous erythema appeared. This incident resulted from an error in the programming of the administration route of the protocol operated by a pharmacist and a physician. The pharmacist, who was responsible for the validation of the computerized medical order and then for the compounding and the dispensing of the drug, did not detect the error. this case highlights the need of improved and irreproachable therapeutic protocols. Recorded in a database, they must be validated pharmaceutically and medicinally to secure computer-based prescribing, drug handling, dispensing, and administering of the antineoplastic drugs. Even if the pharmaceutical analysis of prescriptions is made easier with computerization, we encourage the training of nurses and the evaluation of their knowledge as well as the necessity for pharmacists to learn to detect new kinds of errors and to verify periodically protocols.

  11. Impact of social prescribing on general practice workload and polypharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, A M; McCauley, F; McCarron, M O

    2017-07-01

    Social prescribing has emerged as a useful tool for helping patients overcome some of the social and behavioural determinants of poor health. There has been little research on the impact of social prescribing on use of primary healthcare resources. This study sought to determine whether social prescribing activities influenced patient-general practitioner (GP) contacts and polypharmacy. Quality-improvement design with social prescribing activity interventions from an urban general practice in Northern Ireland. Patients over 65 years of age with a chronic condition who attended their GP frequently or had multiple medications were offered a social prescribing activity. Participants' contacts with GP and the new repeat prescriptions before and during the social prescribing activity were measured. The total number of repeat prescriptions per patient was compared at the time of referral and 6-12 months later. Indications for referral, primary diagnoses and reasons for declining participation in a social prescribing activity after referral were prospectively recorded. Sixty-eight patients agreed to participate but only 28 (41%) engaged in a prescribed social activity. There was no statistically significant difference in GP contacts (visits to GP, home visits or telephone calls) or number of new repeat prescriptions between referral and completion of 12 weeks of social prescribing activity. Similarly there was no statistically significant difference in the total number of repeat prescriptions between referral and 6-12 months after social prescribing activity in either intention to treat or per protocol analyses. Social prescribing participants had similar demographic factors. Mental health issues (anxiety and/or depression) were more common among participants than those who were referred but declined participation in a social prescribing activity (P = 0.022). While social prescribing may help patients' self-esteem and well-being, it may not decrease GP workload. Further

  12. Enteroparasitic occurrence in fecal samples analyzed at the University of Western São Paulo-UNOESTE clinical laboratory, Presidente Prudente, São Paulo State, Brazil Ocorrência de enteroparasitas em amostras fecais analisadas no Laboratório Clínico da UNOESTE, Presidente Prudente, Estado de São Paulo, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair Toshiko Tashima

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to analyze the enteroparasitic occurrence in children from 0 to 12 years old consulted at the University of western São Paulo Clinical Laboratory, Presidente Prudente, SP, Brazil, in relation to the socioeconomic profile of the attended children. Stool samples were examined and a questionnaire was applied with the objective of knowing the patient's age, sex, medical attendance, characteristic of the habitation, provisioning of water, dejection and domestic waste fates, use of footwear and clinical signs. The software EPI INFO 6 (Version 6.04b was used for the elaboration of the data bank structure and analysis after previous data codification. Among 1,000 children analyzed, as many as 21.3% presented some kind of parasite. The most frequent protozoan was Giardia lamblia (7.3% followed by Entamoeba coli (3.9%. The most frequent helminth was Enterobius vermicularis (1.9% followed by Hymenolepis nana (0.5%. The most frequent protozoan association was Giardia lamblia / Entamoeba coli (0.9%.O objetivo deste estudo foi estimar a ocorrência de enteroparasitoses em crianças de 0 a 12 anos de Presidente Prudente - SP por meio de exames parasitológicos, associada ao perfil sócio-econômico da população. Um questionário foi aplicado com o objetivo de conhecer as seguintes variáveis: idade do paciente, sexo, tipo de assistência médica, características da habitação, abastecimento de água, destino dos dejetos, do lixo, uso de calçados e sinais clínicos. Para a elaboração da estrutura de banco de dados e sua análise, utilizou-se o programa EPI INFO 6 (Versão 6.04b após pré-codificação dos dados. Das 1.000 amostras estudadas, 78,7% das crianças não apresentaram parasitas e 21,3% apresentaram alguma espécie de parasita. O protozoário mais freqüente foi Giardia lamblia (7,3% seguido de Entamoeba coli (3,9%. Os helmintos mais freqüentes foram Enterobius vermicularis (1,9%, seguido de Hymenolepis nana (0,5%. A associa

  13. Contamination of public parks in Presidente Prudente (São Paulo, Brazil by Toxocara spp. eggs Contaminação de praças públicas de Presidente Prudente, São Paulo, Brasil, por ovos de Toxocara spp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamilton Alvares Santarém

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate soil contamination by Toxocara spp. eggs in public parks in Presidente Prudente, São Paulo, Brazil. Soil samples (500 g were collected every month over a 12-month period, from 25 parks in different parts of the city (northern, southern, eastern, western and central areas. Two 10-g aliquots of the material collected from each park were subjected to the centrifuge-flotation method to recover Toxocara spp. eggs. Twenty-four out of the 25 squares studied (96.0% were contaminated and the number of eggs recovered ranged from 1 to 398 per sample. Eggs were recovered all over the year. Despite the number being greater in autumn (p O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar a contaminação do solo de praças públicas por ovos de Toxocara spp. em Presidente Prudente, São Paulo. Amostras de solo (500 g foram coletadas mensalmente, durante um período de 12 meses, de 25 praças de cinco diferentes setores da cidade (norte, sul, leste, oeste e central. Duas alíquotas de 10 g do material coletado foram submetidas ao método de centrífugo-flutuação (sulfato de zinco; d = 1.200 g/cm³, para recuperação dos ovos. Das 25 praças estudadas, 24 (96,0% estavam contaminadas e o número variou de 1 a 398 ovos por amostra analisada. A recuperação foi verificada durante todos os meses do ano, sendo maior no outono (p < 0,001. Entretanto, não houve correlação entre o número de ovos e a temperatura média (r = -0,492; p = 0,148 e a precipitação pluviométrica (r = -0,299; p = 0,402 mensal. Não houve influência da localização dos parques sobre a quantidade de ovos (p = 0,7116. Devido ao alto nível de contaminação de parques públicos por ovos de Toxocara spp., a prevenção da contaminação de áreas públicas pelos agentes de larva migrans é indicada.

  14. Estudo transversal de toxoplasmose em alunas de um curso superior da região de Presidente Prudente, Estado de São Paulo Cross-sectional study on toxoplasmosis among female students on a university course in the Presidente Prudente region, State of São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane de Oliveira Souza

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: toxoplasmose é uma doença parasitária causada pelo protozoário Toxoplasma gondii, que acomete o homem e outros animais. A forma mais grave é a toxoplasmose congênita, sendo então importante estabelecer o perfil sorológico da mulher antes da gestação. Este trabalho objetivou analisar a sorologia para toxoplasmose de alunas do curso de Enfermagem da UNOESTE (Universidade do Oeste Paulista Presidente Prudente/SP. MÉTODOS: foram coletadas amostras de sangue de 80 alunas, com idade de 18 a 35 anos após assinatura do Termo de Consentimento. A ocorrência de anticorpos IgM e IgG anti-Toxoplasma gondii foi determinada pelo método ELISA. Este trabalho foi aprovado pelo Comitê de Ética da Instituição e realizado no Laboratório de Imunologia da UNOESTE. RESULTADOS: das 80 amostras de sangue analisadas, 27 alunas apresentaram IgG positiva e nenhuma apresentou anticorpo IgM. CONCLUSÕES: das 80 alunas, 53 (66,2%, são suscetíveis à toxoplasmose numa possível gestação. Sendo 27 (33,8 as alunas consideradas soropositivas.INTRODUCTION: Toxoplasmosis is a parasitic disease caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, which affects humans and other animals. The most severe form is congenital toxoplasmosis. Thus, it is important to establish the serological profile of women before pregnancy. This study aimed to analyze the serology of toxoplasmosis among female students on the nursing course at Unoeste (Universidade do Oeste Paulista, in Presidente Prudente, SP. METHODS: Blood samples were collected from 80 female students aged 18 to 35 years after they had signed the consent statement. Occurrences of anti-Toxoplasma gondii IgM and IgG antibodies were determined using the ELISA method. This study was approved by the institution's ethics committee and was conducted in the Immunology Laboratory at Unoeste. RESULTS: Among the 80 blood samples analyzed, 27 female students were positive for IgG, whereas none of them were positive for

  15. Incidence and transplacental transmission of Neospora caninum in primiparous females from Bos indicus slaughtered in Presidente Prudente, São Paulo, Brazil / Incidência e transmissão transplacentária de Neospora caninum em fêmeas primíparas da raça Bos indicus abatidos em Presidente Prudente, São Paulo, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio do Nascimento Kronka

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available To produce an epidemiological map of neosporosis in Brazil and identify the types of transmission of this disease, the present study evaluated the occurrence of Neospora caninum in Nelore cattle (Bos indicus in Presidente Prudent, west region of Sao Paulo state; its vertical transmission; and the early stage in which fetuses are infected. To achieve this, serum samples from 518 slaughtered pregnant heifers and their fetuses were tested by ELISA technique and fetal brain tissues subjected to PCR. One hundred and three heifers (19.88% had antibodies to N. caninum, as well as 38 (36.8% of fetuses from 4 months of gestation. The conventional PCR failed to detect N. caninum DNA. These findings show that neosporosis occurs in the area studied and that it may be transmitted the transplacental route, althought N. caninum had not detected in brain tissue from non-aborted fetuses. The use of nested PCR it would be applied to increase the sensitivy of test.Para produzir um mapa epidemiológico da neosporose no Brasil e identificar os tipos de transmissão dessa doença, o presente estudo avaliou a ocorrência de Neospora caninum em fêmea Nelore (Bos Indicus em Presidente Prudente, região oeste do Estado de São Paulo e o risco de infecção fetal nos estágios iniciais da gestação. Para a realização deste estudo, amostras de soro de 518 novilhas prenhas abatidas e seus fetos foram testadas pela técnica de ELISA e para avaliação de transmissão vertical, tecido cerebral fetal foi submetido à reação da polimerase em cadeia (PCR. Dessas novilhas, 103 (19,88% tinham anticorpos para N. caninum dos quais 38 (36,8% estavam no 4 mês de gestação. Esses achados mostram que a Neosporose ocorre na área estudada e que pode ser transmitido pela via placentária, embora o N. caninum não tenha sido detectado em tecido cerebral de fetos não abortado. O uso de nested PCR poderia ser aplicado como forma de aumentar a sensibilidade do teste.

  16. Prescribing antibiotics for respiratory tract infections by GPs: management and prescriber characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Akkerman (Annemiek); M.M. Kuyvenhoven (Marijke); J.C. van der Wouden (Hans); T.J. Verheij

    2005-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Due to clinical and non-clinical factors, considerable variation exists in the prescribing of antibiotics for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) by GPs based in the Netherlands. AIM: To assess, in patients with RTIs in Dutch general practice: the

  17. 'Doing the right thing': factors influencing GP prescribing of antidepressants and prescribed doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chris F; Williams, Brian; MacGillivray, Stephen A; Dougall, Nadine J; Maxwell, Margaret

    2017-06-17

    Antidepressant prescribing continues to increase, with 5-16% of adults receiving antidepressants annually. Total prescribing growth is due in part to increased long-term use, greater selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI) use and the use of higher SSRI doses. Evidence does not support routine use of higher SSRI doses for depression treatment, and factors influencing the use of such doses are not well known. The aim of this study was to explore factors influencing GPs' use of antidepressants and their doses to treat depression. Semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of 28 practising GPs; sampled by antidepressant prescribing volume, practice size and deprivation level. A topic guide drawing on past literature was used with enough flexibility to allow additional themes to emerge. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Framework analysis was employed. Constant comparison and disconfirmation were carried out across transcripts, with data collection being interspersed with analysis by three researchers. The thematic framework was then systematically applied to the data and conceptualised into an overarching explanatory model. Depression treatment involved ethical and professional imperatives of 'doing the right thing' for individuals by striving to achieve the 'right care fit'. This involved medicalised and non-medicalised patient-centred approaches. Factors influencing antidepressant prescribing and doses varied over time from first presentation, to antidepressant initiation and longer-term treatment. When faced with distressed patients showing symptoms of moderate to severe depression GPs were confident prescribing SSRIs which they considered as safe and effective medicines, and ethically and professionally appropriate. Many GPs were unaware that higher doses lacked greater efficacy and onset of action occurred within 1-2 weeks, preferring to wait 8-12 weeks before increasing or switching. Ongoing pressures to maintain

  18. The need for continuing education of the prescriber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, M

    2000-12-01

    The Millennium will be seen as an important time of change in the doctor-patient relationship. Until very recently, many patients, male and female, expected not only advice from their doctor, but also to be told which treatment would be best for them. This paternalistic approach, however, is rapidly disappearing. Nowadays, early post-menopausal women expect to make decisions about their treatment, after being fully informed of all the possible benefits and risks. Provision for this requires the doctor to keep abreast of the literature. Occasionally, new data are released that challenge established beliefs. It was thought, for example, that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) would reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. This still applies to apparently fit and healthy women but data from the Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS) have shown that the use of HRT in women with established risk factors for coronary heart disease increases mortality in the short term. A protective effect of HRT on the risk of coronary heart disease was not observed until after 2-3 years of treatment. Patient access to medical information has been revolutionized during the last decade. The availability of books, magazines and newspaper articles, which have always been an important source of patient information, has greatly increased. In addition, the Internet has transformed patient knowledge. According to surveys, these forms of communication provide the major source of information for 50% of women seeking advice about HRT. Indeed, the patient is often aware of the latest medical information before her doctor, possibly because she has more time. With such a large readership, these forms of communication have to report accurately. Unfortunately, they frequently do not and errors in reporting change the emphasis of a piece of medical research. The result is women are frightened and continuance suffers. It is worth remembering that 'bad news', suitably publicized, sells more newspapers and magazines than 'good news'. Competition is growing for 'alternative' products. 'Natural' treatments are 'in'. These treatments are widely claimed to reduce menopausal complaints in older patients and patients are keen to take them. But where is the evidence of efficacy and safety from robust and rigorous studies? All too often it is lacking. The doctor therefore has to advise the patient accurately about products for their treatment, and may also have to provide an opinion on 'alternative' remedies. Knowledge of alternative medical literature is therefore becoming essential. If doctors wish to continue to be respected by patients, they must remain knowledgeable and communicate their knowledge in an unbiased manner. They must emphasize the benefits and risks of different treatments according to the concerns of the patient. Failure of the doctor to provide this service will result not only in loss of respect, but alas, too often, in medico-legal consequences.

  19. Factors influencing antibiotic prescribing in China: an exploratory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Lucy; McKee, Martin

    2009-04-01

    China has very high rates of antibiotic resistance and a health care system that provides strong incentives for over-prescribing. This paper describes the findings of a qualitative study in a province of southern China that seeks to assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to the use of antibiotics. Semi-structured interviews with patients and health workers at provincial, county, township, and village level. Interviews used four probes (common cold, cough, mild diarrhoea and tiredness) where antibiotics were not indicated, supplemented by questions on knowledge, attitudes, and practices. These data were supplemented by two focus groups, with medical students and pharmacists, and discussions with participants at a national conference on antibiotic use. Coughs and diarrhoea are almost universally treated with antibiotics, while the cold is normally treated with antivirals instead or as well. Many physicians are aware that the cold is usually self-limiting but believe that they can speed recovery and that they are responding to patient expectations. Most physicians and many patients are aware of the phenomenon of antibiotic resistance, although it is often seen as a property acquired by the patient and not the micro-organism. Physicians face financial incentives to prescribe, with profit splitting with pharmaceutical suppliers. Sales profits form a major part of a hospital's income. National guidance on use of antibiotics is fragmentary and incomplete. The misuse of antibiotics poses considerable risks. Effective action will require a multi-faceted strategy including education, based on an understanding of existing beliefs, the replacement of perverse incentives with those promoting best practice, and investment in improved surveillance. Much of this will require action at national level.

  20. Benzodiazepine prescribing guideline adherence and misuse potential in Irish minors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kevin D; Sahm, Laura J; McCarthy, Suzanne; Byrne, Stephen

    2015-10-01

    The Good Prescribing Practice for Clinicians guidelines were published in 2002 in Ireland to guide General Practitioners about prescribing benzodiazepines. There has been no research to-date to measure compliance by General Practitioners. Inappropriate prescribing to minors may result in increased use or misuse of benzodiazepines. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prescribing of benzodiazepines to minors in Ireland against the Good Prescribing Practice for Clinicians guidelines. Data for medicines dispensed between January 2009 and December 2012 from the Health Intelligence Ireland database were accessed and analysed. This database contains information about government-subsidised community-pharmacy-dispensed medicines. Benzodiazepine prescribing to minors increased by 10.2% between 2009 and 2012. Almost 15% of patients (n = 2193) were prescribed benzodiazepines for greater than four weeks; which contravenes the guidelines. Approximately half (51.4%) of prescribers who contravened this guideline, prescribed all their benzodiazepines in quantities of greater than one week, against the recommendations of the guidelines. The consequences of prescribing against National Guidelines can result in patients who become long-term benzodiazepine users and thus place an increased burden upon the healthcare system. The reasons for non-compliance by GPs should be investigated to find solutions.

  1. Prescriber compliance with black box warnings in older adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Judith R; Coulen, Charmaine; Berger, Jan E; Moore, Marsha C; McQueen, Angela; Jan, Saira A

    2009-11-01

    Patients prescribed medications with US Food and Drug Administration-issued black box warnings (BBWs) warrant additional vigilance by prescribers because these drugs can cause serious adverse drug events. Seniors are at greater risk for adverse drug events due to increased medication burden and greater health vulnerability. To improve our understanding of the prescribing and patient-monitoring practices of physicians prescribing medications with a BBW to patients age >or=65 years in an ambulatory care setting. A retrospective cohort study of administrative pharmacy and medical claims identified 58,190 patients age >or=65 years in the Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey beneficiary population with >or=1 claim for >or=1 of the 8 targeted medications between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2005. Medications included carbamazepine, amiodarone, ketoconazole, loop diuretics, methotrexate, cyclosporine, metformin and combinations, and cilostazol. Patients were followed 12 months from the index prescription date to evaluate prescriber compliance with BBWs using operationalized definitions of compliance. Patients prescribed drugs with a drug-laboratory warning had lower rates of prescriber BBW compliance (0.7%-24.9%) than patients prescribed drugs with a drug-disease warning (84.7%-90.2%). Administrative claims analysis identified low rates of prescriber compliance with BBWs in managing patients age >or=65 years. Claims analysis may be a cost-effective strategy to monitor prescriber compliance with BBWs in older patients at higher risk.

  2. Ibuprofen in paediatrics: pharmacology, prescribing and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Camilla; Carroll, Will

    2016-12-01

    Ibuprofen, a propionic acid derivative, is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. The oral formulation is widely used in paediatric practice and after paracetamol it is one of the most common drugs prescribed for children in hospital. The treatment of fever with antipyretics such as ibuprofen is controversial as fever is the normal response of the body to infection and unless the child becomes distressed or symptomatic, fever alone should not be routinely treated. Combined treatment with paracetamol and ibuprofen is commonly undertaken but almost certainly is not helpful. This article aims to describe the indications and mode of action of the drug, outline its pharmacokinetics and highlight the important key messages regarding its use in clinical practice. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. GPs perspectives on prescribing intrauterine contraceptive devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodge, Gabrielle; Sanci, Lena; Temple-Smith, Meredith J

    2017-01-01

    Globally, 14% of women use intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUCDs) for prevention of unplanned pregnancy. In Australia, the use of IUCDs is negligible at METHODS: GPs participated in qualitative interviews in February-May 2016, exploring their knowledge, attitudes and practice around IUCDs. Data were thematically analysed. Overall, 17 GPs were interviewed. They identified key barriers to prescription of IUCDs as misconceptions brought to the consultation, lack of current GP inserters, and issues in referral of patients for insertion. Barriers to prescribing IUCDs create challenges for women in accessing all available contraceptive options. Potential solutions to increase IUCD uptake might include local directories of GP inserters and targeted promotion of IUCD use. Increased GP training is necessary to expand the number of current GP inserters.

  4. DNA Brick Crystals with Prescribed Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yonggang; Ong, Luvena L.; Sun, Wei; Song, Jie; Dong, Mingdong; Shih, William M.; Yin, Peng

    2014-01-01

    We describe a general framework for constructing two-dimensional crystals with prescribed depth and sophisticated three-dimensional features. These crystals may serve as scaffolds for the precise spatial arrangements of functional materials for diverse applications. The crystals are self-assembled from single-stranded DNA components called DNA bricks. We demonstrate the experimental construction of DNA brick crystals that can grow to micron-size in the lateral dimensions with precisely controlled depth up to 80 nanometers. They can be designed to display user-specified sophisticated three-dimensional nanoscale features, such as continuous or discontinuous cavities and channels, and to pack DNA helices at parallel and perpendicular angles relative to the plane of the crystals. PMID:25343605

  5. Educational sistem in developing countries

    OpenAIRE

    Denkova, Jadranka

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: Educational sistem in Republic of Macedonia consist of: Pre-school education, primary education, secondary education, high education, master studies, Phd, education of adults and Education for children with specific needs. Pre-school education comprises several types of institutions. In elementary education, with the Law on Amending and Appending the Law on Primary education strating from the school year 2005/2006, it has been prescribed that the year of education before attending t...

  6. A Technological Innovation to Reduce Prescribing Errors Based on Implementation Intentions: The Acceptability and Feasibility of MyPrescribe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyworth, Chris; Hart, Jo; Thoong, Hong; Ferguson, Jane; Tully, Mary

    2017-08-01

    Although prescribing of medication in hospitals is rarely an error-free process, prescribers receive little feedback on their mistakes and ways to change future practices. Audit and feedback interventions may be an effective approach to modifying the clinical practice of health professionals, but these may pose logistical challenges when used in hospitals. Moreover, such interventions are often labor intensive. Consequently, there is a need to develop effective and innovative interventions to overcome these challenges and to improve the delivery of feedback on prescribing. Implementation intentions, which have been shown to be effective in changing behavior, link critical situations with an appropriate response; however, these have rarely been used in the context of improving prescribing practices. Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted to evaluate the acceptability and feasibility of providing feedback on prescribing errors via MyPrescribe, a mobile-compatible website informed by implementation intentions. Data relating to 200 prescribing errors made by 52 junior doctors were collected by 11 hospital pharmacists. These errors were populated into MyPrescribe, where prescribers were able to construct their own personalized action plans. Qualitative interviews with a subsample of 15 junior doctors were used to explore issues regarding feasibility and acceptability of MyPrescribe and their experiences of using implementation intentions to construct prescribing action plans. Framework analysis was used to identify prominent themes, with findings mapped to the behavioral components of the COM-B model (capability, opportunity, motivation, and behavior) to inform the development of future interventions. MyPrescribe was perceived to be effective in providing opportunities for critical reflection on prescribing errors and to complement existing training (such as junior doctors' e-portfolio). The participants were able to provide examples of how they would use

  7. Contact between doctors and the pharmaceutical industry, their perceptions, and the effects on prescribing habits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Lieb

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prescribing behaviour of doctors is influenced by the pharmaceutical industry. This study investigated the extent to which contacts with pharmaceutical sales representatives (PSR and the perception of these contacts influence prescribing habits. METHOD: An online questionnaire regarding contact with PSRs and perceptions of this contact was sent to 1,388 doctors, 11.5% (n = 160 of whom completed the survey. Individual prescribing data over a year (number of prescriptions, expenditure, and daily doses for all on-patent branded, off-patent branded, and generic drugs were obtained from the Bavarian Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians. RESULTS: 84% of the doctors saw PSR at least once a week, and 14% daily. 69% accepted drug samples, 39% accepted stationery and 37% took part in sponsored continuing medical education (CME frequently. 5 physicians (3% accepted no benefits at all. 43% of doctors believed that they received adequate and accurate information from PSRs frequently or always and 42% believed that their prescribing habits were influenced by PSR visits occasionally or frequently. Practices that saw PSRs frequently had significantly higher total prescriptions and total daily doses (but not expenditure than practices that were less frequently visited. Doctors who believed that they received accurate information from PSRs showed higher expenditures on off-patent branded drugs (thus available as generics and a lower proportion of generics. The eschewal of sponsored CME was associated with a lower proportion of on patent-branded drug prescriptions, lower expenditure on off-patent branded drug prescriptions and a higher proportion of generics. Acceptance of office stationery was associated with higher daily doses. CONCLUSIONS: Avoidance of industry-sponsored CME is associated with more rational prescribing habits. Furthermore, gift acceptance and the belief that one is receiving adequate information from a PSR are

  8. Prescribing style and variation in antibiotic prescriptions for sore throat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordoba Currea, Gloria Cristina; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Lopez-Valcarcel, Beatriz Gonzalez

    2015-01-01

    Background: Variation in prescription of antibiotics in primary care can indicate poor clinical practice that contributes to the increase of resistant strains. General Practitioners (GPs), as a professional group, are expected to have a fairly homogeneous prescribing style. In this paper, we...... describe variation in prescribing style within and across groups of GPs from six countries. Methods: Cross-sectional study with the inclusion of 457 GPs and 6394 sore throat patients. We describe variation in prescribing antibiotics for sore throat patients across six countries and assess whether variation...... in “prescribing style” – understood as a subjective tendency to prescribe – has an important effect on variation in prescription of antibiotics by using the concept of prescribing style as a latent variable in a multivariable model. We report variation as a Median Odds Ratio (MOR) which is the transformation...

  9. Prescribing practices amid the OxyContin crisis: examining the effect of print media coverage on opioid prescribing among physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borwein, Alexandra; Kephart, George; Whelan, Emma; Asbridge, Mark

    2013-12-01

    The pain medication OxyContin (hereafter referred to as oxycodone extended release) has been the subject of sustained, and largely negative, media attention in recent years. We sought to determine whether media coverage of oxycodone extended release in North American newspapers has led to changes in prescribing of the drug in Nova Scotia, Canada. An interrupted time-series design examined the effect of media attention on physicians' monthly prescribing of opioids. The outcome measures were, for each physician, the monthly proportions of all opioids prescribed and the proportion of strong opioids prescribed that were for oxycodone extended release. The exposure of interest was media attention defined as the number of articles published each month in 27 North American newspapers. Variations in media effects by provider characteristics (specialty, prescribing volume, and region) were assessed. Within-provider changes in the prescribing of oxycodone extended release in Nova Scotia were observed, and they followed changes in media coverage. Oxycodone extended release prescribing rose steadily prior to receiving media attention. Following peak media attention in the United States, the prescribing of oxycodone extended release slowed. Likewise, following peak coverage in Canadian newspapers, the prescribing of oxycodone extended release declined. These patterns were observed across prescriber specialties and by prescriber volume, though the magnitude of change in prescribing varied. This study demonstrates that print media reporting of oxycodone extended release in North American newspapers, and its continued portrayal as a social problem, coincided with reductions in the prescribing of oxycodone extended release by physicians in Nova Scotia. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Doctors' attitudes about prescribing and knowledge of the costs of common medications.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGuire, C

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Compliance with medical therapy may be compromised because of the affordability of medications. Inadequate physician knowledge of drug costs may unwittingly contribute to this problem. METHODS: We measured attitudes about prescribing and knowledge of medication costs by written survey of medical and surgical non consultant hospital doctors and consultants in two University teaching hospitals (n = 102). Sixty-eight percent felt the cost of medicines was an important consideration in the prescribing decision, however, 88% often felt unaware of the actual costs. Only 33% had easy access to drug cost data, and only 3% had been formally educated about drug costs. Doctors\\' estimates of the cost of a supply of ten commonly used medications were accurate in only 12% of cases, too low for 50%, and too high for 38%. CONCLUSIONS: Interventions are needed to educate doctors about drug costs and provide them with reliable, easily accessible cost information in real-world practice.

  11. A RCT evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of academic detailing versus postal prescribing feedback in changing GP antibiotic prescribing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Naughton, Corina

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of academic detailing (AD) plus postal prescribing feedback versus postal prescribing feedback alone in reducing: (i) the overall rate of antibiotic; and (ii) proportion of second-line antibiotic prescribing. In addition, the cost-effectiveness of an outreach prescriber adviser service versus a postal prescribing feedback service was evaluated.

  12. Prescribing Practices and Polypharmacy in Kitovu Hospital, Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prescribing Practices and Polypharmacy in Kitovu Hospital, Uganda. N McGaughey, M Lynch, D Bell. Abstract. This audit of prescribing practices explores recent trends at Kitovu Hospital, Uganda. The average number of drugs prescribed per patient was 2.89 ± 0.11, of which 1.79±0.09 were generics and 0.69±0.06 ...

  13. Quality circles for pharmacotherapy to modify general practitioners' prescribing behaviour for generic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Wolfgang; Mlczoch-Czerny, Marie-Theres; Jens, Rolf; Dowrick, Christopher

    2012-08-01

    In Austria, the participation of general practitioners (GPs) in so-called 'quality circles for pharmacotherapy' (QCPs) was taken as a special approach to increase the use of generics and possibly, to improve the quality and efficiency of prescribing patterns in primary care. This study aimes at exploring GPs' perception of QCPs whether they think that taking part has helped to change their prescribing habits, their opinions on generics in general and the issues that arise for them in attempting to promote their use. Qualitative analysis was used to evaluate QCP protocols for their potential to evoke discussion in the group and for their relevance to our study questions. Of the 821 self-employed GPs in Vienna under contract with the Vienna District Health Insurance Fund 445 took part at least once in the study period. Seven main topics, which provide insight into various aspects of patient care in primary care, were identified: QCPs work, generic drug prescription, problems related to the sale of generics, patient counselling and education, therapy adherence, coordination of care, competence and medical education. From all prescribed drugs for which generics were available in the fourth quarter of the year 2003 GPs prescribed 33.91% generics, in the fourth quarter of 2004 43.97%, in the fourth quarter of 2005 46.31%, and in the fourth quarter of 2006 49.88%. Peer review groups can be an important method of quality improvement in GPs' prescribing behaviour in favour of generics. QCPs also facilitate the exchange between GPs on problems encountered and provide feedback to policy makers. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Enhancing the quality of antibiotic prescribing in Primary Care: Qualitative evaluation of a blended learning intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hare Monika

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Stemming the Tide of Antibiotic Resistance (STAR Educational Program aims to enhance the quality of antibiotic prescribing and raise awareness about antibiotic resistance among general medical practitioners. It consists of a seven part, theory-based blended learning program that includes online reflection on clinicians' own practice, presentation of research evidence and guidelines, a practice-based seminar focusing on participants' own antibiotic prescribing and resistance rates in urine samples sent from their practice, communication skills training using videos of simulated patients in routine surgeries, and participation in a web forum. Effectiveness was evaluated in a randomised controlled trial in which 244 GPs and Nurse Practitioners and 68 general practices participated. This paper reports part of the process evaluation of that trial. Methods Semi-structured, digitally recorded, and transcribed telephone interviews with 31 purposively sampled trial participants analysed using thematic content analysis. Results The majority of participants reported increased awareness of antibiotic resistance, greater self-confidence in reducing antibiotic prescribing and at least some change in consultation style and antibiotic prescribing behaviour. Reported practical changes included adopting a practice-wide policy of antibiotic prescription reduction. Many GPs also reported increased insight into patients' expectations, ultimately contributing to improved doctor-patient rapport. The components of the intervention put forward as having the greatest influence on changing clinician behaviour were the up-to-date research evidence resources, simple and effective communication skills presented in on-line videos, and presentation of the practice's own antibiotic prescribing levels combined with an overview of local resistance data. Conclusion Participants regarded this complex blended learning intervention acceptable and feasible, and

  15. Physicians-in-training are not prepared to prescribe medical marijuana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evanoff, Anastasia B; Quan, Tiffany; Dufault, Carolyn; Awad, Michael; Bierut, Laura Jean

    2017-11-01

    While medical marijuana use is legal in more than half of U.S. states, evidence is limited about the preparation of physicians-in-training to prescribe medical marijuana. We asked whether current medical school and graduate medical educational training prepare physicians to prescribe medical marijuana. We conducted a national survey of U.S. medical school curriculum deans, a similar survey of residents and fellows at Washington University in St. Louis, and a query of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Curriculum Inventory database for keywords associated with medical marijuana. Surveys were obtained from 101 curriculum deans, and 258 residents and fellows. 145 schools were included in the curriculum search. The majority of deans (66.7%) reported that their graduates were not at all prepared to prescribe medical marijuana, and 25.0% reported that their graduates were not at all prepared to answer questions about medical marijuana. The vast majority of residents and fellows (89.5%) felt not at all prepared to prescribe medical marijuana, while 35.3% felt not at all prepared to answer questions, and 84.9% reported receiving no education in medical school or residency on medical marijuana. Finally, only 9% of medical school curriculums document in the AAMC Curriculum Inventory database content on medical marijuana. Our study highlights a fundamental mismatch between the state-level legalization of medical marijuana and the lack of preparation of physicians-in-training to prescribe it. With even more states on the cusp of legalizing medical marijuana, physician training should adapt to encompass this new reality of medical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. [Does the prescribing of antibiotics in paediatrics improve after a multidisciplinary intervention?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalana-Josa, Pilar; Laclaustra-Mendizábal, Blanca; Aza-Pascual-Salcedo, M Mercedes; Carcas-de-Benavides, Cristina; Lallana-Álvarez, M Jesús; Pina-Gadea, M Belén

    2015-02-01

    Antibiotics overuse is linked to elevated antimicrobial resistance. In Aragon, Spain, the highest antibiotic prescription rates occur among children from 1 to 4 years old. The rate of use in this age group is over 60%. To evaluate the effect of multi-faceted intervention on Primary Care paediatricians to reduce antibiotic use and to improve antibiotic prescribing for paediatric outpatients. Outpatient antimicrobial prescribing was analysed before and after an intervention in paediatricians. The intervention included a clinical education session about diagnosis and treatment in the most prevalent paediatric infectious diseases, a clinical interview and communication skills, a workshop on rapid Streptococcus antigen detection test and patient information leaflets and useful internet websites for parents. The control group included paediatricians without this educational intervention on antibiotics. Antibiotic prescribing decreased from 19.17 defined daily doses per 1000 inhabitants/day (DID) to 14.36 DID among intervention paediatricians vs 19.84 DID to 16.02 DID in controls. The decreasing was higher in the intervention group, but the effect was not statistically significant. Macrolides and broad-spectrum penicillins prescribing decreased in both groups. Antibiotic prescribing decreased, but there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups. The high satisfaction of paediatricians in the intervention group makes it necessary to continue with these kinds of strategies to improve antibiotic use in outpatients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  17. Reducing prescribing errors through creatinine clearance alert redesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Brittany L; Zillich, Alan J; Russell, Scott A; Weiner, Michael; McManus, M Sue; Spina, Jeffrey R; Russ, Alissa L

    2015-10-01

    Literature has shown that computerized creatinine clearance alerts reduce errors during prescribing, and applying human factors principles may further reduce errors. Our objective was to apply human factors principles to creatinine clearance alert design and assess whether the redesigned alerts increase usability and reduce prescribing errors compared with the original alerts. Twenty Veterans Affairs (VA) outpatient providers (14 physicians, 2 nurse practitioners, and 4 clinical pharmacists) completed 2 usability sessions in a counterbalanced study to evaluate original and redesigned alerts. Each session consisted of fictional patient scenarios with 3 medications that warranted prescribing changes because of renal impairment, each associated with creatinine clearance alerts. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected to assess alert usability and the occurrence of prescribing errors. There were 43% fewer prescribing errors with the redesigned alerts compared with the original alerts (P = .001). Compared with the original alerts, redesigned alerts significantly reduced prescribing errors for allopurinol and ibuprofen (85% vs 40% and 65% vs 25%, P = .012 and P = .008, respectively), but not for spironolactone (85% vs 65%). Nine providers (45%) voiced confusion about why the alert was appearing when they encountered the original alert design. When laboratory links were presented on the redesigned alert, laboratory information was accessed 3.5 times more frequently. Although prescribing errors were high with both alert designs, the redesigned alerts significantly improved prescribing outcomes. This investigation provides some of the first evidence on how alerts may be designed to support safer prescribing for patients with renal impairment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Interventions to optimise prescribing for older people in care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alldred, David P; Raynor, David K; Hughes, Carmel; Barber, Nick; Chen, Timothy F; Spoor, Pat

    2013-02-28

    There is a substantial body of evidence that prescribing for care home residents is suboptimal and requires improvement. Consequently, there is a need to identify effective interventions to optimise prescribing and resident outcomes in this context. The objective of the review was to determine the effect of interventions to optimise prescribing for older people living in care homes. We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Specialised Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), The Cochrane Library (Issue 11, 2012); Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, The Cochrane Library (Issue 11, 2012); MEDLINE OvidSP (1980 on); EMBASE, OvidSP (1980 on); Ageline, EBSCO (1966 on); CINAHL, EBSCO (1980 on); International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, OvidSP (1980 on); PsycINFO, OvidSP (1980 on); conference proceedings in Web of Science, Conference Proceedings Citation Index - SSH & Science, ISI Web of Knowledge (1990 on); grey literature sources and trial registries; and contacted authors of relevant studies. We also reviewed the references lists of included studies and related reviews (search period November 2012). We included randomised controlled trials evaluating interventions aimed at optimising prescribing for older people (aged 65 years or older) living in institutionalised care facilities. Studies were included if they measured one or more of the following primary outcomes, adverse drug events; hospital admissions;mortality; or secondary outcomes, quality of life (using validated instrument); medication-related problems; medication appropriateness (using validated instrument); medicine costs. Two authors independently screened titles and abstracts, assessed studies for eligibility, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. A narrative summary of results was presented. The eight included studies involved 7653 residents in 262 (range 1 to 85) care homes in six countries. Six studies were cluster

  19. Effect of a weight-based prescribing method within an electronic health record on prescribing errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, Regina; Barr, Wendy B; Harris, Marissa; Munshi, Shibani

    2009-11-15

    The effect of a weight-based prescribing method within the electronic health record (EHR) on the rate of prescribing errors was studied. A report was generated listing all patients who received a prescription by a clinic provider for either infants' or children's acetaminophen or ibuprofen from January 1 to July 28, 2005 (preintervention group) and from July 29 to December 30, 2005 (postintervention group). Patients were included if they were 12 years old or younger, had a prescription ordered for infants' or children's acetaminophen or ibuprofen within the EHR, and had a weight documented in the chart on the visit day. The dosing range for acetaminophen was 10-15 mg/kg every four to six hours as needed, and the regimen for ibuprofen was 5-10 mg/kg every six to eight hours as needed. Dosing errors were defined as overdosage of strength, overdosage of regimen, underdosage of strength, under-dosage of regimen, and incomprehensible dosing directions. Totals of 316 and 224 patient visits were analyzed from the preintervention and postintervention groups, respectively. Significantly more medication errors were found in the preintervention group than in the postintervention group (103 versus 46, p = 0.002). Significantly fewer strength overdosing errors occurred in the postintervention group (8.9% versus 4.0%, p = 0.028). An automated weight-based dosing calculator integrated into an EHR system in the outpatient setting significantly reduced medication prescribing errors for antipyretics prescribed to pediatric patients. This effect appeared to be strongest for reducing overdose errors.

  20. Dental care resistance prevention and antibiotic prescribing modification—the cluster-randomised controlled DREAM trial

    OpenAIRE

    Löffler, Christin; Böhmer, Femke; Hornung, Anne; Lang, Hermann; Burmeister, Ulrike; Podbielski, Andreas; Wollny, Anja; Kundt, Günther; Altiner, Attila

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial resistance development is one of the most urgent problems in healthcare worldwide. In Europe, dentistry accounts for a comparatively high amount of antibiotic prescriptions. In light of increasing levels of bacterial resistance, this development is alarming. So far, very few interventional studies have been performed, and further research is urgently needed. By means of a complex educational intervention, the DREAM trial aims at optimising antibiotic prescribing behaviour...

  1. Educational attainment, perceived control and the quality of women's diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Mary; Lawrence, Wendy; Crozier, Sarah; Robinson, Siân; Baird, Janis; Margetts, Barrie; Cooper, Cyrus

    2009-06-01

    Data from the Southampton Women's Survey have established that women of lower educational attainment have poorer quality diets than those of higher educational attainment. This relationship is strong and graded such that for every increase in level of educational qualification, there is an increase in the likelihood that a woman will have a better quality diet. It is not wholly explained by socio-economic status. Qualitative research carried out in Southampton suggests that women of lower educational attainment may have a poorer diet because they feel they lack control over the food choices they make for themselves and their families. We set out to investigate the relationship between educational attainment, perceived control and quality of diet in a sample of women from Southampton. Cross-sectional study using structured interviews in which women's diet, educational attainment and perceived control were assessed. 19 Children's Centres and baby clinics in Southampton, UK. 372 women, median age 28 years. Quality of diet assessed by prudent diet score produced from principal components analysis of 20-item food frequency questionnaire, and perceived control assessed by a validated questionnaire. Women of lower educational attainment tended to have lower prudent diet scores and lower perceived control scores than women of higher educational attainment. Having a lower prudent diet score was associated with consuming fewer vegetables and vegetable dishes, less wholemeal bread and vegetarian food, and more chips and roast potatoes, meat pies, Yorkshire puddings and pancakes, crisps and snacks, white bread and added sugar. In a regression model both lower educational attainment and lower perceived control were associated with lower prudent diet scores, independent of the effects of confounding factors. However there was an interaction effect such that lower perceived control was only related to prudent diet score in the group of women of lower educational attainment. Women

  2. Did a reform strategy in drug management improve doctors’ prescribing habits in Montenegro: The example for the cardiovascular drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duborija-Kovačević Nataša

    2006-01-01

    (C08 were prescribed 33.7% more (7.12 vs. 9.52 DDD/1000 inh./day, mostly because of seven times higher prescribing of amlodipine in 2004. Pentaerythritol tetranitrate was left out, but isosorbide dinitrate and isosorbide mononitrate were prescribed more frequently. High-priced atorvastatin was replaced with the older simvastatin, that was prescribed three times more. Conclusion. The reform strategy in drug management mostly improved the doctors' prescribing habits and the subsequent use of cardiovascular drugs within the outpatient setting. For the most part, the noticed changes were in accordance with the actual recommendations, but some cases need additional measures. Regulatory policy, however, could not compensate for the continual education of doctors that prescribe drugs.

  3. What interventions should pharmacists employ to impact health practitioners' prescribing practices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindrod, Kelly A; Patel, Payal; Martin, Janet E

    2006-09-01

    To determine which interventions are effective in influencing health practitioners' prescribing practices and explore differences in intervention complexity, setting, sustainability, cost effectiveness, and impact on patient outcomes. A systematic search for English-language systematic reviews was performed in MEDLINE, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library from the date of inception to July 2005 using search terms in accordance with Cochrane recommendations. Included reviews were required to clearly report a search strategy, inclusion/exclusion criteria, literature assessment criteria, and methods for synthesizing or summarizing information and references. Two reviewers independently identified studies for inclusion, assessed study quality, and extracted relevant information. Interventions were classified as consistently effective, inconsistently effective, and effectiveness uncertain. Thirty-four of 4585 titles reviewed met the inclusion criteria. Quality scores ranged from 70% to 100%. Consistently effective interventions included reminders (manual and computerized), audit and feedback, educational outreach visits, organizational strategies, and patient-mediated interventions. Inconsistently effective interventions included computer decision support systems and educational meetings. Multi-faceted interventions were consistently shown to be more efficacious than single interventions. Limited data precluded exploration of the effects of interventions in different settings, sustainability of effect, cost effectiveness, and patient clinical outcomes. Interventions that are most effective for impacting prescribing practice include audit and feedback, reminders, educational outreach visits, and patient-mediated interventions. To maximize impact, pharmacists' efforts to positively impact prescribing practices should focus on these intervention types rather than relying primarily on passive didactics or dissemination

  4. Concentração de Rn-222 e filhos em águas provenientes de poços e emergências de água da região de Presidente Prudente: resultados preliminares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Araya Osório

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the preliminary results about the concentration of radon and radon daughters in wells and springs water from Presidente Prudente. Six water samples were studied: three from well-water, two from springs water and one from poTabelale water. For the etermination of α-activity the samples were placed inside plastic containers where the CR-39 tracks detectors were outside the water. The track density of α-particles were measured by using optical microscopy. The results show that one sample from well-water presented higher concentration of radon and radon daughters than the other samples.

  5. Prescribed Travel Schedules for Fatigue Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmire, Alexandra; Johnston, Smith; Lockley, Steven

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Fatigue Management Team is developing recommendations for managing fatigue during travel and for shift work operations, as Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Circadian Desynchrony in ISS Operations. The Guidelines provide the International Space Station (ISS ) flight surgeons and other operational clinicians with evidence-based recommendations for mitigating fatigue and other factors related to sleep loss and circadian desynchronization. As much international travel is involved both before and after flight, the guidelines provide recommendations for: pre-flight training, in-flight operations, and post-flight rehabilitation. The objective of is to standardize the process by which care is provided to crewmembers, ground controllers, and other support personnel such as trainers, when overseas travel or schedule shifting is required. Proper scheduling of countermeasures - light, darkness, melatonin, diet, exercise, and medications - is the cornerstone for facilitating circadian adaptation, improving sleep, enhancing alertness, and optimizing performance. The Guidelines provide, among other things, prescribed travel schedules that outline the specific implementation of these mitigation strategies. Each travel schedule offers evidence based protocols for properly using the NASA identified countermeasures for fatigue. This presentation will describe the travel implementation schedules and how these can be used to alleviate the effects of jet lag and/or schedule shifts.

  6. Dinâmica populacional e incidência de moscas-das-frutas e parasitoides em cultivares de pessegueiros (Prunus Persica L. Batsch no município de presidente prudente-sp Population dynamic and occurrence of fruit flies and their parasitoids in peach cultivars (Prunus persica L. Batsch in presidente prudente municipality, sp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia Maria Nalesso Marangoni Montes

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Esta pesquisa teve como objetivos avaliar a dinâmica populacional e registrar a diversidade de moscas-das-frutas (Diptera: Tephritoidea em cultivares de pessegueiro Tropical, Talismã, Aurora 2, Aurora 1, Dourado 2 e Doçura 2, enxertadas sobre os porta-enxertos 'Okinawa' e Umê, em Presidente Prudente-SP. Foram realizadas as correlações da dinâmica populacional com a temperatura e a precipitação, e também a infestação com as características químicas dos frutos, Sólidos Solúveis e Acidez Titulável. No período de julho de 2004 a dezembro de 2006, a dinâmica populacional de moscas-das-frutas foi obtida através de coletas semanais de moscas-das-frutas em armadilhas McPhail, e a incidência foi determinada através da coleta de 30 frutos/planta/cultivar. O delineamento estatístico adotado foi o inteiramente casualizado, com cinco repetições. Ceratitis capitata foi predominante nas cultivares de pessegueiros estudadas. Não foi observada correlação significativa entre população de moscas-das-frutas e as variáveis de temperatura e precipitação, e sólidos solúveis e ácidez titulável. Entre as cultivares de pêssego, Aurora 2 apresentou maior infestação por C. capitata, da ordem de 22 e 23% nos anos 2004 e 2006, respectivamente. Também foi registrada a incidência de Neosilba spp. em frutos de pêssego. Doryctobracon areolatus (Braconidae, Tetrastichus giffardianus (Eulophidae e Pachycrepoideus vindemmiae (Pteromalidae foram recuperados de pupários de Tephritidae.The objectives of this research were evaluate the population dynamic and diversity of fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritoidea on peach cultivars Tropical, Talisma, Aurora 2, Aurora 1, Dourado 2 and Doçura 2, under the rootstocks 'Okinawa' and Umê, in Presidente Prudente, São Paulo, Brazil. The dynamic population of fruit flies was correlated with temperature and precipitation. The fruit fly infestation was correlated with chemical characteristics of fruits

  7. Explaining Our Dreams: The Artist's Role in the Evaluation of Educational Arts Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wronski, Todd

    As educators become increasingly subject to accountability pressures, maximizing the worth of evaluation is a prudent and realistic stance. This paper suggests useful and valid art program evaluation models: (1) Stufflebeam's (1971) CIPP (context, input, process, and product) model; (2) Stake's Countenance Model (responsive evaluation); (3)…

  8. Influence of demand-side measures to enhance renin-angiotensin prescribing efficiency in Europe: implications for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vončina, Luka; Strizrep, Tihomir; Godman, Brian; Bennie, Marion; Bishop, Iain; Campbell, Stephen; Vlahović-Palčevski, Vera; Gustafsson, Lars L

    2011-08-01

    European countries strive to enhance prescribing efficiency. This includes renin-angiotensin drugs following the availability of generic angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs). To compare angiotensin receptor blocker utilization and expenditure patterns in Austria and Croatia following prescribing restrictions, as well as with other European countries introducing different supply- and demand-side measures. Lastly, to appraise the impact of generic losartan in Croatia on utilization of patented angiotensin receptor blockers. Observational retrospective study principally between 2001 and 2007, using defined daily doses and €/1000 inhabitants/year. Demand-side measures were based on the four 'E's - education, engineering, economics and enforcement. Greater intensity of follow-up of prescribing restrictions in Croatia enhanced utilization of ACEIs versus Austria. There was high utilization of ACEIs in Scotland following intensive demand-side measures, similar to Austria and Croatia. Demand-side measures in Spain (Catalonia) and Sweden also appeared to moderate angiotensin receptor blockers utilization. The combination of measures helped stabilize expenditure on renin-angiotensin drugs when adjusted for population sizes despite appreciable increases in volumes. The only exception was Portugal, with less intensive measures. Multiple and intensive demand-side measures enhanced prescribing efficiency. The more intense follow-up of ARB prescribing restrictions in Croatia had a greater influence on subsequent utilization patterns than Austria. Both findings confirm earlier studies. Reforms also favorably enhanced the prescribing of generic losartan once available.

  9. 42 CFR 423.160 - Standards for electronic prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... a prescription for a patient to a non-prescribing provider (such as a nursing facility) that in turn... communication problems that would preclude the use of the NCPDP SCRIPT Standard adopted by this section. (iii... communication of a prescription or prescription-related information between prescribers and dispensers, for the...

  10. Availability of prescribed medicines for elders at Sekou-Toure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    About one-third (31%) were members of social security fund receiving monthly retirement pension. Only 27% (p-value=0.44) of elders received all medicines as per prescription. Majority of elder patients (39.7%) received 50% of prescribed medicines per prescription while 4.1% did not receive any medicine prescribed and ...

  11. The comparative effectiveness of 2 electronic prescribing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Rainu; Barron, Yolanda; Abramson, Erika L

    2011-12-01

    The increasingly widespread adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) is substantially changing the American healthcare delivery system. Differences in the actual effectiveness of EHRs and their component applications, including electronic prescribing (e-prescribing), is not well understood. We compared the effects of 2 types of e-prescribing systems on medication safety as an example of how comparative effectiveness research (CER) can be applied to the study of healthcare delivery. We previously conducted 2 non-randomized, prospective studies with pre-post controls comparing prescribing errors among: (1) providers who adopted a standalone e-prescribing system with robust technical and clinical decision support (CDS) and (2) providers who adopted an EHR with integrated e-prescribing with less robust available CDS and technical support. Both studies evaluated small groups of ambulatory care providers in the same New York community using identical methodology including prescription and chart reviews. We undertook this comparative effectiveness study to directly compare prescribing error rates among the 2 groups of e-prescribing adopters. The stand-alone system reduced error rates from 42.5 to 6.6 errors per 100 prescriptions (P application performed less well, likely due to differences in available CDS and technical resources. Results from this small study highlight the importance of CER that directly compares components of healthcare delivery.

  12. Operational use of prescribed fire in southern California chaparral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ron Dougherty; Philip J. Riggan

    1982-01-01

    The use of prescribed fire in the chaparral could reduce the incidence and impacts of severe wildfires and enhance watershed re-sources. This paper describes the operational planning needed for a successful prescribed fire and discusses the recent experience with this technique on the Cleveland National Forest.

  13. Estimating fuel consumption during prescribed fires in Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginia L. McDaniel; James M. Guldin; Roger W. Perry

    2012-01-01

    While prescribed fire is essential to maintaining numerous plant communities, fine particles produced in smoke can impair human health and reduce visibility in scenic areas. The Arkansas Smoke Management Program was established to mitigate the impacts of smoke from prescribed fires. This program uses fuel loading and consumption estimates from standard fire-behavior...

  14. Defining antimicrobial prescribing quality indicators: what is a new prescription?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, J.; Harings, L.; Winkens, B.; Knottnerus, A.; Weijden, G.D.E.M. van der

    2011-01-01

    : Since guidelines on antibiotic drug treatment often focus on appropriate first choice drugs, assessment of guideline adherence should only concentrate on the first drug prescribed, and not on subsequent antibiotics prescribed after failure of the first one. PURPOSE: To determine a valid cut-off

  15. An assessment of factors influencing the prescribing of antibiotics in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors most strongly associated with prescribing were the patient's opinion that antibiotics were required, his/her expectation of receiving them and the doctor's perception of this expectation. Patients aware of the dangers, to the community, of over-prescribing, expected antibiotics 64% of the time as opposed to 90% of the ...

  16. Florida's Revised Prescribed Fire Law: Protection For Responsible Burners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jim Brenner; Dale Wade

    2003-01-01

    In Florida, natural communities require periodic fires for maintenance of their ecological integrity. Because of public concerns, wildfires can no longer be allowed to perform this mandatory function so prescribed burning is essential to manage these plant and animal communities. We discuss the importance of prescribed fire in Florida, outline a history of the state...

  17. An assessment of factors influencing the prescribing of antibiotics in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An assessment of factors influencing the prescribing of antibiotics in Acute Respiratory Illness: A questionnaire study. D Hoffman, J Botha, I Kleinschmidt. Abstract. Introduction: Non-clinical factors are major determinants in the decision to prescribe medication. This study was prompted by the impression that Primary Care ...

  18. Prescribing opioids in primary care: avoiding perils and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broglio, Kathleen; Cole, B Eliot

    2014-06-15

    Millions of Americans have chronic pain for which chronic opioid therapy may be warranted. In light of recent abuse of these medications, clinicians must exercise caution and develop uniform approaches to prescribing. It is possible to assess for opioid risk and safely prescribe opioids.

  19. Trends in prescribing antibiotics for children in Dutch general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otters, H.B.M.; Wouden, J.C. van der; Schellevis, F.G.; Suijlekom-Smit, L.W.A. van; Koes, B.W.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess changes in antibiotic prescribing patterns for children between 1987 and 2001, and to identify general practice characteristics associated with higher antibiotic prescribing rates. METHODS: Cross-sectional national survey of Dutch general practice in 1987 and 2001. Data were

  20. Prescribing of meprobamate-containing combination analgesics in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 32 mg caffeine and 150 mg meprobamate. The originator product constituted 3.72% of prescribing frequency (average cost: R30.42) compared with 70.63% for the most popular generic (average cost: R11.65). Conclusions: Prescribers should be conscious of the benefits and risks of the active ingredient combinations.

  1. Prescribing Patterns and Medicine Use at the University Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brand name prescribing was also irrational and common. Prescribing outside the ZEML was minimal and rational. INTRODUCTION. Medicines play an important role in the health care delivery system. Drugs are expensive and in most developing countries including Zambia, about 20–50% of health care budgets are spent ...

  2. Use of prescribed fire to reduce wildfire potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Martin; J. Boone Kauffman

    1989-01-01

    Fires were a part of our wildlands prehistorically. Prescribed burning reduces fire hazard and potential fire behavior primarily by reducing fuel quantity and continuity. Fuel continuity should be considered on the micro scale within stands, the mid-scale among, and the macro-scale among watersheds or entire forests. Prescribed fire is only one of the tools which can...

  3. Reducing therapeutic injection overuse through patients-prescribers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reducing therapeutic injection overuse through patients-prescribers Interaction Group Discussions in Kinondoni District, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. ... Prescribed injections that complied with STG was low at baseline and did not significantly improve 3 months after (P>0.05, Χ2 test). Comprehensive studies and sensitization ...

  4. Causes of prescribing errors in hospital inpatients: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Bryony; Schachter, Mike; Vincent, Charles; Barber, Nick

    2002-04-20

    To prevent errors made during the prescription of drugs, we need to know why they arise. Theories of human error used to understand the causes of mistakes made in high-risk industries are being used in health-care. They have not, however, been applied to prescribing errors, which are a great cause of patient harm. Our aim was to use this approach to investigate the causes of such errors. Pharmacists at a UK teaching hospital prospectively identified 88 potentially serious prescribing errors. We interviewed the prescribers who made 44 of these, and analysed our findings with human error theory. Our results suggest that most mistakes were made because of slips in attention, or because prescribers did not apply relevant rules. Doctors identified many risk factors-work environment, workload, whether or not they were prescribing for their own patient, communication within their team, physical and mental well-being, and lack of knowledge. Organisational factors were also identified, and included inadequate training, low perceived importance of prescribing, a hierarchical medical team, and an absence of self-awareness of errors. To reduce prescribing errors, hospitals should train junior doctors in the principles of drug dosing before they start prescribing, and enforce good practice in documentation. They should also create a culture in which prescription writing is seen as important, and formally review interventions made by pharmacists, locum arrangements, and the workload of junior doctors, and make doctors aware of situations in which they are likely to commit errors.

  5. Prescribing of drugs for the treatment of migraine with specific ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Migraine affects between 5.15% of males and 13,5-31% of females in South Africa. Little is known about the prescribing patterns of anti-migraine drugs in South Africa. The aim of the study was to investigate the prescribing of drugs for the treatment of migraine (ATC Group NOZC), with specific emphasis on sumatriptan, in a ...

  6. Proton pump inhibitors: potential cost reductions by applying prescribing guidelines.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahir, Caitriona

    2012-01-01

    There are concerns that proton pump inhibitors (PPI) are being over prescribed in both primary and secondary care. This study aims to establish potential cost savings in a community drug scheme for a one year period according to published clinical and cost-effective guidelines for PPI prescribing.

  7. Prescribing practices in two health care facilities in Warri, Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Inappropriate prescribing has been identified in many health facilities in developing countries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prescribing practices in two health care facilities in Warri located in south-south geopolitical region of Nigeria and identify factors influencing the practices. Method: WHO ...

  8. Enhancing the Quality of Prescribing Practices for Older Veterans Discharged from the Emergency Department (EQUiPPED): Preliminary Results from Enhancing Quality of Prescribing Practices for Older Veterans Discharged from the Emergency Department, a Novel Multicomponent Interdisciplinary Quality Improvement Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Melissa B; Hastings, Susan Nicole; Powers, James; Vandenberg, Ann E; Echt, Katharina V; Bryan, William E; Peggs, Kiffany; Markland, Alayne D; Hwang, Ula; Hung, William W; Schmidt, Anita J; McGwin, Gerald; Ikpe-Ekpo, Edidiong; Clevenger, Carolyn; Johnson, Theodore M; Vaughan, Camille P

    2015-05-01

    Suboptimal medication prescribing for older adults has been described in a number of emergency department (ED) studies. Despite this, few studies have examined ED-targeted interventions aimed at reducing the use of potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs). Enhancing Quality of Prescribing Practices for Older Veterans Discharged from the ED (EQUiPPED) is an ongoing multicomponent, interdisciplinary quality improvement initiative in eight Department of Veterans Affairs EDs. The project aims to decrease the use of PIMs, as identified by the Beers criteria, prescribed to veterans aged 65 and older at the time of ED discharge. Interventions include provider education; informatics-based clinical decision support with electronic medical record-embedded geriatric pharmacy order sets and links to online geriatric content; and individual provider education including academic detailing, audit and feedback, and peer benchmarking. Poisson regression was used to compare the number of PIMs that staff providers prescribed to veterans aged 65 and older discharged from the ED before and after the initiation of the EQUiPPED intervention. Initial data from the first implementation site show that the average monthly proportion of PIMs that staff providers prescribed was 9.4±1.5% before the intervention and 4.6±1.0% after the initiation of EQUiPPED (relative risk=0.48, 95% confidence interval=0.40-0.59, PJournal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  9. The contribution of prescription chart design and familiarity to prescribing error: a prospective, randomised, cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallentire, Victoria R; Hale, Rebecca L; Dewhurst, Neil G; Maxwell, Simon R J

    2013-10-01

    Initiatives to standardise hospital paper-based prescription charts are underway in various countries in an effort to reduce prescribing errors. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent to which prescribing error rates are influenced by prescription chart design and familiarity. In this prospective, randomised, cross-over study, Foundation Year 1 doctors working in five Scottish National Health Service (NHS) Boards participated in study sessions during which they were asked to prescribe lists of medications for five fictional patients using a different design of paper prescription chart for each patient. Each doctor was timed completing each set of prescriptions, and each chart was subsequently assessed against a predefined list of possible errors. A mixed modelling approach using three levels of variables (design of and familiarity with a chart, prescribing speed and individual prescriber) was employed. A total of 72 Foundation Year 1 doctors participated in 10 data-collection sessions. Differences in prescription chart design were associated with significant variations in the rates of prescribing error. The charts from NHS Highland and NHS Grampian produced significantly higher error rates than the other three charts. Participants who took longer to complete their prescriptions made significantly fewer errors, but familiarity with a chart did not predict error rate. This study has important implications for prescription chart design and prescribing education. The inverse relationship between the time taken to complete a prescribing task and the rate of error emphasises the importance of attention to detail and workload as factors in error causation. Further work is required to identify the characteristics of prescription charts that are protective against errors.

  10. Increasing pregnancy-related use of prescribed opioid analgesics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Richard A.; Bobo, William V.; Martin, Peter R.; Morrow, James A.; Wang, Wei; Chandrasekhar, Rameela; Cooper, William O.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To quantify the prevalence of prescribed opioid analgesics among pregnant women enrolled in Tennessee Medicaid from 1995 to 2009. Methods Retrospective cohort study of 277,555 pregnancies identified from birth and fetal death certificates, and linked to previously-validated computerized pharmacy records. Poisson regression was used to estimate trends over time, rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Results During the study period, 29% of pregnant women filled a prescription for an opioid analgesic. From 1995 to 2009, any pregnancy-related use increased 1.90-fold (95% CI = 1.83, 1.98), first trimester use increased 2.27-fold (95% CI = 2.14, 2.41), and second or third trimester use increased 2.02-fold (95% CI = 1.93, 2.12), after adjusting for maternal characteristics. Any pregnancy-related, first trimester, and second or third trimester use were each more likely among mothers who were at least 21 years old, white, non-Hispanic, prima gravid, resided in non-urban areas, enrolled in Medicaid due to disability, and who had less than a high school education. Conclusions Opioid analgesic use by Tennessee Medicaid-insured pregnant women increased nearly 2-fold from 1995 to 2009. Additional study is warranted in order to understand the implications of this increased use. PMID:23889859

  11. Inhaled Drug Delivery: A Practical Guide to Prescribing Inhaler Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Ernst

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct delivery of medication to the target organ results in a high ratio of local to systemic bioavailability and has made aerosol delivery of respiratory medication the route of choice for the treatment of obstructive lung diseases. The most commonly prescribed device is the pressurized metered dose inhaler (pMDI; its major drawback is the requirement that inspiration and actuation of the device be well coordinated. Other requirements for effective drug delivery include an optimal inspiratory flow, a full inspiration from functional residual capacity and a breath hold of at least 6 s. Available pMDIs are to be gradually phased out due to their use of atmospheric ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs as propellants. Newer pMDI devices using non-CFC propellants are available; preliminary experience suggests these devices greatly increase systemic bioavailability of inhaled corticosteroids. The newer multidose dry powder inhalation devices (DPIs are breath actuated, thus facilitating coordination with inspiration, and contain fewer ingredients. Furthermore, drug delivery is adequate even at low inspired flows, making their use appropriate in almost all situations. Equivalence of dosing among different devices for inhaled corticosteroids will remain imprecise, requiring the physician to adjust the dose of medication to the lowest dose that provides adequate control of asthma. Asthma education will be needed to instruct patients on the effective use of the numerous inhalation devices available.

  12. Computational opioid prescribing: a novel application of clinical pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Oscar A; Linares, Annemarie L

    2011-01-01

    We implemented a pharmacokinetics-based mathematical modeling technique using algebra to assist prescribers with point-of-care opioid dosing. We call this technique computational opioid prescribing (COP). Because population pharmacokinetic parameter values are needed to estimate drug dosing regimen designs for individual patients using COP, and those values are not readily available to prescribers because they exist scattered in the vast pharmacology literature, we estimated the population pharmacokinetic parameter values for 12 commonly prescribed opioids from various sources using the bootstrap resampling technique. Our results show that opioid dosing regimen design, evaluation, and modification is feasible using COP. We conclude that COP is a new technique for the quantitative assessment of opioid dosing regimen design evaluation and adjustment, which may help prescribers to manage acute and chronic pain at the point-of-care. Potential benefits include opioid dose optimization and minimization of adverse opioid drug events, leading to potential improvement in patient treatment outcomes and safety.

  13. Medication discussion between nurse prescribers and people with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibley, Andrew; Latter, Sue; Richard, Claude

    2011-01-01

    recently been issued, but the extent to which nurse prescribers are facilitating effective medicine-taking in diabetes remains unknown. Methods. A purposive sample of 20 nurse prescribers working with diabetes patients audio-recorded 59 of their routine consultations and a descriptive analysis......Aim. This paper is a report of a study to identify the content of, and participation in, medicine discussion between nurse prescribers and people with diabetes in England. Background. Diabetes affects 246 million people worldwide and effective management of medicines is an essential component...... of successful disease control. There are now over 20,000 nurse independent prescribers in the UK, many of whom frequently prescribe for people with diabetes. With this responsibility comes a challenge to effectively communicate with patients about medicines. National guidelines on medicines communication have...

  14. Antibiotic prescribing in ambulatory pediatrics in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Adam L; Shapiro, Daniel J; Pavia, Andrew T; Shah, Samir S

    2011-12-01

    Antibiotics are commonly prescribed for children with conditions for which they provide no benefit, including viral respiratory infections. Broad-spectrum antibiotic use is increasing, which adds unnecessary cost and promotes the development of antibiotic resistance. To provide a nationally representative analysis of antibiotic prescribing in ambulatory pediatrics according to antibiotic classes and diagnostic categories and identify factors associated with broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing. We used the National Ambulatory and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care surveys from 2006 to 2008, which are nationally representative samples of ambulatory care visits in the United States. We estimated the percentage of visits for patients younger than 18 years for whom antibiotics were prescribed according to antibiotic classes, those considered broad-spectrum, and diagnostic categories. We used multivariable logistic regression to identify demographic and clinical factors that were independently associated with broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing. Antibiotics were prescribed during 21% of pediatric ambulatory visits; 50% were broad-spectrum, most commonly macrolides. Respiratory conditions accounted for >70% of visits in which both antibiotics and broad-spectrum antibiotics were prescribed. Twenty-three percent of the visits in which antibiotics were prescribed were for respiratory conditions for which antibiotics are not clearly indicated, which accounts for >10 million visits annually. Factors independently associated with broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing included respiratory conditions for which antibiotics are not indicated, younger patients, visits in the South, and private insurance. Broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing in ambulatory pediatrics is extremely common and frequently inappropriate. These findings can inform the development and implementation of antibiotic stewardship efforts in ambulatory care toward the most important geographic regions

  15. Clinical, demographic, and epidemiologic characteristics of hepatitis B virus-infected patients at a tertiary public hospital in Presidente Prudente, State of São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestes-Carneiro, Luiz Euribel; Vieira, Jessyka Thaiza Menezes; Isaac, Luiza Bellintani; Portelinha Filho, Alexandre Martins

    2016-02-01

    Few studies have addressed the primary characteristics of patients infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) in the general population, especially those living in small- and medium-sized cities in Brazil. We aimed to determine the clinical, demographic, and epidemiologic characteristics of patients diagnosed with HBV who were followed up at an infectious diseases clinic of a public hospital in State of São Paulo, Brazil. Medical records of patients aged >18 years and diagnosed with HBV infection between January 2000 and December 2013 were reviewed. Seventy-five patients were enrolled with male-female main infection-associated risk factors; 9 (12%) were co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), 5 (6.7%) with hepatitis C virus (HCV), and 3 (4%) were co-infected with both HIV and HCV. Antiviral HBV therapy was applied in 21 (28%) patients and tenofovir monotherapy was the most prescribed medication. After approximately 2 years of antiviral treatment, the HBV-DNA viral load was undetectable in 12 (92.3%) patients and lower levels of alanine aminotransferase were found in these patients. Over a 13-year interval, very few individuals infected with HBV were identified, highlighting the barriers for caring for patients with HBV in developing countries. New measures need to be implemented to complement curative practices.

  16. Clinical, demographic, and epidemiologic characteristics of hepatitis B virus-infected patients at a tertiary public hospital in Presidente Prudente, State of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Euribel Prestes-Carneiro

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Few studies have addressed the primary characteristics of patients infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV in the general population, especially those living in small- and medium-sized cities in Brazil. We aimed to determine the clinical, demographic, and epidemiologic characteristics of patients diagnosed with HBV who were followed up at an infectious diseases clinic of a public hospital in State of São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: Medical records of patients aged >18 years and diagnosed with HBV infection between January 2000 and December 2013 were reviewed. RESULTS: Seventy-five patients were enrolled with male-female main infection-associated risk factors; 9 (12% were co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, 5 (6.7% with hepatitis C virus (HCV, and 3 (4% were co-infected with both HIV and HCV. Antiviral HBV therapy was applied in 21 (28% patients and tenofovir monotherapy was the most prescribed medication. After approximately 2 years of antiviral treatment, the HBV-DNA viral load was undetectable in 12 (92.3% patients and lower levels of alanine aminotransferase were found in these patients. CONCLUSIONS: Over a 13-year interval, very few individuals infected with HBV were identified, highlighting the barriers for caring for patients with HBV in developing countries. New measures need to be implemented to complement curative practices.

  17. Psychotherapy for depression in primary care: a panel survey of general practitioners' opinion and prescribing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdoux, Hélène; Cortaredona, Sébastien; Dumesnil, Hélène; Sebbah, Remy; Verger, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Psychotherapy is recommended as first-line treatment in patients presenting with mild-to-moderate depression. Although this disorder is mostly managed in primary care, little is known about General Practitioners' (GPs) practice of prescribing psychotherapy. The objectives were to explore GPs' opinion on psychotherapy for depression, and the personal and professional characteristics associated with reported strategies for prescribing psychological therapy and/or an antidepressant in mild-to-moderate depression. A cross-sectional survey was carried out among participants in a panel of randomly selected GPs (2,114/2,496 participated: 84.7%). GPs were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire covering their professional and personal characteristics, their practices and opinions in the area of depression management. A multi-model averaging approach was used to explore the characteristics associated with practice of prescribing psychological therapy in mild-to-moderate depression. Most GPs had a favourable opinion regarding the efficacy of psychotherapy in depression. Slightly more than one out of four reported prescribing psychological therapy alone often/very often in mild-to-moderate depression. These GPs were more likely to be female (OR = 1.56, 95% CI 1.24; 1.97), to have a personal history of psychotherapy (OR = 1.76, 95% CI 1.31; 2.38), no history of depression in someone close (OR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.65; 0.99), and to consider that antidepressants are over-prescribed (OR = 2.02, 95% CI 1.63; 2.49). No association was found with professional characteristics. GPs' personal experience has a greater impact on psychological therapy prescription than professional characteristics. This finding suggests that educational efforts are required for providing GPs decision-making skills regarding psychological therapy prescription, based upon evidence-based medicine rather than subjective factors.

  18. The Knowledge, Attitude and the Perception of Prescribers on the Rational Use of Antibiotics and the Need for an Antibiotic Policy–A Cross Sectional Survey in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Remesh, Ambili; A M Gayathri; Singh, Rohit; Retnavally, K.G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Antibiotics are prescribed frequently and there is always an overuse with a risk of resistance and increasing costs. Rational drug prescribing is essential for minimizing the health care costs and for reducing the resistance. The implementation of a strict antibiotic policy by all the health care institutes is being made mandatory nowadays. An improving awareness among the prescribers which can be created through educational interventions, can promote the rational use of antibioti...

  19. Clinical and financial impact of pharmacy services in the intensive care unit: pharmacist and prescriber perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaren, Robert; Brett McQueen, R; Campbell, Jon

    2013-04-01

    To compare pharmacist and prescriber perceptions of the clinical and financial outcomes of pharmacy services in the intensive care unit (ICU). ICU pharmacists were invited to participate in the survey and were asked to invite two ICU prescriber colleagues to complete questionnaires. ICUs with clinical pharmacy services. The questionnaires were designed to solicit frequency, efficiency, and perceptions about the clinical and financial impact (on a 10-point scale) of pharmacy services including patient care (eight functions), education (three functions), administration (three functions), and scholarship (four functions). Basic services were defined as fundamental, and higher-level services were categorized as desirable or optimal. Respondents were asked to suggest possible sources of funding and reimbursement for ICU pharmacy services. Eighty packets containing one 26-item pharmacy questionnaire and two 16-item prescriber questionnaires were distributed to ICU pharmacists. Forty-one pharmacists (51%) and 46 prescribers (29%) returned questionnaires. Pharmacists had worked in the ICU for 8.3 ± 6.4 years and devoted 50.3 ± 18.7% of their efforts to clinical practice. Prescribers generally rated the impact of pharmacy services more favorably than pharmacists. Fundamental services were provided more frequently and were rated more positively than desirable or optimal services across both groups. The percent efficiencies of providing services without the pharmacist ranged between 40% and 65%. Both groups indicated that salary support for the pharmacist should come from hospital departments of pharmacy or critical care or colleges of pharmacy. Prescribers were more likely to consider other sources of funding for pharmacist salaries. Both groups supported reimbursement of clinical pharmacy services. Critical care pharmacy activities were associated with perceptions of beneficial clinical and financial outcomes. Prescribers valued most services more than pharmacists

  20. Perfil antigênico do vírus da raiva isolado de diferentes espécies de morcegos não hematófagos da Região de Presidente Prudente, Estado de São Paulo Antigen profile of rabies virus isolated from different species of non-hematophagous bats in the region of Presidente Prudente, State of São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avelino Albas

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available O Laboratório de Virologia Clínica e Molecular do Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas da Universidade de São Paulo, utilizando-se da técnica de anticorpos monoclonais, tipificou 18 amostras de vírus rábico provenientes de morcegos não hematófagos de várias espécies provenientes da Região de Presidente Prudente, SP, Brasil. Destas amostras, 15 (82,3% foram definidas como variante 3 (compatível com amostras isoladas de morcegos Desmodus rotundus e 3 (16,7% como variante 4 (compatível com amostras isoladas de morcegos Tadarida brasiliensis.Using the monoclonal antibody technique, the Clinical and Molecular Virology Laboratory of the Institute of Biomedical Sciences of the University of São Paulo typed 18 rabies virus samples from non-hematophagous bats of several species from the region of Presidente Prudente, SP, Brazil. Among these samples, 15 (82.3% were defined as variant 3 (compatible with samples isolated from Desmodus rotundus bats and three (16.7% as variant 4 (compatible with samples isolated from Tadarida brasiliensis bats.

  1. Prescribing smoked cannabis for chronic noncancer pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, Meldon; Srivastava, Anita; Spithoff, Sheryl; Bromley, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Objective To offer preliminary guidance on prescribing smoked cannabis for chronic pain before the release of formal guidelines. Quality of evidence We reviewed the literature on the analgesic effectiveness of smoked cannabis and the harms of medical and recreational cannabis use. We developed recommendations on indications, contraindications, precautions, and dosing of smoked cannabis, and categorized the recommendations based on levels of evidence. Evidence is mostly level II (well conducted observational studies) and III (expert opinion). Main message Smoked cannabis might be indicated for patients with severe neuropathic pain conditions who have not responded to adequate trials of pharmaceutical cannabinoids and standard analgesics (level II evidence). Smoked cannabis is contraindicated in patients who are 25 years of age or younger (level II evidence); who have a current, past, or strong family history of psychosis (level II evidence); who have a current or past cannabis use disorder (level III evidence); who have a current substance use disorder (level III evidence); who have cardiovascular or respiratory disease (level III evidence); or who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant (level II evidence). It should be used with caution in patients who smoke tobacco (level II evidence), who are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (level III evidence), who have anxiety or mood disorders (level II evidence), or who are taking higher doses of opioids or benzodiazepines (level III evidence). Cannabis users should be advised not to drive for at least 3 to 4 hours after smoking, for at least 6 hours after oral ingestion, and for at least 8 hours if they experience a subjective “high” (level II evidence). The maximum recommended dose is 1 inhalation 4 times per day (approximately 400 mg per day) of dried cannabis containing 9% delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (level III evidence). Physicians should avoid referring patients to “cannabinoid” clinics (level

  2. Lithium Prescribing during Pregnancy: A UK Primary Care Database Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, Rachel L.; Nazareth, Irwin; Evans, Stephen J. W.; Osborn, David P. J.; Pinfold, Vanessa; Cowen, Phil J.; Petersen, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Background Women taking lithium must decide whether to continue the medication if they conceive or plan to conceive. Little is known about the extent of prescribing of lithium during pregnancy. Aims To determine: 1) the prevalence of lithium prescribing during pregnancy and 2) to assess whether pregnancy is associated with discontinuation of lithium. Method First, we identified women receiving any lithium prescriptions before and during pregnancy using The Health Improvement Network (THIN) primary care database. Subsequently, we used a Kaplan-Meier plot to compare time to last prescription in women prescribed lithium continuously three months before pregnancy and a comparison group of non-pregnant women. Finally, we described the characteristics of the women prescribed lithium in pregnancy. Results Very few women were prescribed lithium during pregnancy; out of 458,761 pregnancies, we identified 47 (0.01%) in which lithium was prescribed after the 6th week of pregnancy (when the pregnancy was likely to be known). In our study of discontinuation, we found pregnant women were more likely to stop lithium than those who were not pregnant. Of the 52 women who were being continuously prescribed lithium three months before pregnancy, only 17 (33%) continued receiving prescriptions beyond the 6th week of pregnancy. However, most of these 17 women continued treatment throughout pregnancy. Conclusions Pregnancy was strongly associated with discontinuation of lithium. Further evidence on the risks of lithium is needed so that women can weight these against the risk of a deterioration in maternal mental health. PMID:25793580

  3. Survey of Ontario primary care physicians’ experiences with opioid prescribing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenghofer, Elizabeth Francis; Wilson, Lynn; Kahan, Meldon; Sheehan, Carolynn; Srivastava, Anita; Rubin, Ava; Brathwaite, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To measure physicians’ experiences with opioid-related adverse events and their perceived level of confidence in their opioid prescribing skills and practices. Design Mailed survey. Setting The province of Ontario. Participants A total of 1000 primary care physicians randomly selected from the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario registration database. Main outcome measures Opioid-related adverse events and concerns (eg, number of patients, type of opioid, cause of the event or concern); physicians’ confidence, comfort, and satisfaction with opioid prescribing; physicians’ opinions on strategies to optimize their prescribing; and physicians’ perspectives of their interactions with pharmacists and nurses. Results The response rate was close to 66%, for a total of 658 participants. Almost all respondents reported prescribing opioids for chronic pain in the past 3 months. Eighty-six percent of respondents reported being confident in their prescribing of opioids, but 42% of respondents indicated that at least 1 patient had experienced an adverse event related to opioids in the past year, usually involving oxycodone, and 16.3% of respondents did not know if their patients had experienced any opioid-related adverse events. The most commonly cited factors leading to adverse events were that the patient took more than prescribed, the prescribed dose was too high, or the patient took alcohol or sedating drugs with the opioids. Most physicians had concerns about the opioid use of 1 or more of their patients; concerns included running out of opioids early, minimal access to pain and addiction treatment, and addiction and overdose. The reported number of physicians’ patients taking opioids was positively associated with their confidence and comfort levels in opioid prescribing and negatively associated with their belief that many patients become addicted to opioids. Conclusion Most physicians have encountered opioid-related adverse events

  4. Survey of Ontario primary care physicians' experiences with opioid prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenghofer, Elizabeth Francis; Wilson, Lynn; Kahan, Meldon; Sheehan, Carolynn; Srivastava, Anita; Rubin, Ava; Brathwaite, Joanne

    2011-03-01

    To measure physicians' experiences with opioid-related adverse events and their perceived level of confidence in their opioid prescribing skills and practices. Mailed survey. Setting The province of Ontario. A total of 1000 primary care physicians randomly selected from the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario registration database. Opioid-related adverse events and concerns (eg, number of patients, type of opioid, cause of the event or concern); physicians' confidence, comfort, and satisfaction with opioid prescribing; physicians' opinions on strategies to optimize their prescribing; and physicians' perspectives of their interactions with pharmacists and nurses. The response rate was close to 66%, for a total of 658 participants. Almost all respondents reported prescribing opioids for chronic pain in the past 3 months. Eighty-six percent of respondents reported being confident in their prescribing of opioids, but 42% of respondents indicated that at least 1 patient had experienced an adverse event related to opioids in the past year, usually involving oxycodone, and 16.3% of respondents did not know if their patients had experienced any opioid-related adverse events. The most commonly cited factors leading to adverse events were that the patient took more than prescribed, the prescribed dose was too high, or the patient took alcohol or sedating drugs with the opioids. Most physicians had concerns about the opioid use of 1 or more of their patients; concerns included running out of opioids early, minimal access to pain and addiction treatment, and addiction and overdose. The reported number of physicians' patients taking opioids was positively associated with their confidence and comfort levels in opioid prescribing and negatively associated with their belief that many patients become addicted to opioids. Most physicians have encountered opioid-related adverse events. Comprehensive strategies are required to promote safe prescribing of opioids, including

  5. Buprenorphine prescribing practice trends and attitudes among New York providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermack, Andrea; Flannery, Mara; Tofighi, Babak; McNeely, Jennifer; Lee, Joshua D

    2017-03-01

    Buprenorphine office-based opioid maintenance is an increasingly common form of treatment for opioid use disorders. However, total prescribing has not kept pace with the current opioid and overdose epidemic and access remains scarce among the underserved. This study sought to assess current provider attitudes and clinical practices among a targeted sample of primarily New York City public sector buprenorphine prescribers. A cross-sectional online survey purposefully sampled buprenorphine prescribers in NYC with a focus on those serving Medicaid and uninsured patient populations. Expert review of local provider networks, snowball referrals, and in-person networking generated an email list, which received a survey link. A brief 25-question instrument queried provider and practice demographics, prescribing practices including induction approaches and attitudes regarding common hot topics (e.g., buprenorphine diversion, prescriber patient limits, insurance issues, ancillary treatments). Of 132 email invitations, N=72 respondents completed (n=64) or partially completed (n=8) the survey between January and April 2016. Most (79%) were Medicaid providers in non-psychiatric specialties (72%), working in a hospital-based or community general practice (51%), and board-certified in addiction medicine or psychiatry (58%). Practice sizes were generally 100 patients or fewer (71%); many providers (64%) individually prescribed buprenorphine Buprenorphine diversion was not rated as an important practice barrier. In conclusion, this targeted survey of buprenorphine prescribers in NYC treating primarily underserved populations showed a consistent pattern of part-time prescribing to modest volumes of patients, routine use of unobserved buprenorphine induction, and primarily elective referrals to psychosocial counseling. Barriers to prescribing included prior authorization requirements, lack of clinical resources (space, staff) and psychiatric services. Federal and local efforts to

  6. Green pharmacy and pharmEcovigilance: prescribing and the planet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daughton, Christian G; Ruhoy, Ilene S

    2011-03-01

    Active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants, resulting primarily from excretion and bathing and from disposal of leftover drugs by consumers and healthcare facilities. Although prudent disposal of leftover drugs has attracted the most attention for reducing API levels in the aquatic environment, a more effective approach would prevent the generation of leftover drugs in the first place. Many aspects of the practice of medicine and pharmacy can be targeted for reducing environmental contamination by APIs. These same modifications--focused on treating humans and the environment as a single, integral patient--could also have collateral outcomes with improved therapeutic outcomes, and with a reduced incidence of unintended poisonings, drug interactions and drug diversion, and lower consumer costs.

  7. Survey of Primary Care and Mental Health Prescribers' Perspectives on Reducing Opioid and Benzodiazepine Co-Prescribing Among Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Eric J; Malte, Carol A; Hagedorn, Hildi J; Berger, Douglas; Frank, Anissa; Lott, Aline; Achtmeyer, Carol E; Mariano, Anthony J; Saxon, Andrew J

    2017-03-01

    Due to the involvement of opioids and benzodiazepines in rising pharmaceutical overdoses, a reduction in coprescribing of these medications is a national priority, particularly among patients with substance use disorders and other high-risk conditions. However, little is known about primary care (PC) and mental health (MH) prescribers' perspectives on these medications and efforts being implemented to reduce coprescribing. An anonymous survey. One multisite VA health care system. Participants were 55 PC and 31 MH prescribers. Survey development was guided by the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS) conceptual framework. PC and MH prescribers of opioids or benzodiazepines were invited to complete an anonymous electronic survey. Responses were collapsed to highlight agreement, disagreement, and neutrality and summarized with means and percentages. Over 80% of both prescriber groups reported concern about concurrent use and > 75% strongly agreed with clinical practice guidelines (CPG) that recommend caution in coprescribing among patients with high-risk conditions. More than 40% of both prescriber groups indicated that coprescribing continues because of beliefs that patients appear stable without adverse events and tapering/discontinuation is too difficult. Over 70% of prescribers rated strategies for addressing patients who refuse to discontinue, more time with patients, and identification of high-risk patients as helpful in reducing coprescribing. Despite strong agreement with CPGs, prescribers reported several barriers that contribute to coprescribing of opioids and benzodiazepines and challenge their ability to taper these medications. Multiple interventions are likely needed to reduce opioid and benzodiazepine coprescribing.

  8. Impact of an inpatient electronic prescribing system on prescribing error causation: a qualitative evaluation in an English hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puaar, Seetal Jheeta; Franklin, Bryony Dean

    2017-10-10

    Few studies have applied a systems approach to understanding the causes of specific prescribing errors in the context of hospital electronic prescribing (EP). A comprehensive understanding of underlying causes is essential for developing effective interventions to improve prescribing safety. Our objectives were to explore prescribers' perspectives of the causes of errors occurring with EP and to make recommendations to maximise benefits and minimise risks. We studied a large hospital using inpatient EP. From April to June 2016, semistructured interviews were conducted with purposively sampled prescribers involved with a prescribing error. Interviews explored prescribers' perceived causes of the error and views about EP; they were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were thematically analysed against a framework based on Reason's accident causation model, with a focus on identifying latent conditions. Twenty-five interviews explored causes of 32 errors. Slips and rule-based mistakes were the most common active failures. Error causation was multifactorial; environmental, individual, team, task and technology error-producing conditions were all influenced by EP. There were three broad groups of latent conditions: the EP system's functionality and design; the organisation's decisions around EP implementation and use; and prescribing behaviours in the context of EP. Errors were associated with the design of EP itself and its integration within the healthcare environment. Findings suggest that EP vendors should focus on revolutionising interface design and usability issues, bearing in mind the wider healthcare context in which such software is used. Healthcare organisations should draw upon human factors principles when implementing EP. Consideration of work environment, infrastructure, training, prescribing responsibilities and behaviours should be considered to address local issues identified. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated

  9. Análise Espacial da Leishmaniose Visceral Americana no Município de Presidente Prudente: Abordagem Geográfica da Saúde Ambiental | Spatial Analysis of American Visceral Leishmaniasis in the Municipality of Presidente Prudente: A Geographical Approach to E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Sayuri Silvestre Matsumoto

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false PT-BR X-NONE X-NONE Introdução: A Leishmaniose Visceral Americana (LVA é uma zoonose grave. Atinge animais e homens e pode ser fatal. A mortalidade acentuada se dá, sobretudo, devido às condições de precariedade de diagnóstico e tratamento da doença e, por isso, é caracterizada como doença negligenciada. Desde 1990 a LVA vem se disseminando para novas áreas e aumentando sua frequência no estado de São Paulo. Em Presidente Prudente, município do oeste paulista, a enfermidade apareceu em meados de 2009 e vem se espalhando rapidamente entre a população canina, o que tem sido condição prévia para que haja a ocorrência em casos humanos. Pensando na problemática da LVA neste município, a proposta desta pesquisa é analisar a distribuição espacial dos casos de LVA caninos, identificando padrões espaciais da doença. Sabendo onde houve a confirmação de casos de LVA, também se pretende analisar o seu entorno, através de correlações da doença com o ambiente. Metodologia/Desenvolvimento: Para a análise da distribuição espacial dos casos de LVA canina no município de Presidente Prudente foi gerado um banco de dados georreferenciado. O mapeamento se deu por meio da ferramenta de geocodificação de endereços, que consiste em associar o banco de dados (tabela que se quer mapear ao banco de dados de vias por endereço já previamente georreferenciada. A ferramenta faz associações através de comparação de endereços e marca os pontos nas ruas conforme a localização do evento pontual. Após a espacialização dos dados, pretende-se aplicar técnicas em análise espacial, de modo a identificar padrões da doença no município. Também se pretende aplicar geoestatística no censo canino que está sendo cadastrado. Após o mapeamento e a identificação dos locais afetados com LVA, será feito um levantamento biogeográfico, com a intenção de encontrar correlações ambientais que

  10. The shadows of a ghost: a survey of canine leishmaniasis in Presidente Prudente and its spatial dispersion in the western region of São Paulo state, an emerging focus of visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Lourdes Aparecida Zampieri; Fonseca, Elivelton da Silva; Prestes-Carneiro, Luiz Euribel; Guimarães, Raul Borges; Yamashita, Renata Corrêa; Soares, Célio Nereu; Hiramoto, Roberto Mitsuyoshi; Tolezano, José Eduardo

    2015-10-26

    Visceral leishmaniasis is an emerging zoonosis and its geographic distribution is restricted to tropical and temperate regions. Most of the individuals infected in Latin America are in Brazil. Despite the control measures that have been adopted, the disease is spreading throughout new regions of the country. Domestic dogs are involved in the transmission cycle and are considered to be the main epidemiologic reservoir of Leishmania infantum (syn. L. chagasi). Our aim was to determine the prevalence of canine leishmaniasis (CL) and Ehrlichiosis infection in Presidente Prudente as well as the spatial dispersion of the disease in the western region of São Paulo state. Dogs underwent clinical examination and symptoms related to CL were recorded. Anti- Leishmania antibodies were detected using ELISA, rK39-immunocromatographic tests (DPP), and an indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT). Anti-E. canis antibodies were detected by IFAT. A follow-up was conducted in dogs that were positive in the ELISA at the baseline study. Data on the spatial distribution of L. longipalpis and CL in São Paulo state were obtained from Brazilian public health agencies. Serum samples from 4547 dogs were analyzed. The seroprevalence of CL was 11.2% by ELISA and 4.5 % by IFAT. In the follow-up, seroprevalence was 32.9% by ELISA, 15.3% by IFAT, 11.8 % by DPP test, and 66.5% for E. canis. There was a significant positive association between Leishmania and E. canis infection (P < 0.0001). In the follow-up, clinical examinations revealed symptoms compatible with CL in 33.5% of the dogs. L. longipalpis was found in 24 and CL in 15 counties of the Presidente Prudente mesoregion. The dispersion route followed the west frontier of São Paulo state toward Paraná state. Low CL and high ehrlichiosis prevalence rates were found in Presidente Prudente city. This emerging focus of CL is moving through the western region of São Paulo state toward the border of Paraná state. Integrated actions to

  11. Medicare Part D Prescriber Look-up Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This look-up tool is a searchable database that allows you to look up a Medicare Part D prescriber by National Provider Identifier (NPI), or by name and location....

  12. Guidelines prescribed by general practitioners to patients with acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Guidelines prescribed by general practitioners to patients with acute low back pain regarding “return to work”. PA Hough, FC Van Rooyen, E Bredenkamp, K Brough, M Ferreira, H Myburgh, C Snyman, C Van Niekerk ...

  13. Prescribing recommendations for the treatment of acute pain in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Elliot V; Kane, William T; O'Neil, Michael G; Kenna, George A; Katz, Nathaniel P; Golubic, Stephanie; Moore, Paul A

    2011-04-01

    Effective acute pain management is an essential but sometimes challenging component of dental practice. Numerous studies have examined the efficacy of various analgesic agents in dental postoperative models. This article combines an evaluation of the available evidence with current prescribing patterns to provide dental practitioners prescribing recommendations for acute pain, based on the anticipated severity of post-procedural pain. An important consideration when prescribing analgesics is to determine for whom opioid analgesics are necessary and appropriate, and if so, the dose and quantity that should be prescribed. This is partly because of the prevalence of substance and alcohol abuse that can be expected to be encountered within the dental patient population, and because substance abusers in the community frequently obtain prescription drugs from friends and family for misuse.

  14. Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge 1993 Prescribed Fire Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — When environmental and weather conditions are right prescribed fire will be used for the reduction of hazardous fuels, wildlife habitat management and the...

  15. Prevalence and Correlates of “High Dose” Antipsychotic Prescribing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ), and prescribed an anticholinergic (P < 0.001) were significantly more likely to be on high dose antipsychotics. Half (50%) of the patients with bipolar disorder, compared to 34% of those with schizophrenia spectrum disorders, then 10% of ...

  16. Eight principles for safer opioid prescribing and cautions with benzodiazepines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Lynn R; Reisfield, Gary M; Dasgupta, Nabarun

    2015-01-01

    The provision of long-term opioid analgesic therapy for chronic pain requires a careful risk/benefit analysis followed by clinical safety measures to identify and reduce misuse, abuse, and addiction and their associated morbidity and mortality. Multiple data sources show that benzodiazepines, prescribed for comorbid insomnia, anxiety, and mood disorders, heighten the risk of respiratory depression and other adverse outcomes when combined with opioid therapy. Evidence is presented for hazards associated with coadministration of opioids and benzodiazepines and the need for caution when initiating opioid therapy for chronic pain. Clinical recommendations follow, as drawn from 2 previously published literature reviews, one of which proffers 8 principles for safer opioid prescribing; the other review presents risks associated with benzodiazepines, suggests alternatives for co-prescribing benzodiazepines and opioids, and outlines recommendations regarding co-prescribing if alternative therapies are ineffective.

  17. Potentially inappropriate prescribing in older patients admitted to psychiatric hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rongen, S.; Kramers, C.; O'Mahony, D.; Feuth, T.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Ahmed, A.I.A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study are to determine the prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing including potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) and potential prescription omissions (PPOs) and to assess related risk factors in older people with major psychiatric illness.

  18. Substitute consent for nursing home residents prescribed psychotropic medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendina, Nicola; Brodaty, Henry; Draper, Brian; Peisah, Carmelle; Brugue, Esteve

    2009-03-01

    Prescribing psychotropic medications for persons with dementia who lack capacity to give informed consent requires proxy consent under NSW Guardianship legislation. To survey current practice in complying with legislation and regulations in prescribing psychotropic medications for nursing home residents. In three Sydney nursing homes, the files of 77 residents identified as having dementia, being on a psychotropic medication and not having capacity to give informed consent, were audited. In only 6.5% of cases were all regulations adhered to; a further 6.5% attempted and partially completed substitute consent requirements. The problem and the nature of the treatment were documented in 70.1% of cases. In 16.9% of files the only documentation of the prescribed medication was in the medication chart. Doses of medications prescribed were within accepted guidelines. Current regulations and legislation are not being observed. Recommendations are made as to how to make them more practicable.

  19. Asthma medication prescribing before, during and after pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charlton, Rachel A; Pierini, Anna; Klungsøyr, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To explore utilisation patterns of asthma medication before, during and after pregnancy as recorded in seven European population-based databases.  Design: A descriptive drug utilisation study.  Setting: 7 electronic healthcare databases in Denmark, Norway, the Netherlands, Italy (Emilia...... for 3-month time periods and the choice of asthma medicine and changes in prescribing over the study period were evaluated in each database.  Results: In total, 1 165 435 deliveries were identified. The prevalence of asthma medication prescribing during pregnancy was highest in the UK and Wales...... databases (9.4% (CI959.3% to 9.6%) and 9.4% (CI959.1% to 9.6%), respectively) and lowest in the Norwegian database (3.7% (CI953.7% to 3.8%)). In the year before pregnancy, the prevalence of asthma medication prescribing remained constant in all regions. Prescribing levels peaked during the second trimester...

  20. Factor analysis improves the selection of prescribing indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Hanne Marie Skyggedal; Søndergaard, Jens; Sokolowski, Ineta

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test a method for improving the selection of indicators of general practitioners' prescribing. METHODS: We conducted a prescription database study including all 180 general practices in the County of Funen, Denmark, approximately 472,000 inhabitants. Principal factor analysis was used...... to model correlation between 19 register-based indicators for the quality of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) prescribing. RESULTS: The correlation between indicators ranged widely from 0 to 0.93. Factor analysis revealed three dimensions of quality: (1) "Coxib preference", comprising...... appropriate and inappropriate prescribing, as revealed by the correlation of the indicators in the first factor. CONCLUSION: Correlation and factor analysis is a feasible method that assists the selection of indicators and gives better insight into prescribing patterns....

  1. Prescribed Burning Plan for 1985 : Parker River National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the 1985 prescribed burning plan for Parker River National Wildlife Refuge. Treatment Area #3 is the area consisting of the fresh water marsh inside the...

  2. Conformity of nurse prescribing to care needs: nurses' understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faeda, Marília Silveira; Perroca, Márcia Galan

    2017-04-01

    investigate the understanding of nurses on nurse prescribing conformity to the care needs of hospitalized patients and factors associated with that conformity. a descriptive study, with a quantitative approach, was conducted at 20 in-patient units of a teaching hospital in the state of São Paulo. The participants (N=139) answered a semi-structured questionnaire. For 43 (30.9%) nurses, nurse prescribing is always in line with patients' care needs. The fields of body care and elimination, skin and mucosa care and investigation and monitoring were the most frequently addressed. in the perception of most nurses, nurse prescribing does not conform with patients' health heeds. The establishment of strategies to improve prescribing quality is recommended, as well as the development of permanent qualification programs and the systematic use of instruments for assessment of patients' care demands regarding nursing.

  3. Prescribing psychotropic drugs to adults with an intellectual disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trollor, Julian N; Salomon, Carmela; Franklin, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Mental illness is common in people with intellectual disability. They may also have physical health problems which can affect their mental state. Difficulties in communication can contribute to mental health problems being overlooked. These may present with changes in behaviour. Psychological management is usually preferable to prescribing psychotropic drugs. Behavioural approaches are the most appropriate way to manage challenging behaviour. If a drug is considered, prescribers should complete a thorough diagnostic assessment, exclude physical and environmental contributions to symptoms, and consider medical comorbidities before prescribing. Where possible avoid psychotropics with the highest cardiometabolic burden. Prescribe the minimum effective dose and treatment length, and regularly monitor drug efficacy and adverse effects. There is insufficient evidence to support the use of psychotropics for challenging behaviour. They should be avoided unless the behaviour is severe and non-responsive to other treatments. PMID:27756975

  4. Conformity of nurse prescribing to care needs: nurses' understanding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marília Silveira Faeda; Márcia Galan Perroca

    2017-01-01

    Submission: 04-07-2016 Approval: 11-02-2016 ABSTRACT Objective: investigate the understanding of nurses on nurse prescribing conformity to the care needs of hospitalized patients and factors associated with that conformity. Method...

  5. [Are severe dieting procedures still prescribed?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidoux, Véronique; Kruseman, Maaike; Volery, Magali

    2012-03-28

    Very restrictive weight-loss diets are still recommended by a number of physicians although their negative impact has been widely documented. Considering the complexity of obesity as a chronic disease, general practitioners' role in the assessment and follow-up of obese patients is crucial. In particular, they should set realistic guidelines-based goals, in coordination with the health care network. Our pilot study in one region of Switzerland showed a lack of coherence between guidelines and clinical management of obesity. Improved coordination and education of all health care professionals in this field could increase therapeutic efficacy and solve some of the ethical issues raised by inadequate prescriptions.

  6. Reducing Inappropriate Antibiotic Prescribing for Adults With Acute Bronchitis in an Urgent Care Setting: A Quality Improvement Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Tamara L; Townsend, Mary L; Leung, Eugene; Kommu, Sekhar; Vega, Rhonda Y; Hendrix, Cristina C

    Acute bronchitis is a predominantly viral illness and, according to clinical practice guidelines, should not be treated with antibiotics. Despite clear guidelines, acute bronchitis continues to be the most common acute respiratory illness for which antibiotics are incorrectly prescribed. Although the national benchmark for antibiotic prescribing for adults with acute bronchitis is 0%, a preliminary record review before implementing the intervention at the project setting showed that 96% (N = 30) of adults with acute bronchitis in this setting were prescribed an antibiotic. This quality improvement project utilized a single-group, pre-post design. The setting for this project was a large urgent care network with numerous locations in central North Carolina. The purpose was to determine whether nurse practitioners and physician assistants, after participating in a multifaceted provider education session, would reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for healthy adults with acute uncomplicated bronchitis. Twenty providers attended 1 of 4 training sessions offered in October and November 2015. The face-to-face interactive training sessions focused on factors associated with inappropriate antibiotic prescribing, current clinical practice guidelines, and patient communication skills. Retrospective medical record review of 217 pretraining and 335 posttraining encounters for acute bronchitis by 19 eligible participating providers demonstrated a 61.9% reduction in immediate antibiotic prescribing from 91.7% to 29.8%. Delayed prescribing, which accounted for a small percentage of the total prescriptions given, had a small but significant increase of 9.3% after training. Overall, this multifaceted, interactive provider training resulted in significant reductions in inappropriate prescriptions.

  7. Association Between Opioid Prescribing Patterns and Abuse in Ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shriji; Sternberg, Paul

    2017-11-01

    Drug overdoses have become the number 1 cause of mortality in American adults 50 years and younger. Prescription opioid abuse is a growing concern that has garnered widespread attention among policymakers and the general public. To determine the opioid prescribing patterns among ophthalmologists and elucidate their role in the prescription opioid abuse epidemic. In this observational cohort study, beneficiaries and their physicians were analyzed using 2013 to 2015 Medicare Part D Prescriber Data. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Medicare Part D Prescriber Public Use Files for 2013, 2014, and 2015 were accessed. Analysis began in June 2017. Data were collected and analyzed regarding the prescribing patterns for opioid drugs (eg, number of prescriptions written including refills, number of days' supply, and prescriber rates) for all participating ophthalmologists. The mean number of opioid prescriptions written annually by ophthalmologists; prescriber rates compared with all prescriptions written; and geographic distribution of opioid prescriptions written per ophthalmologist. In 2013, 4167 of 19 615 ophthalmologists were women (21.2%). Consistently, most ophthalmologists (88%-89%) wrote 10 opioid prescriptions or fewer annually. Approximately 1% (0.94%-1.03%) of ophthalmologists wrote more than 100 prescriptions per year. On average, ophthalmologists wrote 7 opioid prescriptions per year (134 290 written annually by 19 638 physicians, on average) with a mean supply of 5 days. The 6 states with the highest volume of opioid prescriptions written annually per ophthalmologist were located in the southern United States. In general, ophthalmologists show discretion in their opioid prescribing patterns. The present opioid abuse epidemic should prompt physicians to consider revisiting their prescribing protocols given the high risk for dependency.

  8. Drug Prescribing Pattern in Two Hospitals in Mwanza, Northwest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Kongola

    Key words: Prescribing pattern, generic and brand drugs, antibiotics, injections ... Brand. Figure 1. Use of brand and generic names in Sekou Toure and Magu Hospitals. 54.6%. 48.4%. 44.0%. 46.0%. 48.0%. 50.0%. 52.0%. 54.0%. 56.0%. Sekou Toure. Ma gu. A n tib .... There was a high awareness of generic prescribing in ...

  9. Perspectives on prescribing in nursing homes in Helsinki

    OpenAIRE

    Hosia-Randell, Helka

    2010-01-01

    Prescribing for older patients is challenging. The prevalence of diseases increases with advancing age and causes extensive drug use. Impairments in cognitive, sensory, social and physical functioning, multimorbidity and comorbidities, as well as age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics all add to the complexity of prescribing. This study is a cross-sectional assessment of all long-term residents aged ≥ 65 years in all nursing homes in Helsinki, Finland. The residents...

  10. [Antibiotic prescribing in acute respiratory tract infections in general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malo, S; Bjerrum, L; Feja, C; Lallana, M J; Poncel, A; Rabanaque, M J

    2015-06-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a worldwide threat to public health. Acute respiratory tract infections are the main reason for antibiotic prescribing in the Spanish paediatric population. The aim of the study was to describe the frequency of antibiotic prescription and their pattern of use in acute respiratory tract infections diagnosed in children in Primary Care in Aragón (Spain). A study was conducted over a 1-year period on children between 0 and 14 years-old, recording all episodes of acute otitis, acute pharyngotonsillitis, non-specific upper respiratory infection, and acute bronchitis. The proportion of episodes within each diagnosis receiving an antibiotic prescription was calculated, and the prescribing pattern was determined. Half (50%) of the children in Aragón were diagnosed with a respiratory tract infection during the study period. Non-specific upper respiratory infection was the most frequent diagnosis. An antibiotic was prescribed in 75% of pharyngotonsillitis episodes, 72% of otitis, 27% of bronchitis, and 16% of non-specific upper respiratory infections. Broad spectrum antibiotics, mainly amoxicillin and amoxicillin-clavulanic, were predominantly prescribed. Antibiotic prescribing in respiratory tract infections in children was generally high, and the choice of antibiotics was probably inappropriate in a high percentage of cases. Therefore an improvement in antibiotic prescribing in children appears to be needed. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Opinions Regarding Benzodiazepine Teaching and Prescribing Among Trainees in Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garakani, Amir; Abdullah, Hussain M; Chang, Christine M; Mendelsohn, Nathaniel; Lapidus, Kyle A B

    2017-07-06

    Benzodiazepines are widely prescribed for a variety of symptoms and illnesses. There has been limited investigation on the training psychiatry residents receive regarding benzodiazepine prescribing. This study surveyed US psychiatric trainees about their didactic and clinical experience with benzodiazepines, investigating how experience with benzodiazepines may shape trainees' opinions and likelihood to prescribe. The 14-question online survey was distributed to residents and fellows at US training programs through an invitation from their training directors. Of 466 programs contacted, with an estimated 1345 trainees, a total of 97 programs (20.8%) and 424 trainees (31.5%) responded. The analyses focused only on the 342 general psychiatry trainees who responded. Most trainees reported having formal didactics on benzodiazepines, and earlier training was correlated with higher trainee quality of instruction assessments (p general. The survey indicated that psychiatry trainees generally feel adequately trained through didactic and clinical experience with benzodiazepines. Trainees perceived pressure by patients to prescribe benzodiazepines, but generally felt comfortable in managing benzodiazepine usage. Psychiatry attendings' opinions on benzodiazepines most impacted trainees. Influences on trainees' prescribing patterns are important variables that can impact future benzodiazepine prescribing.

  12. Decision support for sensible dosing in electronic prescribing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, J J; Nwulu, U; Ferner, R E

    2012-08-01

    The sensible dosing of medicines can ensure that patients receive neither excessive doses leading to toxicity nor inappropriately low doses leading to undertreatment. Computerized prescribing systems with embedded decision support can check doses during prescription order entry and display alerts when the prescribed doses are out of range. We have been unable to identify any scheme for the systematic addition of dosing information to CPOE systems. We used pharmacological data to design an algorithm for dose range checking that we tested on a subset of medicines in an electronic prescribing system to ensure that the rules could be implemented in practice. We drafted an initial algorithm based on pharmacological principles, tested it on a subset of frequently prescribed drugs in an electronic prescribing system and then refined it. We considered which clinical decision support functions systems would require to be maximally effective. The final algorithm contained eleven broad factors. We tested it on 30 drug-route-form combinations, and it accommodated the information for all of these combinations. We also identified a variety of system functions that would be required for comprehensive dosing decision support. The dose range checking algorithm that we have derived from first principles will allow the clinical workflow and warnings to be constructed more effectively within systems to enhance patient safety. This will form a basis for the development of optimal schemes for adding decision support to prescribing systems. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Acute oxygen therapy: a review of prescribing and delivery practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cousins JL

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Joyce L Cousins,1–3 Peter AB Wark,3–5 Vanessa M McDonald2–5 1Faculty of Arts, Nursing and Theology, Avondale College of Higher Education, Sydney, 2School of Nursing and Midwifery, 3Priority Research Centre for Healthy Lungs, 4School of Medicine and Public Health, The University of Newcastle, 5Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Hunter Medical Research Institute, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, NSW, Australia Abstract: Oxygen is a commonly used drug in the clinical setting and like other drugs its use must be considered carefully. This is particularly true for those patients who are at risk of type II respiratory failure in whom the risk of hypercapnia is well established. In recent times, several international bodies have advocated for the prescription of oxygen therapy in an attempt to reduce this risk in vulnerable patient groups. Despite this guidance, published data have demonstrated that there has been poor uptake of these recommendations. Multiple interventions have been tested to improve concordance, and while some of these interventions show promise, the sustainability of these interventions are less convincing. In this review, we summarize data that have been published on the prevalence of oxygen prescription and the accurate and appropriate administration of this drug therapy. We also identify strategies that have shown promise in facilitating changes to oxygen prescription and delivery practice. There is a clear need to investigate the barriers, facilitators, and attitudes of clinicians in relation to the prescription of oxygen therapy in acute care. Interventions based on these findings then need to be designed and tested to facilitate the application of evidence-based guidelines to support sustained changes in practice, and ultimately improve patient care. Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, COPD, type II respiratory failure, oxygen therapy, prescribing, hypoxia, hypercapnia

  14. General practitioners' knowledge, attitude and prescribing of antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections in Selangor, Malaysia: findings and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Kamil, Tengku Karmila Tengku; Md Yusof, Faridah Aryani; Alrasheedy, Alian A; Yusoff, Zuraidah Mohd; Saleem, Fahad; Al-Tamimi, Saleh Karamah; Wong, Zhi Yen; Aljadhey, Hisham; Godman, Brian

    2015-04-01

    Antibiotics are widely prescribed especially for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs). Their irrational use can increase costs and resistance. Assess knowledge, attitude and prescribing of antibiotics for URTIs in Selangor, Malaysia, using a cross-sectional survey among general practitioners (GPs) working in private clinics in 2011. One hundred and thirty-nine physicians completed the questionnaire (response rate = 34.8%). 49.6% (n = 69) agreed antibiotics are helpful in treating URTIs, with most GPs agreeing antibiotics may reduce URTI duration and complications. The majority of GPs reported they felt patients expected antibiotics, with 36.7% (n = 51) agreeing patients would change doctors if they did not prescribe antibiotics and 21.6% (n = 30) agreeing when requested they prescribe antibiotics even if they believe them to be unnecessary. When assessed against six criteria, most GPs had a moderate level of knowledge of prescribing for URTIs. However, antibiotic prescriptions could be appreciably reduced. Further programs are needed to educate GPs and patients about antibiotics building on current initiatives.

  15. Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Valk, H.; Crul, M.; Crul, M.; Heering, L.

    2008-01-01

    Education is of crucial importance in the lives of young adults. Attending school is not only a major part of everyday life, but education is a decisive factor for the future. In literature, educational attainment has been tied to a host of outcomes in adult life. Education is perceived as the key

  16. O Herói Virtuoso, Prudente e Dissimulado: O Cortesão como Ideal Masculino nas Cortes Ibéricas dos séculos XVI e XVII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalina Vanderlei Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo, buscamos traçar um perfil do cortesão barroco como personagem que refletia o ideal masculino da nobreza em Espanha e Portugal dos séculos XVI e XVII: homem que deveria ser discreto, prudente, valoroso, honrado e, não menos, dissimulado. E, para reconstruir essa imagem, baseamos-nos em diferentes textos impressos e manuscritos do período, produzidos por cortesãos e tratadistas segundo fórmulas da literatura doutrinária, focando-se principalmente El Héroe, de Baltasar Gracián, a Instrucción, de D. Juan de Silva, e as Memorias Diarias de la Guerra del Brasil, de Duarte de Albuquerque Coelho.

  17. QUANTIFICAÇÃO DE CHUMBO EM SOLOS: UM ESTUDO COMPARATIVO ENTRE ÁREAS DE FALHA GEOLÓGICA E ÁREAS RURAIS NA CIDADE DE PRESIDENTE PRUDENTE/SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Roberto Moreira da Silva Junior

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was the quantification of lead (Pb in soil samples in specific areas in the city of Presidente PrudenteSP, where one of the features of the physical environment of this region is its proximity to areas with strong evidence of a geological fault. Samples were collected at pre-established regions according to the data regarding the emanation of Rn, and also collected soil profiles in the district of Montalvão. Analyzes of Pb using the anodic stripping voltammetry with mercury electrode was satisfactory and proved to have a low detection limit. The concentration of Pb were one hundred lesser in soil samples collected in rural areas, generating the hypothesis of influence of emanation of Rn in Pb concentration. The granulometry analyzes and MEV were used to characterization soils samples.

  18. Systemic antifungal prescribing in neonates and children: outcomes from the Antibiotic Resistance and Prescribing in European Children (ARPEC) Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lestner, J.M.; Versporten, A.; Doerholt, K.; Warris, A.; Roilides, E.; Sharland, M.; Bielicki, J.; Goossens, H.

    2015-01-01

    The appropriate use of systemic antifungals is vital in the prevention and treatment of invasive fungal infection (IFI) in immunosuppressed children and neonates. This multicenter observational study describes the inpatient prescribing practice of antifungal drugs for children and neonates and

  19. Use and feasibility of delayed prescribing for respiratory tract infections: A questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindbæk Morten

    2011-05-01

    approach depends on the patient's diagnosis. In our setting, delayed prescribing seems to be a feasible strategy, especially in cases of sinusitis and otitis. Educational efforts to promote delayed prescribing in similar settings should focus on these diagnoses.

  20. Understanding the culture of antimicrobial prescribing in agriculture: a qualitative study of UK pig veterinary surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, L. A.; Latham, S. M.; Williams, N. J.; Dawson, S.; Donald, I. J.; Pearson, R. B.; Smith, R. F.; Pinchbeck, G. L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The use of antimicrobials in food-producing animals has been linked with the emergence of antimicrobial resistance in bacterial populations, with consequences for animal and public health. This study explored the underpinning drivers, motivators and reasoning behind prescribing decisions made by veterinary surgeons working in the UK pig industry. Methods A qualitative interview study was conducted with 21 veterinary surgeons purposively selected from all UK pig veterinary surgeons. Thematic analysis was used to analyse transcripts. Results Ensuring optimum pig health and welfare was described as a driver for antimicrobial use by many veterinary surgeons and was considered a professional and moral obligation. Veterinary surgeons also exhibited a strong sense of social responsibility over the need to ensure that antimicrobial use was responsible. A close relationship between management practices, health and economics was evident, with improvements in management commonly identified as being potential routes to reduce antimicrobial usage; however, these were not always considered economically viable. The relationship with clients was identified as being a source of professional stress for practitioners due to pressure from farmers requesting antimicrobial prescriptions, and concern over poor compliance of antimicrobial administration by some farmers. Conclusions The drivers behind prescribing decisions by veterinary surgeons were complex and diverse. A combination of education, improving communication between veterinary surgeons and farmers, and changes in regulations, in farm management and in consumer/retailer demands may all be needed to ensure that antimicrobial prescribing is optimal and to achieve significant reductions in use. PMID:27516473

  1. Albumin Utilization in a Teaching Hospital in Tehran: Time to Revise the Prescribing Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokabed Kazemi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since albumin imposes a relatively high cost to a healthcare system, drug use evaluation for this drug is much more important. This study wants to evaluate pattern of albumin use in a large university affiliated hospital in Tehran, Iran.Methods: A concurrent, cross-sectional study was performed in “Shaheed Rajaei” Cardiovascular, Medical and Research Center. All inpatient adults that were prescribed albumin during the study period were evaluated to register the indications for albumin usage according to the evidence-based guidelines.Results: Only for five patients (4% the albumin prescriptions were justifiable. Of these cases, intractable edema was the leading cause of albumin misuse (73 patients; 60.8%. The total 1468 vials of Albumin were prescribed for 120 patients during the study period. The most common reasons to prescribe albumin were acute normovolemic (34%, cardiac failure (0.83%, resistance edema with Albumin>2g/dL (61%, nephrotic syndrome (0.83%, plasmapheresis (1.67%, ascetic (1.67%.Conclusion: These data, together with previous national studies highly suggest a mandatory need for educational measures for practicing physicians along with strict regulations for prescription strategies regarding expensive drugs such as albumin.

  2. Safety of fentanyl initiation according to past opioid exposure among patients newly prescribed fentanyl patches

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friesen, Kevin J; Woelk, Cornelius; Bugden, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Although a convenient opioid delivery system, transdermal fentanyl patches have caused several deaths and resulted in safety warnings reminding prescribers that fentanyl patches should be prescribed...

  3. Prescribed burning supports grassland biodiversity - A multi-species study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkó, Orsolya; Deák, Balázs; Magura, Tibor; Török, Péter; Kelemen, András; Tóth, Katalin; Horváth, Roland; Nagy, Dávid; Debnár, Zsuzsanna; Zsigrai, György; Kapocsi, István; Tóthmérész, Béla

    2017-04-01

    During ancient times, fire was an important factor shaping European landscapes. Nowadays, prescribed burning can be one of the most effective conservation tools for the management of open landscapes, controlling dominant species, reducing accumulated litter or decreasing wildfire risk. In a prescribed burning experiment, we studied the effects of fire on dry alkaline grasslands. We tested whether autumn prescribed burning can be an alternative conservation measure in these grasslands. We selected six sites in Hungary: in three sites, prescribed burning was applied in November 2011, while three sites remained unburnt. We studied the effects of fire on soil characteristics, plant biomass and on the vegetation and arthropod assemblages (isopods, spiders, ground beetles and rove beetles). Soluble salt content increased significantly in the burnt sites, but soil pH, organic matter, potassium and phosphorous did not change. We found that prescribed fire had several positive effects from the nature conservation viewpoint. Diversity and the number of flowering shoots were higher, and the cover of the dominant grass was lower in the burnt sites. Graminoid biomass was lower, while total, green and forb biomass were higher in the burnt plots compared to the control ones. Our findings suggest that prescribed burning fire did not harm arthropods; species-level analyses showed that out of the most abundant invertebrate species, the abundance of ten was not affected, one decreased and one increased after burning. Our findings highlight that mosaic prescribed fire is a viable management tool in open landscapes, because it supports plant diversity and does not threaten arthropods.

  4. A Validation Study of Homeopathic Prescribing and Patient Care Indicators

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    Munmun Koley

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary version of the homeopathic prescribing and patient care indicators was available. The instrument was modified further in this study with an intention to address formally its validity and reliability, audit prescriptions, identify areas of sub-optimal prescribing, and highlight target areas for improving the quality of practices. A cross-sectional study with record analysis was conducted on systematically sampled 377 patients of Mahesh Bhattacharyya Homeopathic Medical College and Hospital (MBHMC and H, Howrah, West Bengal, India. The outcome measures were homeopathic prescribing indicators (6 items and patient care indicators (5 items. Individualized homeopathic prescriptions predominated in the encounters. Areas demanding immediate attention were extremely poor labeling of drugs dispensed from the hospital pharmacy, improper record of case history and disease diagnosis, ongoing therapies, and investigational findings in the prescriptions. Internal consistency of the overall instrument was estimated to be good (Cronbach's alpha: Prescribing indicators 0.752 and patient care indicators 0.791. The prescribing indicators, except items 1 and 3, reflected acceptable item-corrected total correlations – Pearson's r from 0.58 (95% CI: 0.52-0.65 to 0.74 (95% CI: 0.69-0.78. The patient care indicators, except item 2, showed acceptable correlations – Pearson's r from 0.40 (95% CI: 0.31-0.48 to 0.82 (95% CI: 0.78-0.85. The instrument also showed high discriminant validity (prescribing indicators P<0.0001 and patient care indicators P<0.0001. Improper prescribing practice was quite rampant and corrective measures are warranted. The developed indicators appeared to be validated and reliable; however, they are amendable for further development.

  5. Assessment of antipsychotic prescribing in Belgian nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azermai, Majda; Elseviers, Monique; Petrovic, Mirko; van Bortel, Luc; Stichele, Robert Vander

    2011-10-01

    Given the potential adverse effects of antipsychotics, high use in nursing homes creates concern. Our study goal was to explore the use of antipsychotics in relation to resident characteristics, and to assess the appropriateness of antipsychotic prescribing in Belgian nursing homes. Data were used from a cross-sectional study (Prescribing in Homes for the Elderly; PHEBE) conducted in 76 nursing homes in Belgium. Antipsychotics were classified into typical and atypical, using the anatomical therapeutic and chemical classification. Ten inappropriate antipsychotic prescribing indicators were selected from the updated Beers criteria (2003), Bergen District Nursing Home Study (BEDNURS) indicators, and Screening Tool of Older People's Prescriptions criteria (STOPP). The residents' mean age was 84.8 years, 78.1% of whom were female. The prevalence of antipsychotic utilization was 32.9%. Antipsychotics were mainly indicated for dementia-related agitation, and psychosis with/without dementia. Higher use of antipsychotics was found for dementia (OR: 3.27; 95% CI: 2.61-4.09), insomnia (OR: 1.38; 95% CI: 1.10-1.73), depression (OR: 1.30; 95% CI: 1.03-1.65), and age antipsychotic prescribing indicators scoring the highest among users were: long-term use (92.6%), use despite risk of falling (45.6%), combined use with other psychotropics (31.8%), and duplicate use (15.1%). Inappropriate prescribing was associated with depression (OR: 3.41) and insomnia (OR: 2.17). The indicator-driven analysis of antipsychotic prescribing quality revealed a need for improvement, with the main prescribing problems relating to duration and combination of therapies. Risks/benefits of off-label use need to be evaluated more consciously at the start of therapy, and at periodic re-evaluations.

  6. Detecção e conscientização de portadores de hemoglobinopatias nas regiões de São José do Rio Preto e Presidente Prudente, SP (Brasil Detection of carriers of abnormal haemoglobins, and their familiarization with their condition, in the population of the regions of S. José do Rio Preto and Presidente Prudente, S. Paulo (Brazil

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    Paulo César Naoum

    1985-08-01

    Full Text Available Foram analisadas 7.657 amostras de sangue provenientes de 48 cidades das regiões de São José do Rio Preto e de Presidente Prudente, com o objetivo de detectar e conscientizar os portadores de hemoglobinas anormais. As análises efetuadas mostraram que 3,47% tinham hemoglobinas anormais, sendo 2,26% portadores de variantes moleculares (Hbs, AS, AC, SS, SC, AJ, AB2 e 1,21% de talasse-mias (alfa e beta. Os resultados obtidos evidenciaram que estudos semelhantes, além de propiciar o melhor conhecimento das causas genéticas, bioquímicas e hematológicas dessas alterações hereditárias, oferecem também a oportunidade de estimar a importância que essas patologias representam para a saúde pública do nosso país. A ação preventiva foi estabelecida por meio de reuniões de esclarecimentos médicos e biológicos aos portadores de hemoglobinas anormais.A study of abnormal haemoglobins among the inhabitants of S. José do Rio Preto and Presidente Prudente was conducted, using blood samples collected from 7,657 subjects attending health clinics in 48 towns of those regions during 1983-1984. For purposes of analysis the subjects were grouped by region of origin and racial features, 6,941 being classified as "caucasoid" and 716 as "negroid", the latter category including negroes, dark mulattoes, and light mulattoes. Electrophoretic techniques were used to detect abnormal haemoglobins, to determine the presence of haemoglobin types S and C, and isolate the polypeptide chains of other abnormal haemoglobins. Tests for quantification of haemoglobin A2 and fetal haemoglobin were performed as needed. Alpha and beta thalassaemias were diagnosed in accordance with principles established by the World Health Organization. These procedures detected abnormal haemoglobin in 266 (3.47% of the study subjects. These included 173 specific molecular variants (169 of them being type S or type C variants and 93 thalassaemias (4 of them being alpha thalassaemia and 89

  7. General practitioner attitudes towards prescribing aspirin to carriers of Lynch Syndrome: findings from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Samuel G; Foy, Robbie; McGowan, Jennifer; Kobayashi, Lindsay C; Burn, John; Brown, Karen; Side, Lucy; Cuzick, Jack

    2017-10-01

    A dose non-inferiority study comparing 100 mg, 300 mg and 600 mg of aspirin for cancer prevention among Lynch Syndrome carriers is underway (Colorectal Adenoma/Carcinoma Prevention Programme trial 3, CaPP3). To guide implementation of the findings, we investigated general practitioner (GP) attitudes towards aspirin prescribing for Lynch Syndrome carriers. We surveyed 1007 UK GPs (9.6% response rate). Using a within-subjects design, GPs read a statement on harms and benefits of aspirin and indicated their willingness to prescribe aspirin at three doses (100 mg, 300 mg, 600 mg). Approximately two-thirds (70.8%) of GPs had heard of Lynch Syndrome or its associated names, and among those 46.7% were aware of the cancer preventive effects of aspirin among carriers. Two-thirds (68.1%) of GPs reported feeling comfortable discussing harms and benefits of aspirin with a Lynch Syndrome patient. Willingness to prescribe was 91.3% at 100 mg, and declined to 81.8% at 300 mg and 62.3% at 600 mg (p Lynch Syndrome patient in practice (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.01-2.05, p = 0.045). GPs report limited awareness of Lynch Syndrome and the preventive effects of aspirin among carriers. To ensure the optimal dose identified in the CaPP3 trial is readily available to patients, prescribing guidance and strategies to educate GPs should be developed.

  8. Students and Doctors are Unaware of the Cost of Drugs they Frequently Prescribe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Tim; Tichelaar, Jelle; Nanayakkara, Prabath; Richir, Milan; van Agtmael, Michiel

    2017-03-01

    Given the increasing healthcare costs of an ageing population, there is growing interest in rational prescribing, which takes costs of medication into account. We aimed to gain insight into the attitude to and knowledge of medication costs of medical students and doctors in daily practice. This was a cross-sectional electronic survey among medical students (bachelor/master) and doctors (consultants/registrars). Attitude to costs was evaluated using a cost-consciousness scale. In open questions, the participants estimated the cost of commonly prescribed (generic/non-generic) drugs (including separate pharmacy dispensing costs). They were asked where they could find information about drug costs. Overall, a reasonable cost-consciousness was found. Students were less conscious of the cost than were doctors (15.56 SD 3.25 versus 17.81 SD 2.25; scale 0-24; p = 0.001). In contrast to this consciousness, actual estimated drug costs were within a 25% margin for only 5.4% of generic and 13.7% of proprietary drugs (Wilcoxon signed-rank, p doctors (84%) and a minority of students (40%) were able to identify at least one source of information about drug costs. While doctors and students considered it important to be aware of the cost of drugs, this attitude is not reflected in their ability to estimate the cost of frequently prescribed drugs. Cost awareness is important in therapeutic reasoning and cost-effective prescribing. Both should be better addressed in (undergraduate) pharmacotherapy education. © 2016 The Authors. Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  9. Non-medical prescribers and pharmacovigilance: participation, competence and future needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Derek; MacLure, Katie; Paudyal, Vibhu; Hughes, Carmel; Courtenay, Molly; McLay, James

    2013-04-01

    To determine UK non-medical prescribers' (NMPs) (supplementary or independent) current participation and self-reported competence in pharmacovigilance, and their perceptions of training and future needs. Non-medical prescribers in health care in the United Kingdom. Awareness of and participation in the Yellow Card Scheme (YCS); attitudes towards ADR reporting; strategies to encourage reporting; pharmacovigilance training; and demographics. The sample comprised nurse (n = 912) and pharmacist (n = 2,439) NMPs in the UK. Self-reported competence in pharmacovigilance, knowledge of and participation in the YCS, attitudes towards ADR reporting; strategies to encourage ADR reporting; pharmacovigilance training during NMP training. Six hundred and thirteen responses were received giving an overall response rate of 20.4 %. Response rates for nurse and pharmacist prescribers were 32.2 % (n = 293) and 13.1 % (n = 320) respectively. Three hundred and fifty-nine respondents (58.6 %) had submitted a Yellow Card. Although the majority of respondents (70.4 %) felt competent in pharmacovigilance, a third (34.2 %) said they needed further training. Respondents reported a positive attitude towards ADR reporting, yet only a minority (22.9 %) correctly answered factual questions about the YCS. Approximately a third of respondents (35.6 %) "couldn't remember" if pharmacovigilance was covered in their prescribing training. Publicity and education were commonly suggested measures to enhance contribution to the YCS. While NMPs report participation and competence in ADR reporting, there are several key issues to consider including the need for further training and support to optimise their role in pharmacovigilance.

  10. An evaluation of knowledge, attitude and practices about prescribing fixed dose combinations among resident doctors

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    Nimit Goswami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fixed Dose Combinations (FDCs improve patient compliance and decrease pill burden. However, irrational prescribing of FDCs is a major health concern. As resident doctors are primarily involved in patient management at tertiary care hospitals, knowledge about prescribing FDCs is of paramount importance. Objective: To evaluate knowledge, attitude and practice, regarding use of FDCs by resident doctors at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out among resident doctors working at Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad, a tertiary care teaching hospital. One hundred resident doctors from the departments of medicine, obstetrics and gynaecology, surgery, paediatrics, skin and psychiatry, who gave their informed consent, were enrolled. A prevalidated questionnaire regarding knowledge, attitude and prescribing practice of fixed dose combinations was filled up. Data was analyzed with suitable statistical tests. Results: Out of the 100 residents recruited for the study, 34, 33 and 33 residents were selected from the 1 st , 2 nd and 3 rd year respectively. The resident doctors were not aware about all of the advantages and disadvantages of FDCs. On an average, only 31% of the residents (lowest 16% among 1 st year residents had knowledge about the Essential Medicine List (EML. Knowledge about rationality of given FDCs was lacking in 81% of the residents. Only 47% could name a single banned FDC in India. Common sources of information about FDCs were medical representatives, colleagues/peers, the Monthly Index of Medical Specialities (MIMS and Continuous Medical Education (CMEs. A majority of residents (96% agreed that FDCs should be allowed to be marketed. The residents opined that most commonly prescribed FDCs were of antimicrobial drugs, amongst which amoxicillin + clavulanic acid was the most frequent. Conclusion: There is need to improve knowledge about rationality, EML, usage and banned FDCs in post graduate

  11. Repeat prescribing of medications: A system-centred risk management model for primary care organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Julie; Man, Shu Ling; Bartlett, Stephen; Taylor, Kate; Dinwoodie, Mark; Bowie, Paul

    2017-08-01

    Reducing preventable harm from repeat medication prescriptions is a patient safety priority worldwide. In the United Kingdom, repeat prescriptions items issued has doubled in the last 20 years from 5.8 to 13.3 items per patient per annum. This has significant resource implications and consequences for avoidable patient harms. Consequently, we aimed to test a risk management model to identify, measure, and reduce repeat prescribing system risks in primary care. All 48 general medical practices in National Health Service (NHS) Lambeth Clinical Commissioning Group (an inner city area of south London in England) were recruited. Multiple interventions were implemented, including educational workshops, a web-based risk monitoring system, and external reviews of repeat prescribing system risks by clinicians. Data were collected via documentation reviews and interviews and subject to basic thematic and descriptive statistical analyses. Across the 48 participating general practices, 62 unique repeat prescribing risks were identified on 505 occasions (eg, practices frequently experiencing difficulty interpreting medication changes on hospital discharge summaries), equating to a mean of 8.1 risks per practice (range: 1-33; SD = 7.13). Seven hundred sixty-seven system improvement actions were recommended across 96 categories (eg, alerting hospitals to illegible writing and delays with discharge summaries) with a mean of 15.6 actions per practice (range: 0-34; SD = 8.0). The risk management model tested uncovered important safety concerns and facilitated the development and communication of related improvement recommendations. System-wide information on hazardous repeat prescribing and how this could be mitigated is very limited. The approach reported may have potential to close this gap and improve the reliability of general practice systems and patient safety, which should be of high interest to primary care organisations internationally. © 2017 The Authors Journal of

  12. Change in antihypertensive drug prescribing after guideline implementation: a controlled before and after study

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    Helin-Salmivaara Arja

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antihypertensive drug choices and treatment levels are not in accordance with the existing guidelines. We aimed to assess the impact of a guideline implementation intervention on antihypertensive drug prescribing. Methods In this controlled before and after study, the effects of a multifaceted (education, audit and feedback, local care pathway quality programme was evaluated. The intervention was carried out in a health centre between 2002 and 2003. From each health care unit (n = 31, a doctor-nurse pair was trained to act as peer facilitators in the intervention. All antihypertensive drugs prescribed by 25 facilitator general practitioners (intervention GPs and 53 control GPs were retrieved from the nationwide Prescription Register for three-month periods in 2001 and 2003. The proportions of patients receiving specific antihypertensive drugs and multiple antihypertensive drugs were measured before and after the intervention for three subgroups of hypertension patients: hypertension only, with coronary heart disease, and with diabetes. Results In all subgroups, the use of multiple concurrent medications increased. For intervention patients with hypertension only, the odds ratio (OR was 1.12 (95% CI 0.99, 1.25; p = 0.06 and for controls 1.13 (1.05, 1.21; p = 0.002. We observed no statistically significant differences in the change in the prescribing of specific antihypertensive agents between the intervention and control groups. The use of agents acting on the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system increased in all subgroups (hypertension only intervention patients OR 1.19 (1.06, 1.34; p = 0.004 and controls OR 1.24 (1.15, 1.34; p Conclusions A multifaceted guideline implementation intervention does not necessarily lead to significant changes in prescribing performance. Rigorous planning of the interventions and quality projects and their evaluation are essential.

  13. Antibiotic prescribing practices in primary and secondary health care facilities in Uttar Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R; Indira, K; Rizvi, A; Rizvi, T; Jeyaseelan, L

    2008-12-01

    Emerging antibiotic resistance in common pathogens is a worldwide problem known to be related to inappropriate overuse of antibiotics. Wide variability in antibiotic use throughout the world is because of various factors, including socio-cultural differences. To study the rate of antibiotic prescribing for common outpatient illnesses and the various disease, patient, physician and health facility characteristics, which influence this in primary and secondary healthcare settings in Uttar Pradesh. After sampling of health facilities - both private and government, rural and urban, a cross-sectional survey of prescriptions for patients presenting with runny or blocked nose, cough, sore throat, diarrhoea or fever without localizing symptoms was conducted. Information on disease, patient, physician and facility characteristics was collected. Outcome factors: antibiotic prescription and group of antibiotic prescribed. No intervention was made. Overall antibiotic prescription rate was 81.8%. It was significantly higher in urban private than in government settings, and higher in rural than in urban settings. Presence of fever prompted antibiotic use across all strata. Lower age of patients and higher socioeconomic status were associated with higher antibiotic use. Patient requests for antibiotics were very rare. Specialist practices with staff with higher qualifications and better opportunities for updating knowledge were associated with lower antibiotic prescribing. Government health-facilities with larger staff complement and better infrastructure was associated with lower prescribing rates. The most common antimicrobial agents used were the penicillin, sulfonamides and fluoroquinolones. Injection use paralleled antibiotic use. These data on overprescribing of antibiotics can be used to design educational programs for physicians working in these settings.

  14. Doctor contraceptive-prescribing behaviour and women's attitudes towards contraception: two European surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Dominic; Hooper, David J

    2011-06-01

    Many women are prescribed oestrogen-containing contraceptives for whom oestrogen-containing methods may be less suitable. Two surveys examining contraceptive prescription practices among doctors (n = 419) and attitudes towards contraception among women (n = 1623) in France, Germany, Spain, Italy and Russia were evaluated. Progestin-only pills and hormone-free intrauterine devices were the most commonly prescribed contraceptives for women with medical conditions for which oestrogen-containing methods are not preferred (40% and 20%, respectively), those suffering from oestrogen-related side effects (32% and 21%) and those with concerns about the safety of oestrogen-containing methods (28% and 24%). Combined oral contraceptives (COC) were prescribed to ≥ 10% in these two groups. One-quarter of contraceptive users had asked to be switched from one COC to another because of oestrogen-related side effects; a similar proportion had been switched by their doctor for this reason. Half of the women surveyed did not want or had concerns about foreign/additional oestrogen, and about 80% said that they would consider switching to a different hormonal contraceptive to minimize oestrogen exposure. Although most doctors were aware of the World Health Organization medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use, they still prescribed COCs or other oestrogen-containing contraceptives to women with medical conditions for which oestrogen-containing options are not favoured, suggesting a need for additional education. By complying with guidelines and heeding women's concerns, doctors can individualize their contraceptive recommendation to improve safety, acceptance and compliance and, ultimately, reduce the risk of an unintended pregnancy. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Coscinodiscophyceae, Fragilariophyceae e Bacillariophyceae (Achnanthales dos rios Ivaí, São João e dos Patos, bacia hidrográfica do rio Ivaí, município de Prudentópolis, PR, Brasil Coscinodiscophyceae, Fragilariophyceae and Bacillariophyceae (Achnanthales of the Ivaí, São João and Patos rivers in the Ivaí basin, Prudentópolis, Paraná State, Brazil

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    Fernanda Ferrari

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se o levantamento florístico das Coscinodiscophyceae, Fragilariophyceae e Bacillariophyceae (Achnanthales dos rios Ivaí, São João e dos Patos, pertencentes à bacia hidrográfica do rio Ivaí, município de Prudentópolis, Paraná. Quarenta e uma amostras foram coletadas em março, junho e julho/2002 e janeiro/2003, e analisadas. As coletas fitoplanctônicas foram feitas através de arrasto superficial com rede de plâncton (25 µm e as perifíticas através da coleta de porções submersas de macrófitas aquáticas, rochas, cascalho, sedimento ou substrato arenoso. Foram identificados, nove táxons pertencentes à classe Coscinodiscophyceae, oito à classe Fragilariophyceae e quinze à ordem Achnanthales (Bacillariophyceae. Thalassiosira weissflogii (Grunow Fryxell & Hasle, Achnanthidium sp., Planothidium biporomum (Hohn & Hellerman Lange-Bertalot e Cocconeis placentula var. pseudolineata Geitler consistiram em novas citações para o estado do Paraná.A floristic study of Coscinodiscophyceae, Fragilariophyceae and Bacillariophyceae (Achnanthales in the Ivaí, São João and Patos rivers from the upper Ivaí river basin, located at Prudentópolis, Paraná State, Brazil is presented. Forty-one samples were collected in March, June and July/2002 and January/2003, and analysed. Phytoplankton samples were collected with a plankton net (25 µm mesh; periphyton was collected by removing the attached material from submerged portions of aquatic macrophytes, rocks, sediment or the sandy substratum. Nine species of the class Coscinodiscophyceae, eight of the class Fragilariophyceae and fourteen of the order Achnanthales were identified. Thalassiosira weissflogii (Grunow Fryxell & Hasle, Achnanthidium sp., Planothidium biporomum (Hohn & Hellerman Lange-Bertalot and Cocconeis placentula var. pseudolineata Geitler were new diatom records for Paraná State.

  16. A Review of Opioid Overdose Prevention and Naloxone Prescribing: Implications for Translating Community Programming Into Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Shane R; Walley, Alexander Y; Calcaterra, Susan L; Glanz, Jason M; Binswanger, Ingrid A

    2015-01-01

    As physicians have increased opioid prescribing, overdose deaths from pharmaceutical opioids have substantially increased in the United States. Naloxone hydrochloride (naloxone), an opioid antagonist, is the standard of care for treatment of opioid induced respiratory depression. Since 1996, community-based programs have offered overdose prevention education and distributed naloxone for bystander administration to people who use opioids, particularly heroin. There is growing interest in translating overdose education and naloxone distribution (OEND) into conventional medical settings for patients who are prescribed pharmaceutical opioids. For this review, we summarized and classified existing publications on overdose education and naloxone distribution to identify evidence of effectiveness and opportunities for translation into conventional medical settings. For this review, we searched English language PubMed for articles on naloxone based on primary data collection from humans, including feasibility studies, program evaluations, surveys, qualitative studies, and studies comparing the effectiveness of different routes of naloxone administration. We also included cost-effectiveness studies. We identified 41 articles that represented 5 categories: evaluations of OEND programs, effects of OEND programs on experiences and attitudes of participants, willingness of medical providers to prescribe naloxone, comparisons of different routes of naloxone administration, and the cost-effectiveness of naloxone. Existing research suggests that people who are at risk for overdose and other bystanders are willing and able to be trained to prevent overdoses and administer naloxone. Counseling patients about the risks of opioid overdose and prescribing naloxone is an emerging clinical practice that may reduce fatalities from overdose while enhancing the safe prescribing of opioids.

  17. Contact lens prescribing in the Australian states and territories 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Craig A; Morgan, Philip B

    2002-09-01

    This study was conducted to ascertain current preferences for contact lens prescribing in the Australian states and territories. One thousand questionnaires were randomly distributed to proportionate samples of optometrists in each state of Australia. We requested details of the first 10 patients fitted with contact lenses after receipt of the questionnaire. One hundred and seventy-eight completed questionnaires were returned, detailing contact lens fits to 1,611 patients. The mean age of the patient group was 32.1 +/- 13.0 yrs (65 per cent female). For Australia as a whole: 53 per cent of patients were existing wearers, the remainder were new fits; 93 per cent of new fits were with soft lenses, of which seven per cent were for extended wear. Of the refits, 89 per cent were soft lenses and 18 per cent for extended wear. The lens material of first choice was mid-water-content (62 per cent of all soft lens fits). Only eight per cent of all soft fits were for lenses that were not replaced on a planned basis, with two weeks being the replacement interval of choice in all states and territories. The majority of rigid lenses were prescribed using mid-Dk materials (50 per cent). Analysis of solution prescribing indicates that multi-purpose products were the most common regimens for planned replacement soft lenses. The percentage of hydrogen peroxide prescribed increased as lens replacement became less frequent. By state or territory: practitioners in Tasmania prescribed more extended wear than those in any other state (p = 0.007) and practitioners in Queensland prescribed more daily disposable contact lenses than those in any other state (p = 0.009). Non-planned replacement lenses are now rarely prescribed to patients. Extended-wear lenses and rigid lenses continue to be prescribed more to existing contact lens wearers than to new patients. The impact of soft multifocal lens designs on contact lens prescribing is very small, ranging from 2.6 per cent in Queensland to 4

  18. Aceptación de los fármacos genéricos en equipos de atención primaria: efecto de una intervención educativa y de los precios de referencia Acceptance of generic prescribing in general practice: effect of patient education and reference prices

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    J.A. Vallès

    2002-12-01

    referencia incrementó de forma relativa el uso de genéricos.Aims: To assess patient acceptance of the substitution of brand-name drugs for generic equivalents in the context of repeat prescriptions for chronic diseases. Methods: A prospective multicenter study of drug use was performed. Of the 31 centers included in the study, 8 were randomized to the intervention group and 23 to the control group. For 1 year, patients in the intervention group who visited the center to collect repeat prescriptions received verbal and written information on the advantages and disadvantages of generic and brand name drugs. Data on the number of patients taking brand-name drugs for which generic equivalents were available, as well as the reasons and variables related to refusal of generic drugs (age, gender, education, primary care centre, general practitioner, type of drug and total number of repeat prescriptions were collected. The percentage of generic drugs among the total number of drugs prescribed was calculated at 2-monthly intervals. Results: A total of 98.9% of the 4620 patients in the intervention group agreed to change to a generic formulation. The percentage of patients accepting generic drugs was significantly associated with the primary care centre, the class of drug, doctors' influence, and patient satisfaction with the drug. Generic prescriptions represented 5.9% in the intervention practices compared with 2.8% in controls. After the intervention, and before the application of reference prices, the percentages were 6.7% and 3.9%, respectively. Immediately after application of the reference prices, the percentages were 8.6% and 6.3%, respectively. Conclusions: Direct patient education is an effective strategy in increasing the prescription of generic equivalents. General practitioners' motivation and knowledge of generic drugs influenced their use. The application of reference prices increased the use of generic equivalents.

  19. Analysis of the antibiotic prophylaxis prescribed by Spanish Oral Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho-Puchades, Manuel; Herráez-Vilas, José-María; Valmaseda-Castellón, Eduardo; Berini-Aytés, Leonardo; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2009-10-01

    To identify prophylactic antibiotic prescription practices among Spanish dentists with preferential dedication to Oral Surgery in different types of tooth extraction surgeries. Members of the Spanish Oral Surgery Society were surveyed on antibiotic prophylaxis use in 4 different tooth extraction modalities scaled according to their surgical invasiveness. Sixty-nine of the 105 distributed questionnaires were returned completed. Thirteen percent of the surveyed surgeons would prescribe antibiotics to prevent postoperative wound infection when confronted with conventional tooth extraction lasting less than 5 minutes. In the case of surgery lasting more than 5 minutes, the percentage of participants that would prescribe antibiotics increased to 39%. When a mucoperiosteal flap was elevated or an ostectomy was performed, 87% and 100%, respectively, would prescribe antibiotic prophylaxis. Amoxicillin and its combination with clavulanic acid were the most commonly prescribed antibiotics. All participants would prescribe the antibiotic orally, starting after surgery and with a duration that ranged from 2-8 days. The results obtained suggest that antibiotic prophylaxis for preventing local odontogenic infection is not being correctly implemented in Spain. This can generate new bacterial resistances, facilitate adverse drug reactions and favor opportunistic infections. Better designed studies are needed in order to clarify the role of antibiotics in the prevention of postsurgical wound infection.

  20. Impact of prescribed medications on patient safety in older people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anathhanam, Sujo; Powis, Rachel A.; Robson, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Appropriate prescribing for older adults presents unique challenges to the prescriber. An understanding of the scale of the problems and contributing factors is essential when designing interventions to improve patient safety. The altered pharmacology of ageing, the existence of multiple medical conditions and the exclusion of elderly patients from many trials render this subgroup of the population particularly vulnerable to underprescribing and overprescribing. Adverse drug events are common, causing significant morbidity and mortality as well as having economic implications. ‘High-risk’ medications such as opioids, anticoagulants and antipsychotics can have benefits in this group of patients but strategies to optimize their safety are required. Tools exist that help to identify those at risk of adverse drug reactions and to screen for inappropriate prescribing. Developments in information technology are ongoing, and it is hoped that these may enhance the process of medication reconciliation across healthcare transitions and alert the prescriber to potential adverse drug events. This review addresses commonly encountered issues when prescribing for older people, considers strategies to improve medication safety and offers a list of ‘top tips’ to aid the clinician. PMID:25083234

  1. Education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Belue, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    .... Unequal access to quality education leaves millions ill equipped for today's workplace. The "No Child Left Behind Act" is an effective point of departure, yet it too fails to adequately address the myriad issues affecting quality education...

  2. Clozapine: a review of clinical practice guidelines and prescribing trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Clozapine effectiveness in the treatment of refractory schizophrenia has been sustained by published evidence in the last two decades, despite the introduction of safer options. Discussion Current clinical practice guidelines have strongly recommended the use of clozapine in treatment-resistant schizophrenia, but prescribing trends do not appear to have followed such recommendations. Clozapine is still underutilized especially in patients at risk of suicide. It seems that physicians are hesitant in prescribing clozapine due to concerns about serious adverse effects. Recent reports have highlighted the need to inform health professionals about the benefits of treating patients with clozapine and have voiced concerns about the underutilization of clozapine especially in patients at risk of suicide. Summary Guidelines and prescribing patterns reported in various countries worldwide are discussed. Suggestions on how to optimize clozapine utilization have been published but more efforts are needed to properly inform and support prescribers’ practices. PMID:24708834

  3. An audit of generic prescribing in a general surgical department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gleeson, M

    2013-01-17

    BACKGROUND: The Health Service Executive introduced a generic prescription policy to reduce costs. Despite this, generic prescription rates remain low. AIM: To audit in-patient prescription practice in a single surgical department and identify potential savings which could be realised by adherence to the generic prescribing policy. METHODS: Surgical in-patient charts were obtained at the point of discharge and their drug prescription information was recorded. RESULTS: 51 % of prescriptions involved a trade-name prescription where an appropriate generic equivalent existed. The cost implications for hospital and community patients were found to be greatly affected by substitution policies that exist at hospital pharmacy level. CONCLUSION: There is a need to promote greater adherence to generic prescribing amongst hospital doctors in line with international best practice. It can have a positive impact in terms of safe prescribing and can have cost implications at both hospital and community level.

  4. Inappropriate prescribing in the older population: need for new criteria.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Mahony, Denis

    2012-02-03

    Inappropriate prescribing (IP) is a common and serious global healthcare problem in elderly people, leading to increased risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), polypharmacy being the main risk factor for both IP and ADRs. IP in older people is highly prevalent but preventable; hence screening tools for IP have been devised, principally Beers\\' Criteria and the Inappropriate Prescribing in the Elderly Tool (IPET). Although Beers\\' Criteria have become the most widely cited IP criteria in the literature, nevertheless, they have serious deficiencies, including several drugs that are rarely prescribed nowadays, a lack of structure in the presentation of the criteria and omission of several important and common IP instances. New, more up-to-date, systems-based and easily applicable criteria are needed that can be applied in the routine clinical setting.

  5. Prescribing Privileges for Psychologists: A Public Service or Hazard?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheen E. Lakhan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The privilege to prescribe pharmacotherapeutics has been granted in limited areas to psychologists. The psychologist's role in society may be approaching a great evolution that can dramatically impact the state of mental healthcare and the discipline of psychiatry. Opponents argue drug company funding and cheaper non-PhD psychological professionals fuel the movement for prescription rights for PhD level psychologists. However, proponents claim that this right would equip psychologists with greater psychotherapeutic modalities and the capability of having richer doctor-patient relationships to diagnose and treat underserved populations. Nonetheless, the paucity of prescribing psychologist studies cannot allow the biopsychosocial community to make firm opinions, let alone a decision on this debate. This article reviews the history of clinical psychology and highlights the potential divergence into collaborative clinical and health psychologists and autonomous prescribing psychologists.

  6. Statin prescribing according to gender, age and indication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallach-Kildemoes, Helle; Støvring, Henrik; Holme Hansen, Ebba

    2016-01-01

    RATIONALES, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The increasing dispensing of statins has raised concern about the appropriateness of prescribing to various population groups. We aimed to (1) investigate incident and prevalent statin prescribing according to indication, gender and age and (2) relate prescribing...... patterns to evidence on beneficial and adverse effects. METHODS: A cohort of Danish inhabitants (n = 4 424 818) was followed in nationwide registries for dispensed statin prescriptions and hospital discharge information. We calculated incidence rates (2005-2009), prevalence trends (2000-2010) and absolute...... numbers of statin users according to register proxies for indication, gender and age. RESULTS: In 2010, the prevalence became highest for ages 75-84 and was higher in men than women (37% and 33%, respectively). Indication-specific incidences and prevalences peaked at ages around 65-70, but in myocardial...

  7. Public Daycare Noncompliance with Prescribed Lunch Menus and Dietary Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Marcia Aurelina Oliveira; Morais, Tania Beninga

    2015-01-01

    In Brazil, menus for public child daycare centers (PDC) must be planned by a nutritionist in order to meet the infants' nutritional needs and to conform to dietary recommendations. Failure to follow them may jeopardize the infants' health and growth. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to investigate the compliance of actually served lunch menus with the prescribed menus, according to age (7- to 12-month-olds and 13- to 24-month-olds) and whether prescribed and served menus followed the recommended dietary guidelines. Five PDCs were randomly selected for observation, out of 14 existing in the city of Concordia, Brazil. Data collection was carried out during 6 consecutive weeks in September (fall/winter menus) and October (spring/summer menus) in order to cover the menus representative of the entire year. Of 60 lunches recorded, only 20% of them matched the prescribed ones entirely; none of the lunches served to infants aged 7-12 months did so. Fourteen food items were prescribed 157 times throughout the year. Omission (number of times on menu but not served) was the most frequent form of noncompliance in the younger group: 62.4% (98/157). Foods more frequently omitted by the cooks were beef, pork, chicken, and lentils. Compliance with dietary guidelines was higher in the prescribed menus and in those actually served to the 13- to 24-month-old age group. Infants in the 7- to 12-month-old group may be more vulnerable to nutritional inadequacies because menus served to them were less compliant with the prescribed menus. Dietetics professionals should improve the variety of foods on the menus as well as supervise their execution.

  8. Effects of prescribed fires on soil properties: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcañiz, M; Outeiro, L; Francos, M; Úbeda, X

    2018-02-01

    Soils constitute one of the most valuable resources on earth, especially because soil is renewable on human time scales. During the 20th century, a period marked by a widespread rural exodus and land abandonment, fire suppression policies were adopted facilitating the accumulation of fuel in forested areas, exacerbating the effects of wildfires, leading to severe degradation of soils. Prescribed fires emerged as an option for protecting forests and their soils from wildfires through the reduction of fuels levels. However such fires can serve other objectives, including stimulating the regeneration of a particular plant species, maintaining biological diversity or as a tool for recovering grasslands in encroached lands. This paper reviews studies examining the short- and long- term impacts of prescribed fires on the physical, chemical and biological soil properties; in so doing, it provides a summary of the benefits and drawbacks of this technique, to help determine if prescribed fires can be useful for managing the landscape. From the study conducted, we can affirm that prescribed fires affects soil properties but differ greatly depending on soil initial characteristics, vegetation or type of fire. Also, it is possible to see that soil's physical and biological properties are more strongly affected by prescribed fires than are its chemical properties. Finally, we conclude that prescribed fires clearly constitute a disturbance on the environment (positive, neutral or negative depending on the soil property studied), but most of the studies reviewed report a good recovery and their effects could be less pronounced than those of wildfires because of the limited soil heating and lower fire intensity and severity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. [Medication reconciliation errors according to patient risk and type of physician prescriber identified by prescribing tool used].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbao Gómez-Martino, Cristina; Nieto Sánchez, Ángel; Fernández Pérez, Cristina; Borrego Hernando, Mª Isabel; Martín-Sánchez, Francisco Javier

    2017-01-01

    To study the frequency of medication reconciliation errors (MREs) in hospitalized patients and explore the profiles of patients at greater risk. To compare the rates of errors in prescriptions written by emergency physicians and ward physicians, who each used a different prescribing tool. Prospective cross-sectional study of a convenience sample of patients admitted to medical, geriatric, and oncology wards over a period of 6 months. A pharmacist undertook the medication reconciliation report, and data were analyzed for possible associations with risk factors or prescriber type (emergency vs ward physician). A total of 148 patients were studied. Emergency physicians had prescribed for 68 (45.9%) and ward physicians for 80 (54.1%). A total of 303 MREs were detected; 113 (76.4%) patients had at least 1 error. No statistically significant differences were found between prescriber types. Factors that conferred risk for a medication error were use polypharmacy (odds ratio [OR], 3.4; 95% CI, 1.2-9.0; P=.016) and multiple chronic conditions in patients under the age of 80 years (OR, 3.9; 95% CI, 1.1-14.7; P=.039). The incidence of MREs is high regardless of whether the prescriber is an emergency or ward physician. The patients who are most at risk are those taking several medications and those under the age of 80 years who have multiple chronic conditions.

  10. Barriers to accepting e-prescribing in the U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alan D

    2006-01-01

    With the number of prescriptions rising nationally each year, it is surprising that Web-based technology is not fully embraced in the pharmacy industry as an aid to quality-assuring prescribing processes. Traditional prescription handling is done in a manual fashion with physicians hand-writing prescriptions for the patients during an office visit, giving the patient the responsibility of taking the prescription to a pharmacy or mailing the prescription to a mail order company for fulfillment. Electronic prescribing (e-prescribing) has the ability not only to streamline the prescription writing process, but also to reduce the number of errors that may be incurred with hand-written prescriptions. The purpose of this paper is to investigate these phenomena in the U.S.A. A number of hypotheses were tested using principal-components analysis (PCA) and factor analyses. As a result, a total of 55 fully employed, professional and semi-professional service management and internet users, representing a college-educated and knowledge-based sample derived from the metropolitan section of Pittsburgh, was selected. The six major constructs generated from the factor loadings in descending order of importance were: profit and risk factors, shipping and handling, saving, customer relationship management (CRM) and ethics, age, and awareness. The dependent variable chosen to be regressed against these major independent factor-based constructs was willingness to purchase prescriptions online. The overall relationship was found to be statistically significant (F = 2.971, p = 0.015) in predicting willingness to use e-prescribing options based on the various independent constructs. However, when testing the various standardized beta coefficients in the linear model, only the factor score-based construct CRM and ethics was found to significantly contribute to predicting the willingness to purchase prescriptions online (t = -3.074, p = 0.003). Although this study appears to represent the

  11. Improving prescribing practices with rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burchett, Helen E D; Leurent, Baptiste; Baiden, Frank

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The overuse of antimalarial drugs is widespread. Effective methods to improve prescribing practice remain unclear. We evaluated the impact of 10 interventions that introduced rapid diagnostic tests for malaria (mRDTs) on the use of tests and adherence to results in different contexts...... packages, supervision, supplies and community sensitisation. OUTCOME MEASURES: Analysis explored variation in: (1) uptake of mRDTs (% febrile patients tested); (2) provider adherence to positive mRDTs (% Plasmodium falciparum positive prescribed/given Artemisinin Combination Treatment); (3) provider...

  12. Measuring the severity of prescribing errors: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Sara; Reynolds, Matthew; Dermont, Liesbeth; Franklin, Bryony Dean

    2013-12-01

    Prescribing errors are common. It has been suggested that the severity as well as the frequency of errors should be assessed when measuring prescribing error rates. This would provide more clinically relevant information, and allow more complete evaluation of the effectiveness of interventions designed to reduce errors. The objective of this systematic review was to describe the tools used to assess prescribing error severity in studies reporting hospital prescribing error rates. The following databases were searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, and CINAHL (January 1985-January 2013). We included studies that reported the detection and rate of prescribing errors in prescriptions for adult and/or pediatric hospital inpatients, or elaborated on the properties of severity assessment tools used by these studies. Studies not published in English, or that evaluated errors for only one disease or drug class, one route of administration, or one type of prescribing error, were excluded, as were letters and conference abstracts. One reviewer screened all abstracts and obtained complete articles. A second reviewer assessed 10 % of all abstracts and complete articles to check reliability of the screening process. Tools were appraised for country and method of development, whether the tool assessed actual or potential harm, levels of severity assessed, and results of any validity and reliability studies. Fifty-seven percent of 107 studies measuring prescribing error rates included an assessment of severity. Forty tools were identified that assessed severity, only two of which had acceptable reliability and validity. In general, little information was given on the method of development or ease of use of the tools, although one tool required four reviewers and was thus potentially time consuming. The review was limited to studies written in English. One of the review authors was also the author of one of the tools, giving a potential source of bias

  13. Dichotomy in the definition of prescriptive information suggests both prescribed data and prescribed algorithms: biosemiotics applications in genomic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Onofrio David J

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The fields of molecular biology and computer science have cooperated over recent years to create a synergy between the cybernetic and biosemiotic relationship found in cellular genomics to that of information and language found in computational systems. Biological information frequently manifests its "meaning" through instruction or actual production of formal bio-function. Such information is called Prescriptive Information (PI. PI programs organize and execute a prescribed set of choices. Closer examination of this term in cellular systems has led to a dichotomy in its definition suggesting both prescribed data and prescribed algorithms are constituents of PI. This paper looks at this dichotomy as expressed in both the genetic code and in the central dogma of protein synthesis. An example of a genetic algorithm is modeled after the ribosome, and an examination of the protein synthesis process is used to differentiate PI data from PI algorithms.

  14. The prescribing and follow-up of domiciliary oxygen--whose responsibility? A survey of prescribing from primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungin, A Pali; Chinn, David J; Convery, Bernie; Dean, Charles; Cornford, Charles S; Russell, Andrew

    2003-09-01

    Domiciliary oxygen is expensive and is frequently used outside the prescribing guidelines, which include the need for blood oxygen measures, a hospital-based facility. Ongoing prescriptions are generally provided by general practitioners (GPs). A survey in the north-east of England found that the origin of the initial prescription was often obscure and that there was no record of the responsible clinician or of structured follow-up for the majority of patients. Many patients received oxygen outside the prescribing guidelines. There is a need for better organised, conjoint follow-up of patients on domiciliary oxygen.

  15. Drug prescribing pattern for under-fives in a paediatric clinic in south ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of three hundred and seventy-four (71.1%) patients had at least one antibiotic prescribed with antibiotics accounting for 28.2% of all drugs prescribed, while 13.5% of all encounters had an injection prescribed. Prescribing by generic name was done in 68.9 ± 26.5% of all prescribed medications, and 60.4% of all ...

  16. Antibiotic prescribing practice in management of cough and/or ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The increase in resistance of many pathogens to currently available antibiotics has been recognized as life-threatening problem. The development of drug resistance is promoted by irrational prescribing behavior. Inappropriate use of antibiotics is attributed by overprescription, inadequate dosage and use for ...

  17. Analysis of paediatric prescribing profiles in two health-funding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Setting. Two industry databases, one covering a prepaid health maintenance organisation (HMO), the other providing a chronic medication programme for medical schemes and their members. Main outcome measures. Comparison of prescribing profiles of specialists and GPs. Main results. Data from the HMO revealed that ...

  18. Factors Influencing Prescribing Practices of Medical Practitioners in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Medical information from textbooks (64 %) and internet (63 %) were the main sources of prescribing information among medical practitioners. In comparison, medical practitioners in private health facilities (97 %) were more concerned with proven effectiveness of drugs than those working in public health facilities ...

  19. Prescribing of methylphenidate to children and adolescents in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-11-13

    Nov 13, 2008 ... prescriptions were issued in metropolitan areas in this study, but overuse could not be established. This study was a ... the patient, the date of the prescription, the province and the area of residence of the patient, .... all methylphenidate prescribing in Scotland in 2006,16 which is roughly in agreement with ...

  20. Antibiotic prescribing frequency amongst patients in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shallcross, Laura; Beckley, Nick; Rait, Greta

    2017-01-01

    prescribed, individual-level antibiotic use and comorbidity. Methods: This was a cohort study using electronic health records from 1 948 390 adults registered with 385 primary care practices in the UK in 2011-13. We estimated the average number of antibiotic prescriptions per patient and the association...

  1. Exploring the Prevalence of Malaria and Prescribing Pattern of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The primary healthcare is the entry point of the populace into the healthcare sector and is aimed at providing effective and efficient healthcare services. It is paramount to prescribe drugs correctly; especially malaria which remains a major public health problem in Nigeria and a leading causes of outpatient visits ...

  2. Prescribing of methylphenidate to children and adolescents in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pharmacoepidemiological studies on ADHD are limited in South Africa. The primary aim was to analyse the prescribing of methylphenidate to patients aged 18 years and younger in the private health care sector. Methods: Data for a one-month period in 2004 were obtained from a large medical aid ...

  3. Appropriateness of Omeprazole Prescribing in Quebec’s Senior Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Grégoire

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prescribing omeprazole for the treatment of digestive disorders accounts for an important part of the costs in Quebec’s drug benefit plan. In July 1993, the Quebec drug program listed omeprazole, with restriction, in its formulary. On January 1, 1994, this restriction was lifted; since then, omeprazole has been listed in the regular provincial formulary.

  4. Does comorbidity explain trends in prescribing of newer antihypertensive agents?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greving, JP; Denig, P; van der Veen, WJ; Beltman, FW; Sturkenboom, MCJM; de Zeeuw, D; Haaijer-Ruskamp, FM

    2004-01-01

    Objective Concerns exist about heavily prescribing of new drugs when the evidence on hard outcomes is still limited. This has been the case for the newer classes of anti hypertensives, especially in hypertensive patients without additional comorbidity. The association between comorbidity and trends

  5. Prescribing Patterns and Cost of Antihypertensive Drugs in Private ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antihypertensive agents are used to prevent morbidity and mortality related to hypertension. Prescribing patterns and the cost of some antihypertensive were studied for 600 patients attending medical clinics in four private hospitals in Dar es Salaam using the WHO drug use indicator forms. The average number of drugs per ...

  6. The effects of fepeated prescribed burning on Pinus ponderosa growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    David L. Peterson; Stephen S. Sackett; Lindsay J. Robinson; Sally M. Haase

    1994-01-01

    The effect of repeated prescribed burning on long term growth of Pinus ponderosa in northern Arizona was examined. Fire treatments for hazard reduction were initiated in 1976,and growthwas evaluated in 1988 for fire rotations of 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 years. Dendroecological analysis shows that there were only small changes in treegrowth (compared tocontrols) in the...

  7. Investigation into the prescribing patterns and cost of antidiabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The general objective of this study was to investigate the prescribing patterns and cost of antidiabetic medicine in the private health care sector in South Africa by using a medicine claims database. A quantitative, retrospective drug utilisation study was performed on data for the year 2004. Oral antidiabetic medicine ...

  8. Establishment of indicators to improve clinical analysis prescribing patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaepfel, Sabine; Fontaine, Mathieu; Agi, Danièle; Pecquet, Matthieu

    2017-10-01

    An appropriate medical analysis prescribing pattern is part of the medical biologists' work as it enhances patient care and reduces costs. In this study, we use four indicators to aim to evaluate the relevance of clinical analysis prescription. We confronted clinical data and medical analysis prescribed in June 2013 in the emergency department (ED) and found that prescriptions were justified in 73% of TnT prescriptions but only in less than 50% of NTproBNP (27%), APTT (37%), PR (33%) or INR (23%) prescriptions. We noted that staff training, an improved communication between biologists and clinical physicians, and better computing devices, have led to better prescribing patterns. From 2013 to 2015, inappropriate associations of PR and APTT have significantly declined in the intensive care unit. At the same period, amounts of medical analysis as well as department spendings decreased in the ED. The use of indicators is essential to evaluate and monitor the relevance of medical analysis patterns. In this work, we propose to combine a global indicator (cost/day of hospitalization or medical analysis amount/month) with a regular follow up on inadequate prescribed analysis associations. These indicators will need to be adjusted to each clinical department.

  9. Methods used to assess drug prescribing and dispensing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of drugs, observations to assess drug sellers/dispensers roles and consumers behaviour, interviews with the drug sellers and nonprofessional providers themselves, use of simulated client approach and use of the patients care indicators such as generic prescribing/dispensing, number of drugs selected from the essential ...

  10. An experimental prescribed burn to reduce fuel hazard in chaparral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisle R. Green

    1970-01-01

    The feasibility of reducing fuel hazard in chaparral during safe weather conditions was studied in an experimental prescribed burn in southern California. Burning was done under fuel and weather conditions when untreated brush would not bum readily. Preparatory treatment included smashing of brush on strips with a bulldozer, and reduction of moisture content of leaves...

  11. Practices in prescribing protein substitutes for PKU in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aguiar, A; Ahring, K; Almeida, M F

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There appears little consensus concerning protein requirements in phenylketonuria (PKU). METHODS: A questionnaire completed by 63 European and Turkish IMD centres from 18 countries collected data on prescribed total protein intake (natural/intact protein and phenylalanine-free protein...

  12. [The prescribing rights of registered nurses in Canada].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, Josette

    2016-10-01

    In order to improve the performance of the healthcare system in Canada, registered nurses have been given the right to prescribe. The Canadian Nurses Association played a central role in the implementation of this change by developing a national reference framework, now available to Canadian provinces and territories. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Cultures of resistance? A Bourdieusian analysis of doctors' antibiotic prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broom, Alex; Broom, Jennifer; Kirby, Emma

    2014-06-01

    The prospect of an 'antimicrobial perfect storm' in the coming decades through the emergence and proliferation of multi-resistant organisms has become an urgent public health concern. With limited drug discovery solutions foreseeable in the immediate future, and with evidence that resistance can be ameliorated by optimisation of prescribing, focus currently centres on antibiotic use. In hospitals, this is manifest in the development of stewardship programs that aim to alter doctors' prescribing behaviour. Yet, in many clinical contexts, doctors' antibiotic prescribing continues to elude best practice. In this paper, drawing on qualitative interviews with 30 Australian hospital-based doctors in mid-2013, we draw on Bourdieu's theory of practice to illustrate that 'sub-optimal' antibiotic prescribing is a logical choice within the habitus of the social world of the hospital. That is, the rules of the game within the field are heavily weighted in favour of the management of immediate clinical risks, reputation and concordance with peer practice vis-à-vis longer-term population consequences. Antimicrobial resistance is thus a principal of limited significance in the hospital. We conclude that understanding the habitus of the hospital and the logics underpinning practice is a critical step toward developing governance practices that can respond to clinically 'sub-optimal' antibiotic use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Prescribing Patterns and Cost of Antihypertensive Drugs in Private ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nx 6110

    Antihypertensive agents are used to prevent morbidity and mortality related to hypertension. Prescribing patterns and the cost of some antihypertensive were studied for 600 patients attending medical clinics in four private hospitals in Dar es. Salaam using the WHO drug use indicator forms. The average number of drugs ...

  15. Chinese Herbal Medicines – Comparison of Doses Prescribed in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    questionnaire included doses of frequently-used Chinese herbs, cognition of current doses in clinical practice, and doctors' (practitioners') opinions on dose levels. The median of Chinese herbal medicines' dose prescribed by the participants was compared with the upper limit value (ULV) of stipulated doses in China ...

  16. Impacts of prescribed fire on soil loss and soil quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shakesby, Richard A.; Martins Bento, Celia; Ferreira, Carla S.S.; Ferreira, António J.D.; Stoof, C.R.; Urbanek, Emilia; Walsh, Rory P.D.

    2015-01-01

    Prescribed (controlled) fire has recently been adopted as an important wildfire-fighting strategy in the Mediterranean. Relatively little research, however, has assessed its impacts on soil erosion and soil quality. This paper investigates hillslope-scale losses of soil, organic matter and

  17. Retrospective Evaluation of Analgesics Prescribing Pattern in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non-opioid type of analgesics was utilized more than opioid. With oral route being the most favoured route of administration and opioids with exception of tramadol were exclusively administered parenterally. Paracetamol was the commonest prescribed analgesic in accident and emergency department. The result of this ...

  18. GPs motivations of prescribing antidepressants and their practical relevance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkers, A.; Jong, A. de; Braspenning, J.C.C.; Bakker, D. de; Dijk, L. van

    2004-01-01

    Background: Insight in the motivations of prescribing antidepressants may contribute to advance the efficiency of the current, large antidepressant prescription rate. Less is known about why general practitioners (GPs) treat patients with antidepressants or not and choose modern SSRIs instead of the

  19. [Prescribing diuretics: what a practitioner needs to know].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, C; Saudan, P; Ernandez, T

    2015-02-25

    Diuretics are among the most frequently prescribed drugs. Most of them act by inhibiting sodium reabsorption in various nephron segments. By understanding their pharmacological characteristics, it is possible to adapt the type of diuretic to different clinical situations. Practical aspects of their use, including in heart failure, cirrhosis, the nephrotic syndrome and renal failure, are discussed.

  20. A Prescribed Flight Performance Assessment for Undersea Vehicle Autopilot Robustness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-16

    TECHNICAL REPORT/THESIS A PRESCRIBED FLIGHT PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT FOR UNDERSEA VEHICLE AUTOPILOT ROBUSTNESS By Daniel J...Vehicle Autopilot Robustness By Daniel J. Bowman Dr. A. Scott Lewis Technical Report TR 16-002 Date: 16 June 2016...FLIGHT PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT FOR UNDERSEA VEHICLE AUTOPILOT ROBUSTNESS A Thesis in Mechanical Engineering by Daniel J. Bowman

  1. Trends in US Contact Lens Prescribing 2002 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efron, Nathan; Nichols, Jason J; Woods, Craig A; Morgan, Philip B

    2015-07-01

    To document contact lens prescribing patterns in the United States between 2002 and 2014. A survey of contact lens prescribing trends was conducted each year between 2002 and 2014, inclusive. Randomly selected contact lens practitioners were asked to provide information relating to 10 consecutive contact lens fits between January and March each year. Over the 13-year survey period, 1650 survey forms were received from US practitioners representing details of 7702 contact lens fits. The mean (±SD) age of lens wearers was 33.6 (±15.2) years, of whom 65.2% were female. Rigid lens new fits decreased from 13.0% in 2002 to 9.4% in 2014. Across this period, silicone hydrogels have replaced mid water contact lens hydrogels as the soft lens material of choice. Toric lenses represented about 25 to 30% of all soft lens fits. Multifocal soft lenses are generally preferred to monovision. Daily disposable lens fits have recently increased, and in 2014, they represented 27.1% of all soft lens fits. Most lenses are prescribed on 1 to 2 weekly or monthly lens replacement regimen. Extended wear remains a minority lens wearing modality. The vast majority of those wearing reusable lenses use multipurpose lens care solutions. Lenses are mostly worn 7 d/wk. This survey has revealed prescribing trends and preferences in the United States over the past 13 years.

  2. Patterns of prescribing and utilization of asthma medications in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To assess the prescribing patterns of asthma medications in a hospital in Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE) with regard to the demographic pattern of the population. Methods: One hundred fifty four patients, 83 male and 71 female, were randomly selected from the outpatient respiratory diseases clinic of a tertiary ...

  3. Prescribing Errors in Cardiovascular Diseases in a Tertiary Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prescription errors are now known to be contributing to a large number of deaths during the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. However, there is paucity of information about these errors occurring in health facilities in Nigeria. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of prescribing errors in ...

  4. Distribution And Types Of Artificial Crowns And Bridges Prescribed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There were no statically crowned tooth was the maxillary central incisor constituting 59.7 per cent. All – resin crowns were the most prescribed (59.2 per cent) followed was porcelain – fused to – metal crowns (38. 1 per cent). A total of 68 fixed partial dentures, consisting of 178 retainers and 117 poetics made for 68 patients

  5. Prescribed burning and its effect on plant biomass and species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three burning regime (fire protected, early burning, late burning) and their effects on plant biomass and species diversity in Dabagi forest Reserve of Sokoto State were investigated. Prescribed burning was carried out on randomly selected plots (10 m x 10 m) in November (early burn) and March (late burn) 2004.

  6. CDC Vital Signs–Opioid Prescribing

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-07-06

    This podcast is based on the July 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Higher opioid prescribing puts patients at risk for addiction and overdose. Learn what can be done about this serious problem.  Created: 7/6/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/6/2017.

  7. Prescribing patterns of methylphenidate in a South African patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADHD) in children. The primary aim of the study was to investigate the prescribing patterns of methylphenidate of a medical aid patient population in a private sector and to compare the results with previous studies. An exposure cohort drug ...

  8. Plant community responses to prescribed burning in Wisconsin sedge meadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael A. Kost; Diane De Steven

    2000-01-01

    In northern temperate regions, sedge meadows dominated by the tussock-sedge Carex stricta Lam. (Cyperaceae) were historically a fire-maintained community type. In two Wisconsin natural areas (Lulu Lake and Summerton), the authors assessed the effects of time since prescribed spring burning on plant composition and aboveground biomass in eight sedge...

  9. Foreignising as translation strategy in prescribed books for second ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The focus of the paper is to describe the transfer of culture-specific elements of the Afrikaans novel By die Lêplek van die Leeus (In the Lions' Den) by Louise Prinsloo to English. This is a prescribed book for Afrikaans second-language learners in Grade 11 in the Limpopo Province. The story deals with intercultural and ...

  10. Prescribing of methylphenidate to children and adolescents in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-11-13

    Nov 13, 2008 ... One US dollar ($1.00) was equal to R6.21, one British ... The age distribution, including prescribing frequency and cost, of all beneficiaries ... population of children and adolescents in the study, 27.04% (9 391 of the 34 733 ...

  11. [Prescribing of ergometrine for abortion without physical examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-19

    The report of the Board of Medical Discipline in the Hague considering a case in which the complainant is a woman who went to the toilet in her 11th week of pregnancy, heard a splash and began to hemorrhage. The complainant called the defendant physician and requested an immediate visit. The physician found that a visit was not necessary and gave a telephone diagnosis of a miscarriage and prescribed ergometrine (Ermitrine) 1 tablet 3 X daily. About an hour later the complainant became sick and was admitted to the hospital with what turned out to be an incomplete gemelli miscarriage. The complainant held that the physician was negligent on 2 occasions, 1st during the telephone conversation; 2d when the complainant picked up the prescription from the physician, in that he made a diagnosis without a physical examination and prescribed ergometrine. The board ruled that the physician should have determined by means of a vaginal examination whether the abortion had been complete. He was also in error in prescribing ergometrine since this always causes contraction of the uterus and this action is not indicated if there are remnants still in the uterus. By failing to make an examination before prescribing ergometrine the physician was guilty of an action which undermined confidence in medicine. The board voted to issue a letter of caution to the physician and directed that the case be registered with the Ministry of Welfare, Public Health and Culture and published in the medical journals.

  12. Behaviour and effects of prescribed fire in masticated fuelbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric Knapp; J. Morgan Varner; Matt Busse; Carl Skinner; Carol Shestak

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical mastication converts shrub and small tree fuels into surface fuels, and this method is being widely used as a treatment to reduce fire hazard. The compactness of these fuelbeds is thought to moderate fire behaviour, but whether standard fuel models can accurately predict fire behaviour and effects is poorly understood. Prescribed burns were conducted in...

  13. Extent of Occurrence of Prescribing Errors in a Private Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Correct prescription writing has a great influence on the fate of medicine therapy and health of patients. Errors in prescribing may be classified into two main types: errors of omission and errors of commission. Errors of omission are where a prescription is incomplete whereas errors of commission contain ...

  14. Constructing irreducible polynomials with prescribed level curves over finite fields

    OpenAIRE

    Mihai Caragiu

    2001-01-01

    We use Eisenstein's irreducibility criterion to prove that there exists an absolutely irreducible polynomial P(X,Y)∈GF(q)[X,Y] with coefficients in the finite field GF(q) with q elements, with prescribed level curves Xc:={(x,y)∈GF(q)2|P(x,y)=c}.

  15. A model of ponderosa pine growth response to prescribed burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elaine Kennedy Sutherland; W. Wallace Covington; Steve Andariese

    1991-01-01

    Our objective was to model the radial growth response of individual ponderosa pines to prescribed burning in northern Arizona. We sampled 188 trees from two study areas, which were burned in 1976. Within each study area, control and burned trees were of similar age, vigor, height, and competition index. At Chimney Spring, trees were older, less vigorous, and taller and...

  16. Prescribing Patterns and Inappropriate Use of Medications in Elderly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the prescribing patterns and occurrence of potentially inappropriate medications (PIM) among elderly outpatients visiting a tertiary hospital in Nigeria. Methods: A retrospective study was carried out among elderly subjects (age 60 years) who were issued prescriptions in the outpatients department of ...

  17. Topical antibiotic monotherapy prescribing practices in acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, William D; Davis, Scott A; Fleischer, Alan B; Feldman, Steven R

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the frequency of dosing topical antibiotics as monotherapy in the treatment of acne vulgaris, and physician specialty prescribing these medications. This study is a retrospective review of all visits with a sole diagnosis of acne vulgaris (ICD-9-CM code 706.1) found on the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) in 1993-2010. We recorded the number of visits surveyed where acne vulgaris was the sole diagnosis, number of visits where topical antibiotics were the only treatment prescribed, and the specialty of physician in each encounter. Topical erythromycin or clindamycin were the sole medication prescribed in 0.81% of the visits recorded, with 60% of these prescriptions arising from dermatologists and 40% from non-dermatologists. The trend of prescribing topical antibiotic monotherapy is declining (p acnes to topical antibiotic regimens has led to the need to re-evaluate the use of topical antibiotics in the treatment of acne vulgaris. While the rate of topical antibiotic monotherapy is declining, their use should be reserved for situations where the direct need for antibiotics arises. If a clinician feels that antibiotics are a necessary component to acne therapy, they should be used as part of a combination regimen.

  18. A drug utilisation study investigating prescribed daily doses of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To estimate average prescribed daily doses. (PODs) for selected hypolipidaemic agents available on the South African market. Comparison of the estimated. PODs with established ODDs (defined daily doses) and international dosage ranges. To investigate the age and gender of the users of the different ...

  19. Prescribed minimum benefits – quagmire or foundation for social ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prescribed minimum benefits – quagmire or foundation for social health reform? B Taylor, A Taylor, D Burns, J D Rust, P Grobler. Abstract. No Abstract South African Medical Journal Vol. 97 (6) 2007: pp. 446-450. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL ...

  20. Concomitant prescribing of benzodiazepines during antidepressant therapy in the elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, KN; de Vries, CS; ter Huume, K; van den Berg, PB; Brouwers, JRBJ; van den Berg, LTWD

    2002-01-01

    A follow-up study was performed in two ambulatory cohorts aged greater than or equal to65 to investigate whether the prevalence and incidence of anxiolytic/hypnotic benzodiazepine drug prescribing is comparable between users of serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and users of tricyclic

  1. New drugs in general practice: prescribing patterns and external influences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florentinus, S.R.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis several studies are presented with the objective to detect and elucidate the patterns by which new drugs are prescribed by general practitioners (GPs). Furthermore, we studied the influences of medical specialists and community pharmacists as important factors on the GP's decision to

  2. Acorn viability following prescribed fire in upland hardwood forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katie Greenberg; Tara Keyser; Stan Zarnoch; Kris Connor

    2012-01-01

    Restoration of structure and function of mixed-oak (Quercus spp.) forests is a focal issue of forest land managers in the eastern United States due to widespread regeneration failure and poor overstory recruitment of oaks, particularly on productive sites. Prescribed fire is increasingly used as a tool in oak ecosystem restoration, with the goal of reducing competition...

  3. Factors influencing the choice of antidepressants: A study of antidepressant prescribing practice at University psychiatric clinic in Belgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marić Nađa P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Antidepressants are a widely used class of drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate different aspects of antidepressant prescribing practice at University Psychiatric Clinic in Belgrade. Methods. This cross-sectional study was carried out by retrospective analysis of the patient's medical charts. The study included all patients with antidepressant prescribed at discharge during 2009 (n = 296. The evaluation was focused on patient- related factors (socio-demographic and illness related, psychiatrist-related factors (sex and duration of working experience and drug related factors (type of antidepressant, dose, polypharmacy and reimbursement by national health insurance. Results. Antidepressants were prescribed for unipolar depression (F32-34, ICD X either without comorbidity (46.2% or with comorbidity (24.7%, mostly as a monotherapy (91% had one antidepressant, to the patients who were 65% female, aged 50.1 ± 8.9, most of them with 12 years of education (52.6%, married (69.3% and employed (55.9%. The majority of patients had a history of two hospitalizations (Med 2; 25th-75th perc. 1-4 during nine years (Med 9; 25th-75th perc. 2-15 after the first episode of depression. Among them, 19% were found to be suicidal in a lifetime. The single most prescribed antidepressant was sertraline (20.4%, followed by fluoxetine (13.3% and maprotiline (11.7%. Utilization of antidepressants was positively correlated with the rate of reimbursement (p < 0.01. The most prescribed antidepressant group was selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI (47.8%, followed by tricyclic antidepresants (TCA (25.3% and new antidepressants - venlafaxine, tianeptine, mirtazapine, bupropion, trazodone (15.1%. Most of the drugs were prescribed in doses which are at the lower end of the recommended dose-range. Regarding severity of the actual depressive episode, TCA were prescribed for severe depression with psychotic features, while SSRI were choice for

  4. Prescribed fire as an alternative measure in European grassland conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkó, Orsolya; Deák, Balázs; Török, Péter; Tóthmérész, Béla

    2015-04-01

    There are contrasting opinions on the perspectives of prescribed burning management in European grasslands. One hand, prescribed burning can be effectively used with relatively low implementation costs for the management of open landscapes, the reduction of accumulated litter or for decreasing the chance of wildfires. On the other hand burning can also have serious detrimental impacts on grassland ecosystems by promoting the dominance of some problem species (e.g. some competitors or invasive species) and by threatening endangered plant and animal species, especially invertebrates, thus, inappropriate burning can result in a loss of biodiversity in the long run. Our goal was to review the publications on the application of prescribed burning in European grasslands considering general (e.g. timing, frequency and duration) and specific (e.g. types of grasslands, effects on endangered species) circumstances. Even prescribed burning forms an integral part of the North-American grassland management practice, it is rarely applied in Europe, despite the fact that uncontrolled burning occurs frequently in some regions. According to the North-American experiences prescribed burning can be a viable solution for biodiversity conservation and can be a feasible solution for several nature conservation problems. We reviewed prescribed burning studies from Europe and North-America to identify findings which might be adapted to the European grassland conservation strategy. We found that not only the application of fire management is scarce in Europe but there is also a lack of published studies on this topic. European studies - contrary to the North-American practice - usually used yearly dormant-season burning, and concluded that this burning type solely is not feasible to preserve and maintain species-rich grasslands. In North-American grasslands, application of burning has a stronger historical, practical and scientific background; it is fine-tuned in terms of timing, frequency

  5. Antibiotic prescribing practices for catheter urine culture results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Jonathan; Thompson, G William; Austin, Thomas W; Hussain, Zafar; John, Michael; Bombassaro, Anne Marie; Connelly, Sarah E; Elsayed, Sameer

    2013-01-01

    The literature suggests that positive results of catheter urine cultures frequently lead to unnecessary antimicrobial prescribing, which therefore represents an important target for stewardship. To assess the appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing in response to the results of urine cultures from patients with indwelling urinary catheters. This retrospective study was conducted at a tertiary care centre and involved adults with indwelling urinary catheters from whom urine specimens were obtained for culture. Patients with positive or negative culture results were identified from microbiology laboratory reports. The medical records of consecutive patients were screened to select a sample of 80 inpatients (40 per group). Abstracted patient histories were independently evaluated by an expert panel of 3 infectious diseases consultants blinded to the decisions of prescribers and of fellow panelists. The primary end point was concordance of each patient's treatment decision (with respect to the indication) between the expert panel (based on majority agreement, i.e., at least 2 of the 3 expert panelists) and the prescriber. The secondary end points were unnecessary days of therapy and selected outcomes over a predefined period after urine was obtained for culture. A total of 591 charts were screened to generate the targeted number of patients. Baseline demographic characteristics were comparable for the 2 groups, except antibiotic exposure before urine collection was significantly more frequent for the group with negative culture results. The treatment decision was concordant in 40% (16/40) of the patients with a positive culture result and 85% (34/40) of those with a negative culture result (p < 0.001). The most common reason for discordance was administration of antibiotics when not indicated (23 of 24 patients with a positive result and 5 of 6 patients with a negative result), which accounted for 165 and 32 unnecessary days of therapy per 1000 inpatient

  6. Solute clearance in CRRT: prescribed dose versus actual delivered dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyndon, William D; Wille, Keith M; Tolwani, Ashita J

    2012-03-01

    Substantial efforts have been made toward defining the dose threshold of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) associated with improved survival in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. Published studies have used prescribed effluent rates, expressed as total effluent volume (TEV) per weight and unit time (mL/kg/h), as a surrogate for dose. The purpose of this study was to compare differences in CRRT dose based on prescribed effluent rate, measured TEV and direct measurement of urea and creatinine clearance. We analyzed data that had been prospectively collected on 200 patients enrolled in a randomized trial comparing survival with a prescribed effluent rate of 20 mL/kg/h (standard dose) to 35 mL/kg/h (high dose) using pre-dilution continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF). Filters were changed every 72 h. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (SCr), effluent urea nitrogen (EUN) and effluent creatinine (ECr) were collected daily. Actual delivered dose was calculated as: (EUN/BUN)*TEV for urea and (ECr/SCr)*TEV for creatinine. Data were available for 165 patients. In both groups, prescribed dose differed significantly from the measured TEV dose (P < 0.001). In the standard dose group, there was no difference between the measured TEV dose and actual delivered urea and creatinine clearances. However, in the high-dose group, measured TEV dose differed significantly from delivered urea clearance by 7.1% (P < 0.001) and creatinine clearance by 13.9% (P < 0.001). Dose based on prescribed effluent rate or measured TEV is a poor substitute for actual CVVHDF creatinine and urea clearance.

  7. Information on medication history--basis for improved prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorko, Martina; Suselj, Marjan

    2005-01-01

    The spectrum of applied pharmaceuticals, often interactive, persistently expands. In modern therapeutics, patients receive more and more drugs, cases of simultaneous administering of more than 10 different drugs are not seldom. The majority of drugs are prescribed by personal physicians, the rest by the secondary level service specialists, doctors on duty, doctors at the release from the hospital etc. Furthermore, patients keep in stock drugs prescribed in the past. In the Slovene practice of medication prescribing, a major setback is poor information linking between the doctor and the pharmacist, as well as between doctors at different levels of service. Thus, doctors have often raised the issue of timely and accurate informing on the administered drug. This issue became even more pressing upon the implementation of the scheme of substitutable drugs in 2003, allowing the pharmacist to substitute the prescribed drug for an equivalent less expensive one.The paper outlines a project headed by the Health Insurance Institute of Slovenia (Institute) to facilitate the recording of issued drugs on the card. The information on drugs received by a patient in the past will in this way become readily accessible to the prescribing doctor as well as to the administering pharmacist. This objective requires a range of tasks to be completed: business/operational design of the system, introduction of a uniform drug information scheme at the national level, adjusting the functions of the health insurance card system, upgrading the software environment at the health care service providers, training doctors and pharmacists in applying the new information, and ensuring data security in conformity with regulations.

  8. Inappropriate prescribing and adverse drug events in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallagher Paul F

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Inappropriate prescribing (IP in older patients is highly prevalent and is associated with an increased risk of adverse drug events (ADEs, morbidity, mortality and healthcare utilisation. Consequently, IP is a major safety concern and with changing population demographics, it is likely to become even more prevalent in the future. IP can be detected using explicit or implicit prescribing indicators. Theoretically, the routine clinical application of these IP criteria could represent an inexpensive and time efficient method to optimise prescribing practice. However, IP criteria must be sensitive, specific, have good inter-rater reliability and incorporate those medications most commonly associated with ADEs in older people. To be clinically relevant, use of prescribing appropriateness tools must translate into positive patient outcomes, such as reduced rates of ADEs. To accurately measure these outcomes, a reliable method of assessing the relationship between the administration of a drug and an adverse clinical event is required. The Naranjo criteria are the most widely used tool for assessing ADE causality, however, they are often difficult to interpret in the context of older patients. ADE causality criteria that allow for the multiple co-morbidities and prescribed medications in older people are required. Ultimately, the current high prevalence of IP and ADEs is unacceptable. IP screening criteria need to be tested as an intervention to assess their impact on the incidence of ADEs in vulnerable older patients. There is a role for IP screening tools in everyday clinical practice. These should enhance, not replace good clinical judgement, which in turn should be based on sound pharmacogeriatric training.

  9. Inappropriate prescribing and adverse drug events in older people.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hamilton, Hilary J

    2009-01-01

    Inappropriate prescribing (IP) in older patients is highly prevalent and is associated with an increased risk of adverse drug events (ADEs), morbidity, mortality and healthcare utilisation. Consequently, IP is a major safety concern and with changing population demographics, it is likely to become even more prevalent in the future. IP can be detected using explicit or implicit prescribing indicators. Theoretically, the routine clinical application of these IP criteria could represent an inexpensive and time efficient method to optimise prescribing practice. However, IP criteria must be sensitive, specific, have good inter-rater reliability and incorporate those medications most commonly associated with ADEs in older people. To be clinically relevant, use of prescribing appropriateness tools must translate into positive patient outcomes, such as reduced rates of ADEs. To accurately measure these outcomes, a reliable method of assessing the relationship between the administration of a drug and an adverse clinical event is required. The Naranjo criteria are the most widely used tool for assessing ADE causality, however, they are often difficult to interpret in the context of older patients. ADE causality criteria that allow for the multiple co-morbidities and prescribed medications in older people are required. Ultimately, the current high prevalence of IP and ADEs is unacceptable. IP screening criteria need to be tested as an intervention to assess their impact on the incidence of ADEs in vulnerable older patients. There is a role for IP screening tools in everyday clinical practice. These should enhance, not replace good clinical judgement, which in turn should be based on sound pharmacogeriatric training.

  10. Discussing and prescribing expensive unfunded anticancer drugs in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karikios, Deme John; Mileshkin, Linda; Martin, Andrew; Ferraro, Danielle; Stockler, Martin R

    2017-01-01

    Australia has a publicly funded universal healthcare system which heavily subsidises the cost of most registered anticancer drugs. The use of anticancer drugs that are unfunded, that is, not subsidised by the government, entails substantial out-of-pocket costs for patients. We sought to determine how frequently Australian medical oncologists discuss and prescribe unfunded anticancer drugs, and their attitudes and beliefs about their use. Members of the Medical Oncology Group of Australia (MOGA) completed an online survey about their clinical practices over a recent 3-month period. A negative binomial regression model was used to examine the influence of respondent characteristics on the rate of discussions about, and prescription of, unfunded anticancer drugs. Of the 154 respondents (27% of 575 MOGA members), 92% had discussed and 68% had prescribed at least one unfunded anticancer drug in the last 3 months. Respondents reported discussing unfunded anticancer drugs with an average of 2.5 patients per month (95% CI 2.1 to 2.9), and prescribed them to an average of 0.9 patients per month (95% CI 0.7 to 1.2). The rate of discussing unfunded anticancer drugs was associated with being fully qualified (p=0.01), and being in a metropolitan practice (p=0.009), the rate of prescription was associated only with being in metropolitan practice (p=0.006). The concerns about discussing and prescribing unfunded anticancer drugs rated most important were as follows: 'potential to cause financial hardship' and 'difficulty for patients to evaluate the benefits versus the costs'. Australian medical oncologists frequently discuss and prescribe unfunded anticancer drugs, and are concerned about their patients having to face difficult decisions and financial hardship. Further research is needed to better understand the factors that affect how oncologists and patients value expensive, unfunded anticancer drugs.

  11. Antibiotic Prescribing Habits of Dental Surgeons in Hyderabad City, India, for Pulpal and Periapical Pathologies: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Pavan Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine the antibiotic prescribing habits for pulpal and periapical pathology among dentists in Hyderabad city, India. Methodology. A total of 246 questionnaires were distributed to all the dentists registered with the local dental branch. Demographic details and questions regarding type and dosage of antibiotics prescribed for allergic and nonallergic patients were recorded. Inferential statistics were performed, and P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. The response rate for the study was 87.8%. Around 148 (68.5% of respondents regularly prescribed antibiotics for endodontic management. The first antibiotic of choice for patients with no history of medical allergies was a combination of amoxicillin and metronidazole, followed by amoxicillin alone (29.1%. The first antibiotic of choice in case of allergy to penicillin was erythromycin. Necrotic pulp with acute apical periodontitis with swelling and moderate/severe preoperative symptom was the condition most commonly identified for antibiotic therapy (92.1%. Conclusion. The present study reveals that the overall antibiotic prescribing practices among this group of dentists were quite high, and there is a need for more educational initiatives to rationalize the use of antibiotics in dentistry.

  12. Prevalence and nature of off-label antibiotic prescribing for children in a tertiary setting: A descriptive study from Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukattash TL

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of off-label antibiotics in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs and paediatric wards in Jordan. Methods: Data of patients admitted to the neonatal intensive care units and paediatric wards in King Abdulla University Hospital were collected over an 8-week survey between May and July 2012. Data collected in this study included patients’ age, weight, medical history, diagnosis and the details of antibiotics prescribed to each patient. Results: The study involved a total of 250 children (80 admitted to the NICU and 170 admitted to the wards. A total of 598 antibiotic prescriptions were issued for these patients (244 in NICUs and 354 in paediatricwards. The results of the present study show that off-label antibiotic prescribing to paediatric patients is very common. Off-label antibiotic prescribing to paediatric patients is related mostly to doses and indications, and rarely to age. The majority of admitted patients received at least one off-label antibiotic during their hospital stay. Conclusion: This study reveals the high prevalence of off-label use of antibiotic among paediatric children in Jordan. There is a serious need for robust and continuous educational programs to improve the awareness of paediatricians of guidelines surrounding the use of antibiotics in paediatric patients. Furthermore, true collaboration between paediatricians and clinical pharmacists towards safe and effective antibiotic prescribing in paediatric patients is crucial.

  13. Education

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Kin Bing

    2010-01-01

    In the aftermath of the Wenchuan earthquake, measures to restore education will be a critical part of the recovery efforts in Sichuan province. The education system can play an important role in both: (i) minimizing the impact of the disaster on children; and (ii) improving disaster preparedness. To help restore normalcy for children and provide them with physical and psychological assista...

  14. An analysis and comparison of commonly available United Kingdom prescribing resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, A R; Butt, T F; Ferner, R E

    2010-08-01

    Safe prescribing requires accurate and practical information about drugs. Our objective was to measure the utility of current sources of prescribing guidance when used to inform practical prescribing decisions, and to compare current sources of prescribing guidance in the UK with idealized prescribing guidance. We developed 25 clinical scenarios. Two independent assessors rated and ranked the performance of five common sources of prescribing guidance in the UK when used to answer the clinical scenarios. A third adjudicator facilitated review of any disparities. An idealized list of contents for prescribing guidance was developed and sent for comments to academics and users of prescribing guidance. Following consultation an operational check was used to assess compliance with the idealized criteria. The main outcome measures were relative utility in answering the clinical scenarios and compliance with the idealized prescribing guidance. Current sources of prescribing guidance used in the UK differ in their utility, when measured using clinical scenarios. The British National Formulary (BNF) and EMIS LV were the best performing sources in terms of both ranking [mean rank 1·24 and 2·20] and rating [%excellent or adequate 100% and 72%]. Current sources differed in the extent to which they fulfilled criteria for ideal prescribing guidance, but the BNF, and EMIS LV to a lesser extent, closely matched the criteria. We have demonstrated how clinical scenarios can be used to assess prescribing guidance resources. Producers of prescribing guidance documents should consider our idealized template. Prescribers require high-quality information to support their practice. Our test was helpful in distinguishing between prescribing resources. Producers of prescribing guidance should consider the utility of their products to end-users, particularly in those more complex areas where prescribers may need most support. Existing UK prescribing guidance resources differ in their

  15. Building legitimacy by criticising the pharmaceutical industry: a qualitative study among prescribers and local opinion leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittet, Anne-Laure; Saraga, Michael; Stiefel, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    The literature has described opinion leaders not only as marketing tools of the pharmaceutical industry, but also as educators promoting good clinical practice. This qualitative study addresses the distinction between the opinion-leader-as-marketing-tool and the opinion-leader-as-educator, as it is revealed in the discourses of physicians and experts, focusing on the prescription of antidepressants. We explore the relational dynamic between physicians, opinion leaders and the pharmaceutical industry in an area of French-speaking Switzerland. Qualitative content analysis of 24 semistructured interviews with physicians and local experts in psychopharmacology, complemented by direct observation of educational events led by the experts, which were all sponsored by various pharmaceutical companies. Both physicians and experts were critical of the pharmaceutical industry and its use of opinion leaders. Local experts, in contrast, were perceived by the physicians as critical of the industry and, therefore, as a legitimate source of information. Local experts did not consider themselves opinion leaders and argued that they remained intellectually independent from the industry. Field observations confirmed that local experts criticised the industry at continuing medical education events. Local experts were vocal critics of the industry, which nevertheless sponsor their continuing education. This critical attitude enhanced their credibility in the eyes of the prescribing physicians. We discuss how the experts, despite their critical attitude, might still be beneficial to the industry's interests.

  16. Explicit review of risperidone long-acting injection prescribing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, A; Vanderpyl, J; Carswell, C; Stojkovic, M; Robinson, E

    2011-12-01

    Long-acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotics are recommended for those people with a preference for this form of treatment and those who experience negative outcomes due to non-adherence with oral medication. LAI antipsychotics have been associated with improved outcomes and lower treatment discontinuation rates when compared with oral formulations. Risperidone long-acting injection (RLAI) treatment is effective and well-tolerated in clinical trials. The aim of this study was to review RLAI prescribing practice and compare prescribing to best practice recommendations (including indication, initiation, dose and co-prescribing) for adults receiving care from five clinical practice settings of New Zealand. Patients starting publicly funded RLAI between 1 October 2005 and 31 October 2006 in five mental health services were included in the study. Data were retrospectively collected for 443 patients 1 year pre- and post-RLAI initiation at seven cross-sectional time-points (12, 6 and 3 months before; initiation; and 3, 6 and 12 months after). Patient characteristics (gender, age, ethnicity), DSM-IV-TR diagnosis, duration of mental illness, mental health act utilization, treatment setting and antipsychotic treatment (reasons for starting RLAI) were obtained from patient records. The patients were mostly male (64,3%), of European background (42.9%) with a medium age of 34. In line with treatment recommendations, most had a diagnosis of schizophrenia or related psychoses, a history of medication adherence problems and previously been prescribed oral risperidone (72%). Treatment initiation also reflected recommended guidance; most were started on 25 mg/2 weeks (81.9%) and had treatment crossover (93.3%) until RLAI stabilized. For 58.3% of the group who continued for ≥ 12 months, mean fortnightly doses increased from 36.2 mg (3 months) to 41.3 mg (12 months); within the licensed range of 25-50 mg/2 weeks. Areas differing from recommended practice included high rates of

  17. Primary care providers' perspective on prescribing opioids to older adults with chronic non-cancer pain: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitz, Aerin; Moore, Alison A; Papaleontiou, Maria; Granieri, Evelyn; Turner, Barbara J; Reid, M Carrington

    2011-07-14

    The use of opioid medications as treatment for chronic non-cancer pain remains controversial. Little information is currently available regarding healthcare providers' attitudes and beliefs about this practice among older adults. This study aimed to describe primary care providers' experiences and attitudes towards, as well as perceived barriers and facilitators to prescribing opioids as a treatment for chronic pain among older adults. Six focus groups were conducted with a total of 23 physicians and three nurse practitioners from two academically affiliated primary care practices and three community health centers located in New York City. Focus groups were audiotape recorded and transcribed. The data were analyzed using directed content analysis; NVivo software was used to assist in the quantification of identified themes. Most participants (96%) employed opioids as therapy for some of their older patients with chronic pain, although not as first-line therapy. Providers cited multiple barriers, including fear of causing harm, the subjectivity of pain, lack of education, problems converting between opioids, and stigma. New barriers included patient/family member reluctance to try an opioid and concerns about opioid abuse by family members/caregivers. Studies confirming treatment benefit, validated tools for assessing risk and/or dosing for comorbidities, improved conversion methods, patient education, and peer support could facilitate opioid prescribing. Participants voiced greater comfort using opioids in the setting of delivering palliative or hospice care versus care of patients with chronic pain, and expressed substantial frustration managing chronic pain. Providers perceive multiple barriers to prescribing opioids to older adults with chronic pain, and use these medications cautiously. Establishing the long-term safety and efficacy of these medications, generating improved prescribing methods, and implementing provider and patient educational interventions

  18. Primary care providers' perspective on prescribing opioids to older adults with chronic non-cancer pain: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Barbara J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of opioid medications as treatment for chronic non-cancer pain remains controversial. Little information is currently available regarding healthcare providers' attitudes and beliefs about this practice among older adults. This study aimed to describe primary care providers' experiences and attitudes towards, as well as perceived barriers and facilitators to prescribing opioids as a treatment for chronic pain among older adults. Methods Six focus groups were conducted with a total of 23 physicians and three nurse practitioners from two academically affiliated primary care practices and three community health centers located in New York City. Focus groups were audiotape recorded and transcribed. The data were analyzed using directed content analysis; NVivo software was used to assist in the quantification of identified themes. Results Most participants (96% employed opioids as therapy for some of their older patients with chronic pain, although not as first-line therapy. Providers cited multiple barriers, including fear of causing harm, the subjectivity of pain, lack of education, problems converting between opioids, and stigma. New barriers included patient/family member reluctance to try an opioid and concerns about opioid abuse by family members/caregivers. Studies confirming treatment benefit, validated tools for assessing risk and/or dosing for comorbidities, improved conversion methods, patient education, and peer support could facilitate opioid prescribing. Participants voiced greater comfort using opioids in the setting of delivering palliative or hospice care versus care of patients with chronic pain, and expressed substantial frustration managing chronic pain. Conclusions Providers perceive multiple barriers to prescribing opioids to older adults with chronic pain, and use these medications cautiously. Establishing the long-term safety and efficacy of these medications, generating improved prescribing methods

  19. US outpatient antibiotic prescribing variation according to geography, patient population, and provider specialty in 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Lauri A; Bartoces, Monina G; Roberts, Rebecca M; Suda, Katie J; Hunkler, Robert J; Taylor, Thomas H; Schrag, Stephanie J

    2015-05-01

    Appropriate antibiotic prescribing is an essential strategy to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance. US prescribing practices have not been thoroughly characterized. We analyzed outpatient antibiotic prescribing data to identify where appropriate antibiotic prescribing interventions could have the most impact. Oral antibiotic prescriptions dispensed during 2011 were extracted from the IMS Health Xponent database. The number of prescriptions and census denominators were used to calculate prescribing rates. Prescription totals were calculated for each provider specialty. Regression modeling was used to examine the association between socioeconomic and population health factors and prescribing rates. Healthcare providers prescribed 262.5 million courses of antibiotics in 2011(842 prescriptions per 1000 persons). Penicillins and macrolides were the most common antibiotic categories prescribed. The most commonly prescribed individual antibiotic agent was azithromycin. Family practitioners prescribed the most antibiotic courses (24%). The prescribing rate was higher in the South census region (931 prescriptions per 1000 persons) than in the West (647 prescriptions per 1000 persons; P 1.0). Efforts to characterize antibiotic prescribing practices should focus on the South census region and family practitioners. Further understanding of the factors leading to high prescribing among key target populations will inform appropriate prescribing interventions. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  20. Investigating interactions between UK horse owners and prescribers of anthelmintics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, Stephanie; Pinchbeck, Gina L; Tzelos, Thomas; Bartley, David J; Hotchkiss, Emily; Hodgkinson, Jane E; Matthews, Jacqueline B

    2016-12-01

    Helminths are common pathogens of equids and anthelmintic resistance is a major issue in cyathostomin species and Parascaris equorum. At the heart of mitigating the impact of increasing anthelmintic resistance levels, is the responsible dissemination and use of these medicines following best practice principles. There is a paucity of information on interactions between horse owners and anthelmintic prescribers and how this shapes control. Here, a study was undertaken to determine opinions and experiences of horse owners as they relate to anthelmintics purchase and implementation of best practice control. An online survey was distributed via email and social media to explore owners' experiences of purchasing anthelmintics from United Kingdom prescribers, these being veterinarians, suitably qualified persons (SQPs) and pharmacists. Owner responses (n=494) were analysed statistically to compare answers of respondents grouped according to: (i) from whom they bought anthelmintics (Veterinarians n=60; SQPs n=256; Pharmacists n=42; More than one channel n=136), and (ii) by which route (Face-to-face n=234; Telephone n=31; Online n=226) they purchased. Owners who purchased from veterinarians predominantly did so face-to-face (81.3%), whilst those that bought from SQPs purchased via face-to-face (48.8%) and online (46.0%) interactions. Those who purchased from pharmacists predominantly bought anthelmintics online (76.2%). Participants who bought from veterinarians were more likely to view certain factors (i.e. time to talk to the supplier, supplier knowledge) as more important than those who purchased from other prescribers. Those who purchased from veterinarians were more likely to be recommended faecal egg count (FEC) test analysis; however, there was high uptake of FEC testing across all groups. There was a low uptake of anthelmintic efficacy testing; regardless of the prescriber type from whom anthelmintics were purchased. Those who purchased from veterinarians were more

  1. Do advertisements for antihypertensive drugs in Australia promote quality prescribing? A cross-sectional study

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    Spurling Geoffrey K

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antihypertensive medications are widely prescribed by doctors and heavily promoted by the pharmaceutical industry. Despite strong evidence of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of thiazide diuretics, trends in both promotion and prescription of antihypertensive drugs favour newer, less cost-effective agents. Observational evidence shows correlations between exposure to pharmaceutical promotion and less ideal prescribing. Our study therefore aimed to determine whether print advertisements for antihypertensive medications promote quality prescribing in hypertension. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 113 advertisements for antihypertensive drugs from 4 general practice-oriented Australian medical publications in 2004. Advertisements were evaluated using a quality checklist based on a review of hypertension management guidelines. Main outcome measures included: frequency with which antihypertensive classes were advertised, promotion of thiazide class drugs as first line agents, use of statistical claims in advertisements, mention of harms and prices in the advertisements, promotion of assessment and treatment of cardiovascular risk, promotion of lifestyle modification, and targeting of particular patient subgroups. Results Thiazides were the most frequently advertised drug class (48.7% of advertisements, but were largely promoted in combination preparations. The only thiazide advertised as a single agent was the most expensive, indapamide. No advertisement specifically promoted any thiazide as a better first-line drug. Statistics in the advertisements tended to be expressed in relative rather than absolute terms. Drug costs were often reported, but without cost comparisons between drugs. Adverse effects were usually reported but largely confined to the advertisements' small print. Other than mentioning drug interactions with alcohol and salt, no advertisements promoted lifestyle modification. Few

  2. Non-medical prescribing by physiotherapists: issues reported in the current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Joanne H; Grimmer, Karen

    2014-02-01

    Physiotherapists should be proactive in preparing themselves to participate in innovative models of health care, which are emerging from the healthcare workforce reforms in Australia. One challenging outcome of workforce change is physiotherapy (non-medical) prescribing (NMP), which is part of the extension of scope of physiotherapy practice. This paper summarises the current evidence base for Australian physiotherapists seeking to obtain prescribing rights. A targeted literature review was undertaken through EBSCO Host, Cochrane, Medline, SportsDiscus, Cinahl, Healthsource and Google.com using broad search terms to identify peer-reviewed and grey literature pertaining to NMP by physiotherapists, nationally and internationally. No critical appraisal was undertaken however literature was structured into the NHMRC hierarchy of evidence. Themes raised in the included literature were reported descriptively. There were six relevant peer-reviewed articles, of hierarchy levels III_3 and IV. There was however, comprehensive and recent grey literature to inform Australian physiotherapy NMP initiatives. Themes included the need for standard National action in relation to legislative and regulatory/registration issues, appropriate education, credentialing and supervisory requirements for physiotherapy prescribing. Many lessons can be learnt from the literature, including the importance of planned, uniform National action (rather than piecemeal state-by-state initiatives). Essential elements include appropriate training and skills-based recognition within the discipline and the broader health team, and the need to overtly demonstrate effectiveness and safety. Regularly-evaluated service-delivery models which support NMP by physiotherapists are further required, to demonstrate efficiency, timeliness, patient centredness and equity. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Changes in Provider Prescribing Patterns After Implementation of an Emergency Department Prescription Opioid Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Scott R; Yu, Julianna; Williams, Barbara; Vasilyadis, Maria; Blackmore, C Craig

    2017-04-01

    Prescription opioid-associated abuse and overdose is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Opioid prescriptions generated from emergency departments (EDs) nationwide have increased dramatically over the past 20 years, and opioid-related overdose deaths have become an epidemic, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Our aim was to determine the effectiveness of implementing a prescription policy for opioids on overall opioid prescribing patterns in a hospital ED. The ED provider group of an academic, non-university-affiliated urban hospital with 23,000 annual patient visits agreed to opioid prescribing guidelines for chronic pain with the goal of limiting prescriptions that may be used for abuse or diversion. These guidelines were instituted in the ED through collaborative staff meetings and educational and training sessions. We used the electronic medical record to analyze the number and type of opioid discharge prescriptions during the study period from 2006-2014, before and after the prescribing guidelines were instituted in the ED. The number of patients discharged with a prescription for opioids decreased 39.6% (25.7% to 15.6%; absolute decrease 10.2%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 9.6-10.7; p prescription also decreased 14.8%, from 19.5% to 16.6% (absolute decrease 2.9; 95% CI 2.6-3.1; p prescription opioid policy was associated with a significant reduction in total opioid prescriptions and in the number of pills per prescription. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Do advertisements for antihypertensive drugs in Australia promote quality prescribing? A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Brett D; Mansfield, Peter R; Spurling, Geoffrey K; Ward, Alison M

    2008-05-20

    Antihypertensive medications are widely prescribed by doctors and heavily promoted by the pharmaceutical industry. Despite strong evidence of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of thiazide diuretics, trends in both promotion and prescription of antihypertensive drugs favour newer, less cost-effective agents. Observational evidence shows correlations between exposure to pharmaceutical promotion and less ideal prescribing. Our study therefore aimed to determine whether print advertisements for antihypertensive medications promote quality prescribing in hypertension. We performed a cross-sectional study of 113 advertisements for antihypertensive drugs from 4 general practice-oriented Australian medical publications in 2004. Advertisements were evaluated using a quality checklist based on a review of hypertension management guidelines. Main outcome measures included: frequency with which antihypertensive classes were advertised, promotion of thiazide class drugs as first line agents, use of statistical claims in advertisements, mention of harms and prices in the advertisements, promotion of assessment and treatment of cardiovascular risk, promotion of lifestyle modification, and targeting of particular patient subgroups. Thiazides were the most frequently advertised drug class (48.7% of advertisements), but were largely promoted in combination preparations. The only thiazide advertised as a single agent was the most expensive, indapamide. No advertisement specifically promoted any thiazide as a better first-line drug. Statistics in the advertisements tended to be expressed in relative rather than absolute terms. Drug costs were often reported, but without cost comparisons between drugs. Adverse effects were usually reported but largely confined to the advertisements' small print. Other than mentioning drug interactions with alcohol and salt, no advertisements promoted lifestyle modification. Few advertisements (2.7%) promoted the assessment of cardiovascular risk

  5. A 5-year retrospective audit of prescribing by a critical care outreach team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark

    2017-12-15

    UK prescribing legislation changes made in 2006 and 2012 enabled appropriately qualified nurses to prescribe any licensed medication, and all controlled drugs in schedule 2-5 of the Misuse of Drugs Regulations 2001, for any medical condition within their clinical competence. Critical Care Outreach nurses who are independent nurse prescribers are ideally placed to ensure that acutely ill patients receive treatment without delay. The perceived challenge was how Critical Care Outreach nurses would be able to safely prescribe for a diverse patient group. This study informs this developing area of nurse prescribing in critical care practice. The aims of the audit were to: identify which medications were prescribed; develop a critical care outreach formulary; identify the frequency, timing and number of prescribing decisions being made; identify if prescribing practice changed over the years and provide information for our continuing professional development. This article reports on data collected from a 5-year retrospective audit; of prescribing activity undertaken by nine independent nurse prescribers working in a 24/7 Critical Care Outreach team of a 600-bedded district general hospital in the UK. In total, 8216 medication items were prescribed, with an average of 2·6 prescribed per shift. The most commonly prescribed items were intravenous fluids and analgesia, which were mostly prescribed at night and weekends. The audit has shown that Critical Care Outreach nurse prescribing is feasible in a whole hospital patient population. The majority of prescribing occurred after 16:00 and at night. Further research would be beneficial, particularly looking at patient outcomes following reviews from prescribing critical care outreach nurses. The audit is one of the only long-term studies that describes prescribing practice in Critical Care Outreach teams in the UK. © 2017 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  6. Assessing the Effectiveness and Cost-effectiveness of Audit and Feedback on Physician's Prescribing Indicators: Study Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial with Economic Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Soleymani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Physician prescribing is the most frequent medical intervention with a highest impact on healthcare costs and outcomes. Therefore improving and promoting rational drug use is a great interest. We aimed to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of two forms of conducting prescribing audit and feedback interventions and a printed educational material intervention in improving physician prescribing.Method/design: A four-arm randomized trial with economic evaluation will be conducted in Tehran. Three interventions (routine feedback, revised feedback, and printed educational material and a no intervention control arm will be compared. Physicians working in outpatient practices are randomly allocated to one of the four arms using stratified randomized sampling. The interventions are developed based on a review of literature, physician interviews, current experiences in Iran and with theoretical insights from the Theory of Planned Behavior. Effects of the interventions on improving antibiotics and corticosteroids prescribing will be assessed in regression analyses. Cost data will be assessed from a health care provider's perspective and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios will be calculated.DiscussionThis study will determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of three interventions and allow us to determine the most effective interventions in improving prescribing pattern. If the interventions are cost-effective, they will likely be applied nationwide.

  7. Assessing the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of audit and feedback on physician’s prescribing indicators: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial with economic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleymani Fatemeh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physician prescribing is the most frequent medical intervention with a highest impact on healthcare costs and outcomes. Therefore improving and promoting rational drug use is a great interest. We aimed to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of two forms of conducting prescribing audit and feedback interventions and a printed educational material intervention in improving physician prescribing. Method/design A four-arm randomized trial with economic evaluation will be conducted in Tehran. Three interventions (routine feedback, revised feedback, and printed educational material and a no intervention control arm will be compared. Physicians working in outpatient practices are randomly allocated to one of the four arms using stratified randomized sampling. The interventions are developed based on a review of literature, physician interviews, current experiences in Iran and with theoretical insights from the Theory of Planned Behavior. Effects of the interventions on improving antibiotics and corticosteroids prescribing will be assessed in regression analyses. Cost data will be assessed from a health care provider’s perspective and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios will be calculated. Discussion This study will determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of three interventions and allow us to determine the most effective interventions in improving prescribing pattern. If the interventions are cost-effective, they will likely be applied nationwide. Trial registration Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials Registration Number: IRCT201106086740N1Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center of TUMS Ethics Committee Registration Number: 90-02-27-07

  8. Improving hypertension management through pharmacist prescribing; the rural alberta clinical trial in optimizing hypertension (Rural RxACTION: trial design and methods

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    Campbell Norman RC

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with hypertension continue to have less than optimal blood pressure control, with nearly one in five Canadian adults having hypertension. Pharmacist prescribing is gaining favor as a potential clinically efficacious and cost-effective means to improve both access and quality of care. With Alberta being the first province in Canada to have independent prescribing by pharmacists, it offers a unique opportunity to evaluate outcomes in patients who are prescribed antihypertensive therapy by pharmacists. Methods The study is a randomized controlled trial of enhanced pharmacist care, with the unit of randomization being the patient. Participants will be randomized to enhanced pharmacist care (patient identification, assessment, education, close follow-up, and prescribing/titration of antihypertensive medications or usual care. Participants are patients in rural Alberta with undiagnosed/uncontrolled blood pressure, as defined by the Canadian Hypertension Education Program. The primary outcome is the change in systolic blood pressure between baseline and 24 weeks in the enhanced-care versus usual-care arms. There are also three substudies running in conjunction with the project examining different remuneration models, investigating patient knowledge, and assessing health-resource utilization amongst patients in each group. Discussion To date, one-third of the required sample size has been recruited. There are 15 communities and 17 pharmacists actively screening, recruiting, and following patients. This study will provide high-level evidence regarding pharmacist prescribing. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00878566.

  9. [Effectiveness of interventions for improving drug prescribing in Primary Health Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala-González, Marco Antonio; Cabrera-Pivaral, Carlos Enrique; Orozco-Valerio, María de Jesús; Ramos-Herrera, Igor Martín

    2017-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of interventions for improving drug prescribing in Primary Health Care units. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Searches were made in MedLine©, ScienceDirect©, Springer©, SciELO©, Dialnet©, RedALyC© and Imbiomed©, in Spanish, English and Portuguese, using keywords "drug prescribing", "intervention studies" and "primary health care", indexed in each data base up to August 2014. Experimental and quasi-experimental studies were included that had a CASP-score>5 and that evaluated effect of any type intervention on the quality of drug prescription in Primary Health Care. A total of 522 articles were found, and an analysis was performed on 12 that reported 17 interventions: 64.7% educational, 23.5% incorporating pharmacists into the health team, and 11.8% on the use of computer applications. The strong "intervention/improvement" associations were educational interventions OR=2.47 (95% CI; 2.28 - 2.69), incorporation of pharmacists OR=3.28 (95% CI; 2.58 4.18), and use of computer applications OR=10.16 (95% CI; 8.81 -11.71). The use of interventions with computer applications showed to be more effective than educational interventions and incorporation pharmacists into the health team. Future studies are required that include economic variables such as, implementation costs, drug costs and other expenses associated with health care and treatment of diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. A cluster randomised controlled trial of a pharmacist-led collaborative intervention to improve statin prescribing and attainment of cholesterol targets in primary care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Lowrie

    significantly more likely to have cholesterol at target (69.5% vs 63.5%; OR 1.11, CI 1.00-1.23; p = 0.043 as a result of improved simvastatin prescribing. Subgroup analysis showed the primary outcome was achieved by prevalent but not incident patients. Statistically significant improvements occurred in all secondary outcomes for prevalent patients and all but one secondary outcome (the proportion of patients with cholesterol tested for incident patients. SOS practices prescribed more simvastatin 40 mg than usual care practices, up to 10 years later.Through a combination of educational and organisational support, a general practice based pharmacist led collaborative intervention can improve statin prescribing and achievement of cholesterol targets in a high-risk primary care based population.International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials Register ISRCTN61233866.

  11. Methods of prescribing relative exercise intensity: physiological and practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Theresa; Lamberts, Robert Patrick; Lambert, Michael Ian

    2013-07-01

    Exercise prescribed according to relative intensity is a routine feature in the exercise science literature and is intended to produce an approximately equivalent exercise stress in individuals with different absolute exercise capacities. The traditional approach has been to prescribe exercise intensity as a percentage of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) or maximum heart rate (HRmax) and these methods remain common in the literature. However, exercise intensity prescribed at a %VO2max or %HRmax does not necessarily place individuals at an equivalent intensity above resting levels. Furthermore, some individuals may be above and others below metabolic thresholds such as the aerobic threshold (AerT) or anaerobic threshold (AnT) at the same %VO2max or %HRmax. For these reasons, some authors have recommended that exercise intensity be prescribed relative to oxygen consumption reserve (VO2R), heart rate reserve (HRR), the AerT, or the AnT rather than relative to VO2max or HRmax. The aim of this review was to compare the physiological and practical implications of using each of these methods of relative exercise intensity prescription for research trials or training sessions. It is well established that an exercise bout at a fixed %VO2max or %HRmax may produce interindividual variation in blood lactate accumulation and a similar effect has been shown when relating exercise intensity to VO2R or HRR. Although individual variation in other markers of metabolic stress have seldom been reported, it is assumed that these responses would be similarly heterogeneous at a %VO2max, %HRmax, %VO2R, or %HRR of moderate-to-high intensity. In contrast, exercise prescribed relative to the AerT or AnT would be expected to produce less individual variation in metabolic responses and less individual variation in time to exhaustion at a constant exercise intensity. Furthermore, it would be expected that training prescribed relative to the AerT or AnT would provide a more homogenous training

  12. Neutropenia and Agranulocytosis in Chinese Patients Prescribed Clozapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, K L; Yim, P H W

    2015-12-01

    To examine the rate of neutropenia and agranulocytosis, and the pattern of development of these 2 disorders among Chinese patients prescribed clozapine treatment in a local psychiatric unit. Patients who were receiving clozapine when they were under the care of Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital Psychiatric Unit, Hong Kong, from 1 January 1997 to 31 December 2012 and who developed neutropenia and agranulocytosis from 1 January 1997 to 30 June 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 13 patients out of 980 clozapine recipients developed neutropenia and 3 developed agranulocytosis during treatment. Half of them were aged > 50 years and three quarters were female. The majority of patients who developed neutropenia and agranulocytosis were prescribed > 1 psychotropic medication in addition to clozapine. Half of the incidents occurred in the first 18 weeks of clozapine treatment. Long-term monitoring of white cell count is necessary during clozapine treatment. The concurrent use of clozapine with other potentially leukopenic psychotropic drugs should be limited.

  13. Prescribing under the Influence: The Business of Breastmilk Substitutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Rios

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study draws on a general theoretical framework comprising of a decision maker (a doctor, perceived moral intensity of the issue (breastfeeding substitute prescription, and the situational environment (hospital policy, pharma company promotions, and mother’s beliefs regarding breastfeeding to explain the physician’s role and influence on mothers’ infant feeding choices when prescribing infant formula in Kuwait, Middle East. Moral intensity is an issue-contingent model that suggests ethical decisions vary in terms of how much a moral imperative is present in a situation. The moral intensity of the issue is assessed using six components. Path Least Squares results indicate the following moral intensity components have significant impact on prescription behavior: magnitude of consequences, probability of effect, and temporal immediacy. Company promotion and hospital policy also significantly influence doctor’s prescription of infant formula. Doctors appear to disengage from the consequences of over prescribing infant formula.

  14. Radius Constants for Functions with the Prescribed Coefficient Bounds

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    Om P. Ahuja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For an analytic univalent function f(z=z+∑n=2∞anzn in the unit disk, it is well-known that an≤n for n≥2. But the inequality an≤n does not imply the univalence of f. This motivated several authors to determine various radii constants associated with the analytic functions having prescribed coefficient bounds. In this paper, a survey of the related work is presented for analytic and harmonic mappings. In addition, we establish a coefficient inequality for sense-preserving harmonic functions to compute the bounds for the radius of univalence, radius of full starlikeness/convexity of order α  (0≤α<1 for functions with prescribed coefficient bound on the analytic part.

  15. Comparing administration of nutrition support with prescribed dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Terezie Tolar; Griffith, Lara Kelley; Jones, Megan; Allen, Ginny; Yang, Jie; Wang, Chong; Leung, Wing; Williams, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether pediatric bone marrow transplant (BMT) patients receive the prescribed dose of nutrition support (NS). Data were obtained from electronic and paper charts at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. The amount of NS received was compared with the amount prescribed. Data were collected on 32 patients for 63 hospital stays in which NS was administered. The mean percentage of nutrition prescription met and percentage of total estimated energy met were 69% and 72%, respectively. Allogeneic BMT patients received significantly more of their nutrition prescription (92%) than autologous BMT patients did (54%, P < .01). Malnourished patients were significantly more likely to receive the full dose of NS than patients who were considered nourished or obese (P < .05). This study showed that patients who were most in need of NS were more likely to receive the full dose.

  16. Medical professionals' perspectives on prescribed and over-the-counter medicines containing codeine: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Michelle; Carney, Tara; Rich, Eileen; Parry, Charles; Van Hout, Marie-Claire; Deluca, Paolo

    2016-07-14

    To explore prescribing practitioners' perspectives on prescribed codeine use, their ability to identify dependence and their options for treatment in the UK. Cross-sectional design using a questionnaire containing closed-ended and open-ended items. A nationally representative sample of prescribing professionals working in the UK. 300 prescribing professionals working in primary care and pain settings. Participants stated that they regularly reviewed patients prescribed codeine, understood the risks of dependence and recognised the potential for codeine to be used recreationally. Over half the participants felt patients were unaware of the adverse health consequences of high doses of combination codeine medicines. One-quarter of participants experienced patient resentment when asking about medicines containing codeine. Just under 40% of participants agreed that it was difficult to identify problematic use of codeine without being informed by the patient and did not feel confident in identification of codeine dependence. Less than 45% of all participants agreed that codeine dependence could be managed effectively in general practice. Slow or gradual withdrawal was the most popular suggested treatment in managing dependence. Education and counselling was also emphasised in managing codeine-dependent patients in primary care. Communication with patients should involve assessment of patient understanding of their medication, including the risk of dependence. There is a need to develop extra supports for professionals including patient screening tools for identifying codeine dependence. The support structure for managing codeine-dependent patients in primary care requires further examination. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Factors influencing the choice of antidepressants: a study of antidepressant prescribing practice at University Psychiatric Clinic in Belgrade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marić, Nadja P; Stojiljković, Dragan J; Pavlović, Zorana; Jasović-Gamsić, Miroslava

    2012-04-01

    Antidepressants are a widely used class of drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate different aspects of antidepressant prescribing practice at University Psychiatric Clinic in Belgrade. This cross-sectional study was carried out by retrospective analysis of the patient's medical charts. The study included all patients with antidepressant prescribed at discharge during 2009 (n = 296). The evaluation was focused on patient-related factors (socio-demographic and illness related), psychiatrist-related factors (sex and duration of working experience) and drug related factors (type of antidepressant, dose, polypharmacy and reimbursement by national health insurance). Antidepressants were prescribed for unipolar depression (F32-34, ICD X) either without comorbidity (46.2%) or with comorbidity (24.7%), mostly as a monotherapy (91% had one antidepressant), to the patients who were 65% female, aged 50.1 +/- 8.9, most of them with 12 years of education (52.6%), married (69.3%) and employed (55.9%). The majority of patients had a history of two hospitalizations (Med 2; 25th-75th perc. 1-4) during nine years (Med 9; 25th-75th perc. 2-15) after the first episode of depression. Among them, 19% were found to be suicidal in a lifetime. The single most prescribed antidepressant was sertraline (20.4%), followed by fluoxetine (13.3%) and maprotiline (11.7%). Utilization of antidepressants was positively correlated with the rate of reimbursement (p choice for episodes with moderate symptom severity (p = 0.01). Psychiatrists with longer working age (20-30 years) hesitated to prescribe new antidepressants in comparison to younger colleagues (p = 0.01). Economic issues in Serbia as developing country influence the choice of antidepressants, as well as a psychiatrist's working age and severity of depression. However, SSRI are the drugs of the first choice, as it was shown in most of the developed countries nowadays.

  18. Antibiotic-prescribing patterns for Iraqi patients during Ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhael, Ehab Mudher; Jasim, Ali Lateef

    2014-01-01

    During Ramadan, Muslims fast throughout daylight hours. There is a direct link between fasting and increasing incidence of infections. Antibiotic usage for treatment of infections should be based on accurate diagnosis, with the correct dose and dosing regimen for the shortest period to avoid bacterial resistance. This study aimed to evaluate the practices of physicians in prescribing suitable antibiotics for fasting patients and the compliance of the patients in using such antibiotics at regular intervals. An observational study was carried out during the middle 10 days of Ramadan 2014 in two pharmacies at Baghdad. A total of 34 prescriptions (Rx) for adults who suffered from infections were examined. For each included Rx, the researchers documented the age and sex of the patient, the diagnosis of the case, and the name of the given antibiotic(s) with dose and frequency of usage. A direct interview with the patient was also done, at which each patient was asked about fasting and if he/she would like to continue fasting during the remaining period of Ramadan. The patient was also asked if the physician asked him/her about fasting before writing the Rx. More than two-thirds of participating patients were fasting during Ramadan. Antibiotics were prescribed at a higher percentage by dentists and surgeons, for which a single antibiotic with a twice-daily regimen was the most commonly prescribed by physicians for patients during the Ramadan month. Physicians fail to take patient fasting status into consideration when prescribing antibiotics for their fasting patients. Antibiotics with a twice-daily regimen are not suitable and best to be avoided for fasting patients in Iraq during Ramadan - especially if it occurs during summer months - to avoid treatment failure and provoking bacterial resistance.

  19. Variability in Antibiotic Prescribing for Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handy, Lori K; Bryan, Matthew; Gerber, Jeffrey S; Zaoutis, Theoklis; Feemster, Kristen A

    2017-04-01

    Published guidelines recommend amoxicillin for most children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), yet macrolides and broad-spectrum antibiotics are more commonly prescribed. We aimed to determine the patient and clinician characteristics associated with the prescription of amoxicillin versus macrolide or broad-spectrum antibiotics for CAP. Retrospective cohort study in an outpatient pediatric primary care network from July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2013. Patients prescribed amoxicillin, macrolides, or a broad-spectrum antibiotic (amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, cephalosporin, or fluoroquinolone) for CAP were included. Multivariable logistic regression models were implemented to identify predictors of antibiotic choice for CAP based on patient- and clinician-level characteristics, controlling for practice. Of 10 414 children, 4239 (40.7%) received amoxicillin, 4430 (42.5%) received macrolides and 1745 (16.8%) received broad-spectrum antibiotics. The factors associated with an increased odds of receipt of macrolides compared with amoxicillin included patient age ≥5 years (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 6.18; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.53-6.91), previous antibiotic receipt (aOR: 1.79; 95% CI: 1.56-2.04), and private insurance (aOR: 1.47; 95% CI: 1.28-1.70). The predicted probability of a child being prescribed a macrolide ranged significantly between 0.22 and 0.83 across clinics. The nonclinical characteristics associated with an increased odds of receipt of broad-spectrum antibiotics compared with amoxicillin included suburban practice (aOR: 7.50; 95% CI: 4.16-13.55) and private insurance (aOR: 1.42; 95% CI: 1.18-1.71). Antibiotic choice for CAP varied widely across practices. Factors unlikely related to the microbiologic etiology of CAP were significant drivers of antibiotic choice. Understanding drivers of off-guideline prescribing can inform targeted antimicrobial stewardship initiatives. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. Root Disease, Longleaf Pine Mortality, and Prescribed Burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otrosina, W.J; C.H. Walkinshaw; S.J. Zarnoch; S-J. Sung; B.T. Sullivan

    2001-01-01

    Study to determine factors involved in decline of longleaf pine associated with prescribed burning. Trees having symptoms were recorded by crown rating system based upon symptom severity-corresponded to tree physiological status-increased in hot burn plots. Root pathogenic fungi widespread throughout the study site. Histological studies show high fine root mortality rate in the hot burn treatment. Decline syndrome is complexed by root pathogens, soil factors, root damage and dysfunction.