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Sample records for prudent antibiotic prescribing

  1. European survey on principles of prudent antibiotic prescribing teaching in undergraduate students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pulcini, C; Wencker, F; Frimodt-Møller, N

    2015-01-01

    We surveyed European medical schools regarding teaching of prudent antibiotic prescribing in the undergraduate curriculum. We performed a cross-sectional survey in 13 European countries (Belgium, Croatia, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Serbia, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland...... the study design, these are probably optimistic results. Teaching of prudent antibiotic prescribing principles should be improved. National and European programmes for development of specific learning outcomes or competencies are urgently needed....... pharmacology. In-depth interviews were conducted with four lecturers. Thirty-five of 37 medical schools were included in the study. Prudent antibiotic use principles were taught in all but one medical school, but only four of 13 countries had a national programme. Interactive teaching formats were used less...

  2. European survey on principles of prudent antibiotic prescribing teaching in undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulcini, C; Wencker, F; Frimodt-Møller, N; Kern, W V; Nathwani, D; Rodríguez-Baño, J; Simonsen, G S; Vlahović-Palčevski, V; Gyssens, I C

    2015-04-01

    We surveyed European medical schools regarding teaching of prudent antibiotic prescribing in the undergraduate curriculum. We performed a cross-sectional survey in 13 European countries (Belgium, Croatia, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Serbia, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom) in 2013. Proportional sampling was used, resulting in the selection of two to four medical schools per country. A standardized questionnaire based on literature review and validated by a panel of experts was sent to lecturers in infectious diseases, medical microbiology and clinical pharmacology. In-depth interviews were conducted with four lecturers. Thirty-five of 37 medical schools were included in the study. Prudent antibiotic use principles were taught in all but one medical school, but only four of 13 countries had a national programme. Interactive teaching formats were used less frequently than passive formats. The teaching was mandatory for 53% of the courses and started before clinical training in 71%. We observed wide variations in exposure of students to important principles of prudent antibiotic use among countries and within the same country. Some major principles were poorly covered (e.g. reassessment and duration of antibiotic therapy, communication skills). Whereas 77% of the respondents fully agreed that the teaching of these principles should be prioritized, lack of time, mainly due to rigid curriculum policies, was the main reported barrier to implementation. Given the study design, these are probably optimistic results. Teaching of prudent antibiotic prescribing principles should be improved. National and European programmes for development of specific learning outcomes or competencies are urgently needed. Copyright © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Health Alliance for prudent antibiotic prescribing in patients with Respiratory Tract Infections (HAPPY AUDIT) -impact of a non-randomised multifaceted intervention programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Lars; Munck, Anders; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Excessive use of antibiotics is worldwide the most important reason for development of antimicrobial resistance. As antibiotic resistance may spread across borders, high prevalence countries may serve as a source of bacterial resistance for countries with a low prevalence...... with RTIs may lead to a marked reduction in antibiotic prescribing. The pragmatic before-after design used may suffer from some limitations and the reduction in antibiotic prescribing could be influenced by factors not related to the intervention....

  4. Prescribing Antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Kryger; Jepsen, Kim Sune

    2018-01-01

    The medical professions will lose an indispensable tool in clinical practice if even simple infections cannot be cured because antibiotics have lost effectiveness. This article presents results from an exploratory enquiry into “good doctoring” in the case of antibiotic prescribing at a time when...... the knowledge base in the healthcare field is shifting. Drawing on in-depth interviews about diagnosing and prescribing, the article demonstrates how the problem of antimicrobial resistance is understood and engaged with by Danish general practitioners. When general practitioners speak of managing “non......-medical issues,” they refer to routines, clinical expertise, experiences with their patients, and decision-making based more on contextual circumstances than molecular conditions—and on the fact that such conditions can be hard to assess. This article’s contribution to knowledge about how new and global health...

  5. Health Alliance for prudent antibiotic prescribing in patients with respiratory tract infections (HAPPY AUDIT -impact of a non-randomised multifaceted intervention programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reutskiy Anatoliy

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive use of antibiotics is worldwide the most important reason for development of antimicrobial resistance. As antibiotic resistance may spread across borders, high prevalence countries may serve as a source of bacterial resistance for countries with a low prevalence. Therefore, bacterial resistance is an important issue with a potential serious impact on all countries. Initiatives have been taken to improve the quality of antibiotic prescribing in primary care, but only few studies have been designed to determine the effectiveness of multifaceted strategies across countries with different practice setting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a multifaceted intervention targeting general practitioners (GPs and patients in six countries with different health organization and different prevalence of antibiotic resistance. Methods GPs from two Nordic countries, two Baltic Countries and two Hispano-American countries registered patients with respiratory tract infections (RTIs in 2008 and 2009. After first registration they received individual prescriber feedback and they were offered an intervention programme that included training courses, clinical guidelines, posters for waiting rooms, patient brochures and access to point of care tests (Strep A and C-Reactive Protein. Antibiotic prescribing rates were compared before and after the intervention. Results A total of 440 GPs registered 47011 consultations; 24436 before the intervention (2008 and 22575 after the intervention (2009. After the intervention, the GPs significantly reduced the percentage of consultations resulting in an antibiotic prescription. In patients with lower RTI the GPs in Lithuania reduced the prescribing rate by 42%, in Russia by 25%, in Spain by 25%, and in Argentina by 9%. In patients with upper RTIs, the corresponding reductions in the antibiotic prescribing rates were in Lithania 20%, in Russia 15%, in Spain 9%, and in Argentina 5

  6. Trends in Antibiotic Prescribing in Adults in Dutch General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.B. Haeseker (Michiel); N.H.T.M. Dukers-Muijrers (Nicole); C.J.P.A. Hoebe (Christian); C.A. Bruggeman (Cathrien); J.W.L. Cals (Jochen); A. Verbon (Annelies)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Antibiotic consumption is associated with adverse drug events (ADE) and increasing antibiotic resistance. Detailed information of antibiotic prescribing in different age categories is scarce, but necessary to develop strategies for prudent antibiotic use. The aim of this

  7. Alliance for the Prudent Use of Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... governmental organization fighting to preserve the effectiveness of antimicrobial drugs since 1981. With affiliated chapters in over 66 ... Resistant Bacteria, 2015 2014 PCAST Report on Combating Antimicrobial Resistance ... "Antibiotics are uniquely societal drugs because individual use affects others in the community ...

  8. Prescribing antibiotics in general practice:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Rikke Vognbjerg; Pedersen, Line Bjørnskov; Plejdrup Hansen, Malene

    Objectives The majority of antibiotics are prescribed from general practice. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotics increases the risk of development of bacteria resistant to antibiotic treatment. In spite of guidelines aiming to minimize the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics we see an increase...... in the use of these agents. The overall aim of the project is to explore factors influencing the decision process and the prescribing behaviour of the GPs when prescribing antibiotics. We will study the impact of microbiological testing on the choice of antibiotic. Furthermore the project will explore how...... the GPs’ prescribing behaviour is influenced by selected factors. Method The study consists of a register-based study and a questionnaire study. The register-based study is based on data from the Register of Medicinal Product Statistics (prescribed antibiotics), Statistics Denmark (socio-demographic data...

  9. A study of antibiotic prescribing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaruseviciene, L.; Radzeviciene-Jurgute, R.; Jurgutis, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Globally, general practitioners (GPs) write more than 90% of all antibiotic prescriptions. This study examines the experiences of Lithuanian and Russian GPs in antibiotic prescription for upper respiratory tract infections, including their perceptions of when it is not indicated...... clinically or pharmacologically. Methods. 22 Lithuanian and 29 Russian GPs participated in five focus group discussions. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Results. We identified four main thematic categories: patients' faith in antibiotics as medication for upper respiratory tract infections......; patient potential to influence a GP's decision to prescribe antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections; impediments perceived by GPs in advocating clinically grounded antibiotic prescribing with their patients, and strategies applied in physician-patient negotiation about antibiotic prescribing...

  10. Antibiotic prescribing in dental practice in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, A; D'Hoore, W; Vanheusden, A; Van Nieuwenhuysen, J-P

    2009-12-01

    To assess the types and frequency of antibiotic prescriptions by Belgian dentists, the indications for antibiotic prescription, and dentists' knowledge about recommended practice in antibiotic use. In this cross-sectional survey, dental practitioners were asked to record information about all antibiotics prescribed to their patients during a 2-week period. The dental practitioners were also asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire regarding demographic data, prescribing practices, and knowledge about antibiotic use. A random sample of 268 Belgian dentists participated in the survey. During the 2-week period, 24 421 patient encounters were recorded; 1033 patients were prescribed an antibiotic (4.2%). The median number of prescriptions per dentist for the 2 weeks was 3. Broad spectrum antibiotics were most commonly prescribed: 82% of all prescriptions were for amoxycillin, amoxycillin-clavulanic acid and clindamycin. Antibiotics were often prescribed in the absence of fever (92.2%) and without any local treatment (54.2%). The most frequent diagnosis for which antibiotics were prescribed was periapical abscess (51.9%). Antibiotics were prescribed to 63.3% of patients with periapical abscess and 4.3% of patients with pulpitis. Patterns of prescriptions were confirmed by the data from the self-reported practice. Discrepancies between observed and recommended practice support the need for educational initiatives to promote rational use of antibiotics in dentistry in Belgium.

  11. Antibiotic prescribing for acute bronchitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llor, Carl; Bjerrum, Lars

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Acute bronchitis is a self-limiting infectious disease characterized by acute cough with or without sputum but without signs of pneumonia. About 90% of cases are caused by viruses. AREAS COVERED: Antibiotics for acute bronchitis have been associated with an approximately half......-day reduction in duration of cough. However, at follow-up there are no significant differences in overall clinical improvement inpatients treated with antibiotics compared with those receiving placebo. Despite this, antibiotics are administered to approximately two thirds of these patients. This review...... discusses the reason for this antibiotic overprescription. Other therapies targeted to control symptoms have also demonstrated a marginal or no effect. EXPERT COMMENTARY: Clinicians should be aware of the marginal effectiveness of antibiotic therapy. Some strategies like the use of rapid tests, delayed...

  12. Antibiotic Utilization and Prescribing Patterns in a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study of prescribing pattern seeks to monitor, evaluate and suggest a modification in prescriber's prescribing habits so as to make medical care rational and cost effective. Information about antibiotic use pattern is necessary for a constructive approach to problems that arise from multiple antibiotics available. To identify ...

  13. Shift in antibiotic prescribing patterns in relation to antibiotic expenditure in paediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimpen, JLL; van Houten, M.A.

    In paediatrics, antibiotics are among the most commonly prescribed drugs. Because of an overall rise in health care costs, lack of uniformity in drug prescribing and the emergence of antibiotic resistance, monitoring and control of antibiotic use is of growing concern and strict antibiotic policies

  14. [Antibiotic prescribing in acute respiratory tract infections in general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malo, S; Bjerrum, L; Feja, C; Lallana, M J; Poncel, A; Rabanaque, M J

    2015-06-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a worldwide threat to public health. Acute respiratory tract infections are the main reason for antibiotic prescribing in the Spanish paediatric population. The aim of the study was to describe the frequency of antibiotic prescription and their pattern of use in acute respiratory tract infections diagnosed in children in Primary Care in Aragón (Spain). A study was conducted over a 1-year period on children between 0 and 14 years-old, recording all episodes of acute otitis, acute pharyngotonsillitis, non-specific upper respiratory infection, and acute bronchitis. The proportion of episodes within each diagnosis receiving an antibiotic prescription was calculated, and the prescribing pattern was determined. Half (50%) of the children in Aragón were diagnosed with a respiratory tract infection during the study period. Non-specific upper respiratory infection was the most frequent diagnosis. An antibiotic was prescribed in 75% of pharyngotonsillitis episodes, 72% of otitis, 27% of bronchitis, and 16% of non-specific upper respiratory infections. Broad spectrum antibiotics, mainly amoxicillin and amoxicillin-clavulanic, were predominantly prescribed. Antibiotic prescribing in respiratory tract infections in children was generally high, and the choice of antibiotics was probably inappropriate in a high percentage of cases. Therefore an improvement in antibiotic prescribing in children appears to be needed. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessment of antibiotic prescribing in Latvian general practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumpis Uga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Though general antibiotic consumption data is available, information on the actual patterns of prescribing antibiotics locally is difficult to obtain. An easy to use methodology was designed to assess ambulatory management of infections by Latvian general practitioners (GPs. Methods GPs were asked to record data in a patient data collection form for every patient that received antibiotics. Study period – (7 days one week in November, 2008. Data recorded included the following details: an antibiotic, the prescribed dose, dosing interval, route of administration combined with the demographic factors of the patient and clinical diagnosis based on a pre-defined list. Results Two hundred forty eight forms out of the 600 (41% were returned by post. Antibiotics were prescribed in 6.4% (1711/26803 of outpatient consultations. In total, 1763 antibiotics were prescribed during the study period. Ninety seven percent of the patients received monotherapy and only 47 (2.7% patients were prescribed two antibiotics. The most commonly prescribed antibiotics were amoxicillin (33.9% of prescribed, amoxicillin/clavulanate (18,7% and clarithromycin (7.6%. The most commonly treated indications were pharyngitis (29.8%, acute bronchitis (25.3% and rhinosinusitis (10.2%. Pneumonia was mostly treated with amoxicillin/clavulanate (25,7%, amoxicillin (15.7% and clarithromycin (19.3%. Conclusions Methodology employed provided useful additional information on ambulatory practice of prescribing antibiotics and could be used in further assessment studies. Educational interventions should be focused on treatment of acute pharyngitis and bronchitis in children and unnecessary use of quinolones in adults for uncomplicated urinary tract infection.

  16. Enabling factors for antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaruseviciene, Lina; Radzeviciene Jurgute, Ruta; Bjerrum, Lars

    2013-01-01

    . This study aimed to explore experiences of GPs in Lithuania and the Russian Federation with regard to antibiotic prescription for upper respiratory tract infections. By such means it might be possible to reveal external enabling factors that influence antibiotic prescribing in these countries. Method. Five...... for political leadership to encourage clinically grounded antibiotic use; over-the-counter sale of antibiotics; designation of antibiotics as reimbursable medications; supervision by external oversight institutions; lack of guidelines for the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections; and pharmaceutical......Abstract Introduction. General practitioners (GPs) write about 80% of all antibiotic prescriptions, the greatest number of them for patients with respiratory tract infections. However, there is a lack of research targeting the influence of external factors on antibiotic prescribing by physicians...

  17. Topical antibiotic monotherapy prescribing practices in acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, William D; Davis, Scott A; Fleischer, Alan B; Feldman, Steven R

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the frequency of dosing topical antibiotics as monotherapy in the treatment of acne vulgaris, and physician specialty prescribing these medications. This study is a retrospective review of all visits with a sole diagnosis of acne vulgaris (ICD-9-CM code 706.1) found on the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) in 1993-2010. We recorded the number of visits surveyed where acne vulgaris was the sole diagnosis, number of visits where topical antibiotics were the only treatment prescribed, and the specialty of physician in each encounter. Topical erythromycin or clindamycin were the sole medication prescribed in 0.81% of the visits recorded, with 60% of these prescriptions arising from dermatologists and 40% from non-dermatologists. The trend of prescribing topical antibiotic monotherapy is declining (p acnes to topical antibiotic regimens has led to the need to re-evaluate the use of topical antibiotics in the treatment of acne vulgaris. While the rate of topical antibiotic monotherapy is declining, their use should be reserved for situations where the direct need for antibiotics arises. If a clinician feels that antibiotics are a necessary component to acne therapy, they should be used as part of a combination regimen.

  18. "I'm Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde": are GPs' antibiotic prescribing patterns contextually dependent? A qualitative focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandberg, Eva Lena; Brorsson, Annika; Hagstam, Charlotta; Troein, Margareta; Hedin, Katarina

    2013-09-01

    To explore factors and circumstances contributing to prudent antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections in primary care. Two focus groups representing rural and urban areas. A semi-structured interview guide with open-ended questions and an editing analysis style was used. They were examined to identify meaning units that were sorted into categories in an iterative process throughout the analysis. Primary health care in two counties in southern Sweden. Two groups including seven and six general practitioners (GPs) respectively, men and women of different ages with different professional experiences. Exploration of categories, determination of themes, construction of models. The decision to prescribe antibiotics takes place in the encounter between GP and patient, initially characterized by harmony or fight and the subsequent process by collaboration or negotiation, resulting in agreement, compromise, or disagreement. Several factors influence the meeting and contribute to enhancing the conditions for rational prescribing. These conditions are connected to the GP, the relationship, and the setting; organization as well as professional culture. The findings indicate synergies between the factors, and that one factor can sometimes compensate for lack of another. Continuity and mutual trust can make a brief consultation successful, but lack of continuity can eliminate the effects of knowledge and professional skills. The findings emphasize the importance of the encounter between the GP and the patient for prudent antibiotic prescribing. Furthermore, the importance of an appropriate organization of primary care, which promotes continuity and encourages professional autonomy, is demonstrated.

  19. Drug use evaluation of antibiotics prescribed in a Jordanian hospital outpatient and emergency clinics using WHO prescribing indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Niemat, Sahar I.; Bloukh, Diana T.; Al-Harasis, Manal D.; Al-Fanek, Alen F.; Salah, Rehab K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to evaluate the use of antibiotics prescribed in hospital outpatient and emergency clinics in King Hussein Medical Centre (KHMC) using WHO prescribing indicators in an attempt to rationalize the use of antibiotics in the Royal Medical Services. We retrospectively surveyed a sample of 187,822 antibiotic prescriptions obtained from 5 outpatient pharmacies in KHMC written over the period of 3 consecutive months May 2007 to July 2007. The percentage of encounters of an antibiotic prescribed was calculated using the methodology recommended by the WHO. An additional indicator, the percentage share of different antibiotics was also included to identify the frequency prescribed from those antibiotics. The average percentage of prescriptions involving antibiotics was 35.6% out of 187,822 prescriptions surveyed. From these, 65,500 antibiotic prescriptions were observed. Penicillins most frequently amoxcillins and Quinolones most frequently ciprofloxacinllin and norfloxacillin were the most commonly prescribed antibiotics with an average percentage of 31.8% and 27.5%. The average prescribing rate for the other antibiotic categories was as follows: macrolides 5.2%, cephalosporins 16% and amoxcillins/clavulanate 5.4%. The high percentage of prescriptions involving antibiotics observed in KHMC pharmacies requires rational use of antibiotics and judicious prescribing by Military prescribers. An insight into factors influencing antibiotic prescribing patterns and adherence to antibiotic prescribing guidelines by the Military prescribers is warranted. (author)

  20. [Prescribing antibiotics for sore throat: a persistent habit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damoiseaux, Roger A M J; Venekamp, Roderick P

    2015-01-01

    Recently the revision of the guideline of the Dutch College of General Practitioners on sore throat has been published. Again, one of the key messages is restricting the use of antibiotics. In the Netherlands general practitioners prescribe antibiotics in 50% of cases of tonsillitis. Although there has been a decrease in the number of antibiotic prescriptions for tonsillitis in the last 30 years, they are still being prescribed twice as often as is recommended by the guideline. The beliefs of both patient and doctor play an important role in prescribing and better communication might help to improve the situation. Public campaigns can also help by providing the best knowledge on the effectiveness of antibiotics to the public.

  1. Antibiotic prescribing policy and Clostridium difficile diarrhoea.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, K A

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Broad-spectrum antibiotics, particularly intravenous cephalosporins, are associated with Clostridium difficile diarrhoea. Diarrhoea due to C. difficile is a growing problem in hospitals, especially among elderly patients. AIM: To establish whether changing an antibiotic policy with the aim of reducing the use of injectable cephalosporins leads to a reduction in the incidence of C. difficile diarrhoea in elderly patients. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis. METHODS: A group of patients who were subject to the new antibiotic policy from the period following July 2000, were compared with patients who were admitted prior to July 2000 and were not subject to the new policy. Infections, antibiotic prescriptions and mortality rates were determined from case notes, and C. difficle diarrhoea rates from microbiological data. RESULTS: Intravenous cephalosporin use fell from 210 to 28 defined daily doses (p < 0.001) following the change in antibiotic policy, with a corresponding increase in piperacillin-tazobactam (p < 0.001) and moxifloxacin (p < 0.001) use. The new policy led to a significant reduction in C. difficile diarrhoea cases. The relative risk of developing C. difficile infection with the old policy compared to the new policy was 3.24 (95%CI 1.07-9.84, p = 0.03). DISCUSSION: The antibiotic policy was successfully introduced into an elderly care service. It reduced both intravenous cephalosporin use and C. difficile diarrhoea.

  2. Prescribing antibiotics to pediatric dengue: increasing risk of bacterial resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanunjaya Sandopa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Use of antibiotics to treat self-limiting viral infections like dengue fever (DF without any co-morbid conditions in pediatric patients is common practice in India, and a major contribution of the inappropriate use of antibiotics in the country. Objective To provide an analysis of diagnosis, grading, and prescribing of antibiotics in pediatric inpatients with DF in a tertiary care teaching hospital in India. Methods Data from case sheets of all pediatric inpatients (n=370 diagnosed with DF without co-morbid conditions were collected with regards to diagnosis, grading, presence, and appropriateness of antibiotic usage according to the 2009 WHO Guidelines, the National Vector Borne Disease Control Program (NVBDCP of India Guidelines, and the Hospital Infection Society (HIS Guidelines. Results Platelet count determination (50% of the cases was the major diagnostic method for dengue. Inappropriate grading of DF was seen in 20% of patients. Almost 75% of the 370 dengue cases were prescribed antibiotics for the expressed purpose of avoiding hospital-acquired infections. A single antibiotic was given in 225 cases (60.81%, 2 antibiotics in 33 (8.91 % cases, and 3 antibiotics in 9 (2.43% cases. Conclusions From the results it is clear that antibiotics were prescribed to treat DF where the antibiotics do not have any role. DF is a self-limiting viral infection that can be treated with proper management of hemodynamic status with IV fluids. To avoid the usage of antibiotics in the treatment of dengue, awareness has to be created in healthcare professionals regarding the treatment guidelines for dengue and appropriate use of antibiotics to avoid hospital acquired infections.

  3. Nudging guideline-concordant antibiotic prescribing: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, Daniella; Knight, Tara K; Friedberg, Mark W; Linder, Jeffrey A; Goldstein, Noah J; Fox, Craig R; Rothfeld, Alan; Diaz, Guillermo; Doctor, Jason N

    2014-03-01

    "Nudges" that influence decision making through subtle cognitive mechanisms have been shown to be highly effective in a wide range of applications, but there have been few experiments to improve clinical practice. To investigate the use of a behavioral "nudge" based on the principle of public commitment in encouraging the judicious use of antibiotics for acute respiratory infections (ARIs). Randomized clinical trial in 5 outpatient primary care clinics. A total of 954 adults had ARI visits during the study timeframe: 449 patients were treated by clinicians randomized to the posted commitment letter (335 in the baseline period, 114 in the intervention period); 505 patients were treated by clinicians randomized to standard practice control (384 baseline, 121 intervention). The intervention consisted of displaying poster-sized commitment letters in examination rooms for 12 weeks. These letters, featuring clinician photographs and signatures, stated their commitment to avoid inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for ARIs. Antibiotic prescribing rates for antibiotic-inappropriate ARI diagnoses in baseline and intervention periods, adjusted for patient age, sex, and insurance status. Baseline rates were 43.5% and 42.8% for control and poster, respectively. During the intervention period, inappropriate prescribing rates increased to 52.7% for controls but decreased to 33.7% in the posted commitment letter condition. Controlling for baseline prescribing rates, we found that the posted commitment letter resulted in a 19.7 absolute percentage reduction in inappropriate antibiotic prescribing rate relative to control (P = .02). There was no evidence of diagnostic coding shift, and rates of appropriate antibiotic prescriptions did not diminish over time. Displaying poster-sized commitment letters in examination rooms decreased inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for ARIs. The effect of this simple, low-cost intervention is comparable in magnitude to costlier, more

  4. Improving the prescribing of antibiotics for urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, G M; Stanton, L A; Bergin, J K; Chapman, G A

    1997-04-01

    In recent years there have been changes in the recommended antibiotic treatment for urinary tract infections (UTIs). In particular, the use of amoxycillin or co-trimoxazole is now discouraged, with amoxycillin-potassium clavulanate, cephalexin and trimethoprim becoming first-line agents for uncomplicated lower UTIs. To examine whether academic detailing, performed by a pharmacist, could modify prescribing practices for antibiotics used in the treatment of UTI in the community setting. The intervention was conducted in Southern Tasmania, using the remainder of the State as a control area. The target group of general practitioners was sent educational material designed to assist in the appropriate prescribing of antibiotics in the treatment of UTI. A pharmacist then visited each general practitioner and discussed the rational use of antibiotics for UTIs directly with him/her. Outcomes were measured using evaluation feedback from the general practitioners and pharmacoepidemiological data, which were not linked to diagnosis. The key variable examined was the total defined daily doses (DDDs) dispensed for the recommended first-line agents (amoxycillin-potassium clavulanate, cephalexin and trimethoprim) compared with amoxycillin (3 g single-dose form) and co-trimoxazole. The educational programme was very well received by the general practitioners. Changes in the prescribing of antibiotics commonly used for UTIs were evident in both study regions over the course of the study, but the improvements were significantly greater in the intervention area. Educational programmes utilizing academic detailing by pharmacists can modify prescribing practices within the community setting.

  5. Treatment of impetigo: oral antibiotics most commonly prescribed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolaji, Ranti S; Dabade, Tushar S; Gustafson, Cheryl J; Davis, Scott A; Krowchuk, Daniel P; Feldman, Steven R

    2012-04-01

    Impetigo is a highly contagious, superficial skin disease that is frequently seen in children. While data support the use of topical antibiotics for treatment, the medications actually prescribed in practice are not well documented. To determine the prescribing pattern of dermatologists and nondermatologists when treating impetigo and the demographics of the patients treated. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data on office visits for impetigo were analyzed from 1997 to 2007. Patient demographics and the treatments for impetigo were recorded. During this 10-year period, dermatologists managed an estimated 274,815 impetigo visits and nondermatologists an estimated 3,722,462 visits. Both dermatologists and nondermatologists most frequently prescribed oral antibiotics to treat impetigo. Topical antibiotics were second most common, and a variety of combination treatments were used. Oral antibiotics are the most common class of medications used to treat impetigo. There is an opportunity for physicians to take advantage of the equally efficacious topical antibiotics for treating impetigo. A shift towards topical antibiotics would likely decrease morbidity (resulting from adverse effects) associated with use of oral agents.

  6. Reduction in antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections in Swedish primary care- a retrospective study of electronic patient records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Tyrstrup

    2016-11-01

    in prescribing frequency, especially for acute bronchitis and sinusitis. Continuous evaluation of diagnosis linked prescribing data and feedback to doctors is essential in order to achieve a more prudent antibiotic use.

  7. Health Alliance for Prudent Prescribing, Yield and Use of Antimicrobial Drugs in the Treatment of Respiratory Tract Infections (HAPPY AUDIT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Lars; Munck, Anders; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Excessive and inappropriate use of antibiotics is considered to be the most important reason for development of bacterial resistance to antibiotics. As antibiotic resistance may spread across borders, high prevalence countries may serve as a source of bacterial resistance for countries......'surgeries. To ensure public awareness of the risk of resistant bacteria, media campaigns targeting both professionals and the public will be developed and the results will be published and widely disseminated at a Working Conference hosted by the World Association of Family Doctors (WONCA-Europe) at the end...... of the project period. DISCUSSION: HAPPY AUDIT is an EU-financed project with the aim of contributing to the battle against antibiotic resistance through quality improvement of GPs' diagnosis and treatment of RTIs through development of intervention programmes targeting GPs, parents of young children and healthy...

  8. European Antibiotic Awareness Day, 2008 - the first Europe-wide public information campaign on prudent antibiotic use: methods and survey of activities in participating countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnshaw, S; Monnet, D L; Duncan, B; O'Toole, J; Ekdahl, K; Goossens, H

    2009-07-30

    Antibiotic resistance is a major European and global public health problem and is, for a large part, driven by misuse of antibiotics. Hence, reducing unnecessary antibiotic use, particularly for the treatment of certain respiratory tract infections where they are not needed, is a public health priority. The success of national awareness campaigns to educate the public and primary care prescribers about appropriate antibiotic use in Belgium and France stimulated a European initiative coordinated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), and named European Antibiotic Awareness Day (EAAD), to take place each year on 18 November. Specific campaign materials, including key messages, logos, slogans and a media toolkit, were developed and made available for use in European countries. The focus of the first EAAD campaign was about not taking antibiotics for viral infections such as colds and flu. A post-campaign survey was conducted in January 2009. Thirty-two European countries participated in the first EAAD, producing information materials and implementing activities to mark EAAD. Media coverage peaked on 18 and 19 November. At EU level, EAAD was launched at a scientific meeting in the European Parliament, Strasbourg. The event received EU political engagement through support from the EU Commissioner for Health, the Slovenian and French EU Presidencies, and Members of the European Parliament. Critical factors that led to the success of the first EAAD were good cooperation and process for building the campaign, strong political and stakeholder support and development of campaign materials based on scientific evidence. Countries indicated wide support for another EAAD in 2009. For this purpose, ECDC is developing several TV spots as well as a second set of EAAD campaign materials targeting primary care prescribers.

  9. Antibiotic prescribing practices for catheter urine culture results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Jonathan; Thompson, G William; Austin, Thomas W; Hussain, Zafar; John, Michael; Bombassaro, Anne Marie; Connelly, Sarah E; Elsayed, Sameer

    2013-01-01

    The literature suggests that positive results of catheter urine cultures frequently lead to unnecessary antimicrobial prescribing, which therefore represents an important target for stewardship. To assess the appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing in response to the results of urine cultures from patients with indwelling urinary catheters. This retrospective study was conducted at a tertiary care centre and involved adults with indwelling urinary catheters from whom urine specimens were obtained for culture. Patients with positive or negative culture results were identified from microbiology laboratory reports. The medical records of consecutive patients were screened to select a sample of 80 inpatients (40 per group). Abstracted patient histories were independently evaluated by an expert panel of 3 infectious diseases consultants blinded to the decisions of prescribers and of fellow panelists. The primary end point was concordance of each patient's treatment decision (with respect to the indication) between the expert panel (based on majority agreement, i.e., at least 2 of the 3 expert panelists) and the prescriber. The secondary end points were unnecessary days of therapy and selected outcomes over a predefined period after urine was obtained for culture. A total of 591 charts were screened to generate the targeted number of patients. Baseline demographic characteristics were comparable for the 2 groups, except antibiotic exposure before urine collection was significantly more frequent for the group with negative culture results. The treatment decision was concordant in 40% (16/40) of the patients with a positive culture result and 85% (34/40) of those with a negative culture result (p < 0.001). The most common reason for discordance was administration of antibiotics when not indicated (23 of 24 patients with a positive result and 5 of 6 patients with a negative result), which accounted for 165 and 32 unnecessary days of therapy per 1000 inpatient

  10. Antibiotics for URTI and UTI -- prescribing in Malaysian primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Cheong Lieng; Tong, Seng Fah; Khoo, Ee Ming; Lee, Verna; Zailinawati, Abu Hassan; Mimi, Omar; Chen, Wei Seng; Nordin, Salleh

    2011-05-01

    Overprescription of antibiotics is a continuing problem in primary care. This study aims to assess the antibiotic prescribing rates and antibiotic choices for upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) and urinary tract infections (UTI) in Malaysian primary care. Antibiotic prescribing data for URTI and UTI was extracted from a morbidity survey of randomly selected primary care clinics in Malaysia. Analysis was performed of 1,163 URTI and 105 UTI encounters. Antibiotic prescribing rates for URTI and UTI were 33.8% and 57.1% respectively. Antibiotic prescribing rates were higher in private clinics compared to public clinics for URTI, but not for UTI. In URTI encounters, the majority of antibiotics prescribed were penicillins and macrolides, but penicillin V was notably underused. In UTI encounters, the antibiotics prescribed were predominantly penicillins or cotrimoxazole. Greater effort is needed to bring about evidence based antibiotic prescribing in Malaysian primary care, especially for URTIs in private clinics.

  11. US outpatient antibiotic prescribing variation according to geography, patient population, and provider specialty in 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Lauri A; Bartoces, Monina G; Roberts, Rebecca M; Suda, Katie J; Hunkler, Robert J; Taylor, Thomas H; Schrag, Stephanie J

    2015-05-01

    Appropriate antibiotic prescribing is an essential strategy to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance. US prescribing practices have not been thoroughly characterized. We analyzed outpatient antibiotic prescribing data to identify where appropriate antibiotic prescribing interventions could have the most impact. Oral antibiotic prescriptions dispensed during 2011 were extracted from the IMS Health Xponent database. The number of prescriptions and census denominators were used to calculate prescribing rates. Prescription totals were calculated for each provider specialty. Regression modeling was used to examine the association between socioeconomic and population health factors and prescribing rates. Healthcare providers prescribed 262.5 million courses of antibiotics in 2011(842 prescriptions per 1000 persons). Penicillins and macrolides were the most common antibiotic categories prescribed. The most commonly prescribed individual antibiotic agent was azithromycin. Family practitioners prescribed the most antibiotic courses (24%). The prescribing rate was higher in the South census region (931 prescriptions per 1000 persons) than in the West (647 prescriptions per 1000 persons; P 1.0). Efforts to characterize antibiotic prescribing practices should focus on the South census region and family practitioners. Further understanding of the factors leading to high prescribing among key target populations will inform appropriate prescribing interventions. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  12. Dispensing of non-prescribed antibiotics in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almaaytah A

    2015-09-01

    without prescription in Jordan in violation with national regulations regarding this practice. The findings of this study could provide a layout for governmental health authorities to implement strict enfrorcment of national regulations regarding antibiotic dispensing in order to avoid the serious complications that could arise in the future as a result of such practices. Keywords: pharmacy, pharmacy practice, non-prescribed antibiotics, microbial resistance, Jordan

  13. [Level of knowledge of antibiotics prescribed in outpatients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabé Muñoz, Elena; Flores Dorado, Macarena; Martínez Martínez, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    The lack of patient knowledge about their medication is considered to be one of the main reasons for an inappropriate use. This study the level of knowledge in patients about their prescribed antibiotic, and describes some of the factors related to this. A cross-sectional, descriptive and observational study with an analytical component. SITE: A community pharmacy in Murcia. The study form was offered to all customers who arrived to obtain antibiotics while the study was taking place. A validated form was used to determined the level of knowledge was a validated form. A total of 126 patients, most of them women, with an average age of 44.6 years were included. Half of the study population had no knowledge which could ensure the correct use of the antibiotic they were taking. The «process of use» of the medication was the best known dimension by the study population, followed by the «therapeutic aim». The dimension related to the «safety» of the medication was the one with the lowest values. After a logistic regression, a link between the knowledge of the antibiotic and the «know the name of the antibiotic» (p=.05; r=2.15) and the «number of antibiotic the patient takes» (p=.02; r=0.30) variables. The results show that there is a certain lack of information on the use of antibiotics by the study sample. Thes results could help to show the way to follow in future studies, targeted to meet the need of information. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. A RCT evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of academic detailing versus postal prescribing feedback in changing GP antibiotic prescribing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Naughton, Corina

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of academic detailing (AD) plus postal prescribing feedback versus postal prescribing feedback alone in reducing: (i) the overall rate of antibiotic; and (ii) proportion of second-line antibiotic prescribing. In addition, the cost-effectiveness of an outreach prescriber adviser service versus a postal prescribing feedback service was evaluated.

  15. Factors influencing antibiotic prescribing in long-term care facilities: a qualitative in-depth study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buul, L.W. van; Steen, J.T. van der; Doncker, S.M.M.M.; Achterberg, W.P.; Schellevis, F.G.; Veenhuizen, R.B.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Insight into factors that influence antibiotic prescribing is crucial when developing interventions aimed at a more rational use of antibiotics. We examined factors that influence antibiotic prescribing in long-term care facilities, and present a conceptual model that integrates these

  16. Factors influencing antibiotic prescribing in long-term care facilities: a qualitative in-depth study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Buul, L.W.; van der Steen, J.T.; Doncker, S.M.; Achterberg, W.P.; Schellevis, F.G.; Veenhuizen, R.B.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Insight into factors that influence antibiotic prescribing is crucial when developing interventions aimed at a more rational use of antibiotics. We examined factors that influence antibiotic prescribing in long-term care facilities, and present a conceptual model that integrates these

  17. Reducing antibiotic prescribing in Australian general practice: time for a national strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Mar, Christopher B; Scott, Anna Mae; Glasziou, Paul P; Hoffmann, Tammy; van Driel, Mieke L; Beller, Elaine; Phillips, Susan M; Dartnell, Jonathan

    2017-11-06

    In Australia, the antibiotic resistance crisis may be partly alleviated by reducing antibiotic use in general practice, which has relatively high prescribing rates - antibiotics are mostly prescribed for acute respiratory infections, for which they provide only minor benefits. Current surveillance is inadequate for monitoring community antibiotic resistance rates, prescribing rates by indication, and serious complications of acute respiratory infections (which antibiotic use earlier in the infection may have averted), making target setting difficult. Categories of interventions that may support general practitioners to reduce prescribing antibiotics are: regulatory (eg, changing the default to "no repeats" in electronic prescribing, changing the packaging of antibiotics to facilitate tailored amounts of antibiotics for the right indication and restricting access to prescribing selected antibiotics to conserve them), externally administered (eg, academic detailing and audit and feedback on total antibiotic use for individual GPs), interventions that GPs can individually implement (eg, delayed prescribing, shared decision making, public declarations in the practice about conserving antibiotics, and self-administered audit), supporting GPs' access to near-patient diagnostic testing, and public awareness campaigns. Many unanswered clinical research questions remain, including research into optimal implementation methods. Reducing antibiotic use in Australian general practice will require a range of approaches (with various intervention categories), a sustained effort over many years and a commitment of appropriate resources and support.

  18. Assessment of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing among a large cohort of general dentists in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkin, Michael J; Feng, Qianxi; Warren, Kyle; Lockhart, Peter B; Thornhill, Martin H; Munshi, Kiraat D; Henderson, Rochelle R; Hsueh, Kevin; Fraser, Victoria J

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess dental antibiotic prescribing trends over time, to quantify the number and types of antibiotics dentists prescribe inappropriately, and to estimate the excess health care costs of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing with the use of a large cohort of general dentists in the United States. We used a quasi-Poisson regression model to analyze antibiotic prescriptions trends by general dentists between January 1, 2013, and December 31, 2015, with the use of data from Express Scripts Holding Company, a large pharmacy benefits manager. We evaluated antibiotic duration and appropriateness for general dentists. Appropriateness was evaluated by reviewing the antibiotic prescribed and the duration of the prescription. Overall, the number and rate of antibiotic prescriptions prescribed by general dentists remained stable in our cohort. During the 3-year study period, approximately 14% of antibiotic prescriptions were deemed inappropriate, based on the antibiotic prescribed, antibiotic treatment duration, or both indicators. The quasi-Poisson regression model, which adjusted for number of beneficiaries covered, revealed a small but statistically significant decrease in the monthly rate of inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions by 0.32% (95% confidence interval, 0.14% to 0.50%; P = .001). Overall antibiotic prescribing practices among general dentists in this cohort remained stable over time. The rate of inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions by general dentists decreased slightly over time. From these authors' definition of appropriate antibiotic prescription choice and duration, inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions are common (14% of all antibiotic prescriptions) among general dentists. Further analyses with the use of chart review, administrative data sets, or other approaches are needed to better evaluate antibiotic prescribing practices among dentists. Copyright © 2018 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  19. Study of antibiotic prescribing among dental practitioners in Shiraz, Islamic Republic of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessal, G; Khabiri, A; Mirkhani, H; Cookson, B D; Askarian, M

    2011-10-01

    Inappropriate prescribing of antibiotics by health care professionals is a worldwide concern. This study evaluated the knowledge and practices of dental practitioners in the city of Shiraz, Islamic Republic of Iran regarding their therapeutic use of antibiotics for patients with dentoalveolar infections. Of 219 (48.6%) dentists responding to the questionnaire more than 40% would prescribe antibiotics for localized fluctuant swelling and for problems for which antibiotics are not required according to good practice guidelines (acute pulpitis, chronic apical infection, periodontal abscess, chronic gingivitis, chronic periodontitis, pericoronitis and dry socket). A majority correctly prescribed antibiotics for acute periapical infection (77.2%), cellulitis (75.3%) and acute ulcerated gingivitis (63.0%). Amoxicillin was the most frequently prescribed antibiotic for all clinical conditions but there was a wide variation in dosage, frequency and duration for all antibiotics used. Guidelines on rational antibiotic use are needed for dental practitioners in the Islamic Republic of Iran.

  20. Identifying practice-related factors for high-volume prescribers of antibiotics in Danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Sandholdt, Håkon

    2017-01-01

    practice-related factors driving high antibiotic prescribing rates. Results: We included 98% of general practices in Denmark (n = 1962) and identified a 10% group of high prescribers who accounted for 15% of total antibiotic prescriptions and 18% of critically important antibiotic prescriptions. Once case...... prescriptions issued over the phone compared with all antibiotic prescriptions; and a high number of consultations per 1000 patients. We also found that a low number of consultations per 1000 patients was associated with a reduced likelihood of being a high prescriber of antibiotics. Conclusions: An apparent...

  1. National ambulatory antibiotic prescribing patterns for pediatric urinary tract infection, 1998-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Hillary L; Shapiro, Daniel J; Hersh, Adam L

    2011-06-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate patterns of ambulatory antibiotic use and to identify factors associated with broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing for pediatric urinary tract infections (UTIs). We examined antibiotics prescribed for UTIs for children aged younger than 18 years from 1998 to 2007 using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Amoxicillin-clavulanate, quinolones, macrolides, and second- and third-generation cephalosporins were classified as broad-spectrum antibiotics. We evaluated trends in broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing patterns and performed multivariable logistic regression to identify factors associated with broad-spectrum antibiotic use. Antibiotics were prescribed for 70% of pediatric UTI visits. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was the most commonly prescribed antibiotic (49% of visits). Broad-spectrum antibiotics were prescribed one third of the time. There was no increase in overall use of broad-spectrum antibiotics (P = .67); however, third-generation cephalosporin use doubled from 12% to 25% (P = .02). Children younger than 2 years old (odds ratio: 6.4 [95% confidence interval: 2.2-18.7, compared with children 13-17 years old]), females (odds ratio: 3.6 [95% confidence interval: 1.6-8.5]), and temperature ≥ 100.4°F (odds ratio: 2.9 [95% confidence interval: 1.0-8.6]) were independent predictors of broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing. Race, physician specialty, region, and insurance status were not associated with antibiotic selection. Ambulatory care physicians commonly prescribe broad-spectrum antibiotics for the treatment of pediatric UTIs, especially for febrile infants in whom complicated infections are more likely. The doubling in use of third-generation cephalosporins suggests that opportunities exist to promote more judicious antibiotic prescribing because most pediatric UTIs are susceptible to narrower alternatives.

  2. National Ambulatory Antibiotic Prescribing Patterns for Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection, 1998–2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Daniel J.; Hersh, Adam L.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to investigate patterns of ambulatory antibiotic use and to identify factors associated with broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing for pediatric urinary tract infections (UTIs). METHODS: We examined antibiotics prescribed for UTIs for children aged younger than 18 years from 1998 to 2007 using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Amoxicillin-clavulanate, quinolones, macrolides, and second- and third-generation cephalosporins were classified as broad-spectrum antibiotics. We evaluated trends in broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing patterns and performed multivariable logistic regression to identify factors associated with broad-spectrum antibiotic use. RESULTS: Antibiotics were prescribed for 70% of pediatric UTI visits. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was the most commonly prescribed antibiotic (49% of visits). Broad-spectrum antibiotics were prescribed one third of the time. There was no increase in overall use of broad-spectrum antibiotics (P = .67); however, third-generation cephalosporin use doubled from 12% to 25% (P = .02). Children younger than 2 years old (odds ratio: 6.4 [95% confidence interval: 2.2–18.7, compared with children 13–17 years old]), females (odds ratio: 3.6 [95% confidence interval: 1.6–8.5]), and temperature ≥100.4°F (odds ratio: 2.9 [95% confidence interval: 1.0–8.6]) were independent predictors of broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing. Race, physician specialty, region, and insurance status were not associated with antibiotic selection. CONCLUSIONS: Ambulatory care physicians commonly prescribe broad-spectrum antibiotics for the treatment of pediatric UTIs, especially for febrile infants in whom complicated infections are more likely. The doubling in use of third-generation cephalosporins suggests that opportunities exist to promote more judicious antibiotic prescribing because most pediatric UTIs are susceptible to narrower

  3. Rational use of medicine in dentistry: do dentists prescribe antibiotics in appropriate indications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuncuoglu, Cenker Z; Aydin, Mehtap; Kirmizi, N Ipek; Aydin, Volkan; Aksoy, Mesil; Isli, Fatma; Akici, Ahmet

    2017-08-01

    There are concerns regarding appropriate use of antibiotics in dentistry practice. Data on dental antibiotic prescribing patterns by dentists is relatively limited. This nationwide study aimed to examine dentists' antibiotic prescriptions in a diagnosis-based manner in Turkey. This retrospective study on utilization of systemic antibiotics for dental problems was based on the national health data of the dentists obtained from Prescription Information System between January 2013 and August 2015. Only those prescriptions containing single diagnosis and at least one systemic antibiotic were included in the study. Antibiotic prescribing was compared by diagnoses and expertise of dentists. A total of 9,293,410 antibiotics were detected in 9,214,956 prescriptions that contained "single diagnosis and at least one antibiotic." The number of antibiotics per prescription was 1.01. "Periapical abscess without sinus" (28.1%), "dental examination" (20.7%), and "dental caries" (16.2%) were the three most common indications in which antibiotics were prescribed by dentists. While only 3.4% of antibiotics were prescribed upon the single and appropriate "cellulitis and abscess of mouth" diagnosis, the remaining 96.6% was prescribed for irrational/uncertain indications. Consistent in all diagnoses, "amoxicillin + enzyme inhibitor" (58.6%) was the mainly prescribed antibiotic. Analysis of the most preferred "amoxicillin + enzyme inhibitor" prescriptions by expertise of dentists showed significantly much higher prescription rates among Group A specialists and Group B specialists (67.0 and 67.8%, respectively) than those in unidentified dental practitioners (58.2%, p < 0.0001). This study showed that dentists prescribed antibiotics in an arbitrary and mostly unnecessary manner. In general, their antibiotic choices for examined diagnoses could be regarded as irrational. These results indicate the urgent need for improvement of rational antibiotic prescribing habits of dentists.

  4. Drug Use Evaluation of Three Widely Prescribed Antibiotics in a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Mohammadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug utilization studies are helpful in understanding the current practice. We have conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the relevant use of a group of most commonly prescribed antibiotics in a teaching hospital in Iran.  The results of this study may be of help for clinicians to improve the patient care.Methods: Patients who received parenteral ceftazidim, vancomycin and amikacin from December2010 to May 2011 were enrolled in this study. Patient’s data including demographic, length of Hospital stay, drug allergy, first and final diagnosis were recorded in a predesigned data collection form. American Hospital Formulary Services (AHFS book were used as a reference for evaluation of study drug indication and dosing according to diagnosis and microbiological culture. Defined Daily Dose (DDD of each drug extracted from Anatomic and Therapeutic Chemical classification system (ATC/DDD and drug usage data evaluated by calculating the ratio of prescribed drug to its DDD.Results: The ratio of prescribed daily dose to DDD was 0.78, 0.95 and 0.86 for amikacin, ceftazidime and vancomycin respectively. Between amikacin group, 43 patients (86% received drug empirically, the number of empiric treatments for ceftazidim and vancomycin were 45(90% and 44 patients (88%. The renal function tests (Blood Urea Nitrogen, Serum Creatinin were evaluated in 56% of amikacin group, 64% in ceftazidime group and 78% in vancomycin group.Conclusion: The results of this study indicate the need to establish continuing medical education (CME courses for physicians to familiarize them with standards required to use and monitor these agents.

  5. Factors influencing antibiotic prescribing in long-term care facilities: a qualitative in-depth study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Buul, Laura W; van der Steen, Jenny T; Doncker, Sarah M M M; Achterberg, Wilco P; Schellevis, François G; Veenhuizen, Ruth B; Hertogh, Cees M P M

    2014-12-16

    Insight into factors that influence antibiotic prescribing is crucial when developing interventions aimed at a more rational use of antibiotics. We examined factors that influence antibiotic prescribing in long-term care facilities, and present a conceptual model that integrates these factors. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with physicians (n = 13) and nursing staff (n = 13) in five nursing homes and two residential care homes in the central-west region of the Netherlands. An iterative analysis was applied to interviews with physicians to identify and categorize factors that influence antibiotic prescribing, and to integrate these into a conceptual model. This conceptual model was triangulated with the perspectives of nursing staff. The analysis resulted in the identification of six categories of factors that can influence the antibiotic prescribing decision: the clinical situation, advance care plans, utilization of diagnostic resources, physicians' perceived risks, influence of others, and influence of the environment. Each category comprises several factors that may influence the decision to prescribe or not prescribe antibiotics directly (e.g. pressure of patients' family leading to antibiotic prescribing) or indirectly via influence on other factors (e.g. unfamiliarity with patients resulting in a higher physician perceived risk of non-treatment, in turn resulting in a higher tendency to prescribe antibiotics). Our interview study shows that several non-rational factors may affect antibiotic prescribing decision making in long-term care facilities, suggesting opportunities to reduce inappropriate antibiotic use. We developed a conceptual model that integrates the identified categories of influencing factors and shows the relationships between those categories. This model may be used as a practical tool in long-term care facilities to identify local factors potentially leading to inappropriate prescribing, and to subsequently

  6. Dental students′ compliance with antibiotic prescribing guidelines for dental infections in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee Chen Wong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: To investigate the antibiotic prescribing training received by dental students, clinical experience in treating child patients, awareness of antibiotic prescribing guidelines, preparedness in antibiotic prescribing, and compliance with antibiotic prescribing guidelines for the management of dental infections in children. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study involving final year dentals students from Malaysian and Asian dental schools. A self-administered questionnaire consisting of five clinical case scenarios was e-mailed to all final year students at selected dental schools. Students′ responses were compared for each clinical case scenario with the prescribing guidelines of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry and the American Dental Association. Compliance in each scenario was tested for association with their preparedness in antibiotic prescribing, previous training on antibiotic prescribing and awareness of antibiotic prescribing guidelines using Chi-square test. Data collected were analyzed using SPSS statistics version 20. Results: A total of 108 completed responses were received. About 74 (69% students were from Malaysian dental schools. The compliance rate with prescribing guidelines ranged from 15.7% to 43.5%. Those attending Malaysian dental schools (47.3% and those who had treated child patient more often (46.3% were more likely (P < 0.05 to be aware of the guidelines. Those who had received antibiotic prescribing training (21.3% were more likely to think they were well prepared in antibiotic prescribing (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Final year dental students had low awareness and compliance with antibiotic prescribing guidelines. Further research is needed to investigate how compliance with the guidelines may be enhanced.

  7. Antibiotic Prescribing Review as a Component of an Infectious Disease Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speedie, Marilyn K.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The review of physician-prescribing is recognized as an important function for pharmacists. It is suggested that a course aimed at antibiotic drug prescribing review (DPR) would provide the opportunity to reinforce and apply the principles of DPR and to demonstrate how theoretical knowledge of antibiotics could be applied directly to practice.…

  8. Predictors for antibiotic prescribing in patients with exacerbations of COPD in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llor, Carl; Bjerrum, Lars; Munck, Anders

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to describe the antibiotic prescribing rate in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD), to analyse predictors for antibiotic prescribing and to explore the influence of the use C-reactive protein (CRP) rapid test. ME...

  9. The Antibiotic Prescribing Pathway for Presumed Urinary Tract Infections in Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, Christine E; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Scales, Kezia; Ward, Kimberly; Weber, David; Reed, David; McClester, Mallory; Sloane, Philip D

    2017-08-01

    Due to the high rates of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for presumed urinary tract infections (UTIs) in nursing home (NH) residents, we sought to examine the antibiotic prescribing pathway and the extent to which it agrees with the Loeb criteria; findings can suggest strategies for antibiotic stewardship. Chart review of 260 randomly-selected cases from 247 NH residents treated with an antibiotic for a presumed UTI in 31 NHs in North Carolina. We examined the prescribing pathway from presenting illness, to the prescribing event, illness work-up and subsequent clinical events including emergency department use, hospitalization, and death. Analyses described the decision-making processes and outcomes and compared decisions made with Loeb criteria for initiation of antibiotics. Of 260 cases, 60% had documented signs/symptoms of the presenting illness and 15% met the Loeb criteria. Acute mental status change was the most commonly documented sign/symptom (24%). NH providers (81%) were the most common prescribers and ciprofloxacin (32%) was the most commonly prescribed antibiotic. Fourteen percent of presumed UTI cases included a white blood cell count, 71% included a urinalysis, and 72% had a urine culture. Seventy-five percent of cultures grew at least one organism with ≥100,000 colony-forming units/milliliter and 12% grew multi-drug resistant organisms; 28% of antibiotics were prescribed for more than 7 days, and 7% of cases had a subsequent death, emergency department visit, or hospitalization within 7 days. Non-specific signs/symptoms appeared to influence prescribing more often than urinary tract-specific signs/symptoms. Prescribers rarely stopped antibiotics, and a minority prescribed for overly long periods. Providers may need additional support to guide the decision-making process to reduce antibiotic overuse and antibiotic resistance. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  10. Antibiotic Use in Cold and Flu Season and Prescribing Quality: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsan, Marcella; Morden, Nancy E; Gottlieb, Joshua D; Zhou, Weiping; Skinner, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Excessive antibiotic use in cold and flu season is costly and contributes to antibiotic resistance. The study objective was to develop an index of excessive antibiotic use in cold and flu season and determine its correlation with other indicators of prescribing quality. We included Medicare beneficiaries in the 40% random sample denominator file continuously enrolled in fee-for-service benefits for 2010 or 2011 (7,961,201 person-years) and extracted data on prescription fills for oral antibiotics that treat respiratory pathogens. We collapsed the data to the state level so they could be merged with monthly flu activity data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Linear regression, adjusted for state-specific mean antibiotic use and demographic characteristics, was used to estimate how antibiotic prescribing responded to state-specific flu activity. Flu-activity associated antibiotic use varied substantially across states-lowest in Vermont and Connecticut, highest in Mississippi and Florida. There was a robust positive correlation between flu-activity associated prescribing and use of medications that often cause adverse events in the elderly (0.755; Pantibiotic use was positively correlated with prescribing high-risk medications to the elderly and negatively correlated with beta-blocker use after myocardial infarction. These findings suggest that excessive antibiotic use reflects low-quality prescribing. They imply that practice and policy solutions should go beyond narrow, antibiotic specific, approaches to encourage evidence-based prescribing for the elderly Medicare population.

  11. Inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and demand for antibiotics in patients with upper respiratory tract infections is hardly different in female versus male patients as seen in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Kathrine; Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen; Siersma, Volkert

    2015-01-01

    Background: Unnecessary prescribing of antibiotics is a major public health concern. General practitioners (GPs) prescribe most antibiotics, often for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), and have in general been shown to prescribe antibiotics more often to women. No studies have examined...

  12. The Pattern of Antibiotic Prescribing by Dental Practitioners in Zagreb, Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perić, Marina; Perković, Ivana; Romić, Martina; Simeon, Paris; Matijević, Jurica; Mehičić, Goranka Prpić; Krmek, Silvana Jukić

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial resistance is considered a consequence of misuse or overuse of antibiotics. Dentistry significantly contributes to this increasing public health problem. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the pattern of antibiotics prescribed by Croatian dentists in Zagreb area. Out of 220 Doctors of Dental Medicine (DMDs) from Zagreb 110 responded to survey. Prior to the research an ethical approval was obtained. Participants were directly contacted. The questionnaire consisted of two parts: general data on DMDs and the part concerning indications, duration, type and dosage of antibiotic therapy. Data were processed using MS Excel and SPSS for Windows, Version 17.0. Statistical significance was tested by Fisher's exact test, chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U test and Spearman's rank correlation at the level of statistical significance p<0.05. During the period of two months, the doctors prescribed antibiotics to 1,500 patients, 690 (46%) were men and 810 (54%) women. The most often prescribed antibiotics were penicillin (72.5% of patients), represented mostly by amoxicillin in combination with clavulanic acid (57.6%). The most common indication for the prescribed antibiotics was periapical or periodontal abscess (44%). Definite clinical indication (71.2%) was stated as the most common reason for antibiotic prescription. Antibiotic therapy usually lasted 7 days (62.9%). The doctors prescribed daily doses of antibiotics according to the instructions for the use of specific drugs. The examined subjects prescribe antibiotics according to the curriculum taught at the School of Dental Medicine for majority of types, doses and duration of the treatments, although antibiotics over-prescription in cases without medical indication was observed. The national guidelines on antibiotic regimens are required in order to reduce unnecessary antibiotic use. Copyright© by the National Institute of Public Health, Prague 2015.

  13. Antibiotic prescribing in public and private practice: a cross-sectional study in primary care clinics in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab Rahman, Norazida; Teng, Cheong Lieng; Sivasampu, Sheamini

    2016-05-17

    Antibiotic overuse is driving the emergence of antibiotic resistance worldwide. Good data on prescribing behaviours of healthcare providers are needed to support antimicrobial stewardship initiatives. This study examined the differences in antibiotic prescribing rates of public and private primary care clinics in Malaysia. We used data from the National Medical Care Survey (NMCS), a nationwide cluster sample of Malaysian public and private primary care clinics in 2014. NMCS contained demographic, diagnoses and prescribing from 129 public clinics and 416 private clinics. We identified all encounters who were prescribed antibiotic and analyse the prescribing rate, types of antibiotics, and diagnoses that resulted in antibiotic. Five thousand eight hundred ten encounters were prescribed antibiotics; antibiotic prescribing rate was 21.1 % (public clinics 6.8 %, private clinics 30.8 %). Antibiotic prescribing was higher in private clinics where they contributed almost 87 % of antibiotics prescribed in primary care. Upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) was the most frequent diagnosis in patients receiving antibiotic therapy and accounted for 49.2 % of prescriptions. Of the patients diagnosed with URTI, 46.2 % received antibiotic treatment (public 16.8 %, private 57.7 %). Penicillins, cephalosporins and macrolides were the most commonly prescribed antibiotics and accounted for 30.7, 23.6 and 16.0 % of all antibiotics, respectively. More recently available broad-spectrum antibiotics such as azithromycin and quinolones were more frequently prescribed in private clinics. Antibiotic prescribing rates are high in both public and private primary care settings in Malaysia, especially in the latter. This study provides evidence of excessive and inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for self-limiting conditions. These data highlights the needs for more concerted interventions targeting both prescribers and public. Improvement strategies should focus on reducing

  14. General Practitioner trainers prescribe fewer antibiotics in primary care: Evidence from France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devillers, Louise; Sicsic, Jonathan; Delbarre, Angelique; Le Bel, Josselin; Ferrat, Emilie; Saint Lary, Olivier

    2018-01-01

    Antibiotic prescription is a central public health issue. Overall, 90% of antibiotic prescriptions are delivered to patients in ambulatory care, and a substantial proportion of these prescriptions could be avoided. General Practitioner (GP) trainers are similar to other GPs in terms of sociodemographic and medical activities, but they may have different prescription patterns. Our aim was to compare the antibiotic prescribing rates between GP trainers and non-trainers. This observational cross-sectional study was conducted on administrative data claims from the French National Health Insurance. The antibiotic prescribing rate was calculated. The main independent variable was the training status of the GPs. Prescribing rates were adjusted for the various GPs' characteristics (gender, age, location of the practice, number of visits per GP and the case-mix) in a multiple linear regression analysis. Between June 2014 and July 2015 the prescribing patterns of 860 GPs were analysed, among which 102 were GP trainers (12%). Over the year 363,580 patients were prescribed an antibiotic out of 3,499,248 visits for 1,299,308 patients seen over the year thus representing around 27.5% of patients. In the multivariate analyses, being a trainer resulted in a significant difference of 6.62 percentage points (IC 95%: [-8.55; -4.69]; prole of GP trainers in antibiotic prescriptions. By prescribing fewer antibiotics and influencing the next generations of GPs, the human and economic burden of antibiotics could be reduced.

  15. Endodontic treatment-related antibiotic prescribing patterns of South African oral health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalloo, R; Solanki, G; Ramphoma, K; Myburgh, N G

    2017-11-01

    To assess the antibiotic prescribing patterns of South African dentists for patients undergoing endodontic treatment. This study used data from 2013 health insurance claims submitted by South African oral health professionals to determine the antibiotic prescribing patterns related to endodontic treatment. A logistic regression model was used to test the fully adjusted statistical significance of the association between the exploratory variables (gender, age group, event type, abscess treatment, chronic health) and the dependent variable (antibiotic prescription). Odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CI) are reported, and a 95% CI excluding 1 was considered statistically significant. Almost 10% of endodontic treatments were prescribed an antibiotic. There were no significant differences in prescribing patterns by gender, age and chronic health status. Prescriptions were more common at the preparatory stage (9.4%) of root canal treatment compared to the therapy (4.7%) and canal filling (2%) stages. Patients who received apical surgery (OR = 2.28; 95% CI 1.38-3.76) and treatment of an abscess (OR = 2.57; 95% 1.82-3.63) had a significantly increased odds of being prescribed an antibiotic. Almost three-quarters of prescriptions were for narrow spectrum antibiotics. The frequency of antibiotic prescribing by South African dental practitioners for patients undergoing endodontic treatment is relatively low and predominantly involved narrow spectrum antibiotics. It, however, remains important that antibiotics are only prescribed when clinically essential, such as when there are obvious systemic effects. These include fever above 37 degrees, malaise, lymphadenopathy, trismus, increase swelling, cellulitis, osteomyelitis and persistent infection. The wider dissemination and adherence to clear evidence-based prescribing guidelines for antibiotics in this clinical area are important. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Effect of a drug allergy educational program and antibiotic prescribing guideline on inpatient clinical providers' antibiotic prescribing knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Kimberly G; Shenoy, Erica S; Hurwitz, Shelley; Varughese, Christy A; Hooper, David C; Banerji, Aleena

    2014-01-01

    Inpatient providers have varying levels of knowledge in managing patients with drug and/or penicillin (PCN) allergy. Our objectives were (1) to survey inpatient providers to ascertain their baseline drug allergy knowledge and preparedness in caring for patients with PCN allergy, and (2) to assess the impact of an educational program paired with the implementation of a hospital-based clinical guideline. We electronically surveyed 521 inpatient providers at a tertiary care medical center at baseline and again 6 weeks after an educational initiative paired with clinical guideline implementation. The guideline informed providers on drug allergy history taking and antibiotic prescribing for inpatients with PCN or cephalosporin allergy. Of 323 unique responders, 42% (95% CI, 37-48%) reported no prior education in drug allergy. When considering those who responded to both surveys (n = 213), we observed a significant increase in knowledge about PCN skin testing (35% vs 54%; P allergy over time (54% vs 80%; P allergy was severe significantly improved (77% vs 92%; P = .03). Other areas, including understanding absolute contraindications to receiving a drug again and PCN cross-reactivity with other antimicrobials, did not improve significantly. Inpatient providers have drug allergy knowledge deficits but are interested in tools to help them care for inpatients with drug allergies. Our educational initiative and hospital guideline implementation were associated with increased PCN allergy knowledge in several crucial areas. To improve care of inpatients with drug allergy, more research is needed to evaluate hospital policies and sustainable educational tools. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdardottir, N. R.; Nielsen, A. B. S.; Munck, A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) in two countries with different prevalence of antimicrobial resistance: Denmark and Iceland.Design: A cross-sectional study. Settings and subjects. General practitioners (GPs...

  18. Antibiotic prescribing in Danish general practice 2004-13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Siersma, Volkert; Plejdrup Hansen, Malene

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Antibiotic consumption in the primary care sector is often perceived as synonymous with consumption in general practice despite the fact that few countries stratify the primary care sector by providers' medical specialty. We aimed to characterize and quantify antibiotic use in Danish...... general practice relative to the entire primary care sector. Methods: This was a registry-based study including all patients who redeemed an antibiotic prescription between July 2004 and June 2013 at a Danish community pharmacy. Antibiotic use was expressed as DDDs and treatments/1000 inhabitants....../day (DIDs and TIDs, respectively) and assessed according to antibiotic spectrum (narrow versus broad) and their anatomical therapeutic classification codes in total as well as in six age groups. Results: The contribution of general practice to the entire antibiotic use in the primary care sector declined...

  19. Antibiotic Prescribing Patterns in Outpatient Emergency Clinics at Queen Rania Al Abdullah II Children's Hospital, Jordan, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Niemat, Sahar I; Aljbouri, Tareq M; Goussous, Lana S; Efaishat, Rania A; Salah, Rehab K

    2014-07-01

    To investigate antibiotics prescribing patterns in the outpatient pediatric emergency clinic at Queen Rania Al Abdullah II Children's Hospital at Royal Medical Services in Amman, Jordan. The data was collected from the emergency pharmacy over the period of a -five consecutive months. The methodology recommended by the World Health Organization for investigating drug use in a health facility was followed. The study measures the percentage of encounter with a prescribed antibiotic and the percentage share of each antibiotic category. The distribution of diagnostic categories that accounted for all antibiotics being prescribed and the distribution of each antibiotic being prescribed for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) were also measured. Antibiotic prescribing was frequent during pediatric visits to the outpatient pediatric emergency clinic resulting in a high percentage of encounters (85%) when compared to appropriate. Emergency physicians continue to frequently prescribe broad spectrum antibiotics which accounted for approximately (60%) of the total prescribed antibiotics and (83%) of prescribed antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections and macrolides (primarily azithromycin) were the leading class among them. Our results showed high consumption of antibiotics by emergency department pediatricians which highlight the importance for interventions to promote rational and judicious prescribing. An insight into factors influencing antibiotics prescribing patterns by military prescribers is required.

  20. Antibiotic Prescribing Patterns in Outpatient Emergency Clinics at Queen Rania Al Abdullah II Children's Hospital, Jordan, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar I. Al-Niemat

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate antibiotics prescribing patterns in the outpatient pediatric emergency clinic at Queen Rania Al Abdullah II Children’s Hospital at Royal Medical Services in Amman, Jordan. Methods: The data was collected from the emergency pharmacy over the period of a -five consecutive months. The methodology recommended by the World Health Organization for investigating drug use in a health facility was followed. The study measures the percentage of encounter with a prescribed antibiotic and the percentage share of each antibiotic category. The distribution of diagnostic categories that accounted for all antibiotics being prescribed and the distribution of each antibiotic being prescribed for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs were also measured. Results: Antibiotic prescribing was frequent during pediatric visits to the outpatient pediatric emergency clinic resulting in a high percentage of encounters (85% when compared to appropriate. Emergency physicians continue to frequently prescribe broad spectrum antibiotics which accounted for approximately (60% of the total prescribed antibiotics and (83% of prescribed antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections and macrolides (primarily azithromycin were the leading class among them. Conclusion: Our results showed high consumption of antibiotics by emergency department pediatricians which highlight the importance for interventions to promote rational and judicious prescribing. An insight into factors influencing antibiotics prescribing patterns by military prescribers is required.

  1. Prescribing style and variation in antibiotic prescriptions for sore throat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordoba Currea, Gloria Cristina; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Lopez-Valcarcel, Beatriz Gonzalez

    2015-01-01

    never did. After adjusting for patient and GP characteristics, prescribing style in the group of GPs from Russia was about three times more heterogeneous than the prescribing style in the group of GPs from Denmark – Median Odds Ratio ( 6.8, 95%CI 3.1;8.8 ) and ( 2.6, 95%CI 2.2;4.4 ) respectively...

  2. Prescribing antibiotic prophylaxis in orthognathic surgery: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, M.A.E.; Verlinden, C.; Goey, Y.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2014-01-01

    There is no consensus on the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in orthognathic surgery to prevent infections. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis was performed to make evidence-based recommendations. A search of Embase, Ovid Medline,

  3. Understanding the gender gap in antibiotic prescribing : a cross-sectional analysis of English primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, David R M; Dolk, F Christiaan K; Smieszek, Timo; Robotham, Julie V; Pouwels, Koen B

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore the causes of the gender gap in antibiotic prescribing, and to determine whether women are more likely than men to receive an antibiotic prescription per consultation. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis of routinely collected electronic medical records from The Health

  4. Age-specific antibiotic prescribing and adherence to guidelines in pediatric patients in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanovska, V.; Hek, K.; Mantel-Teeuwisse, A.K.; Leufkens, H.G.M.; Dijk, L. van

    2018-01-01

    Background: Most antibiotics in children are used to treat viral and self-limiting conditions. This study aims to compare physicians' adherence to guidelines on antibiotic prescribing in fever and in ear and respiratory infections to children in different age groups in the Netherlands. Methods: Data

  5. Audit of antibiotic prescribing in two governmental teaching hospitals in Indonesia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadi, U.; Duerink, D.O.; Lestari, E.S.; Nagelkerke, N.J.; Keuter, M.; Huis in 't Veld, D.; Suwandojo, E.; Rahardjo, E.; Broek, P. van den; Gyssens, I.C.J.

    2008-01-01

    This article estimates the magnitude and quality of antibiotic prescribing in Indonesian hospitals and aims to identify demographic, socio-economic, disease-related and healthcare-related determinants of use. An audit on antibiotic use of patients hospitalized for 5 days or more was conducted in two

  6. South African medical students’ perceptions and knowledge about antibiotic resistance and appropriate prescribing: Are we providing adequate training to future prescribers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Wasserman,

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Education of medical students has been identified by the World Health Organization as an important aspect of antibiotic resistance (ABR containment. Surveys from high-income countries consistently reveal that medical students recognise the importance of antibiotic prescribing knowledge, but feel inadequately prepared and require more education on how to make antibiotic choices. The attitudes and knowledge of South African (SA medical students regarding ABR and antibiotic prescribing have never been evaluated. Objective. To evaluate SA medical students’ perceptions, attitudes and knowledge about antibiotic use and resistance, and the perceived quality of education relating to antibiotics and infection. Methods. This was a cross-sectional survey of final-year students at three medical schools, using a 26-item self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaires recorded basic demographic information, perceptions about antibiotic use and ABR, sources, quality, and usefulness of current education about antibiotic use, and questions to evaluate knowledge. Hard-copy surveys were administered during whole-class lectures. Results. A total of 289 of 567 (51% students completed the survey. Ninety-two percent agreed that antibiotics are overused and 87% agreed that resistance is a significant problem in SA – higher proportions than those who thought that antibiotic overuse (63% and resistance (61% are problems in the hospitals where they had worked (p<0.001. Most reported that they would appreciate more education on appropriate use of antibiotics (95%. Only 33% felt confident to prescribe antibiotics, with similar proportions across institutions. Overall, prescribing confidence was associated with the use of antibiotic prescribing guidelines (p=0.003, familiarity with antibiotic stewardship (p=0.012, and more frequent contact with infectious diseases specialists (p<0.001. There was an overall mean correct score of 50% on the knowledge

  7. Strategies to Minimize Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Hee Lee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance can be reduced by using antibiotics prudently based on guidelines of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs and various data such as pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic (PD properties of antibiotics, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST, clinical response, and effects on the microbiota, as well as by new antibiotic developments. The controlled use of antibiotics in food animals is another cornerstone among efforts to reduce antibiotic resistance. All major resistance-control strategies recommend education for patients, children (e.g., through schools and day care, the public, and relevant healthcare professionals (e.g., primary-care physicians, pharmacists, and medical students regarding unique features of bacterial infections and antibiotics, prudent antibiotic prescribing as a positive construct, and personal hygiene (e.g., handwashing. The problem of antibiotic resistance can be minimized only by concerted efforts of all members of society for ensuring the continued efficiency of antibiotics.

  8. Antibiotic prescribing practice and adherence to guidelines in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    clinical outcomes, including death, and consume more healthcare resources.[2] Globally 700 ... Individual prescribing decisions affect the population level of resistance. .... professionals (doctors, nurses, dentists and primary care drug therapist ...

  9. An assessment of factors influencing the prescribing of antibiotics in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Questionnaire study involving patients and general practitioners. Population: ... The patient's views and expectations regarding the need for antibiotics, the doctor's perceptions of .... Table I: Frequency table of patient/parent views. Questions to ...

  10. Assessing pharmacists' readiness to prescribe oral antibiotics for limited infections using a case-vignette technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Elizabeth; Czarniak, Petra; Sunderland, Bruce; Parsons, Richard; Hoti, Kreshnik

    2017-02-01

    Background Pharmacist's skills are underutilized whilst they are directly involved with antibiotic supply to the community. Addressing this issue could lead to better use of antibiotics and hence decreased resistance. Objective Explore how pharmacists can prescribe oral antibiotics to treat a limited range of infections whilst focusing on their confidence and appropriateness of prescribing. Setting Community pharmacies, Western Australia. Method Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire also containing case vignettes. These were distributed to a random sample of metropolitan and rural community pharmacies in Western Australia. A Generalised Estimating Equation was used to compare respondents' level of confidence in treating various infections and to assess appropriateness of prescribing. Main outcome measure Appropriateness and confidence of antibiotic prescribing. Results A response rate of 34.2% (i.e. 425 responses to case vignettes) was achieved from 240 pharmacies. There were high levels of confidence to treat simple infections such as uncomplicated UTIs (n = 73; 89.0%), impetigo (n = 65; 79.3%), mild bacterial skin infections (n = 62; 75.6%) and moderate acne (n = 61; 72.4%). Over 80% of respondents were confident to prescribe amoxicillin (n = 73; 89%), trimethoprim (n = 72; 87.8%), amoxicillin and clavulanic acid (n = 70; 85.4%), flucloxacillin (n = 70; 85.4%) and cephalexin (n = 68; 82.9%). High levels of appropriate antibiotic prescribing were shown for uncomplicated UTI (97.2%), cellulitis (98.2%) and adolescent acne (100.0%). Conclusion This study identified key limited infections and antibiotics for which pharmacists were supportive and confident to prescribe. This role could lead to better use of antibiotics in the community and minimisation of resistance.

  11. Seasonality and physician-related factors associated with antibiotic prescribing: A cross-sectional study in Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Safaeian

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: These findings showed the widespread use of antibiotics by general practitioners that was associated with the physicians′ gender, time since graduation and practice location and also season of prescribing. More researches are needed on other factors related to the overprescribing of antibiotics and they could be used to project educational programs for improvement of antibiotic prescribing quality in our country.

  12. "What they see is what you get": Prescribing antibiotics for respiratory tract infections in primary care: Do high prescribers diagnose differently? An analysis of German routine data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueber, Susann; Kuehlein, Thomas; Gerlach, Roman; Tauscher, Martin; Schedlbauer, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Characteristics of high and low prescribers of antibiotics in German primary care were analysed using population data. We aimed to evaluate differences in prescribing rates and factors being associated with high prescribing, and whether high prescribers made the diagnosis of perceived bacterial infections more often. Routine data were provided by the Bavarian Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians. Routine data are delivered by primary care practices on a quarterly basis. We analysed data from 2011 and 2012. Patients older than 15 years with respiratory tract infections consulting a primary care physician were selected (6.647 primary care practices). Patient and physician characteristics associated with high prescribing were identified using stepwise logistic regression. Mean prescribing rate of antibiotics was 24.9%. Prescribing rate for high prescribers was 43.5% compared to 8.5% for low prescribers. High prescribers made the diagnosis of perceived bacterial infections more often (Mhigh = 64.5%, Mlow = 45.2%). In the adjusted regression model, perceived bacterial infections were strongly associated with high prescribing (OR = 13.9, 95% CI [10.2, 18.8]). Treating patients with comorbidities was associated with lower prescribing of antibiotics (OR = 0.6, 95% CI [0.4, 0.8]). High prescribers had a higher practice volume, a higher degree of prescribing dominance, and were situated more often in deprived areas and in rural settings. Compared to findings of studies in other European countries, prescribing rates were low. There was a considerable difference between prescribing rates of high and low prescribers. Diagnostic labelling was the best predictor for high prescribing. Current guidelines recommend considering antibiotic treatment for patients with co-morbidities. In our study, treating a large number of high-risk patients was not associated with high prescribing.

  13. Compliance with Recommendations on Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing for Respiratory Tract Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malo, Sara; Bjerrum, Lars; Feja, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate antibiotic use in primary care, such as in Respiratory Tract Infections (RTIs), is an important cause of bacterial resistance. This study aimed at describing the current pattern of outpatient antibiotic use in acute RTIs in Spain and evaluating adherence to national recommendations......%), whereas low rates were found in acute bronchitis (50%) and non-specific upper RTIs (24%) episodes. A high prescription of broad-spectrum agents and antibiotics not recommended as first choice was observed. In accordance with Spanish guidelines, there exists a potential over-prescribing of antibiotics...

  14. Dental care resistance prevention and antibiotic prescribing modification-the cluster-randomised controlled DREAM trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, Christin; Böhmer, Femke; Hornung, Anne; Lang, Hermann; Burmeister, Ulrike; Podbielski, Andreas; Wollny, Anja; Kundt, Günther; Altiner, Attila

    2014-02-22

    Bacterial resistance development is one of the most urgent problems in healthcare worldwide. In Europe, dentistry accounts for a comparatively high amount of antibiotic prescriptions. In light of increasing levels of bacterial resistance, this development is alarming. So far, very few interventional studies have been performed, and further research is urgently needed. By means of a complex educational intervention, the DREAM trial aims at optimising antibiotic prescribing behaviour of general dentists in Germany. This is a cluster-randomised controlled trial, where each cluster consists of one dental practice and all of its patients in a defined period. Participants are general dentists practicing in the German region of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania. Randomisation takes place after baseline data collection (6 months) and will be stratified by the antibiotic prescribing rates of the participating dental practices. Dentists randomised into the intervention group will participate in a complex small group educational seminar that aims at: increasing knowledge on bacterial resistance, pharmacology, and prophylaxis of infectious endocarditis; increasing awareness of dentist-patient communication using video-taped vignettes of dentist-patient communication on antibiotic treatment; improving collaboration between general dentists, general practitioners, and practice-based cardiologists on the necessity of antibiotic prophylaxis; enhancing awareness of the dentists' own prescribing habits by providing antibiotic prescribing feedback; and increasing patient knowledge on antibiotic treatment by providing patient-centred information material on antibiotic prophylaxis of endocarditis. The dentists randomised into the control group will not receive any educational programme and provide care as usual. Primary outcome is the overall antibiotic prescribing rate measured at T1 (period of six months after intervention). In a subgroup of adult patients affected by odontogenic

  15. Awareness of antibiotic resistance and antibiotic prescribing in UTI treatment: a qualitative study among primary care physicians in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkman, Ingeborg; Berg, Johanna; Viberg, Nina; Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia

    2013-03-01

    To improve education and information for general practitioners in relation to rational antibiotic prescribing for urinary tract infection (UTI), it is important to be aware of GPs' views of resistance and how it influences their choice of UTI treatment. The aim of this study was to explore variations in views of resistance and UTI treatment decisions among general practitioners (GPs) in a county in Sweden. Qualitative, semi-structured interviews were analysed with a phenomenographic approach and content analysis. Primary care in Kronoberg, a county in southern Sweden. Subjects. A purposeful sample of 20 GPs from 15 of 25 health centres in the county. The variation of perceptions of antibiotic resistance in UTI treatment. How UTIs were treated according to the GPs. Three different ways of viewing resistance in UTI treatment were identified. These were: (A) No problem, I have never seen resistance, (B) The problem is bigger somewhere else, and (C) The development of antibiotic resistance is serious and we must be careful. Moreover, GPs' perceptions of antibiotic resistance were mirrored in how they reported their treatment of UTIs in practice. There was a hierarchal scale of how GPs viewed resistance as an issue in UTI treatment. Only GPs who expressed concerns about resistance followed prescribing guidelines completely. This offers valuable insights into the planning and most likely the outcome of awareness or educational activities aimed at changed antibiotic prescribing behaviour.

  16. Prescribing prophylactic antibiotics to users of therapeutic contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomé-Campos, J; Quevedo-Junyent, L; Godoy-Barreda, N; Martínez-Salcedo, I; Romero-Aroca, P

    2013-03-01

    To describe the benefits and optimum use of prophylactic antibiotics in users of therapeutic contact lenses (TCL). A microbiological study was carried out on samples from 33 patients who continuously wore TCL. The resistance to antibiotics of bacteria isolated in our health region was also reviewed. An assessment was also made on whether there were microorganisms of a higher pathogenic potential in TCL than conventional contact lenses, as reported in the literature. No bacteria were isolated from 17 (52%) of the 33 lenses studied. From the 16 (48%) remaining lenses, coagulase negative Staphylococci were isolated from 10 (62%), Propionibacterium acnes from 4 (25%), and Corynebacterium from 2 (13%). The high number of negative cultures and the presence of saprophytic bacteria indicate that prophylactic antibiotic treatment is not precise. The most frequent pathogenic bacteria found in contact lenses are strongly resistant to the current commercially available antibiotics. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Antibiotic prescribing in patients with self-reported sore throat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehta, Nishchay; Schilder, Anne; Fragaszy, Ellen; E R Evans, Hannah; Dukes, Oliver; Manikam, Logan; Little, Paul; Smith, Sarah C; Hayward, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the predictors of general practitioner (GP) consultation and antibiotic use in those developing sore throat. METHODS: We conducted a prospective population-based cohort study on 4461 participants in two rounds (2010-11) from 1897 households. RESULTS: Participants reported

  18. Antibiotic prescribing and patient satisfaction in primary care in England: cross-sectional analysis of national patient survey data and prescribing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Mark; White, Patrick; Jongsma, Hannah; Schofield, Peter; Armstrong, David

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about adverse effects on patient satisfaction may be an important obstacle to attempts to curtail antibiotic prescribing. To determine the relationship between antibiotic prescribing in general practice and reported patient satisfaction. Retrospective cross-sectional study of general practices in England. Data were obtained from the General Practice Patient Survey (GPPS) in 2012 (2.7 million questionnaires in England; 982 999 responses; response rate 36%); the national Quality and Outcomes Framework dataset for England, 2011-2012 (8164 general practices); and general practice and demographic characteristics. Standardised measures of antibiotic prescribing volumes were obtained for each practice in England during 2012-2013, together with 12 other nationally available prescribing variables. The role of antibiotic prescribing volume was identified as a determinant of GPPS scores and adjusted for demographic and practice factors using multiple linear regression. The final dataset consisted of 7800 (95.5%) practices. A total of 33.7 million antibiotic prescriptions were issued to a registered population of 53.8 million patients. Antibiotic prescribing volume was a significant positive predictor of all 'doctor satisfaction' and 'practice satisfaction' scores in the GPPS, and was the strongest predictor of overall satisfaction out of 13 prescribing variables. A theoretical 25% reduction in antibiotic prescribing volume would be associated with 0.5-1.0% lower patient satisfaction scores, a drop of 3-6 centile points in national satisfaction ranking. Patients were less satisfied in practices with frugal antibiotic prescribing. A cautious approach to antibiotic prescribing may require a trade-off in terms of patient satisfaction. © British Journal of General Practice 2016.

  19. Antibiotic Prescribing in Long-Term Care Facilities: A Meta-synthesis of Qualitative Research

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming, Aoife; Bradley, Colin; Cullinan, Shane; Byrne, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this review was to synthesize the findings of qualitative studies investigating the factors influencing antibiotic prescribing in long-term care facilities (LTCFs). These findings will inform the development of future antimicrobial stewardship strategies (AMS) in this setting. Methods We searched Embase, PubMed, PsycInfo, Social Science Citations Index and Google Scholar for all qualitative studies investigating health care professionals? views on antibiotic prescr...

  20. Skin Infections and Antibiotic Stewardship: Analysis of Emergency Department Prescribing Practices, 2007-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Pallin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: National guidelines suggest that most skin abscesses do not require antibiotics, and that cellulitis antibiotics should target streptococci, not community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA. The objective of this study is to describe antimicrobial treatment of skin infections in U.S. emergency departments (EDs and analyze potential quality measures. Methods: The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS is a 4-stage probability sample of all non-federal U.S. ED visits. In 2007 NHAMCS started recording whether incision and drainage was performed at ED visits. We conducted a retrospective analysis, pooling 2007-2010 data, identified skin infections using diagnostic codes, and identified abscesses by performance of incision and drainage. We generated national estimates and 95% confidence intervals using weighted analyses; quantified frequencies and proportions; and evaluated antibiotic prescribing practices. We evaluated 4 parameters that might serve as quality measures of antibiotic stewardship, and present 2 of them as potentially robust enough for implementation. Results: Of all ED visits, 3.2% (95% confidence interval 3.1-3.4% were for skin infection, and 2.7% (2.6-2.9% were first visits for skin infection, with no increase over time (p=0.80. However, anti-CA-MRSA antibiotic use increased, from 61% (56-66% to 74% (71-78% of antibiotic regimens (p<0.001. Twenty-two percent of visits were for abscess, with a non-significant increase (p=0.06. Potential quality measures: Among discharged abscess patients, 87% were prescribed antibiotics (84-90%, overuse. Among antibiotic regimens for abscess patients, 84% included anti-CA-MRSA agents (81-89%, underuse. Conclusion: From 2007-2010, use of anti-CA-MRSA agents for skin infections increased significantly, despite stable visit frequencies. Antibiotics were over-used for discharged abscess cases, and CA-MRSA-active antibiotics were underused among regimens when antibiotics were used for

  1. Antibiotic prescribing in patients with acute rhinosinusitis is not in agreement with European recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lars Christian; Friis Christensen, Sarah; Cordoba Currea, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective. To assess the potential overprescribing in patients with acute rhinosinusitis across six countries with different antibiotic prescribing rates and different prevalence of antibiotic resistance. Design, setting and subjects. A cross-sectional study including GPs from two Nordic...... tract infections" (HAPPY AUDIT). Main outcome measures. Use of antibiotics for acute rhinosinusitis based on the recommendations in the European Position Paper on Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyps 2007 (EP3OS). Results. In total, 618 participating GPs registered 33 273 patients with RTI of whom 1150 (3...... overprescribing) and 23% had symptoms recommendations (EP3OS guidelines). To prevent overprescribing, efforts should be made to implement...

  2. Incidence, risk factors and treatment of diarrhoea among Dutch travellers: reasons not to routinely prescribe antibiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belderok, S.M.; van den Hoek, A.; Kint, J.A.; van der Loeff, M.F.S.; Sonder, G.J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Travellers' diarrhoea (TD) is the most common infectious disease among travellers. In the Netherlands, stand-by or prophylactic antibiotics are not routinely prescribed to travellers. This study prospectively assessed the incidence rate, risk factors, and treatment of TD among

  3. Improving appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing for lower respiratory tract infections. The physician's decision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, M.F.

    2013-01-01

    Stud­ies suggest that increasing appropriate use of antimicrobials leads to a reduced pressure on the development of antimicrobial resistance. In this thesis we evaluated several different strategies with the aim to improve the quality of antibiotic prescribing for community-acquired pneumonia

  4. Antibiotics prescribed before, during and after pregnancy in the Netherlands : a drug utilization study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Linda; Bos, H Jens; van Langen, Irene M; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T W; Bakker, Marian K

    2014-01-01

    PurposeTo describe the prescription of antibiotics before, during and after pregnancy, and the trends over a 16-year period in the Netherlands, and to determine whether they were prescribed according to national guidelines. MethodsThe IADB (http://iadb.nl) contains prescriptions dispensed by

  5. Incidence, risk factors and treatment of diarrhoea among Dutch travellers: reasons not to routinely prescribe antibiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belderok, Sanne-Meike; van den Hoek, Anneke; Kint, Joan A.; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.; Sonder, Gerard Jb

    2011-01-01

    Travellers' diarrhoea (TD) is the most common infectious disease among travellers. In the Netherlands, stand-by or prophylactic antibiotics are not routinely prescribed to travellers. This study prospectively assessed the incidence rate, risk factors, and treatment of TD among immunocompetent

  6. Dyspnea in Children as a Symptom of Acute Respiratory Tract Infections and Antibiotic Prescribing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Risteska-Nejashmikj

    2018-03-01

    CONCLUSION: Perceptions and the parent's attitudes do not correlate with the severity of clinical picture of the disease in children and lack of use Evidence-based medicine (EBM, insecurity, fear, loss of patients effect on antibiotic prescribing of the doctors.

  7. Microbiological point of care testing before antibiotic prescribing in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Steffen; Thomsen, Reimar W.; Bro, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Point-of-care testing (POCT) in primary care may improve rational antibiotic prescribing. We examined use of POCT in Denmark, including patient- and general practitioner (GP)-related predictors. METHODS: We linked nationwide health care databases to assess POCT use (C-reactive protein...... (CRP), group A streptococcal (GAS) antigen swabs, bacteriological cultures, and urine test strips) per 1,000 overall GP consultations, 2004-2013. We computed odds ratios (OR) of POCT in patients prescribed antibiotics according to patient and GP age and sex, GP practice type, location, and workload....... RESULTS: The overall use of POCT in Denmark increased by 45.8% during 2004-2013, from 147.2 per 1,000 overall consultations to 214.8. CRP tests increased by 132%, bacteriological cultures by 101.7% while GAS swabs decreased by 8.6%. POCT preceded 28% of antibiotic prescriptions in 2004 increasing to 44...

  8. Impact of a clinical guideline for prescribing antibiotics to inpatients reporting penicillin or cephalosporin allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Kimberly G; Shenoy, Erica S; Varughese, Christy A; Hurwitz, Shelley; Hooper, David C; Banerji, Aleena

    2015-10-01

    Self-reported penicillin allergy infrequently reflects an inability to tolerate penicillins. Inpatients reporting penicillin allergy receive alternative antibiotics that might be broader spectrum, more toxic, or less effective. To develop and assess a clinical guideline for the general inpatient provider that directs taking a history and prescribing antibiotics for patients with penicillin or cephalosporin allergy. A guideline was implemented to assist providers with assessing allergy history and prescribing antibiotics for patients with reported penicillin or cephalosporin allergy. The guideline used a standard 2-step graded challenge or test dose. A quasi-experimental study was performed to assess safety, feasibility, and impact on antibiotic use by comparing treatment 21 months before guideline implementation with 12 months after guideline implementation. Significantly more test doses to β-lactam antibiotics were performed monthly after vs before guideline implementation (median 14.5, interquartile range 13-16.25, vs 2, interquartile range 1-3.25, P  .5) between periods. Guideline-driven test doses decreased alternative antimicrobial therapy after the test dose, including vancomycin (68.3% vs 37.2%, P penicillin or cephalosporin allergy was associated with an almost 7-fold increase in the number of test doses to β-lactams without increased adverse drug reactions. Patients assessed with guideline-driven test doses were observed to have significantly decreased alternative antibiotic exposure. Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Appropriateness of Antibiotic Prescribing in U. S. Children’s Hospitals: A National Point Prevalence Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribble, Alison; Lee, Brian; Handy, Lori; Gerber, Jeffrey S; Hersh, Adam L; Kronman, Matthew; Terrill, Cindy; Newland, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Multiple studies estimate that inappropriate antibiotic prescribing ranges from 30–50% in hospitalized patients, but few have included pediatric patients. Pediatric studies characterizing inappropriate prescribing are needed to target and improve antimicrobial stewardship program (ASP) efforts. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of antimicrobial prescribing at 30 U.S. children’s hospitals. Participating hospitals were academic, tertiary care hospitals in the Sharing Antimicrobial Reports for Pediatric Stewardship (SHARPS) collaborative. Subjects were children 0–17 years with an active antibiotic order at 0800 on a single day during three consecutive calendar quarters (Q3 2016 – Q1 2017). Each hospital’s ASP used a standardized survey to collect data on antibiotic orders and evaluate appropriateness. Data were pooled from the three surveys. The primary outcome was the pooled estimate for the percentage of prescriptions classified as inappropriate. Secondary outcomes were pooled estimates for indication, reason for inappropriate use, and ASP review status for each antibiotic. Results Of 19,598 children hospitalized on survey days, 6,922 (35%) had ≥1 active antibiotic order. Median age of children receiving antibiotics was 3.7 years (0.5, 10.9). Figures 1 and 2 show the most common antibiotics and indications. Of all antibiotic orders, 1,514 (15%) were classified as inappropriate, and 19% of patients with antibiotic orders had at least one inappropriate order. The most common reasons for inappropriate use were bug-drug mismatch (26%), surgical prophylaxis > 24 hours (18%) and unnecessary duplicate therapy (12%). ASPs would not have routinely reviewed 50% of all inappropriate orders. An additional 22% of inappropriate orders were for antibiotics typically reviewed by ASPs, but were yet to be reviewed at the time of the survey. Conclusion Across 30 children’s hospitals, approximately 1 in 3 hospitalized children is receiving an antibiotic

  10. Development and Evaluation of an Ontology for Guiding Appropriate Antibiotic Prescribing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, E. Yoko; Kuperman, Gilad J.; Cimino, James J.; Bakken, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To develop and apply formal ontology creation methods to the domain of antimicrobial prescribing and to formally evaluate the resulting ontology through intrinsic and extrinsic evaluation studies. Methods We extended existing ontology development methods to create the ontology and implemented the ontology using Protégé-OWL. Correctness of the ontology was assessed using a set of ontology design principles and domain expert review via the laddering technique. We created three artifacts to support the extrinsic evaluation (set of prescribing rules, alerts and an ontology-driven alert module, and a patient database) and evaluated the usefulness of the ontology for performing knowledge management tasks to maintain the ontology and for generating alerts to guide antibiotic prescribing. Results The ontology includes 199 classes, 10 properties, and 1,636 description logic restrictions. Twenty-three Semantic Web Rule Language rules were written to generate three prescribing alerts: 1) antibiotic-microorganism mismatch alert; 2) medication-allergy alert; and 3) non-recommended empiric antibiotic therapy alert. The evaluation studies confirmed the correctness of the ontology, usefulness of the ontology for representing and maintaining antimicrobial treatment knowledge rules, and usefulness of the ontology for generating alerts to provide feedback to clinicians during antibiotic prescribing. Conclusions This study contributes to the understanding of ontology development and evaluation methods and addresses one knowledge gap related to using ontologies as a clinical decision support system component—a need for formal ontology evaluation methods to measure their quality from the perspective of their intrinsic characteristics and their usefulness for specific tasks. PMID:22019377

  11. [Reasons for inappropriate prescribing of antibiotics in a high-complexity pediatric hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruvinsky, Silvina; Mónaco, Andrea; Pérez, Guadalupe; Taicz, Moira; Inda, Laura; Kijko, Ivana; Constanzo, Patricia; Bologna, Rosa

    2011-12-01

    Determine the reasons for inappropriate prescription of antibiotics and identify opportunities to improve prescription of these drugs in pediatric patients hospitalized in intermediate and intensive care units. A prospective, descriptive longitudinal study was conducted of pediatric patients in intermediate and intensive care units who received parenteral administration of antibiotics, with the exception of newborns, burn unit patients, and surgical prophylaxis patients. A univariate analysis and multiple logistic regression were performed. A total of 376 patients with a median of age of 50 months were studied (interquartile range [IQR] 14.5-127 months). Out of the total patients studied, 75% had one or more underlying conditions. A total of 40.6% of these patients had an oncologic pathology and 33.5% had neurological conditions. The remaining 25.9% had other underlying conditions. Antibiotic treatment was inappropriate in 35.6% of the patients studied (N = 134). In 73 (54.4%) of the 134 cases, inappropriate use was due to the type of antibiotic prescribed, the dose administered, or the treatment period. The 61 (45.5%) remaining cases did not require antibiotic treatment. In the multivariate analysis, the risk factors for inappropriate use of antibiotics were: administration of ceftriaxone OR 2 (95% CI, 1.3-3.7; P = 0.02); acute lower respiratory tract infection OR 1.8 (95% CI, 1.1-3.3; P < 0.04); onset of fever of unknown origin in hospital inpatients OR 5.55 (95% CI, 2.5-12; P < 0.0001); and febrile neutropenia OR 0.3 (95% CI, 0.1-0.7; P = 0.009). Inappropriate use of antibiotics was less common in the clinical conditions that were well-characterized. Prescribing practices that could be improved were identified through the preparation and circulation of guidelines for antibiotic use in hospital inpatients.

  12. Factors influencing antibiotic prescribing habits and use of sensitivity testing amongst veterinarians in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    De Briyne, N.; Atkinson, J.; Pokludov?, L.; Borriello, S. P.; Price, S.

    2013-01-01

    The Heads of Medicines Agencies and the Federation of Veterinarians of Europe undertook a survey to gain a better insight into the decision-making process of veterinarians in Europe when deciding which antibiotics to prescribe. The survey was completed by 3004 practitioners from 25 European countries. Analysis was to the level of different types of practitioner (food producing (FP) animals, companion animals, equines) and country for Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Spain, Sweden and...

  13. Help-seeking and antibiotic prescribing for acute cough in a Chinese primary care population: a prospective multicentre observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Carmen Ka Man; Liu, Zhaomin; Butler, Chris C; Wong, Samuel Yeung Shan; Fung, Alice; Chan, Dicken; Yip, Benjamin Hon Kei; Kung, Kenny

    2016-01-21

    Acute cough is a common reason to prescribe antibiotics in primary care. This study aimed to explore help-seeking and antibiotic prescribing for acute cough in Chinese primary care population. This is a prospective multicentre observational study that included adults presenting with acute cough. Clinicians recorded patients' presenting symptoms, examination findings and medication prescription. Patients completed symptom diaries for up to 28 days by charting their symptom severity and recovery. Adjusted binary logistic regression models identified factors independently associated with antibiotic prescription. Primary care clinicians (n=19) recruited 455 patients. A total of 321 patients (70.5%) returned their completed symptom diaries. Concern about illness severity (41.6%) and obtaining a prescription for symptomatic medications (45.9%), rather than obtaining a prescription for antibiotics, were the main reasons for consulting. Antibiotics were prescribed for 6.8% (n=31) of patients, of which amoxicillin was the most common antimicrobial prescribed (61.3%), as it was associated with clinicians' perception of benefit from antibiotic treatment (odds ratio (OR): 25.9, 95% confidence interval (CI): 6.7-101.1), patients' expectation for antibiotics (OR: 5.1, 95% CI: 1.7-11.6), anticipation (OR: 5.1, 95% CI: 1.6-15.0) and request for antibiotics (OR 15.7, 95% CI: 5.0-49.4), as well as the severity of respiratory symptoms (cough, sputum, short of breath and wheeze OR: 2.7-3.7, all Pantibiotic prescription rates between private primary care clinicians and public primary care clinicians (17.4 vs 1.6%, P=0.00). Symptomatic medication was prescribed in 98.0% of patients. Mean recovery was 9 days for cough and 10 days for all symptoms, which was not significantly associated with antibiotic treatment. Although overall antibiotic-prescribing rates were low, there was a higher rate of antibiotic prescribing among private primary care clinicians, which warrants further

  14. National trends in ambulatory visits and antibiotic prescribing for skin and soft-tissue infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Adam L; Chambers, Henry F; Maselli, Judith H; Gonzales, Ralph

    2008-07-28

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has emerged as a common cause of skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs) in the United States. It is unknown whether this development has affected the national rate of visits to primary care practices and emergency departments (EDs) and whether changes in antibiotic prescribing have occurred. We examined visits by patients with SSTIs to physician offices, hospital outpatient departments, and EDs using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from 1997 to 2005. We estimated annual visit rates for all SSTIs and a subset classified as abscess/cellulitis. For abscess/cellulitis visits, we examined trends in characteristics of patients and clinical settings and in antibiotic prescribing. Overall rate of visits for SSTIs increased from 32.1 to 48.1 visits per 1000 population (50%; P = .003 for trend), reaching 14.2 million by 2005. More than 95% of this change was attributable to visits for abscess/cellulitis, which increased from 17.3 to 32.5 visits per 1000 population (88% increase; P trend). The largest relative increases occurred in EDs (especially in high safety-net-status EDs and in the South), among black patients, and among patients younger than 18 years. Use of antibiotics recommended for CA-MRSA increased from 7% to 28% of visits (P < .001) during the study period. Independent predictors of treatment with these antibiotics included being younger than 45 years, living in the South, and an ED setting. The incidence of SSTIs has rapidly increased nationwide in the CA-MRSA era and appears to disproportionately affect certain populations. Although physicians are beginning to modify antibiotic prescribing practices, opportunities for improvement exist, targeting physicians caring for patients who are at high risk.

  15. Trends in broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing for children with acute otitis media in the United States, 1998–2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gambler Angela S

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overuse of broad-spectrum antibiotics is associated with antibiotic resistance. Acute otitis media (AOM is responsible for a large proportion of antibiotics prescribed for US children. Rates of broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing for AOM are unknown. Methods Analysis of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 1998 to 2004 (N = 6,878. Setting is office-based physicians, hospital outpatient departments, and emergency departments. Patients are children aged 12 years and younger prescribed antibiotics for acute otitis media. Main outcome measure is percentage of broad-spectrum antibiotics, defined as amoxicillin/clavulanate, macrolides, cephalosporins and quinolones. Results Broad-spectrum prescribing for acute otitis media increased from 34% of visits in 1998 to 45% of visits in 2004 (P Conclusion Prescribing of broad-spectrum antibiotics for acute otitis media has steadily increased from 1998 to 2004. Associations with non-clinical factors suggest potential for improvement in prescribing practice.

  16. Pharmacodynamic evaluation of commonly prescribed oral antibiotics against respiratory bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pignatari Antonio CC

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Upper and lower respiratory tract infections (RTIs account for a substantial portion of outpatient antibiotic utilization. However, the pharmacodynamic activity of commonly used oral antibiotic regimens has not been studied against clinically relevant pathogens. The objective of this study was to assess the probability of achieving the requisite pharmacodynamic exposure for oral antibacterial regimens commonly prescribed for RTIs in adults against bacterial isolates frequently involved in these processes (S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, and M. catharralis. Methods Using a 5000-subject Monte Carlo simulation, the cumulative fractions of response (CFR, (i.e., probabilities of achieving requisite pharmacodynamic targets for the most commonly prescribed oral antibiotic regimens, as determined by a structured survey of medical prescription patterns, were assessed against local respiratory bacterial isolates from adults in São Paulo collected during the same time period. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of 230 isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae (103, Haemophilus influenzae (98, and Moraxella catharralis (29 from a previous local surveillance were used. Results The most commonly prescribed antibiotic regimens were azithromycin 500 mg QD, amoxicillin 500 mg TID, and levofloxacin 500 mg QD, accounting for 58% of the prescriptions. Varied doses of these agents, plus gatifloxacin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, moxifloxacin, and cefaclor made up the remaining regimens. Utilizing aggressive pharmacodynamic exposure targets, the only regimens to achieve greater than 90% CFR against all three pathogens were amoxicillin/amoxicillin-clavulanate 500 mg TID (> 91%, gatifloxacin 400 mg QD (100%, and moxifloxacin 400 mg QD (100%. Considering S. pneumoniae isolates alone, azithromycin 1000 mg QD also achieved greater than 90% CFR (91.3%. Conclusions The only regimens to achieve high CFR against all three pathogen populations in both scenarios

  17. The influence of a sustained multifaceted approach to improve antibiotic prescribing in Slovenia during the past decade: findings and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürst, Jurij; Čižman, Milan; Mrak, Jana; Kos, Damjan; Campbell, Stephen; Coenen, Samuel; Gustafsson, Lars L; Fürst, Luka; Godman, Brian

    2015-02-01

    Rising antibiotic resistance has become an increasing public health problem. There is a well-established correlation between antibiotic consumption and antimicrobial resistance. Consequently, measures to rationalize the prescribing of antibiotics should reduce the resistant strains. Following a 24% increase in antibiotic consumption at the end of the 1990s, multiple activities were designed and introduced by the Health Insurance Institute of Slovenia (ZZZS) and other organizations in Slovenia at the end of 1999. These activities reduced the antibiotic consumption by 18.7% by 2002. These measures have continued. To study changes in antibiotic utilization from 1995 to 2012 alongside the multiple interventions and their consequences, including changes in resistance patterns. This was a retrospective observational study involving all patients dispensed at least one ZZZS prescription for an antibiotic in Slovenia. Utilization was expressed in defined daily doses per thousand inhabitants per day. Multifaceted interventions were conducted over time involving all key stakeholder groups, that is, the Ministry of Health, ZZZS, physician groups and patients. These included comprehensive communication programs as well as prescribing restrictions for a number of antibiotics and classes. From 1999 to 2012, antibiotic consumption decreased by 2-9% per year, with an overall decrease of 31%. There were also appreciable structural changes. Overall antibiotic utilization and the utilization of 7 out of 10 antibiotics significantly decreased after multiple interventions. The resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae to penicillin decreased in line with decreased utilization. However, its resistance to macrolides increased from 5.4 to 21% despite halving of its utilization. The resistance of Escherichia coli to fluoroquinolones doubled from 10 to 21% despite utilization decreasing by a third. Expenditures on antibiotics decreased by 53%. Multiple demand-side measures introduced following

  18. Factors influencing antibiotic prescribing habits and use of sensitivity testing amongst veterinarians in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Briyne, N; Atkinson, J; Pokludová, L; Borriello, S P; Price, S

    2013-11-16

    The Heads of Medicines Agencies and the Federation of Veterinarians of Europe undertook a survey to gain a better insight into the decision-making process of veterinarians in Europe when deciding which antibiotics to prescribe. The survey was completed by 3004 practitioners from 25 European countries. Analysis was to the level of different types of practitioner (food producing (FP) animals, companion animals, equines) and country for Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Spain, Sweden and the UK. Responses indicate no single information source is universally considered critical, though training, published literature and experience were the most important. Factors recorded which most strongly influenced prescribing behaviour were sensitivity tests, own experience, the risk for antibiotic resistance developing and ease of administration. Most practitioners usually take into account responsible use warnings. Antibiotic sensitivity testing is usually performed where a treatment failure has occurred. Significant differences were observed in the frequency of sensitivity testing at the level of types of practitioners and country. The responses indicate a need to improve sensitivity tests and services, with the availability of rapid and cheaper testing being key factors.

  19. Antibiotic Prescribing Habits of Dental Surgeons in Hyderabad City, India, for Pulpal and Periapical Pathologies: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Pavan Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine the antibiotic prescribing habits for pulpal and periapical pathology among dentists in Hyderabad city, India. Methodology. A total of 246 questionnaires were distributed to all the dentists registered with the local dental branch. Demographic details and questions regarding type and dosage of antibiotics prescribed for allergic and nonallergic patients were recorded. Inferential statistics were performed, and P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. The response rate for the study was 87.8%. Around 148 (68.5% of respondents regularly prescribed antibiotics for endodontic management. The first antibiotic of choice for patients with no history of medical allergies was a combination of amoxicillin and metronidazole, followed by amoxicillin alone (29.1%. The first antibiotic of choice in case of allergy to penicillin was erythromycin. Necrotic pulp with acute apical periodontitis with swelling and moderate/severe preoperative symptom was the condition most commonly identified for antibiotic therapy (92.1%. Conclusion. The present study reveals that the overall antibiotic prescribing practices among this group of dentists were quite high, and there is a need for more educational initiatives to rationalize the use of antibiotics in dentistry.

  20. Ten years of antibiotic consumption in ambulatory care: Trends in prescribing practice and antibiotic resistance in Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apfalter Petra

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primary aims of this study were (i to determine the quantity and pattern of antibiotic use in Austria between 1998 and 2007 and (ii to analyze antibiotic resistance rates in relation to antibiotic consumption in important clinical situations in order to provide data for empirical therapeutic regimens for key indications. Methods Consumption data and resistance data were obtained via the Austrian surveillance networks European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System (EARSS and European Surveillance on Antimicrobial Consumption (ESAC. The EARSS collects data on isolates from blood and cerebrospinal fluid obtained predominantly in the hospital setting. The Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC classification and the Defined Daily Dose (DDD measurement units were assigned to the data. The number of DDDs and packages per 1,000 inhabitants (PID were used to calculate the level of antibiotic consumption. Antibiotic resistance was expressed in resistance rates, i.e., the percentage of resistant isolates compared to all isolates of one bacterial species. Results The overall antibiotic consumption measured in DIDs increased by 10% between 1998 and 2007, whereas PIDs decreased by 3%. The consumption of substances within the drug utilization 90% segment (measured in PID increased for ciprofloxacin (+118.9, clindamycin (+76.3, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (+61.9%, cefpodoxime (+31.6, azithromycin (+24.7; and decreased for erythromycin (-79.5%, trimethoprim (-56,1%, norfloxacin (-48.8%, doxycycline (-44.6, cefaclor (-35.1%, penicillin (-34.0%, amoxicillin (-22.5, minocycline (-21.9% and clarithromycin (-9.9%. Starting in 2001, an increase in the percentage of invasive E. coli isolates resistant to aminopenicillins (from 35% to 53%, fluoroquinolones (from 7% to 25.5% and third-generation cephalosporins (from 0% to 8.8% was observed. The percentage of nonsusceptible or intermediate penicillin-resistant pneumococcal isolates remained

  1. Occurrence and fate of most prescribed antibiotics in different water environments of Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Roya; Yunesian, Masud; Nasseri, Simin; Gholami, Mitra; Jalilzadeh, Esfandiyar; Shoeibi, Shahram; Mesdaghinia, Alireza

    2018-04-01

    The presence of most prescribed antibiotic compounds from four therapeutic classes (β-lactam, cephalosporins, macrolides, fluoroquinolones) were studied at two full-scale WWTPs, two rivers, thirteen groundwater resources, and five water treatment plants in Tehran. Analytical methodology was based on high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry after solid-phase extraction. Samples were collected at 33 sample locations on three sampling periods over four months from June to August 2016. None of the target antibiotics were detected in groundwater resources and water treatment plants, while seven out of nine target antibiotics were analyzed in two studied river waters as well as the influent and effluent of wastewater treatment plants at concentrations ranging from WWTP A, whereas cephalosporins including cephalexin (523.3-977.7ng/L) and cefixime (278.65 to 422.1ng/L) were the most abundant detected antibiotics in the influent and effluent of WWTP B. Aqueous phase removal efficiencies were assessed and ranged from 339.83% to 100% for the seven detected antibiotics. "Negative removals" were observed for erythromycin, azithromycin, and cefixime due to the deconjugation of conjugated metabolites via biological transformation in the studied WWTPs. From a statistical point of view, significant differences (pantibiotics in the two studied river waters. Statistical results revealed that there were significant differences in the concentrations of ciprofloxacin, azithromycin, and erythromycin (pWWTP effluent) and Kan River (non-receiving WWTP effluent) which demonstrated that WWTPs discharges could be an important source of antibiotics being released in water bodies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Antibiotic prescribing for acute lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) - guideline adherence in the German primary care setting: An analysis of routine data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Eva Maria; Pelzl, Steffen; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Laux, Gunter

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic overprescribing in primary care has major impacts on the development of antibiotic resistance. The objective of this study is to provide insight in antibiotics prescriptions for patients suffering from cough, acute bronchitis or community acquired pneumonia in primary care. Data from 2009 to 2013 of electronic health records of 12,880 patients in Germany were obtained from a research database. The prescription of antibiotics for acute lower respiratory tract infections was compared to the national S3 guideline cough from the German Society of General Practitioners and Family Medicine. Antibiotics were prescribed in 41% of consultations. General practitioners' decision of whether or not to prescribe an antibiotic was congruent with the guideline in 52% of consultations and the antibiotic choice congruence was 51% of antibiotic prescriptions. Hence, a congruent prescribing decision and a prescription of recommendation was found in only 25% of antibiotic prescriptions. Split by diagnosis we found that around three quarters of antibiotics prescribed for cough (73%) and acute bronchitis (78%) were not congruent to the guidelines. In contrast to that around one quarter of antibiotics prescribed for community acquired pneumonia (28%) were not congruent to the guidelines. Our results show that there is a big gap between guideline recommendation and actual prescribing, in the decision to prescribe and the choice of antibiotic agent. This gap could be closed by periodic quality circles on antibiotic prescribing for GPs.

  3. Incidence, risk factors and treatment of diarrhoea among Dutch travellers: reasons not to routinely prescribe antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belderok, Sanne-Meike; van den Hoek, Anneke; Kint, Joan A; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F; Sonder, Gerard Jb

    2011-10-29

    Travellers' diarrhoea (TD) is the most common infectious disease among travellers. In the Netherlands, stand-by or prophylactic antibiotics are not routinely prescribed to travellers. This study prospectively assessed the incidence rate, risk factors, and treatment of TD among immunocompetent travellers. Persons who attended the travel clinic of the Public Health Service Amsterdam in 2006-2007 before short-term travel to tropical and subtropical countries were invited to answer a questionnaire regarding sociodemographics and travel purpose; they were also asked to keep a daily structured travel diary, recording their itinerary, symptoms, and self-medication or consultation with a doctor. Diarrhoea episodes containing blood or mucous were considered severe. Of 1202 travellers, the median age was 38 years, and the median travel duration 3 weeks. Of all episodes, 96% were mild. The median duration of TD was 2 days and significantly shorter in subsequent episodes compared to first episodes (p sex, a Western country of birth, and tourism as the purpose of travel. The lowest risk was in travellers to South America. An independent risk factor for subsequent episodes was female sex. In total, 5% of travellers used antibiotics; of those, 92% had mild diarrhoea, and 53% received antibiotics over the counter. TD is common among travellers, but the overall course is mild, not requiring treatment. The incidence rates for first and second episodes are comparable. Female sex is a risk factor for the first episode, as well as subsequent ones. Prescription antibiotics are not needed in short-term healthy travellers.

  4. Reducing early career general practitioners' antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections: a pragmatic prospective non-randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Parker; Tapley, Amanda; Morgan, Simon; Davis, Joshua S; McElduff, Patrick; Yardley, Lucy; Henderson, Kim; Dallas, Anthea; McArthur, Lawrie; Mulquiney, Katie; Davey, Andrew; Little, Paul; Spike, Neil; van Driel, Mieke L

    2018-01-16

    Inappropriate antibiotic prescription and consequent antibacterial resistance is a major threat to healthcare. To evaluate the efficacy of a multifaceted intervention in reducing early career general practitioners' (GPs') antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) and acute bronchitis/bronchiolitis. A pragmatic non-randomized trial employing a non-equivalent control group design nested within an existing cohort study of GP registrars' (trainees') clinical practice. The intervention included access to online modules (covering the rationale of current clinical guidelines recommending non-prescription of antibiotics for URTI and bronchitis/bronchiolitis, and communication skills in management of acute bronchitis) followed by a face-to-face educational session. The intervention was delivered to registrars (and their supervisors) in two of Australia's seventeen regional GP training providers (RTPs). Three other RTPs were the control group. Outcomes were proportion of registrars' URTI consultations and bronchitis/bronchiolitis consultations prescribed antibiotics. Intention-to-treat analyses employed logistic regression within a Generalised Estimating Equation framework, adjusted for relevant independent variables. The predictors of interest were time; treatment group; and an interaction term for time-by-treatment group. The P value associated with an interaction term determined statistically significant differences in antibiotic prescribing. Analyses include data of 217 intervention RTPs' and 311 control RTPs' registrars. There was no significant reduction in antibiotic prescribing for URTIs. For bronchitis/bronchiolitis, a significant reduction (interaction P value = 0.024) remained true for analysis adjusted for independent variables (P value = 0.040). The adjusted absolute reduction in prescribing was 15.8% (95% CI: 4.2%-27.5%). A multifaceted intervention reduced antibiotic prescribing for bronchitis/bronchiolitis but not URTIs. © The

  5. The prevalence of prescribing antibiotics by primary health care physicians in Turkey: A multi-centered survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acimis, N.M.; Yazici, A.C.; Gocmen, L.; Mas, R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Antibiotics are widely used in the treatment of infections and for empirical treatment purposes. Despite this common consumption of antibiotics, it is difficult to state that antibiotics are chosen and used consciously. This study was planned to determine the prevalence of prescribing antibiotics in Turkey. Methodology: This cross-sectional study was conducted in November 2003. The study was carried out in a total of 46 primary care health centers of the following cities; Central Anatolian, Western Anatolian, Eastern Anatolian regions. Results: Two hundred sixty seven physicians participated in the study, 38.9% (104) of which were women and 61.1% (163) were men. The proportion of antibiotic prescription was by 22,6%, and the most frequently chosen antibiotics were 15.6% (3301) Amoxycilline + Clavulanic acid (Amox/Clav), 15.1% (3184) Ampicilline + Sulbactam 12.84% (2711), respectively. When prescriptions with antibiotics were evaluated according to diagnosis, the most frequent diagnoses were found to be as follows: 53.3% (11430) Acute Upper Respiratory Infections, 16.4% (3516) Urinary Tract Infections. Conclusions: The findings of the study suggest that primary health care physicians most often prescribe for acute respiratory tract infections, and prescribe Amoxycilline + Clavunic the most. It may be argued that more extensive studies are needed in this field. (author)

  6. Antibiotic prescribing on admission to patients with pneumonia and prior outpatient antibiotic treatment: a cohort study on clinical outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Garde, Ewoudt M. W.; Natsch, Stephanie; Prins, Jan M.; van der Linden, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Most pneumonia treatment guidelines recommend that prior outpatient antibiotic treatment should be considered when planning inpatient antibiotic regimen. Our purpose was to study in patients admitted for community-acquired pneumonia the mode of continuing antibiotic treatment at the

  7. Antibiotic prescribing on admission to patients with pneumonia and prior outpatient antibiotic treatment : A cohort study on clinical outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van De Garde, Ewoudt M W; Natsch, Stephanie; Prins, Jan M.; Van Der Linden, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Most pneumonia treatment guidelines recommend that prior outpatient antibiotic treatment should be considered when planning inpatient antibiotic regimen. Our purpose was to study in patients admitted for community-acquired pneumonia the mode of continuing antibiotic treatment at the

  8. Factors Influencing Patterns of Antibiotic Prescribing in Primary Health Care Centers in the Savodjbolaq District During 2012-13: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh. Karimi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Inappropriate prescribing of antibiotics is one of the main reasons for antibiotic resistance in the world which has an increasing pressure and cost on health system and also household economy. The present study aimed to determine the pattern of antibiotic prescribing and related it,s factors in health centers. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional design, 1068 random prescriptions of General Physicians (GPs who work in Savodjbolaq Health Centers were studied. Variables included age, gender of patients and physicians, frequency of antibiotic prescribing, rate of combination therapy, methods of prescribing, type of patient’s insurance booklet and seasons. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS version 18 software. Results: More than half of prescriptions (56.8% included at least one antibiotics. One in every four prescriptions had some sort of antibiotic combination therapy. According to the scientific criteria, 57.1% of antibiotics were prescribed inappropriately. among these criteria, the highest error belongs to doses per day with 67.72%. Frequency of antibiotic prescribing based on age, gender, type of patient’s insurance booklet, physicians experience, different seasons was significantly different (p<0.05. Conclusions: Combination therapy and unscientific prescribing of antibiotics for youths are concern for public health and household economy. Review of protocols and methods of supervision, Changes in purchasing medical services, Design and implementation of operational and targeted educational interventions, Training physicians emphasizing on logical aspects of antibiotic prescription and prescribing skills, are recommended.  

  9. Incidence, risk factors and treatment of diarrhoea among Dutch travellers: reasons not to routinely prescribe antibiotics

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    Belderok Sanne-Meike

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Travellers' diarrhoea (TD is the most common infectious disease among travellers. In the Netherlands, stand-by or prophylactic antibiotics are not routinely prescribed to travellers. This study prospectively assessed the incidence rate, risk factors, and treatment of TD among immunocompetent travellers. Methods Persons who attended the travel clinic of the Public Health Service Amsterdam in 2006-2007 before short-term travel to tropical and subtropical countries were invited to answer a questionnaire regarding sociodemographics and travel purpose; they were also asked to keep a daily structured travel diary, recording their itinerary, symptoms, and self-medication or consultation with a doctor. Diarrhoea episodes containing blood or mucous were considered severe. Results Of 1202 travellers, the median age was 38 years, and the median travel duration 3 weeks. Of all episodes, 96% were mild. The median duration of TD was 2 days and significantly shorter in subsequent episodes compared to first episodes (p Conclusions TD is common among travellers, but the overall course is mild, not requiring treatment. The incidence rates for first and second episodes are comparable. Female sex is a risk factor for the first episode, as well as subsequent ones. Prescription antibiotics are not needed in short-term healthy travellers.

  10. Focus on early-career GPs: qualitative evaluation of a multi-faceted educational intervention to improve antibiotic prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckx, Laura; Anthierens, Sibyl; Magin, Parker J; Morgan, Simon; McArthur, Lawrie; Yardley, Lucy; Dallas, Anthea; Little, Paul; van Driel, Mieke L

    2018-01-16

    We conducted an educational intervention emphasizing rational antibiotic prescribing in early-career General Practitioners (GP) in vocational training (trainees). The intervention consisted of an online introduction module, an online communication training module, face-to-face workshops, and cases to be discussed one-on-one by the trainee-supervisor dyad during regular scheduled education sessions. To explore the participants' experiences with the intervention. A qualitative study of 14 GP trainees and supervisors. Interviews followed a semi-structured interview guide, were transcribed and analysed using concurrent thematic analysis. Overall, the intervention was well received. Resources were not often used in practice, but GP trainees used the information in communicating with patients. The intervention improved trainees' confidence and provided new communication strategies, e.g. explicitly asking about patients' expectations and talking patients through the examination to form an overall clinical picture. Trainees seemed eager to learn and adapt their practice, whereas GP supervisors rather commented that the intervention was reinforcing. None of the participants reported prescribing conflicts between trainee and supervisor. However, most participants identified conflicts within the GP practice or with specialists: other doctors who prescribe more antibiotics perpetuate patients' ideas that antibiotics will fix everything, which in turn causes conflict with the patient and undermines attempts to improve antibiotic prescribing. The educational intervention was received positively. Early-career GPs thought it influenced their prescribing behaviour and improved their confidence in non-prescribing. Interventions that target teams (e.g. entire practice) could minimize conflict, ensure consistency of messages and support overall antibiotic stewardship in primary care. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please

  11. Behavioral Economics Interventions to Improve Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing for Acute Respiratory Infections: a Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Cynthia L; Zangwill, Kenneth M; Hay, Joel W; Meeker, Daniella; Doctor, Jason N

    2018-05-08

    Behavioral economics interventions have been shown to effectively reduce the rates of inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions for acute respiratory infections (ARIs). To determine the cost-effectiveness of three behavioral economic interventions designed to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions for ARIs. Thirty-year Markov model from the US societal perspective with inputs derived from the literature and CDC surveillance data. Forty-five-year-old adults with signs and symptoms of ARI presenting to a healthcare provider. (1) Provider education on guidelines for the appropriate treatment of ARIs; (2) Suggested Alternatives, which utilizes computerized clinical decision support to suggest non-antibiotic treatment choices in lieu of antibiotics; (3) Accountable Justification, which mandates free-text justification into the patient's electronic health record when antibiotics are prescribed; and (4) Peer Comparison, which sends a periodic email to prescribers about his/her rate of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing relative to clinician colleagues. Discounted costs, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. Each intervention has lower costs but higher QALYs compared to provider education. Total costs for each intervention were $178.21, $173.22, $172.82, and $172.52, and total QALYs were 14.68, 14.73, 14.74, and 14.74 for the control, Suggested Alternatives, Accountable Justification, and Peer Comparison groups, respectively. Results were most sensitive to the quality-of-life of the uninfected state, and the likelihood and costs for antibiotic-associated adverse events. Behavioral economics interventions can be cost-effective strategies for reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions by reducing healthcare resource utilization.

  12. Antibiotic-prescribing habits among Norwegian dentists: a survey over 25 years (1990-2015).

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    Preus, Hans R; Fredriksen, Karen W; Vogsland, Andrea E; Sandvik, Leiv; Grytten, Jostein I

    2017-08-01

    Bacterial antibiotic resistance is a steadily growing global problem, which today is compared with issues such as global warming, ozone depletion, and extinction of species. Consequently, calls come from global, Pan-European, and national authorities to gain insight into, limit, and stringently qualify the use of antibiotics in human and veterinary medicine, as well as in food production. Dentists are not considered to be frequent prescribers of antibiotics. However, few studies have identified how much, and in which situations, dentists prescribe such drugs. The aims of the present study were to survey Norwegian dentists' antibiotic-prescribing habits in 2015 and to compare the findings with previous studies (1990 and 2004) and with the actual numbers of dispensed prescriptions obtained from the 'Norwegian National Prescription Register'. The results from 1990 to 2004 show that there was a general increase in antibiotic prescriptions by Norwegian dentists, followed by a reduction or flattening of the prescription volume curve from 2004 to 2015. Despite this, possibilities for further improvements have been identified and recommendations given for targeted campaigns to reduce the prescription volume in dentistry by a further 30%, which has been ordered by the Norwegian National Assembly. © 2017 Eur J Oral Sci.

  13. Knowledge and Attitude of Physicians toward Prescribing Antibiotics and the Risk of Resistance in Two Reference Hospitals

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    Adel Alothman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Antibiotics are essential and abundantly prescribed in hospitals because of their effectiveness and lifesaving benefits. However, the unnecessary use of antibiotics has been observed in earlier studies, and it has persisted through recent years as a major issue since it is one of the leading causes of antibiotic resistance. The increase in antibiotic resistance nowadays is one of the most critical concerns in global public health around the world. The objective of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and perceptions related to antibiotic prescription among physicians at our medical centers. Method A cross-sectional survey of non-infectious diseases specialized physicians. The study was conducted during 2015 at two tertiary care centers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Result Of the 107 returned questionnaires, 93 were complete and valuable. Most respondents (82% perceived antibiotic resistance to be a critical problem globally, and 78% also think that it is a very important national problem. These attitudes did not differ across specialty or level of training. Widespread antibiotic use and inappropriate empirical choices were believed by 81% of the participants to be important general causes of resistance. Only half of respondents thought that antibiotic restriction is a useful intervention to decrease the antibiotic resistance. The physicians believed educational interventions are the most useful and effective way to improve prescription patterns and decrease antibiotic resistance. Complications due to infection with resistant organisms were acknowledged by almost all of the participants, with some differences in their estimations of how often it will occur. Conclusion Antimicrobial resistance, globally and nationally, is considered as a serious threat, and physicians in this survey acknowledged that. Among the most significant factors is antimicrobial misuse, either by overprescribing or providing inappropriate drugs with some

  14. Cost-effectiveness of point-of-care C-reactive protein testing to inform antibiotic prescribing decisions

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    Oppong, Raymond; Jit, Mark; Smith, Richard D; Butler, Christopher C; Melbye, Hasse; Mölstad, Sigvard; Coast, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Background Point-of-care C-reactive protein (POCCRP) is a biomarker of inflammation that offers clinicians a rapid POC test to guide antibiotic prescribing decisions for acute cough and lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI). However, evidence that POCCRP is cost-effective is limited, particularly outside experimental settings. Aim To assess the cost-effectiveness of POCCRP as a diagnostic tool for acute cough and LRTI from the perspective of the health service. Design and setting Observational study of the presentation, management, and outcomes of patients with acute cough and LRTI in primary care settings in Norway and Sweden. Method Using hierarchical regression, data were analysed in terms of the effect on antibiotic use, cost, and patient outcomes (symptom severity after 7 and 14 days, time to recovery, and EQ-5D), while controlling for patient characteristics (self-reported symptom severity, comorbidities, and health-related quality of life) at first attendance. Results POCCRP testing is associated with non-significant positive reductions in antibiotic prescribing (P = 0.078) and increased cost (P = 0.092). Despite the uncertainty, POCCRP testing is also associated with a cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gain of €9391. At a willingness-to-pay threshold of €30 000 per QALY gained, there is a 70% probability of CRP being cost-effective. Conclusion POCCRP testing is likely to provide a cost-effective diagnostic intervention both in terms of reducing antibiotic prescribing and in terms of QALYs gained. PMID:23834883

  15. E-learning on antibiotic prescribing-the role of autonomous motivation in participation: a prospective cohort study.

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    Caris, Martine G; Sikkens, Jonne J; Kusurkar, Rashmi A; van Agtmael, Michiel A

    2018-05-10

    E-learning is increasingly used in education on antimicrobial stewardship, but participation rates are often low. Insight into factors that affect participation is therefore needed. Autonomous motivation is associated with higher achievements in medical education and could also play a role in e-learning participation. We therefore aimed to investigate the role of residents' autonomous motivation in their participation in e-learning on antibiotic prescribing. We performed a multicentre cohort study in two academic and two teaching hospitals. Residents who filled out questionnaires on antibiotic knowledge, the perceived importance of antibiotics and motivation [Self-Regulation Questionnaire - Academic (SRQ-a)] received e-learning access. We used the SRQ-a to calculate relative autonomous motivation (RAM), an index that estimates the amount of autonomous motivation compared with the amount of controlled motivation. We then analysed associations between RAM and participation in e-learning with logistic regression. Eighty-six residents participated (74% female, mean age 30 years). Overall e-learning participation was 58% (n = 50). Participation was 41% in residents with negative RAM (i.e. more controlled motivation) and 62% in residents with positive RAM (i.e. more autonomous motivation). RAM was positively associated with participation, adjusted for residency in an academic hospital (adjusted OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.5-4.6). Participation in non-obligatory e-learning on antibiotic prescribing is higher in residents with more autonomous motivation. Interventions to increase autonomous motivation could improve participation. Preceding e-learning on antibiotic prescribing with face-to-face education, to explain the importance of the subject, could enhance autonomous motivation and thus optimize e-learning efficiency.

  16. Prescriber and Patient Responsibilities in Treatment of Acute Respiratory Tract Infections — Essential for Conservation of Antibiotics

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    Antonio C. Pignatari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Inappropriate antibiotic use in normally self-limiting acute respiratory tract infections (RTIs, such as sore throat and the common cold, is a global problem and an important factor for increasing levels of antibiotic resistance. A new group of international experts—the Global Respiratory Infection Partnership (GRIP—is committed to addressing this issue, with the interface between primary care practitioners and their patients as their core focus. To combat the overuse of antibiotics in the community, and facilitate a change from prescribing empiric antibiotic treatment towards cautious deferment combined with symptomatic relief, there is a need to introduce and enhance evidence-based dialogue between primary care practitioners and their patients. Communication with patients should focus on the de-medicalisation of self-limiting viral infections, which can be achieved via a coherent globally endorsed framework outlining the rationale for appropriate antibiotic use in acute RTIs in the context of antibiotic stewardship and conservancy. The planned framework is intended to be adaptable at a country level to reflect local behaviours, cultures and healthcare systems, and has the potential to serve as a model for change in other therapeutic areas.

  17. Compliance to guidelines for the prescribing of antibiotics in acute infections at Namibia's national referral hospital: a pilot study and the implications.

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    Nakwatumbah, S; Kibuule, D; Godman, B; Haakuria, V; Kalemeera, F; Baker, A; Mubita, M

    2017-07-01

    Sub-optimal antibiotic prescribing remains a public health concern in Namibia. The objective was to determine the level and predictors of compliance to guidelines in the prescribing of antibiotics in acute infections at a national referral hospital in Namibia to improve future prescribing. An analytical cross-sectional survey design. The clinical records of patients receiving care were reviewed. Prescribing practices were assessed using a self- administered questionnaire with reference to Namibia Standard Treatment Guidelines (NSTG). The majority of prescriptions (62%) complied with the NSTGs; however, lower than national targets (95%). Most prescriptions were empiric and prescribers typically made reference to the NSTG (58%). Diagnosed infections were principally respiratory infections (58%) and penicillins were the most used antibiotics. Good concurrence between signs and symptoms with the diagnosis indicated on the prescription - OR=5.2 (95% CI: 1.4, 19.2), a diagnosis of upper respiratory tract (p=0.001), oral-dental OR=0.1(95% CI: 0.03,0.3) and urogenital infections OR=0.3(95% CI: 0.1,0.95) and the prescribing of penicillins (p=0.001) or combination antibiotics and amphenicols were independent predictors of compliance to the NSTGs. The main behaviours associated with antibiotic prescribing were patient influences, clinical state, and access to guidelines. Compliance with NSTGs is suboptimal. Prescribing of combination antibiotics, penicillins and diagnosis of oral dental, genitourinary and ear, nose and throat infections were important predictors for NSTG compliance. There is a need to implement antibiotic indicators and stewardship programmes, and ensure access to NSTGs, to improve future antibiotic prescribing in Namibia.

  18. A survey of primary care physician practices in antibiotic prescribing for the treatment of uncomplicated male gonoccocal urethritis

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    Blanchon Thierry

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of resistance to antimicrobial therapy by Neisseria gonorrhoeae causes on-going problems for individual case management of gonorrhoea. Surveillance data about N. gonorrhoeae have indicated an increase in the incidence of gonorrhoea in France in 2006. As a consequence of the development of antibiotic resistance in N. gonorrhoeae, French guidelines excluded fluoroquinolones as a standard treatment for N. gonorrhoeae. Ceftriaxone became the recommended treatment, associated with azithromycin for Clamydia trachomatis infection. Our aim was to describe the practice patterns of general practitioners (GPs in managing the antibiotic treatment of patients with symptoms suggestive of uncomplicated male urethritis. Methods We developed a clinical vignette describing a man with typical gonococcal urethritis symptoms to elicit questions about antibiotic treatment. We mailed the electronic questionnaire to a random sample of 1000 French GPs belonging to the Sentinelles Network. Results By the end of the survey period, 350 vignettes were received, yielding a response rate of 35%. Sixty-six GPs (20.2% prescribed the recommended antibiotics for the simultaneous treatment of N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis infections, while 132 GPs (40.4% prescribed only non-recommended antibiotics, including ciprofloxacin in 69 cases (21.1%. General practitioners with less than 10 years in practice showed better compliance to guidelines than those with more years in practice (p Conclusions The results suggest a mismatch between the guidelines and the antibiotic treatment of male uncomplicated urethritis by French GPs, mostly among the subgroup of physicians who have been in practice longer. Educational approaches based on practice feedback need to be developed to improve these deficits in the quality of care.

  19. A survey of primary care physician practices in antibiotic prescribing for the treatment of uncomplicated male gonoccocal urethritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The development of resistance to antimicrobial therapy by Neisseria gonorrhoeae causes on-going problems for individual case management of gonorrhoea. Surveillance data about N. gonorrhoeae have indicated an increase in the incidence of gonorrhoea in France in 2006. As a consequence of the development of antibiotic resistance in N. gonorrhoeae, French guidelines excluded fluoroquinolones as a standard treatment for N. gonorrhoeae. Ceftriaxone became the recommended treatment, associated with azithromycin for Clamydia trachomatis infection. Our aim was to describe the practice patterns of general practitioners (GPs) in managing the antibiotic treatment of patients with symptoms suggestive of uncomplicated male urethritis. Methods We developed a clinical vignette describing a man with typical gonococcal urethritis symptoms to elicit questions about antibiotic treatment. We mailed the electronic questionnaire to a random sample of 1000 French GPs belonging to the Sentinelles Network. Results By the end of the survey period, 350 vignettes were received, yielding a response rate of 35%. Sixty-six GPs (20.2%) prescribed the recommended antibiotics for the simultaneous treatment of N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis infections, while 132 GPs (40.4%) prescribed only non-recommended antibiotics, including ciprofloxacin in 69 cases (21.1%). General practitioners with less than 10 years in practice showed better compliance to guidelines than those with more years in practice (p urethritis by French GPs, mostly among the subgroup of physicians who have been in practice longer. Educational approaches based on practice feedback need to be developed to improve these deficits in the quality of care. PMID:21592343

  20. Uncomplicated E Coli Urinary Tract Infection in College Women: A Follow-Up Study of E Coli Sensitivities to Commonly Prescribed Antibiotics

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    Ansbach, Robert K.; Dybus, Karen; Bergeson, Rachel

    2005-01-01

    Treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) has changed in the past few years with researchers advocating empiric treatment for shorter periods of time without the use of cultures. Researchers report that antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli (E coli) to commonly prescribed antibiotics in uncomplicated UTIs has been increasing.…

  1. Antibiotic Prescribing for Oro-Facial Infections in the Paediatric Outpatient: A Review

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    Najla Dar-Odeh

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available There are many reports on the complications associated with antibiotics abuse during the treatment of paediatric patients, particularly those related to antimicrobial resistance. The dental profession is no exception; there is growing evidence that dental practitioners are misusing antibiotics in the treatment of their paediatric patients. This review is directed to dental practitioners who provide oral healthcare to children. It is also directed to medical practitioners, particularly those working in emergency departments and encountering children with acute orofacial infections. A systematic search of literature was conducted to explore the clinical indications and recommended antibiotic regimens for orofacial infections in paediatric outpatients. The main indications included cellulitis, aggressive periodontitis, necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, and pericoronitis. Amoxicillin was found to be the most commonly recommended antibiotic for short durations of 3–5 days, with metronidazole or azithromycin being the alternative antibiotics in penicillin-sensitive patients.

  2. Interacting factors associated with Low antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections in primary health care - a mixed methods study in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandberg, Eva Lena; Brorsson, Annika; André, Malin; Gröndal, Hedvig; Mölstad, Sigvard; Hedin, Katarina

    2016-07-18

    Prescribing of antibiotics for common infections varies widely, and there is no medical explanation. Systematic reviews have highlighted factors that may influence antibiotic prescribing and that this is a complex process. It is unclear how factors interact and how the primary care organization affects diagnostic procedures and antibiotic prescribing. Therefore, we sought to explore and understand interactions between factors influencing antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections in primary care. Our mixed methods design was guided by the Triangulation Design Model according to Creswell. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected in parallel. Quantitative data were collected by prescription statistics, questionnaires to patients, and general practitioners' audit registrations. Qualitative data were collected through observations and semi-structured interviews. From the analysis of the data from the different sources an overall theme emerged: A common practice in the primary health care centre is crucial for low antibiotic prescribing in line with guidelines. Several factors contribute to a common practice, such as promoting management and leadership, internalized guidelines including inter-professional discussions, the general practitioner's diagnostic process, nurse triage, and patient expectation. These factors were closely related and influenced each other. The results showed that knowledge must be internalized and guidelines need to be normative for the group as well as for every individual. Low prescribing is associated with adapted and transformed guidelines within all staff, not only general practitioners. Nurses' triage and self-care advice played an important role. Encouragement from the management level stimulated inter-professional discussions about antibiotic prescribing. Informal opinion moulders talking about antibiotic prescribing was supported by the managers. Finally, continuous professional development activities were encouraged

  3. Optimising the quality of antibiotic prescribing in out-of-hours primary care in Belgium: a study protocol for an action research project.

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    Colliers, Annelies; Coenen, Samuel; Philips, Hilde; Remmen, Roy; Anthierens, Sibyl

    2017-10-15

    Antimicrobial resistance is a major public health threat driven by inappropriate antibiotic use, mainly in general practice and for respiratory tract infections. In Belgium, the quality of general practitioners' (GPs) antibiotic prescribing is low. To improve antibiotic use, we need a better understanding of this quality problem and corresponding interventions. A general practitioners cooperative (GPC) for out-of-hours (OOH) care presents a unique opportunity to reach a large group of GPs and work on quality improvement. Participatory action research (PAR) is a bottom-up approach that focuses on implementing change into daily practice and has the potential to empower practitioners to produce their own solutions to optimise their antibiotic prescribing. This PAR study to improve antibiotic prescribing quality in OOH care uses a mixed methods approach. In a first exploratory phase, we will develop a partnership with a GPC and map the existing barriers and opportunities. In a second phase, we will focus on facilitating change and implementing interventions through PDSA (Plan-Do-Study-Act) cycles. In a third phase, antibiotic prescribing quality outside and antibiotic use during office hours will be evaluated. Equally important are the process evaluation and theory building on improving antibiotic prescribing. The study protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Antwerp University Hospital/University of Antwerp. PAR unfolds in response to the needs and issues of the stakeholders, therefore new ethics approval will be obtained at each new stage of the research. Interventions to improve antibiotic prescribing are needed now more than ever and outcomes will be highly relevant for GPCs, GPs in daily practice, national policymakers and the international scientific community. NCT03082521; Pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless

  4. Experimental evaluation of the effects of drug information on antibiotic prescribing: a study in outpatient care in an area of Sri lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angunawela, I I; Diwan, V K; Tomson, G

    1991-06-01

    The intervention level of epidemiology is useful for studying effects in health systems research. Due to practical and ethical reasons, it is often difficult to apply experimental methods such as classical randomized clinical trials in the field. However with alternative approaches such as 'randomization by group' some of these problems can be overcome. Drug information has since long been considered as an instrument to influence physicians, however evaluation of its effects is a new field of research. In the present study the impact of drug information on prescribing behaviour was evaluated in an outpatient setting in Sri Lanka. The study included 15 state health institutions (45 prescribers) with a common drug formulary. Groups of prescribers were randomized into two interventions; newsletters and newsletters reinforced by a group seminar, and one control group. The target topic was 'rational prescribing of antibiotics'. Some 18,766 randomly selected outpatient drug prescriptions were studied. Antibiotics (and sulphonamides) were prescribed to 33.2% of the patients. An overall trend towards a decrease in proportion of patients prescribed antibiotics in the two intervention groups was seen, although the difference was not significant (p greater than 0.05) compared to the control group. This is similar to the effect of written information on prescribing in other studies. A mean difference of -7.4% in written, -7.3% in written + seminar and -0.4% in the control group was shown. The general antibiotic prescribing pattern did not change in any of the three groups. Penicillin was the most commonly prescribed antibiotic and tetracycline was only rarely prescribed to children. This experiment indicates the feasibility of drug information intervention studies in developing countries.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Clinical characteristics, diagnostic evaluation, and antibiotic prescribing patterns for skin infections in nursing homes

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    Norihiro Yogo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The epidemiology and management of skin infections in nursing homes has not been adequately described. We reviewed the characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of skin infections among residents of nursing homes to identify opportunities to improve antibiotic use. Methods: A retrospective study involving 12 nursing homes in the Denver metropolitan area. For residents at participating nursing homes diagnosed with a skin infection between July 1, 2013 and June 30, 2014, clinical and demographic information was collected through manual chart review.Results: Of 100 cases included in the study, the most common infections were non-purulent cellulitis (n=55, wound infection (n=27, infected ulcer (n=8, and cutaneous abscess (n=7. In 26 cases, previously published minimum clinical criteria for initiating antibiotics (Loeb criteria were not met. Most antibiotics (n=52 were initiated as a telephone order following a call from a nurse, and 41 patients were not evaluated by a provider within 48 hours after initiation of antibiotics. Nearly all patients (n=95 were treated with oral antibiotics alone. The median treatment duration was 7 days (interquartile range [IQR] 7-10; 43 patients received treatment courses of ≥ 10 days.Conclusions: Most newly diagnosed skin infections in nursing homes were non-purulent infections treated with oral antibiotics. Antibiotics were initiated by telephone in over half of cases, and lack of a clinical evaluation within 48 hours after starting antibiotics was common. Improved diagnosis through more timely clinical evaluations and decreasing length of therapy are important opportunities for antibiotic stewardship in nursing homes.

  6. Non prescribed sale of antibiotics in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Abdulhak, Aref A; Altannir, Mohamad A; Almansor, Mohammed A; Almohaya, Mohammed S; Onazi, Atallah S; Marei, Mohammed A; Aldossary, Oweida F; Obeidat, Sadek A; Obeidat, Mustafa A; Riaz, Muhammad S; Tleyjeh, Imad M

    2011-07-07

    Antibiotics sales without medical prescriptions are increasingly recognized as sources of antimicrobial misuse that can exacerbate the global burden of antibiotic resistance. We aimed to determine the percentage of pharmacies who sell antibiotics without medical prescriptions, examining the potential associated risks of such practice in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, by simulation of different clinical scenarios. A cross sectional study of a quasi-random sample of pharmacies stratified by the five regions of Riyadh. Each pharmacy was visited once by two investigators who simulated having a relative with a specific clinical illness (sore throat, acute bronchitis, otitis media, acute sinusitis, diarrhea, and urinary tract infection (UTI) in childbearing aged women). A total of 327 pharmacies were visited. Antibiotics were dispensed without a medical prescription in 244 (77.6%) of 327, of which 231 (95%) were dispensed without a patient request. Simulated cases of sore throat and diarrhea resulted in an antibiotic being dispensed in (90%) of encounters, followed by UTI (75%), acute bronchitis (73%), otitis media (51%) and acute sinusitis (40%). Metronidazole (89%) and ciprofloxacin (86%) were commonly given for diarrhea and UTI, respectively, whereas amoxicillin/clavulanate was dispensed (51%) for the other simulated cases. None of the pharmacists asked about antibiotic allergy history or provided information about drug interactions. Only 23% asked about pregnancy status when dispensing antibiotics for UTI-simulated cases. We observed that an antibiotic could be obtained in Riyadh without a medical prescription or an evidence-based indication with associated potential clinical risks. Strict enforcement and adherence to existing regulations are warranted.

  7. Non prescribed sale of antibiotics in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia: A Cross Sectional Study

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    Obeidat Sadek A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotics sales without medical prescriptions are increasingly recognized as sources of antimicrobial misuse that can exacerbate the global burden of antibiotic resistance. We aimed to determine the percentage of pharmacies who sell antibiotics without medical prescriptions, examining the potential associated risks of such practice in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, by simulation of different clinical scenarios. Methods A cross sectional study of a quasi-random sample of pharmacies stratified by the five regions of Riyadh. Each pharmacy was visited once by two investigators who simulated having a relative with a specific clinical illness (sore throat, acute bronchitis, otitis media, acute sinusitis, diarrhea, and urinary tract infection (UTI in childbearing aged women. Results A total of 327 pharmacies were visited. Antibiotics were dispensed without a medical prescription in 244 (77.6% of 327, of which 231 (95% were dispensed without a patient request. Simulated cases of sore throat and diarrhea resulted in an antibiotic being dispensed in (90% of encounters, followed by UTI (75%, acute bronchitis (73%, otitis media (51% and acute sinusitis (40%. Metronidazole (89% and ciprofloxacin (86% were commonly given for diarrhea and UTI, respectively, whereas amoxicillin/clavulanate was dispensed (51% for the other simulated cases. None of the pharmacists asked about antibiotic allergy history or provided information about drug interactions. Only 23% asked about pregnancy status when dispensing antibiotics for UTI-simulated cases. Conclusions We observed that an antibiotic could be obtained in Riyadh without a medical prescription or an evidence-based indication with associated potential clinical risks. Strict enforcement and adherence to existing regulations are warranted.

  8. Impact of introduction of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria on antibiotic prescribing: analysis of observational and randomised studies in public and private healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Heidi; Bruxvoort, Katia J; Cairns, Matthew E; Chandler, Clare I R; Leurent, Baptiste; Ansah, Evelyn K; Baiden, Frank; Baltzell, Kimberly A; Björkman, Anders; Burchett, Helen E D; Clarke, Siân E; DiLiberto, Deborah D; Elfving, Kristina; Goodman, Catherine; Hansen, Kristian S; Kachur, S Patrick; Lal, Sham; Lalloo, David G; Leslie, Toby; Magnussen, Pascal; Jefferies, Lindsay Mangham; Mårtensson, Andreas; Mayan, Ismail; Mbonye, Anthony K; Msellem, Mwinyi I; Onwujekwe, Obinna E; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Reyburn, Hugh; Rowland, Mark W; Shakely, Delér; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Webster, Jayne; Wiseman, Virginia L; Yeung, Shunmay; Schellenberg, David; Staedke, Sarah G; Whitty, Christopher J M

    2017-03-29

    Objectives  To examine the impact of use of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria on prescribing of antimicrobials, specifically antibiotics, for acute febrile illness in Africa and Asia. Design  Analysisof nine preselected linked and codesigned observational and randomised studies (eight cluster or individually randomised trials and one observational study). Setting  Public and private healthcare settings, 2007-13, in Afghanistan, Cameroon, Ghana, Nigeria, Tanzania, and Uganda. Participants  522 480 children and adults with acute febrile illness. Interventions  Rapid diagnostic tests for malaria. Main outcome measures  Proportions of patients for whom an antibiotic was prescribed in trial groups who had undergone rapid diagnostic testing compared with controls and in patients with negative test results compared with patients with positive results. A secondary aim compared classes of antibiotics prescribed in different settings. Results  Antibiotics were prescribed to 127 052/238 797 (53%) patients in control groups and 167 714/283 683 (59%) patients in intervention groups. Antibiotics were prescribed to 40% (35 505/89 719) of patients with a positive test result for malaria and to 69% (39 400/57 080) of those with a negative result. All but one study showed a trend toward more antibiotic prescribing in groups who underwent rapid diagnostic tests. Random effects meta-analysis of the trials showed that the overall risk of antibiotic prescription was 21% higher (95% confidence interval 7% to 36%) in intervention settings. In most intervention settings, patients with negative test results received more antibiotic prescriptions than patients with positive results for all the most commonly used classes: penicillins, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (one exception), tetracyclines, and metronidazole. Conclusions  Introduction of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria to reduce unnecessary use of antimalarials-a beneficial public health outcome-could drive

  9. Impact of a multipronged education strategy on antibiotic prescribing in Quebec, Canada.

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    Weiss, Karl; Blais, Régis; Fortin, Anne; Lantin, Sonia; Gaudet, Michel

    2011-09-01

    Antibiotic overuse and resistance have become a major threat in the last 2 decades. Many programs tried to optimize antibiotic consumption in the inpatient setting, but the outpatient environment that represents the bulk of antibiotic use has been challenging. Following a significant rise of Clostridium difficile infections, all the health care stakeholders in the province of Quebec, Canada initiated a global education program targeting physicians and pharmacists. A bundle approach was used; 11 user-friendly guidelines were produced by a group of experts and sent to all physicians and pharmacists in Quebec in January 2005. Downloadable versions of guidelines were posted on a dedicated Web site. They were promoted by professional organizations, universities, and experts during educational events, and there was strong acceptance by the pharmaceutical industry with a willingness to follow the recommendations in their marketing. The Intercontinental Medical Statistics (IMS) database was used to analyze and compare Quebec's total outpatient prescriptions per 1000 inhabitants with those in the other Canadian provinces for 2 time periods: preintervention (January 2003 to December 2004), and postintervention (February 2005 to December 2007). In 2004, antibiotic consumption per capita was 23.3% higher in Canada generally than in Quebec. After the guidelines dissemination, the gap between Quebec and the other Canadian provinces increased by 4.1 prescriptions/1000 inhabitants (P = .0002), and the trend persisted 36 months later. Antibiotic costs fell $134.5/1000 inhabitants in Quebec compared with the rest of Canada (P = .054). The implementation of guidelines significantly reduced antibiotic prescriptions in Quebec compared with the rest of the country, and there was a strong trend toward significant cost reduction.

  10. Effects of communication training with the MAAS-Global-D instrument on the antibiotic prescribing for respiratory infections in primary care: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial.

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    Hammersen, Friederike; Goetz, Katja; Soennichsen, Andreas; Emcke, Timo; Steinhaeuser, Jost

    2016-04-02

    Primary care physicians account for the majority of antibiotic prescribing in ambulatory care in Germany. Respiratory diseases are, regardless of effectiveness, often treated with antibiotics. Research has found this use without indication to be caused largely by communication problems (e.g. expectations on the patient's part or false assumptions about them by the physician). The present randomised controlled trial (RCT) study evaluates whether communication training for primary care physicians can reduce the antibiotic prescribing rate for respiratory tract infections. The study consists of three groups: group A will receive communication training; group B will be given the same, plus additional, access to an evidence-based point-of-care tool; and group C will function as the control group. The primary endpoint is the difference between intervention and control groups regarding the antibiotic prescribing rate before and after the intervention assessed through routine data. The communication skills are captured with the help of the communication instrument MAAS-Global-D, as well as individual videos of physician-patient consultations recorded by the primary care physicians. These skills will also be regarded with respect to the antibiotic prescribing rate. A process evaluation using qualitative as well as quantitative methods should provide information about barriers and enablers to implementing the communication training. The trial contributes to an insight into the effectiveness of the different components to reduce antibiotic prescribing, which will also be supported by an extensive evaluation. Communication training could be an effective method of reducing antibiotic prescribing in primary care. DRKS00009566 DATE REGISTRATION: 5 November 2015.

  11. Eliciting views on antibiotic prescribing and resistance among hospital and outpatient care physicians in Berlin, Germany: results of a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Edward; Ziegelmann, Antina; Eckmanns, Tim; Krause, Gérard

    2012-01-01

    To better understand physicians' views on factors of influence for the prescribing of antibiotics and on antibiotic resistance in the Berlin region, Germany. Qualitative study with focus groups. Outpatient care and hospital care practice in the Berlin region, Germany. 7 General practitioners, two urologists, one paediatrician from outpatient care and eight internists, two paediatricians, two ear, nose and throat specialists and two urologists from hospital care. Physicians showed differential interest in topics related to antibiotic prescribing and antibiotic resistance. Outpatient care physicians were interested in topics around their own prescribing, such as being able to diagnose and prescribe precisely, and topics about patient demand and non-compliance. Hospital care physicians were interested in hygiene challenges, limited consult time and multi-resistant pathogens. Physicians considered the development of resistance to be more in the domain of clinical treatment than that of the patient. Major challenges related to antibiotic resistance for this group of physicians are access to and clarity of treatment recommendations, implementation of hygienic measures, as well as increased outsourcing of laboratory services. Results raise questions about whether meeting physicians' expectations should be a focus when developing intervention that aims to influence antibiotic resistance in this and other areas of Germany.

  12. Antibiotic prescribing in women during and after delivery in a non-teaching, tertiary care hospital in Ujjain, India: a prospective cross-sectional study.

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    Sharma, Megha; Sanneving, Linda; Mahadik, Kalpana; Santacatterina, Michele; Dhaneria, Suryaprakash; Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Antibacterial drugs (hereafter referred to as antibiotics) are crucial to treat infections during delivery and postpartum period to reduce maternal mortality. Institutional deliveries have the potential to save lives of many women but extensive use of antibiotics, add to the development and spread of antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to present antibiotic prescribing among inpatients during and after delivery in a non-teaching, tertiary care hospital in the city of Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh, India. A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted including women having had either a vaginal delivery or a cesarean section in the hospital. Trained nursing staff collected the data on daily bases, using a specific form attached to each patient file. Statistical analysis, including bivariate and multivariable logistic regression was conducted. Of the total 1077 women, 566 (53%) had a vaginal delivery and 511 (47%) had a cesarean section. Eighty-seven percent of the women that had a vaginal delivery and 98% of the women having a cesarean section were prescribed antibiotics. The mean number of days on antibiotics in hospital for the women with a vaginal delivery was 3.1 (±1.7) and for the women with cesarean section was 6.0 (±2.5). Twenty-eight percent of both the women with vaginal deliveries and the women with cesarean sections were prescribed antibiotics at discharge. The most commonly prescribed antibiotic group in the hospital for both the women that had a vaginal delivery and the women that had a cesarean section were third-generation cephalosporins (J01DD). The total number of defined daily doses (DDD) per100 bed days for women that had a vaginal delivery was 101, and 127 for women that had a cesarean section. The high percentage of women having had a vaginal delivery that received antibiotics and the deviation from recommendation for cesarean section in the hospital is a cause of concern. Improved maternal health and rational use of antibiotics are

  13. Antibiotic prescribing for endodontic therapies: a comparative survey between general dental practitioners and final year Bachelor of Dental Surgery students in Cardiff, UK.

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    Al Masan, A A; Dummer, P M H; Farnell, D J J; Vianna, M E

    2018-07-01

    To evaluate the views of final year dental surgery students (BDS; G1) at Cardiff University and general dental practitioners (GDPs; G2) within the geographic area of Cardiff, Wales, on antibiotic prescribing for endodontic conditions, and investigate the potential differences between the two groups. A cross-sectional online questionnaire-based survey of 12 qualitative and quantitative questions was distributed to 76 final year BDS Cardiff University students and 55 dental practices within Cardiff, UK. Six questions recorded general information, and the remaining questions included a series of hypothetical clinical scenarios, where the participants were asked to state whether they would or would not prescribe antibiotics. The data were analysed using spss version 23 to produce descriptive statistics, contingency tables and to run chi-square (χ²) tests, Fisher's exact tests and relative risk calculations. The response rate was 60% (n = 79). All G1 participants were aware of the consequences of antibiotic overuse. Approximately 60% of responders were aware of guidelines for antibiotic use in endodontic therapies, and 83% would only use antibiotics for a limited selection of patients (e.g. patients with systemic complications). G1 responses to clinical scenarios indicated overall that they were comparable to the ideal answers except for acute apical abscess (64% believed that antibiotics were indicated). The majority of G2 were aware of the consequences of antibiotic overuse. Only 28% of G2 were aware of guidelines for antibiotic use in endodontic therapies. Overall responses revealed that antibiotics would be prescribed for: systemic complications (78%), acute apical abscess (72%) and symptomatic apical periodontitis (28%). The clinical scenarios revealed G1 were more likely to prescribe antibiotics compared to G2 for cases of necrotic pulp with symptomatic apical periodontitis without systemic complications (incorrect answer) and less likely to other clinical

  14. Improving antibiotic prescribing skills in medical students: the effect of e-learning after 6 months.

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    Sikkens, Jonne J; Caris, Martine G; Schutte, Tim; Kramer, Mark H H; Tichelaar, Jelle; van Agtmael, Michiel A

    2018-05-09

    Antimicrobial prescribing behaviour is first established during medical study, but teachers often cite lack of time as an important problem in the implementation of antimicrobial stewardship in the medical curriculum. The use of electronic learning (e-learning) is a potentially time-efficient solution, but its effectiveness in changing long-term prescribing behaviour in medical students is as yet unknown. We performed a prospective controlled intervention study of the long-term effects of a short interactive e-learning course among fourth year medical students in a Dutch university. The e-learning was temporarily implemented as a non-compulsory course during a 6 week period. Six months later, all students underwent an infectious disease-based objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) aimed at simulating postgraduate prescribing. If they passed, each student did the OSCE only once. We created a control group of students from a period when the e-learning was not implemented. Main outcomes were the OSCE pass percentage and knowledge, drug choice and overall scores. We used propensity scores to create equal comparisons. We included 71 students in the intervention group and 285 students in the control group. E-learning participation in the intervention group was 81%. The OSCE pass percentage was 86% in the control group versus 97% in the intervention group (+11%, OR 5.9, 95% CI 1.7-20.0). OSCE overall, knowledge and drug choice grades (1-10) were also significantly higher in the intervention group (differences +0.31, +0.31 and +0.51, respectively). E-learning during a limited period can significantly improve medical students' performance of an antimicrobial therapeutic consultation in a situation simulating clinical practice 6 months later.

  15. General practitioners’ views on the acceptability and applicability of a web-based intervention to reduce antibiotic prescribing for acute cough in multiple European countries: a qualitative study prior to a randomised trial

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    Anthierens Sibyl

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interventions to promote prudent antibiotic prescribing by general practitioners (GPs have often only been developed for use in one country. We aimed to develop an intervention which would be appropriate to implement in multiple European countries in order to offer greater benefit to practice whilst using fewer resources. The INTRO (INternet TRaining for antibiOtic use intervention needed to deliver training to GPs in the use of C-Reactive Protein (CRP near patient tests to help diagnose acute cough and in communication skills to help explain prescribing decisions to patients. We explored GPs’ views on the initial version of INTRO to test acceptability and potentially increase applicability for use in multiple countries before the start of a randomised trial. Method 30 GPs from five countries (Belgium, England, the Netherlands, Poland and Spain, were interviewed using a “think aloud” approach. GPs were asked to work through the intervention and discuss their views on the content and format in relation to following the intervention in their own practice. GPs viewed the same intervention but versions were created in five languages. Data were coded using thematic analysis. Results GPs in all five countries reported the view that the intervention addressed an important topic, was broadly acceptable and feasible to use, and would be a useful tool to help improve clinical practice. However, GPs in the different countries identified aspects of the intervention that did not reflect their national culture or healthcare system. These included perceived differences in communication style used in the consultation, consultation length and the stage of illness at which patient typically presented. Conclusion An online intervention to support evidence-based use of antibiotics is acceptable and feasible to implement amongst GPs in multiple countries. However, tailoring of the intervention to suit national contexts was necessary by

  16. Nephrology comanagement and the quality of antibiotic prescribing in primary care for patients with chronic kidney disease: a retrospective cross-sectional study.

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    Zhu, Justin X G; Nash, Danielle M; McArthur, Eric; Farag, Alexandra; Garg, Amit X; Jain, Arsh K

    2018-04-12

    In primary care, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are frequently prescribed excessive doses of antibiotics relative to their kidney function. We examined whether nephrology comanagement is associated with improved prescribing in primary care. In a retrospective propensity score-matched cross-sectional study, we studied the appropriateness of antibiotic prescriptions by primary care physicians to Ontarians ≥66 years of age with CKD Stages 4 and 5 (estimated glomerular filtration rate <30 mL/min/1.73 m2 not receiving dialysis) from 1 April 2003 to 31 March 2014. Comanagement was defined as having at least one outpatient visit with a nephrologist within the year prior to antibiotic prescription date. We compared the rate of appropriately dosed antibiotics in primary care between 3937 patients who were comanaged by a nephrologist and 3937 patients who were not. Only 1184 (30%) of 3937 noncomanaged patients had appropriately dosed antibiotic prescriptions prescribed by a primary care physician. Nephrology comanagement was associated with an increased likelihood that an appropriately dosed prescription was prescribed by a primary care physician; however, the magnitude of the effect was modest [1342/3937 (34%); odds ratio 1.20 (95% confidence interval 1.09-1.32); P < 0.001]. The majority of antibiotics prescribed by primary care physicians are inappropriately dosed in CKD patients, whether or not a nephrologist is comanaging the patient. Nephrologists have an opportunity to increase awareness of appropriate dosing of medications in primary care through the patients they comanage.

  17. Antimicrobial prescribing patterns of surgical speciality in a tertiary care hospital in India: Role of persuasive intervention for changing antibiotic prescription behaviour

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    Chand Wattal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inappropriate use of antibiotics globally has been linked to increase in antibiotic resistance. Objectives: This interventional study assessed the impact of antibiotic prescription feedback and focus group discussions (FGD on hospital-based prescribers before and after the FGD. Study Design: The present study was performed at a tertiary care centre in New Delhi, wherein 45 units from surgical specialities were included for FGD. Thirty-five units were assessed for the antibiotic usage during 12 months pre-intervention and 3 and 6 months post-intervention period. The outcome measured was a change in antibiotic prescription rates reflected as daily defined doses per 100 bed days as defined by the World Health Organisation. Results: Reduction in the level of antibiotic consumption was observed in 15 of 35 units (42.85% during the 3 months post-intervention period, which was significant (P < 0.05 in 3/35 (8.57% surgical units. A significant reduction (P < 0.05 was observed for the units of endoscopic gynaecology, super-speciality and transplant surgery units B and C, and orthopaedic unit C during the 6 months period. Decreasing trend (P < 0.05 was observed in 2/35 (5.71% units during the entire period. Overall reduction of antibiotic consumption (1.88% was observed, with an increase in the use of low-end antibiotics and a decrease in the use of high-end antibiotics. Conclusion: The present study clearly demonstrates a weak impact of FGD in changing antibiotic prescribing behaviour. Further analysis of the sustainability of FGD and its long-term impact on antimicrobial resistance needs to be evaluated. The effect of continuous educational sessions and multifaceted interventions cannot be ignored.

  18. Long-term effect of a practice-based intervention (HAPPY AUDIT) aimed at reducing antibiotic prescribing in patients with respiratory tract infections.

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    Llor, Carl; Bjerrum, Lars; Molero, José M; Moragas, Ana; González López-Valcárcel, Beatriz; Monedero, M José; Gómez, Manuel; Cid, Marina; Alcántara, Juan de Dios; Cots, Josep M; Ribas, Joana M; García, Guillermo; Ortega, Jesús; Pineda, Vicenta; Guerra, Gloria; Munuera, Susana

    2018-04-27

    Few studies have evaluated the long-term effects of educational interventions on antibiotic prescription and the results are controversial. This study was aimed at assessing the effect of a multifaceted practice-based intervention carried out 6 years earlier on current antibiotic prescription for respiratory tract infections (RTIs). The 210 general practitioners (GPs) who completed the first two registrations in 2008 and 2009 were invited to participate in a third registration. The intervention held before the second registration consisted of discussion about the first registration of results, appropriate use of antibiotics for RTIs, patient brochures, a workshop and the provision of rapid tests. As in the previous registrations, GPs were instructed to complete a template for all the patients with RTIs during 15 working days in 2015. A new group of GPs from the same areas was also invited to participate and acted as controls. A multilevel logistic regression analysis was performed considering the prescription of antibiotics as the dependent variable. A total of 121 GPs included in the 2009 intervention (57.6%) and 117 control GPs registered 22 247 RTIs. On adjustment for covariables, compared with the antibiotic prescription observed just after the intervention, GPs assigned to intervention prescribed slightly more antibiotics 6 years later albeit without statistically significant differences (OR 1.08, 95% CI 0.89-1.31, P = 0.46), while GPs in the control group prescribed significantly more antibiotics (OR 2.74, 95% CI 2.09-3.59, P < 0.001). This study shows that a single multifaceted intervention continues to reduce antibiotic prescribing 6 years later.

  19. Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotics are powerful medicines that fight bacterial infections. Used properly, antibiotics can save lives. They either kill bacteria or ... natural defenses can usually take it from there. Antibiotics do not fight infections caused by viruses, such ...

  20. Antibiotic prescribing and resistance: knowledge level of medical students of clinical years of University Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia

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    Haque M

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mainul Haque, Nor Iza A Rahman, Zainal Zulkifli, Salwani Ismail Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu, Malaysia Abstract: The innovation of penicillin by Dr Alexander Fleming in 1928 and its use in clinical practice saved many lives, especially during the Second World War. Tuberculosis still carries a significant public health threat and has re-emerged over the past two decades, even in modern countries where tuberculosis was thought to be eliminated. The World Health Organization defines antimicrobial resistance as the resistance of a microorganism to an antimicrobial drug that was initially effective for treatment of infections caused by the microbe. Therefore, the findings of the current study will provide data to enable the design of a new educational program to better equip our students in confronting antimicrobial resistance. This study was a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey, which was undertaken in the Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia. The study participants were students of the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery program (MBBS of Year III, IV, and V. A total of 142 out of 164 (86% medical students returned the questionnaire. Specifically, the year-wise breakdown of responses was 29% (41, 39% (55, and 32% (45 for Year III, IV, and V, respectively. Among the study respondents, 28% (40 were male, and the remaining 72% (102 were female. In all, 67% of the participants felt more confident in “making an accurate diagnosis of infection/sepsis.” The majority (88% of the study participants stated that they would like more training on antibiotic selection. This research has found that there is a gap between theoretical input and clinical practice; the students are demanding more educational intervention to face the threat of antimicrobial resistance. Keywords: antibiotic, prescribing, resistance, medical students, knowledge

  1. A survey of the views and capabilities of community pharmacists in Western Australia regarding the rescheduling of selected oral antibiotics in a framework of pharmacist prescribing

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    Fatima Sinkala

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Antibiotic misuse in the community contributes to antimicrobial resistance. One way to address this may be by better utilizing community pharmacists’ skills in antibiotic prescribing. The aims of this study were to examine the level of support for “down-scheduling” selected antibiotics and to evaluate factors determining the appropriateness of community pharmacist prescribing for a limited range of infections, including their decision to refer to a doctor. Methods Self-administered questionnaires, including graded case vignette scenarios simulating real practice, were sent to Western Australian community pharmacists. In addition to descriptive statistics and chi-square testing, a General Estimating Equation (GEE was used to identify factors associated with appropriateness of therapy and the decision to refer, for each of the seven vignettes. Results Of the 240 pharmacists surveyed, 90 (37.5% responded, yielding 630 responses to seven different case vignettes. There was more than 60% respondent support for expanded prescribing (rescheduling of commonly prescribed antibiotics. Overall 426/630 (67.6% chose to treat the patient while the remaining 204/630 (32.4% referred the patient to a doctor. Of those electing to treat, 380/426 (89.2% opted to use oral antibiotics, with 293/380 (77.2% treating with an appropriate selection and regimen. The GEE model indicated that pharmacists were more likely to prescribe inappropriately for conditions such as otitis media (p = 0.0060 and urinary tract infection in pregnancy (p < 0.0001 compared to more complex conditions. Over 80% of all pharmacists would refer the patient to a doctor following no improvement within 3 days, or within 24 h in the case of community acquired pneumonia. It was more common for younger pharmacists to refer the patient to a doctor (p = 0.0165. Discussion This study adds further insight into community pharmacy/pharmacist characteristics associated with

  2. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Reported Practices Among Obstetrician-Gynecologists in the USA Regarding Antibiotic Prescribing for Upper Respiratory Tract Infections

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    Shadi Chamany

    2005-01-01

    determining whether an OB/GYN-specific program promoting appropriate antibiotic use would significantly contribute to the efforts to decrease inappropriate antibiotic use among primary care providers.

  3. Study of Pre-disposing Factors of Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Antibiotic Prescribing Pattern with Reference to Antibiotic Sensitivity Test.

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    Shrestha, R; Shrestha, B; Shakya Shrestha, S; Pant, A; Prajapati, B; Karmacharya, B M

    2015-01-01

    for Penicillin group of drugs. The most widely used antibiotics were found to be Cephalosporin group of drugs (68%). Conclusion The present study revealed that the case of COPD is more in female and the commonest pre-disposing factor is found to be smoke/firewood. Cephalosporin group of drugs is the most commonly prescribed drug.

  4. Alternative indicators for monitoring the quality of a continuous intervention program on antibiotic prescribing during changing healthcare conditions.

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    Bantar, C; Franco, D; Heft, C; Vesco, E; Arango, C; Izaguirre, M; Alcázar, G; Boleas, M; Oliva, M E

    2005-06-01

    We recently published on the impact of a four-phase hospital-wide intervention program designed to optimize the quality of antibiotic use, where a multidisciplinary team (MDT) could modify prescription at the last phase. Because health care quality was changing during the last 5 years (late 1999 to early 2004), we developed certain indicators to monitor the quality of our intervention over time. Different periods were defined as baseline (pre-intervention), initial intervention-active control, pre-crisis control, crisis control, post-crisis control and end of crisis control. Major indicators were rates of prescription modification by the MDT; prescription for an uncertain infection and a novel index formula (RIcarb) to estimate the rationale for carbapenem use. We assessed 2115 antimicrobial prescriptions. Modification of prescription rate was 30% at the beginning and decreased thereafter up to stable levels. Rate of prescriptions ordered for cases of both uncertain infection and unknown source of infection decreased significantly after intervention (i.e. from baseline to active control). In contrast, a doubling of culture-directed prescriptions was observed between these periods. RIcarb values lower and higher than 60% (modal, cut-off) were assumed as carbapenem overuse and underuse, respectively. Overuse was observed at the pre-intervention, while pronounced underuse was shown during the crisis (RIcarb, 45% and 87%, respectively). The present study demonstrates that certain indicators, other than the widely adopted impact outcomes, are a suitable tool for monitoring the quality of a continuous, long-term, active intervention on antimicrobial prescribing practice, especially when applied in a changing healthcare setting.

  5. The impact of interventions to improve the quality of prescribing and use of antibiotics in primary care patients with respiratory tract infections: a systematic review protocol.

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    Martínez-González, Nahara Anani; Coenen, Samuel; Plate, Andreas; Colliers, Annelies; Rosemann, Thomas; Senn, Oliver; Neuner-Jehle, Stefan

    2017-06-13

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are the most common reason for primary care (PC) consultations and for antibiotic prescribing and use. The majority of RTIs have a viral aetiology however, and antibiotic consumption is ineffective and unnecessary. Inappropriate antibiotic use contributes greatly to antibiotic resistance (ABR) leading to complications, increased adverse events, reconsultations and costs. Improving antibiotic consumption is thus crucial to containing ABR, which has become an urgent priority worldwide. We will systematically review the evidence about interventions aimed at improving the quality of antibiotic prescribing and use for acute RTI. We will include primary peer-reviewed and grey literature of studies conducted on in-hours and out-of-hours PC patients (adults and children): (1) randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-RCTs and/or cluster-RCTs evaluating the effectiveness, feasibility and acceptability of patient-targeted and clinician-targeted interventions and (2) RCTs and other study designs evaluating the effectiveness of public campaigns and regulatory interventions. We will search MEDLINE (EBSCOHost), EMBASE (Elsevier), the Cochrane Library (Wiley), CINHAL (EBSCOHost), PsychINFO (EBSCOHost), Web of Science, LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences), TRIP (Turning Research Into Practice) and opensgrey.eu without language restriction. We will also search the reference lists of included studies and relevant reviews. Primary outcomes include the rates of (guideline-recommended) antibiotics prescribed and/or used. Secondary outcomes include immediate or delayed use of antibiotics, and feasibility and acceptability outcomes. We will assess study eligibility and risk of bias, and will extract data. Data permitting, we will perform meta-analyses. This is a systematic review protocol and so formal ethical approval is not required. We will not collect confidential, personal or primary data. The findings of this

  6. Antibiotics in urinary-tract infections. Sustained change in prescribing habits by practice test and self-reflection: a mixed methods before-after study.

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    Kuehlein, T; Goetz, K; Laux, G; Gutscher, A; Szecsenyi, J; Joos, S

    2011-06-01

    BACKGROUND The German guideline recommends trimethoprim (TMP) for the treatment of uncomplicated lower-urinary-tract infections (uLUTI) in primary care. In the authors' research network, the participating general practitioners (GPs) were asked why they prescribe mostly quinolones instead. The GPs stated the perception of a high rate of therapy failure of TMP and strongly rejected the guideline. OBJECTIVE To examine prescribing behaviour for uLUTI and whether a practice test of TMP might effect a change in prescribing habits. METHODS The study was conducted using observational and qualitative elements. A first focus-group (n=6) assessed reasons for current prescribing behaviour. In a 3-month practice test, patients with uLUTI were prescribed TMP (150 mg twice for 3 days). In a second focus group, the GPs (n=12) were presented with the results of the practice test. RESULTS The first focus group revealed that prescribing was mainly driven by former hospital training and what was perceived as common therapy. GPs felt no need to change a successful regimen. In the practice test, TMP had a success rate of 94% (84 episodes of uLUTI). The second focus group revealed that the practice test had strongly changed opinions in favour of TMP. Self-reflection and ownership of data acquisition were seen as major contributions for change in prescribing. After the test period, TMP remained the antibiotic most often prescribed. CONCLUSION Internal evidence and peer-group opinion are strong determinants for clinical decisions. A self-conducted practice test, together with self-reflection in a peer group, strongly supports the process of change.

  7. Recent trends in prescribing antibiotics for acute tonsillitis in pediatric ambulatory care in Taiwan, 2000-2009: A nationwide population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lo-Yi; Lai, Chou-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Jen; Cho, Ching-Yi; Luo, Yu-Cheng; Jeng, Mei-Jy; Wu, Keh-Gong

    2017-08-01

    Acute tonsillitis is the leading diagnosis in pediatric ambulatory care, and group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus is the main reason for antibiotic prescriptions in patients with acute tonsillitis. The aim of this study was to analyze trends in prescribing antibiotics and to investigate the prescription patterns for acute tonsillitis in pediatric ambulatory care in Taiwan from 2000 to 2009. Data on children younger than 18 years with a primary diagnosis of acute tonsillitis were retrieved from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan from 2000 to 2009. Concomitant bacterial infections were excluded. Sex, age, seasonality, location, level of medical institution, and physician specialty were analyzed. Annual and monthly changes in antibiotic prescriptions and classification were also evaluated. A total of 40,775 cases were enrolled, with an overall antibiotic prescription rate of 16.8%. There was a remarkable decline in the antibiotic prescription rates for tonsillitis from 28.4% in 2000 to 10.9% in 2009. Factors associated with a higher prescription rate included older age, visits from eastern Taiwan, medical centers, and nonpediatrician physicians. Otolaryngologists had higher antibiotic prescription rate, whereas pediatricians had the lowest (21.9% vs. 11.6%). The rates of obtaining throat cultures were low although the culture performing rate in the medical centers was significantly higher (12.3%, p < 0.001). From 2000 to 2009, there was a remarkable decline in the antibiotic prescription rates for tonsillitis. Further studies to evaluate diagnostic tools such as rapid antigen detection tests or throat cultures to decrease antibiotic prescriptions are warranted. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Improving antibiotic prescribing for adults with community acquired pneumonia: Does a computerised decision support system achieve more than academic detailing alone? – a time series analysis

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    Black James F

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ideal method to encourage uptake of clinical guidelines in hospitals is not known. Several strategies have been suggested. This study evaluates the impact of academic detailing and a computerised decision support system (CDSS on clinicians' prescribing behaviour for patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP. Methods The management of all patients presenting to the emergency department over three successive time periods was evaluated; the baseline, academic detailing and CDSS periods. The rate of empiric antibiotic prescribing that was concordant with recommendations was studied over time comparing pre and post periods and using an interrupted time series analysis. Results The odds ratio for concordant therapy in the academic detailing period, after adjustment for age, illness severity and suspicion of aspiration, compared with the baseline period was OR = 2.79 [1.88, 4.14], p Conclusion Deployment of a computerised decision support system was associated with an early improvement in antibiotic prescribing practices which was greater than the changes seen with academic detailing. The sustainability of this intervention requires further evaluation.

  9. Clinicians’ Views and Experiences of Interventions to Enhance the Quality of Antibiotic Prescribing for Acute Respiratory Tract Infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anthierens, Sibyl; Tonkin-Crine, Sarah; Cals, Jochen W.; Coenen, Samuel; Yardley, Lucy; Brookes-Howell, Lucy; Fernandez-Vandellos, Patricia; Krawczyk, Jaroslaw; Godycki-Cwirko, Maciek; Llor, Carl; Butler, Christopher C.; Verheij, Theo; Goossens, Herman; Little, Paul; Francis, Nick A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence shows a high rate of unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions in primary care in Europe and the United States. Given the costs of widespread use and associated antibiotic resistance, reducing inappropriate use is a public health priority. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to explore clinicians’

  10. Clinician-targeted interventions to influence antibiotic prescribing behaviour for acute respiratory infections in primary care: an overview of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkin-Crine, Sarah Kg; Tan, Pui San; van Hecke, Oliver; Wang, Kay; Roberts, Nia W; McCullough, Amanda; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Butler, Christopher C; Del Mar, Chris B

    2017-09-07

    Antibiotic resistance is a worldwide health threat. Interventions that reduce antibiotic prescribing by clinicians are expected to reduce antibiotic resistance. Disparate interventions to change antibiotic prescribing behaviour for acute respiratory infections (ARIs) have been trialled and meta-analysed, but not yet synthesised in an overview. This overview synthesises evidence from systematic reviews, rather than individual trials. To systematically review the existing evidence from systematic reviews on the effects of interventions aimed at influencing clinician antibiotic prescribing behaviour for ARIs in primary care. We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Science Citation Index to June 2016. We also searched the reference lists of all included reviews. We ran a pre-publication search in May 2017 and placed additional studies in 'awaiting classification'.We included both Cochrane and non-Cochrane reviews of randomised controlled trials evaluating the effect of any clinician-focussed intervention on antibiotic prescribing behaviour in primary care. Two overview authors independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of included reviews using the ROBIS tool, with disagreements reached by consensus or by discussion with a third overview author. We used the GRADE system to assess the quality of evidence in included reviews. The results are presented as a narrative overview. We included eight reviews in this overview: five Cochrane Reviews (33 included trials) and three non-Cochrane reviews (11 included trials). Three reviews (all Cochrane Reviews) scored low risk across all the ROBIS domains in Phase 2 and low risk of bias overall. The remaining five reviews scored high risk on Domain 4 of Phase 2 because the 'Risk of bias' assessment had not been specifically considered and discussed in the review Results and Conclusions. The trials

  11. Political economy of prudent budgetary policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, F.

    2010-01-01

    The principles of tax smoothing and public debt management with stochastic shocks to future national income are extended for prudence. A prudent government deliberately underestimates future national income and the tax base, especially if the variance and persistence of shocks hitting the tax base

  12. A Prudent Approach to Fair Use Workflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karey Patterson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This poster will outline a new highly efficient workflow for the management of copyright materials that is prudent and accommodates generally and legally accepted Fair Use limits. The workflow allows library or copyright staff an easy means to keep on top of their copyright obligations, manage licenses and review and adjust schedules but is still a highly efficient means to cope with large numbers of requests to use materials. The poster details speed and efficiency gains for professors and library staff while reducing legal exposure.

  13. C-reactive protein point-of-care testing and antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract infections in rural primary health centres of North Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yebyo, Henock; Medhanyie, Araya Abrha; Spigt, Mark; Hopstaken, Rogier

    2016-01-14

    Unjustified antibiotic prescribing for acute upper respiratory infections (URTIs) is probably more common in poor-resource settings where physicians are scarce. Introducing C-reactive protein (CRP) point-of-care testing in such settings could reduce the misuse of antibiotics, which could avert antibiotic resistance. However, information useful for the applicability of CRP test in resource-limited settings is lacking. This study aimed to elicit the frequency of antibiotic prescribing and distribution of CRP levels in remote, rural settings in Ethiopia. We included 414 patients with acute URTIs from four health centres. Health professionals recorded the clinical features of the patients, but the laboratory professionals measured the CRP levels of all patients at the point of care. The most prominent respiratory causes for consultation were acute URTIs combined (44.4%), and lower respiratory tract infections-pneumonia (29.71%) and acute bronchitis (25.84%). The CRP distribution was Ethiopia is unduly high, with high proportions of mild, self-limiting illness, mostly URTIs. Implementation of CRP point-of-care testing in such resource-constrained settings, with low- or middle-grade healthcare professionals, could help reconcile the inappropriate use of antibiotics by withholding from patients who do not benefit from antibiotic treatment.

  14. Are cultural dimensions relevant for explaining cross-national differences in antibiotic use in Europe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelen Greta

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotics are widely-used medicines for which a more prudent use has been advocated to minimize development of resistance. There are considerable cross-national differences that can only partially be explained by epidemiological difference and variations in health care structure. The aim of this study was to explore whether cross-national differences in use of antibiotics (prescribed and non-prescribed are associated with differences between national cultures as described in Hofstede's model of cultural dimensions (Power Distance, Individualism, Masculinity, Uncertainty Avoidance and Long-Term Orientation. Methods Country-level data of prescribed antibiotic use and self-medication with antibiotics were correlated to country-specific scores of cultural dimensions obtained from Hofstede. Data on use of antibiotics were provided by three European studies, based on different methods and/or countries: Self-medication with Antibiotics and Resistance in Europe (SAR, based on a survey in 2003 on reported use of antibiotics in 19 countries, the European Surveillance on Antimicrobial Consumption, based on distribution and reimbursement of antibiotics in ambulatory care (1997–2002, and the 2002 interview-based Eurobarometer study, asking whether respondents had taken antibiotics in the previous 12 months. These studies provided data on antibiotics use for 27 European countries in total, for which scores of cultural dimensions were also available. The SAR-study differentiated between prescribed antibiotics and self-medication with antibiotics. Results Significant positive correlations were found for Power Distance Index with use of prescribed antibiotics in the three studies (rho between 0.59 and 0.62 and with self-medication (rho = 0.54 in the SAR study. Positive significant correlations were found for the Uncertainty Avoidance Index with the use of antibiotics as reported in two studies (rho between 0.57 and 0.59; for the SAR study

  15. Are cultural dimensions relevant for explaining cross-national differences in antibiotic use in Europe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschepper, Reginald; Grigoryan, Larissa; Lundborg, Cecilia Stålsby; Hofstede, Geert; Cohen, Joachim; Kelen, Greta Van Der; Deliens, Luc; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M

    2008-06-06

    Antibiotics are widely-used medicines for which a more prudent use has been advocated to minimize development of resistance. There are considerable cross-national differences that can only partially be explained by epidemiological difference and variations in health care structure. The aim of this study was to explore whether cross-national differences in use of antibiotics (prescribed and non-prescribed) are associated with differences between national cultures as described in Hofstede's model of cultural dimensions (Power Distance, Individualism, Masculinity, Uncertainty Avoidance and Long-Term Orientation). Country-level data of prescribed antibiotic use and self-medication with antibiotics were correlated to country-specific scores of cultural dimensions obtained from Hofstede. Data on use of antibiotics were provided by three European studies, based on different methods and/or countries: Self-medication with Antibiotics and Resistance in Europe (SAR), based on a survey in 2003 on reported use of antibiotics in 19 countries, the European Surveillance on Antimicrobial Consumption, based on distribution and reimbursement of antibiotics in ambulatory care (1997-2002), and the 2002 interview-based Eurobarometer study, asking whether respondents had taken antibiotics in the previous 12 months. These studies provided data on antibiotics use for 27 European countries in total, for which scores of cultural dimensions were also available. The SAR-study differentiated between prescribed antibiotics and self-medication with antibiotics. Significant positive correlations were found for Power Distance Index with use of prescribed antibiotics in the three studies (rho between 0.59 and 0.62) and with self-medication (rho = 0.54) in the SAR study. Positive significant correlations were found for the Uncertainty Avoidance Index with the use of antibiotics as reported in two studies (rho between 0.57 and 0.59; for the SAR study the correlations were insignificant). Masculinity

  16. Assessment of antibiotic use in farm animals in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manishimwe, Rosine; Nishimwe, Kizito; Ojok, Lonzy

    2017-08-01

    The irrational use of antibiotics in humans and animals is highly related to the emergence and increase of antibiotic-resistant bacteria worldwide. A cross-sectional survey aimed at evaluating the current level of practices regarding antibiotic use in farm animals in Rwanda was carried out countrywide. Interviews were conducted on 229 farmers rearing different types of animals. The study has revealed that almost all respondent farmers could name at least one antibiotic used in farm animals and peni-streptomycin was named by most of them (95.6%). The use of antibiotics in farm animals was observed in the majority of respondents (97.4%). It was found that 44.4 and 26.5% of respondents reported that they used antibiotics for disease prevention and growth promotion, respectively. The use of non-prescribed antibiotics in animals was also reported by more than the half of respondent farmers (55.6%). The majority of farmers had a moderate level of practices regarding antibiotic use in farm animals (73.5%), very few had a high level (26%) and only one respondent had a low level. The high level of practices in regard to antibiotic use in animals was associated with the location of the farm, the type of reared animals, and the rearing system. The results of this study give an insight into antibiotics usage practices in farm animals in Rwanda. The generated information can guide sensitizations and promotions of the prudent use of antibiotics among farmers in order to limit the increase of antibiotic resistance in the country.

  17. Effect of a training and educational intervention for physicians and caregivers on antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections in children at primary care facilities in rural China: a cluster-randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaolin; Zhang, Zhitong; Walley, John D; Hicks, Joseph P; Zeng, Jun; Deng, Simin; Zhou, Yu; Yin, Jia; Newell, James N; Sun, Qiang; Zou, Guanyang; Guo, Yan; Upshur, Ross E G; Lin, Mei

    2017-12-01

    Inappropriate antibiotic prescribing contributes to the generation of drug resistance worldwide, and is particularly common in China. We assessed the effectiveness of an antimicrobial stewardship programme aiming to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing in paediatric outpatients by targeting providers and caregivers in primary care hospitals in rural China. We did a pragmatic, cluster-randomised controlled trial with a 6-month intervention period. Clusters were primary care township hospitals in two counties of Guangxi province in China, which were randomly allocated to the intervention group or the control group (in a 1:1 ratio in Rong county and in a 5:6 ratio in Liujiang county). Randomisation was stratified by county. Eligible participants were children aged 2-14 years who attended a township hospital as an outpatient and were given a prescription following a primary diagnosis of an upper respiratory tract infection. The intervention included clinician guidelines and training on appropriate prescribing, monthly prescribing peer-review meetings, and brief caregiver education. In hospitals allocated to the control group, usual care was provided, with antibiotics prescribed at the individual clinician's discretion. Patients were masked to their allocated treatment group but doctors were not. The primary outcome was the antibiotic prescription rate in children attending the hospitals, defined as the cluster-level proportion of prescriptions for upper respiratory tract infections in 2-14-year-old outpatients, issued during the final 3 months of the 6-month intervention period (endline), that included one or more antibiotics. The outcome was based on prescription records and analysed by modified intention-to-treat. This study is registered with the ISRCTN registry, number ISRCTN14340536. We recruited all 25 eligible township hospitals in the two counties (14 hospitals in Rong county and 11 in Liujiang county), and randomly allocated 12 to the intervention group

  18. Handling Time-dependent Variables : Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz-Price, L. Silvia; Frencken, Jos F.; Tarima, Sergey; Bonten, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating quantitative associations between antibiotic exposure and antibiotic resistance development is important. In the absence of randomized trials, observational studies are the next best alternative to derive such estimates. Yet, as antibiotics are prescribed for varying time periods,

  19. [Assessment of antibiotic use and impact of an intervention intended to modify the prescribing behavior in surgical prophylaxis in 6hospitals in the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Saucedo, Gerardo Del Carmen; de la Garza-Camargo, Mauricio; Briones-Lara, Evangelina; Carmona-González, Sandra; García-Cabello, Ricardo; Islas-Esparza, Luis Arturo; Saldaña-Flores, Gustavo; González-Cano, Juan Roberto; González-Ruvalcaba, Román; Valadez-Botello, Francisco Javier; Muñoz-Maldonado, Gerardo Enrique; Montero-Cantú, Carlos Alberto; Díaz-Ramos, Rita Delia; Solórzano-Santos, Fortino

    Improper use of antibiotics increases antimicrobial resistance. Evaluate the use of antibiotics and the impact of an intervention designed to improve antibiotic prescription for surgical prophylaxis in 6 hospitals of Monterrey, Mexico. Design: A prospective multicenter survey and a pretest-postest experimental study. Phase 1: Survey to evaluate the use of antibiotics through an especially designed guide. Phase 2: Intervention designed to improve antibiotic prescription for surgical prophylaxis by the medical staff by using printed, audiovisual and electronic messages. Phase 3: Survey to evaluate the impact of the intervention. Frequencies, percentages, medians, ranges and X 2 test. Phase 1: We evaluated 358 surgical patients, 274 prophylactic antibiotic regimens. A total of 96% of antibiotics regimens began with inappropriate timing (290/302), 82.8% were inappropriate regimens (274/331), 77.7% were in inappropriate dosage (230/296), 86% of inadequate length (241/280), and in 17.4% restricted antibiotics were used (52/299). Phase 2: 9 sessions including 189 physicians (14 department chairs, 58 general practitioners and 117 residents). Phase 3: We evaluated 303 surgical patients, 218 prophylactic antibiotics regimens. Inappropriate treatment commencement was reduced to 84.1% (180/214) (P<0.001), inappropriate regimens to 75.3% (162/215) (P=0.03), inappropriate dosages to 51.2% (110/215) (P<0.001), and use of restricted antibiotics to 8.3% (18/215) (P=0.003). Inappropriate use of prophylactic antibiotics in surgery is a frequent problem in Monterrey. The intervention improved the antibiotic prescription for surgical prophylaxis by reducing inappropriate treatment commencement, regimens, dosages, and overuse of restricted antibiotics. It is necessary to strengthen strategies to improve the prescription of antibiotics in surgical prophylaxis. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  20. Parents' socioeconomic factors related to high antibiotic prescribing in primary health care among children aged 0-6 years in the Capital Region of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jette Nygaard; Bjerrum, Lars; Boel, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the distribution of antibiotic prescriptions in primary health care among children aged 0-6 years and its association with socioeconomic factors. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study describing antibiotic prescriptions and socioeconomic factors, using different population......-based registers from Statistics Denmark. SETTING: Antibiotic prescriptions in 2012 from primary health care in the Capital Region of Denmark. SUBJECTS: The population of children aged 0-6 years (n = 139,398) in the Capital Region of Denmark. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: High use of antibiotics identified by number...... of antibiotic prescriptions (≥ 3 prescriptions per year) and defined daily doses (DDD). A multinomial logistic regression analysis estimating the association between high antibiotic use and parents' education, employment status, income, child's sex, and ethnic background. RESULTS: Ten percent of children...

  1. Prudent avoidance guidelines for power frequency magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuttall, K.

    1999-01-01

    In March 1991, following a wide ranging inquiry into community needs and high voltage transmission line development, Sir Harry Gibbs, an ex-Chief Justice of the High Court of Australia concluded that adverse health effects from power frequency electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) had not been established. He went on to find that there was some evidence that they might pose a risk to health. On this basis, he recommended a policy of prudent avoidance in the construction of new transmission lines. Since that time, a succession of inquiries in Australia and overseas have made similar findings and recommended prudent avoidance. This paper provides practical guidance to electricity transmission and distribution utilities and other interested stakeholders in the application of prudent avoidance to the design and siting of new electrical facilities. The paper provides background information and a range of general measures which might prudently be applied. It is not the authors' intention to provide precise instructions for the application of prudent avoidance but, rather, to provide a series of guiding principles which may be applied to particular situations, having regard to the specific design practices and other policies of individual electricity utilities. Copyright (1999) Australasian Radiation Protection Society Inc

  2. The unusual asymptotics of three-sided prudent polygons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaton, Nicholas R; Guttmann, Anthony J; Flajolet, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    We have studied the area-generating function of prudent polygons on the square lattice. Exact solutions are obtained for the generating function of two-sided and three-sided prudent polygons, and a functional equation is found for four-sided prudent polygons. This is used to generate series coefficients in polynomial time, and these are analysed to determine the asymptotics numerically. A careful asymptotic analysis of the three-sided polygons produces a most surprising result. A transcendental critical exponent is found, and the leading amplitude is not quite a constant, but is a constant plus a small oscillatory component with an amplitude approximately 10 -8 times that of the leading amplitude. This effect cannot be seen by any standard numerical analysis, but it may be present in other models. If so, it changes our whole view of the asymptotic behaviour of lattice models. (fast track communication)

  3. Promoting prudent antimicrobial use in the veterinary field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vibeke Frøkjær

    2013-01-01

    to reduce use, a strategy that may not always be appropriate in the clinical setting. In contrast, ‘responsible’ implies appropriate use whether or not this results in an overall reduction. Both prudent use and responsible use imply veterinary prescription of antimicrobials only when based on proper...

  4. The Senate CTB Treaty Rejection: Prudent Statesmanship or Partisan Politics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-12-13

    the Constitution the theory of separation of powers , which so many delegates had come to believe in.5...Fathers who had fought for the advice and consent clause and the principle of separation of powers in 1789 would have been pleased with the prudent

  5. The "prudent layperson" definition of an emergency medical condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, James; Galvin, Hannah K; Johnson, Sandra C

    2002-01-01

    The study objectives, based on federal and state legislative language, were to objectively define symptoms and signs commonly agreed on by "prudent laypersons" as "emergency medical conditions." After comprehensive tabulation of symptom classifications from the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9), we performed a survey of nonmedical laypersons. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, proportional calculations, and 95% confidence intervals. A minority of symptoms and signs (25/87, 29%) were considered emergency medical conditions by more than half of nonmedical survey respondents who were self-defined as prudent laypersons. The leading conditions deemed emergencies were loss of consciousness, seizure, no recognition of one side of the body, paralysis, shock, gangrene, coughing blood, trouble breathing, chest pain, and choking. Pain, except for renal colic or chest pain, was not considered an emergency. No symptoms or signs specifically related to gynecologic disorders were considered emergencies. Most symptoms and signs tabulated in the diagnostic coding manual, ICD-9, are not considered emergency medical conditions by self-designated prudent laypersons. These include many conditions that are commonly investigated and treated in the emergency department setting. Use of the prudent layperson standard for reimbursable emergency health services may not reflect the actual scope of symptoms necessitating emergency care.

  6. Antibiotic prophylaxis for patients undergoing elective endoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiotic prophylaxis for patients undergoing elective endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. M Brand, D Bisoz. Abstract. Background. Antibiotic prophylaxis for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is controversial. We set out to assess the current antibiotic prescribing practice among ...

  7. Incidence of Clostridium difficile infection in patients receiving high-risk antibiotics with or without a proton pump inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, D; Young, L R; Reddy, S; Bergman, C; Young, J D

    2016-02-01

    Considering the incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), risk reduction strategies are crucial. Prior studies suggest that proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use can increase the risk of CDI over antibiotics alone; however, data and guidelines have been conflicting. The aim was to compare CDI incidence in patients receiving high-risk antibiotics, comparing rates in those prescribed a PPI versus those without overlapping PPI exposure. This retrospective cohort study assessed the incidence of CDI in veterans receiving high-risk antibiotics over an approximately three-year period. High-risk antibiotics were defined as: ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, clindamycin, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, or cefixime. We identified subjects who were prescribed any high-risk antibiotic, finding 3513 on a concomitant PPI and 6149 not taking a PPI. Of these subjects, 111 were diagnosed with CDI and met inclusion criteria. Baseline characteristics, CDI severity, length of hospitalization and antibiotic therapy prior to infection were similar in both groups. The incidence of CDI was significantly higher in patients prescribed a PPI (odds ratio: 2.2; 95% confidence interval: 1.52-3.23; P=0.0001). A strong association was found between concurrent PPI use with fluoroquinolones (P=0.005) and clindamycin (P=0.045). The use of PPIs together with high-risk antibiotics was associated with a significantly higher incidence of CDI. Our study provides further support for the CDI prevention strategy of judicious PPI use, especially in patients receiving high-risk antibiotics. Prudent avoidance of PPIs may reduce the incidence of CDI, a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Are antibiotics over-prescribed in Poland? Management of upper respiratory tract infections in primary health care region of Warszawa, Wola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windak, A; Tomasik, T; Jacobs, H M; de Melker, R A

    1996-10-01

    Concern about the increasing numbers of multiple resistant strains resulting from over- and misuse of antibiotics is growing world-wide. A questionnaire based on two cases related to respiratory tract infections for which antibiotic prescription was disputable was sent to primary care physicians in the health care district of Warszawa, Wola, Poland. The prescription percentage for both cases was high, with a large variety in choice of antibiotic therapy made by the doctors. This finding was striking when compared with the more restrictive prescription behaviour of Dutch general practitioners. Moreover, this high prescription percentage was combined with other abundant activities. In the case of the patient with acute tonsillitis, 53% of the primary care physicians would have ordered additional tests, 94% would have advised bed-rest and 9% would have referred. In the sinusitis case, these figures were 88, 74 and 54% respectively. No correlations were found between choice of antibiotics and characteristics of the physicians such as age, gender, experience with working in primary health care or degree of specialization. In conclusion, the results of this small pilot study indicate that Polish first-contact doctors have an inadequate prescription behaviour in cases with upper respiratory tract infections. Our results underline the need for courses in pharmacotherapy within the postgraduate education course in family medicine recently introduced in Poland.

  9. Antibiotic resistance status of Escherichia coli isolated from healthy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research revealed a high level of antibiotic resistance among E. coli. The percentage of resistance observed for the antibiotics included in this study reflected the degree of their respective uses in pig production in the study area. This work further supports the need for prudent use of each of the antibiotics in animal ...

  10. An intervention modelling experiment to change GPs' intentions to implement evidence-based practice: using theory-based interventions to promote GP management of upper respiratory tract infection without prescribing antibiotics #2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaner Eileen FS

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychological theories of behaviour may provide a framework to guide the design of interventions to change professional behaviour. Behaviour change interventions, designed using psychological theory and targeting important motivational beliefs, were experimentally evaluated for effects on the behavioural intention and simulated behaviour of GPs in the management of uncomplicated upper respiratory tract infection (URTI. Methods The design was a 2 × 2 factorial randomised controlled trial. A postal questionnaire was developed based on three theories of human behaviour: Theory of Planned Behaviour; Social Cognitive Theory and Operant Learning Theory. The beliefs and attitudes of GPs regarding the management of URTI without antibiotics and rates of prescribing on eight patient scenarios were measured at baseline and post-intervention. Two theory-based interventions, a "graded task" with "action planning" and a "persuasive communication", were incorporated into the post-intervention questionnaire. Trial groups were compared using co-variate analyses. Results Post-intervention questionnaires were returned for 340/397 (86% GPs who responded to the baseline survey. Each intervention had a significant effect on its targeted behavioural belief: compared to those not receiving the intervention GPs completing Intervention 1 reported stronger self-efficacy scores (Beta = 1.41, 95% CI: 0.64 to 2.25 and GPs completing Intervention 2 had more positive anticipated consequences scores (Beta = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.46 to 1.98. Intervention 2 had a significant effect on intention (Beta = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.41 to 1.38 and simulated behaviour (Beta = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.19 to 0.74. Conclusion GPs' intended management of URTI was significantly influenced by their confidence in their ability to manage URTI without antibiotics and the consequences they anticipated as a result of doing so. Two targeted behaviour change interventions differentially affected

  11. An intervention modelling experiment to change GPs' intentions to implement evidence-based practice: using theory-based interventions to promote GP management of upper respiratory tract infection without prescribing antibiotics #2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrisos, Susan; Eccles, Martin; Johnston, Marie; Francis, Jill; Kaner, Eileen FS; Steen, Nick; Grimshaw, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    Background Psychological theories of behaviour may provide a framework to guide the design of interventions to change professional behaviour. Behaviour change interventions, designed using psychological theory and targeting important motivational beliefs, were experimentally evaluated for effects on the behavioural intention and simulated behaviour of GPs in the management of uncomplicated upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). Methods The design was a 2 × 2 factorial randomised controlled trial. A postal questionnaire was developed based on three theories of human behaviour: Theory of Planned Behaviour; Social Cognitive Theory and Operant Learning Theory. The beliefs and attitudes of GPs regarding the management of URTI without antibiotics and rates of prescribing on eight patient scenarios were measured at baseline and post-intervention. Two theory-based interventions, a "graded task" with "action planning" and a "persuasive communication", were incorporated into the post-intervention questionnaire. Trial groups were compared using co-variate analyses. Results Post-intervention questionnaires were returned for 340/397 (86%) GPs who responded to the baseline survey. Each intervention had a significant effect on its targeted behavioural belief: compared to those not receiving the intervention GPs completing Intervention 1 reported stronger self-efficacy scores (Beta = 1.41, 95% CI: 0.64 to 2.25) and GPs completing Intervention 2 had more positive anticipated consequences scores (Beta = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.46 to 1.98). Intervention 2 had a significant effect on intention (Beta = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.41 to 1.38) and simulated behaviour (Beta = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.19 to 0.74). Conclusion GPs' intended management of URTI was significantly influenced by their confidence in their ability to manage URTI without antibiotics and the consequences they anticipated as a result of doing so. Two targeted behaviour change interventions differentially affected these beliefs. One

  12. Rationalising prescribing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadmann, Sarah; Bang, Lia Evi

    2015-01-01

    Initiatives in the name of 'rational pharmacotherapy' have been launched to alter what is seen as 'inappropriate' prescribing practices of physicians. Based on observations and interviews with 20 general practitioners (GPs) in 2009-2011, we explored how attempts to rationalise prescribing interac...

  13. Surveys of public knowledge and attitudes with regard to antibiotics in Poland: Did the European Antibiotic Awareness Day campaigns change attitudes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Mazińska

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance is a global public health problem. Monitoring the level of knowledge regarding antibiotics is a part of the European Union Community strategy against antimicrobial resistance.To assess knowledge by the general public in Poland regarding antibiotics, AMR, and the impact of the European Antibiotic Awareness Day campaigns.The repeated cross-sectional study was developed and carried out among the general public in Poland (in 5 waves between 2009 and 2011, embracing a total of 5004 respondents. The survey was based on a self-designed questionnaire, and carried out by Millward Brown SMG/KRC, using Computer Assisted Telephone Interviews (CATI.A high percentage of Polish adults had used antibiotics within the 12 months preceding their participation in the study (38%. Statistically relevant differences were observed regarding the respondents' gender, age, education and employment status. The majority of the antibiotics used were prescribed by physicians (90%. In all five waves, 3% of the respondents purchased an antibiotic without a prescription. Prescriptions were mostly obtained from a general practitioner. The prevailing reasons for taking antibiotics were the common cold, sore throat, cough and flu. Approximately 40% of the respondents expected a prescription for an antibiotic against the flu. The vast majority knew that antibiotics kill bacteria (80% but at the same time 60% of respondents believed antibiotics kill viruses. Physicians, pharmacists, hospital staff and nurses were mentioned as the most trustworthy sources of information. A third of the respondents declared to have come across information on the prudent use of antibiotics in the preceding 12 months. In the fifth wave, nearly half of the participants (48%, who had come across information about antibiotics in the preceding 12 months declared that the information resulted in a change in their attitude towards antibiotic use.The survey generated information about

  14. The RESET Mindset Model applied on decreasing antibiotic usage in dairy cattle in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, T. J. G. M.; Wessels, R. J.; Jansen, Jolanda

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prudent use of antibiotics is important to prevent antibiotic resistance in humans and in animals. For this reason politicians demanded a decrease of total antibiotic use and of use of critically important antibiotics in animal husbandry in the Netherlands. In the dairy sector the use of

  15. Antibiotics for respiratory, ear and urinary tract disorders and consistency among GPs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, D.S.Y.; Kuyvenhoven, M.M.; Dijk, L. van; Verheij, T.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To describe specific diagnoses for which systemic antibiotics are prescribed, to assess adherence of antibiotic choice to national guidelines and to assess consistency among general practitioners (GPs) in prescribed volumes of antibiotics for respiratory, ear and urinary tract disorders.

  16. The RESET Mindset Model applied on decreasing antibiotic usage in dairy cattle in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, T. J. G. M.; Wessels, R. J.; Jansen, Jolanda

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prudent use of antibiotics is important to prevent antibiotic resistance in humans and in animals. For this reason politicians demanded a decrease of total antibiotic use and of use of critically important antibiotics in animal husbandry in the Netherlands. In the dairy sector the use of antibiotics almost halved in the years 2009-2015, with a decrease of the use of critically important antibiotics to very low levels. THEORY OF BEHAVIOUR CHANGE: To realize a sustainable decrease i...

  17. Motivos de la prescripción inadecuada de antibióticos en un hospital pediátrico de alta complejidad Reasons for inappropriate prescribing of antibiotics in a high-complexity pediatric hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina Ruvinsky

    2011-12-01

    unit patients, and surgical prophylaxis patients. A univariate analysis and multiple logistic regression were performed. RESULTS: A total of 376 patients with a median of age of 50 months were studied (interquartile range [IQR] 14.5-127 months. Out of the total patients studied, 75% had one or more underlying conditions. A total of 40.6% of these patients had an oncologic pathology and 33.5% had neurological conditions. The remaining 25.9% had other underlying conditions. Antibiotic treatment was inappropriate in 35.6% of the patients studied (N = 134. In 73 (54.4% of the 134 cases, inappropriate use was due to the type of antibiotic prescribed, the dose administered, or the treatment period. The 61 (45.5% remaining cases did not require antibiotic treatment. In the multivariate analysis, the risk factors for inappropriate use of antibiotics were: administration of ceftriaxone OR 2 (95% CI, 1.3-3.7; P = 0.02; acute lower respiratory tract infection OR 1.8 (95% CI, 1.1-3.3; P < 0.04; onset of fever of unknown origin in hospital inpatients OR 5.55 (95% CI, 2.5-12; P < 0.0001; and febrile neutropenia OR 0.3 (95% CI, 0.1-0.7; P = 0.009. CONCLUSIONES: Inappropriate use of antibiotics was less common in the clinical conditions that were well-characterized. Prescribing practices that could be improved were identified through the preparation and circulation of guidelines for antibiotic use in hospital inpatients.

  18. Prescribing procrastination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, George H.

    1979-01-01

    In his everyday work the family physician sees many patients whose problems have been diagnosed but for whom postponement of an active treatment plan is indicated. The physician must therefore prescribe procrastination in a carefully planned way. I describe some ideas and practical methods for doing this. PMID:529244

  19. Cost - utility analysis of parenteral antibiotics prescribed in medical wards in a tertiary care health facility in southern province of Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukshmy Menik Hettihewa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Parenteral antibiotic (PA prescription pattern in a hospital will directly influence the annual budget allocation, development of bacterial resistance and occurrence of unnecessary adverse drug reactions if it is done with poor adherence to the standard guidelines of prescription. As specialist in the field we understand the need of conducting economic studies in relation to the cost and utility of PA prescription pattern. It will be helpful to predict the drug procurement plan for the next year and also to prevent unnecessary complications mentioned above. Objective: Our main objective was to analyze the cost/utility relationship of PA drugs which were used in medical wards in this hospital according to the top ten of the cost (TTTC and the top ten of the consumption (TTCS. Materials and method : Aggregate data from the pharmacy record books were collected for year 2010 from indoor pharmacy. Unit prize was obtained from medical supplies division. Total quantity consumed by each medical ward was considered for analysis of the cost /utility relationship. Two top ten lists were prepared according to the cost and the consumption respectively for medical wards and the correlation was analyzed using non parametric testing with spearman test. Results: Regarding PA drugs used in this hospital, 7/10 PA drugs in TTTC are not included in the TTCS. Out of the total cost for TTTC, 82.6% of the cost had been spent for the PA drugs which are not in the TTCS and 17.5% of the cost of TTTC was used to purchase only three drugs from the TTCS. But these three drugs had contributed only 28% of top ten consumption. 72% of the PA drugs in TTCS were not costly drugs and highly consumed in medical wards. Correlation was significantly positive between cost and utility of PA drugs. ( r=-0.91,p<0.001 Conclusion: Majority of the consumed PA drugs are non-costly and it indicates the prescriptions had been done according to the rational guidelines including

  20. Prudent management of utility assets -- Problem or promise?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatch, D.; Serwinowski, M.

    1998-01-01

    As utilities move into a deregulated market, the extent and nature of their asset base, as well as, the manner in which they have managed it, may play a key factor in the form of regulatory recovery. Utilities must face the issue of stranded assets. One form of addressing this issue is using ''EVA'', Economic Value Added as a mechanism to form financial models for prudent asset management. The authors present an approach to this challenging aspect of deregulation. They focus on the following utility assets: buildings/facilities, and excess real physical assets. Primarily focusing on Niagara Mohawk, two or three case studies are used to demonstrate how proactive management and EVA analysis transforms underperforming utility assets. These will be presented in a way that can show benefits for all utility stakeholders such as cost avoidance, load growth, real estate tax savings, stranded asset reductions, environmental gains, corporate image enhancement, and regulatory/governmental gains; over and above possible economic gains. Examples will be given that include the transformation of utility assets into award winning commercial, residential, and industrial developments as well as recreational/park lands and greenways. Similarly, other examples will show the many tangible and intangible benefits of an effective investment recovery and waste stream management program. Various strategies will also be presented that detail how utilities can begin to develop a total comprehensive plan for their asset portfolio. The first step in realizing and maximizing EVA towards a portfolio of assets is a change in corporate policy--one from passive ownership to active prudent management. Service and cost will drive competition resulting from full deregulation. To drive down costs, utilities will need to become more efficient in dealing with their asset base. By embracing an EVA model on an entire asset portfolio, utilities can prepare and excel in the newly shaped marketplace

  1. Real-life data on antibiotic prescription and sputum culture diagnostics in acute exacerbations of COPD in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bathoorn E

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Erik Bathoorn,1 Feikje Groenhof,2 Ron Hendrix,1,3 Thys van der Molen,2,4 Bhanu Sinha,1 Huib AM Kerstjens,5 Alex W Friedrich,1 Janwillem WH Kocks2,4 1Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands; 2Department of Primary Care, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands; 3Department of Pulmonary Diseases and Tuberculosis, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands; 4Department of Medical Microbiology, Certe – Laboratory for Infectious Diseases, Groningen, the Netherlands; 5GRIAC Research Institute, Groningen, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands Background: Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD are generally treated with optimization of bronchodilation therapy and a course of oral corticosteroids, mostly without antibiotics. The Dutch guidelines recommend prudent use of antibiotics, with amoxicillin or doxycycline as first choice. Here we evaluate adherence to these guidelines with regard to antibiotic prescription in AECOPD in primary care and the use of sputum cultures. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed a longitudinal cohort of patients in three primary care practices in the north-eastern region of the Netherlands from 2009 to 2013 (n=36,172 subjects participating in the Registration Network Groningen. Antibiotics prescribed for AECOPD -10/+28 days from the start date of corticosteroid courses were evaluated. In addition, we assessed regional data on the susceptibility of respiratory pathogens from COPD patients. Results: We identified 1,297 patients with COPD. Of these, 616 experienced one or more exacerbations, resulting in a total of 1,558 exacerbations, for which 1,594 antibiotic courses were prescribed. The recommended antibiotics doxycycline and amoxicillin accounted for 56% of the prescribed

  2. A process evaluation of the UK-wide Antibiotic Guardian campaign: developing engagement on antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Alex; Hopkins, Susan; Sallis, Anna; Budd, Emma L; Ashiru-Oredope, Diane

    2017-06-01

    Public Health England developed and led a new UK-wide pledge campaign aiming to improve behaviours around the prudent use and prescription of antibiotics. This paper presents a process evaluation for the first season of the campaign to determine the impact of the campaign and inform future campaigns. Data were collected from AntibioticGuardian.com and Google analytics between August 2014 and January 2015. The primary outcome was the decision to pledge and was assessed according to target audience, location, source and route of referral to the website. There were 47 158 unique visits to the website and 12 509 visitors made a pledge (26.5%) to become Antibiotic Guardians (AGs); 69% were healthcare professionals. Social media directed the most traffic to the website (24% of the public that signed up cited social media as how they discovered the campaign), other acquisition routes such as self-directed, email or website referral, were more effective at encouraging visitors to pledge. The campaign completed its goal of 10 000 AGs in the first year. Further work is required to improve engagement with target audiences and determine whether this campaign has an impact on antibiotic consumption and prescribing behaviour among the public and healthcare professionals. © Crown copyright 2016.

  3. Patients’ vs. Physicians’ Assessments of Emergencies: The Prudent Layperson Standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langdorf, Mark I

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare perception of the need for emergency care by emergency department (ED patients vs. emergency physicians (EPs. Methods: Mailed survey to EPs and a convenience sample of ED patients. Survey rated urgency of acute sore throat, ankle injury, abdominal pain, and hemiparesis, as well as the best definition of “emergency.” Responses were compared with chi-square (p < .05. Results: 119/140 (85% of EPs and 1453 ED patients responded. EPs were more likely to judge acute abdominal pain (79.8% vs. 43.4%, p < 0.001, odds ratio (OR 5.16, 95% confidence interval (CI 3.19-8.40 and hemiparesis (100% vs. 82.6%, p < 0.001, OR 24.9, 95% CI 3.75-94.4 as an emergency. Similar proportions of ED patients and EPs considered sore throat (12.2% vs. 7.6%, p = 0.18, OR 0.59, CI 0.27-1.23 and ankle injury (46.9% vs. 38.6%, p = 0.10, OR 0.71, CI 0.48-1.06 an emergency. EPs (35% and ED patients (40% agreed to a similar degree with the “prudent layperson” definition, “a condition that may result in death, permanent disability, or severe pain.” (p = .36, OR 1.22, CI 0.81-1.84. EPs were more likely to add, “the condition prevented work,” (27% vs. 16%, p = 0.003, OR 0.51, CI 0.33-0.81. Patients more often added, “occurred outside business hours” (15% vs. 4%, p = 0.002, OR 4.0, CI = 1.5-11.3. Conclusion: For serious complaints, ED patients’ thresholds for seeking care are higher than judged appropriate by EPs. Stroke is not uniformly recognized as an emergency. Absent consensus for the “correct” threshold, the prudent layperson standard is appropriate.

  4. Prudent layperson definition of an emergent pediatric medical condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Craig J; Poirier, Michael P; Cantwell, John R; Ermis, Peter R; Isaacman, Daniel J

    2006-03-01

    This study was designed to assess how well parents rated pediatric medical conditions based on their perceived degree of urgency so as to determine if the "Prudent Layperson Standard'' is reasonable. A self-administered, supervised survey was given to a convenience sample of 340 caregivers in the emergency department of an urban children's hospital. Respondents were asked to rank the urgency of 15 scenarios. A caregiver response within 1 point of the physician score was considered concordant with medical opinion. A 2-week-old infant with a rectal temperature of 103.7 degrees F was the only emergent scenario underestimated by caregivers. A 1 1/2-yr-old child with an upper respiratory tract infection, a 7-year-old child with ringworm, an 8-month-old infant with a simple forehead contusion, and a 4-year-old child with conjunctivitis were the non-urgent scenarios overestimated by caregivers. Laypeople are able to identify cases constructed to represent obvious pediatric medical emergencies. Several patient subgroups frequently overestimate medical urgency.

  5. Out-Patient Prescribing Practices at Mbagathi District Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On average, each patient was prescribed 3.85 types of drugs. A total of 835 drugs were prescribed by generic name, accounting for 25.6% of total number of drugs prescribed (1,506). Out of 391 sampled prescriptions, 266 had antibiotics accounting for (68.0%). A relatively small proportion of the prescriptions, 9.5% had an ...

  6. The analysis of tetracyclines, quinolones, macrolides, lincosamides, pleuromutilins, and sulfonamides in chicken feathers using UHPLC-MS/MS in order to monitor antibiotic use in the poultry sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Larissa J.M.; Bolck, Yvette J.C.; Rademaker, Janneau; Zuidema, Tina; Berendsen, Bjorn J.A.

    2017-01-01

    In The Netherlands, all antibiotic treatments should be registered at the farm and in a central database. To enforce correct antibiotic use and registration, and to enforce prudent use of antibiotics, there is a need for methods that are able to detect antibiotic treatments. Ideally, such a method

  7. High Antibiotic Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malo, Sara; José Rabanaque, María; Feja, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Heavy antibiotic users are those individuals with the highest exposure to antibiotics. They play an important role as contributors to the increasing risk of antimicrobial resistance. We applied different methods to identify and characterize the group of heavy antibiotic users in Spain as well...... as their exposure to antibiotics. Data on outpatient prescribing of antimicrobials (ATC J01) in 2010 were obtained from a prescription database covering Aragón (northeastern Spain). The antimicrobial consumption at the individual level was analysed both according to the volume of DDD and the number of packages...... purchased per year. Heavy antibiotic users were identified according to Lorenz curves and characterized by age, gender, and their antimicrobial prescription profile. Lorenz curves demonstrated substantial differences in the individual use of antimicrobials. Heavy antibiotic users (5% of individuals...

  8. The role of prudent love in the practice of clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcum, James A

    2011-10-01

    Virtues are an important component in the practice of clinical medicine. Prudence or wisdom and charity or love are often viewed as crucial for virtuous practice. Generally, the two virtues are discussed separately, with no connection between them; however, a synergy exists between the two virtues as a compound virtue of prudent love in which the properties of the compound virtue transcend those of the individual virtues. To examine the nature of prudent love and to discuss its role in the practice of clinical medicine. Philosophical and conceptual analyses. Prudent love exhibits properties, which are the result of a synergistic interaction between the two individual virtues. Succinctly, prudent love synergism is an outcome of a particular structural relationship between the two virtues in which motivational love prompts the prudent clinician to acquire and utilize clinical competence, which then allows the loving clinician to take care of an individual patient's health care needs. In turn, the virtuous clinician's ability to meet those needs successfully feedbacks onto the motivation to satisfy them initially, thereby encouraging and enhancing the clinician to fulfil them even more prudently and lovingly, not only for the individual patient but also for other patients. The compound virtue of prudent love provides a comprehensive approach to practising medicine that meets not only the needs of patients but also fulfils the physician's sense as healer. Although challenges face teaching virtues in the medical curriculum, strategies are available for incorporating training in virtues into the curriculum. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Macrolide antibiotics and the airway: antibiotic or non-antibiotic effects?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, D M

    2010-03-01

    The macrolides are a class of antibiotics widely prescribed in infectious disease. More recently, there has been considerable interest in potential indications for these agents, in addition to their simple antibacterial indications, in a number of lung pathophysiologies.

  10. Combating antibiotic resistance - A Policy Roadmap to Reduce Use of Medically Important Antibiotics in Livestock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Lance B.; Newland, Jason; Bole, Aparna

    edical and public health organizations around the world agree that more prudent use of antibiotics in human medicine and in livestock production is paramount to slow the spread of antibiotic resistance. Of particular concern is the widespread use of antibiotics important to human medicine in food...... animals. In the U.S., such use accounts for 70% of all sales of medically important antibiotics. It is against this backdrop that 12 antibiotic resistance experts from the fields of infectious disease medicine, veterinary medicine, microbiology, epidemiology and public health joined to craft a policy...... roadmap to help move the U.S. forward in addressing the contribution of livestock antibiotic use to the growing global threat of antibiotic resistance. The policy roadmap consists of 11 core policy recommendations that are aimed at a broad set of stakeholders: federal, state and local policymakers, food...

  11. [Antibiotic therapy in patients with renal insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckhaupt, H; Rose, K G

    1985-06-01

    For the otolaryngologist (ENT specialist), too, antibiotics are among the most frequently prescribed drugs. This article gives the essential fundamentals for the antibiotic treatment of patients with restricted kidney functions, as well as advice for antibiotic therapy in clinics and in medical practice.

  12. The pattern of antibiotic usage in surgical in-patients of a teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Prudent use of antibiotics will curtail health care costs and potential adverse effects to the individual taking them and also diminishes the wide ecologic effects leading to selection of antibiotic resistant pathogenic Organisms. Adverse- effects to the individual taking them diminish the wide ecologic effects ...

  13. Improving the prescription of antibiotics, focus on surgical prophylaxis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasteren, M.E.E. van

    2008-01-01

    This thesis comprises several studies on the implementation of guidelines for antimicrobial use in prophylaxis as well as in therapy. The main part focuses on the data of the CHIPS-study; a quality improvement project of surgical prophylaxis in the Netherlands promoting prudent use of antibiotics

  14. Anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of antibiotics and their use in dermatology

    OpenAIRE

    Swetalina Pradhan; Bhushan Madke; Poonam Kabra; Adarsh Lata Singh

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics (antibacterial, antiviral, and antiparasitic) are class of drugs which result in either killing or inhibiting growth and multiplication of infectious organisms. Antibiotics are commonly prescribed by all specialties for treatment of infections. However, antibiotics have hitherto immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties and can be exploited for various noninfectious dermatoses. Dermatologists routinely prescribe antibiotics in treatment of various noninfectious disorders. ...

  15. Antibiotics and shared decision-making in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butler, C.C.; Kinnersley, P.; Prout, H.; Rollnick, S.; Edwards, A.; Elwyn, G.

    2001-01-01

    Antibiotics are often prescribed to patients with respiratory tract infections who are unlikely to benefit. Models of physician-patient interaction may help understanding of this problem and inform the design of communication skills interventions to enhance appropriate prescribing. The

  16. Antibiotic RX in Hospitals: Proceed with Caution PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the March 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Antibiotics save lives, but poor prescribing practices can put patients at risk for health problems. Learn how to protect patients by protecting antibiotics.

  17. Vital Signs - Antibiotic RX in Hospitals: Proceed with Caution

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast is based on the March 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Antibiotics save lives, but poor prescribing practices can put patients at risk for health problems. Learn how to protect patients by protecting antibiotics.

  18. Antibiotics: Use and misuse in pediatric dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    F C Peedikayil

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotics are commonly used in dentistry for prophylactic as well as for therapeutic purposes. Most often antibiotics are used in unwarranted situations, which may give rise to resistant bacterial strains. Dentists want to make their patients well and to prevent unpleasant complications. These desires, coupled with the belief that many oral problems are infectious, stimulate the prescribing of antibiotics. Good knowledge about the indications of antibiotics is the need of the hour in prescr...

  19. Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... all that ails you. Antibiotics, also known as antimicrobial drugs, are drugs that fight infections caused by bacteria. ... Information for Consumers and Health Professionals Information by drug class Antimicrobial Resistance Animal and Veterinary Related Resources Further information ...

  20. Did a local distribution company procure prudently during the California electricity crisis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, C.-K.; Lloyd, Debra; Clayton, William

    2006-01-01

    To manage cost risk, prudent procurement of electric power requires that some portion of a buyer's energy demand be met through long-term contracting. Under cost-of-service regulation or performance-based regulation, a local distribution company (LDC) should be allowed to fully recover all prudently incurred power procurement costs. However, the regulatory test of prudence is an ex post review with the threat of disallowance. This paper presents an economic analysis of procurement prudence involving a small LDC, Bear Valley Electric Service (BVES), which serves a resort area in Southern California. The key findings are: (a) high and volatile prices and rolling blackouts characterized the market environment faced by the owner of BVES, Southern California Water Company (SCWC), at its signing of a 5-year fixed price contract; (b) SCWC was a price-taker with no incentive to act imprudently; (c) the contract was obtained via a competitive bidding process; (d) the contract price was comparable to the benchmark price of contemporaneous contracts; (e) the fixed price contract was economic when compared to available alternatives; and (f) despite (a)-(e), a negotiated settlement with the state regulator and a large user resulted in substantial disallowance. The policy implication is that a regulator should approve a prudent procurement plan proposed by an LDC to remove the unreasonable risk of an ex post review. If the LDC strictly adheres to the plan, the resulting electricity purchases are per se prudent and should entitle the LDC to full cost recovery

  1. Antibiotic use and microbiome function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Manuel; Méndez-García, Celia; Rojo, David; Barbas, Coral; Moya, Andrés

    2017-06-15

    Our microbiome should be understood as one of the most complex components of the human body. The use of β-lactam antibiotics is one of the microbiome covariates that influence its composition. The extent to which our microbiota changes after an antibiotic intervention depends not only on the chemical nature of the antibiotic or cocktail of antibiotics used to treat specific infections, but also on the type of administration, duration and dose, as well as the level of resistance that each microbiota develops. We have begun to appreciate that not all bacteria within our microbiota are vulnerable or reactive to different antibiotic interventions, and that their influence on both microbial composition and metabolism may differ. Antibiotics are being used worldwide on a huge scale and the prescription of antibiotics is continuing to rise; however, their effects on our microbiota have been reported for only a limited number of them. This article presents a critical review of the antibiotics or antibiotic cocktails whose use in humans has been linked to changes in the composition of our microbial communities, with a particular focus on the gut, oral, respiratory, skin and vaginal microbiota, and on their molecular agents (genes, proteins and metabolites). We review the state of the art as of June 2016, and cover a total of circa 68 different antibiotics. The data herein are the first to compile information about the bacteria, fungi, archaea and viruses most influenced by the main antibiotic treatments prescribed nowadays. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Use of antibiotics in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Broe, A.; Aabenhus, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: We aimed to describe the use of systemic antibiotics among children in Denmark. Methods: National data on drug use in Denmark were extracted from the Danish National Prescription Database. We used prescription data for all children in Denmark aged 0 to 11 years from January 1, 2000...... to December 31, 2012. Results: We obtained data on 5,884,301 prescriptions for systemic antibiotics issued to 1,206,107 children. The most used single substances were phenoxymethylpenicillin (45%), amoxicillin (34%) and erythromycin (6%). The highest incidence rate of antibiotic treatment episodes......-1. There was little evidence of heavy users. Conclusion: Prescribing rate of antibiotics to children in Denmark remained stable at a high level from 2000 to 2012. An increase in the use of broad-spectrum beta-lactam penicillin was noted, but otherwise the prescribing pattern adhered well to National guidelines...

  3. Learning from prescribing errors

    OpenAIRE

    Dean, B

    2002-01-01

    

 The importance of learning from medical error has recently received increasing emphasis. This paper focuses on prescribing errors and argues that, while learning from prescribing errors is a laudable goal, there are currently barriers that can prevent this occurring. Learning from errors can take place on an individual level, at a team level, and across an organisation. Barriers to learning from prescribing errors include the non-discovery of many prescribing errors, lack of feedback to th...

  4. Antibiotics prescription in Nigerian dental healthcare services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azodo, C C; Ojehanon, P I

    2014-09-01

    Inappropriate antibiotics prescription in dental healthcare delivery that may result in the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, is a worldwide concern. The objective of the study was to determine the antibiotics knowledge and prescription patterns among dentists in Nigeria. A total of 160 questionnaires were distributed to dentists attending continuing education courses organized by two organizations in Southern and Northern parts of Nigeria. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 17.0. A total of 146 questionnaires were returned, properly filled, out of 160 questionnaires, giving an overall response rate 91.3%. The clinical factors predominantly influenced the choice of therapeutic antibiotics among the respondents. In this study, the most commonly prescribed antibiotics among the respondents was a combination of amoxicillin and metronidazole. Of the respondents, 136 (93.2%) of them considered antibiotic resistance as a major problem in Nigeria and 102 (69.9%) have experienced antibiotics resistance in dental practice. The major reported conditions for prophylactic antibiotics among the respondents were diabetic mellitus, HIV/AIDS, history of rheumatic fever, other heart anomalies presenting with heart murmur and presence of prosthetic hip. The knowledge of adverse effects of antibiotics was greatest for tooth discoloration which is related to tetracycline. Data from this study revealed the most commonly prescribed antibiotics as a combination of amoxicillin and metronidazole. There existed gaps in prophylactic antibiotic prescription, consideration in the choice of therapeutic antibiotics and knowledge of adverse effects of antibiotics among the studied dentists.

  5. The determinants of the antibiotic resistance process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Beatriz Espinosa; Altagracia Martínez, Marina; Sánchez Rodríguez, Martha A; Wertheimer, Albert I

    2009-01-01

    The use of antibiotic drugs triggers a complex interaction involving many biological, sociological, and psychological determinants. Resistance to antibiotics is a serious worldwide problem which is increasing and has implications for morbidity, mortality, and health care both in hospitals and in the community. To analyze current research on the determinants of antibiotic resistance and comprehensively review the main factors in the process of resistance in order to aid our understanding and assessment of this problem. We conducted a MedLine search using the key words "determinants", "antibiotic", and "antibiotic resistance" to identify publications between 1995 and 2007 on the determinants of antibiotic resistance. Publications that did not address the determinants of antibiotic resistance were excluded. The process and determinants of antibiotic resistance are described, beginning with the development of antibiotics, resistance and the mechanisms of resistance, sociocultural determinants of resistance, the consequences of antibiotic resistance, and alternative measures proposed to combat antibiotic resistance. Analysis of the published literature identified the main determinants of antibiotic resistance as irrational use of antibiotics in humans and animal species, insufficient patient education when antibiotics are prescribed, lack of guidelines for treatment and control of infections, lack of scientific information for physicians on the rational use of antibiotics, and lack of official government policy on the rational use of antibiotics in public and private hospitals.

  6. Grievances in cases using antibiotics due to orodental problems and assessment of the need for antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandemir, S; Ergül, N

    2000-04-01

    To assess the complaints of patients who were prescribed antibiotics following orodental problems and the need for antibiotics prescribed for this purpose. Examinations were carried out in the Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology, Ege University, Turkey. A total of 203 patients (129 females and 74 males) between 8-70 years of age (mean age 37.7 +/- 13.9). Examination and report. Frequency of unnecessary antibiotic use. Antibiotic therapy was not necessary for 151 (74.4 per cent) cases. Antibiotics were unnecessarily prescribed in 45 cases of acute irreversible pulpitis, 10 chronic apical abscess, 6 acute apical paradontitis, 7 gingivitis, 10 periodontitis, 4 epulis, 2 TMJ (temporomandibular junction) dysfunction, 2 sharp ridge of alveolar bone, 1 burning mouth syndrome and 1 recurrent aphthous stomatitis. In 108 (53.2 per cent) of the cases, the prescribed antibiotics were found to be penicillins, 102 of which were broad-spectrum. It was also determined that only 6 (7.7 per cent) of the 78 cases diagnosed as acute apical abscess were given drainage as local therapy. Principles for treating dental infections suggest that an antibiotic should only be used to supplement and not substitute for conventional surgical methods. Therefore, in cases with acute apical abscess, mechanical treatment (drainage) should be the first step. Inappropriate antibiotic use is quite widespread in dentistry. Dentists should avoid inappropriate use of antibiotics. To prevent inappropriate administration, necessary precautions need to be taken against dispensing antibiotics without prescription.

  7. Qualitative evaluation of antibiotic usage in pediatric patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hindra Irawan Satari; Agus Firmansyah; Theresia Theresia

    2011-01-01

    Background Antibiotics are among the most commonly prescribed drug for pediatric patients. Inappropriate use of antibiotics can increase morbidity, mortality, patient cost and bacterial antibiotic resistence. Antibiotic uses can be evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively. Objective To qualitatively evaluate antibiotic use in patients using Gyssens algorithm. Methods We performed a descriptive, retrospective study of matient medical records of those admitted to the pediatric ward fro...

  8. Antibiotic effectiveness: balancing conservation against innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2014-09-12

    Antibiotic effectiveness is a natural societal resource that is diminished by antibiotic use. As with other such assets, keeping it available requires both conservation and innovation. Conservation encompasses making the best use of current antibiotic effectiveness by reducing demand through vaccination, infection control, diagnostics, public education, incentives for clinicians to prescribe fewer antibiotics, and restrictions on access to newer, last-resort antibiotics. Innovation includes improving the efficacy of current drugs and replenishing effectiveness by developing new drugs. In this paper, I assess the relative benefits and costs of these two approaches to maintaining our ability to treat infections. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. Antibiotic resistance in hospitals: a ward-specific random effect model in a low antibiotic consumption environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrin, Magne; Raastad, Ragnhild; Tvete, Ingunn Fride; Berild, Dag; Frigessi, Arnoldo; Leegaard, Truls; Monnet, Dominique L; Walberg, Mette; Müller, Fredrik

    2013-04-15

    Association between previous antibiotic use and emergence of antibiotic resistance has been reported for several microorganisms. The relationship has been extensively studied, and although the causes of antibiotic resistance are multi-factorial, clear evidence of antibiotic use as a major risk factor exists. Most studies are carried out in countries with high consumption of antibiotics and corresponding high levels of antibiotic resistance, and currently, little is known whether and at what level the associations are detectable in a low antibiotic consumption environment. We conduct an ecological, retrospective study aimed at determining the impact of antibiotic consumption on antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in three hospitals in Norway, a country with low levels of antibiotic use. We construct a sophisticated statistical model to capture such low signals. To reduce noise, we conduct our study at hospital ward level. We propose a random effect Poisson or binomial regression model, with a reparametrisation that allows us to reduce the number of parameters. Inference is likelihood based. Through scenario simulation, we study the potential effects of reduced or increased antibiotic use. Results clearly indicate that the effects of consumption on resistance are present under conditions with relatively low use of antibiotic agents. This strengthens the recommendation on prudent use of antibiotics, even when consumption is relatively low. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Antibiotic RX in Hospitals: Proceed with Caution

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-03-04

    This podcast is based on the March 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Antibiotics save lives, but poor prescribing practices can put patients at risk for health problems. Learn how to protect patients by protecting antibiotics.  Created: 3/4/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 3/4/2014.

  11. Achieving Prudent Dementia Care (Palliare: An International Policy and Practice Imperative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie Tolson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the provision of integrated advanced dementia care within seven European countries and critically reviews the potential contribution of the Prudent Healthcare perspective as a starting point for reform. Progressive efforts to innovate, promote quality and integrate care are tempered with the reality of resource constraints. Some policy makers in Europe and North America have turned their attention to the principles of Prudent Healthcare as a potential mechanism to maximise benefits for patients within available resources. As dementia progresses, living well requires increasing levels of support and care, people living with advanced dementia have complex health and social care needs, are highly dependent on others but are not yet at the terminal end stage of the condition. People with advanced dementia can benefit from a dementia specific palliative approach to care ('Palliare', that helps them to live the best life possible for the months and often years they live with advanced dementia. It is also highly desirable to align policy innovations with integrated palliative care practice models and the education of the dementia workforce to accelerate informed improvements in advanced dementia care. There may be some coherence, at least superficially between Prudent Healthcare and integrated palliative care models such as Palliare. It is argued that for successful implementation, both require practitioners to be equipped with knowledge and skills and be empowered to deliver high quality care often within impoverished care environments. Adoption of the prudent perspective will however require development of a repertoire of approaches to hear the voice or proxy voice of people living with advanced dementia and to commit to the development and implementation of new evidence for advanced dementia practice. Evidence informing this policy debate draws upon contemporary literature and policy and the findings from research activities

  12. O MUSEU HISTÓRICO E A MEMÓRIA DA CIDADE DE PRESIDENTE PRUDENTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Hirao

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the question of the Environmental Historic Patrimony of President Prudente SP, medium size city in the interior of São Paulo State and the necessity of Renovação and Revitalização Architectural of its Historical Museum and Municipal Archives. It discuss of the listed process and the importance in the formation of local identity. It analyzes the necessity of its adequacy to the new urban functions contemporaries.

  13. Antibiotic Utilization in Pediatric Hospitalized Patients – A Single Center Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasime Qorraj Bytyqi

    2017-03-01

    CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that surveillance programs on antibiotic resistance should be established and accompanied by analyses of drug utilisation data which can aid in the creation of valid cross-national studies on antibiotic usage and resistance, to motivate improvements in prescribing and guideline-directed antibiotic prescribing.

  14. Antibiotic use and associated factors in patients with dementia: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maaden, T. van der; Hendriks, S.A.; Vet, H.C. de; Zomerhuis, M.T.; Smalbrugge, M.; Jansma, E.P.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Hertogh, C.M.; Steen, J.T. van der

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infections frequently occur in patients with dementia and antibiotics are often prescribed, but may also be withheld. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this systematic review is to provide a systematic overview of the prevalence of antibiotic use, and factors associated with prescribing antibiotics

  15. Alarm signs and antibiotic prescription in febrile children in primary care : an observational cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elshout, Gijs; van Ierland, Yvette; Bohnen, Arthur M.; de Wilde, Marcel; Oostenbrink, Rianne; Moll, Henriette A.; Berger, Marjolein Y.

    Background Although fever in children is often self-limiting, antibiotics are frequently prescribed for febrile illnesses. GPs may consider treating serious infections by prescribing antibiotics. Aim To examine whether alarm signs and/or symptoms for serious infections are related to antibiotic

  16. Prescribing patterns for upper respiratory tract infections: a prescription-review of primary care practice in Kedah, Malaysia, and the implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezal, Rabiatul Salmi; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Alrasheedy, Alian A; Saleem, Fahad; Yusof, Faridah Aryani Md; Kamal, Mardhiyah; Mohd Din, Rosminah; Godman, Brian

    2015-01-01

    It is necessary to ascertain current prescribing of antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) to address potential overuse. A retrospective analysis was conducted of all prescriptions for URTIs among 10 public primary healthcare centers in Kedah, Malaysia, from 1 January to 31 March 2014. A total of 123,524 prescriptions were screened and analyzed. Of these, 7129 prescriptions were for URTI, with 31.8% (n = 2269) containing antibiotics. Macrolides were the most commonly prescribed antibiotic, constituting 61% (n = 1403) of total antibiotics prescribed. There was a statistically significant association between different prescribers and diagnoses (p = 0.001) and a weak positive trend suggesting family medicine specialists are more competent in antibiotic prescribing, followed by medical officers and assistant medical officers (τ = 0.122). Prescribing practices of some prescribers were inconsistent with current guidelines encouraging resistance development. National antimicrobial stewardship programs and further educational initiatives are ongoing in Malaysia to improve antibiotic use.

  17. Antibiotic Prescription in Danish General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Rikke Vognbjerg; Plejdrup Hansen, Malene; Pedersen, Line Bjørnskov

    2016-01-01

    1. Background & Aim The overall aim of the project is to describe antibiotic consumption in Danish general practice with emphasis on specific types of antibiotics. The project will shed light on the impact of microbiological diagnostic methods (MDM) on the choice of antibiotic and the project...... will explore how the GPs prescription behaviour is influenced by selected factors. Antibiotics are essential when treating potentially lethal infections. An increasing development of resistant bacteria is considered one of the primary threats to public health. The majority of antibiotics (90%) are prescribed...... from general practice. The prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics can cause unnecessary side effects for the individual and increases the risk of development of bacteria resistant to antibiotic treatment. Both the prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics and the level of resistant bacteria...

  18. Antibiotics for sore throat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinks, Anneliese; Glasziou, Paul P; Del Mar, Chris B

    2013-11-05

    Sore throat is a common reason for people to present for medical care. Although it remits spontaneously, primary care doctors commonly prescribe antibiotics for it. To assess the benefits of antibiotics for sore throat for patients in primary care settings. We searched CENTRAL 2013, Issue 6, MEDLINE (January 1966 to July week 1, 2013) and EMBASE (January 1990 to July 2013). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs of antibiotics versus control assessing typical sore throat symptoms or complications. Two review authors independently screened studies for inclusion and extracted data. We resolved differences in opinion by discussion. We contacted trial authors from three studies for additional information. We included 27 trials with 12,835 cases of sore throat. We did not identify any new trials in this 2013 update. 1. Symptoms Throat soreness and fever were reduced by about half by using antibiotics. The greatest difference was seen at day three. The number needed to treat to benefit (NNTB) to prevent one sore throat at day three was less than six; at week one it was 21. 2. Non-suppurative complications The trend was antibiotics protecting against acute glomerulonephritis but there were too few cases to be sure. Several studies found antibiotics reduced acute rheumatic fever by more than two-thirds within one month (risk ratio (RR) 0.27; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.12 to 0.60). 3. Suppurative complications Antibiotics reduced the incidence of acute otitis media within 14 days (RR 0.30; 95% CI 0.15 to 0.58); acute sinusitis within 14 days (RR 0.48; 95% CI 0.08 to 2.76); and quinsy within two months (RR 0.15; 95% CI 0.05 to 0.47) compared to those taking placebo. 4. Subgroup analyses of symptom reduction Antibiotics were more effective against symptoms at day three (RR 0.58; 95% CI 0.48 to 0.71) if throat swabs were positive for Streptococcus, compared to RR 0.78; 95% CI 0.63 to 0.97 if negative. Similarly at week one the RR was 0.29 (95% CI 0.12 to 0

  19. Antibiotics prescription practices for provisional malaria cases in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Irrational antibiotic use is an important factor for development and spread of resistance to currently used antibiotics. This study was carried out to assess antibiotic prescribing practices among cases diagnosed as malaria at three hospitals in Moshi Municipality in northern Tanzania. Methods: This was a cross ...

  20. Parental contribution to over prescription of antibiotics for sore throat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Antibiotics are often prescribed by physicians for sore throat in children because of the danger of post streptococcal complications. The role of the parents in over prescription of antibiotics is less well known. Objective: To evaluate the knowledge, attitudes and practice of parents to antibiotic prescription for ...

  1. Diversity and antibiotic resistance of uropathogenic bacteria from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTI) are one of the major causes of prescribing and antibiotic consumption. In order to use the best antibiotic treatment for their patients, reliable and recent data about epidemiology and antibiotic resistance profile of uropathogenic bacteria must be available for clinicians. Therefore ...

  2. Detection of residues antibiotics in food using a microbiological method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Ali, Ahmed

    2007-01-01

    Antibiotics are effective therapeutic agents because of their property of selective bacterial toxicity which helps controlling infections. Animals, just like humans, can be treated with antibiotics. This use of antibiotics can lead to the development of resistance. Resistant strains may cause severe infections in humans and animals. In addition, antibiotic residues might represent a problem for human health. Our objective is to develop a microbiological method for the detection of antibiotic residues in poultry(muscle, liver,...). For this purpose, antibiotic sensitive bacteria and selective agar media were used. An inhibition growth zone surrounds each of the food samples containing antibiotic residues after a prescribed incubation time. (Author). 23 refs

  3. STUDY OF PRESCRIBING PATTERN OF ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS IN SELECTED PATIENTS ATTENDING TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjan Adhikari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are the most commonly prescribed drugs in hospitals and their irrational use is one of the important factors for the development and spread of resistance. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic prescription pattern in the patient attending the tertiary care hospital. It was found that a total of 333 antibiotics where prescribed in 245 prescriptions. The average number of antibiotics per prescription was approximately1.4. The most commonly used antibiotics were moxifloxacin 19.5%, metronidazole 10.4%, amoxicillin + cloxacillin 10.2% and ciprofloxacin 6%. antibiotics were almost equally prescribed to both male and female. 45.5% of the antibiotics shows adherence with the National List of Essential Medicines of India. 76.6% of the antibiotics were single products while 23.4% were fixed dose combination. The most commonly used dosage forms were tablets (57%, drops (23.5% and creams (11.7%.57.3% were prescribed irrationally. Quinolones (48.2% and antifungals (21.5% were the most common types of prescribed antibiotics in which irrationality was found.

  4. Variation in Antibiotic Susceptibility of Uropathogens by Age among Ambulatory Pediatric Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quach, Yennie; Bearden, David T.; Smith, David H.; Sharp, Susan E.; Guzman-Cottrill, Judith A.

    2013-01-01

    We compared uropathogen antibiotic susceptibility across age groups of ambulatory pediatric patients. For Escherichia coli (n=5,099) and other Gram-negative rods (n=626), significant differences (purinary anti-infectives may be lower in the youngest children. Further investigation into these differences is needed to facilitate appropriate and prudent treatment of urinary tract infections. PMID:24091131

  5. Antibiotic susceptibility of probiotic strains: Is it reasonable to combine probiotics with antibiotics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neut, C; Mahieux, S; Dubreuil, L J

    2017-11-01

    The main goal of this study was to determine the in vitro susceptibility of strains collected from marketed probiotics to antibiotics used to treat community-acquired infections. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 16 antibiotics were determined using a gradient strip (E test) or the agar dilution method for fidaxomicin. The probiotics demonstrated various antibiotic patterns. Bacterial probiotics are generally susceptible to most prescribed antibiotics orally administered, whereas yeast probiotics, such as Saccharomyces boulardii, are resistant. Special attention must be paid to co-prescriptions of antibiotics and probiotics to ensure that the probiotic strain is not susceptible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of Methods for Genetic Assessment of Antibiotic Resistance In Animal Herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Gunilla Veslemøy

    with a parallel selection for resistant bacteria. Since the hazards related to antibiotic resistance development have been recognized, the prudent use of antibiotics has been in focus, especially concerning their use in animal production. For many years antibiotics have been, and still are, recklessly used...... in the animal production especially in the form of growth promoters. Due to the associated risks of resistant zoonotic bacteria transmission from animals to humans, it is of interest to keep antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance under strict surveillance.This PhD study was based on the development of real......-time PCR (qPCR) assays that supply an easy and rapid method for quantifying antibiotic resistance levels in animal herds. The pig production is accountable for a large portion of the antibiotics used for food producing animals in Denmark. Therefore, the antibiotic resistance genes included in this study...

  7. Antibiotics, pediatric dysbiosis, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangay, Pajau; Ward, Tonya; Gerber, Jeffrey S; Knights, Dan

    2015-05-13

    Antibiotics are by far the most common medications prescribed for children. Recent epidemiological data suggests an association between early antibiotic use and disease phenotypes in adulthood. Antibiotic use during infancy induces imbalances in gut microbiota, called dysbiosis. The gut microbiome's responses to antibiotics and its potential link to disease development are especially complex to study in the changing infant gut. Here, we synthesize current knowledge linking antibiotics, dysbiosis, and disease and propose a framework for studying antibiotic-related dysbiosis in children. We recommend future studies into the microbiome-mediated effects of antibiotics focused on four types of dysbiosis: loss of keystone taxa, loss of diversity, shifts in metabolic capacity, and blooms of pathogens. Establishment of a large and diverse baseline cohort to define healthy infant microbiome development is essential to advancing diagnosis, interpretation, and eventual treatment of pediatric dysbiosis. This approach will also help provide evidence-based recommendations for antibiotic usage in infancy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Radon and radon daughters' concentration in spring and wells waters from Presidente Prudente: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osorio, Ana Maria Araya; Saenz, Carlos Alberto Tello; Pereira, Luiz Augusto Stuani

    2009-01-01

    This work presents the preliminary results about the concentration of radon and radon daughters in wells and springs water from Presidente Prudente. Six water samples were studied: three from well-water, two from springs water and one from potable water. For the determination of α-activity the samples were placed inside plastic containers where the CR-39 tracks detectors were outside the water. The track density of α-particles were measured by using optical microscopy. The results show that one sample from well-water presented higher concentration of radon and radon daughters than the other samples. (author)

  9. Opioid Prescribing PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the July 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Higher opioid prescribing puts patients at risk for addiction and overdose. Learn what can be done about this serious problem.

  10. Guidelines for antibiotic prophylaxis in abdominal surgery for adults

    OpenAIRE

    Tadeja Pintar; Blaž Trotovšek; Bojana Beović

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Background.Evidence based recommendations for antibiotic prophylaxis in abdominal surgery are prepared to reduce postoperative complications and to reduce inappropriate prophylactic antibiotic prescribing. The original guidline address risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI), benefits and risks of antibiotic profilaxis and  indications for surgical antibiotic profilaxis.Update of recommendations is an opportunity to expand and review the evidence supporting recommendations. R...

  11. PSYCHOMOTOR PROFILE OF CHILDREN WITH ADHD-A SCHOOL IN THE CITY OF PRESIDENTE PRUDENTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Rodrigues Costa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Attention Deficit Hyperactivity/ Impulsiveness Disorder (ADHD is a neurobehavioral disorder which is common in the population of children at school age and the psychomotor activity in these children can be substantially lower than that expected in 30% to 50% of the cases. Thus, this study aims at describing the psychomotor profile of children diagnosed with ADHD. Initially, the research was assessed and authorized by the Education Department of Presidente Prudente-SP. Five children with the diagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity/ Impulsiveness isorder took part in the study, none of them carrying comorbidities, aging between six and nine years, of both sexes, regularly enrolled in a public school in President Prudente-SP and participating in an extension project developed by the school. For the collection of data, the Motor Development Scale was used, as described by Rosa Neto (2002,in which all the tests proposed were used: fine motor skills, global motor skills, balance, body schema/ speed, spatial and temporal organization. The test was individually applied, in a single session, lasting 35 minutes on average. The data were analyzed according to the criteria established by the author. By analyzing the data, the motor performance of the children was between lower normal and medium.

  12. Occupational Pension Funds (IORPs) & Sustainability: What does the Prudent Person Principle say?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horváthová, Alexandra; Feldthusen, Rasmus Kristian; Ulfbeck, Vibe Garf

    2017-01-01

    The European Union encourages individuals to save in private and occupational pension funds to complement their state saving-plans. Throughout their lives, employers directly sponsor occupational retirement saving plans, so individual employees may top up their future pensions. While the European...... Union clearly supports the formation and cross-border participation in these financial vehicles by adopting EU regulatory framework, the EU has also decided to determine a common investment decision standard to be used in all Member States, called the Prudent Person Principle. According...... to this principle, the fund - the future retirement for many - shall be managed with care, the skill of an expert, prudence and due diligence. Under this principle, the pension fund’s governing body is given a broad authority to invest the pension assets in a prudent fashion in light of the particular investment...... plan of a fund. At the same time, the EU is also moving towards more Responsible Investment and inclusion of the ESG-principles (Environment, Social and Governance). The question we aim to answer in this paper is how these two principles co-exist and whether, due to the new Directive adopted...

  13. PERFIL DA OFERTA DE CARNE OVINA NO MUNÍCIPIO DE PRESIDENTE PRUDENTE-SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilice Zundt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to carry out a survey in the retail market of Presidente Prudente (SP, seeking to know the offer of sheep meat products, considering the type of establishment, meat cut, type of packaging, brand presence, Price / kg. We analyzed items of the sheep meat market available to consumers in the city of Presidente Prudente-SP, and for this purpose, information was obtained from 69 retail establishments, using non-probabilistic sampling for convenience. There was presence of sheep meat in only 10% of the sampled establishments. Informal products were found in 90% of the butchers surveyed, while formal products were located in meat boutiques, hypermarkets and supermarkets. The most common cuts were: rib, shank and palette, with a frequency of 24.24%, 27.27% and 24.24%, respectively. Locals selling products with no provenance practice more affordable prices than establishments of origin, and sheep meat is made in a timid manner. It was observed that the cuts of first shank and paddle, followed by the rib were found in greater percentage. It is important to mention that the supply of sheep meat through informal slaughter was present in 90% of the butchers visited. In relation to the dissemination and promotion of sheep meat, the sites visited do not present marketing strategies, and new research should be carried out with more comprehensive markets in order to know better the regional marketKey words: market compound, meat cuts, sheep, retail

  14. Public knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding antibiotic use in Kosovo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajmi, Drita; Berisha, Merita; Begolli, Ilir; Hoxha, Rina; Mehmeti, Rukije; Mulliqi-Osmani, Gjyle; Kurti, Arsim; Loku, Afrim; Raka, Lul

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antimicrobial resistance is becoming a major public health challenge worldwide, caused primarily by the misuse of antibiotics. Antibiotic use is closely related to the knowledge, attitudes and behaviour of a population. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the level of knowledge, attitudes and practices about antibiotic use among the general public in Kosovo. Methods: A cross-sectional face-to-face survey was carried out with a sample of 811 randomly selected Kosovo residents. The methodology used for this survey was based on the European Commission Eurobarometer survey on antimicrobial resistance. Results: More than half of respondents (58.7%) have used antibiotics during the past year. A quarter of respondents consumed antibiotics without a medical prescription. The most common reasons for usage were flu (23.8%), followed by sore throat (20.2%), cold (13%) and common cold (7.6%). 42.5% of respondents think that antibiotics are effective against viral infections. Almost half of respondents (46.7%) received information about the unnecessary use of antibiotics and 32.5% of them report having changed their views and behaviours after receiving this information. Health care workers were identified as the most trustworthy source of information on antibiotic use (67.2%). Conclusion: These results provide quantitative baseline data on Kosovar knowledge, attitudes and practice regarding the use of antibiotic. These findings have potential to empower educational campaigns to promote the prudent use of antibiotics in both community and health care settings. PMID:28503216

  15. Use of antibiotics by primary care doctors in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam Tai

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To determine the use of antibiotics by primary care doctors. Methods General practitioners in Hong Kong were invited to fill in a short questionnaire on every patient with infection that they had seen on the first full working day once every three months for four consecutive quarters starting from December 2005. Results Forty six primary care doctors took part and a total of 3096 completed questionnaires were returned. The top three diagnoses were upper respiratory tract infection (46.7%, gastrointestinal infection (8.2% and pharyngitis (7.1%. Thirty percent of patient encounters with infections were prescribed antibiotics but only 5.2% of patient encounters with upper respiratory tract infection (URTI were prescribed antibiotics. Amino-penicillins were the most commonly used antibiotics while beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations (BLBLIs were the second most commonly used antibiotics and they accounted for 16.5% and 14.0% of all antibiotics used respectively. Of all patients or their carers, those who demanded or wished for antibiotics were far more likely to be prescribed antibiotics (Pearson chi-square test, p Conclusion The antibiotic prescribing patterns of primary care doctors in Hong Kong are broadly similar to primary care doctors in other developed countries but a relatively low rate of antibiotics is used for URTI.

  16. Forgotten antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pulcini, Céline; Bush, Karen; Craig, William A

    2012-01-01

    In view of the alarming spread of antimicrobial resistance in the absence of new antibiotics, this study aimed at assessing the availability of potentially useful older antibiotics. A survey was performed in 38 countries among experts including hospital pharmacists, microbiologists, and infectious...

  17. Physicians′ drug prescribing patterns at the national health insurance scheme unit of a teaching hospital in the North Eastern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Nnaemeka Okoro

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: On one hand, there was under prescribing of injection which is commendable. On the other hand, despite the efforts of WHO and other international organizations in promoting rational use of drugs, irrational prescribing still occurs. There were high tendency of poly pharmacy, overprescribing of antibiotics, lack of compliance with the principles of NHIS essential drugs, and generic prescribing.

  18. Electronic prescribing reduces prescribing error in public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawahna, Ramzi; Rahman, Nisar-Ur; Ahmad, Mahmood; Debray, Marcel; Yliperttula, Marjo; Declèves, Xavier

    2011-11-01

    To examine the incidence of prescribing errors in a main public hospital in Pakistan and to assess the impact of introducing electronic prescribing system on the reduction of their incidence. Medication errors are persistent in today's healthcare system. The impact of electronic prescribing on reducing errors has not been tested in developing world. Prospective review of medication and discharge medication charts before and after the introduction of an electronic inpatient record and prescribing system. Inpatient records (n = 3300) and 1100 discharge medication sheets were reviewed for prescribing errors before and after the installation of electronic prescribing system in 11 wards. Medications (13,328 and 14,064) were prescribed for inpatients, among which 3008 and 1147 prescribing errors were identified, giving an overall error rate of 22·6% and 8·2% throughout paper-based and electronic prescribing, respectively. Medications (2480 and 2790) were prescribed for discharge patients, among which 418 and 123 errors were detected, giving an overall error rate of 16·9% and 4·4% during paper-based and electronic prescribing, respectively. Electronic prescribing has a significant effect on the reduction of prescribing errors. Prescribing errors are commonplace in Pakistan public hospitals. The study evaluated the impact of introducing electronic inpatient records and electronic prescribing in the reduction of prescribing errors in a public hospital in Pakistan. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Antibiotic and antiseptic resistance: impact on public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, S B

    2000-10-01

    More and more we are moving patients from hospitals to homes for continued treatment. Vancomycin and triclosan were used for 30 years before any resistance emerged, because their applications were strictly limited. Today, after greatly increased use, resistance to both antibiotics and antibacterials has appeared. Of importance there are genetic links between resistance to antibiotics and to antibacterials. Health professionals and the public need to be educated about the rational use of drugs that affect the microbial world. The Alliance for the Prudent Use of Antibiotics, an international organization established in 1981 with members in more than 100 countries, has adopted education as its prime mission. Via its web site (www.apua.org) and linked information on reservoirs of antibiotic resistance (ROAR) among nonpathogenic bacteria, it reaches both providers and consumers. The message is simple: bacteria are needed for our survival. The vast majority of bacteria perform important functions that are crucial for our lives. Prudent use of both antibiotics and antibacterials must be championed to achieve and maintain the balanced microbial environment in which we have entered and evolved.

  20. Antibiotic prescription: An oral physician′s point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahendra Patait

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antibiotics are important in the management and prophylaxis of infections in patients at a risk of experiencing microbial disease. Uses of systemic antibiotics in dentistry are limited since management of acute dental conditions is primarily based upon extraction of teeth or extirpation of the pulp. However, the literature provides evidence of inappropriate prescribing practices by practitioners, due to a number of factors from inadequate knowledge to social factors. Aim: The aim was to assess the therapeutic prescription of antibiotics in the dental office. Materials and Methods: In the current study, 42 faculty members of two dental colleges in the same vicinity were included. A questionnaire was drafted and sent to the dentists to collect data pertaining to the conditions in which antibiotics were prescribed and most commonly prescribed antibiotic. Results: During the study period, 42 faculty members from various departments in the institutes were surveyed, of which 41 questionnaires were completely filled. Amoxicillin was the most commonly prescribed antibiotic followed by other amoxicillin combinations; Metronidazole was most widely prescribed antibiotic for anaerobic infections. Conclusion: We have entered an era where cures may be few due to increasing microbial resistance. The biggest force for change will be if all practicing dentists looked at their prescribing and made it more rational.

  1. The determinants of the antibiotic resistance process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Espinosa Franco

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Beatriz Espinosa Franco1, Marina Altagracia Martínez2, Martha A Sánchez Rodríguez1, Albert I Wertheimer31Facultad de Estudios Superiores Zaragoza (UNAM, Mexico; 2Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Unidad Xochimilco, Mexico; 3Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USABackground: The use of antibiotic drugs triggers a complex interaction involving many biological, sociological, and psychological determinants. Resistance to antibiotics is a serious worldwide problem which is increasing and has implications for morbidity, mortality, and health care both in hospitals and in the community.Objectives: To analyze current research on the determinants of antibiotic resistance and comprehensively review the main factors in the process of resistance in order to aid our understanding and assessment of this problem.Methods: We conducted a MedLine search using the key words “determinants”, “antibiotic”, and “antibiotic resistance” to identify publications between 1995 and 2007 on the determinants of antibiotic resistance. Publications that did not address the determinants of antibiotic resistance were excluded.Results: The process and determinants of antibiotic resistance are described, beginning with the development of antibiotics, resistance and the mechanisms of resistance, sociocultural determinants of resistance, the consequences of antibiotic resistance, and alternative measures proposed to combat antibiotic resistance.Conclusions: Analysis of the published literature identified the main determinants of antibiotic resistance as irrational use of antibiotics in humans and animal species, insufficient patient education when antibiotics are prescribed, lack of guidelines for treatment and control of infections, lack of scientific information for physicians on the rational use of antibiotics, and lack of official government policy on the rational use of antibiotics in public and private hospitals.Keywords: antibiotic drug resistance

  2. Impact of pharmacist intervention on antibiotic use and prophylactic antibiotic use in urology clean operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y; Ma, L-Y; Zhao, X; Tian, S-H; Sun, L-Y; Cui, Y-M

    2015-08-01

    The use of prophylactic antibiotics in clean operations was routine in China before 2011. Along with the appeal for using antibiotics rationally by WHO in 2011, China launched a national special rectification scheme on clinical use of antibiotics from April that year. The scheme, aimed at achieving rational use of antibiotics, made pharmacists part of the responsible medical team. Our objective was to describe the impacts of pharmacist intervention on the use of antibiotics, particularly in urology clean operations. Pharmacists participated in antibiotic stewardship programmes of the hospital and urological clinical work and conducted real-time interventions at the same time from 2011 to 2013. Data on the use of antibiotics between 2010 and 2013 in urology were collected. Comparison of the 2013 data with those of 2010 showed that antibiotic use density [AUD= DDDs*100/(The number of patients who were treated the same period*Average days in hospital). DDDs = Total drug consumption (g)/DDD. DDD is the Defined Daily Dose] decreased by 57·8(58·8%); average antibiotic cost decreased by 246·94 dollars; the cost of antibiotics as a percentage of total drug cost decreased by 27·7%; the rate of use of antibiotics decreased from 100% to 7·3%. The study illustrates how an antibiotic stewardship programme with pharmacist participation including real-time interventions can promote improved antibiotic-prescribing and significantly decrease costs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. POLÍTICA HABITACIONAL E O CAPITAL PRIVADO EM PRESIDENTE PRUDENTE-SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibila Corral de Arêa Leão Honda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks the discussion of the implementation of social housing in medium- sized cities in Brazil in the 2000s decade, reflecting in the production of urban space. The emphasis is on the role of Local Government and its relationship with private enterprise for the production of low-income housing. It discusses the relationship between the urban and housing policies and the enterprises implementation by private initiative, its mechanisms and effects on the production of urban space, taking as study case projects financed by the Residential Leasing Program (PAR of Caixa Econômica Federal, in the city of Presidente Prudente, located in the west of Sao Paulo state. In the case dealt, the lack of urban policy with clear guidelines for housing policy leads to a direct action of private capital, which contributes to the production of exclusive and segregated spaces.

  4. PRESIDENTE PRUDENTE-SP E A CARÊNCIA DE POLÍTICA HABITACIONAL INCLUSIVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibila Corral de Area Leao Honda

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper intents to contribute to a critical analysis on the production of low-income housing by the private sector in medium-sized cities in Brazil, between 1999 and 2008, examining their effects on urban space. Discusses the role of municipalities, post-1988 Brazilian Federal Constitution, with emphasis on the Programa de Arrendamento Residencial (PAR, established in 1999 by the Federal Government, and taking as a case study Presidente Prudente, a city located west of Sao Paulo State. Its focus is to discuss the relationship between the urban and housing policies and enterprises implementation by the private initiative and funded by the Caixa Economica Federal, through the PAR, its mechanisms and effects on the production of urban space. It is evident in the urban policy of this city that the absence of specific guidelines towards housing policy leads to a direct action of private capital, which contributes to the production of urban segregation and exclusion.

  5. Antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Frieri

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Antimicrobial resistance in bacterial pathogens is a challenge that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Multidrug resistance patterns in Gram-positive and -negative bacteria are difficult to treat and may even be untreatable with conventional antibiotics. There is currently a shortage of effective therapies, lack of successful prevention measures, and only a few new antibiotics, which require development of novel treatment options and alternative antimicrobial therapies. Biofilms are involved in multidrug resistance and can present challenges for infection control. Virulence, Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium difficile infection, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and control in the Emergency Department are also discussed. Keywords: Antibiotic resistance, Biofilms, Infections, Public health, Emergency Department

  6. Opioid Prescribing PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-07-06

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the July 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Higher opioid prescribing puts patients at risk for addiction and overdose. Learn what can be done about this serious problem.  Created: 7/6/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/6/2017.

  7. Matrix with Prescribed Eigenvectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Faiz

    2011-01-01

    It is a routine matter for undergraduates to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a given matrix. But the converse problem of finding a matrix with prescribed eigenvalues and eigenvectors is rarely discussed in elementary texts on linear algebra. This problem is related to the "spectral" decomposition of a matrix and has important technical…

  8. Antibiotic overusage and resistance: A cross-sectional survey among pediatric dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapna Konde

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Most human orofacial infections originate from odontogenic infections and prescribing antibiotics has become a ubiquitous phenomenon. The World Health Organization (WHO has recognized the inappropriate, indiscriminate, and irrational use of antibiotics leading to antibiotic resistance as a global problem. Objective: The objective of this survey is to compare the antibiotic prescription pattern and the awareness of antibiotic resistance among Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS practitioners and pediatric dentists. Materials and methods: A hundred BDS practitioners and 100 pediatric dentists included in the study were given a questionnaire containing both open-ended and closed-ended questions. The questionnaire comprised information pertaining to antibiotic prescription for most common oral conditions, commonly prescribed antibiotics, their dosage, etc. Results: The majority of the practitioners prescribed antibiotics for managing oral diseases. On comparing the prescription patterns between the BDS practitioners and pediatric dentists, there was an overprescription in the BDS group for many conditions, which was statistically significant. Amoxicillin was the most commonly prescribed drug in both the groups. In the presence of an anaerobic infection, the most preferred drug was a combination of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid with metronidazole. With regard to the duration of antibiotic prescription, 74% BDS practitioners prescribed antibiotics as a 3-day course and 60% pediatric dentists resorted to a 5-day course, which was statistically significant. The awareness regarding antibiotic prophylaxis and antibiotic resistance was found to be adequate in both the groups. However, there was a general lack of awareness with regard to the guidelines for antibiotic prescribing in both the groups. Conclusion: Practitioners should prescribe antibiotics in accordance with the guidelines to curb antibiotic resistance, an emerging public health

  9. Influences on the start, selection and duration of treatment with antibiotics in long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneman, Nick; Campitelli, Michael A; Giannakeas, Vasily; Morris, Andrew M; Bell, Chaim M; Maxwell, Colleen J; Jeffs, Lianne; Austin, Peter C; Bronskill, Susan E

    2017-06-26

    Understanding the extent to which current antibiotic prescribing behaviour is influenced by clinicians' historical patterns of practice will help target interventions to optimize antibiotic use in long-term care. Our objective was to evaluate whether clinicians' historical prescribing behaviours influence the start, prolongation and class selection for treatment with antibiotics in residents of long-term care facilities. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all physicians who prescribed to residents in long-term care facilities in Ontario between Jan. 1 and Dec. 31, 2014. We examined variability in antibiotic prescribing among physicians for 3 measures: start of treatment with antibiotics, use of prolonged durations exceeding 7 days and selection of fluoroquinolones. Funnel plots with control limits were used to determine the extent of variation and characterize physicians as extreme low, low, average, high and extreme high prescribers for each tendency. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess whether a clinician's prescribing tendency in the previous year predicted current prescribing patterns, after accounting for residents' demographics, comorbidity, functional status and indwelling devices. Among 1695 long-term care physicians, who prescribed for 93 132 residents, there was wide variability in the start of antibiotic treatment (median 45% of patients, interquartile range [IQR] 32%-55%), use of prolonged treatment durations (median 30% of antibiotic prescriptions, IQR 19%-46%) and selection of fluoroquinolones (median 27% of antibiotic prescriptions, IQR 18%-37%). Prescribing tendencies for antibiotics by physicians in 2014 correlated strongly with tendencies in the previous year. After controlling for individual resident characteristics, prior prescribing tendency was a significant predictor of current practice. Physicians prescribing antibiotics exhibited individual, measurable and historical tendencies toward start of antibiotic treatment

  10. Newly approved antibiotics and antibiotics reserved for resistant infections: Implications for emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazer-Amirshahi, Maryann; Pourmand, Ali; May, Larissa

    2017-01-01

    Millions of patients are evaluated every year in the emergency department (ED) for bacterial infections. Emergency physicians often diagnose and prescribe initial antibiotic therapy for a variety of bacterial infections, ranging from simple urinary tract infections to severe sepsis. In life-threatening infections, inappropriate choice of initial antibiotic has been shown to increase morbidity and mortality. As such, initiation of appropriate antibiotic therapy on the part of the emergency physician is critical. Increasing rates of antibiotic resistance, drug allergies, and antibiotic shortages further complicates the choice of antibiotics. Patients may have a history of prior resistant infections or culture data indicating that common first-line antibiotics used in the ED may be ineffective. In recent years, there have been several new antibiotic approvals as well as renewed interest in second and third line antibiotics because of the aforementioned concerns. In addition, several newly approved antibiotics have the advantage of being administered once weekly or even as a single infusion, which has the potential to decrease hospitalizations and healthcare costs. This article reviews newly approved antibiotics and antibiotics used to treat resistant infections with a focus on implications for emergency medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Alarm signs and antibiotic prescription in febrile children in primary care: An observational cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Elshout (Gijs); Y. van Ierland (Yvette); A.M. Bohnen (Arthur); M. de Wilde (Marcel); R. Oostenbrink (Rianne); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte); M.Y. Berger (Marjolein)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground Although fever in children is often self-limiting, antibiotics are frequently prescribed for febrile illnesses. GPs may consider treating serious infections by prescribing antibiotics. Aim To examine whether alarm signs and/or symptoms for serious infections are related to

  12. Antibiotic Prescription in Febrile Children : A Cohort Study during Out-of-Hours Primary Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elshout, Gijs; Kool, Marijke; Van der Wouden, Johannes C.; Moll, Henriette A.; Koes, Bart W.; Berger, Marjolein Y.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Fever is common in children and often self-limiting, nevertheless antibiotics are frequently prescribed. We determined how often antibiotics were prescribed in children presenting with fever at a family physicians' out-of-hours service and established the children's signs and symptoms

  13. Antibiotics and oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRossi, Scott S; Hersh, Elliot V

    2002-10-01

    With the exception of rifampin-like drugs, there is a lack of scientific evidence supporting the ability of commonly prescribed antibiotics, including all those routinely employed in outpatient dentistry, to either reduce blood levels and/or the effectiveness of oral contraceptives. To date, all clinical trials studying the effects of concomitant antibiotic therapy (with the exception of rifampin and rifabutin) have failed to demonstrate an interaction. Like all drugs, oral contraceptives are not 100% effective with the failure rate in the typical United States population reported to be as high as 3%. It is thus possible that the case reports of unintended pregnancies during antibiotic therapy may simply represent the normal failure rate of these drugs. Considering that both drug classes are prescribed frequently to women of childbearing potential, one would expect a much higher rate of oral contraceptive failure in this group of patients if a true drug:drug interaction existed. On the other hand, if the interaction does exist but is a relatively rare event, occurring in, say, 1 in 5000 women, clinical studies such as those described in this article would not detect the interaction. The pharmacokinetic studies of simultaneous antibiotic and oral contraceptive ingestion, and the retrospective studies of pregnancy rates among oral contraceptive users exposed to antibiotics, all suffer from one potential common weakness, i.e., their relatively small sample size. Sample sizes in the pharmacokinetic trials ranged from 7 to 24 participants, whereas the largest retrospective study of pregnancy rates still evaluated less than 800 total contraceptive users. Still, the incidence of such a rare interaction would not differ from the accepted normal failure rate of oral contraceptive therapy. The medico-legal ramifications of what looks like at best a rare interaction remains somewhat "murky." On one hand, we have medico-legal experts advising the profession to exercise caution

  14. Physician behaviour for antimicrobial prescribing for paediatric upper respiratory tract infections: a survey in general practice in Trinidad, West Indies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramdhanie Joseph

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs are among the most frequent reasons for physician office visits in paediatrics. Despite their predominant viral aetiology, URTIs continue to be treated with antimicrobials. We explored general practitioners' (GPs prescribing behaviour for antimicrobials in children (≤ 16 years with URTIs in Trinidad, using the guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC as a reference. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 92 consenting GPs from the 109 contacted in Central and East Trinidad, between January to June 2003. Using a pilot-tested questionnaire, GPs identified the 5 most frequent URTIs they see in office and reported on their antimicrobial prescribing practices for these URTIs to trained research students. Results The 5 most frequent URTIs presenting in children in general practice, are the common cold, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, sinusitis and acute otitis media (AOM in rank order. GPs prescribe at least 25 different antibiotics for these URTIs with significant associations for amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, cefaclor, cefuroxime, erythromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin (p 30 years were more likely to prescribe antibiotics for the common cold (p = 0.014. Severity (95.7% and duration of illness (82.5% influenced doctors' prescribing and over prescribing in general practice was attributed to parent demands (75% and concern for secondary bacterial infections (70%. Physicians do not request laboratory investigations primarily because they are unnecessary (86% and the waiting time for results is too long (51%. Conclusions Antibiotics are over prescribed for paediatric URTIs in Trinidad and amoxicillin with co-amoxiclav were preferentially prescribed. Except for AOM, GPs' prescribing varied from the CDC guidelines for drug and duration. Physicians recognise antibiotics are overused and consider parents expecting antibiotics and a concern for secondary

  15. Antibiotics used most commonly to treat animals in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Briyne, N.; Atkinson, J.; Pokludová, L.; Borriello, S. P.

    2014-01-01

    The Heads of Medicines Agencies and the Federation of Veterinarians of Europe undertook a survey to gain an insight into European prescribing of antibiotics for animals, in particular to highlight the diseases for which antibiotics are most commonly said to be prescribed and which different classes, including human critically important antibiotics (CIAs). The survey was completed by 3004 practitioners from 25 European countries. Many older antibiotics (eg, penicillins, tetracyclines) are cited most frequently as the prescribed classes to treat the main food producing species. The frequency of citation of non-CIAs predominates. CIAs are mostly frequently cited to be prescribed for: urinary diseases in cats (62 per cent), respiratory diseases in cattle (45 per cent), diarrhoea in cattle and pigs (respectively 29 per cent and 34 per cent), locomotion disorders in cattle (31 per cent), postpartum dysgalactia syndrome complex in pigs (31 per cent) and dental disease in dogs (36 per cent). Clear ‘preferences’ between countries can be observed between antibiotic classes. The use of national formularies and guidance helps to drive responsible use of antibiotics and can significantly reduce the extent of use of CIAs. A more widespread introduction of veterinary practice antibiotic prescribing policies and monitoring obedience to these should ensure more widespread compliance with responsible use guidelines. PMID:24899065

  16. Community-Based Prescribing for Impetigo in Remote Australia: An Opportunity for Antimicrobial Stewardship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Stefanie Jane; Cush, James; Ward, Jeanette E

    2017-01-01

    To support antibiotic prescribing for both hospital and community-based health professionals working in remote North Western Australia, a multidisciplinary Antimicrobial Stewardship (AMS) Committee was established in 2013. This Committee is usually focused on hospital-based prescribing. A troubling increase in sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim resistance in Staphylococcus aureus antibiograms from 9 to 18% over 1 year prompted a shift in gaze to community prescribing. Finding a paucity of relevant research, we first investigated contextual factors influencing local prescribing. We also designed a systematic survey of experts with experience relevant to our setting using a structured response survey (12 questions) to better understand specific AMS risks. Using these findings, recommendations were formulated for the AMS Committee. Prescribing recommendations in a regional Skin Infections Protocol had previously been altered in December 2014. From 15 experts, we received 9 comprehensive responses (60%) about AMS risks in community prescribing. If feasible, prescribing audits also would have been valuable. Ten recommendations regarding specific antibiotic recommendations were submitted to the AMS Committee. As AMS Committees in Australia usually focus on hospital-based prescribing, novel methods such as external expert opinion could inform deliberations about community-based prescribing. Our approach meant that this AMS Committee was able to intervene in the 2017 organizational review of the regional Skin Infections Protocol used by prescribers likely unaware of AMS risks. This experience demonstrates the value of incorporating AMS principles in community-based prescribing in context of a remote setting.

  17. Changing doctor prescribing behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P.S.; Mäkelä, M.; Vermeulen, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    Collaboration on Effective Professional Practice. This register is kept up to date by searching the following databases for reports of relevant research: DHSS-DATA; EMBASE; MEDLINE; SIGLE; Resource Database in Continuing Medical Education (1975-1994), along with bibliographies of related topics, hand searching......The aim of this overview was to identify interventions that change doctor prescribing behaviour and to derive conclusions for practice and further research. Relevant studies (indicating prescribing as a behaviour change) were located from a database of studies maintained by the Cochrane...... of key journals and personal contact with content area experts. Randomised controlled trials and non-equivalent group designs with pre- and post-intervention measures were included. Outcome measures were those used by the study authors. For each study we determined whether these were positive, negative...

  18. Antibiotic prescribing patterns in out-of-hours primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huibers, Linda; Moth, Grete; Christensen, Morten Bondo

    2014-01-01

    Denne artikel undersøger, hvor ofte der udskrives antibiotika efter henvendelse til lægevagten. Resultaterne viser, at omkring 15 % af all henvendelser fra borgere til lægevagten i den undersøgte periode endte med udskrivning af en recept på antibiotika: 26,1 % ved fremmøde, 10,7 % ved telefonkon...

  19. Antibiotic resistance in community-acquired urinary tract infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the treatment of other infections would inevitably lead to the development of resistance. S Afr Med J 1994; 84: 600-602. Antibiotic resistance is a major problem in developing countries.' There are many reasons for this, including antibiotic use in animal feeds, inappropriate prescribing and poor sanitation. Resistance rates in ...

  20. Self-medication with antibiotics in a Swedish general population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svensson, E; Haaijer-Ruskamp, FM; Lundborg, CS

    To assess the extent of antibiotic self-medication in a Swedish population, a postal questionnaire was distributed to 1000 randomly selected subjects. The antibiotics used were in all but 3 cases reported to have been obtained with a prescription. Thus, prescribers are the primary target for

  1. Variations in antibiotic use for respiratory tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Mckay

    2017-04-01

    These are preliminary results, with full analytic results available in the coming months. These results will have implications for better understanding the extent of variations in antibiotic prescribing, and some of the drivers of these variations, as well as the potential to inform ongoing efforts to improve the appropriateness of antibiotic use.

  2. [A communication campaign to improve how antibiotics are used].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héron, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    A wide-scale information campaign, using a memorable slogan, reminded health professionals and users that the prescribing of antibiotics is not 'automatic' in the case of a viral infection. The fight against antibiotic resistant bacteria requires the consumption of these medications to be limited in order to preserve their effectiveness. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. Determinants of antibiotic prescription in paediatric patients: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... differences (p>0.05) in the prescription rates of the hospitals. The most commonly used antibiotics were beta-lactams (57.3%), aminoglycosides (28.3%) and co-trimoxazole (9.4%). Antibiotics were prescribed in all cases of bronchopneumonia, fever, sepsis and acute gastroenteritis. For malaria and undefined diagnoses, ...

  4. Antibiotic Resistance Patterns of Common Gram-negative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The resistance of bacteria causing urinary tract infection (UTI) to commonly prescribed antibiotics is increasing both in developing and developed countries. Resistance has emerged even to more potent antimicrobial agents. This study was undertaken to determine the current antibiotic resistance pattern ...

  5. Antibiotic Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Christian

    morbidity and mortality as well as an increase in the cost of treatment. Understanding how bacteria respond to antibiotic exposure gives the foundations for a rational approach to counteract antimicrobial resistance. In the work presented in this thesis, I explore the two fundamental sources...... of antimicrobial resistance: (1) adaptive mutations and (2) horizontal acquisition of resistance genes from antibiotic gene reservoirs. By studying the geno- and phenotypic changes of E. coli in response to single and drug-pair exposures, I uncover the evolutionary trajectories leading to adaptive resistance. I...... to rationally design drug combinations that limit the evolution of antibiotic resistance due to counteracting evolutionary trajectories. My results highlight that an in-depth knowledge about the genetic responses to the individual antimicrobial compounds enables the prediction of responses to drug combinations...

  6. AN AUDIT OF PRESCRIPTION FOR ANTIBIOTIC IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN KOLKATA, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjan Adhikari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are most commonly prescribed drugs in tertiary care hospitals; more than 30% of the hospitalised patients were treated with antibiotics. Rational use of antibiotics is very important to ensure the optimum treatment outcomes and to limit the emergence of bacterial resistance. Present study is a hospital based cross-sectional study carried out for a period of three months in different clinical departments of a tertiary care hospital to find out the antibiotics prescribing pattern. Out of total 551 evaluated prescriptions, an antibiotic was prescribed in 45.5% cases. The most commonly prescribed antibiotics were Moxifloxacin 19.5%, Metronidazole 10.4% and Amoxicillin+Cloxacillin 10.2%, broad spectrum antibiotics usage was higher & 87.7% of the antibiotics were prescribed by brand names. The appropriate use of antibiotic is a greatest need of the current situation all over the world. The rising antibiotic resistance is a global problem which is directly related with the irrational prescription of antibiotics.

  7. The interventional diagnosis and therapy for thyroid disease should be studied deeply and developed prudently

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Wei; Cheng Yongde

    2007-01-01

    Many details concerning the interventional diagnosis and therapy of thyroid disease need to be studied deeply and carefully; for example, the thyroid applied anatomy, especially the anatomical imageology study of the thyroid arterial anastomosis involving the therapeutic effects and complications, the thyroid artery embolization treatment, presently as a substitution or the supplement therapy for the traditional classical therapy of Graves disease. There are many exploration to extend the indication scope, the therapeutic effect, embolization scope in intervention for Graves disease due to having no accurate individual quantification standard, and so on. The thyroid arterial embolization for Graves disease is to reduce the main cause of thyroxin secretion. Simultaneously, the comprehensive therapeutic effects might have possibly produce the thyroidcytic apoptosis and immune adjustments. Serious complications such as the cerebral infarction, the hyperthyroidism crisis, the hypocalcemia, the periodic paralysis, and so on commonly occured in thyroid arterial embolization. It is necessary to keep strictly the procedure rule and the indication. The mid-and long- term therapeutic effect of thyroid artery embolization for Graves disease is good, but still need more extensive and prudent research for the prospective achievement. (authors)

  8. Prudent Protomognathus and despotic Leptothorax duloticus: Differential costs of ant slavery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, James F.; Alloway, Thomas M.

    2001-01-01

    The concept of ant slavery rests on the untested assumption that slave-making ants impose fitness costs on colonies of the species they raid. We tested that assumption by comparing the summertime seasonal productivity of Leptothorax spp. colonies in field exclosures without slavemakers, with a colony of the obligatory slave-making ant Protomognathus americanus, or with a colony of the obligatory slavemaker Leptothorax duloticus. Leptothorax longispinosus colonies placed in exclosures with P. americanus colonies did not differ significantly in any demographic attribute from colonies in exclosures without slavemakers. By contrast, Leptothorax curvispinosus colonies exposed to L. duloticus experienced significant reductions in dealate queens, workers, and larvae relative to control colonies exclosed without slavemakers. The pronounced difference in the impact of these slavemakers on their host-species populations correlates with differences in the behavior of the slavemakers observed in the laboratory and likely explains why P. americanus is more abundant than L. duloticus in nature. It seems that more advanced social parasites, like anatomical parasites, evolve to minimize their impact on their hosts, and thus can be regarded as “prudent social parasites.” PMID:11572933

  9. Efficacy of aerobic exercise and a prudent diet for improving selected lipids and lipoproteins in adults: A meta-analysis of andomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies addressing the effects of aerobic exercise and a prudent diet on lipid and lipoprotein concentrations in adults have reached conflicting conclusions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of aerobic exercise combined with a prudent diet on lipid and lipoprotein concentration...

  10. Efficacy of aerobic exercise and a prudent diet for improving selected lipids and lipoproteins in adults: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies addressing the effects of aerobic exercise and a prudent diet on lipid and lipoprotein concentrations in adults have reached conflicting conclusions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of aerobic exercise combined with a prudent diet on lipid and lipoprotein concentration...

  11. Antibiotic Resistance in Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stultz, Jeremy S; Doern, Christopher D; Godbout, Emily

    2016-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common problem in pediatric patients. Resistance to common antibiotic agents appears to be increasing over time, although resistance rates may vary based on geographic region or country. Prior antibiotic exposure is a pertinent risk factor for acquiring resistant organisms during a first UTI and recurrent UTI. Judicious prescribing of antibiotics for common pediatric conditions is needed to prevent additional resistance from occurring. Complex pediatric patients with histories of hospitalizations, prior antibiotic exposure, and recurrent UTIs are also at high risk for acquiring UTIs due to extended spectrum beta-lactamase-producing organisms. Data regarding the impact of in vitro antibiotic susceptibility testing interpretation on UTI treatment outcomes is lacking.

  12. Prescribed fire research in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick Brose

    2009-01-01

    Prescribed fire in Pennsylvania is a relatively new forestry practice because of the State's adverse experience with highly destructive wildfires in the early 1900s. The recent introduction of prescribed fire raises a myriad of questions regarding its correct and safe use. This poster briefly describes the prescribed fire research projects of the Forestry Sciences...

  13. Antibiotic Use and Misuse during Pregnancy and Delivery: Benefits and Risks

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez de Tejada, Begoña

    2014-01-01

    Although pregnancy is considered as a physiological state, most pregnant women in developed countries receive multiple medications to prevent maternal or neonatal complications, with antibiotics among the most frequently prescribed. During pregnancy, antibiotics are often prescribed in the context of preterm labor, intrapartum fever, prevention of neonatal Group B Streptococcus fever, and cesarean section. Outside this period, they are commonly prescribed in the community setting for respira...

  14. Antibiotics in pediatrics: Parental knowledge and attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trkulja Maja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Antibiotics represent the most prescribed class of medication in the pediatric circles. Almost 50% of the medication was prescribed without definite merit. Recently published studies have shown that the level of knowledge, awareness, as well as parents' expectations, play a significant role in the amount of prescribed antibiotics by pediatricians. Aim: To assess the level of parent's education, attitude and behavior, in regard to antibiotic use in pediatric population in Serbia. Material and methods: The cross-sectional study was performed between October 2015 and February 2016. An anonymous survey approach had been used. Demographic data of the participants gave an insight in the level of knowledge and common practice regarding the use of antibiotics in children. The data collected was analyzed by methods of descriptive and analytic statistics. Results: Of 850 recruited, 763 completed and returned the survey. A high level of knowledge was found in 79.5% of the participants. The highest percent of parents answered the questions correctly in regard to reporting drug-related adverse reactions, including allergic reactions (99% and 93% respectively. Almost one third (27% of the parents thought that antibiotics can cure viral infections. More than 20% of participants thought that antibiotics can control pain, and that more expensive medication was more effective. The worrisome is the fact that 15% bought antibiotic at least once without a doctor's prescriptions, while 18% stashed away leftovers for later use. Conclusion: Although study results showed good quality data, parents are still deciding by themselves if they should start antibiotic therapy. Reinforcing established educational programs and encouraging communication with their pediatrician would be highly justified.

  15. Combating Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bacteria Phasing Out Certain Antibiotic Use in Farm Animals FDA: Cutting-Edge Technology Sheds Light on Antibiotic Resistance For More Information Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance Antimicrobial Resistance Information for Consumers and Health Professionals CDC: ...

  16. "Practical knowledge" and perceptions of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance among drugsellers in Tanzanian private drugstores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomson Göran

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies indicate that antibiotics are sold against regulation and without prescription in private drugstores in rural Tanzania. The objective of the study was to explore and describe antibiotics sale and dispensing practices and link it to drugseller knowledge and perceptions of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance. Methods Exit customers of private drugstores in eight districts were interviewed about the drugstore encounter and drugs bought. Drugsellers filled in a questionnaire with closed- and open-ended questions about antibiotics and resistance. Data were analyzed using mixed quantitative and qualitative methods. Results Of 350 interviewed exit customers, 24% had bought antibiotics. Thirty percent had seen a health worker before coming and almost all of these had a prescription. Antibiotics were dispensed mainly for cough, stomachache, genital complaints and diarrhea but not for malaria or headache. Dispensed drugs were assessed as relevant for the symptoms or disease presented in 83% of all cases and 51% for antibiotics specifically. Non-prescribed drugs were assessed as more relevant than the prescribed. The knowledge level of the drugseller was ranked as high or very high by 75% of the respondents. Seventy-five drugsellers from three districts participated. Seventy-nine percent stated that diseases caused by bacteria can be treated with antibiotics but 24% of these also said that antibiotics can be used for treating viral disease. Most (85% said that STI can be treated with antibiotics while 1% said the same about headache, 4% general weakness and 3% 'all diseases'. Seventy-two percent had heard of antibiotic resistance. When describing what an antibiotic is, the respondents used six different kinds of keywords. Descriptions of what antibiotic resistance is and how it occurs were quite rational from a biomedical point of view with some exceptions. They gave rise to five categories and one theme: Perceiving antibiotic

  17. Development of effective hospital-based antibiotic stewardship program. The role of infectious disease specialist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Chrysos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive antibiotic consumption and misuse is one of the main factors responsible for the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and has been associated with increased health care costs. Active intervention is necessary in changing antimicrobial prescribing practices. The Infection Control Committee and the administration of our hospital decided to implement an antibiotic stewardship program beginning in January 2016 in order to reduce inappropriate antibiotic use and to combat antibiotic resistance through improved prescribing practices. The antimicrobial stewardship team includes an ID specialist, physicians, infection control nurses, a microbiologist and a pharmacist who are responsible for the implementation of the program. Preauthorization by an ID specialist and prospective review is necessary for all pharmacy orders of antibiotics under restriction. Pre-intervention, we collected Pharmacy and hospital data regarding antibiotic consumption and numbers of patient-days for the years 2013-2015. We calculated antibiotic use in Defined Daily Doses (DDDs/100 patient-days. After one year, the antibiotic stewardship program was effective in reducing consumption of most antibiotics. The result of the implementation of the program in our hospital was a reduction about 17% of antibiotic DDDs/100 patient-days and about 21% of the antibiotic cost/100 patient-days. Education is an essential element of our program in order to influence prescribing behavior. Lectures and brochures are used to supplement strategies. Antibiotic stewardship programs have been shown from many studies to improve patient outcomes, reduce antibiotic resistance and save money.

  18. Pervasive antibiotic misuse in the Cambodian community: antibiotic-seeking behaviour with unrestricted access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chhorvoin Om

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotic misuse is widespread in resource-limited countries such as Cambodia where the burden of infectious diseases is high and access to antibiotics is unrestricted. We explored healthcare seeking behaviour related to obtaining antibiotics and drivers of antibiotic misuse in the Cambodian community. Methods In-depth interviews were held with family members of patients being admitted in hospitals and private pharmacies termed pharmacy attendants in the catchment areas of the hospitals. Nurses who run community primary healthcare centres located within the hospital catchment areas were invited to attend focus group discussions. Nvivo version 10 was used to code and manage thematic data analysis. Results We conducted individual interviews with 35 family members, 7 untrained pharmacy attendants and 3 trained pharmacists and 6 focus group discussions with 30 nurses. Self-medication with a drug-cocktail was widespread and included broad-spectrum antibiotics for mild illness. Unrestricted access to antibiotics was facilitated by various community enablers including pharmacies or drug outlets, nurse suppliers and unofficial village medical providers referred to as “village Pett” whose healthcare training has historically been in the field and not at university. These enablers supplied the community with various types of antibiotics including broad spectrum fluoroquinolones and cephalosporins. When treatment was perceived to be ineffective patients would prescriber-shop various suppliers who would unfailingly provide them with antibiotics. The main driver of the community’s demand for antibiotics was a mistaken belief in the benefits of antibiotics for a common cold, high temperature, pain, malaria and ‘Roleak’ which includes a broad catch-all for perceived inflammatory conditions. For severe illnesses, patients would attend a community healthcare centre, hospital, or when their finances permitted, a private prescriber

  19. Planejamento ambiental e ocupação do solo urbano em Presidente Prudente (SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibila Corral de Arêa Leão Honda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available O planejamento urbano ambiental é processo de extrema importância para os centros urbanos atualmente, auxiliando na ocupação racional e no equilíbrio ambiental. Não deveria ser desvinculado das políticas de desenvolvimento, pois está diretamente relacionado à qualidade de vida. Auxiliando nesse processo, o plano diretor municipal, aprovado constitucionalmente em 1988, é instrumento fundamental para orientar a ação dos agentes em prol do desenvolvimento urbano equilibrado. Apoiado nessa premissa, este artigo tem como objetivo primeiro a contribuição dessa discussão, por meio da relação de uso e ocupação do solo urbano e a produção da habitação de interesse social em cidades médias, considerando as questões ambientais, tendo como estudo de caso a realidade da cidade de Presidente Prudente, município localizado no oeste do Estado de São Paulo, no período entre 1997 e 1999. A metodologia utilizada foi baseada em pesquisa qualitativa, com levantamentos de campo dos conjuntos habitacionais escolhidos, segundo aspectos arquitetônicos, urbanísticos e ambientais. Verifica-se uma realidade inadequada no município analisado, cujos projetos de habitação social são inseridos na malha urbana desconsiderando normas, leis e diretrizes, em um processo de políticas urbanas não coerentes com os propósitos socioambientais desejáveis.

  20. Prevailing practices in the use of antibiotics by dairy farmers in Eastern Haryana region of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vikash; Gupta, Jancy

    2018-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to assess the antibiotic use in dairy animals and to trace its usage pattern among the small, medium, and large dairy farmers in Eastern Haryana region of India. Materials and Methods: Karnal and Kurukshetra districts from Eastern region of Haryana state were purposively selected, and four villages from each district were selected randomly. From each village, 21 farmers were selected using stratified random sampling by categorizing into small, medium, and large farmers constituting a total of 168 farmers as respondents. An antibiotic usage index (AUI) was developed to assess usage of antibiotics by dairy farmers. Results: Frequency of veterinary consultancy was high among large dairy farmers, and they mostly preferred veterinarians over para-veterinarians for treatment of dairy animals. Small farmers demanded low-cost antibiotics from veterinarians whereas large farmers rarely went for it. Antibiotics were used maximum for therapeutic purposes by all categories of farmers. Completion of treatment schedules and follow-up were strictly practiced by the majority of large farmers. AUI revealed that large farmers were more consistent on decision-making about prudent use of antibiotics. Routine use of antibiotics after parturition to prevent disease and sale of milk without adhering to withdrawal period was responsible for aggravating the antibiotic resistance. The extent of antibiotic use by small farmers depended on the severity of disease. The large farmers opted for the prophylactic use of antibiotics at the herd level. Conclusion: Antibiotic usage practices were judicious among large dairy farmers, moderately prudent by medium dairy farmers and faulty by small farmers. The frequency of veterinary consultancy promoted better veterinary-client relationship among large farmers. PMID:29657416

  1. Improving antimicrobial prescribing: implementation of an antimicrobial i.v.-to-oral switch policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, A D; Sutherland, R K; Mackintosh, C L

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship programmes reduce the risk of hospital associated infections (HAI) and antimicrobial resistance, and include early intravenous-to-oral switch (IVOS) as a key stewardship measure. We audited the number of patients on intravenous antimicrobials suitable for oral switch, assessed whether prescribing guidelines were followed and reviewed prescribing documentation in three clinical areas in the Western General Hospital, Edinburgh, in late 2012. Following this, the first cycle results and local guidelines were presented at a local level and at the hospital grand rounds, posters with recommendations were distributed, joint infection consult and antimicrobial rounds commenced and an alert antimicrobial policy was introduced before re-auditing in early 2013. We demonstrate suboptimal prescribing of intravenous antimicrobials, with 43.9% (43/98) of patients eligible for IVOS at the time of auditing. Only 56.1% (55/98) followed empiric prescribing recommendations. Documentation of antimicrobial prescribing was poor with stop dates recorded in 14.3%, indication on prescription charts in 18.4% and in the notes in 90.8%. The commonest reason for deferring IVOS was deteriorating clinical condition or severe sepsis. Further work to encourage prudent antimicrobial prescribing and earlier consideration of IVOS is required.

  2. Maltese Antibiotic Stewardship Programme in the Community (MASPIC): protocol of a prospective quasiexperimental social marketing intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba-Gustafsson, Erika A; Borg, Michael A; Rosales-Klintz, Senia; Nyberg, Anna; StålsbyLundborg, Cecilia

    2017-09-24

    Antibiotic misuse is a key driver of antibiotic resistance. In 2015/2016, Maltese respondents reported the highest proportions of antibiotic consumption in Europe. Since antibiotics are prescription-only medicines in Malta, research on effective strategies targeting general practitioners' (GPs) knowledge and behaviour is needed. Multifaceted behaviour change (BC) interventions are likely to be effective. Social marketing (SM) can provide the tools to promote sustained BC; however, its utilisation in Europe is limited. This paper aims to describe the design and methods of a multifaceted SM intervention aimed at changing Maltese GPs' antibiotic prescribing behaviour for patients with acute respiratory tract infections (aRTIs). This 4-year quasiexperimental intervention study will be carried out in Malta and includes three phases: preintervention, intervention and postintervention. The preintervention phase intends to gain insight into the practices and attitudes of GPs, pharmacists and parents through interviews, focus group discussions and antibiotic prescribing surveillance. A 6-month intervention targeting GPs will be implemented following assessment of their prescribing intention and readiness for BC. The intervention will likely comprise: prescribing guidelines, patient educational materials, delayed antibiotic prescriptions and GP education. Outcomes will be evaluated in the postintervention phase through questionnaires based on the theory of planned behaviour and stages-of-change theory, as well as postintervention surveillance. The primary outcome will be the antibiotic prescribing rate for all patients with aRTIs. Secondary outcomes will include the proportion of diagnosis-specific antibiotic prescription and symptomatic relief medication prescribed, and the change in GPs stage-of-change and their intention to prescribe antibiotics. The project received ethical approval from the University of Malta's Research Ethics Committee. Should this intervention

  3. Maltese Antibiotic Stewardship Programme in the Community (MASPIC): protocol of a prospective quasiexperimental social marketing intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba-Gustafsson, Erika A; Borg, Michael A; Rosales-Klintz, Senia; Nyberg, Anna; StålsbyLundborg, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Antibiotic misuse is a key driver of antibiotic resistance. In 2015/2016, Maltese respondents reported the highest proportions of antibiotic consumption in Europe. Since antibiotics are prescription-only medicines in Malta, research on effective strategies targeting general practitioners’ (GPs) knowledge and behaviour is needed. Multifaceted behaviour change (BC) interventions are likely to be effective. Social marketing (SM) can provide the tools to promote sustained BC; however, its utilisation in Europe is limited. This paper aims to describe the design and methods of a multifaceted SM intervention aimed at changing Maltese GPs’ antibiotic prescribing behaviour for patients with acute respiratory tract infections (aRTIs). Methods and analysis This 4-year quasiexperimental intervention study will be carried out in Malta and includes three phases: preintervention, intervention and postintervention. The preintervention phase intends to gain insight into the practices and attitudes of GPs, pharmacists and parents through interviews, focus group discussions and antibiotic prescribing surveillance. A 6-month intervention targeting GPs will be implemented following assessment of their prescribing intention and readiness for BC. The intervention will likely comprise: prescribing guidelines, patient educational materials, delayed antibiotic prescriptions and GP education. Outcomes will be evaluated in the postintervention phase through questionnaires based on the theory of planned behaviour and stages-of-change theory, as well as postintervention surveillance. The primary outcome will be the antibiotic prescribing rate for all patients with aRTIs. Secondary outcomes will include the proportion of diagnosis-specific antibiotic prescription and symptomatic relief medication prescribed, and the change in GPs stage-of-change and their intention to prescribe antibiotics. Ethics and dissemination The project received ethical approval from the University of

  4. Do antibiotic residues in soils play a role in amplification and transmission of antibiotic resistant bacteria in cattle populations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Ruben Call

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available When we consider factors that contribute to the emergence, amplification, and persistence of antibiotic resistant bacteria, the conventional assumption is that antibiotic use is the primary driver in these processes and that selection occurs primarily in the patient or animal. Evidence suggests that this may not always be the case. Experimental trials show that parenteral administration of a third-generation cephalosporin (ceftiofur in cattle has limited or short-term effects on the prevalence of ceftiofur-resistant bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract. While this response may be sufficient to explain a pattern of widespread resistance to cephalosporins, approximately two-thirds of ceftiofur metabolites are excreted in the urine raising the possibility that environmental selection plays an important additive role in the amplification and maintenance of antibiotic resistant E. coli on farms. Consequently, we present a rationale for an environmental selection hypothesis whereby excreted antibiotic residues such as ceftiofur are a significant contributor to the proliferation of antibiotic resistant bacteria in food animal systems. We also present a mathematical model of our hypothesized system as a guide for designing experiments to test this hypothesis. If supported for antibiotics such as ceftiofur, then there may be new approaches to combat the proliferation of antibiotic resistance beyond the prudent use mantra.

  5. Social determinants of prescribed and non-prescribed medicine use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Altés Anna

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to describe the use of prescribed and non prescribed medicines in a non-institutionalised population older than 15 years of an urban area during the year 2000, in terms of age and gender, social class, employment status and type of Primary Health Care. Methods Cross-sectional study. Information came from the 2000 Barcelona Health Interview Survey. The indicators used were the prevalence of use of prescribed and non-prescribed medicines in the two weeks prior to the interview. Descriptive analyses, bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were carried out. Results More women than men took medicines (75.8% vs. 60% respectively. The prevalence of use of prescribed medicines increased with age while the prevalence of non-prescribed use decreased. These age differences are smaller among those with poor perceived health. In terms of social class, a higher percentage of men with good health in the more advantaged classes took non-prescribed medicines compared with disadvantaged classes (38.7% vs 31.8%. In contrast, among the group with poor health, more people from the more advantaged classes took prescribed medicines, compared with disadvantaged classes (51.4% vs 33.3%. A higher proportion of people who were either retired, unemployed or students, with good health, used prescribed medicines. Conclusion This study shows that beside health needs, there are social determinants affecting medicine consumption in the city of Barcelona.

  6. What are school children in Europe being taught about hygiene and antibiotic use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecky, Donna M; McNulty, Cliodna A M; Adriaenssens, Niels; Koprivová Herotová, Tereza; Holt, Jette; Touboul, Pia; Merakou, Kyriakoula; Koncan, Raffaella; Olczak-Pienkowska, Anna; Avô, António Brito; Campos, José; Farrell, David; Kostkova, Patty; Weinberg, Julius

    2011-06-01

    e-Bug is a pan-European antibiotic and hygiene teaching resource that aims to reinforce awareness in school children of microbes, prudent antibiotic use, hygiene and the transmission of infection. Prior to the production of the resource, it was essential to examine the educational structure across each partner country and assess what school children were being taught on these topics. A questionnaire was devised for distribution to each European partner (Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, England, France, Greece, Italy, Poland, Portugal and Spain), exploring their educational structure and examining educational resources or campaigns currently available. From the data collected it was evident that the majority of European schools have structured hand hygiene practices in place from a young age. The curricula in all countries cover the topic of human health and hygiene, but limited information is provided on antibiotics and their prudent use. School educational resources that link to the national curriculum and implement National Advice to the Public campaigns in the classroom are limited. The Microbes en question mobile health education campaign in France is an example of a successful children's education campaign and an innovative programme. Evaluation of the impact of school education on attitude and change of behaviour is also limited throughout many European countries. Not enough is currently being done across Europe to educate school children on the importance of appropriate antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance. The data from this research were used to develop e-Bug, a European Union-funded antibiotic and hygiene teaching resource.

  7. Nurses as Antibiotic Brokers: Institutionalized Praxis in the Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broom, Alex; Broom, Jennifer; Kirby, Emma; Scambler, Graham

    2017-11-01

    We are likely moving rapidly toward a post-antibiotic era, as a result of escalating antimicrobial resistance, rapidly declining antibiotic production and profligate overuse. Hitherto research has almost exclusively focused on doctors' prescribing, with nurses' roles in antibiotic use remaining virtually invisible. Drawing on interviews with 30 nurses, we focus on nurses as brokers of doctors' antibiotic decisions, nursing capacity to challenge doctors' decisions, and, "back stage" strategies for circumnavigating organizational constraints. We argue that nurses occupy an essential and conscious position as brokers within the hospital; a subject position that is not neutral, facilitates (short-term) cohesion, and involves the pursuit of particular (preferred) nursing outcomes. Illustrating how authority can be diffuse, mediated by institutionalized praxis, and how professionals evade attempts to govern their practice, we challenge the reification of physician prescribing power, arguing that it may work against the utilization of nurses as important stakeholders in the future of antibiotics.

  8. Attitudes of pharmacists and physicians to antibiotic policies in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu, A; Simpson, J M; Armour, C L

    1999-06-01

    Antibiotic therapy in hospitals has substantial impact on patient outcome and the pharmacy drug budget. Antibiotic policies have been implemented by some hospitals to improve the quality of patient outcome and cost of antibiotic therapy. Antibiotic policies impose certain requirements on pharmacists and physicians. Pharmacists' and physicians' attitudes to and opinions about antibiotic policies are likely to affect the usefulness of such policies. To determine the attitudes of pharmacists and physicians to antibiotic policies in New South Wales (NSW) hospitals. Pharmacists and physicians in NSW public hospitals were surveyed to determine their attitudes to and opinions on antibiotic policies. A simple one-stage cluster sample of 241 pharmacists and a two-stage cluster sample of 701 physicians were obtained. Factor analysis was used to identify the attitudinal dimensions. General linear modelling was used to investigate the effects of predictor variables on outcome variables. The response rates were 91% and 77% for pharmacists and physicians, respectively. Factor analysis identified three dimensions of attitude to antibiotic policies: that they encourage rational antibiotic use; that they improve the quality of antibiotic prescribing and that they are associated with some problems. The reliability of these factors (Cronbach's alpha) ranged from 0.71 to 0.74, and was 0.90 for the overall attitude scale. Pharmacists and physicians had a positive overall attitude to antibiotic policies. Whereas physicians recognize that antibiotic policies improve the quality of prescribing, this was highly correlated with identification of problems (alpha = 0.71). In urban hospitals, pharmacists were more likely than physicians to associate antibiotics with problems. There was a positive overall attitude to hospital antibiotic policies expressed by pharmacists and physicians.

  9. When Does Overuse of Antibiotics Become a Tragedy of the Commons?

    OpenAIRE

    Porco, Travis C.; Gao, Daozhou; Scott, James C.; Shim, Eunha; Enanoria, Wayne T.; Galvani, Alison P.; Lietman, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Over-prescribing of antibiotics is considered to result in increased morbidity and mortality from drug-resistant organisms. A resulting common wisdom is that it would be better for society if physicians would restrain their prescription of antibiotics. In this view, self-interest and societal interest are at odds, making antibiotic use a classic “tragedy of the commons”. Methods and Findings We developed two mathematical models of transmission of antibiotic resistance, featuring de...

  10. Australian consumer perspectives, attitudes and behaviours on antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance: a qualitative study with implications for public health policy and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Elaine P M; Page, Katie; Nissen, Lisa; Doust, Jenny; Graves, Nicholas

    2017-10-10

    Consumers receive over 27 million antibiotic prescriptions annually in Australian primary healthcare. Hence, consumers are a key group to engage in the fight against antibiotic resistance. There is a paucity of research pertaining to consumers in the Australian healthcare environment. This study aimed to investigate the perspectives, attitudes and behaviours of Australian consumers on antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance, to inform national programs for reducing inappropriate antibiotic consumption. Semi-structured interviews with 32 consumers recruited via convenience and snowball sampling from a university population in South East Queensland. Interview transcripts were deductively and inductively coded. Main themes were identified using iterative thematic analysis. Three themes emerged from the analysis, to elucidate factors affecting antibiotic use: (a) prescription type; (b) consumer attitudes, behaviours, skills and knowledge; and (c) consumer engagement with antibiotic resistance. Consumers held mixed views regarding the use of delayed antibiotic prescriptions, and were often not made aware of the use of repeat antibiotic prescriptions. Consumers with regular general practitioners were more likely to have shared expectations regarding minimising the use of antibiotics. Even so, advice or information mediated by general practitioners was influential with all consumers; and helped to prevent inappropriate antibiotic use behaviours. Consumers were not aware of the free Return of Unwanted Medicines service offered by pharmacies and disposed of leftover antibiotics through household waste. To engage with mitigating antibiotic resistance, consumers required specific information. Previous public health campaigns raising awareness of antibiotics were largely not seen by this sample of consumers. Australian consumers have specific information needs regarding prescribed antibiotics to enable appropriate antibiotic use behaviours. Consumers also have expectations

  11. Australian consumer perspectives, attitudes and behaviours on antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance: a qualitative study with implications for public health policy and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine P. M. Lum

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Consumers receive over 27 million antibiotic prescriptions annually in Australian primary healthcare. Hence, consumers are a key group to engage in the fight against antibiotic resistance. There is a paucity of research pertaining to consumers in the Australian healthcare environment. This study aimed to investigate the perspectives, attitudes and behaviours of Australian consumers on antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance, to inform national programs for reducing inappropriate antibiotic consumption. Method Semi-structured interviews with 32 consumers recruited via convenience and snowball sampling from a university population in South East Queensland. Interview transcripts were deductively and inductively coded. Main themes were identified using iterative thematic analysis. Results Three themes emerged from the analysis, to elucidate factors affecting antibiotic use: (a prescription type; (b consumer attitudes, behaviours, skills and knowledge; and (c consumer engagement with antibiotic resistance. Consumers held mixed views regarding the use of delayed antibiotic prescriptions, and were often not made aware of the use of repeat antibiotic prescriptions. Consumers with regular general practitioners were more likely to have shared expectations regarding minimising the use of antibiotics. Even so, advice or information mediated by general practitioners was influential with all consumers; and helped to prevent inappropriate antibiotic use behaviours. Consumers were not aware of the free Return of Unwanted Medicines service offered by pharmacies and disposed of leftover antibiotics through household waste. To engage with mitigating antibiotic resistance, consumers required specific information. Previous public health campaigns raising awareness of antibiotics were largely not seen by this sample of consumers. Conclusions Australian consumers have specific information needs regarding prescribed antibiotics to enable

  12. Qualitative evaluation of antibiotic usage in pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hindra Irawan Satari

    2011-12-01

    Methods We performed a descriptive, retrospective study of matient medical records of those admitted to the pediatric ward from January 1 – June 30, 2009. Records were screened for patient antibiotic use, followed by qualitative evaluation using Gyssens algorithm on data from patient who received antibiotic treatment. Results We found 49.2% of subject were prescribed antibiotics. The majority of patients given antibiotics were aged 1 month - 1 year (39.3%. Antibiotic use was categorized by therapy type : empirical, prophylactic, or definitive. We found empirical therapy in 73% of cases, prophylactic in 8%, and definitive in 15%. Cefotaxime was the most common antibiotic used (25.1%, followed by ceftazidime (14% and cotrimoxazole (1%. 39.6% of subjects were given antibiotics appropriately, while 48.3% were given inappropriately. In 3.3% of patients, antibiotics were given without indication and in 8.8% there was insufficient data. Conclusions Of hospitalized patients receiving antibiotic treatment at the Departement of Child Health, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, 39.6% were given antibiotic appropriately, while 48.3% were given antibiotics inappropriately. Cefotaxime was the most commonly used, as well as most inappropriately given antibiotic.

  13. Radon and radon daughters' concentration in spring and wells waters from Presidente Prudente: preliminary results; Concentracao de Rn-222 e filhos em aguas provenientes de pocos e emergencias de agua da regiao de Presidente Prudente: resultados preliminares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osorio, Ana Maria Araya; Saenz, Carlos Alberto Tello [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FCT/UNESP), Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica Quimica e Biologia; Aguiar, Claudinei Rodrigues de [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), PR (Brazil); Pereira, Luiz Augusto Stuani [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-15

    This work presents the preliminary results about the concentration of radon and radon daughters in wells and springs water from Presidente Prudente. Six water samples were studied: three from well-water, two from springs water and one from potable water. For the determination of α-activity the samples were placed inside plastic containers where the CR-39 tracks detectors were outside the water. The track density of α-particles were measured by using optical microscopy. The results show that one sample from well-water presented higher concentration of radon and radon daughters than the other samples. (author)

  14. [Proper antibiotic therapy. From penicillin to pharmacogenomic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramia, G; Ruffini, E

    2012-04-01

    Antibiotics have always been considered one of the wonder discoveries of the 20th century. The use of penicillin by Flaming, opened up the golden era of antibiotics and now is hard to imagine the practice of medicine without antibiotics. Life-threatening infections, such as meningitis, endocarditis, bacteremic pneumonia sepsis, would again prove fatal. Also aggressive chemotherapy and transplant procedures would prove impossible. Another real wonder has been the rise of antibiotic resistance soon after the clinical use of penicillin in hospitals and communities. Several study demonstrated an excessive amount of antibiotic prescribing for communities patients and inpatients and in some hospital up to 50% of antibiotic usage is inappropriate: the benefits of antibiotic treatment come with the risk of antibiotic resistance development. In hospitals, infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria are associated with higher mortality, morbidity and prolonged hospital stay compared with infections caused by antibiotic-susceptible bacteria. A variety of strategies has been proposed to reduce the cost and improve the quality of medication use. Education, guidelines and evidence based recommendations are considered to be essential elements of any program designed to influence prescribing behavior and can provide a foundation of knowledge that will enhance and increase the acceptance of stewardship strategies. Evidence-based recommendations, an approach to clinical practice helping to make decisions based on clinical expertise and on intimate knowledge of the individual patient's situations, beliefs, and priorities, enhance antimicrobial stewardship, that include appropriate selection, dosing, route, and duration of antimicrobial therapy can maximize clinical cure or prevention of infection while limiting the unintended consequences, such as the emergence of resistance, adverse drug events, and cost. These evidence-based guidelines are not a substitute for clinical

  15.  Treating Children Without Antibiotics in Primary Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanan Kutty

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The overuse of antibiotics in children is becoming a major public health problem. Although most of the common childhood infections such as diarrhea and upper respiratory tract infections are caused by viruses, large volumes of antibiotics are prescribed for these infections in children in the primary care settings. Excessive use of antibiotics is the fundamental risk factor for the development of antibiotic resistance. It is estimated that 90�0of upper respiratory tract infections are self limiting viral illnesses and even bacterial infections like acute otitis media often run a self limiting course. Clinical trials have shown that antibiotic use to treat common upper respiratory tract infections like sore throat, nasopharyngitis and otitis media has no or minimal benefit on the clinical outcome. This report discusses two strategies considered to reduce the use of antibiotic in these conditions: i No prescription, and ii Delayed prescription of antibiotics for common upper respiratory tract infections. Moreover, this report calls for a significant modification of the prescribing habits of physicians, and to also extend community awareness on the harms of the misuse and overuse of antibiotics. It is imperative to educate health workers as well as the Community in a coordinated and sustainable manner about the growing public health problem of antibiotic resistance.

  16. Utilisation of antibiotic therapy in community practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGowan, B

    2008-10-01

    The aim of the study was to identify outpatient antibiotic consumption between Jan 2000 and Dec 2005 through analysis of the HSE-Primary Care Reimbursement Services (PCRS) database as part of the Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance in Ireland (SARI) project. Total antibiotic consumption on the PCRS scheme between January 2000 and December 2005 expressed in Defined Daily Dose per 1000 PCRS inhabitants per day increased by 26%. The penicillin group represents the highest consumption accounting for approximately 50% of the total outpatient antibiotic use. Total DIDs for this group increased by 25% between 2000 and 2005. Co-amoxiclav and amoxicillin account for 80% of the total consumption of this group of anti-infectives. With the exception of aminoglycosides and sulfonamides which demonstrated a decrease in DID consumption of 47% and 8% respectively, all other groups of anti-infectives had an increase in DID consumption of greater than 25% during the study period. Antibiotic prescribing data is a valuable tool for assessing public health strategies aiming to optimise antibiotic prescribing.

  17. Western Dietary Pattern Increases, and Prudent Dietary Pattern Decreases, Risk of Incident Diverticulitis in a Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strate, Lisa L; Keeley, Brieze R; Cao, Yin; Wu, Kana; Giovannucci, Edward L; Chan, Andrew T

    2017-04-01

    Dietary fiber is implicated as a risk factor for diverticulitis. Analyses of dietary patterns may provide information on risk beyond those of individual foods or nutrients. We examined whether major dietary patterns are associated with risk of incident diverticulitis. We performed a prospective cohort study of 46,295 men who were free of diverticulitis and known diverticulosis in 1986 (baseline) using data from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. Each study participant completed a detailed medical and dietary questionnaire at baseline. We sent supplemental questionnaires to men reporting incident diverticulitis on biennial follow-up questionnaires. We assessed diet every 4 years using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Western (high in red meat, refined grains, and high-fat dairy) and prudent (high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains) dietary patterns were identified using principal component analysis. Follow-up time accrued from the date of return of the baseline questionnaire in 1986 until a diagnosis of diverticulitis, diverticulosis or diverticular bleeding; death; or December 31, 2012. The primary end point was incident diverticulitis. During 894,468 person years of follow-up, we identified 1063 incident cases of diverticulitis. After adjustment for other risk factors, men in the highest quintile of Western dietary pattern score had a multivariate hazard ratio of 1.55 (95% CI, 1.20-1.99) for diverticulitis compared to men in the lowest quintile. High vs low prudent scores were associated with decreased risk of diverticulitis (multivariate hazard ratio, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.60-0.91). The association between dietary patterns and diverticulitis was predominantly attributable to intake of fiber and red meat. In a prospective cohort study of 46,295 men, a Western dietary pattern was associated with increased risk of diverticulitis, and a prudent pattern was associated with decreased risk. These data can guide dietary interventions for the prevention of

  18. [Patient safety in antibiotics administration: Risk assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqueda Palau, M; Pérez Juan, E

    To determine the level of risk in the preparation and administration of antibiotics frequently used in the Intensive Care Unit using a risk matrix. A study was conducted using situation analysis and literature review of databases, protocols and good practice guidelines on intravenous therapy, drugs, and their administration routes. The most used antibiotics in the ICU registered in the ENVIN-HELICS program from 1 April to 30 June 2015 were selected. In this period, 257 patients received antimicrobial treatment and 26 antibiotics were evaluated. Variables studied: A risk assessment of each antibiotic using the scale Risk Assessment Tool, of the National Patient Safety Agency, as well as pH, osmolarity, type of catheter recommended for administration, and compatibility and incompatibility with other antibiotics studied. Almost two-thirds (65.3%) of antibiotics had more than 3 risk factors (represented by a yellow stripe), with the remaining 34.7% of antibiotics having between 0 and 2 risk factors (represented by a green stripe). There were no antibiotics with 6 or more risk factors (represented by a red stripe). Most drugs needed reconstitution, additional dilution, and the use of part of the vial to administer the prescribed dose. More than half of the antibiotics studied had a moderate risk level; thus measures should be adopted in order to reduce it. The risk matrix is a useful tool for the assessment and detection of weaknesses associated with the preparation and administration of intravenous antibiotics. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Worldwide pattern of antibiotic prescription in endodontic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Egea, Juan José; Martín-González, Jenifer; Jiménez-Sánchez, María Del Carmen; Crespo-Gallardo, Isabel; Saúco-Márquez, Juan José; Velasco-Ortega, Eugenio

    2017-08-01

    Odontogenic infections, and especially endodontic infections, are polymicrobial, involving a combination of Gram-positive and Gram-negative facultative anaerobes and strictly anaerobic bacteria. Therefore, antibiotics can be used as an adjunct to endodontic treatment. However, most chronic and even acute endodontic infections can be successfully managed by disinfection of the root-canal system, which eliminates the source of infection, followed by abscess drainage or tooth extraction, without the need for antibiotics. The literature provides evidence of inadequate prescribing practices by dentists. The aim of this concise review was to analyse the worldwide pattern of antibiotic prescription in endodontic infections. Comprehensive searches were conducted in MEDLINE/PubMed, Wiley Online Database, Web of Science and Scopus. The databases were searched up to 13 March 2016 for studies in which dentists used systemic antibiotics to treat endodontic lesions and which reported data on the type of antibiotic prescribed and on the diagnosis of the endodontic disease treated. The electronic and hand searches identified 69 titles, of which 25 were included in the final analysis. Amoxicillin was reported as the drug of choice for endodontic infections in most countries, and clindamycin and erythromycin were the choice for patients allergic to penicillin. Dentists worldwide prescribe antibiotics for non-indicated conditions, such as pulpitis. Antibiotics are overprescribed for the management of endodontic infections. It is necessary to improve antibiotic-prescribing habits in the treatment of endodontic infections, as well as to introduce educational initiatives to encourage the coherent and proper use of antibiotics in such conditions. © 2017 FDI World Dental Federation.

  20. Antibiotic Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Hoffmann, Tammy C; McCullough, Amanda R

    2015-01-01

    hygiene, and possibly vaccination and exercise, may be effective. Also, a large range of complementary and alternative medicines (e.g. zinc, vitamin C and probiotics) are proposed for preventing and treating ARIs, but evidence for efficacy is scarce. General practitioners' (GPs) attitudes towards...... wrong. Shared decision making might be a solution, as it enables clinician and patient to participate jointly in making a health decision, having discussed the options together with the evidence for their harms as well as benefits. Furthermore, GPs' diagnostic uncertainty - often leading...... will greatly improve the use of antibiotics for ARIs. However, used in concert, combinations are likely to enable clinicians and health care systems to implement the strategies that will reduce antimicrobial resistance in the future....

  1. Use of Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Tooth Extractions, Dental Implants, and Periodontal Surgical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Katie J; Henschel, Heather; Patel, Ursula; Fitzpatrick, Margaret A; Evans, Charlesnika T

    2018-01-01

    Guidelines for antibiotics prior to dental procedures for patients with specific cardiac conditions and prosthetic joints have changed, reducing indications for antibiotic prophylaxis. In addition to guidelines focused on patient comorbidities, systematic reviews specific to dental extractions and implants support preprocedure antibiotics for all patients. However, data on dentist adherence to these recommendations are scarce. This was a cross-sectional study of veterans undergoing tooth extractions, dental implants, and periodontal procedures. Patients receiving antibiotics for oral or nonoral infections were excluded. Data were collected through manual review of the health record. Of 183 veterans (mean age, 62 years; 94.5% male) undergoing the included procedures, 82.5% received antibiotic prophylaxis (mean duration, 7.1 ± 1.6 days). Amoxicillin (71.3% of antibiotics) and clindamycin (23.8%) were prescribed most frequently; 44.7% of patients prescribed clindamycin were not labeled as penicillin allergic. Of those who received prophylaxis, 92.1% received postprocedure antibiotics only, 2.6% received preprocedural antibiotics only, and 5.3% received pre- and postprocedure antibiotics. When prophylaxis was indicated, 87.3% of patients received an antibiotic. However, 84.9% received postprocedure antibiotics when preprocedure administration was indicated. While the majority of antibiotics were indicated, only 8.2% of patients received antibiotics appropriately. The primary reason was secondary to prolonged duration. Three months postprocedure, there were no occurrences of Clostridium difficile infection, infective endocarditis, prosthetic joint infections, or postprocedure oral infections. The majority of patients undergoing a dental procedure received antibiotic prophylaxis as indicated. Although patients for whom antibiotic prophylaxis was indicated should have received a single preprocedure dose, most antibiotics were prescribed postprocedure. Dental stewardship

  2. What do I need to know about penicillin antibiotics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Charlotte I; Germovsek, Eva; Sharland, Mike

    2017-02-01

    The penicillins remain the class of antibiotics most commonly prescribed to children worldwide. In an era when the risks posed by antimicrobial resistance are growing, an understanding of antibiotic pharmacology and how to apply these principles in clinical practice is increasingly important. This paper provides an overview of the pharmacology of penicillins, focusing on those aspects of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicity that are clinically relevant in paediatric prescribing. Penicillin allergy is frequently reported but a detailed history of suspected adverse reactions is essential to identify whether a clinically relevant hypersensitivity reaction is likely or not. The importance of additional factors such as antibiotic palatability, concordance and stewardship are also discussed, highlighting their relevance to optimal prescribing of the penicillins for children. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Guidelines for antibiotic prophylaxis in abdominal surgery for adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeja Pintar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Background.Evidence based recommendations for antibiotic prophylaxis in abdominal surgery are prepared to reduce postoperative complications and to reduce inappropriate prophylactic antibiotic prescribing. The original guidline address risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI, benefits and risks of antibiotic profilaxis and  indications for surgical antibiotic profilaxis.Update of recommendations is an opportunity to expand and review the evidence supporting recommendations. Recommendations for common surgical procedures in abdominal surgery in adults are included in this guideline.Surgical antibiotic prophylaxis is and adjunct to, not a substitue for, good surgical tecnique. Antibiotic prophylactic should be regarded as one component of an effective policy for the control of healthcare-associated infection. 

  4. Community-Based Prescribing for Impetigo in Remote Australia: An Opportunity for Antimicrobial Stewardship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Jane Oliver

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundTo support antibiotic prescribing for both hospital and community-based health professionals working in remote North Western Australia, a multidisciplinary Antimicrobial Stewardship (AMS Committee was established in 2013. This Committee is usually focused on hospital-based prescribing. A troubling increase in sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim resistance in Staphylococcus aureus antibiograms from 9 to 18% over 1 year prompted a shift in gaze to community prescribing.What we didFinding a paucity of relevant research, we first investigated contextual factors influencing local prescribing. We also designed a systematic survey of experts with experience relevant to our setting using a structured response survey (12 questions to better understand specific AMS risks. Using these findings, recommendations were formulated for the AMS Committee.What we learnedPrescribing recommendations in a regional Skin Infections Protocol had previously been altered in December 2014. From 15 experts, we received 9 comprehensive responses (60% about AMS risks in community prescribing. If feasible, prescribing audits also would have been valuable. Ten recommendations regarding specific antibiotic recommendations were submitted to the AMS Committee.Strengthening AMS in remote settingsAs AMS Committees in Australia usually focus on hospital-based prescribing, novel methods such as external expert opinion could inform deliberations about community-based prescribing. Our approach meant that this AMS Committee was able to intervene in the 2017 organizational review of the regional Skin Infections Protocol used by prescribers likely unaware of AMS risks. This experience demonstrates the value of incorporating AMS principles in community-based prescribing in context of a remote setting.

  5. Prescribed burning: a topical issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bovio G

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Prescribed burning is a promising technique for the prevention of forest fires in Italy. The research deepened several ecological and operative aspects. However, legal issues need to be thoroughly investigated.

  6. The RESET Mindset Model applied on decreasing antibiotic usage in dairy cattle in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, T J G M; Jansen, J; Wessels, R J

    2017-01-01

    Prudent use of antibiotics is important to prevent antibiotic resistance in humans and in animals. For this reason politicians demanded a decrease of total antibiotic use and of use of critically important antibiotics in animal husbandry in the Netherlands. In the dairy sector the use of antibiotics almost halved in the years 2009-2015, with a decrease of the use of critically important antibiotics to very low levels. To realize a sustainable decrease in antibiotic usage, the mindset towards the subject was considered crucial. Based on several models from social psychology, the RESET Mindset Model was used. This model contains the most important cues to change human behaviour, being Rules and regulations, Education and information, Social pressure, Economics, and Tools. To change behaviour of groups in order to reach a tipping point, it is of utmost importance to not choose among the different cues, but to use them all. In order to decrease antibiotic usage in dairy cattle in the Netherlands several actions, obliged as well as voluntary, were undertaken. An independent veterinary medicine authority was founded that became active for all animal sectors. In the dairy sector a national database on antibiotic usage called MediRund was developed, which made transparency and benchmarking on antibiotic usage at the national and the herd level possible. Several other activities are described, such as herd health and treatment plans, selective dry cow therapy, and the strong limitation on the use of critically important antibiotics. Antibiotic usage at the herd level, referred to as the 'antibiotic number', became an important and socially accepted herd level parameter. The actions undertaken worked through different cues, all part of the RESET Mindset Model. As such, different types of dairy farmers sensitive to different types of cues were motivated to change their behaviour. Antibiotic usage in dairy cattle in the Netherlands decreased significantly by intense

  7. Safe prescribing: a titanic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routledge, Philip A

    2012-10-01

    The challenge to achieve safe prescribing merits the adjective 'titanic'. The organisational and human errors leading to poor prescribing (e.g. underprescribing, overprescribing, misprescribing or medication errors) have parallels in the organisational and human errors that led to the loss of the Titanic 100 years ago this year. Prescribing can be adversely affected by communication failures, critical conditions, complacency, corner cutting, callowness and a lack of courage of conviction, all of which were also factors leading to the Titanic tragedy. These issues need to be addressed by a commitment to excellence, the final component of the 'Seven C's'. Optimal prescribing is dependent upon close communication and collaborative working between highly trained health professionals, whose role is to ensure maximum clinical effectiveness, whilst also protecting their patients from avoidable harm. Since humans are prone to error, and the environments in which they work are imperfect, it is not surprising that medication errors are common, occurring more often during the prescribing stage than during dispensing or administration. A commitment to excellence in prescribing includes a continued focus on lifelong learning (including interprofessional learning) in pharmacology and therapeutics. This should be accompanied by improvements in the clinical working environment of prescribers, and the encouragement of a strong safety culture (including reporting of adverse incidents as well as suspected adverse drug reactions whenever appropriate). Finally, members of the clinical team must be prepared to challenge each other, when necessary, to ensure that prescribing combines the highest likelihood of benefit with the lowest potential for harm. © 2012 The Author. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Safe prescribing: a titanic challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routledge, Philip A

    2012-01-01

    The challenge to achieve safe prescribing merits the adjective ‘titanic’. The organisational and human errors leading to poor prescribing (e.g. underprescribing, overprescribing, misprescribing or medication errors) have parallels in the organisational and human errors that led to the loss of the Titanic 100 years ago this year. Prescribing can be adversely affected by communication failures, critical conditions, complacency, corner cutting, callowness and a lack of courage of conviction, all of which were also factors leading to the Titanic tragedy. These issues need to be addressed by a commitment to excellence, the final component of the ‘Seven C's’. Optimal prescribing is dependent upon close communication and collaborative working between highly trained health professionals, whose role is to ensure maximum clinical effectiveness, whilst also protecting their patients from avoidable harm. Since humans are prone to error, and the environments in which they work are imperfect, it is not surprising that medication errors are common, occurring more often during the prescribing stage than during dispensing or administration. A commitment to excellence in prescribing includes a continued focus on lifelong learning (including interprofessional learning) in pharmacology and therapeutics. This should be accompanied by improvements in the clinical working environment of prescribers, and the encouragement of a strong safety culture (including reporting of adverse incidents as well as suspected adverse drug reactions whenever appropriate). Finally, members of the clinical team must be prepared to challenge each other, when necessary, to ensure that prescribing combines the highest likelihood of benefit with the lowest potential for harm. PMID:22738396

  9. Unifying quantitative life-history theory and field endocrinology to assess prudent parenthood in a long-lived seabird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterthwaite, W.H.; Kitaysky, A.S.; Hatch, Shyla A.; Piatt, John F.; Mangel, M.

    2010-01-01

    Question: Can field measurements of stress hormones help us to assess the prudent parent hypothesis in a long-lived seabird? Organism: Black-legged kittiwake, Rissa tridactyla. Location: Duck and Gull Islands, Cook Inlet, Alaska, Methods: We examined the statistical relationship between the stress hormone corticosterone and mortality in black-legged kittiwakes. We built a demographic model of the kittiwake life cycle to determine whether the mortality rates associated with persisting in a breeding attempt despite high corticosterone caused the birds to sacrifice more lifetime reproductive output than they gain from one year's breeding. Results: The probability of apparent mortality increased with corticosterone, suggesting some birds incurred increased mortality risk for the sake of breeding. For Duck Island (low reproductive success), it appears birds sacrificed more lifetime reproductive success than a prudent parent would. On Gull Island, it appears most but possibly not all birds were behaving in ways consistent with theory, although definitive statements require larger samples of highly stressed birds. ?? 2010 William H. Satterthwaite.

  10. Antimicrobial agents are societal drugs: how should this influence prescribing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Paul; Gould, Ian M

    2006-01-01

    This paper is concerned with how those who prescribe antimicrobials should consider the wider repercussions of their actions. It is accepted that in an ecological system, pressure will cause evolution; this is also the case with antimicrobials, the result being the development of resistance and the therapeutic failure of drugs. To an extent, this can be ameliorated through advances by the pharmaceutical industry, but that should not stop us from critically appraising our use and modifying our behavior to slow this process down. Up to 50% of prescribing in human medicine and 80% in veterinary medicine and farming has been considered questionable. The Alliance for the Prudent Use of Antimicrobials (APUA) was approached by the WHO to review the situation. Their recommendations include decreasing the prescribing of antibacterials for nonbacterial infections. In the UK, there has been an initiative called "the path of least resistance". This encourages general practitioners to avoid prescribing or reduce the duration of prescriptions for conditions such as upper respiratory tract infections and uncomplicated urinary tract infections; this approach has been successful. Another recommendation is to reduce the prescribing of broad-spectrum antibacterials. In UK hospitals, the problems identified with the inappropriate use of antibacterials are insufficient training in infectious disease, difficulty in selecting empirical antibacterial therapy, poor use of available microbiological information, the fear of litigation and the fact that the majority of antibacterials are prescribed by the least experienced doctors. With close liaison between the laboratories and clinicians, and the development of local protocols, this can be addressed. Another recommendation is to tighten the use of antibacterial prophylaxis and to improve patient compliance. Through a combination of improved education for doctors and patients, and improved communication skills, these problems can be

  11. Antibiotic prescription strategies for acute sore throat: a prospective observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Paul; Stuart, Beth; Hobbs, F D Richard; Butler, Chris C; Hay, Alastair D; Delaney, Brendan; Campbell, John; Broomfield, Sue; Barratt, Paula; Hood, Kerenza; Everitt, Hazel; Mullee, Mark; Williamson, Ian; Mant, David; Moore, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Data from trials suggest that antibiotics reduce the risk of complications of sore throat by at least 50%, but few trials for complications have been done in modern settings, and datasets of delayed antibiotic prescription are underpowered. Observational evidence is important in view of poor compliance with antibiotic treatment outside trials, but no prospective observational cohort studies have been done to date. We generated a large prospective cohort from the DESCARTE study, and the PRISM component of DESCARTE, of 12,829 adults presenting with sore throat (≤ 2 weeks duration) in primary care. Our follow-up of the cohort was based on a detailed and structured review of routine medical records, and analysis of the comparison of three antibiotic prescription strategies (no antibiotic prescription, immediate antibiotic prescription, and delayed antibiotic prescription) to control for the propensity to prescribe antibiotics. Information about antibiotic prescription was recorded in 12,677 individuals (4805 prescribed no antibiotics, 6088 prescribed antibiotics immediately, and 1784 prescribed delayed antibiotics). We documented by review of patients' notes (n=11,950) the development of suppurative complications (eg, quinsy, impetigo and cellulitis, otitis media, and sinusitis) or reconsultation with new or non-resolving symptoms). We used multivariate analysis to control for variables significantly related to the propensity to prescribe antibiotics and for clustering by general practitioner. 164 (1.4%) of the 11,950 patients with information available developed complications; otitis media and sinusitis were the most common complications (101 patients [62%]). Compared with no antibiotic prescription, immediate antibiotic prescription was associated with fewer complications (adjusted risk ratio [RR] 0.62, 95% CI 0.43-0.91, estimated number needed to treat [NNT 193) as was delayed prescription of antibiotics (0.58, 0.34-0.98; NNT 174). 1787 of the 11,950 patients (15

  12. Antibiotic Prescription Knowledge of Dentists in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: An Online, Country-wide Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halboub, Esam; Alzaili, Abdulaziz; Quadri, Mir Faeq Ali; Al-Haroni, Mohammed; Al-Obaida, Mohammad Ibrahim; Al-Hebshi, Nezar Noor

    2016-03-01

    Dentists are probably contributing to the development of bacterial resistance to certain antibiotics. Campaigns to promote prudent use of antibiotics in dentistry are, thus, needed but require proper identification of dentists' knowledge gaps. The objective here was to comprehensively evaluate antibiotic prescription knowledge of dentists in Saudi Arabia. A link to an online, previously validated questionnaire was emailed to 5199 dentists registered with the Saudi Dental Society. The questionnaire comprised 42 scorable items measuring antibiotics prescription knowledge in five different domains in addition to nonscorable questions regarding first-choice antibiotics and previous attendance of a course/workshop about antibiotic prescription. Each correct answer was given one mark. Mean scores were calculated as percentages and categorized as good (> 80%), intermediate (60-80%), or poor (antibiotic; 62% reported attending a course/workshop in the last 5 years. The average knowledge score was 69%, being highest for nonclinical indications (79%) and lowest for prophylactic use (56%). The worst per-item scores were noted for rheumatic heart disease (19%), trismus (28%), surgical extraction (30%), apicectomy (31%), and periodontal abscess (33%). Female dentists, dentists in governmental sector, and those with higher qualifications had significantly better knowledge. The level of knowledge was hardly intermediate and several deficits were identified, indicating an urgent need for educational campaigns and provision of guidelines promoting rational use of antibiotics by dentists. Irrational use of antibiotics by dentists can contribute to the problem of antibacterial resistance.

  13. Introduction to prescribed fires in Southern ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas A. Waldrop; Scott L. Goodrick

    2012-01-01

    This publication is a guide for resource managers on planning and executing prescribed burns in Southern forests and grasslands. It includes explanations of reasons for prescribed burning, environmental effects, weather, and techniques as well as general information on prescribed burning.

  14. Knowledge regarding antibiotic drug action and prescription practices among dentist in Jaipur city, Rajasthan

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    Dushyant Pal Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dentists prescribe antibiotics routinely to manage oral and dental infections. Unscrupulous antibiotic prescriptions can be associated with unfavorable side effects and the development of resistance. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the level of knowledge regarding antibiotic prescription use among dentists in Jaipur City, Rajasthan. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire survey was conducted among 300 dentists in Jaipur city. A validated, self-designed, 21-item, closed-ended questionnaire was used to collect data on knowledge regarding antibiotic prescription. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Results: A total of 300 dental practitioners were included in the study. The majority of the respondents seem to prescribe antibiotics that are broad spectrum or the ones that are commonly used. A considerable percentage of the respondents were not aware of the pregnancy drug risk categories by Food and Drug Administration. The most of the respondents said that they prescribe antibiotics on the basis of the diagnosis, whereas more than two-thirds of the respondents said that they never advise culture sensitivity test before prescribing the antibiotics. Conclusion: Our findings suggest the knowledge of dentists regarding antibiotic prescription is inadequate and more focus should be given to the ongoing training regarding the pharmacological aspects, pertinent medical conditions, and prophylactic use of antibiotics in dentistry.

  15. Clinical decision making in restorative dentistry, endodontics, and antibiotic prescription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadik, Yehuda; Levin, Liran

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of geographic location of graduation (Israel, Eastern Europe, Latin America) on decision making regarding management of dental caries, periapical lesions, and antibiotic prescribing routines. A questionnaire was given to ninety-eight general practitioners regarding demographic and work habits. Photographs of lesions were shown on a screen. Participants reported recommended treatment and whether they would routinely prescribe antibiotics following regular endodontic treatment, retreatment, and impacted third molar surgical extraction in healthy patients. There was a 94 percent (n=92) response rate, of which eighty-five responses were used in the data analysis. Surgical treatment of asymptomatic enamel caries lesions was not recommended by most of the subjects, and surgery was recommended for DEJ caries lesions in low or moderate caries risk patients, both without significant differences between geographic regions of dental school graduation. Israelis had a lower frequency of retreatment in asymptomatic teeth that demonstrated periapical radiolucency with post restoration (without crown) compared to Latin Americans and East Europeans. Most of the participants would not retreat asymptomatic teeth that demonstrated periapical radiolucency with post and crown. After third molar surgery, 46 percent of participants routinely prescribed antibiotics. Significantly more Latin American graduates prescribed antibiotics following endodontic treatment, retreatment, and third molar extractions (pantibiotics) and overtreatment (caries) among young practitioners reflect failure of undergraduate education in proper use of antibiotics and management of the carious lesions according to the patient's clinical presentation and caries risk assessment rather than routinely undertaking surgical caries treatment.

  16. Evaluation of antibiotic usage in swine reproduction farms in Umbria region based on the quantitative analysis of antimicrobial consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Scoppetta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic use in food-producing animals has considerable impact on public health, especially with respect to the development and spread of antibiotic resistance. Pigs represent one of the main species in which antibiotics are frequently used for different purposes. Surveillance of antibiotic consumption and dose appropriateness, through novel approaches based on defined daily doses, is strongly needed to assess farms’ antibiotic risk, in terms of spread of antibiotic resistance and possibile presence of residues in meat. In this study, antibiotic consumption was monitored in 14 swine reproduction farms, together with managerial, structural, and health aspects. Most of the controlled farms (65% were classified as at medium antibiotic risk, 21% at high antibiotic risk, and 14% at low antibiotic risk. Critical aspects of antibiotic administration concerned treatments for suckling and weaner piglets, oral antibiotic administration, treatment and diagnosis of gastroenteric infections, and use of critically important antimicrobials for human medicine, especially colistin. These aspects could be considered critical aspects of antibiotic use in from-farrow-to-wean/finish swine farms in the Umbria region and must be controlled to minimize risks. Even though a small number of farms in Umbria region are at high antibiotic risk, the risk of antibiotic resistance should be minimized, and management and biosecurity of the farms should be improved by extending the use of antimicrobial susceptibility tests and optimizing the diagnostic methods for infectious diseases. Furthermore, farmers’ and veterinarians’ knowledge of antibiotic resistance should be improved and the prudent use of antibiotics encouraged to prevent the development and spread of resistant microorganisms.

  17. Antibiotic prescriptions for outpatient acute rhinosinusitis in Canada, 2007-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weese, Scott; Glass-Kaastra, Shiona; McIsaac, Warren

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Acute rhinosinusitis (ARS) is a respiratory disease commonly caused by viral infections. Physicians regularly prescribe antibiotics despite bacterial etiologies being uncommon. This is of concern, as this use adds to the selection pressure for resistance. Here we present the descriptive epidemiology of acute rhinosinusitis and corresponding antibiotic prescribing practices by Canadian outpatient physicians from 2007–2013. Materials/Methods Diagnosis and antibiotic prescription data for ARS were extracted from the Canadian Disease and Therapeutic Index for 2007 to 2013, and population data were acquired from Statistics Canada. ARS diagnosis and antibiotic prescription rates and frequencies of antibiotic classes were calculated. Results Eighty-eight percent of patients diagnosed with ARS in 2013 were adults, with a greater rate of antibiotic prescriptions observed among the adults relative to the pediatric patients (1632.9 and 468.6 antibiotic prescriptions per 10,000 inhabitants). Between 2007 and 2013, the ARS diagnosis rate decreased from 596 to 464 diagnoses per 10,000 inhabitants, while the percentage of diagnoses with antibiotic prescriptions at the national level remained stable (87% to 84%). From 2007 to 2013, prescription rates for macrolides decreased from 203.5 to 105.4 prescriptions per 10,000 inhabitants. In 2013, penicillins with extended spectrum were more commonly prescribed compared to macrolides among adult patients (153.5 and 105.4 prescriptions per 10,000 inhabitants, respectively). Conclusion This study is the first to describe physician antibiotic prescribing practices for treatment of ARS in Canada. Results show that antibiotic treatment for ARS represents an area for implementing antimicrobial stewardship, and through it, managing antibiotic resistance. Further work is required to better understand diagnosing practices and treatment criteria for ARS, and use this information to further assist physicians to limit unnecessary

  18. Demographics of antibiotic persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollerova, Silvia; Jouvet, Lionel; Steiner, Ulrich

    Persister cells, cells that can survive antibiotic exposure but lack heritable antibiotic resistance, are assumed to play a crucial role for the evolution of antibiotic resistance. Persistence is a stage associated with reduced metabolic activity. Most previous studies have been done on batch...... even play a more prominent role for the evolution of resistance and failures of medical treatment by antibiotics as currently assumed....

  19. Antibiotic RX in Hospitals: Proceed with Caution PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-03-04

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the March 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Antibiotics save lives, but poor prescribing practices can put patients at risk for health problems. Learn how to protect patients by protecting antibiotics.  Created: 3/4/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 3/4/2014.

  20. Antibiotic prescription: An oral physician's point of view

    OpenAIRE

    Patait, Mahendra; Urvashi, N.; Rajderkar, M.; Kedar, S.; Shah, Kinjal; Patait, Reeta

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antibiotics are important in the management and prophylaxis of infections in patients at a risk of experiencing microbial disease. Uses of systemic antibiotics in dentistry are limited since management of acute dental conditions is primarily based upon extraction of teeth or extirpation of the pulp. However, the literature provides evidence of inappropriate prescribing practices by practitioners, due to a number of factors from inadequate knowledge to social factors. Aim: The aim ...

  1. Timing of antibiotic prophylaxis in surgery for adult hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thonse, Raghuram; Sreenivas, Muthyala; Sherman, Kevin P.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antibiotic prophylaxis is widely used in surgery for hip fractures. METHODS AND RESULTS: In a retrospective study of case notes of 100 patients, frequent inaccuracies in dose administration were observed. This was applicable to both the pre-operative and the postoperative doses. Longer time intervals between the doses, failure to administer the prescribed doses, and failure of proper documentation were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Improvement in the awareness of staff and timely administration of prophylactic antibiotic has resulted from this study. PMID:15239868

  2. Characterisation of antibiotic prescriptions for acute respiratory tract infections in Danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Saust, Laura Trolle

    2017-01-01

    Inappropriate use of antibiotics is contributing to the increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance. Several Danish guidelines on antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract infections in general practice have been issued to promote rational prescribing of antibiotics, however it is unclear...... if these recommendations are followed. We aimed to characterise the pattern of antibiotic prescriptions for patients diagnosed with acute respiratory tract infections, by means of electronic prescriptions, labeled with clinical indications, from Danish general practice. Acute respiratory tract infections accounted for 456...... prescription patterns for acute respiratory tract infections by data linkage of clinical indications. The findings confirm that penicillin V is the most commonly prescribed antibiotic agent for treatment of patients with an acute respiratory tract infection in Danish general practice. However, second...

  3. Inappropriate prescribing in the elderly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, P

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Drug therapy is necessary to treat acute illness, maintain current health and prevent further decline. However, optimizing drug therapy for older patients is challenging and sometimes, drug therapy can do more harm than good. Drug utilization review tools can highlight instances of potentially inappropriate prescribing to those involved in elderly pharmacotherapy, i.e. doctors, nurses and pharmacists. We aim to provide a review of the literature on potentially inappropriate prescribing in the elderly and also to review the explicit criteria that have been designed to detect potentially inappropriate prescribing in the elderly. METHODS: We performed an electronic search of the PUBMED database for articles published between 1991 and 2006 and a manual search through major journals for articles referenced in those located through PUBMED. Search terms were elderly, inappropriate prescribing, prescriptions, prevalence, Beers criteria, health outcomes and Europe. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Prescription of potentially inappropriate medications to older people is highly prevalent in the United States and Europe, ranging from 12% in community-dwelling elderly to 40% in nursing home residents. Inappropriate prescribing is associated with adverse drug events. Limited data exists on health outcomes from use of inappropriate medications. There are no prospective randomized controlled studies that test the tangible clinical benefit to patients of using drug utilization review tools. Existing drug utilization review tools have been designed on the basis of North American and Canadian drug formularies and may not be appropriate for use in European countries because of the differences in national drug formularies and prescribing attitudes. CONCLUSION: Given the high prevalence of inappropriate prescribing despite the widespread use of drug-utilization review tools, prospective randomized controlled trials are necessary to identify useful interventions. Drug

  4. Immunostimulation asa method limiting unnecessary antibiotic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Szczukocka-Zych

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recurring respiratory tract infections are typical of childhood. This results from the fact that children are exposed to pathogens, usually in groups of people, and from the immaturity of the immune system. Most upper and lower respiratory tract infections are caused by viruses. Nevertheless, antibiotics, which target bacteria, are often prescribed. Antibiotic overuse leads to increased microbial resistance to these drugs, resulting in their inefficacy. Improper treatment of respiratory infections with antibiotics ultimately leads to treatment failure. An increase in antibiotic resistance of many bacterial strains is becoming a serious global problem and makes treatment much more difficult. It is a responsibility of each physician to use antibiotics properly and implement adequate prevention of recurring respiratory tract infections. For many years, it has been attempted to find effective agents that improve immunity in children. The pharmaceutical market offers various preparations advertised as immunostimulants, such as bacterial lysates, vitamins, dietary supplements, probiotics or herbal, animal and homeopathic products. The role of immunomodulatory substances is to promote the immune system to fight pathogens, reduce the frequency of infections and decrease the demand for antibiotics. Unfortunately, most immunomodulators do not have sufficiently reliable clinical trials that would confirm their efficacy.

  5. Increasing awareness about antibiotic use and resistance: a hands-on project for high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Maria João; Santos, Catarina L; Costa, Patrício; Lencastre, Leonor; Tavares, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Health-promoting education is essential to foster an informed society able to make decisions about socio-scientific issues based on scientifically sustained criteria. Antibiotic resistance is currently a major public health issue. Considering that irrational antibiotic use has been associated with the development and widespread of antibiotic resistant bacteria, educational interventions to promote prudent antibiotic consumption are required. This study focuses on the outcomes of an interventional program implemented at the University of Porto, Portugal, to promote awareness about antibiotic resistance at high school levels (15-17 year old). The project Microbiology recipes: antibiotics à la carte articulates a set of wet and dry lab activities designed to promote the participants' understanding of concepts and processes underlying antibiotics' production and activity, such as the notion of mechanisms of action of antibiotics. Following a mix-method approach based on a pre-/post design, the effectiveness of this project was assessed by gathering data from surveys, direct observation and analysis of artifacts of 42 high school students (aged 15 and 16 years). The results indicate that the participants developed a more comprehensive picture of antibiotic resistance. The project was shown to promote more sophisticated conceptualizations of bacteria and antibiotics, increased awareness about the perils of antibiotic resistance, and enhanced consciousness towards measures that can be undertaken to mitigate the problem. The participants regarded their experiences as enjoyable and useful, and believed that the project contributed to improve their understanding and raise their interest about the issues discussed. Furthermore, there were also improvements in their procedural skills concerning the laboratory techniques performed. This study evidences the possibility of increasing high school students' awareness about the consequences of antibiotic resistance and the

  6. Evaluation of antibiotic prescription in the Lebanese community: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Saleh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antibiotics are considered among the most commonly prescribed drug classes in developing countries. Inappropriate prescription of antibiotics is a major public health concern and is related to the development of antimicrobial resistance. Objective: This study aimed at assessing the appropriateness of antibiotic prescription by non-infectious disease physicians in a community setting in Lebanon. Methods: A pilot cross-sectional study was undertaken on community pharmacy patients presenting with antibiotic prescription. It was performed over a period of 4 months in different regions of Lebanon. Participants answered a questionnaire inquiring about socio-demographic characteristics, medical conditions, symptoms that required medical attention, the doctor's diagnosis, the prescribed antibiotic, and whether laboratory tests were ordered to identify the causative organism or not. Data were analyzed using SPSS 17. Results: We studied 270 patients (49.3% males and 50.7% females. This study showed that the most-prescribed antibiotics were the cephalosporins (82% and that almost half of the illnesses for which antibiotics were prescribed were respiratory tract infections (41%. The study also showed that the choice of the prescribed antibiotic was appropriate in 61.5% of the studied cases, while the prescribed dose and the duration of the treatment were inaccurate in 52 and 64% of the cases, respectively. In addition, fever seemed to be a factor that influenced the physician's prescriptions, since the choice of drug conformity to guidelines increased from 53.7% (1 day of fever to 88.9% (1 week of fever, and the dose prescription compliance to guidelines was higher (55.9% for patients suffering from fever compared to those with no fever (38.1%. Conclusion: This study showed a high prevalence of inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions in Lebanon. Therefore, actions should be taken to optimize antibiotic prescription.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of antibiotics for COPD management: observational analysis using CPRD data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronaldson, Sarah J; Raghunath, Anan; Torgerson, David J; Van Staa, Tjeerd

    2017-04-01

    It is often difficult to determine the cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations, and antibiotics are frequently prescribed. This study conducted an observational cost-effectiveness analysis of prescribing antibiotics for exacerbations of COPD based on routinely collected data from patient electronic health records. A cohort of 45 375 patients aged 40 years or more who attended their general practice for a COPD exacerbation during 2000-2013 was identified from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Two groups were formed ("immediate antibiotics" or "no antibiotics") based on whether antibiotics were prescribed during the index general practice (GP) consultation, with data analysed according to subsequent healthcare resource use. A cost-effectiveness analysis was undertaken from the perspective of the UK National Health Service, using a time horizon of 4 weeks in the base case. The use of antibiotics for COPD exacerbations resulted in cost savings and an improvement in all outcomes analysed; i.e. GP visits, hospitalisations, community respiratory team referrals, all referrals, infections and subsequent antibiotics prescriptions were lower for the antibiotics group. Hence, the use of antibiotics was dominant over no antibiotics. The economic analysis suggests that use of antibiotics for COPD exacerbations is a cost-effective alternative to not prescribing antibiotics for patients who present to their GP, and remains cost-effective when longer time horizons of 3 months and 12 months are considered. It would be useful for a definitive trial to be undertaken in this area to determine the cost-effectiveness of antibiotics for COPD exacerbations.

  8. Antibiotic Use in 2016 by Members of the American Association of Endodontists: Report of a National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germack, Mark; Sedgley, Christine M; Sabbah, Wael; Whitten, Brian

    2017-10-01

    This study surveyed the antibiotic prescribing practices of endodontists, and data were compared with previous surveys conducted in 1994 and 1999. A 17-question survey was sent via www.surveymonkey.com to 3000 active members of the American Association of Endodontists for responses about antibiotic prescribing practices and demographics. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, and linear regression analyses. Six hundred eighty-six participants (22.86%) completed the survey. The most frequently prescribed antibiotics were amoxicillin (60.71%) followed by penicillin V (30.43%) and clindamycin for patients with allergies (95.4%). Respondents reported prescribing antibiotics for irreversible pulpitis with mild symptoms (1.75%), irreversible pulpitis with moderate symptoms (6.41%), necrotic pulp with symptomatic apical periodontitis (43.59%), chronic apical abscess without (10.50%) or with symptoms (29.74%), acute apical abscess (95.92%), avulsion (70.26%), endodontic surgery (41.69%), retreatment (silver point [23.76%] or gutta-percha [15.60%]), postoperative pain after instrumentation or obturation (12.39%), and perforation repair (5.98%). The type of practice (solo/group) and geographic region (Southeast) were significant predictors of increased antibiotic prescribing; 36.89% of respondents reported prescribing antibiotics that are not necessary, most commonly because of patient expectations. Since 1999, there has been a significant shift from prescribing penicillin V to amoxicillin as endodontists' first choice of antibiotic and a significant increase in the use of clindamycin for penicillin-allergic patients. Antibiotics continue to be prescribed in clinical situations for which they are typically not indicated, most commonly because of patient expectations. Regional differences in antibiotic prescribing practices by endodontists exist in the United States. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier

  9. Audit of antibiotic use in a Brazilian University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Guimarães Fonseca

    Full Text Available A cohort study was carried out at the Marilia Medical School Hospital. In the first phase the pattern of antibiotic use was evaluated. Antibiotics were prescribed for 55.4% of the patients; antibiotic combinations were used in 43%. Therapeutic use of antibiotics was considered inadequate in 27%. Respiratory and skin infections were the most frequently diagnosed. In up to 31% of the cases the treatment of respiratory infections was considered inadequate. The surgical use of antibiotic prophylaxis was evaluated in the second phase. Prophylaxis was indicated in 73.2% of the surgeries. The antibiotics most used for prophylaxis were first generation cephalosporins. In 78.9% of the surgeries, the antibiotic was correctly chosen. In 15.9% of the surgeries, the initial antibiotic administration was correctly timed. The use of antibiotics in the post-operative period was appropriate in 29.8% of the cases. The independent risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI, as determined by logistic regression analysis adjusted to class of wound risk, were the choice of antibiotic to be used prophylactically and the duration of antibiotic treatment in the post-operative period. Those who received appropriate prophylactic antibiotics had a lower rate of SSI than those who received innapropriated antibiotics [RR=0.49/95%; CI=0.25-0.90]. Patients who received prophylactic antibiotics correctly in the post-operative period had a lower risk of SSI than those who did not [RR=0.21/95%; CI=0.70-0.63]. The mean length of hospital stay was shorter among patients whose prophylactic treatment was correctly employed than among for which it was not [6.1 (±9.8 and 11.1 (±13.5 days, p=0.25].

  10. ELECTORAL PRESCRIBERS. WHO ARE THEY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin SASU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The decision to vote and choosing among the candidates is an extremely important one with repercussions on everyday life by determining, in global mode, its quality for the whole society. Therefore the whole process by which the voter decides becomes a central concern. Prescribers, supposed to have a big influence on the electoral market, are a component of the microenvironment political organizations. These are people who occupy important positions that can influence the behavior of others. In the political environment, prescribers are known under the name of "opinion formers", "opinion leaders", "mediators" (Beciu, 2009 or "influencers" (Keller and Berry, 2003 Weimann, 1994. This paper aims to review the central opinions on what is the influence prescribers, opinion makers on voting behavior, voting and decisions on whether and how they act?

  11. To prescribe codeine or not to prescribe codeine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Marc L; Wanat, Matthew A

    2014-09-01

    A recently published study in Pediatrics by Kaiser et al. (2014; Epub April 21, DOI: 10.1542/peds.2013-3171) reported that on average, over the past decade, children aged 3 to 17 were prescribed approximately 700,000 prescriptions for codeine-containing products each year in association with emergency department (ED) visits. Although, guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics issued warnings in 1997 and reaffirmed their concerns regarding the safety and effectiveness of codeine in 2006, it is still often prescribed for pain and cough associated with upper respiratory infection. With the impending rescheduling of hydrocodone combination products to Schedule II, physicians and mid-level prescribers may be compelled to prescribe codeine-containing products (e.g., with acetaminophen) due to reduced administrative burden and limits on Schedule II prescriptive authority for nurse practitioners and physician assistants in some states. This commentary expounds on the safety and effectiveness concerns of codeine, with a primary focus on patients in the ED setting.

  12. Psychologists' right to prescribe – should prescribing privileges be ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Current changes in legislation regarding prescription rights increase the possibility of non-medical practitioners being authorised to presctibe medication. There has been ongoing debate about granting psychologists in South Africa a limited right to prescribe (RTP) psychotropic medication. The main reasons advanced for ...

  13. Antibiotic use in childhood alters the gut microbiota and predisposes to overweight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katri Korpela

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A correlation between the use of antibiotics in early life and the excessive weight gain in later childhood has been shown in several large cohort studies all over the world. One hypothesis explaining this association is the pervasive impact that antibiotics may have on the intestinal microbiota, and this has been supported by recent mouse studies. Studies have shown dramatic changes in the intestinal microbiota of adults in response to oral antibiotic treatments. However, little is known about the impact of antibiotics on the intestinal microbiota of children, although antibiotics account for the majority of the medication prescribed to children in Western countries.

  14. Prevalence of Antibiotic Resistance in Escherichia coli Isolated from Poultry Meat Supply in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Safarpordehkordi

    2014-08-01

    Conclusions: Despite the high contamination rate of chicken meat with Escherichia coli, majority of isolates had high resistance to common antibiotics. Complete cooking of meat and avoid indiscriminate prescribing of antibiotics, preventing the occurrence of food poisoning due to resistant Escherichia coli.

  15. A Price Comparison of Antibiotics in a Tertiary Healthcare Facility in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A large proportion of the population in developing countries including Nigeria lacks regular access to medicines for disease treatment. This has been linked to the high cost of these drugs, antibiotics inclusive. We undertook to compare the prices of antibiotics prescribed in the pediatric ward of a tertiary health-care facility in ...

  16. Patients insist on antibiotics for sinusitis? Here is a good reason to say "no".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Sarah-Anne; Hickner, John

    2008-07-01

    Stop prescribing antibiotics for adults with a clinical diagnosis of acute sinusitis, unless the patient has severe symptoms. Antibiotics have little if any positive effects on the severity and duration of symptoms, and they cause adverse effects and create unnecessary expense.

  17. Isolation, identification, characterization and antibiotic sensitivity profile of pathogenic Legionella pneumophila isolates from different water sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannan Subbaram

    2017-05-01

    Conclusions: Serious and fatal L. pneumophila infections may be transmitted through water. Legionella can survive under various conditions in various water sources. L. pneumophila is the important pathogen causing human disease. Great challenge prevails to health care professionals because these Legionellae acquired antibiotic resistance to many routinely prescribed antibiotics.

  18. Antibiotics for preterm rupture of membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Sara; Boulvain, Michel; Neilson, James P

    2010-08-04

    antibiotics seemed to have little effect on the health of children. The decision to prescribe antibiotics for women with PROM is not clearcut. Benefits in some short-term outcomes (prolongation of pregnancy, infection, less abnormal cerebral ultrasound before discharge from hospital) should be balanced against a lack of evidence of benefit for others, including perinatal mortality, and longer term outcomes. If antibiotics are prescribed it is unclear which would be the antibiotic of choice.Co-amoxiclav should be avoided in women at risk of preterm delivery due to increased risk of neonatal necrotising enterocolitis.

  19. O Outro na Cidade: Deficiência, Acessibilidade e Saúde em Presidente Prudente-SP | The Other City: Disability, Accessibility and Health en Presidente Prudente-SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Cristina Alves

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false PT-BR X-NONE X-NONE Introdução: O acesso aos serviços de saúde pode ser visto como uma forma de compreensão dos processos de produção e reprodução dos espaços urbanos contemporâneos, especialmente, por que o uso e apropriação da cidade podem revelar inúmeras formas de exclusão e desigualdade social. Tal situação é ainda mais perceptível quando se trata de pessoas com algum tipo de deficiência, que precisam se locomover em busca da saúde pelo espaço urbano. O objetivo desta pesquisa é entender como se concretiza a mobilidade e a acessibilidade do portador de deficiência ao sistema de saúde de Presidente Prudente-SP, de forma a captar as estratégias e os contextos geográficos desses sujeitos. Para tanto, pretendemos discutir e analisar a deficiência do ponto de vista geográfico, além de basear o trabalho através da pesquisa qualitativa a respeito do acesso e acessibilidade tomando como referência a vida cotidiana das pessoas com deficiência(s moradoras de Presidente Prudente-SP. Ao fazermos este recorte temático, pretendemos demonstrar, portanto, que é possível uma compreensão mais clara das desigualdades de saúde-doença no espaço urbano, uma vez que os sujeitos representam e concebem tal espaço, de forma singular. Metodologia/Desenvolvimento: Publicações do Instituto de Geografia e Estatística (IBGE, com dados preliminares da amostra do Censo 2010, revelam que o Brasil conta com um índice de 23,9% de pessoas com deficiência, aproximadamente 45,6 milhões de pessoas. Em Presidente Prudente-SP, o número da população residente que possui alguma deficiência visual, auditiva, motora ou mental/intelectual investigadas, é de 21.4% de seus 207.610 habitantes. Ao fazer o mapeamento das deficiências para Presidente Prudente-SP, constata-se a existência de um maior contingente desta população nas áreas periféricas e longe dos estabelecimentos de saúde da cidade. Tais

  20. Prescribed burning for understory restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth W. Outcalt

    2006-01-01

    Because the longleaf ecosystem evolved with and is adapted to frequent fire, every 2 to 8 years, prescribed burning is often useful for restoring understory communities to a diverse ground layer of grasses, herbs, and small shrubs. This restoration provides habitat for a number of plant and animal species that are restricted to or found mostly in longleaf pine...

  1. Automation bias in electronic prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyell, David; Magrabi, Farah; Raban, Magdalena Z; Pont, L G; Baysari, Melissa T; Day, Richard O; Coiera, Enrico

    2017-03-16

    Clinical decision support (CDS) in e-prescribing can improve safety by alerting potential errors, but introduces new sources of risk. Automation bias (AB) occurs when users over-rely on CDS, reducing vigilance in information seeking and processing. Evidence of AB has been found in other clinical tasks, but has not yet been tested with e-prescribing. This study tests for the presence of AB in e-prescribing and the impact of task complexity and interruptions on AB. One hundred and twenty students in the final two years of a medical degree prescribed medicines for nine clinical scenarios using a simulated e-prescribing system. Quality of CDS (correct, incorrect and no CDS) and task complexity (low, low + interruption and high) were varied between conditions. Omission errors (failure to detect prescribing errors) and commission errors (acceptance of false positive alerts) were measured. Compared to scenarios with no CDS, correct CDS reduced omission errors by 38.3% (p < .0001, n = 120), 46.6% (p < .0001, n = 70), and 39.2% (p < .0001, n = 120) for low, low + interrupt and high complexity scenarios respectively. Incorrect CDS increased omission errors by 33.3% (p < .0001, n = 120), 24.5% (p < .009, n = 82), and 26.7% (p < .0001, n = 120). Participants made commission errors, 65.8% (p < .0001, n = 120), 53.5% (p < .0001, n = 82), and 51.7% (p < .0001, n = 120). Task complexity and interruptions had no impact on AB. This study found evidence of AB omission and commission errors in e-prescribing. Verification of CDS alerts is key to avoiding AB errors. However, interventions focused on this have had limited success to date. Clinicians should remain vigilant to the risks of CDS failures and verify CDS.

  2. Exploring Patient Awareness and Perceptions of the Appropriate Use of Antibiotics: A Mixed-Methods Study

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Marion E.; Liu, Tsai-Ling; Taylor, Yhenneko J.; Davidson, Lisa; Schmid, Monica; Yates, Traci; Scotton, Janice; Spencer, Melanie D.

    2017-01-01

    In the outpatient setting, estimates suggest that 30% of the antibiotics prescribed are unnecessary. This study explores patient knowledge and awareness of appropriate use of antibiotics and expectations regarding how antibiotics are used for their treatment in outpatient settings. A survey was administered to a convenience sample of patients, parents, and caregivers (n = 190) at seven primary care clinics and two urgent care locations. Fisher’s exact tests compared results by patient charact...

  3. The use of oral antibiotics in treating acne vulgaris: a new approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrah, Georgia; Tan, Ernest

    2016-09-01

    Although acne is not an infectious disease, oral antibiotics have remained a mainstay of treatment over the last 40 years. The anti-inflammatory properties of oral antibiotics, particularly the tetracyclines, are efficacious in treating inflammatory acne lesions. Common prescribing practices in Dermatology exert significant selection pressure on bacteria, contributing to the development of antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic use for acne not only promotes resistance in Propionibacterium acnes, but also affects other host bacteria with pathogenic potential. This review will summarize the commonly used treatments for acne vulgaris, and how they should be combined as rational treatment. The indications for using oral antibiotics in acne will be highlighted. Strategies described in the literature to conserve the utility of oral antibiotics will be summarized. These include limiting the duration of antibiotic therapy, concomitant use of a topical non-antibiotic agent, use of subantimicrobial dose doxycycline, and the introduction of topical dapsone. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Association of Adverse Events With Antibiotic Use in Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Pranita D; Avdic, Edina; Li, David X; Dzintars, Kathryn; Cosgrove, Sara E

    2017-09-01

    Estimates of the incidence of overall antibiotic-associated adverse drug events (ADEs) in hospitalized patients are generally unavailable. To describe the incidence of antibiotic-associated ADEs for adult inpatients receiving systemic antibiotic therapy. Retrospective cohort of adult inpatients admitted to general medicine wards at an academic medical center. At least 24 hours of any parenteral or oral antibiotic therapy. Medical records of 1488 patients were examined for 30 days after antibiotic initiation for the development of the following antibiotic-associated ADEs: gastrointestinal, dermatologic, musculoskeletal, hematologic, hepatobiliary, renal, cardiac, and neurologic; and 90 days for the development of Clostridium difficile infection or incident multidrug-resistant organism infection, based on adjudication by 2 infectious diseases trained clinicians. In 1488 patients, the median age was 59 years (interquartile range, 49-69 years), and 758 (51%) participants were female. A total of 298 (20%) patients experienced at least 1 antibiotic-associated ADE. Furthermore, 56 (20%) non-clinically indicated antibiotic regimens were associated with an ADE, including 7 cases of C difficile infection. Every additional 10 days of antibiotic therapy conferred a 3% increased risk of an ADE. The most common ADEs were gastrointestinal, renal, and hematologic abnormalities, accounting for 78 (42%), 45 (24%), and 28 (15%) 30-day ADEs, respectively. Notable differences were identified between the incidence of ADEs associated with specific antibiotics. Although antibiotics may play a critical role when used appropriately, our findings underscore the importance of judicious antibiotic prescribing to reduce the harm that can result from antibiotic-associated ADEs.

  5. The antibiotic resistome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Gerard D

    2010-08-01

    Antibiotics are essential for the treatment of bacterial infections and are among our most important drugs. Resistance has emerged to all classes of antibiotics in clinical use. Antibiotic resistance has, proven inevitable and very often it emerges rapidly after the introduction of a drug into the clinic. There is, therefore, a great interest in understanding the origins, scope and evolution of antibiotic resistance. The review discusses the concept of the antibiotic resistome, which is the collection of all genes that directly or indirectly contribute to antibiotic resistance. The review seeks to assemble current knowledge of the resistome concept as a means of understanding the totality of resistance and not just resistance in pathogenic bacteria. The concept of the antibiotic resistome provides a framework for the study and understanding of how resistance emerges and evolves. Furthermore, the study of the resistome reveals strategies that can be applied in new antibiotic discoveries.

  6. Know When Antibiotics Work

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-15

    This podcast provides a brief background about antibiotics and quick tips to help prevent antibiotic resistance.  Created: 4/15/2015 by Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Disease (NCIRD), Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Program.   Date Released: 4/16/2015.

  7. Antibiotics: Miracle Drugs

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    The overuse of antibiotics has led to the development of resistance among bacteria, making antibiotics ineffective in treating certain conditions. This podcast discusses the importance of talking to your healthcare professional about whether or not antibiotics will be beneficial if you've been diagnosed with an infectious disease.

  8. Use and feasibility of delayed prescribing for respiratory tract infections: A questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindbæk Morten

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delayed prescribing of antibiotics for respiratory tract infections (RTIs lowers the amount of antibiotics consumed. Several national treatment guidelines on RTIs recommend the strategy. When advocating treatment innovations, the feasibility and credibility of the innovation must be taken into account. The objective of this study was to explore GPs use and patients uptake of wait-and-see prescriptions for RTIs, and to investigate the feasibility of the strategy from GPs' and patients' perspectives. Methods Questionnaire survey among Norwegian GPs issuing and patients receiving a wait-and-see-prescription for RTIs. Patients reported symptoms, confidence and antibiotics consumption, GPs reported diagnoses, reason for issuing a wait-and-see-prescription and their opinion about the method. Results 304 response pairs from consultations with 49 GPs were received. The patient response rate was 80%. The most common diagnosis for the GPs to issue a wait-and-see prescription was sinusitis (33% and otitis (21%. 46% of the patients reported to consume the antibiotics. When adjusted for other factors, the diagnosis did not predict antibiotic consumption, but both being 16 years or more (p = 0,006 and reporting to have a fever (p = 0,012 doubled the odds of antibiotic consumption, while feeling very ill more than quadrupled the odds (p = 0,002. In 210 cases (69%, the GP found delayed prescribing a very reasonable strategy, and 270 patients (89% would prefer to receive a wait-and-see prescription in a similar situation in the future. The GPs found delayed prescribing very reasonable most frequently in cases of sinusitis (79%, p = 0,007 and least frequently in cases of lower RTIs (49%, p = 0,002. Conclusion Most patients and GPs are satisfied with the delayed prescribing strategy. The patients' age, symptoms and malaise are more important than the diagnosis in predicting antibiotic consumption. The GP's view of the method as a reasonable

  9. Risk-benefit analysis of restricting antimicrobial prescribing in children: what do we really know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Tamara; Saxena, Sonia; Murray, Joanna; Sharland, Mike

    2010-06-01

    Most childhood respiratory infections including acute otitis media (AOM), sore throat, upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) and sinusitis are self-limiting illnesses. Yet, despite extensive guidance discouraging routine use of antibiotics to limit side-effects and combat antimicrobial resistance, antibiotic prescribing for these conditions remains high in many developed countries, fuelled by the fear of rare but serious bacterial complications including mastoiditis, quinsy, pneumonia and brain abscess. This review summarizes evidence for the role of antibiotics in preventing serious complications of URTIs in children. From a key observational study reporting antibiotic use in children, the calculated excess risk of suppurative complications of respiratory tract infections in children who did not receive an antibiotic was 3.8 per 10 000. Despite extensive searches of the literature, no data were found to assess the affect of antibiotics upon the risk of brain abscess after sinusitis in children. New information from observational studies suggests antibiotics show little benefit in preventing complications of mastoiditis following AOM, quinsy following sore throat and pneumonia following URTI/bronchitis. Further research should focus on stratifying the key risk factors for such complications and optimizing long-term monitoring strategies to detect any future changes in the risk-benefit analysis for antibiotic prescription.

  10. The prescribing practices of nurses who care for patients with skin conditions: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Nicola; Courtenay, Molly; Stenner, Karen

    2013-07-01

    To explore the practice of nurses who prescribe medication for patients with skin conditions. Nurses have lead roles in dermatology services. In the United Kingdom, nurses in primary care frequently prescribe medicines for skin conditions, but there are concerns about role preparation and access to continuing professional development. The prescribing practices of nurse independent supplementary prescribers who care for patients with skin conditions are under-researched. Cross-sectional survey. An online questionnaire was used to survey 186 nurses who prescribed for skin conditions from May-July 2010. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and nonparametric tests. The majority worked in primary care (78%) and general practice (111, 59.7%). Twenty (10.8%) had specialist modules (at diploma, degree or master's level), 104 (55.9%) had dermatology training (e.g. study days), 44 (23.7%) had no training, and a further 18 (9.6%) did not respond. Oral antibiotics, topical antifungal and antibacterial drugs were frequently prescribed. Nurses with specialist dermatology training used their qualification in a greater number of ways, prescribed the broadest range of products and prescribed more items per week. Over 70% reporting on continuing professional development had been able to access it. A large number of nurses in primary care prescribe medicines for skin conditions and are involved in medicines management activities. Lack of specialist dermatology training is a concern and associated with lower prescribing-related activities. Access to dermatology training and continuing professional development are required to support nurse development in this area of practice and maximise benefits. Nurse prescribers' involvement in medicines management activities has important implications in terms of improving access to services, efficiency and cost savings. To maximise their contribution, improved provision of specialist dermatology training is required. This will be of

  11. Decreasing Inappropriate Use of Antibiotics in Primary Care in Four Countries in South America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbiztondo, Inés; Bjerrum, Lars; Caballero, Lidia

    2017-01-01

    the effectiveness of online feedback on reducing antibiotic prescribing in patients with suspected respiratory tract infections (RTIs) attending primary care. The aim was to reduce antibiotic prescribing in patients with acute bronchitis and acute otitis media. Both are RTIs for which antibiotics have a very...... limited effect. A cluster randomized two-arm control trial was implemented. Healthcare centres from Bolivia, Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay participating in the quality improvement program HAPPY AUDIT were randomly allocated to either intervention or control group. During ten consecutive weeks, GPs...... in the intervention group received evidence-based online feedback on the management of suspected RTIs. In patients with acute bronchitis, the intervention reduced the antibiotic prescribing rate from 71.6% to 56% (control group from 61.2% to 52%). In patients with acute otitis media, the intervention reduced...

  12. Can we influence prescribing patterns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbarbaro, J A

    2001-09-15

    A variety of programming techniques and methods of training have been employed to change physician behavior. Didactic continuing medical education lectures and clinical guidelines have had minimal impact, although endorsement of national professional guidelines by local opinion leaders appears to have a positive influence on the impact of professional guidelines. Interactive, hands-on workshops, performance reporting, and peer/patient feedback are also effective. Changing prescribing habits has been equally difficult. Drug utilization letters involving both pharmacist and physician have more impact than do letters sent only to the physician. Academic detailing, when properly executed, has been consistently effective. When combined with these strategies, closed formularies become a powerful tool in changing prescribing behavior.

  13. Antibiotic-Induced Rash in Patients With Infectious Mononucleosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Dennis F; Ramos, Carroll L

    2017-02-01

    To provide an extensive review of case reports, epidemiological data, and the underlying mechanism of antibiotic-induced skin rash in patients with concurrent infectious mononucleosis (IM). A MEDLINE literature search inclusive of the dates 1946 to June 2016 was performed using the search terms anti-bacterial agents and infectious mononucleosis. EMBASE (1980 to June 2016) was searched using the terms mononucleosis and antibiotic agent and drug eruption. References of all relevant articles were reviewed for additional citations and information. We selected English-language, primary literature, review articles, and mechanistic articles that addressed antibiotic-induced skin rash in patients with concurrent IM. We assessed all case reports available for causality utilizing a modified Naranjo nomogram specifically designed for this subject. We assembled the available epidemiological data into tables to identify trends in incidence rates over the years. We identified 17 case reports of antibiotic-associated rash in patients with IM. The median Naranjo score was 6 (range = 1 to 8). The top 3 reported drugs were ampicillin, azithromycin, and amoxicillin. Incidence of this adverse effect was higher in the 1960s (55.6%, 45%, and 33%) than in 2013 (33% and 15%). The mechanism most commonly proposed is a transient virus-mediated immune alteration that sets the stage for loss of antigenic tolerance and the development of a reversible, delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction to the antibiotic. A reassessment of the long-held belief of the high incidence (80%-100%) of antibiotic-induced skin rash in patients with IM seems prudent. Additional studies will be necessary to clarify this issue.

  14. Antibiotic use for irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotry, Anirudha; Fedorowicz, Zbys; van Zuuren, Esther J; Farman, Allan G; Al-Langawi, Jassim Hasan

    2016-02-17

    Irreversible pulpitis, which is characterised by acute and intense pain, is one of the most frequent reasons that patients attend for emergency dental care. Apart from removal of the tooth, the customary way of relieving the pain of irreversible pulpitis is by drilling into the tooth, removing the inflamed pulp (nerve) and cleaning the root canal. However, a significant number of dentists continue to prescribe antibiotics to stop the pain of irreversible pulpitis.This review updates the previous version published in 2013. To assess the effects of systemic antibiotics for irreversible pulpitis. We searched the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 27 January 2016); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 12); MEDLINE via Ovid (1946 to 27 January 2016); EMBASE via Ovid (1980 to 27 January 2016), ClinicalTrials.gov (to 27 January 2016) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (to 27 January 2016). There were no language restrictions in the searches of the electronic databases. Randomised controlled trials which compared pain relief with systemic antibiotics and analgesics, against placebo and analgesics in the acute preoperative phase of irreversible pulpitis. Two review authors screened studies and extracted data independently. We assessed the quality of the evidence of included studies using GRADEpro software. Pooling of data was not possible and a descriptive summary is presented. One trial assessed at low risk of bias, involving 40 participants was included in this update of the review. The quality of the body of evidence was rated low for the different outcomes. There was a close parallel distribution of the pain ratings in both the intervention and placebo groups over the seven-day study period. There was insufficient evidence to claim or refute a benefit for penicillin for pain intensity. There was no significant difference in the mean total number of ibuprofen tablets over the

  15. Which prosthetic foot to prescribe?

    OpenAIRE

    De Asha, AR; Barnett, CT; Struchkov, V; Buckley, JG

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: \\ud Clinicians typically use findings from cohort studies to objectively inform judgements regarding the potential (dis)advantages of prescribing a new prosthetic device. However, before finalising prescription a clinician will typically ask a patient to 'try out' a change of prosthetic device while the patient is at the clinic. Observed differences in gait when using the new device should be the result of the device’s mechanical function, but could also conceivably be due to pa...

  16. Prescribing patterns in premenstrual syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Paul W

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over 300 therapies have been proposed for premenstrual syndrome. To date there has been only one survey conducted in the UK of PMS treatments prescribed by GPs, a questionnaire-based study by the National Association of Premenstrual Syndrome in 1989. Since then, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors have been licensed for severe PMS/PMDD, and governmental recommendations to reduce the dosage of vitamin B6 (the first choice over-the-counter treatment for many women with PMS have been made. This study investigates the annual rates of diagnoses and prescribing patterns for premenstrual syndrome (1993–1998 within a computerised general practitioner database. Methods Retrospective survey of prescribing data for premenstrual syndrome between 1993–1998 using the General Practice Research Database for the West Midlands Region which contains information on 282,600 female patients Results Overall the proportion of women with a prescription-linked diagnosis of premenstrual syndrome has halved over the five years. Progestogens including progesterone were the most commonly recorded treatment for premenstrual syndrome during the whole study period accounting for over 40% of all prescriptions. Selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors accounted for only 2% of the prescriptions in 1993 but rose to over 16% by 1998, becoming the second most commonly recorded treatment. Vitamin B6 accounted for 22% of the prescriptions in 1993 but dropped markedly between 1997 and 1998 to 11%. Conclusions This study shows a yearly decrease in the number of prescriptions linked to diagnoses for premenstrual syndrome. Progestogens including progesterone, is the most widely prescribed treatment for premenstrual syndrome despite the lack of evidence demonstrating their efficacy.

  17. Knowledge, awareness, and attitudes toward antibiotic use and antimicrobial resistance among Saudi population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Zowalaty, Mohamed E; Belkina, Tatiana; Bahashwan, Saleh A; El Zowalaty, Ahmed E; Tebbens, Jurjen Duintjer; Abdel-Salam, Hassan A; Khalil, Adel I; Daghriry, Safaa I; Gahtani, Mona A; Madkhaly, Fatimah M; Nohi, Nahed I; Khodari, Rafaa H; Sharahili, Reem M; Dagreery, Khlood A; Khormi, Mayisah; Habibah, Sarah Abuo; Medrba, Bayan A; Gahtani, Amal A; Hifthi, Rasha Y; Zaid, Jameelah M; Amshan, Arwa W; Alneami, Alqasim A; Noreddin, Ayman; Vlček, Jiří

    2016-10-01

    Background Inappropriate use of antibiotics is a public health problem of great concern. Objective To evaluate knowledge of antibiotics, race, gender and age as independent risk factors for self-medication. Setting Residents and population from different regions of Saudi Arabia. Methods We conducted a cross sectional survey study among residents. Data were collected between June 2014 to May, 2015 from 1310 participants and data were recorded anonymously. The questionnaire was randomly distributed by interview of participants and included sociodemographic characteristics, antibiotics knowledge, attitudes and behavior with respect to antibiotics usage. Main outcome measure Population aggregate scores on questions and data were analyzed using univariate logistic regression to evaluate the influence of variables on self-prescription of antibiotics. Results The response rate was 87.7 %. A cumulative 63.6 % of participants reported to have purchased antibiotics without a prescription from pharmacies; 71.1 % reported that they did not finish the antibiotic course as they felt better. The availability of antibiotics without prescription was found to be positively associated with self-medication (OR 0.238, 95 % CI 0.17-0.33). Of those who used prescribed or non-prescribed antibiotics, 44.7 % reported that they kept left-over antibiotics from the incomplete course of treatment for future need. Interestingly, 62 % of respondents who used drugs without prescription agreed with the statement that antibiotics should be access-controlled prescribed by a physician. We also found significant association between storage, knowledge/attitudes and education. Conclusions The overall level of awareness on antibiotics use among residents in Saudi Arabia is low. This mandates public health awareness intervention programs to be implemented on the use of antibiotics.

  18. Systemic antibiotics in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slots, Jørgen

    2004-11-01

    This position paper addresses the role of systemic antibiotics in the treatment of periodontal disease. Topical antibiotic therapy is not discussed here. The paper was prepared by the Research, Science and Therapy Committee of the American Academy of Periodontology. The document consists of three sections: 1) concept of antibiotic periodontal therapy; 2) efficacy of antibiotic periodontal therapy; and 3) practical aspects of antibiotic periodontal therapy. The conclusions drawn in this paper represent the position of the American Academy of Periodontology and are intended for the information of the dental profession.

  19. Cost-effectiveness of antibiotics for COPD management: observational analysis using CPRD data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Ronaldson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It is often difficult to determine the cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD exacerbations, and antibiotics are frequently prescribed. This study conducted an observational cost-effectiveness analysis of prescribing antibiotics for exacerbations of COPD based on routinely collected data from patient electronic health records. A cohort of 45 375 patients aged 40 years or more who attended their general practice for a COPD exacerbation during 2000–2013 was identified from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Two groups were formed (“immediate antibiotics” or “no antibiotics” based on whether antibiotics were prescribed during the index general practice (GP consultation, with data analysed according to subsequent healthcare resource use. A cost-effectiveness analysis was undertaken from the perspective of the UK National Health Service, using a time horizon of 4 weeks in the base case. The use of antibiotics for COPD exacerbations resulted in cost savings and an improvement in all outcomes analysed; i.e. GP visits, hospitalisations, community respiratory team referrals, all referrals, infections and subsequent antibiotics prescriptions were lower for the antibiotics group. Hence, the use of antibiotics was dominant over no antibiotics. The economic analysis suggests that use of antibiotics for COPD exacerbations is a cost-effective alternative to not prescribing antibiotics for patients who present to their GP, and remains cost-effective when longer time horizons of 3 months and 12 months are considered. It would be useful for a definitive trial to be undertaken in this area to determine the cost-effectiveness of antibiotics for COPD exacerbations.

  20. The Nordic Prudent Diet Reduces Risk of Cognitive Decline in the Swedish Older Adults: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Shakersain

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate dietary pattern for preserving cognitive function in northern Europe remains unknown. We aimed to identify a Nordic dietary pattern index associated with slower cognitive decline compared to the Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay, Mediterranean Diet, Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, and Baltic Sea Diet indices. A total of 2223 dementia-free adults aged ≥60 were followed for 6 years. Mini-Mental State Examination was administrated at baseline and follow-ups. Dietary intake was assessed by 98-item food frequency questionnaire, and the Nordic Prudent Dietary Pattern (NPDP was identified. Data were analysed using mixed-effects and parametric survival models and receiver operating characteristic curves with adjustment for potential confounders. Moderate (β = 0.139, 95% CI 0.077−0.201 and high adherence (β = 0.238, 95% CI 0.175−0.300 to NPDP were associated with less cognitive decline compared to other four indices. High adherence to NPDP was also associated with the lowest risk of MMSE decline to ≤24 (HR = 0.176, 95% CI 0.080−0.386 and had the greatest ability to predict such decline (area under the curve = 0.70. Moderate-to-high adherence to the NPDP may predict a better-preserved cognitive function among older adults in Nordic countries. Regional dietary habits should be considered in developing dietary guidelines for the prevention of cognitive impairment and dementia.

  1. The Nordic Prudent Diet Reduces Risk of Cognitive Decline in the Swedish Older Adults: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakersain, Behnaz; Rizzuto, Debora; Larsson, Susanna C; Faxén-Irving, Gerd; Fratiglioni, Laura; Xu, Wei-Li

    2018-02-17

    Appropriate dietary pattern for preserving cognitive function in northern Europe remains unknown. We aimed to identify a Nordic dietary pattern index associated with slower cognitive decline compared to the Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay, Mediterranean Diet, Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, and Baltic Sea Diet indices. A total of 2223 dementia-free adults aged ≥60 were followed for 6 years. Mini-Mental State Examination was administrated at baseline and follow-ups. Dietary intake was assessed by 98-item food frequency questionnaire, and the Nordic Prudent Dietary Pattern (NPDP) was identified. Data were analysed using mixed-effects and parametric survival models and receiver operating characteristic curves with adjustment for potential confounders. Moderate (β = 0.139, 95% CI 0.077-0.201) and high adherence (β = 0.238, 95% CI 0.175-0.300) to NPDP were associated with less cognitive decline compared to other four indices. High adherence to NPDP was also associated with the lowest risk of MMSE decline to ≤24 (HR = 0.176, 95% CI 0.080-0.386) and had the greatest ability to predict such decline (area under the curve = 0.70). Moderate-to-high adherence to the NPDP may predict a better-preserved cognitive function among older adults in Nordic countries. Regional dietary habits should be considered in developing dietary guidelines for the prevention of cognitive impairment and dementia.

  2. Medicare Provider Data - Part D Prescriber

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Part D Prescriber Public Use File (PUF) provides information on prescription drugs prescribed by individual physicians and other health care providers and paid...

  3. Dutch Travel Health Nurses: Prepared to Prescribe?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overbosch, Femke W.; Koeman, Susan C.; van den Hoek, Anneke; Sonder, Gerard J. B.

    2012-01-01

    Background. In travel medicine, as in other specialties, independent prescribing of medication has traditionally been the domain of practitioners like physicians, dentists, and midwives. However, a 2011 ruling in the Netherlands expands independent prescribing and introduces supplementary

  4. The quality of outpatient antimicrobial prescribing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malo, Sara; Bjerrum, Lars; Feja, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse and compare the quality of outpatient antimicrobial prescribing in Denmark and Aragón (in northeastern Spain), with the objective of assessing inappropriate prescribing....

  5. Knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding antibiotic use for upper respiratory tract infections: a survey of Thai students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saengcharoen, Woranuch; Lerkiatbundit, Sanguan; Kaewmang, Kanchana

    2012-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of antibiotic use in upper respiratory tract infections (URI) among students at different educational levels (Grade 12 students and high vocational students) and to examine factors influencing antibiotic use for URI. A cross sectional questionnaire survey was used with students in one large and one small city in Thailand. Of 712 respondents, more than 75% of all groups had misconceptions on the benefits of antibiotics. Grade 12 students, especially those in the big city, had the highest knowledge scores about antibiotic use in URI, while high vocational students had the lowest. Incomplete taking of a course of antibiotic treatment recommended by health providers was found in more than 45% of respondents in each group. In addition, approximately half of them had taken antibiotics for less than 5 days. Knowledge about antibiotic use in URI, attitudes towards antibiotic use, attitudes towards antibiotic prescribing for treating colds by physicians and by drugstores, belief in the common use of antibiotics for colds, and expectations of receiving antibiotics from physicians significantly influenced intentions and behaviors about antibiotic use. Students had misconceptions on antibiotic use for URI. The Ministry of Education should incorporate information on proper antibiotic use in the formal health education. Reliable sources of information on the correct use of antibiotics should also be more widely available to improve the use of antibiotics.

  6. Outpatient consumption of antibiotics in the City of Zagreb (2006-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Anja; Štimac, Danijela

    2014-02-01

    To investigate outpatient consumption of antibiotics during the 2006-2010 period in the City of Zagreb and compare it with other European countries. Data on outpatient consumption of antibiotics were obtained from all pharmacies in the City of Zagreb. Based on the data obtained, the number of defined daily doses per 1000 inhabitants per day (DDDs/TID) were calculated for each ATC subgroup. Drug Utilization 90% (DU90%) method and ratio indicators were used for the assessment of drug prescribing quality. During the period of five years total antibiotics consumption has declined from 37.38 DDDs/TID in 2006 to 33.28 DDDs/ TID in 2010. The most frequently prescribed subgroup was penicillins (J01C). DU90% segment included 10 out of a total of 32 antibiotics in the year 2006 and 10 out of a total of 23 antibiotics in the year 2010. Leading position in the consumption, in 2006 and 2010, was held by broad-spectrum antibiotics, moreover their consumption increased in 2010. Consumption of antibiotics in Zagreb is still very high and is similar to the consumption in European countries with the highest consumption of antibiotics. Reduced consumption of narrow-spectrum antibiotics and unjustified increase in the consumption of broad-spectrum antibiotics suggess that physicians do not follow clinical guidelines.

  7. Inappropriate prescribing: criteria, detection and prevention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Marie N

    2012-06-01

    Inappropriate prescribing is highly prevalent in older people and is a major healthcare concern because of its association with negative healthcare outcomes including adverse drug events, related morbidity and hospitalization. With changing population demographics resulting in increasing proportions of older people worldwide, improving the quality and safety of prescribing in older people poses a global challenge. To date a number of different strategies have been used to identify potentially inappropriate prescribing in older people. Over the last two decades, a number of criteria have been published to assist prescribers in detecting inappropriate prescribing, the majority of which have been explicit sets of criteria, though some are implicit. The majority of these prescribing indicators pertain to overprescribing and misprescribing, with only a minority focussing on the underprescribing of indicated medicines. Additional interventions to optimize prescribing in older people include comprehensive geriatric assessment, clinical pharmacist review, and education of prescribers as well as computerized prescribing with clinical decision support systems. In this review, we describe the inappropriate prescribing detection tools or criteria most frequently cited in the literature and examine their role in preventing inappropriate prescribing and other related healthcare outcomes. We also discuss other measures commonly used in the detection and prevention of inappropriate prescribing in older people and the evidence supporting their use and their application in everyday clinical practice.

  8. Ribosomal Antibiotics: Contemporary Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Auerbach-Nevo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Most ribosomal antibiotics obstruct distinct ribosomal functions. In selected cases, in addition to paralyzing vital ribosomal tasks, some ribosomal antibiotics are involved in cellular regulation. Owing to the global rapid increase in the appearance of multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacterial strains, and to the extremely slow progress in developing new antibiotics worldwide, it seems that, in addition to the traditional attempts at improving current antibiotics and the intensive screening for additional natural compounds, this field should undergo substantial conceptual revision. Here, we highlight several contemporary issues, including challenging the common preference of broad-range antibiotics; the marginal attention to alterations in the microbiome population resulting from antibiotics usage, and the insufficient awareness of ecological and environmental aspects of antibiotics usage. We also highlight recent advances in the identification of species-specific structural motifs that may be exploited for the design and the creation of novel, environmental friendly, degradable, antibiotic types, with a better distinction between pathogens and useful bacterial species in the microbiome. Thus, these studies are leading towards the design of “pathogen-specific antibiotics,” in contrast to the current preference of broad range antibiotics, partially because it requires significant efforts in speeding up the discovery of the unique species motifs as well as the clinical pathogen identification.

  9. Patterns of drug prescribing in a hospital in Dubai, United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wess L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the pattern of drug prescription by consultants in a private hospital in Dubai, UnitedArab Emirates, 1190 prescriptions were collected from the hospital’s pharmacy over 30 days. In total,2659 drugs were prescribed. The mean number of drugs per encounter was 2.2. Only 4.4% of alldrugs prescribed were generic. Polypharmacy was observed in only 7.5% of all encounters.Information about the prescribing physician and the patient was invariably deficient. Name of patient,age, and gender were absent in 2.9%, 9.7%, and 12% of prescriptions, respectively. In addition, noneof the prescriptions mentioned address, diagnosis, or allergy of the patient. Name of physician,signature, speciality and license or registration number were omitted in 12.2%, 10.3%, 20.3%, and54.9% of prescriptions. The most commonly prescribed therapeutic classes of drugs (and principaldrug in each class were as follows: 23.4% non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, Diclofenacsodium being 51.6%, 21.4% antibiotics (amoxicillin-clavulanate 13.5%, and 11.5% gastrointestinaldrugs (GI, Hyoscine-N-butylbromide 28.1%. Other therapeutic classes included endocrine drugs(6.1%, vitamin supplements (5.9%, nasal decongestants (4%, antihistaminics (3.8% andcardiovascular drugs (2.6%. Antibiotic injections accounted for 7.4% of all antibiotics prescribed,which was equivalent to 1.6% of all prescriptions. Other agents prescribed in small proportions ofencounters collectively amounted to 21.3%. This study reveals the prescription trends, and indicatespossible areas of improvement in prescription practice.

  10. Switching Between Antibiotics Among Danish Children 0-4 Years of Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reilev, Mette; Thomsen, Reimar W; Aabenhus, Rune

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Denmark, the use of amoxicillin is widespread among children, despite phenoxymethylpenicillin being recommended as first-line therapy. The reason for this apparent discrepancy is not fully understood. We aimed at evaluating prescribing patterns of antibiotics among Danish children...... aged 0-4 years, with emphasis on incidence of treatment episodes, choice of initial antibiotic treatment and switching patterns between different types of antibiotics. METHODS: We identified all children ≤4 years who filled a prescription of antibiotics from 2000-2015 according to the nationwide Danish...... National Prescription Registry. We estimated the incidence rate of episodes treated with antibiotics and the choice of initial antibiotic treatment over time. Further, we assessed the cumulative risk of switching within 0-3 days after initiating therapy. RESULTS: We identified 3,481,684 antibiotic...

  11. A mixed methods study to understand patient expectations for antibiotics for an upper respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaarslev, Christina; Yee, Melissa; Chan, Georgi; Fletcher-Lartey, Stephanie; Khan, Rabia

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a public health challenge supplemented by inappropriate prescribing, especially for an upper respiratory tract infection in primary care. Patient/carer expectations have been identified as one of the main drivers for inappropriate antibiotics prescribing by primary care physicians. The aim of this study was to understand who is more likely to expect an antibiotic for an upper respiratory tract infection from their doctor and the reasons underlying it. This study used a sequential mixed methods approach: a nationally representative cross sectional survey ( n  = 1509) and four focus groups. The outcome of interest was expectation and demand for an antibiotic from a doctor when presenting with a cold or flu. The study found 19.5 % of survey respondents reported that they would expect the doctor to prescribe antibiotics for a cold or flu. People younger than 65 years of age, those who never attended university and those speaking a language other than English at home were more likely to expect or demand antibiotics for a cold or flu. People who knew that 'antibiotics don't kill viruses' and agreed that 'taking an antibiotic when one is not needed means they won't work in the future' were less likely to expect or demand antibiotics. The main reasons for expecting antibiotics were believing that antibiotics are an effective treatment for a cold or flu and that they shortened the duration and potential deterioration of their illness. The secondary reason centered around the value or return on investment for visiting a doctor when feeling unwell. Our study found that patients do not appear to feel they have a sufficiently strong incentive to consider the impact of their immediate use of antibiotics on antimicrobial resistance. The issue of antibiotic resistance needs to be explained and reframed as a more immediate health issue with dire consequences to ensure the success of future health campaigns.

  12. A mixed methods study to understand patient expectations for antibiotics for an upper respiratory tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Gaarslev

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antimicrobial resistance is a public health challenge supplemented by inappropriate prescribing, especially for an upper respiratory tract infection in primary care. Patient/carer expectations have been identified as one of the main drivers for inappropriate antibiotics prescribing by primary care physicians. The aim of this study was to understand who is more likely to expect an antibiotic for an upper respiratory tract infection from their doctor and the reasons underlying it. Methods This study used a sequential mixed methods approach: a nationally representative cross sectional survey (n = 1509 and four focus groups. The outcome of interest was expectation and demand for an antibiotic from a doctor when presenting with a cold or flu. Results The study found 19.5 % of survey respondents reported that they would expect the doctor to prescribe antibiotics for a cold or flu. People younger than 65 years of age, those who never attended university and those speaking a language other than English at home were more likely to expect or demand antibiotics for a cold or flu. People who knew that ‘antibiotics don’t kill viruses’ and agreed that ‘taking an antibiotic when one is not needed means they won’t work in the future’ were less likely to expect or demand antibiotics. The main reasons for expecting antibiotics were believing that antibiotics are an effective treatment for a cold or flu and that they shortened the duration and potential deterioration of their illness. The secondary reason centered around the value or return on investment for visiting a doctor when feeling unwell. Conclusion Our study found that patients do not appear to feel they have a sufficiently strong incentive to consider the impact of their immediate use of antibiotics on antimicrobial resistance. The issue of antibiotic resistance needs to be explained and reframed as a more immediate health issue with dire consequences to ensure the

  13. Prescription pattern of antibiotic and analgesic in endodontic treatment in Kuwaiti population: A self-administered Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal J Al-Maslamani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical and non-surgical endodontic treatment of involved teeth can necessitate prescription of analgesics and antimicrobials. The literature suggests confusion amongst practitioners regarding the need for adjunctive medication, mainly during non-surgical endodontic treatment, often leading to over-prescription. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the current clinical practice of dentists participated in this study with respect to antibiotic and analgesic prescription patterns in their endodontic treatment management in Kuwait. Materials and Methods: Prescription patterns for antibiotics and analgesics were analyzed based on the responses to self-administered questionnaire (n = 169. Information was collected based on different clinical endodontic diagnostic scenarios. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS software version 17.0 to determine relationships between prescription patterns, age, gender, and dental qualification (specialists and general dentists. Results: Ninety-two percent of dentists prescribed analgesics for the management of endodontic pain. While 16% prescribed antibiotics for severe dental pain; 62% prescribed antibiotics for acute apical abscesses. Significantly more male dentists prescribed antibiotics for dental pain than female dentists. No significant difference was found between general dental practitioners′ and specialists′ attitude toward drug prescriptions. Amoxicillin and ibuprofen were the most commonly prescribed medications. Conclusion: While the majority of dentists appeared to prescribe antibiotics and analgesics appropriately, some did not. This research confirmed previous studies and established a need for imparting information of evidence-based prescriptions protocols for the dentists surveyed in this study in Kuwait.

  14. Risks and benefits associated with antibiotic use for acute respiratory infections: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meropol, Sharon B; Localio, A Russell; Metlay, Joshua P

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics are frequently prescribed for acute nonspecific respiratory infections (ARIs), presumably to avoid small risks of progression to serious bacterial illness. However, even low risks of associated adverse drug events could result in many such events at the population level. Our objective was to assess the risks and benefits of antibiotic use in a cohort of patients with ARIs, comparing outcomes of patients who were prescribed antibiotics with outcomes of patients not receiving antibiotics. We used a June 1986 to August 2006 cohort of adult patients with ARI visits from a UK primary care database. Exposure was an antibiotic prescribed with the visit. Primary outcomes were hospitalization within 15 days for (1) severe adverse drug events (hypersensitivity, diarrhea, seizure, arrhythmia, hepatic or renal failure), and (2) community-acquired pneumonia. The cohort included 1,531,019 visits with an ARI diagnosis; prescriptions for antibiotics were given in 65% of cases. The adjusted risk difference for treated vs untreated patients per 100,000 visits was 1.07 fewer adverse events (95% CI, -4.52 to 2.38; P = .54) and 8.16 fewer pneumonia hospitalizations (95% CI, -13.24 to -3.08; P = .002). The number needed to treat to prevent 1 hospitalization for pneumonia was 12,255. Compared with patients with ARI who were not treated with antibiotics, patients who were treated with antibiotics were not at increased risk of severe adverse drug events and had a small decreased risk of pneumonia hospitalization. This small benefit from antibiotics for a common ambulatory diagnosis creates persistent tension; at the societal level, physicians are compelled to reduce antibiotic prescribing, thus minimizing future resistance, whereas at the encounter level, they are compelled to optimize the benefit-risk balance for that patient.

  15. The EURO, Prudent Coherence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.J.M. Arnold (Ivo); C.G. de Vries (Casper)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractA flurry of recent articles has argued on the basis of constructed European wide monetary aggregates that the demand for EURO's will be more stable than the current demand for national currencies. In policy circles this seemingly moderating effect of monetary integration figures as an

  16. Characterisation of antibiotic prescriptions for acute respiratory tract infections in Danish general practice: a retrospective registry based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Saust, Laura Trolle; Bjerrum, Lars

    2017-05-19

    Inappropriate use of antibiotics is contributing to the increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance. Several Danish guidelines on antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract infections in general practice have been issued to promote rational prescribing of antibiotics, however it is unclear if these recommendations are followed. We aimed to characterise the pattern of antibiotic prescriptions for patients diagnosed with acute respiratory tract infections, by means of electronic prescriptions, labeled with clinical indications, from Danish general practice. Acute respiratory tract infections accounted for 456,532 antibiotic prescriptions issued between July 2012 and June 2013. Pneumonia was the most common indication with 178,354 prescriptions (39%), followed by acute tonsillitis (21%) and acute otitis media (19%). In total, penicillin V accounted for 58% of all prescriptions, followed by macrolides (18%) and amoxicillin (15%). The use of second-line agents increased with age for all indications, and comprised more than 40% of the prescriptions in patients aged >75 years. Women were more often prescribed antibiotics regardless of clinical indication. This is the first Danish study to characterise antibiotic prescription patterns for acute respiratory tract infections by data linkage of clinical indications. The findings confirm that penicillin V is the most commonly prescribed antibiotic agent for treatment of patients with an acute respiratory tract infection in Danish general practice. However, second-line agents like macrolides and amoxicillin with or without clavulanic acid are overused. Strategies to improve the quality of antibiotic prescribing especially for pneumonia, acute otitis media and acute rhinosinusitis are warranted. TRACKING THE OVERUSE OF ANTIBIOTICS: Better adherence to guidelines for prescribing antibiotics for different respiratory tract infections are warranted in Danish general practice. The over-use of antibiotics, particularly so

  17. Características das ilhas de calor em cidades de porte médio: exemplos de Presidente Prudente (Brasil e Rennes (França Caractéristiques des îlots de chaleur urbains dans des villes de taille moyenne: exemples de Presidente Prudente (Brésil et Rennes (France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hervé Quenol

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo analisar e comparar as características térmicas do clima urbano em duas cidades de médio porte: Rennes (França e Presidente Prudente (Brasil, por meio de registros da temperatura do ar (pontos fixos e medidas itinerantes e dados térmicos de superfície obtidos pelo tratamento de imagens do satélite Landsat 7. Verificou-se o aumento das temperaturas, ligeiramente maiores em Rennes, do que em Presidente Prudente e a geração de ilhas de calor urbanas (ICU, decorrentes do processo de urbanização nas duas cidades.Cet article a pour objectif d’étudier les caractéristiques du climat dans deux villes moyennes (Rennes en France et Presidente Prudente au Brésil à partir de trois types de mesures de températures : des mesures réalisées dans des stations fixes, des mesures itinérantes et des données de températures de surface obtenues à partir d’images du satellite Landsat 7. On montre que l’augmentation des températures est légèrement plus importante à Rennes qu’à Presidente Prudente ainsi que le développement d’îlots de chaleur urbains (ICU résultant de l’extension de la tache urbaine des deux agglomérations.This paper aims to analyze and compare thermal characteristics of urban climate of two middle size cities: Rennes (France and Presidente Prudente (Brazil, by registering air temperature  (network pointes and mobile transect and surface data obtained by using Landsat7 satellite thermal images. Results shows that temperature grows faster in Rennes than Presidente Prudente and urban heat island generation (UHI by different cities urbanization processes.

  18. Antibiotics and Breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá Del Fiol, Fernando; Barberato-Filho, Silvio; de Cássia Bergamaschi, Cristiane; Lopes, Luciane Cruz; Gauthier, Timothy P

    2016-01-01

    During the breastfeeding period, bacterial infections can occur in the nursing mother, requiring the use of antibiotics. A lack of accurate information may lead health care professionals and mothers to suspend breastfeeding, which may be unnecessary. This article provides information on the main antibiotics that are appropriate for clinical use and the interference of these antibiotics with the infant to support medical decisions regarding the discontinuation of breastfeeding. We aim to provide information on the pharmacokinetic factors that interfere with the passage of antibiotics into breast milk and the toxicological implications of absorption by the infant. Publications related to the 20 most frequently employed antibiotics and their transfer into breast milk were evaluated. The results demonstrate that most antibiotics in clinical use are considered suitable during breastfeeding; however, the pharmacokinetic profile of each drug must be observed to ensure the resolution of the maternal infection and the safety of the infant. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Effect of interactive group discussion among physicians to promote rational prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garjani, A; Salimnejad, M; Shamsmohamadi, M; Baghchevan, V; Vahidi, R G; Maleki-Dijazi, N; Rezazadeh, H

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of an educational intervention (interactive group discussion) on the prescribing behaviour of 51 general physicians from the north-west of Tabriz. Prescriptions were analysed pre-intervention and post-intervention (control and intervention groups) using a proforma with 8 indicators of correct prescribing. The mean number of drugs per prescription pre-intervention was 3.82. The percentage of prescriptions with antibiotics, corticosteroids and injections were 40.8%, 25.9% and 58.0%, respectively. Following the intervention there were slight but not significant changes in the indicators in both intervention and control groups compared with pre-intervention results.

  20. A Survey on Knowledge and Attitude of Rational Use of Antibiotics on Predesigned Proforma among Interns and 1st year Postgraduate Students’

    OpenAIRE

    Dr.Poonam Patel; Dr. Jay Shah,; Dr. P . Nyati,

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND-In the present era we are facing the major problem called antibiotics resistance. Appropriate knowledge of antibiotics of medical student can greatly help to combat this problem. Keeping these points in mind we have planned the study to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of antibiotics prescribing among the medical student and sensitizing the student regarding antibiotics resistance. METHODOLOGY- In this study, 181students (interns and 1st year PG resident) were include...

  1. Antibiotics for preterm rupture of membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Sara; Boulvain, Michel; Neilson, James P

    2013-12-02

    antibiotics seemed to have little effect on the health of children. Routine prescription of antibiotics for women with preterm rupture of the membranes is associated with prolongation of pregnancy and improvements in a number of short-term neonatal morbidities, but no significant reduction in perinatal mortality. Despite lack of evidence of longer-term benefit in childhood, the advantages on short-term morbidities are such that we would recommend antibiotics are routinely prescribed. The antibiotic of choice is not clear but co-amoxiclav should be avoided in women due to increased risk of neonatal necrotising enterocolitis.

  2. Variability in Antibiotic Use Across PICUs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogan, Thomas V; Thurm, Cary; Hersh, Adam L; Gerber, Jeffrey S; Smith, Michael J; Shah, Samir S; Courter, Joshua D; Patel, Sameer J; Parker, Sarah K; Kronman, Matthew P; Lee, Brian R; Newland, Jason G

    2018-03-10

    To characterize and compare antibiotic prescribing across PICUs to evaluate the degree of variability. Retrospective analysis from 2010 through 2014 of the Pediatric Health Information System. Forty-one freestanding children's hospital. Children aged 30 days to 18 years admitted to a PICU in children's hospitals contributing data to Pediatric Health Information System. To normalize for potential differences in disease severity and case mix across centers, a subanalysis was performed of children admitted with one of the 20 All Patient Refined-Diagnosis Related Groups and the seven All Patient Refined-Diagnosis Related Groups shared by all PICUs with the highest antibiotic use. The study included 3,101,201 hospital discharges from 41 institutions with 386,914 PICU patients. All antibiotic use declined during the study period. The median-adjusted antibiotic use among PICU patients was 1,043 days of therapy/1,000 patient-days (interquartile range, 977-1,147 days of therapy/1,000 patient-days) compared with 893 among non-ICU children (interquartile range, 805-968 days of therapy/1,000 patient-days). For PICU patients, the median adjusted use of broad-spectrum antibiotics was 176 days of therapy/1,000 patient-days (interquartile range, 152-217 days of therapy/1,000 patient-days) and was 302 days of therapy/1,000 patient-days (interquartile range, 220-351 days of therapy/1,000 patient-days) for antimethicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus agents, compared with 153 days of therapy/1,000 patient-days (interquartile range, 130-182 days of therapy/1,000 patient-days) and 244 days of therapy/1,000 patient-days (interquartile range, 203-270 days of therapy/1,000 patient-days) for non-ICU children. After adjusting for potential confounders, significant institutional variability existed in antibiotic use in PICU patients, in the 20 All Patient Refined-Diagnosis Related Groups with the highest antibiotic usage and in the seven All Patient Refined-Diagnosis Related Groups shared

  3. Structure of polysaccharide antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matutano, L.

    1966-01-01

    Study of the structure of antibiotics having two or several sugars in their molecule. One may distinguish: the polysaccharide antibiotics themselves, made up of two or several sugars either with or without nitrogen, such as streptomycin, neomycins, paromomycine, kanamycin, chalcomycin; the hetero-polysaccharide antibiotics made up of one saccharide part linked to an aglycone of various type through a glucoside: macrolide, pigment, pyrimidine purine. Amongst these latter are: erythromycin, magnamycin, spiramycin, oleandomycin, cinerubin and amicetin. The sugars can either play a direct role in biochemical reactions or act as a dissolving agent, as far as the anti-microbe power of these antibiotics is concerned. (author) [fr

  4. Antibiotics: Miracle Drugs

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-16

    The overuse of antibiotics has led to the development of resistance among bacteria, making antibiotics ineffective in treating certain conditions. This podcast discusses the importance of talking to your healthcare professional about whether or not antibiotics will be beneficial if you’ve been diagnosed with an infectious disease.  Created: 4/16/2015 by Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Disease (NCIRD), Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Program.   Date Released: 4/16/2015.

  5. Evidence for a complex relationship between antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli: from medical center patients to a receiving environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlé, Kenny; Capdeville, Marion-Justine; Berthe, Thierry; Budzinski, Hélène; Petit, Fabienne

    2012-02-07

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant fecal bacteria (E. coli) in water along a medical center-wastewater treatment plant-river continuum (4 km). A multiresidue chemical analysis methodology, using solid phase extraction coupled with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, was performed to detect whether low levels of contamination by 34 antibiotics were related to antibiotic resistance of E. coli and antibiotic use. The contamination of water by antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant E. coli decreased along the continuum. Although amoxicillin was predominantly prescribed, only ofloxacin (1 ng·L(-1)) and sulfamethoxazole (4 ng·L(-1)) persisted in the river. At the retirement home, in the medical center, even though no tetracycline and sulfamethoxazole were consumed, the highest occurrences of antibiotic resistance were in classes of quinolones (42.0%), sulfonamides (24.0%), tetracyclines (38.0%), and penicillins (38.0%), mainly due to the presence of multiple antibiotic-resistance genes on class 1 integrons. Along the continuum, the occurrence of E. coli resistant to antibiotics and those carrying class 1 integrons decreased in water samples (p-value antibiotic compounds (ofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole) were found, but they did not correspond to the major resistances (tetracycline, amoxicillin) of E. coli.

  6. Surgeon preferences regarding antibiotic prophylaxis for ballistic fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marecek, Geoffrey S; Earhart, Jeffrey S; Gardner, Michael J; Davis, Jason; Merk, Bradley R

    2016-06-01

    Scant evidence exists to support antibiotic use for low velocity ballistic fractures (LVBF). We therefore sought to define current practice patterns. We hypothesized that most surgeons prescribe antibiotics for LVBF, prescribing is not driven by institutional protocols, and that decisions are based on protocols utilized for blunt trauma. A web-based questionnaire was emailed to the membership of the Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA). The questionnaire included demographic information and questions about LVBF treatment practices. Two hundred and twenty surgeons responded. One hundred and fifty-four (70 %) respondents worked at a Level-1 trauma center, 176 (80 %) had received fellowship education in orthopaedic trauma and 104 (47 %) treated at least 10 ballistic fractures annually. Responses were analyzed with SAS 9.3 for Windows (SAS Institute Inc, Cary, NC). One hundred eighty-six respondents (86 %) routinely provide antibiotics for LVBF. Those who did not were more apt to do so for intra-articular fractures (8/16, 50 %) and pelvic fractures with visceral injury (10/16, 63 %). Most surgeons (167, 76 %) do not believe the Gustilo-Anderson classification applies to ballistic fractures, and (20/29, 70 %) do not base their antibiotic choice on the classification system. Few institutions (58, 26 %) have protocols guiding antibiotic use for LVBF. Routine antibiotic use for LVBF is common; however, practice is not dictated by institutional protocol. Although antibiotic use generally follows current blunt trauma guidelines, surgeons do not base their treatment decisions the Gustilo-Anderson classification. Given the high rate of antibiotic use for LVBF, further study should focus on providing evidence-based treatment guidelines.

  7. Preserving the 'commons': addressing the sustainable use of antibiotics through an economic lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, C M; Edwards, S E; Harbarth, S

    2017-10-01

    As the growth of antibiotic resistance has resulted in large part from widespread use of antibiotics, every effort must be made to ensure their sustainable use. This narrative review aims to assess the potential contribution of health economic analyses to sustainable use efforts. The work draws on existing literature and experience with health economic tools. The study examines some of the weaknesses in the health, regulatory, and industry arenas that could contribute to inappropriate or suboptimal prescribing of antibiotics and describes how economic analysis could be used to improve current practice by comparing both costs and health outcomes to maximize societal wellbeing over the longer-term. It finds that economic considerations underpinning current antibiotic prescribing strategies are incomplete and short-termist, with the result that they may foster suboptimal use. It also stresses that perverse incentives that drive antibiotic sales and inappropriate prescribing practices must be dis-entangled for sustainable use policies to gain traction. Finally, payment structures can be used to re-align incentives and promote optimal prescribing and sustainable use more generally. In particular, eliminating or altering reimbursement differentials could help steer clinical practice more deliberately towards the minimization of selection pressure and the resulting levels of antibiotic resistance. This work highlights the need for appropriately designed cost-effectiveness analyses, incentives analysis, and novel remuneration systems to underpin sustainable use policies both within and beyond the health sector. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. The analysis of tetracyclines, quinolones, macrolides, lincosamides, pleuromutilins, and sulfonamides in chicken feathers using UHPLC-MS/MS in order to monitor antibiotic use in the poultry sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Larissa J M; Bolck, Yvette J C; Rademaker, Janneau; Zuidema, Tina; Berendsen, Bjorn J A

    2017-08-01

    In The Netherlands, all antibiotic treatments should be registered at the farm and in a central database. To enforce correct antibiotic use and registration, and to enforce prudent use of antibiotics, there is a need for methods that are able to detect antibiotic treatments. Ideally, such a method is able to detect antibiotic applications during the entire lifespan of an animal, including treatments administered during the first days of the animals' lives. Monitoring tissue, as is common practice, only provides a limited window of opportunity, as residue levels in tissue soon drop below measurable quantities. The analysis of feathers proves to be a promising tool in this respect. Furthermore, a qualitative confirmatory method was developed for the analyses of six major groups of antibiotics in ground chicken feathers, aiming for a detection limit as low as reasonably possible. The method was validated according to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. All compounds comply with the criteria and, as a matter of fact, 58% of the compounds could also be quantified according to regulations. Additionally, we demonstrated that a less laborious method, in which whole feathers were analyzed, proved successful in the detection of applied antibiotics. Most compounds could be detected at levels of 2 μg kg -1 or below with the exception of sulfachloropyridazine, tylosin, and tylvalosin. This demonstrates the effectiveness of feather analysis to detect antibiotic use to allow effective enforcement of antibiotic use and prevent the illegal, off-label, and nonregistered use of antibiotics.

  9. The effects of antibiotic usage in food animals on the development of antimicrobial resistance of importance for humans in Campylobacter and Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1999-01-01

    Modern food animal production depends on use of large amounts of antibiotics for disease control. This provides favourable conditions for the spread and persistence of antimicrobial-resistant zoonotic bacteria such as Campylobacter and E. coli O157. The occurrence of antimicrobial resistance...... to antimicrobials used in human therapy is increasing in human pathogenic Campylobacter and E. coli from animals. There is an urgent need to implement strategies for prudent use of antibiotics in food animal production to prevent further increases in the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in food-borne human...

  10. The Effect of Rapid Antigen Detection Test on Antibiotic Prescription Decision of Clinicians and Reducing Antibiotic Costs in Children with Acute Pharyngitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, Engin; Sirin Kose, Seda; Akca, Deniz; Yildiz, Kerem; Elmas, Cengizhan; Baris, Mustafa; Anil, Murat

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of rapid antigen detection test (RADT) in the diagnosis of streptococcal pharyngitis, its impact on antibiotic prescription decision of pediatricians and influence on reduction of antibiotic treatment costs in children with pharyngitis. The study group consisted of 223 patients who were diagnosed with pharyngitis by pediatricians. The sensitivity and specificity of RADT were 92.1% (95% Cl: 78.6-98.3%) and 97.3% (95% Cl: 93.8-99.1%), respectively. In the first assessment, before performing RADT, pediatricians decided to prescribe antibiotics for 178 (79.8%) patients with pharyngitis. After learning RADT results, pediatricians finally decided to prescribe antibiotics for 83 (37.2%) patients with pharyngitis, and antibiotic prescription decreased by 42.6%. Antibiotic costs in non-Group A streptococcus pharyngitis, Group A streptococcus pharyngitis and all subjects groups decreased by 80.8%, 48%, and 76.4%, respectively. Performing RADT in children with pharyngitis has an important impact on treatment decision of clinicians, reduction of unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions and antibiotic costs. © The Author [2016]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Inappropriate prescribing in geriatric patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, Patrick J

    2012-02-03

    Inappropriate prescribing in older people is a common condition associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and financial costs. Medication use increases with age, and this, in conjunction with an increasing disease burden, is associated with adverse drug reactions. This review outlines why older people are more likely to develop adverse drug reactions and how common the problem is. The use of different tools to identify and measure the problem is reviewed. Common syndromes seen in older adults (eg, falling, cognitive impairment, sleep disturbance) are considered, and recent evidence in relation to medication use for these conditions is reviewed. Finally, we present a brief summary of significant developments in the recent literature for those caring for older people.

  12. [Antibiotics: present and future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérdy, János

    2013-04-14

    The author discuss the up to date interpretation of the concept of antibiotics and antibiotic research, as well as the present role of various natural, semisynthetic and synthetic antibiotic compounds in various areas of the human therapy. The origin and the total number of all antibiotics and applied antibiotics in the practice, as well as the bioactive microbial metabolites (antibiotics) in other therapeutical, non-antibiotic fields (including agriculture) are also reviewed. The author discusses main problems, such as increasing (poly)resistance, virulence of pathogens and the non-scientific factors (such as a decline of research efforts and their sociological, economic, financial and regulatory reasons). A short summary of the history of Hungarian antibiotic research is also provided. The author briefly discusses the prospects in the future and the general advantages of the natural products over synthetic compounds. It is concluded that new approaches for the investigation of the unlimited possibilities of the living world are necessary. The discovery of new types or simply neglected (micro)organisms and their biosynthetic capabilities, the introduction of new biotechnological and genetic methods (genomics, metagenom, genome mining) are absolutely required in the future.

  13. The future of antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance continues to spread even as society is experiencing a market failure of new antibiotic research and development (R&D). Scientific, economic, and regulatory barriers all contribute to the antibiotic market failure. Scientific solutions to rekindle R&D include finding new screening strategies to identify novel antibiotic scaffolds and transforming the way we think about treating infections, such that the goal is to disarm the pathogen without killing it or modulate the host response to the organism without targeting the organism for destruction. Future economic strategies are likely to focus on ‘push’ incentives offered by public-private partnerships as well as increasing pricing by focusing development on areas of high unmet need. Such strategies can also help protect new antibiotics from overuse after marketing. Regulatory reform is needed to re-establish feasible and meaningful traditional antibiotic pathways, to create novel limited-use pathways that focus on highly resistant infections, and to harmonize regulatory standards across nations. We need new antibiotics with which to treat our patients. But we also need to protect those new antibiotics from misuse when they become available. If we want to break the cycle of resistance and change the current landscape, disruptive approaches that challenge long-standing dogma will be needed. PMID:25043962

  14. History of Antibiotics Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Kathrin I

    2016-01-01

    For thousands of years people were delivered helplessly to various kinds of infections, which often reached epidemic proportions and have cost the lives of millions of people. This is precisely the age since mankind has been thinking of infectious diseases and the question of their causes. However, due to a lack of knowledge, the search for strategies to fight, heal, and prevent the spread of communicable diseases was unsuccessful for a long time. It was not until the discovery of the healing effects of (antibiotic producing) molds, the first microscopic observations of microorganisms in the seventeenth century, the refutation of the abiogenesis theory, and the dissolution of the question "What is the nature of infectious diseases?" that the first milestones within the history of antibiotics research were set. Then new discoveries accelerated rapidly: Bacteria could be isolated and cultured and were identified as possible agents of diseases as well as producers of bioactive metabolites. At the same time the first synthetic antibiotics were developed and shortly thereafter, thousands of synthetic substances as well as millions of soil borne bacteria and fungi were screened for bioactivity within numerous microbial laboratories of pharmaceutical companies. New antibiotic classes with different targets were discovered as on assembly line production. With the beginning of the twentieth century, many of the diseases which reached epidemic proportions at the time-e.g., cholera, syphilis, plague, tuberculosis, or typhoid fever, just to name a few, could be combatted with new discovered antibiotics. It should be considered that hundred years ago the market launch of new antibiotics was significantly faster and less complicated than today (where it takes 10-12 years in average between the discovery of a new antibiotic until the launch). After the first euphoria it was quickly realized that bacteria are able to develop, acquire, and spread numerous resistance mechanisms

  15. Perfil de prescritores e prescrição de antimicrobianos nas infecções das vias aéreas superiores em Pediatria Perfil de prescriptores y prescripción de antimicrobianos en las infecciones de vías aéreas superiores en pediatría Profile of prescribers and prescription of antibiotics in upper respiratory infections in Pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina P. da Rocha

    2012-12-01

    explanatory letter by mail or at the Primary Health Care Units about the research and a form with questions concerning: time of graduation, medical residency, workload and workplace, how they update their medical knowledge, factors considered when prescribing antimicrobials, and clinical cases on upper respiratory infections. Personal information was related to the answers of the clinical cases. For statistical analysis, the Z and Tukey-Kramer tests were applied, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: The sample included 170 prescribers, out of whom 87% had medical residence in Pediatrics, 75% worked for the Public Health System, and 71% worked more than 40 hours per week. Physicians who graduated in the past ten years emphasized the pharmaceutical industry as a way of keeping themselves updated in comparison to the ones who had been graduated for more than 30 years; 33% of the public health system physicians cared for more than five patients per hour. Regarding clinical cases, the correct answers averaged 87%. Consulting medical entities as a way of continuous medical education was associated with correct answers, while using materials from the pharmaceutical industry was associated with the incorrect ones (p<0.05. There was a clear trend towards decreasing the quality of the prescription as the number of patients per hour increased. CONCLUSIONS: Efficient education and improvement of work load could reduce the prescription of antibiotics for upper airway infections in children.

  16. Antibiotics for acute otitis media in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venekamp, Roderick P; Sanders, Sharon L; Glasziou, Paul P; Del Mar, Chris B; Rovers, Maroeska M

    2015-06-23

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is one of the most common diseases in early infancy and childhood. Antibiotic use for AOM varies from 56% in the Netherlands to 95% in the USA, Canada and Australia. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in The Cochrane Library in Issue 1, 1997 and previously updated in 1999, 2005, 2009 and 2013. To assess the effects of antibiotics for children with AOM. We searched CENTRAL (2015, Issue 3), MEDLINE (1966 to April week 3, 2015), OLDMEDLINE (1958 to 1965), EMBASE (January 1990 to April 2015), Current Contents (1966 to April 2015), CINAHL (2008 to April 2015) and LILACS (2008 to April 2015). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing 1) antimicrobial drugs with placebo and 2) immediate antibiotic treatment with expectant observation (including delayed antibiotic prescribing) in children with AOM. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. For the review of antibiotics against placebo, 13 RCTs (3401 children and 3938 AOM episodes) from high-income countries were eligible and had generally low risk of bias. The combined results of the trials revealed that by 24 hours from the start of treatment, 60% of the children had recovered whether or not they had placebo or antibiotics. Pain was not reduced by antibiotics at 24 hours (risk ratio (RR) 0.89, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78 to 1.01) but almost a third fewer had residual pain at two to three days (RR 0.70, 95% CI 0.57 to 0.86; number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) 20). A quarter fewer had pain at four to seven days (RR 0.76, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.91; NNTB 16) and two-thirds fewer had pain at 10 to 12 days (RR 0.33, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.66; NNTB 7) compared with placebo. Antibiotics did reduce the number of children with abnormal tympanometry findings at two to four weeks (RR 0.82, 95% CI 0.74 to 0.90; NNTB 11), at six to eight weeks (RR 0.88, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.00; NNTB 16) and the number of children with tympanic

  17. CQUIN audit for prescription of antibiotics for urinary tract infections in an acute medical assessment unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, Maylin; Rezwan, Nivin

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are a common presentation in a medical assessment unit, and we wanted to check compliance with hospital guidelines for antibiotic prescribing in patients presenting to hospital with urinary tract infection. The guidelines are based on local organisms and sensitivities. A retrospective audit of 40 patient records with positive urine cultures from July to August 2013 showed that 20% of patients with culture confirmed UTI were not given antibiotics at all. Of those prescribed antibiotics, 25% were non-compliant with local policy, and nearly one in two patients received more than one antibiotic. Furthermore, stop dates were not stated on 77% of the drug charts and duration of treatment ranged from one to 11 days. Interventions were then introduced in the form of group teaching sessions, proactive checks by Trust pharmacists and widely distributed posters, and the same data sets collected for April to March 2014 to assess for efficacy of the interventions. On re-auditing, 35% patients were not prescribed any antibiotics. However, compliance with local policy was 100%, including 100% drug charts having a stop/review date stated. The overall duration of treatment now ranged from one to seven days, and fewer than one in four patients had more than one antibiotic. Our results showed that improvement was needed in antibiotic stewardship, in particular with regards to compliance with the local guidelines and documentation of prescription. We have demonstrated that it is possible to improve compliance through teaching, by displaying information prominently, and vigilance by the clinical team. The outcome of this is a decreased number and duration of antibiotics prescribed, which has benefits for the patients, the hospital, and the community as a whole. Further work would include interventions to improve the number of patients who are missing antibiotic prescriptions altogether.

  18. Nurse prescribing in dermatology: doctors' and non-prescribing nurses' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Karen; Carey, Nicola; Courtenay, Molly

    2009-04-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to explore doctor and non-prescribing nurse views about nurse prescribing in the light of their experience in dermatology. The cooperation of healthcare professionals and peers is of key importance in enabling and supporting nurse prescribing. Lack of understanding of and opposition to nurse prescribing are known barriers to its implementation. Given the important role they play, it is necessary to consider how the recent expansion of nurse prescribing rights in England impacts on the views of healthcare professionals. Interviews with 12 doctors and six non-prescribing nurses were conducted in 10 case study sites across England between 2006 and 2007. Participants all worked with nurses who prescribed for patients with dermatological conditions in secondary or primary care. Thematic analysis was conducted on the interview data. Participants were positive about their experiences of nurse prescribing having witnessed benefits from it, but had reservations about nurse prescribing in general. Acceptance was conditional upon the nurses' level of experience, awareness of their own limitations and the context in which they prescribed. Fears that nurses would prescribe beyond their level of competence were expected to reduce as understanding and experience of nurse prescribing increased. Indications are that nurse prescribing can be acceptable to doctors and nurses so long as it operates within recommended parameters. Greater promotion and assessment of standards and criteria are recommended to improve understanding and acceptance of nurse prescribing.

  19. Using theory to explore facilitators and barriers to delayed prescribing in Australia: a qualitative study using the Theoretical Domains Framework and the Behaviour Change Wheel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Lucy; McCullough, Amanda; Del Mar, Chris; Lowe, John

    2017-02-13

    Delayed antibiotic prescribing reduces antibiotic use for acute respiratory infections in trials in general practice, but the uptake in clinical practice is low. The aim of the study was to identify facilitators and barriers to general practitioners' (GPs') use of delayed prescribing and to gain pharmacists' and the public's views about delayed prescribing in Australia. This study used the Theoretical Domains Framework and the Behaviour Change Wheel to explore facilitators and barriers to delayed prescribing in Australia. Forty-three semi-structured, face-to-face interviews with general practitioners, pharmacists and patients were conducted. Responses were coded into domains of the Theoretical Domains Framework, and specific criteria from the Behaviour Change Wheel were used to identify which domains were relevant to increasing the use of delayed prescribing by GPs. The interviews revealed nine key domains that influence GPs' use of delayed prescribing: knowledge; cognitive and interpersonal skills; memory, attention and decision-making processes; optimism; beliefs about consequences; intentions; goals; emotion; and social influences: GPs knew about delayed prescribing; however, they did not use it consistently, preferring to bring patients back for review and only using it with patients in a highly selective way. Pharmacists would support GPs and the public in delayed prescribing but would fill the prescription if people insisted. The public said they would delay taking their antibiotics if asked by their GP and given the right information on managing symptoms and when to take antibiotics. Using a theory-driven approach, we identified nine key domains that influence GPs' willingness to provide a delayed prescription to patients with an acute respiratory infection presenting to general practice. These data can be used to develop a structured intervention to change this behaviour and thus reduce antibiotic use for acute respiratory infections in general practice.

  20. Pharmacy clients' attitudes to expanded pharmacist prescribing and the role of agency theory on involved stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoti, Kreshnik; Hughes, Jeffery; Sunderland, Bruce

    2011-02-01

    To examine the views of regular pharmacy clients on pharmacist prescribing and employ agency theory in considering the relationship between the stakeholders involved. Computer assisted telephone interviews were conducted with 400 pharmacy clients recruited around Australia. Potential respondents were identified using a random number generation function in Microsoft Excel. Data were analysed with SPSS version 17 using one-way analysis of variance, principal component analysis and linear regression. The relationships between the main stakeholders involved were explored using agency theory. A total of 1153 answered calls recruited 400 consenting pharmacy clients. Most respondents (71%) trusted pharmacists adopting an expanded role in prescribing, however the majority (66%) supported this only after a diagnosis had been made by a doctor. Those who accepted pharmacist diagnosing and prescribing preferred that this was limited to pain management and antibiotics. Most respondents (64%) considered that expanded pharmacist prescribing would improve their access to prescription medicines, although those over 65 years of age were less supportive than younger respondents. Factors which contributed positively to clients' perception of trust in an expanded prescribing role for pharmacists were identified, and improved access to medicines was found to be the strongest predictor (P Agency theory would conceptualize the introduction of pharmacist prescribers, as disrupting the principal (patient) agent (doctor) relationship. Its introduction would best be facilitated by careful change management. © 2011 The Authors. IJPP © 2011 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  1. Prescribing Safety in Ambulatory Care: Physician Perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rundall, Thomas G; Hsu, John; Lafata, Jennifer E; Fung, Vicki; Paez, Kathryn A; Simpkins, Jan; Simon, Steven R; Robinson, Scott B; Uratsu, Connie; Gunter, Margaret J; Soumerai, Stephen B; Selby, Joseph V

    2005-01-01

    .... We asked about current safety practices, perceptions of ambulatory prescribing safety. Using a content analysis approach, three investigators independently coded responses into thematic categories...

  2. [Impact of regulatory measures in the trends of community consumption of antibiotics in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavestrello, Luis; Cabello, Angela; Casanova, Dunny

    2002-11-01

    The indiscriminate use of antibiotics increases the appearance of bacterial resistance and forces the use of more expensive alternatives. The Chilean Ministry of Health is regulating the consumption of antibiotics since September 1999. These regulatory measures restricted the sale of antibiotics only when these were prescribed by an MD or an DS. To study the impact of these regulatory measures on antibiotics sales in pharmacies. A retrospective analysis of antibiotics sales in pharmacies from 1996 to 2000. The information was obtained from the International Marketing System (IMS Health), an auditing system of pharmacy sales. The consumption unit used was the Defined Daily Dose per 1000 inhabitants/day (DDD). There was an important reduction in DDD, after the introduction of regulatory measures, for amoxicillin, ampicillin, erythromycin, trimethoprim/sulpha, chroramphenicol, cloxacillin and phenoxymethylpenicillin. There was also a important fall in sales, expressed in dollars. The regulatory measures of the Ministry of Health, had an immediate and great impact on antibiotics sales in Chile.

  3. Antibiotic dosing in critically ill patients receiving CRRT: underdosing is overprevalent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Susan J; Mueller, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    Published CRRT drug dosing algorithms and other dosing guidelines appear to result in underdosed antibiotics, leading to failure to attain pharmacodynamic targets. High mortality rates persist with inadequate antibiotic therapy as the most important risk factor for death. Reasons for unintended antibiotic underdosing in patients receiving CRRT are many. Underdosing may result from lack of the recognition that better hepatic function in AKI patients yields higher nonrenal antibiotic clearance compared to ESRD patients. Other factors include the variability in body size and fluid composition of patients, the serious consequence of delayed achievement of antibiotic pharmacodynamic targets in septic patients, potential subtherapeutic antibiotic concentrations at the infection site, and the influence of RRT intensity on antibiotic concentrations. Too often, clinicians weigh the benefits of overcautious antibiotic dosing to avoid antibiotic toxicity too heavily against the benefits of rapid attainment of therapeutic antibiotic concentrations in critically ill patients receiving CRRT. We urge clinicians to prescribe antibiotics aggressively for these vulnerable patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Addressing resistance to antibiotics in systematic reviews of antibiotic interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical; Garner, Paul; Sinclair, David J; Afshari, Arash; Pace, Nathan Leon; Cullum, Nicky; Williams, Hywel C; Smyth, Alan; Skoetz, Nicole; Del Mar, Chris; Schilder, Anne G M; Yahav, Dafna; Tovey, David

    Antibiotics are among the most important interventions in healthcare. Resistance of bacteria to antibiotics threatens the effectiveness of treatment. Systematic reviews of antibiotic treatments often do not address resistance to antibiotics even when data are available in the original studies. This

  5. Bacterial infections in Lilongwe, Malawi: aetiology and antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoka Mwai H

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Life-threatening infections present major challenges for health systems in Malawi and the developing world because routine microbiologic culture and sensitivity testing are not performed due to lack of capacity. Use of empirical antimicrobial therapy without regular microbiologic surveillance is unable to provide adequate treatment in the face of emerging antimicrobial resistance. This study was conducted to determine antimicrobial susceptibility patterns in order to inform treatment choices and generate hospital-wide baseline data. Methods Culture and susceptibility testing was performed on various specimens from patients presenting with possible infectious diseases at Kamuzu Central Hospital, Lilongwe, Malawi. Results Between July 2006 and December 2007 3104 specimens from 2458 patients were evaluated, with 60.1% from the adult medical service. Common presentations were sepsis, meningitis, pneumonia and abscess. An etiologic agent was detected in 13% of patients. The most common organisms detected from blood cultures were Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella species and Streptococcus pneumoniae, whereas Streptococcus pneumoniae and Cryptococcus neoformans were most frequently detected from cerebrospinal fluid. Haemophilus influenzae was rarely isolated. Resistance to commonly used antibiotics was observed in up to 80% of the isolates while antibiotics that were not commonly in use maintained susceptibility. Conclusions There is widespread resistance to almost all of the antibiotics that are empirically used in Malawi. Antibiotics that have not been widely introduced in Malawi show better laboratory performance. Choices for empirical therapy in Malawi should be revised accordingly. A microbiologic surveillance system should be established and prudent use of antimicrobials promoted to improve patient care.

  6. The effectiveness of computerised decision support on antibiotic use in hospitals: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Inappropriate antimicrobial use has been shown to be an important determinant of the emergence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Health information technology (HIT) in the form of Computerised Decision Support (CDS) represents an option for improving antimicrobial prescribing and containing AMR. Objectives To evaluate the evidence for CDS in improving quantitative and qualitative measures of antibiotic prescribing in inpatient hospital settings. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted of articles published from inception to 20th December 2014 using eight electronic databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, PUBMED, Web of Science, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, HMIC and PsychINFo. An updated systematic literature search was conducted from January 1st 2015 to October 1st 2016 using PUBMED. The search strategy used combinations of the following terms: (electronic prescribing) OR (clinical decision support) AND (antibiotic or antibacterial or antimicrobial) AND (hospital or secondary care or inpatient). Studies were evaluated for quality using a 10-point rating scale. Results Eighty-one studies were identified matching the inclusion criteria. Seven outcome measures were evaluated: adequacy of antibiotic coverage, mortality, volume of antibiotic usage, length of stay, antibiotic cost, compliance with guidelines, antimicrobial resistance, and CDS implementation and uptake. Meta-analysis of pooled outcomes showed CDS significantly improved the adequacy of antibiotic coverage (n = 13; odds ratio [OR], 2.11 [95% CI, 1.67 to 2.66, p ≤ 0.00001]). Also, CDS was associated with marginally lowered mortality (n = 20; OR, 0.85 [CI, 0.75 to 0.96, p = 0.01]). CDS was associated with lower antibiotic utilisation, increased compliance with antibiotic guidelines and reductions in antimicrobial resistance. Conflicting effects of CDS on length of stay, antibiotic costs and system uptake were also noted. Conclusions CDS has the potential to improve the adequacy of antibiotic

  7. Bacterial clonal diagnostics as a tool for evidence-based empiric antibiotic selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Tchesnokova

    Full Text Available Despite the known clonal distribution of antibiotic resistance in many bacteria, empiric (pre-culture antibiotic selection still relies heavily on species-level cumulative antibiograms, resulting in overuse of broad-spectrum agents and excessive antibiotic/pathogen mismatch. Urinary tract infections (UTIs, which account for a large share of antibiotic use, are caused predominantly by Escherichia coli, a highly clonal pathogen. In an observational clinical cohort study of urgent care patients with suspected UTI, we assessed the potential for E. coli clonal-level antibiograms to improve empiric antibiotic selection. A novel PCR-based clonotyping assay was applied to fresh urine samples to rapidly detect E. coli and the urine strain's clonotype. Based on a database of clonotype-specific antibiograms, the acceptability of various antibiotics for empiric therapy was inferred using a 20%, 10%, and 30% allowed resistance threshold. The test's performance characteristics and possible effects on prescribing were assessed. The rapid test identified E. coli clonotypes directly in patients' urine within 25-35 minutes, with high specificity and sensitivity compared to culture. Antibiotic selection based on a clonotype-specific antibiogram could reduce the relative likelihood of antibiotic/pathogen mismatch by ≥ 60%. Compared to observed prescribing patterns, clonal diagnostics-guided antibiotic selection could safely double the use of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and minimize fluoroquinolone use. In summary, a rapid clonotyping test showed promise for improving empiric antibiotic prescribing for E. coli UTI, including reversing preferential use of fluoroquinolones over trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The clonal diagnostics approach merges epidemiologic surveillance, antimicrobial stewardship, and molecular diagnostics to bring evidence-based medicine directly to the point of care.

  8. Bacterial clonal diagnostics as a tool for evidence-based empiric antibiotic selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchesnokova, Veronika; Avagyan, Hovhannes; Rechkina, Elena; Chan, Diana; Muradova, Mariya; Haile, Helen Ghirmai; Radey, Matthew; Weissman, Scott; Riddell, Kim; Scholes, Delia; Johnson, James R; Sokurenko, Evgeni V

    2017-01-01

    Despite the known clonal distribution of antibiotic resistance in many bacteria, empiric (pre-culture) antibiotic selection still relies heavily on species-level cumulative antibiograms, resulting in overuse of broad-spectrum agents and excessive antibiotic/pathogen mismatch. Urinary tract infections (UTIs), which account for a large share of antibiotic use, are caused predominantly by Escherichia coli, a highly clonal pathogen. In an observational clinical cohort study of urgent care patients with suspected UTI, we assessed the potential for E. coli clonal-level antibiograms to improve empiric antibiotic selection. A novel PCR-based clonotyping assay was applied to fresh urine samples to rapidly detect E. coli and the urine strain's clonotype. Based on a database of clonotype-specific antibiograms, the acceptability of various antibiotics for empiric therapy was inferred using a 20%, 10%, and 30% allowed resistance threshold. The test's performance characteristics and possible effects on prescribing were assessed. The rapid test identified E. coli clonotypes directly in patients' urine within 25-35 minutes, with high specificity and sensitivity compared to culture. Antibiotic selection based on a clonotype-specific antibiogram could reduce the relative likelihood of antibiotic/pathogen mismatch by ≥ 60%. Compared to observed prescribing patterns, clonal diagnostics-guided antibiotic selection could safely double the use of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and minimize fluoroquinolone use. In summary, a rapid clonotyping test showed promise for improving empiric antibiotic prescribing for E. coli UTI, including reversing preferential use of fluoroquinolones over trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The clonal diagnostics approach merges epidemiologic surveillance, antimicrobial stewardship, and molecular diagnostics to bring evidence-based medicine directly to the point of care.

  9. The effectiveness of computerised decision support on antibiotic use in hospitals: A systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher E Curtis

    Full Text Available Inappropriate antimicrobial use has been shown to be an important determinant of the emergence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR. Health information technology (HIT in the form of Computerised Decision Support (CDS represents an option for improving antimicrobial prescribing and containing AMR.To evaluate the evidence for CDS in improving quantitative and qualitative measures of antibiotic prescribing in inpatient hospital settings.A systematic literature search was conducted of articles published from inception to 20th December 2014 using eight electronic databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, PUBMED, Web of Science, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, HMIC and PsychINFo. An updated systematic literature search was conducted from January 1st 2015 to October 1st 2016 using PUBMED. The search strategy used combinations of the following terms: (electronic prescribing OR (clinical decision support AND (antibiotic or antibacterial or antimicrobial AND (hospital or secondary care or inpatient. Studies were evaluated for quality using a 10-point rating scale.Eighty-one studies were identified matching the inclusion criteria. Seven outcome measures were evaluated: adequacy of antibiotic coverage, mortality, volume of antibiotic usage, length of stay, antibiotic cost, compliance with guidelines, antimicrobial resistance, and CDS implementation and uptake. Meta-analysis of pooled outcomes showed CDS significantly improved the adequacy of antibiotic coverage (n = 13; odds ratio [OR], 2.11 [95% CI, 1.67 to 2.66, p ≤ 0.00001]. Also, CDS was associated with marginally lowered mortality (n = 20; OR, 0.85 [CI, 0.75 to 0.96, p = 0.01]. CDS was associated with lower antibiotic utilisation, increased compliance with antibiotic guidelines and reductions in antimicrobial resistance. Conflicting effects of CDS on length of stay, antibiotic costs and system uptake were also noted.CDS has the potential to improve the adequacy of antibiotic coverage and marginally decrease mortality in

  10. Veterinarians’ Perception, Knowledge and Practices of Antibiotic Stewardship in Enugu State Southeast, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madubuike Umunna ANYANWU

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional survey utilizing structured questionnaires was used to study the veterinarians’ perception, knowledge and practices of antibiotic stewardship (ABS in Enugu State, Southeastern Nigeria. Data obtained were analyzed using chi-square on SPSS (Version 15.0 at a significance level of P < 0.05 to determine possible associations between variables and perceptions/knowledge about ABS. Out of 280 respondents, 41 (17.1% had heard about ABS. Minority of the respondents perceived/knew that using antibiotics only when necessary (6.4%, 18, administering antibiotics at the appropriate dose (6.4%, 18 and administering antibiotics for appropriate duration in every case (4.3%, 12 were among the principles of ABS. The study also showed that age, gender, qualification, years of practice and locations did not exert any influence (P > 0.05 on the awareness of respondents about ABS. More than one-third of the respondents wrongly perceived that increasing the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics (35.4%, 99 is one of the goals of ABS, whereas the minority of the respondents rightly perceived/knew that minimizing toxicity and other adverse effects (16.8%, 47 and reducing antibiotic resistance (ABR (43.2%, 121 are also goals of ABS. Only 21.4% (60 had overall knowledge of ABS. Prescribing antibiotics without seeing/examining the patient, prescribing antibiotics for any case suspected to be infectious, prescribing broad-spectrum antibiotics despite availability of narrow-spectrum antibiotics, prescribing different classes/types of antibiotics concurrently to ensure therapeutic efficacy, prescribing overdose of antibiotics to ensure efficacy and non-consultation of the veterinary formulary/other resources when in doubt during prescription, are some of inappropriate/untoward ABS practices/behaviors/attitudes amongst the respondents. No significant association (P > 0.05 was found between practices of ABS and age, gender, qualification, years of practice and

  11. An audit of empiric antibiotic choice in the inpatient management of community-acquired pneumonia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Delaney, F

    2017-04-01

    Adherence to antimicrobial guidelines for empiric antibiotic prescribing in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has been reported to be worryingly low. We conducted a review of empiric antibiotic prescribing for sixty consecutive adult patients admitted to the Mercy University Hospital with a diagnosis of CAP. When analysed against local antimicrobial guidelines, guideline concordant empiric antibiotics were given in only 48% of cases, lower than the average rate in comparable studies. Concordance was 100% in cases where the CURB-65 pneumonia severity assessment score, on which the guidelines are based, was documented in the medical notes. The use of excessively broad spectrum and inappropriate antibiotics is a notable problem. This study supports the theory that lack of knowledge regarding pneumonia severity assessment tools and unfamiliarity with therapeutic guidelines are key barriers to guideline adherence, which remains a significant problem despite increased focus on antimicrobial stewardship programs in Ireland

  12. Integrating qualitative research methods into care improvement efforts within a learning health system: addressing antibiotic overuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Plaza, Corrine E; Parry, Carla; Hahn, Erin E; Tang, Tania; Nguyen, Huong Q; Gould, Michael K; Kanter, Michael H; Sharp, Adam L

    2016-08-15

    Despite reports advocating for integration of research into healthcare delivery, scant literature exists describing how this can be accomplished. Examples highlighting application of qualitative research methods embedded into a healthcare system are particularly needed. This article describes the process and value of embedding qualitative research as the second phase of an explanatory, sequential, mixed methods study to improve antibiotic stewardship for acute sinusitis. Purposive sampling of providers for in-depth interviews improved understanding of unwarranted antibiotic prescribing and elicited stakeholder recommendations for improvement. Qualitative data collection, transcription and constant comparative analyses occurred iteratively. Emerging themes and sub-themes identified primary drivers of unwarranted antibiotic prescribing patterns and recommendations for improving practice. These findings informed the design of a health system intervention to improve antibiotic stewardship for acute sinusitis. Core components of the intervention are also described. Qualitative research can be effectively applied in learning healthcare systems to elucidate quantitative results and inform improvement efforts.

  13. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, Nienke L; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; van Duijn, Pleun J; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to classical infection prevention protocols and surveillance programs, counterintuitive interventions, such as selective decontamination with antibiotics and antibiotic rotation have been applied and investigated to control the emergence of antibiotic resistance. This review provides an overview of selective oropharyngeal and digestive tract decontamination, decolonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic rotation as strategies to modulate antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit.

  14. Cough mixtures: rational or irrational prescribing in Hong Kong?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, William C W; Dickinson, James; Chan, Cynthia

    2005-08-01

    To investigate the extent and how cough mixtures are prescribed, and what conditions or specific groups of people would contribute to its prescription in Hong Kong. Using diagnosis and drug data obtained from logbooks submitted by participants in the diploma in family medicine course between 1999 and 2003, we selected and analysed all patients with a diagnosis of cough or cough-related illnesses as well as cough mixtures that were used to treat them. This study confirmed that cough-related illnesses were common in the Hong Kong primary care setting and cough mixtures were used quite liberally irrespective of the patients' age and sex. Combination preparations accounted for over half of the prescriptions and cough mixture was used less in severe cases when antibiotics were given. Private doctors working in the public sector. Given the current health care system, inappropriate and over-prescribing of cough mixtures can be improved by promoting health education and awareness among patients seeking medical help for this common medical condition.

  15. Determinants of between-country differences in ambulatory antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance in Europe: a longitudinal observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blommaert, A; Marais, C; Hens, N; Coenen, S; Muller, A; Goossens, H; Beutels, P

    2014-02-01

    To identify key determinants explaining country-year variations in antibiotic use and resistance. Ambulatory antibiotic use data [in defined daily doses per 1000 inhabitants per day (DIDs)] for 19 European countries from 1999 to 2007 were collected, along with 181 variables describing countries in terms of their agriculture, culture, demography, disease burden, education, healthcare organization and socioeconomics. After assessing data availability, overlap and relevance, multiple imputation generalized estimating equations were applied with a stepwise selection procedure to select significant determinants of global antibiotic use (expressed in DIDs), relative use of subgroups (amoxicillin and co-amoxiclav) and resistance of Escherichia coli and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Relative humidity, healthcare expenditure proportional to gross domestic product, feelings of distrust, proportion of population aged >65 years and availability of treatment guidelines were associated with higher total antibiotic use expressed in DIDs. Restrictions on marketing activities towards prescribers, population density, number of antibiotics, educational attainment and degree of atheism were associated with a lower number of total DIDs used. Relative prescribing of amoxicillin and co-amoxiclav was mainly determined by healthcare system choices [e.g. general practitioner (GP) registration and restricted marketing]. Specific antibiotic use was found to be a significant determinant of resistance for some but not all drug/organism combinations. Incentives to stimulate GP gatekeeping were associated with lower levels of resistance, and life expectancy at age 65+ and atheism were associated with more resistance. Myriad factors influence antibiotic use and resistance at the country level and an important part of these can be modified by policy choices.

  16. Prevalence and Predictors of Inappropriate Medications Prescribing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data analysis involved use of World Health Organization (WHO) prescribing indicators, Updated 2002 Beer's criteria and DRUG-REAX® system software package of MICROMEDEX (R) Healthcare Series to assess the prescribing pattern, identify potentially inappropriate medications and potential drug-drug interactions, ...

  17. Medication errors: prescribing faults and prescription errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velo, Giampaolo P; Minuz, Pietro

    2009-06-01

    1. Medication errors are common in general practice and in hospitals. Both errors in the act of writing (prescription errors) and prescribing faults due to erroneous medical decisions can result in harm to patients. 2. Any step in the prescribing process can generate errors. Slips, lapses, or mistakes are sources of errors, as in unintended omissions in the transcription of drugs. Faults in dose selection, omitted transcription, and poor handwriting are common. 3. Inadequate knowledge or competence and incomplete information about clinical characteristics and previous treatment of individual patients can result in prescribing faults, including the use of potentially inappropriate medications. 4. An unsafe working environment, complex or undefined procedures, and inadequate communication among health-care personnel, particularly between doctors and nurses, have been identified as important underlying factors that contribute to prescription errors and prescribing faults. 5. Active interventions aimed at reducing prescription errors and prescribing faults are strongly recommended. These should be focused on the education and training of prescribers and the use of on-line aids. The complexity of the prescribing procedure should be reduced by introducing automated systems or uniform prescribing charts, in order to avoid transcription and omission errors. Feedback control systems and immediate review of prescriptions, which can be performed with the assistance of a hospital pharmacist, are also helpful. Audits should be performed periodically.

  18. Psychiatric Prescribers' Experiences With Doctor Shoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Julie; Johnson, Mary; Karnik, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Doctor shopping is a primary method of prescription medication diversion. After opioids, benzodiazepines and stimulants are the next most common prescription medications used nonmedically. Studies have shown that patients who engage in doctor shopping find it fun, exciting, and easy to do. There is a lack of research on the prescriber's perspective on the phenomenon of doctor shopping. This study investigates the experiences of prescribers in psychiatry with patients who engage in doctor shopping. Fifteen prescribers including psychiatrists and psychiatric nurse practitioners working in outpatient psychiatry were interviewed to elicit detailed information about their experiences with patients who engage in doctor shopping. Themes found throughout the interview were that psychiatric prescribers' experience with patients who engage in doctor shopping includes (a) detecting red flags, (b) negative emotional responding, (c) addressing the patient and the problem, and (d) inconsistently implementing precautions. When red flags were detected when prescribing controlled drugs, prescribers in psychiatry experienced both their own negative emotional responses such as disappointment and resentment as well as the negative emotions of the patients such as anger and other extreme emotional responses. Psychiatric prescribers responded to patient's doctor shopping in a variety of ways such as changing their practice, discharging the patients or taking steps to not accept certain patients identified as being at risk for doctor shopping, as well as by talking to the patient and trying to offer them help. Despite experiencing doctor shopping, the prescribers inconsistently implemented precautionary measures such as checking prescription drug monitoring programs. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Selection of antibiotic resistance at very low antibiotic concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Sandegren, Linus

    2014-01-01

    Human use of antibiotics has driven the selective enrichment of pathogenic bacteria resistant to clinically used drugs. Traditionally, the selection of resistance has been considered to occur mainly at high, therapeutic levels of antibiotics, but we are now beginning to understand better the importance of selection of resistance at low levels of antibiotics. The concentration of an antibiotic varies in different body compartments during treatment, and low concentrations of antibiotics are fou...

  20. Antibiotic alternatives: the substitution of antibiotics in animal husbandry?

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Guyue; Hao, Haihong; Xie, Shuyu; Wang, Xu; Dai, Menghong; Huang, Lingli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2014-01-01

    It is a common practice for decades to use of sub-therapeutic dose of antibiotics in food-animal feeds to prevent animals from diseases and to improve production performance in modern animal husbandry. In the meantime, concerns over the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to the unreasonable use of antibiotics and an appearance of less novelty antibiotics have prompted efforts to develop so-called alternatives to antibiotics. Whether or not the alternatives could really ...

  1. Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Gonorrhea Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Low Resolution ...

  2. Glycopeptide antibiotic biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Grace; Thaker, Maulik N; Koteva, Kalinka; Wright, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Glycopeptides such as vancomycin, teicoplanin and telavancin are essential for treating infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria. Unfortunately, the dwindled pipeline of new antibiotics into the market and the emergence of glycopeptide-resistant enterococci and other resistant bacteria are increasingly making effective antibiotic treatment difficult. We have now learned a great deal about how bacteria produce antibiotics. This information can be exploited to develop the next generation of antimicrobials. The biosynthesis of glycopeptides via nonribosomal peptide assembly and unusual amino acid synthesis, crosslinking and tailoring enzymes gives rise to intricate chemical structures that target the bacterial cell wall. This review seeks to describe recent advances in our understanding of both biosynthesis and resistance of these important antibiotics.

  3. Antibiotics for uncomplicated diverticulitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel M; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2012-01-01

    Diverticulitis is an inflammatory complication to the very common condition diverticulosis. Uncomplicated diverticulitis has traditionally been treated with antibiotics with reference to the microbiology, extrapolation from trials on complicated intra-abdominal infections and clinical experience....

  4. Antibiotics Smart Use: a workable model for promoting the rational use of medicines in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Sumpradit, Nithima; Chongtrakul, Pisonthi; Anuwong, Kunyada; Pumtong, Somying; Kongsomboon, Kedsenee; Butdeemee, Parichart; Khonglormyati, Jurairat; Chomyong, Santi; Tongyoung, Parnuchote; Losiriwat, Suraphol; Seesuk, Piyanooch; Suwanwaree, Pongthep; Tangcharoensathien, Viroj

    2012-01-01

    The Antibiotics Smart Use (ASU) programme was introduced in Thailand as a model to promote the rational use of medicines, starting with antibiotics. The programme’s first phase consisted of assessing interventions intended to change prescribing practices; the second phase examined the feasibility of programme scale-up. Currently the programme is in its third phase, which centres on sustainability. This paper describes the concept behind ASU, the programme’s functional modalities, the developm...

  5. Prescription for antibiotics at drug shops and strategies to improve quality of care and patient safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Buregyeya, Esther; Rutebemberwa, Elizeus

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The main objective of this study was to assess practices of antibiotic prescription at registered drug shops with a focus on upper respiratory tract infections among children in order to provide data for policy discussions aimed at improving quality of care and patient safety......-line drug for treatment of pneumonia in children according to the guidelines. CONCLUSIONS: There is urgent need to regulate drug shop practices of prescribing and selling antibiotics, for the safety of patients seeking care at these outlets....

  6. Antibiotic use in a tertiary healthcare facility in Ghana: a point prevalence survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appiah-Korang Labi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The global rise and spread of antibiotic resistance is limiting the usefulness of antibiotics in the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases. The use of antibiotic stewardship programs guided by local data on prescribing practices is a useful strategy to control and reduce antibiotic resistance. Our objective in this study was to determine the prevalence and indications for use of antibiotics at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital Accra, Ghana. Methods An antibiotic point prevalence survey was conducted among inpatients of the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital between February and March 2016. Folders and treatment charts of patients on admission at participating departments were reviewed for antibiotics administered or scheduled to be administered on the day of the survey. Data on indication for use were also collected. Prevalence of antibiotic use was determined by dividing the number of inpatients on antibiotics at the time of survey by the total number of patients on admission. Results Of the 677 inpatients surveyed, 348 (51.4%, 95% CI, 47.6–55.2 were on treatment with antibiotics. Prevalence was highest among Paediatric surgery where 20/22 patients (90.9%, 95% CI, 70.8–98.9 were administered antibiotics and lowest among Obstetrics patients with 77/214 (36%, 95% CI, 29.5–42.8. The indications for antibiotic use were 245/611 (40.1% for community-acquired infections, 205/611 (33.6% for surgical prophylaxis, 129/611 (21.1% for healthcare associated infections and 33/611 (5.4% for medical prophylaxis. The top five antibiotics prescribed in the hospital were metronidazole 107 (17.5%, amoxicillin-clavulinic acid 82 (13.4%, ceftriaxone 17(12.1%, cefuroxime 61 (10.0%, and cloxacillin 52 (8.5% respectively. Prevalence of meropenem and vancomycin use was 12(2% and 1 (.2% respectively. The majority of patients 181 (52% were being treated with two antibiotics. Conclusion This study indicated a high prevalence of antibiotic use among

  7. Influences on the prescribing of new drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Luke; de Almedia Neto, Abelio C; Wutzke, Sonia; Patterson, Craig; Mackson, Judith; Weekes, Lynn; Williamson, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the factors that influence prescribing of new drugs among general practitioners, endocrinologists and psychiatrists. Four focus groups were conducted with GPs, endocrinologists and psychiatrists on sources of awareness and influences on prescribing of new drugs. Pharmaceutical companies were the most important source for becoming aware of new drugs. There were many influences on the decision to prescribe a new drug, the most important being efficacy, safety, cost and advantage over existing therapies. Endocrinologists placed greater emphasis on evidence from clinical trials and scientific conferences, and psychiatrists and GPs placed more weight on pharmaceutical representatives, colleagues and specialists. New drug prescribing occurs in a complex environment with many influences. Effective interventions to promote rational, safe and effective prescribing of new drugs will need to be cognisant of these factors.

  8. Antipsychotic prescribing in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, Wendy; Curran, Stephen; Wattis, John

    2003-09-01

    older people. There is a need to redress this balance to ensure that the prescribing of antipsychotics in older people is evidence based.

  9. Design and rationale of the Procalcitonin Antibiotic Consensus Trial (ProACT), a multicenter randomized trial of procalcitonin antibiotic guidance in lower respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, David T; Angus, Derek C; Chang, Chung-Chou H; Doi, Yohei; Fine, Michael J; Kellum, John A; Peck-Palmer, Octavia M; Pike, Francis; Weissfeld, Lisa A; Yabes, Jonathan; Yealy, Donald M

    2017-08-29

    Overuse of antibiotics is a major public health problem, contributing to growing antibiotic resistance. Procalcitonin has been reported to be commonly elevated in bacterial, but not viral infection. Multiple European trials found procalcitonin-guided care reduced antibiotic use in lower respiratory tract infection, with no apparent harm. However, applicability to US practice is limited due to trial design features impractical in the US, between-country differences, and residual safety concerns. The Procalcitonin Antibiotic Consensus Trial (ProACT) is a multicenter randomized trial to determine the impact of a procalcitonin antibiotic prescribing guideline, implemented with basic reproducible strategies, in US patients with lower respiratory tract infection. We describe the trial methods using the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) framework, and the rationale for key design decisions, including choice of eligibility criteria, choice of control arm, and approach to guideline implementation. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02130986 . Registered May 1, 2014.

  10. Phenotypic Resistance to Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L. Martinez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of antibiotic resistance is usually associated with genetic changes, either to the acquisition of resistance genes, or to mutations in elements relevant for the activity of the antibiotic. However, in some situations resistance can be achieved without any genetic alteration; this is called phenotypic resistance. Non-inherited resistance is associated to specific processes such as growth in biofilms, a stationary growth phase or persistence. These situations might occur during infection but they are not usually considered in classical susceptibility tests at the clinical microbiology laboratories. Recent work has also shown that the susceptibility to antibiotics is highly dependent on the bacterial metabolism and that global metabolic regulators can modulate this phenotype. This modulation includes situations in which bacteria can be more resistant or more susceptible to antibiotics. Understanding these processes will thus help in establishing novel therapeutic approaches based on the actual susceptibility shown by bacteria during infection, which might differ from that determined in the laboratory. In this review, we discuss different examples of phenotypic resistance and the mechanisms that regulate the crosstalk between bacterial metabolism and the susceptibility to antibiotics. Finally, information on strategies currently under development for diminishing the phenotypic resistance to antibiotics of bacterial pathogens is presented.

  11. Antibiotics produced by Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procópio, Rudi Emerson de Lima; Silva, Ingrid Reis da; Martins, Mayra Kassawara; Azevedo, João Lúcio de; Araújo, Janete Magali de

    2012-01-01

    Streptomyces is a genus of Gram-positive bacteria that grows in various environments, and its shape resembles filamentous fungi. The morphological differentiation of Streptomyces involves the formation of a layer of hyphae that can differentiate into a chain of spores. The most interesting property of Streptomyces is the ability to produce bioactive secondary metabolites, such as antifungals, antivirals, antitumorals, anti-hypertensives, immunosuppressants, and especially antibiotics. The production of most antibiotics is species specific, and these secondary metabolites are important for Streptomyces species in order to compete with other microorganisms that come in contact, even within the same genre. Despite the success of the discovery of antibiotics, and advances in the techniques of their production, infectious diseases still remain the second leading cause of death worldwide, and bacterial infections cause approximately 17 million deaths annually, affecting mainly children and the elderly. Self-medication and overuse of antibiotics is another important factor that contributes to resistance, reducing the lifetime of the antibiotic, thus causing the constant need for research and development of new antibiotics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Antibiotic resistance patterns of community-acquired urinary tract infections in children with vesicoureteral reflux receiving prophylactic antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chi-Hui; Tsai, Ming-Horng; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Su, Lin-Hui; Tsau, Yong-Kwei; Lin, Chi-Jen; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Lin, Tzou-Yien

    2008-12-01

    The goal was to examine bacterial antimicrobial resistance of recurrent urinary tract infections in children receiving antibiotic prophylaxis because of primary vesicoureteral reflux. We reviewed data retrospectively for children with documented vesicoureteral reflux in 2 hospitals during a 5-year follow-up period. The patients were receiving co-trimoxazole, cephalexin, or cefaclor prophylaxis or prophylaxis with a sequence of different antibiotics (alternative monotherapy). Demographic data, degree of vesicoureteral reflux, prophylactic antibiotics prescribed, and antibiotic sensitivity results of first urinary tract infections and breakthrough urinary tract infections were recorded. Three hundred twenty-four patients underwent antibiotic prophylaxis (109 with co-trimoxazole, 100 with cephalexin, 44 with cefaclor, and 71 with alternative monotherapy) in one hospital and 96 children underwent co-trimoxazole prophylaxis in the other hospital. Breakthrough urinary tract infections occurred in patients from both hospitals (20.4% and 25%, respectively). Escherichia coli infection was significantly less common in children receiving antibiotic prophylaxis, compared with their initial episodes of urinary tract infection, at both hospitals. Children receiving cephalosporin prophylaxis were more likely to have an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing organism for breakthrough urinary tract infections, compared with children with co-trimoxazole prophylaxis. Antimicrobial susceptibilities to almost all antibiotics decreased with cephalosporin prophylaxis when recurrent urinary tract infections developed. The extent of decreased susceptibilities was also severe for prophylaxis with a sequence of different antibiotics. However, antimicrobial susceptibilities decreased minimally in co-trimoxazole prophylaxis groups. Children receiving cephalosporin prophylaxis are more likely to have extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing bacteria or multidrug-resistant uropathogens

  13. Inappropriate prescribing in outpatient healthcare: an evaluation of respiratory infection visits among veterans in teaching versus non-teaching primary care clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane M. Parente

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent study led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC revealed at least 30% of antibiotic prescriptions in the outpatient setting were inappropriate. In this study of all ages, among adult patients, results were similar to the overall population, with the majority of inappropriate prescribing relating to respiratory infections. We applied the same methodology to investigate rates of antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections in outpatient primary care clinics at the Providence Veterans Affairs Medical Center. The results of our evaluation reflected comparable rates of inappropriate prescribing, but when stratified by teaching versus non-teaching primary care clinics, inappropriate prescribing was significantly higher in non-teaching clinics (17.6% vs 44.0%, p < .0001. Respiratory infection visits in non-teaching outpatient clinics may be a pragmatic target for antimicrobial stewardship programs.

  14. Reasonable application of antibiotic prophylaxis in maxillofacial trauma: Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Yadegari Naeeni

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Despite advances in trauma management, treatment of the consequent infections has remained a major challenge. Antibiotic prophylaxis has been widely applied to reduce such infections. Although bacteria are present in most body parts, severe infections after treatment are less frequent in the head and neck of healthy individuals. The aim of the present study was to review the reasonable application of antibiotic prophylaxis in maxillofacial trauma. Materials and Methods: In this review article, PubMed and Google Scholar databases were searched for studies on antibiotic prophylaxis in maxillofacial trauma published during 2000-2014. Conclusion: Antibiotics were not prescribed for tears and small clean wounds in the face and mouth. However, prophylaxis was applied for extensive mouth injuries which involved the facial skin. In case of maxillofacial fractures, 24-hour administration of antibiotics sufficed for compound fractures of the mandible and other parts of the face. Antibiotics were not required in other types of fractures. Prophylaxis should be applied over short pre- or post-operative periods based on the severity and complexity of maxillofacial fractures and their relations with intra- and extraoral environments. Apparently, more detailed studies are warranted to further clarify the subject.

  15. Antibiotic Use and Misuse during Pregnancy and Delivery: Benefits and Risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begoña Martinez de Tejada

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Although pregnancy is considered as a physiological state, most pregnant women in developed countries receive multiple medications to prevent maternal or neonatal complications, with antibiotics among the most frequently prescribed. During pregnancy, antibiotics are often prescribed in the context of preterm labor, intrapartum fever, prevention of neonatal Group B Streptococcus fever, and cesarean section. Outside this period, they are commonly prescribed in the community setting for respiratory, urinary, and ear, nose and throat infection symptoms. Whereas some of the current indications have insightful reasons to justify their use, potential risks related to overuse and misuse may surpass the benefits. Of note, the recent 2014 World Health Assembly expressed serious concern regarding antibiotic resistance due to antibiotic overuse and misuse and urged immediate action to combat antibiotic resistance on a global scale. Most studies in the obstetrics field have focused on the benefits of antibiotics for short-term maternal and neonatal complications, but with very little (if any interest in long-term consequences.

  16. Antibiotic use and misuse during pregnancy and delivery: benefits and risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez de Tejada, Begoña

    2014-08-07

    Although pregnancy is considered as a physiological state, most pregnant women in developed countries receive multiple medications to prevent maternal or neonatal complications, with antibiotics among the most frequently prescribed. During pregnancy, antibiotics are often prescribed in the context of preterm labor, intrapartum fever, prevention of neonatal Group B Streptococcus fever, and cesarean section. Outside this period, they are commonly prescribed in the community setting for respiratory, urinary, and ear, nose and throat infection symptoms. Whereas some of the current indications have insightful reasons to justify their use, potential risks related to overuse and misuse may surpass the benefits. Of note, the recent 2014 World Health Assembly expressed serious concern regarding antibiotic resistance due to antibiotic overuse and misuse and urged immediate action to combat antibiotic resistance on a global scale. Most studies in the obstetrics field have focused on the benefits of antibiotics for short-term maternal and neonatal complications, but with very little (if any) interest in long-term consequences.

  17. [Management of odontogenic infections in Primary Care: Antibiotic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles Raya, Purificación; Javierre Miranda, Ana Pilar; Moreno Millán, Nemesio; Mas Casals, Ariadna; de Frutos Echániz, Elena; Morató Agustí, M Luisa

    2017-12-01

    Our aim is to contribute to the rational use of antibiotics prescribed by family doctors when a patient consults for a dental problem. Nowadays we should not ask which antibiotic to give. The question has to be if we need to prescribe antibiotics in front of the most common odontogenic infections seen in our practice. We review the main dental infections, which should be their appropriate management and the role of prevention. We need to know the complexity of the oral microbiome because it?ll depend on the appropriateness of the antibiotherapy, the evolution towards cure or progression of some odontogenic infections. The bacterial plaque, formed by the biofilm, behaves as a barrier to the action of antimicrobials. It?s in the prevention of its development as well as in it mechanical elimination once shaped, in what the family doctor should insist. We must transmit antibiotics don?t heal dental pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Neuropharmacology and mental health nurse prescribers.

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    Skingsley, David; Bradley, Eleanor J; Nolan, Peter

    2006-08-01

    To outline the development and content of a 'top-up' neuropharmacology module for mental health nurse prescribers and consider how much pharmacology training is required to ensure effective mental health prescribing practice. Debate about the content of prescribing training courses has persisted within the United Kingdom since the mid-1980s. In early 2003 supplementary prescribing was introduced and gave mental health nurses the opportunity to become prescribers. The challenge of the nurse prescribing curriculum for universities is that they have only a short time to provide nurses from a range of backgrounds with enough knowledge to ensure that they meet agreed levels of competency for safe prescribing. There is growing concern within mental health care that the prescribing of medication in mental health services falls short of what would be deemed good practice. Over the past two decades, nurse training has increasingly adopted a psychosocial approach to nursing care raising concerns that, although nurses attending prescribing training may be able to communicate effectively with service users, they may lack the basic knowledge of biology and pharmacology to make effective decisions about medication. Following the completion of a general nurse prescribing course, mental health nurses who attended were asked to identify their specific needs during the evaluation phase. Although they had covered basic pharmacological principles in their training, they stated that they needed more specific information about drugs used in mental health; particularly how to select appropriate drug treatments for mental health conditions. This paper describes how the nurses were involved in the design of a specific module which would enable them to transfer their theoretical leaning to practice and in so doing increase their confidence in their new roles. The findings of this study suggest that the understanding and confidence of mental health nurse prescribers about the drugs they

  19. Can pay-for-performance to primary care providers stimulate appropriate use of antibiotics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellegård, Lina Maria; Dietrichson, Jens; Anell, Anders

    2018-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major threat to public health worldwide. As the healthcare sector's use of antibiotics is an important contributor to the development of resistance, it is crucial that physicians only prescribe antibiotics when needed and that they choose narrow-spectrum antibiotics, which act on fewer bacteria types, when possible. Inappropriate use of antibiotics is nonetheless widespread, not least for respiratory tract infections (RTI), a common reason for antibiotics prescriptions. We examine if pay-for-performance (P4P) presents a way to influence primary care physicians' choice of antibiotics. During 2006-2013, 8 Swedish healthcare authorities adopted P4P to make physicians select narrow-spectrum antibiotics more often in the treatment of children with RTI. Exploiting register data on all purchases of RTI antibiotics in a difference-in-differences analysis, we find that P4P significantly increased the share of narrow-spectrum antibiotics. There are no signs that physicians gamed the system by issuing more prescriptions overall. © 2017 The Authors Health Economics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Antibiotic use and knowledge in the community of Yemen, Saudi Arabia, and Uzbekistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkina, Tatyana; Al Warafi, Abdullah; Hussein Eltom, Elhassan; Tadjieva, Nigora; Kubena, Ales; Vlcek, Jiri

    2014-04-15

    Inappropriate use of antibiotics has resulted in a dramatic increase of antimicrobial resistance in developing countries. We examined knowledge, attitudes, and practices of antibiotic use in three Asian countries. A nationwide cross-sectional study of teachers in large cities of Yemen, Saudi Arabia, and Uzbekistan was conducted. A random sample of 1,200 teachers was selected in each country. Data were collected through a questionnaire-based survey and then analyzed using descriptive and multivariate statistical methods. The prevalence of non-prescription antibiotic use ranged from 48% in Saudi Arabia to 78% in Yemen and Uzbekistan. Pharmacies were the main source of non-prescribed antibiotics. The most common reasons for antibiotic use were cough (40%) and influenza (34%). Forty-nine percent of respondents discontinued antibiotics when they felt better. Although awareness of the dangers of antibiotic use correlated inversely with self-medication, understanding of the appropriate use of antibiotics was limited. The prevalence of antibiotic self-medication in the educated adult population in the studied countries was found to be alarmingly high. Effective strategies involving regulatory enforcement prohibiting sales of antibiotics without prescription should be implemented along with educational interventions for health professionals and the public.

  1. Exploring Patient Awareness and Perceptions of the Appropriate Use of Antibiotics: A Mixed-Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Marion E; Liu, Tsai-Ling; Taylor, Yhenneko J; Davidson, Lisa; Schmid, Monica; Yates, Traci; Scotton, Janice; Spencer, Melanie D

    2017-10-31

    In the outpatient setting, estimates suggest that 30% of the antibiotics prescribed are unnecessary. This study explores patient knowledge and awareness of appropriate use of antibiotics and expectations regarding how antibiotics are used for their treatment in outpatient settings. A survey was administered to a convenience sample of patients, parents, and caregivers (n = 190) at seven primary care clinics and two urgent care locations. Fisher's exact tests compared results by patient characteristics. Although 89% of patients correctly believed that antibiotics work well for treating infections from bacteria, 53% incorrectly believed that antibiotics work well for treating viral infections. Patients who incorrectly believed that antibiotics work well for treating viral infections were more than twice as likely to expect a provider to give them an antibiotic when they have a cough or common cold. Patients who completed the survey also participated in semi-structured interviews (n = 4), which were analyzed using thematic analysis. Patients reported experiencing confusion about which illnesses may be treated by antibiotics and unclear communication from clinicians about the appropriate use of antibiotics. Development of easy to understand patient educational materials can help address patients' incorrect perceptions of appropriate antibiotic use and facilitate patient-provider communication.

  2. Prescription patterns and costs of acne/rosacea medications in Medicare patients vary by prescriber specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Myron; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Kaffenberger, Benjamin H

    2017-09-01

    Prescription patterns for acne/rosacea medications have not been described in the Medicare population, and comparisons across specialties are lacking. To describe the medications used for treating acne/rosacea in the Medicare population and evaluate differences in costs between specialties. A cross-sectional study was performed of the 2008 and 2010 Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Prescription Drug Profiles, which contains 100% of Medicare part D claims. Topical antibiotics accounted for 63% of all prescriptions. Patients ≥65 years utilized more oral tetracycline-class antibiotics and less topical retinoids. Specialists prescribed brand name drugs for the most common topical retinoids and most common topical antibiotics more frequently than family medicine/internal medicine (FM/IM) physicians by 6%-7%. Topical retinoids prescribed by specialists were, on average, $18-$20 more in total cost and $2-$3 more in patient cost than the same types of prescriptions from FM/IM physicians per 30-day supply. Specialists (60%) and IM physicians (56%) prescribed over twice the rate of branded doxycycline than FM doctors did (27%). The total and patient costs for tetracycline-class antibiotics were higher from specialists ($18 and $4 more, respectively) and IM physicians ($3 and $1 more, respectively) than they were from FM physicians. The data might contain rare prescriptions used for conditions other than acne/rosacea, and suppression algorithms might underestimate the number of specialist brand name prescriptions. Costs of prescriptions for acne/rosacea from specialists are higher than those from primary care physicians and could be reduced by choosing generic and less expensive options. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A Multicenter Evaluation of Prolonged Empiric Antibiotic Therapy in Adult ICUs in the United States.

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    Thomas, Zachariah; Bandali, Farooq; Sankaranarayanan, Jayashri; Reardon, Tom; Olsen, Keith M

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the rate of prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy in adult ICUs in the United States. Our secondary objective is to examine the relationship between the prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy rate and certain ICU characteristics. Multicenter, prospective, observational, 72-hour snapshot study. Sixty-seven ICUs from 32 hospitals in the United States. Nine hundred ninety-eight patients admitted to the ICU between midnight on June 20, 2011, and June 21, 2011, were included in the study. None. Antibiotic orders were categorized as prophylactic, definitive, empiric, or prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy. Prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy was defined as empiric antibiotics that continued for at least 72 hours in the absence of adjudicated infection. Standard definitions from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were used to determine infection. Prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy rate was determined as the ratio of the total number of empiric antibiotics continued for at least 72 hours divided by the total number of empiric antibiotics. Univariate analysis of factors associated with the ICU prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy rate was conducted using Student t test. A total of 660 unique antibiotics were prescribed as empiric therapy to 364 patients. Of the empiric antibiotics, 333 of 660 (50%) were continued for at least 72 hours in instances where Centers for Disease Control and Prevention infection criteria were not met. Suspected pneumonia accounted for approximately 60% of empiric antibiotic use. The most frequently prescribed empiric antibiotics were vancomycin and piperacillin/tazobactam. ICUs that utilized invasive techniques for the diagnosis of ventilator-associated pneumonia had lower rates of prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy than those that did not, 45.1% versus 59.5% (p = 0.03). No other institutional factor was significantly associated with prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy rate. Half of all

  4. Influence of Clinical Communication on Parents' Antibiotic Expectations for Children With Respiratory Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Christie; Ingram, Jenny; Lucas, Patricia J; Redmond, Niamh M; Kai, Joe; Hay, Alastair D; Horwood, Jeremy

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand clinicians' and parents' perceptions of communication within consultations for respiratory tract infections (RTI) in children and what influence clinician communication had on parents' understanding of antibiotic treatment. We video recorded 60 primary care consultations for children aged 3 months to 12 years who presented with RTI and cough in 6 primary care practices in England. We then used purposive sampling to select 27 parents and 13 clinicians for semistructured video-elicitation interviews. The videos were used as prompts to investigate participants' understanding and views of communication within the consultations. We analyzed the interview data thematically. While clinicians commonly told parents that antibiotics are not effective against viruses, this did not have much impact on parents' beliefs about the need to consult or on their expectations concerning antibiotics. Parents believed that antibiotics were needed to treat more severe illnesses, a belief that was supported by the way clinicians accompanied viral diagnoses with problem-minimizing language and antibiotic prescriptions with more problem-oriented language. Antibiotic prescriptions tended to confirm parents' beliefs about what indicated illness severity, which often took into account the wider impact on a child's life. While parents understood antimicrobial resistance poorly, most held beliefs that supported reduced antibiotic prescribing. A minority attributed it to resource rationing, however. Clinician communication and prescribing behavior confirm parents' beliefs that antibiotics are needed to treat more severe illnesses. Interventions to reduce antibiotic expectations need to address communication within the consultation, prescribing behavior, and lay beliefs. © 2016 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  5. A national quality incentive scheme to reduce antibiotic overuse in hospitals: evaluation of perceptions and impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, J; Ashiru-Oredope, D; Budd, E; Howard, P; Walker, A S; Hopkins, S; Llewelyn, M J

    2018-02-28

    In 2016/2017, a financially linked antibiotic prescribing quality improvement initiative Commissioning for Quality and Innovation (AMR-CQUIN) was introduced across acute hospitals in England. This aimed for >1% reductions in DDDs/1000 admissions of total antibiotics, piperacillin/tazobactam and carbapenems compared with 2013/2014 and improved review of empirical antibiotic prescriptions. To assess perceptions of staff leading antimicrobial stewardship activity regarding the AMR-CQUIN, the investments made by hospitals to achieve it and how these related to achieving reductions in antibiotic use. We invited antimicrobial stewardship leads at acute hospitals across England to complete a web-based survey. Antibiotic prescribing data were downloaded from the PHE Antimicrobial Resistance Local Indicators resource. Responses were received from 116/155 (75%) acute hospitals. Owing to yearly increases in antibiotic use, most trusts needed to make >5% reductions in antibiotic consumption to achieve the AMR-CQUIN goal of 1% reduction. Additional funding was made available at 23/113 (20%) trusts and, in 18 (78%), this was trend for increased antibiotic use reversed in 2016/2017. In 2014/2015, year-on-year changes were +3.7% (IQR -0.8%, +8.4%), +9.4% (+0.2%, +19.5%) and +5.8% (-6.2%, +18.2%) for total antibiotics, piperacillin/tazobactam and carbapenems, respectively, and +0.1% (-5.4%, +4.0%), -4.8% (-16.9%, +3.2%) and -8.0% (-20.2%, +4.0%) in 2016/2017. Hospitals where staff believed they could reduce antibiotic use were more likely to do so (P < 0.001). Introducing the AMR-CQUIN was associated with a reduction in antibiotic use. For individual hospitals, achieving the AMR-CQUIN was associated with favourable perceptions of staff and not availability of funding.

  6. Trends in antibiotic treatment of acute otitis media and treatment failure in children, 2000-2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah J McGrath

    Full Text Available Guidelines to treat acute otitis media (AOM were published in 2004. Initial declines in prescribing were shown, but it's unknown if they were sustained. We examine trends in antibiotic dispensing patterns to treat AOM among a large population of children. We also document trends in antibiotic failure.Children aged 3 months to 12 years with an AOM diagnosis, enrolled in a commercial claims database between January 1, 2000-December 31, 2011 were included. Pharmacy claims within 7 days of diagnosis were searched for antibiotic prescriptions. Antibiotic failure was defined as a dispensing of a different antibiotic class within 2-18 days after the first prescription. We analyzed trends in antibiotic use and failure by class of antibiotic and year.We identified over 4 million children under 13 years with AOM. The proportion of antibiotic dispensing decreased from 66.0% in 2005 to 51.9% in 2007, after which the instances of dispensing rebounded to pre-guideline levels. However, levels began decreasing again in 2010 and the antibiotic use rate in 2011 was 57.6%. Cephalosporin prescriptions increased by 41.5% over eleven years. Antibiotic failure decreased slightly, and macrolides had the lowest proportion of failures, while all other classes had failure rates around 10%.In recent years, antibiotic dispensing to treat AOM remains high. In addition, the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics is increasing despite having a high rate of treatment failure. Overprescribing of antibiotics and use of non-penicillin therapy for AOM treatment could lead to the development of antibiotic-resistant infections.

  7. Nurse practitioner prescribing: an international perspective

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    Fong J

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Jacqueline Fong,1,2 Thomas Buckley,2 Andrew Cashin3 1St George Hospital, Kogarah, 2Sydney Nursing School, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia; 3School of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW, Australia Background: Internationally, the delivery of care provided by nurses and midwives has undergone a significant change due to a variety of interrelated factors, including economic circumstances, a diminishing number of medical providers, the unavailability of adequate health care services in underserved and rural areas, and growing specialization among the professions. One solution to the challenges of care delivery has been the introduction of nurse practitioners (NPs and the authorization of NPs to prescribe medicines. Aim: The aim of this paper was to review the current international literature related to NP prescribing and compare the findings to the Australian context. The review focuses on literature from the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. Methods: Databases were searched from January 2000 to January 2015. The following keywords: “nurse practitioner”, “advanced nurse”, “advanced practice nurse”, “prescri*”, “Australia”, “United States America”, “UK”, “New Zealand”, “Canada”, “Europe”, “drug prescri*”, “prescri* authority”, and “prescri* legislation” were used. Findings: NPs tend to prescribe in differing contexts of practice to provide care in underserved populations and require good systems literacy to practice across complex systems. The key themes identified internationally related to NP prescribing relate to barriers to prescribing, confidence in prescribing, and the unique role of NPs in prescribing medicines, eg, the high prevalence of prescribing pain medicines in several countries, including Australia. Conclusion: Across all countries reviewed, there appears a need for further research into the organizational and

  8. Antibiotics for acute bronchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Susan M; Fahey, Tom; Smucny, John; Becker, Lorne A

    2017-06-19

    The benefits and risks of antibiotics for acute bronchitis remain unclear despite it being one of the most common illnesses seen in primary care. To assess the effects of antibiotics in improving outcomes and to assess adverse effects of antibiotic therapy for people with a clinical diagnosis of acute bronchitis. We searched CENTRAL 2016, Issue 11 (accessed 13 January 2017), MEDLINE (1966 to January week 1, 2017), Embase (1974 to 13 January 2017), and LILACS (1982 to 13 January 2017). We searched the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov on 5 April 2017. Randomised controlled trials comparing any antibiotic therapy with placebo or no treatment in acute bronchitis or acute productive cough, in people without underlying pulmonary disease. At least two review authors extracted data and assessed trial quality. We did not identify any new trials for inclusion in this 2017 update. We included 17 trials with 5099 participants in the primary analysis. The quality of trials was generally good. At follow-up there was no difference in participants described as being clinically improved between the antibiotic and placebo groups (11 studies with 3841 participants, risk ratio (RR) 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.99 to 1.15). Participants given antibiotics were less likely to have a cough (4 studies with 275 participants, RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.49 to 0.85; number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) 6) and a night cough (4 studies with 538 participants, RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.54 to 0.83; NNTB 7). Participants given antibiotics had a shorter mean cough duration (7 studies with 2776 participants, mean difference (MD) -0.46 days, 95% CI -0.87 to -0.04). The differences in presence of a productive cough at follow-up and MD of productive cough did not reach statistical significance.Antibiotic-treated participants were more likely to be improved according to clinician's global assessment (6 studies

  9. Antibiotic resistance and therapeutic management of sepsis in a Malaysian public Hospital

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    Forouzan Bayat Nejad

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to document the microbial profile and pattern of use of antibiotics in the government hospital of Penang state, Malaysia. An audit was conducted in 2007 in the general medical ward of Hospital Pulau Pinang, Malaysia. The mortality rate was 54.22% with severesepsis or septicaemia. Mithicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus caused 37% of deaths, while 33% of deaths involved Klebsiella Spp. Commonly prescribed antibiotics included; cloxacillin 500mg (qid 20%, tazocin 2gm (bid1.1%, and vancomycin 1gm (od 27%. We report the useof high doses of antibiotics in the six months prior to anotable rise in resistant infections.

  10. Antibiotic prescription patterns for upper respiratory tract infections in the outpatient Qatari population in the private sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Adeel Ajwad; Navasero, Cristina S; Thomas, Bright; Marri, Salih Al; Katheeri, Huda Al; Thani, Asmaa Al; Khal, Abdullatif Al; Khan, Tasnim; Abou-Samra, Abdul-Badi

    2017-02-01

    Antibiotics are often inappropriately prescribed for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) in developed countries. Data on the proportion of inappropriate prescriptions are lacking from the Middle East and other developing countries. Health insurance claims for all antibiotics prescribed for URTIs in the private sector in the State of Qatar between May 2014 and December 2015 were retrieved. During the study period, health insurance was limited to Qatari nationals. Topical antibiotics were excluded. Data on the prescriber's specialty, as listed with the licensing authority, were also retrieved. Diagnoses were classified as appropriate or inappropriate based on the likelihood of a bacterial etiology that may warrant antibiotic use. A total of 75 733 claims were made during the study period. Of these, 41 556 (55%) were for an appropriate indication, while 34 177 (45%) were for an inappropriate indication. The most common antibiotic classes prescribed were cephalosporins (43% of claims; 44% inappropriate), penicillins (28% of claims; 44% inappropriate), macrolides (19% of claims; 52% inappropriate), and fluoroquinolones (9% of claims; 40% inappropriate). Nearly 5% of antibiotics were prescribed in intravenous formulations. The most common prescribers were General/Family Practice physicians (53% of claims; 50% inappropriate), followed by Pediatrics (18.6% of claims; 36% inappropriate) and Internal Medicine (14.1% of claims; 44% inappropriate). There is a high rate of inappropriate antibiotic prescription for acute URTIs in the private health care sector in the State of Qatar. Further studies are needed to determine the population-based rates across the country. Interventions to decrease inappropriate use in such settings are urgently needed. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. TAKEO SAWADA: UMA ANÁLISE DE SUA PRÁTICA DOCENTE NO CURSO “PINTURA INFANTIL COM CRIATIVIDADE” EM PRESIDENTE PRUDENTE

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    Denise Penna Quintanilha

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This research was made for developing an analysis of teaching methods used by the artist in his "Painting Children with creativity” course and their importance for the region. The Art Education issue has been placed in high priority within the education system in Brazil and it can greatly contribute to the analysis of the methods of the most respected Art teachers in the Presidente Prudente region, whose memory will be lost for lack of proper recording. The main objectives were the recovery and identification of methods of teaching Art used by the artist and art educator Takeo Sawada highlighting his work and teaching experience and analysis of its methodology, contextualizing it in the current teaching practice. The research was conducted with 10 former students, family and friends from Presidente Prudente and the methodology employed was the case study, through records and interviews focused. It can be observed that his attitude towards the students was based on a subtle and sometimes unnoticed presence that, given the difficulties, did not point directly to the solution but it made the student discover it. It is hoped that this research shows a pattern of conduct that can serve as educational scholarships for the training of future art teachers.

  12. The association between Western and Prudent dietary patterns and fasting blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetes and normal glucose metabolism in older Australian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Erin I; Jacka, Felice N; Butterworth, Peter; Anstey, Kaarin J; Cherbuin, Nicolas

    2017-06-01

    High blood glucose and type 2 diabetes are associated with a range of adverse health and cognitive outcomes. One factor that contributes to high blood glucose and type 2 diabetes is dietary intake. This study investigated the relationship between dietary patterns, fasting blood glucose and diabetes status in a sample of 209 participants aged 60-65. Blood plasma glucose was measured from venous blood samples. Individual Prudent and Western dietary patterns were estimated from a self-completed food frequency questionnaire. The relationship between dietary patterns, diabetes, and blood glucose was assessed via general linear model analyses controlling for age, sex, height, and total caloric intake. Results indicated that there was no association between Prudent diet and fasting blood glucose levels, or type 2 diabetes. In contrast, an individual in the upper tertile for Western dietary score had a significantly higher risk of having diabetes than an individual in the lower tertile for Western dietary score. However, there was no significant association between Western diet and fasting blood glucose. Western diet may be associated with type 2 diabetes through mechanisms beyond impacting blood plasma glucose directly. The fact that the association between Western diet and type 2 diabetes remained even when total caloric intake was controlled for highlights the need for policy and population health interventions targeting the reduction of unhealthy food consumption.

  13. ESTRATÉGIAS DE MARKETING NA INDÚSTRIA DE ALIMENTOS: O CASO DOS FRIGORÍFICOS NA REGIÃO DE PRESIDENTE PRUDENTE-SP

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    João Guilherme de Camargo Ferraz Machado

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desse trabalho foi analisar as estratégias de marketing e comunicação dos frigoríficos na região de Presidente Prudente-SP, visando melhorar a competitividade do setor e de toda a cadeia produtiva, identificando as principais estratégias relacionadas ao composto mercadológico. A coleta de dados se deu por meio de entrevistas semi-estruturadas, aplicadas em dois frigoríficos da região de Presidente Prudente-SP. Observou-se que as estratégias do composto mercadológico das empresas do setor sofrem poucas variações, em função das características dos produtos e do público-alvo dessas empresas. Também foi verificado um distanciamento entre as empresas e o consumidor final, no que diz respeito às práticas de marketing e comunicação, podendo ser responsável por um desconhecimento, por parte das empresas, das necessidades e dos hábitos de consumo do consumidor final.

  14. The multifaceted roles of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in nature

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    Saswati eSengupta

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are chemotherapeutic agents, which have been a very powerful tool in the clinical management of bacterial diseases since the 1940s. However, benefits offered by these magic bullets have been substantially lost in subsequent days following the widespread emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistant strains. While it is obvious that excessive and imprudent use of antibiotics significantly contributes to the emergence of resistant strains, antibiotic-resistance is also observed in natural bacteria of remote places unlikely to be impacted by human intervention. Both antibiotic biosynthetic genes and resistance-conferring genes have been known to evolve billions of years ago, long before clinical use of antibiotics. Hence it appears that antibiotics and antibiotics resistance determinants have some other roles in nature, which often elude our attention because of overemphasis on the therapeutic importance of antibiotics and the crisis imposed by the antibiotic-resistance in pathogens. In the natural milieu, antibiotics are often found to be present in subinhibitory concentrations acting as signalling molecules supporting quorum sensing and biofilm formation. They also play an important role in the production of virulence factors and influence host-parasite interactions (e.g., phagocytosis, adherence to the target cell and so on. The evolutionary and ecological aspects of antibiotics and antibiotic-resistance in the naturally occurring microbial community are little understood. Therefore, the actual role of antibiotics in nature warrants in-depth investigations. Studies on such an intriguing behaviour of the microorganisms promise insight into the intricacies of the microbial physiology and are likely to provide some lead in controlling the emergence and subsequent dissemination of antibiotic resistance. This article highlights some of the recent findings on the role of antibiotics and genes that confer resistance to antibiotics in

  15. Respiratory Infections and Antibiotic Usage in Common Variable Immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperlich, Johannes M; Grimbacher, Bodo; Workman, Sarita; Haque, Tanzina; Seneviratne, Suranjith L; Burns, Siobhan O; Reiser, Veronika; Vach, Werner; Hurst, John R; Lowe, David M

    Patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) suffer frequent respiratory tract infections despite immunoglobulin replacement and are prescribed significant quantities of antibiotics. The clinical and microbiological nature of these exacerbations, the symptomatic triggers to take antibiotics, and the response to treatment have not been previously investigated. To describe the nature, frequency, treatment, and clinical course of respiratory tract exacerbations in patients with CVID and to describe pathogens isolated during respiratory tract exacerbations. We performed a prospective diary card exercise in 69 patients with CVID recruited from a primary immunodeficiency clinic in the United Kingdom, generating 6210 days of symptom data. We collected microbiology (sputum microscopy and culture, atypical bacterial PCR, and mycobacterial culture) and virology (nasopharyngeal swab multiplex PCR) samples from symptomatic patients with CVID. There were 170 symptomatic exacerbations and 76 exacerbations treated by antibiotics. The strongest symptomatic predictors for commencing antibiotics were cough, shortness of breath, and purulent sputum. There was a median delay of 5 days from the onset of symptoms to commencing antibiotics. Episodes characterized by purulent sputum responded more quickly to antibiotics, whereas sore throat and upper respiratory tract symptoms responded less quickly. A pathogenic virus was isolated in 56% of respiratory exacerbations and a potentially pathogenic bacteria in 33%. Patients with CVID delay and avoid treatment of symptomatic respiratory exacerbations, which could result in structural lung damage. However, viruses are commonly represented and illnesses dominated by upper respiratory tract symptoms respond poorly to antibiotics, suggesting that antibiotic usage could be better targeted. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. All rights reserved.

  16. Global shortage of neonatal and paediatric antibiotic trials: rapid review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Georgina; Barker, Charlotte I; Folgori, Laura; Bielicki, Julia A; Bradley, John S; Lutsar, Irja; Sharland, Mike

    2017-10-13

    There have been few clinical trials (CTs) on antibiotics that inform neonatal and paediatric drug labelling. The rate of unlicensed and off-label prescribing in paediatrics remains high. It is unclear whether the current neonatal and paediatric antibiotic research pipeline is adequate to inform optimal drug dosing. Using the ClinicalTrials.gov registry, this review aims to establish the current global status of antibiotic CTs in children up to 18 years of age. Studies were identified using key word searches of the ClinicalTrials.gov registry and were manually filtered using prespecified inclusion/exclusion criteria. 76 registered open CTs of antibiotics in children were identified globally; 23 (30%) were recruiting newborns (only 8 (11%) included preterm neonates), 52 (68%) infants and toddlers, 58 (76%) children and 54 (71%) adolescents. The majority of registered trials were late phase (10 (15%) phase 3 and 23 (35%) phase 4/pharmacovigilance). Two-thirds were sponsored by non-profit organisations, compared with pharmaceutical companies (50 (66%) vs 26 (34%), respectively). A greater proportion of non-profit funded trials were efficacy-based strategic trials (n=34, 68%), in comparison with industry-led trials, which were most often focused on safety or pharmacokinetic data (n=17, 65%). Only 2 of the 37 antibiotics listed on the May 2016 Pew Charitable Trusts antibiotic development pipeline, currently being studied in adults, appear to be currently recruiting in open paediatric CTs. This review highlights that very few paediatric antibiotic CTs are being conducted globally, especially in neonates. There is a striking disparity noted between antibiotic drug development programmes in adults and children. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Modeling of outpatient prescribing process in iran: a gateway toward electronic prescribing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Samadbeik, Mahnaz; Sadoughi, Farahnaz

    2014-01-01

    Implementation of electronic prescribing system can overcome many problems of the paper prescribing system, and provide numerous opportunities of more effective and advantageous prescribing. Successful implementation of such a system requires complete and deep understanding of work content, human force, and workflow of paper prescribing. The current study was designed in order to model the current business process of outpatient prescribing in Iran and clarify different actions during this process. In order to describe the prescribing process and the system features in Iran, the methodology of business process modeling and analysis was used in the present study. The results of the process documentation were analyzed using a conceptual model of workflow elements and the technique of modeling "As-Is" business processes. Analysis of the current (as-is) prescribing process demonstrated that Iran stood at the first levels of sophistication in graduated levels of electronic prescribing, namely electronic prescription reference, and that there were problematic areas including bottlenecks, redundant and duplicated work, concentration of decision nodes, and communicative weaknesses among stakeholders of the process. Using information technology in some activities of medication prescription in Iran has not eliminated the dependence of the stakeholders on paper-based documents and prescriptions. Therefore, it is necessary to implement proper system programming in order to support change management and solve the problems in the existing prescribing process. To this end, a suitable basis should be provided for reorganization and improvement of the prescribing process for the future electronic systems.

  18. Understanding the determinants of antimicrobial prescribing within hospitals: the role of "prescribing etiquette".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charani, E; Castro-Sanchez, E; Sevdalis, N; Kyratsis, Y; Drumright, L; Shah, N; Holmes, A

    2013-07-01

    There is limited knowledge of the key determinants of antimicrobial prescribing behavior (APB) in hospitals. An understanding of these determinants is required for the successful design, adoption, and implementation of quality improvement interventions in antimicrobial stewardship programs. Qualitative semistructured interviews were conducted with doctors (n = 10), pharmacists (n = 10), and nurses and midwives (n = 19) in 4 hospitals in London. Interviews were conducted until thematic saturation was reached. Thematic analysis was applied to the data to identify the key determinants of antimicrobial prescribing behaviors. The APB of healthcare professionals is governed by a set of cultural rules. Antimicrobial prescribing is performed in an environment where the behavior of clinical leaders or seniors influences practice of junior doctors. Senior doctors consider themselves exempt from following policy and practice within a culture of perceived autonomous decision making that relies more on personal knowledge and experience than formal policy. Prescribers identify with the clinical groups in which they work and adjust their APB according to the prevailing practice within these groups. A culture of "noninterference" in the antimicrobial prescribing practice of peers prevents intervention into prescribing of colleagues. These sets of cultural rules demonstrate the existence of a "prescribing etiquette," which dominates the APB of healthcare professionals. Prescribing etiquette creates an environment in which professional hierarchy and clinical groups act as key determinants of APB. To influence the antimicrobial prescribing of individual healthcare professionals, interventions need to address prescribing etiquette and use clinical leadership within existing clinical groups to influence practice.

  19. Prescribing Practices and Polypharmacy in Kitovu Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    1Division of Medicine and Therapeutics, Centre for Medical Education, The Queen's ... This audit of prescribing practices explores recent trends at Kitovu Hospital, Uganda ..... This creates a cycle of poor ... interventions to remedy these is vital.

  20. The social act of electronic medication prescribing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E.C.M. Aarts (Jos)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Prescribing medication is embedded in social norms and cultures. In modern Western health care professionals and policy makers have attempted to rationalize medicine by addressing cost-effectiveness of diagnostic and therapeutic treatments and the development of

  1. Customization in prescribing for bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkin, Dominic; Volpe-Vartanian, Joanna; Merrick, Elizabeth L; Horgan, Constance M; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Frank, Richard G; Lee, Sue

    2012-06-01

    For many disorders, patient heterogeneity requires physicians to customize their treatment to each patient's needs. We test for the existence of customization in physicians' prescribing for bipolar disorder, using data from a naturalistic clinical effectiveness trial of bipolar disorder treatment (STEP-BD), which did not constrain physician prescribing. Multinomial logit is used to model the physician's choice among five combinations of drug classes. We find that our observed measure of the patient's clinical status played only a limited role in the choice among drug class combinations, even for conditions such as mania that are expected to affect class choice. However, treatment of a patient with given characteristics differed widely depending on which physician was seen. The explanatory power of the model was low. There was variation within each physician's prescribing, but the results do not suggest a high degree of customization in physicians' prescribing, based on our measure of clinical status. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. A computerized education module improves patient knowledge and attitudes about appropriate antibiotic use for acute respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Erika Leemann; Mackenzie, Thomas D; Metlay, Joshua P; Camargo, Carlos A; Gonzales, Ralph

    2011-12-01

    Over-use of antibiotics for acute respiratory infections (ARIs) increases antimicrobial resistance, treatment costs, and side effects. Patient desire for antibiotics contributes to over-use. To explore whether a point-of-care interactive computerized education module increases patient knowledge and decreases desire for antibiotics. Bilingual (English/Spanish) interactive kiosks were available in 8 emergency departments as part of a multidimensional intervention to reduce antibiotic prescribing for ARIs. The symptom-tailored module included assessment of symptoms, knowledge about ARIs (3 items), and desire for antibiotics on a 10-point visual analog scale. Multivariable analysis assessed predictors of change in desire for antibiotics. Of 686 adults with ARI symptoms, 63% initially thought antibiotics might help. The proportion of patients with low (1-3 on the scale) desire for antibiotics increased from 22% pre-module to 49% post-module (pknowledge about antibiotics and ARIs. Learning correlated with changes in personal desire for antibiotics. By reducing desire for antibiotics, point-of-care interactive educational computer technology may help decrease inappropriate use for antibiotics for ARIs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nurse prescribing ethics and medical marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J

    This article suggests that nurse prescribers require an awareness of key concepts in ethics, such as deontology and utilitarianism to reflect on current debates and contribute to them. The principles of biomedical ethics have also been influential in the development of professional codes of conduct. Attention is drawn to the importance of the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry's code of practice for the pharmaceutical industry in regulating marketing aimed at prescribers.

  4. Prevalence of inappropriate prescribing in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnhøj, Lisbeth; Thirstrup, Steffen; Kristensen, Mogens Brandt

    2007-01-01

    to the patients. Topical, dermatological medications and medications not used regularly were excluded. RESULTS: 212 patients were prescribed 1621 medications by their GPs at baseline. In all, 640 (39.5%) of the medications had one or more inappropriate ratings in the 10 criteria making up the MAI. The main part...... is good. However, the majority of patients used one or more medications with inappropriate ratings. The inappropriate prescribing relates to specific therapeutic groups and criteria, which should be targeted in future interventions....

  5. Estimating the effect of treatment rate changes when treatment benefits are heterogeneous: antibiotics and otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Tae-Ryong; Brooks, John M; Chrischilles, Elizabeth A; Bergus, George

    2008-01-01

    Contrast methods to assess the health effects of a treatment rate change when treatment benefits are heterogeneous across patients. Antibiotic prescribing for children with otitis media (OM) in Iowa Medicaid is the empirical example. Instrumental variable (IV) and linear probability model (LPM) are used to estimate the effect of antibiotic treatments on cure probabilities for children with OM in Iowa Medicaid. Local area physician supply per capita is the instrument in the IV models. Estimates are contrasted in terms of their ability to make inferences for patients whose treatment choices may be affected by a change in population treatment rates. The instrument was positively related to the probability of being prescribed an antibiotic. LPM estimates showed a positive effect of antibiotics on OM patient cure probability while IV estimates showed no relationship between antibiotics and patient cure probability. Linear probability model estimation yields the average effects of the treatment on patients that were treated. IV estimation yields the average effects for patients whose treatment choices were affected by the instrument. As antibiotic treatment effects are heterogeneous across OM patients, our estimates from these approaches are aligned with clinical evidence and theory. The average estimate for treated patients (higher severity) from the LPM model is greater than estimates for patients whose treatment choices are affected by the instrument (lower severity) from the IV models. Based on our IV estimates it appears that lowering antibiotic use in OM patients in Iowa Medicaid did not result in lost cures.

  6. Antibiotic-associated diarrhea and the older dental patient: how do dentists respond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwetchkenbaum, Samuel R; Overbeck, Kevin J; Pomerantz, Sherry C

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal complications from antibiotic use, including Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), can have significant morbidity, especially among older patients. This descriptive study surveyed dentists to find out how they would respond to a patient with signs indicating potential CDI. A survey on prescribing medications for older patients was mailed to 1,000 dentists in New Jersey. Questions were asked regarding antibiotic selection, probiotic use, and approach to a patient scenario of diarrhea after antibiotic use. Respondents chose amoxicillin most frequently as an antibiotic, and clindamycin if penicillin allergy. When informed their patients had diarrhea, 64.5% advised them to stop the antibiotic. If the patient continued to have diarrhea on follow-up, 75.5% contacted the patient's physician. Most (61.6%) do not prescribe probiotics prophylactically. Most dentists respond appropriately to antibiotic-associated diarrhea in advising to stop the antibiotic, and seeking physician involvement if no improvement, but there are still many who make recommendations that could delay appropriate care. Dentists may wish to learn more about benefits of probiotics. © 2015 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems: State of the science

    Science.gov (United States)

    We propose a simple causal model depicting relationships involved in dissemination of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems and potential effects on human health, functioning of natural ecosystems, and agricultural productivity. Available evidence for each causal link is briefly su...

  8. The social act of electronic medication prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, Jos

    2013-01-01

    Prescribing medication is embedded in social norms and cultures. In modern Western health care professionals and policy makers have attempted to rationalize medicine by addressing cost-effectiveness of diagnostic and therapeutic treatments and the development of guidelines and protocols based on the outcomes of clinical studies. These notions of cost-effectiveness and evidence-based medicine have also been embedded in technology such as electronic prescribing systems. Such constraining systems may clash with the reality of clinical practice, where formal boundaries of responsibility and authorization are often blurred. Such systems may therefore even impede patient care. Medication is seen as the essence of medical practice. Prescribing is a social act. In a hospital medications may be aimed at treating a patient for a specific condition, in primary care the professional often meets the patient with her or his social and cultural notions of a health problem. The author argues that the design and implementation of electronic prescribing systems should address the social and cultural context of prescribing. Especially in primary care, where health problems are often ill defined and evidence-based medicine guidelines do not always work as intended, studies need to take into account the sociotechnical character of electronic prescribing systems.

  9. Overdosing on Antibiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Du, a Beijing resident in her 60s, believes that an antibiotic is a panacea for the maladies of her now 6-year-old grand- daughter Guoguo. Du began to take care of her granddaugh- ter since the child was merely 2 months old, for the gid's parents were busy. She is comfortable with her caretaker duties except when the girl runs high fevers. Then, the anxious grandma will feed the girl antibiotics or take her to a private child clinic nearby for intravenous infusion.

  10. Antibiotics in Animal Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcão, Amílcar C.

    The administration of antibiotics to animals to prevent or treat diseases led us to be concerned about the impact of these antibiotics on human health. In fact, animal products could be a potential vehicle to transfer drugs to humans. Using appropri ated mathematical and statistical models, one can predict the kinetic profile of drugs and their metabolites and, consequently, develop preventive procedures regarding drug transmission (i.e., determination of appropriate withdrawal periods). Nevertheless, in the present chapter the mathematical and statistical concepts for data interpretation are strictly given to allow understanding of some basic pharma-cokinetic principles and to illustrate the determination of withdrawal periods

  11. Comparison of Procalcitonin Guidance-Administered Antibiotics with Standard Guidelines on Antibiotic Therapy in Children with Lower Respiratory Tract Infections: A Retrospective Study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guo; Wu, Gao; Wu, Shuxie; Wu, Hanbin

    2017-01-01

    To establish the efficacy of an algorithm based on the biomarker procalcitonin (PCT) to reduce antibiotic exposure in pediatric patients with lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). The clinical data of 357 patients (standard group (n = 174) using SAS 9.1.3 software. The overall adverse effect rates were similar in both the PCT and standard groups: 42 (22.95%) and 51 (29.31%), respectively. The length of hospital stay was not significantly different between the PCT (9.96 ± 5.81 days) and standard groups (10.58 ± 4.24 days) (difference: -0.62%; 95% CI: -1.68 to 0.43). Antibiotic prescribing rates were significantly different in the PCT group compared to the standard group: 54.64% versus 83.91% (difference: -29.26%; 95% CI: -38.31, -20.22; p = 0.23). Mean duration of antibiotic exposure in the PCT group (3.98 ± 2.17 days) was lower than the standard groups (6.66 ± 5.59 days) (difference: -2.68%; 95% CI: -3.21 to -2.16). This study showed that PCT guidance of antibiotic treatment in children and adolescents with LRTI reduced the duration of antibiotic exposure and antibiotic prescribing rates, but did not affect the adverse effect rate and length of hospital stay. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Internet and social media use for antibiotic-related information seeking: Findings from a survey among adult population in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucco, Rossella; Lavano, Francesco; Anfosso, Rosa; Bianco, Aida; Pileggi, Claudia; Pavia, Maria

    2018-03-01

    The Internet represents an increasingly common source of health-related information. Internet and Social Media can be used to promote a prudent use of antibiotics. To establish the extent of Internet and Social Media use to search for antibiotic related information and the potential implications in health care among adult population in Italy. This cross-sectional study was conducted from March to May 2017, among a sample of parents of public school students. A 2-stage cluster sample design was planned. An informed consent form and a questionnaire were given to selected students to deliver to their parents. The questionnaire included questions on knowledge, attitudes, and behavior toward antibiotic use, and questions about Internet use to gather information about antibiotics. A total of 913 parents completed the questionnaire, with a 67.4% response rate; 22.1% did not know when it was appropriate to use antibiotics. 32.3% of parents reported self-medication with antibiotics. 73.4% of respondents used the Internet to search for information about antibiotic use. Among social networks users, 46.5% reported the use of these media to get information about antibiotics and 45% of instant messaging app users share information about antibiotics. The results of the multiple logistic regression analysis showed that Internet use to search for antibiotic-related information was higher among females, younger subjects, with a higher level of education, in those who reported self-medication with antibiotics and in those who needed additional information on side effects of antibiotics from the GP compared with those who did not need any additional information. Internet use was significantly less likely in participants with cardiovascular diseases and cancer compared with those without chronic conditions, and in those who reported to strongly agree/agree, or were uncertain about antibiotic use without a GP prescription, compared with those who reported to be disagree

  13. Maternal antibiotic exposure during pregnancy and hospitalization with infection in offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Jessica Eden; Wu, Chunsen; Pedersen, Lars Henning

    2018-01-01

    not receive pre-hospitalization antibiotics, this association was present only in those born vaginally. Higher risks of infection-related hospitalization occurred when pregnancy antibiotic prescriptions were closer to birth and in mothers receiving more pregnancy antibiotics. Children born to mothers exposed...... hospitalization with infection. Methods: We used population-based Danish national databases for pregnancies between 1995 and 2009. Infants were followed from birth until their first infection-related hospitalization, death, 14th birthday, emigration or end-2009. Exposure was maternal antibiotics prescribed before...... and during pregnancy. Outcome was infection-related hospitalization. Results: 141 359 (18%) mothers had at least one antibiotic prescription during pregnancy, 230 886 (29.4% of those with complete data) in the 18 months before pregnancy. Of 776 657 live-born singletons, 443 546 infection...

  14. Risk of resistance related to antibiotic use before admission in patients with community-acquired bacteraemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Gitte; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Steffensen, Flemming Hald

    1999-01-01

    %), Streptococcus pneumoniae (23%) Staphylococcus aureus (10%). Of the 575 isolates of E. coli, 425 (74%), 432 (75%) and 518 (90%) were susceptible to ampicillin, sulphonamides and trimethoprim, respectively. Previous antibiotic prescriptions were strongly associated with resistance to ampicillin, sulphonamides...... and trimethoprim in E. coli. The association was less pronounced for S. aureus and enteric rods other than E. coli. Antibiotic prescriptions within the last 3 months predicted antibiotic resistance, and this should be taken into account when selecting empirical antibiotic therapy of severe community...... admission and to 37% during the 6 months. The most frequently prescribed antibiotics within 30 days were ampicillin (28%), penicillin G (27%), sulphonamides and/or trimethoprim (16%) and macrolides (14%). The most frequent blood isolates were Escherichia coli (33%), other Enterobacteriaceae 8...