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Sample records for prsv resistant transgenic

  1. Protection and coexistence of conventional papaya productions with PRSV resistant transgenic papaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) is a devastating disease that has a detrimental impact on both commercial papaya production and Caricaceae germplasm conservation. Transgenic line 55-1 and derived progeny ‘SunUp’ and ‘Rainbow’ are resistant to PRSV and have saved the papaya industry in Hawaii. In small...

  2. Isolation and Characterisation of PRSV-P Resistance Genes in Carica and Vasconcellea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Razean Haireen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Papaya (Carica papaya L. is one of the major tropical fruit crops worldwide, but it is limited throughout its range by papaya ringspot virus type P (PRSV-P. Previous genetic studies identified a functional PRSV-P resistance marker in a mapping population of F2 plants of Vasconcellea pubescens (resistant to PRSV-P × Vasconcellea parviflora (susceptible to PRSV-P and showed that the marker exhibited homology to a serine threonine protein kinase (STK gene. Full length cDNAs of putative PRSV-P resistance genes designated CP_STK from C. papaya and VP_STK1 and VP_STK2 from V. pubescens were cloned by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE. Due to a frame-shift mutation, the two homologous sequences are transcribed and edited differently such that the gene product in V. pubescens is two separate transcripts, whereas in C. papaya they are fused into a single message. A peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS2 present in VP_STK2 but absent in the other transcripts may be the functional source of PRSV resistance in V. pubescens. The STK gene from V. pubescens may have been derived from an alternative splicing to confer resistance. The putative resistance gene, VP_STK2, that was identified in this study is a potential new source of PRSV-P resistance for papaya genotypes.

  3. Influence of coat protein transgene copy number on resistance in transgenic line 63-1 against Papaya ringspot virus isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, M.T.; Níckel, O.; Gonsalves, D.

    2005-01-01

    Line 63-1 is a 'Sunset'-derived transgenic papaya expressing the coat protein (CP) gene from a mild mutant of a Hawaiian isolate of Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). Previous work showed that line 63-1 R, plants exhibited a range of resistance to severe PRSV isolates from Hawaii (HA), Jamaica (JA),

  4. Line 63-1: A New Virus-resistant Transgenic Papaya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tennant, P.; Souza, M.T.; Fitch, M.M.; Manshardt, R.; Slightom, J.L.; Gonsalves, D.

    2005-01-01

    The disease resistance of a transgenic line expressing the coat protein (CP) gene of the mild strain of the papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) from Hawaii was further analyzed against PRSV isolates from Hawaii and other geographical regions. Line 63-1 originated from the same transformation experiment

  5. Nucleotide Sequence-Homology-Independent Breakdown of Transgenic Resistance by More Virulent Virus Strains and a Potential Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Kung, Yi-Jung; You, Bang-Jau; Raja, Joseph A. J.; Chen, Kuan-Chun; Huang, Chiung-Huei; Bau, Huey-Jiunn; Yang, Ching-Fu; Huang, Chung-Hao; Chang, Chung-Ping; Yeh, Shyi-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Controlling plant viruses by genetic engineering, including the globally important Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV), mainly involves coat protein (CP) gene mediated resistance via post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). However, the breakdown of single- or double-virus resistance in CP-gene-transgenic papaya by more virulent PRSV strains has been noted in repeated field trials. Recombination analysis revealed that the gene silencing suppressor HC-Pro or CP of the virulent PRSV strain 5-19 is ...

  6. Combining ability of summer-squash lines with different degrees of parthenocarpy and PRSV-W resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Willian Nogueira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to assess heterosis in a set of 16 summer-squash hybrids, and evaluate the combining capacity of the respective parental lines, which differed as to the degree of parthenocarpy and resistance to PRSV-W (Papaya Ringspot Virus-Watermelon strain. The hybrids were obtained using a partial diallel cross design (4 x 4. The lines of parental group I were 1 = ABX-037G-77-03-05-01-01-bulk, 2 = ABX-037G-77-03-05-03-10-bulk, 3 = ABX-037G77-03-05-01-04-bulk and 4 = ABX-037G-77-03-05-05-01-bulk, and of group II, 1' = ABX-037G-77-03-05-04-08-bulk, 2' = ABX-037G-77-03-05-02-11-bulk, 3' = Clarice and 4' = Caserta. The 16 hybrids and eight parental lines were evaluated for PRSV-W resistance, parthenocarpic expression and yield in randomized complete-block designs, with three replications. Parthenocarpy and the resistance to PRSV-W were rated by means of a scale from 1 to 5, where 1 = non-parthenocarpic or high resistance to PRSV-W, and 5 = parthenocarpic or high susceptibility to PRSV-W. Both additive and non-additive gene effects were important in the expression of parthenocarpy and resistance to PRSV-W. Whereas estimates of heterosis in parthenocarpy usually tended towards a higher degree, resistance to PRSV-W was towards higher susceptibility. At least one F1 hybrid was identified with a satisfactory degree of parthenocarpy, resistance to PRSV-W and high fruit-yield.

  7. Inheritance of resistance to papaya ringspot virus-watermelon strain (PRSV-W in ‘Whitaker’ summer squash line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cícero B Menezes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the genetic control of the PRSV-W (Papaya Ringspot Virus – Watermelon Strain resistance in Cucurbita pepo ‘Whitaker’ line. Plants of parental lines Whitaker (resistant and Caserta (susceptible, and of the generations F1, F2, BC11 and BC12 were evaluated for their reactions to PRSV-W. Caserta plants showed severe mosaic symptoms, while Whitaker grew vigorously and remained almost totally symptom-free. Most of the F1, F2and backcross plants also presented severe mosaic symptoms. Data were used to test a hypothesis of monogenic inheritance under different presumed degrees of dominance, and genetic models were tested using maximum likelihood tests of genetic control. Broad-sense heritability was of 0.57 for the first evaluation. Resistance to PRSV-W in C. pepo ‘Whitaker’ is due to a major gene effect summed to polygenic effects.

  8. Resistance to papaya ringspot virus-watermelon strain (PRSV-W) in the desert watermelon Citrullus colocynthis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bitter desert watermelon (Citrullus colocynthis) is a valuable source for improving disease or pest resistance in watermelon cultivars. The objective of this study was to identify C. colocynthis accessions displaying resistance to the papaya ringspot virus-watermelon strain (PRSV-W) that could ...

  9. Assaying for pollen drift from transgenic Rainbow to nontransgenic Kapoho papaya under commercial and experimental field conditions in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 1992 papaya ringpsot virus (PRSV) was discovered in Puna district of Hawaii Island where 95% of the state of Hawaii’s papaya was being grown. By 1998 production in Puna had decreased 50% from 1998 levels. A PRSV-resistant transgenic papaya ‘Rainbow’ expressing the coat protein gene of PRSV was ...

  10. Determining sex and screening for the adventitious presence of transgenic material in Carica papaya L. seed germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaya Ringspot Virus (PRSV) is a devastating disease that has a detrimental impact on both commercial papaya production and Caricaceae germplasm conservation. The PRSV coat protein transgenic line 55-1 and derived progeny are resistant to PRSV and have saved the papaya industry in Hawaii. However,...

  11. Sequence similarity between the cp gene and the transgene in transgenic papayas = Similaridade de seqüência entre o gene cp do vírus e do transgene presente em mamoeiros transgênicos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, M.T.; Teixeira, M.; Gonsalves, D.

    2005-01-01

    The Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) coat protein transgene present in 'Rainbow' and 'SunUp' papayas disclose high sequence similarity (>89%) to the cp gene from PRSV BR and TH. Despite this, both isolates are able to break down the resistance in 'Rainbow', while only the latter is able to do so in

  12. Potential threat of a new pathotype of Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus infecting transgenic papaya resistant to Papaya ringspot virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bau, H-J; Kung, Y-J; Raja, J A J; Chan, S-J; Chen, K-C; Chen, Y-K; Wu, H-W; Yeh, S-D

    2008-07-01

    A virus identified as a new pathotype of Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV, P-TW-WF) was isolated from diseased papaya in an isolated test-field in central Taiwan, where transgenic papaya lines resistant to Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) were evaluated. The infected plants displayed severe mosaic, distortion and shoe-stringing on leaves; stunting in apex; and water-soaking on petioles and stems. This virus, which did not react in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with the antiserum to the PRSV coat protein, infected only papaya, but not the other 18 plant species tested. Virions studied under electron microscope exhibited morphology and dimensions of potyvirus particles. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction conducted using potyvirus-specific primers generated a 1,927-nucleotide product corresponding to the 3' region of a potyvirus, showing high sequence identity to the CP gene and 3' noncoding region of PLDMV. Search for similar isolates with the antiserum against CP of P-TW-WF revealed scattered occurrence of PLDMV in Taiwan. Phylogenetic analysis of PLDMV isolates of Taiwan and Japan indicated that the Taiwan isolates belong to a separate genetic cluster. Since all the Taiwan isolates infected only papaya, unlike the cucurbit-infecting Japanese P type isolates, the Taiwan isolates are considered a new pathotype of PLDMV. Susceptibility of all our PRSV-resistant transgenic papaya lines to PLDMV indicates that the virus is an emerging threat for the application of PRSV-resistant transgenic papaya in Taiwan and elsewhere.

  13. Broad virus resistance in transgenic plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, M.W.

    2003-01-01

    Viruses are significant threats to agricultural crops worldwide and the limited sources of natural resistance warrant the development of novel resistance sources. Several methods of transgenic protection have been successfully applied, including protein- and RNA-mediated approaches. Increased

  14. Insect-resistant transgenic Pinus radiata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Lynette J; Charity, Julia A; Gresham, Belinda; Kay, Nod; Walter, Christian

    2005-05-01

    Transgenic radiata pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) plants containing a Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin gene, crylAc, were produced by means of biolistic transformation of embryogenic tissue. Using the selectable marker gene nptII and corresponding geneticin selection, 20 independent transgenic lines from five genotypes were established. Over 200 plants regenerated from ten transgenic lines were successfully transferred to soil. The integration and expression of the introduced genes in transgenic tissue and/or plants were confirmed by PCR, Southern hybridisation and neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPTII) and Bt ELISA assays. Bioassays with larvae of the painted apple moth, Teia anartoides, demonstrated that transgenic plants displayed variable levels of resistance to insect damage, with one transgenic line being highly resistant to feeding damage.

  15. Screening of Transgenic Citrus for HLB Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Dutt, M.; Omar, A.; Barthe, G. A.; Orbovic, V.; Irey, M.; Grosser, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic citrus scion (mostly grapefruit and sweet orange) and rootstock cultivars (Carrizo and experimental complex tetraploids) were transformed with gene(s) encoding antimicrobial peptides or systemic acquired resistance (SAR) proteins. Each transgene was under control of an enhanced CaMV 35S promoter. Several genes were also under control of a phloem specific Arabidopsis SUC2 (AtSUC2) promoter.  A number of clones of each transgenic line (at least 3 replicate plants per clone) were eval...

  16. Strategies for antiviral resistance in transgenic plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, M.W.; Laimer, M.; Noris, E.; Schubert, J.; Wassenegger, M.; Tepfer, M.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic engineering offers a means of incorporating new virus resistance traits into existing desirable plant cultivars. The initial attempts to create transgenes conferring virus resistance were based on the pathogen-derived resistance concept. The expression of the viral coat protein gene in

  17. Transgenic animals resistant to infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiley, L

    2016-04-01

    The list of transgenic animals developed to test ways of producing livestock resistant to infectious disease continues to grow. Although the basic techniques for generating transgenic animals have not changed very much in the ten years since they were last reviewed for the World Organisation for Animal Health, one recent fundamental technological advance stands to revolutionise genome engineering. The advent of technically simple and efficient site-specific gene targeting has profound implications for genetically modifying livestock species.

  18. Toxins for Transgenic Resistance to Hemipteran Pests

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    Bryony C. Bonning

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The sap sucking insects (Hemiptera, which include aphids, whiteflies, plant bugs and stink bugs, have emerged as major agricultural pests. The Hemiptera cause direct damage by feeding on crops, and in some cases indirect damage by transmission of plant viruses. Current management relies almost exclusively on application of classical chemical insecticides. While the development of transgenic crops expressing toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt has provided effective plant protection against some insect pests, Bt toxins exhibit little toxicity against sap sucking insects. Indeed, the pest status of some Hemiptera on Bt-transgenic plants has increased in the absence of pesticide application. The increased pest status of numerous hemipteran species, combined with increased prevalence of resistance to chemical insecticides, provides impetus for the development of biologically based, alternative management strategies. Here, we provide an overview of approaches toward transgenic resistance to hemipteran pests.

  19. Transgenic strategies for improving rice disease resistance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-04

    May 4, 2009 ... Review. Transgenic strategies for improving rice disease resistance. Huijuan Zhang, Guojun Li, Wei Li and Fengming Song*. State Key Laboratory for Rice Biology, Institute of Biotechnology, Zhejiang University-Huajiachi Campus, Hangzhou,. Zhejiang 310029, P.R. .... In RTBV-ODs2 line, RTBV DNA.

  20. Toxicity assessment of transgenic papaya ringspot virus of 823-2210 line papaya fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-Tang; Yen, Gow-Chin; Huang, Ting-Tzu; Chan, Lit-Fu; Cheng, Ying-Huey; Wu, Jhaol-Huei; Yeh, Shyi-Dong; Wang, Sheng-Yang; Liao, Jiunn-Wang

    2013-02-20

    The transgenic papaya is a valuable strategy for creating plants resistant to papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) infection and increasing production. This study was further performed to evaluate the comparative toxicity effects of the newly developed transgenic line of the fruits of two backcross transgenic papaya lines (2210 and 823) and one hybrid line (823-2210) and compare to their parent non-transgenic (TN-2) counterparts. The stability analysis of coat protein (CP) of PRSV was investigated using the digestion stability assays in simulated gastric fluid (SGF), simulated intestinal fluid (SIF), and bile salts to detect the CP fragments. Results revealed that the CP fragments were rapidly hydrolyzed in SGF and were undetectable in organs and gastrointestinal contents in rats. For the genotoxicity, three in vitro assays were conducted and exhibited that non-transgenic and backcross transgenic papaya fruits were negative. Moreover, a repeated animal feeding study was conducted by feeding 2 g/kg of body weight (bw) of non-transgenic and backcross transgenic papaya fruits for 28 days in rats. There were no biological or toxicological significances between non-transgenic and backcross transgenic papaya fruits in rats. The results demonstrated that the backcross transgenic papaya fruit can be recognized as an equivalent substitution for traditional papaya in food safety.

  1. Production of Homozygous Transgenic Rainbow Trout with Enhanced Disease Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Chiou, Pinwen Peter; Chen, Maria J.; Lin, Chun-Mean; Khoo, Jenny; Larson, Jon; Holt, Rich; Leong, Jo-Ann; Thorgarrd, Gary; Chen, Thomas T.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies conducted in our laboratory showed that transgenic medaka expressing cecropin B transgenes exhibited resistant characteristic to fish bacterial pathogens, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Vibrio anguillarum. To confirm whether antimicrobial peptide gene will also exhibit anti-bacterial and anti-viral characteristics in aquaculture important fish species, we produced transgenic rainbow trout expressing cecropin P1 or a synthetic cecropin B analog, CF-17, transgene by sperm-mediated...

  2. Inheritance of Resistance to Papaya Ringspot Virus-Papaya Strain in Melon (Cucumis melo L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Setiadi Daryono

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV is one of potyviruses causing severe damage to the production of cucurbit crops including melon, however resistant melons to PRSV have not yet commercially available. To find resistant genetic source of melons against PRSV, sixty three melons were manually inoculated with PRSV-papaya strain (PRSV-P isolated in Thailand. Levels of resistance to PRSV-P accumulation in melon leaf tissue were evaluated using a combination of visual symptom observation and RT-PCR analysis. Among melons tested, Yamatouri, Mawatauri, PI 414723, and PI 371795 showed to be resistance to PRSV-P To study the inheritance of resistance to PRSV-P, breeding experiments were conducted by crossing the resistant Yamatouri with susceptible Vakharman. The genetic analysis results revealed that a single dominant gene conferred resistance to PRSV-P in Yamatouri and its generation.

  3. Development of transgenic papayas expressing the coat protein gene from a Brazilian isolate of Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) = Desenvolvimento de mamoeiros transgênicos resistentes a vírus expressando o gene da capa protéica de um isolado brasileiro de Papaya ringspot virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, M.T.; Níckel, O.; Gonsalves, D.

    2005-01-01

    Translatable and nontranslatable versions of the coat protein (cp) gene of a Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) isolate collected in the state of Bahia, Brazil, were engineered for expression in Sunrise and Sunset Solo varieties of papaya (Carica papaya). The biolistic system was used to transform

  4. [Effect of transgenic insect-resistant rice on biodiversity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Zhen

    2011-05-01

    Rice is the most important food crops in maintaining food security in China. The loss of China's annual rice production caused by pests is over ten million tons. Present studies showed that the transgenic insect-resistant rice can substantially reduce the application amount of chemical pesticides. In the case of no pesticide use, the pest density in transgenic rice field is significantly lower than that in non-transgenic field, and the neutral insects and natural enemies of pests increased significantly, indicating that the ecological environment and biodiversity toward the positive direction. The gene flow frequency from transgenic rice is dramatically reduced with the distance increases, reaching less than 0.01% at the distance of 6.2 m. Application of transgenic insect-resistant rice in China has an important significance for ensuring food security, maintaining sustainable agricultural development, and protecting the ecological environment and biodiversity. This review summarized the research progress in transgenic insect-resistant rice and its effect on biodiversity. The research directions and development trends of crop pest controlling in future are discussed. These help to promote better use of transgenic insect-resistant rice.

  5. Transgenic resistance to Citrus tristeza virus in grapefruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febres, Vicente J; Lee, Richard F; Moore, Gloria A

    2008-01-01

    Grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) transgenic plants transformed with a variety of constructs derived from the Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) genome were tested for their resistance to the virus. Most transgenic lines were susceptible (27 lines), a few were partially resistant (6 lines) and only one line, transformed with the 3' end of CTV was resistant. Transgene expression levels and siRNA accumulation were determined to identify whether the resistance observed was RNA-mediated. The responses were varied. At least one resistant plant from a partially resistant line showed no steady-state transgene mRNA, siRNA accumulation and no viral RNA, implicating posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) as the mechanism of resistance. The most resistant line showed no transgene mRNA accumulation and promoter methylation of cytosines in all contexts, the hallmark of RNA-directed DNA methylation and transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). The variety of responses, even among clonally propagated plants, is unexplained but is not unique to citrus. The genetics of CTV, host response or other factors may be responsible for this variability.

  6. Transgenic strategies for improving rice disease resistance | Zhang ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improvement of virus resistance can be achieved by generating transgenic rice lines with expression of genes encoding viral coat protein or replication enzymes, expression of RNA interference constructs and suppression of insect vectors. Varieties with improved resistance against fungal and bacterial pathogens can be ...

  7. Transgenic resistance of eggplants to the Colorado potato beetle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arpaia, S.

    1999-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the use of transgenic plant resistance as a method to control the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say in eggplant. The gene conferring resistance is coding for a Cry3B toxin and it is a synthetic version of a wild-type

  8. Resistance of Antimicrobial Peptide Gene Transgenic Rice to Bacterial Blight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei WANG

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptide is a polypeptide with antimicrobial activity. Antimicrobial peptide genes Np3 and Np5 from Chinese shrimp (Fenneropenaeus Chinensis were integrated into Oryza sativa L. subsp. japonica cv. Aichi ashahi by Agrobacterium mediated transformation system. PCR analysis showed that the positive ratios of Np3 and Np5 were 36% and 45% in T0 generation, respectively. RT-PCR analysis showed that the antimicrobial peptide genes were expressed in T1 generation, and there was no obvious difference in agronomic traits between transgenic plants and non-transgenic plants. Four Np3 and Np5 transgenic lines in T1 generation were inoculated with Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae strain CR4, and all the four transgenic lines had significantly enhanced resistance to bacterial blight caused by the strain CR4. The Np5 transgenic lines also showed higher resistance to bacterial blight caused by strains JS97-2, Zhe 173 and OS-225. It is suggested that transgenic lines with Np5 gene might possess broad spectrum resistance to rice bacterial blight.

  9. Transgenic tomato hybrids resistant to tomato spotted wilt virus infection.

    OpenAIRE

    de Haan,; Ultzen, T.; Prins, M; Gielen, J.; Goldbach, R; Grinsven, van, Saskia

    1996-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) infections cause significant economic losses in the commercial culture of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). Culture practices have only been marginally effective in controlling TSWV. The ultimate way to minimize losses caused by TSWV is resistant varieties. These can be obtained by introgression of natural sources of resistance from wild relatives or by expressing viral sequences in transgenic tomato plants. We report high levels of resistance to TSWV obtained...

  10. Detailed characterization of Mirafiori lettuce virus-resistant transgenic lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawazu, Yoichi; Fujiyama, Ryoi; Noguchi, Yuji; Kubota, Masaharu; Ito, Hidekazu; Fukuoka, Hiroyuki

    2010-04-01

    Lettuce big-vein disease is caused by Mirafiori lettuce virus (MiLV), which is vectored by the soil-borne fungus Olpidium brassicae. A MiLV-resistant transgenic lettuce line was developed through introducing inverted repeats of the MiLV coat protein (CP) gene. Here, a detailed characterization study of this lettuce line was conducted by comparing it with the parental, non-transformed 'Kaiser' cultivar. There were no significant differences between transgenic and non-transgenic lettuce in terms of pollen fertility, pollen dispersal, seed production, seed dispersal, dormancy, germination, growth of seedlings under low or high temperature, chromatographic patterns of leaf extracts, or effects of lettuce on the growth of broccoli or soil microflora. A significant difference in pollen size was noted, but the difference was small. The length of the cotyledons of the transgenic lettuce was shorter than that of 'Kaiser,' but there were no differences in other morphological characteristics. Agrobacterium tumefaciens used for the production of transgenic lettuce was not detected in transgenic seeds. The transgenic T(3), T(4), and T(5) generations showed higher resistance to MiLV and big-vein symptoms expression than the resistant 'Pacific' cultivar, indicating that high resistance to lettuce big-vein disease is stably inherited. PCR analysis showed that segregation of the CP gene was nearly 3:1 in the T(1) and T(2) generations, and that the transgenic T(3) generation was homozygous for the CP gene. Segregation of the neomycin phosphotransferase II (npt II) gene was about 3:1 in the T(1) generation, but the full length npt II gene was not detected in the T(2) or T(3) generation. The segregation pattern of the CP and npt II genes in the T(1) generation showed the expected 9:3:3:1 ratio. These results suggest that the fragment including the CP gene and that including the npt II gene have been integrated into two unlinked loci, and that the T(1) plant selected in our study did

  11. Assessment of peanut quality and compositional characteristics among transgenic sclerotinia blight-resistant and non-transgenic susceptible cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiahuai; Telenko, Darcy E P; Phipps, Patrick M; Grabau, Elizabeth A

    2014-08-06

    This study presents the results of a comparison that includes an analysis of variance and a canonical discriminant analysis to determine compositional equivalence and similarity between transgenic, sclerotinia blight-resistant and non-transgenic, susceptible cultivars of peanut in 3 years of field trials. Three Virginia-type cultivars (NC 7, Wilson, and Perry) and their corresponding transgenic lines (N70, W73, and P39) with a barley oxalate oxidase gene were analyzed for differences in key mineral nutrients, fatty acid components, hay constituents, and grade characteristics. Results from both analyses demonstrated that transgenic lines were compositionally similar to their non-transgenic parent cultivar in all factors as well as market-grade characteristics and nutritional value. Transgenic lines expressing oxalate oxidase for resistance to sclerotinia blight were substantially equivalent to their non-transgenic parent cultivar in quality and compositional characteristics.

  12. Transgene translatability increases effectiveness of replicase-mediated resistance to cucumber mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintermantel, W M; Zaitlin, M

    2000-03-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants expressing an altered form of the 2a replicase gene from the Fny strain of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) exhibit suppressed virus replication and restricted virus movement when inoculated mechanically or by aphid vectors. Additional transformants have been generated which contain replicase gene constructs designed to determine the role(s) of transgene mRNA and/or protein in resistance. Resistance to systemic disease caused by CMV, as well as delayed infection, was observed in several lines of transgenic plants which were capable of expressing either full-length or truncated replicase proteins. In contrast, among plants which contained nontranslatable transgene constructs, only one of 61 lines examined exhibited delays or resistance. Once infected, plants never recovered, regardless of transgene translatability. Transgenic plants exhibiting a range of resistance levels were examined for transgene copy number, mRNA and protein levels. Although ribonuclease protection assays demonstrated that transgene mRNA levels were very low, resistant lines had consistently more steady-state transgene mRNA than susceptible lines. Furthermore, chlorotic or necrotic local lesions developed on the inoculated leaves of transgenic lines containing translatable transgenes, but not on inoculated leaves of lines containing nontranslatable transgenes. These results demonstrate that translatability of the transgene and possibly expression of the transgene protein itself facilitates replicase-mediated resistance to CMV in tobacco.

  13. Transgenic Strategies for Enhancement of Nematode Resistance in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad A. Ali

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant parasitic nematodes (PPNs are obligate biotrophic parasites causing serious damage and reduction in crop yields. Several economically important genera parasitize various crop plants. The root-knot, root lesion, and cyst nematodes are the three most economically damaging genera of PPNs on crops within the family Heteroderidae. It is very important to devise various management strategies against PPNs in economically important crop plants. Genetic engineering has proven a promising tool for the development of biotic and abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants. Additionally, the genetic engineering leading to transgenic plants harboring nematode resistance genes has demonstrated its significance in the field of plant nematology. Here, we have discussed the use of genetic engineering for the development of nematode resistance in plants. This review article also provides a detailed account of transgenic strategies for the resistance against PPNs. The strategies include natural resistance genes, cloning of proteinase inhibitor coding genes, anti-nematodal proteins and use of RNA interference to suppress nematode effectors. Furthermore, the manipulation of expression levels of genes induced and suppressed by nematodes has also been suggested as an innovative approach for inducing nematode resistance in plants. The information in this article will provide an array of possibilities to engineer resistance against PPNs in different crop plants.

  14. Transgenic Strategies for Enhancement of Nematode Resistance in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Muhammad A.; Azeem, Farrukh; Abbas, Amjad; Joyia, Faiz A.; Li, Hongjie; Dababat, Abdelfattah A.

    2017-01-01

    Plant parasitic nematodes (PPNs) are obligate biotrophic parasites causing serious damage and reduction in crop yields. Several economically important genera parasitize various crop plants. The root-knot, root lesion, and cyst nematodes are the three most economically damaging genera of PPNs on crops within the family Heteroderidae. It is very important to devise various management strategies against PPNs in economically important crop plants. Genetic engineering has proven a promising tool for the development of biotic and abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants. Additionally, the genetic engineering leading to transgenic plants harboring nematode resistance genes has demonstrated its significance in the field of plant nematology. Here, we have discussed the use of genetic engineering for the development of nematode resistance in plants. This review article also provides a detailed account of transgenic strategies for the resistance against PPNs. The strategies include natural resistance genes, cloning of proteinase inhibitor coding genes, anti-nematodal proteins and use of RNA interference to suppress nematode effectors. Furthermore, the manipulation of expression levels of genes induced and suppressed by nematodes has also been suggested as an innovative approach for inducing nematode resistance in plants. The information in this article will provide an array of possibilities to engineer resistance against PPNs in different crop plants. PMID:28536595

  15. Dihydrofolate Reductase and Thymidylate Synthase Transgenes Resistant to Methotrexate Interact to Permit Novel Transgene Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushworth, David; Mathews, Amber; Alpert, Amir; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2015-09-18

    Methotrexate (MTX) is an anti-folate that inhibits de novo purine and thymidine nucleotide synthesis. MTX induces death in rapidly replicating cells and is used in the treatment of multiple cancers. MTX inhibits thymidine synthesis by targeting dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and thymidylate synthase (TYMS). The use of MTX to treat cancer also causes bone marrow suppression and inhibits the immune system. This has led to the development of an MTX-resistant DHFR, DHFR L22F, F31S (DHFR(FS)), to rescue healthy cells. 5-Fluorouracil-resistant TYMS T51S, G52S (TYMS(SS)) is resistant to MTX and improves MTX resistance of DHFR(FS) in primary T cells. Here we find that a known mechanism of MTX-induced increase in DHFR expression persists with DHFR(FS) and cis-expressed transgenes. We also find that TYMS(SS) expression of cis-expressed transgenes is similarly decreased in an MTX-inducible manner. MTX-inducible changes in DHFR(FS) and TYMS(SS) expression changes are lost when both genes are expressed together. In fact, expression of the DHFR(FS) and TYMS(SS) cis-expressed transgenes becomes correlated. These findings provide the basis for an unrecognized post-transcriptional mechanism that functionally links expression of DHFR and TYMS. These findings were made in genetically modified primary human T cells and have a clear potential for use in clinical applications where gene expression needs to be regulated by drug or maintained at a specific expression level. We demonstrate a potential application of this system in the controlled expression of systemically toxic cytokine IL-12. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. New species in the papaya ringspot virus cluster: insights into the evolution of the PRSV lineage

    OpenAIRE

    Romay, Gustavo; Millot, Pauline; Wipf-Scheibel, Catherine; Dafalla, Gasim; Lecoq, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    The “Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) cluster” of cucurbit-infecting potyviruses contains five acknowledged species that have similar biological, serological and molecular properties. Additional data suggest there are other uncharacterized species from various locations in the world that likely belong to the PRSV cluster including a new PRSV-like virus reported from Sudan in 2003. Molecular and biological data indicated that the virus from Sudan belongs to a new species, tentatively named wild me...

  17. Development of transgenic watermelon resistant to Cucumber mosaic virus and Watermelon mosaic virus by using a single chimeric transgene construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Yi; Ku, Hsin-Mei; Chiang, Yi-Hua; Ho, Hsiu-Yin; Yu, Tsong-Ann; Jan, Fuh-Jyh

    2012-10-01

    Watermelon, an important fruit crop worldwide, is prone to attack by several viruses that often results in destructive yield loss. To develop a transgenic watermelon resistant to multiple virus infection, a single chimeric transgene comprising a silencer DNA from the partial N gene of Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV) fused to the partial coat protein (CP) gene sequences of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) and Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) was constructed and transformed into watermelon (cv. Feeling) via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Single or multiple transgene copies randomly inserted into various locations in the genome were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Transgenic watermelon R(0) plants were individually challenged with CMV, CGMMV or WMV, or with a mixture of these three viruses for resistance evaluation. Two lines were identified to exhibit resistance to CMV, CGMMV, WMV individually, and a mixed inoculation of the three viruses. The R(1) progeny of the two resistant R(0) lines showed resistance to CMV and WMV, but not to CGMMV. Low level accumulation of transgene transcripts in resistant plants and small interfering (si) RNAs specific to CMV and WMV were readily detected in the resistant R(1) plants by northern blot analysis, indicating that the resistance was established via RNA-mediated post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). Loss of the CGMMV CP-transgene fragment in R1 progeny might be the reason for the failure to resistant CGMMV infection, as shown by the absence of a hybridization signal and no detectable siRNA specific to CGMMV in Southern and northern blot analyses. In summary, this study demonstrated that fusion of different viral CP gene fragments in transgenic watermelon contributed to multiple virus resistance via PTGS. The construct and resistant watermelon lines developed in this study could be used in a watermelon breeding program for resistance to multiple viruses.

  18. Transgenic resistance of eggplants to the Colorado potato beetle

    OpenAIRE

    Arpaia, S.

    1999-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the use of transgenic plant resistance as a method to control the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say in eggplant. The gene conferring resistance is coding for a Cry3B toxin and it is a synthetic version of a wild-type gene originally obtained from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis Berl.

    Eggplant cultivations are constantly attacked by a number of serious pests (e.g. th...

  19. Pathogen resistance of transgenic tobacco plants producing caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun-Soo; Sano, Hiroshi

    2008-02-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) is a typical purine alkaloid, and produced by a variety of plants such as coffee and tea. Its physiological function, however, is not completely understood, but chemical defense against pathogens and herbivores, and allelopathic effects against competing plant species have been proposed. Previously, we constructed transgenic tobacco plants, which produced caffeine up to 5 microg per gram fresh weight of leaves, and showed them to repel caterpillars of tobacco cutworms (Spodoptera litura). In the present study, we found that these transgenic plants constitutively expressed defense-related genes encoding pathogenesis-related (PR)-1a and proteinase inhibitor II under non-stressed conditions. We also found that they were highly resistant against pathogens, tobacco mosaic virus and Pseudomonas syringae. Expression of PR-1a and PR-2 was higher in transgenic plants than in wild-type plants during infection. Exogenously applied caffeine to wild-type tobacco leaves exhibited the similar resistant activity. These results suggested that caffeine stimulated endogenous defense system of host plants through directly or indirectly activating gene expression. This assumption is essentially consistent with the idea of chemical defense, in which caffeine may act as one of signaling molecules to activate defense response. It is thus conceivable that the effect of caffeine is bifunctional; direct interference with pest metabolic pathways, and activation of host defense systems.

  20. Lactoferrin-derived resistance against plant pathogens in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshman, Dilip K; Natarajan, Savithiry; Mandal, Sudhamoy; Mitra, Amitava

    2013-12-04

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a ubiquitous cationic iron-binding milk glycoprotein that contributes to nutrition and exerts a broad-spectrum primary defense against bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and viruses in mammals. These qualities make lactoferrin protein and its antimicrobial motifs highly desirable candidates to be incorporated in plants to impart broad-based resistance against plant pathogens or to economically produce them in bulk quantities for pharmaceutical and nutritional purposes. This study introduced bovine LF (BLF) gene into tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum var. Xanthi), Arabidopsis ( A. thaliana ) and wheat ( Triticum aestivum ) via Agrobacterium -mediated plant transformation. Transgenic plants or detached leaves exhibited high levels of resistance against the damping-off causing fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani and the head blight causing fungal pathogen Fusarium graminearum . LF also imparted resistance to tomato plants against a bacterial pathogen, Ralstonia solanacearum . Similarly, other researchers demonstrated expression of LF and LF-mediated high-quality resistance to several other aggressive fungal and bacterial plant pathogens in transgenic plants and against viral pathogens by foliar applications of LF or its derivatives. Taken together, these studies demonstrated the effectiveness of LF for improving crop quality and its biopharming potentials for pharmaceautical and nutritional applications.

  1. Interlaboratory validation data on real-time polymerase chain reaction detection for unauthorized genetically modified papaya line PRSV-YK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Nakamura

    2016-06-01

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR detection method for unauthorized genetically modified (GM papaya (Carica papaya L. line PRSV-YK (PRSV-YK detection method was developed using whole genome sequence data (DDBJ Sequenced Read Archive under accession No. PRJDB3976. Interlaboratory validation datasets for PRSV-YK detection method were provided. Data indicating homogeneity of samples prepared for interlaboratory validation were included. Specificity and sensitivity test data for PRSV-YK detection method were also provided.

  2. Production of marker-free and RSV-resistant transgenic rice using a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Two of the pDTRSVCP lines and three pDTRSVSP lines harbouring the homozygous target gene, but not the hpt gene, were strongly resistant to RSV. A molecular analysis of the resistant transgenic plants confirmed the stable integration and expression of the target genes. The resistant transgenic plants displayed lower ...

  3. Inheritance of Resistance to Pstv in Transgenic Peanuts Containing Cp Pstv Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Dwi Hapsoro, Hajrial Aswidinnoor, Rusmilah Suseno, Jumanto, and Sudarsono

    2008-01-01

    Inheritance of Resistance to PStV in Transgenic Peanuts Containing cp PStV Gene. We have obtained transgenic peanut lines containing coat protein gene of PStV. To get maximal use of the transgenic character in a breeding program, it is necessary that the transgene is also stably inherited and expressed.  This experiment was conducted from June 2002 – January 2005 at Plant Molecular Biology Laboratory, Bogor Agricultural University, and Queensland Agricultural Biotechnology Center, The Univers...

  4. Transgenic Cavendish bananas with resistance to Fusarium wilt tropical race 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, James; James, Anthony; Paul, Jean-Yves; Khanna, Harjeet; Smith, Mark; Peraza-Echeverria, Santy; Garcia-Bastidas, Fernando; Kema, Gert; Waterhouse, Peter; Mengersen, Kerrie; Harding, Robert

    2017-11-14

    Banana (Musa spp.) is a staple food for more than 400 million people. Over 40% of world production and virtually all the export trade is based on Cavendish banana. However, Cavendish banana is under threat from a virulent fungus, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense tropical race 4 (TR4) for which no acceptable resistant replacement has been identified. Here we report the identification of transgenic Cavendish with resistance to TR4. In our 3-year field trial, two lines of transgenic Cavendish, one transformed with RGA2, a gene isolated from a TR4-resistant diploid banana, and the other with a nematode-derived gene, Ced9, remain disease free. Transgene expression in the RGA2 lines is strongly correlated with resistance. Endogenous RGA2 homologs are also present in Cavendish but are expressed tenfold lower than that in our most resistant transgenic line. The expression of these homologs can potentially be elevated through gene editing, to provide non-transgenic resistance.

  5. Resistance Economics of Transgenic Crops under Uncertainty: A Real Option Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesseler, J.H.H.

    2003-01-01

    The development of pest resistance is one of the many concerns about the long-term success of transgenic crops. This chapter discusses resistances as additional irreversible costs related to the release of transgenic crops. These irreversible costs, their uncertainty, and the uncertainty about

  6. Hybridizing transgenic Bt cotton with non-Bt cotton counters resistance in pink bollworm

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wan, Peng; Xu, Dong; Cong, Shengbo; Jiang, Yuying; Huang, Yunxin; Wang, Jintao; Wu, Huaiheng; Wang, Ling; Wu, Kongming; Carriere, Yves; Mathias, Andrea; Li, Xianchun; Tabashnik, Bruce E

    2017-01-01

    .... However, these benefits are being eroded by evolution of resistance in pests. We report a strategy for combating resistance by crossing transgenic Bt plants with conventional non-Bt plants and then crossing the resulting first-generation (F1...

  7. Surge in insect resistance to transgenic crops and prospects for sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabashnik, Bruce E; Carrière, Yves

    2017-10-11

    Transgenic crops have revolutionized insect pest control, but their effectiveness has been reduced by evolution of resistance in pests. We analyzed global monitoring data reported during the first two decades of transgenic crops, with each case representing the responses of one pest species in one country to one insecticidal protein from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). The cases of pest resistance to Bt crystalline (Cry) proteins produced by transgenic crops increased from 3 in 2005 to 16 in 2016. By contrast, in 17 other cases there was no decrease in pest susceptibility to Bt crops, including the recently introduced transgenic corn that produces a Bt vegetative insecticidal protein (Vip). Recessive inheritance of pest resistance has favored sustained susceptibility, but even when inheritance is not recessive, abundant refuges of non-Bt host plants have substantially delayed resistance. These insights may inform resistance management strategies to increase the durability of current and future transgenic crops.

  8. Rice Blast Resistance of Transgenic Rice Plants with Pi-d2 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-xi CHEN

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to rice blast of transgenic rice lines harboring rice blast resistance gene Pi-d2 transformed from three different expression vectors of pCB6.3kb, pCB5.3kb and pZH01-2.72kb were analyzed. Nine advanced-generation transgenic rice lines with Pi-d2 gene displayed various resistance to 39 rice blast strains, and the highest disease-resistant frequency reached 91.7%. Four early-generation homozygous transgenic lines with Pi-d2 gene exhibited resistance to more than 81.5% of 58 rice blast strains, showing the characteristic of wide-spectrum resistance. The transgenic embryonic calli selected by the crude toxin of rice blast fungus showed that the callus induction rate of immature embryo from transgenic rice plants decreased as the concentration of crude toxin in the culture medium increased. When the concentration of crude toxin reached 40%, the callus induction rate of immature embryo from transgenic lines was 49.3%, and that of the receptor control was 5%. The disease incidence of neck blast of the transgenic rice lines in fields under induction was 0% to 50%, indicating that the rice blast resistance of transgenic rice lines is much higher than that of the receptor control.

  9. Algerian watermelon mosaic virus (AWMV): a new potyvirus species in the PRSV cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakoubi, Soumaya; Lecoq, Hervé; Desbiez, Cécile

    2008-08-01

    A potyvirus was isolated from a naturally infected squash plant in Algeria in 1986. Biological and serological data have revealed that the virus, initially described as H4, is related to other cucurbit-infecting potyviruses, particularly Moroccan watermelon mosaic virus (MWMV) and Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). To establish unequivocally the taxonomic status of H4, its full-length genome sequence was established. H4 shared identities of 70% and 65% at the amino acid level with MWMV and PRSV, respectively, indicating that H4 is a distinct species of the PRSV cluster. The name Algerian watermelon mosaic virus (AWMV) is proposed for this new potyvirus species.

  10. Transgenic strategies to confer resistance against viruses in rice plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahide eSasaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rice (Oryza sativa L. is cultivated in more than 100 countries and supports nearly half of the world’s population. Developing efficient methods to control rice viruses is thus an urgent necessity because viruses cause serious losses in rice yield. Most rice viruses are transmitted by insect vectors, notably planthoppers and leafhoppers. Viruliferous insect vectors can disperse their viruses over relatively long distances, and eradication of the viruses is very difficult once they become widespread. Exploitation of natural genetic sources of resistance is one of the most effective approaches to protect crops from virus infection; however, only a few naturally occurring rice genes confer resistance against rice viruses. In an effort to improve control, many investigators are using genetic engineering of rice plants as a potential strategy to control viral diseases. Using viral genes to confer pathogen-derived resistance against crops is a well-established procedure, and the expression of various viral gene products has proved to be effective in preventing or reducing infection by various plant viruses since the 1990s. RNA-interference (RNAi, also known as RNA silencing, is one of the most efficient methods to confer resistance against plant viruses on their respective crops. In this article, we review the recent progress, mainly conducted by our research group, in transgenic strategies to confer resistance against tenuiviruses and reoviruses in rice plants. Our findings also illustrate that not all RNAi constructs against viral RNAs are equally effective in preventing virus infection and that it is important to identify the viral Achilles’ heel gene to target for RNAi attack when engineering plants.

  11. Transgenic strategies to confer resistance against viruses in rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaya, Takahide; Nakazono-Nagaoka, Eiko; Saika, Hiroaki; Aoki, Hideyuki; Hiraguri, Akihiro; Netsu, Osamu; Uehara-Ichiki, Tamaki; Onuki, Masatoshi; Toki, Seichi; Saito, Koji; Yatou, Osamu

    2014-01-13

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is cultivated in more than 100 countries and supports nearly half of the world's population. Developing efficient methods to control rice viruses is thus an urgent necessity because viruses cause serious losses in rice yield. Most rice viruses are transmitted by insect vectors, notably planthoppers and leafhoppers. Viruliferous insect vectors can disperse their viruses over relatively long distances, and eradication of the viruses is very difficult once they become widespread. Exploitation of natural genetic sources of resistance is one of the most effective approaches to protect crops from virus infection; however, only a few naturally occurring rice genes confer resistance against rice viruses. Many investigators are using genetic engineering of rice plants as a potential strategy to control viral diseases. Using viral genes to confer pathogen-derived resistance against crops is a well-established procedure, and the expression of various viral gene products has proved to be effective in preventing or reducing infection by various plant viruses since the 1990s. RNA interference (RNAi), also known as RNA silencing, is one of the most efficient methods to confer resistance against plant viruses on their respective crops. In this article, we review the recent progress, mainly conducted by our research group, in transgenic strategies to confer resistance against tenuiviruses and reoviruses in rice plants. Our findings also illustrate that not all RNAi constructs against viral RNAs are equally effective in preventing virus infection and that it is important to identify the viral "Achilles' heel" gene to target for RNAi attack when engineering plants.

  12. Limited fitness advantages of crop-weed hybrid progeny containing insect-resistant transgenes (Bt/CpTI in transgenic rice field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The spread of insect-resistance transgenes from genetically engineered (GE rice to its coexisting weedy rice (O. sativa f. spontanea populations via gene flow creates a major concern for commercial GE rice cultivation. Transgene flow to weedy rice seems unavoidable. Therefore, characterization of potential fitness effect brought by the transgenes is essential to assess environmental consequences caused by crop-weed transgene flow. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Field performance of fitness-related traits was assessed in advanced hybrid progeny of F(4 generation derived from a cross between an insect-resistant transgenic (Bt/CpTI rice line and a weedy strain. The performance of transgene-positive hybrid progeny was compared with the transgene-negative progeny and weedy parent in pure and mixed planting of transgenic and nontransgenic plants under environmental conditions with natural vs. low insect pressure. Results showed that under natural insect pressure the insect-resistant transgenes could effectively suppress target insects and bring significantly increased fitness to transgenic plants in pure planting, compared with nontransgenic plants (including weedy parent. In contrast, no significant differences in fitness were detected under low insect pressure. However, such increase in fitness was not detected in the mixed planting of transgenic and nontransgenic plants due to significantly reduced insect pressure. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Insect-resistance transgenes may have limited fitness advantages to hybrid progeny resulted from crop-weed transgene flow owning to the significantly reduced ambient target insect pressure when an insect-resistant GE crop is grown. Given that the extensive cultivation of an insect-resistant GE crop will ultimately reduce the target insect pressure, the rapid spread of insect-resistance transgenes in weedy populations in commercial GE crop fields may be not likely to happen.

  13. Transgenic banana expressing Pflp gene confers enhanced resistance to Xanthomonas wilt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namukwaya, B; Tripathi, L; Tripathi, J N; Arinaitwe, G; Mukasa, S B; Tushemereirwe, W K

    2012-08-01

    Banana Xanthomonas wilt (BXW), caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum, is one of the most important diseases of banana (Musa sp.) and currently considered as the biggest threat to banana production in Great Lakes region of East and Central Africa. The pathogen is highly contagious and its spread has endangered the livelihood of millions of farmers who rely on banana for food and income. The development of disease resistant banana cultivars remains a high priority since farmers are reluctant to employ labor-intensive disease control measures and there is no host plant resistance among banana cultivars. In this study, we demonstrate that BXW can be efficiently controlled using transgenic technology. Transgenic bananas expressing the plant ferredoxin-like protein (Pflp) gene under the regulation of the constitutive CaMV35S promoter were generated using embryogenic cell suspensions of banana. These transgenic lines were characterized by molecular analysis. After challenge with X. campestris pv. musacearum transgenic lines showed high resistance. About 67% of transgenic lines evaluated were completely resistant to BXW. These transgenic lines did not show any disease symptoms after artificial inoculation of in vitro plants under laboratory conditions as well as potted plants in the screen-house, whereas non-transgenic control plants showed severe symptoms resulting in complete wilting. This study confirms that expression of the Pflp gene in banana results in enhanced resistance to BXW. This transgenic technology can provide a timely solution to the BXW pandemic.

  14. Production of marker-free and RSV-resistant transgenic rice using a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-07-22

    Jul 22, 2013 ... these transgenic traits and the environment (Kuiper et al. 2001; Dale .... The insects were brushed off the plants twice a day to achieve uniform infection rates. Insects were killed using insecticide 72 h post inoculation (p.i.), and the plants were ..... transgenic rice with strong heritable RSV resistance that are.

  15. INHERITANCE OF RESISTANCE TO PStV IN TRANSGENIC PEANUTS CONTAINING cp PStV GENE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Hapsoro, Hajrial Aswidinnoor, Rusmilah Suseno, Jumanto, dan Sudarsono .

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Inheritance of Resistance to PStV in Transgenic Peanuts Containing cp PStV Gene. We have obtained transgenic peanut lines containing coat protein gene of PStV. To get maximal use of the transgenic character in a breeding program, it is necessary that the transgene is also stably inherited and expressed.  This experiment was conducted from June 2002 – January 2005 at Plant Molecular Biology Laboratory, Bogor Agricultural University, and Queensland Agricultural Biotechnology Center, The University of Queensland, Australia. The research aimed (1 to test whether PStV cp transgene was functional in progenies derived from crosses between transgenic peaanut plants containing PStV cp gene and non-transgenic ones and (2 to determine pattern of inheritance of resistance to PStV as a result of PStV  cp gene action. Several crosses were made between trangenic peanut cv.Gajah resistant to PStV (T4 generation and non-transgenic peanut line WS susceptible to PStV. The F1 and F2 populations were mechanically inoculated with PStV two weeks after planting. The experiment showed that all plants in the F1 population were less susceptible to PStV, suggesting that the transgene was partially dominant.  Phenotipic segregation in F2 population was not Mendelian with the appearance of quick and slow recovery plants and the number of resistant plants being more than expected. However, the proportion of transgenic and non-transgenic plants followed 3:1 ratio, which was Mendelian.

  16. Transgenic expression of Lactoferrin imparts resistance to a soilborne fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum var Xanthi) and Arabidopsis (A. thaliana) plants expressing an antimicrobial bovine lactoferrin (BLF) gene were developed and evaluated for resistance against an economically important fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, the causal agent of damping off diseases....

  17. Transgenic Cavendish bananas with resistance to Fusarium wilt tropical race 4

    OpenAIRE

    Dale, James; James, Anthony; Paul, Jean-Yves; Khanna, Harjeet; Smith, Mark; Peraza-Echeverria, Santy; Garcia-Bastidas, Fernando; Kema, Gert; Waterhouse, Peter; Mengersen, Kerrie; Harding, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Banana (Musa spp.) is a staple food for more than 400 million people. Over 40% of world production and virtually all the export trade is based on Cavendish banana. However, Cavendish banana is under threat from a virulent fungus, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense tropical race 4 (TR4) for which no acceptable resistant replacement has been identified. Here we report the identification of transgenic Cavendish with resistance to TR4. In our 3-year field trial, two lines of transgenic Cavendish, ...

  18. Differential leaf resistance to insects of transgenic sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) expressing tobacco anionic peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, P F; Lagrimini, L M; Herms, D A

    1998-07-01

    Leaves of transgenic sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) trees that expressed tobacco anionic peroxidase were compared with leaves of L. styraciflua trees that did not express the tobacco enzyme. Leaves of the transgenic trees were generally more resistant to feeding by caterpillars and beetles than wild-type leaves. However, as for past studies with transgenic tobacco and tomato expressing the tobacco anionic peroxidase, the degree of relative resistance depended on the size of insect used and the maturity of the leaf. Decreased growth of gypsy moth larvae appeared mainly due to decreased consumption, and not changes in the nutritional quality of the foliage. Transgenic leaves were more susceptible to feeding by the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea. Thus, it appears the tobacco anionic peroxidase can contribute to insect resistance, but its effects are more predictable when it is expressed in plant species more closely related to the original gene source.

  19. Transgenic rice plants expressing cry1Ia5 gene are resistant to stem borer (Chilo agamemnon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaieb, Reda E A

    2010-01-01

    The stem borer, Chilo agamemnon Bles., is the most serious insect pest in rice fields of the Egyptian Nile Delta. To induce rice plant resistance to Chilo agamemnon, the cry1Ia5 gene was introduced to rice plants (Oryza sativa L.). The integration of the cry1Ia5 gene into the plant genome was confirmed using PCR and Southern blot analyses. The obtained plantlets were transferred to the greenhouse until seeds were collected. Northern blot analysis of the T1 plants confirmed the expression of the cry1Ia5 gene. The insecticidal activity of the transgenic plants against the rice stem borer Chilo agamemnon were tested. The third larval instars were fed on stem cuts from three transgenic lines (L1, L2 and L3) as well as cuts from the control (gfp-transgenic) plants for one week and the mortality percentage was daily recorded. Transgenic line-3 showed the highest mortality percentage after one day (50%) followed by L2 (25%) then L1 (0%). Two days post treatment the mortality percentage increased to 70, 45 and 25% for transgenic lines 1, 2 and 3 respectively. Mortality of 100% was recorded four days post treatment, while those fed on the gfp-transgenic rice (control) showed 0% mortality. Thus, transgenic plants showed high resistance to stem borers and can serve as a novel genetic resource in breeding programs. Transgenic plants expressing BT protein were normal in phenotype with as good seed setting as the nontransgenic control plants.

  20. Enhanced fungal resistance in transgenic cotton expressing an endochitinase gene from Trichoderma virens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emani, Chandrakanth; Garcia, Juan Manuel; Lopata-Finch, Emily; Pozo, Maria Jose; Uribe, Pedro; Kim, Dong-Jin; Sunilkumar, Ganesan; Cook, Douglas R; Kenerley, Charles M; Rathore, Keerti S

    2003-09-01

    Mycoparasitic fungi are proving to be rich sources of antifungal genes that can be utilized to genetically engineer important crops for resistance against fungal pathogens. We have transformed cotton and tobacco plants with a cDNA clone encoding a 42 kDa endochitinase from the mycoparasitic fungus, Trichoderma virens. Plants from 82 independently transformed callus lines of cotton were regenerated and analysed for transgene expression. Several primary transformants were identified with endochitinase activities that were significantly higher than the control values. Transgene integration and expression was confirmed by Southern and Northern blot analyses, respectively. The transgenic endochitinase activities were examined in the leaves of transgenic tobacco as well as in the leaves, roots, hypocotyls and seeds of transgenic cotton. Transgenic plants with elevated endochitinase activities also showed the expected 42 kDa endochitinase band in fluorescence, gel-based assays performed with the leaf extracts in both species. Homozygous T2 plants of the high endochitinase-expressing cotton lines were tested for disease resistance against a soil-borne pathogen, Rhizoctonia solani and a foliar pathogen, Alternaria alternata. Transgenic cotton plants showed significant resistance to both pathogens.

  1. Stacking of antimicrobial genes in potato transgenic plants confers increased resistance to bacterial and fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Mercedes; Furman, Nicolás; Mencacci, Nicolás; Picca, Pablo; Toum, Laila; Lentz, Ezequiel; Bravo-Almonacid, Fernando; Mentaberry, Alejandro

    2012-01-20

    Solanum tuberosum plants were transformed with three genetic constructions expressing the Nicotiana tabacum AP24 osmotine, Phyllomedusa sauvagii dermaseptin and Gallus gallus lysozyme, and with a double-transgene construction expressing the AP24 and lysozyme sequences. Re-transformation of dermaseptin-transformed plants with the AP24/lysozyme construction allowed selection of plants simultaneously expressing the three transgenes. Potato lines expressing individual transgenes or double- and triple-transgene combinations were assayed for resistance to Erwinia carotovora using whole-plant and tuber infection assays. Resistance levels for both infection tests compared consistently for most potato lines and allowed selection of highly resistant phenotypes. Higher resistance levels were found in lines carrying the dermaseptin and lysozyme sequences, indicating that theses proteins are the major contributors to antibacterial activity. Similar results were obtained in tuber infection tests conducted with Streptomyces scabies. Plant lines showing the higher resistance to bacterial infections were challenged with Phytophthora infestans, Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium solani. Considerable levels of resistance to each of these pathogens were evidenced employing semi-quantitative tests based in detached-leaf inoculation, fungal growth inhibition and in vitro plant inoculation. On the basis of these results, we propose that stacking of these transgenes is a promising approach to achieve resistance to both bacterial and fungal pathogens. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Development and Characterization of Transgenic Sugarcane with Insect Resistance and Herbicide Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zhi Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetically modified crops which had been commercial applied extensively majorly are the insect resistance and herbicide tolerance events. In this study, the Bt insecticidal gene Cry1Ab, the glyphosate-tolerant gene EPSPS, and the selection marker gene PMI were combined into a single transferred DNA fragment and introduced into sugarcane by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Thirty-three resistant plantlets were obtained after selection using a PMI/mannose selection system. Thirty of these resistant plantlets were PCR positive for the three target genes. Southern blot assay revealed that the copy number of the integrated fragment in the transformed plantlets varied from 1 to 7. ELISA analysis showed that 23 of the 33 resistant plantlets expressed Cry1Ab and EPSPS protein. Five single-copy and ELISA-positive transgenic lines were tested under laboratory and field conditions to determine their resistance to insects and herbicides, and also evaluated their agronomic characteristics and industrial traits. Results showed that larvae fed with fodder mixture containing stem tissues from single-copy transgenic lines were weak and small, moreover, pupation and eclosion were delayed significantly during voluntary feeding bioassays. None of transgenic sugarcane was destroyed by cane borer while more than 30% of wild type sugarcane was destroyed by cane borer. For herbicide resistance, the transgenic plantlets grew healthy even when treated with up to 0.5% roundup while wild type plantlets would die off when treated with 0.1% roundup. Thus demonstrate that these transgenic lines showed strong insect resistance and glyphosate tolerance under both laboratory and field conditions. But in the field most of the transgenic plants were shorter and more slender than non-transformed control plants. So they presented poor agronomic characteristics and industrial traits than non-transformed control plants. Thus, a considerable number of embryogenic calli should be

  3. Development and Characterization of Transgenic Sugarcane with Insect Resistance and Herbicide Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen Zhi; Yang, Ben Peng; Feng, Xiao Yan; Cao, Zheng Ying; Feng, Cui Lian; Wang, Jun Gang; Xiong, Guo Ru; Shen, Lin Bo; Zeng, Jun; Zhao, Ting Ting; Zhang, Shu Zhen

    2017-01-01

    Genetically modified crops which had been commercial applied extensively majorly are the insect resistance and herbicide tolerance events. In this study, the Bt insecticidal gene Cry1Ab, the glyphosate-tolerant gene EPSPS, and the selection marker gene PMI were combined into a single transferred DNA fragment and introduced into sugarcane by Agrobacterium -mediated transformation. Thirty-three resistant plantlets were obtained after selection using a PMI/mannose selection system. Thirty of these resistant plantlets were PCR positive for the three target genes. Southern blot assay revealed that the copy number of the integrated fragment in the transformed plantlets varied from 1 to 7. ELISA analysis showed that 23 of the 33 resistant plantlets expressed Cry1Ab and EPSPS protein. Five single-copy and ELISA-positive transgenic lines were tested under laboratory and field conditions to determine their resistance to insects and herbicides, and also evaluated their agronomic characteristics and industrial traits. Results showed that larvae fed with fodder mixture containing stem tissues from single-copy transgenic lines were weak and small, moreover, pupation and eclosion were delayed significantly during voluntary feeding bioassays. None of transgenic sugarcane was destroyed by cane borer while more than 30% of wild type sugarcane was destroyed by cane borer. For herbicide resistance, the transgenic plantlets grew healthy even when treated with up to 0.5% roundup while wild type plantlets would die off when treated with 0.1% roundup. Thus demonstrate that these transgenic lines showed strong insect resistance and glyphosate tolerance under both laboratory and field conditions. But in the field most of the transgenic plants were shorter and more slender than non-transformed control plants. So they presented poor agronomic characteristics and industrial traits than non-transformed control plants. Thus, a considerable number of embryogenic calli should be infected to obtain

  4. Transgenic pigeonpea events expressing Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa exhibit resistance to Helicoverpa armigera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Gourab; Ganguly, Shreeparna; Purohit, Arnab; Chaudhuri, Rituparna Kundu; Das, Sampa; Chakraborti, Dipankar

    2017-07-01

    Independent transgenic pigeonpea events were developed using two cry genes. Transgenic Cry2Aa-pigeonpea was established for the first time. Selected transgenic events demonstrated 100% mortality of Helicoverpa armigera in successive generations. Lepidopteran insect Helicoverpa armigera is the major yield constraint of food legume pigeonpea. The present study was aimed to develop H. armigera-resistant transgenic pigeonpea, selected on the basis of transgene expression and phenotyping. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of embryonic axis explants of pigeonpea cv UPAS 120 was performed using two separate binary vectors carrying synthetic Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal crystal protein genes, cry1Ac and cry2Aa. T0 transformants were selected on the basis of PCR and protein expression profile. T1 events were exclusively selected on the basis of expression and monogenic character for cry, validated through Western and Southern blot analyses, respectively. Independently transformed 12 Cry1Ac and 11 Cry2Aa single-copy events were developed. The level of Cry-protein expression in T1 transgenic events was 0.140-0.175% of total soluble protein. Expressed Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa proteins in transgenic pigeonpea exhibited significant weight loss of second-fourth instar larvae of H. armigera and ultimately 80-100% mortality in detached leaf bioassay. Selected Cry-transgenic pigeonpea events, established at T2 generation, inherited insect-resistant phenotype. Immunohistofluorescence localization in T3 plants demonstrated constitutive accumulation of Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa in leaf tissues of respective transgenic events. This study is the first report of transgenic pigeonpea development, where stable integration, effective expression and biological activity of two Cry proteins were demonstrated in subsequent three generations (T0, T1, and T2). These studies will contribute to biotechnological breeding programmes of pigeonpea for its genetic improvement.

  5. Engineered resistance to Plasmodium falciparum development in transgenic Anopheles stephensi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison T Isaacs

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Transposon-mediated transformation was used to produce Anopheles stephensi that express single-chain antibodies (scFvs designed to target the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. The scFvs, m1C3, m4B7, and m2A10, are derived from mouse monoclonal antibodies that inhibit either ookinete invasion of the midgut or sporozoite invasion of salivary glands. The scFvs that target the parasite surface, m4B7 and m2A10, were fused to an Anopheles gambiae antimicrobial peptide, Cecropin A. Previously-characterized Anopheles cis-acting DNA regulatory elements were included in the transgenes to coordinate scFv production with parasite development. Gene amplification and immunoblot analyses showed promoter-specific increases in transgene expression in blood-fed females. Transgenic mosquito lines expressing each of the scFv genes had significantly lower infection levels than controls when challenged with P. falciparum.

  6. RNAi-mediated resistance to SMV and BYMV in transgenic tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Thi Mai Thu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Soybean mosaic virus (SMV and bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV are two typical types of viruses that cause mosaic in soybean plants. Multiple viral infections at the same site can lead to 66% to 80% yield reduction. We have aimed to improve SMV and BYMV resistance in Vietnamese soybeans using gene transfer techniques under the mechanism of RNAi. In this study, we present newly generated transgenic tobacco plants carrying RNAi [CPi (SMV-BYMV] resistance to the two types of viruses; 73.08% of transgenic tobacco lines proved to be fully resistant to SMV and BYMV. In addition, the number of virus copies in transgenic tobacco plants was reduced on average by more than 51% compared to the control plants (wild type. This promising result shows the potential of transerring the CPi (SMV-BYMV structure in soybean to increase resistance of soybean to SMV and BYMV and advance the aims of antiviral soybean breeding in Vietnam.

  7. Comparison of the physiological characteristics of transgenic insect-resistant cotton and conventional lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaogang; Ding, Changfeng; Wang, Xingxiang; Liu, Biao

    2015-03-04

    The introduction of transgenic insect-resistant cotton into agricultural ecosystems has raised concerns regarding its ecological effects. Many studies have been conducted to compare the differences in characteristics between transgenic cotton and conventional counterparts. However, few studies have focused on the different responses of transgenic cotton to stress conditions, especially to the challenges of pathogens. The aim of this work is to determine the extent of variation in physiological characteristics between transgenic insect-resistant cotton and the conventional counterpart infected by cotton soil-borne pathogens. The results showed that the difference in genetic backgrounds is the main factor responsible for the effects on biochemical characteristics of transgenic cotton when incubating with cotton Fusarium oxysporum. However, genetic modification had a significantly greater influence on the stomatal structure of transgenic cotton than the effects of cotton genotypes. Our results highlight that the differences in genetic background and/or genetic modifications may introduce variations in physiological characteristics and should be considered to explore the potential unexpected ecological effects of transgenic cotton.

  8. Molecular Analysis and Effectiveness Assay of AV1 Gene in Transgenic Tobacco for Resistance to Begomovirus

    OpenAIRE

    Santoso, Tri Joko; Herman, Muhammad; Hidayat, Sri H; Aswidinnoor, Hajrial; Sudarsono, Sudarsono

    2012-01-01

    Genetic transformationof tobacco plant using AV1 gene was conducted atthe previously experiment and generated transgenic tobaccoplants positively carrying the selectable marker nptII gene.The objectives of this experiment were to (1) analyze thepresence of Begomovirus AV1 gene in T0 generation putativetransgenic tobacco plants using PCR technique with specificprimers and its correlation with resistance phenotype, (2)analyze the integration and copy number of the transgene inT0 generation puta...

  9. Inheritance of plum pox virus resistance in transgenic plums

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have studied the heritability of the virus transgene engineered in 'HoneySweet' plum through different cross-hybridization with two commercial cultivars of Prunus domestica (Prunier d’Ente 303 and Quetsche 2906) and one wild species, P. spinosa 2862, rootstock using 'HoneySweet' plum as the polle...

  10. Field trials to evaluate effects of continuously planted transgenic insect-resistant cottons on soil invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaogang; Liu, Biao; Wang, Xingxiang; Han, Zhengmin; Cui, Jinjie; Luo, Junyu

    2012-03-01

    Impacts on soil invertebrates are an important aspect of environmental risk assessment and post-release monitoring of transgenic insect-resistant plants. The purpose of this study was to research and survey the effects of transgenic insect-resistant cottons that had been planted over 10 years on the abundance and community structure of soil invertebrates under field conditions. During 3 consecutive years (2006-2008), eight common taxa (orders) of soil invertebrates belonging to the phylum Arthropoda were investigated in two different transgenic cotton fields and one non-transgenic cotton field (control). Each year, soil samples were taken at four different growth stages of cotton (seedling, budding, boll forming and boll opening). Animals were extracted from the samples using the improved Tullgren method, counted and determined to the order level. The diversity of the soil fauna communities in the different fields was compared using the Simpson's, Shannon's diversity indices and evenness index. The results showed a significant sampling time variation in the abundance of soil invertebrates monitored in the different fields. However, no difference in soil invertebrate abundance was found between the transgenic cotton fields and the control field. Both sampling time and cotton treatment had a significant effect on the Simpson's, Shannon's diversity indices and evenness index. They were higher in the transgenic fields than the control field at the growth stages of cotton. Long-term cultivation of transgenic insect-resistant cottons had no significant effect on the abundance of soil invertebrates. Collembola, Acarina and Araneae could act as the indicators of soil invertebrate in this region to monitor the environmental impacts of transgenic plants in the future. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  11. Transgenic fish resistant to infectious diseases, their risk and prevention of escape into the environment and future candidate genes for disease transgene manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Rex A

    2009-03-01

    Transgenic fish have been produced that have improved growth, disease resistance, survival in cold and body composition, have altered color, that can act as bioindicators for estrogenic pollutants and that can produce pharmaceutical proteins. The largest amount of transgenic research has focused on growth hormone transfer. A relatively small amount of research has focused on enhancing disease resistance, but significant enhancement has been accomplished. Pleiotropic effects from the transfer of other transgenes, particularly growth hormone gene can alter disease resistance in both positive and negative ways. Most negative effects for all transgenes appear to lower fitness traits, which is positive for biological containment. Transgenic fish appear to pose little environmental risk, but this research is not fully conclusive. To expedite commercialization and minimize environmental risk, transgenic sterilization research is underway. A large amount of functional genomics research has resulted in a much better understanding of gene expression when fish are experiencing disease epizootics. This information may allow the future design of more effective transgenic approaches to address disease resistance.

  12. Transgenic maize plants expressing the Totivirus antifungal protein, KP4, are highly resistant to corn smut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Aron; Islamovic, Emir; Kaur, Jagdeep; Gold, Scott; Shah, Dilip; Smith, Thomas J

    2011-10-01

    The corn smut fungus, Ustilago maydis, is a global pathogen responsible for extensive agricultural losses. Control of corn smut using traditional breeding has met with limited success because natural resistance to U. maydis is organ specific and involves numerous maize genes. Here, we present a transgenic approach by constitutively expressing the Totivirus antifungal protein KP4, in maize. Transgenic maize plants expressed high levels of KP4 with no apparent negative impact on plant development and displayed robust resistance to U. maydis challenges to both the stem and ear tissues in the greenhouse. More broadly, these results demonstrate that a high level of organ independent fungal resistance can be afforded by transgenic expression of this family of antifungal proteins. © 2011 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2011 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Development of transgenic sweet potato with multiple virus resistance in South Africa (SA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivparsad, B J; Gubba, A

    2014-04-01

    Multiple infections of Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV), Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV), Sweet potato virus G (SPVG) and Sweet potato mild mottle virus (SPMMV) cause a devastating synergistic disease complex of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas Lam.) in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. In order to address the problem of multiple virus infections and synergism, this study aimed to develop transgenic sweet potato (cv. Blesbok) plants with broad virus resistance. Coat protein gene segments of SPFMV, SPCSV, SPVG and SPMMV were used to induce gene silencing in transgenic sweet potato. Transformation of apical tips of sweet potato cv. Blesbok was achieved by using Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404 harboring the expression cassette. Polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot analyses showed integration of the transgenes occurred in six of the 24 putative transgenic plants and that all plants seemed to correspond to the same transformation event. The six transgenic plants were challenged by graft inoculation with SPFMV, SPCSV, SPVG and SPMMV-infected Ipomoea setosa Ker. Although virus presence was detected using nitrocellulose enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, all transgenic plants displayed delayed and milder symptoms of chlorosis and mottling of lower leaves when compared to the untransformed control plants. These results warrant further investigation on resistance to virus infection under field conditions.

  14. Broad-spectrum transgenic resistance against distinct tospovirus species at the genus level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jui-Chu; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Raja, Joseph A J; Yang, Ching-Fu; Chien, Wan-Chu; Lin, Chen-Hsuan; Liu, Fang-Lin; Wu, Hui-Wen; Yeh, Shyi-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Thrips-borne tospoviruses cause severe damage to crops worldwide. In this investigation, tobacco lines transgenic for individual WLm constructs containing the conserved motifs of the L RNA-encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (L) gene of Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV) were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The WLm constructs included: (i) translatable WLm in a sense orientation; (ii) untranslatable WLmt with two stop codons; (iii) untranslatable WLmts with stop codons and a frame-shift; (iv) untranslatable antisense WLmA; and (v) WLmhp with an untranslatable inverted repeat of WLm containing the tospoviral S RNA 3'-terminal consensus sequence (5'-ATTGCTCT-3') and an NcoI site as a linker to generate a double-stranded hairpin transcript. A total of 46.7-70.0% transgenic tobacco lines derived from individual constructs showed resistance to the homologous WSMoV; 35.7-100% plants of these different WSMoV-resistant lines exhibited broad-spectrum resistance against four other serologically unrelated tospoviruses Tomato spotted wilt virus, Groundnut yellow spot virus, Impatiens necrotic spot virus and Groundnut chlorotic fan-spot virus. The selected transgenic tobacco lines also exhibited broad-spectrum resistance against five additional tospoviruses from WSMoV and Iris yellow spot virus clades, but not against RNA viruses from other genera. Northern analyses indicated that the broad-spectrum resistance is mediated by RNA silencing. To validate the L conserved region resistance in vegetable crops, the constructs were also used to generate transgenic tomato lines, which also showed effective resistance against WSMoV and other tospoviruses. Thus, our approach of using the conserved motifs of tospoviral L gene as a transgene generates broad-spectrum resistance against tospoviruses at the genus level.

  15. Broad-spectrum transgenic resistance against distinct tospovirus species at the genus level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Chu Peng

    Full Text Available Thrips-borne tospoviruses cause severe damage to crops worldwide. In this investigation, tobacco lines transgenic for individual WLm constructs containing the conserved motifs of the L RNA-encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (L gene of Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The WLm constructs included: (i translatable WLm in a sense orientation; (ii untranslatable WLmt with two stop codons; (iii untranslatable WLmts with stop codons and a frame-shift; (iv untranslatable antisense WLmA; and (v WLmhp with an untranslatable inverted repeat of WLm containing the tospoviral S RNA 3'-terminal consensus sequence (5'-ATTGCTCT-3' and an NcoI site as a linker to generate a double-stranded hairpin transcript. A total of 46.7-70.0% transgenic tobacco lines derived from individual constructs showed resistance to the homologous WSMoV; 35.7-100% plants of these different WSMoV-resistant lines exhibited broad-spectrum resistance against four other serologically unrelated tospoviruses Tomato spotted wilt virus, Groundnut yellow spot virus, Impatiens necrotic spot virus and Groundnut chlorotic fan-spot virus. The selected transgenic tobacco lines also exhibited broad-spectrum resistance against five additional tospoviruses from WSMoV and Iris yellow spot virus clades, but not against RNA viruses from other genera. Northern analyses indicated that the broad-spectrum resistance is mediated by RNA silencing. To validate the L conserved region resistance in vegetable crops, the constructs were also used to generate transgenic tomato lines, which also showed effective resistance against WSMoV and other tospoviruses. Thus, our approach of using the conserved motifs of tospoviral L gene as a transgene generates broad-spectrum resistance against tospoviruses at the genus level.

  16. New species in the papaya ringspot virus cluster: Insights into the evolution of the PRSV lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbiez, C; Wipf-Scheibel, C; Millot, P; Verdin, E; Dafalla, G; Lecoq, H

    2017-09-15

    The "Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) cluster" of cucurbit-infecting potyviruses contains five acknowledged species that have similar biological, serological and molecular properties. Additional data suggest there are other uncharacterized species from various locations in the world that likely belong to the PRSV cluster including a new PRSV-like virus reported from Sudan in 2003. Molecular and biological data indicated that the virus from Sudan belongs to a new species, tentatively named wild melon vein banding virus (WMVBV). The complete nucleotide sequence of a second virus from Sudan revealed it was a divergent relative of Moroccan watermelon mosaic virus (MWMV). Based on sequence similarity this virus was determined to be a distinct species and tentatively named Sudan watermelon mosaic virus (SuWMV). Molecular analyses indicate that SuWMV is a recombinant between WMVBV- and MWMV-related viruses. Based on surveys performed in Sudan between 1992 and 2012, SuWMV appeared 10 times more frequent than WMVBV in that country (14.6% vs. 1.5% of the samples tested). The geographic structure and molecular diversity patterns of the putative and acknowledged species suggest that the PRSV-like cluster originated in the Old World about 3600 years ago, with an important diversification in Africa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Silencing Agrobacterium oncogenes in transgenic grapevine results in strain-specific crown gall resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galambos, A; Zok, A; Kuczmog, A; Oláh, R; Putnoky, P; Ream, W; Szegedi, E

    2013-11-01

    Grapevine rootstock transformed with an Agrobacterium oncogene-silencing transgene was resistant to certain Agrobacterium strains but sensitive to others. Thus, genetic diversity of Agrobacterium oncogenes may limit engineering crown gall resistance. Crown gall disease of grapevine induced by Agrobacterium vitis or Agrobacterium tumefaciens causes serious economic losses in viticulture. To establish crown gall-resistant lines, somatic proembryos of Vitis berlandieri × V. rupestris cv. 'Richter 110' rootstock were transformed with an oncogene-silencing transgene based on iaaM and ipt oncogene sequences from octopine-type, tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid pTiA6. Twenty-one transgenic lines were selected, and their transgenic nature was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These lines were inoculated with two A. tumefaciens and three A. vitis strains. Eight lines showed resistance to octopine-type A. tumefaciens A348. Resistance correlated with the expression of the silencing genes. However, oncogene silencing was mostly sequence specific because these lines did not abolish tumorigenesis by A. vitis strains or nopaline-type A. tumefaciens C58.

  18. Simultaneous activation of salicylate production and fungal resistance in transgenic chrysanthemum producing caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun-Soo; Lim, Soon; Yoda, Hiroshi; Choi, Chang-Sun; Choi, Yong-Eui

    2011-01-01

    Caffeine functions in the chemical defense against biotic attackers in a few plant species including coffee and tea. Transgenic tobacco plants that endogenously produced caffeine by expressing three N-methyltransferases involved in the caffeine biosynthesis pathway exhibited a strong resistance to pathogens and herbivores. Here we report that transgenic Chrysanthemum, which produced an equivalent level of caffeine as the tobacco plants at approximately 3 µg g−1 fresh tissues, also exhibited a resistance against grey mold fungal attack. Transcripts of PR-2 gene, a marker for pathogen response, were constitutively accumulated in mature leaves without pathogen attack. The levels of salicylic acid and its glucoside conjugate in mature leaves of the transgenic lines were found to be 2.5-fold higher than in the wild type control. It is suggested that endogenous caffeine stimulated production and/or deposition of salicylates, which possibly activated a series of defense reactions even under non-stressed conditions. PMID:21346420

  19. Simultaneous activation of salicylate production and fungal resistance in transgenic Chrysanthemum producing caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun-Soo; Lim, Soon; Yoda, Hiroshi; Choi, Yong-Eui; Sano, Hiroshi

    2011-03-01

    Caffeine functions in the chemical defense against biotic attackers in a few plant species, including coffee and tea. Transgenic tobacco plants that endogenously produced caffeine by expressing three N-methyltransferases involved in the caffeine biosynthesis pathway exhibited a strong resistance to pathogens and herbivores. Here we report that transgenic Chrysanthemum, which produced an equivalent level of caffeine as the tobacco plants at approximately 3 μg g(-1) fresh tissues, also exhibited a resistance against grey mold fungal attack. Transcripts of PR-2 gene, a marker for pathogen response, were constitutively accumulated in mature leaves without pathogen attack. The levels of salicylic acid and its glucoside conjugate in mature leaves of the transgenic lines were found to be 2.5-fold higher than in the wild type control. It is suggested that endogenous caffeine stimulated production and/or deposition of salicylates, which possibly activated a series of defense reactions even under non-stressed conditions.

  20. Comparative analysis of nutritional compositions of transgenic RNAi-mediated virus-resistant bean (event EMB-PV051-1) with its non-transgenic counterpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, José L V; de Oliveira Santos, Juliana; Conte, Carmine; Pacheco, Sidney; Nogueira, Elsa O P L; Souza, Thiago L P O; Faria, Josias C; Aragão, Francisco J L

    2015-10-01

    Golden mosaic is among the most economically important diseases that severely reduce bean production in Latin America. In 2011, a transgenic bean event named Embrapa 5.1 (EMB-PV051-1), resistant to bean golden mosaic virus, was approved for commercial release in Brazil. The aim of this study was to measure and evaluate the nutritional components of the beans, as well as the anti-nutrient levels in the primary transgenic line and its derived near-isogenic lines after crosses and backcrosses with two commercial cultivars. Nutritional assessment of transgenic crops used for human consumption is an important aspect of safety evaluations. Results demonstrated that the transgenic bean event, cultivated under field conditions, was substantially equivalent to that of the non-transgenic bean plants. In addition, the amounts of the nutritional components are within the range of values observed for several bean commercial varieties grown across a range of environments and seasons.

  1. Field resistance of transgenic plantain to nematodes has potential for future African food security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Leena; Babirye, Annet; Roderick, Hugh; Tripathi, Jaindra N; Changa, Charles; Urwin, Peter E; Tushemereirwe, Wilberforce K; Coyne, Danny; Atkinson, Howard J

    2015-01-30

    Plant parasitic nematodes impose losses of up to 70% on plantains and cooking bananas in Africa. Application of nematicides is inappropriate and resistant cultivars are unavailable. Where grown, demand for plantain is more than for other staple crops. Confined field testing demonstrated that transgenic expression of a biosafe, anti-feedant cysteine proteinase inhibitor and an anti-root invasion, non-lethal synthetic peptide confers resistance to plantain against the key nematode pests Radopholus similis and Helicotylenchus multicinctus. The best peptide transgenic line showed improved agronomic performance relative to non-transgenic controls and provided about 99% nematode resistance at harvest of the mother crop. Its yield was about 186% in comparison with the nematode challenged control non-transgenic plants based on larger bunches and diminished plant toppling in storms, due to less root damage. This is strong evidence for utilizing this resistance to support the future food security of 70 million, mainly poor Africans that depend upon plantain as a staple food.

  2. Transgenic expression of lactoferrin imparts enhanced resistance to head blight of wheat caused by Fusarium graminearum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Jigang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of plant gene transfer systems has allowed for the introgression of alien genes into plant genomes for novel disease control strategies, thus providing a mechanism for broadening the genetic resources available to plant breeders. Using the tools of plant genetic engineering, a broad-spectrum antimicrobial gene was tested for resistance against head blight caused by Fusarium graminearum Schwabe, a devastating disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. and barley (Hordeum vulgare L. that reduces both grain yield and quality. Results A construct containing a bovine lactoferrin cDNA was used to transform wheat using an Agrobacterium-mediated DNA transfer system to express this antimicrobial protein in transgenic wheat. Transformants were analyzed by Northern and Western blots to determine lactoferrin gene expression levels and were inoculated with the head blight disease fungus F. graminearum. Transgenic wheat showed a significant reduction of disease incidence caused by F. graminearum compared to control wheat plants. The level of resistance in the highly susceptible wheat cultivar Bobwhite was significantly higher in transgenic plants compared to control Bobwhite and two untransformed commercial wheat cultivars, susceptible Wheaton and tolerant ND 2710. Quantification of the expressed lactoferrin protein by ELISA in transgenic wheat indicated a positive correlation between the lactoferrin gene expression levels and the levels of disease resistance. Conclusions Introgression of the lactoferrin gene into elite commercial wheat, barley and other susceptible cereals may enhance resistance to F. graminearum.

  3. MSI-99, a magainin analogue, imparts enhanced disease resistance in transgenic tobacco and banana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, A; Ganapathi, T R; Mukherjee, P K; Bapat, V A

    2003-02-01

    Magainin is one of the earliest reported antimicrobial peptides isolated from skin secretions of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis. A synthetic substitution analogue of magainin, MSI-99, is employed in this study to impart disease resistance in transgenic tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacumL.) and banana [( Musaspp. cv. Rasthali (AAB)]. This peptide inhibited the growth and spore germination of Fusarium oxysporumf.sp. cubenseat 16 micro g/ml. MSI-99 has been subcloned into plant expression vectors pMSI164 and pMSI168, targeting the peptide into the cytoplasm and extracellular spaces, respectively. Tobacco plants transformed with pMSI168 showed enhanced resistance against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Alternaria alternataand Botrytis cinerea. Transgenic banana pants were obtained for both pMSI164 and pMSI168 transformations and showed resistance to F. oxysporumf.sp. cubenseand Mycosphaerella musicola. The transgenic nature of the transformants and expression of this peptide was confirmed through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. The results suggest that MSI-99 can be useful in imparting enhanced disease resistance in transgenic plants.

  4. Generation of PVY coat protein siRNAs in transgenic potatoes resistant to PVY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic potatoes expressing the potato virus Y coat protein (PVY-CP) inverted hairpin RNA (ihRNA) construct driven by the Solanum bulbocastanum ubiquitin 409s promoter exhibited resistance to PVY in glass house studies using PVYNTN and PVYO as inocula and in field studies using naturally occurrin...

  5. Transgenic expression of lactoferrin imparts enhanced resistance to head blight of wheat caused by Fusarium graminearum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The development of plant gene transfer systems has allowed for the introgression of alien genes into plant genomes for novel disease control strategies, thus providing a mechanism for broadening the genetic resources available to plant breeders. Using the tools of plant genetic engineering, a broad-spectrum antimicrobial gene was tested for resistance against head blight caused by Fusarium graminearum Schwabe, a devastating disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) that reduces both grain yield and quality. Results A construct containing a bovine lactoferrin cDNA was used to transform wheat using an Agrobacterium-mediated DNA transfer system to express this antimicrobial protein in transgenic wheat. Transformants were analyzed by Northern and Western blots to determine lactoferrin gene expression levels and were inoculated with the head blight disease fungus F. graminearum. Transgenic wheat showed a significant reduction of disease incidence caused by F. graminearum compared to control wheat plants. The level of resistance in the highly susceptible wheat cultivar Bobwhite was significantly higher in transgenic plants compared to control Bobwhite and two untransformed commercial wheat cultivars, susceptible Wheaton and tolerant ND 2710. Quantification of the expressed lactoferrin protein by ELISA in transgenic wheat indicated a positive correlation between the lactoferrin gene expression levels and the levels of disease resistance. Conclusions Introgression of the lactoferrin gene into elite commercial wheat, barley and other susceptible cereals may enhance resistance to F. graminearum. PMID:22405032

  6. Antibiotic-Resistant Soil Bacteria in Transgenic Plant Fields

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sandrine Demanèche; Hervé Sanguin; John Poté; Elisabeth Navarro; Dominique Bernillon; Patrick Mavingui; Walter Wildi; Timothy M. Vogel; Pascal Simonet

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the prevalence and polymorphism of antibiotic resistance genes in soil bacteria and their potential to be transferred horizontally is required to evaluate the likelihood and ecological...

  7. Field resistance of transgenic plantain to nematodes has potential for future African food security.

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathi, L; Babirye, A; Roderick, H; Tripathi, JN; Changa, C; Urwin, PE; Tushemereirwe, WK; Coyne, D; Atkinson, HJ

    2015-01-01

    Plant parasitic nematodes impose losses of up to 70% on plantains and cooking bananas in Africa. Application of nematicides is inappropriate and resistant cultivars are unavailable. Where grown, demand for plantain is more than for other staple crops. Confined field testing demonstrated that transgenic expression of a biosafe, anti-feedant cysteine proteinase inhibitor and an anti-root invasion, non-lethal synthetic peptide confers resistance to plantain against the key nematode pests Radopho...

  8. Apoptosis-related genes confer resistance to Fusarium wilt in transgenic 'Lady Finger' bananas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Jean-Yves; Becker, Douglas K; Dickman, Martin B; Harding, Robert M; Khanna, Harjeet K; Dale, James L

    2011-12-01

    Fusarium wilt, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc), is one of the most devastating diseases of banana (Musa spp.). Apart from resistant cultivars, there are no effective control measures for the disease. We investigated whether the transgenic expression of apoptosis-inhibition-related genes in banana could be used to confer disease resistance. Embryogenic cell suspensions of the banana cultivar, 'Lady Finger', were stably transformed with animal genes that negatively regulate apoptosis, namely Bcl-xL, Ced-9 and Bcl-2 3' UTR, and independently transformed plant lines were regenerated for testing. Following a 12-week exposure to Foc race 1 in small-plant glasshouse bioassays, seven transgenic lines (2 × Bcl-xL, 3 × Ced-9 and 2 × Bcl-2 3' UTR) showed significantly less internal and external disease symptoms than the wild-type susceptible 'Lady Finger' banana plants used as positive controls. Of these, one Bcl-2 3' UTR line showed resistance that was equivalent to that of wild-type Cavendish bananas that were included as resistant negative controls. Further, the resistance of this line continued for 23-week postinoculation at which time the experiment was terminated. Using TUNEL assays, Foc race 1 was shown to induce apoptosis-like features in the roots of wild-type 'Lady Finger' plants consistent with a necrotrophic phase in the life cycle of this pathogen. This was further supported by the observed reduction in these effects in the roots of the resistant Bcl-2 3' UTR-transgenic line. This is the first report on the generation of transgenic banana plants with resistance to Fusarium wilt. © 2011 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2011 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Genetic diversity in the 3'-terminal region of papaya ringspot virus (PRSV-W) isolates from watermelon in Oklahoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Osama A; Ali, Akhtar

    2012-03-01

    The 3'-terminal region (1191 nt) containing part of the NIb gene, complete coat protein (CP) and poly-A tail of 64 papaya ringspot virus (PRSV-W) isolates collected during 2008-2009 from watermelon in commercial fields of four different counties of Oklahoma were cloned and sequenced. Nucleotide and amino acid sequence identities ranged from 95.2-100% and 97.1-100%, respectively, among the Oklahoman PRSV-W isolates. Phylogenetic analysis showed that PRSW-W isolates clustered according to the locations where they were collected within Oklahoma, and each cluster contained two subgroups. All subgroups of Oklahoman PRSV-W isolates were on separate branches when compared to 35 known isolates originating from other parts of the world, including the one reported previously from the USA. This study helps in our understanding about the genetic diversity of PRSV-W isolates infecting cucurbits in Oklahoma.

  10. Transgenic banana plants expressing Xanthomonas wilt resistance genes revealed a stable non-target bacterial colonization structure

    OpenAIRE

    Nimusiima, Jean; K?berl, Martina; Tumuhairwe, John Baptist; Kubiriba, Jerome; Staver, Charles; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Africa is among the continents where the battle over genetically modified crops is currently being played out. The impact of GM in Africa could potentially be very positive. In Uganda, researchers have developed transgenic banana lines resistant to banana Xanthomonas wilt. The transgenic lines expressing hrap and pflp can provide a timely solution to the pandemic. However, the impact of the transgenes expression on non-target microorganisms has not yet been investigated. To study this effect,...

  11. Transgenic Expression of a Viral Cystatin Gene CpBV-CST1 in Tobacco Confers Insect Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, E; Kim, Y; Yeam, I; Kim, Y

    2016-10-01

    A viral gene, CpBV-CST1, was identified from a polydnavirus Cotesia plutellae bracovirus (CpBV). Its protein product was significantly toxic to lepidopteran insects. This study generated a transgenic tobacco plant expressing CpBV-CST1 Expression of transgene CpBV-CST1 was confirmed in T1 generation (second generation after transgenesis) in both mRNA and protein levels. Young larvae of Spodoptera exigua (Hübner) suffered high mortalities after feeding on transgenic tobacco. All 10 T1 transgenic tobacco plants had no significant variation in speed-to-kill. In order to further explore insect resistance of these transgenic tobaccos, bioassays were performed by assessing antixenosis and antibiosis. S. exigua larvae significantly avoided T1 plants in a choice test. Larvae fed with T1 plant exhibited significant decrease in protease activity in the midgut due to consuming CpBV-CST1 protein produced by the transgenic plant. Furthermore, the transgenic tobacco exhibited similar insect resistance to other tobacco-infesting insects, including a leaf-feeding insect, Helicoverpa assulta, and a sap-feeding insect, Myzus persicae These results demonstrate that a viral cystatin gene can be used to develop insect-resistant transgenic plant, suggesting a prospective possibility of expanding the current transgenic approach to high-valued crops. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Transgenic tomato hybrids resistant to tomato spotted wilt virus infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de P.; Ultzen, T.; Prins, M.; Gielen, J.; Goldbach, R.; Grinsven, van M.

    1996-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) infections cause significant economic losses in the commercial culture of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). Culture practices have only been marginally effective in controlling TSWV. The ultimate way to minimize losses caused by TSWV is resistant varieties. These can

  13. Arabidopsis EF-Tu receptor enhances bacterial disease resistance in transgenic wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonbeek, Henk-Jan; Wang, Hsi-Hua; Stefanato, Francesca L; Craze, Melanie; Bowden, Sarah; Wallington, Emma; Zipfel, Cyril; Ridout, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    Perception of pathogen (or microbe)-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs/MAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) is a key component of plant innate immunity. The Arabidopsis PRR EF-Tu receptor (EFR) recognizes the bacterial PAMP elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and its derived peptide elf18. Previous work revealed that transgenic expression of AtEFR in Solanaceae confers elf18 responsiveness and broad-spectrum bacterial disease resistance. In this study, we developed a set of bioassays to study the activation of PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) in wheat. We generated transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum) plants expressing AtEFR driven by the constitutive rice actin promoter and tested their response to elf18. We show that transgenic expression of AtEFR in wheat confers recognition of elf18, as measured by the induction of immune marker genes and callose deposition. When challenged with the cereal bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. oryzae, transgenic EFR wheat lines had reduced lesion size and bacterial multiplication. These results demonstrate that AtEFR can be transferred successfully from dicot to monocot species, further revealing that immune signalling pathways are conserved across these distant phyla. As novel PRRs are identified, their transfer between plant families represents a useful strategy for enhancing resistance to pathogens in crops. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. Transgenic resistance confers effective field level control of bacterial spot disease in tomato.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana M Horvath

    Full Text Available We investigated whether lines of transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum expressing the Bs2 resistance gene from pepper, a close relative of tomato, demonstrate improved resistance to bacterial spot disease caused by Xanthomonas species in replicated multi-year field trials under commercial type growing conditions. We report that the presence of the Bs2 gene in the highly susceptible VF 36 background reduced disease to extremely low levels, and VF 36-Bs2 plants displayed the lowest disease severity amongst all tomato varieties tested, including commercial and breeding lines with host resistance. Yields of marketable fruit from transgenic lines were typically 2.5 times that of the non-transformed parent line, but varied between 1.5 and 11.5 fold depending on weather conditions and disease pressure. Trials were conducted without application of any copper-based bactericides, presently in wide use despite negative impacts on the environment. This is the first demonstration of effective field resistance in a transgenic genotype based on a plant R gene and provides an opportunity for control of a devastating pathogen while eliminating ineffective copper pesticides.

  15. Transgenic virus resistance in crop-wild Cucurbita pepo does not prevent vertical transmission of zucchini yellow mosaic virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. E. Simmons; Holly Prendeville; J. P. Dunham; M. J. Ferrari; J. D. Earnest; D. Pilson; G. P. Munkvold; E. C. Holmes; A. G. Stephenson

    2015-01-01

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) is an economically important pathogen of cucurbits that is transmitted both horizontally and vertically. Although ZYMV is seed-transmitted in Cucurbita pepo, the potential for seed transmission in virus-resistant transgenic cultivars is not known. We crossed and backcrossed a transgenic...

  16. THE SEGREGATION PATTERN OF INSECT RESISTANCE GENES IN THE PROGENIES AND CROSSES OF TRANSGENIC ROJOLELE RICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoto Satoto

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Successful application of genetic transformation technique, especially in developing rice variety resistant to brown plant hopper and stem borer, will depend on transgene being expressed and the gene inherited in a stable and predictable manner. This study aimed to analyse transgene segregation pattern of the progenies and the crosses of transgenic rice cv. Rojolele harboring cry1Ab and gna genes. The third generation (T2 of fivetransgenic Rojolele events containing gna and/or cry1Ab were evaluated for two generations to identify the homozygous lines and to study their inheritance. The homozygous lines were selected based on the result of PCR technique. The segregation patterns of gna and cry1Ab were studied in eight F2 populations derived from Rojolele x transgenic Rojolele homozygous for cry1Ab and or gna and their reciprocal crosses. Data  resulted from PCR of F2 population were analysed using a Chi Square test. The study obtained six homozygous lines for gna, namely A22- 1-32, A22-1-37, C72-1-9, F11-1-48, K21-1-39, K21-1-48, and two homozygous lines for cry1Ab, namely K21-1-39 and K21- 1-48. Both cry1Ab and gna transgenes had been inherited through selfing and crossing with their wild type as indicated from the F1 containing gna and cry1Ab as many as 48.4% and 47.4%, respectively. In six of the eight crosses, gna was inherited in a 3:1 ratio consistent with Mendelian inheritance of a single dominant locus, while in the remaining two crosses, gna was segregated in a 1:1 ratio. The presence of cry1Ab in F2 populations also showed a 3:1 segregation ratio in all crosses. In the F2 population derived from F1 plant containing cry1Ab and gna, both transgenes segregated in a 9:3:3:1 dihybrid segregation ratio. This study will add to the diversity of genetic sources for insect resistance and allow further use of these transgenic lines for pyramiding resistance to brown plant hopper and stem borer or  separately in rice breeding programs whenever

  17. Development of marker-free transgenic lettuce resistant to Mirafiori lettuce big-vein virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawazu, Yoichi; Fujiyama, Ryoi; Imanishi, Shunsuke; Fukuoka, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Hirotaka; Matsumoto, Satoru

    2016-10-01

    Lettuce big-vein disease caused by Mirafiori lettuce big-vein virus (MLBVV) is found in major lettuce production areas worldwide, but highly resistant cultivars have not yet been developed. To produce MLBVV-resistant marker-free transgenic lettuce that would have a transgene with a promoter and terminator of lettuce origin, we constructed a two T-DNA binary vector, in which the first T-DNA contained the selectable marker gene neomycin phosphotransferase II, and the second T-DNA contained the lettuce ubiquitin gene promoter and terminator and inverted repeats of the coat protein (CP) gene of MLBVV. This vector was introduced into lettuce cultivars 'Watson' and 'Fuyuhikari' by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Regenerated plants (T0 generation) that were CP gene-positive by PCR analysis were self-pollinated, and 312 T1 lines were analyzed for resistance to MLBVV. Virus-negative plants were checked for the CP gene and the marker gene, and nine lines were obtained which were marker-free and resistant to MLBVV. Southern blot analysis showed that three of the nine lines had two copies of the CP gene, whereas six lines had a single copy and were used for further analysis. Small interfering RNAs, which are indicative of RNA silencing, were detected in all six lines. MLBVV infection was inhibited in all six lines in resistance tests performed in a growth chamber and a greenhouse, resulting in a high degree of resistance to lettuce big-vein disease. Transgenic lettuce lines produced in this study could be used as resistant cultivars or parental lines for breeding.

  18. Impact of the ahas transgene for herbicides resistance on biological nitrogen fixation and yield of soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungria, Mariangela; Nakatani, André Shigueyoshi; Souza, Rosinei Aparecida; Sei, Fernando Bonafé; de Oliveira Chueire, Ligia Maria; Arias, Carlos Arrabal

    2015-02-01

    Studies on the effects of transgenes in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] and the associated use of specific herbicides on biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) are still few, although it is important to ensure minimal impacts on benefits provided by the root-nodule symbiosis. Cultivance CV127 transgenic soybean is a cultivar containing the ahas gene, which confers resistance to herbicides of the imidazolinone group. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the ahas transgene and of imidazolinone herbicide on BNF parameters and soybean yield. A large-scale set of field experiments was conducted, for three cropping seasons, at nine sites in Brazil, with a total of 20 trials. The experiment was designed as a completely randomized block with four replicates and the following treatments: (T1) near isogenic transgenic soybean (Cultivance CV127) + herbicide of the imidazolinone group (imazapyr); (T2) near isogenic transgenic soybean + conventional herbicides; and (T3) parental conventional soybean (Conquista) + conventional herbicides; in addition, two commercial cultivars were included, Monsoy 8001 (M-SOY 8001) (T4), and Coodetec 217 (CD 217) (T5). At the R2 growth stage, plants were collected and BNF parameters evaluated. In general, there were no effects on BNF parameters due to the transgenic trait or associated with the specific herbicide. Similarly, at the final harvest, no grain-yield effects were detected related to the ahas gene or to the specific herbicide. However, clear effects on BNF and grain yield were attributed to location and cropping season.

  19. Native cell-death genes as candidates for developing wilt resistance in transgenic banana plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghag, Siddhesh B; Shekhawat, Upendra K Singh; Ganapathi, Thumballi R

    2014-07-04

    In order to feed an ever-increasing world population, there is an urgent need to improve the production of staple food and fruit crops. The productivity of important food and fruit crops is constrained by numerous biotic and abiotic factors. The cultivation of banana, which is an important fruit crop, is severely threatened by Fusarium wilt disease caused by infestation by an ascomycetes fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc). Since there are no established edible cultivars of banana resistant to all the pathogenic races of Foc, genetic engineering is the only option for the generation of resistant cultivars. Since Foc is a hemibiotrophic fungus, investigations into the roles played by different cell-death-related genes in the progression of Foc infection on host banana plants are important. Towards this goal, three such genes namely MusaDAD1, MusaBAG1 and MusaBI1 were identified in banana. The study of their expression pattern in banana cells in response to Foc inoculation (using Foc cultures or fungal toxins like fusaric acid and beauvericin) indicated that they were indeed differentially regulated by fungal inoculation. Among the three genes studied, MusaBAG1 showed the highest up-regulation upon Foc inoculation. Further, in order to characterize these genes in the context of Foc infection in banana, we generated transgenic banana plants constitutively overexpressing the three genes that were later subjected to Foc bioassays in a contained greenhouse. Among the three groups of transgenics tested, transformed banana plants overexpressing MusaBAG1 demonstrated the best resistance towards Foc infection. Further, these plants also showed the highest relative overexpression of the transgene (MusaBAG1) among the three groups of transformed plants generated. Our study showed for the first time that native genes like MusaBAG1 can be used to develop transgenic banana plants with efficient resistance towards pathogens like Foc. Published by Oxford University Press

  20. Generation of transgenic plantain (Musa spp.) with resistance to plant pathogenic nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roderick, Hugh; Tripathi, Leena; Babirye, Annet; Wang, Dong; Tripathi, Jaindra; Urwin, Peter E; Atkinson, Howard J

    2012-10-01

    Plant parasitic nematodes impose a severe constraint on plantain and banana productivity; however, the sterile nature of many cultivars precludes conventional breeding for resistance. Transgenic plantain cv. Gonja manjaya (Musa AAB) plants, expressing a maize cystatin that inhibits nematode digestive cysteine proteinases and a synthetic peptide that disrupts nematode chemoreception, were assessed for their ability to resist nematode infection. Lines were generated that expressed each gene singly or both together in a stacked defence. Nematode challenge with a single species or a mixed population identified 10 lines with significant resistance. The best level of resistance achieved against the major pest species Radopholus similis was 84% ± 8% for the cystatin, 66% ± 14% for the peptide and 70% ± 6% for the dual defence. In the mixed population, trial resistance was also demonstrated to Helicotylenchus multicinctus. A fluorescently labelled form of the chemodisruptive peptide underwent retrograde transport along certain sensory dendrites of R. similis as required to disrupt chemoreception. The peptide was degraded after 30 min in simulated intestinal fluid or boiling water and after 1 h in nonsterile soil. In silico sequence analysis suggests that the peptide is not a mammalian antigen. This work establishes the mode of action of a novel nematode defence, develops the evidence for its safe and effective deployment against multiple nematode species and identifies transgenic plantain lines with a high level of resistance for a proposed field trial. © 2012 THE AUTHORS. MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY © 2012 BSPP AND BLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD.

  1. Transcriptional Network Analysis Reveals Drought Resistance Mechanisms of AP2/ERF Transgenic Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongryul Ahn

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate at the molecular level how a transgenic version of rice “Nipponbare” obtained a drought-resistant phenotype. Using multi-omics sequencing data, we compared wild-type rice (WT and a transgenic version (erf71 that had obtained a drought-resistant phenotype by overexpressing OsERF71, a member of the AP2/ERF transcription factor (TF family. A comprehensive bioinformatics analysis pipeline, including TF networks and a cascade tree, was developed for the analysis of multi-omics data. The results of the analysis showed that the presence of OsERF71 at the source of the network controlled global gene expression levels in a specific manner to make erf71 survive longer than WT. Our analysis of the time-series transcriptome data suggests that erf71 diverted more energy to survival-critical mechanisms related to translation, oxidative response, and DNA replication, while further suppressing energy-consuming mechanisms, such as photosynthesis. To support this hypothesis further, we measured the net photosynthesis level under physiological conditions, which confirmed the further suppression of photosynthesis in erf71. In summary, our work presents a comprehensive snapshot of transcriptional modification in transgenic rice and shows how this induced the plants to acquire a drought-resistant phenotype.

  2. Assessing the ecological risks from the persistence and spread of feral populations of insect-resistant transgenic maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybould, Alan; Higgins, Laura S; Horak, Michael J; Layton, Raymond J; Storer, Nicholas P; De La Fuente, Juan Manuel; Herman, Rod A

    2012-06-01

    One source of potential harm from the cultivation of transgenic crops is their dispersal, persistence and spread in non-agricultural land. Ecological damage may result from such spread if the abundance of valued species is reduced. The ability of a plant to spread in non-agricultural habitats is called its invasiveness potential. The risks posed by the invasiveness potential of transgenic crops are assessed by comparing in agronomic field trials the phenotypes of the crops with the phenotypes of genetically similar non-transgenic crops known to have low invasiveness potential. If the transgenic and non-transgenic crops are similar in traits believed to control invasiveness potential, it may be concluded that the transgenic crop has low invasiveness potential and poses negligible ecological risk via persistence and spread in non-agricultural habitats. If the phenotype of the transgenic crop is outside the range of the non-transgenic comparators for the traits controlling invasiveness potential, or if the comparative approach is regarded as inadequate for reasons of risk perception or risk communication, experiments that simulate the dispersal of the crop into non-agricultural habitats may be necessary. We describe such an experiment for several commercial insect-resistant transgenic maize events in conditions similar to those found in maize-growing regions of Mexico. As expected from comparative risk assessments, the transgenic maize was found to behave similarly to non-transgenic maize and to be non-invasive. The value of this experiment in assessing and communicating the negligible ecological risk posed by the low invasiveness potential of insect-resistant transgenic maize in Mexico is discussed.

  3. Control of Resistant Pink Bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella) by Transgenic Cotton That Produces Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry2Ab

    OpenAIRE

    Tabashnik, Bruce E.; Dennehy, Timothy J.; Sims, Maria A.; Larkin, Karen; Head, Graham P.; Moar, William J.; Carrière, Yves

    2002-01-01

    Crops genetically engineered to produce Bacillus thuringiensis toxins for insect control can reduce use of conventional insecticides, but insect resistance could limit the success of this technology. The first generation of transgenic cotton with B. thuringiensis produces a single toxin, Cry1Ac, that is highly effective against susceptible larvae of pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella), a major cotton pest. To counter potential problems with resistance, second-generation transgenic cotton...

  4. Perspective on the combined use of an independent transgenic sexing and a multifactorial reproductive sterility system to avoid resistance development against transgenic Sterile Insect Technique approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckermann, Kolja N; Dippel, Stefan; KaramiNejadRanjbar, Mohammad; Ahmed, Hassan M; Curril, Ingrid M; Wimmer, Ernst A

    2014-01-01

    The Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) is an accepted species-specific genetic control approach that acts as an insect birth control measure, which can be improved by biotechnological engineering to facilitate its use and widen its applicability. First transgenic insects carrying a single killing system have already been released in small scale trials. However, to evade resistance development to such transgenic approaches, completely independent ways of transgenic killing should be established and combined. Most established transgenic sexing and reproductive sterility systems are based on the binary tTA expression system that can be suppressed by adding tetracycline to the food. However, to create 'redundant killing' an additional independent conditional expression system is required. Here we present a perspective on the use of a second food-controllable binary expression system - the inducible Q system - that could be used in combination with site-specific recombinases to generate independent transgenic killing systems. We propose the combination of an already established transgenic embryonic sexing system to meet the SIT requirement of male-only releases based on the repressible tTA system together with a redundant male-specific reproductive sterility system, which is activated by Q-system controlled site-specific recombination and is based on a spermatogenesis-specifically expressed endonuclease acting on several species-specific target sites leading to chromosome shredding. A combination of a completely independent transgenic sexing and a redundant reproductive male sterility system, which do not share any active components and mediate the induced lethality by completely independent processes, would meet the 'redundant killing' criteria for suppression of resistance development and could therefore be employed in large scale long-term suppression programs using biotechnologically enhanced SIT.

  5. Expression of soybean lectin in transgenic tobacco results in enhanced resistance to pathogens and pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peipei; Wang, Yu; Zhou, Xiaohui; Xie, Yongli; Wu, Huijun; Gao, Xuewen

    2013-10-01

    Lectins are proteins of non-immune origin that specifically interact with carbohydrates, known to play important roles in the defense system of plants. In this study, in order to study the function of a new soybean lectin (SBL), the corresponding encoding gene lec-s was introduced into tobacco plants via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Southern blot analyses had revealed that the lec-s gene was stable integrated into the chromosome of the tobacco. The results of the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) also indicated that the lec-s gene in the transgenic tobacco plants could be expressed under the control of the constitutive CaMV35S promoter. Evaluation agronomic of the performance had showed that the transgenic plants could resist to the infection of Phytophthora nicotianae. Insect bioassays using detached leaves from transgenic tobacco plants demonstrated that the ectopically expressed SBL significantly (P.0.05) reduced the weight gain of larvae of the beet armyworm (Spodoptera exigua). Further on, the lectins retarded the development of the larvae and their metamorphosis. These findings suggest that soybean lectins have potential as a protective agent against pathogens and insect pests through a transgenic approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Transgenic expression of plant chitinases to enhance disease resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cletus, Jean; Balasubramanian, Vaiyapuri; Vashisht, Divya; Sakthivel, Natarajan

    2013-11-01

    Crop plants have evolved an array of mechanisms to counter biotic and abiotic stresses. Many pathogenesis-related proteins are expressed by plants during the attack of pathogens. Advances in recombinant DNA technology and understanding of plant-microbe interactions at the molecular level have paved the way for isolation and characterization of genes encoding such proteins, including chitinases. Chitinases are included in families 18 and 19 of glycosyl hydrolases (according to www.cazy.org ) and they are further categorized into seven major classes based on their aminoacid sequence homology, three-dimensional structures, and hydrolytic mechanisms of catalytic reactions. Although chitin is not a component of plant cell walls, plant chitinases are involved in development and non-specific stress responses. Also, chitinase genes sourced from plants have been successfully over-expressed in crop plants to combat fungal pathogens. Crops such as tomato, potato, maize, groundnut, mustard, finger millet, cotton, lychee, banana, grape, wheat and rice have been successfully engineered for fungal resistance either with chitinase alone or in combination with other PR proteins.

  7. Tobacco OPBP1 Enhances Salt Tolerance and Disease Resistance of Transgenic Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xujun Chen

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Osmotin promoter binding protein 1 (OPBP1, an AP2/ERF transcription factor of tobacco, has been demonstrated to function in disease resistance and salt tolerance in tobacco. To increase stress tolerant capability of rice, we generated rice plants with an OPBP1 overexpressing construct. Salinity shock treatment with 250 mM NaCl indicated that most of the OPBP1 transgenic plants can survive, whereas the control seedlings cannot. Similar recovery was found by using the seedlings grown in 200 mM NaCl for two weeks. The OPBP1 transgenic and control plants were also studied for oxidative stress tolerance by treatment with paraquat, showing the transgenic lines were damaged less in comparison with the control plants. Further, the OPBP1 overexpression lines exhibited enhanced resistance to infections of Magnaporthe oryzae and Rhizoctonia solani pathogens. Gene expressing analysis showed increase in mRNA accumulation of several stress related genes. These results suggest that expression of OPBP1 gene increase the detoxification capability of rice.

  8. Over expression of rice chitinase gene in transgenic peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) improves resistance against leaf spot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Munir; Nazir, Farhat; Ali, Shaukat; Asif, M Ahsan; Zafar, Yusuf; Iqbal, Javaid; Ali, Ghulam Muhammad

    2012-02-01

    A Rice chitinase-3 under enhance version of CaMV 35S was introduced into peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) through Agrobacterium mediation. Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LB4404 was used harboring the binary vector (pB1333-EN4-RCG3) containing the chitinase (chit) and hygromycin resistance (hpt) gene as selectable marker. Putative transgenic shoots were regenerated and grown on MS medium supplemented with 5 mg/l BAP, 1 mg/l kinetin, and 30 mg/l hygromycin. Elongated shoots were examined for the presence of the integrated rice chitinase gene along with hygromycin gene as selectable. The integration pattern of transgene in the nuclear genome of the putative transformed plants (T(0)) was confirmed through Southern hybridization analysis of the genomic DNA. Survival rate of the in vitro regenerated plantlets was over 60% while healthy putatively transgenic (T(0)) plants with over 42% transformation frequency were produced through Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer of the rice chitinase gene and all the plants flowered and set seed normally. T1 plants were tested for resistance against Cercospora arachidicola by infection with the microspores. Transgenic strains exhibited a higher resistance than the control (non-transgenic plants). chitinase gene expression in highly resistant transgenic strains was compared to that of a susceptible control. A good correlation was observed between chitinase activity and fungal pathogen resistance.

  9. Scorpion Venom Heat-Resistant Peptide Protects Transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans from β-Amyloid Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Gang; Wang, Xi; Zhou, Ting-Ting; Wu, Xue-Fei; Peng, Yan; Zhang, Wan-Qin; Li, Shao; Zhao, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP) is a component purified from Buthus martensii Karsch scorpion venom. Our previous studies found SVHRP could enhance neurogenesis and inhibit microglia-mediated neuroinflammation in vivo. Here, we use the transgenic CL4176, CL2006, and CL2355 strains of Caenorhabditis elegans which express the human Aβ1-42 to investigate the effects and the possible mechanisms of SVHRP mediated protection against Aβ toxicity in vivo. The results showed that SVHRP-fed worms displayed remarkably decreased paralysis, less abundant toxic Aβ oligomers, reduced Aβ plaque deposition with respect to untreated animals. SVHRP also suppressed neuronal Aβ expression-induced defects in chemotaxis behavior and attenuated levels of ROS in the transgenic C. elegans. Taken together, these results suggest SVHRP could protect against Aβ-induced toxicity in C. elegans. Further studies need to be conducted in murine models and humans to analyze the effectiveness of the peptide. PMID:27507947

  10. Scorpion Venom Heat-Resistant Peptide Protects Transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans from β- Amyloid Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Gang Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP is a component purified from Buthus martensii Karsch scorpion venom. Our previous studies found SVHRP could enhance neurogenesis and inhibit microglia-mediated neuroinflammation in vivo. Here, we use the transgenic CL4176, CL2006 and CL2355 strains of Caenorhabditis elegans which express the human Aβ1–42 to investigate the effects and the possible mechanisms of SVHRP mediated protection against Aβ toxicity in vivo. The results showed that SVHRP-fed worms displayed remarkably decreased paralysis, less abundant toxic Aβ oligomers, reduced Aβ plaque deposition with respect to untreated animals. SVHRP also suppressed neuronal Aβ expression-induced defects in chemotaxis behavior and attenuated levels of ROS in the transgenic C. elegans. Taken together, these results suggest SVHRP could protect against Aβ-induced toxicity in C. elegans. Further studies need to be conducted in murine models and humans to analyze the effectiveness of the peptide.

  11. Enhanced virus resistance in transgenic maize expressing a dsRNA-specific endoribonuclease gene from E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuling Cao

    Full Text Available Maize rough dwarf disease (MRDD, caused by several Fijiviruses in the family Reoviridae, is a global disease that is responsible for substantial yield losses in maize. Although some maize germplasm have low levels of polygenic resistance to MRDD, highly resistant cultivated varieties are not available for agronomic field production in China. In this work, we have generated transgenic maize lines that constitutively express rnc70, a mutant E. coli dsRNA-specific endoribonuclease gene. Transgenic lines were propagated and screened under field conditions for 12 generations. During three years of evaluations, two transgenic lines and their progeny were challenged with Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV, the causal agent of MRDD in China, and these plants exhibited reduced levels of disease severity. In two normal years of MRDD abundance, both lines were more resistant than non-transgenic plants. Even in the most serious MRDD year, six out of seven progeny from one line were resistant, whereas non-transgenic plants were highly susceptible. Molecular approaches in the T12 generation revealed that the rnc70 transgene was integrated and expressed stably in transgenic lines. Under artificial conditions permitting heavy virus inoculation, the T12 progeny of two highly resistant lines had a reduced incidence of MRDD and accumulation of RBSDV in infected plants. In addition, we confirmed that the RNC70 protein could bind directly to RBSDV dsRNA in vitro. Overall, our data show that RNC70-mediated resistance in transgenic maize can provide efficient protection against dsRNA virus infection.

  12. Transgenic Citrus Expressing an Arabidopsis NPR1 Gene Exhibit Enhanced Resistance against Huanglongbing (HLB; Citrus Greening).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, Manjul; Barthe, Gary; Irey, Michael; Grosser, Jude

    2015-01-01

    Commercial sweet orange cultivars lack resistance to Huanglongbing (HLB), a serious phloem limited bacterial disease that is usually fatal. In order to develop sustained disease resistance to HLB, transgenic sweet orange cultivars 'Hamlin' and 'Valencia' expressing an Arabidopsis thaliana NPR1 gene under the control of a constitutive CaMV 35S promoter or a phloem specific Arabidopsis SUC2 (AtSUC2) promoter were produced. Overexpression of AtNPR1 resulted in trees with normal phenotypes that exhibited enhanced resistance to HLB. Phloem specific expression of NPR1 was equally effective for enhancing disease resistance. Transgenic trees exhibited reduced diseased severity and a few lines remained disease-free even after 36 months of planting in a high-disease pressure field site. Expression of the NPR1 gene induced expression of several native genes involved in the plant defense signaling pathways. The AtNPR1 gene being plant derived can serve as a component for the development of an all plant T-DNA derived consumer friendly GM tree.

  13. Overexpressing MhNPR1 in transgenic Fuji apples enhances resistance to apple powdery mildew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiu-Kong; Zhang, Ji-Yu; Zhang, Zhen; Du, Xiao-Li; Du, Bei-Bei; Qu, Shen-Chun

    2012-08-01

    Fuji is susceptible to fungal diseases like apple powdery mildew. Non-expressor of pathogenesis-related gene 1 (NPR1) plays a key role in regulating salicylic acid (SA)-mediated systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Previous studies show that overexpressing the Malus hupehensis-derived NPR1 (MhNPR1) gene in tobacco induces the transcript expression of pathogenesis-related genes (PRs) and resistance to the fungus Botrytis cinerea. In this study we introduced the MhNPR1 gene into the 'Fuji' apple via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Four transgenic apple lines were verified by PCR and RT-PCR. The semi-quantitative RT-PCR results showed that transcript overexpression of the MhNPR1 gene induced the expression of MdPRs and MdMLO genes known to interact with powdery mildew. Furthermore, the transgenic apple plants resisted infection by apple powdery mildew better than the wild-type plants. As a result, transcript overexpression of the MhNPR1 gene induced SAR and enhanced the Fuji apple's resistance to fungal disease.

  14. Transgenic Citrus Expressing an Arabidopsis NPR1 Gene Exhibit Enhanced Resistance against Huanglongbing (HLB; Citrus Greening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjul Dutt

    Full Text Available Commercial sweet orange cultivars lack resistance to Huanglongbing (HLB, a serious phloem limited bacterial disease that is usually fatal. In order to develop sustained disease resistance to HLB, transgenic sweet orange cultivars 'Hamlin' and 'Valencia' expressing an Arabidopsis thaliana NPR1 gene under the control of a constitutive CaMV 35S promoter or a phloem specific Arabidopsis SUC2 (AtSUC2 promoter were produced. Overexpression of AtNPR1 resulted in trees with normal phenotypes that exhibited enhanced resistance to HLB. Phloem specific expression of NPR1 was equally effective for enhancing disease resistance. Transgenic trees exhibited reduced diseased severity and a few lines remained disease-free even after 36 months of planting in a high-disease pressure field site. Expression of the NPR1 gene induced expression of several native genes involved in the plant defense signaling pathways. The AtNPR1 gene being plant derived can serve as a component for the development of an all plant T-DNA derived consumer friendly GM tree.

  15. Detection of stress resistance genes in transgenic maize by multiplex and touchdown polymerase chain reaction

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    Bannikova M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To develop a methodology for detection of the genes of resistance to the stress factors in transgenic maize by multiplex (mPCR and touchdown polymerase chain reactions. Methods. isolation of total DNA by CTAB method, purification of DNA from RNA and proteins, electrophoresis of total DNA and amplification products in agarose gel, polymerase chain reaction. Results. The protocol of multiplex and touchdown polymerase chain reactions has been developed for simultaneous verification of the quality of total DNA extracted from the studied maize plant samples and detection of the following genes that determine resistance to the stress factors in the transgenic maize and maize transformation events: BT176, MON810, MON88017, DAS1507, DAS59122, MIR604, GA21, NK603 (mPCR, Bt11, MON863, MON89034, T25 (touchdown PCR. The multiplex PCR and touchdown PCR were developed using the reference samples. Conclusions. The proposed protocol of mPCR and touchdown PCR reactions can be used for mass analysis of maize samples to detect the genes of tolerance/resistance to herbicides and genes of resistance to insects reliably, authentically, quickly and cheaply.

  16. SP-LL-37, human antimicrobial peptide, enhances disease resistance in transgenic rice.

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    In Hye Lee

    Full Text Available Human LL-37 is a multifunctional antimicrobial peptide of cathelicidin family. It has been shown in recent studies that it can serve as a host's defense against influenza A virus. We now demonstrate in this study how signal peptide LL-37 (SP-LL-37 can be used in rice resistance against bacterial leaf blight and blast. We synthesized LL-37 peptide and subcloned in a recombinant pPZP vector with pGD1 as promoter. SP-LL-37 was introduced into rice plants by Agrobacterium mediated transformation. Stable expression of SP-LL-37 in transgenic rice plants was confirmed by RT-PCR and ELISA analyses. Subcellular localization of SP-LL-37-GFP fusion protein showed evidently in intercellular space. Our data on testing for resistance to bacterial leaf blight and blast revealed that the transgenic lines are highly resistant compared to its wildtype. Our results suggest that LL-37 can be further explored to improve wide-spectrum resistance to biotic stress in rice.

  17. Ectopic accumulation of linalool confers resistance to Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri in transgenic sweet orange plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Takehiko; Endo, Tomoko; Rodríguez, Ana; Fujii, Hiroshi; Goto, Shingo; Matsuura, Takakazu; Hojo, Yuko; Ikeda, Yoko; Mori, Izumi C; Fujikawa, Takashi; Peña, Leandro; Omura, Mitsuo

    2017-05-01

    In order to clarify whether high linalool content in citrus leaves alone induces strong field resistance to citrus canker caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc), and to assess whether this trait can be transferred to a citrus type highly sensitive to the bacterium, transgenic 'Hamlin' sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) plants over-expressing a linalool synthase gene (CuSTS3-1) were generated. Transgenic lines (LIL) with the highest linalool content showed strong resistance to citrus canker when spray inoculated with the bacterium. In LIL plants inoculated by wounding (multiple-needle inoculation), the linalool level was correlated with the repression of the bacterial titer and up-regulation of defense-related genes. The exogenous application of salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate or linalool triggered responses similar to those constitutively induced in LIL plants. The linalool content in Ponkan mandarin leaves was significantly higher than that of leaves from six other representative citrus genotypes with different susceptibilities to Xcc. We propose that linalool-mediated resistance might be unique to citrus tissues accumulating large amounts of volatile organic compounds in oil cells. Linalool might act not only as a direct antibacterial agent, but also as a signal molecule involved in triggering a non-host resistance response against Xcc. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Chimeric cDNA Sequences from Citrus tristeza virus Confer RNA Silencing-Mediated Resistance in Transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Gourgopal; Sudarshana, Mysore R; Ullman, Diane E; Ding, Shou-Wei; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Falk, Bryce W

    2006-08-01

    ABSTRACT RNA silencing has been shown to be an important mechanism for conferring resistance in transgenic, virus-resistant plants. We used this approach to evaluate resistance in Nicotiana benthamiana plants transformed with chimeric coding and noncoding sequences from Citrus tristeza virus (CTV). Several independent transgenic plant lines were generated, using two constructs (pCTV1 and pCTV2) designed to produce self-complementary transcripts. The pCTV1 contained cDNA sequences from the CTV capsid protein (CP), p20, and 3' untranslated region (UTR); and pCTV2 contained CP, p23, and 3' UTR sequences. Heterologous recombinant Potato virus X (PVX) containing either homologous or heterologous CTV sequences was used to challenge plants and resistance was evaluated phenotypically and validated with reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and northern hybridization analysis. Transgenic plants (T1 generation) for each construct showed resistance to recombinant PVX constructs used for challenge experiments when PVX contained p20 or UTR (for CTV1 plants), or p23 or UTR (for CTV2 plants). However, no resistance was seen when plants were challenged with PVX containing the CTV CP. T2 generation plants also showed resistance even when challenged with PVX containing the cognate CTV sequences obtained from heterologous CTV isolates. The presence of transgene-specific small interfering RNAs in the resistant CTV1 and CTV2 plants indicated that resistance was mediated by post-transcriptional gene silencing.

  19. Overexpression of a Chitinase Gene from Trichoderma asperellum Increases Disease Resistance in Transgenic Soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fuli; Ruan, Xianle; Wang, Xian; Liu, Zhihua; Hu, Lizong; Li, Chengwei

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, a chi gene from Trichoderma asperellum, designated Tachi, was cloned and functionally characterized in soybean. Firstly, the effects of sodium thiosulfate on soybean Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation with embryonic tip regeneration system were investigated. The transformation frequency was improved by adding sodium thiosulfate in co-culture medium for three soybean genotypes. Transgenic soybean plants with constitutive expression of Tachi showed increased resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum compared to WT plants. Meanwhile, overexpression of Tachi in soybean exhibited increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) level as well as peroxidase (POD) and catalase (SOD) activities, decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) content, along with diminished electrolytic leakage rate after S. sclerotiorum inoculation. These results suggest that Tachi can improve disease resistance in plants by enhancing ROS accumulation and activities of ROS scavenging enzymes and then diminishing cell death. Therefore, Tachi represents a candidate gene with potential application for increasing disease resistance in plants.

  20. Enhanced UV resistance and improved killing of malaria mosquitoes by photolyase transgenic entomopathogenic fungi.

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    Weiguo Fang

    Full Text Available The low survival of microbial pest control agents exposed to UV is the major environmental factor limiting their effectiveness. Using gene disruption we demonstrated that the insect pathogenic fungus Metarhizium robertsii uses photolyases to remove UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD and pyrimidine (6-4 photoproducts [(6-4PPs] from its DNA. However, this photorepair is insufficient to fix CPD lesions and prevent the loss of viability caused by seven hours of solar radiation. Expression of a highly efficient archaeal (Halobacterium salinarum CPD photolyase increased photorepair >30-fold in both M. robertsii and Beauveria bassiana. Consequently, transgenic strains were much more resistant to sunlight and retained virulence against the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. In the field this will translate into much more efficient pest control over a longer time period. Conversely, our data shows that deleting native photolyase genes will strictly contain M. robertsii to areas protected from sunlight, alleviating safety concerns that transgenic hypervirulent Metarhizium spp will spread from mosquito traps or houses. The precision and malleability of the native and transgenic photolyases allows design of multiple pathogens with different strategies based on the environments in which they will be used.

  1. Overexpression of Poplar Pyrabactin Resistance-Like Abscisic Acid Receptors Promotes Abscisic Acid Sensitivity and Drought Resistance in Transgenic Arabidopsis.

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    Jingling Yu

    Full Text Available Drought stress is an important environmental factor limiting productivity of plants, especially fast growing species with high water consumption like poplar. Abscisic acid (ABA is a phytohormone that positively regulates seed dormancy and drought resistance. The PYR1 (Pyrabactin Resistance 1/ PYRL (PYR-Like/ RCAR (Regulatory Component of ABA Receptor (PYR/PYL/RCAR ABA receptor family has been identified and widely characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, their functions in poplars remain unknown. Here, we report that 2 of 14 PYR/PYL/RCAR orthologues in poplar (Populus trichocarpa (PtPYRLs function as a positive regulator of the ABA signal transduction pathway. The Arabidopsis transient expression and yeast two-hybrid assays showed the interaction among PtPYRL1 and PtPYRL5, a clade A protein phosphatase 2C, and a SnRK2, suggesting that a core signalling complex for ABA signaling pathway exists in poplars. Phenotypic analysis of PtPYRL1 and PtPYRL5 transgenic Arabidopsis showed that these two genes positively regulated the ABA responses during the seed germination. More importantly, the overexpression of PtPYRL1 and PtPYRL5 substantially improved ABA sensitivity and drought stress tolerance in transgenic plants. In summary, we comprehensively uncovered the properties of PtPYRL1 and PtPYRL5, which might be good target genes to genetically engineer drought-Resistant plants.

  2. A hybrid Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxin gene gives resistance against a coleopteran and a lepidopteran pest in transgenic potato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naimov, S.; Dukiandjiev, S.; Maagd, de R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Expression of Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxins has proven to be a successful strategy for obtaining insect resistance in transgenic plants. Drawbacks of expression of a single resistance gene are the limited target spectrum and the potential for rapid adaptation of the pest. Hybrid toxins

  3. Enhanced pest resistance and increased phenolic production in maize callus transgenically expressing a maize chalcone isomerase -3 like gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant losses in maize production are due to damage by insects and ear rot fungi. A gene designated as chalcone-isomerase-like, located in a quantitative trait locus for resistance to Fusarium ear rot fungi, was cloned from a Fusarium ear rot resistant inbred and transgenically expressed in mai...

  4. Field Trial and Molecular Characterization of RNAi-Transgenic Tomato Plants That Exhibit Resistance to Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Geminivirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Alejandro; Carlos, Natacha; Ruiz, Yoslaine; Callard, Danay; Sánchez, Yadira; Ochagavía, María Elena; Seguin, Jonathan; Malpica-López, Nachelli; Hohn, Thomas; Lecca, Maria Rita; Pérez, Rosabel; Doreste, Vivian; Rehrauer, Hubert; Farinelli, Laurent; Pujol, Merardo; Pooggin, Mikhail M

    2016-03-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a widely used approach to generate virus-resistant transgenic crops. However, issues of agricultural importance like the long-term durability of RNAi-mediated resistance under field conditions and the potential side effects provoked in the plant by the stable RNAi expression remain poorly investigated. Here, we performed field trials and molecular characterization studies of two homozygous transgenic tomato lines, with different selection markers, expressing an intron-hairpin RNA cognate to the Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) C1 gene. The tested F6 and F4 progenies of the respective kanamycin- and basta-resistant plants exhibited unchanged field resistance to TYLCV and stably expressed the transgene-derived short interfering RNA (siRNAs) to represent 6 to 8% of the total plant small RNAs. This value outnumbered the average percentage of viral siRNAs in the nontransformed plants exposed to TYLCV-infested whiteflies. As a result of the RNAi transgene expression, a common set of up- and downregulated genes was revealed in the transcriptome profile of the plants selected from either of the two transgenic events. A previously unidentified geminivirus causing no symptoms of viral disease was detected in some of the transgenic plants. The novel virus acquired V1 and V2 genes from TYLCV and C1, C2, C3, and C4 genes from a distantly related geminivirus and, thereby, it could evade the repressive sequence-specific action of transgene-derived siRNAs. Our findings shed light on the mechanisms of siRNA-directed antiviral silencing in transgenic plants and highlight the applicability limitations of this technology as it may alter the transcriptional pattern of nontarget genes.

  5. Changes in fitness-associated traits due to the stacking of transgenic glyphosate resistance and insect resistance in Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londo, J P; Bollman, M A; Sagers, C L; Lee, E H; Watrud, L S

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, genetically modified crops are being developed to express multiple ‘stacked' traits for different types of transgenes, for example, herbicide resistance, insect resistance, crop quality and tolerance to environmental stresses. The release of crops that express multiple traits could result in ecological changes in weedy environments if feral crop plants or hybrids formed with compatible weeds results in more competitive plants outside of agriculture. To examine the effects of combining transgenes, we developed a stacked line of canola (Brassica napus L.) from a segregating F2 population that expresses both transgenic glyphosate resistance (CP4 EPSPS) and lepidopteran insect resistance (Cry1Ac). Fitness-associated traits were evaluated between this stacked genotype and five other Brassica genotypes in constructed mesocosm plant communities exposed to insect herbivores (Plutella xylostella L.) or glyphosate-drift. Vegetative biomass, seed production and relative fecundity were all reduced in stacked trait plants when compared with non-transgenic plants in control treatments, indicating potential costs of expressing multiple transgenes without selection pressure. Although costs of the transgenes were offset by selective treatment, the stacked genotype continued to produce fewer seeds than either single transgenic line. However, the increase in fitness of the stacked genotype under selective pressure contributed to an increased number of seeds within the mesocosm community carrying unselected, hitchhiking transgenes. These results demonstrate that the stacking of these transgenes in canola results in fitness costs and benefits that are dependent on the type and strength of selection pressure, and could also contribute to changes in plant communities through hitchhiking of unselected traits. PMID:21427753

  6. Modified expression of alternative oxidase in transgenic tomato and petunia affects the level of tomato spotted wilt virus resistance

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    Ma Hao

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV has a very wide host range, and is transmitted in a persistent manner by several species of thrips. These characteristics make this virus difficult to control. We show here that the over-expression of the mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX in tomato and petunia is related to TSWV resistance. Results The open reading frame and full-length sequence of the tomato AOX gene LeAox1au were cloned and introduced into tomato 'Healani' and petunia 'Sheer Madness' using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Highly expressed AOX transgenic tomato and petunia plants were selfed and transgenic R1 seedlings from 10 tomato lines and 12 petunia lines were used for bioassay. For each assayed line, 22 to 32 tomato R1 progeny in three replications and 39 to 128 petunia progeny in 13 replications were challenged with TSWV. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays showed that the TSWV levels in transgenic tomato line FKT4-1 was significantly lower than that of wild-type controls after challenge with TSWV. In addition, transgenic petunia line FKP10 showed significantly less lesion number and smaller lesion size than non-transgenic controls after inoculation by TSWV. Conclusion In all assayed transgenic tomato lines, a higher percentage of transgenic progeny had lower TSWV levels than non-transgenic plants after challenge with TSWV, and the significantly increased resistant levels of tomato and petunia lines identified in this study indicate that altered expression levels of AOX in tomato and petunia can affect the levels of TSWV resistance.

  7. Transgenic Sugarcane with a cry1Ac Gene Exhibited Better Phenotypic Traits and Enhanced Resistance against Sugarcane Borer.

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    Shiwu Gao

    Full Text Available We developed sugarcane plants with improved resistance to the sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis (F. An expression vector pGcry1Ac0229, harboring the cry1Ac gene and the selectable marker gene, bar, was constructed. This construct was introduced into the sugarcane cultivar FN15 by particle bombardment. Transformed plantlets were identified after selection with Phosphinothricin (PPT and Basta. Plantlets were then screened by PCR based on the presence of cry1Ac and 14 cry1Ac positive plantlets were identified. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR revealed that the copy number of cry1Ac gene in the transgenic lines varied from 1 to 148. ELISA analysis showed that Cry1Ac protein levels in 7 transgenic lines ranged from 0.85 μg/FWg to 70.92 μg/FWg in leaves and 0.04 μg/FWg to 7.22 μg/FWg in stems, and negatively correlated to the rate of insect damage that ranged from 36.67% to 13.33%, respectively. Agronomic traits of six transgenic sugarcane lines with medium copy numbers were similar to the non-transgenic parental line. However, phenotype was poor in lines with high or low copy numbers. Compared to the non-transgenic control plants, all transgenic lines with medium copy numbers had relatively equal or lower sucrose yield and significantly improved sugarcane borer resistance, which lowered susceptibility to damage by insects. This suggests that the transgenic sugarcane lines harboring medium copy numbers of the cry1Ac gene may have significantly higher resistance to sugarcane borer but the sugarcane yield in these lines is similar to the non-transgenic control thus making them superior to the control lines.

  8. Climate change, transgenic corn adoption and field-evolved resistance in corn earworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, P Dilip; Dively, Galen P

    2017-06-01

    Increased temperature anomaly during the twenty-first century coincides with the proliferation of transgenic crops containing the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner) (Bt) to express insecticidal Cry proteins. Increasing temperatures profoundly affect insect life histories and agricultural pest management. However, the implications of climate change on Bt crop-pest interactions and insect resistance to Bt crops remains unexamined. We analysed the relationship of temperature anomaly and Bt adoption with field-evolved resistance to Cry1Ab Bt sweet corn in a major pest, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie). Increased Bt adoption during 1996-2016 suppressed H. zea populations, but increased temperature anomaly buffers population reduction. Temperature anomaly and its interaction with elevated selection pressure from high Bt acreage probably accelerated the Bt-resistance development. Helicoverpa zea damage to corn ears, kernel area consumed, mean instars and proportion of late instars in Bt varieties increased with Bt adoption and temperature anomaly, through additive or interactive effects. Risk of Bt-resistant H. zea spreading is high given extensive Bt adoption, and the expected increase in overwintering and migration. Our study highlights the challenges posed by climate change for Bt biotechnology-based agricultural pest management, and the need to incorporate evolutionary processes affected by climate change into Bt-resistance management programmes.

  9. Transgenic Rice Plants Harboring Genomic DNA from Zizania latifolia Confer Bacterial Blight Resistance

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    Wei-wei SHEN

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the sequence of a resistance gene analog FZ14 derived from Zizania latifolia (Griseb., a pair of specific PCR primers FZ14P1/FZ14P2 was designed to isolate candidate disease resistance gene. The pooled-PCR approach was adopted using the primer pair to screen a genomic transformation-competent artificial chromosome (TAC library derived from Z. latifolia. A positive TAC clone (ZR1 was obtained and confirmed by sequence analysis. The results indicated that ZR1 consisted of conserved motifs similar to P-loop (kinase 1a, kinase 2, kinase 3a and GLPL (Gly-Leu-Pro-Leu, suggesting that it could be a portion of NBS-LRR type of resistance gene. Using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Nipponbare mature embryo, a total of 48 independent transgenic T0 plants were obtained. Among them, 36 plants were highly resistant to the virulent bacterial blight strain PXO71. The results indicate that ZR1 contains at least one functional bacterial blight resistance gene.

  10. Climate change, transgenic corn adoption and field-evolved resistance in corn earworm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dively, Galen P.

    2017-01-01

    Increased temperature anomaly during the twenty-first century coincides with the proliferation of transgenic crops containing the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner) (Bt) to express insecticidal Cry proteins. Increasing temperatures profoundly affect insect life histories and agricultural pest management. However, the implications of climate change on Bt crop–pest interactions and insect resistance to Bt crops remains unexamined. We analysed the relationship of temperature anomaly and Bt adoption with field-evolved resistance to Cry1Ab Bt sweet corn in a major pest, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie). Increased Bt adoption during 1996–2016 suppressed H. zea populations, but increased temperature anomaly buffers population reduction. Temperature anomaly and its interaction with elevated selection pressure from high Bt acreage probably accelerated the Bt-resistance development. Helicoverpa zea damage to corn ears, kernel area consumed, mean instars and proportion of late instars in Bt varieties increased with Bt adoption and temperature anomaly, through additive or interactive effects. Risk of Bt-resistant H. zea spreading is high given extensive Bt adoption, and the expected increase in overwintering and migration. Our study highlights the challenges posed by climate change for Bt biotechnology-based agricultural pest management, and the need to incorporate evolutionary processes affected by climate change into Bt-resistance management programmes. PMID:28680673

  11. Generation of marker-free Bt transgenic indica rice and evaluation of its yellow stem borer resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S; Arul, L; Talwar, D

    2010-01-01

    We report on generation of marker-free (‘clean DNA’) transgenic rice (Oryza sativa), carrying minimal gene-expression-cassettes of the genes of interest, and evaluation of its resistance to yellow stem borer Scirpophaga incertulas (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). The transgenic indica rice harbours a translational fusion of 2 different Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) genes, namely cry1B-1Aa, driven by the green-tissue-specific phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) promoter. Mature seed-derived calli of an elite indica rice cultivar Pusa Basmati-1 were co-bombarded with gene-expression-cassettes (clean DNA fragments) of the Bt gene and the marker hpt gene, to generate marker-free transgenic rice plants. The clean DNA fragments for bombardment were obtained by restriction digestion and gel extraction. Through biolistic transformation, 67 independent transformants were generated. Transformation frequency reached 3.3%, and 81% of the transgenic plants were co-transformants. Stable integration of the Bt gene was confirmed, and the insert copy number was determined by Southern analysis. Western analysis and ELISA revealed a high level of Bt protein expression in transgenic plants. Progeny analysis confirmed stable inheritance of the Bt gene according to the Mendelian (3:1) ratio. Insect bioassays revealed complete protection of transgenic plants from yellow stem borer infestation. PCR analysis of T2 progeny plants resulted in the recovery of up to 4% marker-free transgenic rice plants.

  12. Modeling evolution of resistance of sugarcane borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) to transgenic Bt corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J; Huang, F; Onstad, D W

    2014-08-01

    Diatraea saccharalis (F.) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) is a target pest of transgenic corn expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) protein, and the first evidence of resistance by D. saccharalis to Cry1Ab corn was detected in a field population in northeast Louisiana in 2004. We used a model of population dynamics and genetics of D. saccharalis to 1) study the effect of interfield dispersal, the first date that larvae enter diapause for overwintering, toxin mortality, the proportion of non-Bt corn in the corn patch, and the area of a crop patch on Bt resistance evolution; and 2) to identify gaps in empirical knowledge for managing D. saccharalis resistance to Bt corn. Increasing, the proportion of corn refuge did not always improve the durability of Bt corn if the landscape also contained sugarcane, sorghum, or rice. In the landscape, which consisted of 90% corn area, 5% sorghum area, and 5% rice area, the durability of single-protein Bt corn was 40 yr when the proportion of corn refuge was 0.2 but 16 yr when the proportion of corn refuge was 0.5. The Bt resistance evolution was sensitive to a change (from Julian date 260 to 272) in the first date larvae enter diapause for overwintering and moth movement. In the landscapes with Bt corn, non-Bt corn, sugarcane, sorghum, and rice, the evolution of Bt resistance accelerated when larvae entered diapause for overwintering early. Intermediate rates of moth movement delayed evolution of resistance more than either extremely low or high rates. This study suggested that heterogeneity in the agrolandscapes may complicate the strategy for managing Bt resistance in D. saccharalis, and designing a Bt resistance management strategy for D. saccharalis is challenging because of a lack of empirical data about overwintering and moth movement.

  13. Transgenic expression in citrus of single-chain antibody fragments specific to Citrus tristeza virus confers virus resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Magdalena; Esteban, Olga; Gil, Maite; Gorris, M Teresa; Martínez, M Carmen; Peña, Leandro; Cambra, Mariano

    2010-12-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) causes one of the most destructive viral diseases of citrus worldwide. Generation of resistant citrus genotypes through genetic engineering could be a good alternative to control CTV. To study whether production of single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies in citrus could interfere and immunomodulate CTV infection, transgenic Mexican lime plants expressing two different scFv constructs, separately and simultaneously, were generated. These constructs derived from the well-referenced monoclonal antibodies 3DF1 and 3CA5, specific against CTV p25 major coat protein, whose mixture is able to detect all CTV isolates characterized so far. ScFv accumulation levels were low and could be readily detected just in four transgenic lines. Twelve homogeneous and vigorous lines were propagated and CTV-challenged by graft inoculation with an aggressive CTV strain. A clear protective effect was observed in most transgenic lines, which showed resistance in up to 40-60% of propagations. Besides, both a delay in symptom appearance and attenuation of symptom intensity were observed in infected transgenic plants compared with control plants. This effect was more evident in lines carrying the 3DF1scFv transgene, being probably related to the biological functions of the epitope recognized by this antibody. This is the first report describing successful protection against a pathogen in woody transgenic plants by ectopic expression of scFv recombinant antibodies.

  14. Transgenic banana plants expressing Xanthomonas wilt resistance genes revealed a stable non-target bacterial colonization structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimusiima, Jean; Köberl, Martina; Tumuhairwe, John Baptist; Kubiriba, Jerome; Staver, Charles; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-12-10

    Africa is among the continents where the battle over genetically modified crops is currently being played out. The impact of GM in Africa could potentially be very positive. In Uganda, researchers have developed transgenic banana lines resistant to banana Xanthomonas wilt. The transgenic lines expressing hrap and pflp can provide a timely solution to the pandemic. However, the impact of the transgenes expression on non-target microorganisms has not yet been investigated. To study this effect, transgenic and control lines were grown under field conditions and their associated microbiome was investigated by 16S rRNA gene profiling combining amplicon sequencing and molecular fingerprinting. Three years after sucker planting, no statistically significant differences between transgenic lines and their non-modified predecessors were detected for their associated bacterial communities. The overall gammaproteobacterial rhizosphere microbiome was highly dominated by Xanthomonadales, while Pseudomonadales and Enterobacteriales were accumulated in the pseudostem. Shannon indices revealed much higher diversity in the rhizosphere than in the pseudostem endosphere. However, the expression of the transgenes did not result in changes in the diversity of Gammaproteobacteria, the closest relatives of the target pathogen. In this field experiment, the expression of the resistance genes appears to have no consequences for non-target rhizobacteria and endophytes.

  15. Enhanced whitefly resistance in transgenic tobacco plants expressing double stranded RNA of v-ATPase A gene.

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    Nidhi Thakur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Expression of double strand RNA (dsRNA designed against important insect genes in transgenic plants have been shown to give protection against pests through RNA interference (RNAi, thus opening the way for a new generation of insect-resistant crops. We have earlier compared the efficacy of dsRNAs/siRNAs, against a number of target genes, for interference in growth of whitefly (Bemisia tabaci upon oral feeding. The v-ATPase subunit A (v-ATPaseA coding gene was identified as a crucial target. We now report the effectiveness of transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA to silence v-ATPaseA gene expression for the control of whitefly infestation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Transgenic tobacco lines were developed for the expression of long dsRNA precursor to make siRNA and knock down the v-ATPaseA mRNA in whitefly. Molecular analysis and insecticidal properties of the transgenic plants established the formation of siRNA targeting the whitefly v-ATPaseA, in the leaves. The transcript level of v-ATPaseA in whiteflies was reduced up to 62% after feeding on the transgenic plants. Heavy infestation of whiteflies on the control plants caused significant loss of sugar content which led to the drooping of leaves. The transgenic plants did not show drooping effect. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Host plant derived pest resistance was achieved against whiteflies by genetic transformation of tobacco which generated siRNA against the whitefly v-ATPaseA gene. Transgenic tobacco lines expressing dsRNA of v-ATPaseA, delivered sufficient siRNA to whiteflies feeding on them, mounting a significant silencing response, leading to their mortality. The transcript level of the target gene was reduced in whiteflies feeding on transgenic plants. The strategy can be taken up for genetic engineering of plants to control whiteflies in field crops.

  16. Development of transgenic cotton lines expressing Allium sativum agglutinin (ASAL) for enhanced resistance against major sap-sucking pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajhala, Chakravarthy S K; Sadumpati, Vijaya Kumar; Nunna, Hariprasad Rao; Puligundla, Sateesh Kumar; Vudem, Dashavantha Reddy; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2013-01-01

    Mannose-specific Allium sativum leaf agglutinin encoding gene (ASAL) and herbicide tolerance gene (BAR) were introduced into an elite cotton inbred line (NC-601) employing Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. Cotton transformants were produced from the phosphinothricin (PPT)-resistant shoots obtained after co-cultivation of mature embryos with the Agrobacterium strain EHA105 harbouring recombinant binary vector pCAMBIA3300-ASAL-BAR. PCR and Southern blot analysis confirmed the presence and stable integration of ASAL and BAR genes in various transformants of cotton. Basta leaf-dip assay, northern blot, western blot and ELISA analyses disclosed variable expression of BAR and ASAL transgenes in different transformants. Transgenes, ASAL and BAR, were stably inherited and showed co-segregation in T1 generation in a Mendelian fashion for both PPT tolerance and insect resistance. In planta insect bioassays on T2 and T3 homozygous ASAL-transgenic lines revealed potent entomotoxic effects of ASAL on jassid and whitefly insects, as evidenced by significant decreases in the survival, development and fecundity of the insects when compared to the untransformed controls. Furthermore, the transgenic cotton lines conferred higher levels of resistance (1-2 score) with minimal plant damage against these major sucking pests when bioassays were carried out employing standard screening techniques. The developed transgenics could serve as a potential genetic resource in recombination breeding aimed at improving the pest resistance of cotton. This study represents the first report of its kind dealing with the development of transgenic cotton resistant to two major sap-sucking insects.

  17. Development of Transgenic Cotton Lines Expressing Allium sativum Agglutinin (ASAL) for Enhanced Resistance against Major Sap-Sucking Pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunna, Hariprasad Rao; Puligundla, Sateesh Kumar; Vudem, Dashavantha Reddy; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2013-01-01

    Mannose-specific Allium sativum leaf agglutinin encoding gene (ASAL) and herbicide tolerance gene (BAR) were introduced into an elite cotton inbred line (NC-601) employing Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. Cotton transformants were produced from the phosphinothricin (PPT)-resistant shoots obtained after co-cultivation of mature embryos with the Agrobacterium strain EHA105 harbouring recombinant binary vector pCAMBIA3300-ASAL-BAR. PCR and Southern blot analysis confirmed the presence and stable integration of ASAL and BAR genes in various transformants of cotton. Basta leaf-dip assay, northern blot, western blot and ELISA analyses disclosed variable expression of BAR and ASAL transgenes in different transformants. Transgenes, ASAL and BAR, were stably inherited and showed co-segregation in T1 generation in a Mendelian fashion for both PPT tolerance and insect resistance. In planta insect bioassays on T2 and T3 homozygous ASAL-transgenic lines revealed potent entomotoxic effects of ASAL on jassid and whitefly insects, as evidenced by significant decreases in the survival, development and fecundity of the insects when compared to the untransformed controls. Furthermore, the transgenic cotton lines conferred higher levels of resistance (1–2 score) with minimal plant damage against these major sucking pests when bioassays were carried out employing standard screening techniques. The developed transgenics could serve as a potential genetic resource in recombination breeding aimed at improving the pest resistance of cotton. This study represents the first report of its kind dealing with the development of transgenic cotton resistant to two major sap-sucking insects. PMID:24023750

  18. Stability of gene silencing-based resistance to Plum pox virus in transgenic plum (Prunus domestica L.) under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hily, Jean-Michel; Scorza, Ralph; Malinowski, Tadeusz; Zawadzka, Barbara; Ravelonandro, Michel

    2004-10-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) is one of the most devastating diseases of Prunus species. Since few sources of resistance to PPV have been identified, transgene-based resistance offers a complementary approach to developing PPV-resistant stone fruit cultivars. C5, a transgenic clone of Prunus domestica L., containing the PPV coat protein (CP) gene, has been described as highly resistant to PPV in greenhouse tests, displaying characteristics typical of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). We show in this report that C5 trees exposed to natural aphid vectors in the field remained uninfected after 4 years while susceptible transgenic and untransformed trees developed severe symptoms within the first year. C5 trees inoculated by chip budding showed only very mild symptoms and PPV could be detected in these trees by IC-RT-PCR. The PPV-CP transgene in C5 was specifically hyper-methylated with no detectable expression. These results indicate both stability and efficiency of PTGS-based PPV resistance in plum under field conditions.

  19. Field-Evolved Resistance in Corn Earworm to Cry Proteins Expressed by Transgenic Sweet Corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dively, Galen P; Venugopal, P Dilip; Finkenbinder, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic corn engineered with genes expressing insecticidal toxins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner) (Bt) are now a major tool in insect pest management. With its widespread use, insect resistance is a major threat to the sustainability of the Bt transgenic technology. For all Bt corn expressing Cry toxins, the high dose requirement for resistance management is not achieved for corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), which is more tolerant to the Bt toxins. We present field monitoring data using Cry1Ab (1996-2016) and Cry1A.105+Cry2Ab2 (2010-2016) expressing sweet corn hybrids as in-field screens to measure changes in field efficacy and Cry toxin susceptibility to H. zea. Larvae successfully damaged an increasing proportion of ears, consumed more kernel area, and reached later developmental stages (4th - 6th instars) in both types of Bt hybrids (Cry1Ab-event Bt11, and Cry1A.105+Cry2Ab2-event MON89034) since their commercial introduction. Yearly patterns of H. zea population abundance were unrelated to reductions in control efficacy. There was no evidence of field efficacy or tissue toxicity differences among different Cry1Ab hybrids that could contribute to the decline in control efficacy. Supportive data from laboratory bioassays demonstrate significant differences in weight gain and fitness characteristics between the Maryland H. zea strain and a susceptible strain. In bioassays with Cry1Ab expressing green leaf tissue, Maryland H. zea strain gained more weight than the susceptible strain at all concentrations tested. Fitness of the Maryland H. zea strain was significantly lower than that of the susceptible strain as indicated by lower hatch rate, longer time to adult eclosion, lower pupal weight, and reduced survival to adulthood. After ruling out possible contributing factors, the rapid change in field efficacy in recent years and decreased susceptibility of H. zea to Bt sweet corn provide strong evidence of field-evolved resistance in H

  20. Field-Evolved Resistance in Corn Earworm to Cry Proteins Expressed by Transgenic Sweet Corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dively, Galen P.; Finkenbinder, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Background Transgenic corn engineered with genes expressing insecticidal toxins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner) (Bt) are now a major tool in insect pest management. With its widespread use, insect resistance is a major threat to the sustainability of the Bt transgenic technology. For all Bt corn expressing Cry toxins, the high dose requirement for resistance management is not achieved for corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), which is more tolerant to the Bt toxins. Methodology/Major Findings We present field monitoring data using Cry1Ab (1996–2016) and Cry1A.105+Cry2Ab2 (2010–2016) expressing sweet corn hybrids as in-field screens to measure changes in field efficacy and Cry toxin susceptibility to H. zea. Larvae successfully damaged an increasing proportion of ears, consumed more kernel area, and reached later developmental stages (4th - 6th instars) in both types of Bt hybrids (Cry1Ab—event Bt11, and Cry1A.105+Cry2Ab2—event MON89034) since their commercial introduction. Yearly patterns of H. zea population abundance were unrelated to reductions in control efficacy. There was no evidence of field efficacy or tissue toxicity differences among different Cry1Ab hybrids that could contribute to the decline in control efficacy. Supportive data from laboratory bioassays demonstrate significant differences in weight gain and fitness characteristics between the Maryland H. zea strain and a susceptible strain. In bioassays with Cry1Ab expressing green leaf tissue, Maryland H. zea strain gained more weight than the susceptible strain at all concentrations tested. Fitness of the Maryland H. zea strain was significantly lower than that of the susceptible strain as indicated by lower hatch rate, longer time to adult eclosion, lower pupal weight, and reduced survival to adulthood. Conclusions/Significance After ruling out possible contributing factors, the rapid change in field efficacy in recent years and decreased susceptibility of H. zea to Bt

  1. TRANSGENIC PLANTS OF RAPE (BRASSICA NAPUS L. WITH GENE OSMYB4 HAVE INCREASED RESISTANCE TO SALTS OF HEAVY METALS

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    Raldugina G.N.

    2012-08-01

    fact that at very high concentrations of salts non-transformed plants died after 12-13 days, whereas the transgenic oilseed rape remained alive long enough time. Thus, the incorporation of the plant gene transcription factor OSMYB4 increased the resistance of transgenic plants to the stress effect of HM.

  2. The use of transgenic fruit trees as a resistance strategy for virus epidemics: the plum pox (sharka) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravelonandro, M; Scorza, R; Callahan, A; Levy, L; Jacquet, C; Monsion, M; Damsteegt, V

    2000-11-01

    Sharka or plum pox, caused by Plum pox virus (PPV: genus Potyvirus; Family Potyviridae), is the most serious disease of Prunus. Most cultivated Prunus species are highly susceptible and conventional breeding has not produced highly resistant and commercially acceptable varieties. Success in developing virus-resistant herbaceous crops through genetic engineering led us to investigate this approach for resistance to PPV. Our programme aims to develop a biotechnological approach to PPV control that is effective and shown to be environmentally safe. The programme began with the cloning of the PPV coat protein (CP) gene and the development of a transformation system for plum (Prunus domestica). The CP construct was first tested in Nicotiana benthamiana in which it proved effective in producing transgenic plants with varying levels of CP expression. Some of these plants, particularly low PPV CP expressers, were resistant to PPV, or recovered from initial infection. Based on these results plum was transformed using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens system and both low and high PPV CP-expressing transgenic plum lines were obtained. These were inoculated with PPV by bud grafts in the greenhouse. Line C-5 proved to be highly resistant. It contained multiple copies of the insert, produced low levels of PPV CP mRNA, no detectable CP and the insert appeared to be methylated. These characteristics all suggest that the resistance of the C-5 clone is based on post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). Field tests of C-5 and other transgenic lines in Poland, Romania and Spain have demonstrated that such trees when inoculated by bud-grafts allow a low level of PPV multiplication, from which they rapidly recover. C-5 plants exposed to natural infection for 3 years did not become infected, whereas control trees were infected in the first year. Hybrid plums having the C-5 PPV CP insert inherited from C-5 are virus-resistant, demonstrating the usefulness of C-5 as a parent in developing

  3. From immunity to susceptibility: virus resistance induced in tomato by a silenced transgene is lost as TGS overcomes PTGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catoni, Marco; Lucioli, Alessandra; Doblas-Ibáñez, Paula; Accotto, Gian Paolo; Vaira, Anna Maria

    2013-09-01

    Tomato line 30.4 was obtained engineering the nucleocapsid (N) gene of tomato spotted wilt virus into plant genome, and immunity to tomato spotted wilt virus infection of its self-pollinated homozygous progeny was observed. Despite the presence of a high amount of transgenic transcripts, transgenic proteins have not been detected, suggesting a mechanism of resistance mediated by RNA. In the present study, we identify post-transcriptional gene silencing as the main mechanism of resistance, which is able to spread systemically through grafting, and show that the line 30.4 resistant plants produce both 24 and 21-22 nt N-gene specific siRNA classes. The transgenic locus in chromosome 4 shows complex multiple insertions of four T-DNA copies in various orientations, all with 3' end deletions in the terminator and part of the N gene. However, for three of them, polyadenylated transcripts are produced, due to flanking tomato genome sequences acting as alternative terminators. Interestingly, starting at the fifth generation after the transformation event, some individual plants show a tomato spotted wilt virus-susceptible phenotype. The change is associated with the disappearance of transgene-specific transcripts and siRNAs, and with hyper-methylation of the transgene, which proceeds gradually through the generations. Once it reaches a critical threshold, the shift from post-transcriptional gene silencing to transcriptional silencing of the transgene eliminates the previously well established virus resistance. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. MANAGING THE RISK OF EUROPEAN CORN BORER RESISTANCE TO TRANSGENIC CORN: AN ASSESSMENT OF CONTROVERSIAL REFUGE RECOMMENDATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Hurley, Terrance M.; Secchi, Silvia; Hellmich, Richard L.

    1999-01-01

    A bioeconomic model is developed to evaluate the tradeoff between the risk of resistance and increased productivity when refuge is planted in conjunction with transgenic pesticidal corn. The model is used to evaluate controversial refuge recommendations when producers are allowed to treat refuge in years of high pest pressure.

  5. The impact of altered herbicide residues in transgenic herbicide-resistant crops on standard setting for herbicide residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleter, G.A.; Unsworth, J.B.; Harris, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The global area covered with transgenic (genetically modified) crops has rapidly increased since their introduction in the mid-1990s. Most of these crops have been rendered herbicide resistant, for which it can be envisaged that the modification has an impact on the profile and level of herbicide

  6. Constitutive expression of Arabidopsis NPR1 confers enhanced resistance to the early instars of Spodoptera litura in transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meur, Gargi; Budatha, Madhusudhan; Srinivasan, Tantravahi; Rajesh Kumar, Koppolu Raja; Dutta Gupta, Aparna; Kirti, Pulugurtha Bharadwaja

    2008-08-01

    In Arabidopsis, NPR1 (AtNPR1) regulates salicylic acid (SA)-mediated activation of PR genes at the onset of systemic acquired resistance. AtNPR1 also modulates SA-induced suppression of jasmonic acid-responsive gene expression, and npr1 mutants manifest enhanced herbivore resistance. We have raised stable transgenic tobacco lines, expressing AtNPR1 constitutively, which showed elevated expression of PR1 and PR2 genes upon SA treatment. Herbivore bioassays with a generalist polyphagous pest, Spodoptera litura, revealed that the transgenic lines exhibited enhanced resistance compared to the wild-type plants, particularly with respect to younger larval populations. Insect-mediated injury induced several protease inhibitors (PIs), more significantly a 40-kDa serine PI in all the tobacco lines, but the induction was higher in the transgenic plants. We show in this communication that heterologous expression of AtNPR1 provides enhanced resistance to early larval populations of the herbivore, Spodoptera in transgenic tobacco plants.

  7. Controversy Associated With the Common Component of Most Transgenic Plants – Kanamycin Resistance Marker Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srećko Jelenić

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant genetic engineering is a powerful tool for producing crops resistant to pests, diseases and abiotic stress or crops with improved nutritional value or better quality products. Currently over 70 genetically modified (GM crops have been approved for use in different countries. These cover a wide range of plant species with significant number of different modified traits. However, beside the technology used for their improvement, the common component of most GM crops is the neomycin phosphotransferase II gene (nptII, which confers resistance to the antibiotics kanamycin and neomycin. The nptII gene is present in GM crops as a marker gene to select transformed plant cells during the first steps of the transformation process. The use of antibiotic-resistance genes is subject to controversy and intense debate, because of the likelihood that clinical therapy could be compromised due to inactivation of the oral dose of the antibiotic from consumption of food derived from the transgenic plant, and because of the risk of gene transfer from plants to gut and soil microorganisms or to consumer’s cells. The present article discusses these possibilities in the light of current scientific knowledge.

  8. Laboratory and field evaluation of the transgenic Populus alba × Populus glandulosa expressing double coleopteran-resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bingyu; Chen, Min; Zhang, Xiaofen; Luan, Hehui; Diao, Shu; Tian, Yingchuan; Su, Xiaohua

    2011-05-01

    Expression of the two coleopteran-resistant proteins (Bt-Cry3A and oryzacystatin I) was detected in the leaves of field-grown transgenic poplar (BOGA-5) in two or three subsequent years. The BOGA-5 contained ∼10 μg g(-1) of Cry3A over the individual years with no detection in the control, and protein extracts from BOGA-5 displayed a higher reduction in papain activity (∼42%) compared with ∼21% in the control. Laboratory feeding experiments showed that the total mortality of the target pest Plagiodera versicolora (Coleoptera, Chrysomelida) larvae fed with BOGA-5 leaves was 76.7%, significantly higher than that of the control (P< .05). However, no significant differences were detected in the mortality, exuviation index, pupation rate or adult eclosion rate of the non-target Clostera anachoreta (Lepidoptera, Notodontidae) fed with leaves from transgenic and non-transgenic poplars. Field investigation indicated that the transgenic poplar retained coleopteran insect resistance in the field, suggesting the potential use of the double gene transgenic poplar for pest management in commercial poplar plantations. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  9. Field resistance to Fusarium oxysporum and Verticillium dahliae in transgenic cotton expressing the plant defensin NaD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Yolanda M; McKenna, James A; McGinness, Bruce S; Hinch, Jillian; Poon, Simon; Connelly, Angela A; Anderson, Marilyn A; Heath, Robyn L

    2014-04-01

    The plant defensin NaD1, from Nicotiana alata, has potent antifungal activity against a range of filamentous fungi including the two important cotton pathogens, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum (Fov) and Verticillium dahliae. Transgenic cotton plants expressing NaD1 were produced and plants from three events were selected for further characterization. Homozygous plants were assessed in greenhouse bioassays for resistance to Fov. One line (D1) was selected for field trial testing over three growing seasons in soils naturally infested with Fov and over two seasons in soils naturally infested with V. dahliae. In the field trials with Fov-infested soil, line D1 had 2-3-times the survival rate, a higher tolerance to Fov (higher disease rank), and a 2-4-fold increase in lint yield compared to the non-transgenic Coker control. When transgenic line D1 was planted in V. dahliae-infested soil, plants had a higher tolerance to Verticillium wilt and up to a 2-fold increase in lint yield compared to the non-transgenic Coker control. Line D1 did not exhibit any detrimental agronomic features compared to the parent Coker control when plants were grown in non-diseased soil. This study demonstrated that the expression of NaD1 in transgenic cotton plants can provide substantial resistance to two economically important fungal pathogens.

  10. Insect-resistance and high-yield transgenic tobacco obtained by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern blot and Western blot analyses showed that VHb gene was expressed in the transgenic plants. Toxicity assay indicated that insectidal gene expressed pesticidal toxin protein. The net weight of transgenic tobacco plants exceeded that of nontransgenic ones by 8%. Compared to non-transgenic tobacco plants, ...

  11. Expression of multiple resistance genes enhances tolerance to environmental stressors in transgenic poplar (Populus × euramericana 'Guariento'.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Su

    Full Text Available Commercial and non-commercial plants face a variety of environmental stressors that often cannot be controlled. In this study, transgenic hybrid poplar (Populus × euramericana 'Guariento' harboring five effector genes (vgb, SacB, JERF36, BtCry3A and OC-I were subjected to drought, salinity, waterlogging and insect stressors in greenhouse or laboratory conditions. Field trials were also conducted to investigate long-term effects of transgenic trees on insects and salt tolerance in the transformants. In greenhouse studies, two transgenic lines D5-20 and D5-21 showed improved growth, as evidenced by greater height and basal diameter increments and total biomass relative to the control plants after drought or salt stress treatments. The improved tolerance to drought and salt was primarily attributed to greater instantaneous water use efficiency (WUEi in the transgenic trees. The chlorophyll concentrations tended to be higher in the transgenic lines under drought or saline conditions. Transformed trees in drought conditions accumulated more fructan and proline and had increased Fv/Fm ratios (maximum quantum yield of photosystem II under waterlogging stress. Insect-feeding assays in the laboratory revealed a higher total mortality rate and lower exuviation index of leaf beetle [Plagiodera versicolora (Laicharting] larvae fed with D5-21 leaves, suggesting enhanced insect resistance in the transgenic poplar. In field trials, the dominance of targeted insects on 2-year-old D5-21 transgenic trees was substantially lower than that of the controls, indicating enhanced resistance to Coleoptera. The average height and DBH (diameter at breast height of 2.5-year-old transgenic trees growing in naturally saline soil were 3.80% and 4.12% greater than those of the control trees, but these increases were not significant. These results suggested that multiple stress-resistance properties in important crop tree species could be simultaneously improved, although

  12. Efficient genetic transformation of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench) and generation of insect-resistant transgenic plants expressing the cry1Ac gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendran, M; Deole, Satish G; Harkude, Satish; Shirale, Dattatray; Nanote, Asaram; Bihani, Pankaj; Parimi, Srinivas; Char, Bharat R; Zehr, Usha B

    2013-08-01

    Agrobacterium -mediated transformation system for okra using embryos was devised and the transgenic Bt plants showed resistance to the target pest, okra shoot, and fruit borer ( Earias vittella ). Okra is an important vegetable crop and progress in genetic improvement via genetic transformation has been impeded by its recalcitrant nature. In this paper, we describe a procedure using embryo explants for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and tissue culture-based plant regeneration for efficient genetic transformation of okra. Twenty-one transgenic okra lines expressing the Bacillus thuringiensis gene cry1Ac were generated from five transformation experiments. Molecular analysis (PCR and Southern) confirmed the presence of the transgene and double-antibody sandwich ELISA analysis revealed Cry1Ac protein expression in the transgenic plants. All 21 transgenic plants were phenotypically normal and fertile. T1 generation plants from these lines were used in segregation analysis of the transgene. Ten transgenic lines were selected randomly for Southern hybridization and the results confirmed the presence of transgene integration into the genome. Normal Mendelian inheritance (3:1) of cry1Ac gene was observed in 12 lines out of the 21 T0 lines. We selected 11 transgenic lines segregating in a 3:1 ratio for the presence of one transgene for insect bioassays using larvae of fruit and shoot borer (Earias vittella). Fruit from seven transgenic lines caused 100 % larval mortality. We demonstrate an efficient transformation system for okra which will accelerate the development of transgenic okra with novel agronomically useful traits.

  13. [Antimicrobial activities of ant Ponericin W1 against plant pathogens in vitro and the disease resistance in its transgenic Arabidopsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong-Fang; Sun, Peng-Wei; Tang, Ding-Zhong

    2013-08-01

    The antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) exhibit a broad antimicrobial spectrum. The application of AMPs from non-plant organisms attracts considerable attention in plant disease resistance engineering. Ponericin W1, isolated from the venom of ant (Pachycondyla goeldii), shows antimicrobial activities against Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and the budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae); however, it is not clear whether Ponericin W1 is effective against plant pathogens. The results of this study indicated synthesized Ponericin W1 inhibited mycelial growth of Magnaporthe oryzae and Botrytis cinerea, as well as hyphal growth and spore production of Fusarium graminearum. Besides, Ponericin W1 exhibited antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. After codon optimization, Ponericin W1 gene was constructed into plant expression vector, and transformed into Arabidopsis thaliana by floral dip method. The Ponericin W1 was located in intercellular space of the transgenic plants as expected. Compared with the wild-type plants, there were ungerminated spores and less hyphal, conidia on the leaves of transgenic plants after innoculation with the powdery mildew fungus Golovinomyces cichoracearum. After innoculation with the pathogenic bac-terium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, the baceria in the leaves of transgenic plants was significantly less than the wild-type plants, indicating that the transgenic plants displayed enhanced disease resistance to pathogens. These results demonstrate a potential use of Ponericin W1 in genetic engineering for broad-spectrum plant disease resistance.

  14. Acquiring transgenic tobacco plants with insect resistance and glyphosate tolerance by fusion gene transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, He; Lang, Zhihong; Zhu, Li; Huang, Dafang

    2012-10-01

    The advantages of gene 'stacking' or 'pyramiding' are obvious in genetically modified (GM) crops, and several different multi-transgene-stacking methods are available. Using linker peptides for multiple gene transformation is considered to be a good method to meet a variety of needs. In our experiment, the Bt cry1Ah gene, which encodes the insect-resistance protein, and the mG ( 2 ) -epsps gene, which encodes the glyphosate-tolerance protein, were connected by a 2A or LP4/2A linker. Linker 2A is a peptide from the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) that has self-cleavage activity. LP4 is a peptide from Raphanus sativus seeds that has a recognition site and is cleaved by a protease. LP4/2A is a hybrid peptide that contains the first 9 amino acids of LP4 and 20 amino acids from 2A. We used the linker peptide to construct four coordinated expression vectors: pHAG, pHLAG, pGAH and pGLAH. Two single gene expression vectors, pSAh and pSmG(2), were used as controls. The six expression vectors and the pCAMBIA2301 vector were transferred into tobacco by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation, and 529 transformants were obtained. Molecular detection and bioassay detection data demonstrated that the transgenic tobaccos possessed good pest resistance and glyphosate tolerance. The two genes in the fusion vector were expressed simultaneously. The plants with the genes linked by the LP4/2A peptide showed better pest resistance and glyphosate tolerance than the plants with the genes linked by 2A. The expression level of the two genes linked by LP4/2A was not significantly different from the single gene vector. Key message The expression level of the two genes linked by LP4/2A was higher than those linked by 2A and was not significantly different from the single gene vector.

  15. Resistance to tomato spotted wilt virus infection in transgenic tobacco expressing the viral nucleocapsid gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, D J; Ellis, P J

    1992-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid containing the entire tomato spotted with virus (TSWV) nucleocapsid gene, with the exception of nucleotide encoding three N-terminal amino acids, was isolated by screening a complementary DNA library, prepared against random primed viral RNA, using a specific monoclonal antibody. The insert contained in plasmid pTSW1 was repaired and amplified by polymerase chain reaction, and the complete nucleocapsid protein gene was introduced into Nicotiana tabacum 'Samsun' by leaf disk transformation using Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Transgenic plants expressing the viral nucleocapsid protein were resistant to subsequent infection following mechanical inoculation with TSWV as indicated by a lack of systemic symptoms and little or no systemic accumulation of virus as determined by double antibody sandwich enzyme-liked immunosorbent assay. These results further extend the applicability of coat protein-mediated resistance, as previously demonstrated for a number of simple plant viruses composed of a positive-sense RNA genome encapsidated with a single species of coat protein, to a membrane-encapsidated, multi-component, negative-sense RNA virus.

  16. Transgenic cotton expressing Cry10Aa toxin confers high resistance to the cotton boll weevil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Thuanne Pires; Arraes, Fabricio Barbosa Monteiro; Lourenço-Tessutti, Isabela Tristan; Silva, Marilia Santos; Lisei-de-Sá, Maria Eugênia; Lucena, Wagner Alexandre; Macedo, Leonardo Lima Pepino; Lima, Janaina Nascimento; Santos Amorim, Regina Maria; Artico, Sinara; Alves-Ferreira, Márcio; Mattar Silva, Maria Cristina; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria Fatima

    2017-08-01

    Genetically modified (GM) cotton plants that effectively control cotton boll weevil (CBW), which is the most destructive cotton insect pest in South America, are reported here for the first time. This work presents the successful development of a new GM cotton with high resistance to CBW conferred by Cry10Aa toxin, a protein encoded by entomopathogenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) gene. The plant transformation vector harbouring cry10Aa gene driven by the cotton ubiquitination-related promoter uceA1.7 was introduced into a Brazilian cotton cultivar by biolistic transformation. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays revealed high transcription levels of cry10Aa in both T 0 GM cotton leaf and flower bud tissues. Southern blot and qPCR-based 2 -ΔΔCt analyses revealed that T 0 GM plants had either one or two transgene copies. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of Cry10Aa protein expression showed variable protein expression levels in both flower buds and leaves tissues of T 0 GM cotton plants, ranging from approximately 3.0 to 14.0 μg g -1 fresh tissue. CBW susceptibility bioassays, performed by feeding adults and larvae with T 0 GM cotton leaves and flower buds, respectively, demonstrated a significant entomotoxic effect and a high level of CBW mortality (up to 100%). Molecular analysis revealed that transgene stability and entomotoxic effect to CBW were maintained in T 1 generation as the Cry10Aa toxin expression levels remained high in both tissues, ranging from 4.05 to 19.57 μg g -1 fresh tissue, and the CBW mortality rate remained around 100%. In conclusion, these Cry10Aa GM cotton plants represent a great advance in the control of the devastating CBW insect pest and can substantially impact cotton agribusiness. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Transgenic rice expressing the cry2AX1 gene confers resistance to multiple lepidopteran pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, M; Reddy, P Sairam; Mustafa, G; Rajesh, G; Narasu, V M Laxmi; Udayasuriyan, V; Rana, Debashis

    2016-10-01

    A chimeric Bacillus thuringiensis toxin (Bt) gene, cry2AX1was cloned in a bi-selectable marker free binary vector construct. The cry2AX1 gene, driven by the Chrysanthemum rbcS1 promoter, was introduced into JK1044R, the restorer line (Oryza sativa L. ssp. Indica) of a notified commercially grown rice hybrid in India, by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Its effect against two major lepidopteran insect pests viz., yellow stem borer (YSB) Scirpophaga incertulas, rice leaf folder (RLF) Cnaphalocrocis medinalis and one minor insect pest, oriental army worm (OAW) Mythimna separata was demonstrated through bioassays of transgenic rice plants under laboratory and greenhouse conditions. The rbcS1 promoter with chloroplast signal peptide was used to avoid Cry2AX1 protein expression in rice seed endosperm tissue. A total of 37 independent transformants were generated, of which after preliminary molecular characterization and YSB bioassay screening, five events were selected for their protein expression and bioefficacy against all three rice insect. One elite transgenic rice line, BtE15, was identified with Cry2AX1 expression ranging from 0.68 to 1.34 µg g(-1) leaf fresh weight and with 80-92 % levels of resistance against rice pests at the vegetative and reproductive stages. Increase in Cry2AX1 protein concentration was also observed with crop maturity. The Cry2AX1protein concentration in the de-husked seeds was negligible (as low as 2.7-3.6 ng g(-1)). These results indicate the potential application of cry2AX1 gene in rice for protection against YSB, RLF and OAW.

  18. Mechanism of cell death and disease resistance induction by transgenic expression of bacterio-opsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontier, Dominique; Mittler, Ron; Lam, Eric

    2002-06-01

    One of the earliest signal transduction events that trigger the hypersensitive response (HR) of plants against pathogen attack is thought to be an alteration of proton flux across the plasma membrane (PM). However, no direct genetic evidence for the involvement of PM-localised proton channels or pumps in the induction of this response has been reported. We previously showed that expression of the bacterial proton pump bacterio-opsin (bO) in transgenic plants resulted in the spontaneous activation of the HR. Here we show that the bO protein is likely localised to the PM in transgenic tobacco plants. Furthermore, mutational analysis shows that induction of the HR by bO expression is dependent upon the capability of bO to translocate protons. Although bO functions as a light-driven proton pump in Halobacteria when assembled with retinal, we also show by mutational analysis that this chromophore binding is unnecessary for its in planta activity. Taken together, our results suggest that expression of bO in plants leads to the insertion of a passive proton channel into the PM. The activity of this channel in the PM results in spontaneous activation of cell death and HR-associated phenotypes including enhanced resistance to a broad spectrum of plant pathogens. Our work provides direct molecular evidence to support a working model in which alterations in ionic homeostasis at the level of the PM may work as one of the critical steps in the signalling pathway for the activation of the HR.

  19. Transgenic rice expressing Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL) exhibits high-level resistance against major sap-sucking pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarasi, Bharathi; Sadumpati, Vijayakumar; Immanni, China Pasalu; Vudem, Dasavantha Reddy; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2008-01-01

    Background Rice (Oryza sativa) productivity is adversely impacted by numerous biotic and abiotic factors. An approximate 52% of the global production of rice is lost annually owing to the damage caused by biotic factors, of which ~21% is attributed to the attack of insect pests. In this paper we report the isolation, cloning and characterization of Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (asal) gene, and its expression in elite indica rice cultivars using Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation method. The stable transgenic lines, expressing ASAL, showed explicit resistance against major sap-sucking pests. Results Allium sativum leaf lectin gene (asal), coding for mannose binding homodimeric protein (ASAL) from garlic plants, has been isolated and introduced into elite indica rice cultivars susceptible to sap-sucking insects, viz., brown planthopper (BPH), green leafhopper (GLH) and whitebacked planthopper (WBPH). Embryogenic calli of rice were co-cultivated with Agrobacterium harbouring pSB111 super-binary vector comprising garlic lectin gene asal along with the herbicide resistance gene bar, both under the control of CaMV35S promoter. PCR and Southern blot analyses confirmed stable integration of transgenes into the genomes of rice plants. Northern and western blot analyses revealed expression of ASAL in different transgenic rice lines. In primary transformants, the level of ASAL protein, as estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, varied between 0.74% and 1.45% of the total soluble proteins. In planta insect bioassays on transgenic rice lines revealed potent entomotoxic effects of ASAL on BPH, GLH and WBPH insects, as evidenced by significant decreases in the survival, development and fecundity of the insects. Conclusion In planta insect bioassays were carried out on asal transgenic rice lines employing standard screening techniques followed in conventional breeding for selection of insect resistant plants. The ASAL expressing rice plants, bestowed with high

  20. Transgenic rice expressing Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL exhibits high-level resistance against major sap-sucking pests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vudem Dasavantha

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rice (Oryza sativa productivity is adversely impacted by numerous biotic and abiotic factors. An approximate 52% of the global production of rice is lost annually owing to the damage caused by biotic factors, of which ~21% is attributed to the attack of insect pests. In this paper we report the isolation, cloning and characterization of Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (asal gene, and its expression in elite indica rice cultivars using Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation method. The stable transgenic lines, expressing ASAL, showed explicit resistance against major sap-sucking pests. Results Allium sativum leaf lectin gene (asal, coding for mannose binding homodimeric protein (ASAL from garlic plants, has been isolated and introduced into elite indica rice cultivars susceptible to sap-sucking insects, viz., brown planthopper (BPH, green leafhopper (GLH and whitebacked planthopper (WBPH. Embryogenic calli of rice were co-cultivated with Agrobacterium harbouring pSB111 super-binary vector comprising garlic lectin gene asal along with the herbicide resistance gene bar, both under the control of CaMV35S promoter. PCR and Southern blot analyses confirmed stable integration of transgenes into the genomes of rice plants. Northern and western blot analyses revealed expression of ASAL in different transgenic rice lines. In primary transformants, the level of ASAL protein, as estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, varied between 0.74% and 1.45% of the total soluble proteins. In planta insect bioassays on transgenic rice lines revealed potent entomotoxic effects of ASAL on BPH, GLH and WBPH insects, as evidenced by significant decreases in the survival, development and fecundity of the insects. Conclusion In planta insect bioassays were carried out on asal transgenic rice lines employing standard screening techniques followed in conventional breeding for selection of insect resistant plants. The ASAL expressing rice

  1. Transgenic rice expressing Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL) exhibits high-level resistance against major sap-sucking pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarasi, Bharathi; Sadumpati, Vijayakumar; Immanni, China Pasalu; Vudem, Dasavantha Reddy; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2008-10-14

    Rice (Oryza sativa) productivity is adversely impacted by numerous biotic and abiotic factors. An approximate 52% of the global production of rice is lost annually owing to the damage caused by biotic factors, of which approximately 21% is attributed to the attack of insect pests. In this paper we report the isolation, cloning and characterization of Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (asal) gene, and its expression in elite indica rice cultivars using Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation method. The stable transgenic lines, expressing ASAL, showed explicit resistance against major sap-sucking pests. Allium sativum leaf lectin gene (asal), coding for mannose binding homodimeric protein (ASAL) from garlic plants, has been isolated and introduced into elite indica rice cultivars susceptible to sap-sucking insects, viz., brown planthopper (BPH), green leafhopper (GLH) and whitebacked planthopper (WBPH). Embryogenic calli of rice were co-cultivated with Agrobacterium harbouring pSB111 super-binary vector comprising garlic lectin gene asal along with the herbicide resistance gene bar, both under the control of CaMV35S promoter. PCR and Southern blot analyses confirmed stable integration of transgenes into the genomes of rice plants. Northern and western blot analyses revealed expression of ASAL in different transgenic rice lines. In primary transformants, the level of ASAL protein, as estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, varied between 0.74% and 1.45% of the total soluble proteins. In planta insect bioassays on transgenic rice lines revealed potent entomotoxic effects of ASAL on BPH, GLH and WBPH insects, as evidenced by significant decreases in the survival, development and fecundity of the insects. In planta insect bioassays were carried out on asal transgenic rice lines employing standard screening techniques followed in conventional breeding for selection of insect resistant plants. The ASAL expressing rice plants, bestowed with high entomotoxic

  2. Expression of rice thaumatin-like protein gene in transgenic banana plants enhances resistance to fusarium wilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, F; Sariah, M; Maziah, M

    2012-02-01

    The possibility of controlling Fusarium wilt--caused by Fusarium oxysporum sp. cubensec (race 4)--was investigated by genetic engineering of banana plants for constitutive expression of rice thaumatin-like protein (tlp) gene. Transgene was introduced to cauliflower-like bodies' cluster, induced from meristemic parts of male inflorescences, using particle bombardment with plasmid carrying a rice tlp gene driving by the CaMV 35S promoter. Hygromycin B was used as the selection reagent. The presence and integration of rice tlp gene in genomic DNA confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analyses. RT-PCR revealed the expression of transgene in leaf and root tissues in transformants. Bioassay of transgenic banana plants challenged with Fusarium wilt pathogen showed that expression of TLP enhanced resistance to F. oxysporum sp. cubensec (race 4) compared to control plants.

  3. High-efficiency Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and regeneration of insect-resistant transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Meenakshi; Sanyal, Indraneel; Amla, D V

    2011-09-01

    To develop an efficient genetic transformation system of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.), callus derived from mature embryonic axes of variety P-362 was transformed with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404 harboring p35SGUS-INT plasmid containing the uidA gene encoding β-glucuronidase (GUS) and the nptII gene for kanamycin selection. Various factors affecting transformation efficiency were optimized; as Agrobacterium suspension at OD(600) 0.3 with 48 h of co-cultivation period at 20°C was found optimal for transforming 10-day-old MEA-derived callus. Inclusion of 200 μM acetosyringone, sonication for 4 s with vacuum infiltration for 6 min improved the number of GUS foci per responding explant from 1.0 to 38.6, as determined by histochemical GUS assay. For introducing the insect-resistant trait into chickpea, binary vector pRD400-cry1Ac was also transformed under optimized conditions and 18 T(0) transgenic plants were generated, representing 3.6% transformation frequency. T(0) transgenic plants reflected Mendelian inheritance pattern of transgene segregation in T(1) progeny. PCR, RT-PCR, and Southern hybridization analysis of T(0) and T(1) transgenic plants confirmed stable integration of transgenes into the chickpea genome. The expression level of Bt-Cry protein in T(0) and T(1) transgenic chickpea plants was achieved maximum up to 116 ng mg(-1) of soluble protein, which efficiently causes 100% mortality to second instar larvae of Helicoverpa armigera as analyzed by an insect mortality bioassay. Our results demonstrate an efficient and rapid transformation system of chickpea for producing non-chimeric transgenic plants with high frequency. These findings will certainly accelerate the development of chickpea plants with novel traits.

  4. Transgenic rice plants expressing a modified cry1Ca1 gene are resistant to Spodoptera litura and Chilo suppressalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Mohsin Abbas; Ye, Gongyin; Yao, Hongwei; You, Taek H; Loit, Evelin; Dean, Donald H; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Altosaar, Illimar

    2009-11-01

    Nucleotide sequence encoding the truncated insecticidal Cry1Ca1 protein from Bacillus thuringiensis was extensively modified based on the codon usage of rice genes. The overall G + C contents of the synthetic cry1Ca1 coding sequence were raised to 65% with an additional bias of enriching for G and C ending codons as preferred by monocots. The synthetic gene was introduced into the Chinese japonica variety, Xiushui 11, by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Transgenic rice plants harboring this gene were highly resistant to Chilo suppressalis and Spodoptera litura larvae as revealed by insect bioassays. High levels of Cry1Ca1 protein were obtained in the leaves of transgenic rice, which were effective in achieving 100% mortality of S. litura and C. suppressalis larvae. The levels of Cry1Ca1 expression in the leaves of these transgenic plants were up to 0.34% of the total soluble proteins. The larvae of C. suppressalis and S. litura could consume a maximum of 1.89 and 4.89 mm2 of transgenic leaf area whereas the consumption of nontransgenic leaves by these larvae was significantly higher; 58.33 and 61.22 mm2, respectively. Analysis of R1 transgenic plants indicated that the cry1Ca1 was inherited by the progeny plants and provided complete protection against C. suppressalis and S. litura larvae.

  5. Evaluation of the resistance of transgenic potato plants expressing various levels of Cry3A against the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say) in the laboratory and field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhaoxu; Pang, Jinhuan; Guo, Wenchao; Zhong, Naiqin; Tian, Yingchuan; Xia, Guixian; Wu, Jiahe

    2012-12-01

    The Colorado potato beetle (CPB), Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say, is a destructive pest. The CPB is a quarantine pest in China, but has now invaded the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region and is continuing to spread eastwards. To control the damage and overspreading, transgenic potato plants expressing Cry3A toxin were developed, and their resistance to CPB was evaluated by bioassays in the laboratory and field in 2009, 2010 and 2011. The insect resistance of the high-dose (HD) transgenic lines was significantly greater than the middle-dose (MD) and low-dose (LD) transgenic lines regarding leaf consumption, biomass accumulation and mortality. The HD and MD transgenic lines showed 100% mortality when inoculated with first- and second-instar larvae; however, the LD transgenic lines showed about 50% mortality. The HD transgenic lines exhibited a significantly higher yield than the MD and LD transgenic lines owing to their high CPB resistance. Commercially available transgenic potato plants with above 0.1% Cry3A of total soluble protein and NT control refugia could control damage, delay adaptation and halt dispersion eastwards. The two HD transgenic lines developed in this study, PAH1 and PAH2, are ideal for use as cultivars or germplasm to breed new cultivars. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Prototype demonstration of transgenic resistance to the nematode Radopholus similis conferred on banana by a cystatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Howard J; Grimwood, Sam; Johnston, Kate; Green, Jayne

    2004-04-01

    Cavendish banana was transformed using Agrobacterium tumefaciens to express a protein engineered rice cystatin (OcIdeltaD86) of value for control of plant parasitic nematodes. Expression for each line was under control of a constitutive promoter from the maize ubiquitin gene (UBI-1), a constitutive, chimeric promoter from the octopine and mannopine synthase genes of A. tumefaciens or a promoter from a root-preferentially expressed tubulin gene Arabidopsis (TUB-1). Lines were selected as of potential interest after 8 weeks challenge in containment if their mean R. similis/25 g roots for three sibling plants were more than 1 standard normal variate below the grand mean for all plants in c7-15 lines challenged concurrently. A total of 16 lines were selected on this basis as putative positives. Western blots confirmed that eight of these lines expressed cystatin with a mean of 0.08 +/- 0.04% tsp. All but two of 19 negatively selected lines from bioassays did not express cystatin. The mean resistance level of the confirmed positive lines was 69 +/- 17%. ELISA established the positive lines under control of UBI provided significantly higher expression levels of OcIdeltaD86 than recorded for the other two promoters. Lines of interest were confirmed as producing a transcript for OcIdeltaD86 by RT-PCR. Eight plants of one UBI promoter line expressing only 0.1 +/- 0.004% tsp as cystatin were re-challenged with R. similis and achieved a resistance of 70 +/- 10%. Subsequent repeat western blotting confirmed that this line still produced the cystatin after the trial. This is the first report of transgenic resistance against a major pest or disease of banana.

  7. The Development of a Remote Sensor System and Decision Support Systems Architecture to Monitor Resistance Development in Transgenic Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacas, Joseph; Glaser, John; Copenhaver, Kenneth; May, George; Stephens, Karen

    2008-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has declared that "significant benefits accrue to growers, the public, and the environment" from the use of transgenic pesticidal crops due to reductions in pesticide usage for crop pest management. Large increases in the global use of transgenic pesticidal crops has reduced the amounts of broad spectrum pesticides used to manage pest populations, improved yield and reduced the environmental impact of crop management. A significant threat to the continued use of this technology is the evolution of resistance in insect pest populations to the insecticidal Bt toxins expressed by the plants. Management of transgenic pesticidal crops with an emphasis on conservation of Bt toxicity in field populations of insect pests is important to the future of sustainable agriculture. A vital component of this transgenic pesticidal crop management is establishing the proof of concept basic understanding, situational awareness, and monitoring and decision support system tools for more than 133650 square kilometers (33 million acres) of bio-engineered corn and cotton for development of insect resistance . Early and recent joint NASA, US EPA and ITD remote imagery flights and ground based field experiments have provided very promising research results that will potentially address future requirements for crop management capabilities.

  8. Bacterial community composition in the rhizosphere of a transgenic, herbicide-resistant maize (Zea mays) and comparison to its non-transgenic cultivar Bosphore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalenberger, Achim; Tebbe, Christoph C

    2002-04-01

    Bacterial communities in rhizospheres of transgenic maize (Zea mays, with the pat-gene conferring resistance to the herbicide glufosinate; syn. l-phosphinothricin) were compared to its isogenic, non-transgenic cultivar. Total DNA was extracted from bacterial cell consortia collected from rhizospheres of plants grown in an agricultural field. With the use of three different primer pairs binding to evolutionarily conserved regions of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, partial sequences were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR products were subjected to single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) to generate genetic profiles which corresponded to the diversity of the amplified sequences. Genetic profiles of rhizospheres consisted of 40-60 distinguishable bands depending on the chosen primer pairs, and the variability between independent replicates was very low. Neither the genetic modification nor the use of the herbicide Liberty (syn. Basta; active ingredient: glufosinate) affected the SSCP profiles as investigated with digital image analysis. In contrast, PCR-SSCP profiles of bacterial communities from rhizospheres of sugar beet, grown in the same field as a control crop, were clearly different. A less pronounced but significant difference was also observed with rhizosphere samples from fine roots of maize plants collected 35 and 70 days after sowing. Sequencing of the dominant 30 products from one typical SSCP profile generated from transgenic maize rhizospheres indicated the presence of typical soil and rhizosphere bacteria: half of the bands could be attributed to Proteobacteria, mainly of the alpha- and beta-subgroups. Other SSCP bands could be assigned to members of the following phylogenetic groups: Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides, Chlamydiales-Verrucomicrobium, Planctomyces, Holophaga and to Gram-positive bacteria with a high G+C DNA content.

  9. Transgenic expression of antimicrobial peptide D2A21 confers resistance to diseases incited by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci and Xanthomonas citri, but not Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guixia Hao

    Full Text Available Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB associated with 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las and citrus canker disease incited by Xanthomonas citri are the most devastating citrus diseases worldwide. To control citrus HLB and canker disease, we previously screened over forty antimicrobial peptides (AMPs in vitro for their potential application in genetic engineering. D2A21 was one of the most active AMPs against X. citri, Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Sinorhizobium meliloti with low hemolysis activity. Therefore, we conducted this work to assess transgenic expression of D2A21 peptide to achieve citrus resistant to canker and HLB. We generated a construct expressing D2A21 and initially transformed tobacco as a model plant. Transgenic tobacco expressing D2A21 was obtained by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Successful transformation and D2A21 expression was confirmed by molecular analysis. We evaluated disease development incited by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci in transgenic tobacco. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing D2A21 showed remarkable disease resistance compared to control plants. Therefore, we performed citrus transformations with the same construct and obtained transgenic Carrizo citrange. Gene integration and gene expression in transgenic plants were determined by PCR and RT-qPCR. Transgenic Carrizo expressing D2A21 showed significant canker resistance while the control plants showed clear canker symptoms following both leaf infiltration and spray inoculation with X. citri 3213. Transgenic Carrizo plants were challenged for HLB evaluation by grafting with Las infected rough lemon buds. Las titer was determined by qPCR in the leaves and roots of transgenic and control plants. However, our results showed that transgenic plants expressing D2A21 did not significantly reduce Las titer compared to control plants. We demonstrated that transgenic expression of D2A21 conferred resistance to diseases incited by P. syringae pv. tabaci and X. citri

  10. Transgenic tetraploid Isatis indigotica expressing Bt Cry1Ac and Pinellia ternata agglutinin showed enhanced resistance to moths and aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ying; Wang, Kai; Ding, Ruxian; Zhang, Hanming; Di, Peng; Chen, Junfeng; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Wansheng

    2012-01-01

    Co-expression of multiple genes encoding different kinds of insect resistant proteins has been developed to confer a broader spectrum of pest control. Tetraploid Isatis indigotica Fort was transformed with a plasmid, p3300BP, containing Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac gene (Bt) and Pinellia ternata agglutinin gene (Pta) and the selectable marker herbicide resistance gene (Bar) driven by the CaMV35S promoter via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. The integration and expression of introduced genes in regenerated transgenic plants were confirmed by PCR and Western blot assays. Insect bioassay test demonstrated transgenic lines had significant inhibition to diamondback moths (Plutella xylostella L.) and peach potato aphids (Myzus persicae Sulzer) simultaneously. Our study reported here would be a great motivation for field culture of tetraploid I. indigotica, also providing an efficient molecular breeding strategy to provide insect tolerant plants.

  11. Effects of transgenic poplar leaves with binary insect-resistance genes used as feed for rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyan Yang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to explore the potential toxicological effects on rabbits of transgenic poplar (Populus cathayana Rehd. leaves with binary insect-resistance genes used as feed. Fifty-four 40-d-old weaned New Zealand White Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus (live weight 0.98±0.1 kg were fed for 70 consecutive days with a common pelleted diet and fresh poplar leaves containing a chitinase-BmkIT gene combination or untransformed counterparts (60 g/d. Rabbit body weight and hematological and biochemical data in blood samples were recorded. Organ histological structures were observed and the organ weights in the 2 groups were also measured. The results of the growth study revealed no significant differences (P>0.05 for final mean BW of rabbits, intake of the combined feed and poplar leaves or feed conversion ratio between the 2 groups. No obvious pathological changes were observed in the small intestine, stomach, spleen, kidney, lung, heart, bladder, pancreas, prostate and ovary. Electron microscopic observation of liver cells and renal cells showed they were both normal in the 2 groups. All hematological and biochemical data tested fell within the normal range in the 2 groups after 70 d of feeding. We conclude that the poplar leaves with the chitinase-BmkIT gene combination had no obvious harmful effects on rabbits.

  12. Field resistance to Fusarium oxysporum and Verticillium dahliae in transgenic cotton expressing the plant defensin NaD1

    OpenAIRE

    Gaspar, Yolanda M.; McKenna, James A.; McGinness, Bruce S.; Hinch, Jillian; Poon, Simon; Connelly, Angela A.; Anderson, Marilyn A.; Heath, Robyn L.

    2014-01-01

    The plant defensin NaD1, from Nicotiana alata, has potent antifungal activity against a range of filamentous fungi including the two important cotton pathogens, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum (Fov) and Verticillium dahliae. Transgenic cotton plants expressing NaD1 were produced and plants from three events were selected for further characterization. Homozygous plants were assessed in greenhouse bioassays for resistance to Fov. One line (D1) was selected for field trial testing over thr...

  13. Gene Technology for Papaya Ringspot Virus Disease Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Md. Abul Kalam; Sidik, Nik Marzuki

    2014-01-01

    Papaya (Carica papaya) is severely damaged by the papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). This review focuses on the development of PRSV resistant transgenic papaya through gene technology. The genetic diversity of PRSV depends upon geographical distribution and the influence of PRSV disease management on a sequence of PRSV isolates. The concept of pathogen-derived resistance has been employed for the development of transgenic papaya, using a coat protein-mediated, RNA-silencing mechanism and replicase gene-mediated transformation for effective PRSV disease management. The development of PRSV-resistant papaya via post-transcriptional gene silencing is a promising technology for PRSV disease management. PRSV-resistant transgenic papaya is environmentally safe and has no harmful effects on human health. Recent studies have revealed that the success of adoption of transgenic papaya depends upon the application, it being a commercially viable product, bio-safety regulatory issues, trade regulations, and the wider social acceptance of the technology. This review discusses the genome and the genetic diversity of PRSV, host range determinants, molecular diagnosis, disease management strategies, the development of transgenic papaya, environmental issues, issues in the adoption of transgenic papaya, and future directions for research. PMID:24757435

  14. Gene technology for papaya ringspot virus disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Md Abul Kalam; Amin, Latifah; Sidik, Nik Marzuki

    2014-01-01

    Papaya (Carica papaya) is severely damaged by the papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). This review focuses on the development of PRSV resistant transgenic papaya through gene technology. The genetic diversity of PRSV depends upon geographical distribution and the influence of PRSV disease management on a sequence of PRSV isolates. The concept of pathogen-derived resistance has been employed for the development of transgenic papaya, using a coat protein-mediated, RNA-silencing mechanism and replicase gene-mediated transformation for effective PRSV disease management. The development of PRSV-resistant papaya via post-transcriptional gene silencing is a promising technology for PRSV disease management. PRSV-resistant transgenic papaya is environmentally safe and has no harmful effects on human health. Recent studies have revealed that the success of adoption of transgenic papaya depends upon the application, it being a commercially viable product, bio-safety regulatory issues, trade regulations, and the wider social acceptance of the technology. This review discusses the genome and the genetic diversity of PRSV, host range determinants, molecular diagnosis, disease management strategies, the development of transgenic papaya, environmental issues, issues in the adoption of transgenic papaya, and future directions for research.

  15. RNAi-Mediated Transgenic Tospovirus Resistance Broken by Intraspecies Silencing Suppressor Protein Complementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassani-Mehraban, Afshin; Brenkman, A. B.; van den Broek, N. J. F.; Goldbach, Rob; Kormelink, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Extension of an inverted repeat transgene cassette, containing partial nucleoprotein (N) gene sequences from four different tomato-infecting Tospovirus spp. with a partial N gene sequence from the tomato strain of Tomato yellow ring virus (TYRV-t), renders transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants

  16. Petunia floral defensins with unique prodomains as novel candidates for development of fusarium wilt resistance in transgenic banana plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghag, Siddhesh B; Shekhawat, Upendra K Singh; Ganapathi, Thumballi R

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are a potent group of defense active molecules that have been utilized in developing resistance against a multitude of plant pathogens. Floral defensins constitute a group of cysteine-rich peptides showing potent growth inhibition of pathogenic filamentous fungi especially Fusarium oxysporum in vitro. Full length genes coding for two Petunia floral defensins, PhDef1 and PhDef2 having unique C-terminal 31 and 27 amino acid long predicted prodomains, were overexpressed in transgenic banana plants using embryogenic cells as explants for Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. High level constitutive expression of these defensins in elite banana cv. Rasthali led to significant resistance against infection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense as shown by in vitro and ex vivo bioassay studies. Transgenic banana lines expressing either of the two defensins were clearly less chlorotic and had significantly less infestation and discoloration in the vital corm region of the plant as compared to untransformed controls. Transgenic banana plants expressing high level of full-length PhDef1 and PhDef2 were phenotypically normal and no stunting was observed. In conclusion, our results suggest that high-level constitutive expression of floral defensins having distinctive prodomains is an efficient strategy for development of fungal resistance in economically important fruit crops like banana.

  17. Petunia floral defensins with unique prodomains as novel candidates for development of fusarium wilt resistance in transgenic banana plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhesh B Ghag

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides are a potent group of defense active molecules that have been utilized in developing resistance against a multitude of plant pathogens. Floral defensins constitute a group of cysteine-rich peptides showing potent growth inhibition of pathogenic filamentous fungi especially Fusarium oxysporum in vitro. Full length genes coding for two Petunia floral defensins, PhDef1 and PhDef2 having unique C-terminal 31 and 27 amino acid long predicted prodomains, were overexpressed in transgenic banana plants using embryogenic cells as explants for Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. High level constitutive expression of these defensins in elite banana cv. Rasthali led to significant resistance against infection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense as shown by in vitro and ex vivo bioassay studies. Transgenic banana lines expressing either of the two defensins were clearly less chlorotic and had significantly less infestation and discoloration in the vital corm region of the plant as compared to untransformed controls. Transgenic banana plants expressing high level of full-length PhDef1 and PhDef2 were phenotypically normal and no stunting was observed. In conclusion, our results suggest that high-level constitutive expression of floral defensins having distinctive prodomains is an efficient strategy for development of fungal resistance in economically important fruit crops like banana.

  18. Expression of a maize Myb transcription factor driven by a putative silk-specific promoter significantly enhances resistance to Helicoverpa zea in transgenic maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric T; Berhow, Mark A; Dowd, Patrick F

    2007-04-18

    Hi II maize (Zea mays) plants were engineered to express maize p1 cDNA, a Myb transcription factor, controlled by a putative silk specific promoter, for secondary metabolite production and corn earworm resistance. Transgene expression did not enhance silk color, but about half of the transformed plant silks displayed browning when cut, which indicated the presence of p1-produced secondary metabolites. Levels of maysin, a secondary metabolite with insect toxicity, were highest in newly emerged browning silks. The insect resistance of transgenic silks was also highest at emergence, regardless of maysin levels, which suggests that other unidentified p1-induced molecules likely contributed to larval mortality. Mean survivor weights of corn earworm larvae fed mature browning transgenic silks were significantly lower than weights of those fed mature nonbrowning transgenic silks. Some transgenic pericarps browned with drying and contained similar molecules found in pericarps expressing a dominant p1 allele, suggesting that the promoter may not be silk-specific.

  19. Transgenic banana plants expressing small interfering RNAs targeted against viral replication initiation gene display high-level resistance to banana bunchy top virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhawat, Upendra K S; Ganapathi, Thumballi R; Hadapad, Ashok B

    2012-08-01

    The banana aphid-transmitted Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) is the most destructive viral pathogen of bananas and plantains worldwide. Lack of natural sources of resistance to BBTV has necessitated the exploitation of proven transgenic technologies for obtaining BBTV-resistant banana cultivars. In this study, we have explored the concept of using intron-hairpin-RNA (ihpRNA) transcripts corresponding to viral master replication initiation protein (Rep) to generate BBTV-resistant transgenic banana plants. Two ihpRNA constructs namely ihpRNA-Rep and ihpRNA-ProRep generated using Rep full coding sequence or Rep partial coding sequence together with its 5' upstream regulatory region, respectively, and castor bean catalase intron were successfully transformed into banana embryogenic cells. ihpRNA-Rep- and ihpRNA-ProRep-derived transgenic banana plants, selected based on preliminary screening for efficient reporter gene expression, were completely resistant to BBTV infection as indicated by the absence of disease symptoms after 6 months of viruliferous aphid inoculation. The resistance to BBTV infection was also evident by the inability to detect cDNAs coding for viral coat protein, movement protein and Rep protein by RT-PCR from inoculated transgenic leaf extracts. Southern analysis of the two groups of transgenics showed that ihpRNA transgene was stably integrated into the banana genome. The detection of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) derived from the ihpRNA transgene sequence in transformed BBTV-resistant plants positively established RNA interference as the mechanism underlying the observed resistance to BBTV. Efficient screening of optimal transformants in this vegetatively propagated non-segregating fruit crop ensured that all the transgenic plants assayed were resistant to BBTV infection.

  20. Expression of antimicrobial peptides thanatin(S) in transgenic Arabidopsis enhanced resistance to phytopathogenic fungi and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tingquan; Tang, Dingzhong; Chen, Weida; Huang, Hexun; Wang, Rui; Chen, Yongfang

    2013-09-15

    Thanatin(S) is an analog of thanatin, an insect antimicrobial peptide possessing strong and broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. In order to investigate if the thanatin could be used in engineering transgenic plants for increased resistance against phytopathogens, the synthetic thanatin(S) was introduced into Arabidopsis thaliana plants. To increase the expression level of thanatin(S) in plants, the coding sequence was optimized by plant-preference codon. To avoid cellular protease degradation, signal peptide of rice Cht1 was fused to N terminal of thanatin(S) for secreting the expressed thanatin(S) into intercellular spaces. To evaluate the application value of thanatin(S) in plant disease control, the synthesized coding sequence of Cht1 signal peptide (Cht1SP)-thanatin(S) was ligated to plant gateway destination binary vectors pGWB11 (with FLAG tag). Meanwhile, in order to observe the subcellular localization of Cht1SP-thanatin(S)-GFP and thanatin(S)-GFP, the sequences of Cht1SP-thanatin(S) and thanatin(S) were respectively linked to pGWB5 (with GFP tag). The constructs were transformed into Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0 and mutant pad4-1 via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The transformants with Cht1SP-thanatin(S)-FLAG fusion gene were analyzed by genomic PCR, real-time PCR, and western blots and the transgenic Arabidopsis plants introduced respectively Cht1SP-thanatin(S)-GFP and thanatin(S)-GFP were observed by confocal microscopy. Transgenic plants expressing Cht1SP-thanatin(S)-FLAG fusion protein showed antifungal activity against Botrytis cinerea and powdery mildew, as well as antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. And the results from confocal observation showed that the GFP signal from Cht1SP-thanatin(S)-GFP transgenic Arabidopsis plants occurred mainly in intercellular space, while that from thanatin(S)-GFP transgenic plants was mainly detected in the cytoplasm and that from empty vector transgenic plants was distributed

  1. Transgenic Cotton Plants Expressing the HaHR3 Gene Conferred Enhanced Resistance to Helicoverpa armigera and Improved Cotton Yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qiang; Wang, Zhenzhen; He, Yunxin; Xiong, Yehui; Lv, Shun; Li, Shupeng; Zhang, Zhigang; Qiu, Dewen; Zeng, Hongmei

    2017-08-30

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been developed as an efficient technology. RNAi insect-resistant transgenic plants expressing double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) that is ingested into insects to silence target genes can affect the viability of these pests or even lead to their death. HaHR3 , a molt-regulating transcription factor gene, was previously selected as a target expressed in bacteria and tobacco plants to control Helicoverpa armigera by RNAi technology. In this work, we selected the dsRNA- HaHR3 fragment to silence HaHR3 in cotton bollworm for plant mediated-RNAi research. A total of 19 transgenic cotton lines expressing HaHR3 were successfully cultivated, and seven generated lines were used to perform feeding bioassays. Transgenic cotton plants expressing ds HaHR3 were shown to induce high larval mortality and deformities of pupation and adult eclosion when used to feed the newly hatched larvae, and 3rd and 5th instar larvae of H. armigera . Moreover, HaHR3 transgenic cotton also demonstrated an improved cotton yield when compared with controls.

  2. Disease resistance conferred by the expression of a gene encoding a synthetic peptide in transgenic cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Kanniah; Cary, Jeffrey W; Jaynes, Jesse M; Cleveland, Thomas E

    2005-11-01

    Fertile, transgenic cotton plants expressing the synthetic antimicrobial peptide, D4E1, were produced through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. PCR products and Southern blots confirmed integration of the D4E1 gene, while RT-PCR of cotton RNA confirmed the presence of D4E1 transcripts. In vitro assays with crude leaf protein extracts from T0 and T1 plants confirmed that D4E1 was expressed at sufficient levels to inhibit the growth of Fusarium verticillioides and Verticillium dahliae compared to extracts from negative control plants transformed with pBI-d35S(Omega)-uidA-nos (CGUS). Although in vitro assays did not show control of pre-germinated spores of Aspergillus flavus, bioassays with cotton seeds in situ or in planta, inoculated with a GFP-expressing A. flavus, indicated that the transgenic cotton seeds inhibited extensive colonization and spread by the fungus in cotyledons and seed coats. In planta assays with the fungal pathogen, Thielaviopsis basicola, which causes black root rot in cotton, showed typical symptoms such as black discoloration and constriction on hypocotyls, reduced branching of roots in CGUS negative control T1 seedlings, while transgenic T1 seedlings showed a significant reduction in disease symptoms and increased seedling fresh weight, demonstrating tolerance to the fungal pathogen. Significant advantages of synthetic peptides in developing transgenic crop plants that are resistant to diseases and mycotoxin-causing fungal pathogens are highlighted in this report.

  3. Using a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and Chemoresistance of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0162 TITLE: Using a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and...TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Using a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc... Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and Chemoresistance of Prostate Cancer Feng Yang, Ph.D. Department of

  4. Insect-resistant transgenic plants in a multi-trophic context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, Astrid T; Dicke, Marcel

    2002-08-01

    So far, genetic engineering of plants in the context of insect pest control has involved insertion of genes that code for toxins, and may be characterized as the incorporation of biopesticides into classical plant breeding. In the context of pesticide usage in pest control, natural enemies of herbivores have received increasing attention, because carnivorous arthropods are an important component of insect pest control. However, in plant breeding programmes, natural enemies of herbivores have largely been ignored, although there are many examples that show that plant breeding affects the effectiveness of biological control. Negative influences of modified plant characteristics on carnivorous arthropods may induce population growth of new, even more harmful pest species that had no pest status prior to the pesticide treatment. Sustainable pest management will only be possible when negative effects on non-target, beneficial arthropods are minimized. In this review, we summarize the effects of insect-resistant crops and insect-resistant transgenic crops, especially Bt crops, from a food web perspective. As food web components, we distinguish target herbivores, non-target herbivores, pollinators, parasitoids and predators. Below-ground organisms such as Collembola, nematodes and earthworms should also be included in risk assessment studies, but have received little attention. The toxins produced in Bt plants retain their toxicity when bound to the soil, so accumulation of these toxins is likely to occur. Earthworms ingest the bound toxins but are not affected by them. However, earthworms may function as intermediaries through which the toxins are passed on to other trophic levels. In studies where effects of insect-resistant (Bt) plants on natural enemies were considered, positive, negative and no effects have been found. So far, most studies have concentrated on natural enemies of target herbivores. However, Bt toxins are structurally rearranged when they bind to

  5. Chitinase activities, scab resistance, mycorrhization rates and biomass of own-rooted and grafted transgenic apple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Schäfer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the impact of constitutively expressed Trichoderma atroviride genes encoding exochitinase nag70 or endochitinase ech42 in transgenic lines of the apple cultivar Pinova on the symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF. We compared the exo- and endochitinase activities of leaves and roots from non-transgenic Pinova and the transgenic lines T386 and T389. Local and systemic effects were examined using own-rooted trees and trees grafted onto rootstock M9. Scab susceptibility was also assessed in own-rooted and grafted trees. AMF root colonization was assessed microscopically in the roots of apple trees cultivated in pots with artificial substrate and inoculated with the AMF Glomus intraradices and Glomus mosseae. Own-rooted transgenic lines had significantly higher chitinase activities in their leaves and roots compared to non-transgenic Pinova. Both of the own-rooted transgenic lines showed significantly fewer symptoms of scab infection as well as significantly lower root colonization by AMF. Biomass production was significantly reduced in both own-rooted transgenic lines. Rootstock M9 influenced chitinase activities in the leaves of grafted scions. When grafted onto M9, the leaf chitinase activities of non-transgenic Pinova (M9/Pinova and transgenic lines (M9/T386 and M9/T389 were not as different as when grown on their own roots. M9/T386 and M9/T389 were only temporarily less infected by scab than M9/Pinova. M9/T386 and M9/T389 did not differ significantly from M9/Pinova in their root chitinase activities, AMF root colonization and biomass.

  6. Expression of cry2Ah1 and two domain II mutants in transgenic tobacco confers high resistance to susceptible and Cry1Ac-resistant cotton bollworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengyan; Wang, Zeyu; Zhou, Yiyao; Li, Changhui; Wang, Guiping; Wang, Hai; Zhang, Jie; Liang, Gemei; Lang, Zhihong

    2018-01-11

    To improve the novel Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal gene cry2Ah1 toxicity, two mutants cry2Ah1-vp (V354VP) and cry2Ah1-sp (V354SP) were performed. SWISS-MODEL analysis showed two mutants had a longer loop located between β-4 and β-5 of domain II, resulting in higher binding affinity with brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) of Helicoverpa armigera comparing with Cry2Ah1. The cry2Ah1, cry2Ah1-vp, and cry2Ah1-sp were optimized codon usage according to plant codon bias, and named mcry2Ah1, mcry2Ah1-vp, and mcry2Ah1-sp. They were transformed into tobacco via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and a total of 4, 8, and 24 transgenic tobacco plants were obtained, respectively. The molecular detection showed the exogenous gene was integrated into tobacco genome, and successfully expressed at the transcript and translation levels. Cry2Ah1 protein in transgenic tobacco plants varied from 4.41 to 40.28 μg g -1 fresh weight. Insect bioassays indicated that all transgenic tobacco plants were highly toxic to both susceptible and Cry1Ac-resistant cotton bollworm larvae, and the insect resistance efficiency to Cry1Ac-resistant cotton bollworm was highest in mcry2Ah1-sp transgenic tobacco plants. The results demonstrated that cry2Ah1 was a useful Bt insecticidal gene to susceptible and Cry1Ac-resistant cotton bollworm and had potential application for insect biocontrol and as a candidate for pyramid strategy in Bt crops.

  7. Transgenic basmati rice transformed with the Xa21 gene shows resistance against bacterial leaf blight

    OpenAIRE

    MUKHTAR, ZAHID; HASNAIN, SHAHIDA

    2017-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivar Super Basmati was transformed with a cloned gene, Xa21, through particle bombardment method. Twenty-two plants were recovered from the selected calli. Initial screening through PCR confirmed the presence of the transgene in 21 plants. Southern analysis further confirmed the integration of the Xa21 gene into the genome of these transgenic plants. Analysis of the T1 generation revealed that both the hpt and Xa21 genes were successfully transmitted from the primar...

  8. Derivation and interpretation of hazard quotients to assess ecological risks from the cultivation of insect-resistant transgenic crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybould, Alan; Caron-Lormier, Geoffrey; Bohan, David A

    2011-06-08

    Cost-effective and rigorous risk assessments for chemicals may be based on hazard quotients (HQs): the ratio of a measure of exposure to a substance and a measure of the effect of that substance. HQs have been used for many years in ecological risk assessments for the use of synthetic pesticides in agriculture, and methods for calculating pesticide HQs have been adapted for use with transgenic crops. This paper describes how laboratory methods for assessing the ecotoxicological effects of synthetic pesticides have been modified for the measurement of effects of insecticidal proteins, and how these effect measures are combined with exposure estimates to derive HQs for assessing the ecological risks from the cultivation of insect-resistant transgenic crops. The potential for ecological modeling to inform the design of laboratory effects tests for insecticidal proteins is also discussed.

  9. Detection of nptII (kanamycin resistance) genes in genomes of transgenic plants by marker-rescue transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, J; Wackernagel, W

    1998-04-01

    We have developed a novel system for the sensitive detection of nptII genes (kanamycin resistance determinants) including those present in transgenic plant genomes. The assay is based on the recombinational repair of an nptII gene with an internal 10-bp deletion located on a plasmid downstream of a bacterial promoter. Uptake of an nptII gene by transformation restores kanamycin resistance. In Escherichia coli, promoterless nptII genes provided by electroporation were rescued with high efficiency in a RecA-dependent recombinational process. For the rescue of nptII genes present in chromosomal plant DNA, the system was adapted to natural transformation, which favours the uptake of linear DNA. When competent Acinetobacter sp. BD413 (formerly A. calcoaceticus) cells containing the mutant nptII gene on a plasmid were transformed with DNA from various transgenic plants carrying nptII as a marker gene (Solanum tuberosum, Nicotiana tabacum, Beta vulgaris, Brassica napus, Lycopersicon esculentum), kanamycin-resistant transformants were obtained roughly in proportion to the concentration of nptII genes in the plant DNA. The rescue of nptII genes occurred in the presence of a more than 6 x 10(6)-fold excess of plant DNA. Only 18 ng of potato DNA (2.5 x 10(3) genome equivalents, each with one copy of nptII) was required to produce one kanamycin-resistant transformant. These experiments and others employing DNA isolated from soil samples demonstrate that the system allows reliable and highly sensitive monitoring of nptII genes in transgenic plant DNA and in DNA from environmental sources, such as soil, without the need for prior DNA amplification (e.g. by PCR).

  10. Overexpression of a weed (Solanum americanum) proteinase inhibitor in transgenic tobacco results in increased glandular trichome density and enhanced resistance to Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera litura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ming; Wang, Zhaoyu; Li, Huapeng; Xia, Kuai-Fei; Cai, Yinpeng; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2009-04-23

    In this study we produced transgenic tobacco plants by overexpressing a serine proteinase inhibitor gene, SaPIN2a, from the American black nightshade Solanum americanum under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. SaPIN2a was properly transcribed and translated as indicated by Northern blot and Western blot analyses. Functional integrity of SaPIN2a in transgenic plants was confirmed by proteinase inhibitory activity assay. Bioassays for insect resistance showed that SaPIN2a-overexpressing transgenic tobacco plants were more resistant to cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera) and tobacco cutworm (Spodoptera litura) larvae, two devastating pests of important crop plants, than the control plants. Interestingly, overexpression of SaPIN2a in transgenic tobacco plants resulted in a significant increase in glandular trichome density and a promotion of trichome branching, which could also provide an additional resistance mechanism in transgenic plants against insect pests. Therefore, SaPIN2a could be used as an alternative proteinase inhibitor for the production of insect-resistant transgenic plants.

  11. Transgenic indica rice plants harboring a synthetic cry2A* gene of Bacillus thuringiensis exhibit enhanced resistance against lepidopteran rice pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Tang, Wei; Xu, Caiguo; Li, Xianghua; Lin, Yongjun; Zhang, Qifa

    2005-11-01

    A novel synthetic cry2A* gene was introduced into the elite indica rice restorer line Minghui 63 by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. A total of 102 independent transformants were obtained. Among them, 71 transformants were positive cry2A* plants according to PCR analysis. Four highly insect-resistant lines with single-copy insertion (designated as 2A-1, 2A-2, 2A-3, and 2A-4) were selected based on field assessment and Southern blot analysis in the T(1) generation. All four transgenic lines showed Mendelian segregation by seed germination on 1/2 MS medium containing Basta. Homozygous transgenic plants were selected according to germination ratio (100%) in the T2 generation. Cry2A* protein concentrations were determined in homozygous transgenic lines, their derived hybrids, and their backcross offspring. The Cry2A* protein concentrations of four homozygous transgenic lines ranged from 9.65 to 12.11 microg/g of leaf fresh weight. There was little variation in the hybrids and backcross offspring. Insect bioassays were conducted in both the laboratory and field. All four transgenic lines were significantly resistant to lepidopteran rice pests. These cry2A* transgenic lines can be used to produce insect-resistant hybrids and serve as a resistant source for the development of two-toxin Bt rice.

  12. Overexpression of a Weed (Solanum americanum Proteinase Inhibitor in Transgenic Tobacco Results in Increased Glandular Trichome Density and Enhanced Resistance to Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera litura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng-Fu Xu

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study we produced transgenic tobacco plants by overexpressing a serine proteinase inhibitor gene, SaPIN2a, from the American black nightshade Solanum americanum under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. SaPIN2a was properly transcribed and translated as indicated by Northern blot and Western blot analyses. Functional integrity of SaPIN2a in transgenic plants was confirmed by proteinase inhibitory activity assay. Bioassays for insect resistance showed that SaPIN2a-overexpressing transgenic tobacco plants were more resistant to cotton bollworm(Helicoverpa armigera and tobacco cutworm(Spodoptera litura larvae, two devastating pests of important crop plants, than the control plants. Interestingly, overexpression of SaPIN2a in transgenic tobacco plants resulted in a significant increase in glandular trichome density and a promotion of trichome branching, which could also provide an additional resistance mechanism in transgenic plants against insect pests. Therefore, SaPIN2a could be used as an alternative proteinase inhibitor for the production of insect-resistant transgenic plants.

  13. [Relationship of Zn content and Na/K ratio to the resistance to pathogen invasion in antisense ACS transgenic tomato fruit and normal tomato].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Bei; Shen, Lin; Liu, Can; Tian, Shi-Ping; Sheng, Ji-Ping

    2009-02-01

    In the present work, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was used to determine the content of Zn, Na and K and the ratio of Na/K in antisense ACS transgenic tomato fruit (in which the antisense ACC synthase gene construct was inserted) and in normal tomato fruit of the same variety (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Lichun). The difference in mineral elements content between the two tomatoes and the involvement of Zn content and Na/K ratio in the disease resistance of postharvest tomato fruit were discussed. The results showed that the ethylene biosynthesis is limited in antisense ACS transgenic tomato fruit. Meanwhile, the resistance to Rhizopus nigricans invasion of this transgenic tomato was higher, the disease incidence and lesion area in transgenic tomato fruit were 20.0% and 33.3% lower than those in control fruit, respectively. In addition, the content of Zn in transgenic tomato fruit was 0.322 microg x g(-1) and was 1.5 times higher than that in Lichun tomato fruit. There was no significant difference in K content between transgenic tomato fruit and Lichun fruit, but the content of Na in transgenic tomato fruit was significant higher than that in Lichun fruit and the Na/K ratio in transgenic tomato fruit was 2.0 times higher than that in Lichun fruit. It is suggested that the content of Zn and the Na/K ratio may be involved in the resistance response to pathogen invasion and the development of antisense ACS transgenic tomato fruit.

  14. Transgenic zebrafish eggs containing bactericidal peptide is a novel food supplement enhancing resistance to pathogenic infection of fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-Yung; Yang, Ping-Hsi; Kao, Chia-Ling; Huang, Han-I; Tsai, Huai-Jen

    2010-03-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) was used as a bioreactor to produce bovine lactoferricin (LFB), which has wide-ranging antimicrobial activity. We constructed an expression plasmid in which LFB was fused with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and driven by zebrafish beta-actin promoter. After microinjection, six transgenic founders were screened on the basis of GFP appearance. Among them, a stable ZBL-5 line was selected by the ubiquitous and strong expression of GFP. Using PCR and Western blot analysis, we confirmed that the recombinant LFB-GFP protein was produced by the F2 progeny derived from the ZBL-5 line. The bactericidal agar plate assay proved that the functional domain of LFB was released from the LFB-GFP fusion protein, resulting in strong bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli, Edwardsiella tarda and Aeromonas hydrophila. Furthermore, adult zebrafish were given one feeding of fifty 72-hpf transgenic embryos. The treated fish were then immersed in freshwater containing 1 x 10(5) CFU ml(-1)E. tarda for 7 days. The survival rate of the treated zebrafish was significantly higher than that of fish fed with fifty wild-type embryos (75 +/- 12.5% versus 4 +/- 7.2%). This line of evidence suggested that pathogen resistance can be enhanced by using transgenic embryos containing LFB-GFP as a food supplement for fish, while, at the same time, reducing the demand of chemical antibiotics. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Overexpressing the Sedum alfredii Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase Increased Resistance to Oxidative Stress in Transgenic Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Superoxide dismutase (SOD is a very important reactive oxygen species (ROS-scavenging enzyme. In this study, the functions of a Cu/Zn SOD gene (SaCu/Zn SOD, from Sedum alfredii, a cadmium (Cd/zinc/lead co-hyperaccumulator of the Crassulaceae, was characterized. The expression of SaCu/Zn SOD was induced by Cd stress. Compared with wild-type (WT plants, overexpression of SaCu/Zn SOD gene in transgenic Arabidopsis plants enhanced the antioxidative defense capacity, including SOD and peroxidase activities. Additionally, it reduced the damage associated with the overproduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and superoxide radicals (O2•-. The influence of Cd stress on ion flux across the root surface showed that overexpressing SaCu/Zn SOD in transgenic Arabidopsis plants has greater Cd uptake capacity existed in roots. A co-expression network based on microarray data showed possible oxidative regulation in Arabidopsis after Cd-induced oxidative stress, suggesting that SaCu/Zn SOD may participate in this network and enhance ROS-scavenging capability under Cd stress. Taken together, these results suggest that overexpressing SaCu/Zn SOD increased oxidative stress resistance in transgenic Arabidopsis and provide useful information for understanding the role of SaCu/Zn SOD in response to abiotic stress.

  16. Transgenic Cotton Plants Expressing the HaHR3 Gene Conferred Enhanced Resistance to Helicoverpa armigera and Improved Cotton Yield

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Qiang; Wang, Zhenzhen; He, Yunxin; Xiong, Yehui; Lv, Shun; Li, Shupeng; Zhang, Zhigang; Qiu, Dewen; Zeng, Hongmei

    2017-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been developed as an efficient technology. RNAi insect-resistant transgenic plants expressing double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) that is ingested into insects to silence target genes can affect the viability of these pests or even lead to their death. HaHR3, a molt-regulating transcription factor gene, was previously selected as a target expressed in bacteria and tobacco plants to control Helicoverpa armigera by RNAi technology. In this work, we selected the dsRNA-HaHR3 f...

  17. The hrpZ gene of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola enhances resistance to rhizomania disease in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana and sugar beet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ourania I Pavli

    Full Text Available To explore possible sources of transgenic resistance to the rhizomania-causing Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV, Nicotiana benthamiana plants were constructed to express the harpin of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (HrpZ(Psph. The HrpZ protein was expressed as an N-terminal fusion to the PR1 signal peptide (SP/HrpZ to direct harpin accumulation to the plant apoplast. Transgene integration was verified by mPCR in all primary transformants (T0, while immunoblot analysis confirmed that the protein HrpZ(Psph was produced and the signal peptide was properly processed. Neither T0 plants nor selfed progeny (T1 showed macroscopically visible necrosis or any other macroscopic phenotypes. However, plants expressing the SP/HrpZ(Psph showed increased vigor and grew faster in comparison with non-transgenic control plants. Transgenic resistance was assessed after challenge inoculation with BNYVV on T1 progeny by scoring of disease symptoms and by DAS-ELISA at 20 and 30 dpi. Transgenic and control lines showed significant differences in terms of the number of plants that became infected, the timing of infection and the disease symptoms displayed. Plants expressing the SP/HrpZ(Psph developed localized leaf necrosis in the infection area and had enhanced resistance upon challenge with BNYVV. In order to evaluate the SP/HrpZ-based resistance in the sugar beet host, A. rhizogenes-mediated root transformation was exploited as a transgene expression platform. Upon BNYVV inoculation, transgenic sugar beet hairy roots showed high level of BNYVV resistance. In contrast, the aerial non-transgenic parts of the same seedlings had virus titers that were comparable to those of the seedlings that were untransformed or transformed with wild type R1000 cells. These findings indicate that the transgenically expressed SP/HrpZ protein results in enhanced rhizomania resistance both in a model plant and sugar beet, the natural host of BNYVV. Possible molecular

  18. Agronomic performance of F1, F2 and F3 hybrids between weedy rice and transgenic glufosinate-resistant rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoling; Wang, Zhou; Qiang, Sheng

    2011-08-01

    Studies of hybrid fitness, of which agronomic performance may be an indicator, can help in evaluating the potential for introgression of a transgene from a transgenic crop to wild relatives. The objective of this study was to assess the agronomic performance of reciprocal hybrids between two transgenic glufosinate-resistant rice lines, Y0003 and 99-t, and two weedy rice accessions, WR1 and WR2, in the greenhouse. F1 hybrids displayed heterosis in height, flag leaf area and number of spikelets per panicle. The agronomic performance of F1 between WR1 and Y0003 was not affected by crossing direction. The tiller and panicle numbers of F1 individuals were higher than their F2 counterparts. However, these traits did not change significantly from the F2 to the F3 generation or in hybrids with weedy rice as maternal or paternal plants. For all hybrids, the in vitro germination rates of fresh pollen were similar and significantly lower than those of their parents, seed sets were similar to or of lower value than those of weedy rice parents and seed shattering characteristics were partially suppressed, but the survival of hybrids over winter in the field was similar to that of weedy rice parents. All F1, F2 and F3 hybrids had similar composite agronomic performance to weedy rice parents. There was no significant decrease in the composite agronomic performance of any of the hybrids compared with weedy rice. This implies that gene flow from transgenic cultivated rice to weedy rice could occur under natural conditions. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Aged neuropeptide Y transgenic rats are resistant to acute stress but maintain spatial and non-spatial learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal, Cristina C; Vercauteren, Freya; Dumont, Yvan; Michalkiewicz, Michael; Quirion, Rémi

    2004-08-31

    The behavioral phenotype of five-month-old rats overexpressing neuropeptide Y (NPY) has previously been described [Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 97 (2000) 12852]. In this transgenic rat model, there is central overexpression of prepro-NPY mRNA and NPY peptide in the hippocampus and hypothalamus and decreased Y1 binding sites within the hippocampus. These molecular and neurochemical events led to altered anxiety profile and learning abilities in NPY-overexpressing rats. In the present study, anxiety and learning/memory related behaviors were examined in one-year-old NPY-transgenic rats in order to assess any behavioral changes that may have occurred during the aging process. As observed in 5-month-old overexpressing rats, aged NPY-transgenic animals are resistant to acute physical restraint stress measured by the elevated-plus maze and demonstrate anxiolytic-like activity in the open field. However, in contrast to data in young rats, there was no significant difference between aged wildtype and NPY-transgenic animals in relation to spatial and non-spatial memory as indicated by the (allo- and ego-centric) Morris water maze and object recognition test. It would thus appear that the anxiolytic-like profile observed in young NPY-overexpressing rats is maintained in older animals providing further evidence for a role for NPY in anxious behaviors. However, the cognitive deficits observed in young rats do not appear to occur in older animals suggesting the existence of compensatory mechanisms leading to a reversal of the learning deficits noted in younger animals. These results also provide additional evidence for the mechanistic dissociation between anxiety and cognition-related behaviors modulated by NPY.

  20. Enhanced Tissue-Specific Expression of the Herbicide Resistance bar Gene in Transgenic Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L cv. Coker 310FR) Using the Arabidopsis rbcS ats1A Promoter

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    KUMAR, Shashi; P. TIMKO, Michael

    2004-01-01

    A highly regenerating cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cultivar, Coker 310FR, was used to generate transgenic plants expressing the herbicide resistance gene, bar, encoding phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT...

  1. Accumulation of the long class of siRNA is associated with resistance to Plum pox virus in a transgenic woody perennial plum tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hily, Jean-Michel; Scorza, Ralph; Webb, Kevin; Ravelonandro, Michel

    2005-08-01

    We investigated the hallmarks of posttranscription gene silencing (PTGS) in mature plants, embryos, and seedlings of the transgenic plum trees (Prunus sp.) that are resistant to Plum pox virus (PPV). We previously demonstrated that the transgene insert and resistance to PPV were mutually inherited in progeny of line C5. We show here that C5 constitutively produces a short (22 nt) and a long (25 to 26 nt) species of short interfering (si)RNA from embryo to mature plant in the absence of PPV inoculation. Unlike siRNA, methylation and transcription of the PPV-coat protein transgene were 're-set' following seed germination. Uninoculated transgenic susceptible clones did not display DNA methylation, nor did they produce detectable levels of siRNA. Upon infection, susceptible clones, transgenic or untransformed, did produce siRNA but only the short 22-nt species. These findings show that plum trees respond to virus infection by initiating PTGS-like mechanisms that involve the production of siRNA. We further suggest that high-level virus resistance in transgenic Prunus species requires the production of the long-size class of siRNA. The research adds new insights into PTGS silencing in woody perennial plant species.

  2. mlo-based powdery mildew resistance in hexaploid bread wheat generated by a non-transgenic TILLING approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Garcia, Johanna; Spencer, David; Thieron, Hannah; Reinstädler, Anja; Hammond-Kosack, Kim; Phillips, Andrew L; Panstruga, Ralph

    2017-03-01

    Wheat is one of the most widely grown cereal crops in the world and is an important food grain source for humans. However, wheat yields can be reduced by many abiotic and biotic stress factors, including powdery mildew disease caused by Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici (Bgt). Generating resistant varieties is thus a major effort in plant breeding. Here, we took advantage of the non-transgenic Targeting Induced Lesions IN Genomes (TILLING) technology to select partial loss-of-function alleles of TaMlo, the orthologue of the barley Mlo (Mildew resistance locus o) gene. Natural and induced loss-of-function alleles (mlo) of barley Mlo are known to confer durable broad-spectrum powdery mildew resistance, typically at the expense of pleiotropic phenotypes such as premature leaf senescence. We identified 16 missense mutations in the three wheat TaMlo homoeologues, TaMlo-A1, TaMlo-B1 and TaMlo-D1 that each lead to single amino acid exchanges. Using transient gene expression assays in barley single cells, we functionally analysed the different missense mutants and identified the most promising candidates affecting powdery mildew susceptibility. By stacking of selected mutant alleles we generated four independent lines with non-conservative mutations in each of the three TaMlo homoeologues. Homozygous triple mutant lines and surprisingly also some of the homozygous double mutant lines showed enhanced, yet incomplete, Bgt resistance without the occurrence of discernible pleiotropic phenotypes. These lines thus represent an important step towards the production of commercial non-transgenic, powdery mildew-resistant bread wheat varieties. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Insect-resistance and high-yield transgenic tobacco obtained by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2010-10-04

    Oct 4, 2010 ... to the Tobacco Plants. J. Xiamen University (Natural Science). 43(5):. 706-709. Wu DL, Cui HZ, Guo SDC (2001). Onstruction of plant expression vector harboring a fused insecticidal gene and development of transgenic tobacco plants. Scientia Agricultura Sinica, 34(5): 465-. 468. Wang and Guo 6631.

  4. Tomato transgenic plants expressing hairpin construct of a nematode protease gene conferred enhanced resistance to root-knot nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Tushar K; Papolu, Pradeep K; Banakar, Prakash; Choudhary, Divya; Sirohi, Anil; Rao, Uma

    2015-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita) cause substantial yield losses in vegetables worldwide, and are difficult to manage. Continuous withdrawal of environmentally-harmful nematicides from the global market warrants the need for novel nematode management strategies. Utility of host-delivered RNAi has been demonstrated in several plants (Arabidopsis, tobacco, and soybean) that exhibited resistance against root-knot and cyst nematodes. Herein, a M. incognita-specific protease gene, cathepsin L cysteine proteinase (Mi-cpl-1), was targeted to generate tomato transgenic lines to evaluate the genetically modified nematode resistance. In vitro knockdown of Mi-cpl-1 gene led to the reduced attraction and penetration of M. incognita in tomato, suggesting the involvement of Mi-cpl-1 in nematode parasitism. Transgenic expression of the RNAi construct of Mi-cpl-1 gene resulted in 60-80% reduction in infection and multiplication of M. incognita in tomato. Evidence for in vitro and in vivo silencing of Mi-cpl-1 was confirmed by expression analysis using quantitative PCR. Our study demonstrates that Mi-cpl-1 plays crucial role during plant-nematode interaction and plant-mediated downregulation of this gene elicits detrimental effect on M. incognita development, reinforcing the potential of RNAi technology for management of phytonematodes in crop plants.

  5. Tomato transgenic plants expressing hairpin construct of a nematode protease gene conferred enhanced resistance to root-knot nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Kanti Dutta

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita cause substantial yield losses in vegetables worldwide, and are difficult to manage. Continuous withdrawal of environmentally-harmful nematicides from the global market warrants the need for novel nematode management strategies. Utility of host-delivered RNAi has been demonstrated in several plants (Arabidopsis, tobacco and soybean that exhibited resistance against root-knot and cyst nematodes. Herein, a M. incognita-specific protease gene, cathepsin L cysteine proteinase (Mi-cpl-1, was targeted to generate tomato transgenic lines to evaluate the genetically modified nematode resistance. In vitro knockdown of Mi-cpl-1 gene led to the reduced attraction and penetration of M. incognita in tomato, suggesting the involvement of Mi-cpl-1 in nematode parasitism. Transgenic expression of the RNAi construct of Mi-cpl-1 gene resulted in 60-80% reduction in infection and multiplication of M. incognita in tomato. Evidence for in vitro and in vivo silencing of Mi-cpl-1 was confirmed by expression analysis using quantitative PCR. Our study demonstrates that Mi-cpl-1 plays crucial role during plant-nematode interaction and plant-mediated downregulation of this gene elicits detrimental effect on M. incognita development, reinforcing the potential of RNAi technology for management of phytonematodes in crop plants.

  6. Lack of transgene and glyphosate effects on yield, and mineral and amino acid content of glyphosate-resistant soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Stephen O; Rimando, Agnes M; Reddy, Krishna N; Cizdziel, James V; Bellaloui, Nacer; Shaw, David R; Williams, Martin M; Maul, Jude E

    2017-05-25

    There has been controversy as to whether the glyphosate resistance gene and/or glyphosate applied to glyphosate-resistant (GR) soybean affect the content of cationic minerals (especially Mg, Mn and Fe), yield and amino acid content of GR soybean. A two-year field study (2013 and 2014) examined these questions at sites in Mississippi, USA. There were no effects of glyphosate, the GR transgene or field crop history (for a field with both no history of glyphosate use versus one with a long history of glyphosate use) on grain yield. Furthermore, these factors had no consistent effects on measured mineral (Al, As, Ba, Cd, Ca, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Ga, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Rb, Se, Sr, Tl, U, V, Zn) content of leaves or harvested seed. Effects on minerals were small and inconsistent between years, treatments and mineral, and appeared to be random false positives. No notable effects on free or protein amino acids of the seed were measured, although glyphosate and its degradation product, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), were found in the seed in concentrations consistent with previous studies. Neither glyphosate nor the GR transgene affect the content of the minerals measured in leaves and seed, harvested seed amino acid composition, or yield of GR soybean. Furthermore, soils with a legacy of GR crops have no effects on these parameters in soybean. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Inducible expression of a fusion gene encoding two proteinase inhibitors leads to insect and pathogen resistance in transgenic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilis, Jordi; López-García, Belén; Meynard, Donaldo; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; San Segundo, Blanca

    2014-04-01

    Plant proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are considered as candidates for increased insect resistance in transgenic plants. Insect adaptation to PI ingestion might, however, compromise the benefits received by transgenic expression of PIs. In this study, the maize proteinase inhibitor (MPI), an inhibitor of insect serine proteinases, and the potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor (PCI) were fused into a single open reading frame and introduced into rice plants. The two PIs were linked using either the processing site of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1B precursor protein or the 2A sequence from the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Expression of each fusion gene was driven by the wound- and pathogen-inducible mpi promoter. The mpi-pci fusion gene was stably inherited for at least three generations with no penalty on plant phenotype. An important reduction in larval weight of Chilo suppressalis fed on mpi-pci rice, compared with larvae fed on wild-type plants, was observed. Expression of the mpi-pci fusion gene confers resistance to C. suppressalis (striped stem borer), one of the most important insect pest of rice. The mpi-pci expression systems described may represent a suitable strategy for insect pest control, better than strategies based on the use of single PI genes, by preventing insect adaptive responses. The rice plants expressing the mpi-pci fusion gene also showed enhanced resistance to infection by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of the rice blast disease. Our results illustrate the usefulness of the inducible expression of the mpi-pci fusion gene for dual resistance against insects and pathogens in rice plants. © 2013 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Transgenic expression of the rice Xa21 pattern recognition receptor in banana (Musa sp.) confers resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Jaindra Nath; Lorenzen, Jim; Bahar, Ofir; Ronald, Pamela; Tripathi, Leena

    2014-01-01

    Summary Banana Xanthomonas wilt (BXW), caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum (Xcm), is the most devastating disease of banana in east and central Africa. The spread of BXW threatens the livelihood of millions of African farmers who depend on banana for food security and income. There are no commercial chemicals, bio-control agents or resistant cultivars available to control BXW. Here we take advantage of the robust resistance conferred by the rice pattern recognition receptor (PRR), XA21, to the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). We identified a set of genes required for activation of Xa21 mediated immunity (rax) that were conserved in both Xoo and Xcm. Based on the conservation, we hypothesized that intergeneric transfer of Xa21 would confer resistance to Xcm. We evaluated 25 transgenic lines of the banana cultivar ‘Gonja manjaya’ (AAB) using a rapid bioassay and 12 transgenic plants in the glass house for resistance against Xcm. About fifty percent of the transgenic lines showed complete resistance to Xcm in both assays. In contrast, all of the non-transgenic control plants showed severe symptoms that progressed to complete wilting. These results indicate that the constitutive expression of the rice Xa21 gene in banana results in enhanced resistance against Xcm. Furthermore this work demonstrates the feasibility of PRR gene transfer between monocotyledonous species and provides a valuable new tool for controlling the BXW pandemic of banana, a staple food for 100 million people in east Africa. PMID:24612254

  9. A comparative investigation of the metabolism of the herbicide glufosinate in cell cultures of transgenic glufosinate-resistant and non-transgenic oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and corn (Zea mays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhland, Monika; Engelhardt, Gabriele; Pawlizki, Karlheinz

    2002-10-01

    To obtain information on differences between the metabolic pathways of the herbicide glufosinate (trade names: BASTA, LIBERTY) in non-transgenic, glufosinate-sensitive plants and in transgenic, glufosinate-resistant plants, the metabolism of 14C-labeled glufosinate and its enantiomers L- and D-glufosinate was studied using cell cultures of oilseed rape and corn. Transformation of glufosinate in both sensitive and transgenic rape cells remained at a low rate of about 3-10% in contrast to corn cells, where 20% was transformed in sensitive and 43% in transgenic cells after 14 days of incubation, the rest remaining as unchanged glufosinate. In sensitive rape and corn cells the main metabolite was 4-methylphosphinico-2-oxo-butanoic acid (PPO) with 7.3 and 16.4%, respectively, together with low amounts of 3-methylphosphinicopropionic acid (MPP), 4-methylphosphinico-2-hydroxybutanoic acid (MHB), 4-methylphosphinicobutanoic acid (MPB) and 2-methylphosphinicoacetic acid (MPA). An additional metabolite formed in transgenic cell cultures was 2-acetamido-4-methylbutanoic acid (N-acetyl-L-glufosinate, NGA), which was formed at rates of 3.2% in rape and 16.1% in corn. A further minor metabolite, not yet identified, was detected in both cell types. The liberation of 0.2% 14CO2 indicates further metabolic steps prior to a limited mineralization in plant cell cultures. L-glufosinate was transformed into the same metabolites as the glufosinate racemate. D-glufosinate was not metabolized.

  10. Ribosome Inactivating Protein of barley enhanced resistance to Rhizoctonia solani in transgenic potato cultivar 'Desirée' in greenhouse conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M'hamdi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the potato cultivar 'Desirée' was transformed via Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404 containing the plasmid pBIN19 which harbors the Ribosome Inactivating Protein (rip30. The potato leaf discs were used as an explant for transformation. The in vitro regeneration parameters (percentage of callus regenerated, number of shoots per callus, percentage of regenerated roots and percentage of the transgenic plants were evaluated. The PCR technique was used for identification of transformed plants. Southern and Western blot analyses were applied for molecular characterization of the transgenic clones. A greenhouse assay was carried out to evaluate the resistance to Rhizoctonia solani pathogen of transgenic clones expressing the rip30 gene. The results revealed that not all the plants developed in selective medium were positive for the corresponding gene using the PCR technique. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that the tested transgenic plants integrated three copies of rip30 gene into their genome. The expression of the RIP30 protein was confirmed in the leaf extracts of the transgenic clones by Western blot analysis. Resistance evaluation of the transgenic plants in greenhouse conditions showed that disease incidence and severity were reduced for R. solani.

  11. Expression of a rice chitinase gene in transgenic banana ('Gros Michel', AAA genome group) confers resistance to black leaf streak disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Gabriella; Sági, László; Jacon, Géraldine; Arinaitwe, Geofrey; Busogoro, Jean-Pierre; Thiry, Els; Strosse, Hannelore; Swennen, Rony; Remy, Serge

    2013-02-01

    Transgenic banana (Musa acuminata 'Gros Michel') integrating either of two rice chitinase genes was generated and its resistance to Black Leaf Streak disease caused by the fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis was tested using a leaf disk bioassay. PCR screening indicated the presence of the hpt selectable marker gene in more than 90 % of the lines tested, whereas more than three quarters of the lines contained the linked rice chitinase gene resulting in a co-transformation frequency of at least 71.4 %. Further, a unique stable integration of the transgenes in each line revealed some false negative PCR results and the expected co-transformation frequency of 100 %. The transgene insert number per line ranged from 1 to 5 and single transgene insert lines (25 % of all) were identified. Considerable delay in disease development (up to 63 days post-incoculation) over a monitoring period of 108 days occurred in nine lines with extracellularly targeted chitinase out of 17 transgenic lines tested and their necrotic leaf area decreased by 73-94 % compared to the untransformed susceptible control line. Finally, correlation between symptom development and rice chitinase expression was confirmed in two lines by Western analysis. The potential of rice chitinase genes to enhance resistance against M. fijiensis in banana was demonstrated as well as the usefulness of the leaf disk bioassay for early disease screening in transgenic banana lines.

  12. A novel 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase transgene for glyphosate resistance stimulates growth and fecundity in weedy rice (Oryza sativa) without herbicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Xia, Hui; Yang, Xiao; Xu, Ting; Si, Hong Jiang; Cai, Xing Xing; Wang, Feng; Su, Jun; Snow, Allison A; Lu, Bao-Rong

    2014-04-01

    Understanding evolutionary interactions among crops and weeds can facilitate effective weed management. For example, gene flow from crops to their wild or weedy relatives can lead to rapid evolution in recipient populations. In rice (Oryza sativa), transgenic herbicide resistance is expected to spread to conspecific weedy rice (Oryza sativa f. spontanea) via hybridization. Here, we studied fitness effects of transgenic over-expression of a native 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (epsps) gene developed to confer glyphosate resistance in rice. Controlling for genetic background, we examined physiological traits and field performance of crop-weed hybrid lineages that segregated for the presence or absence of this novel epsps transgene. Surprisingly, we found that transgenic F2 crop-weed hybrids produced 48-125% more seeds per plant than nontransgenic controls in monoculture- and mixed-planting designs without glyphosate application. Transgenic plants also had greater EPSPS protein levels, tryptophan concentrations, photosynthetic rates, and per cent seed germination compared with nontransgenic controls. Our findings suggest that over-expression of a native rice epsps gene can lead to fitness advantages, even without exposure to glyphosate. We hypothesize that over-expressed epsps may be useful to breeders and, if deployed, could result in fitness benefits in weedy relatives following transgene introgression. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. A novel 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase transgene for glyphosate resistance stimulates growth and fecundity in weedy rice (Oryza sativa) without herbicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Xia, Hui; Yang, Xiao; Xu, Ting; Si, Hong Jiang; Cai, Xing Xing; Wang, Feng; Su, Jun; Snow, Allison A; Lu, Bao-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Understanding evolutionary interactions among crops and weeds can facilitate effective weed management. For example, gene flow from crops to their wild or weedy relatives can lead to rapid evolution in recipient populations. In rice (Oryza sativa), transgenic herbicide resistance is expected to spread to conspecific weedy rice (Oryza sativa f. spontanea) via hybridization. Here, we studied fitness effects of transgenic over-expression of a native 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (epsps) gene developed to confer glyphosate resistance in rice. Controlling for genetic background, we examined physiological traits and field performance of crop–weed hybrid lineages that segregated for the presence or absence of this novel epsps transgene. Surprisingly, we found that transgenic F2 crop–weed hybrids produced 48–125% more seeds per plant than nontransgenic controls in monoculture- and mixed-planting designs without glyphosate application. Transgenic plants also had greater EPSPS protein levels, tryptophan concentrations, photosynthetic rates, and per cent seed germination compared with nontransgenic controls. Our findings suggest that over-expression of a native rice epsps gene can lead to fitness advantages, even without exposure to glyphosate. We hypothesize that over-expressed epsps may be useful to breeders and, if deployed, could result in fitness benefits in weedy relatives following transgene introgression. PMID:23905647

  14. Transgenic loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plants expressing a modified delta-endotoxin gene of Bacillus thuringiensis with enhanced resistance to Dendrolimus punctatus Walker and Crypyothelea formosicola Staud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei; Tian, Yingchuan

    2003-02-01

    A synthetic version of the CRY1Ac gene of Bacillus thuringiensis has been used for the transformation of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) using particle bombardment. Mature zygotic embryos were used to be bombarded and to generate organogenic callus and transgenic regenerated plants. Expression vector pB48.215 DNA contained a synthetic Bacillus thuringiensis (B.t.) CRY1Ac coding sequence flanked by the double cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and nopaline synthase (NOS) terminator sequences, and the neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPTII) gene controlled by the promoter of the nopaline synthase gene was introduced into loblolly pine tissues by particle bombardment. The transformed tissues were proliferated and selected on media with kanamycin. Shoot regeneration was induced from the kanamycin-resistant calli, and transgenic plantlets were then produced. More than 60 transformed plants from independent transformation events were obtained for each loblolly pine genotype tested. The integration and expression of the introduced genes in the transgenic loblolly pine plants was confirmed by polymerase chain reactions (PCR) analysis, by Southern hybridization, by Northern blot analysis, and by Western blot analysis. Effective resistance of transgenic plants against Dendrolimus punctatus Walker and Crypyothelea formosicola Staud was verified in feeding bioassays with the insects. The transgenic plants recovered could represent a good opportunity to analyse the impact of genetic engineering of pine for sustainable resistance to pests using a B. thuringiensis insecticidal protein. This protocol enabled the routine transformation of loblolly pine plants that were previously difficult to transform.

  15. Enhanced resistance to blister blight in transgenic tea (Camellia sinensis [L.] O. Kuntze) by overexpression of class I chitinase gene from potato (Solanum tuberosum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H Ranjit; Deka, Manab; Das, Sudripta

    2015-07-01

    Tea is the second most consumed beverage in the world. A crop loss of up to 43 % has been reported due to blister blight disease of tea caused by a fungus, Exobasidium vexans. Thus, it directly affects the tea industry qualitatively and quantitatively. Solanum tuberosum class I chitinase gene (AF153195) is a plant pathogenesis-related gene. It was introduced into tea genome via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation with hygromycin phosphotransferase (hpt) gene conferring hygromycin resistance as plant selectable marker. A total of 41 hygromycin resistant plantlets were obtained, and PCR analysis established 12 plantlets confirming about the stable integration of transgene in the plant genome. Real-time PCR detected transgene expression in four transgenic plantlets (T28, C57, C9, and T31). Resistance to biotrophic fungal pathogen, E. vexans, was tested by detached leaf infection assay of greenhouse acclimated plantlets. An inhibitory activity against the fungal pathogen was evident from the detached leaves from the transformants compared with the control. Fungal lesion formed on control plantlet whereas the transgenic plantlets showed resistance to inoculated fungal pathogen by the formation of hypersensitivity reaction area. This result suggests that constitutive expression of the potato class I chitinase gene can be exploited to improve resistance to fungal pathogen, E. vexans, in economical perennial plantation crop like tea.

  16. Transgenic Cotton Plants Expressing Cry1Ia12 Toxin Confer Resistance to Fall Armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) and Cotton Boll Weevil (Anthonomus grandis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Raquel S.; Oliveira-Neto, Osmundo B.; Moura, Hudson F. N.; de Macedo, Leonardo L. P.; Arraes, Fabrício B. M.; Lucena, Wagner A.; Lourenço-Tessutti, Isabela T.; de Deus Barbosa, Aulus A.; da Silva, Maria C. M.; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria F.

    2016-01-01

    Gossypium hirsutum (commercial cooton) is one of the most economically important fibers sources and a commodity crop highly affected by insect pests and pathogens. Several transgenic approaches have been developed to improve cotton resistance to insect pests, through the transgenic expression of different factors, including Cry toxins, proteinase inhibitors, and toxic peptides, among others. In the present study, we developed transgenic cotton plants by fertilized floral buds injection (through the pollen-tube pathway technique) using an DNA expression cassette harboring the cry1Ia12 gene, driven by CaMV35S promoter. The T0 transgenic cotton plants were initially selected with kanamycin and posteriorly characterized by PCR and Southern blot experiments to confirm the genetic transformation. Western blot and ELISA assays indicated the transgenic cotton plants with higher Cry1Ia12 protein expression levels to be further tested in the control of two major G. hirsutum insect pests. Bioassays with T1 plants revealed the Cry1Ia12 protein toxicity on Spodoptera frugiperda larvae, as evidenced by mortality up to 40% and a significant delay in the development of the target insects compared to untransformed controls (up to 30-fold). Also, an important reduction of Anthonomus grandis emerging adults (up to 60%) was observed when the insect larvae were fed on T1 floral buds. All the larvae and adult insect survivors on the transgenic lines were weaker and significantly smaller compared to the non-transformed plants. Therefore, this study provides GM cotton plant with simultaneous resistance against the Lepidopteran (S. frugiperda), and the Coleopteran (A. grandis) insect orders, and all data suggested that the Cry1Ia12 toxin could effectively enhance the cotton transgenic plants resistance to both insect pests. PMID:26925081

  17. Transgenic cotton plants expressing Cry1Ia12 toxin confer resistance to fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda and cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Sampaio Oliveira

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Gossypium hirsutum (commercial cooton is one of the most economically important fibers sources and a commodity crop highly affected by insect pests and pathogens. Several transgenic approaches have been developed to improve cotton resistance to insect pests, through the transgenic expression of different factors, including Cry toxins, proteinase inhibitors, and toxic peptides, among others. In the present study, we developed transgenic cotton plants by fertilized floral buds injection (through the pollen-tube pathway technique using an DNA expression cassette harboring the cry1Ia12 gene, driven by CaMV35S promoter. The T0 transgenic cotton plants were initially selected with kanamycin and posteriorly characterized with PCR and Southern blot experiments to confirm the genetic transformation. Western blot and ELISA assays indicated the transgenic cotton plants with higher Cry1Ia12 protein expression levels to be further tested in the control of two major G. hirsutum insect pests. Bioassays with T1 plants revealed the Cry1Ia12 protein toxicity on Spodoptera frugiperda larvae, as evidenced by mortality up to 40% and a significant delay in the development of the target insects compared to untransformed controls (up to 30-fold. Also, a significant reduction of Anthonomus grandis emerging adults (up to 60% was observed when the insect larvae were fed on T1 floral buds. All the larvae and adult insect survivors on the transgenic lines were weaker and significantly smaller compared to the non-transformed plants. Therefore, this study provides GM cotton plant with simultaneous resistance against the Lepidopteran (S. frugiperda and the Coleopteran (A. grandis insect orders, and all data suggested that the Cry1Ia12 toxin could effectively enhance the cotton transgenic plants resistance to both insect pests.

  18. Transgenic Cotton Plants Expressing Cry1Ia12 Toxin Confer Resistance to Fall Armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) and Cotton Boll Weevil (Anthonomus grandis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Raquel S; Oliveira-Neto, Osmundo B; Moura, Hudson F N; de Macedo, Leonardo L P; Arraes, Fabrício B M; Lucena, Wagner A; Lourenço-Tessutti, Isabela T; de Deus Barbosa, Aulus A; da Silva, Maria C M; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria F

    2016-01-01

    Gossypium hirsutum (commercial cooton) is one of the most economically important fibers sources and a commodity crop highly affected by insect pests and pathogens. Several transgenic approaches have been developed to improve cotton resistance to insect pests, through the transgenic expression of different factors, including Cry toxins, proteinase inhibitors, and toxic peptides, among others. In the present study, we developed transgenic cotton plants by fertilized floral buds injection (through the pollen-tube pathway technique) using an DNA expression cassette harboring the cry1Ia12 gene, driven by CaMV35S promoter. The T0 transgenic cotton plants were initially selected with kanamycin and posteriorly characterized by PCR and Southern blot experiments to confirm the genetic transformation. Western blot and ELISA assays indicated the transgenic cotton plants with higher Cry1Ia12 protein expression levels to be further tested in the control of two major G. hirsutum insect pests. Bioassays with T1 plants revealed the Cry1Ia12 protein toxicity on Spodoptera frugiperda larvae, as evidenced by mortality up to 40% and a significant delay in the development of the target insects compared to untransformed controls (up to 30-fold). Also, an important reduction of Anthonomus grandis emerging adults (up to 60%) was observed when the insect larvae were fed on T1 floral buds. All the larvae and adult insect survivors on the transgenic lines were weaker and significantly smaller compared to the non-transformed plants. Therefore, this study provides GM cotton plant with simultaneous resistance against the Lepidopteran (S. frugiperda), and the Coleopteran (A. grandis) insect orders, and all data suggested that the Cry1Ia12 toxin could effectively enhance the cotton transgenic plants resistance to both insect pests.

  19. Transgenic plants expressing ω-ACTX-Hv1a and snowdrop lectin (GNA) fusion protein show enhanced resistance to aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasu, Erich Y T; Edwards, Martin G; Fitches, Elaine; Gatehouse, John A; Gatehouse, Angharad M R

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant fusion proteins containing arthropod toxins have been developed as a new class of biopesticides. The recombinant fusion protein Hv1a/GNA, containing the spider venom toxin ω-ACTX-Hv1a linked to snowdrop lectin (GNA) was shown to reduce survival of the peach-potato aphid Myzus persicae when delivered in artificial diet, with survival plants contained intact fusion protein in leaf tissues at an estimated level of 25.6 ± 4.1 ng/mg FW. Transgenic Arabidopsis expressing Hv1a/GNA induced up to 40% mortality of M. persicae after 7 days exposure in detached leaf bioassays, demonstrating that transgenic plants can deliver fusion proteins to aphids. Grain aphids (Sitobion avenae) were more susceptible than M. persicae to the Hv1a/GNA fusion protein in artificial diet bioassays (LC50 = 0.73 mg/ml after 2 days against LC50 = 1.81 mg/ml for M. persicae), as they were not able to hydrolyze the fusion protein as readily as M. persicae. Expression of this fusion protein in suitable host plants for the grain aphid is likely to confer higher levels of resistance than that shown with the M. persicae/Arabidopsis model system.

  20. Effects of defoliating insect resistance QTLs and a cry1Ac transgene in soybean near-isogenic lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, S; Walker, D R; Boerma, H R; All, J N; Parrott, W A

    2008-02-01

    The crystal proteins coded by transgenes from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have shown considerable value in providing effective insect resistance in a number of crop species, including soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr. Additional sources of soybean insect resistance would be desirable to manage the development of tolerance/resistance to crystal proteins by defoliating insects and to sustain the deployment of Bt crops. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects and interactions of three insect resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs; QTL-M, QTL-H, and QTL-G) originating from Japanese soybean PI 229358 and a cry1Ac gene in a "Benning" genetic background. A set of 16 BC(6)F(2)-derived near isogenic lines (NILs) was developed using marker-assisted backcrosses and evaluated for resistance to soybean looper [SBL, Pseudoplusia includens (Walker)] and corn earworm [CEW, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie)] in field cage, greenhouse, and detached leaf assays. Both Bt and QTL-M had significantly reduced defoliation by both SBL and CEW and reduced larval weight of CEW. The antibiosis QTL-G had a significant effect on reducing CEW larval weight and also a significant effect on reducing defoliation by SBL and CEW in some assays. The antixenosis QTL-H had no main effect, but it appeared to function through interaction with QTL-M and QTL-G. Adding QTL-H and QTL-G further enhanced the resistance of the Bt and QTL-M combination to CEW in the field cage assay. These results should help guide the development of strategies for effective management of insect pests and for sustainable deployment of Bt genes.

  1. Infestation of transgenic powdery mildew-resistant wheat by naturally occurring insect herbivores under different environmental conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Álvarez-Alfageme

    Full Text Available A concern associated with the growing of genetically modified (GM crops is that they could adversely affect non-target organisms. We assessed the impact of several transgenic powdery mildew-resistant spring wheat lines on insect herbivores. The GM lines carried either the Pm3b gene from hexaploid wheat, which confers race-specific resistance to powdery mildew, or the less specific anti-fungal barley seed chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase. In addition to the non-transformed control lines, several conventional spring wheat varieties and barley and triticale were included for comparison. During two consecutive growing seasons, powdery mildew infection and the abundance of and damage by naturally occurring herbivores were estimated under semi-field conditions in a convertible glasshouse and in the field. Mildew was reduced on the Pm3b-transgenic lines but not on the chitinase/glucanase-expressing lines. Abundance of aphids was negatively correlated with powdery mildew in the convertible glasshouse, with Pm3b wheat plants hosting significantly more aphids than their mildew-susceptible controls. In contrast, aphid densities did not differ between GM plants and their non-transformed controls in the field, probably because of low mildew and aphid pressure at this location. Likewise, the GM wheat lines did not affect the abundance of or damage by the herbivores Oulema melanopus (L. and Chlorops pumilionis Bjerk. Although a previous study has revealed that some of the GM wheat lines show pleiotropic effects under field conditions, their effect on herbivorous insects appears to be low.

  2. Muscle-Specific IRS-1 Ser→Ala Transgenic Mice Are Protected From Fat-Induced Insulin Resistance in Skeletal Muscle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Katsutaro Morino; Susanne Neschen; Stefan Bilz; Saki Sono; Dimitrios Tsirigotis; Richard M. Reznick; Irene Moore; Yoshio Nagai; Varman Samuel; David Sebastian; Morris White; William Philbrick; Gerald I. Shulman

    2008-01-01

    Muscle-Specific IRS-1 Ser→Ala Transgenic Mice Are Protected From Fat-Induced Insulin Resistance in Skeletal Muscle Katsutaro Morino 1 2 , Susanne Neschen 1 2 , Stefan Bilz 2 , Saki Sono 2 , Dimitrios Tsirigotis 2 3 , Richard M...

  3. A nematode demographics assay in transgenic roots reveals no significant impacts of the Rhg1 locus LRR-Kinase on soybean cyst nematode resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines, SCN) is the most economically damaging pathogen of soybean (Glycine max) in the U.S. The Rhg1 locus is repeatedly observed as the quantitative trait locus with the greatest impact on SCN resistance. The Glyma18g02680.1 gene at the Rhg1 locus that encodes an apparent leucine-rich repeat transmembrane receptor-kinase (LRR-kinase) has been proposed to be the SCN resistance gene, but its function has not been confirmed. Generation of fertile transgenic soybean lines is difficult but methods have been published that test SCN resistance in transgenic roots generated with Agrobacterium rhizogenes. Results We report use of artificial microRNA (amiRNA) for gene silencing in soybean, refinements to transgenic root SCN resistance assays, and functional tests of the Rhg1 locus LRR-kinase gene. A nematode demographics assay monitored infecting nematode populations for their progress through developmental stages two weeks after inoculation, as a metric for SCN resistance. Significant differences were observed between resistant and susceptible control genotypes. Introduction of the Rhg1 locus LRR-kinase gene (genomic promoter/coding region/terminator; Peking/PI 437654-derived SCN-resistant source), into rhg1- SCN-susceptible plant lines carrying the resistant-source Rhg4+ locus, provided no significant increases in SCN resistance. Use of amiRNA to reduce expression of the LRR-kinase gene from the Rhg1 locus of Fayette (PI 88788 source of Rhg1) also did not detectably alter resistance to SCN. However, silencing of the LRR-kinase gene did have impacts on root development. Conclusion The nematode demographics assay can expedite testing of transgenic roots for SCN resistance. amiRNAs and the pSM103 vector that drives interchangeable amiRNA constructs through a soybean polyubiqutin promoter (Gmubi), with an intron-GFP marker for detection of transgenic roots, may have widespread use in legume biology. Studies in which expression

  4. Development of transgenic CryIA(c) + GNA cotton plants via pollen tube pathway method confers resistance to Helicoverpa armigera and Aphis gossypii Glover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi; Zhu, Zhen; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2013-01-01

    Elite cotton cultivar Sumian16 was transformed with p7RPSBK-mGNA-NPTII containing Bt (CryIA(c)), Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) resistance genes and selectable marker NptII gene via the pollen tube pathway method and two fertile transgenic Bt + GNA plants were obtained in the present study. The integration and expression of the Bt and GNA genes were confirmed by molecular biology techniques and insect bioassays. Insect bioassays showed that the transformed plants were highly toxic to bollworm larvae as well as obviously retarding development of aphid populations. PCR analyses and identification of resistance to Kanamycin and bollworm showed that the resistance to bollworm for the two transgenic plants was dominantly inherited in a Mendelian manner and the two resistance genes and selectable marker co-segregated from primary transformed parents to the first self-fertilized progeny plants.

  5. Volatile Organic Compounds Induced by Herbivory of the Soybean Looper Chrysodeixis includens in Transgenic Glyphosate-Resistant Soybean and the Behavioral Effect on the Parasitoid, Meteorus rubens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strapasson, Priscila; Pinto-Zevallos, Delia M; Da Silva Gomes, Sandra M; Zarbin, Paulo H G

    2016-08-01

    Transgenic soybean plants (RR) engineered to express resistance to glyphosate harbor a variant of the enzyme EPSPS (5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase) involved in the shikimic acid pathway, the biosynthetic route of three aromatic amino acids: phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan. The insertion of the variant enzyme CP4 EPSPS confers resistance to glyphosate. During the process of genetic engineering, unintended secondary effects are likely to occur. In the present study, we quantified volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted constitutively or induced in response to herbivory by the soybean looper Chrysodeixis includens in transgenic soybean and its isogenic (untransformed) line. Since herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) are known to play a role in the recruitment of natural enemies, we assessed whether changes in VOC profiles alter the foraging behavior of the generalist endoparasitic larval parasitoid, Meteorus rubens in the transgenic line. Additionally, we assessed whether there was a difference in plant quality by measuring the weight gain of the soybean looper. In response to herbivory, several VOCs were induced in both the conventional and the transgenic line; however, larger quantities of a few compounds were emitted by transgenic plants. Meteorus rubens females were able to discriminate between the odors of undamaged and C. includens-damaged plants in both lines, but preferred the odors emitted by herbivore-damaged transgenic plants over those emitted by herbivore-damaged conventional soybean plants. No differences were observed in the weight gain of the soybean looper. Our results suggest that VOC-mediated tritrophic interactions in this model system are not negatively affected. However, as the preference of the wasps shifted towards damaged transgenic plants, the results also suggest that genetic modification affects that tritrophic interactions in multiple ways in this model system.

  6. Post-transcriptional gene silencing of the p23 silencing suppressor of Citrus tristeza virus confers resistance to the virus in transgenic Mexican lime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagoaga, Carmen; López, Carmelo; de Mendoza, Alfonso Hermoso; Moreno, Pedro; Navarro, Luis; Flores, Ricardo; Peña, Leandro

    2006-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that most Mexican limes (Citrus aurantifolia (Christ.) Swing.) expressing the p23 gene of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) exhibit aberrations resembling viral leaf symptoms. Here we report that five independent transgenic lines having normal phenotype displayed characteristics typical of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS): multiple copies of the transgene, low levels of the corresponding mRNA, methylation of the silenced transgene, and accumulation of p23-specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). When graft- or aphid-inoculated with CTV, some propagations of these silenced lines were immune: they neither expressed symptoms nor accumulated virions and viral RNA as estimated by DAS-ELISA and Northern blot hybridization, respectively. Other propagations were moderately resistant because they became infected later and showed attenuated symptoms compared to controls. The susceptible propagations, in addition to symptom expression and elevated virus titer, accumulated p23-specific siRNAs at levels significantly higher than immune or non-inoculated propagations, and showed transgene demethylation. This variable response among clonal transformants indicates that factors other than the genetic background of the transgenic plants play a key role in PTGS-mediated resistance.

  7. Multitrophic effects of plant resistance: from basic ecology to application in transgenic crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kos, M.

    2012-01-01

    Plants have evolved a wide array of direct and indirect resistance traits that prevent or reduce herbivory by insects. The aim of this thesis was to study the effects of direct and indirect plant resistance traits on the multitrophic interactions between brassicaceous plants, leaf-chewing and

  8. Transgenic crops with an improved resistance to biotic stresses. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohidfar, M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pests, diseases and weeds (biotic stresses are significant limiting factors for crop yield and production. However, the limitations associated with conventional breeding methods necessitated the development of alternative methods for improving new varieties with higher resistance to biotic stresses. Molecular techniques have developed applicable methods for genetic transformation of a wide range of plants. Genetic engineering approach has been demonstrated to provide enormous options for the selection of the resistance genes from different sources to introduce them into plants to provide resistance against different biotic stresses. Literature. In this review, we focus on strategies to achieve the above mentioned objectives including expression of insecticidal, antifungal, antibacterial, antiviral resistance and herbicide detoxification for herbicide resistance. Conclusion. Regardless of the concerns about commercialization of products from genetically modified (GM crops resistant to biotic stresses, it is observed that the cultivation area of these crops is growing fast each year. Considering this trend, it is expected that production and commercialization of GM crops resistant to biotic stresses will continue to increase but will also extend to production of crops resistant to abiotic stresses (e.g. drought, salinity, etc. in a near future.

  9. Seleção de linhagens de melancia resistentes ao Watermelon mosaic virus e ao Papaya ringspot virus Selection of resistant watermelon lines to Watermelon mosaic virus and Papaya ringspot virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Evando Aguiar Beserra Júnior

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Foram avaliadas 20 linhagens de melancia, provenientes do cruzamento da cultivar comercial suscetível Crimson Sweet e da introdução PI 595201 resistente ao Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV e Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV-W. As linhagens, e os parentais foram inoculados com o WMV ou com o PRSV-W em casa-de-vegetação distintas. Aos 35 e 49 dias após a primeira inoculação (DAI, as plantas foram avaliadas por meio de uma escala de notas, em que 1 (ausência de sintomas a 5 (intenso mosaico e deformações foliares. Pelos resultados infere-se que, aos 35 DAI, as linhagens 1, 2 e 20 apresentaram resistência tanto para o WMV como para o PRSV-W, com médias de 1,95, 1,80 e 2,25 para o WMV, e de 2,50, 2,30 e 2,50 para o PRSV-W, respectivamente. As linhagens 5, 7 e 13 foram resistentes somente ao WMV e as plantas das linhagens 3, 10 e 18 para o PRSV-W. A reação das linhagens permaneceu em geral pouco alterada aos 49 DAI. A existência de linhagens resistentes somente ao WMV e somente ao PRSV-W, ao lado de linhagens resistentes a ambos os vírus, é indicativo de que as resistências ao WMV e ao PRSV-W não são controladas pelos mesmos genes.Twenty advanced watermelon breeding lines, derived from the cross between cv. Crimson Sweet (susceptible and PI 595201 (resistant to WMV and PRSV-W, were screened for resistance to both potyviruses. The twenty lines, among with Crimson Sweet and PI 595201, were inoculated with either WMV or PRSV-W, in two different greenhouse trials. Plants were evaluated for symptoms 35 and 49 days after the first inoculation (DAI, using a scale from 1 (no symptoms to 5 (severe mosaic and foliar distortion. Evaluations at 35 DAI indicated that lines 1, 2 and 20 had good levels of resistance to both WMV and PRSV-W, with ratings of 1,95, 1,80 and 2,25 for WMV, and of 2,50, 2,30 and 2,50 for PRSV-W, respectively. Lines 5, 7 and 13 were resistant to WMV only, whereas lines 3, 10 and 18 were resistant to PRSV-W only. The reaction of

  10. Field-evolved resistance by western corn rootworm to multiple Bacillus thuringiensis toxins in transgenic maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassmann, Aaron J; Petzold-Maxwell, Jennifer L; Clifton, Eric H; Dunbar, Mike W; Hoffmann, Amanda M; Ingber, David A; Keweshan, Ryan S

    2014-04-08

    The widespread planting of crops genetically engineered to produce insecticidal toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) places intense selective pressure on pest populations to evolve resistance. Western corn rootworm is a key pest of maize, and in continuous maize fields it is often managed through planting of Bt maize. During 2009 and 2010, fields were identified in Iowa in which western corn rootworm imposed severe injury to maize producing Bt toxin Cry3Bb1. Subsequent bioassays revealed Cry3Bb1 resistance in these populations. Here, we report that, during 2011, injury to Bt maize in the field expanded to include mCry3A maize in addition to Cry3Bb1 maize and that laboratory analysis of western corn rootworm from these fields found resistance to Cry3Bb1 and mCry3A and cross-resistance between these toxins. Resistance to Bt maize has persisted in Iowa, with both the number of Bt fields identified with severe root injury and the ability western corn rootworm populations to survive on Cry3Bb1 maize increasing between 2009 and 2011. Additionally, Bt maize targeting western corn rootworm does not produce a high dose of Bt toxin, and the magnitude of resistance associated with feeding injury was less than that seen in a high-dose Bt crop. These first cases of resistance by western corn rootworm highlight the vulnerability of Bt maize to further evolution of resistance from this pest and, more broadly, point to the potential of insects to develop resistance rapidly when Bt crops do not achieve a high dose of Bt toxin.

  11. Intercellular production of tamavidin 1, a biotin-binding protein from Tamogitake mushroom, confers resistance to the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae in transgenic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Yoshimitsu; Oka, Naomi; Suzuki, Junko; Tsukamoto, Hiroshi; Ishida, Yuji

    2012-05-01

    The blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, one of the most devastating rice pathogens in the world, shows biotin-dependent growth. We have developed a strategy for creating disease resistance to M. oryzae whereby intercellular production of tamavidin 1, a biotin-binding protein from Pleurotus cornucopiae occurs in transgenic rice plants. The gene that encodes tamavidin 1, fused to the sequence for a secretion signal peptide derived from rice chitinase gene, was connected to the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, and the resultant construct was introduced into rice. The tamavidin 1 was accumulated at levels of 0.1-0.2% of total soluble leaf proteins in the transgenic rice and it was localized in the intercellular space of rice leaves. The tamavidin 1 purified from the transgenic rice was active, it bound to biotin and inhibited in vitro growth of M. oryzae by causing biotin deficiency. The transgenic rice plants showed a significant resistance to M. oryzae. This study shows the possibility of a new strategy to engineer disease resistance in higher plants by taking advantage of a pathogen's auxotrophy.

  12. Transgenic plants expressing -ACTX-Hv1a and snowdrop lectin (GNA fusion protein show enhanced resistance to aphids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erich Y.T. Nakasu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant fusion proteins containing arthropod toxins have been developed as a new class of biopesticides. The recombinant fusion protein Hv1a/GNA, containing the spider venom toxin w-ACTX-Hv1a linked to snowdrop lectin (GNA was shown to reduce survival of the peach-potato aphid Myzus persicae when delivered in artificial diet, with survival <10% after 8 days exposure to fusion protein at 1 mg/ml. Although the fusion protein was rapidly degraded by proteases in the insect, Hv1a/GNA oral toxicity to M. persicae was significantly greater than GNA alone. A construct encoding the fusion protein, including the GNA leader sequence, under control of the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter was transformed into Arabidopsis; the resulting plants contained intact fusion protein in leaf tissues at an estimated level of 25.6±4.1 ng/mg FW. Transgenic Arabidopsis expressing Hv1a/GNA induced up to 40% mortality of M. persicae after seven days exposure in detached leaf bioassays, demonstrating that transgenic plants can deliver fusion proteins to aphids. Grain aphids (Sitobion avenae were more susceptible than M. persicae to the Hv1a/GNA fusion protein in artificial diet bioassays (LC50=0.73 mg/ml after two days against LC50=1.81 mg/ml for M. persicae, as they were not able to hydrolyze the fusion protein as readily as M. persicae. Expression of this fusion protein in suitable host plants for the grain aphid is likely to confer higher levels of resistance than that shown with the M. persicae/Arabidopsis model system.

  13. Simple and economical assay systems for evaluation of phosphinothricin resistant transgenics of sorghum, Sorghum bicolor. (L.) Moench., and pearl millet, Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harshavardhan, D; Santha, B; Rani, T S; Ulaganathan, K; Madhulety, T Y; Laxminarayana, C; Seetharama, N

    2003-02-01

    Five simple and rapid methods for evaluation of sorghum and pearl millet transgenics resistant to herbicide phosphinothricin (used as selectable marker) were studied. For rapid in vitro selection, three assays (establishment of sensitivity curves for embryogenic calli, determination of lethal doses for seed germination, and a rapid screening of cut young leaves based on the colour change of the medium) were established. For rapid screening of transgenic progeny, effects of in vivo Basta leaf spray and dip tests were studied at three different morphological stages. For all the above assays, LD50, and LD100 values were higher for pearl millet than sorghum. However, in both the crops, genotype effect was not significant. The assays standardized in the study were found to be effective for rapid, economical and mass-scale identification and characterization of transgenic plants of sorghum and pearl millet.

  14. Suitability of transgenic glyphosate-resistant soybeans to green cloverworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morjan, Wilmar E; Pedigo, Larry P

    2002-12-01

    Host plant suitability to green cloverworm, Hypena scabra (F.), was evaluated on two conventional soybean varieties (Stine 2499-0 and 2972-2) and two RoundUp Ready Soybeans (Stine 2506-4 and 2892-4) with and without exposure to glyphosate. No differences among treatments were detected on developmental time and survivorship. Developmental time from first instar to adult ranged from 24.7 to 25.5 d, and survivorship ranged from 86 to 96%. No sex bias was observed among treatments (proportion of females ranged from 0.41 to 0.50). Morphological differences were observed between sexes; males had a longer and wider thorax, longer wings, and longer body. Females had longer and wider abdomens. Although treatments did not affect size (calculated with principal component analyses), significant differences were observed between males and females. These results suggest that soybean genetic differences (between conventional varieties and analogous transgenic varieties) or plant stress (induced by glyphosate metabolization) do not affect the plant suitability to H. scabra.

  15. Green-tissue-specific, C(4)-PEPC-promoter-driven expression of Cry1Ab makes transgenic potato plants resistant to tuber moth (Phthorimaea operculella, Zeller).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasimi Hagh, Ziba; Rahnama, Hassan; Panahandeh, Jaber; Baghban Kohneh Rouz, Bahram; Arab Jafari, Khoda Morad; Mahna, Nasser; Mahna, Naser

    2009-12-01

    An important strategy for obtaining a safer transgenic plant may be the use of a spatial- or tissue-specific promoter, instead of a constitutive one. In this study, we have used a light-inducible maize PEPC promoter to regulate the cry1Ab gene, aiming to produce transgenic potatoes that are resistant to potato tuber moth (PTM) (Phthorimaea operculella, Zeller). Out of 60 regenerated lines having normal phenotypes, 55 lines were PCR-positive for both the cry1Ab and nptII genes. Southern analysis on three selected putative transgenic lines revealed that they have only a single intact copy of the cry1Ab gene. An investigation of the Cry1Ab protein in the leaves and light-exposed (LE) tubers of the transgenic lines demonstrated the presence of the protein in the foliage and green tubers but not in the light-not exposed (LNE) tubers. A bioassay analysis of excised leaves of nine randomly selected lines showed that eight lines had 100% PTM larval mortality. Confirming results were obtained in six selected lines using the whole plant bioassay in the greenhouse. LE transgenic tubers also exhibited 100% larval mortality; however, the levels of damage to the LNE transgenic tubers were high and statistically the same as those incurred by the non-transgenic ones. Based on the results, we believe that this spatial expression of Cry1Ab using the light-inducible PEPC promoter can control PTM infestation in the field and significantly reduce pollution transmission to storage potatoes.

  16. [Comparison between transgenic insect-resistant cotton expressing Cry1Ac protein and its parental variety in rhizospheric fungal diversity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jian-Gang; Jiao, Hai-Hua; Bai, Zhi-Hui; Qi, Hong-Yan; Ma, An-Zhou; Zhuang, Guo-qiang; Zhang, Hong-xun

    2014-11-01

    The dynamics of rhizospheric fungal diversity and biomass at different sampling stages associated with two transgenic insectresistant cottons expressing Cry1Ac protein and their control varieties were studied under greenhouse conditions, followed by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR), in order to evaluate the ecological security of planting transgenic cotton expressing Cry1Ac protein. The results indicated that the fungal superior bands in rhizosphere of transgenic Bt cotton were similar with that of control cotton at four sampling stages, the more obvious difference in the blurred bands among transgenic Bt cotton, JM20 and SHIYUAN321 was detected. The rhizospheric fungal biomass of transgenic Bt cotton SGK321 was significantly lower than that of its parental control cotton at seedling stage, while the slight decrease in fungal biomass of transgenic Bt cotton XP188 was detected at boll forming stage, the ill-defined decrease, even growing tendency in two transgenic Bt cottons was detected at other stages. However, the difference of rhizospheric fungal community compositions and biomass was not only existed between transgenic cotton and its control, but also between SHIYUAN321 and JM20, and the same phenomenon was also detected between transgenic Bt cotton SGK321 and XP188. Hence, Bt protein is not the only incentive resulting in the difference in fungal community composition and diversity, the decrease in biomass between transgenic cotton and untransgenic cotton, different cotton varieties has an effect on them.

  17. Transgenic Rice Plants Harboring Genomic DNA from Zizania latifolia Confer Bacterial Blight Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Wei-Wei; Song, Cheng-Li; Chen, Jie; Fu, Ya-ping; Jian-li WU; Shao-mei JIANG

    2011-01-01

    Based on the sequence of a resistance gene analog FZ14 derived from Zizania latifolia (Griseb.), a pair of specific PCR primers FZ14P1/FZ14P2 was designed to isolate candidate disease resistance gene. The pooled-PCR approach was adopted using the primer pair to screen a genomic transformation-competent artificial chromosome (TAC) library derived from Z. latifolia. A positive TAC clone (ZR1) was obtained and confirmed by sequence analysis. The results indicated that ZR1 consisted of conserved ...

  18. Transgenic maize plants expressing the Totivirus antifungal protein, KP4, are highly resistant to corn smut

    Science.gov (United States)

    The corn smut fungus, Ustilago maydis, is a global pathogen responsible for extensive agricultural losses. Control of corn smut using traditional breeding has met with limited success because natural resistance to U. maydis is organ specific and involves numerous maize genes. Here, we present a tran...

  19. Development and deregulation of the plum pox virus resistant transgenic plum 'HoneySweet'

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have demonstrated that genetic engineering can be an important source of high level and durable resistance against Plum pox virus (PPV). We have shown, through a number of field studies, the environmental safety of this genetically engineered plum. Nevertheless, the utilization of this demonstr...

  20. Inheritance of RNA silencing and PPV resistance in transgenic progeny of 'HoneySweet' plum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plum pox virus (PPV) is one of the major diseases affecting the stone fruit industry. For this reason, the production of PPV resistant stone fruit trees is an important objective for developing sustainable agricultural systems. Over the last 10 years of field trials, 'HoneySweet' plum has displaye...

  1. Transgenic expression of the Aedes aegypti CYP9J28 confers pyrethroid resistance in Drosophila melanogaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlidi, N.; Monastirioti, M.; Daborn, P.; Van Leeuwen, T.; Vontas, J.

    2012-01-01

    The emergence and spread of insecticide resistance in mosquitoes, such as the major vector of dengue and yellow fever Aedes aegypti, is a major public health problem. A number of studies have been conducted to-date aiming to identify specific molecular changes that are associated with the phenotype,

  2. Inoculation of transgenic resistant potato by Phytophthora infestans affects host plant choice of a generalist moth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abreha, K.B.; Alexandersson, Erik; Vossen, J.H.; Anderson, Peter; Andreasson, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen attack and the plant's response to this attack affect herbivore oviposition preference and larval performance. Introduction of major resistance genes against Phytophthora infestans (Rpi-genes), the cause of the devastating late blight disease, from wild Solanum species into potato

  3. Glyphostate-drift but not herbivory alters the rate of transgene flow from single and stacked trait transgenic canola (Brassica napus L.) to non-transgenic B. napus and B. rapa

    Science.gov (United States)

    While transgenic plants can offer agricultural benefits, the escape of transgenes out of crop fields is a major environmental concern. Escape of transgenic herbicide resistance has occurred between transgenic Brassica napus (canola) and weedy species in numerous locations. In t...

  4. Marker-free, tissue-specific expression of Cry1Ab as a safe transgenic strategy for insect resistance in rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yongbin; Chen, Lei; He, Xiuling; Jin, Qingsheng; Zhang, Xiaoming; He, Zuhua

    2013-01-01

    Rice is the major food resource for nearly half of the global population; however, insect infestation could severely affect the production of this staple food. To improve rice insect resistance and reduce the levels of Bt toxin released into the environment, the Cry1Ab gene was conjugated to the rice rbcS promoter to express Bt toxin in specific tissues of transgenic plants. Eight marker-free, T(2) lines were separated from the T(0) cotransformants. Using RT-PCR, high levels of Cry1Ab expression were detected in the leaf but not in the seed. The Cry1Ab protein level ranged from 1.66 to 3.31 µg g(-1) in the leaves of four transgenic lines, but was barely detectable in their seeds by ELISA. Bioassays showed that the mortality rate of silkworm larvae feeding on mulberry leaves dipped in transgenic rice flour and pollen was less than that of the positive control (KMD), and that their average weight was higher than that of KMD, suggesting that the Cry1Ab protein was not expressed in the seed and pollen. The transgene conferred a high level of resistance to insects and biosafety to the rice plants, which could be directly used in rice breeding. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Resistance to tospoviruses in Nicotiana benthamiana transformed with the N gene of tomato spotted wilt virus: correlation between transgene expression and protection in primary transformants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaira, A M; Semeria, L; Crespi, S; Lisa, V; Allavena, A; Accotto, G P

    1995-01-01

    Nicotiana benthamiana was transformed with the nucleoprotein (N) gene of an Italian isolate of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV). Forty-five T1 primary transformant lines were analyzed for the expression of N protein and for resistance to TSWV and three other tospoviruses: impatiens necrotic spot virus (INSV), groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV), and groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV). Thirteen of these lines were further characterized. Resistance to all TSWV isolates tested was found in two lines. The expression of the transgene (N mRNA) was lower in these resistant lines than in any of the susceptible lines, and the transgene N protein was either absent or present below detectable levels. These lines were susceptible to the other tospoviruses tested, but they developed symptoms milder than controls when inoculated with GRSV. Some of the lines producing high levels of N protein showed delays (of 2-3 weeks) in symptom expression with at least one of the TSWV isolates tested and symptom delay or attenuation with INSV or GRSV (or both). From our results it appears that high expression of TSWV N protein retards, in some cases, disease development by TSWV and INSV. In contrast, the lack of detectable expression of the transgenic N protein, accompanied by limited production of N transcripts, conferred TSWV-specific resistance.

  6. Inoculation of Transgenic Resistant Potato by Phytophthora infestans Affects Host Plant Choice of a Generalist Moth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kibrom B Abreha

    Full Text Available Pathogen attack and the plant's response to this attack affect herbivore oviposition preference and larval performance. Introduction of major resistance genes against Phytophthora infestans (Rpi-genes, the cause of the devastating late blight disease, from wild Solanum species into potato changes the plant-pathogen interaction dynamics completely, but little is known about the effects on non-target organisms. Thus, we examined the effect of P. infestans itself and introduction of an Rpi-gene into the crop on host plant preference of the generalist insect herbivore, Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae. In two choice bioassays, S. littoralis preferred to oviposit on P. infestans-inoculated plants of both the susceptible potato (cv. Desiree and an isogenic resistant clone (A01-22: cv. Desiree transformed with Rpi-blb1, when compared to uninoculated plants of the same genotype. Both cv. Desiree and clone A01-22 were equally preferred for oviposition by S. littoralis when uninoculated plants were used, while cv. Desiree received more eggs compared to the resistant clone when both were inoculated with the pathogen. No significant difference in larval and pupal weight was found between S. littoralis larvae reared on leaves of the susceptible potato plants inoculated or uninoculated with P. infestans. Thus, the herbivore's host plant preference in this system was not directly associated with larval performance. The results indicate that the Rpi-blb1 based resistance in itself does not influence insect behavior, but that herbivore oviposition preference is affected by a change in the plant-microbe interaction.

  7. Terpene Down-Regulation Triggers Defense Responses in Transgenic Orange Leading to Resistance against Fungal Pathogens1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Ana; Shimada, Takehiko; Cervera, Magdalena; Alquézar, Berta; Gadea, José; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; De Ollas, Carlos José; Rodrigo, María Jesús; Zacarías, Lorenzo; Peña, Leandro

    2014-01-01

    Terpenoid volatiles are isoprene compounds that are emitted by plants to communicate with the environment. In addition to their function in repelling herbivores and attracting carnivorous predators in green tissues, the presumed primary function of terpenoid volatiles released from mature fruits is the attraction of seed-dispersing animals. Mature oranges (Citrus sinensis) primarily accumulate terpenes in peel oil glands, with d-limonene accounting for approximately 97% of the total volatile terpenes. In a previous report, we showed that down-regulation of a d-limonene synthase gene alters monoterpene levels in orange antisense (AS) fruits, leading to resistance against Penicillium digitatum infection. A global gene expression analysis of AS versus empty vector (EV) transgenic fruits revealed that the down-regulation of d-limonene up-regulated genes involved in the innate immune response. Basal levels of jasmonic acid were substantially higher in the EV compared with AS oranges. Upon fungal challenge, salicylic acid levels were triggered in EV samples, while jasmonic acid metabolism and signaling were drastically increased in AS orange peels. In nature, d-limonene levels increase in orange fruit once the seeds are fully viable. The inverse correlation between the increase in d-limonene content and the decrease in the defense response suggests that d-limonene promotes infection by microorganisms that are likely involved in facilitating access to the pulp for seed-dispersing frugivores. PMID:24192451

  8. Production of a Highly Protease-Resistant Fungal α-Galactosidase in Transgenic Maize Seeds for Simplified Feed Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenxia; Zhang, Yuhong; Zhou, Xiaojin; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Xiaolu; Chen, Rumei; Meng, Qingchang; Yuan, Jianhua; Yang, Peilong; Yao, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Raffinose-family oligosaccharide (RFO) in soybeans is one of the major anti-nutritional factors for poultry and livestocks. α-Galactosidase is commonly supplemented into the animal feed to hydrolyze α-1,6-galactosidic bonds on the RFOs. To simplify the feed processing, a protease-resistant α-galactosidase encoding gene from Gibberella sp. strain F75, aga-F75, was modified by codon optimization and heterologously expressed in the embryos of transgentic maize driven by the embryo-specific promoter ZM-leg1A. The progenies were produced by backcrossing with the commercial inbred variety Zheng58. PCR, southern blot and western blot analysis confirmed the stable integration and tissue specific expression of the modified gene, aga-F75m, in seeds over four generations. The expression level of Aga-F75M reached up to 10,000 units per kilogram of maize seeds. In comparison with its counterpart produced in Pichia pastoris strain GS115, maize seed-derived Aga-F75M showed a lower temperature optimum (50 °C) and lower stability over alkaline pH range, but better thermal stability at 60 °C to 70 °C and resistance to feed pelleting inactivation (80 °C). This is the first report of producing α-galactosidase in transgenic plant. The study offers an effective and economic approach for direct utilization of α-galactosidase-producing maize without any purification or supplementation procedures in the feed processing.

  9. Production of a Highly Protease-Resistant Fungal α-Galactosidase in Transgenic Maize Seeds for Simplified Feed Processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxia Yang

    Full Text Available Raffinose-family oligosaccharide (RFO in soybeans is one of the major anti-nutritional factors for poultry and livestocks. α-Galactosidase is commonly supplemented into the animal feed to hydrolyze α-1,6-galactosidic bonds on the RFOs. To simplify the feed processing, a protease-resistant α-galactosidase encoding gene from Gibberella sp. strain F75, aga-F75, was modified by codon optimization and heterologously expressed in the embryos of transgentic maize driven by the embryo-specific promoter ZM-leg1A. The progenies were produced by backcrossing with the commercial inbred variety Zheng58. PCR, southern blot and western blot analysis confirmed the stable integration and tissue specific expression of the modified gene, aga-F75m, in seeds over four generations. The expression level of Aga-F75M reached up to 10,000 units per kilogram of maize seeds. In comparison with its counterpart produced in Pichia pastoris strain GS115, maize seed-derived Aga-F75M showed a lower temperature optimum (50 °C and lower stability over alkaline pH range, but better thermal stability at 60 °C to 70 °C and resistance to feed pelleting inactivation (80 °C. This is the first report of producing α-galactosidase in transgenic plant. The study offers an effective and economic approach for direct utilization of α-galactosidase-producing maize without any purification or supplementation procedures in the feed processing.

  10. Expression of a rice chitinase gene in transgenic banana ('Gros Michel', AAA genome group) confers resistance to black leaf streak disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kovacs, Gabriella; Sagi; Jacon, Géraldine; Arinaitwe, Geofrey; Busogoro, Jean-Pierre; Thiry, Els; Strosse, Hannelore; Swennen, Rony; Remy, Serge

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic banana (Musa acuminata ?Gros Michel?) integrating either of two rice chitinase genes was generated and its resistance to Black Leaf Streak disease caused by the fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis was tested using a leaf disk bioassay. PCR screening indicated the presence of the hpt selectable marker gene in more than 90?% of the lines tested, whereas more than three quarters of the lines contained the linked rice chitinase gene resulting in a co-transformation frequency of at least 71...

  11. Transgenic expression of the rice Xa21 pattern-recognition receptor in banana (Musa sp.) confers resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Jaindra N; Lorenzen, Jim; Bahar, Ofir; Ronald, Pamela; Tripathi, Leena

    2014-08-01

    Banana Xanthomonas wilt (BXW), caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum (Xcm), is the most devastating disease of banana in east and central Africa. The spread of BXW threatens the livelihood of millions of African farmers who depend on banana for food security and income. There are no commercial chemicals, biocontrol agents or resistant cultivars available to control BXW. Here, we take advantage of the robust resistance conferred by the rice pattern-recognition receptor (PRR), XA21, to the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). We identified a set of genes required for activation of Xa21-mediated immunity (rax) that were conserved in both Xoo and Xcm. Based on the conservation, we hypothesized that intergeneric transfer of Xa21 would confer resistance to Xcm. We evaluated 25 transgenic lines of the banana cultivar 'Gonja manjaya' (AAB) using a rapid bioassay and 12 transgenic lines in the glasshouse for resistance against Xcm. About 50% of the transgenic lines showed complete resistance to Xcm in both assays. In contrast, all of the nontransgenic control plants showed severe symptoms that progressed to complete wilting. These results indicate that the constitutive expression of the rice Xa21 gene in banana results in enhanced resistance against Xcm. Furthermore, this work demonstrates the feasibility of PRR gene transfer between monocotyledonous species and provides a valuable new tool for controlling the BXW pandemic of banana, a staple food for 100 million people in east Africa. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Transgenic Expression of the piRNA-Resistant Masculinizer Gene Induces Female-Specific Lethality and Partial Female-to-Male Sex Reversal in the Silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Hiroki; Sumitani, Megumi; Chikami, Yasuhiko; Yahata, Kensuke; Uchino, Keiro; Kiuchi, Takashi; Katsuma, Susumu; Aoki, Fugaku; Sezutsu, Hideki; Suzuki, Masataka G

    2016-08-01

    In Bombyx mori (B. mori), Fem piRNA originates from the W chromosome and is responsible for femaleness. The Fem piRNA-PIWI complex targets and cleaves mRNAs transcribed from the Masc gene. Masc encodes a novel CCCH type zinc-finger protein and is required for male-specific splicing of B. mori doublesex (Bmdsx) transcripts. In the present study, several silkworm strains carrying a transgene, which encodes a Fem piRNA-resistant Masc mRNA (Masc-R), were generated. Forced expression of the Masc-R transgene caused female-specific lethality during the larval stages. One of the Masc-R strains weakly expressed Masc-R in various tissues. Females heterozygous for the transgene expressed male-specific isoform of the Bombyx homolog of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein (ImpM) and Bmdsx. All examined females showed a lower inducibility of vitellogenin synthesis and exhibited abnormalities in the ovaries. Testis-like tissues were observed in abnormal ovaries and, notably, the tissues contained considerable numbers of sperm bundles. Homozygous expression of the transgene resulted in formation of the male-specific abdominal segment in adult females and caused partial male differentiation in female genitalia. These results strongly suggest that Masc is an important regulatory gene of maleness in B. mori.

  13. Transgenic Expression of the piRNA-Resistant Masculinizer Gene Induces Female-Specific Lethality and Partial Female-to-Male Sex Reversal in the Silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Sakai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In Bombyx mori (B. mori, Fem piRNA originates from the W chromosome and is responsible for femaleness. The Fem piRNA-PIWI complex targets and cleaves mRNAs transcribed from the Masc gene. Masc encodes a novel CCCH type zinc-finger protein and is required for male-specific splicing of B. mori doublesex (Bmdsx transcripts. In the present study, several silkworm strains carrying a transgene, which encodes a Fem piRNA-resistant Masc mRNA (Masc-R, were generated. Forced expression of the Masc-R transgene caused female-specific lethality during the larval stages. One of the Masc-R strains weakly expressed Masc-R in various tissues. Females heterozygous for the transgene expressed male-specific isoform of the Bombyx homolog of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein (ImpM and Bmdsx. All examined females showed a lower inducibility of vitellogenin synthesis and exhibited abnormalities in the ovaries. Testis-like tissues were observed in abnormal ovaries and, notably, the tissues contained considerable numbers of sperm bundles. Homozygous expression of the transgene resulted in formation of the male-specific abdominal segment in adult females and caused partial male differentiation in female genitalia. These results strongly suggest that Masc is an important regulatory gene of maleness in B. mori.

  14. Transgenic Expression of the piRNA-Resistant Masculinizer Gene Induces Female-Specific Lethality and Partial Female-to-Male Sex Reversal in the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikami, Yasuhiko; Yahata, Kensuke; Uchino, Keiro; Kiuchi, Takashi; Katsuma, Susumu; Aoki, Fugaku; Sezutsu, Hideki; Suzuki, Masataka G.

    2016-01-01

    In Bombyx mori (B. mori), Fem piRNA originates from the W chromosome and is responsible for femaleness. The Fem piRNA-PIWI complex targets and cleaves mRNAs transcribed from the Masc gene. Masc encodes a novel CCCH type zinc-finger protein and is required for male-specific splicing of B. mori doublesex (Bmdsx) transcripts. In the present study, several silkworm strains carrying a transgene, which encodes a Fem piRNA-resistant Masc mRNA (Masc-R), were generated. Forced expression of the Masc-R transgene caused female-specific lethality during the larval stages. One of the Masc-R strains weakly expressed Masc-R in various tissues. Females heterozygous for the transgene expressed male-specific isoform of the Bombyx homolog of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein (ImpM) and Bmdsx. All examined females showed a lower inducibility of vitellogenin synthesis and exhibited abnormalities in the ovaries. Testis-like tissues were observed in abnormal ovaries and, notably, the tissues contained considerable numbers of sperm bundles. Homozygous expression of the transgene resulted in formation of the male-specific abdominal segment in adult females and caused partial male differentiation in female genitalia. These results strongly suggest that Masc is an important regulatory gene of maleness in B. mori. PMID:27579676

  15. GhWRKY68 reduces resistance to salt and drought in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haihong Jia

    Full Text Available The WRKY transcription factors modulate numerous physiological processes, including plant growth, development and responses to various environmental stresses. Currently, our understanding of the functions of the majority of the WRKY family members and their possible roles in signalling crosstalk is limited. In particular, very few WRKYs have been identified and characterised from an economically important crop, cotton. In this study, we characterised a novel group IIc WRKY gene, GhWRKY68, which is induced by different abiotic stresses and multiple defence-related signalling molecules. The β-glucuronidase activity driven by the GhWRKY68 promoter was enhanced after exposure to drought, salt, abscisic acid (ABA and H2O2. The overexpression of GhWRKY68 in Nicotiana benthamiana reduced resistance to drought and salt and affected several physiological indices. GhWRKY68 may mediate salt and drought responses by modulating ABA content and enhancing the transcript levels of ABA-responsive genes. GhWRKY68-overexpressing plants exhibited reduced tolerance to oxidative stress after drought and salt stress treatments, which correlated with the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, reduced enzyme activities, elevated malondialdehyde (MDA content and altered ROS-related gene expression. These results indicate that GhWRKY68 is a transcription factor that responds to drought and salt stresses by regulating ABA signalling and modulating cellular ROS.

  16. Transgenic alfalfa plants co-expressing glutathione S-transferase (GST) and human CYP2E1 show enhanced resistance to mixed contaminates of heavy metals and organic pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan [Department of Pharmaceutics, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, 53 Zhengzhou Road, P.O. Box 70, Qingdao 266042 (China); Liu, Junhong, E-mail: liujh@qust.edu.cn [Department of Pharmaceutics, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, 53 Zhengzhou Road, P.O. Box 70, Qingdao 266042 (China)

    2011-05-15

    Transgenic alfalfa plants simultaneously expressing human CYP2E1 and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were generated from hypocotyl segments by the use of an Agrobacterium transformation system for the phytoremediation of the mixed contaminated soil with heavy metals and organic pollutants. The transgenic alfalfa plants were screened by a combination of kanamycin resistance, PCR, GST and CYP2E1 activity and Western blot analysis. The capabilities of mixed contaminants (heavy metals-organic compounds) resistance of pKHCG transgenic alfalfa plants became markedly increased compared with the transgenic alfalfa plants expressing single gene (GST or CYP2E1) and the non-transgenic control plants. The pKHCG alfalfa plants exhibited strong resistance towards the mixtures of cadmium (Cd) and trichloroethylene (TCE) that were metabolized by the introduced GST and CYP2E1 in combination. Our results show that the pKHCG transgenic alfalfa plants have good potential for phytoremediation because they have cross-tolerance towards the complex contaminants of heavy metals and organic pollutants. Therefore, these transgenic alfalfa plants co-expressing GST and human P450 CDNAs may have a great potential for phytoremediation of mixed environmental contaminants.

  17. Transgenic alfalfa plants co-expressing glutathione S-transferase (GST) and human CYP2E1 show enhanced resistance to mixed contaminates of heavy metals and organic pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Junhong

    2011-05-15

    Transgenic alfalfa plants simultaneously expressing human CYP2E1 and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were generated from hypocotyl segments by the use of an Agrobacterium transformation system for the phytoremediation of the mixed contaminated soil with heavy metals and organic pollutants. The transgenic alfalfa plants were screened by a combination of kanamycin resistance, PCR, GST and CYP2E1 activity and Western blot analysis. The capabilities of mixed contaminants (heavy metals-organic compounds) resistance of pKHCG transgenic alfalfa plants became markedly increased compared with the transgenic alfalfa plants expressing single gene (GST or CYP2E1) and the non-transgenic control plants. The pKHCG alfalfa plants exhibited strong resistance towards the mixtures of cadmium (Cd) and trichloroethylene (TCE) that were metabolized by the introduced GST and CYP2E1 in combination. Our results show that the pKHCG transgenic alfalfa plants have good potential for phytoremediation because they have cross-tolerance towards the complex contaminants of heavy metals and organic pollutants. Therefore, these transgenic alfalfa plants co-expressing GST and human P450 CDNAs may have a great potential for phytoremediation of mixed environmental contaminants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Efficient dsRNA-mediated transgenic resistance to Beet necrotic yellow vein virus in sugar beets is not affected by other soilborne and aphid-transmitted viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennefors, Britt-Louise; van Roggen, Petra M; Yndgaard, Flemming; Savenkov, Eugene I; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2008-04-01

    Rhizomania caused by Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) is one of the most devastating sugar beet diseases. Sugar beet plants engineered to express a 0.4 kb inverted repeat construct based on the BNYVV replicase gene accumulated the transgene mRNA to similar levels in leaves and roots, whereas accumulation of the transgene-homologous siRNA was more pronounced in roots. The roots expressed high levels of resistance to BNYVV transmitted by the vector, Polymyxa betae. Resistance to BNYVV was not decreased following co-infection of the plants with Beet soil borne virus and Beet virus Q that share the same vector with BNYVV. Similarly, co-infection with the aphid-transmitted Beet mild yellowing virus, Beet yellows virus (BYV), or with all of the aforementioned viruses did not affect the resistance to BNYVV, while they accumulated in roots. These viruses are common in most of the sugar beet growing areas in Europe and world wide. However, there was a competitive interaction between BYV and BMYV in sugar beet leaves, as infection with BYV decreased the titres of BMYV. Other interactions between the viruses studied were not observed. The results suggest that the engineered resistance to BNYVV expressed in the sugar beets of this study is efficient in roots and not readily compromised following infection of the plants with heterologous viruses.

  19. Citrus psorosis virus coat protein-derived hairpin construct confers stable transgenic resistance in citrus against psorosis A and B syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Francesco, A; Costa, N; García, M L

    2017-04-01

    Citrus psorosis virus (CPsV) is the causal agent of psorosis, a serious and widespread citrus disease. Two syndromes of psorosis, PsA and PsB, have been described. PsB is the most aggressive and rampant form. Previously, we obtained Pineapple sweet orange plants transformed with a hairpin construct derived from the CPsV coat protein gene (ihpCP). Some of these plants were resistant to CPsV 90-1-1, a PsA isolate homologous to the transgene. In this study, we found that expression of the ihpCP transgene and siRNA production in lines ihpCP-10 and -15 were stable with time and propagation. In particular, line ihpCP-15 has been resistant for more than 2 years, even after re-inoculation. The ihpCP plants were also resistant against a heterologous CPsV isolate that causes severe PsB syndrome. Line ihpCP-15 manifested complete resistance while line ihpCP-10 was tolerant to the virus, although with variable behaviour, showing delay and attenuation in PsB symptoms. These lines are promising for a biotech product aimed at eradicating psorosis.

  20. Regeneration of multiple shoots from transgenic potato events facilitates the recovery of phenotypically normal lines: assessing a cry9Aa2 gene conferring insect resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobs Jeanne ME

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recovery of high performing transgenic lines in clonal crops is limited by the occurrence of somaclonal variation during the tissue culture phase of transformation. This is usually circumvented by developing large populations of transgenic lines, each derived from the first shoot to regenerate from each transformation event. This study investigates a new strategy of assessing multiple shoots independently regenerated from different transformed cell colonies of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.. Results A modified cry9Aa2 gene, under the transcriptional control of the CaMV 35S promoter, was transformed into four potato cultivars using Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer using a nptII gene conferring kanamycin resistance as a selectable marker gene. Following gene transfer, 291 transgenic lines were grown in greenhouse experiments to assess somaclonal variation and resistance to potato tuber moth (PTM, Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller. Independently regenerated lines were recovered from many transformed cell colonies and Southern analysis confirmed whether they were derived from the same transformed cell. Multiple lines regenerated from the same transformed cell exhibited a similar response to PTM, but frequently exhibited a markedly different spectrum of somaclonal variation. Conclusions A new strategy for the genetic improvement of clonal crops involves the regeneration and evaluation of multiple shoots from each transformation event to facilitate the recovery of phenotypically normal transgenic lines. Most importantly, regenerated lines exhibiting the phenotypic appearance most similar to the parental cultivar are not necessarily derived from the first shoot regenerated from a transformed cell colony, but can frequently be a later regeneration event.

  1. RNA interference-based resistance in transgenic tomato plants against Tomato yellow leaf curl virus-Oman (TYLCV-OM) and its associated betasatellite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammara, Um e; Mansoor, Shahid; Saeed, Muhammad; Amin, Imran; Briddon, Rob W; Al-Sadi, Abdullah Mohammed

    2015-03-04

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), a monopartite begomovirus (family Geminiviridae) is responsible for heavy yield losses for tomato production around the globe. In Oman at least five distinct begomoviruses cause disease in tomato, including TYLCV. Unusually, TYLCV infections in Oman are sometimes associated with a betasatellite (Tomato leaf curl betasatellite [ToLCB]; a symptom modulating satellite). RNA interference (RNAi) can be used to develop resistance against begomoviruses at either the transcriptional or post-transcriptional levels. A hairpin RNAi (hpRNAi) construct to express double-stranded RNA homologous to sequences of the intergenic region, coat protein gene, V2 gene and replication-associated gene of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus-Oman (TYLCV-OM) was produced. Initially, transient expression of the hpRNAi construct at the site of virus inoculation was shown to reduce the number of plants developing symptoms when inoculated with either TYLCV-OM or TYLCV-OM with ToLCB-OM to Nicotiana benthamiana or tomato. Solanum lycopersicum L. cv. Pusa Ruby was transformed with the hpRNAi construct and nine confirmed transgenic lines were obtained and challenged with TYLCV-OM and ToLCB-OM by Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation. For all but one line, for which all plants remained symptomless, inoculation with TYLCV-OM led to a proportion (≤25%) of tomato plants developing symptoms of infection. For inoculation with TYLCV-OM and ToLCB-OM all lines showed a proportion of plants (≤45%) symptomatic. However, for all infected transgenic plants the symptoms were milder and virus titre in plants was lower than in infected non-transgenic tomato plants. These results show that RNAi can be used to develop resistance against geminiviruses in tomato. The resistance in this case is not immunity but does reduce the severity of infections and virus titer. Also, the betasatellite may compromise resistance, increasing the proportion of plants which ultimately show symptoms.

  2. Development and Event-specific Detection of Transgenic Glyphosate-resistant Rice Expressing the G2-EPSPS Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yufeng; Jin, Xi; Tang, Qiaoling; Zhang, Xin; Yang, Jiangtao; Liu, Xiaojing; Cai, Junfeng; Zhang, Xiaobing; Wang, Xujing; Wang, Zhixing

    2017-01-01

    Glyphosate is a widely used herbicide, due to its broad spectrum, low cost, low toxicity, high efficiency, and non-selective characteristics. Rice farmers rarely use glyphosate as a herbicide, because the crop is sensitive to this chemical. The development of transgenic glyphosate-tolerant rice could greatly improve the economics of rice production. Here, we transformed the Pseudomonas fluorescens G2 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene G2-EPSPS, which conferred tolerance to glyphosate herbicide into a widely used japonica rice cultivar, Zhonghua 11 (ZH11), to develop two highly glyphosate-tolerant transgenic rice lines, G2-6 and G2-7, with one exogenous gene integration. Seed germination tests and glyphosate-tolerance assays of plants grown in a greenhouse showed that the two transgenic lines could greatly improve glyphosate-tolerance compared with the wild-type; The glyphosate-tolerance field test indicated that both transgenic lines could grow at concentrations of 20,000 ppm glyphosate, which is more than 20-times the recommended concentration in the field. Isolation of the flanking sequence of transgenic rice G2-6 indicated that the 5'-terminal of T-DNA was inserted into chromosome 8 of the rice genome. An event-specific PCR test system was established and the limit of detection of the primers reached five copies. Overall, the G2-EPSPS gene significantly improved glyphosate-tolerance in transgenic rice; furthermore, it is a useful candidate gene for the future development of commercial transgenic rice.

  3. Enhanced quantitative resistance against fungal disease by combinatorial expression of different barley antifungal proteins in transgenic tobacco

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jach, G; Görnhardt, B; Mundy, J

    1995-01-01

    was detected in the transgenic plants by Northern and Western blot analysis. The leader peptides in CHI and GLU led to accumulation of these proteins in the intercellular space of tobacco leaves. RIP, which is naturally deposited in the cytosol of barley endosperm cells, was expressed either in its original...... cytosolic form or fused to a plant secretion peptide (spRIP). Fungal infection assays revealed that expression of the individual genes in each case resulted in an increased protection against the soilborne fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, which infects a range of plant species including tobacco....... Transgenic tobacco lines were generated with tandemly arranged genes coding for RIP and CHI as well as GLU and CHI. The performance of tobacco plants co-expressing the barley transgenes GLU/CHI or CHI/RIP in a Rhizoctonia solani infection assay revealed significantly enhanced protection against fungal attack...

  4. Resistance to Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae in transgenic soybean (Glycine max (L. Merrill Fabales, Fabaceae cultivar IAS5 expressing a modified Cry1Ac endotoxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Schenkel Homrich

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Somatic embryos of the commercial soybean (Glycine max cultivar IAS5 were co-transformed using particle bombardment with a synthetic form of the Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxin crystal protein gene cry1Ac, the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene gusA and the hygromycin resistance gene hpt. Hygromycin-resistant tissues were proliferated individually to give rise to nine sets of clones corresponding to independent transformation events. The co-bombardment resulted in a co-transformation efficiency of 44%. Many histodifferentiated embryos and 30 well-developed plants were obtained. Twenty of these plants flowered and fourteen set seeds. The integration and expression of the cry1Ac, gusA and hpt transgenes into the genomes of a sample of transformed embryos and all T0, T1, T2 and T3 plants were confirmed by Gus activity, PCR, Southern and western blot, and ELISA techniques. Two T0 plants out of the seven co-transformed plants produced seeds and were analyzed for patterns of integration and inheritance until the T3 generation. Bioassays indicated that the transgenic plants were highly toxic to the velvetbean caterpillar Anticarsia gemmatalis, thus offering a potential for effective insect resistance in soybean.

  5. Co-expression of chimeric chitinase and a polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein in transgenic canola (Brassica napus) confers enhanced resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaei, Mahboobeh; Motallebi, Mostafa; Zamani, Mohammad Reza; Panjeh, Nasim Zarin

    2016-06-01

    Sclerotinia stem rot (SSR) caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is one of the major fungal diseases of canola. To develop resistance against this fungal disease, the chit42 from Trichoderma atroviride with chitin-binding domain and polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein 2 (PG1P2) of Phaseolus vulgaris were co-expressed in canola via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Stable integration and expression of transgenes in T0 and T2 plants was confirmed by PCR, Southern blot and RT-PCR analyses. Chitinase activity and PGIP2 inhibition were detected by colorimetric and agarose diffusion assay in transgenic lines but not in untransformed plants. The crude proteins from single copy transformant leaves having high chitinase and PGIP2 activity (T16, T8 and T3), showed up to 44 % inhibition of S. sclerotiorum hyphal growth. The homozygous T2 plants, showing inheritance in Mendelian fashion (3:1), were further evaluated under greenhouse conditions for resistance to S. sclerotiorum. Intact plants contaminated with mycelia showed resistance through delayed onset of the disease and restricted size and expansion of lesions as compared to wild type plants. Combined expression of chimeric chit42 and pgip2 in Brassica napus L. provide subsequent protection against SSR disease and can be helpful in increasing the canola production in Iran.

  6. Transgenic rice plants expressing the antifungal AFP protein from Aspergillus giganteus show enhanced resistance to the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca, María; Bortolotti, Cristina; Rufat, Mar; Peñas, Gisela; Eritja, Ramón; Tharreau, Didier; del Pozo, Alvaro Martinez; Messeguer, Joaquima; San Segundo, Blanca

    2004-01-01

    The Aspergillus giganteus antifungal protein (AFP), encoded by the afp gene, has been reported to possess in vitro antifungal activity against various economically important fungal pathogens, including the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea. In this study, transgenic rice ( Oryza sativa ) constitutively expressing the afp gene was generated by Agrobacterium -mediated transformation. Two different DNA constructs containing either the afp cDNA sequence from Aspergillus or a chemically synthesized codon-optimized afp gene were introduced into rice plants. In both cases, the DNA region encoding the signal sequence from the tobacco AP24 gene was N-terminally fused to the coding sequence of the mature AFP protein. Transgenic rice plants showed stable integration and inheritance of the transgene. No effect on plant morphology was observed in the afp -expressing rice lines. The inhibitory activity of protein extracts prepared from leaves of afp plants on the in vitro growth of M. grisea indicated that the AFP protein produced by the trangenic rice plants was biologically active. Several of the T(2) homozygous afp lines were challenged with M. grisea in a detached leaf infection assay. Transformants exhibited resistance to rice blast at various levels. Altogether, the results presented here indicate that AFP can be functionally expressed in rice plants for protection against the rice blast fungus M. grisea.

  7. Co-transforming bar and CsALDH Genes Enhanced Resistance to Herbicide and Drought and Salt Stress in Transgenic Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhen; Zhang, Daiyu; Zhang, Jianquan; Di, Hongyan; Wu, Fan; Hu, Xiaowen; Meng, Xuanchen; Luo, Kai; Zhang, Jiyu; Wang, Yanrong

    2015-01-01

    Drought and high salinity are two major abiotic factors that restrict the productivity of alfalfa. By application of the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method, an oxidative responsive gene, CsALDH12A1, from the desert grass Cleistogenes songorica together with the bar gene associated with herbicide resistance, were co-transformed into alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). From the all 90 transformants, 16 were positive as screened by spraying 1 mL L(-1) 10% Basta solution and molecularly diagnosis using PCR. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that drought and salt stress induced high CsALDH expression in the leaves of the transgenic plants. The CsALDH expression levels under drought (15 d) and salt stress (200 mM NaCl) were 6.11 and 6.87 times higher than in the control plants, respectively. In comparison to the WT plants, no abnormal phenotypes were observed among the transgenic plants, which showed significant enhancement of tolerance to 15 d of drought and 10 d of salinity treatment. Evaluation of the physiological and biochemical indices during drought and salt stress of the transgenic plants revealed relatively lower Na(+) content and higher K(+) content in the leaves relative to the WT plants, a reduction of toxic on effects and maintenance of osmotic adjustment. In addition, the transgenic plants could maintain a higher relative water content level, higher shoot biomass, fewer changes in the photosystem, decreased membrane injury, and a lower level of osmotic stress. These results indicate that the co-expression of the introduced bar and CsALDH genes enhanced the herbicide, drought and salt tolerance of alfalfa and therefore can potentially be used as a novel genetic resource for the future breeding programs to develop new cultivars.

  8. Co-transforming bar and CsALDH Genes Enhanced Resistance to Herbicide and Drought and Salt Stress in Transgenic Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhen; Zhang, Daiyu; Zhang, Jianquan; Di, Hongyan; Wu, Fan; Hu, Xiaowen; Meng, Xuanchen; Luo, Kai; Zhang, Jiyu; Wang, Yanrong

    2015-01-01

    Drought and high salinity are two major abiotic factors that restrict the productivity of alfalfa. By application of the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method, an oxidative responsive gene, CsALDH12A1, from the desert grass Cleistogenes songorica together with the bar gene associated with herbicide resistance, were co-transformed into alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). From the all 90 transformants, 16 were positive as screened by spraying 1 mL L-1 10% Basta solution and molecularly diagnosis using PCR. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that drought and salt stress induced high CsALDH expression in the leaves of the transgenic plants. The CsALDH expression levels under drought (15 d) and salt stress (200 mM NaCl) were 6.11 and 6.87 times higher than in the control plants, respectively. In comparison to the WT plants, no abnormal phenotypes were observed among the transgenic plants, which showed significant enhancement of tolerance to 15 d of drought and 10 d of salinity treatment. Evaluation of the physiological and biochemical indices during drought and salt stress of the transgenic plants revealed relatively lower Na+ content and higher K+ content in the leaves relative to the WT plants, a reduction of toxic on effects and maintenance of osmotic adjustment. In addition, the transgenic plants could maintain a higher relative water content level, higher shoot biomass, fewer changes in the photosystem, decreased membrane injury, and a lower level of osmotic stress. These results indicate that the co-expression of the introduced bar and CsALDH genes enhanced the herbicide, drought and salt tolerance of alfalfa and therefore can potentially be used as a novel genetic resource for the future breeding programs to develop new cultivars. PMID:26734025

  9. Co-transforming bar and CsALDH genes enhanced resistance to herbicide and drought and salt stress in transgenic alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen eDuan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Drought and high salinity are two major abiotic factors that restrict the productivity of alfalfa. By application of the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method, an oxidative responsive gene, CsALDH12A1, from the desert grass Cleistogenes songorica together with the bar gene associated with herbicide resistance, were co-transformed into alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.. From the all 90 transformants, 16 were positive as screened by spraying 1 mL L-1 10% Basta solution and molecularly diagnosis using PCR. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that drought and salt stress induced high CsALDH expression in the leaves of the transgenic plants. The CsALDH expression levels under drought (15 d and salt stress (200 mM NaCl were 6.11 and 6.87 times higher than in the control plants, respectively. In comparison to the WT plants, no abnormal phenotypes were observed among the transgenic plants, which showed significant enhancement of tolerance to 15 d of drought and 10 d of salinity treatment. Evaluation of the physiological and biochemical indices during drought and salt stress of the transgenic plants revealed relatively lower Na+ content and higher K+ content in the leaves relative to the WT plants, a reduction of toxic on effects and maintenance of osmotic adjustment. In addition, the transgenic plants could maintain a higher relative water content (RWC level, higher shoot biomass, fewer changes in the photosystem, decreased membrane injury, and a lower level of osmotic stress. These results indicate that the co-expression of the introduced bar and CsALDH genes enhanced the herbicide, drought and salt tolerance of alfalfa and therefore can potentially be used as a novel genetic resource for the future breeding programs to develop new cultivars.

  10. Resistance to chronic wasting disease in transgenic mice expressing a naturally occurring allelic variant of deer prion protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meade-White, K.; Race, B.; Trifilo, M.; Bossers, A.; Favara, C.; Lacasse, R.; Miller, M.; Williams, E.; Oldstone, M.; Race, R.; Chesebro, B.

    2007-01-01

    Prion protein (PrP) is a required factor for susceptibility to transmissible spongiform encephalopathy or prion diseases. In transgenic mice, expression of prion protein (PrP) from another species often confers susceptibility to prion disease from that donor species. For example, expression of deer

  11. Enhanced whitefly resistance in transgenic tobacco plants expressing double stranded RNA of v-ATPase A gene

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thakur, Nidhi; Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Verma, Praveen C; Chandrashekar, Krishnappa; Tuli, Rakesh; Singh, Pradhyumna K

    2014-01-01

    .... The v-ATPase subunit A (v-ATPaseA) coding gene was identified as a crucial target. We now report the effectiveness of transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA to silence v-ATPaseA gene expression for the control of whitefly infestation...

  12. Enhanced Whitefly Resistance in Transgenic Tobacco Plants Expressing Double Stranded RNA of v-ATPase A Gene: e87235

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nidhi Thakur; Santosh Kumar Upadhyay; Praveen C Verma; Krishnappa Chandrashekar; Rakesh Tuli; Pradhyumna K Singh

    2014-01-01

    .... The v-ATPase subunit A (v-ATPaseA) coding gene was identified as a crucial target. We now report the effectiveness of transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA to silence v-ATPaseA gene expression for the control of whitefly infestation...

  13. Expression of apoplast-targeted plant defensin MtDef4.2 confers resistance to leaf rust pathogen Puccinia triticina but does not affect mycorrhizal symbiosis in transgenic wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jagdeep; Fellers, John; Adholeya, Alok; Velivelli, Siva L S; El-Mounadi, Kaoutar; Nersesian, Natalya; Clemente, Thomas; Shah, Dilip

    2017-02-01

    Rust fungi of the order Pucciniales are destructive pathogens of wheat worldwide. Leaf rust caused by the obligate, biotrophic basidiomycete fungus Puccinia triticina (Pt) is an economically important disease capable of causing up to 50 % yield losses. Historically, resistant wheat cultivars have been used to control leaf rust, but genetic resistance is ephemeral and breaks down with the emergence of new virulent Pt races. There is a need to develop alternative measures for control of leaf rust in wheat. Development of transgenic wheat expressing an antifungal defensin offers a promising approach to complement the endogenous resistance genes within the wheat germplasm for durable resistance to Pt. To that end, two different wheat genotypes, Bobwhite and Xin Chun 9 were transformed with a chimeric gene encoding an apoplast-targeted antifungal plant defensin MtDEF4.2 from Medicago truncatula. Transgenic lines from four independent events were further characterized. Homozygous transgenic wheat lines expressing MtDEF4.2 displayed resistance to Pt race MCPSS relative to the non-transgenic controls in growth chamber bioassays. Histopathological analysis suggested the presence of both pre- and posthaustorial resistance to leaf rust in these transgenic lines. MtDEF4.2 did not, however, affect the root colonization of a beneficial arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis. This study demonstrates that the expression of apoplast-targeted plant defensin MtDEF4.2 can provide substantial resistance to an economically important leaf rust disease in transgenic wheat without negatively impacting its symbiotic relationship with the beneficial mycorrhizal fungus.

  14. Expression of an alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) peroxidase gene in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana enhances resistance to NaCl and H2O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, K; Xiao, G Z; Guo, W E; Yuan, J B; Li, J; Chao, Y H; Han, L B

    2016-05-23

    Peroxidases (PODs) are enzymes that play important roles in catalyzing the reduction of H2O2 and the oxidation of various substrates. They function in many different and important biological processes, such as defense mechanisms, immune responses, and pathogeny. The POD genes have been cloned and identified in many plants, but their function in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is not known, to date. Based on the POD gene sequence (GenBank accession No. L36157.1), we cloned the POD gene in alfalfa, which was named MsPOD. MsPOD expression increased with increasing H2O2. The gene was expressed in all of the tissues, including the roots, stems, leaves, and flowers, particularly in stems and leaves under light/dark conditions. A subcellular analysis showed that MsPOD was localized outside the cells. Transgenic Arabidopsis with MsPOD exhibited increased resistance to H2O2 and NaCl. Moreover, POD activity in the transgenic plants was significantly higher than that in wild-type Arabidopsis. These results show that MsPOD plays an important role in resistance to H2O2 and NaCl.

  15. Resistance levels to two strains of Potato virus Y (PVY in transgenic potatoes cv. Achat Níveis de resistência ao Potato virus Y (PVY em batata cv. Achat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André N. Dusi

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Two transgenic potato clones of cv. Achat, denominated 1P and 63P were challenged with two Potato virus Y strains (PVY O and PVY N, under greenhouse conditions, to be evaluated for resistance to these strains. Optical density values of the Elisa readings of samples from the transgenic plants were compared to readings from samples of the inoculated non-transformed plants. Clone 1P was extremely resistant to both PVY strains, reflected by not being systemically infected. Clone 63P, however, presented partial resistance to both PVY strains as local or systemic infection was delayed in some days. These results confirm the previously reported extreme resistance to PVY of clone 1P.Dois clones transgênicos de batata, derivados da cv. Achat, denominados 1P e 63P foram desafiados com duas estirpes do Potato virus Y (PVY O PVY N, em condições de casa-de-vegetação, para avaliação do nível de resistência dos clones ao vírus. Os valores de densidade óptica das leituras dos testes de Elisa foram comparados a leituras dos clones não transformados e inoculados. O clone 1P apresentou extrema resistência a ambas as estirpes, não tendo sido observada infecção sistêmica nos dois ensaios. O Clone 63P apresentou resistência parcial às duas estirpes, refletida no retardo do aparecimento de infecções sistêmicas por duas semanas. Os resultados obtidos confirmam o alto nível de resistência do clone 1P, relatado anteriormente.

  16. Comparisons of Transcriptional Profiles of Gut Genes between Cry1Ab-Resistant and Susceptible Strains of Ostrinia nubilalis Revealed Genes Possibly Related to the Adaptation of Resistant Larvae to Transgenic Cry1Ab Corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxiu Yao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A microarray developed on the basis of 2895 unique transcripts from larval gut was used to compare gut gene expression profiles between a laboratory-selected Cry1Ab-resistant (R strain and its isoline susceptible (S strain of the European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis after the larvae were fed the leaves of transgenic corn (MON810 expressing Cry1Ab or its non-transgenic isoline for 6 h. We revealed 398 gut genes differentially expressed (i.e., either up- or down-regulated genes with expression ratio ≥2.0 in S-strain, but only 264 gut genes differentially expressed in R-strain after being fed transgenic corn leaves. Although the percentages of down-regulated genes among the total number of differentially expressed genes (50% in S-strain and 45% in R-strain were similar between the R- and S-strains, the expression ratios of down-regulated genes were much higher in S-strain than in R-strain. We revealed that 17 and 9 significantly up- or down-regulated gut genes from S and R-strain, respectively, including serine proteases and aminopeptidases. These genes may be associated with Cry1Ab toxicity by degradation, binding, and cellular defense. Overall, our study suggests enhanced adaptation of Cry1Ab-resistant larvae on transgenic Cry1Ab corn as revealed by lower number and lower ratios of differentially expressed genes in R-strain than in S-strain of O. nubilalis.

  17. Comparisons of Transcriptional Profiles of Gut Genes between Cry1Ab-Resistant and Susceptible Strains of Ostrinia nubilalis Revealed Genes Possibly Related to the Adaptation of Resistant Larvae to Transgenic Cry1Ab Corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianxiu; Zhu, Yu-Cheng; Lu, Nanyan; Buschman, Lawrent L; Zhu, Kun Yan

    2017-01-30

    A microarray developed on the basis of 2895 unique transcripts from larval gut was used to compare gut gene expression profiles between a laboratory-selected Cry1Ab-resistant (R) strain and its isoline susceptible (S) strain of the European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) after the larvae were fed the leaves of transgenic corn (MON810) expressing Cry1Ab or its non-transgenic isoline for 6 h. We revealed 398 gut genes differentially expressed (i.e., either up- or down-regulated genes with expression ratio ≥2.0) in S-strain, but only 264 gut genes differentially expressed in R-strain after being fed transgenic corn leaves. Although the percentages of down-regulated genes among the total number of differentially expressed genes (50% in S-strain and 45% in R-strain) were similar between the R- and S-strains, the expression ratios of down-regulated genes were much higher in S-strain than in R-strain. We revealed that 17 and 9 significantly up- or down-regulated gut genes from S and R-strain, respectively, including serine proteases and aminopeptidases. These genes may be associated with Cry1Ab toxicity by degradation, binding, and cellular defense. Overall, our study suggests enhanced adaptation of Cry1Ab-resistant larvae on transgenic Cry1Ab corn as revealed by lower number and lower ratios of differentially expressed genes in R-strain than in S-strain of O. nubilalis.

  18. Grafting on a Non-Transgenic Tolerant Tomato Variety Confers Resistance to the Infection of a Sw5-Breaking Strain of Tomato spotted wilt virus via RNA Silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanò, Roberta; Mascia, Tiziana; Kormelink, Richard; Gallitelli, Donato

    2015-01-01

    RNA silencing controls endogenous gene expression and drives defensive reactions against invasive nucleic acids like viruses. In plants, it has been demonstrated that RNA silencing can be transmitted through grafting between scions and silenced rootstocks to attenuate virus and viroid accumulation in the scions. This has been obtained mostly using transgenic plants, which may be a drawback in current agriculture. In the present study, we examined the dynamics of infection of a resistance-breaking strain of Tomato spotted wilt virus (RB-TSWV) through the graft between an old Apulian (southern Italy) tomato variety, denoted Sl-Ma, used as a rootstock and commercial tomato varieties used as scions. In tests with non-grafted plants, Sl-Ma showed resistance to the RB-TSWV infection as viral RNA accumulated at low levels and plants recovered from disease symptoms by 21 days post inoculation. The resistance trait was transmitted to the otherwise highly susceptible tomato genotypes grafted onto Sl-Ma. The results from the analysis of small RNAs hallmark genes involved in RNA silencing and virus-induced gene silencing suggest that RNA silencing is involved in the resistance showed by Sl-Ma against RB-TSWV and in scions grafted on this rootstock. The results from self-grafted susceptible tomato varieties suggest also that RNA silencing is enhanced by the graft itself. We can foresee interesting practical implications of the approach described in this paper.

  19. Grafting on a Non-Transgenic Tolerant Tomato Variety Confers Resistance to the Infection of a Sw5-Breaking Strain of Tomato spotted wilt virus via RNA Silencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Spanò

    Full Text Available RNA silencing controls endogenous gene expression and drives defensive reactions against invasive nucleic acids like viruses. In plants, it has been demonstrated that RNA silencing can be transmitted through grafting between scions and silenced rootstocks to attenuate virus and viroid accumulation in the scions. This has been obtained mostly using transgenic plants, which may be a drawback in current agriculture. In the present study, we examined the dynamics of infection of a resistance-breaking strain of Tomato spotted wilt virus (RB-TSWV through the graft between an old Apulian (southern Italy tomato variety, denoted Sl-Ma, used as a rootstock and commercial tomato varieties used as scions. In tests with non-grafted plants, Sl-Ma showed resistance to the RB-TSWV infection as viral RNA accumulated at low levels and plants recovered from disease symptoms by 21 days post inoculation. The resistance trait was transmitted to the otherwise highly susceptible tomato genotypes grafted onto Sl-Ma. The results from the analysis of small RNAs hallmark genes involved in RNA silencing and virus-induced gene silencing suggest that RNA silencing is involved in the resistance showed by Sl-Ma against RB-TSWV and in scions grafted on this rootstock. The results from self-grafted susceptible tomato varieties suggest also that RNA silencing is enhanced by the graft itself. We can foresee interesting practical implications of the approach described in this paper.

  20. Psc-AFP from Psoralea corylifolia L. overexpressed in Pichia pastoris increases antimicrobial activity and enhances disease resistance of transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiu-Mei; Xie, Cheng-Jian; Wang, De; Wei, Yun-Min; Cai, Jie; Cheng, Shan-Shan; Yang, Xing -Yong; Sui, An -Ping

    2017-02-01

    Psc-AFP, isolated from the seeds of Psoralea corylifolia L., is an antimicrobial protein with trypsin inhibitor activity. Its encoding gene was cloned by 3'- rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) combined with Y-shaped adaptor-dependent extension (YADE) method. The gene Psc-AFP encodes a protein of 203 amino acids with a deduced signal peptide of 24 residues. The growth inhibition effect exerted by the heterologously expressed Psc-AFP in Pichia pastoris revealed that the recombinant Psc-AFP inhibited mycelium growth of Aspergillus niger, Rhizoctonia solani, and Alternaria brassicae and conidial germination of Alternaria alternata. The recombinant Psc-AFP also showed protease inhibitor activity manifested by the inhibition of trypsin. The transgenic tobacco bioassays confirmed that overexpressing Psc-AFP significantly enhanced the disease resistance of tobacco and that some of the transgenic lines were almost fully tolerant to Ralstonia solanacearum and A. alternata, whereas no apparent alteration in plant growth and development was observed. Collectively, these results indicate that the recombinant Psc-AFP is an active antimicrobial protein, with protease inhibitor activity that can be successfully produced in the yeast and tobacco and, therefore, maybe a potential antimicrobial candidate for practical use.

  1. Ectopic expression of ZmSIMK1 leads to improved drought tolerance and activation of systematic acquired resistance in transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Liu, Yang; Cai, Guohua; Jiang, Shanshan; Pan, Jiaowen; Li, Dequan

    2014-02-20

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades play pivotal roles in diverse signaling pathways related to plant biotic and abiotic stress responses. In this study, a group B MAPK gene in Zea mays, ZmSIMK1, was functionally analyzed. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that ZmSIMK1 transcript could be induced by drought, salt, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000) and certain exogenous signaling molecules. Analysis of the ZmSIMK1 promoter revealed a group of putative cis-acting elements related to drought and defense responses. β-Glucuronidase (GUS) staining produced similar results as qRT-PCR. ZmSIMK1 was mainly localized in the nucleus, and further study indicated that the C-terminal domain (CD) was essential for targeting to the nucleus. Transgenic tobacco accumulated less reactive oxygen species (ROS), had higher levels of antioxidant enzyme activity and osmoregulatory substances and exhibited an increased germination rate compared with wild-type (WT) tobacco under drought stress. ROS-related and drought stress-responsive genes in transgenic tobacco were significantly upregulated compared with the same genes in WT lines under drought stress. Moreover, overexpression of ZmSIMK1 promoted the hypersensitive response (HR) and pathogen-related gene (PR) transcription in addition to triggering systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in tobacco. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Bean [alpha]-Amylase Inhibitor Confers Resistance to the Pea Weevil (Bruchus pisorum) in Transgenic Peas (Pisum sativum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, H. E.; Gollasch, S.; Moore, A.; Tabe, L. M.; Craig, S.; Hardie, D. C.; Chrispeels, M. J.; Spencer, D.; Higgins, TJV.

    1995-04-01

    Bruchid larvae cause major losses of grain legume crops through-out the world. Some bruchid species, such as the cowpea weevil and the azuki bean weevil, are pests that damage stored seeds. Others, such as the pea weevil (Bruchus pisorum), attack the crop growing in the field. We transferred the cDNA encoding the [alpha]-amylase inhibitor ([alpha]-AI) found in the seeds of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) into pea (Pisum sativum) using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Expression was driven by the promoter of phytohemagglutinin, another bean seed protein. The [alpha]-amylase inhibitor gene was stably expressed in the transgenic pea seeds at least to the T5 seed generation, and [alpha]-AI accumulated in the seeds up to 3% of soluble protein. This level is somewhat higher than that normally found in beans, which contain 1 to 2% [alpha]-AI. In the T5 seed generation the development of pea weevil larvae was blocked at an early stage. Seed damage was minimal and seed yield was not significantly reduced in the transgenic plants. These results confirm the feasibility of protecting other grain legumes such as lentils, mungbean, groundnuts, and chickpeas against a variety of bruchids using the same approach. Although [alpha]-AI also inhibits human [alpha]-amylase, cooked peas should not have a negative impact on human energy metabolism.

  3. Prima facie evidence that a phytocystatin for transgenic plant resistance to nematodes is not a toxic risk in the human diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Howard J; Johnston, Katherine A; Robbins, Mark

    2004-02-01

    A protein-engineered rice cystatin (OcIDeltaD86) provides transgenic, partial crop resistance to plant nematodes. This study determined whether its oral uptake has adverse effects on male Sprague-Dawley rats when they are administered by oral gavage 0.1-10 mg OcIDeltaD86/kg body weight daily for 28 d. Body weight and water and food intakes were unaltered for most of the study. The only significant changes in fresh weight of nine organs were for the liver (4% decrease; P 95% loss of such inhibition after 15 s in simulated gastric fluid. The results suggest that the no effect level (NOEL) for OcIDeltaD86 is >10 mg/(kg. d). This provides a range of dietary exposure >200-2000 fold depending upon the promoter used to control its expression in potato.

  4. The novel gene VpPR4-1 from Vitis pseudoreticulata increases powdery mildew resistance in transgenic Vitis vinifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingmin eDai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenesis-related proteins (PRs can lead to increased resistance of the whole plant to pathogen attack. Here, we isolate and characterize a PR-4 protein from a wild Chinese grape Vitis pseudoreticulata which shows greatly elevated transcription following powdery mildew infection. Its expression profiles under a number of abiotic stresses were also investigated. The PR-4 gene was overexpressed in regenerated V. vinifera cv. Red Globe via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation and verified by the Western blot. The transgenic grapevines exhibited higher expression levels of PR-4 protein content than wild-type vines and also repressed the growth of powdery mildew. The PR gene responds differently to different stresses in the PR-4 transformants. This study demonstrates that PR-4 protein in grapes plays a vital role in defense against powdery mildew invasion.

  5. The Novel Gene VpPR4-1 from Vitis pseudoreticulata Increases Powdery Mildew Resistance in Transgenic Vitis vinifera L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lingmin; Wang, Dan; Xie, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Chaohong; Wang, Xiping; Xu, Yan; Wang, Yuejin; Zhang, Jianxia

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenesis-related proteins (PRs) can lead to increased resistance of the whole plant to pathogen attack. Here, we isolate and characterize a PR-4 protein (VpPR4-1) from a wild Chinese grape Vitis pseudoreticulata which shows greatly elevated transcription following powdery mildew infection. Its expression profiles under a number of abiotic stresses were also investigated. Powdery mildew, salicylic acid, and jasmonic acid methyl ester significantly increased the VpPR4-1 induction while NaCl and heat treatments just slightly induced VpPR4-1 expression. Abscisic acid and cold treatment slightly affected the expression level of VpPR4-1. The VpPR4-1 gene was overexpressed in 30 regenerated V. vinifera cv. Red Globe via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation and verified by the Western blot. The 26 transgenic grapevines exhibited higher expression levels of PR-4 protein content than wild-type vines and six of them were inoculated with powdery mildew which showed that the growth of powdery mildew was repressed. The powdery mildew-resistance of Red Globe transformed with VpPR4-1 was enhanced inoculated with powdery mildew. Moreover, other powdery mildew resistant genes were associated with feedback regulation since VpPR4-1 is in abundance. This study demonstrates that PR-4 protein in grapes plays a vital role in defense against powdery mildew invasion. PMID:27303413

  6. Multiple different defense mechanisms are activated in the young transgenic tobacco plants which express the full length genome of the Tobacco mosaic virus, and are resistant against this virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jada, Balaji; Soitamo, Arto J; Siddiqui, Shahid Aslam; Murukesan, Gayatri; Aro, Eva-Mari; Salakoski, Tapio; Lehto, Kirsi

    2014-01-01

    Previously described transgenic tobacco lines express the full length infectious Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) genome under the 35S promoter (Siddiqui et al., 2007. Mol Plant Microbe Interact, 20: 1489-1494). Through their young stages these plants exhibit strong resistance against both the endogenously expressed and exogenously inoculated TMV, but at the age of about 7-8 weeks they break into TMV infection, with typical severe virus symptoms. Infections with some other viruses (Potato viruses Y, A, and X) induce the breaking of the TMV resistance and lead to synergistic proliferation of both viruses. To deduce the gene functions related to this early resistance, we have performed microarray analysis of the transgenic plants during the early resistant stage, and after the resistance break, and also of TMV-infected wild type tobacco plants. Comparison of these transcriptomes to those of corresponding wild type healthy plants indicated that 1362, 1150 and 550 transcripts were up-regulated in the transgenic plants before and after the resistance break, and in the TMV-infected wild type tobacco plants, respectively, and 1422, 1200 and 480 transcripts were down-regulated in these plants, respectively. These transcriptome alterations were distinctly different between the three types of plants, and it appears that several different mechanisms, such as the enhanced expression of the defense, hormone signaling and protein degradation pathways contributed to the TMV-resistance in the young transgenic plants. In addition to these alterations, we also observed a distinct and unique gene expression alteration in these plants, which was the strong suppression of the translational machinery. This may also contribute to the resistance by slowing down the synthesis of viral proteins. Viral replication potential may also be suppressed, to some extent, by the reduction of the translation initiation and elongation factors eIF-3 and eEF1A and B, which are required for the TMV replication

  7. Multiple different defense mechanisms are activated in the young transgenic tobacco plants which express the full length genome of the Tobacco mosaic virus, and are resistant against this virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Jada

    Full Text Available Previously described transgenic tobacco lines express the full length infectious Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV genome under the 35S promoter (Siddiqui et al., 2007. Mol Plant Microbe Interact, 20: 1489-1494. Through their young stages these plants exhibit strong resistance against both the endogenously expressed and exogenously inoculated TMV, but at the age of about 7-8 weeks they break into TMV infection, with typical severe virus symptoms. Infections with some other viruses (Potato viruses Y, A, and X induce the breaking of the TMV resistance and lead to synergistic proliferation of both viruses. To deduce the gene functions related to this early resistance, we have performed microarray analysis of the transgenic plants during the early resistant stage, and after the resistance break, and also of TMV-infected wild type tobacco plants. Comparison of these transcriptomes to those of corresponding wild type healthy plants indicated that 1362, 1150 and 550 transcripts were up-regulated in the transgenic plants before and after the resistance break, and in the TMV-infected wild type tobacco plants, respectively, and 1422, 1200 and 480 transcripts were down-regulated in these plants, respectively. These transcriptome alterations were distinctly different between the three types of plants, and it appears that several different mechanisms, such as the enhanced expression of the defense, hormone signaling and protein degradation pathways contributed to the TMV-resistance in the young transgenic plants. In addition to these alterations, we also observed a distinct and unique gene expression alteration in these plants, which was the strong suppression of the translational machinery. This may also contribute to the resistance by slowing down the synthesis of viral proteins. Viral replication potential may also be suppressed, to some extent, by the reduction of the translation initiation and elongation factors eIF-3 and eEF1A and B, which are required for the

  8. Multiple Different Defense Mechanisms Are Activated in the Young Transgenic Tobacco Plants Which Express the Full Length Genome of the Tobacco Mosaic Virus, and Are Resistant against this Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jada, Balaji; Soitamo, Arto J.; Siddiqui, Shahid Aslam; Murukesan, Gayatri; Aro, Eva-Mari; Salakoski, Tapio; Lehto, Kirsi

    2014-01-01

    Previously described transgenic tobacco lines express the full length infectious Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) genome under the 35S promoter (Siddiqui et al., 2007. Mol Plant Microbe Interact, 20: 1489–1494). Through their young stages these plants exhibit strong resistance against both the endogenously expressed and exogenously inoculated TMV, but at the age of about 7–8 weeks they break into TMV infection, with typical severe virus symptoms. Infections with some other viruses (Potato viruses Y, A, and X) induce the breaking of the TMV resistance and lead to synergistic proliferation of both viruses. To deduce the gene functions related to this early resistance, we have performed microarray analysis of the transgenic plants during the early resistant stage, and after the resistance break, and also of TMV-infected wild type tobacco plants. Comparison of these transcriptomes to those of corresponding wild type healthy plants indicated that 1362, 1150 and 550 transcripts were up-regulated in the transgenic plants before and after the resistance break, and in the TMV-infected wild type tobacco plants, respectively, and 1422, 1200 and 480 transcripts were down-regulated in these plants, respectively. These transcriptome alterations were distinctly different between the three types of plants, and it appears that several different mechanisms, such as the enhanced expression of the defense, hormone signaling and protein degradation pathways contributed to the TMV-resistance in the young transgenic plants. In addition to these alterations, we also observed a distinct and unique gene expression alteration in these plants, which was the strong suppression of the translational machinery. This may also contribute to the resistance by slowing down the synthesis of viral proteins. Viral replication potential may also be suppressed, to some extent, by the reduction of the translation initiation and elongation factors eIF-3 and eEF1A and B, which are required for the TMV

  9. Expression of tobacco class II catalase gene activates the endogenous homologous gene and is associated with disease resistance in transgenic potato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, D; Xie, Z; Chen, C; Fan, B; Chen, Z

    1999-02-01

    We have previously shown that healthy potato plants respond poorly to salicylic acid (SA) for activating disease resistance against the late blight fungal pathogen Phytophthora infestans. However, SA is essential for the establishment of potato systemic acquired resistance (SAR) against P. infestans after treatment with the fungal elicitor arachidonic acid (AA). To understand the molecular mechanisms through which AA induces SA-dependent SAR in potato, we have recently studied the expression of potato class II catalase (Cat2St) in comparison with its tobacco homologue, Cat2Nt, which has previously been shown to bind SA. In the present study, we show that tobacco Cat2Nt is expressed at high levels and accounts for almost half of total SA-binding activity detected in tobacco leaves. In contrast, potato Cat2St is not expressed in healthy leaves, which is associated with the low SA responsiveness of potato plants for activation of disease resistance mechanisms. Upon treatment with AA, expression of potato Cat2St is induced not only in AA-treated leaves, but also in the upper untreated parts of the plants, concomitant with the establishment of SA-dependent SAR to P. infestans. Moreover, expression of the tobacco Cat2Nt gene in transgenic potato plants leads to constitutive expression of the endogenous potato Cat2St gene and is associated with enhanced resistance to P. infestans. These results collectively indicate that plant SA-binding class II catalases may play an important role in the development of disease resistance, possibly by serving as biological targets of SA.

  10. Lack of transgene and glyphosate effects on yield, and mineral and amino acid content of glyphosate-resistant soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    There has been controversy as to whether the glyphosate resistance gene and/or glyphosate applied to glyphosate-resistant (GR) soybean affect mineral content (especially Mg, Mn, and Fe), yield and amino acid content of GR soybean. A two-year field study (2013 and 2014) examined these questions at si...

  11. Transgenic expression of a maize geranyl geranyl transferase gene sequence in maize callus increases resistance to ear rot pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determining the genes responsible for pest resistance in maize can allow breeders to develop varieties with lower losses and less contamination with undesirable toxins. A gene sequence coding for a geranyl geranyl transferase-like protein located in a fungal ear rot resistance quantitative trait loc...

  12. Transgenic Forest Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertuğrul Filiz

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Biotechnological methods are used in many areas nowadays and one of these areas is applications of biotechnology in forest trees. Biotechnological methods are used frequently on vital issues such as gaining resistance against diseases and herbicide of forest trees, increasing tree growth rates and development of resistance against environmental stresses (drought, salinity, climate change etc.. Also, for improving the quality of wood that reducing lignin content and increasing the amount of cellulose draws attention. This together with applications, positive and negative effects of transgenic trees to the environment is discussed and it was tried to be provided on the auditing legal regulations concerned with these studies.

  13. Overexpression of GhWRKY27a reduces tolerance to drought stress and resistance to Rhizoctonia solani infection in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan eYan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available WRKY proteins constitute transcriptional regulators involved in various biological processes, especially in coping with diverse biotic and abiotic stresses. However, in contrast to other well-characterized WRKY groups, the functions of group III WRKY transcription factors are poorly understood in the economically important crop cotton (Gossypium hirsutum. In this study, a group III WRKY gene from cotton, GhWRKY27a, was isolated and characterized. Our data indicated that GhWRKY27a localized to the nucleus and that GhWRKY27a expression could be strongly induced by abiotic stresses, pathogen infection, and multiple defense-related signaling molecules. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS of GhWRKY27a enhanced tolerance to drought stress in cotton. In contrast, GhWRKY27a overexpression in Nicotiana benthamiana markedly reduced plant tolerance to drought stress, as determined through physiological analyses of leaf water loss, survival rates and the stomatal aperture. This susceptibility was coupled with reduced stomatal closure in response to abscisic acid and decreased expression of stress-related genes. In addition, GhWRKY27a-overexpressing plants exhibited reduced resistance to Rhizoctonia solani infection, mainly demonstrated by the transgenic lines exhibiting more severe disease symptoms, accompanied by attenuated expression of defense-related genes in Nicotiana benthamiana. Taken together, these findings indicated that GhWRKY27a functions in negative responses to drought tolerance and in resistance to Rhizoctonia solani infection.

  14. Implication of Legal References on Technological Dissemination: A Study on Transgenic Soybeans Resistant to Glyphosate Herbicide in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Rodrigues

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The following paper aims at establishing a connection between the evolution of legal landmarks related to soybeans tolerant to glyphosate-based herbicide in Brazil and the planting growth of this transgenic soybean in Brazil, in order to determine the role that such soybeans play in today's domestic agricultural scenario. To do so, a study of Brazilian laws that protect intellectual creations was carried out (Industrial Property Law - Law number 9.279/96 and the Plant Protection Law – Law number 9.456/97, the Law on Biosafety – Law number 11105 / 05 – and the Law on Brazilian Seeds and Seedlings - Law number 10.711/03, in order to delimit the matter protected by each of those laws while establishing its interfaces. Regarding planting, the Biosafety Law of 2005 corresponds to the fourth law which deals with soybeans tolerant to glyphosate-based herbicide and ensures that those previously registered may be marketed without limitation per crop. In order to estimate the space that soybean seeds tolerant to glyphosate-based herbicide began to occupy in the Brazilian market, in the 2008/2009 harvest, compared to the other not genetically modified soybeans, a search in the Ministry of Agriculture´s database was done (http://www.agricultura.gov.br through the available records of certified, non-certified and basic seeds.

  15. Refinement of the Citrus tristeza virus resistance gene (Ctv) positional map in Poncirus trifoliata and generation of transgenic grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) plant lines with candidate resistance genes in this region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Mamta

    2006-06-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is a major pathogen of Citrus. A single dominant gene Ctv present in the trifoliate relative of Citrus, Poncirus trifoliata confers broad spectrum resistance against CTV. Refinement of genetic maps has delimited this gene to a 121 kb region, comprising of ten candidate Ctv resistance genes. The ten candidate genes were individually cloned in Agrobacterium based binary vector and transformed into three CTV susceptible grapefruit varieties. Two of the candidate R-genes, R-2 and R-3 are exclusively expressed in transgenic plants and in Poncirus trifoliata, while five other genes are also expressed in non-transformed Citrus controls. Northern blotting with a CTV derived probe for assessment of infection in virus inoculated plants over a span of three growth periods, each comprising of six to eight weeks, indicates either an absence of initiation of infection or it's slow spread in R-2 plant lines or an initial appearance of infection and it's subsequent obliteration in some R-1 and R-4 plant lines. Limited genome walk up- and downstream form R-1 gene, based on it's 100% sequence identity between Poncirus and Citrus, indicates promoter identity of 92% between the two varieties. Further upstream and downstream sequencing indicates the presence of an O-methyl transferase and a Copia like gene respectively in Citrus instead of the amino acid transporter like gene upstream and a sugar transporter like gene downstream in Poncirus. The possibility of recombinations in the resistance locus of Citrus and the need for consistent monitoring for virus infection and gene expression in the transgenic Citrus trees is discussed.

  16. Resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. gladioli in transgenic Gladiolus plants expressing either a bacterial chloroperoxidase or fungal chitinase genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three antifungal genes, a non-heme chloroperoxidase from Pseudomonas pyrrocinia, and an exochitinase and endochitinase from Fusarium venetanum under regulation by the CaMV 35S promoter, were used to transform Gladiolus for resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. gladioli. Gladiolus plants were conf...

  17. Plasma adiponectin levels are increased despite insulin resistance in corticotropin-releasing hormone transgenic mice, an animal model of Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinahara, Masayuki; Nishiyama, Mitsuru; Iwasaki, Yasumasa; Nakayama, Shuichi; Noguchi, Toru; Kambayashi, Machiko; Okada, Yasushi; Tsuda, Masayuki; Stenzel-Poore, Mary P; Hashimoto, Kozo; Terada, Yoshio

    2009-01-01

    Adiponectin (AdN), an adipokine derived from the adipose tissue, has an insulin-sensitizing effect, and plasma AdN is shown to be decreased in obesity and/or insulin resistant state. To clarify whether changes in AdN are also responsible for the development of glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance, we examined AdN concentration in plasma and AdN expression in the adipose tissue, using corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) transgenic mouse (CRH-Tg), an animal model of Cushing syndrome. We found, unexpectedly, that plasma AdN levels in CRHTg were significantly higher than those in wild-type littermates (wild-type: 19.7+/-2.5, CRH-Tg: 32.4+/-3.1 microg/mL, pAdN mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased in the adipose tissue of CRH-Tg. Bilateral adrenalectomy in CRH-Tg eliminated both their Cushing's phenotype and their increase in plasma AdN levels (wild-type/sham: 9.4+/-0.5, CRH-Tg/sham: 15.7+/-2.0, CRH-Tg/ADX: 8.5+/-0.4 microg/mL). These results strongly suggest that AdN is not a major factor responsible for the development of insulin resistance in Cushing syndrome. Our data also suggest that glucocorticoid increases plasma AdN levels but decreases AdN expression in adipocytes, the latter being explained possibly by the decrease in AdN metabolism in the Cushing state.

  18. transgenic plants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    been initiated in this area by the Global Pest. Resistance Management Programme located at. MSU. Through effective resistance management training, pesticide use patterns change, and the effective lift: span of pesticides and host plant resistance technology increases. Effective resistance management can mean reduced.

  19. Field-Evolved Mode 1 Resistance of the Fall Armyworm to Transgenic Cry1Fa-Expressing Corn Associated with Reduced Cry1Fa Toxin Binding and Midgut Alkaline Phosphatase Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakka, Siva R K; Gong, Liang; Hasler, James; Banerjee, Rahul; Sheets, Joel J; Narva, Kenneth; Blanco, Carlos A; Jurat-Fuentes, Juan L

    2015-12-04

    Insecticidal protein genes from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are expressed by transgenic Bt crops (Bt crops) for effective and environmentally safe pest control. The development of resistance to these insecticidal proteins is considered the most serious threat to the sustainability of Bt crops. Resistance in fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) populations from Puerto Rico to transgenic corn producing the Cry1Fa insecticidal protein resulted, for the first time in the United States, in practical resistance, and Bt corn was withdrawn from the local market. In this study, we used a field-collected Cry1Fa corn-resistant strain (456) of S. frugiperda to identify the mechanism responsible for field-evolved resistance. Binding assays detected reduced Cry1Fa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac but not Cry1Ca toxin binding to midgut brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) from the larvae of strain 456 compared to that from the larvae of a susceptible (Ben) strain. This binding phenotype is descriptive of the mode 1 type of resistance to Bt toxins. A comparison of the transcript levels for putative Cry1 toxin receptor genes identified a significant downregulation (>90%) of a membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase (ALP), which translated to reduced ALP protein levels and a 75% reduction in ALP activity in BBMV from 456 compared to that of Ben larvae. We cloned and heterologously expressed this ALP from susceptible S. frugiperda larvae and demonstrated that it specifically binds with Cry1Fa toxin. This study provides a thorough mechanistic description of field-evolved resistance to a transgenic Bt crop and supports an association between resistance and reduced Cry1Fa toxin binding and levels of a putative Cry1Fa toxin receptor, ALP, in the midguts of S. frugiperda larvae. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Selection for resistance to mCry3A-expressing transgenic corn in western corn rootworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meihls, Lisa N; Higdon, Matthew L; Ellersieck, Mark; Hibbard, Bruce E

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the development of resistance to mCry3A, a laboratory colony of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, was established from field survivors of mCry3A-expressing (MIR604) corn, Zea mays L. Feral adults emerging from MIR604 (selected) and isoline (control) field plots were collected and returned to the laboratory. Progeny of each colony was reared one generation on isoline corn and then crossed reciprocally with a nondiapausing colony. The resulting nondiapausing progeny were then reared on greenhouse corn in accordance with the wild type parent's origin (on MIR604 or isoline corn). After four, seven, and 10 total generations of selection, the resistance ratio of the selected colony was 0.5, 4.3, and 15.4 in terms of lethal concentration (LC)50 values in toxicity assays, with the latter two LC50 values being significant. After seven generations of selection in total, selected and control colonies were screened on MIR604 and isoline corn under field conditions. There was a significant colony x corn pedigree interaction in terms of plant damage. There was no significant difference in damage between MIR604 and isoline corn, whereas this difference was significant for the control colony. After 14 generations of selection, a seedling bioassay was performed. Again, there was a significant colony x corn pedigree interaction, this time in terms of the number of larvae recovered. There was no significant difference in the number of larvae recovered from MIR604 and isoline corn for the selected colony, whereas this difference was significant for the control colony, although larval size was greater on isoline corn for both colonies. Resistance has developed in western corn rootworm laboratory colonies to all Bt proteins currently registered for corn rootworm management, which emphasizes the importance of adhering to resistance management plans for maintaining product efficacy.

  1. Tomato transgenic plants expressing hairpin construct of a nematode protease gene conferred enhanced resistance to root-knot nematodes

    OpenAIRE

    Dutta, Tushar K.; Papolu, Pradeep K.; Banakar, Prakash; Choudhary, Divya; Sirohi, Anil; Rao, Uma

    2015-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita) cause substantial yield losses in vegetables worldwide, and are difficult to manage. Continuous withdrawal of environmentally-harmful nematicides from the global market warrants the need for novel nematode management strategies. Utility of host-delivered RNAi has been demonstrated in several plants (Arabidopsis, tobacco, and soybean) that exhibited resistance against root-knot and cyst nematodes. Herein, a M. incognita-specific protease gene, cathep...

  2. Tomato transgenic plants expressing hairpin construct of a nematode protease gene conferred enhanced resistance to root-knot nematodes

    OpenAIRE

    Tushar Kanti Dutta

    2015-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita) cause substantial yield losses in vegetables worldwide, and are difficult to manage. Continuous withdrawal of environmentally-harmful nematicides from the global market warrants the need for novel nematode management strategies. Utility of host-delivered RNAi has been demonstrated in several plants (Arabidopsis, tobacco and soybean) that exhibited resistance against root-knot and cyst nematodes. Herein, a M. incognita-specific protease gene, catheps...

  3. Petunia Floral Defensins with Unique Prodomains as Novel Candidates for Development of Fusarium Wilt Resistance in Transgenic Banana Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Ghag, Siddhesh B.; Shekhawat, Upendra K. Singh; Ganapathi, Thumballi R.

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are a potent group of defense active molecules that have been utilized in developing resistance against a multitude of plant pathogens. Floral defensins constitute a group of cysteine-rich peptides showing potent growth inhibition of pathogenic filamentous fungi especially Fusarium oxysporum in vitro. Full length genes coding for two Petunia floral defensins, PhDef1 and PhDef2 having unique C- terminal 31 and 27 amino acid long predicted prodomains, were overexpressed i...

  4. Transgenic insect-resistant corn affects the fourth trophic level: effects of Bacillus thuringiensis-corn on the facultative hyperparasitoid Tetrastichus howardi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prütz, Gernot; Brink, Andreas; Dettner, Konrad

    2004-09-01

    As hyperparasitoids may have a considerable influence on the control of herbivorous arthropods, analyzing the host-mediated impact of Bacillus thuringiensis-plants (“Bt-plants”) on hyperparasitoids is of interest. Laboratory-scale experiments were conducted in order to assess the potential effect of Bt-corn leaf material on the facultative hyperparasitoid Tetrastichus howardi (Olliff) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), mediated through the herbivore Chilo partellus Swinhoe (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) and its primary parasitoid Cotesia flavipes (Cameron) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). In the Bt-group, significantly less C. flavipes larvae per host spun cocoons and pupated than in the control, and the mean fresh weight of a single C. flavipes cocoon was significantly reduced compared to the control. All C. flavipes cocoons of one host formed cocoon clusters. T. howardi females of the Bt-group parasitized significantly less cocoon clusters than in the control. Moreover, significantly fewer C. flavipes cocoons per cocoon cluster were successfully parasitized as compared to the control. As a consequence, T. howardi females of the control had more offspring than in the Bt-group. Adult female T. howardi offspring of the Bt-group weighed significantly less than in the control, but there was no significant weight difference between males of both groups. Our results suggest that transgenic insect-resistant plants could affect hyperparasitoids indirectly. However, it remains to be determined whether facultative hyperparasitoids prefer to develop as primary or secondary parasitoids under field conditions.

  5. Insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus in transgenic mice expressing nuclear SREBP-1c in adipose tissue: model for congenital generalized lipodystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Iichiro; Hammer, Robert E.; Richardson, James A.; Ikemoto, Shinji; Bashmakov, Yuriy; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Brown, Michael S.

    1998-01-01

    Overexpression of the nuclear form of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (nSREBP-1c/ADD1) in cultured 3T3-L1 preadipocytes was shown previously to promote adipocyte differentiation. Here, we produced transgenic mice that overexpress nSREBP-1c in adipose tissue under the control of the adipocyte-specific aP2 enhancer/promoter. A syndrome with the following features was observed: (1) Disordered differentiation of adipose tissue. White fat failed to differentiate fully, and the size of white fat depots was markedly decreased. Brown fat was hypertrophic and contained fat-laden cells resembling immature white fat. Levels of mRNA encoding adipocyte differentiation markers (C/EBPα, PPARγ, adipsin, leptin, UCP1) were reduced, but levels of Pref-1 and TNFα were increased. (2) Marked insulin resistance with 60-fold elevation in plasma insulin. (3) Diabetes mellitus with elevated blood glucose (>300 mg/dl) that failed to decline when insulin was injected. (4) Fatty liver from birth and elevated plasma triglyceride levels later in life. These mice exhibit many of the features of congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL), an autosomal recessive disorder in humans. PMID:9784493

  6. The genetic structure of Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis, populations in China: haplotype variance in northern populations and potential impact on management of resistance to transgenic maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Coates, Brad S; Kim, Kyung Seok; Bourguet, Denis; Ponsard, Sergine; He, Kanglai; Wang, Zhenying

    2014-01-01

    Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis (Guenée), is a severe pest that infests cultivated maize in the major production regions of China. Populations show genotype-by-environment variation in voltinism, such that populations with a single generation (univoltine) are fixed in Northern China where growing seasons are short. Low genetic differentiation was found among samples from 33 collection sites across China and one site from North Korea (n=1673) using variation at 6 nuclear microsatellite loci (ENA corrected global FST=0.020; P valuenuclear loci and was corroborated by clustering of co-ancestries among genotypes using the program STRUCTURE. In contrast, a mitochondrial haplotype network identified 4 distinct clusters, where 70.5% of samples from univoltine populations were within a single group. Univoltine populations were also placed into a unique cluster using Population Graph and Principal component analyses, which showed significant differentiation with multivoltine populations (φST=0.400; P value<0.01). This study suggests that gene flow among O. furnacalis in China may be high among regions, with the exception of northeastern localities. Haplotype variation may be due to random genetic drift resulting from partial reproductive isolation between univoltine and multivoltine O. furnacalis populations. Such reproductive isolation might impact the potential spread of alleles that confer resistance to transgenic maize in China. © The American Genetic Association 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Constitutive expression of the poplar WRKY transcription factor PtoWRKY60 enhances resistance to Dothiorella gregaria Sacc. in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shenglong; Jiang, Yuanzhong; Duan, Yanjiao; Karim, Abdul; Fan, Di; Yang, Li; Zhao, Xin; Yin, Jia; Luo, Keming

    2014-10-01

    WRKY proteins are involved in various physiological processes in plants, especially in coping with diverse biotic and abiotic stresses. However, limited information is available on the roles of specific WRKY transcription factors in poplar defense. In this study, we reported the characterization of PtoWRKY60, a Group IIa WRKY member, from Populus tomentosa Carr. The gene expression profile of PtoWRKY60 in various tissues showed that it significantly accumulated in old leaves. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that PtoWRKY60 had a close relationship with AtWRKY18, AtWRKY40 and AtWRKY60. PtoWRKY60 was induced mainly by salicylic acid (SA) and slightly by Dothiorella gregaria Sacc., jasmonic acid, wounding treatment, low temperature and salinity stresses. Overexpression of PtoWRKY60 in poplar resulted in increased resistance to D. gregaria. The defense-associated genes, such as PR5.1, PR5.2, PR5.4, PR5.5 and CPR5, were markedly up-regulated in transgenic plants overexpressing PtoWRKY60. These results indicate that PtoWRKY60 might be partly involved in the signal transduction pathway initiated by SA in Populus. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Comparison of transgenic plant production for bacterial blight ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-03-29

    Mar 29, 2010 ... Resistance of transgenic plants against Xanthomonas oryzae pathovar oryzae was evaluated with various ... The tested transgenic plants were resistant to all the indigenous and exotic strains tested due to the broad ...... indica rice with chitinase gene for enhanced sheath blight resistance. Biologia ...

  9. Manejo de capim pé-de-galinha em lavouras de soja transgênica resistente ao glifosato Management of goose grass on transgenic soybean, resistant to glyphosate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André da Rosa Ulguim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a resistência de capim pé-de-galinha (Eleusine indica ao glifosato, em lavouras de soja transgênica; avaliar o efeito de aplicações de glifosato em diferentes estádios de desenvolvimento; identificar práticas agronômicas associadas à seleção de biótipos resistentes; e avaliar a eficiência dos herbicidas cletodim, fluazifope-P-butílico, clomazona, glufosinato de amônio e glifosato nas plantas resistentes. Plantas escapes ao tratamento com glifosato foram coletadas em 24 propriedades, no Rio Grande do Sul. As plantas foram cultivadas em casa de vegetação, tendo-se avaliado a sua resistência ao glifosato. Os acessos resistentes foram selecionados e avaliados quanto ao efeito da aplicação do glifosato em diferentes estádios de crescimento e quanto à sensibilidade aos herbicidas. Foi aplicado um questionário aos produtores para identificação das práticas agronômicas associadas às falhas no controle. O controle de E. indica pelo glifosato é mais efetivo com a aplicação em estádios iniciais de desenvolvimento. Práticas agronômicas, como uso contínuo de baixas doses do herbicida, aplicação em estádios de desenvolvimento avançados das plantas daninhas (mais de um afilho e a ausência de rotação de culturas foram relacionadas às falhas de controle observadas. Os herbicidas cletodim, fluazifope-P-butílico e glufosinato de amônio são alternativas eficientes para o controle de E. indica.The objective of this work was to evaluate the resistance of goose grass (Eleusine indica to glyphosate application in transgenic soybean crops; evaluate the effect of glyphosate applications in different growth stages; identify the main agronomic practices associated with the selection of resistant biotypes; and evaluate the effect of the herbicides clethodim, fluazifop-p-butyl, clomazone, glufosinate ammonium, and glyphosate on resistant plants. Plants that survived glyphosate application

  10. Plant biotechnology: transgenic crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewry, Peter R; Jones, Huw D; Halford, Nigel G

    2008-01-01

    Transgenesis is an important adjunct to classical plant breeding, in that it allows the targeted manipulation of specific characters using genes from a range of sources. The current status of crop transformation is reviewed, including methods of gene transfer, the selection of transformed plants and control of transgene expression. The application of genetic modification technology to specific traits is then discussed, including input traits relating to crop production (herbicide tolerance and resistance to insects, pathogens and abiotic stresses) and output traits relating to the composition and quality of the harvested organs. The latter include improving the nutritional quality for consumers as well as the improvement of functional properties for food processing.

  11. Determining gene flow in transgenic cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoping

    2013-01-01

    Gene flow is one of the major concerns associated with the release of transgenic plants into the environment. Unrestricted gene flow can results in super weeds, reduction in species fitness and genetic diversity, and contamination of traditional plants and foods. Thus, it is important and also necessary to evaluate the extent of gene flow in the field for transgenic plants already released or being considered for a release. Transgenic cotton is among the first transgenic crops for commercialization, which are widely cultivated around the world. In this chapter, we use transgenic insect resistant cotton and herbicide-tolerant cotton as two examples to present a field practice method for determining transgene flow in cotton. The procedure includes three major sections: (1) field design, (2) seed collection, and (3) field and lab bioassay.

  12. The receptor like kinase at Rhg1-a/Rfs2 caused pleiotropic resistance to sudden death syndrome and soybean cyst nematode as a transgene by altering signaling responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srour Ali

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soybean (Glycine max (L. Merr. resistance to any population of Heterodera glycines (I., or Fusarium virguliforme (Akoi, O’Donnell, Homma & Lattanzi required a functional allele at Rhg1/Rfs2. H. glycines, the soybean cyst nematode (SCN was an ancient, endemic, pest of soybean whereas F. virguliforme causal agent of sudden death syndrome (SDS, was a recent, regional, pest. This study examined the role of a receptor like kinase (RLK GmRLK18-1 (gene model Glyma_18_02680 at 1,071 kbp on chromosome 18 of the genome sequence within the Rhg1/Rfs2 locus in causing resistance to SCN and SDS. Results A BAC (B73p06 encompassing the Rhg1/Rfs2 locus was sequenced from a resistant cultivar and compared to the sequences of two susceptible cultivars from which 800 SNPs were found. Sequence alignments inferred that the resistance allele was an introgressed region of about 59 kbp at the center of which the GmRLK18-1 was the most polymorphic gene and encoded protein. Analyses were made of plants that were either heterozygous at, or transgenic (and so hemizygous at a new location with, the resistance allele of GmRLK18-1. Those plants infested with either H. glycines or F. virguliforme showed that the allele for resistance was dominant. In the absence of Rhg4 the GmRLK18-1 was sufficient to confer nearly complete resistance to both root and leaf symptoms of SDS caused by F. virguliforme and provided partial resistance to three different populations of nematodes (mature female cysts were reduced by 30–50%. In the presence of Rhg4 the plants with the transgene were nearly classed as fully resistant to SCN (females reduced to 11% of the susceptible control as well as SDS. A reduction in the rate of early seedling root development was also shown to be caused by the resistance allele of the GmRLK18-1. Field trials of transgenic plants showed an increase in foliar susceptibility to insect herbivory. Conclusions The inference that soybean has

  13. The receptor like kinase at Rhg1-a/Rfs2 caused pleiotropic resistance to sudden death syndrome and soybean cyst nematode as a transgene by altering signaling responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srour, Ali; Afzal, Ahmed J; Blahut-Beatty, Laureen; Hemmati, Naghmeh; Simmonds, Daina H; Li, Wenbin; Liu, Miao; Town, Christopher D; Sharma, Hemlata; Arelli, Prakash; Lightfoot, David A

    2012-08-02

    Soybean (Glycine max (L. Merr.)) resistance to any population of Heterodera glycines (I.), or Fusarium virguliforme (Akoi, O'Donnell, Homma & Lattanzi) required a functional allele at Rhg1/Rfs2. H. glycines, the soybean cyst nematode (SCN) was an ancient, endemic, pest of soybean whereas F. virguliforme causal agent of sudden death syndrome (SDS), was a recent, regional, pest. This study examined the role of a receptor like kinase (RLK) GmRLK18-1 (gene model Glyma_18_02680 at 1,071 kbp on chromosome 18 of the genome sequence) within the Rhg1/Rfs2 locus in causing resistance to SCN and SDS. A BAC (B73p06) encompassing the Rhg1/Rfs2 locus was sequenced from a resistant cultivar and compared to the sequences of two susceptible cultivars from which 800 SNPs were found. Sequence alignments inferred that the resistance allele was an introgressed region of about 59 kbp at the center of which the GmRLK18-1 was the most polymorphic gene and encoded protein. Analyses were made of plants that were either heterozygous at, or transgenic (and so hemizygous at a new location) with, the resistance allele of GmRLK18-1. Those plants infested with either H. glycines or F. virguliforme showed that the allele for resistance was dominant. In the absence of Rhg4 the GmRLK18-1 was sufficient to confer nearly complete resistance to both root and leaf symptoms of SDS caused by F. virguliforme and provided partial resistance to three different populations of nematodes (mature female cysts were reduced by 30-50%). In the presence of Rhg4 the plants with the transgene were nearly classed as fully resistant to SCN (females reduced to 11% of the susceptible control) as well as SDS. A reduction in the rate of early seedling root development was also shown to be caused by the resistance allele of the GmRLK18-1. Field trials of transgenic plants showed an increase in foliar susceptibility to insect herbivory. The inference that soybean has adapted part of an existing pathogen recognition and

  14. Cross-pollination of nontransgenic corn ears with transgenic Bt corn: efficacy against lepidopteran pests and implications for resistance management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkness, E C; O'Rourke, P K; Hutchison, W D

    2011-10-01

    The efficacy of nontransgenic sweet corn, Zea mays L., hybrids cross-pollinated by Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) sweet corn hybrids expressing Cry1Ab toxin was evaluated in both field and laboratory studies in Minnesota in 2000. Non-Bt and Bt hybrids (maternal plants) were cross-pollinated with pollen from both non-Bt and Bt hybrids (paternal plants) to create four crosses. Subsequent crosses were evaluated for efficacy in the field against European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner), and corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), and in laboratory bioassays against O. nubilalis. Field studies indicated that crosses with maternal Bt plants led to low levels of survival for both O. nubilalis and H. zea compared with the non-Bt x non-Bt cross. However, the cross between non-Bt ears and Bt pollen led to survival rates of 43 and 63% for O. nubilalis and H. zea larvae, respectively. This intermediate level of survival also was reflected in the number of kernels damaged. Laboratory bioassays for O. nubilalis, further confirmed field results with larval survival on kernels from the cross between non-Bt ears and Bt pollen reaching 60% compared with non-Bt crossed with non-Bt. These results suggest that non-Bt refuge plants, when planted in proximity to Bt plants, and cross-pollinated, can result in sublethal exposure of O. nubilalis and H. zea larvae to Bt and may undermine the high-dose/refuge resistance management strategy for corn hybrids expressing Cry1Ab.

  15. Transgenic expression of human heme oxygenase-1 in pigs confers resistance against xenograft rejection during ex vivo perfusion of porcine kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Björn; Ramackers, Wolf; Lucas-Hahn, Andrea; Lemme, Erika; Hassel, Petra; Queisser, Anna-Lisa; Herrmann, Doris; Barg-Kues, Brigitte; Carnwath, Joseph W; Klose, Johannes; Tiede, Andreas; Friedrich, Lars; Baars, Wiebke; Schwinzer, Reinhard; Winkler, Michael; Niemann, Heiner

    2011-01-01

    The major immunological hurdle to successful porcine-to-human xenotransplantation is the acute vascular rejection (AVR), characterized by endothelial cell (EC) activation and perturbation of coagulation. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and its derivatives have anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory effects and protect against reactive oxygen species, rendering HO-1 a promising molecule to control AVR. Here, we report the production and characterization of pigs transgenic for human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) and demonstrate significant protection in porcine kidneys against xenograft rejection in ex vivo perfusion with human blood and transgenic porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAEC) in a TNF-α-mediated apoptosis assay. Transgenic and non-transgenic PAEC were tested in a TNF-α-mediated apoptosis assay. Expression of adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin) was measured by real-time PCR. hHO-1 transgenic porcine kidneys were perfused with pooled and diluted human AB blood in an ex vivo perfusion circuit. MHC class-II up-regulation after induction with IFN-γ was compared between wild-type and hHO-1 transgenic PAEC. Cloned hHO-1 transgenic pigs expressed hHO-1 in heart, kidney, liver, and in cultured ECs and fibroblasts. hHO-1 transgenic PAEC were protected against TNF-α-mediated apoptosis. Real-time PCR revealed reduced expression of adhesion molecules like ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin. These effects could be abrogated by the incubation of transgenic PAECs with the specific HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphorine IX (Zn(II)PPIX, 20 μm). IFN-γ induced up-regulation of MHC class-II molecules was significantly reduced in PAECs from hHO-1 transgenic pigs. hHO-1 transgenic porcine kidneys could successfully be perfused with diluted human AB-pooled blood for a maximum of 240 min (with and without C1 inh), while in wild-type kidneys, blood flow ceased after ∼60 min. Elevated levels of d-Dimer and TAT were detected, but no significant consumption of fibrinogen and

  16. Food safety knowledge on the Bt mutant protein Cry8Ka5 employed in the development of coleopteran-resistant transgenic cotton plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Davi F; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M; Grossi-de-Sá, Maria F; Carvalho, Ana F U

    2015-01-01

    Insecticidal Cry proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have been exploited in the development of genetically modified (GM) crops for pest control. However, several pests are still difficult to control such as the coleopteran boll weevil Anthonomus grandis. By applying in vitro molecular evolution to the cry8Ka1 gene sequence, variants were generated with improved activity against A. grandis. Among them, Cry8Ka5 mutant protein showed coleoptericidal activity 3-fold higher (LC50 2.83 μg/mL) than that of the original protein (Cry8Ka1). Cry8Ka5 has been used in breeding programs in order to obtain coleopteran-resistant cotton plants. Nevertheless, there is some concern in relation to the food safety of transgenic crops, especially to the heterologously expressed proteins. In this context, our research group has performed risk assessment studies on Cry8Ka5, using the tests recommended by Codex as well as tests that we proposed as alternative and/or complementary approaches. Our results on the risk analysis of Cry8Ka5 taken together with those of other Cry proteins, point out that there is a high degree of certainty on their food safety. It is reasonable to emphasize that most safety studies on Cry proteins have essentially used the Codex approach. However, other methodologies would potentially provide additional information such as studies on the effects of Cry proteins and derived peptides on the indigenous gastrointestinal microbiota and on intestinal epithelial cells of humans. Additionally, emerging technologies such as toxicogenomics potentially will offer sensitive alternatives for some current approaches or methods.

  17. Overexpression of Poplar PtrWRKY89 in Transgenic Arabidopsis Leads to a Reduction of Disease Resistance by Regulating Defense-Related Genes in Salicylate- and Jasmonate-Dependent Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanzhong Jiang

    Full Text Available The plant hormones jasmonic acid (JA and salicylic acid (SA play key roles in plant defenses against pathogens and several WRKY transcription factors have been shown to have a role in SA/JA crosstalk. In a previous study, overexpression of the poplar WRKY gene PtrWRKY89 enhanced resistance to pathogens in transgenic poplars. In this study, the promoter of PtrWRKY89 (ProPtrWRKY89 was isolated and used to drive GUS reporter gene. High GUS activity was observed in old leaves of transgenic Arabidopsis containing ProPtrWRKY89-GUS construct and GUS expression was extremely induced by SA solution and SA+MeJA mixture but not by MeJA treatment. Subcellular localization and transactivation assays showed that PtrWRKY89 acted as a transcription activator in the nucleus. Constitutive expression of PtrWRKY89 in Arabidopsis resulted in more susceptible to Pseudomonas syringae and Botrytis cinerea compared to wild-type plants. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR analysis confirmed that marker genes of SA and JA pathways were down-regulated in transgenic Arabidopsis after pathogen inoculations. Overall, our results indicated that PtrWRKY89 modulates a cross talk in resistance to P. syringe and B. cinerea by negatively regulating both SA and JA pathways in Arabidopsis.

  18. Resistance to BmNPV via Overexpression of an Exogenous Gene Controlled by an Inducible Promoter and Enhancer in Transgenic Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liang; Cheng, Tingcai; Zhao, Ping; Yang, Qiong; Wang, Genhong; Jin, Shengkai; Lin, Ping; Xiao, Yang; Xia, Qingyou

    2012-01-01

    The hycu-ep32 gene of Hyphantria cunea NPV can inhibit Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) multiplication in co-infected cells, but it is not known whether the overexpression of the hycu-ep32 gene has an antiviral effect in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. Thus, we constructed four transgenic vectors, which were under the control of the 39 K promoter of BmNPV (39 KP), Bombyx mori A4 promoter (A4P), hr3 enhancer of BmNPV combined with 39 KP, and hr3 combined with A4P. Transgenic lines were created via embryo microinjection using practical diapause silkworm. qPCR revealed that the expression level of hycu-ep32 could be induced effectively after BmNPV infection in transgenic lines where hycu-ep32 was controlled by hr3 combined with 39 KP (i.e., HEKG). After oral inoculation of BmNPV with 3 × 105 occlusion bodies per third instar, the mortality with HEKG-B was approximately 30% lower compared with the non-transgenic line. The economic characteristics of the transgenic lines remained unchanged. These results suggest that overexpression of an exogenous antiviral gene controlled by an inducible promoter and enhancer is a feasible method for breeding silkworms with a high antiviral capacity. PMID:22870254

  19. Resistance to BmNPV via overexpression of an exogenous gene controlled by an inducible promoter and enhancer in transgenic silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Jiang

    Full Text Available The hycu-ep32 gene of Hyphantria cunea NPV can inhibit Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV multiplication in co-infected cells, but it is not known whether the overexpression of the hycu-ep32 gene has an antiviral effect in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. Thus, we constructed four transgenic vectors, which were under the control of the 39 K promoter of BmNPV (39 KP, Bombyx mori A4 promoter (A4P, hr3 enhancer of BmNPV combined with 39 KP, and hr3 combined with A4P. Transgenic lines were created via embryo microinjection using practical diapause silkworm. qPCR revealed that the expression level of hycu-ep32 could be induced effectively after BmNPV infection in transgenic lines where hycu-ep32 was controlled by hr3 combined with 39 KP (i.e., HEKG. After oral inoculation of BmNPV with 3 × 10(5 occlusion bodies per third instar, the mortality with HEKG-B was approximately 30% lower compared with the non-transgenic line. The economic characteristics of the transgenic lines remained unchanged. These results suggest that overexpression of an exogenous antiviral gene controlled by an inducible promoter and enhancer is a feasible method for breeding silkworms with a high antiviral capacity.

  20. Tuberculosis-resistant transgenic cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis is a devastating disease that affects humans and many animal species. In humans, tuberculosis (TB) is mainly caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, while most cases in cattle are caused by Mycobacterium bovis. However, Mb can also cause, albeit rarely, human TB. In this issue, Wu et al. ...

  1. Plantas transgênicas resistentes aos herbicidas: situação e perspectivas Resistant transgenic plants to the herbicide: situation and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Andréa Monquero

    2005-01-01

    DNA inserted into their cells from another organism. In some cases, this organism may be from a other individue of the same species, or from another species with which they would not normally cross-breed. The use of genetic modification in plant breeding aims to: increase crop yields beyond the maximum for existing varieties; reduce post-harvest losses; make crops more tolerant to environment stresses; make crops that use efficiently nitrogen and phosphorous; improve nutritional value of foods; produce plants that are resistant to certain herbicide, pests or diseases; develop alternative resources for industry such as fuels and pharmaceuticals. Many consumers are concerned that genetic modification isn't natural and believe that conventional breeding is better than GMOs because it follows the principles of natural selection, or uses natural mutations. However, it is also possible to produce undesirable combinations of genes by conventional breeding. Several concerns are associated with the use of herbicide-tolerant crops. Those include: (a drift to nearby susceptible plants; (b herbicide-resistant crops becoming weedy and difficult to control; (c illegal use of seeds; (d negative public reaction to genetic engineer; (e hybridization between GM crop plants and their wild relatives; and (g increased selection for resistant weed biotypes or tolerant species. The generation of genetically modified organisms has fomented a controversial debate in various sectors of our society. Yet we must be cautious before generalizing the use of transgenics since each case should be analyzed regarding both its particular advantages and drawbacks, and contribution to the improvement of life quality.

  2. Inhibition of Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Growth by Transgenic Corn Expressing Bt Toxins and Development of Resistance to Cry1Ab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisig, Dominic D; Reay-Jones, Francis P F

    2015-08-01

    Transgenic corn, Zea mays L., that expresses the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin Cry1Ab is only moderately toxic to Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) and has been planted commercially since 1996. Growth and development of H. zea was monitored to determine potential changes in susceptibility to this toxin over time. Small plots of corn hybrids expressing Cry1F, Cry1F × Cry1Ab, Cry1Ab × Cry3Bb1, Cry1A.105 × Cry2Ab2 × Cry3Bb1, Cry1A.105 × Cry2Ab2, and Vip3Aa20 × Cry1Ab × mCry3A were planted in both 2012 and 2013 inNorth and South Carolina with paired non-Bt hybrids from the same genetic background. H. zea larvae were sampled on three time periods from ears and the following factors were measured: kernel area injured (cm(2)) by H. zea larvae, larval number per ear, larval weight, larval length, and larval head width. Pupae were sampled on a single time period and the following factors recorded: number per ear, weight, time to eclosion, and the number that eclosed. There was no reduction in larval weight, number of insect entering the pupal stadium, pupal weight, time to eclosion, and number of pupae able to successfully eclose to adulthood in the hybrid expressing Cry1Ab compared with a non-Bt paired hybrid. As Cry1Ab affected these in 1996, H. zea may be developing resistance to Cry1Ab in corn, although these results are not comprehensive, given the limited sampling period, size, and geography. We also found that the negative impacts on larval growth and development were greater in corn hybrids with pyramided traits compared with single traits. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. A point mutation (L1015F) of the voltage-sensitive sodium channel gene associated with lambda-cyhalothrin resistance in Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) population from the transgenic Bt cotton field of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Congai; Gao, Xiwu

    2016-02-01

    In China, the green mirid bug, Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür), has caused severe economic damage to many kinds of crops, especially the cotton and jujubes. Pyrethroid insecticides have been widely used for controlling this pest in the transgenic Bt cotton field. Five populations of A. lucorum collected from cotton crops at different locations in China were evaluated for lambda-cyhalothrin resistance. The results showed that only the population collected from Shandong Province exhibited 30-fold of resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin. Neither PBO nor DEF had obvious synergism when compared the synergistic ratio between SS and RR strain which was originated from the Shandong population. Besides, there were no statistically significant differences (p>0.05) in the carboxylesterase, glutathione S-transferase, or 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase activities between the Shandong population and the laboratory susceptible strain (SS). The full-length sodium channel gene named AlVSSC encoding 2028 amino acids was obtained by RT-PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). One single point mutation L1015F in the AlVSSC was detected only in the Shandong population. Our results revealed that the L1015F mutation associated with pyrethroid resistance was identified in A. lucorum populations in China. These results will be useful for the rational chemical control of A. lucorum in the transgenic Bt cotton field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Overexpression of a Weed (Solanum americanum) Proteinase Inhibitor in Transgenic Tobacco Results in Increased Glandular Trichome Density and Enhanced Resistance to Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera litura

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Ming; Wang, Zhaoyu; Li, Huapeng; Xia, Kuai-Fei; Cai, Yinpeng; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2009-01-01

    In this study we produced transgenic tobacco plants by overexpressing a serine proteinase inhibitor gene, SaPIN2a, from the American black nightshade Solanum americanum under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. SaPIN2a was properly transcribed and translated as indicated by Northern blot and Western blot analyses. Functional integrity of SaPIN2a in transgenic plants was confirmed by proteinase inhibitory activity assay. Bioassays for i...

  5. Transgenic mice with astrocyte-targeted production of interleukin-6 are resistant to high-fat diet-induced increases in body weight and body fat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hidalgo, Juan; Florit, Sergi; Giralt, Mercedes

    2010-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a major cytokine involved in both normal physiological brain functions and underlying significant neuropathology. IL-6 has been suggested to play a role in the control of body weight but the results are somewhat controversial. In this study we have challenged transgenic mi...

  6. Subchronic Immunotoxicity Assessment of Genetically Modified Virus-Resistant Papaya in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-Tang; Lee, Wei-Cheng; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Wu, Jhaol-Huei; Yen, Gow-Chin; Yeh, Shyi-Dong; Cheng, Ying-Huey; Chang, Shih-Chieh; Liao, Jiunn-Wang

    2016-07-27

    Papaya is an important fruit that provides a variety of vitamins with nutritional value and also holds some pharmacological properties, including immunomodulation. Genetically modified (GM) papaya plants resistant to Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) infection have been generated by cloning the coat protein gene of the PRSV which can be used as a valuable strategy to fight PRSV infection and to increase papaya production. In order to assess the safety of GM papaya as a food, this subchronic study was conducted to assess the immunomodulatory responses of the GM papaya line 823-2210, when compared with its parent plant of non-GM papaya, Tainung-2 (TN-2), in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Both non-GM and GM 823-2210 papaya fruits at low (1 g/kg bw) and high (2 g/kg bw) dosages were administered via daily oral gavage to male and female rats consecutively for 90 days. Immunophenotyping, mitogen-induced splenic cell proliferation, antigen-specific antibody response, and histopathology of the spleen and thymus were evaluated at the end of the experiment. Results of immunotoxicity assays revealed no consistent difference between rats fed for 90 days with GM 823-2210 papaya fruits, as opposed to those fed non-GM TN-2 papaya fruits, suggesting that with regard to immunomodulatory responses, GM 823-2210 papaya fruits maintain substantial equivalence to fruits of their non-GM TN-2 parent.

  7. Transgenic sorghum plants via microprojectile bombardment.

    OpenAIRE

    Casas, A M; Kononowicz, A K; Zehr, U B; Tomes, D T; Axtell, J. D.; Butler, L. G.; Bressan, R. A.; Hasegawa, P M

    1993-01-01

    Transgenic sorghum plants have been obtained after microprojectile bombardment of immature zygotic embryos of a drought-resistant sorghum cultivar, P898012. DNA delivery parameters were optimized based on transient expression of R and C1 maize anthocyanin regulatory elements in scutellar cells. The protocol for obtaining transgenic plants consists of the delivery of the bar gene to immature zygotic embryos and the imposition of bialaphos selection pressure at various stages during culture, fr...

  8. Ethics and Transgenic Crops: a Review

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    This article represents a review of some of the ethical dilemmas that have arisen as a result of the development and deployment of transgenic crop plants. The potential for transgenic crops to alleviate human hunger and the possible effects on human health are discussed. Risks and benefits to the environment resulting from genetic engineering of crops for resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses are considered, in addition to effects on biodiversity. The socio-economic impacts and distributi...

  9. The Study of the Participation of Heat Shock Proteins in the Resistance to High and Low Temperatures with the Use of Thellungiella (Thellungiella salsuguinea and Transgenic Lines of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.Z. Gamburg

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Transgenic lines of Arabidopsis with HSP101 gene in sense and anti sense orientations acquired resistance to hard heat shock (50° C 10 min or 45-47° C 1 hour and to freezing (-4° C 2 hours due to the preliminary 2 hour’s heating at 37° C. Thus, it was shown at the first time that the induction of the resistance to hard heat shock and freezing with mild heat shock is possible in the absence of HSP101 synthesis. Thellungiella with the genome to 95-97% identical to the genome of Arabidopsis did not have higher resistance to high temperature, but was significantly more resistant to freezing. It differed from Arabidopsis by several times higher contents of HSP101, HSP60 and HSC70. Contents of these HSPs in Arabidopsis increased as a result of hardening at 4° C what was accompanied by the increase of the resistance to freezing. It is supposed that the resistances to heat and cold shocks are dependent not only from HSP101, but also from other HSPs.

  10. Field evaluation of soybean engineered with a synthetic cry1Ac transgene for resistance to corn earworm, soybean looper, velvetbean caterpillar (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), and lesser cornstalk borer (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, D R; All, J N; McPherson, R M; Boerma, H R; Parrott, W A

    2000-06-01

    A transgenic line of the soybean 'Jack', Glycine max (L.) Merrill, expressing a synthetic cry1Ac gene from Bacillus thuringiensis variety kurstaki (Jack-Bt), was evaluated for resistance to four lepidopteran pests in the field. Jack-Bt and genotypes serving as susceptible and resistant controls were planted in field cages and artificially infested with larvae of corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), and velvetbean caterpillar, Anticarsia gemmatalis (Hübner), in 1996, 1997, and 1998, and also with soybean looper, Pseudoplusia includens (Walker), in 1996. Susceptible controls included Jack (1996-1998), 'Cobb' (1996), and Jack-HPH (1996). GatIR 81-296 was used as the resistant control in all 3 yr. Compared with untransformed Jack, Jack-Bt showed three to five times less defoliation from corn earworm and eight to nine times less damage from velvetbean caterpillar. Defoliation of GatIR 81-296 was intermediate between that of Jack and Jack-Bt for corn earworm, and similar to that of Jack for velveltbean caterpillar. Jack-Bt exhibited significant, but lower resistance to soybean looper. Jack-Bt also showed four times greater resistance than Jack to natural infestations of lesser cornstalk borer, Elasmopalpus lignosellus (Zeller), in conventional field plots at two locations in 1998. Data from these experiments suggest that expression of this cry1Ac construct in soybean should provide adequate levels of resistance to several lepidopteran pests under field conditions.

  11. Extreme resistance to two Brazilian strains of Potato virus Y (PVY in transgenic potato, cv. Achat, expressing the PVYº coat protein Resistência extrema a duas estirpes do Potato virus Y (PVY de batata transgênica, cv. Achat, expressando o gene da capa protéica do PVY O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Romano

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The coat protein (CP gene of the potato virus Y strain "o" (PVY O was introduced into potato, cultivar Achat, via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Sixty three putative transgenic lines were challenged against the Brazilian strains PVY-OBR and PVY-NBR. An extremely resistant phenotype, against the two strains, was observed in one line, denominated 1P. No symptoms or positive ELISA results were observed in 16 challenged plants from this line. Another clone, named as 63P, showed a lower level of resistance. Southern blot analysis showed five copies of the CP gene in the extremely resistant line and at least three copies in the other resistant line. The stability of the integrated transgenes in the extreme resistant line was examined during several in vitro multiplications over a period of three years, with no modification in the Southern pattern was observed. The stability of the transgenes, the absence of primary infections and the relatively broad spectrum of resistance suggest that the extremely resistant line obtained in this work can be useful for agricultural purposes.O gene da capa protéica (CP do Potato virus Y estirpe "o", foi introduzido em batata cultivar Achat, via Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Sessenta e três linhas possivelmente transgênicas foram desafiadas com as estirpes brasileiras PVY-OBR e PVY-NBR. Uma linha apresentou extrema resistência às duas estirpes inoculadas, e foi denominado clone 1P. Não foram observados sintomas sistêmicos de infecção e as plantas foram negativas em Elisa. Outra linha, denominada clone 63P, mostrou algum nível de resistência. Análises por Southern blot indicaram a presença de pelo menos cinco cópias do gen CP no clone 1P e pelo menos três cópias no clone 63P. A estabilidade do gene introduzido no clone 1P foi avaliada durante três anos, após várias multiplicações in vitro. Não foram observadas mudanças no padrão do Southern blot. A estabilidade do transgene, na

  12. Agronomic performance, chromosomal stability and resistance to velvetbean caterpillar of transgenic soybean expressing cry1Ac gene Performance agronômica, estabilidade cromossômica e resistência à lagarta-da-soja em soja transgênica que expressa o gene cry1Ac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Schenkel Homrich

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to analyze the agronomic performance and chromosomal stability of transgenic homozygous progenies of soybean [Glycine max (L. Merrill.], and to confirm the resistance of these plants against Anticarsia gemmatalis. Eleven progenies expressing cry1Ac, hpt and gusA genes were evaluated for agronomic characteristics in relation to the nontransformed parent IAS 5 cultivar. Cytogenetical analysis was carried out on transgenic and nontransgenic plants. Two out of the 11 transgenic progenies were also evaluated, in vitro and in vivo, for resistance to A. gemmatalis. Two negative controls were used in resistance bioassays: a transgenic homozygous line, containing only the gusA reporter gene, and nontransgenic 'IAS 5' plants. The presence of cry1Ac transgene affected neither the development nor the yield of plants. Cytogenetical analysis showed that transgenic plants presented normal karyotype. In detached-leaf bioassay, cry1Ac plants exhibited complete efficacy against A. gemmatalis, whereas negative controls were significantly damaged. Whole-plant feeding assay confirmed a very high protection of cry1Ac against velvetbean caterpillar, while nontransgenic 'IAS 5' plants and homozygous gusA line exhibited 56.5 and 71.5% defoliation, respectively. The presence of cry1Ac transgene doesn't affect the majority of agronomic traits (including yield of soybean and grants high protection against A. gemmatalis.O objetivo deste trabalho foi analisar a performance agronômica e a estabilidade cromossômica de progênies transgênicas homozigotas de soja [Glycine max (L. Merrill.], e confirmar a resistência dessas plantas a Anticarsia gemmatalis. Onze progênies com expressão dos genes cry1Ac, hpt e gusA foram avaliadas quanto às características agronômicas, em relação à cultivar parental IAS 5 não transformada. Análises citogenéticas foram realizadas em plantas transgênicas e não transgênicas. Duas das 11 prog

  13. No evidence for a role of adipose tissue-derived serum amyloid a in the development of insulin resistance or obesity-related inflammation in hSAA1(+/-) transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlin, Sofie; Olsson, Maja; Olsson, Bob; Svensson, Per-Arne; Sjöholm, Kajsa

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a low-grade inflammation including moderately increased serum levels of the acute phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA). In obesity, SAA is mainly produced from adipose tissue and serum levels of SAA are associated with insulin resistance. SAA has been described as a chemoattractant for inflammatory cells and adipose tissue from obese individuals contains increased numbers of macrophages. However, whether adipose tissue-derived SAA can have a direct impact on macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue or the development of insulin resistance is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of adipose tissue-derived SAA1 on the development of insulin resistance and obesity-related inflammation. We have previously established a transgenic mouse model expressing human SAA1 in the adipose tissue. For this report, hSAA1(+/-) transgenic mice and wild type mice were fed with a high fat diet or normal chow. Effects of hSAA1 on glucose metabolism were assessed using an oral glucose tolerance test. Real-time PCR was used to measure the mRNA levels of macrophage markers and genes related to insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue. Cytokines during inflammation were analyzed using a Proinflammatory 7-plex Assay. We found similar insulin and glucose levels in hSAA1 mice and wt controls during an oral glucose tolerance test and no decrease in mRNA levels of genes related to insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue in neither male nor female hSAA1 animals. Furthermore, serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines and mRNA levels of macrophage markers in adipose tissue were not increased in hSAA1 mice. Hence, in this model we find no evidence that adipose tissue-derived hSAA1 influences the development of insulin resistance or obesity-related inflammation.

  14. Diversity of arthropod community in transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D J; Lu, Z Y; Liu, J X; Li, C L; Yang, M S

    2015-12-02

    Poplar-cotton agro-ecosystems are the main agricultural planting modes of plain cotton fields in China. Here, we performed a systematic survey of the diversity and population of arthropod communities in four different combination of poplar-cotton eco-systems, including I) non-transgenic poplar and non-transgenic cotton fields; II) non-transgenic poplar and transgenic cotton fields [Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) cotton]; III) Bt transgenic poplar (high insect resistant strain Pb29) and non-transgenic cotton; and IV) transgenic poplar and transgenic cotton fields, over a period of 3 years. Based on the statistical methods used to investigate community ecology, the effects of transgenic ecosystems on the whole structure of the arthropod community, on the structure of arthropods in the nutritive layer, and on the similarity of arthropod communities were evaluated. The main results were as follows: the transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystem has a stronger inhibitory effect on insect pests and has no impact on the structure of the arthropod community, and therefore, maintains the diversity of the arthropod community. The character index of the community indicated that the structure of the arthropod community of the transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystem was better than that of the poplar-cotton ecosystem, and that system IV had the best structure. As for the abundance of nutritional classes, the transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystem was also better than that of the non-transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystem. The cluster analysis and similarity of arthropod communities between the four different transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystems illustrated that the structure of the arthropod community excelled in the small sample of the transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystems.

  15. Molecular Analyses of Transgenic Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trijatmiko, Kurniawan Rudi; Arines, Felichi Mae; Oliva, Norman; Slamet-Loedin, Inez Hortense; Kohli, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    One of the major challenges in plant molecular biology is to generate transgenic plants that express transgenes stably over generations. Here, we describe some routine methods to study transgene locus structure and to analyze transgene expression in plants: Southern hybridization using DIG chemiluminescent technology for characterization of transgenic locus, SYBR Green-based real-time RT-PCR to measure transgene transcript level, and protein immunoblot analysis to evaluate accumulation and stability of transgenic protein product in the target tissue.

  16. Overview of the investigation of transgenic plums in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic plums of Prunus domestica L. transformed with the Plum pox virus coat protein gene (PPV-CP) were the subjects of three experiments undertaken in Romania. In the first experiment, PPV-CP transgenic clones C2, C3, C4, C5, C6 and PT3 were evaluated for Sharka resistance under high natural i...

  17. Overview on the investigations of transgenic plums in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic plums of Prunus domestica L. transformed with the Plum pox virus coat protein gene (PPV-CP) were the subjects of three experiments undertaken in Romania. In the first experiment, PPV-CP transgenic clones C2, C3, C4, C5, C6, PT3 and PT5 were evaluated for Sharka resistance under high natu...

  18. Clean vector technology for marker-free transgenic fruit crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krens, F.A.; Pelgrom, K.T.B.; Schaart, J.G.; Nijs, den A.P.M.; Rouwendal, G.J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Marker-free transgenic crops confer several advantages over transgenic crops equipped with selection genes coding e.g. for antibiotic resistance. Firstly, the European Union has prepared a guidance document for risk assessment of GM-crops to be introduced in the environment (E.U. Joint Working Group

  19. Multiple transgene traits may create un-intended fitness effects in Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasingly, genetically modified crops are being developed to express multiple “stacked” traits for different types of transgenes, for example, herbicide resistance, insect resistance, crop quality and resistance to environmental factors. The release of crops that express mult...

  20. Production of transgenic pigs over-expressing the antiviral gene Mx1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanmei Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The myxovirus resistance gene (Mx1 has a broad spectrum of antiviral activities. It is therefore an interesting candidate gene to improve disease resistance in farm animals. In this study, we report the use of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT to produce transgenic pigs over-expressing the Mx1 gene. These transgenic pigs express approximately 15–25 times more Mx1 mRNA than non-transgenic pigs, and the protein level of Mx1 was also markedly enhanced. We challenged fibroblast cells isolated from the ear skin of transgenic and control pigs with influenza A virus and classical swine fever virus (CFSV. Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA revealed a profound decrease of influenza A proliferation in Mx1 transgenic cells. Growth kinetics showed an approximately 10-fold reduction of viral copies in the transgenic cells compared to non-transgenic controls. Additionally, we found that the Mx1 transgenic cells were more resistant to CSFV infection in comparison to non-transgenic cells. These results demonstrate that the Mx1 transgene can protect against viral infection in cells of transgenic pigs and indicate that the Mx1 transgene can be harnessed to develop disease-resistant pigs.

  1. In vivo RNA interference of BmNHR96 enhances the resistance of transgenic silkworm to BmNPV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ji-Gui; Liu, Tai-Hang; Dong, Xiao-Long; Wu, Yun-Fei; Zhang, Qian; Zhou, Liang; Chen, Peng; Lu, Cheng; Pan, Min-Hui

    2017-11-04

    We previously identified a nuclear hormone receptor gene, BmNHR96, which promotes Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) entry into silkworm cells. In an attempt to create an antiviral silkworm strain for better silk production, we used RNAi to downregulate BmNHR96 in silkworm larvae. We screened the resulting BmNHR96-RNAi silkworm strain (NHR) and also explored the antiviral mechanism in vivo. We found that the survival rate of the NHR strain was higher than that of the Dazao strain, when silkworm larvae were infected with BmNPV via oral ODV infection and BV injection. More importantly, the economic characteristics (silk yield) of the transgenic line remained unchanged. These findings reveal that RNAi of BmNHR96 could be an effective way to enhance the tolerance of B. mori to BmNPV infection. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Transgenic lilies via pollen mediated transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leede-Plegt, van der L.M.; Kronenburg-van de Ven, van B.C.E.; Franken, J.; Tuyl, van J.M.; Tunen, van A.J.; Dons, J.J.M.

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a procedure for the production of transgenic lilies by using the pollen grain as vector for DNA delivery. First, a particle gun was used for the introduction of the NPTII gene (for kanamycin resistance) into pollen of lily (Lilium longiflorum), cv ‘Gelria’. Subsequently the

  3. OPTIMAL BAND SELECTION OF HYPERSPECTRAL DATA FOR TRANSGENIC CORN IDENTIFICATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resistance development by insect pests to the insecticidal proteins expressed in transgenic crops would increase reliance on broad spectrum chemical insecticides subsequently reducing environmental quality and increasing worker exposure to toxic chemicals. An important component ...

  4. Primary transgenic bovine cells and their rejuvenated cloned equivalents show transgene-specific epigenetic differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-González, Lucia; Couldrey, Christine; Meinhardt, Marcus W; Cole, Sally A; Wells, David N; Laible, Götz

    2012-01-01

    Cell-mediated transgenesis, based on somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), provides the opportunity to shape the genetic make-up of cattle. Bovine primary fetal fibroblasts, commonly used cells for SCNT, have a limited lifespan, and complex genetic modifications that require sequential transfections can be challenging time and cost-wise. To overcome these limitations, SCNT is frequently used to rejuvenate the cell lines and restore exhausted growth potential. We have designed a construct to be used in a 2-step cassette exchange experiment. Our transgene contains a puromycin resistance marker gene and an enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) expression cassette, both driven by a strong mammalian promoter, and flanked by loxP sites and sequences from the bovine β-casein locus. Several transgenic cell lines were generated by random insertion into primary bovine cell lines. Two of these original cell lines were rederived by SCNT and new primary cells, with the same genetic makeup as the original donors, were established. While the original cell lines were puromycin-resistant and had a characteristic EGFP expression profile, all rejuvenated cell lines were sensitive to puromycin, and displayed varied EGFP expression, indicative of various degrees of silencing. When the methylation states of individual CpG sites within the transgene were analyzed, a striking increase in transgene-specific methylation was observed in all rederived cell lines. The results indicate that original transgenic donor cells and their rejuvenated derivatives may not be equivalent and differ in the functionality of their transgene sequences.

  5. Transgenic expression of the rice Xa21 pattern recognition receptor in banana (Musa sp.) confers resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathi, Jaindra Nath; Lorenzen, Jim; Bahar, Ofir; Ronald, Pamela; Tripathi, Leena

    2014-01-01

    Banana Xanthomonas wilt (BXW), caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum (Xcm), is the most devastating disease of banana in east and central Africa. The spread of BXW threatens the livelihood of millions of African farmers who depend on banana for food security and income. There are no commercial chemicals, bio-control agents or resistant cultivars available to control BXW. Here we take advantage of the robust resistance conferred by the rice pattern recognition receptor ...

  6. TaNAC1 acts as a negative regulator of stripe rust resistance in wheat, enhances susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae, and promotes lateral root development in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengtao; Lin, Ruiming; Feng, Jing; Chen, Wanquan; Qiu, Dewen; Xu, Shichang

    2015-01-01

    Plant-specific NAC transcription factors (TFs) constitute a large family and play important roles in regulating plant developmental processes and responses to environmental stresses, but only some of them have been investigated for effects on disease reaction in cereal crops. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is an effective strategy for rapid functional analysis of genes in plant tissues. In this study, TaNAC1, encoding a new member of the NAC1 subgroup, was cloned from bread wheat and characterized. It is a TF localized in the cell nucleus, and contains an activation domain in its C-terminal. TaNAC1 was strongly expressed in wheat roots and was involved in responses to infection by the obligate pathogen Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici and defense-related hormone treatments such as salicylic acid (SA), methyl jasmonate, and ethylene. Knockdown of TaNAC1 with barley stripe mosaic virus-induced gene silencing (BSMV-VIGS) enhanced stripe rust resistance. TaNAC1-overexpression in Arabidopsis thaliana plants gave enhanced susceptibility, attenuated systemic-acquired resistance to Pseudomonas syringae DC3000, and promoted lateral root development. Jasmonic acid-signaling pathway genes PDF1.2 and ORA59 were constitutively expressed in transgenic plants. TaNAC1 overexpression suppressed the expression levels of resistance-related genes PR1 and PR2 involved in SA signaling and AtWRKY70, which functions as a connection node between the JA- and SA-signaling pathways. Collectively, TaNAC1 is a novel NAC member of the NAC1 subgroup, negatively regulates plant disease resistance, and may modulate plant JA- and SA-signaling defense cascades.

  7. TaNAC1 acts as a negative regulator of stripe rust resistance in wheat, enhances susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae, and promotes lateral root development in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengtao eWang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant-specific NAC transcription factors constitute a large family and play important roles in regulating plant developmental processes and responses to environmental stresses, but only some of them have been investigated for effects on disease reaction in cereal crops. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS is an effective strategy for rapid functional analysis of genes in plant tissues. In this study, TaNAC1, encoding a new member of the NAC1 subgroup, was cloned from bread wheat and characterized. It is a transcription factor localized in the cell nucleus, and contains an activation domain in its C-terminal. TaNAC1 was strongly expressed in wheat roots and was involved in responses to infection by the obligate pathogen Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici and defense-related hormone treatments such as salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate and ethylene. Knockdown of TaNAC1 with barley stripe mosaic virus-induced gene silencing (BSMV-VIGS enhanced stripe rust resistance. TaNAC1-overexpression in Arabidopsis plants gave enhanced susceptibility, attenuated systemic-acquired resistance to Pseudomonas syringae DC3000, and promoted lateral root development. Jasmonic acid-signaling pathway genes PDF1.2 and ORA59 were constitutively expressed in transgenic plants. TaNAC1 overexpression suppressed the expression levels of resistance-related genes PR1 and PR2 involved in SA signaling and AtWRKY70, which functions as a connection node between the JA- and SA-signaling pathways. Collectively, TaNAC1 is a novel NAC member of the NAC1 subgroup, negatively regulates plant disease resistance, and may modulate plant JA- and SA-signaling defense cascades.

  8. Effects of refuges on the evolution of resistance to transgenic corn by the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deitloff, Jennifer; Dunbar, Mike W; Ingber, David A; Hibbard, Bruce E; Gassmann, Aaron J

    2016-01-01

    Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte is a major pest of corn and causes over a billion dollars of economic loss annually through yield reductions and management costs. Corn producing toxins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) has been developed to help manage D. v. virgifera. However, previous studies have demonstrated the ability of this species to evolve resistance to Bt toxins in both laboratory and field settings. We used an experimental evolution approach to test the refuge strategies for delaying resistance of D. v. virgifera to corn producing Bt toxin Cry34/35Ab1. In the absence of refuges, D. v. virgifera developed resistance to Bt corn after three generations of selection. In some cases, non-Bt refuges reduced the level of resistance compared with the strain selected in the absence of refuges, but refuge strains did show reduced susceptibility to Bt corn compared with the unselected strain. In this study, non-Bt refuges delayed resistance to Bt corn by D. v. virgifera in some cases but not others. Combining the refuge strategy with pyramids of multiple Bt toxins and applying other pest management strategies will likely be necessary to delay resistance of D. v. virgifera to Bt corn. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. BNYVV-derived dsRNA confers resistance to rhizomania disease of sugar beet as evidenced by a novel transgenic hairy root approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavli, R.; Panopoulos, N.J.; Goldbach, R.W.; Skaracis, G.N.

    2010-01-01

    Agrobacterium rhizogenes-transformed sugar beet hairy roots, expressing dsRNA from the Beet necrotic yellow vein virus replicase gene, were used as a novel approach to assess the efficacy of three intron-hairpin constructs at conferring resistance to rhizomania disease. Genetically engineered roots

  10. Arabidopsis genes, AtNPR1, AtTGA2 and AtPR-5, confer partial resistance to soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) when overexpressed in transgenic soybean roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Benjamin F; Beard, Hunter; Brewer, Eric; Kabir, Sara; MacDonald, Margaret H; Youssef, Reham M

    2014-04-16

    Extensive studies using the model system Arabidopsis thaliana to elucidate plant defense signaling and pathway networks indicate that salicylic acid (SA) is the key hormone triggering the plant defense response against biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic pathogens, while jasmonic acid (JA) and derivatives are critical to the defense response against necrotrophic pathogens. Several reports demonstrate that SA limits nematode reproduction. Here we translate knowledge gained from studies using Arabidopsis to soybean. The ability of thirty-one Arabidopsis genes encoding important components of SA and JA synthesis and signaling in conferring resistance to soybean cyst nematode (SCN: Heterodera glycines) are investigated. We demonstrate that overexpression of three of thirty-one Arabidoposis genes in transgenic soybean roots of composite plants decreased the number of cysts formed by SCN to less than 50% of those found on control roots, namely AtNPR1(33%), AtTGA2 (38%), and AtPR-5 (38%). Three additional Arabidopsis genes decreased the number of SCN cysts by 40% or more: AtACBP3 (53% of the control value), AtACD2 (55%), and AtCM-3 (57%). Other genes having less or no effect included AtEDS5 (77%), AtNDR1 (82%), AtEDS1 (107%), and AtPR-1 (80%), as compared to control. Overexpression of AtDND1 greatly increased susceptibility as indicated by a large increase in the number of SCN cysts (175% of control). Knowledge of the pathogen defense system gained from studies of the model system, Arabidopsis, can be directly translated to soybean through direct overexpression of Arabidopsis genes. When the genes, AtNPR1, AtGA2, and AtPR-5, encoding specific components involved in SA regulation, synthesis, and signaling, are overexpressed in soybean roots, resistance to SCN is enhanced. This demonstrates functional compatibility of some Arabidopsis genes with soybean and identifies genes that may be used to engineer resistance to nematodes.

  11. [Effects of mepiquat chloride on inorganic elements contents in seeds of transgenic insect-resistant cotton determined by ICP-MS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xi-Feng; Tian, Xiao-Li; Li, Zhao-Hu; He, Zhong-Pei; Zhai, Zhi-Xi; Duan, Liu-Sheng

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of a worldwide used plant growth regulator mepiquat chloride on the nutrition value and safety of seeds of transgenic Bt cotton, inorganic element components and contents in seeds of Bt cotton (Gossypium hirsutum cv. Guoxin 6) under field condition were determined using ICP-MS. In Bt cotton seeds, 54 kinds of inorganic elements were identified by ICP-MS, and 5 kinds of major elements, K, P, Mg, Ca and Na, were in range from 138.3 to 13,835.1 microg x g(-1). The contents of 14 kinds of microelements were determined as in descending order of Si, B, Mn, Sr, Zn, Ni, Cu, Mo, Fe, Co, Se, V, I and Sn, in the range from 14.2 ng x g(-1) to 81.7 microg x g(-1). Five kinds of heavy metals were detected with the contents from 0.14 to 55.3 ng x g(-1), and their order from high to low is Pb, Cd, Cr, As and Hg. Other 30 kinds of elements were also detected in Bt cotton seeds by ICP-MS, including Rb, Be, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Ge, Rh, Ag, Sb, W, U and Y. Foliar application of mepiquat chloride significantly reduced the contents of Ca, Fe, Si, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu and I, and remarkably decreased heavy metals Pb, Cd and Cr in the cotton seeds, by 68%, 67% and 54% respectively. While mepiquat chloride did not change the contents of most major and micro elements, it heightened 8 kinds, but lowered 7 kinds of the other 30 trace elements. This research indicated that mepiquat chloride application strengthened the security regarding the cotton seed as the material of cooking oil.

  12. VuDREB2A, a novel DREB2-type transcription factor in the drought-tolerant legume cowpea, mediates DRE-dependent expression of stress-responsive genes and confers enhanced drought resistance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhukhan, Ayan; Kobayashi, Yasufumi; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Tokizawa, Mutsutomo; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y; Iuchi, Satoshi; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Panda, Sanjib Kumar; Sahoo, Lingaraj

    2014-09-01

    VuDREB2A exists in cowpea as a canonical DREB2-type transcription factor, having the ability to bind dehydration-responsive elements in vitro and confer enhanced drought resistance in transgenic Arabidopsis. Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp) is an important cultivated legume that can survive better in arid conditions than other crops. But the molecular mechanisms involved in the drought tolerance of this species remain elusive with very few reported candidate genes. The Dehydration-Responsive Element-Binding Protein2 (DREB2) group of transcription factors plays key roles in plant responses to drought. However, no DREB2 ortholog has been reported from cowpea so far. In this study, we isolated and characterized a gene from cowpea, namely VuDREB2A, encoding a protein of 377 amino acids exhibiting features of reported DREB2-type proteins. In cowpea, VuDREB2A transcript accumulation was highly induced by desiccation, heat and salt, but slightly by exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) treatment. We also isolated the VuDREB2A promoter and predicted stress-responsive cis-elements in it using Arabidopsis microarray data. The E. coli-expressed VuDREB2A protein showed binding to synthetic oligonucleotides with Dehydration-Responsive Elements (DREs) from Arabidopsis, in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Heterologous expression of VuDREB2A in Arabidopsis significantly improved plant survival under drought. In addition, overexpression of a truncated version of VuDREB2A, after removal of a putative negative regulatory domain (between amino acids 132-182) led to a dwarf phenotype in the transgenic plants. Microarray and quantitative PCR analyses of VuDREB2A overexpressing Arabidopsis revealed up-regulation of stress-responsive genes having DRE overrepresented in their promoters. In summary, our results indicate that VuDREB2A conserves the basic functionality and mode of regulation of DREB2A in Arabidopsis and could be a potent candidate gene for the genetic improvement of drought

  13. THE TRIAL OF TRANSGENICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio f. Díaz García

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper discloses the uncertainty with which transgenic uses are authorized.  It provides a list of reasons showing that there is no absolute proof of the benefits of transgenic use.  Moreover it discusses the need to provide more credibility to safety studies and reports on results of various tests of GMOs.  Finally it proposes the establishment of higher penalties for specialists that omit relevant information in their studies and reports on this matter.

  14. Role of the 25-26 nt siRNA in the resistance of transgenic Prunus domestica graft inoculated with plum pox virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Jiban Kumar; Briard, Pascal; Hily, Jean Michel; Ravelonandro, Michel; Scorza, Ralph

    2008-02-01

    The reaction of a genetically engineered plum clone (C5) resistant to plum pox virus (PPV) by graft inoculation with the virus was evaluated. The resistance in this clone has been demonstrated to be mediated through post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). A single C5 plant out of 30 plants inoculated with PPV M strain by double chip-budding showed mild diffuse mosaic 'Sharka' symptom at the bottom section of the scion. The upper leaves of this PPV-infected C5 plant remained symptomless and the virus was not detected in them by either DAS-ELISA or RT-PCR. An RNA silencing associated small interfering RNA duplex, siRNA (21-26 nt), was detected in non-inoculated C5 plants and in the portions of inoculated C5 plant in which PPV could not be detected. In the PPV-infected portion of the C5 plant and in C6 PPV susceptible plants only the approximately 21-22 nt siRNAs was detected. Cytosine-methylation was confirmed in C5 plants both uninfected and showing PPV symptoms. The 25-26 nt siRNA normally present in C5 was absent in PPV-infected C5 tissues confirming the critical role of this siRNA in the resistance of clone C5 to PPV infection. We also show that this PPV infection was limited and transient. It was only detected in one plant at one of four post-dormancy sampling dates and did not appear to affect the overall PPV resistance of the C5 clone.

  15. Transgenic Nicotiana tabacum cultivar Samsun plants carrying the wild sugar beet Hs1pro1 gene have resistance to root-knot nematodes

    OpenAIRE

    SÖNMEZ, Çağla; ELEKCİOĞLU, İbrahim Halil; YÜCEL, Ayşe Meral; Öktem, Hüseyin Avni

    2014-01-01

    Nematodes are the principal animal parasites of plants, causing annual crop losses of more than US100 billion worldwide. Conventional control measures against nematode infection include toxic nematicide application to soil, crop rotation practices, and classical breeding approaches. However, due to the limitations of each technique, biotechnology presents itself as an effective alternative in nematode control. To date, several resistance genes against nematodes have been cloned. One such gene...

  16. Papaya ringspot virus-P: characteristics, pathogenicity, sequence variability and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Savarni; Suzuki, Jon Y; Ferreira, Stephen A; Gonsalves, Dennis

    2008-05-01

    Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) is an aphid-transmitted plant virus belonging to the genus Potyvirus, family Potyviridae, with a positive sense RNA genome. PRSV isolates belong to either one of two major strains, P or W. The P strains infect both papaya and cucurbits whereas the W strains infect only cucurbits. PRSV-P is found in all major papaya-growing areas. Virions are filamentous, non-enveloped and flexuous measuring 760-800 x 12 nm. Virus particles contain 94.5% protein and 5.5% nucleic acid. The protein component consists of the virus coat protein (CP), which has a molecular weight of about 36 kDa as estimated by Western blot analysis. Density of the sedimenting component in purified PRSV preparations is 1.32 g/cm(3) in CsCl. The PRSV genome consists of a unipartite linear single-stranded positive sense RNA of 10 326 nucleotides with a 5' terminus, genome-linked protein, VPg. The virus is naturally transmitted via aphids in a non-persistent manner. Both the CP and helper component (HC-Pro) are required for vector transmission. This virus can also be transmitted mechanically, and is typically not seed-transmitted. PRSV has a limited number of hosts belonging to the families Caricaceae, Chenopodiaceae and Cucurbitaceae. Propagation hosts are: Carica papaya, Cucurbita pepo and Cucumis metuliferus cv. accession 2459. Local lesion assay hosts are: Chenopodium quinoa and Chenopodium amaranticolor. Two transgenic papaya varieties, Rainbow and SunUp, with engineered resistance to PRSV have been commercially grown in Hawaii since 1998. Besides transgenic resistance, tolerant varieties, cross-protection and other cultural practices such as isolation and rogueing of infected plants are used to manage the disease. 00.057.0.01.045. 57010045. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ICTVdb/ICTVdB/57010045.htm.

  17. Biotechnology: herbicide-resistant crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic, herbicide-resistant (HR) crops are planted on about 80% of the land covered by transgenic crops. More than 90% of HR crios are glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, the others being resistant to glufosinate. The wide-scale adoption of HR crops, largely for economic reasons, has been the mos...

  18. Transgenic Brassica rapa plants over-expressing eIF(iso)4E variants show broad-spectrum Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinhee; Kang, Won-Hee; Hwang, Jeena; Yang, Hee-Bum; Dosun, Kim; Oh, Chang-Sik; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2014-08-01

    The protein-protein interaction between VPg (viral protein genome-linked) of potyviruses and eIF4E (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E) or eIF(iso)4E of their host plants is a critical step in determining viral virulence. In this study, we evaluated the approach of engineering broad-spectrum resistance in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa) to Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV), which is one of the most important potyviruses, by a systematic knowledge-based approach to interrupt the interaction between TuMV VPg and B. rapa eIF(iso)4E. The seven amino acids in the cap-binding pocket of eIF(iso)4E were selected on the basis of other previous results and comparison of protein models of cap-binding pockets, and mutated. Yeast two-hybrid assay and co-immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that W95L, K150L and W95L/K150E amino acid mutations of B. rapa eIF(iso)4E interrupted its interaction with TuMV VPg. All eIF(iso)4E mutants were able to complement an eIF4E-knockout yeast strain, indicating that the mutated eIF(iso)4E proteins retained their function as a translational initiation factor. To determine whether these mutations could confer resistance, eIF(iso)4E W95L, W95L/K150E and eIF(iso)4E wild-type were over-expressed in a susceptible Chinese cabbage cultivar. Evaluation of the TuMV resistance of T1 and T2 transformants demonstrated that the over-expression of the eIF(iso)4E mutant forms can confer resistance to multiple TuMV strains. These data demonstrate the utility of knowledge-based approaches for the engineering of broad-spectrum resistance in Chinese cabbage. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  19. Transgenic plants with increased calcium stores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah (Inventor); Tsou, Pei-Lan (Inventor); Robertson, Dominique (Inventor); Boss, Wendy (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides transgenic plants over-expressing a transgene encoding a calcium-binding protein or peptide (CaBP). Preferably, the CaBP is a calcium storage protein and over-expression thereof does not have undue adverse effects on calcium homeostasis or biochemical pathways that are regulated by calcium. In preferred embodiments, the CaBP is calreticulin (CRT) or calsequestrin. In more preferred embodiments, the CaBP is the C-domain of CRT, a fragment of the C-domain, or multimers of the foregoing. In other preferred embodiments, the CaBP is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum by operatively associating the transgene encoding the CaBP with an endoplasmic reticulum localization peptide. Alternatively, the CaBP is targeted to any other sub-cellular compartment that permits the calcium to be stored in a form that is biologically available to the plant. Also provided are methods of producing plants with desirable phenotypic traits by transformation of the plant with a transgene encoding a CaBP. Such phenotypic traits include increased calcium storage, enhanced resistance to calcium-limiting conditions, enhanced growth and viability, increased disease and stress resistance, enhanced flower and fruit production, reduced senescence, and a decreased need for fertilizer production. Further provided are plants with enhanced nutritional value as human food or animal feed.

  20. Accumulation of transgene-derived siRNAs is not sufficient for RNAi-mediated protection against Citrus tristeza virus in transgenic Mexican lime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Carmelo; Cervera, Magdalena; Fagoaga, Carmen; Moreno, Pedro; Navarro, Luis; Flores, Ricardo; Peña, Leandro

    2010-01-01

    Mexican lime plants transformed with the 3'-terminal 549 nucleotides of the Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) genome in sense, antisense and intron-hairpin formats were analysed for transgene-derived transcript and short interfering RNA (siRNA) accumulation, and for CTV resistance. Propagations from all sense, antisense and empty-vector transgenic lines were susceptible to CTV, except for a single sense-line plant with a complex transgene integration pattern that showed transgene-derived siRNAs in association with low levels of the transgene-derived transcript. In contrast, nine of 30 intron-hairpin lines showed CTV resistance, with 9%-56% of bud-propagated plants, depending on the line, remaining uninfected on graft inoculation, and the others being susceptible. Although resistance was always associated with the presence of transgene-derived siRNAs, their level in different sense and intron-hairpin transformants was variable irrespective of the response to CTV infection. In intron-hairpin lines with single transgene integration, CTV resistance was correlated with low accumulation of the transgene-derived transcript rather than with high accumulation of transgene-derived siRNAs.

  1. Mutant PIK3CA accelerates HER2-driven transgenic mammary tumors and induces resistance to combinations of anti-HER2 therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanker, Ariella B.; Pfefferle, Adam D.; Balko, Justin M.; Kuba, María Gabriela; Young, Christian D.; Sánchez, Violeta; Sutton, Cammie R.; Cheng, Hailing; Perou, Charles M.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2013-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2; ERBB2) amplification and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) mutations often co-occur in breast cancer. Aberrant activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway has been shown to correlate with a diminished response to HER2-directed therapies. We generated a mouse model of HER2-overexpressing (HER2+), PIK3CAH1047R-mutant breast cancer. Mice expressing both human HER2 and mutant PIK3CA in the mammary epithelium developed tumors with shorter latencies compared with mice expressing either oncogene alone. HER2 and mutant PIK3CA also cooperated to promote lung metastases. By microarray analysis, HER2-driven tumors clustered with luminal breast cancers, whereas mutant PIK3CA tumors were associated with claudin-low breast cancers. PIK3CA and HER2+/PIK3CA tumors expressed elevated transcripts encoding markers of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and stem cells. Cells from HER2+/PIK3CA tumors more efficiently formed mammospheres and lung metastases. Finally, HER2+/PIK3CA tumors were resistant to trastuzumab alone and in combination with lapatinib or pertuzumab. Both drug resistance and enhanced mammosphere formation were reversed by treatment with a PI3K inhibitor. In sum, PIK3CAH1047R accelerates HER2-mediated breast epithelial transformation and metastatic progression, alters the intrinsic phenotype of HER2-overexpressing cancers, and generates resistance to approved combinations of anti-HER2 therapies. PMID:23940356

  2. Herbicide-tolerant Transgenic Soybean over 15 Years of Cultivation: Pesticide Use, Weed Resistance, and Some Economic Issues. The Case of the USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Bonny

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Genetically modified (GM herbicide-tolerant (HT crops have been largely adopted where they have been authorized. Nevertheless, they are fiercely criticized by some, notably because of the herbicide use associated with them. However, how much herbicide is applied to GMHT crops compared to conventional crops, and what impacts does the use of herbicide have? The paper first presents some factors explaining the predominance of GMHT crops. Then, trends in the use of herbicide for GM crops are studied in the case of the most widespread HT crop: HT soybean in the USA. The trends in the toxicity of herbicides applied to HT soybean are also addressed, as well as the appearance of glyphosate-resistant (GR weeds. Lastly, the paper examines the spread of GR weeds and its impact. How are farmers, weed scientists, and the industry coping with this development, and what are the prospects of glyphosate-tolerant crops given weed resistance? In conclusion, some issues of sustainability and innovation governance raised by genetically modified herbicide-tolerant crops are discussed.

  3. Phytoremediation with transgenic trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peuke, A.D.; Rennenberg, H. [Inst. fuer Forstbotanik und Baumphysiologie, Professur fuer Baumphysiologie, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany)

    2005-04-01

    In the present paper actual trends in the use of transgenic trees for phytoremediation of contaminated soils are reviewed. In this context a current field trial in which transgenic poplars with enhanced GSH synthesis and hence elevated capacity for phytochelatin production are compared with wildtype plants for the removal of heavy metals at different levels of contamination and under different climatic conditions. The studies are carried out with grey poplar (Populus tremula x P. alba), wildtype plants and plants overexpressing the gene for {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gshI) from E. coli in the cytosol. The expression of this gene in poplar leads to two- to four-fold enhanced GSH concentrations in the leaves. In greenhouse experiments under controlled conditions these transgenic poplars showed a high potential for uptake and detoxification of heavy metals and pesticides. This capacity is evaluated in field experiments. Further aims of the project are to elucidate (a) the stability of the transgene under field conditions and (b) the possibility of horizontal gene transfer to microorganisms in the rhizosphere. The results will help to assess the biosafety risk of the use of transgenic poplar for phytoremediation of soils. (orig.)

  4. Transgene mus som sygdomsmodeller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuster, Mikkel Bruhn; Porse, Bo Torben

    2003-01-01

    Transgenic animal models have proven to be useful tools in understanding both basic biology and the events associated with disease. Recent technical advances in the area of genomic manipulation in combination with the availability of the human and murine genomic sequences now allow the precise ta...... tailoring of the mouse genome. In this review we describe a few systems in which transgenic animal models have been employed for the purpose of studying the etiology of human diseases. Udgivelsesdato: 2003-Feb-17......Transgenic animal models have proven to be useful tools in understanding both basic biology and the events associated with disease. Recent technical advances in the area of genomic manipulation in combination with the availability of the human and murine genomic sequences now allow the precise...

  5. Transgenic plants as vital components of integrated pest management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kos, Martine; van Loon, J.J.A.; Dicke, M.; Vet, L.E.M.

    2009-01-01

    Although integrated pest management (IPM) strategies have been developed worldwide, further improvement of IPM effectiveness is required. The use of transgenic technology to create insect-resistant plants can offer a solution to the limited availability of highly insect-resistant cultivars.

  6. Transgenic technology adoption and on-farm varietal diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Krishna, Vijesh V.; Zilberman, David; Qaim, Matin

    2009-01-01

    Transgenic pest-resistant varieties are hypothesized to reduce farmers’ demand for on-farm diversity through an act of substitution, as both serve as production risk reducing instruments. This adverse agro-biodiversity impact of technology adoption might be partially counteracted by an expanding seed sector, supplying a large number of transgenic varieties. The case of Bt cotton in India is taken for empirical illustration. The production function analyses show that both Bt technology and on-...

  7. Glyphosate-drift but not herbivory alters the rate of transgene flow from single and stacked trait transgenic canola (Brassica napus) to nontransgenic B. napus and B. rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londo, Jason P; Bollman, Michael A; Sagers, Cynthia L; Lee, E Henry; Watrud, Lidia S

    2011-08-01

    Transgenic plants can offer agricultural benefits, but the escape of transgenes is an environmental concern. In this study we tested the hypothesis that glyphosate drift and herbivory selective pressures can change the rate of transgene flow between the crop Brassica napus (canola), and weedy species and contribute to the potential for increased transgene escape risk and persistence outside of cultivation. • We constructed plant communities containing single transgenic B. napus genotypes expressing glyphosate herbicide resistance (CP4 EPSPS), lepidopteran insect resistance (Cry1Ac), or both traits ('stacked'), plus nontransgenic B. napus, Brassica rapa and Brassica nigra. Two different selective pressures, a sublethal glyphosate dose and lepidopteran herbivores (Plutella xylostella), were applied and rates of transgene flow and transgenic seed production were measured. • Selective treatments differed in the degree in which they affected gene flow and production of transgenic hybrid seed. Most notably, glyphosate-drift increased the incidence of transgenic seeds on nontransgenic B. napus by altering flowering phenology and reproductive function. • The findings of this study indicate that transgenic traits may be transmitted to wild populations and may increase in frequency in weedy populations through the direct and indirect effects of selection pressures on gene flow. No claim to original US government works. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  8. Transgenic sorghum plants via microprojectile bombardment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, A M; Kononowicz, A K; Zehr, U B; Tomes, D T; Axtell, J D; Butler, L G; Bressan, R A; Hasegawa, P M

    1993-12-01

    Transgenic sorghum plants have been obtained after microprojectile bombardment of immature zygotic embryos of a drought-resistant sorghum cultivar, P898012. DNA delivery parameters were optimized based on transient expression of R and C1 maize anthocyanin regulatory elements in scutellar cells. The protocol for obtaining transgenic plants consists of the delivery of the bar gene to immature zygotic embryos and the imposition of bialaphos selection pressure at various stages during culture, from induction of somatic embryogenesis to rooting of regenerated plantlets. One in about every 350 embryos produced embryogenic tissues that survived bialaphos treatment; six transformed callus lines were obtained from three of the eight sorghum cultivars used in this research. Transgenic (T0) plants were obtained from cultivar P898012 (two independent transformation events). The presence of the bar and uidA genes in the T0 plants was confirmed by Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA. Phosphinothricin acetyltransferase activity was detected in extracts of the T0 plants. These plants were resistant to local application of the herbicide Ignite/Basta, and the resistance was inherited in T1 plants as a single dominant locus.

  9. Arabidopsis genes, AtNPR1, AtTGA2 and AtPR-5, confer partial resistance to soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) when overexpressed in transgenic soybean roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Extensive studies using the model system Arabidopsis thaliana to elucidate plant defense signaling and pathway networks indicate that salicylic acid (SA) is the key hormone triggering the plant defense response against biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic pathogens, while jasmonic acid (JA) and derivatives are critical to the defense response against necrotrophic pathogens. Several reports demonstrate that SA limits nematode reproduction. Results Here we translate knowledge gained from studies using Arabidopsis to soybean. The ability of thirty-one Arabidopsis genes encoding important components of SA and JA synthesis and signaling in conferring resistance to soybean cyst nematode (SCN: Heterodera glycines) are investigated. We demonstrate that overexpression of three of thirty-one Arabidoposis genes in transgenic soybean roots of composite plants decreased the number of cysts formed by SCN to less than 50% of those found on control roots, namely AtNPR1(33%), AtTGA2 (38%), and AtPR-5 (38%). Three additional Arabidopsis genes decreased the number of SCN cysts by 40% or more: AtACBP3 (53% of the control value), AtACD2 (55%), and AtCM-3 (57%). Other genes having less or no effect included AtEDS5 (77%), AtNDR1 (82%), AtEDS1 (107%), and AtPR-1 (80%), as compared to control. Overexpression of AtDND1 greatly increased susceptibility as indicated by a large increase in the number of SCN cysts (175% of control). Conclusions Knowledge of the pathogen defense system gained from studies of the model system, Arabidopsis, can be directly translated to soybean through direct overexpression of Arabidopsis genes. When the genes, AtNPR1, AtGA2, and AtPR-5, encoding specific components involved in SA regulation, synthesis, and signaling, are overexpressed in soybean roots, resistance to SCN is enhanced. This demonstrates functional compatibility of some Arabidopsis genes with soybean and identifies genes that may be used to engineer resistance to nematodes. PMID:24739302

  10. Evidence for Field-Evolved Resistance of Striacosta albicosta (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) to Cry1F Bacillus thuringiensis Protein and Transgenic Corn Hybrids in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J L; Lepping, M D; Rule, D M; Farhan, Y; Schaafsma, A W

    2017-10-01

    Western bean cutworm, Striacosta albicosta (Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is a pest of corn (Zea mays L.) that has recently expanded its range into Ontario, Canada. Control of S. albicosta damage to corn hybrids containing event TC1507-expressing Cry1F Bacillus thuringiensis protein alone or pyramided with event MON 89034 expressing Cry1A.105 and Cry2Ab2 Bt proteins was tested in 2011-2015 in Ontario in small- and large-scale field plots with natural infestation. In 2011, significantly lower incidence and severity of kernel damage was sustained by Cry1F × Cry1A.105 + Cry2Ab2 corn compared with a non-Bt near-isogenic hybrid. However, from 2012 to 2015, there was no difference in incidence or severity of damage comparing non-Bt hybrids with Cry1F hybrids alone or pyramided with Cry1A.105 and Cry2Ab2 planted as a pure stand or with an integrated refuge (95% Bt: 5% non-Bt seeds). In 2015, neonate larvae derived from Ontario field-collections were tested in concentration-response diet-overlay bioassays with lyophilized Cry1F protein at concentrations up to 75 µg cm-2. The concentrations at which mortality of 50% (LC50) of the collections occurred ranged from approximately 10 µg cm-2 (F0) to >28 µg cm-2 (F1) in a 7-d bioassay, indicating relative insensitivity to Cry1F. Results from field experiments, laboratory bioassays, and the history of exposure to Cry1F in corn show that S. albicosta in Ontario are not controlled by Cry1F-expressing corn hybrids and provide evidence for the conclusion that the evolution of resistance to Cry1F has occurred. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Dissociation between transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) infectivity and proteinase K-resistant PrP(Sc) levels in peripheral tissue from a murine transgenic model of TSE disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobie, Karen; Barron, Rona

    2013-05-01

    Most current diagnostic tests for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) rely on the presence of proteinase K (PK)-resistant PrP(Sc) (PrP-res) in postmortem tissues as an indication of TSE disease. However, a number of studies have highlighted a discrepancy between TSE infectivity and PrP-res levels in both natural and experimental cases of TSE disease. Previously, we have shown high TSE infectivity levels in the brain tissue of mice that have a clinical TSE disease with associated vacuolar pathology but little or no detectable PrP-res. Here, the levels of TSE infectivity and PrP-res within a peripheral tissue of this mouse model were investigated. Biochemical analysis showed that low levels of PrP-res were present in the spleen tissue in comparison to the levels observed in the spleen of mice infected with ME7 or 79A. However, upon subpassage of brain and spleen tissue from clinically ill mice with little or no PrP-res detectable, similar short incubation periods to disease were observed, indicating that infectivity levels were similarly high in both tissues. Thus, the discrepancy between PrP-res and TSE infectivity was also present in the peripheral tissues of this disease model. This result indicates that peripheral tissues can contain higher levels of infectivity given the correct combination of host species, PrP genotype, and TSE agent. Therefore, the assumption that the levels of peripheral infectivity are lower than those in the central nervous system is not always correct, and this could have implications for current food safety regulations.

  12. Transgenics in Agriculture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 2. Transgenics in Agriculture. D Rex Arunraj B Gajendra Babu. Classroom Volume 6 Issue 2 February 2001 pp 83-92. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/02/0083-0092 ...

  13. Primary transgenic bovine cells and their rejuvenated cloned equivalents show transgene-specific epigenetic differences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Alonso-González

    Full Text Available Cell-mediated transgenesis, based on somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT, provides the opportunity to shape the genetic make-up of cattle. Bovine primary fetal fibroblasts, commonly used cells for SCNT, have a limited lifespan, and complex genetic modifications that require sequential transfections can be challenging time and cost-wise. To overcome these limitations, SCNT is frequently used to rejuvenate the cell lines and restore exhausted growth potential. We have designed a construct to be used in a 2-step cassette exchange experiment. Our transgene contains a puromycin resistance marker gene and an enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP expression cassette, both driven by a strong mammalian promoter, and flanked by loxP sites and sequences from the bovine β-casein locus. Several transgenic cell lines were generated by random insertion into primary bovine cell lines. Two of these original cell lines were rederived by SCNT and new primary cells, with the same genetic makeup as the original donors, were established. While the original cell lines were puromycin-resistant and had a characteristic EGFP expression profile, all rejuvenated cell lines were sensitive to puromycin, and displayed varied EGFP expression, indicative of various degrees of silencing. When the methylation states of individual CpG sites within the transgene were analyzed, a striking increase in transgene-specific methylation was observed in all rederived cell lines. The results indicate that original transgenic donor cells and their rejuvenated derivatives may not be equivalent and differ in the functionality of their transgene sequences.

  14. Several methods to detect the inheritance and resistance to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Majority of the transgenic plants had only a single copy of the inserted CryIA(c) gene. Leaf section bioassays showed that resistance against larvae of diamondback moth in CryIA(c) transgenic cabbage was significantly enhanced. The inheritance patterns of the transgene in T1 offspring of transgenic cabbage were ...

  15. Several methods to detect the inheritance and resistance to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-17

    Jun 17, 2009 ... Majority of the transgenic plants had only a single copy of the inserted CryIA(c) gene. Leaf section bioassays showed that resistance against larvae of diamondback moth in CryIA(c) transgenic cabbage was significantly enhanced. The inheritance patterns of the transgene in T1 offspring of transgenic.

  16. Physicochemical and biochemical characterization of transgenic papaya modified for protection against Papaya ringspot virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Madeen; Minott, Donna A; Pinnock, Simone; Tennant, Paula F; Jackson, Jose C

    2014-03-30

    Papaya, a nutritious tropical fruit, is consumed both in its fresh form and as a processed product worldwide. Major quality indices which include firmness, acidity, pH, colour and size, are cultivar dependent. Transgenic papayas engineered for resistance to Papaya ringspot virus were evaluated over the ripening period to address physicochemical quality attributes and food safety concerns. With the exception of one transgenic line, no significant differences (P > 0.05) were observed in firmness, acidity and pH. Lightness (L*) and redness (a*) of the pulps of non-transgenic and transgenic papaya were similar but varied over the ripening period (P Transgene proteins, CP and NPTII, were not detected in fruit pulp at the table-ready stage. The findings suggest that transformation did not produce any major unintended alterations in the physicochemical attributes of the transgenic papayas. Transgene proteins in the edible fruit pulp were low or undetectable. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Molecular and functional characterization of cry1Ac transgenic pea lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teressa Negawo, Alemayehu; Baranek, Linda; Jacobsen, Hans-Jörg; Hassan, Fathi

    2016-10-01

    Transgenic pea lines transformed with the cry1Ac gene were characterized at molecular (PCR, RT-PCR, qRT-PCR and immunostrip assay) and functional levels (leaf paint and insect feeding bioassays). The results showed the presence, expression, inheritance and functionality of the introduced transgene at different progeny levels. Variation in the expression of the cry1Ac gene was observed among the different transgenic lines. In the insect bioassay studies using the larvae of Heliothis virescens, both larval survival and plant damage were highly affected on the different transgenic plants. Up to 100 % larval mortality was observed on the transgenic plants compared to 17.42 % on control plants. Most of the challenged transgenic plants showed very negligible to substantially reduced feeding damage indicating the insect resistance of the developed transgenic lines. Further analysis under field condition will be required to select promising lines for future uses.

  18. Improved nutritive quality and salt resistance in transgenic maize by simultaneously overexpression of a natural lysine-rich protein gene, SBgLR, and an ERF transcription factor gene, TSRF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meizhen; Liu, Chen; Li, Shixue; Zhu, Dengyun; Zhao, Qian; Yu, Jingjuan

    2013-04-29

    Maize (Zea mays L.), as one of the most important crops in the world, is deficient in lysine and tryptophan. Environmental conditions greatly impact plant growth, development and productivity. In this study, we used particle bombardment mediated co-transformation to obtain marker-free transgenic maize inbred X178 lines harboring a lysine-rich protein gene SBgLR from potato and an ethylene responsive factor (ERF) transcription factor gene, TSRF1, from tomato. Both of the target genes were successfully expressed and showed various expression levels in different transgenic lines. Analysis showed that the protein and lysine content in T1 transgenic maize seeds increased significantly. Compared to non-transformed maize, the protein and lysine content increased by 7.7% to 24.38% and 8.70% to 30.43%, respectively. Moreover, transgenic maize exhibited more tolerance to salt stress. When treated with 200 mM NaCl for 48 h, both non-transformed and transgenic plant leaves displayed wilting and losing green symptoms and dramatic increase of the free proline contents. However, the degree of control seedlings was much more serious than that of transgenic lines and much more increases of the free proline contents in the transgenic lines than that in the control seedlings were observed. Meanwhile, lower extent decreases of the chlorophyll contents were detected in the transgenic seedlings. Quantitative RT-PCR was performed to analyze the expression of ten stress-related genes, including stress responsive transcription factor genes, ZmMYB59 and ZmMYC1, proline synthesis related genes, ZmP5CS1 and ZmP5CS2, photosynthesis-related genes, ZmELIP, ZmPSI-N, ZmOEE, Zmrbcs and ZmPLAS, and one ABA biosynthesis related gene, ZmSDR. The results showed that with the exception of ZmP5CS1 and ZmP5CS2 in line 9-10 and 19-11, ZmMYC1 in line 19-11 and ZmSDR in line 19-11, the expression of other stress-related genes were inhibited in transgenic lines under normal conditions. After salt treatment

  19. Improved Nutritive Quality and Salt Resistance in Transgenic Maize by Simultaneously Overexpression of a Natural Lysine-Rich Protein Gene, SBgLR, and an ERF Transcription Factor Gene, TSRF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meizhen Wang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Maize (Zea mays L., as one of the most important crops in the world, is deficient in lysine and tryptophan. Environmental conditions greatly impact plant growth, development and productivity. In this study, we used particle bombardment mediated co-transformation to obtain marker-free transgenic maize inbred X178 lines harboring a lysine-rich protein gene SBgLR from potato and an ethylene responsive factor (ERF transcription factor gene, TSRF1, from tomato. Both of the target genes were successfully expressed and showed various expression levels in different transgenic lines. Analysis showed that the protein and lysine content in T1 transgenic maize seeds increased significantly. Compared to non-transformed maize, the protein and lysine content increased by 7.7% to 24.38% and 8.70% to 30.43%, respectively. Moreover, transgenic maize exhibited more tolerance to salt stress. When treated with 200 mM NaCl for 48 h, both non-transformed and transgenic plant leaves displayed wilting and losing green symptoms and dramatic increase of the free proline contents. However, the degree of control seedlings was much more serious than that of transgenic lines and much more increases of the free proline contents in the transgenic lines than that in the control seedlings were observed. Meanwhile, lower extent decreases of the chlorophyll contents were detected in the transgenic seedlings. Quantitative RT-PCR was performed to analyze the expression of ten stress-related genes, including stress responsive transcription factor genes, ZmMYB59 and ZmMYC1, proline synthesis related genes, ZmP5CS1 and ZmP5CS2, photosynthesis-related genes, ZmELIP, ZmPSI-N, ZmOEE, Zmrbcs and ZmPLAS, and one ABA biosynthesis related gene, ZmSDR. The results showed that with the exception of ZmP5CS1 and ZmP5CS2 in line 9–10 and 19–11, ZmMYC1 in line 19–11 and ZmSDR in line 19–11, the expression of other stress-related genes were inhibited in transgenic lines under normal

  20. Transgenic approaches to western corn rootworm control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narva, Kenneth E; Siegfried, Blair D; Storer, Nicholas P

    2013-01-01

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) is a significant corn pest throughout the United States corn belt. Rootworm larvae feed on corn roots causing yield losses and control expenditures that are estimated to exceed US$1 billion annually. Traditional management practices to control rootworms such as chemical insecticides or crop rotation have suffered reduced effectiveness due to the development of physiological and behavioral resistance. Transgenic maize expressing insecticidal proteins are very successful in protecting against rootworm damage and preserving corn yield potential. However, the high rate of grower adoption and early reliance on hybrids expressing a single mode of action and low-dose traits threatens the durability of commercialized transgenic rootworm technology for rootworm control. A summary of current transgenic approaches for rootworm control and the corresponding insect resistance management practices is included. An overview of potential new modes of action based on insecticidal proteins, and especially RNAi targeting mRNA coding for essential insect proteins is provided.

  1. Glyphosate drift promotes changes in fitness and transgene gene flow in canola (Brassica napus) and hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londo, Jason P.; Bautista, Nonnatus S.; Sagers, Cynthia L.; Lee, E. Henry; Watrud, Lidia S.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims With the advent of transgenic crops, genetically modified, herbicide-resistant Brassica napus has become a model system for examining the risks and potential ecological consequences of escape of transgenes from cultivation into wild compatible species. Escaped transgenic feral B. napus and hybrids with compatible weedy species have been identified outside of agriculture and without the apparent selection for herbicide resistance. However, herbicide (glyphosate) exposure can extend beyond crop field boundaries, and a drift-level of herbicide could function as a selective agent contributing to increased persistence of transgenes in the environment. Methods The effects of a drift level (0·1 × the field application rate) of glyphosate herbicide and varied levels of plant competition were examined on plant fitness-associated traits and gene flow in a simulated field plot, common garden experiment. Plants included transgenic, glyphosate-resistant B. napus, its weedy ancestor B. rapa, and hybrid and advanced generations derived from them. Key Results The results of this experiment demonstrate reductions in reproductive fitness for non-transgenic genotypes and a contrasting increase in plant fitness for transgenic genotypes as a result of glyphosate-drift treatments. Results also suggest that a drift level of glyphosate spray may influence the movement of transgenes among transgenic crops and weeds and alter the processes of hybridization and introgression in non-agronomic habitats by impacting flowering phenology and pollen availability within the community. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate the potential for persistence of glyphosate resistance transgenes in weedy plant communities due to the effect of glyphosate spray drift on plant fitness. Additionally, glyphosate drift has the potential to change the gene-flow dynamics between compatible transgenic crops and weeds, simultaneously reducing direct introgression into weedy species

  2. Farm-scale evaluation of the impacts of transgenic cotton on biodiversity, pesticide use, and yield

    OpenAIRE

    Cattaneo, Manda G.; Yafuso, Christine; Schmidt, Chris; Huang, Cho-ying; Rahman, Magfurar; Olson, Carl; Ellers-Kirk, Christa; Orr,Barron J.; Marsh, Stuart E.; Antilla, Larry; Dutilleul, Pierre; Carrière, Yves

    2006-01-01

    Higher yields and reduced pesticide impacts are needed to mitigate the effects of agricultural intensification. A 2-year farm-scale evaluation of 81 commercial fields in Arizona show that use of transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) cotton reduced insecticide use, whereas transgenic cotton with Bt protein and herbicide resistance (BtHr) did not affect herbicide use. Transgenic cotton had higher yield than nontransgenic cotton for any given number of insecticide applications. However, nontran...

  3. Comparative study of transgenic and non-transgenic maize (Zea mays) flours commercialized in Brazil, focussing on proteomic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Nádia; Barbosa, Herbert; Jacob, Silvana; Arruda, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Genetically modified foods are a major concern around the world due to the lack of information concerning their safety and health effects. This work evaluates differences, at the proteomic level, between two types of crop samples: transgenic (MON810 event with the Cry1Ab gene, which confers resistance to insects) and non-transgenic maize flour commercialized in Brazil. The 2-D DIGE technique revealed 99 differentially expressed spots, which were collected in 2-D PAGE gels and identified via mass spectrometry (nESI-QTOF MS/MS). The abundance of protein differences between the transgenic and non-transgenic samples could arise from genetic modification or as a result of an environmental influence pertaining to the commercial sample. The major functional category of proteins identified was related to disease/defense and, although differences were observed between samples, no toxins or allergenic proteins were found. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Generation and characterization of human heme oxygenase-1 transgenic pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Hye-Jung; Koo, Ok Jae; Yang, Jaeseok; Cho, Bumrae; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Park, Sol Ji; Hurh, Sunghoon; Kim, Hwajung; Lee, Eun Mi; Ro, Han; Kang, Jung Taek; Kim, Su Jin; Won, Jae-Kyung; O'Connell, Philip J; Kim, Hyunil; Surh, Charles D; Lee, Byeong-Chun; Ahn, Curie

    2012-01-01

    Xenotransplantation using transgenic pigs as an organ source is a promising strategy to overcome shortage of human organ for transplantation. Various genetic modifications have been tried to ameliorate xenograft rejection. In the present study we assessed effect of transgenic expression of human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1), an inducible protein capable of cytoprotection by scavenging reactive oxygen species and preventing apoptosis caused by cellular stress during inflammatory processes, in neonatal porcine islet-like cluster cells (NPCCs). Transduction of NPCCs with adenovirus containing hHO-1 gene significantly reduced apoptosis compared with the GFP-expressing adenovirus control after treatment with either hydrogen peroxide or hTNF-α and cycloheximide. These protective effects were diminished by co-treatment of hHO-1 antagonist, Zinc protoporphyrin IX. We also generated transgenic pigs expressing hHO-1 and analyzed expression and function of the transgene. Human HO-1 was expressed in most tissues, including the heart, kidney, lung, pancreas, spleen and skin, however, expression levels and patterns of the hHO-1 gene are not consistent in each organ. We isolate fibroblast from transgenic pigs to analyze protective effect of the hHO-1. As expected, fibroblasts derived from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs were significantly resistant to both hydrogen peroxide damage and hTNF-α and cycloheximide-mediated apoptosis when compared with wild-type fibroblasts. Furthermore, induction of RANTES in response to hTNF-α or LPS was significantly decreased in fibroblasts obtained from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs. These findings suggest that transgenic expression of hHO-1 can protect xenografts when exposed to oxidative stresses, especially from ischemia/reperfusion injury, and/or acute rejection mediated by cytokines. Accordingly, hHO-1 could be an important candidate molecule in a multi-transgenic pig strategy for xenotransplantation.

  5. Generation and characterization of human heme oxygenase-1 transgenic pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Jung Yeom

    Full Text Available Xenotransplantation using transgenic pigs as an organ source is a promising strategy to overcome shortage of human organ for transplantation. Various genetic modifications have been tried to ameliorate xenograft rejection. In the present study we assessed effect of transgenic expression of human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1, an inducible protein capable of cytoprotection by scavenging reactive oxygen species and preventing apoptosis caused by cellular stress during inflammatory processes, in neonatal porcine islet-like cluster cells (NPCCs. Transduction of NPCCs with adenovirus containing hHO-1 gene significantly reduced apoptosis compared with the GFP-expressing adenovirus control after treatment with either hydrogen peroxide or hTNF-α and cycloheximide. These protective effects were diminished by co-treatment of hHO-1 antagonist, Zinc protoporphyrin IX. We also generated transgenic pigs expressing hHO-1 and analyzed expression and function of the transgene. Human HO-1 was expressed in most tissues, including the heart, kidney, lung, pancreas, spleen and skin, however, expression levels and patterns of the hHO-1 gene are not consistent in each organ. We isolate fibroblast from transgenic pigs to analyze protective effect of the hHO-1. As expected, fibroblasts derived from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs were significantly resistant to both hydrogen peroxide damage and hTNF-α and cycloheximide-mediated apoptosis when compared with wild-type fibroblasts. Furthermore, induction of RANTES in response to hTNF-α or LPS was significantly decreased in fibroblasts obtained from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs. These findings suggest that transgenic expression of hHO-1 can protect xenografts when exposed to oxidative stresses, especially from ischemia/reperfusion injury, and/or acute rejection mediated by cytokines. Accordingly, hHO-1 could be an important candidate molecule in a multi-transgenic pig strategy for xenotransplantation.

  6. Characterisation of tospovirus resistance in transgenic plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, M.

    1997-01-01

    Over the past two decades tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) has become increasingly important as a pathogen in many crops. This can be attributed to intensified world trade and concomitant spread of one of the most important vectors of the virus, the thrips Frankliniella occidentalis.

  7. Allergenicity assessment of the Papaya ringspot virus coat protein expressed in transgenic Rainbow papaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    The virus-resistant, transgenic commercial papaya cultivars Rainbow and SunUp (Carica papaya L.) have been consumed locally in Hawaii and elsewhere in the mainland US and Canada since their release to planters in Hawaii in 1998. These cultivars are derived from transgenic papaya line 55-1 and carry ...

  8. Glyphosate drift promotes changes in fitness and transgene flow in canola (Brassica napus) and hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. With the advent of transgenic crops, genetically modified, herbicide resistant B. napus has become a model system for examining the risks of escape of transgenes from cultivation and for evaluating potential ecological consequences of novel genes in wild species. 2. We exam...

  9. Goss’s wilt incidence in sweet corn is independent of transgenic traits and glyphosate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently claims have been made that the use of glyphosate and transgenic crop traits increases the risk of plant diseases. Transgenic traits used widely for years in dent corn are now available in commercial sweet corn cultivars, specifically, the combination of glyphosate resistance (GR) and Lepid...

  10. Silencing mechansim of C5 transgenic plums is stable under challenge inoculation with heterologous viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic C5 'HoneySweet' is a clone of Prunus domestica L. transformed with the Plum pox virus coat protein gene (PPV-CP). This transgenic plum displays post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) which makes it highly resistant to PPV infection. To test the effect of heterologous viruses on the ...

  11. Detection of probable marker-free transgene-positive rice plants ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 91; Issue 2. Detection of probable marker-free transgene-positive rice plants resistant to rice tungro disease from backcross progenies of transgenic Pusa Basmati 1. Somnath Roy Amrita Banerjee Jayanta Tarafdar Bijoy K. Senapati. Research Note Volume 91 Issue 2 August ...

  12. Strategies for resistance to bacterial wilt disease of bananas through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The transgenic approach shows potential for the genetic improvement of the crop using a wide set of transgenes currently available which may confer bacterial resistance. This article discusses the potential strategies to develop transgenic banana plants resistant to bacterial wilt disease. Key Words: Banana, bacterial wilt, ...

  13. Transgenic algae engineered for higher performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkefer, Pat J; Anderson, Penelope S; Knight, Thomas J

    2014-10-21

    The present disclosure relates to transgenic algae having increased growth characteristics, and methods of increasing growth characteristics of algae. In particular, the disclosure relates to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and a glutamine synthetase.

  14. Immunity to tomato yellow leaf curl virus in transgenic tomato is associated with accumulation of transgene small RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibman, Diana; Prakash, Shanmugam; Wolf, Dalia; Zelcer, Aaron; Anfoka, Ghandi; Haviv, Sabrina; Brumin, Marina; Gaba, Victor; Arazi, Tzahi; Lapidot, Moshe; Gal-On, Amit

    2015-11-01

    Gene silencing is a natural defense response of plants against invading RNA and DNA viruses. The RNA post-transcriptional silencing system has been commonly utilized to generate transgenic crop plants that are "immune" to plant virus infection. Here, we applied this approach against the devastating DNA virus tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) in its host tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.). To generate broad resistance to a number of different TYLCV viruses, three conserved sequences (the intergenic region [NCR], V1-V2 and C1-C2 genes) from the genome of the severe virus (TYLCV) were synthesized as a single insert and cloned into a hairpin configuration in a binary vector, which was used to transform TYLCV-susceptible tomato plants. Eight of 28 independent transgenic tomato lines exhibited immunity to TYLCV-Is and to TYLCV-Mld, but not to tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus, which shares relatively low sequence homology with the transgene. In addition, a marker-free (nptII-deleted) transgenic tomato line was generated for the first time by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation without antibiotic selection, followed by screening of 1180 regenerated shoots by whitefly-mediated TYLCV inoculation. Resistant lines showed a high level of transgene-siRNA (t-siRNA) accumulation (22% of total small RNA) with dominant sizes of 21 nt (73%) and 22 nt (22%). The t-siRNA displayed hot-spot distribution ("peaks") along the transgene, with different distribution patterns than the viral-siRNA peaks observed in TYLCV-infected tomato. A grafting experiment demonstrated the mobility of 0.04% of the t-siRNA from transgenic rootstock to non-transformed scion, even though scion resistance against TYLCV was not achieved.

  15. Enhanced drought tolerance in transgenic Leymus chinensis plants with constitutively expressed wheat TaLEA3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijuan; Li, Xiaofeng; Chen, Shuangyan; Liu, Gongshe

    2009-02-01

    Leymus chinensis is an important grassland perennial grass. However, its drought tolerance requires to be improved. LEA (late embryogenesis abundant) genes are believed to confer resistance to drought and water deficiency. Using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, a wheat LEA gene, TaLEA(3), was integrated into L. chinensis. The transgenic lines showed enhanced growth ability under drought stress during which transgenic lines had increased the relative water content, leaf water potential, relative average growth rate, but decreased the malondialdehyde content compared with the non-transgenic plant. Thus, transgenic breeding is an efficient approach to enhance drought tolerance in L. chinensis.

  16. Virus-derived transgenes expressing hairpin RNA give immunity to Tobacco mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An effective method for obtaining resistant transgenic plants is to induce RNA silencing by expressing virus-derived dsRNA in plants and this method has been successfully implemented for the generation of different plant lines resistant to many plant viruses. Results Inverted repeats of the partial Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV movement protein (MP gene and the partial Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV replication protein (Rep gene were introduced into the plant expression vector and the recombinant plasmids were transformed into Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was carried out and three transgenic tobacco lines (MP16-17-3, MP16-17-29 and MP16-17-58 immune to TMV infection and three transgenic tobacco lines (Rep15-1-1, Rep15-1-7 and Rep15-1-32 immune to CMV infection were obtained. Virus inoculation assays showed that the resistance of these transgenic plants could inherit and keep stable in T4 progeny. The low temperature (15℃ did not influence the resistance of transgenic plants. There was no significant correlation between the resistance and the copy number of the transgene. CMV infection could not break the resistance to TMV in the transgenic tobacco plants expressing TMV hairpin MP RNA. Conclusions We have demonstrated that transgenic tobacco plants expressed partial TMV movement gene and partial CMV replicase gene in the form of an intermolecular intron-hairpin RNA exhibited complete resistance to TMV or CMV infection.

  17. Potential transgenic routes to increase tree biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubouzet, Joseph G; Strabala, Timothy J; Wagner, Armin

    2013-11-01

    Biomass is a prime target for genetic engineering in forestry because increased biomass yield will benefit most downstream applications such as timber, fiber, pulp, paper, and bioenergy production. Transgenesis can increase biomass by improving resource acquisition and product utilization and by enhancing competitive ability for solar energy, water, and mineral nutrients. Transgenes that affect juvenility, winter dormancy, and flowering have been shown to influence biomass as well. Transgenic approaches have increased yield potential by mitigating the adverse effects of prevailing stress factors in the environment. Simultaneous introduction of multiple genes for resistance to various stress factors into trees may help forest trees cope with multiple or changing environments. We propose multi-trait engineering for tree crops, simultaneously deploying multiple independent genes to address a set of genetically uncorrelated traits that are important for crop improvement. This strategy increases the probability of unpredictable (synergistic or detrimental) interactions that may substantially affect the overall phenotype and its long-term performance. The very limited ability to predict the physiological processes that may be impacted by such a strategy requires vigilance and care during implementation. Hence, we recommend close monitoring of the resultant transgenic genotypes in multi-year, multi-location field trials. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. [TSA improve transgenic porcine cloned embryo development and transgene expression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Qing-Ran; Zhu, Jiang; Huang, Bo; Huan, Yan-Jun; Wang, Feng; Shi, Yong-Qian; Liu, Zhong-Feng; Wu, Mei-Ling; Liu, Zhong-Hua

    2011-07-01

    Uncompleted epigenetic reprogramming is attributed to the low efficiency of producing transgenic cloned animals. Histone modification associated with epigenetics can directly influence the embryo development and transgene expression. Trichostatin A (TSA), as an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, can change the status of histone acetylation, improve somatic cell reprogramming, and enhance cloning efficiency. TSA prevents the chromatin structure from being condensed, so that transcription factor could binds to DNA sequence easily and enhance transgene expression. Our study established the optimal TSA treatment on porcine donor cells and cloned embryos, 250 nmol/L, 24 h and 40 nmol/L, 24 h, respectively. Furthermore, we found that both the cloned embryo and the donor cell treated by TSA resulted in the highest development efficiency. Meanwhile, TSA can improve transgene expression in donor cell and cloned embryo. In summary, TSA can significantly improve porcine reconstructed embryo development and transgene expression.

  19. Recent advances in development of marker-free transgenic plants ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-01-31

    Jan 31, 2012 ... During the efficient genetic transformation of plants with the gene of interest, some selectable marker genes are also used in order to identify the transgenic plant cells or tissues. Usually, antibiotic- or herbicide-selective agents and their corresponding resistance genes are used to introduce economically ...

  20. Recent advances in development of marker-free transgenic plants ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    During the efficient genetic transformation of plants with the gene of interest, some selectable marker genes are also used in order to identify the transgenic plant cells or tissues. Usually, antibiotic- or herbicide-selective agents and their corresponding resistance genes are used to introduce economically valuable genes into ...

  1. Development of putative transgenic lines of cassava variety H-226 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CMD) caused by the Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV) and Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus (SLCMV). An attempt was done to develop transgenic cassava lines resistant to SLCMV through RNAi vector targeting a conserved 440 bp of 5' end ...

  2. Assessment of Bollgard II cotton pollen mediated transgenes flow to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cotton is the main cash crop in Burkina Faso. However, production is highly affected by bollworms and leafworms in the last years due to the spread out of the resistance of bollworms to most used pesticides. This has led to experiment on Bt cotton from 2003 to 2007. The inevitable coexistence between transgenic and ...

  3. Transgenic approaches in potato: effects on glycoalkaloids levels

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sayyar

    2013-02-20

    Feb 20, 2013 ... summarize recent progress in understanding the sources of unintended effects with particular emphasis on changes in glycoalkaloids in both conventional and transgenic potato varieties and the possible implications of these changes on pathogen resistance and food safety. UNINTENDED EFFECTS IN ...

  4. TRANSGENIC PLANTS: ENVIRONMENTAL PERSISTENCE AND EFFECTS ON SOIL AND PLANT ECOSYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genetic engineering of plants has facilitated the production of valuable agricultural and forestry crops. Transgenic plants have been created that have increased resistance to pests, herbicides, pathogens, and environmental stress, enhanced qualitative and quantitative trait...

  5. Comparative nutritional compositions and proteomics analysis of transgenic Xa21 rice seeds compared to conventional rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayen, Dipak; Paul, Soumitra; Sarkar, Sailendra Nath; Datta, Swapan K; Datta, Karabi

    2016-07-15

    Transgenic rice expressing the Xa21 gene have enhanced resistant to most devastating bacterial blight diseases caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). However, identification of unintended modifications, owing to the genetic modification, is an important aspect of transgenic crop safety assessment. In this study, the nutritional compositions of seeds from transgenic rice plants expressing the Xa21 gene were compared against non-transgenic rice seeds. In addition, to detect any changes in protein translation levels as a result of Xa21 gene expression, rice seed proteome analyses were also performed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. No significant differences were found in the nutritional compositions (proximate components, amino acids, minerals, vitamins and anti-nutrients) of the transgenic and non-transgenic rice seeds. Although gel electrophoresis identified 11 proteins that were differentially expressed between the transgenic and non-transgenic seed, only one of these (with a 20-fold up-regulation in the transgenic seed) shows nutrient reservoir activity. No new toxins or allergens were detected in the transgenic seeds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Epigenetic silencing in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeevkumar, Sarma; Anunanthini, Pushpanathan; Sathishkumar, Ramalingam

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing is a natural phenomenon in which the expression of genes is regulated through modifications of DNA, RNA, or histone proteins. It is a mechanism for defending host genomes against the effects of transposable elements and viral infection, and acts as a modulator of expression of duplicated gene family members and as a silencer of transgenes. A major breakthrough in understanding the mechanism of epigenetic silencing was the discovery of silencing in transgenic tobacco plants due to the interaction between two homologous promoters. The molecular mechanism of epigenetic mechanism is highly complicated and it is not completely understood yet. Two different molecular routes have been proposed for this, that is, transcriptional gene silencing, which is associated with heavy methylation of promoter regions and blocks the transcription of transgenes, and post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), the basic mechanism is degradation of the cytosolic mRNA of transgenes or endogenous genes. Undesired transgene silencing is of major concern in the transgenic technologies used in crop improvement. A complete understanding of this phenomenon will be very useful for transgenic applications, where silencing of specific genes is required. The current status of epigenetic silencing in transgenic technology is discussed and summarized in this mini-review.

  7. Genotoxicity of N-nitroso-N-methylurea and acetone oxime in the transgenic Drosophila carrying the human gene encoding a subunit of glutathione S-transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rysková, M; Chroust, K; Trbusek, M; Benedík, J; Jowett, T

    1997-01-01

    The genotoxic effects of N-nitroso-N-methylurea (MNU) and acetone oxime (ACOX) were tested in the Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster. We have performed the same assay on transgenic flies expressing the human gene encoding a glutathione S-transferase alpha subunit (HGST). The SMART assay is used here to demonstrate genotoxicity and to determine the effect of human glutathione S-transferase on the genotoxic response. Three types of Drosophila strains were used: non-transgenic strains first described by Szabad (1986), transgenic strains derived from the Szabad strains but expressing the bacterial lacZ gene, and similarly derived transgenic strains expressing the HGST gene. MNU was highly genotoxic in both transgenic and non-transgenic flies. The non-transgenic lies were significantly more sensitive to the genotoxic effects of MNU compared to both types of transgenic flies. There were statistically significant differences between the transgenic HGST crosses and transgenic lacZ and non-transgenic control crosses but there was no significant difference between the genotoxic response to MNU in flies from the transgenic cross with lacZ and from the cross carrying three copies of HGST. ACOX also proved to be genotoxic to both non-transgenic and transgenic flies. However, flies carrying three copies of the gene were significantly more resistant to the genotoxic effect of ACOX than those transgenic flies with two or no copies of the human gene.

  8. Influences of the disease resistance conferred by the individual ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To research possible influences of the disease resistance conferred by different trans-resistance genes on the transgenic rice plants in their yields and grain quality, three transgenic rice lines, including two with the resistance genes Pi-d2 and Pi-d3, respectively, for rice blast, and one with the resistance gene Xa21 for rice ...

  9. Efficient Generation of Marker-Free Transgenic Rice Plants Using an Improved Transposon-Mediated Transgene Reintegration Strategy1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoqing; Zhou, Jie; Li, Jun; Zou, Xiaowei; Zhao, Jianhua; Li, Qingliang; Xia, Ran; Yang, Ruifang; Wang, Dekai; Zuo, Zhaoxue; Tu, Jumin; Tao, Yuezhi; Chen, Xiaoyun; Xie, Qi; Zhu, Zengrong

    2015-01-01

    Marker-free transgenic plants can be developed through transposon-mediated transgene reintegration, which allows intact transgene insertion with defined boundaries and requires only a few primary transformants. In this study, we improved the selection strategy and validated that the maize (Zea mays) Activator/Dissociation (Ds) transposable element can be routinely used to generate marker-free transgenic plants. A Ds-based gene of interest was linked to green fluorescent protein in transfer DNA (T-DNA), and a green fluorescent protein-aided counterselection against T-DNA was used together with polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based positive selection for the gene of interest to screen marker-free progeny. To test the efficacy of this strategy, we cloned the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) δ-endotoxin gene into the Ds elements and transformed transposon vectors into rice (Oryza sativa) cultivars via Agrobacterium tumefaciens. PCR assays of the transposon empty donor site exhibited transposition in somatic cells in 60.5% to 100% of the rice transformants. Marker-free (T-DNA-free) transgenic rice plants derived from unlinked germinal transposition were obtained from the T1 generation of 26.1% of the primary transformants. Individual marker-free transgenic rice lines were subjected to thermal asymmetric interlaced-PCR to determine Ds(Bt) reintegration positions, reverse transcription-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect Bt expression levels, and bioassays to confirm resistance against the striped stem borer Chilo suppressalis. Overall, we efficiently generated marker-free transgenic plants with optimized transgene insertion and expression. The transposon-mediated marker-free platform established in this study can be used in rice and possibly in other important crops. PMID:25371551

  10. Efficient generation of marker-free transgenic rice plants using an improved transposon-mediated transgene reintegration strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoqing; Zhou, Jie; Li, Jun; Zou, Xiaowei; Zhao, Jianhua; Li, Qingliang; Xia, Ran; Yang, Ruifang; Wang, Dekai; Zuo, Zhaoxue; Tu, Jumin; Tao, Yuezhi; Chen, Xiaoyun; Xie, Qi; Zhu, Zengrong; Qu, Shaohong

    2015-01-01

    Marker-free transgenic plants can be developed through transposon-mediated transgene reintegration, which allows intact transgene insertion with defined boundaries and requires only a few primary transformants. In this study, we improved the selection strategy and validated that the maize (Zea mays) Activator/Dissociation (Ds) transposable element can be routinely used to generate marker-free transgenic plants. A Ds-based gene of interest was linked to green fluorescent protein in transfer DNA (T-DNA), and a green fluorescent protein-aided counterselection against T-DNA was used together with polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based positive selection for the gene of interest to screen marker-free progeny. To test the efficacy of this strategy, we cloned the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) δ-endotoxin gene into the Ds elements and transformed transposon vectors into rice (Oryza sativa) cultivars via Agrobacterium tumefaciens. PCR assays of the transposon empty donor site exhibited transposition in somatic cells in 60.5% to 100% of the rice transformants. Marker-free (T-DNA-free) transgenic rice plants derived from unlinked germinal transposition were obtained from the T1 generation of 26.1% of the primary transformants. Individual marker-free transgenic rice lines were subjected to thermal asymmetric interlaced-PCR to determine Ds(Bt) reintegration positions, reverse transcription-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect Bt expression levels, and bioassays to confirm resistance against the striped stem borer Chilo suppressalis. Overall, we efficiently generated marker-free transgenic plants with optimized transgene insertion and expression. The transposon-mediated marker-free platform established in this study can be used in rice and possibly in other important crops. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Characterization of mercury bioremediation by transgenic bacteria expressing metallothionein and polyphosphate kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez-Ruiz Gloriene

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of transgenic bacteria has been proposed as a suitable alternative for mercury remediation. Ideally, mercury would be sequestered by metal-scavenging agents inside transgenic bacteria for subsequent retrieval. So far, this approach has produced limited protection and accumulation. We report here the development of a transgenic system that effectively expresses metallothionein (mt-1 and polyphosphate kinase (ppk genes in bacteria in order to provide high mercury resistance and accumulation. Results In this study, bacterial transformation with transcriptional and translational enhanced vectors designed for the expression of metallothionein and polyphosphate kinase provided high transgene transcript levels independent of the gene being expressed. Expression of polyphosphate kinase and metallothionein in transgenic bacteria provided high resistance to mercury, up to 80 μM and 120 μM, respectively. Here we show for the first time that metallothionein can be efficiently expressed in bacteria without being fused to a carrier protein to enhance mercury bioremediation. Cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry analyzes revealed that the mt-1 transgenic bacteria accumulated up to 100.2 ± 17.6 μM of mercury from media containing 120 μM Hg. The extent of mercury remediation was such that the contaminated media remediated by the mt-1 transgenic bacteria supported the growth of untransformed bacteria. Cell aggregation, precipitation and color changes were visually observed in mt-1 and ppk transgenic bacteria when these cells were grown in high mercury concentrations. Conclusion The transgenic bacterial system described in this study presents a viable technology for mercury bioremediation from liquid matrices because it provides high mercury resistance and accumulation while inhibiting elemental mercury volatilization. This is the first report that shows that metallothionein expression provides mercury resistance and

  12. Modifying Bananas: From Transgenics to Organics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Dale

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Bananas are one of the top ten world food crops. Unlike most other major food crops, bananas are difficult to genetically improve. The challenge is that nearly all banana cultivars and landraces are triploids, with high levels of male and female infertility. There are a number of international conventional breeding programs and many of these are developing new cultivars. However, it is virtually impossible to backcross bananas, thus excluding the possibility of introgressing new traits into a current cultivar. The alternative strategy is to “modify” the cultivar itself. We have been developing the capacity to modify Cavendish bananas and other cultivars for both disease resistance and enhanced fruit quality. Initially, we were using transgenes; genes that were derived from species outside of the Musa or banana genus. However, we have recently incorporated two banana genes (cisgenes into Cavendish; one to enhance the level of pro-vitamin A and the other to increase the resistance to Panama disease. Modified Cavendish with these cisgenes have been employed in a field trial. Almost certainly, the next advance will be to edit the Cavendish genome, to generate the desired traits. As these banana cultivars are essentially sterile, transgene flow and the outcrossing of modified genes into wild Musa species. are highly unlikely and virtually impossible in other triploid cultivars. Therefore, genetic changes in bananas may be compatible with organic farming.

  13. Transgenics, agroindustry and food sovereignty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Alejandro León Vega

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Food sovereignty has been implemented constitutionally in Ecuador; however, many of the actions and policies are designed to benefit the dominant model of food production, based in agroindustry, intensive monocultures, agrochemicals and transgenics. This article reflects upon the role of family farming as a generator of food sovereignty, and secondly the threat to them by agroindustry agriculture based in transgenic. The role played by food aid in the introduction of transgenic in Latin America and other regions of the world is also analyzed.

  14. Sensitivity of a real-time PCR method for the detection of transgenes in a mixture of transgenic and non-transgenic seeds of papaya (Carica papaya L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nageswara-Rao, Madhugiri; Kwit, Charles; Agarwal, Sujata; Patton, Mariah T; Skeen, Jordan A; Yuan, Joshua S; Manshardt, Richard M; Stewart, C Neal

    2013-09-01

    Genetically engineered (GE) ringspot virus-resistant papaya cultivars 'Rainbow' and 'SunUp' have been grown in Hawai'i for over 10 years. In Hawai'i, the introduction of GE papayas into regions where non-GE cultivars are grown and where feral non-GE papayas exist have been accompanied with concerns associated with transgene flow. Of particular concern is the possibility of transgenic seeds being found in non-GE papaya fruits via cross-pollination. Development of high-throughput methods to reliably detect the adventitious presence of such transgenic material would benefit both the scientific and regulatory communities. We assessed the accuracy of using conventional qualitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as well as real-time PCR-based assays to quantify the presence of transgenic DNA from bulk samples of non-GE papaya seeds. In this study, an optimized method of extracting high quality DNA from dry seeds of papaya was standardized. A reliable, sensitive real-time PCR method for detecting and quantifying viral coat protein (cp) transgenes in bulk seed samples utilizing the endogenous papain gene is presented. Quantification range was from 0.01 to 100 ng/μl of GE-papaya DNA template with a detection limit as low as 0.01% (10 pg). To test this system, we simulated transgene flow using known quantities of GE and non-GE DNA and determined that 0.038% (38 pg) GE papaya DNA could be detected using real-time PCR. We also validated this system by extracting DNA from known ratios of GE seeds to non-GE seeds of papaya followed by real-time PCR detection and observed a reliable detection limit of 0.4%. This method for the quick and sensitive detection of transgenes in bulked papaya seed lots using conventional as well as real-time PCR-based methods will benefit numerous stakeholders. In particular, this method could be utilized to screen selected fruits from maternal non-GE papaya trees in Hawai'i for the presence of transgenic seed at typical regulatory threshold levels

  15. Development and application of transgenic technologies in cassava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nigel; Chavarriaga, Paul; Raemakers, Krit; Siritunga, Dimuth; Zhang, Peng

    2004-11-01

    The capacity to integrate transgenes into the tropical root crop cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is now established and being utilized to generate plants expressing traits of agronomic interest. The tissue culture and gene transfer systems currently employed to produce these transgenic cassava have improved significantly over the past 5 years and are assessed and compared in this review. Programs are underway to develop cassava with enhanced resistance to viral diseases and insects pests, improved nutritional content, modified and increased starch metabolism and reduced cyanogenic content of processed roots. Each of these is described individually for the underlying biology the molecular strategies being employed and progress achieved towards the desired product. Important advances have occurred, with transgenic plants from several laboratories being prepared for field trails.

  16. Production of human CD59-transgenic pigs by embryonic germ cell nuclear transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Kwang Sung; Won, Ji Young [Department of Physiology, Dankook University School of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-Ki [Animal Biotechnology Division, National Institute of Animal Science, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Sorrell, Alice M. [Department of Physiology, Dankook University School of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun [Department of Nanobiomedical Science, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Jae-Seok [Animal Biotechnology Division, National Institute of Animal Science, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Bong-Hwan [Genomics and Bioinformatics Division, National Institute of Animal Science, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Won-Kyong [Animal Biotechnology Division, National Institute of Animal Science, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Hosup, E-mail: shim@dku.edu [Department of Nanobiomedical Science, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Human CD59 (hCD59) gene was introduced into porcine embryonic germ (EG) cells. {yields} hCD59-transgenic EG cells were resistant to hyperacute rejection in cytolytic assay. {yields} hCD59-transgenic pigs were produced by EG cell nuclear transfer. -- Abstract: This study was performed to produce transgenic pigs expressing the human complement regulatory protein CD59 (hCD59) using the nuclear transfer (NT) of embryonic germ (EG) cells, which are undifferentiated stem cells derived from primordial germ cells. Because EG cells can be cultured indefinitely in an undifferentiated state, they may provide an inexhaustible source of nuclear donor cells for NT to produce transgenic pigs. A total of 1980 NT embryos derived from hCD59-transgenic EG cells were transferred to ten recipients, resulting in the birth of fifteen piglets from three pregnancies. Among these offspring, ten were alive without overt health problems. Based on PCR analysis, all fifteen piglets were confirmed as hCD59 transgenic. The expression of the hCD59 transgene in the ten living piglets was verified by RT-PCR. Western analysis showed the expression of the hCD59 protein in four of the ten RT-PCR-positive piglets. These results demonstrate that hCD59-transgenic pigs could effectively be produced by EG cell NT and that such transgenic pigs may be used as organ donors in pig-to-human xenotransplantation.

  17. Evaluación de barreras vegetales en el manejo integrado de la mancha anular del papayo (PRSV-P en Michoacán, México Evaluation of plant barriers in an integrated management of papayo ringspot in Michoacan, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Rivas-Valencia

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available El efecto de barreras vegetales como componente de un programa de manejo integrado (MI, se validó y adaptó en 1999 en Michoacán, México, para controlar la Mancha Anular del Papayo, enfermedad causada por el Papaya ringspot potyvirus type-P (PRSV-P. Se estableció un experimento en parcelas divididas con dos factores experimentales: barreras vegetales (Hibiscus sabdariffa, y componentes de MI: MI sin aspersión de citrolina (1.5% (MI-A, MI sin eliminación de plantas con síntomas iniciales de virosis antes de floración (MI-D y MI. Las barreras vegetales sembradas 20 días antes del trasplante del papayo y el desplante retrasaron en 19 días el inicio del progreso de epidemias en el MI lo que resultó en una mayor producción (14.2% que el resto de tratamientos, aunque fue superado por MI-A en vigor (4% en diámetro de tallo. La citrolina fue fitotóxica, disminuyó el vigor de plantas (5.3% y no limitó significativamente el desarrollo de la enfermedad ya que la intensidad de las epidemias (X0 = 47días, Yf = 84% y ABCPE = 3220% días fue similar al testigo. El uso de barreras vegetales por si sola aparentemente no es suficiente para la reducción de la incidencia y dispersión de la enfermedad. Los áfidos más abundantes, con reconocida capacidad transmisora del PRSV-P, fueron Aphis gossypii, A. nerii, A. spiraecola y Macrosiphum euphorbiae, los cuales representaron aproximadamente el 13% del total de áfidos capturados.The effect of plant barriers as a component of an integrated management program (IM was validated and adapted in 1999, in Michoacan, Mexico, to control papaya ringspot, caused by papaya ringspot potyvirus type-P (PRSV-P. A split-plot design was established with two experimental factors: plant barriers and components of IM: IM without oil sprinkling (IM-O, IM without plant rouging (IM-R, and complete IM. Plant barriers (Hibiscus sabdariffa, sowed 20 days before papaya transplanting, and plant rouging delayed the epidemics

  18. Transgenic plants for phytoremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestri, Elena; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2011-01-01

    Phytoremediation is a green, sustainable and promising solution to problems of environmental contamination. It entails the use of plants for uptake, sequestration, detoxification or volatilization of inorganic and organic pollutants from soils, water, sediments and possibly air. Phytoremediation was born from the observation that plants possessed physiological properties useful for environmental remediation. This was shortly followed by the application of breeding techniques and artificial selection to genetically improve some of the more promising and interesting species. Now, after nearly 20 years of research, transgenic plants for phytoremediation have been produced, but none have reached commercial existence. Three main approaches have been developed: (1) transformation with genes from other organisms (mammals, bacteria, etc.); (2) transformation with genes from other plant species; and (3) overexpression of genes from the same plant species. Many encouraging results have been reported, even though in some instances results have been contrary to expectations. This review will illustrate the main examples with a critical discussion of what we have learnt from them.

  19. Assessment of the diversity and dynamics of Plum pox virus and aphid populations in transgenic European plums under Mediterranean conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capote, Nieves; Pérez-Panadés, Jordi; Monzó, César; Carbonell, Emilio; Urbaneja, Alberto; Scorza, Ralph; Ravelonandro, Michel; Cambra, Mariano

    2008-06-01

    The molecular variability of Plum pox virus (PPV) populations was compared in transgenic European plums (Prunus domestica L.) carrying the coat protein (CP) gene of PPV and non-transgenic plums in an experimental orchard in Valencia, Spain. A major objective of this study was to detect recombination between PPV CP transgene transcripts and infecting PPV RNA. Additionally, we assessed the number and species of PPV aphid vectors that visited transgenic and non-transgenic plum trees. Test trees consisted of five different P. domestica transgenic lines, i.e. the PPV-resistant C5 'HoneySweet' line and the PPV-susceptible C4, C6, PT6 and PT23 lines, and non-transgenic P. domestica and P. salicina Lind trees. No significant difference in the genetic diversity of PPV populations infecting transgenic and conventional plums was detected, in particular no recombinant between transgene transcripts and incoming viral RNA was found at detectable levels. Also, no significant difference was detected in aphid populations, including viruliferous individuals, that visited transgenic and conventional plums. Our data indicate that PPV-CP transgenic European plums exposed to natural PPV infection over an 8 year period caused limited, if any, risk beyond the cultivation of conventional plums under Mediterranean conditions in terms of the emergence of recombinant PPV and diversity of PPV and aphid populations.

  20. Transgenic Expression of the Anti-parasitic Factor TEP1 in the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volohonsky, Gloria; Hopp, Ann-Katrin; Saenger, Mélanie; Soichot, Julien; Scholze, Heidi; Boch, Jens; Blandin, Stéphanie A; Marois, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Mosquitoes genetically engineered to be resistant to Plasmodium parasites represent a promising novel approach in the fight against malaria. The insect immune system itself is a source of anti-parasitic genes potentially exploitable for transgenic designs. The Anopheles gambiae thioester containing protein 1 (TEP1) is a potent anti-parasitic protein. TEP1 is secreted and circulates in the mosquito hemolymph, where its activated cleaved form binds and eliminates malaria parasites. Here we investigated whether TEP1 can be used to create malaria resistant mosquitoes. Using a GFP reporter transgene, we determined that the fat body is the main site of TEP1 expression. We generated transgenic mosquitoes that express TEP1r, a potent refractory allele of TEP1, in the fat body and examined the activity of the transgenic protein in wild-type or TEP1 mutant genetic backgrounds. Transgenic TEP1r rescued loss-of-function mutations, but did not increase parasite resistance in the presence of a wild-type susceptible allele. Consistent with previous reports, TEP1 protein expressed from the transgene in the fat body was taken up by hemocytes upon a challenge with injected bacteria. Furthermore, although maturation of transgenic TEP1 into the cleaved form was impaired in one of the TEP1 mutant lines, it was still sufficient to reduce parasite numbers and induce parasite melanization. We also report here the first use of Transcription Activator Like Effectors (TALEs) in Anopheles gambiae to stimulate expression of endogenous TEP1. We found that artificial elevation of TEP1 expression remains moderate in vivo and that enhancement of endogenous TEP1 expression did not result in increased resistance to Plasmodium. Taken together, our results reveal the difficulty of artificially influencing TEP1-mediated Plasmodium resistance, and contribute to further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying mosquito resistance to Plasmodium parasites.

  1. Transgenic Expression of the Anti-parasitic Factor TEP1 in the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Volohonsky

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mosquitoes genetically engineered to be resistant to Plasmodium parasites represent a promising novel approach in the fight against malaria. The insect immune system itself is a source of anti-parasitic genes potentially exploitable for transgenic designs. The Anopheles gambiae thioester containing protein 1 (TEP1 is a potent anti-parasitic protein. TEP1 is secreted and circulates in the mosquito hemolymph, where its activated cleaved form binds and eliminates malaria parasites. Here we investigated whether TEP1 can be used to create malaria resistant mosquitoes. Using a GFP reporter transgene, we determined that the fat body is the main site of TEP1 expression. We generated transgenic mosquitoes that express TEP1r, a potent refractory allele of TEP1, in the fat body and examined the activity of the transgenic protein in wild-type or TEP1 mutant genetic backgrounds. Transgenic TEP1r rescued loss-of-function mutations, but did not increase parasite resistance in the presence of a wild-type susceptible allele. Consistent with previous reports, TEP1 protein expressed from the transgene in the fat body was taken up by hemocytes upon a challenge with injected bacteria. Furthermore, although maturation of transgenic TEP1 into the cleaved form was impaired in one of the TEP1 mutant lines, it was still sufficient to reduce parasite numbers and induce parasite melanization. We also report here the first use of Transcription Activator Like Effectors (TALEs in Anopheles gambiae to stimulate expression of endogenous TEP1. We found that artificial elevation of TEP1 expression remains moderate in vivo and that enhancement of endogenous TEP1 expression did not result in increased resistance to Plasmodium. Taken together, our results reveal the difficulty of artificially influencing TEP1-mediated Plasmodium resistance, and contribute to further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying mosquito resistance to Plasmodium parasites.

  2. Matrix attachment regions included in a bicistronic vector enhances and stabilizes follistatin gene expressions in both transgenic cells and transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming HU,Jing GUO,Chunling BAI,Zhuying WEI,Li GAO,Tingmao HU,Shorgan BOU,Guangpeng LI

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, follistatin (FST gene expression vectors with either a bicistronic gene transfer cassette alone, or a bicistron gene cassette carrying a matrix attachment region (MAR were constructed and transfected to bovine fetal fibroblasts. Evaluations of both the integration and expression of exogenous FST indicated that the pMAR-CAG-FST-IRES-AcGFP1-polyA-MAR (pMAR-FST vector had higher capacity to form monoclonal transgenic cells than the vector without MAR, though transient transfection and integration efficiency were similar with either construct. Remarkably, protein expression in transgenic cells with the pMAR-FST vector was significantly higher than that from the bicistronic vector. Exogenous FST was expressed in all of the pMAR-FST transgenic mice at F0, F1 and F2. Total muscle growth in F0 mice was significantly greater than in wild-type mice, with larger muscles in fore and hind limbs of transgenic mice. pMAR-FST transgenic mice were also found with more evenly distributed muscle bundles and thinner spaces between sarcolemma, which suggests a correlation between transgene expression-associated muscle development and the trend of muscle growth. In conclusion, a pMAR-FST vector, which excluded the resistant genes and frame structure, enhances and stabilizes FST gene expressions in both transfected cells and transgenic mice.

  3. [Transgenic animals and animal welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Christoph

    1998-01-01

    Under the pressure of a public vote in Switzerland (7 June 1998) on an initiative to ban the production, use and patenting of transgenic animals, their value for biomedical research and development is intensely debated. In addition, the Swiss legislation has adopted (1992) a constitutional obligation to "take into account the dignity of creatures". The term "dignity of creatures", however, can be interpreted in anthropocentric or biocentric ways. The government has now formulated the legal implications of this term for transgenic animals and plants in various laws including the animal and environmental protection laws. This paper gives arguments for a fair evaluation of trangenic animals from an animal welfare point of view where not only the costs of animal suffering must be considered but also the probability of potential benefit for man. A self-confident research community should allow such an evaluation procedure even in view of an outcome which could ban many uses of transgenic animals

  4. Novel transgenic rice-based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azegami, Tatsuhiko; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2015-04-01

    Oral vaccination can induce both systemic and mucosal antigen-specific immune responses. To control rampant mucosal infectious diseases, the development of new effective oral vaccines is needed. Plant-based vaccines are new candidates for oral vaccines, and have some advantages over the traditional vaccines in cost, safety, and scalability. Rice seeds are attractive for vaccine production because of their stability and resistance to digestion in the stomach. The efficacy of some rice-based vaccines for infectious, autoimmune, and other diseases has been already demonstrated in animal models. We reported the efficacy in mice, safety, and stability of a rice-based cholera toxin B subunit vaccine called MucoRice-CTB. To advance MucoRice-CTB for use in humans, we also examined its efficacy and safety in primates. The potential of transgenic rice production as a new mucosal vaccine delivery system is reviewed from the perspective of future development of effective oral vaccines.

  5. Metagenomic-based impact study of transgenic grapevine rootstock on its associated virome and soil microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    For some crops, the only possible approach to gain a specific trait requires genome modification. The development of virus-resistant transgenic plants based on the pathogen-derived resistance strategy has been a success story for over three decades. However, potential risks associated with the techn...

  6. Health Considerations Regarding Horizontal Transfer of Microbial Transgenes Present in Genetically Modified Crops

    OpenAIRE

    Kleter, Gijs A.; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M; Aarts, Henk J. M.

    2005-01-01

    The potential effects of horizontal gene transfer on human health are an important item in the safety assessment of genetically modified organisms. Horizontal gene transfer from genetically modified crops to gut microflora most likely occurs with transgenes of microbial origin. The characteristics of microbial transgenes other than antibiotic-resistance genes in market-approved genetically modified crops are reviewed. These characteristics include the microbial source, natural function, funct...

  7. THE TRANSGENIC PLANTS – ADVANTAGES REGARDING THEIR CULTIVATION AND POTENTIALLY RISKS CONCERNING THE FOOD SAFETY

    OpenAIRE

    Dana PUSTA; PAŞCA, Ioan; MORAR, Roman; SOBOLU, Rodica; Camelia RĂDUCU; ODAGIU Antonia

    2009-01-01

    During the last decades the genetic modifi ed organisms (GMO) have started to “conquer”, little by little our lives. The most widely used are the trangenic plants, because they have bigger productions and they are resistant to different pests. In the beginning, the spread of the transgenic plants was controlled, but today many countries cultivate genetic modifi ed plants without any control. Among these countries Romania is ahead, starting the cultivation of the transgenic plants in 1999, ver...

  8. Transgenic sugarcane overexpressing CaneCPI-1 negatively affects the growth and development of the sugarcane weevil Sphenophorus levis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Vanessa Karine; Soares-Costa, Andrea; Chakravarthi, Mohan; Ribeiro, Carolina; Chabregas, Sabrina Moutinho; Falco, Maria Cristina; Henrique-Silva, Flavio

    2017-01-01

    Transgenic sugarcane expressing CaneCPI-1 exhibits resistance to Sphenophorus levis larvae. Transgenic plants have widely been used to improve resistance against insect attack. Sugarcane is an economically important crop; however, great losses are caused by insect attack. Sphenophorus levis is a sugarcane weevil that digs tunnels in the stem base, leading to the destruction of the crop. This insect is controlled inefficiently by chemical insecticides. Transgenic plants expressing peptidase inhibitors represent an important strategy for impairing insect growth and development. Knowledge of the major peptidase group present in the insect gut is critical when choosing the most effective inhibitor. S. levis larvae use cysteine peptidases as their major digestive enzymes, primarily cathepsin L-like activity. In this study, we developed transgenic sugarcane plants that overexpress sugarcane cysteine peptidase inhibitor 1 (CaneCPI-1) and assessed their potential through feeding bioassays with S. levis larvae. Cystatin overexpression in the transgenic plants was evaluated using semi-quantitative RT-PCR, RT-qPCR, and immunoblot assays. A 50% reduction of the average weight was observed in larvae that fed on transgenic plants in comparison to larvae that fed on non-transgenic plants. In addition, transgenic sugarcane exhibited less damage caused by larval attack than the controls. Our results suggest that the overexpression of CaneCPI-1 in sugarcane is a promising strategy for improving resistance against this insect.

  9. CsWRKY46, a WRKY transcription factor from cucumber, confers cold resistance in transgenic-plant by regulating a set of cold-stress responsive genes in an ABA-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Yu, Hongjun; Yang, Xueyong; Li, Qiang; Ling, Jian; Wang, Hong; Gu, Xingfang; Huang, Sanwen; Jiang, Weijie

    2016-11-01

    Plant WRKY transcription factors are trans-regulatory proteins that are involved in plant immune responses, development and senescence; however, their roles in abiotic stress are still not well understood, especially in the horticultural crop cucumber. In this study, a novel cucumber WRKY gene, CsWRKY46 was cloned and identified, which was up-regulated in response to cold stress and exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) treatment. CsWRKY46 is belonging to group II of the WRKY family, CsWRKY46 was found exclusively in the nucleus, as indicated by a transient expression assay. Yeast one-hybrid assay shown that CsWRKY46 interact with the W-box in the promoter of ABI5. Transgenic Arabidopsis lines over-expressing CsWRKY46, WRK46-OE1 and WRK46-OE5 had higher seedling survival rates upon freezing treatment compared with that of the wild-type. The above over-expression lines also showed much a higher proline accumulation, less electrolyte leakage and lower malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Furthermore, the CsWRKY46 overexpression lines were hypersensitive to ABA during seed germination, but the seedlings were not. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses revealed that the expression levels of the ABA-responsive transcription factor ABI5 were higher in the WRKY46-OE lines than in wild-type and that the overexpression of CsWRKY46 increased the expression of stress-inducible genes, including RD29A and COR47. Taken together, our results demonstrated that CsWRKY46 from cucumber conferred cold tolerance to transgenic plants and positively regulated the cold signaling pathway in an ABA-dependent manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Cell suspension culture-mediated incorporation of the rice bel gene into transgenic cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Liping; Liu, RuiE; Chu, Bijue; Yu, Xiushuang; Sun, Jie; Jones, Brian; Pan, Gang; Cheng, Xiaofei; Wang, Huizhong; Zhu, Shuijin; Sun, Yuqiang

    2012-01-01

    Cotton plants engineered for resistance to the herbicides, glyphosate or glufosinate have made a considerable impact on the production of the crop worldwide. In this work, embryogenic cell cultures derived from Gossypium hirsutum L. cv Coker 312 hypocotyl callus were transformed via Agrobacterium tumefaciens with the rice cytochrome P450 gene, CYP81A6 (bel). In rice, bel has been shown to confer resistance to both bentazon and sulfanylurea herbicides. Transformed cells were selected on a liquid medium supplemented alternately or simultaneously with kanamycin (50mg/L) and bentazon (4.2 µmol). A total of 17 transgenic cotton lines were recovered, based on the initial resistance to bentazon and on PCR detection of the bel transgene. Bel integration into the cotton genome was confirmed by Southern blot and expression of the transgene was verified by RT-PCR. In greenhouse and experimental plot trials, herbicide (bentazon) tolerance of up to 1250 mg/L was demonstrated in the transgenic plants. Transgenic lines with a single copy of the bel gene showed normal Mendelian inheritance of the characteristic. Importantly, resistance to bentazon was shown to be stably incorporated in the T1, T2 and T3 generations of self-fertilised descendents and in plants outcrossed to another upland cotton cultivar. Engineering resistance to bentazon in cotton through the heterologous expression of bel opens the possibility of incorporating this trait into elite cultivars, a strategy that would give growers a more flexible alternative to weed management in cotton crops.

  11. Cell suspension culture-mediated incorporation of the rice bel gene into transgenic cotton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Ke

    Full Text Available Cotton plants engineered for resistance to the herbicides, glyphosate or glufosinate have made a considerable impact on the production of the crop worldwide. In this work, embryogenic cell cultures derived from Gossypium hirsutum L. cv Coker 312 hypocotyl callus were transformed via Agrobacterium tumefaciens with the rice cytochrome P450 gene, CYP81A6 (bel. In rice, bel has been shown to confer resistance to both bentazon and sulfanylurea herbicides. Transformed cells were selected on a liquid medium supplemented alternately or simultaneously with kanamycin (50mg/L and bentazon (4.2 µmol. A total of 17 transgenic cotton lines were recovered, based on the initial resistance to bentazon and on PCR detection of the bel transgene. Bel integration into the cotton genome was confirmed by Southern blot and expression of the transgene was verified by RT-PCR. In greenhouse and experimental plot trials, herbicide (bentazon tolerance of up to 1250 mg/L was demonstrated in the transgenic plants. Transgenic lines with a single copy of the bel gene showed normal Mendelian inheritance of the characteristic. Importantly, resistance to bentazon was shown to be stably incorporated in the T1, T2 and T3 generations of self-fertilised descendents and in plants outcrossed to another upland cotton cultivar. Engineering resistance to bentazon in cotton through the heterologous expression of bel opens the possibility of incorporating this trait into elite cultivars, a strategy that would give growers a more flexible alternative to weed management in cotton crops.

  12. Stable transmission and transcription of newfoundland ocean pout type III fish antifreeze protein (AFP) gene in transgenic mice and hypothermic storage of transgenic ovary and testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagis, Haydar; Aktoprakligil, Digdem; Mercan, Hande Odaman; Yurdusev, Nevzat; Turgut, Gazi; Sekmen, Sakir; Arat, Sezen; Cetin, Seyfettin

    2006-11-01

    Here we describe the generation of transgenic mice carrying type III fish antifreeze protein (AFP) gene and evaluate whether AFP type III protects transgenic mouse ovaries and testes from hypothermic storage. AFPs exist in many different organisms. In fish, AFPs protect the host from freezing at temperatures below the colligative freezing point by adsorbing to the surface of nucleating ice crystals and inhibiting their growth. The transgenic expression of AFP holds great promise for conferring freeze-resistant plant and animal species. AFP also exhibits a potential for the cryopreservation of tissues and cells. In this study, we have generated 42 founder mice harboring the Newfoundland ocean pout (OP5A) type III AFP transgene and established one transgenic line (the line #6). This study demonstrated that AFP gene construct has been stably transmitted to the mouse progeny in the F3 generations in the line #6. Furthermore, the presence of AFP transcripts was confirmed by RT-PCR analysis on cDNAs from liver, kidney, ovarian, and testis tissues of the mouse from F3 generation in this line. These results indicate that ocean pout type III AFP gene could be integrated and transmitted to the next generation and stably transcribed in transgenic mice. In histological analysis of testis and ovarian tissues of nontransgenic control and AFP transgenic mice it has been shown that both tissues of AFP transgenic mice were protected from hypothermic storage (+4 degrees C). The AFP III transgenic mice obtained for the first time in this study would be useful for investigating the biological functions of AFP in mammalian systems and also its potential role in cryopreservation.

  13. Defence-related gene expression in transgenic lemon plants producing an antimicrobial Trichoderma harzianum endochitinase during fungal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distefano, Gaetano; La Malfa, Stefano; Vitale, Alessandro; Lorito, Matteo; Deng, Ziniu; Gentile, Alessandra

    2008-10-01

    Constitutive over-expression of antifungal genes from microorganisms involved in plant defence mechanisms represents a promising strategy for conferring genetic resistance against a broad range of plant pathogenic fungi. In the present work, two transgenic lemon clones with the chit42 gene from Trichoderma harzianum were tested for resistance to fungal disease and expression level of defence-related genes was evaluated. Different resistance-related processes, such as production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), systemic acquired resistance (SAR) and induced systemic resistance (ISR), were monitored in transgenic and wild type lemon clones inoculated with Botrytis cinerea, the causal agent of grey mould in citrus. Expression of genes that encode gluthatione peroxidase (GPX), a producer of ROS, chitinases, glucanases (SAR), PAL, HPL, and AOS (ISR) was measured by quantitative PCR during the first 24 h after leaf inoculation. Leaves of transgenic lemon plants inoculated with B. cinerea showed significantly less lesion development than wild type leaves. Tissues from detached leaves of different transgenic lemon clones showed a significant correlation between resistance and transgene expression. On the other hand, the over-expression of the transgenic fungal gene enhanced by two-three folds transcript levels of genes associated with enhanced ROS production and ISR establishment, while the expression of native chitinase and glucanase genes involved in SAR was down-regulated.

  14. Variable patterns of expression of luciferase in transgenic tobacco leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, W M

    1990-01-01

    A carboxyl-terminally modified firefly luciferase, encoded as a gene fusion to the neomycin phosphotransferase gene (which confers kanamycin resistance), was found to be enzymatically active for both enzymes when expressed in bacteria and in transgenic plants. A military-type starlight vision system was used to conveniently analyze the pattern of gene expression in transgenic tobacco plant leaves. Transgenic tobacco plants which expressed luciferase uniformly in all areas of the leaf, and assays for luciferin, demonstrated that luciferin rapidly penetrates all regions of a tobacco leaf in at least two dimensions. Depending on the test gene structure or, presumably, on the transferred DNA (T-DNA) insertional context, other transgenic plants were obtained that expressed luciferase with a wide range of nonuniform patterns from nominally the same cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. For instance, the veins can be dark, while only the interveinal regions of the leaf lamina glow, or only the small capillary veins glow, or only the major veins glow. Local and/or systemic induction in response to wounding was also demonstrated. Images PMID:2251262

  15. Arabidopsis genes, AtNPR1, AtTGA2 and AtPR-5, confer partial resistance to soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) when overexpressed in transgenic soybean roots

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matthews, Benjamin F; Beard, Hunter; Brewer, Eric; Kabir, Sara; MacDonald, Margaret H; Youssef, Reham M

    2014-01-01

    .... Here we translate knowledge gained from studies using Arabidopsis to soybean. The ability of thirty-one Arabidopsis genes encoding important components of SA and JA synthesis and signaling in conferring resistance to soybean cyst nematode (SCN...

  16. Tanscriptomic Study of the Soybean-Fusarium virguliforme Interaction Revealed a Novel Ankyrin-Repeat Containing Defense Gene, Expression of Whose during Infection Led to Enhanced Resistance to the Fungal Pathogen in Transgenic Soybean Plants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ngaki, Micheline N; Wang, Bing; Sahu, Binod B; Srivastava, Subodh K; Farooqi, Mohammad S; Kambakam, Sekhar; Swaminathan, Sivakumar; Bhattacharyya, Madan K

    2016-01-01

      Fusarium virguliforme causes the serious disease sudden death syndrome (SDS) in soybean. Host resistance to this pathogen is partial and is encoded by a large number of quantitative trait loci, each conditioning small effects...

  17. Transgenic Anopheles gambiae expressing an antimalarial peptide suffer no significant fitness cost.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare C McArthur

    Full Text Available Mosquito-borne diseases present some of the greatest health challenges faced by the world today. In many cases, existing control measures are compromised by insecticide resistance, pathogen tolerance to drugs and the lack of effective vaccines. In light of these difficulties, new genetic tools for disease control programmes, based on the deployment of genetically modified mosquitoes, are seen as having great promise. Transgenic strains may be used to control disease transmission either by suppressing vector populations or by replacing susceptible with refractory genotypes. In practice, the fitness of the transgenic strain relative to natural mosquitoes will be a critical determinant of success. We previously described a transgenic strain of Anopheles gambiae expressing the Vida3 peptide into the female midgut following a blood-meal, which exhibited significant protection against malaria parasites. Here, we investigated the fitness of this strain relative to non-transgenic controls through comparisons of various life history traits. Experiments were designed, as far as possible, to equalize genetic backgrounds and heterogeneity such that fitness comparisons focussed on the presence and expression of the transgene cassette. We also employed reciprocal crosses to identify any fitness disturbance associated with inheritance of the transgene from either the male or female parent. We found no evidence that the presence or expression of the effector transgene or associated fluorescence markers caused any significant fitness cost in relation to larval mortality, pupal sex ratio, fecundity, hatch rate or longevity of blood-fed females. In fact, fecundity was increased in transgenic strains. We did, however, observe some fitness disturbances associated with the route of inheritance of the transgene. Maternal inheritance delayed male pupation whilst paternal inheritance increased adult longevity for both males and unfed females. Overall, in comparison to

  18. Enhancing banana weevil ( Cosmopolites sordidus ) resistance by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this review, the current status of banana weevil resistance, sources of resistance and resistance mechanisms is assessed. Further, current efforts and future prospects for identifying resistance genes outside the genus Musa with potential to control banana weevil in a transgenic approach are outlined and discussed.

  19. Pollen-mediated gene flow from transgenic perennial creeping bentgrass and hybridization at the landscape level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luz Zapiola

    Full Text Available The planting of 162 ha of transgenic glyphosate-resistant creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera near Madras, OR, USA, allowed a unique opportunity to study gene flow over time from a perennial outcrossing species at the landscape level. While conducting a four year in situ survey, we collected panicles and leaf tissue samples from creeping bentgrass and its sexually compatible species. Seeds from the panicles were planted, and seedlings were tested in the greenhouse for expression of the transgene. Gene flow via pollen was found in all four years, at frequencies of 0.004 to 2.805%. Chloroplast markers, in combination with internal transcribed spacer nuclear sequence analysis, were used to aid in identification of transgenic interspecific and intergeneric hybrid seedlings found during the testing and of established plants that could not be positively identified in the field. Interspecific transgenic hybrids produced on redtop (Agrostis gigantea plants in situ were identified three of the four years and one intergeneric transgenic creeping bentgrass x rabbitfoot grass (Polypogon monspeliensis hybrid was identified in 2005. In addition, we confirmed a non-transgenic creeping bentgrass x redtop hybrid in situ, demonstrating that interspecific hybrids have established in the environment outside production fields. Results of this study should be considered for deregulation of transgenic events, studies of population dynamics, and prediction of gene flow in the environment.

  20. A transgenic approach to control hemipteran insects by expressing insecticidal genes under phloem-specific promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaid, Shaista; Amin, Imran; Jander, Georg; Mukhtar, Zahid; Saeed, Nasir A; Mansoor, Shahid

    2016-10-06

    The first generation transgenic crops used strong constitutive promoters for transgene expression. However, tissue-specific expression is desirable for more precise targeting of transgenes. Moreover, piercing/sucking insects, which are generally resistant to insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins, have emerged as a major pests since the introduction of transgenic crops expressing these toxins. Phloem-specific promoters isolated from Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) were used for the expression of two insecticidal proteins, Hadronyche versuta (Blue Mountains funnel-web spider) neurotoxin (Hvt) and onion leaf lectin, in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Here we demonstrate that transgenic plants expressing Hvt alone or in combination with onion leaf lectin are resistant to Phenacoccus solenopsis (cotton mealybug), Myzus persicae (green peach aphids) and Bemisia tabaci (silver leaf whitefly). The expression of both proteins under different phloem-specific promoters resulted in close to 100% mortality and provided more rapid protection than Hvt alone. Our results suggest the employment of the Hvt and onion leaf lectin transgenic constructs at the commercial level will reduce the use of chemical pesticides for control of hemipteran insect pests.

  1. The development of a reproducible Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation system for garlic (Allium sativum L.) and the production of transgenic garlic resistant to beet armyworm (Spodoptera exigua Hübner)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng Sijun, S.J.; Henken, B.; Ahn, Y.K.; Krens, F.A.; Kik, C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a reliable transformation system for garlic (Allium sativum L.) and its application in producing insect resistant GM garlic lines. The transformation system is based on Agrobacterium tumefaciens as a vector, using young callus derived from different callus

  2. Expression of apoplast-targeted plant defensin MtDef4.2 confers resistance to leaf rust pathogen Puccinia triticina but does not affect mycorrhizal symbiosis in transgenic wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust diseases caused by Puccinia spp. pose a major threat to global wheat production. Puccinia triticina (Pt), an obligate basidiomycete biotroph, causes leaf rust disease which incurs yield losses of up to 50% in wheat. Historically, resistant wheat cultivars have been used to control leaf rust, bu...

  3. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  4. The presence of Bt-transgenic oilseed rape in wild mustard populations affects plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongbo; Stewart, C Neal; Li, Junsheng; Huang, Hai; Zhang, Xitao

    2015-12-01

    The adventitious presence of transgenic plants in wild plant populations is of ecological and regulatory concern, but the consequences of adventitious presence are not well understood. Here, we introduced Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac (Bt)-transgenic oilseed rape (Bt OSR, Brassica napus) with various frequencies into wild mustard (Brassica juncea) populations. We sought to better understand the adventitious presence of this transgenic insecticidal crop in a wild-relative plant population. We assessed the factors of competition, resource availability and diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) infestation on plant population dynamics. As expected, Bt OSR performed better than wild mustard in mixed populations under herbivore attack in habitats with enough resources, whereas wild mustard had higher fitness when Bt OSR was rarer in habitats with limited resources. Results suggest that the presence of insect-resistant transgenic plants could decrease the growth of wild mustard and Bt OSR plants and their populations, especially under high herbivore pressure.

  5. Agribusiness Perspectives on Transgenic Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Bill

    2017-01-01

    Declining yields of the major human food crops, looming growth in global population and rise of populism, and ill-founded bans on agricultural and horticultural crops and foodstuffs which are genetically modified have potentially serious implications. It makes the chance less than otherwise would be the case that agribusiness value chains in the future will meet the growing demand around the world for more and different foods from more and wealthier people. In the agribusiness value chain, transgenic wheat, meeting a consumer "trigger need" also must meet the "experience" and "credence," risk-related criteria of well-informed consumers. Public policy that rejects science-based evidence about the reductions in costs of production and price of genetically modified agricultural products and the science about the safety of genetically modified foods, including transgenic wheat, has imposed significant costs on producers and consumers. If the science-based evidence is accepted, transgenic wheat has potential to improve significantly the well-being of grain growers and consumers all over the world.

  6. Can we stop transgenes from taking a walk on the wild side?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugosch, Katrina M; Whitton, Jeannette

    2008-03-01

    Whether the potential costs associated with broad-scale use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) outweigh possible benefits is highly contentious, including within the scientific community. Even among those generally in favour of commercialization of GM crops, there is nonetheless broad recognition that transgene escape into the wild should be minimized. But is it possible to achieve containment of engineered genetic elements in the context of large scale agricultural production? In a previous study, Warwick et al. (2003) documented transgene escape via gene flow from herbicide resistant (HR) canola (Brassica napus) into neighbouring weedy B. rapa populations (Fig. 1) in two agricultural fields in Quebec, Canada. In a follow-up study in this issue of Molecular Ecology, Warwick et al. (2008) show that the transgene has persisted and spread within the weedy population in the absence of selection for herbicide resistance. Certainly a trait like herbicide resistance is expected to spread when selected through the use of the herbicide, despite potentially negative epistatic effects on fitness. However, Warwick et al.'s findings suggest that direct selection favouring the transgene is not required for its persistence. So is there any hope of preventing transgene escape into the wild?

  7. Impacts of transgenic poplar-cotton agro-ecosystems upon target pests and non-target insects under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D J; Liu, J X; Lu, Z Y; Li, C L; Comada, E; Yang, M S

    2015-07-27

    Poplar-cotton agro-ecosystems are the main agricultural planting modes of cotton fields in China. With increasing acres devoted to transgenic insect-resistant poplar and transgenic insect-resistant cotton, studies examining the effects of transgenic plants on target and non-target insects become increasingly important. We systematically surveyed populations of both target pests and non-target insects for 4 different combinations of poplar-cotton eco-systems over 3 years. Transgenic Bt cotton strongly resisted the target insects Fall webworm moth [Hyphantria cunea (Drury)], Sylepta derogata Fabrieius, and American bollworm (Heliothis armigera), but no clear impact on non-target insect cotton aphids (Aphis gossypii). Importantly, intercrops containing transgenic Pb29 poplar significantly increased the inhibitory effects of Bt cotton on Fall webworm moth in ecosystem IV. Highly resistant Pb29 poplar reduced populations of the target pests Grnsonoma minutara Hubner and non-target insect poplar leaf aphid (Chaitophorus po-pulialbae), while Fall webworm moth populations were unaffected. We determined the effects of Bt toxin from transgenic poplar and cotton on target and non-target pests in different ecosystems of cotton-poplar intercrops and identified the synergistic effects of such combinations toward both target and non-target insects.

  8. Optimization of Biofuel Production From Transgenic Microalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2013-0145 OPTIMIZATION OF BIOFUEL PRODUCTION FROM TRANSGENIC MICROALGAE Richard Sayre Donald Danforth...Technical 20080815 to 20120630 OPTIMIZATION OF BIOFUEL PRODUCTION FROM TRANSGENIC MICROALGAE FA9550-08-1-0451 Richard Sayre Donald Danforth Plant...BIOFUEL PRODUCTION FROM TRANSGENIC MICROALGAE Grant/Contract Number: FA9550-08-1-0451 Reporting Period: Final Report Abstract: We have compared the

  9. Expression Systems and Species Used for Transgenic Animal Bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Yanli Wang; Sihai Zhao; Liang Bai; Jianglin Fan; Enqi Liu

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic animal bioreactors can produce therapeutic proteins with high value for pharmaceutical use. In this paper, we compared different systems capable of producing therapeutic proteins (bacteria, mammalian cells, transgenic plants, and transgenic animals) and found that transgenic animals were potentially ideal bioreactors for the synthesis of pharmaceutical protein complexes. Compared with other transgenic animal expression systems (egg white, blood, urine, seminal plasma, and silkworm ...

  10. A comparative study of element concentrations and binding in transgenic and non-transgenic soybean seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Mataveli, LRV; Pohl, P.; Mounicou, S; Arruda, MAZ; Szpunar, J

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic and non-transgenic soybean seeds were compared in terms of total element concentrations, behavior of elements during sequential extraction fractionation and element bioaccessibility using an in vitro simulated gastrointestinal digestion. The analysis were carried out by ICP-sector field-MS or size-exclusion ICP-MS (25 elements in concentrations varying from ng g(-1) to the % level). It seems that transgenic and non-transgenic soybean seeds exhibit statistically significant differen...

  11. Relative Fitness of Transgenic vs. Non-Transgenic Maize x Teosinte Hybrids: a Field Evalutation

    OpenAIRE

    Clegg, J.; Ellstrand, N. C.; Guadagnuolo, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Concern has been often expressed regarding the impact and persistence of transgenes that enter wild populations via gene flow. The impact of a transgene and its persistence are largely determined by the relative fitness of transgenic hybrids and hybrid derivatives compared to non-transgenic plants. Nevertheless, few studies have addressed this question experimentally in the field. Despite the economic importance of maize, and the fact that it naturally hybridizes with the teosinte taxon Zea m...

  12. Production of transgenic kiwifruit plants harboring the SbtCry1Ac gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H Y; Liu, H M; Liu, X Z

    2015-07-28

    The kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis Planch.) is an economically and nutritionally important fruit crop that has a remarkably high vitamin C content and is popular throughout the world. However, kiwifruit plants are vulnerable to attack from pests, and effective pest control is urgently required. Transgenic kiwifruit plants containing the synthetic chimeric gene SbtCry1Ac that encodes the insecticidal protein btCrylAc were obtained through an Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of kiwifruit leaf discs. The kanamycin resistance of the transgenic plants was then analyzed. Results from polymerase chain reactions and genomic DNA Southern blot analyses indicated that SbtCrylAc had been integrated into the genomes of these plants. The results of insect bioassays revealed that the average Oraesia excavate inhibition rate of plants tested at 10 days post-infestation was 75.2%. To our knowledge, this is the first study that has developed insect-resistant transgenic kiwifruit plants.

  13. A Brief History of Promoter Development for Use in Transgenic Maize Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuccio, Michael L

    2018-01-01

    Promoters regulate gene expression, and are essential biotechnology tools. Since its introduction in the mid-1990s, biotechnology has greatly enhanced maize productivity primarily through the development of insect control and herbicide tolerance traits. Additional biotechnology applications include improving seed nutrient composition, industrial protein production, therapeutic production, disease resistance, abiotic stress resistance, and yield enhancement. Biotechnology has also greatly expanded basic research into important mechanisms that govern plant growth and reproduction. Many novel promoters have been developed to facilitate this work, but only a few are widely used. Transgene optimization includes a variety of strategies some of which effect promoter structure. Recent reviews examine the state of the art with respect to transgene design for biotechnology applications. This chapter examines the use of transgene technology in maize, focusing on the way promoters are selected and used. The impact of new developments in genomic technology on promoter structure is also discussed.

  14. Fontes de resistência em melancia aos principais potyvírus isolados de cucurbitáceas no Nordeste brasileiro Sources of resistance in watermelon to the main cucurbit potyvírus isolated in the Northeast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanuzia B. de Oliveira

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A melancia, Citrullus spp., pode ser infetada por várias espécies de vírus, dentre as quais se destacam as pertencentes à família Potyviridae. Visando identificar fontes de resistência a potyvírus, foi iniciado na UFC um programa de indexação do banco de germoplasma de melancia da Embrapa Semi-Árido. Foram utilizadas as espécies de potyvírus, isoladas de cucurbitáceas no Nordeste: Papaya ringspot virus type W (PRSV-W; Watermelon mosaic virus-2 (WMV-2 e Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV. Dos 50 acessos de melancia avaliados, 37 pertencem a Citrullus lanatus, 9 a C. lanatus var. citroides e 4 a C. colocynthis. Em casa-de-vegetação foram inoculadas 4 plantas envasadas de cada acesso com PRSV-W, 4 com WMV-2 e 4 com ZYMV, ficando 4 sem inoculação. As inoculações foram efetuadas 8 dias após o plantio, e 15 dias depois. As plantas assintomáticas foram reinoculadas. As plantas que persistiram sem sintomas, após um período de 25 dias após a primeira inoculação, foram testadas por ELISA contra os anti-soros correspondentes. Dentre os acessos avaliados, 5 mostraram-se resistentes aos 3 vírus, um resistente somente ao PRSV-W, 21 resistentes somente ao ZYMV e nenhum com resistência isolada ao WMV-2. No entanto, 45 acessos apresentaram resistência ao ZYMV isoladamente ou em combinação com outro potyvírus. Os acessos suscetíveis, apresentaram sintomas 10 dias após a primeira inoculação enquanto que os resistentes permaneceram sem sintomas após a segunda inoculação e com resultados negativos em ELISA. Alguns acessos poderão ser cruzados visando obter populações segregantes para a seleção de indivíduos homozigotos recessivos e, juntamente com os acessos com resistência tripla identificados, ampliar a variabilidade genética de fontes quanto a características de planta e fruto.The watermelon, Citrullus spp., can be infected by several virus species from the Potyviridae family. In the Universidade Federal do Cear

  15. The ZmRCP-1 promoter of maize provides root tip specific expression of transgenes in plantain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyango, Stephen O; Roderick, Hugh; Tripathi, Jaindra N; Collins, Richard; Atkinson, Howard J; Oduor, Richard O; Tripathi, Leena

    2016-12-01

    Bananas and plantains (Musa spp.) provide 25 % of the food energy requirements for more than 100 million people in Africa. Plant parasitic nematodes cause severe losses to the crop due to lack of control options. The sterile nature of Musa spp. hampers conventional breeding but makes the crop suitable for genetic engineering. A constitutively expressed synthetic peptide in transgenic plantain has provided resistance against nematodes. Previous work with the peptide in potato plants indicates that targeting expression to the root tip improves the efficacy of the defence mechanism. However, a promoter that will provide root tip specific expression of transgenes in a monocot plant, such as plantain, is not currently available. Here, we report the cloning and evaluation of the maize root cap-specific protein-1 (ZmRCP-1) promoter for root tip targeted expression of transgenes that provide a defence against plant parasitic nematodes in transgenic plantain. Our findings indicate that the maize ZmRCP-1 promoter delivers expression of β-glucuronidase (gusA) gene in roots but not in leaves of transgenic plantains. In mature old roots, expression of gusA gene driven by ZmRCP-1 becomes limited to the root cap. Invasion by the nematode Radopholus similis does not modify Root Cap-specific Protein-1 promoter activity. Root cap-specific protein-1 promoter from maize can provide targeted expression of transgene for nematode resistance in transgenic plantain.

  16. Dual gene expression cassette is superior than single gene cassette for enhancing sheath blight tolerance in transgenic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Subhasis; Molla, Kutubuddin A; Das, Kaushik; Sarkar, Sailendra Nath; Datta, Swapan K; Datta, Karabi

    2017-08-11

    Sheath blight, caused by the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, is a serious and destructive disease of the rice. In order to improve sheath blight resistance, we developed three different kinds of transgenic rice lines. The first transgenic line overexpresses the rice chitinase gene (OsCHI11); the second contains the Arabidopsis NPR1 (AtNPR1) gene and, the third has pyramided constructs with both the genes (OsCHI11 and AtNPR1). This is a comparative study between the single-gene transgenic lines and the double gene transgenic in terms of their ability to activate the plant defense system. Rice plants of each individual construct were screened via PCR, Southern hybridization, activity assays, and expression analysis. The best transgenic lines of each construct were chosen for comparative study. The fold change in qRT-PCR and activity assays revealed that the pyramided transgenic rice plants show a significant upregulation of defense-related genes, PR genes, and antioxidant marker genes as compared to the single transgene. Simultaneous co-expression of both the genes was found to be more efficient in tolerating oxidative stress. In R. solani (RS) toxin assay, mycelial agar disc bioassay, and in vivo plant bioassay, pyramided transgenic plant lines were more competent at restricting the pathogen development and enhancing sheath blight tolerance as compared to single gene transformants.

  17. Transformation of pecan and regeneration of transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGranahan, G H; Leslie, C A; Dandekar, A M; Uratsu, S L; Yates, I E

    1993-09-01

    A gene transfer system developed for walnut (Juglans regia L.) was successfully applied to pecan (Carya illinoensis [Wang] K. Koch). Repetitively embryogenic somatic embryos derived from open-pollinated seed of 'Elliott', 'Wichita', and 'Schley' were co-cultivated with Agrobacterium strain EHA 101/pCGN 7001, which contains marker genes for beta-glucuronidase activity and resistance to kanamycin. Several modifications of the standard walnut transformation techniques were tested, including a lower concentration of kanamycin and a modified induction medium, but these treatments had no measurable effect on efficiency of transformation. Nineteen of the 764 viable inoculated embryos produced transgenic subclones; 13 of these were from the line 'Elliott'6, 3 from 'Schley'5/3, and 3 from 'Wichita'9. Transgenic embryos of 'Wichita'9 germinated most readily and three subclones were successfully micropropagated. Three transgenic plants of one of these subclones were obtained by grafting the tissue cultured shoots to seedling pecan rootstock in the greenhouse. Gene insertion, initially detected by GUS activity, was confirmed by detection of integrated T-DNA sequences using Southern analysis.

  18. Transgenic plants in the social context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Machado Rodríguez

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The new biotechnologies take part of the daily life. Within their branches is the vegetal transgenesis which has revolutionized agriculture, considering itself the superior level of the Green Revolution. The transfer of genes from a specie to another one, from a kingdom to the other has made possible the acquisition, by the plants, of unusual characters having allowed them to survive in inhospitable surroundings, to renew the resources of the substrate, to resist to diseases and plagues, herbicides, hydric stress, to provide better nutrients and phytomedicines where the “green vaccines” stand out. The speed with which these technologies have been developed has allowed taking the transgenic cultures to million hectares in many countries of the world, and the number grows every year. In spite of an absent of reports of environmental damages, nor of human health or animal, for more than 45 years of these practices with recombinant DNA, a strict control is followed case by case in the liberation of these genetically modified organisms (GMO by the biosecurity, which plays a fundamental role in the prevision of risks towards environment and the society. The public opinion is divided about this subject so controverted. That is why it is necessary that the scientists explain clearly about the reach of the vegetal biotechnologies and get involve in the interchange of impressions. Key words: biotechnologies, biosafety, public perception

  19. EXPRESSION OF CHITINASE GENE IN TRANSGENIC RAPE PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Longdou

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The hypocotyl and cotyledon of Brassica napus L. H165 and Brassica juncea DB3 were transformed with chitinase gene and herbicide-resistance gene by co-culture with Agrobacterium tumefacients LBA4404, and rape plants were obtained which could grow on the medium containing herbicide. The PCR result showed that exotic genes were integrated in the genome of the rape. Further study was performed to determine the impact of temperature on the transgenic rate and the differentiation of explants.

  20. A Built-In Strategy to Mitigate Transgene Spreading from Genetically Modified Corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Yu, Hui; Zhang, Fengzhen; Lin, Chaoyang; Gao, Jianhua; Fang, Jun; Ding, Xiahui; Shen, Zhicheng; Xu, Xiaoli

    2013-01-01

    Transgene spreading is a major concern in cultivating genetically modified (GM) corn. Cross-pollination may cause the spread of transgenes from GM cornfields to conventional fields. Occasionally, seed lot contamination, volunteers, mixing during sowing, harvest, and trade can also lead to transgene escape. Obviously, new biological confinement technologies are highly desired to mitigate transgene spreading in addition to physical separation and isolation methods. In this study, we report the development of a built-in containment method to mitigate transgene spreading in corn. In this method, an RNAi cassette for suppressing the expression of the nicosulfuron detoxifying enzyme CYP81A9 and an expression cassette for the glyphosate tolerant 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene G10 were constructed and transformed into corn via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The GM corn plants that were generated were found to be sensitive to nicosulfuron but resistant to glyphosate, which is exactly the opposite of conventional corn. Field tests demonstrated that GM corn plants with silenced CYP81A9 could be killed by applying nicosulfuron at 40 g/ha, which is the recommended dose for weed control in cornfields. This study suggests that this built-in containment method for controlling the spread of corn transgenes is effective and easy to implement. PMID:24324711

  1. Genomic evaluation of oxalate-degrading transgenic soybean in response to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxalate oxidases catalyze the degradation of oxalic acid (OA). Highly resistant transgenic soybean carrying an oxalate oxidase (OxO) gene and its susceptible parent soybean line, AC Colibri, were tested for genome-wide gene expression in response to the necrotrophic, OA producing pathogen Sclerotini...

  2. Transgenic potatoes for potato cyst nematode control can replace pesticide use without impact on soil quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayne Green

    Full Text Available Current and future global crop yields depend upon soil quality to which soil organisms make an important contribution. The European Union seeks to protect European soils and their biodiversity for instance by amending its Directive on pesticide usage. This poses a challenge for control of Globodera pallida (a potato cyst nematode for which both natural resistance and rotational control are inadequate. One approach of high potential is transgenically based resistance. This work demonstrates the potential in the field of a new transgenic trait for control of G. pallida that suppresses root invasion. It also investigates its impact and that of a second transgenic trait on the non-target soil nematode community. We establish that a peptide that disrupts chemoreception of nematodes without a lethal effect provides resistance to G. pallida in both a containment and a field trial when precisely targeted under control of a root tip-specific promoter. In addition we combine DNA barcoding and quantitative PCR to recognise nematode genera from soil samples without microscope-based observation and use the method for nematode faunal analysis. This approach establishes that the peptide and a cysteine proteinase inhibitor that offer distinct bases for transgenic plant resistance to G. pallida do so without impact on the non-target nematode soil community.

  3. Evaluation of glyphosate application on transgenic soybean and its relationship with shikimic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine]-resistant crops (GRC) are the transgenic crops most extensively grown worldwide, with soybean being the major GRC. It is important to evaluate the impact of glyphosate on the shikimate pathway, growth and yield of GR soybean in the field. Furthermore, whether...

  4. Recovery of amiRNA3-PARP1 transgenic maize plants using a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Positive plant selectable marker genes are commonly used in plant transformation because they not only enhance the frequency of generation transgenic tissues but are considered biosafe, unlike antibiotic or herbicide resistance genes. In this study, the binary vector pNOV2819-ubiamiRNA3PARP1, harbouring the ...

  5. Inhibition of cell death as an approach for development of transgenic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc) is one of the major threats to dessert banana (Musa spp.) production. In Uganda, 'Sukali Ndiizi' is one of the most popular dessert banana cultivars and it is highly susceptible to Fusarium wilt. Development of resistant cultivars through transgenic approaches has shown to offer one ...

  6. Occurence of Cucumber Mosaic Virus in Ornamental Plants and Perspectives of Transgenic Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Y.K.

    2003-01-01

    This thesis described the characterization of a range of ornamental-infecting Cucumber mosaic virus strains and the development of novel transgene constructs to improve the efficiency of obtaining resistant transformants which is essential for most ornamental plants that are

  7. Nematode neuropeptides as transgenic nematicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Cheryl; Fleming, Colin C.; Maule, Aaron G.

    2017-01-01

    Plant parasitic nematodes (PPNs) seriously threaten global food security. Conventionally an integrated approach to PPN management has relied heavily on carbamate, organophosphate and fumigant nematicides which are now being withdrawn over environmental health and safety concerns. This progressive withdrawal has left a significant shortcoming in our ability to manage these economically important parasites, and highlights the need for novel and robust control methods. Nematodes can assimilate exogenous peptides through retrograde transport along the chemosensory amphid neurons. Peptides can accumulate within cells of the central nerve ring and can elicit physiological effects when released to interact with receptors on adjoining cells. We have profiled bioactive neuropeptides from the neuropeptide-like protein (NLP) family of PPNs as novel nematicides, and have identified numerous discrete NLPs that negatively impact chemosensation, host invasion and stylet thrusting of the root knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita and the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida. Transgenic secretion of these peptides from the rhizobacterium, Bacillus subtilis, and the terrestrial microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii reduce tomato infection levels by up to 90% when compared with controls. These data pave the way for the exploitation of nematode neuropeptides as a novel class of plant protective nematicide, using novel non-food transgenic delivery systems which could be deployed on farmer-preferred cultivars. PMID:28241060

  8. Nematode neuropeptides as transgenic nematicides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil D Warnock

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant parasitic nematodes (PPNs seriously threaten global food security. Conventionally an integrated approach to PPN management has relied heavily on carbamate, organophosphate and fumigant nematicides which are now being withdrawn over environmental health and safety concerns. This progressive withdrawal has left a significant shortcoming in our ability to manage these economically important parasites, and highlights the need for novel and robust control methods. Nematodes can assimilate exogenous peptides through retrograde transport along the chemosensory amphid neurons. Peptides can accumulate within cells of the central nerve ring and can elicit physiological effects when released to interact with receptors on adjoining cells. We have profiled bioactive neuropeptides from the neuropeptide-like protein (NLP family of PPNs as novel nematicides, and have identified numerous discrete NLPs that negatively impact chemosensation, host invasion and stylet thrusting of the root knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita and the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida. Transgenic secretion of these peptides from the rhizobacterium, Bacillus subtilis, and the terrestrial microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii reduce tomato infection levels by up to 90% when compared with controls. These data pave the way for the exploitation of nematode neuropeptides as a novel class of plant protective nematicide, using novel non-food transgenic delivery systems which could be deployed on farmer-preferred cultivars.

  9. Positron emission tomography : measurement of transgene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, EFJ; Vaalburg, W

    Noninvasive and repetitive imaging of transgene expression can play a pivotal role in the development of gene therapy strategies, as it offers investigators a means to determine the effectiveness of their gene transfection protocols. In the last decade, imaging of transgene expression using positron

  10. [New advances in animal transgenic technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhen-Hong; Miao, Xiang-Yang; Zhu, Rui-Liang

    2010-06-01

    Animal transgenic technology is one of the fastest growing biotechnology in the 21st century. It is used to integrate foreign genes into the animal genome by genetic engineering technology so that foreign genes can be expressed and inherited to the offspring. The transgenic efficiency and precise control of gene expression are the key limiting factors on preparation of transgenic animals. A variety of transgenic techniques are available, each of which has its own advantages and disadvantages and still needs further study because of unresolved technical and safety issues. With the in-depth research, the transgenic technology will have broad application prospects in the fields of exploration of gene function, animal genetic improvement, bioreactor, animal disease models, organ transplantation and so on. This article reviews the recently developed animal gene transfer techniques, including germline stem cell mediated method to improve the efficiency, gene targeting to improve the accuracy, RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing technology, and the induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) transgenic technology. The new transgenic techniques can provide a better platform for the study of trans-genic animals and promote the development of medical sciences, livestock production, and other fields.

  11. Transgenic crops: Current challenges and future perspectives

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-29

    Dec 29, 2008 ... development of Genetically Modified (GM) crops. As the time went on, various social, political, environmental and technical issues related to transgenic crops took their birth. The development of transgenic crops has raised some issues more especially the problem of food and environmental safety, some ...

  12. Will transgenic plants adversely affect the environment?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In general, it seems that large-scale implementation of transgenic insecticidal and herbicide tolerant plants do not display considerable negative effects on the environments and, moreover, at least some transgenic plants can improve the corresponding environments and human health because their production considerably ...

  13. Leaf proteome analysis of transgenic plants expressing antiviral antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Carli, Mariasole; Villani, Maria Elena; Renzone, Giovanni; Nardi, Luca; Pasquo, Alessandra; Franconi, Rosella; Scaloni, Andrea; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Desiderio, Angiola

    2009-02-01

    The expression of exogenous antibodies in plant is an effective strategy to confer protection against viral infection or to produce molecules with pharmaceutical interest. However, the acceptance of the transgenic technology to obtain self-protecting plants depends on the assessment of their substantial equivalence compared to non-modified crops with an established history of safe use. In fact, the possibility exists that the introduction of transgenes in plants may alter expression of endogenous genes and/or normal production of metabolites. In this study, we investigated whether the expression in plant of recombinant antibodies directed against viral proteins may influence the host leaf proteome. Two transgenic plant models, generated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation, were analyzed for this purpose, namely, Lycopersicon esculentum cv. MicroTom and Nicotiana benthamiana, expressing recombinant antibodies against cucumber mosaic virus and tomato spotted wilt virus, respectively. To obtain a significant representation of plant proteomes, optimized extraction procedures have been devised for each plant species. The proteome repertoire of antibody-expressing and control plants was compared by 2-DE associated to DIGE technology. Among the 2000 spots detected within the gels, about 10 resulted differentially expressed in each transgenic model and were identified by MALDI-TOF PMF and muLC-ESI-IT-MS/MS procedures. Protein variations were restricted to a limited number of defined differences with an average ratio below 2.4. Most of the differentially expressed proteins were related to photosynthesis or defense function. The overall results suggest that the expression of recombinant antibodies in both systems does not significantly alter the leaf proteomic profile, contributing to assess the biosafety of resistant plants expressing antiviral antibodies.

  14. Efficient generation of marker-free transgenic rice plants using an improved transposon-mediated transgene reintegration strategy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gao, Xiaoqing; Zhou, Jie; Li, Jun; Zou, Xiaowei; Zhao, Jianhua; Li, Qingliang; Xia, Ran; Yang, Ruifang; Wang, Dekai; Zuo, Zhaoxue; Tu, Jumin; Tao, Yuezhi; Chen, Xiaoyun; Xie, Qi; Zhu, Zengrong; Qu, Shaohong

    2015-01-01

    Marker-free transgenic plants can be developed through transposon-mediated transgene reintegration, which allows intact transgene insertion with defined boundaries and requires only a few primary transformants...

  15. Transgenes and their contributions to epigenetic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Shortly after gene transfer technologies had been established for different plant species, the first reports emerged about transgenes showing unexpected segregation patterns due to unstable expression. Initially, the erratic expression behavior of transgenes was considered a nuisance that impeded the impact and efficiency of a new technology. With the investigation of transgene silencing effects, however, it soon became clear that transgenes had helped us in a rather unexpected way to identify novel molecular pathways that were highly relevant to plant development and evolution. This article gives an account of a journey that started with the analysis of transgene-related silencing events and that led to the discovery of a new molecular world of small RNAs and epigenetic marks that regulate plant gene expression and adaptation to environmental changes.

  16. The draft genome of the transgenic tropical fruit tree papaya ( Carica papaya Linnaeus)

    OpenAIRE

    Ming, Ray; Hou, Shaobin; Feng, Yun; Yu, Qinguyi; Thimmapuram, Jyothi

    2008-01-01

    Papaya, a fruit crop cultivated in tropical and subtropical regions, is known for its nutritional benefits and medicinal applications. Here we report a 3 draft genome sequence of 'SunUp' papaya, the first commercial virus-resistant transgenic fruit tree1 to be sequenced. The papaya genome is three times the size of the Arabidopsis genome, but contains fewer genes, including significantly fewer disease-resistance gene analogues. Comparison of the five sequenced genomes suggests a minimal angio...

  17. The bottle gourd genome provides insights into Cucurbitaceae evolution and facilitates mapping of a Papaya ring-spot virus resistance locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shan; Shamimuzzaman, Md; Sun, Honghe; Salse, Jerome; Sui, Xuelian; Wilder, Alan; Wu, Zujian; Levi, Amnon; Xu, Yong; Ling, Kai-Shu; Fei, Zhangjun

    2017-12-01

    Bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) is an important vegetable crop as well as a rootstock for other cucurbit crops. In this study, we report a high-quality 313.4-Mb genome sequence of a bottle gourd inbred line, USVL1VR-Ls, with a scaffold N50 of 8.7 Mb and the longest of 19.0 Mb. About 98.3% of the assembled scaffolds are anchored to the 11 pseudomolecules. Our comparative genomic analysis identifies chromosome-level syntenic relationships between bottle gourd and other cucurbits, as well as lineage-specific gene family expansions in bottle gourd. We reconstructed the genome of the most recent common ancestor of Cucurbitaceae, which revealed that the ancestral Cucurbitaceae karyotypes consisted of 12 protochromosomes with 18 534 protogenes. The 12 protochromosomes are largely retained in the modern melon genome, while have undergone different degrees of shuffling events in other investigated cucurbit genomes. The 11 bottle gourd chromosomes derive from the ancestral Cucurbitaceae karyotypes followed by 19 chromosomal fissions and 20 fusions. The bottle gourd genome sequence has facilitated the mapping of a dominant monogenic locus, Prs, conferring Papaya ring-spot virus (PRSV) resistance in bottle gourd, to a 317.8-kb region on chromosome 1. We have developed a cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) marker tightly linked to the Prs locus and demonstrated its potential application in marker-assisted selection of PRSV resistance in bottle gourd. This study provides insights into the paleohistory of Cucurbitaceae genome evolution, and the high-quality genome sequence of bottle gourd provides a useful resource for plant comparative genomics studies and cucurbit improvement. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Gene-splitting technology: a novel approach for the containment of transgene flow in Nicotiana tabacum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-Jing Wang

    Full Text Available The potential impact of transgene escape on the environment and food safety is a major concern to the scientists and public. This work aimed to assess the effect of intein-mediated gene splitting on containment of transgene flow. Two fusion genes, EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc, were constructed and integrated into N. tabacum, using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. EPSPSn-In encodes the first 295 aa of the herbicide resistance gene 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS fused with the first 123 aa of the Ssp DnaE intein (In, whereas Ic-EPSPSc encodes the 36 C-terminal aa of the Ssp DnaE intein (Ic fused to the rest of EPSPS C terminus peptide sequences. Both EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc constructs were introduced into the same N. tabacum genome by genetic crossing. Hybrids displayed resistance to the herbicide N-(phosphonomethyl-glycine (glyphosate. Western blot analysis of protein extracts from hybrid plants identified full-length EPSPS. Furthermore, all hybrid seeds germinated and grew normally on glyphosate selective medium. The 6-8 leaf hybrid plants showed tolerance of 2000 ppm glyphosate in field spraying. These results indicated that functional EPSPS protein was reassembled in vivo by intein-mediated trans-splicing in 100% of plants. In order to evaluate the effect of the gene splitting technique for containment of transgene flow, backcrossing experiments were carried out between hybrids, in which the foreign genes EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc were inserted into different chromosomes, and non-transgenic plants NC89. Among the 2812 backcrossing progeny, about 25% (664 plantlets displayed glyphosate resistance. These data indicated that transgene flow could be reduced by 75%. Overall, our findings provide a new and highly effective approach for biological containment of transgene flow.

  19. Western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) dispersal and adaptation to single-toxin transgenic corn deployed with block or blended refuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zaiqi; Onstad, David W; Nowatzki, Timothy M; Stanley, Bruce H; Meinke, Lance J; Flexner, J Lindsey

    2011-08-01

    A simulation model of the temporal and spatial dynamics and population genetics of western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, was created to evaluate the use of block refuges and seed blends in the management of resistance to transgenic insecticidal corn (Zea mays L.). This Bt corn expresses one transgenic corn event, DAS-59122-7, that produces a binary insecticidal protein toxin (Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1) and provides host-plant resistance. The model incorporates the latest information about larval and adult behavior. Results of this modeling effort indicate that the seed-blend scenarios in many cases produced equal or greater durability than block refuges that were relocated each year. Resistance evolved in the most likely scenarios in 10-16 yr. Our standard analysis presumed complete adoption of 59122 corn by all farmers in our hypothetical region, no crop rotation, and 100% compliance with Insect Resistant Management (IRM) regulations. As compliance levels declined, resistance evolved faster when block refuges were deployed. Seed treatments that killed the pest when applied to all seeds in a seed blend or just to seeds in Bt corn blocks delayed evolution of resistance. Greater control of the pest population by the seed treatment facilitated longer durability of the transgenic trait. Therefore, data support the concept that pyramiding a transgenic insecticidal trait with a highly efficacious insecticidal seed treatment can delay evolution of resistance.

  20. Occurrence of Transgenic Feral Alfalfa (Medicago sativa subsp. sativa L. in Alfalfa Seed Production Areas in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie L Greene

    Full Text Available The potential environmental risks of transgene exposure are not clear for alfalfa (Medicago sativa subsp. sativa, a perennial crop that is cross-pollinated by insects. We gathered data on feral alfalfa in major alfalfa seed-production areas in the western United States to (1 evaluate evidence that feral transgenic plants spread transgenes and (2 determine environmental and agricultural production factors influencing the location of feral alfalfa, especially transgenic plants. Road verges in Fresno, California; Canyon, Idaho; and Walla Walla, Washington were surveyed in 2011 and 2012 for feral plants, and samples were tested for the CP4 EPSPS protein that conveys resistance to glyphosate. Of 4580 sites surveyed, feral plants were observed at 404 sites. Twenty-seven percent of these sites had transgenic plants. The frequency of sites having transgenic feral plants varied among our study areas. Transgenic plants were found in 32.7%, 21.4.7% and 8.3% of feral plant sites in Fresno, Canyon and Walla Walla, respectively. Spatial analysis suggested that feral populations started independently and tended to cluster in seed and hay production areas, places where seed tended to drop. Significant but low spatial auto correlation suggested that in some instances, plants colonized nearby locations. Neighboring feral plants were frequently within pollinator foraging range; however, further research is needed to confirm transgene flow. Locations of feral plant clusters were not well predicted by environmental and production variables. However, the likelihood of seed spillage during production and transport had predictive value in explaining the occurrence of transgenic feral populations. Our study confirms that genetically engineered alfalfa has dispersed into the environment, and suggests that minimizing seed spillage and eradicating feral alfalfa along road sides would be effective strategies to minimize transgene dispersal.

  1. Occurrence of Transgenic Feral Alfalfa (Medicago sativa subsp. sativa L.) in Alfalfa Seed Production Areas in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Stephanie L; Kesoju, Sandya R; Martin, Ruth C; Kramer, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The potential environmental risks of transgene exposure are not clear for alfalfa (Medicago sativa subsp. sativa), a perennial crop that is cross-pollinated by insects. We gathered data on feral alfalfa in major alfalfa seed-production areas in the western United States to (1) evaluate evidence that feral transgenic plants spread transgenes and (2) determine environmental and agricultural production factors influencing the location of feral alfalfa, especially transgenic plants. Road verges in Fresno, California; Canyon, Idaho; and Walla Walla, Washington were surveyed in 2011 and 2012 for feral plants, and samples were tested for the CP4 EPSPS protein that conveys resistance to glyphosate. Of 4580 sites surveyed, feral plants were observed at 404 sites. Twenty-seven percent of these sites had transgenic plants. The frequency of sites having transgenic feral plants varied among our study areas. Transgenic plants were found in 32.7%, 21.4.7% and 8.3% of feral plant sites in Fresno, Canyon and Walla Walla, respectively. Spatial analysis suggested that feral populations started independently and tended to cluster in seed and hay production areas, places where seed tended to drop. Significant but low spatial auto correlation suggested that in some instances, plants colonized nearby locations. Neighboring feral plants were frequently within pollinator foraging range; however, further research is needed to confirm transgene flow. Locations of feral plant clusters were not well predicted by environmental and production variables. However, the likelihood of seed spillage during production and transport had predictive value in explaining the occurrence of transgenic feral populations. Our study confirms that genetically engineered alfalfa has dispersed into the environment, and suggests that minimizing seed spillage and eradicating feral alfalfa along road sides would be effective strategies to minimize transgene dispersal.

  2. Rapid characterization of transgenic and non-tra