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Sample records for prpsc limited proteolysis

  1. Recombinant PrPSc shares structural features with brain-derived PrPSc: Insights from limited proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevillano, Alejandro M; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Younas, Neelam; Wang, Fei; R Elezgarai, Saioa; Bravo, Susana; Vázquez-Fernández, Ester; Rosa, Isaac; Eraña, Hasier; Gil, David; Veiga, Sonia; Vidal, Enric; Erickson-Beltran, Melissa L; Guitián, Esteban; Silva, Christopher J; Nonno, Romolo; Ma, Jiyan; Castilla, Joaquín; R Requena, Jesús

    2018-01-01

    Very solid evidence suggests that the core of full length PrPSc is a 4-rung β-solenoid, and that individual PrPSc subunits stack to form amyloid fibers. We recently used limited proteolysis to map the β-strands and connecting loops that make up the PrPSc solenoid. Using high resolution SDS-PAGE followed by epitope analysis, and mass spectrometry, we identified positions ~116/118, 133-134, 141, 152-153, 162, 169 and 179 (murine numbering) as Proteinase K (PK) cleavage sites in PrPSc. Such sites likely define loops and/or borders of β-strands, helping us to predict the threading of the β-solenoid. We have now extended this approach to recombinant PrPSc (recPrPSc). The term recPrPSc refers to bona fide recombinant prions prepared by PMCA, exhibiting infectivity with attack rates of ~100%. Limited proteolysis of mouse and bank vole recPrPSc species yielded N-terminally truncated PK-resistant fragments similar to those seen in brain-derived PrPSc, albeit with varying relative yields. Along with these fragments, doubly N- and C-terminally truncated fragments, in particular ~89/97-152, were detected in some recPrPSc preparations; similar fragments are characteristic of atypical strains of brain-derived PrPSc. Our results suggest a shared architecture of recPrPSc and brain PrPSc prions. The observed differences, in particular the distinct yields of specific PK-resistant fragments, are likely due to differences in threading which result in the specific biochemical characteristics of recPrPSc. Furthermore, recombinant PrPSc offers exciting opportunities for structural studies unachievable with brain-derived PrPSc.

  2. Recombinant PrPSc shares structural features with brain-derived PrPSc suggesting that they have a similar architecture: Insights from limited proteolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    An extensive body of experimental and spectroscopic evidence supports the hypothesis that PrPSc is a multimer of 4-rung ß-solenoids, and that individual PrPSc solenoids stack to form amyloid fibers. We recently used limited proteolysis to map the ß-strands and connecting loops that make up the PrPSc...

  3. Probing the structure of GPI-less PrPSc by limited proteolysis(Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limited proteolysis is a very useful tool to pinpoint flexible regions within scrapie prion protein (PrPSc), but due to carbohydrate and glysosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) moieties, and limitations of the analytical techniques, until now it was impossible to characterize accurately these regions. To...

  4. Conformational changes in DNA gyrase revealed by limited proteolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Maxwell, A

    1998-01-01

    We have used limited proteolysis to identify conformational changes in DNA gyrase. Gyrase exhibits a proteolytic fingerprint dominated by two fragments, one of approximately 62 kDa, deriving from the A protein, and another of approximately 25 kDa from the B protein. Quinolone binding to the enzyme......-DNA complex induces a conformational change which is reflected in the protection of the C-terminal 47-kDa domain of the B protein. An active site mutant (Tyr122 to Ser in the A protein) that binds quinolones but cannot cleave DNA still gives the quinolone proteolytic pattern, while stabilization of a cleaved...

  5. Isolation and characterization of a proteinase K-sensitive PrPSc fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastrana, Miguel A; Sajnani, Gustavo; Onisko, Bruce; Castilla, Joaquín; Morales, Rodrigo; Soto, Claudio; Requena, Jesús R

    2006-12-26

    Recent studies have shown that a sizable fraction of PrPSc present in prion-infected tissues is, contrary to previous conceptions, sensitive to digestion by proteinase K (PK). This finding has important implications in the context of diagnosis of prion disease, as PK has been extensively used in attempts to distinguish between PrPSc and PrPC. Even more importantly, PK-sensitive PrPSc (sPrPSc) might be essential to understand the process of conversion and aggregation of PrPC leading to infectivity. We have isolated a fraction of sPrPSc. This material was obtained by differential centrifugation at an intermediate speed of Syrian hamster PrPSc obtained through a conventional procedure based on ultracentrifugation in the presence of detergents. PK-sensitive PrPSc is completely degraded under standard conditions (50 mug/mL of proteinase K at 37 degrees C for 1 h) and can also be digested with trypsin. Centrifugation in a sucrose gradient showed sPrPSc to correspond to the lower molecular weight fractions of the continuous range of oligomers that constitute PrPSc. PK-sensitive PrPSc has the ability to convert PrPC into protease-resistant PrPSc, as assessed by the protein misfolding cyclic amplification assay (PMCA). Limited proteolysis of sPrPSc using trypsin allows for identification of regions that are particularly susceptible to digestion, i.e., are partially exposed and flexible; we have identified as such the regions around residues K110, R136, R151, K220, and R229. PK-sensitive PrPSc isolates should prove useful for structural studies to help understand fundamental issues of the molecular biology of PrPSc and in the quest to design tests to detect preclinical prion disease.

  6. Limited proteolysis of myoglobin opens channel in ferrochelatase-globin complex for iron to zinc transmetallation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganelli, Marcella O; Grossi, Alberto B; Dores-Silva, Paulo R; Borges, Julio C; Cardoso, Daniel R; Skibsted, Leif H

    2016-11-01

    Recombinant ferrochelatase (BsFECH) from Bacillus subtilis expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) was found by UV-visible spectroscopy to bind the model substrate tetraphenylporphyrin-sulfonate, TPPS, with Ka=3.8 10(5)mol/L in aqueous phosphate buffer pH 5.7 at 30°C, and to interact with metmyoglobin with Ka=1.07±0.13 10(5)mol/L at 30°C. The iron/zinc exchange in myoglobin occurring during maturation of Parma hams seems to depend on such substrate binding to BsFECH and was facilitated by limited pepsin proteolysis of myoglobin to open a reaction channel for metal exchange still with BsFECH associated to globin. BsFECH increased rate of zinc insertion in TPPS significantly and showed saturation kinetics with an apparent binding constant of Zn(II) to the [enzyme-TPPS] complex of 1.3 10(4)mol/L and a first-order rate constant of 6.6 10(-1)s(-1) for dissociation of the tertiary complex, a similar pattern was found for zinc/iron transmetallation in myoglobin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Limited proteolysis and peptide mapping for comparability of biopharmaceuticals: An evaluation of repeatability, intra-assay precision and capability to detect structural change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Camille; Burkitt, Will; Perraud, Xavier; O'Hara, John; Jone, Carl

    2016-05-10

    The use of limited proteolysis followed by peptide mapping for the comparability of the higher-order structure of biopharmaceuticals was investigated. In this approach the proteolysis is performed under non-reducing and non-denaturing conditions, and the resulting peptide map is determined by the samples primary and higher order structures. This allows comparability of biopharmaceuticals to be made in terms of their higher order structure, using a method that is relatively simple to implement. The digestion of a monoclonal antibody under non-denaturing conditions was analyzed using peptide mapping, circular dichroism (CD) and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). This allowed an optimal digestion time to be chosen. This method was then assessed for its ability to detect structural change using a monoclonal antibody, which had been subjected to a range of stresses; deglycosylation, mild denaturation and a batch that had failed specifications due to in-process reduction. The repeatability and inter-assay precision were assessed. It was demonstrated that the limited proteolysis peptide maps of the three stressed samples were significantly different to control samples and that the differences observed were consistent between the occasions when the assays were run. A combination of limited proteolysis and CD or SDS-PAGE analysis was shown to enhance the capacity of these techniques to detect structural change, which otherwise would not have been observed. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Proteinase K and the structure of PrPSc: The good, the bad and the ugly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Christopher J; Vázquez-Fernández, Ester; Onisko, Bruce; Requena, Jesús R

    2015-09-02

    Infectious proteins (prions) are, ironically, defined by their resistance to proteolytic digestion. A defining characteristic of the transmissible isoform of the prion protein (PrP(Sc)) is its partial resistance to proteinase K (PK) digestion. Diagnosis of prion disease typically relies upon immunodetection of PK-digested PrP(Sc) by Western blot, ELISA or immunohistochemical detection. PK digestion has also been used to detect differences in prion strains. Thus, PK has been a crucial tool to detect and, thereby, control the spread of prions. PK has also been used as a tool to probe the structure of PrP(Sc). Mass spectrometry and antibodies have been used to identify PK cleavage sites in PrP(Sc). These results have been used to identify the more accessible, flexible stretches connecting the β-strand components in PrP(Sc). These data, combined with physical constraints imposed by spectroscopic results, were used to propose a qualitative model for the structure of PrP(Sc). Assuming that PrP(Sc) is a four rung β-solenoid, we have threaded the PrP sequence to satisfy the PK proteolysis data and other experimental constraints. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Surface expression and limited proteolysis of ADAM10 are increased by a dominant negative inhibitor of dynamin

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    Slack Barbara E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amyloid precursor protein (APP is cleaved by β- and γ-secretases to generate toxic amyloid β (Aβ peptides. Alternatively, α-secretases cleave APP within the Aβ domain, precluding Aβ formation and releasing the soluble ectodomain, sAPPα. We previously showed that inhibition of the GTPase dynamin reduced APP internalization and increased release of sAPPα, apparently by prolonging the interaction between APP and α-secretases at the plasma membrane. This was accompanied by a reduction in Aβ generation. In the present study, we investigated whether surface expression of the α-secretase ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease10 is also regulated by dynamin-dependent endocytosis. Results Transfection of human embryonic kidney (HEK cells stably expressing M3 muscarinic receptors with a dominant negative dynamin I mutant (dyn I K44A, increased surface expression of both immature, and mature, catalytically active forms of co-expressed ADAM10. Surface levels of ADAM10 were unaffected by activation of protein kinase C (PKC or M3 receptors, indicating that receptor-coupled shedding of the ADAM substrate APP is unlikely to be mediated by inhibition of ADAM10 endocytosis in this cell line. Dyn I K44A strongly increased the formation of a C-terminal fragment of ADAM10, consistent with earlier reports that the ADAM10 ectodomain is itself a target for sheddases. The abundance of this fragment was increased in the presence of a γ-secretase inhibitor, but was not affected by M3 receptor activation. The dynamin mutant did not affect the distribution of ADAM10 and its C-terminal fragment between raft and non-raft membrane compartments. Conclusions Surface expression and limited proteolysis of ADAM10 are regulated by dynamin-dependent endocytosis, but are unaffected by activation of signaling pathways that upregulate shedding of ADAM substrates such as APP. Modulation of ADAM10 internalization could affect cellular behavior in two

  10. Characterization of IgG1 immunoglobulins and peptide-Fc fusion proteins by limited proteolysis in conjunction with LC-MS.

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    Kleemann, Gerd R; Beierle, Jill; Nichols, Andrew C; Dillon, Thomas M; Pipes, Gary D; Bondarenko, Pavel V

    2008-03-15

    A combinatory approach for the characterization of post-translational and chemical modifications in high molecular weight therapeutic proteins like antibodies and peptide-Fc fusion proteins (MW > or = 50 000 Da) is presented. In this approach, well-established techniques such as limited proteolysis, reversed-phase (RP) high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and in-line mass spectrometry (MS) were combined for the characterization of a monoclonal IgG1 antibody and three different peptide-Fc fusion proteins. The one commonality of these molecules is the presence of a similarly accessible lysine residue either located in the flexible hinge region of the antibody or in the flexible linker of the peptide-Fc fusion proteins. Applying limited proteolysis using endoproteinase Lys-C resulted in the predominant cleavage C-terminal of this lysine residue. The created fragments, two identical Fab domain fragments and one Fc domain fragment derived from the IgG1 antibody and one Fc domain fragment and each of the three individual peptide moieties generated from the peptide-Fc fusion proteins, were readily accessible for complete separation by RP-HPLC and detailed characterization by in-line MS analysis. This approach facilitated rapid detection of a variety of chemical modifications such as methionine oxidation, disulfide bond scrambling, and reduction as well as the characterization of various carbohydrate chains. We found limited proteolysis followed by RP-HPLC-MS to be less time-consuming for sample preparation, analysis, and data interpretation than traditional peptide mapping procedures. At the same time, the reduced sample complexity provided superior chromatographic and mass spectral resolution than the analysis of the corresponding intact molecules or a large number of enzymatically generated fragments.

  11. Fully validated LCMS bioanalysis of Bevacizumab in human plasma using nano-surface and molecular-orientation limited (nSMOL) proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Noriko; Umino, Yukari; Aoki, Chikage; Yamane, Naoe; Hamada, Akinobu; Shimada, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    The chemistry of nano-surface and molecular-orientation limited (nSMOL) proteolysis is the Fab-selective limited proteolysis by making use the difference of protease nanoparticle diameter (200 nm) and antibody resin pore diameter (100 nm). In this report, we have demonstrated that the full validation for Bevacizumab bioanalysis in human plasma using nSMOL. The immunoglobulin fraction was collected by Protein A resin from plasma, then nSMOL reaction was performed using the FG nanoparticle-immobilized trypsin under the nondenaturing physiological condition at 50 °C for 6 h. After removal of resin and nanoparticles, the signature peptide of Bevacizumab complementarity-determining region (CDR) and internal standard P14R were simultaneously quantified by LCMS multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). This nSMOL method quantification of Bevacizumab showed sensitivity of 0.146 μg/ml and linearity of 0.146-300 μg/ml. The intra- and inter-assay precision of lower limit of quantification (LLOQ), low quality control (LQC), middle quality control (MQC), and high quality control (HQC) was 7.94-15.2% and 14.6%, 7.15-13.5% and 11.7%, 2.63-6.47% and 5.83%, and 3.09-4.35% and 4.45%, respectively. These results indicate that nSMOL is also significant method for Bevacizumab bioanalysis in human plasma. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Accumulation profiles of PrPSc in hemal nodes of naturally and experimentally scrapie-infected sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In classical scrapie, the disease-associated abnormal isoform (PrPSc) of normal prion protein accumulates principally in the nervous system and lymphoid tissues of small ruminants. Lymph nodes traffic leukocytes via lymphatic and blood vasculatures but hemal nodes lack lymphatic vessels and thus traffic leukocytes only via the blood. Although PrPSc accumulation profiles are well-characterized in ovine lymphoid tissues, there is limited information on such profiles in hemal nodes. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the follicular accumulation of PrPSc within hemal nodes and lymph nodes by prion epitope mapping and western blot studies. Results Our studies found that PrPSc accumulation in 82% of animals’ abdominal hemal nodes when PrPSc is detected in both mesenteric and retropharyngeal lymph nodes collected from preclinical and clinical, naturally and experimentally (blood transfusion) scrapie-infected sheep representing all three major scrapie-susceptible Prnp genotypes. Abdominal hemal nodes and retropharyngeal lymph nodes were then used to analyze immune cell phenotypes and PrPSc epitope mapping by immunohistochemistry and PrPSc banding patterns by western blot. Similar patterns of PrPSc accumulation were detected within the secondary follicles of hemal nodes and retropharyngeal lymph nodes, where cellular labeling was mostly associated with macrophages and follicular dendritic cells. The pattern of PrPSc accumulation within hemal nodes and retropharyngeal lymph nodes also did not differ with respect to epitope mapping with seven mAbs (N-terminus, n = 4; globular domain, n = 2; C-terminus, n = 1) in all three Prnp genotypes. Western blot analysis of hemal node and retropharyngeal lymph node homogenates revealed identical three banding patterns of proteinase K resistant PrPSc. Conclusion Despite the anatomical difference in leukocyte trafficking between lymph nodes and hemal nodes, the follicles of hemal nodes appear to

  13. The Structure of PrPSc Prions

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    Holger Wille

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available PrPSc (scrapie isoform of the prion protein prions are the infectious agent behind diseases such as Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease in humans, bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle, chronic wasting disease in cervids (deer, elk, moose, and reindeer, as well as goat and sheep scrapie. PrPSc is an alternatively folded variant of the cellular prion protein, PrPC, which is a regular, GPI-anchored protein that is present on the cell surface of neurons and other cell types. While the structure of PrPC is well studied, the structure of PrPSc resisted high-resolution determination due to its general insolubility and propensity to aggregate. Cryo-electron microscopy, X-ray fiber diffraction, and a variety of other approaches defined the structure of PrPSc as a four-rung β-solenoid. A high-resolution structure of PrPSc still remains to be solved, but the four-rung β-solenoid architecture provides a molecular framework for the autocatalytic propagation mechanism that gives rise to the alternative conformation of PrPSc. Here, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the structure of PrPSc and speculate about the molecular conversion mechanisms that leads from PrPC to PrPSc.

  14. L-lysine escinat, thiotriazolin, gordox and mydocalm influence on oxygen tension in the intestinal wall and acid-base balance and limited proteolysis in intestinal venous blood in terms of intraabdominal hypertension modeling

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    Sapegin V.I.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In acute experiments on rabbits there were studied changes in oxygen tension in the intestinal wall tissues, acid-base balance and limited proteolysis and its inhibitors in intestinal venous blood, protective action of L-lysine escinat (0,15 mg/kg / single dose, thiotriazolin (25 mg/kg / single dose, aprotinin (gordox (10,000 units/kg / single dose in sequential modeling of standard levels increasing of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH — 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350 m H2O, and also of tolperison (mydocalm (5 mg/kg / single dose on modeling of stable 3-hour IAH 200 m H2O. The IAH modeling was performed by means of stand of our construction. Under the influence of IAH the compensated metabolic acidosis in intestinal venous blood with a compensative hyperpnoe develops, decline of oxygen tension in tissues and activating of a limited proteolysis as well as decline of its inhibitors activity in intestinal venous blood occur. By the degree of metabolic acidosis prevention investigational preparations were distributed as follows gordox > thiotriazolin = L-lysine escinat = mydocalm, and by prevention of decline of oxygen tension in tissues — thiotriazolin > L-lysine escinat > mydocalm > gordox, it is is connected with different rate of methabolic products excretion into the blood, due to the influence on blood circulation and transcapilary exchange. By the degree of prevention of proteolytic activity and inhibitory potential changes, investigational preparations were distributed as follows: gordox > mydocalm > thiotriazolin > L-lysine escinat, this is connected with inhibition of proteolysis in gordox, and in other ones – with reduction of ischemic damage of tissues. Owing to different mechanism of action thiotriazolin, L-lysine escinat and mydocalm may be simultaneously recommended for a conservative treatment of patients with intraabdominal hypertension syndrome.

  15. A novel method for preclinical detection of PrPSc in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Richard; Chang, Binggong; Gray, Perry; Piltch, Martin; Bulgin, Marie S; Sorensen-Melson, Sharon; Miller, Michael W

    2010-07-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that a moderate amount of protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) coupled to a novel surround optical fibre immunoassay (SOFIA) detection scheme can be used to detect the disease-associated form of the prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in protease-untreated plasma from preclinical and clinical scrapie sheep, and white-tailed deer with chronic wasting disease, following natural and experimental infection. PrP(Sc), resulting from a conformational change of the normal (cellular) form of prion protein (PrP(C)), is considered central to neuropathogenesis and serves as the only reliable molecular marker for prion disease diagnosis. While the highest levels of PrP(Sc) are present in the central nervous system, the development of a reasonable diagnostic assay requires the use of body fluids that characteristically contain exceedingly low levels of PrP(Sc). PrP(Sc) has been detected in the blood of sick animals by means of PMCA technology. However, repeated cycling over several days, which is necessary for PMCA of blood material, has been reported to result in decreased specificity (false positives). To generate an assay for PrP(Sc) in blood that is both highly sensitive and specific, we have utilized limited serial PMCA (sPMCA) with SOFIA. We did not find any enhancement of sPMCA with the addition of polyadenylic acid nor was it necessary to match the genotypes of the PrP(C) and PrP(Sc) sources for efficient amplification.

  16. Expression, limited proteolysis and preliminary crystallographic analysis of IpaD, a component of the Shigella flexneri type III secretion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Steven [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Roversi, Pietro [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Espina, Marianela [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas (United States); Deane, Janet E. [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Birket, Susan; Picking, William D. [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas (United States); Blocker, Ariel [Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Picking, Wendy L. [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas (United States); Lea, Susan M., E-mail: susan.lea@path.ox.ac.uk [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2006-09-01

    IpaD, the putative needle-tip protein of the S. flexneri type III secretion system, has been crystallized in a variety of crystal forms using in-drop proteolysis. Native and selenomethionine-labelled data collection and preliminary analyses are reported. IpaD, the putative needle-tip protein of the Shigella flexneri type III secretion system, has been overexpressed and purified. Crystals were grown of the native protein in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 55.9, b = 100.7, c = 112.0 Å, and data were collected to 2.9 Å resolution. Analysis of the native Patterson map revealed a peak at 50% of the origin on the Harker section v = 0.5, suggesting twofold non-crystallographic symmetry parallel to the b crystallographic axis. As attempts to derivatize or grow selenomethionine-labelled protein crystals failed, in-drop proteolysis was used to produce new crystal forms. A trace amount of subtilisin Carlsberg was added to IpaD before sparse-matrix screening, resulting in the production of several new crystal forms. This approach produced SeMet-labelled crystals and diffraction data were collected to 3.2 Å resolution. The SeMet crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 139.4, b = 45.0, c = 99.5 Å, β = 107.9°. An anomalous difference Patterson map revealed peaks on the Harker section v = 0, while the self-rotation function indicates the presence of a twofold noncrystallographic symmetry axis, which is consistent with two molecules per asymmetric unit.

  17. Re-assessment of PrP(Sc distribution in sporadic and variant CJD.

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    Richard Rubenstein

    Full Text Available Human prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders associated with an accumulation of PrP(Sc in the central nervous system (CNS. Of the human prion diseases, sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD, which has no known origin, is the most common form while variant CJD (vCJD is an acquired human prion disease reported to differ from other human prion diseases in its neurological, neuropathological, and biochemical phenotype. Peripheral tissue involvement in prion disease, as judged by PrP(Sc accumulation in the tonsil, spleen, and lymph node has been reported in vCJD as well as several animal models of prion diseases. However, this distribution of PrP(Sc has not been consistently reported for sCJD. We reexamined CNS and non-CNS tissue distribution and levels of PrP(Sc in both sCJD and vCJD. Using a sensitive immunoassay, termed SOFIA, we also assessed PrP(Sc levels in human body fluids from sCJD as well as in vCJD-infected humanized transgenic mice (Tg666. Unexpectedly, the levels of PrP(Sc in non-CNS human tissues (spleens, lymph nodes, tonsils from both sCJD and vCJD did not differ significantly and, as expected, were several logs lower than in the brain. Using protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA followed by SOFIA, PrP(Sc was detected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, but not in urine or blood, in sCJD patients. In addition, using PMCA and SOFIA, we demonstrated that blood from vCJD-infected Tg666 mice showing clinical disease contained prion disease-associated seeding activity although the data was not statistically significant likely due to the limited number of samples examined. These studies provide a comparison of PrP(Sc in sCJD vs. vCJD as well as analysis of body fluids. Further, these studies also provide circumstantial evidence that in human prion diseases, as in the animal prion diseases, a direct comparison and intraspecies correlation cannot be made between the levels of PrP(Sc and infectivity.

  18. Plasminogen: A cellular protein cofactor for PrPSc propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Charles E; Ryou, Chongsuk

    2011-01-01

    The biochemical essence of prion replication is the molecular multiplication of the disease-associated misfolded isoform of prion protein (PrP), termed PrPSc, in a nucleic acid-free manner. PrP(Sc) is generated by the protein misfolding process facilitated by conformational conversion of the host-encoded cellular PrP to PrP(Sc). Evidence suggests that an auxiliary factor may play a role in PrP(Sc) propagation. We and others previously discovered that plasminogen interacts with PrP, while its functional role for PrPSc propagation remained undetermined. In our recent in vitro PrP conversion study, we showed that plasminogen substantially stimulates PrP(Sc) propagation in a concentration-dependent manner by accelerating the rate of PrP(Sc) generation, while depletion of plasminogen, destabilization of its structure, and interference with the PrP-plasminogen interaction hinder PrP(Sc) propagation. Further investigation in cell culture models confirmed an increase of PrP(Sc) formation by plasminogen. Although molecular basis of the observed activity for plasminogen remain to be addressed, our results demonstrate that plasminogen is the first cellular protein auxiliary factor proven to stimulate PrP(Sc) propagation.

  19. Structural studies of PrPSc

    OpenAIRE

    Vázquez Fernández, Ester

    2013-01-01

    Elucidation of the structure of PrPSc continues to be one major challenge in prion research. Molecular basis of the biology of prion protein, such as the molecular mechanism of prion replication and aggregation, the species barrier and the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration will not be understood until the structure is solved. Given that high-resolution techniques such as NMR or X-ray crystallography cannot be used, a number of lower resolution analytical approaches have been attempted.

  20. Plasminogen: A cellular protein cofactor for PrPSc propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Mays, Charles E; Ryou, Chongsuk

    2011-01-01

    The biochemical essence of prion replication is the molecular multiplication of the disease-associated misfolded isoform of prion protein (PrP), termed PrPSc, in a nucleic acid-free manner. PrPSc is generated by the protein misfolding process facilitated by conformational conversion of the host-encoded cellular PrP to PrPSc. Evidence suggests that an auxiliary factor may play a role in PrPSc propagation. We and others previously discovered that plasminogen interacts with PrP, while its functi...

  1. PK-sensitive PrPSc is infectious and shares basic structural features with PK-resistant PrPSc

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the main characteristics of the transmissible isoform of the prion protein (PrPSc) is its partial resistance to proteinase K (PK) digestion. Diagnosis of prion disease typically relies upon immunodetection of PK-digested PrPSc following Western blot or ELISA. More recently, researchers determ...

  2. Product inhibition in native-state proteolysis.

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    Joseph R Kasper

    Full Text Available The proteolysis kinetics of intact proteins by nonspecific proteases provides valuable information on transient partial unfolding of proteins under native conditions. Native-state proteolysis is an approach to utilize the proteolysis kinetics to assess the energetics of partial unfolding in a quantitative manner. In native-state proteolysis, folded proteins are incubated with nonspecific proteases, and the rate of proteolysis is determined from the disappearance of the intact protein. We report here that proteolysis of intact proteins by nonspecific proteases, thermolysin and subtilisin deviates from first-order kinetics. First-order kinetics has been assumed for the analysis of native-state proteolysis. By analyzing the kinetics of proteolysis with varying concentrations of substrate proteins and also with cleavage products, we found that the deviation from first-order kinetics results from product inhibition. A kinetic model including competitive product inhibition agrees well with the proteolysis time course and allows us to determine the uninhibited rate constant for proteolysis as well as the apparent inhibition constant. Our finding suggests that the likelihood of product inhibition must be considered for quantitative assessment of proteolysis kinetics.

  3. Characterization of prion protein (PrP)-derived peptides that discriminate full-length PrPSc from PrPC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Anthony L; Yam, Alice Y; Michelitsch, Melissa M D; Wang, Xuemei; Gao, Carol; Goodson, Robert J; Shimizu, Robert; Timoteo, Gulliver; Hall, John; Medina-Selby, Angelica; Coit, Doris; McCoin, Colin; Phelps, Bruce; Wu, Ping; Hu, Celine; Chien, David; Peretz, David

    2007-07-10

    On our initial discovery that prion protein (PrP)-derived peptides were capable of capturing the pathogenic prion protein (PrP(Sc)), we have been interested in how these peptides interact with PrP(Sc). After screening peptides from the entire human PrP sequence, we found two peptides (PrP(19-30) and PrP(100-111)) capable of binding full-length PrP(Sc) in plasma, a medium containing a complex mixture of other proteins including a vast excess of the normal prion protein (PrP(C)). The limit of detection for captured PrP(Sc) was calculated to be 8 amol from a approximately 10(5)-fold dilution of 10% (wt/vol) human variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease brain homogenate, with >3,800-fold binding specificity to PrP(Sc) over PrP(C). Through extensive analyses, we show that positively charged amino acids play an important, but not exclusive, role in the interaction between the peptides and PrP(Sc). Neither hydrophobic nor polar interactions appear to correlate with binding activity. The peptide-PrP(Sc) interaction was not sequence-specific, but amino acid composition affected binding. Binding occurs through a conformational domain that is only present in PrP(Sc), is species-independent, and is not affected by proteinase K digestion. These and other findings suggest a mechanism by which cationic domains of PrP(C) may play a role in the recruitment of PrP(C) to PrP(Sc).

  4. Inhibition of cholesterol recycling impairs cellular PrPSc propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Gilch, Sabine; Bach, Christian; Lutzny, Gloria; Vorberg, Ina; Sch?tzl, Hermann M.

    2009-01-01

    The infectious agent in prion diseases consists of an aberrantly folded isoform of the cellular prion protein (PrPc), termed PrPSc, which accumulates in brains of affected individuals. Studies on prion-infected cultured cells indicate that cellular cholesterol homeostasis influences PrPSc propagation. Here, we demonstrate that the cellular PrPSc content decreases upon accumulation of cholesterol in late endosomes, as induced by NPC-1 knock-down or treatment with U18666A. PrPc trafficking, lip...

  5. Modulation of Glycosaminoglycans Affects PrPSc Metabolism but Does Not Block PrPSc Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Hanna; Graßmann, Andrea; Bester, Romina; Hossinger, André; Möhl, Christoph; Paulsen, Lydia; Groschup, Martin H; Schätzl, Hermann; Vorberg, Ina

    2015-10-01

    Mammalian prions are unconventional infectious agents composed primarily of the misfolded aggregated host prion protein PrP, termed PrP(Sc). Prions propagate by the recruitment and conformational conversion of cellular prion protein into abnormal prion aggregates on the cell surface or along the endocytic pathway. Cellular glycosaminoglycans have been implicated as the first attachment sites for prions and cofactors for cellular prion replication. Glycosaminoglycan mimetics and obstruction of glycosaminoglycan sulfation affect prion replication, but the inhibitory effects on different strains and different stages of the cell infection have not been thoroughly addressed. We examined the effects of a glycosaminoglycan mimetic and undersulfation on cellular prion protein metabolism, prion uptake, and the establishment of productive infections in L929 cells by two mouse-adapted prion strains. Surprisingly, both treatments reduced endogenous sulfated glycosaminoglycans but had divergent effects on cellular PrP levels. Chemical or genetic manipulation of glycosaminoglycans did not prevent PrP(Sc) uptake, arguing against their roles as essential prion attachment sites. However, both treatments effectively antagonized de novo prion infection independently of the prion strain and reduced PrP(Sc) formation in chronically infected cells. Our results demonstrate that sulfated glycosaminoglycans are dispensable for prion internalization but play a pivotal role in persistently maintained PrP(Sc) formation independent of the prion strain. Recently, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) became the focus of neurodegenerative disease research as general attachment sites for cell invasion by pathogenic protein aggregates. GAGs influence amyloid formation in vitro. GAGs are also found in intra- and extracellular amyloid deposits. In light of the essential role GAGs play in proteinopathies, understanding the effects of GAGs on protein aggregation and aggregate dissemination is crucial for

  6. Infectivity-associated PrPSc and disease duration-associated PrPSc of mouse BSE prions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Okada, Hiroyuki; Masujin, Kentaro; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Disease-related prion protein (PrPSc), which is a structural isoform of the host-encoded cellular prion protein, is thought to be a causative agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. However, the specific role of PrPSc in prion pathogenesis and its relationship to infectivity remain controversial. A time-course study of prion-affected mice was conducted, which showed that the prion infectivity was not simply proportional to the amount of PrPSc in the brain. Centrifugation (20,000 ×g) of the brain homogenate showed that most of the PrPSc was precipitated into the pellet, and the supernatant contained only a slight amount of PrPSc. Interestingly, mice inoculated with the obtained supernatant showed incubation periods that were approximately 15 d longer than those of mice inoculated with the crude homogenate even though both inocula contained almost the same infectivity. Our results suggest that a small population of fine PrPSc may be responsible for prion infectivity and that large, aggregated PrPSc may contribute to determining prion disease duration. PMID:26555211

  7. Sodium valproate does not augment Prpsc in murine neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, C; Casagrande, F; Andrieu, T; Dormont, D; Clayette, P

    2007-10-01

    Sodium valproate (VPA) has been reported to increase the accumulation of the pathologic isoform of prion protein (PrPsc) in scrapie-infected murine neuroblastoma cells. In this study, the effect of VPA on PrPsc accumulation was investigated in murine N2a neuroblastoma cells chronically infected with scrapie strain 22L (N2a-22L). No accumulation of PrPsc was detected after short-term (3 days) or long-term (21 days) treatment of N2a-22L cells with 4.8, 12, 18 or 24 microM VPA. Higher VPA concentrations (240 and 600 microM) also failed to augment PrPsc expression. In conclusion, in our experimental conditions, no deleterious effect was induced by VPA on prions replication.

  8. Heterogeneity of the Abnormal Prion Protein (PrPSc) of the Chandler Scrapie Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Kazuo; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Masujin, Kentaro; Imamura, Morikazu; Mohri, Shirou; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2013-02-18

    The pathological prion protein, PrPSc, displays various sizes of aggregates. In this study, we investigated the conformation, aggregation stability and proteinase K (PK)-sensitivity of small and large PrPSc aggregates of mouse-adapted prion strains. We showed that small PrPSc aggregates, previously thought to be PK-sensitive, are resistant to PK digestion. Furthermore, we showed that small PrPSc aggregates of the Chandler scrapie strain have greater resistance to PK digestion and aggregation-denaturation than large PrPSc aggregates of this strain. We conclude that this strain consists of heterogeneous PrPSc.

  9. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis: emergent role in cell signalling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Aonghus J; Coleman-Vaughan, Caroline; McCarthy, Justin V

    2017-10-27

    Receptor signalling events including those initiated following activation of cytokine and growth factor receptors and the well-characterised death receptors (tumour necrosis factor receptor, type 1, FasR and TRAIL-R1/2) are initiated at the cell surface through the recruitment and formation of intracellular multiprotein signalling complexes that activate divergent signalling pathways. Over the past decade, research studies reveal that many of these receptor-initiated signalling events involve the sequential proteolysis of specific receptors by membrane-bound proteases and the γ-secretase protease complexes. Proteolysis enables the liberation of soluble receptor ectodomains and the generation of intracellular receptor cytoplasmic domain fragments. The combined and sequential enzymatic activity has been defined as regulated intramembrane proteolysis and is now a fundamental signal transduction process involved in the termination or propagation of receptor signalling events. In this review, we discuss emerging evidence for a role of the γ-secretase protease complexes and regulated intramembrane proteolysis in cell- and immune-signalling pathways. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  10. The N-terminal cleavage site of PrPSc from BSE differs from that of PrPSc from scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hiroko K; Yokoyama, Takashi; Takata, Masuhiro; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Imamura, Morikazu; Ushiki, Yuko K; Shinagawa, Morikazu

    2005-03-25

    Heterogeneity in transmissible spongiform encephalopathy is thought to have derived from conformational variation in an abnormal isoform of the prion protein (PrPSc). To characterize PrPSc in bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and scrapie, we analyzed the newly generated N-terminus of PrPSc isoforms by digestion with proteinase K (PK). With a lower concentration of PK, the terminal amino acid of BSE PrPSc converged at N96. Under the same conditions, however, the terminal amino acid of scrapie PrPSc was G81 or G85. Furthermore, with an increase of PK concentration, the N-terminal amino acid was shifted and converged at G89. The results suggest that the PK cleavage site of BSE PrPSc is uniform and is different from the cleavage site of scrapie PrPSc.

  11. Efficient proteolysis strategies based on microchip bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang; Bao, Huimin; Zhang, Luyan; Chen, Gang

    2013-04-26

    In proteome research, proteolysis is an important procedure prior to the mass spectrometric identification of proteins. The typical time of conventional in-solution proteolysis is as long as several hours to half a day. To enhance proteolysis efficiency, a variety of microchip bioreactors have been developed for the rapid digestion and identification of proteins in the past decade. This review mainly focuses on the recent advances and the key strategies of microchip bioreactors in protein digestion. The subjects covered include microchip proteolysis systems, the immobilization of proteases in microchannels, the applications of microchip bioreactors in highly efficient proteolysis, and future prospects. It is expected that microchip bioreactors will become powerful tools in protein analysis and will find a wide range of applications in high-throughput protein identification. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Peptide aptamers expressed in the secretory pathway interfere with cellular PrPSc formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilch, Sabine; Kehler, Claudia; Schätzl, Hermann M

    2007-08-10

    Prion diseases are rare and obligatory fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by the accumulation of a misfolded isoform (PrPSc) of the host-encoded prion protein (PrPc). Prophylactic and therapeutic regimens against prion diseases are very limited. To extend such strategies we selected peptide aptamers binding to PrP from a combinatorial peptide library presented on the Escherichia coli thioredoxin A (trxA) protein as a scaffold. In a yeast two-hybrid screen employing full-length murine PrP (aa 23-231) as a bait we identified three peptide aptamers that reproducibly bind to PrP. Treatment of prion-infected cells with recombinantly expressed aptamers added to the culture medium abolished PrPSc conversion with an IC50 between 350 and 700 nM. For expression in eukaryotic cells, peptide aptamers were fused to an N-terminal signal peptide for entry of the secretory pathway. The C terminus was modified by a glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol-(GPI) anchoring signal, a KDEL retention motif and the transmembrane and cytosolic domain of LAMP-I, respectively. These peptide aptamers retained their binding properties to PrPc and, depending on peptide sequence and C-terminal modification, interfered with endogenous PrPSc conversion upon expression in prion-infected cells. Notably, infection of cell cultures could be prevented by expression of KDEL peptide aptamers. For the first time, we show that trxA-based peptide aptamers can be targeted to the secretory pathway, thereby not losing the affinity for their target protein. Beside their inhibitory effect on prion conversion, these molecules could be used as fundament for rational drug design.

  13. Immunoreactivity of specific epitopes of PrPSc is enhanced by pretreatment in a hydrated autoclave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, T; Momotani, E; Kimura, K; Yuasa, N

    1996-01-01

    An abnormal protein (PrPSc) accumulates in animals affected with scrapie. Immunoblotting procedures have been used widely to detect PrPSc. Blotted membranes were subjected to pretreatment in a hydrated autoclave, and the subsequent immunoreactivity of PrPSc was examined. The immunoreactivity of PrPSc to antisera against the synthetic peptides of the mouse PrP amino acid sequences 199 to 208 and 213 to 226 was enhanced by the pretreatment. However, the reactivity to antisera of peptide sequences 100 to 115 and 165 to 174 was not affected. The antibody-binding ability of the specific epitopes which are located close to the C-terminal end of PrP27-30 the proteinase-resistant portion of PrPSc, was enhanced by pretreatment in a hydrated autoclave. This pretreatment increased the sensitivity of PrPSc, and it would be useful for diagnosis of scrapie. PMID:8807215

  14. Ionic strength and transition metals control PrPSc protease resistance and conversion-inducing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishina, Koren; Jenks, Samantha; Supattapone, Surachai

    2004-09-24

    The essential component of infectious prions is a misfolded protein termed PrPSc, which is produced by conformational change of a normal host protein, PrPC. It is currently unknown whether PrPSc molecules exist in a unique conformation or whether they are able to undergo additional conformational changes. Under commonly used experimental conditions, PrPSc molecules are characteristically protease-resistant and capable of inducing the conversion of PrPC molecules into new PrPSc molecules. We describe the effects of ionic strength, copper, and zinc on the conformation-dependent protease resistance and conversion-inducing activity of PrPSc molecules in scrapie-infected hamster brains. In the absence of divalent cations, PrPSc molecules were > 20-fold more sensitive to proteinase K digestion in low ionic strength buffers than in high ionic strength buffers. Addition of micromolar concentrations of copper or zinc ions restored the protease resistance of PrPSc molecules under conditions of low ionic strength. These transition metals also controlled the conformation of purified truncated PrP-(27-30) molecules at low ionic strength, confirming that the N-terminal octapeptide repeat region of PrPSc is not required for binding to copper or zinc ions. The protease-sensitive and protease-resistant conformations of PrPSc were reversibly interchangeable, and only the protease-resistant conformation of PrPSc induced by high ionic strength was able to induce the formation of new protease-resistant PrP (PrPres) molecules in vitro. These findings show that PrPSc molecules are structurally interconvertible and that only a subset of PrPSc conformations are able to induce the conversion of other PrP molecules. Copyright 2004 American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Prion inhibition with multivalent PrPSc binding compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Charles E; Joy, Shaon; Li, Lei; Yu, Linghui; Genovesi, Sacha; West, Frederick G; Westaway, David

    2012-10-01

    Quinacrine and related heterocyclic compounds have antiprion activity. Since the infectious pathogen of prion diseases is composed of multimeric PrP(Sc) assemblies, we hypothesized that this antiprion property could be enhanced by attaching multiple quinacrine-derived chloroquinoline or acridine moieties to a scaffold. In addition to exploring Congo red dye and tetraphenylporphyrin tetracarboxylic acid scaffolds, which already possess intrinsic prion-binding ability; trimesic acid was used in this role. In practice, Congo red itself could not be modified with chloroquinoline or acridine units, and a modified dicarboxyl analog was also unreactive. The latter also lacked antiprion activity in infected cultured cells. While addition of chloroquinoline to a tetraphenylporphyrin tetracarboxylic acid scaffold resulted in some reduction of PrP(Sc), moieties attached to a trimesic acid scaffold exhibited sub-micromolar IC(50)'s as well as a toxicity profile superior to quinacrine. Antiprion activity of these molecules was influenced by the length, polarity, and rigidity associated with the variable linear or cyclic polyamine tethers, and in some instances was modulated by host-cell and/or strain type. Unexpectedly, several compounds in our series increased PrP(Sc) levels. Overall, inhibitory and enhancing properties of these multivalent compounds offer new avenues for structure-based investigation of prion biology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Alternative fates of newly formed PrPSc upon prion conversion on the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goold, Rob; McKinnon, Chris; Rabbanian, Samira; Collinge, John; Schiavo, Giampietro; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2013-08-15

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative diseases characterised by the accumulation of misfolded prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in the brain. They are caused by the templated misfolding of normal cellular protein, PrP(C), by PrP(Sc). We have recently generated a unique cell system in which epitope-tagged PrP(C) competent to produce bona fide PrP(Sc) is expressed in neuroblastoma cells. Using this system we demonstrated that PrP(Sc) forms on the cell surface within minutes of prion exposure. Here, we describe the intracellular trafficking of newly formed PrP(Sc). After formation in GM1-enriched lipid microdomains at the plasma membrane, PrP(Sc) is rapidly internalised to early endosomes containing transferrin and cholera toxin B subunit. Following endocytosis, PrP(Sc) intracellular trafficking diverges: some is recycled to the plasma membrane via Rab11-labelled recycling endosomes; the remaining PrP(Sc) is subject to retromer-mediated retrograde transport to the Golgi. This pathway leads to lysosomal degradation, and we show that this is the dominant PrP(Sc) degradative mechanism in the early stages of prion infection.

  17. PrPSc in Salivary Glands of Scrapie-Affected Sheep▿

    OpenAIRE

    Vascellari, Marta; Nonno, Romolo; Mutinelli, Franco; Bigolaro, Michela; Di Bari, Michele Angelo; Melchiotti, Erica; Marcon, Stefano; D'Agostino, Claudia; Vaccari, Gabriele; Conte, Michela; De Grossi, Luigi; Rosone, Francesca; Giordani, Francesco; Agrimi, Umberto

    2007-01-01

    The salivary glands of scrapie-affected sheep and healthy controls were investigated for the presence of the pathological prion protein (PrPSc). PrPSc was detected in major (parotid and mandibular) and minor (buccal, labial, and palatine) salivary glands of naturally and experimentally infected sheep. Using Western blotting, the PrPSc concentration in glands was estimated to be 0.02 to 0.005% of that in brain. Immunohistochemistry revealed intracellular depositions of PrPSc in ductal and acin...

  18. Alternative fates of newly formed PrPSc upon prion conversion on the plasma membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Goold, Rob; McKinnon, Chris; Rabbanian, Samira; Collinge, John; Schiavo, Giampietro; Tabrizi, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative diseases characterised by the accumulation of misfolded prion protein (PrPSc) in the brain. They are caused by the templated misfolding of normal cellular protein, PrPC, by PrPSc. We have recently generated a unique cell system in which epitope-tagged PrPC competent to produce bona fide PrPSc is expressed in neuroblastoma cells. Using this system we demonstrated that PrPSc forms on the cell surface within minutes of prion exposure. Here, we describe ...

  19. Proteolysis and consistency of Meshanger cheese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de L.

    1978-01-01

    Proteolysis in Meshanger cheese, estimated by quantitative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is discussed. The conversion of α s1 -casein was proportional to rennet concentration in the cheese. Changes in consistency, after a maximum, were correlated to breakdown of

  20. Proteolysis controls endogenous substance P levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Mitchell

    Full Text Available Substance P (SP is a prototypical neuropeptide with roles in pain and inflammation. Numerous mechanisms regulate endogenous SP levels, including the differential expression of SP mRNA and the controlled secretion of SP from neurons. Proteolysis has long been suspected to regulate extracellular SP concentrations but data in support of this hypothesis is scarce. Here, we provide evidence that proteolysis controls SP levels in the spinal cord. Using peptidomics to detect and quantify endogenous SP fragments, we identify the primary SP cleavage site as the C-terminal side of the ninth residue of SP. If blocking this pathway increases SP levels, then proteolysis controls SP concentration. We performed a targeted chemical screen using spinal cord lysates as a proxy for the endogenous metabolic environment and identified GM6001 (galardin, ilomastat as a potent inhibitor of the SP(1-9-producing activity present in the tissue. Administration of GM6001 to mice results in a greater-than-three-fold increase in the spinal cord levels of SP, which validates the hypothesis that proteolysis controls physiological SP levels.

  1. Biology of PrPsc accumulation in two natural scrapie-infected sheep flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplazi, Patrick; O'Rourke, Katherine; Wolf, Cynthia; Shaw, Daniel; Baszler, Timothy V

    2004-11-01

    Sheep scrapie is a prion disease that requires interaction of exogenous prions with host prion protein (PrP) supporting prion formation. Disease is associated with deposition of a host-generated conformational variant of PrP, PrPsc, in a variety of tissues, including brain, resulting in fatal spongiform encephalopathy. Efficiency of PrPsc formation is determined by polymorphisms in the PrP-coding sequence. This article adds to previous data of natural sheep scrapie, concentrating on the effect of host genotype and age on PrPsc accumulation patterns during preclinical and clinical disease. Two entire scrapie-infected, predominantly Suffolk-cross, sheep flocks euthanized for regulatory purposes were genotyped and analyzed for PrPsc deposition in various tissues using single- and dual-label immunohistochemistry. Scrapie, as defined by PrPsc deposition, occurred in 13/80 sheep. Preclinical disease was evident in nearly 70% of infected sheep, ranging in age from 14 months to 7 years. PrPsc accumulated systemically in the nervous tissue, various lymphoid tissues, both alimentary tract related and non-alimentary tract related, and the placenta. Clinical neurological illness was always associated with spongiform encephalopathy and PrPsc deposition in the brain. Only 6 of 9 sheep with preclinical scrapie had PrPsc deposition in the brain but widespread PrPsc deposition in peripheral lymphoid tissue, supporting previous data showing peripheral PrPsc accumulation preceding deposition in the brain. PrPsc colocalized with a marker for follicular dendritic cells throughout the lymphoid system. PrPsc also accumulated in the peripheral nervous system, particularly the nervous supply of the gastrointestinal tract. Abundant PrPsc was evident in trophoblast cells of placentomes but not in the endometrium, myometrium, or associated nervous plexus. PrPsc deposits were not observed in the mammary parenchyma or bone marrow. Scrapie susceptibility was defined genetically by PrP codon 171

  2. Distribution of Peripheral PrPSc in Sheep with Naturally Acquired Scrapie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, María Carmen; Monzón, Marta; Marín, Belén; Badiola, Juan José; Monleón, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of prion protein (PrPSc) in the central nervous system is the hallmark of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. However, in some of these diseases such as scrapie or chronic wasting disease, the PrPSc can also accumulate in other tissues, particularly in the lymphoreticular system. In recent years, PrPSc in organs other than nervous and lymphoid have been described, suggesting that distribution of this protein in affected individuals may be much larger than previously thought. In the present study, 11 non-nervous/non-lymphoid organs from 16 naturally scrapie infected sheep in advanced stages of the disease were examined for the presence of PrPSc. Fourteen infected sheep were of the ARQ/ARQ PRNP genotype and 2 of the VRQ/VRQ, where the letters A, R, Q, and V represent the codes for amino-acids alanine, arginine, glutamine and valine, respectively. Adrenal gland, pancreas, heart, skin, urinary bladder and mammary gland were positive for PrPSc by immunohistochemistry and IDEXX HerdChek scrapie/BSE Antigen EIA Test in at least one animal. Lung, liver, kidney and skeletal muscle exhibited PrPSc deposits by immunohistochemistry only. To our knowledge, this is the first report regarding the presence of PrPSc in the heart, pancreas and urinary bladder in naturally acquired scrapie infections. In some other organs examined, in which PrPSc had been previously detected, PrPSc immunolabeling was observed to be associated with new structures within those organs. The results of the present study illustrate a wide dissemination of PrPSc in both ARQ/ARQ and VRQ/VRQ infected sheep, even when the involvement of the lymphoreticular system is scarce or absent, thus highlighting the role of the peripheral nervous system in the spread of PrPSc. PMID:24828439

  3. Methionine Sulfoxides on PrPSc: A Prion-Specific Covalent Signature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canello, T.; Engelstein, R.; Moshel, O.; Xanthopoulos, K.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Sklaviadis, T.; Gasset, M.; Gabizon, R.

    2008-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders believed to be transmitted by PrPSc, an aberrant form of the membrane protein PrPC. In the absence of an established form-specific covalent difference, the infectious properties of PrPSc were uniquely ascribed to the self-perpetuation properties

  4. DNA-Protein Crosslink Proteolysis Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Bruno; Popovic, Marta; Ramadan, Kristijan

    2017-06-01

    Proteins that are covalently bound to DNA constitute a specific type of DNA lesion known as DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs). DPCs represent physical obstacles to the progression of DNA replication. If not repaired, DPCs cause stalling of DNA replication forks that consequently leads to DNA double-strand breaks, the most cytotoxic DNA lesion. Although DPCs are common DNA lesions, the mechanism of DPC repair was unclear until now. Recent work unveiled that DPC repair is orchestrated by proteolysis performed by two distinct metalloproteases, SPARTAN in metazoans and Wss1 in yeast. This review summarizes recent discoveries on two proteases in DNA replication-coupled DPC repair and establishes DPC proteolysis repair as a separate DNA repair pathway for genome stability and protection from accelerated aging and cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cellular contractility requires ubiquitin mediated proteolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuval Cinnamon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular contractility, essential for cell movement and proliferation, is regulated by microtubules, RhoA and actomyosin. The RhoA dependent kinase ROCK ensures the phosphorylation of the regulatory Myosin II Light Chain (MLC Ser19, thereby activating actomyosin contractions. Microtubules are upstream inhibitors of contractility and their depolymerization or depletion cause cells to contract by activating RhoA. How microtubule dynamics regulates RhoA remains, a major missing link in understanding contractility. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We observed that contractility is inhibited by microtubules not only, as previously reported, in adherent cells, but also in non-adhering interphase and mitotic cells. Strikingly we observed that contractility requires ubiquitin mediated proteolysis by a Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase. Inhibition of proteolysis, ubiquitination and neddylation all led to complete cessation of contractility and considerably reduced MLC Ser19 phosphorylation. CONCLUSIONS: Our results imply that cells express a contractility inhibitor that is degraded by ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, either constitutively or in response to microtubule depolymerization. This degradation seems to depend on a Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase and is required for cellular contractions.

  6. Analysis of prion strains by PrPSc profiling in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, Gaby; Seeger, Harald; Bogousslavsky, Julien; Tolnay, Markus; Janzer, Robert Charles; Aguzzi, Adriano; Glatzel, Markus

    2006-02-01

    Prion diseases are a group of invariably fatal neurodegenerative disorders affecting humans and a wide range of mammals. An essential part of the infectious agent, termed the prion, is composed of an abnormal isoform (PrPSc) of a host-encoded normal cellular protein (PrPC). The conversion of PrPC to PrPSc is thought to play a crucial role in the development of prion diseases and leads to PrPSc deposition, mainly in the central nervous system. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), the most common form of human prion disease, presents with a marked clinical heterogeneity. This diversity is accompanied by a molecular signature which can be defined by histological, biochemical, and genetic means. The molecular classification of sCJD is an important tool to aid in the understanding of underlying disease mechanisms and the development of therapy protocols. Comparability of classifications is hampered by disparity of applied methods and inter-observer variability. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a new quantification protocol for PrPSc by using internal standards on each Western blot, which allows for generation and direct comparison of individual PrPSc profiles. By studying PrPSc profiles and PrPSc type expression within nine defined central nervous system areas of 50 patients with sCJD, we were able to show distinct PrPSc distribution patterns in diverse subtypes of sCJD. Furthermore, we were able to demonstrate the co-existence of more than one PrPSc type in individuals with sCJD in about 20% of all patients and in more than 50% of patients heterozygous for a polymorphism on codon 129 of the gene encoding the prion protein (PRNP). PrPSc profiling represents a valuable tool for the molecular classification of human prion diseases and has important implications for their diagnosis by brain biopsy. Our results show that the co-existence of more than one PrPSc type might be influenced by genetic and brain region-specific determinants. These findings

  7. In situ proteolysis of the Vibrio cholerae matrix protein RbmA promotes biofilm recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel R; Maestre-Reyna, Manuel; Lee, Gloria; Gerard, Harry; Wang, Andrew H-J; Watnick, Paula I

    2015-08-18

    The estuarine gram-negative rod and human diarrheal pathogen Vibrio cholerae synthesizes a VPS exopolysaccharide-dependent biofilm matrix that allows it to form a 3D structure on surfaces. Proteins associated with the matrix include, RbmA, RbmC, and Bap1. RbmA, a protein whose crystallographic structure suggests two binding surfaces, associates with cells by means of a VPS-dependent mechanism and promotes biofilm cohesiveness and recruitment of cells to the biofilm. Here, we show that RbmA undergoes limited proteolysis within the biofilm. This proteolysis, which is carried out by the hemagglutinin/protease and accessory proteases, yields the 22-kDa C-terminal polypeptide RbmA*. RbmA* remains biofilm-associated. Unlike full-length RbmA, the association of RbmA* with cells is no longer VPS-dependent, likely due to an electropositive surface revealed by proteolysis. We provide evidence that this proteolysis event plays a role in recruitment of VPS(-) cells to the biofilm surface. Based on our findings, we propose that association of RbmA with the matrix reinforces the biofilm structure and leads to limited proteolysis of RbmA to RbmA*. RbmA*, in turn, promotes recruitment of cells that have not yet initiated VPS synthesis to the biofilm surface. The assignment of two functions to RbmA, separated by a proteolytic event that depends on matrix association, dictates an iterative cycle in which reinforcement of recently added biofilm layers precedes the recruitment of new VPS(-) cells to the biofilm.

  8. Fluorescent Immunoassay Development for PrPSc Detection and Antemortem Diagnosis of TSEs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carp, Richard I

    2005-01-01

    The overall goal of our study is to develop methods of high-sensitivity and high-specificity for the antemortem diagnosis of prion diseases by detecting PrPSc in biological fluids using fluorescent immunoassay...

  9. Fluorescent Immunoassay Development for PrP(Sc) Detection and Antemortem Diagnosis of TSEs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carp, Richard I

    2004-01-01

    The overall goal of our study is to develop methods of high-sensitivity and high-specificity for the antemortem diagnosis of prion diseases by detecting PrPsc in biological fluids using fluorescent immunoassay...

  10. Methamphetamine increases Prion Protein and induces dopamine-dependent expression of protease resistant PrPsc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrucci, M; Ryskalin, L; Biagioni, F; Gambardella, S; Busceti, C L; Falleni, A; Lazzeri, G; Fornai, F

    2017-07-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPc) is physiologically expressed within selective brain areas of mammals. Alterations in the secondary structure of this protein lead to scrapie-like prion protein (PrPsc), which precipitates in the cell. PrPsc has been detected in infectious, inherited or sporadic neurodegenerative disorders. Prion protein metabolism is dependent on autophagy and ubiquitin proteasome. Despite not being fully elucidated, the physiological role of prion protein relates to chaperones which rescue cells under stressful conditions.Methamphetamine (METH) is a widely abused drug which produces oxidative stress in various brain areas causing mitochondrial alterations and protein misfolding. These effects produce a compensatory increase of chaperones while clogging cell clearing pathways. In the present study, we explored whether METH administration modifies the amount of PrPc. Since high levels of PrPc when the clearing systems are clogged may lead to its misfolding into PrPsc, we further tested whether METH exposure triggers the appearance of PrPsc. We analysed the effects of METH and dopamine administration in PC12 and striatal cells by using SDS-PAGE Coomassie blue, immune- histochemistry and immune-gold electron microscopy. To analyze whether METH administration produces PrPsc aggregates we used antibodies directed against PrP following exposure to proteinase K or sarkosyl which digest folded PrPc but misfolded PrPsc. We fond that METH triggers PrPsc aggregates in DA-containing cells while METH is not effective in primary striatal neurons which do not produce DA. In the latter cells exogenous DA is needed to trigger PrPsc accumulation similarly to what happens in DA containing cells under the effects of METH. The present findings, while fostering novel molecular mechanisms involving prion proteins, indicate that, cell pathology similar to prion disorders can be mimicked via a DA-dependent mechanism by a drug of abuse.

  11. Highly efficient proteolysis accelerated by electromagnetic waves for Peptide mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiwen; Liu, Ting; Chen, Gang

    2011-09-01

    Proteomics will contribute greatly to the understanding of gene functions in the post-genomic era. In proteome research, protein digestion is a key procedure prior to mass spectrometry identification. During the past decade, a variety of electromagnetic waves have been employed to accelerate proteolysis. This review focuses on the recent advances and the key strategies of these novel proteolysis approaches for digesting and identifying proteins. The subjects covered include microwave-accelerated protein digestion, infrared-assisted proteolysis, ultraviolet-enhanced protein digestion, laser-assisted proteolysis, and future prospects. It is expected that these novel proteolysis strategies accelerated by various electromagnetic waves will become powerful tools in proteome research and will find wide applications in high throughput protein digestion and identification.

  12. Assessment of strain-specific PrP(Sc elongation rates revealed a transformation of PrP(Sc properties during protein misfolding cyclic amplification.

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    Nuria Gonzalez-Montalban

    Full Text Available Prion replication is believed to consist of two components, a growth or elongation of infectious isoform of the prion protein (PrP(Sc particles and their fragmentation, a process that provides new replication centers. The current study introduced an experimental approach that employs Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification with beads (PMCAb and relies on a series of kinetic experiments for assessing elongation rates of PrP(Sc particles. Four prion strains including two strains with short incubation times to disease (263K and Hyper and two strains with very long incubation times (SSLOW and LOTSS were tested. The elongation rate of brain-derived PrP(Sc was found to be strain-specific. Strains with short incubation times had higher rates than strains with long incubation times. Surprisingly, the strain-specific elongation rates increased substantially for all four strains after they were subjected to six rounds of serial PMCAb. In parallel to an increase in elongation rates, the percentages of diglycosylated PrP glycoforms increased in PMCAb-derived PrP(Sc comparing to those of brain-derived PrP(Sc. These results suggest that PMCAb selects the same molecular features regardless of strain initial characteristics and that convergent evolution of PrP(Sc properties occurred during in vitro amplification. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that each prion strain is comprised of a variety of conformers or 'quasi-species' and that change in the prion replication environment gives selective advantage to those conformers that replicate most effectively under specific environment.

  13. Assessment of Strain-Specific PrPSc Elongation Rates Revealed a Transformation of PrPSc Properties during Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Montalban, Nuria; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2012-01-01

    Prion replication is believed to consist of two components, a growth or elongation of infectious isoform of the prion protein (PrPSc) particles and their fragmentation, a process that provides new replication centers. The current study introduced an experimental approach that employs Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification with beads (PMCAb) and relies on a series of kinetic experiments for assessing elongation rates of PrPSc particles. Four prion strains including two strains with short incubation times to disease (263K and Hyper) and two strains with very long incubation times (SSLOW and LOTSS) were tested. The elongation rate of brain-derived PrPSc was found to be strain-specific. Strains with short incubation times had higher rates than strains with long incubation times. Surprisingly, the strain-specific elongation rates increased substantially for all four strains after they were subjected to six rounds of serial PMCAb. In parallel to an increase in elongation rates, the percentages of diglycosylated PrP glycoforms increased in PMCAb-derived PrPSc comparing to those of brain-derived PrPSc. These results suggest that PMCAb selects the same molecular features regardless of strain initial characteristics and that convergent evolution of PrPSc properties occurred during in vitro amplification. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that each prion strain is comprised of a variety of conformers or ‘quasi-species’ and that change in the prion replication environment gives selective advantage to those conformers that replicate most effectively under specific environment. PMID:22815972

  14. Microglia in the degenerating brain are capable of phagocytosis of beads and of apoptotic cells, but do not efficiently remove PrPSc, even upon LPS stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Martina M; Field, Robert H; Perry, V Hugh; Murray, Carol L; Cunningham, Colm

    2010-12-01

    Despite the phagocytic machinery available to microglia the aberrant amyloid proteins produced during Alzheimer's and prion disease, amyloid-β and PrP(Sc), are inefficiently cleared. We have shown that microglia in the ME7 model of prion disease show morphological evidence of activation, synthesize low levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and are primed to produce exaggerated responses to subsequent inflammatory challenges. Whether these microglia engage in significant phagocytic activity in the disease per se, or upon subsequent inflammatory challenge is not clear. In the present study we show transcriptional activation of a large number of scavenger receptors (SRs), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), oxidative enzymes, and cathepsins in ME7 animals. Hippocampally-injected inert latex beads (6 μm) are efficiently phagocytosed by microglia of ME7 prion-diseased animals, but not by microglia in normal animals. Stimulation of ME7 animals with systemic bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) induced further increases in SR-A2, MMP3, and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) but decreased, or did not alter, transcription of most phagocytosis-related genes examined and did not enhance clearance of deposited PrP(Sc). Furthermore, intracerebral injection with LPS (0.5 μg) induced marked microglial production of IL-1β, robust cellular infiltration and marked apoptosis but also did not induce further clearance of PrP(Sc). These data indicate that microglia in the prion-diseased brain are capable of phagocytosis per se, but show limited efficacy in removing PrP(Sc) even upon marked escalation of CNS inflammation. Furthermore, microglia/macrophages remain IL-1β-negative during phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. The data demonstrate that phagocytic activity and pro-inflammatory microglial phenotype do not necessarily correlate.

  15. Functional Imaging of Proteolysis: Stromal and Inflammatory Cells Increase Tumor Proteolysis

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    Mansoureh Sameni

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The underlying basement membrane is degraded during progression of breast and colon carcinoma. Thus, we imaged degradation of a quenched fluorescent derivative of basement membrane type IV collagen (DQ-collagen IV by living human breast and colon tumor spheroids. Proteolysis of DQ-collagen IV by HCT 116 and HKh-2 human colon tumor spheroids was both intracellular and pericellular. In contrast, proteolysis of DQ-collagen IV by BT20 human breast tumor spheroids was pericellular. As stromal elements can contribute to proteolytic activities associated with tumors, we also examined degradation of DQ-collagen IV by human monocytes/macrophages and colon and breast fibroblasts. Fibroblasts themselves exhibited a modest amount of pericellular degradation. Degradation was increased 4–17-fold in cocultures of fibroblasts and tumor cells as compared to either cell type alone. Inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases, plasmin, and the cysteine protease, cathepsin B, all reduced degradation in the cocultures. Monocytes did not degrade DQ-collagen IV; however, macrophages degraded DQ-collagen IV intracellularly. In coculture of tumor cells, fibroblasts, and macrophages, degradation of DQ-collagen IV was further increased. Imaging of living tumor and stromal cells has, thus, allowed us to establish that tumor proteolysis occurs pericellularly and intracellularly and that tumor, stromal, and inflammatory cells all contribute to degradative processes.

  16. Inhibition of PrPSc formation by synthetic O-sulfated glycopyranosides and their polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Satoko; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Kenji; Kambara, Mikie; Kim, Chan-Lan; Ishiguro, Naotaka; Nagatsuka, Takehiro; Uzawa, Hirotaka; Horiuchi, Motohiro

    2006-10-20

    Sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and sulfated glycans inhibit formation of the abnormal isoform of prion protein (PrPSc) in prion-infected cells and prolong the incubation time of scrapie-infected animals. Sulfation of GAGs is not tightly regulated and possible sites of sulfation are randomly modified, which complicates elucidation of the fundamental structures of GAGs that mediate the inhibition of PrPSc formation. To address the structure-activity relationship of GAGs in the inhibition of PrPSc formation, we screened the ability of various regioselectively O-sulfated glycopyranosides to inhibit PrPSc formation in prion-infected cells. Among the glycopyranosides and their polymers examined, monomeric 4-sulfo-N-acetyl-glucosamine (4SGN), and two glycopolymers, poly-4SGN and poly-6-sulfo-N-acetyl-glucosamine (poly-6SGN), inhibited PrPSc formation with 50% effective doses below 20 microg/ml, and their inhibitory effect became more evident with consecutive treatments. Structural comparisons suggested that a combination of an N-acetyl group at C-2 and an O-sulfate group at either O-4 or O-6 on glucopyranoside might be involved in the inhibition of PrPSc formation. Furthermore, polymeric but not monomeric 6SGN inhibited PrPSc formation, suggesting the importance of a polyvalent configuration in its effect. These results indicate that the synthetic sulfated glycosides are useful not only for the analysis of structure-activity relationship of GAGs but also for the development of therapeutics for prion diseases.

  17. PrPSc spreading patterns in the brain of sheep linked to different prion types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemheuer, Wiebke M; Benestad, Sylvie L; Wrede, Arne; Wemheuer, Wilhelm E; Brenig, Bertram; Bratberg, Bjørn; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J

    2011-02-15

    Scrapie in sheep and goats has been known for more than 250 years and belongs nowadays to the so-called prion diseases that also include e.g. bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle (BSE) and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. According to the prion hypothesis, the pathological isoform (PrPSc) of the cellular prion protein (PrPc) comprises the essential, if not exclusive, component of the transmissible agent. Currently, two types of scrapie disease are known--classical and atypical/Nor98 scrapie. In the present study we examine 24 cases of classical and 25 cases of atypical/Nor98 scrapie with the sensitive PET blot method and validate the results with conventional immunohistochemistry. The sequential detection of PrPSc aggregates in the CNS of classical scrapie sheep implies that after neuroinvasion a spread from spinal cord and obex to the cerebellum, diencephalon and frontal cortex via the rostral brainstem takes place. We categorize the spread of PrPSc into four stages: the CNS entry stage, the brainstem stage, the cruciate sulcus stage and finally the basal ganglia stage. Such a sequential development of PrPSc was not detectable upon analysis of the present atypical/Nor98 scrapie cases. PrPSc distribution in one case of atypical/Nor98 scrapie in a presumably early disease phase suggests that the spread of PrPSc aggregates starts in the di- or telencephalon. In addition to the spontaneous generation of PrPSc, an uptake of the infectious agent into the brain, that bypasses the brainstem and starts its accumulation in the thalamus, needs to be taken into consideration for atypical/Nor98 scrapie.

  18. TSE strain differentiation in mice by immunohistochemical PrP(Sc) profiles and triplex Western blot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Keulen, Lucien J M; Langeveld, Jan P M; Dolstra, Corry H; Jacobs, Jorg; Bossers, Alex; van Zijderveld, Fred G

    2015-10-01

    TSE strains are routinely identified by their incubation period and vacuolation profile in the brain after intracerebral inoculation and serial passaging in inbred mouse lines. There are some major drawbacks to this method that are related to the variation in vacuolation that exists in the brains of mice infected with the same TSE strain and to variation between observers and laboratories in scoring vacuolation and determining the final incubation period. We investigated the potential of PrP(Sc) immunohistochemistry and triplex Western blotting as possible alternative methods to differentiate between TSE strains. TSE reference strains ME7, 87A/87V, 22A/22C, 79A/79V and 301C/301V were intracerebrally inoculated in RIII or VM inbred mice that differ in their PrP genotype. Immunohistochemical PrP(Sc) profiles were drawn up by scanning light microscopy both on coronal and sagittal sections. On the basis of the localization of PrP(Sc) in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellar cortex and the overall type of PrP(Sc) staining, all TSE strains could be well differentiated from each other through their typical strain dependent characteristics. In addition, Western blot showed that the combination of glycosylation profile and 12B2 epitope content of PrP(Sc) allowed to distinguish between all reference strains except for ME7 and 22A in VM mice. TSE strains in mice can be identified on the basis of their PrP(Sc) profile alone. The potential to identify TSE strains in ruminants with these PrP(Sc) profiles after a single primary passage in mice will be the topic of future studies. © 2014 British Neuropathological Society.

  19. Sc237 hamster PrPSc and Sc237-derived mouse PrPSc generated by interspecies in vitro amplification exhibit distinct pathological and biochemical properties in tga20 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Miyako; Imamura, Morikazu; Okada, Hiroyuki; Shimozaki, Noriko; Murayama, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi; Mohri, Shirou

    2011-05-01

    Prions are the infectious agents responsible for transmissible spongiform encephalopathy, and are primarily composed of the pathogenic form (PrP(Sc)) of the host-encoded prion protein (PrP(C)). Recent studies have revealed that protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA), a highly sensitive method for PrP(Sc) detection, can overcome the species barrier in several xenogeneic combinations of PrP(Sc) seed and PrP(C) substrate. Although these findings provide valuable insight into the origin and diversity of prions, the differences between PrP(Sc) generated by interspecies PMCA and by in vivo cross-species transmission have not been described. This study investigated the histopathological and biochemical properties of PrP(Sc) in the brains of tga20 transgenic mice inoculated with Sc237 hamster scrapie prion and PrP(Sc) from mice inoculated with Sc237-derived mouse PrP(Sc), which had been generated by interspecies PMCA using Sc237 as seed and normal mouse brain homogenate as substrate. Tga20 mice overexpressing mouse PrP(C) were susceptible to Sc237 after primary transmission. PrP(Sc) in the brains of mice inoculated with Sc237-derived mouse PrP(Sc) and in the brains of mice inoculated with Sc237 differed in their lesion profiles and accumulation patterns, Western blot profiles, and denaturant resistance. In addition, these PrP(Sc) exhibited distinctive virulence profiles upon secondary passage. These results suggest that different in vivo and in vitro environments result in propagation of PrP(Sc) with different biological properties. © 2011 The Societies and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. [Changes in the immunochemical properties of beta-lactoglobulin during proteolysis and exposure to various physico-chemical factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmoshinskiĭ, I V; Krzhechkovskaia, V V; Zorin, S N

    1990-01-01

    Heating of cow milk beta-lactoglobulin at 96 degrees, pH 8.0 led to the protein aggregation because of intermolecular disulfide exchange as shown by agarose gel immunoelectrophoresis, where additional precipitation strips were detected. At the same time, there was not observed dissociation of beta-lactoglobulin into separate fractions after proteolysis or denaturation in 8 M urea. beta-Lactoglobulin, its thermoaggregated and S-carboxymethyl denaturated forms exhibited similar anaphylactic effect on sensitized guinea pigs. Allergenic properties of beta-lactoglobulin appears to be unaltered in food hydrolyzates after thermal treatment and limited proteolysis.

  1. Allosteric regulation of rhomboid intramembrane proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunova, Elena; Panwar, Pankaj; Skiba, Pauline M; Gale, Nicola; Mak, Michelle W; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2014-09-01

    Proteolysis within the lipid bilayer is poorly understood, in particular the regulation of substrate cleavage. Rhomboids are a family of ubiquitous intramembrane serine proteases that harbour a buried active site and are known to cleave transmembrane substrates with broad specificity. In vitro gel and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based kinetic assays were developed to analyse cleavage of the transmembrane substrate psTatA (TatA from Providencia stuartii). We demonstrate significant differences in catalytic efficiency (kcat/K0.5) values for transmembrane substrate psTatA (TatA from Providencia stuartii) cleavage for three rhomboids: AarA from P. stuartii, ecGlpG from Escherichia coli and hiGlpG from Haemophilus influenzae demonstrating that rhomboids specifically recognize this substrate. Furthermore, binding of psTatA occurs with positive cooperativity. Competitive binding studies reveal an exosite-mediated mode of substrate binding, indicating allostery plays a role in substrate catalysis. We reveal that exosite formation is dependent on the oligomeric state of rhomboids, and when dimers are dissociated, allosteric substrate activation is not observed. We present a novel mechanism for specific substrate cleavage involving several dynamic processes including positive cooperativity and homotropic allostery for this interesting class of intramembrane proteases. © 2014 The Authors.

  2. Probing catalytic rate enhancement during intramembrane proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunova, Elena; Smithers, Cameron C; Corradi, Valentina; Espiritu, Adam C; Young, Howard S; Tieleman, D Peter; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2016-09-01

    Rhomboids are ubiquitous intramembrane serine proteases involved in various signaling pathways. While the high-resolution structures of the Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG with various inhibitors revealed an active site comprised of a serine-histidine dyad and an extensive oxyanion hole, the molecular details of rhomboid catalysis were unclear because substrates are unknown for most of the family members. Here we used the only known physiological pair of AarA rhomboid with its psTatA substrate to decipher the contribution of catalytically important residues to the reaction rate enhancement. An MD-refined homology model of AarA was used to identify residues important for catalysis. We demonstrated that the AarA active site geometry is strict and intolerant to alterations. We probed the roles of H83 and N87 oxyanion hole residues and determined that substitution of H83 either abolished AarA activity or reduced the transition state stabilization energy (ΔΔG‡) by 3.1 kcal/mol; substitution of N87 decreased ΔΔG‡ by 1.6-3.9 kcal/mol. Substitution M154, a residue conserved in most rhomboids that stabilizes the catalytic general base, to tyrosine, provided insight into the mechanism of nucleophile generation for the catalytic dyad. This study provides a quantitative evaluation of the role of several residues important for hydrolytic efficiency and oxyanion stabilization during intramembrane proteolysis.

  3. Regulatory Proteolysis in Arabidopsis-Pathogen Interactions

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    Miklós Pogány

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Approximately two and a half percent of protein coding genes in Arabidopsis encode enzymes with known or putative proteolytic activity. Proteases possess not only common housekeeping functions by recycling nonfunctional proteins. By irreversibly cleaving other proteins, they regulate crucial developmental processes and control responses to environmental changes. Regulatory proteolysis is also indispensable in interactions between plants and their microbial pathogens. Proteolytic cleavage is simultaneously used both by plant cells, to recognize and inactivate invading pathogens, and by microbes, to overcome the immune system of the plant and successfully colonize host cells. In this review, we present available results on the group of proteases in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana whose functions in microbial pathogenesis were confirmed. Pathogen-derived proteolytic factors are also discussed when they are involved in the cleavage of host metabolites. Considering the wealth of review papers available in the field of the ubiquitin-26S proteasome system results on the ubiquitin cascade are not presented. Arabidopsis and its pathogens are conferred with abundant sets of proteases. This review compiles a list of those that are apparently involved in an interaction between the plant and its pathogens, also presenting their molecular partners when available.

  4. Immunolocalisation of PrPSc in scrapie-infected N2a mouse neuroblastoma cells by light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veith, Nathalie M; Plattner, Helmut; Stuermer, Claudia A O; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J; Bürkle, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    The causative agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) is PrPSc, an infectious, misfolded isoform of the cellular prion protein (PrPC). The localisation and trafficking of PrPSc and sites of conversion from PrPC to PrPSc are under debate, particularly since most published work did not discriminate between PrPC and PrPSc. Here we describe the localisation of PrPC and PrPSc in a scrapie-infected neuroblastoma cell line, ScN2a, by light and electron microscopic immunolocalisation. After eliminating PrPC with proteinase K, PrPSc was detected at the plasma membrane, endocytosed via clathrin-coated pits and delivered to early endosomes. Finally, PrPSc was detected in late endosomes/lysosomes. As we detected PrPSc at the cell surface, in early endosomes and in late endosomes/lysosomes, i.e. locations where PrPC is also present, our data imply that the conversion process could take place at the plasma membrane and/or along the endocytic pathway. Finally, we observed the release of PrPC/PrPSc via exocytotic pathways, i.e. via exosomes and as an opaque electron-dense mass which may represent a mechanism of intercellular spreading of infectious prions.

  5. Accumulation of pathological prion protein PrPSc in the skin of animals with experimental and natural scrapie.

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    Achim Thomzig

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Prion infectivity and its molecular marker, the pathological prion protein PrP(Sc, accumulate in the central nervous system and often also in lymphoid tissue of animals or humans affected by transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Recently, PrP(Sc was found in tissues previously considered not to be invaded by prions (e.g., skeletal muscles. Here, we address the question of whether prions target the skin and show widespread PrP(Sc deposition in this organ in hamsters perorally or parenterally challenged with scrapie. In hamsters fed with scrapie, PrP(Sc was detected before the onset of symptoms, but the bulk of skin-associated PrP(Sc accumulated in the clinical phase. PrP(Sc was localized in nerve fibres within the skin but not in keratinocytes, and the deposition of PrP(Sc in skin showed no dependence from the route of infection and lymphotropic dissemination. The data indicated a neurally mediated centrifugal spread of prions to the skin. Furthermore, in a follow-up study, we examined sheep naturally infected with scrapie and detected PrP(Sc by Western blotting in skin samples from two out of five animals. Our findings point to the skin as a potential reservoir of prions, which should be further investigated in relation to disease transmission.

  6. Histidines in the octapeptide repeat of PrPC react with PrPSc at an acidic pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruite, Justin T; Abalos, Gil C; Bellon, Anne; Solforosi, Laura

    2011-03-15

    Cellular PrP is actively cycled between the cell surface and the endosomal pathway. The exact site and mechanism of conversion from PrP(C) to PrP(Sc) remain unknown. We have previously used recombinant antibodies containing grafts of PrP sequence to identify three regions of PrP(C) (aa23-27, 98-110, and 136-158) that react with PrP(Sc) at neutral pH. To determine if any regions of PrP(C) react with PrP(Sc) at an acidic pH similar to that of an endosomal compartment, we tested our panel of grafted antibodies for the ability to precipitate PrP(Sc) in a range of pH conditions. At pH near or lower than 6, PrP-grafted antibodies representing the octapeptide repeat react strongly with PrP(Sc) but not PrP(C). Modified grafts in which the histidines of the octarepeat were replaced with alanines did not react with PrP(Sc). PrP(Sc) precipitated by the octapeptide at pH 5.7 was able to seed conversion of normal PrP to PrP(Sc) in vitro. However, modified PrP containing histidine to alanine substitutions within the octapeptide repeats was still converted to PrP(Sc) in N2a cells. These results suggest that once PrP has entered the endosomal pathway, the acidic environment facilitates the binding of PrP(Sc) to the octarepeat of PrP(C) by the change in charge of the histidines within the octarepeat.

  7. Cellular Trafficking of the Pathogenic Prion Protein PrPSc and Phenotypic Characterisation of Deletion Mutants in the Hydrophobic Domain of the Normal Prion Protein PrPC

    OpenAIRE

    Veith, Nathalie Monika

    2008-01-01

    The localisation of the pathogenic prion protein PrPSc was investigated with light and electron microscopy. The PrPSc specific antibody 15B3 was tested for its efficiency in immuncytochemistry. Subsequently, an appropriate method was found to stain PrPSc selectively. PrPSc was detected in clathrin coated pits, early endosomes, late endosomes/lysosomes nad exosomes. PrPSc could not be observed in lipid droplets.In the next part of the thesis different mutants of the prion protein carrying micr...

  8. Proteolysis of Livanjski cheese during ripening

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    Samir KALIT

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Livanjski cheese belongs to the group of hard cheeses which is traditionally produced in Livno (Bosnia and Herzegovina. Proteolytic changes during the ripening of Livanjski cheese have not been investigated extensively. The aim of this paper was to determine its proteolytic changes during the different stages of ripening. Five Livanjski cheeses (from raw cow’s or a mixture of sheep’s and cow’s milk were observed during the ripening to evaluate its typical proteolytic profile. An electophoretic profile of Livanjski cheese was determined by Urea-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (urea-PAGE and a densitometric evaluation of the urea-PAGE gels was performed using a densitometer. The water-soluble nitrogen fraction in the total nitrogen (WSN %TN and the 12%-TCA-soluble nitrogen fraction in the total nitrogen (TCA-SN %TN of the cheese were determined using the Kjeldahl method. Degradation of αs1-casein by chymosin caused a significant decrease (P < 0.05 of relative content of this protein in Livanjski cheese at the sixth week point of ripening. Due to the activity of chymosin on αs1-casein, αs1-I-casein and αs1-II-casein developed, which caused a significant increase (P < 0.05 of Index alpha. The relative ratio of β-casein significantly decreased (P < 0.05 during ripening leading to a significant accumulation (P < 0.05 of degraded product (sum γ1-casein, γ2-casein and γ3-casein. These proteolytic changes caused a significant increase (P < 0.05 of Index betta. Accumulation of medium, small peptides and amino acids caused a significant (P < 0.05 increase of the relative content of WSN %TN and TCA-SN %TN. In general, proteolysis of Livanjski cheese during ripening was moderate probably due to the low moisture content and low water activity, although it was produced from raw milk. Taking into account that the ratio β-casein : αs1-casein at the end of ripening was 1.46, it could be concluded that degradation of αs1-casein could be the

  9. 4-hydroxytamoxifen leads to PrPSc clearance by conveying both PrPC and PrPSc to lysosomes independently of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzo, Ludovica; Marijanovic, Zrinka; Browman, Duncan; Chamoun, Zeina; Caputo, Anna; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2013-03-15

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders involving the abnormal folding of a native cellular protein, named PrP(C), to a malconformed aggregation-prone state, enriched in beta sheet secondary structure, denoted PrP(Sc). Recently, autophagy has garnered considerable attention as a cellular process with the potential to counteract neurodegenerative diseases of protein aggregation such as Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, and Parkinson's disease. Stimulation of autophagy by chemical compounds has also been shown to reduce PrP(Sc) in infected neuronal cells and prolong survival times in mouse models. Consistent with previous reports, we demonstrate that autophagic flux is increased in chronically infected cells. However, in contrast to recent findings we show that autophagy does not cause a reduction in scrapie burden. We report that in infected neuronal cells different compounds known to stimulate autophagy are ineffective in increasing autophagic flux and in reducing PrP(Sc). We further demonstrate that tamoxifen and its metabolite 4-hydroxytamoxifen lead to prion degradation in an autophagy-independent manner by diverting the trafficking of both PrP and cholesterol to lysosomes. Our data indicate that tamoxifen, a well-characterized, widely available pharmaceutical, may have applications in the therapy of prion diseases.

  10. PrP glycoforms are associated in a strain-specific ratio in native PrPSc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili-Shirazi, Azadeh; Summers, Linda; Linehan, Jacqueline; Mallinson, Gary; Anstee, David; Hawke, Simon; Jackson, Graham S; Collinge, John

    2005-09-01

    Prion diseases involve conversion of host-encoded cellular prion protein (PrPC) to a disease-related isoform (PrPSc). Using recombinant human beta-PrP, a panel of monoclonal antibodies was produced that efficiently immunoprecipitated native PrPSc and recognized epitopes between residues 93-105, indicating for the first time that this region is exposed in both human vCJD and mouse RML prions. In contrast, monoclonal antibodies raised to human alpha-PrP were more efficient in immunoprecipitating PrPC than PrPSc, and some of them could also distinguish between different PrP glycoforms. Using these monoclonal antibodies, the physical association of PrP glycoforms was studied in normal brain and in the brains of humans and mice with prion disease. It was shown that while PrPC glycoforms can be selectively immunoprecipitated, the differentially glycosylated molecules of native PrPSc are closely associated and always immunoprecipitate together. Furthermore, the ratio of glycoforms comprising immunoprecipitated native PrPSc from diverse prion strains was similar to those observed on denaturing Western blots. These studies are consistent with the view that the proportion of each glycoform incorporated into PrPSc is probably controlled in a strain-specific manner and that each PrPSc particle contains a mixture of glycoforms.

  11. Live imaging of prions reveals nascent PrPSc in cell-surface, raft-associated amyloid strings and webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouvinski, Alexander; Karniely, Sharon; Kounin, Maria; Moussa, Sanaa; Goldberg, Miri D; Warburg, Gabriela; Lyakhovetsky, Roman; Papy-Garcia, Dulce; Kutzsche, Janine; Korth, Carsten; Carlson, George A; Godsave, Susan F; Peters, Peter J; Luhr, Katarina; Kristensson, Krister; Taraboulos, Albert

    2014-02-03

    Mammalian prions refold host glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored PrP(C) into β-sheet-rich PrP(Sc). PrP(Sc) is rapidly truncated into a C-terminal PrP27-30 core that is stable for days in endolysosomes. The nature of cell-associated prions, their attachment to membranes and rafts, and their subcellular locations are poorly understood; live prion visualization has not previously been achieved. A key obstacle has been the inaccessibility of PrP27-30 epitopes. We overcame this hurdle by focusing on nascent full-length PrP(Sc) rather than on its truncated PrP27-30 product. We show that N-terminal PrP(Sc) epitopes are exposed in their physiological context and visualize, for the first time, PrP(Sc) in living cells. PrP(Sc) resides for hours in unexpected cell-surface, slow moving strings and webs, sheltered from endocytosis. Prion strings observed by light and scanning electron microscopy were thin, micrometer-long structures. They were firmly cell associated, resisted phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, aligned with raft markers, fluoresced with thioflavin, and were rapidly abolished by anti-prion glycans. Prion strings and webs are the first demonstration of membrane-anchored PrP(Sc) amyloids.

  12. Generation of monoclonal antibody that distinguishes PrPSc from PrPC and neutralizes prion infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Motohiro; Karino, Ayako; Furuoka, Hidefumi; Ishiguro, Naotaka; Kimura, Kumiko; Shinagawa, Morikazu

    2009-11-25

    To establish PrP(Sc)-specific mAbs, we immunized Prnp(-/-) mice with PrP(Sc) purified from prion-infected mice. Using this approach, we obtained mAb 6H10, which reacted with PrP(Sc) treated with proteinase K, but not with PrP(Sc) pretreated with more than 3 M GdnHCl. In contrast, reactivity of pan-PrP mAbs increased with increasing concentrations of GdnHCl used for pretreatment of PrP(Sc). In histoblot analysis, mAb 6H10 showed a positive reaction on a non-denatured histoblot but reactivity was lower when the histoblot was pretreated by autoclaving. Epitope analysis suggested that the extreme C-terminus of PrP is likely to be part of the epitope for mAb 6H10. MAb 6H10 immunoprecipitated PrP(Sc) from brains of mice, sheep, and cattle infected with prions. Furthermore, pretreatment of purified PrP(Sc) with mAb 6H10 reduced the infectious titer more than 1 log. Taken together, these results suggest that mAb 6H10 recognizes a conformational epitope on PrP(Sc) that is related to prion infectivity.

  13. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: the extent of microglia activation is dependent on the biochemical type of PrPSc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puoti, Gianfranco; Giaccone, Giorgio; Mangieri, Michela; Limido, Lucia; Fociani, Paolo; Zerbi, Pietro; Suardi, Silvia; Rossi, Giacomina; Iussich, Selina; Capobianco, Raffaella; Di Fede, Giuseppe; Marcon, Gabriella; Cotrufo, Roberto; Filippini, Graziella; Bugiani, Orso; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2005-10-01

    In prion-related encephalopathies, microglial activation occurs early and is dependent on accumulation of disease-specific forms of the prion protein (PrPSc) and may play a role in nerve cell death. Previously, we found that different types of PrPSc (i.e. type 1 and type 2) coexisted in approximately 25% of patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD); and a close relationship was detected between PrPSc type, the pattern of PrP immunoreactivity, and extent of spongiform degeneration. To investigate whether microglial reaction is related to the biochemical type and deposition pattern of PrPSc, we carried out a neuropathologic and biochemical study on 26 patients with sporadic CJD, including all possible genotypes at codon 129 of the prion protein gene. By quantitative analysis, we demonstrated that strong microglial activation was associated with type 1 PrPSc and diffuse PrP immunoreactivity, whereas type 2 PrPSc and focal PrP deposits were accompanied by mild microglia reaction. These findings support the view that the phenotypic heterogeneity of sporadic CJD is largely determined by the physicochemical properties of distinct PrPSc conformers.

  14. How do PrPSc Prions Spread between Host Species, and within Hosts?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil A. Mabbott

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are sub-acute neurodegenerative diseases that affect humans and some domestic and free-ranging animals. Infectious prion agents are considered to comprise solely of abnormally folded isoforms of the cellular prion protein known as PrPSc. Pathology during prion disease is restricted to the central nervous system where it causes extensive neurodegeneration and ultimately leads to the death of the host. The first half of this review provides a thorough account of our understanding of the various ways in which PrPSc prions may spread between individuals within a population, both horizontally and vertically. Many natural prion diseases are acquired peripherally, such as by oral exposure, lesions to skin or mucous membranes, and possibly also via the nasal cavity. Following peripheral exposure, some prions accumulate to high levels within the secondary lymphoid organs as they make their journey from the site of infection to the brain, a process termed neuroinvasion. The replication of PrPSc prions within secondary lymphoid organs is important for their efficient spread to the brain. The second half of this review describes the key tissues, cells and molecules which are involved in the propagation of PrPSc prions from peripheral sites of exposure (such as the lumen of the intestine to the brain. This section also considers how additional factors such as inflammation and aging might influence prion disease susceptibility.

  15. Small molecules and antibodies: a means of distinguishing between PrPC and PrPSc

    Science.gov (United States)

    PrPSc and PrPC are isoforms, since they possess identical covalent structures and identical post-translational modifications. The same amino acid may react differently with the same chemical reagent in an isoform-dependent manner. The site of covalent modification can be identified by mass spectrom...

  16. Distinguishing between PrPC and PrPSc using small molecule reagents(Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background/Introduction. The structural difference between PrPSc and PrPC is entirely conformational: they are isoforms. Both isoforms possess identical covalent structures and identical post-translational modifications. This means that the same amino acid can react differently with the same chemica...

  17. Stability properties of PrPSc from cattle with experimental transmissible spongiform encephalopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs), including scrapie in sheep, chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cervids, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), are fatal diseases of the nervous system associated with accumulation of misfolded prion protein (PrPSc). Different strains of BSE exist...

  18. Distinguishing between PrPC and PrPSc using small molecule reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background/Introduction. The structural difference between PrPSc and PrPC is entirely conformational: they are isoforms. Both isoforms possess identical covalent structures and identical post-translational modifications. This means that the same amino acid can react differently with the same chemic...

  19. Ultra-efficient PrP(Sc amplification highlights potentialities and pitfalls of PMCA technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Mario Cosseddu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the potential of voles to reproduce in vitro the efficiency of prion replication previously observed in vivo, we seeded protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA reactions with either rodent-adapted Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE strains or natural TSE isolates. Vole brain homogenates were shown to be a powerful substrate for both homologous or heterologous PMCA, sustaining the efficient amplification of prions from all the prion sources tested. However, after a few serial automated PMCA (saPMCA rounds, we also observed the appearance of PK-resistant PrP(Sc in samples containing exclusively unseeded substrate (negative controls, suggesting the possible spontaneous generation of infectious prions during PMCA reactions. As we could not definitively rule out cross-contamination through a posteriori biochemical and biological analyses of de novo generated prions, we decided to replicate the experiments in a different laboratory. Under rigorous prion-free conditions, we did not observe de novo appearance of PrP(Sc in unseeded samples of M109M and I109I vole substrates, even after many consecutive rounds of saPMCA and working in different PMCA settings. Furthermore, when positive and negative samples were processed together, the appearance of spurious PrP(Sc in unseeded negative controls suggested that the most likely explanation for the appearance of de novo PrP(Sc was the occurrence of cross-contamination during saPMCA. Careful analysis of the PMCA process allowed us to identify critical points which are potentially responsible for contamination events. Appropriate technical improvements made it possible to overcome PMCA pitfalls, allowing PrP(Sc to be reliably amplified up to extremely low dilutions of infected brain homogenate without any false positive results even after many consecutive rounds. Our findings underline the potential drawback of ultrasensitive in vitro prion replication and warn on cautious

  20. Enzymatic degradation of PrPSc by a protease secreted from Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snajder, Marko; Vilfan, Tanja; Cernilec, Maja; Rupreht, Ruth; Popović, Mara; Juntes, Polona; Serbec, Vladka Čurin; Ulrih, Nataša Poklar

    2012-01-01

    An R30 fraction from the growth medium of Aeropyrum pernix was analyzed for the protease that can digest the pathological prion protein isoform (PrP(Sc)) from different species (human, bovine, deer and mouse). Degradation of the PrP(Sc) isoform by the R30 fraction and the purified protease was evaluated using the 6H4 anti-PrP monoclonal antibody. Fragments from the N-terminal and C-terminal of PrP(Sc) were also monitored by Western blotting using the EB8 anti-PrP monoclonal antibody, and by dot blotting using the C7/5 anti-PrP monoclonal antibody, respectively. For detection of smaller peptides from incomplete digestion of PrP(Sc), the EB8 monoclonal antibody was used after precipitation with sodium phosphotungstate. Characterization of the purified active protease from the R30 fraction was achieved, through purification by fast protein liquid chromatography, and identification by tandem mass spectrometry the serine metalloprotease pernisine. SDS-PAGE and zymography show the purified pernisine plus its proregion with a molecular weight of ca. 45 kDa, and the mature purified pernisine as ca. 23 kDa. The purified pernisine was active between 58 °C and 99 °C, and between pH 3.5 and 8.0. The temperature and pH optima of the enzymatic activity of the purified pernisine in the presence of 1 mM CaCl(2) were 105 °C ± 0.5 °C and pH 6.5 ± 0.2, respectively. Our study has identified and characterized pernisine as a thermostable serine metalloprotease that is secreted from A. pernix and that can digest the pathological prion protein PrP(Sc).

  1. Enzymatic degradation of PrPSc by a protease secreted from Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Snajder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An R30 fraction from the growth medium of Aeropyrum pernix was analyzed for the protease that can digest the pathological prion protein isoform (PrP(Sc from different species (human, bovine, deer and mouse. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Degradation of the PrP(Sc isoform by the R30 fraction and the purified protease was evaluated using the 6H4 anti-PrP monoclonal antibody. Fragments from the N-terminal and C-terminal of PrP(Sc were also monitored by Western blotting using the EB8 anti-PrP monoclonal antibody, and by dot blotting using the C7/5 anti-PrP monoclonal antibody, respectively. For detection of smaller peptides from incomplete digestion of PrP(Sc, the EB8 monoclonal antibody was used after precipitation with sodium phosphotungstate. Characterization of the purified active protease from the R30 fraction was achieved, through purification by fast protein liquid chromatography, and identification by tandem mass spectrometry the serine metalloprotease pernisine. SDS-PAGE and zymography show the purified pernisine plus its proregion with a molecular weight of ca. 45 kDa, and the mature purified pernisine as ca. 23 kDa. The purified pernisine was active between 58 °C and 99 °C, and between pH 3.5 and 8.0. The temperature and pH optima of the enzymatic activity of the purified pernisine in the presence of 1 mM CaCl(2 were 105 °C ± 0.5 °C and pH 6.5 ± 0.2, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study has identified and characterized pernisine as a thermostable serine metalloprotease that is secreted from A. pernix and that can digest the pathological prion protein PrP(Sc.

  2. PrPSc formation and clearance as determinants of prion tropism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikiya, Ronald A; Langenfeld, Katie A; Eckland, Thomas E; Trinh, Jonathan; Holec, Sara A M; Mathiason, Candace K; Kincaid, Anthony E; Bartz, Jason C

    2017-03-01

    Prion strains are characterized by strain-specific differences in neuropathology but can also differ in incubation period, clinical disease, host-range and tissue tropism. The hyper (HY) and drowsy (DY) strains of hamster-adapted transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) differ in tissue tropism and susceptibility to infection by extraneural routes of infection. Notably, DY TME is not detected in the secondary lymphoreticular system (LRS) tissues of infected hosts regardless of the route of inoculation. We found that similar to the lymphotropic strain HY TME, DY TME crosses mucosal epithelia, enters draining lymphatic vessels in underlying laminae propriae, and is transported to LRS tissues. Since DY TME causes disease once it enters the peripheral nervous system, the restriction in DY TME pathogenesis is due to its inability to establish infection in LRS tissues, not a failure of transport. To determine if LRS tissues can support DY TME formation, we performed protein misfolding cyclic amplification using DY PrPSc as the seed and spleen homogenate as the source of PrPC. We found that the spleen environment can support DY PrPSc formation, although at lower rates compared to lymphotropic strains, suggesting that the failure of DY TME to establish infection in the spleen is not due to the absence of a strain-specific conversion cofactor. Finally, we provide evidence that DY PrPSc is more susceptible to degradation when compared to PrPSc from other lymphotrophic strains. We hypothesize that the relative rates of PrPSc formation and clearance can influence prion tropism.

  3. Mouse-adapted ovine scrapie prion strains are characterized by different conformers of PrPSc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackray, Alana M; Hopkins, Lee; Klein, Michael A; Bujdoso, Raymond

    2007-11-01

    The agent responsible for prion disease may exist in different forms, commonly referred to as strains, with each carrying the specific information that determines its own distinct biological properties, such as incubation period and lesion profile. Biological strain typing of ovine scrapie isolates by serial passage in conventional mice has shown some diversity in ovine prion strains. However, this biological diversity remains poorly supported by biochemical prion strain typing. The protein-only hypothesis predicts that variation between different prion strains in the same host is manifest in different conformations adopted by PrPSc. Here we have investigated the molecular properties of PrPSc associated with two principal Prnp(a) mouse-adapted ovine scrapie strains, namely, RML and ME7, in order to establish biochemical prion strain typing strategies that may subsequently be used to discriminate field cases of mouse-passaged ovine scrapie isolates. We used a conformation-dependent immunoassay and a conformational stability assay, together with Western blot analysis, to demonstrate that RML and ME7 PrPSc proteins show distinct biochemical and physicochemical properties. Although RML and ME7 PrPSc proteins showed similar resistance to proteolytic digestion, they differed in their glycoform profiles and levels of proteinase K (PK)-sensitive and PK-resistant isoforms. In addition, the PK-resistant core (PrP27-30) of ME7 was conformationally more stable following exposure to guanidine hydrochloride or Sarkosyl than was RML PrP27-30. Our data show that mouse-adapted ovine scrapie strains can be discriminated by their distinct conformers of PrPSc, which provides a basis to investigate their diversity at the molecular level.

  4. Effects of different experimental conditions on the PrPSc core generated by protease digestion: implications for strain typing and molecular classification of CJD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notari, Silvio; Capellari, Sabina; Giese, Armin; Westner, Ingo; Baruzzi, Agostino; Ghetti, Bernardino; Gambetti, Pierluigi; Kretzschmar, Hans A; Parchi, Piero

    2004-04-16

    The discovery of molecular subtypes of the pathological prion protein PrPSc has provided the basis for a novel classification of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) and a potentially powerful method for strain typing. However, there is still a significant disparity regarding the understanding and nomenclature of PrPSc types. In addition, it is still unknown whether a specific PrPSc type is associated with each TSE phenotypic variant. In sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), five disease phenotypes are known, but only two major types of PrPSc, types 1 and 2, have been consistently reproduced. We further analyzed PrPSc properties in sCJD and variant CJD using a high resolution gel electrophoresis system and varying experimental conditions. We found that pH varies among CJD brain homogenates in standard buffers, thereby influencing the characteristics of protease-treated PrPSc. We also show that PrPSc type 1 and type 2 are heterogeneous species which can be further distinguished into five molecular subtypes that fit the current histopathological classification of sCJD variants. Our results shed light on previous disparities in PrPSc typing, provide a refined classification of human PrPSc types, and support the notion that the pathological TSE phenotype is related to PrPSc structure.

  5. Perlecan and the Blood-Brain Barrier: Beneficial Proteolysis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill eRoberts

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The cerebral microvasculature is important for maintaining brain homeostasis. This is achieved via the blood-brain barrier (BBB, composed of endothelial cells with specialized tight junctions, astrocytes and a basement membrane. Prominent components of the basement membrane extracellular matrix (ECM include fibronectin, laminin, collagen IV and perlecan, all of which regulate cellular processes via signal transduction through various cell membrane bound ECM receptors. Expression and proteolysis of these ECM components can be rapidly altered during pathological states of the central nervous system. In particular, proteolysis of perlecan, a heparan sulfate proteoglycan, occurs within hours following ischemia induced by experimental stroke. Proteolysis of ECM components following stroke results in the degradation of the basement membrane and further disruption of the BBB. While it is clear that such proteolysis has negative consequences for the BBB, we propose that it also may lead to generation of ECM protein fragments, including the C-terminal domain V (DV of perlecan, that potentially have a positive influence on other aspects of CNS health. Indeed, perlecan DV has been shown to be persistently generated after stroke and beneficial as a neuroprotective molecule and promoter of post-stroke brain repair. This mini-review will discuss beneficial roles of perlecan protein fragment generation within the brain during stroke.

  6. Analysis of raw meat to predict proteolysis in Parma ham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schivazappa, C; Degni, M; Nanni Costa, L; Russo, V; Buttazzoni, L; Virgili, R

    2002-01-01

    Four hundred and thirty-seven pigs (223 purebred Italian Large White, 97 Italian Landrace, and 117 Duroc), were studied to examine the effect of breed on meat quality and assess the possibility of relating proteolysis of dry-cured hams to raw meat quality. The Duroc pigs had intramuscular fat contents and water holding capacities (M. Semimembranosus) significantly higher than those of the Large White and Landrace. The latter had a significantly higher pH(24h) and cathepsin B activities significantly lower than the Duroc breed. The dry-cured hams (M. Biceps femoris) from the three breeds were significantly different in proximate composition, proteolysis and weight loss at the end of ageing. Data for green hams (including salt content) were used to compute a model to fit the proteolysis of the corresponding dry-cured hams. The variables included in the model (R(2)=0.53 and Pham, pH(24h), weight loss after the first salting step, and the salt content of the dry-cured ham. The raw hams with the highest cathepsin B activities, the lowest pH(24h), and the highest weight loss after the first salting were those in which greatest proteolysis occured.

  7. The effect of different packaging materials on proteolysis, sensory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, tulum cheese was manufactured using raw ewe's milk and was ripened in goat's skin and plastic bags. The effect of ripening materials (skin bag or plastic) on proteolysis was investigated during 120 days of ripening. In addition, sensory scores of the cheeses were assessed at the 90th and 120th days.

  8. What history tells us XLI. Ubiquitin and proteolysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Biochemistry vs. molecular biology; energy dependence; lysosome; nucleosome; proteolysis; ubiquitin. Abstract. Author Affiliations. MICHEL MORANGE1. Centre Cavaillès, République des Savoirs: Lettres, Sciences, Philosophie USR 3608, Ecole Normale Supérieure, 29 Rue d'Ulm, 75230, Paris Cedex 05, ...

  9. Collagen fibril architecture, domain organization, and triple-helical conformation govern its proteolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perumal, Shiamalee; Antipova, Olga; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O. (IIT)

    2008-06-24

    We describe the molecular structure of the collagen fibril and how it affects collagen proteolysis or 'collagenolysis.' The fibril-forming collagens are major components of all mammalian connective tissues, providing the structural and organizational framework for skin, blood vessels, bone, tendon, and other tissues. The triple helix of the collagen molecule is resistant to most proteinases, and the matrix metalloproteinases that do proteolyze collagen are affected by the architecture of collagen fibrils, which are notably more resistant to collagenolysis than lone collagen monomers. Until now, there has been no molecular explanation for this. Full or limited proteolysis of the collagen fibril is known to be a key process in normal growth, development, repair, and cell differentiation, and in cancerous tumor progression and heart disease. Peptide fragments generated by collagenolysis, and the conformation of exposed sites on the fibril as a result of limited proteolysis, regulate these processes and that of cellular attachment, but it is not known how or why. Using computational and molecular visualization methods, we found that the arrangement of collagen monomers in the fibril (its architecture) protects areas vulnerable to collagenolysis and strictly governs the process. This in turn affects the accessibility of a cell interaction site located near the cleavage region. Our observations suggest that the C-terminal telopeptide must be proteolyzed before collagenase can gain access to the cleavage site. Collagenase then binds to the substrate's 'interaction domain,' which facilitates the triple-helix unwinding/dissociation function of the enzyme before collagenolysis.

  10. Analyses of N-linked glycans of PrPSc revealed predominantly 2,6-linked sialic acid residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katorcha, Elizaveta; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2017-11-01

    Mammalian prions (PrPSc ) consist of misfolded, conformationally altered, self-replicating states of the sialoglycoprotein called prion protein or PrPC . Recent studies revealed that the sialylation status of PrPSc plays a major role in evading innate immunity and infecting a host. Establishing the type of linkage by which sialic acid residues are attached to galactose is important, as it helps to identify the sialyltransferases responsible for sialylating PrPC and outline strategies for manipulating the sialyation status of PrPSc . Using enzymatic treatment with sialidases and lectin blots, this study demonstrated that in N-linked glycans of PrPSc , the sialic acid residues are predominantly alpha 2,6-linked. High percentages of alpha 2,6-linked sialic acids were observed in PrPSc of three prion strains 22L, RML, and ME7, as well as PrPSc from brain, spleen, or N2a cells cultured in vitro. Moreover, the variation in the percentage of alpha 2,3- versus 2,6-linked sialic acid was found to be relatively minor between brain-, spleen-, or cell-derived PrPSc , suggesting that the type of linkage is independent of tissue type. Based on the current results, we propose that sialyltransferases of St6Gal family, which is responsible for attaching sialic acids via alpha 2,6-linkages to N-linked glycans, controls sialylation of PrPC and PrPSc . © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. Cell cycle- and cell growth-regulated proteolysis of mammalian CDC6 is dependent on APC-CDH1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, B O; Wagener, C; Marinoni, F

    2000-01-01

    CDC6 is conserved during evolution and is essential and limiting for the initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication. Human CDC6 activity is regulated by periodic transcription and CDK-regulated subcellular localization. Here, we show that, in addition to being absent from nonproliferating cells, CDC6...... is targeted for ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis by the anaphase promoting complex (APC)/cyclosome in G(1). A combination of point mutations in the destruction box and KEN-box motifs in CDC6 stabilizes the protein in G(1) and in quiescent cells. Furthermore, APC, in association with CDH1, ubiquitinates CDC6...... in vitro, and both APC and CDH1 are required and limiting for CDC6 proteolysis in vivo. Although a stable mutant of CDC6 is biologically active, overexpression of this mutant or wild-type CDC6 is not sufficient to induce multiple rounds of DNA replication in the same cell cycle. The APC-CDH1-dependent...

  12. Co-existence of distinct prion types enables conformational evolution of human PrPSc by competitive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldiman, Tracy; Kim, Chae; Cohen, Yvonne; Chen, Wei; Blevins, Janis; Qing, Liuting; Cohen, Mark L; Langeveld, Jan; Telling, Glenn C; Kong, Qingzhong; Safar, Jiri G

    2013-10-11

    The unique phenotypic characteristics of mammalian prions are thought to be encoded in the conformation of pathogenic prion proteins (PrP(Sc)). The molecular mechanism responsible for the adaptation, mutation, and evolution of prions observed in cloned cells and upon crossing the species barrier remains unsolved. Using biophysical techniques and conformation-dependent immunoassays in tandem, we isolated two distinct populations of PrP(Sc) particles with different conformational stabilities and aggregate sizes, which frequently co-exist in the most common human prion disease, sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The protein misfolding cyclic amplification replicates each of the PrP(Sc) particle types independently and leads to the competitive selection of those with lower initial conformational stability. In serial propagation with a nonglycosylated mutant PrP(C) substrate, the dominant PrP(Sc) conformers are subject to further evolution by natural selection of the subpopulation with the highest replication rate due to its lowest stability. Cumulatively, the data show that sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease PrP(Sc) is not a single conformational entity but a dynamic collection of two distinct populations of particles. This implies the co-existence of different prions, whose adaptation and evolution are governed by the selection of progressively less stable, faster replicating PrP(Sc) conformers.

  13. Co-existence of Distinct Prion Types Enables Conformational Evolution of Human PrPSc by Competitive Selection*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldiman, Tracy; Kim, Chae; Cohen, Yvonne; Chen, Wei; Blevins, Janis; Qing, Liuting; Cohen, Mark L.; Langeveld, Jan; Telling, Glenn C.; Kong, Qingzhong; Safar, Jiri G.

    2013-01-01

    The unique phenotypic characteristics of mammalian prions are thought to be encoded in the conformation of pathogenic prion proteins (PrPSc). The molecular mechanism responsible for the adaptation, mutation, and evolution of prions observed in cloned cells and upon crossing the species barrier remains unsolved. Using biophysical techniques and conformation-dependent immunoassays in tandem, we isolated two distinct populations of PrPSc particles with different conformational stabilities and aggregate sizes, which frequently co-exist in the most common human prion disease, sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The protein misfolding cyclic amplification replicates each of the PrPSc particle types independently and leads to the competitive selection of those with lower initial conformational stability. In serial propagation with a nonglycosylated mutant PrPC substrate, the dominant PrPSc conformers are subject to further evolution by natural selection of the subpopulation with the highest replication rate due to its lowest stability. Cumulatively, the data show that sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease PrPSc is not a single conformational entity but a dynamic collection of two distinct populations of particles. This implies the co-existence of different prions, whose adaptation and evolution are governed by the selection of progressively less stable, faster replicating PrPSc conformers. PMID:23974118

  14. Exposure of RML scrapie agent to a sodium percarbonate-based product and sodium dodecyl sulfate renders PrPSc protease sensitive but does not eliminate infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jodi D; Nicholson, Eric M; Foster, Gregory H; Greenlee, Justin J

    2013-01-11

    Prions, the causative agents of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, are notoriously difficult to inactivate. Current decontamination recommendations by the World Health Organization include prolonged exposure to 1 N sodium hydroxide or > 20,000 ppm sodium hypochlorite, or autoclaving. For decontamination of large stainless steel surfaces and equipment as in abattoirs, for example, these methods are harsh or unsuitable. The current study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of a commercial product containing sodium percarbonate to inactivate prions. Samples of mouse brain infected with a mouse-adapted strain of the scrapie agent (RML) were exposed to a sodium percarbonate-based product (SPC-P). Treated samples were evaluated for abnormal prion protein (PrPSc)-immunoreactivity by western blot analysis, and residual infectivity by mouse bioassay. Exposure to a 21% solution of SPC-P or a solution containing either 2.1% or 21% SPC-P in combination with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) resulted in increased proteinase K sensitivity of PrPSc. Limited reductions in infectivity were observed depending on treatment condition. A marginal effect on infectivity was observed with SPC-P alone, but an approximate 2-3 log10 reduction was observed with the addition of SDS, though exposure to SDS alone resulted in an approximate 2 log10 reduction. This study demonstrates that exposure of a mouse-adapted scrapie strain to SPC-P does not eliminate infectivity, but does render PrPSc protease sensitive.

  15. Exploration of the main sites for the transformation of normal prion protein (PrPC into pathogenic prion protein (PrPsc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xi-Lin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The functions and mechanisms of prion proteins (PrPC are currently unknown, but most experts believe that deformed or pathogenic prion proteins (PrPSc originate from PrPC, and that there may be plural main sites for the conversion of normal PrPC into PrPSc. In order to better understand the mechanism of PrPC transformation to PrPSc, the most important step is to determine the replacement or substitution site.

  16. Recent advances in cell-free PrPSc amplification technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atarashi, Ryuichiro

    2009-01-01

    The development of amplification technology for abnormal forms of prion protein in vitro has had a great impact on the field of prion research. This novel technology has generated new possibilities for understanding the molecular basis of prions and for developing an early diagnostic test for prion diseases. This review provides an overview of recent progress in cell-free PrPSc amplification techniques.

  17. Dynamics and genetics of PrPSc placental accumulation in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroux, C; Corbière, F; Tabouret, G; Lugan, S; Costes, P; Mathey, J; Delmas, J M; Weisbecker, J L; Foucras, G; Cassard, H; Elsen, J M; Schelcher, F; Andréoletti, O

    2007-03-01

    Placentae from scrapie-affected ewes are an important source of contamination. This study confirmed that scrapie-incubating ewes bearing susceptible genotypes could produce both abnormal prion protein (PrPSc)-positive and -negative placentae, depending only on the PRP genotype of the fetus. The results also provided evidence indicating that scrapie-incubating ARR/VRQ ewes may be unable to accumulate prions in the placenta, whatever the genotype of their progeny. Multinucleated trophoblast cells appeared to play a key role in placental PrPSc accumulation. PrPSc accumulation began in syncytiotrophoblasts before disseminating to uninucleated trophoblasts. As these result from trophoblast/uterine epithelial cell fusion, syncytiotrophoblast cells expressed maternal and fetal PrPC, whilst uninucleated trophoblast cells only expressed fetal PrPC. In ARR/VRQ scrapie-infected ewes, expression of the ARR allele by syncytiotrophoblasts appeared to prevent initiation of PrPSc placental deposition. The absence of prions in affected ARR/VRQ sheep placentae reinforces strongly the interest in ARR selection for scrapie control.

  18. Short-term study of the uptake of PrPSc by the Peyer’s patches in hamsters after oral exposure to scrapie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, Ann-Louise; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2006-01-01

    The disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc) has been detected in the ileal Peyer's patches of lambs as early as one week after oral exposure to scrapie. In hamsters, the earliest reported time of PrPSc detection in the Peyer's patches after oral exposure to scrapie is 69 days post...... of the scrapie agent. PrPSc was demonstrated in the Peyer's patches only a few days after exposure, i.e., much earlier than previously reported. This study Supports the view that the Peyer's patches constitute at least one of the primary entry sites of PrPSc after oral exposure to scrapie....

  19. Qualitative and Quantitative Detection of PrPSc Based on the Controlled Release Property of Magnetic Microspheres Using Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichao Lou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Prion protein (PrPSc has drawn widespread attention due to its pathological potential to prion diseases. In this work, we constructed a novel surface plasmon resonance (SPR detection assay involving magnetic microspheres (MMs and its controlled release property, for selective capture, embedding, concentration, and SPR detection of PrPSc with high sensitivity and specificity. Aptamer-modified magnetic particles (AMNPs were used to specifically capture PrPSc. Amphiphilic copolymer was used to embed the labeled PrPSc and form magnetic microspheres to isolate PrPSc from the external environment. Static magnetic and alternating magnetic fields were used to concentrate and control release the embedded PrPSc, respectively. Finally, the released AMNPs-labeled PrPSc was detected by SPR which was equipped with a bare gold sensing film. A good linear relationship was obtained between SPR responses and the logarithm of PrPSc concentrations over a range of 0.01–1000 ng/mL. The detection sensitivity for PrPSc was improved by 10 fold compared with SPR direct detection format. The specificity of the present biosensor was also determined by PrPC and other reagents as controls. This proposed approach could also be used to isolate and detect other highly pathogenic biomolecules with similar structural characteristics by altering the corresponding aptamer in the AMNPs conjugates.

  20. The N-Terminal Sequence of Prion Protein Consists an Epitope Specific to the Abnormal Isoform of Prion Protein (PrPSc)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masujin, Kentaro; Kaku-Ushiki, Yuko; Miwa, Ritsuko; Okada, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Yoshihisa; Kasai, Kazuo; Matsuura, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The conformation of abnormal prion protein (PrPSc) differs from that of cellular prion protein (PrPC), but the precise characteristics of PrPSc remain to be elucidated. To clarify the properties of native PrPSc, we attempted to generate novel PrPSc-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) by immunizing PrP-deficient mice with intact PrPSc purified from bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)-affected mice. The generated mAbs 6A12 and 8D5 selectivity precipitated PrPSc from the brains of prion-affected mice, sheep, and cattle, but did not precipitate PrPC from the brains of healthy animals. In histopathological analysis, mAbs 6A12 and 8D5 strongly reacted with prion-affected mouse brains but not with unaffected mouse brains without antigen retrieval. Epitope analysis revealed that mAbs 8D5 and 6A12 recognized the PrP subregions between amino acids 31–39 and 41–47, respectively. This indicates that a PrPSc-specific epitope exists in the N-terminal region of PrPSc, and mAbs 6A12 and 8D5 are powerful tools with which to detect native and intact PrPSc. We found that the ratio of proteinase K (PK)-sensitive PrPSc to PK-resistant PrPSc was constant throughout the disease time course. PMID:23469131

  1. The Strain-Encoded Relationship between PrPSc Replication, Stability and Processing in Neurons is Predictive of the Incubation Period of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, Jacob I.; Schutt, Charles R.; Shikiya, Ronald A.; Aguzzi, Adriano; Kincaid, Anthony E.; Bartz, Jason C.

    2011-01-01

    Prion strains are characterized by differences in the outcome of disease, most notably incubation period and neuropathological features. While it is established that the disease specific isoform of the prion protein, PrPSc, is an essential component of the infectious agent, the strain-specific relationship between PrPSc properties and the biological features of the resulting disease is not clear. To investigate this relationship, we examined the amplification efficiency and conformational stability of PrPSc from eight hamster-adapted prion strains and compared it to the resulting incubation period of disease and processing of PrPSc in neurons and glia. We found that short incubation period strains were characterized by more efficient PrPSc amplification and higher PrPSc conformational stabilities compared to long incubation period strains. In the CNS, the short incubation period strains were characterized by the accumulation of N-terminally truncated PrPSc in the soma of neurons, astrocytes and microglia in contrast to long incubation period strains where PrPSc did not accumulate to detectable levels in the soma of neurons but was detected in glia similar to short incubation period strains. These results are inconsistent with the hypothesis that a decrease in conformational stability results in a corresponding increase in replication efficiency and suggest that glia mediated neurodegeneration results in longer survival times compared to direct replication of PrPSc in neurons. PMID:21437239

  2. Quantification of surviving cerebellar granule neurones and abnormal prion protein (PrPSc) deposition in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease supports a pathogenic role for small PrPSc deposits common to the various molecular subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucheux, B A; Morain, E; Diouron, V; Brandel, J-P; Salomon, D; Sazdovitch, V; Privat, N; Laplanche, J-L; Hauw, J-J; Haïk, S

    2011-08-01

    Neuronal death is a major neuropathological hallmark in prion diseases. The association between the accumulation of the disease-related prion protein (PrP(Sc) ) and neuronal loss varies within the wide spectrum of prion diseases and their experimental models. In this study, we investigated the relationships between neuronal loss and PrP(Sc) deposition in the cerebellum from cases of the six subtypes of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD; n=100) that can be determined according to the M129V polymorphism of the human prion protein gene (PRNP) and PrP(Sc) molecular types. The numerical density of neurones was estimated with a computer-assisted image analysis system and the accumulation of PrP(Sc) deposits was scored. The scores of PrP(Sc) immunoreactive deposits of the punctate type (synaptic type) were correlated with neurone counts - the higher the score the higher the neuronal loss - in all sCJD subtypes. Large 5- to 50-µm-wide deposits (focal type) were found in sCJD-MV2 and sCJD-VV2 subtypes, and occasionally in a few cases of the other studied groups. By contrast, the highest scores for 5- to 50-µm-wide deposits observed in sCJD-MV2 subtype were not associated with higher neuronal loss. In addition, these scores were inversely correlated with neuronal counts in the sCJD-VV2 subtype. These results support a putative pathogenic role for small PrP(Sc) deposits common to the various sCJD subtypes. Furthermore, the observation of a lower loss of neurones associated with PrP(Sc) type-2 large deposits is consistent with a possible 'protective' role of aggregated deposits in both sCJD-MV2 and sCJD-VV2 subtypes. © 2011 The Authors. Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology © 2011 British Neuropathological Society.

  3. MMP20 Proteolysis of Native Amelogenin Regulates Mineralization In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, S.Y.; Yamakoshi, Y.; Simmer, J.P.; Margolis, H.C.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that native phosphorylated full-length porcine amelogenin (P173) and its predominant cleavage product (P148) can inhibit spontaneous calcium phosphate formation in vitro by stabilizing an amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) precursor phase. Since full-length amelogenin undergoes proteolysis by matrix metalloproteinase 20 (MMP20, enamelysin) soon after secretion, the present study was conducted to assess the effect of amelogenin proteolysis on calcium phosphate formation. Calcium and phosphate were sequentially added to protein solutions without and with added MMP20 (ratio = 200:1) under physiological-like conditions of ionic strength (163 mM) in 50 mM Tris-HCl (pH 7.4) at 37 °C. Protein degradation with time was assessed by gel-electrophoresis, and mineral products formed were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). MMP20 was found to cleave P173 to primarily generate P148, along with P162, P46-148, and P63/64-148. In sharp contrast, MMP20 did not cleave P148. In addition, the formation of well-aligned bundles of enamel-like hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals was promoted in the presence of P173 with added MMP20, while only ACP particles were seen in the absence of MMP20. Although P148 was found to have a somewhat lower capacity to stabilize ACP and prevent HA formation compared with P173 in the absence of MMP20, essentially no HA formation was observed in the presence of somewhat higher concentrations of P148 regardless of MMP20 addition, due to the lack of observed protein proteolysis. Present findings suggest that ACP transformation to ordered arrays of enamel crystals may be regulated in part by the proteolysis of full-length native amelogenin, while the predominant amelogenin degradation product in developing enamel (e.g., P148) primarily serves to prevent uncontrolled mineral formation during the secretory stage of amelogenesis. PMID:27558264

  4. In vitro amplification of PrPSc derived from the brain and blood of sheep infected with scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Leigh; Terry, Linda A

    2008-12-01

    Scrapie is a fatal, naturally transmissible, neurodegenerative prion disease that affects sheep and goats and is characterized by the accumulation of a misfolded protein, PrPSc, converted from host-encoded PrPc, in the central nervous system of affected animals. Highly efficient in vitro conversion of host PrPc to PrPSc has been achieved in models of scrapie and in natural prion diseases by protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA). Here, we demonstrate amplification, by serial PMCA, of PrPSc from individual sources of scrapie-infected sheep. Efficiency of amplification was affected by the pairing of the source of PrPSc with the control brain substrate of different genotypes of PrP. In line with previous studies, efficiency of amplification was greatly enhanced with the addition of a synthetic polyanion, polyadenylic acid (PolyA), facilitating rapid detection of low levels of PrPSc from body fluids such as blood. To this end PrPSc was amplified, in a 3 day PMCA assay, from blood leukocyte preparations from VRQ/VRQ scrapie-affected sheep at clinical end point. While PolyA-assisted PMCA resulted in spontaneous conversion of PrPc, we were able to distinguish blood samples from unaffected and affected sheep under controlled conditions. This study demonstrates that highly efficient amplification of PrPSc can be achieved for ovine scrapie from both brain and blood from naturally infected sheep and shows potential applications for improvements in current diagnostics and pre-mortem testing.

  5. PrPSc accumulation in fetal cotyledons of scrapie-resistant lambs is influenced by fetus location in the uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alverson, Janet; O'Rourke, Katherine I; Baszler, Timothy V

    2006-04-01

    Placentae from scrapie-infected ewes have been shown to accumulate PrPSc when the genotype of the fetus is of a susceptible genotype (VRQ/VRQ, ARQ/VRQ or ARQ/ARQ). Cotyledons from fetuses of genotypes ARR/ARR, ARQ/ARR and ARQ/VRR have previously been shown to be resistant to PrPSc accumulation. By using ewes from a naturally infected scrapie flock, cotyledons from fetuses of multiple births of different genotypes were examined. PrPSc was detected in fetal cotyledons of genotype ARQ/ARQ, but not in cotyledons from their dizygotic twin of genotype ARQ/ARR. This confirms earlier reports of single fetuses of these genotypes, but is the first description of such a finding in twin fetuses, one of each genotype. It is also demonstrated that cotyledons from sibling fetuses of genotypes ARQ/VRQ and ARQ/ARQ have different patterns of PrPSc accumulation depending on whether the dam is of genotype ARQ/ARQ or ARQ/VRQ. Lastly, it is shown that cotyledons from fetuses with resistant genotypes are weakly positive for PrPSc when they have shared the same pregnant uterine horn with a fetus of a susceptible genotype with cotyledons positive for the detection of PrPSc. Additionally, a PCR product for the Sry gene, a product specific to males, was found in cotyledons from female fetuses that had shared a uterine horn with a male fetus. This indicates that some sharing of fetal blood occurs between placentomes and fetuses residing in the same uterine horn, which can result in PrPSc accumulation in cotyledons with resistant genotypes.

  6. Small protease sensitive oligomers of PrPSc in distinct human prions determine conversion rate of PrP(C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae; Haldiman, Tracy; Surewicz, Krystyna; Cohen, Yvonne; Chen, Wei; Blevins, Janis; Sy, Man-Sun; Cohen, Mark; Kong, Qingzhong; Telling, Glenn C; Surewicz, Witold K; Safar, Jiri G

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian prions replicate by converting cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into pathogenic conformational isoform (PrP(Sc)). Variations in prions, which cause different disease phenotypes, are referred to as strains. The mechanism of high-fidelity replication of prion strains in the absence of nucleic acid remains unsolved. We investigated the impact of different conformational characteristics of PrP(Sc) on conversion of PrP(C) in vitro using PrP(Sc) seeds from the most frequent human prion disease worldwide, the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). The conversion potency of a broad spectrum of distinct sCJD prions was governed by the level, conformation, and stability of small oligomers of the protease-sensitive (s) PrP(Sc). The smallest most potent prions present in sCJD brains were composed only of∼20 monomers of PrP(Sc). The tight correlation between conversion potency of small oligomers of human sPrP(Sc) observed in vitro and duration of the disease suggests that sPrP(Sc) conformers are an important determinant of prion strain characteristics that control the progression rate of the disease.

  7. Small protease sensitive oligomers of PrPSc in distinct human prions determine conversion rate of PrP(C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chae Kim

    Full Text Available The mammalian prions replicate by converting cellular prion protein (PrP(C into pathogenic conformational isoform (PrP(Sc. Variations in prions, which cause different disease phenotypes, are referred to as strains. The mechanism of high-fidelity replication of prion strains in the absence of nucleic acid remains unsolved. We investigated the impact of different conformational characteristics of PrP(Sc on conversion of PrP(C in vitro using PrP(Sc seeds from the most frequent human prion disease worldwide, the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD. The conversion potency of a broad spectrum of distinct sCJD prions was governed by the level, conformation, and stability of small oligomers of the protease-sensitive (s PrP(Sc. The smallest most potent prions present in sCJD brains were composed only of∼20 monomers of PrP(Sc. The tight correlation between conversion potency of small oligomers of human sPrP(Sc observed in vitro and duration of the disease suggests that sPrP(Sc conformers are an important determinant of prion strain characteristics that control the progression rate of the disease.

  8. Influence of Mabs on PrP(Sc formation using in vitro and cell-free systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binggong Chang

    Full Text Available PrP(Sc is believed to serve as a template for the conversion of PrP(C to the abnormal isoform. This process requires contact between the two proteins and implies that there may be critical contact sites that are important for conversion. We hypothesized that antibodies binding to either PrP(cor PrP(Sc would hinder or prevent the formation of the PrP(C-PrP(Sc complex and thus slow down or prevent the conversion process. Two systems were used to analyze the effect of different antibodies on PrP(Sc formation: (i neuroblastoma cells persistently infected with the 22L mouse-adapted scrapie stain, and (ii protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA, which uses PrP(Sc as a template or seed, and a series of incubations and sonications, to convert PrP(C to PrP(Sc. The two systems yielded similar results, in most cases, and demonstrate that PrP-specific monoclonal antibodies (Mabs vary in their ability to inhibit the PrP(C-PrP(Sc conversion process. Based on the numerous and varied Mabs analyzed, the inhibitory effect does not appear to be epitope specific, related to PrP(C conformation, or to cell membrane localization, but is influenced by the targeted PrP region (amino vs carboxy.

  9. Immunohistochemistry for PrPSc in natural scrapie reveals patterns which are associated with the PrP genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiropoulos, J; Casalone, C; Caramelli, M; Simmons, M M

    2007-08-01

    Immunohistochemistry for PrPSc is used widely in scrapie diagnosis. In natural scrapie cases the use of immunohistochemistry (IHC) has revealed the existence of up to 12 different morphological types of immunostained deposits. The significance of this pattern variability in relation to genotype has not been studied extensively in natural disease. In this study we recorded in detail PrPSc patterns at the obex level of the medulla oblongata from 163 animals derived from 55 flocks which presented through passive surveillance in the UK and Italy. A strong association was seen between PrPSc patterns and PrP genotype, particularly in relation to codon 136. In a blind assessment of this association we were able to predict, with over 80% accuracy, the genotype of 151 scrapie cases which were presented through passive surveillance from 13 farms. The genotype of these cases was ARQ/ARQ or VRQ/VRQ. The association of PrPsc patterns with genotype was generally stronger in those farms where all the affected animals belonged to a single genotype compared with farms where both genotypes were identified, with the exception of one farm in which the genotype of all affected sheep was ARQ/ARQ and the PrPSc patterns were of the VRQ/VRQ type. Our observations support the hypothesis that the observed association between specific IHC patterns and genotypes may in fact be strain driven but in natural disease individual scrapie strains may demonstrate a genotypic tropism.

  10. Sporadic fatal insomnia with spongiform degeneration in the thalamus and widespread PrPSc deposits in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Yue-Shan; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Takahashi, Hitoshi

    2005-06-01

    We report a case of human prion disease of 29 months duration in a 74-year-old Japanese man. The disease started with progressive sleeplessness and dementia. MRI showed gradually progressive cerebral atrophy. Neuronal loss, spongiform change and gliosis were evident in the thalamus and cerebral cortex, as well as in the striatum and amygdaloid nucleus. In the cerebellar cortex, mild-to-moderate depletion of Pukinje cells and spongiform change were observed. Mild neuronal loss in the inferior olivary nucleus was also seen. Immunohistochemistry revealed widespread perivacuolar deposits of abnormal prion protein (PrPsc) in the cerebral cortex, thalamus, basal ganglia, and brainstem, and minimal plaque-like deposits of PrPSc in the cerebellar cortex. In the cerebellar plaque-like deposits, the presence of amyloid fibrils was confirmed ultrastructurally. The entire pathology appeared to lie halfway between those of CJD and fatal insomnia, and further demonstrated the relationship between spongiform degeneration and PrPSc deposits, especially in the diseased thalamus. By immunoblotting, the thalamus was shown to contain the lowest amount of PrPSc among the brain regions examined. The PrPSc of type 2, in which the ratio of the three glycoforms was compatible with that of sporadic fatal insomnia (MM2-thalamic variant) reported previously, was also demonstrated. Analysis of the prion protein gene (PRNP) showed no mutation, and homozygosity for methionine at codon 129. In conclusion, we considered that this patient had been suffering from sporadic, pathologically atypical fatal insomnia.

  11. Small Protease Sensitive Oligomers of PrPSc in Distinct Human Prions Determine Conversion Rate of PrPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae; Haldiman, Tracy; Surewicz, Krystyna; Cohen, Yvonne; Chen, Wei; Blevins, Janis; Sy, Man-Sun; Cohen, Mark; Kong, Qingzhong; Telling, Glenn C.; Surewicz, Witold K.; Safar, Jiri G.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian prions replicate by converting cellular prion protein (PrPC) into pathogenic conformational isoform (PrPSc). Variations in prions, which cause different disease phenotypes, are referred to as strains. The mechanism of high-fidelity replication of prion strains in the absence of nucleic acid remains unsolved. We investigated the impact of different conformational characteristics of PrPSc on conversion of PrPC in vitro using PrPSc seeds from the most frequent human prion disease worldwide, the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). The conversion potency of a broad spectrum of distinct sCJD prions was governed by the level, conformation, and stability of small oligomers of the protease-sensitive (s) PrPSc. The smallest most potent prions present in sCJD brains were composed only of∼20 monomers of PrPSc. The tight correlation between conversion potency of small oligomers of human sPrPSc observed in vitro and duration of the disease suggests that sPrPSc conformers are an important determinant of prion strain characteristics that control the progression rate of the disease. PMID:22876179

  12. A refined method for molecular typing reveals that co-occurrence of PrPSc types in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is not the rule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notari, S.; Capellari, S.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Giese, A.; Strammiello, R.; Gambetti, P.; Kretzschmar, H.A.; Parchi, P.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular typing in Creutzfeldt¿Jakob disease (CJD) relies on the detection of distinct protease-resistant prion protein (PrPSc) core fragments, which differ in molecular mass or glycoform ratio. However, the definition and correct identification of CJD cases with a co-occurrence of PrPSc types

  13. Detection of PrPSc in Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded Tissue by Western Blot Differentiates Classical Scrapie, Nor98 Scrapie, and BSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies including bovine spongiform encephalopathy and scrapie are fatal neurodegenerative disorders associated with the presence of an infectious abnormal isoform of normal mammalian proteins called prions (PrP**Sc). Identification of PrP**Sc in the CNS is typicall...

  14. Detection and localisation of PrP(Sc in the liver of sheep infected with scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally J Everest

    Full Text Available Prions are largely contained within the nervous and lymphoid tissue of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE infected animals. However, following advances in diagnostic sensitivity, PrP(Sc, a marker for prion disease, can now be located in a wide range of viscera and body fluids including muscle, saliva, blood, urine and milk, raising concerns that exposure to these materials could contribute to the spread of disease in humans and animals. Previously we demonstrated low levels of infectivity in the liver of sheep experimentally challenged with bovine spongiform encephalopathy. In this study we show that PrP(Sc accumulated in the liver of 89% of sheep naturally infected with scrapie and 100% of sheep challenged with BSE, at both clinical and preclinical stages of the disease. PrP(Sc was demonstrated in the absence of obvious inflammatory foci and was restricted to isolated resident cells, most likely Kupffer cells.

  15. Regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels by proteolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathryn, ABELE; Jian, YANG

    2015-01-01

    Voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are multi-subunit membrane proteins present in a variety of tissues and control many essential physiological processes. Due to their vital importance, VGCCs are regulated by a myriad of proteins and signaling pathways. Here we review the literature on the regulation of VGCCs by proteolysis of the pore-forming α1 subunit, Cavα1. This form of regulation modulates channel function and degradation and affects cellular gene expression and excitability. L-type Ca2+ channels are proteolyzed in two ways, depending on tissue localization. In the heart and skeletal muscle, the distal C-terminus of Cavα1 is cleaved and acts as an autoinhibitor when it reassociates with the proximal C-terminus. Relief of this autoinhibition underlies the β-adrenergic stimulation-induced enhancement of cardiac and skeletal muscle calcium currents, part of the “fight or flight” response. Proteolysis of the distal C-terminus of L-type channels also occurs in the brain and is probably catalyzed by a calpain-like protease. In some brain regions, the entire C-terminus of L-type Ca2+ channels can be cleaved by an unknown protease and translocates to the nucleus acting as a transcription factor. The distal C-terminus of P/Q-channel Cavα1 is also proteolyzed and translocates to the nucleus. Truncated forms of the PQ-channel Cavα1 are produced by many disease-causing mutations and interfere with the function of full-length channels. Truncated forms of N-type channel Cavα1, generated by mutagenesis, affect the expression of full-length channels. New forms of proteolysis of VGCC subunits remain to be discovered and may represent a fruitful area of VGCC research. PMID:23090491

  16. [Role of defective intracellular proteolysis in human degenerative diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezelof, Christian

    2012-11-01

    Although intracellular protein synthesis has been studied extensively, protein degradation and disposal, know as proteolysis, has been relatively neglected. Modern studies which led two Nobel prizes (de Duve in 1950 and Herschko, Rose and Ciechanover in 1980) established that proteolysis is ensured by two separate but complementary mechanisms: lysosomes responsible for auto and heterophagy and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System (UPS). The UPS involves ubiquitin, a small molecule consisting of 76 amino acids found in all eukaryotic cells that ensures the identification of the protein to be degraded and its transport to the proteasome, an intracellular complex with enzymes which degrade unneeded or damaged proteins. The proteasome, acting as a composting agent, ensures the enzymatic dissociation of the protein. In this degradation process, as infinite screw, ubiquitin, peptides and amino acids are released and made available for a new cycle. Knowledge of the UPS and its related disorders is continually expanding. Concurrent with lysosomes which work in acidic environment, it is currently known that the UPS provides 80% to 90% of the proteolysis of the short-life proteins and ensures, as chaperon-molecules, the right conformation and hence the correct function of the proteins. The proteolytic activity generates abnormal residues (tau protein, amyloid and related proteins) and various soluble and insoluble wastes. Some are precipitated as inclusion-bodies or aggregosomes, identified years ago by pathologists. These aggregosomes affect almost exclusively long-lived cells (nervous and muscular, macophages). Pigment deposits, such as lipofuscines made by the peroxydation of cell membranes, are the most abundant. Due to their diverse chemical composition, they cannot be empoyed for a scientific classification. Failures of these systems are numerous. They vary not according to the chemical nature of the abnormal protein and wastes but the life span of the targeted cells and

  17. Chemometric analysis of proteolysis during ripening of Ragusano cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallico, V; McSweeney, P L H; Siebert, K J; Horne, J; Carpino, S; Licitra, G

    2004-10-01

    Chemometric modeling of peptide and free amino acid data was used to study proteolysis in Protected Denomination of Origin Ragusano cheese. Twelve cheeses ripened 3 to 7 mo were selected from local farmers and were analyzed in 4 layers: rind, external, middle, and internal. Proteolysis was significantly affected by cheese layer and age. Significant increases in nitrogen soluble in pH 4.6 acetate buffer and 12% trichloroacetic acid were found from rind to core and throughout ripening. Patterns of proteolysis by urea-PAGE showed that rind-to-core and age-related gradients of moisture and salt contents influenced coagulant and plasmin activities, as reflected in varying rates of hydrolysis of the caseins. Analysis of significant intercorrelations among chemical parameters revealed that moisture, more than salt content, had the largest single influence on rates of proteolysis. Lower levels of 70% ethanol-insoluble peptides coupled to higher levels of 70% ethanol-soluble peptides were found by reversed phase-HPLC in the innermost cheese layers and as the cheeses aged. Non-significant increases of individual free amino acids were found with cheese age and layer. Total free amino acids ranged from 14.3 mg/g (6.2% of total protein) at 3 mo to 22.0 mg/g (8.4% of total protein) after 7 mo. Glutamic acid had the largest concentration in all samples at each time and, jointly with lysine and leucine, accounted for 48% of total free amino acids. Principal components analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis of the data from reversed phase-HPLC chromatograms and free amino acids analysis showed that the peptide profiles were more useful in differentiating Ragusano cheese by age and farm origin than the amino acid data. Combining free amino acid and peptide data resulted in the best partial least squares regression model (R(2) = 0.976; Q(2) = 0.952) predicting cheese age, even though the peptide data alone led to a similarly precise prediction (R(2) = 0.961; Q(2) = 0.923). The

  18. Early Generation of New PrPSc on Blood Vessels after Brain Microinjection of Scrapie in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesebro, Bruce; Striebel, James; Rangel, Alejandra; Phillips, Katie; Hughson, Andrew; Caughey, Byron; Race, Brent

    2015-09-22

    Aggregation of misfolded host proteins in the central nervous system is believed to be important in the pathogenic process in several neurodegenerative diseases of humans, including prion diseases, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. In these diseases, protein misfolding and aggregation appear to expand through a process of seeded polymerization. Prion diseases occur in both humans and animals and are experimentally transmissible orally or by injection, thus providing a controllable model of other neurodegenerative protein misfolding diseases. In rodents and ruminants, prion disease has a slow course, lasting months to years. Although prion infectivity has been detected in brain tissue at 3 to 4 weeks postinfection (p.i.), the details of early prion replication in the brain are not well understood. Here we studied the localization and quantitation of PrPSc generation in vivo starting at 30 min postmicroinjection of scrapie into the brain. In C57BL mice at 3 days p.i., generation of new PrPSc was detected by immunohistochemistry and immunoblot assays, and at 7 days p.i., new generation was confirmed by real-time quaking-induced conversion assay. The main site of new PrPSc generation was near the outer basement membrane of small and medium blood vessels. The finding and localization of replication at this site so early after injection have not been reported previously. This predominantly perivascular location suggested that structural components of the blood vessel basement membrane or perivascular astrocytes might act as cofactors in the initial generation of PrPSc. The location of PrPSc replication at the basement membrane also implies a role for the brain interstitial fluid drainage in the early infection process. Neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and prion diseases, of humans are characterized by misfolding and aggregation of certain proteins, resulting in the destruction of brain tissue. In these diseases

  19. Detection of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy-Specific PrPSc by Treatment with Heat and Guanidine Thiocyanate

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Rudolf K; Oesch, Bruno; Fatzer, Rosmarie; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Vandevelde, Marc

    1999-01-01

    The conversion of a ubiquitous cellular protein (PrPC), an isoform of the prion protein (PrP), to the pathology-associated isoform PrPSc is one of the hallmarks of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Accumulation of PrPSc has been used to diagnose BSE. Here we describe a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that involves antibodies against epitopes within the protease-resistant core of the PrP molecule to measure the amou...

  20. TYK2 activity promotes ligand-induced IFNAR1 proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marijanovic, Zrinka; Ragimbeau, Josiane; Kumar, K G Suresh; Fuchs, Serge Y; Pellegrini, Sandra

    2006-07-01

    The type I IFNR (interferon receptor) is a heterodimer composed of two transmembrane chains, IFNAR1 (interferon-alpha receptor 1 subunit) and IFNAR2, which are associated with the tyrosine kinases Tyk2 and Jak1 (Janus kinase 1) respectively. Ligand-induced down-regulation of the type I IFNR is a major mechanism of negative regulation of cellular signalling and involves the internalization and lysosomal degradation of IFNAR1. IFNalpha promotes the phosphorylation of IFNAR1 on Ser535, followed by recruitment of the E3 ubiquitin ligase, beta-TrCP2 (beta-transducin repeats-containing protein 2), ubiquitination of IFNAR1 and proteolysis. The non-catalytic role of Tyk2 in sustaining the steady-state IFNAR1 level at the plasma membrane is well documented; however, little is known about the function of Tyk2 in the steps that precede and succeed serine phosphorylation and ubiquitination of IFNAR1 in response to ligand binding. In the present study, we show that catalytic activation of Tyk2 is not essential for IFNAR1 internalization, but is required for ligand-induced IFNAR1 serine phosphorylation, ubiquitination and efficient lysosomal proteolysis.

  1. Composition, proteolysis, and volatile profile of Strachitunt cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masotti, F; Cattaneo, S; Stuknytė, M; Battelli, G; Vallone, L; De Noni, I

    2017-03-01

    Strachitunt, a blue-veined Italian cheese, received the Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) label in 2014. Its unique technological feature is represented by the dual-curd method of production. Strachitunt is produced from raw bovine milk with or without the inoculation of natural starter cultures of lactic acid bacteria, and the addition of secondary cultures of mold spores is not permitted by the product specification. Physico-chemical properties, proteolysis, and volatile profile of Strachitunt were investigated in 10 cheese samples (ripened for 75 d) made throughout spring 2015 and provided by the main cheese maker. Overall, composition parameters showed a large variability among samples. Cheese was characterized by an acid paste (pH 5.46) and a lower extent of proteolysis compared with other blue-veined varieties. The main chemical groups of volatile organic compounds were alcohols and esters, whereas ketones represented only a minor component. The erratic adventitious contamination by mold spores of the cheese milk, the unique dual-curd method of cheese-making, and the large time variability between the piercing time and the end of ripening could be highlighted as the main causes of both the distinctive analytical fingerprint and the scarce standardization of this blue-veined cheese. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Multiplexed single-molecule force proteolysis measurements using magnetic tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Arjun S; Chai, Jack; Dunn, Alexander R

    2012-07-25

    The generation and detection of mechanical forces is a ubiquitous aspect of cell physiology, with direct relevance to cancer metastasis(1), atherogenesis(2) and wound healing(3). In each of these examples, cells both exert force on their surroundings and simultaneously enzymatically remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM). The effect of forces on ECM has thus become an area of considerable interest due to its likely biological and medical importance(4-7). Single molecule techniques such as optical trapping(8), atomic force microscopy(9), and magnetic tweezers(10,11) allow researchers to probe the function of enzymes at a molecular level by exerting forces on individual proteins. Of these techniques, magnetic tweezers (MT) are notable for their low cost and high throughput. MT exert forces in the range of ~1-100 pN and can provide millisecond temporal resolution, qualities that are well matched to the study of enzyme mechanism at the single-molecule level(12). Here we report a highly parallelizable MT assay to study the effect of force on the proteolysis of single protein molecules. We present the specific example of the proteolysis of a trimeric collagen peptide by matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1); however, this assay can be easily adapted to study other substrates and proteases.

  3. Causal Relationship between Microbial Ecology Dynamics and Proteolysis during Manufacture and Ripening of Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) Cheese Canestrato Pugliese

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pasquale, Ilaria; Calasso, Maria; Mancini, Leonardo; Ercolini, Danilo; La Storia, Antonietta; De Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, community-level physiological profiles determined by the use of Biolog EcoPlates, and proteolysis analyses were used to characterize Canestrato Pugliese Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) cheese. The number of presumptive mesophilic lactococci in raw ewes' milk was higher than that of presumptive mesophilic lactobacilli. The numbers of these microbial groups increased during ripening, showing temporal and numerical differences. Urea-PAGE showed limited primary proteolysis, whereas the analysis of the pH 4.6-soluble fraction of the cheese revealed that secondary proteolysis increased mainly from 45 to 75 days of ripening. This agreed with the concentration of free amino acids. Raw ewes' milk was contaminated by several bacterial phyla: Proteobacteria (68%; mainly Pseudomonas), Firmicutes (30%; mainly Carnobacterium and Lactococcus), Bacteroidetes (0.05%), and Actinobacteria (0.02%). Almost the same microbial composition persisted in the curd after molding. From day 1 of ripening onwards, the phylum Firmicutes dominated. Lactococcus dominated throughout ripening, and most of the Lactobacillus species appeared only at 7 or 15 days. At 90 days, Lactococcus (87.2%), Lactobacillus (4.8%; mainly Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus sakei), and Leuconostoc (3.9%) dominated. The relative utilization of carbon sources by the bacterial community reflected the succession. This study identified strategic phases that characterized the manufacture and ripening of Canestrato Pugliese cheese and established a causal relationship between mesophilic lactobacilli and proteolysis. PMID:24771032

  4. Causal relationship between microbial ecology dynamics and proteolysis during manufacture and ripening of protected designation of origin (PDO) cheese Canestrato Pugliese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pasquale, Ilaria; Calasso, Maria; Mancini, Leonardo; Ercolini, Danilo; La Storia, Antonietta; De Angelis, Maria; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Gobbetti, Marco

    2014-07-01

    Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, community-level physiological profiles determined by the use of Biolog EcoPlates, and proteolysis analyses were used to characterize Canestrato Pugliese Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) cheese. The number of presumptive mesophilic lactococci in raw ewes' milk was higher than that of presumptive mesophilic lactobacilli. The numbers of these microbial groups increased during ripening, showing temporal and numerical differences. Urea-PAGE showed limited primary proteolysis, whereas the analysis of the pH 4.6-soluble fraction of the cheese revealed that secondary proteolysis increased mainly from 45 to 75 days of ripening. This agreed with the concentration of free amino acids. Raw ewes' milk was contaminated by several bacterial phyla: Proteobacteria (68%; mainly Pseudomonas), Firmicutes (30%; mainly Carnobacterium and Lactococcus), Bacteroidetes (0.05%), and Actinobacteria (0.02%). Almost the same microbial composition persisted in the curd after molding. From day 1 of ripening onwards, the phylum Firmicutes dominated. Lactococcus dominated throughout ripening, and most of the Lactobacillus species appeared only at 7 or 15 days. At 90 days, Lactococcus (87.2%), Lactobacillus (4.8%; mainly Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus sakei), and Leuconostoc (3.9%) dominated. The relative utilization of carbon sources by the bacterial community reflected the succession. This study identified strategic phases that characterized the manufacture and ripening of Canestrato Pugliese cheese and established a causal relationship between mesophilic lactobacilli and proteolysis. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Atypical PrPsc distribution in goats naturally affected with scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofianidis, G; Psychas, V; Billinis, C; Spyrou, V; Argyroudis, S; Vlemmas, I

    2008-01-01

    The brain and spinal cord of 48 goats from two Greek herds in which scrapie had been reported were examined. All animals were symptomless at the time of euthanasia. Notably, no lesions were observed either at the level of the obex or at other regions of the brain and spinal cord. Immunohistochemical examination revealed PrPsc labelling of the linear and fine punctuate types, mainly in the cerebral cortices, of 36 goats. Twenty-seven of them were negative by ELISA (designed to detect proteinase-resistant PrP) at the level of the obex but positive in a pooled brain sample, and the majority carried PrP genotypes associated with scrapie susceptibility. Surprisingly, in 16 of the 27 animals, PrPsc deposits were detected only in the rostral parts of the brain. In addition, nine animals which were ELISA-positive at the level of the obex exhibited positive immunoreactivity, but not in the dorsal vagal nucleus. The findings indicate that this unusual scrapie type may have been underdiagnosed previously and may be of importance in scrapie surveillance programmes.

  6. Temporal resolution of PrPSc transport, PrPSc accumulation, activation of glia and neuronal death in retinas from C57Bl/6 mice inoculated with RML scrapie: Relevance to biomarkers of prion disease progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currently, there is a lack of pathologic landmarks to objectively evaluate the progression of prion disease in vivo. The goal of this work was to determine the temporal relationship between transport of misfolded prion protein to the retina from the brain, accumulation of PrPSc in the retina, the re...

  7. Proteolysis of virulence regulator ToxR is associated with entry of Vibrio cholerae into a dormant state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Almagro-Moreno

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae O1 is a natural inhabitant of aquatic environments and causes the diarrheal disease, cholera. Two of its primary virulence regulators, TcpP and ToxR, are localized in the inner membrane. TcpP is encoded on the Vibrio Pathogenicity Island (VPI, a horizontally acquired mobile genetic element, and functions primarily in virulence gene regulation. TcpP has been shown to undergo regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP in response to environmental conditions that are unfavorable for virulence gene expression. ToxR is encoded in the ancestral genome and is present in non-pathogenic strains of V. cholerae, indicating it has roles outside of the human host. In this study, we show that ToxR undergoes RIP in V. cholerae in response to nutrient limitation at alkaline pH, a condition that occurs during the stationary phase of growth. This process involves the site-2 protease RseP (YaeL, and is dependent upon the RpoE-mediated periplasmic stress response, as deletion mutants for the genes encoding these two proteins cannot proteolyze ToxR under nutrient limitation at alkaline pH. We determined that the loss of ToxR, genetically or by proteolysis, is associated with entry of V. cholerae into a dormant state in which the bacterium is normally found in the aquatic environment called viable but nonculturable (VBNC. Strains that can proteolyze ToxR, or do not encode it, lose culturability, experience a change in morphology associated with cells in VBNC, yet remain viable under nutrient limitation at alkaline pH. On the other hand, mutant strains that cannot proteolyze ToxR remain culturable and maintain the morphology of cells in an active state of growth. Overall, our findings provide a link between the proteolysis of a virulence regulator and the entry of a pathogen into an environmentally persistent state.

  8. Characterization of intracellular dynamics of inoculated PrP-res and newly generated PrPSc during early stage prion infection in Neuro2a cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Takeshi; Baron, Gerald S; Suzuki, Akio; Hasebe, Rie; Horiuchi, Motohiro

    2014-01-01

    Summary To clarify the cellular mechanisms for the establishment of prion infection, we analyzed the intracellular dynamics of inoculated and newly generated abnormal isoform of prion protein (PrPSc) in Neuro2a cells. Within 24 h after inoculation, the newly generated PrPSc was evident at the plasma membrane, in early endosomes, and in late endosomes, but this PrPSc was barely evident in lysosomes; in contrast, the majority of the inoculated PrPSc was evident in late endosomes and lysosomes. However, during the subsequent 48 h, the newly generated PrPSc increased remarkably in early endosomes and recycling endosomes. Overexpression of wild-type and mutant Rab proteins showed that membrane trafficking along not only the endocytic-recycling pathway but also the endo-lysosomal pathway is involved in de novo PrPSc generation. These results suggest that the trafficking of exogenously introduced PrPSc from the endo-lysosomal pathway to the endocytic-recycling pathway is important for the establishment of prion infection. PMID:24503096

  9. New insights into early sequential PrPsc accumulation in scrapie infected mouse brain evidenced by the use of streptomycin sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencsik, Anna A; Leclere, Edwige; Perron, Hervé; Moussa, Aly

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the amplifying potentialities of streptomycin sulfate in the immunohistochemical (IHC) detection of the abnormal prion protein (PrPsc), we used a sequential brain sampling from C506M3 scrapie strain inoculated C57Bl/6 mice. The weekly removed brains, from 7 to 63 days post intra-cranial inoculation were analysed using PrPsc IHC. The introduction of streptomycin sulfate, a technique developed for accurate cellular and regional mapping of PrPsc deposition in several animal TSEs, revealed a substantial amplifying effect and a clear specific PrPsc detection as early as 28 days post inoculation. The location of the first detected PrPsc deposits suggests a possible involvement of the cerebrospinal fluid in the early dissemination of the infectious agent. The meaning of these newly accessible PrPsc deposits is discussed in relation to a possible nascent form of PrPsc molecules detected in situ for the first time. Altogether, these findings argue that this method can be highly useful to study the early stages after infection with prion agents.

  10. Co-existence of Distinct Prion Types Enables Conformational Evolution of Human PrPSc by Competitive Selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haldiman, T.; Kim, C.; Cohen, Y.; Chen, W.; Blevins, J.; Qing, L.; Cohen, M.L.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Telling, G.C.; Kong, Q.; Safar, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    The unique phenotypic characteristics of mammalian prions are thought to be encoded in the conformation of pathogenic prion proteins (PrPSc). The molecular mechanism responsible for the adaptation, mutation, and evolution of prions observed in cloned cells and upon crossing the species barrier

  11. Transmission of the agent of sheep scrapie to deer results in PrPSc with two distinct molecular profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this work was to determine susceptibility of white-tailed deer (WTD) to the agent of sheep scrapie and to compare the resultant PrPSc to that of the original inoculum and chronic wasting disease (CWD). We inoculated WTD by a natural route of exposure (concurrent oral and intranasal (I...

  12. High titers of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy infectivity associated with extremely low levels of PrPSc in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Rona M; Campbell, Susan L; King, Declan; Bellon, Anne; Chapman, Karen E; Williamson, R Anthony; Manson, Jean C

    2007-12-07

    Diagnosis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) disease in humans and ruminants relies on the detection in post-mortem brain tissue of the protease-resistant form of the host glycoprotein PrP. The presence of this abnormal isoform (PrP(Sc)) in tissues is taken as indicative of the presence of TSE infectivity. Here we demonstrate conclusively that high titers of TSE infectivity can be present in brain tissue of animals that show clinical and vacuolar signs of TSE disease but contain low or undetectable levels of PrP(Sc). This work questions the correlation between PrP(Sc) level and the titer of infectivity and shows that tissues containing little or no proteinase K-resistant PrP can be infectious and harbor high titers of TSE infectivity. Reliance on protease-resistant PrP(Sc) as a sole measure of infectivity may therefore in some instances significantly underestimate biological properties of diagnostic samples, thereby undermining efforts to contain and eradicate TSEs.

  13. Relationships between PrPSc stability and incubation time for United States scrapie strains in a natural host system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), including scrapie in sheep (Ovis aries), are fatal neurodegenerative diseases caused by the misfolding of the cellular prion protein (PrP**C) into a beta-rich conformer (PrP**Sc) that accumulates into higher-order structures in the brain and other ti...

  14. The region approximately between amino acids 81 and 137 of proteinase K-resistant PrPSc is critical for the infectivity of the Chandler prion strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindoh, Ryo; Kim, Chan-Lan; Song, Chang-Hyun; Hasebe, Rie; Horiuchi, Motohiro

    2009-04-01

    Although the major component of the prion is believed to be the oligomer of PrP(Sc), little information is available concerning regions on the PrP(Sc) molecule that affect prion infectivity. During the analysis of PrP(Sc) molecules from various prion strains, we found that PrP(Sc) of the Chandler strain showed a unique property in the conformational-stability assay, and this property appeared to be useful for studying the relationship between regions of the PrP(Sc) molecule and prion infectivity. Thus, we analyzed PrP(Sc) of the Chandler strain in detail and analyzed the infectivities of the N-terminally denatured and truncated forms of proteinase K-resistant PrP. The N-terminal region of PrP(Sc) of the Chandler strain showed region-dependent resistance to guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) treatment. The region approximately between amino acids (aa) 81 and 137 began to be denatured by treatment with 1.5 M GdnHCl. Within this stretch, the region comprising approximately aa 81 to 90 was denatured almost completely by 2 M GdnHCl. Furthermore, the region approximately between aa 90 and 137 was denatured completely by 3 M GdnHCl. However, the C-terminal region thereafter was extremely resistant to the GdnHCl treatment. This property was not observed in PrP(Sc) molecules of other prion strains. Denaturation of the region between aa 81 and 137 by 3 M GdnHCl significantly prolonged the incubation periods in mice compared to that for the untreated control. More strikingly, the denaturation and removal of this region nearly abolished the infectivity. This finding suggests that the conformation of the region between aa 81 and 137 of the Chandler strain PrP(Sc) molecule is directly associated with prion infectivity.

  15. Coordinate regulation of RARgamma2, TBP, and TAFII135 by targeted proteolysis during retinoic acid-induced differentiation of F9 embryonal carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carré Lucie

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of mouse F9 embryonal carcinoma cells with all-trans retinoic acid (T-RA induces differentiation into primitive endodermal type cells. Differentiation requires the action of the receptors for all trans, and 9cis-retinoic acid (RAR and RXR, respectively and is accompanied by growth inhibition, changes in cell morphology, increased apoptosis, proteolytic degradation of the RARγ2 receptor, and induction of target genes. Results We show that the RNA polymerase II transcription factor TFIID subunits TBP and TAFII135 are selectively depleted in extracts from differentiated F9 cells. In contrast, TBP and TAFII135 are readily detected in extracts from differentiated F9 cells treated with proteasome inhibitors showing that their disappearance is due to targeted proteolysis. This regulatory pathway is not limited to F9 cells as it is also seen when C2C12 myoblasts differentiate into myotubes. Targeting of TBP and TAFII135 for proteolysis in F9 cells takes place coordinately with that previously reported for the RARγ2 receptor and is delayed or does not take place in RAR mutant F9 cells where differentiation is known to be impaired or abolished. Moreover, ectopic expression of TAFII135 delays proteolysis of the RARγ2 receptor and impairs primitive endoderm differentiation at an early stage as evidenced by cell morphology, induction of marker genes and apoptotic response. In addition, enhanced TAFII135 expression induces a novel differentiation pathway characterised by the appearance of cells with an atypical elongated morphology which are cAMP resistant. Conclusions These observations indicate that appropriately timed proteolysis of TBP and TAFII135 is required for normal F9 cell differentiation. Hence, in addition to transactivators, targeted proteolysis of basal transcription factors also plays an important role in gene regulation in response to physiological stimuli.

  16. Physiological regulation of epithelial sodium channel by proteolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Per; Friis, Ulla G; Bistrup, Claus

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Activation of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) by proteolysis appears to be relevant for day-to-day physiological regulation of channel activity in kidney and other epithelial tissues. Pathophysiogical, proteolytic activation of ENaC in kidney has been demonstrated in proteinuric...... disease. RECENT FINDINGS: A variation in sodium and potassium intake or plasma aldosterone changes the number of cleaved α and γ-ENaC subunits and is associated with changes in ENaC currents. The protease furin mediates intracellular cleavage, whereas the channel-activating protease prostasin (CAP-1...... opens the way for new understanding of the pathogenesis of proteinuric sodium retention, which may involve plasmin and present several potential new drug targets....

  17. Nutritional Control of DNA Replication Initiation through the Proteolysis and Regulated Translation of DnaA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Leslie

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria can arrest their own growth and proliferation upon nutrient depletion and under various stressful conditions to ensure their survival. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for suppressing growth and arresting the cell cycle under such conditions remain incompletely understood. Here, we identify post-transcriptional mechanisms that help enforce a cell-cycle arrest in Caulobacter crescentus following nutrient limitation and during entry into stationary phase by limiting the accumulation of DnaA, the conserved replication initiator protein. DnaA is rapidly degraded by the Lon protease following nutrient limitation. However, the rate of DnaA degradation is not significantly altered by changes in nutrient availability. Instead, we demonstrate that decreased nutrient availability downregulates dnaA translation by a mechanism involving the 5' untranslated leader region of the dnaA transcript; Lon-dependent proteolysis of DnaA then outpaces synthesis, leading to the elimination of DnaA and the arrest of DNA replication. Our results demonstrate how regulated translation and constitutive degradation provide cells a means of precisely and rapidly modulating the concentration of key regulatory proteins in response to environmental inputs.

  18. Inhibitors of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 signaling pathway clear prion-infected cells from PrPSc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordström, Elin K; Luhr, Katarina M; Ibáñez, Carlos; Kristensson, Krister

    2005-09-14

    Prions represent a unique class of infectious agents in which the normal cellular prion protein (PrPC) is converted to an abnormal isoform (PrPSc), which accumulates in the brain and constitutes the major, if not the only, component of the infectious particle. Factors that still remain to be identified may facilitate the conversion of PrPC to PrPSc. In the present study, we first demonstrated that a growth factor of the neurotrophin family, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), stimulates the formation of PrPSc in a gonadotropin-releasing hormone-secreting neuronal cell line (GT1-1 cells) infected with the Rocky Mountain Laboratory (RML) strain of scrapie as determined by Western blot analysis. We then observed that the prion-infected cells can be cleared from PrPSc by treatment with three inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) [1,4-diamino-2,3-dicyano-1,4-bis(o-aminophenylmercapto)butadiene and 2-(2-amino-3-methyoxyphenyl)-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one, as well as alpha-[amino[(4-aminophenyl)thio]methylene]-2-(trifluoromethyl) benzeneacetonitrile, which passes the blood-brain barrier], a component of one of the intracellular signaling pathways activated by BDNF. The MEK1/2 inhibitors were also efficient in clearing PrPSc from prion-infected GT1-1 cells stimulated to accumulate high levels of PrPSc by enhanced serum concentrations in the medium or by the use of a serum-free neuron-specific neurobasal medium. PrPSc did not reappear in the cultures within 5 weeks after completion of treatment. We conclude that inhibitors of the MEK1/2 pathway can efficiently and probably irreversibly clear PrP(Sc) from prion-infected cells. The MEK pathway may therefore be a suitable target for therapeutic intervention in prion diseases.

  19. Global Identification of Biofilm-Specific Proteolysis in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Michael B; Salcedo, Eugenia C; Lohse, Matthew B; Hartooni, Nairi; Gulati, Megha; Sanchez, Hiram; Takagi, Julie; Hube, Bernhard; Andes, David R; Johnson, Alexander D; Craik, Charles S; Nobile, Clarissa J

    2016-09-13

    Candida albicans is a fungal species that is part of the normal human microbiota and also an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing mucosal and systemic infections. C. albicans cells proliferate in a planktonic (suspension) state, but they also form biofilms, organized and tightly packed communities of cells attached to a solid surface. Biofilms colonize many niches of the human body and persist on implanted medical devices, where they are a major source of new C. albicans infections. Here, we used an unbiased and global substrate-profiling approach to discover proteolytic activities produced specifically by C. albicans biofilms, compared to planktonic cells, with the goal of identifying potential biofilm-specific diagnostic markers and targets for therapeutic intervention. This activity-based profiling approach, coupled with proteomics, identified Sap5 (Candidapepsin-5) and Sap6 (Candidapepsin-6) as major biofilm-specific proteases secreted by C. albicans Fluorogenic peptide substrates with selectivity for Sap5 or Sap6 confirmed that their activities are highly upregulated in C. albicans biofilms; we also show that these activities are upregulated in other Candida clade pathogens. Deletion of the SAP5 and SAP6 genes in C. albicans compromised biofilm development in vitro in standard biofilm assays and in vivo in a rat central venous catheter biofilm model. This work establishes secreted proteolysis as a promising enzymatic marker and potential therapeutic target for Candida biofilm formation. Biofilm formation by the opportunistic fungal pathogen C. albicans is a major cause of life-threatening infections. This work provides a global characterization of secreted proteolytic activity produced specifically by C. albicans biofilms. We identify activity from the proteases Sap5 and Sap6 as highly upregulated during C. albicans biofilm formation and develop Sap-cleavable fluorogenic substrates that enable the detection of biofilms from C. albicans and also

  20. Protease-sensitive conformers in broad spectrum of distinct PrPSc structures in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease are indicator of progression rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae; Haldiman, Tracy; Cohen, Yvonne; Chen, Wei; Blevins, Janis; Sy, Man-Sun; Cohen, Mark; Safar, Jiri G

    2011-09-01

    The origin, range, and structure of prions causing the most common human prion disease, sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), are largely unknown. To investigate the molecular mechanism responsible for the broad phenotypic variability of sCJD, we analyzed the conformational characteristics of protease-sensitive and protease-resistant fractions of the pathogenic prion protein (PrP(Sc)) using novel conformational methods derived from a conformation-dependent immunoassay (CDI). In 46 brains of patients homozygous for polymorphisms in the PRNP gene and exhibiting either Type 1 or Type 2 western blot pattern of the PrP(Sc), we identified an extensive array of PrP(Sc) structures that differ in protease sensitivity, display of critical domains, and conformational stability. Surprisingly, in sCJD cases homozygous for methionine or valine at codon 129 of the PRNP gene, the concentration and stability of protease-sensitive conformers of PrP(Sc) correlated with progression rate of the disease. These data indicate that sCJD brains exhibit a wide spectrum of PrP(Sc) structural states, and accordingly argue for a broad spectrum of prion strains coding for different phenotypes. The link between disease duration, levels, and stability of protease-sensitive conformers of PrP(Sc) suggests that these conformers play an important role in the pathogenesis of sCJD.

  1. Protease-sensitive conformers in broad spectrum of distinct PrPSc structures in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease are indicator of progression rate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chae Kim

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The origin, range, and structure of prions causing the most common human prion disease, sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD, are largely unknown. To investigate the molecular mechanism responsible for the broad phenotypic variability of sCJD, we analyzed the conformational characteristics of protease-sensitive and protease-resistant fractions of the pathogenic prion protein (PrP(Sc using novel conformational methods derived from a conformation-dependent immunoassay (CDI. In 46 brains of patients homozygous for polymorphisms in the PRNP gene and exhibiting either Type 1 or Type 2 western blot pattern of the PrP(Sc, we identified an extensive array of PrP(Sc structures that differ in protease sensitivity, display of critical domains, and conformational stability. Surprisingly, in sCJD cases homozygous for methionine or valine at codon 129 of the PRNP gene, the concentration and stability of protease-sensitive conformers of PrP(Sc correlated with progression rate of the disease. These data indicate that sCJD brains exhibit a wide spectrum of PrP(Sc structural states, and accordingly argue for a broad spectrum of prion strains coding for different phenotypes. The link between disease duration, levels, and stability of protease-sensitive conformers of PrP(Sc suggests that these conformers play an important role in the pathogenesis of sCJD.

  2. Effect of proteolysis of low-density serum lipoproteins on their interaction with macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karmanskii, I.M.; Kovaleva, G.G.; Viktorova, L.N.; Shpikiter, V.O.

    1987-01-01

    The authors previously postulated, on the basis of changes observed in the structural stability of low-density lipoproteins during treatment with pepsin or aortic cathepsin, that enzymatic modifications may lead to potentiation of the atherogenic properties of the lipoproteins. They also reported that treatment of lipoproteins with trypsin causes an increase in their binding with aortic glycosaminoglycans and to increased degradation by fibroblasts of patients with hereditary hypercholesterolemia. Limited proteolysis of lipoproteins with pepsin facilitated their binding with fibronectin. In this paper the authors investigate the uptake and degradation of low-density lipoproteins by macrophages after their limited hydrolysis by pepsin, an analog of tissue cathepsin D. The lipoproteins were isolated from the serum of healthy blood donors by ultracentrifugation. Iodination of the proteins with I 125 was carried out by the iodine monochloride method. Uptake and retention of the labelled lipoprotein were measured with a gamma counter. The increased uptake of the proteins, partially hydrolized by pepsin, was accompanied by their more intense degradation by macrophages.

  3. Proteolysis of truncated hemolysin A yields a stable dimerization interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, Walter R.P.; Bhattacharyya, Basudeb; Grilley, Daniel P.; Weaver, Todd M. (Wabash); (UW)

    2017-02-21

    Wild-type and variant forms of HpmA265 (truncated hemolysin A) fromProteus mirabilisreveal a right-handed, parallel β-helix capped and flanked by segments of antiparallel β-strands. The low-salt crystal structures form a dimeric structureviathe implementation of on-edge main-chain hydrogen bonds donated by residues 243–263 of adjacent monomers. Surprisingly, in the high-salt structures of two variants, Y134A and Q125A-Y134A, a new dimeric interface is formedviamain-chain hydrogen bonds donated by residues 203–215 of adjacent monomers, and a previously unobserved tetramer is formed. In addition, an eight-stranded antiparallel β-sheet is formed from the flap regions of crystallographically related monomers in the high-salt structures. This new interface is possible owing to additional proteolysis of these variants after Tyr240. The interface formed in the high-salt crystal forms of hemolysin A variants may mimic the on-edge β-strand positioning used in template-assisted hemolytic activity.

  4. Imaging Proteolysis by Living Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Sameni

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant progression is accompanied by degradation of extracellular matrix proteins. Here we describe a novel confocal assay in which we can observe proteolysis by living human breast cancer cells (BT20 and BT549 through the use of quenchedfluorescent protein substrates. Degradation thus was imaged, by confocal optical sectioning, as an accumulation of fluorescent products. With the BT20 cells, fluorescence was localized to pericellular focal areas that coincide with pits in the underlying matrix. In contrast, fluorescence was localized to intracellular vesicles in the BT549 cells, vesicles that also label for lysosomal markers. Neither intracellular nor pericellular fluorescence was observed in the BT549 cells in the presence of cytochalasin B, suggesting that degradation occurred intracellularly and was dependent on endocytic uptake of substrate. In the presence of a cathepsin 13-selective cysteine protease inhibitor, intracellular fluorescence was decreased ~90% and pericellular fluorescence decreased 67% to 96%, depending on the protein substrate. Matrix metallo protease inhibitors reduced pericellular fluorescence ~50%, i.e., comparably to a serine and a broad spectrum cysteine protease inhibitor. Our results suggest that: 1 a proteolytic cascade participates in pericellular digestion of matrix proteins by living human breast cancer cells, and 2 the cysteine protease cathepsin B participates in both pericellular and intracellular digestion of matrix proteins by living human breast cancer cells.

  5. Global Identification of Biofilm-Specific Proteolysis in Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B. Winter

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a fungal species that is part of the normal human microbiota and also an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing mucosal and systemic infections. C. albicans cells proliferate in a planktonic (suspension state, but they also form biofilms, organized and tightly packed communities of cells attached to a solid surface. Biofilms colonize many niches of the human body and persist on implanted medical devices, where they are a major source of new C. albicans infections. Here, we used an unbiased and global substrate-profiling approach to discover proteolytic activities produced specifically by C. albicans biofilms, compared to planktonic cells, with the goal of identifying potential biofilm-specific diagnostic markers and targets for therapeutic intervention. This activity-based profiling approach, coupled with proteomics, identified Sap5 (Candidapepsin-5 and Sap6 (Candidapepsin-6 as major biofilm-specific proteases secreted by C. albicans. Fluorogenic peptide substrates with selectivity for Sap5 or Sap6 confirmed that their activities are highly upregulated in C. albicans biofilms; we also show that these activities are upregulated in other Candida clade pathogens. Deletion of the SAP5 and SAP6 genes in C. albicans compromised biofilm development in vitro in standard biofilm assays and in vivo in a rat central venous catheter biofilm model. This work establishes secreted proteolysis as a promising enzymatic marker and potential therapeutic target for Candida biofilm formation.

  6. Enrichment of PrPSc in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues prior to analysis by Western blot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Eric M

    2011-07-01

    Diagnosis of prion disease is primarily through immunodetection of the infectious agent. Typically, 2 distinct procedures are recommended for a definitive diagnosis, with immunohistochemistry and Western blot providing the most information as to the specific isolate in question. In the past, these approaches required formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue and fresh or frozen tissue, respectively; however, methods have been developed that allow for use of fixed tissue for Western blot. The present study describes a method of enriching PrP(Sc) in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues prior to Western blot analysis for the detection of PrP(Sc). With this modified procedure, 5 times the previously reported sample size may be used for analysis, greatly enhancing the sensitivity of this procedure.

  7. Dietary protein deficiency reduces lysosomal and nonlysosomal ATP-dependent proteolysis in muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawa, N. E. Jr; Kettelhut, I. C.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    When rats are fed a protein deficient (PD) diet for 7 days, rates of proteolysis in skeletal muscle decrease by 40-50% (N. E. Tawa, Jr., and A. L. Goldberg. Am. J. Physiol. 263 (Endocrinol. Metab. 26): E317-325, 1992). To identify the underlying biochemical adaptations, we measured different proteolytic processes in incubated muscles. The capacity for intralysosomal proteolysis, as shown by sensitivity to methylamine or lysosomal protease inhibitors, fell 55-75% in muscles from PD rats. Furthermore, extracts of muscles of PD rats showed 30-70% lower activity of many lysosomal proteases, including cathepsins B, H, and C, and carboxypeptidases A and C, as well as other lysosomal hydrolases. The fall in cathepsin B and proteolysis was evident by 3 days on the PD diet, and both returned to control levels 3 days after refeeding of the normal diet. In muscles maintained under optimal conditions, 80-90% of protein breakdown occurs by nonlysosomal pathways. In muscles of PD rats, this ATP-dependent process was also 40-60% slower. Even though overall proteolysis decreased in muscles of PD rats, their capacity for Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis increased (by 66%), as did the activity of the calpains (+150-250%). Thus the lysosomal and the ATP-dependent processes decrease coordinately and contribute to the fall in muscle proteolysis in PD animals.

  8. Anti-prion drug mPPIg5 inhibits PrP(C conversion to PrP(Sc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M McCarthy

    Full Text Available Prion diseases, also known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, are a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases that include scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE in cattle and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD in humans. The 'protein only hypothesis' advocates that PrP(Sc, an abnormal isoform of the cellular protein PrP(C, is the main and possibly sole component of prion infectious agents. Currently, no effective therapy exists for these diseases at the symptomatic phase for either humans or animals, though a number of compounds have demonstrated the ability to eliminate PrPSc in cell culture models. Of particular interest are synthetic polymers known as dendrimers which possess the unique ability to eliminate PrP(Sc in both an intracellular and in vitro setting. The efficacy and mode of action of the novel anti-prion dendrimer mPPIg5 was investigated through the creation of a number of innovative bio-assays based upon the scrapie cell assay. These assays were used to demonstrate that mPPIg5 is a highly effective anti-prion drug which acts, at least in part, through the inhibition of PrP(C to PrP(Sc conversion. Understanding how a drug works is a vital component in maximising its performance. By establishing the efficacy and method of action of mPPIg5, this study will help determine which drugs are most likely to enhance this effect and also aid the design of dendrimers with anti-prion capabilities for the future.

  9. Anti-Prion Drug mPPIg5 Inhibits PrPC Conversion to PrPSc

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, James M.; Franke, Markus; Resenberger, Ulrike K.; Waldron, Sibeal; Simpson, Jeremy C.; Tatzelt, Jörg; Appelhans, Dietmar; Rogers, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases, also known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, are a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases that include scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans. The ‘protein only hypothesis’ advocates that PrPSc, an abnormal isoform of the cellular protein PrPC, is the main and possibly sole component of prion infectious agents. Currently, no effective therapy exists for these diseases at the symptomatic phase for either humans or animals, though a number of compounds have demonstrated the ability to eliminate PrPSc in cell culture models. Of particular interest are synthetic polymers known as dendrimers which possess the unique ability to eliminate PrPSc in both an intracellular and in vitro setting. The efficacy and mode of action of the novel anti-prion dendrimer mPPIg5 was investigated through the creation of a number of innovative bio-assays based upon the scrapie cell assay. These assays were used to demonstrate that mPPIg5 is a highly effective anti-prion drug which acts, at least in part, through the inhibition of PrPC to PrPSc conversion. Understanding how a drug works is a vital component in maximising its performance. By establishing the efficacy and method of action of mPPIg5, this study will help determine which drugs are most likely to enhance this effect and also aid the design of dendrimers with anti-prion capabilities for the future. PMID:23383136

  10. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies for ante- and post-mortem detection of PrPSc in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Dietrich Moura Costa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Scrapie is a disease that affects sheep and goats and is characterized by the accumulation of an abnormal isoform (PrPSc of the cellular prion protein, PrPC, in the central nervous system (CNS and in lymphoid tissues. Detection of PrPSc in these tissues can be attempted by a variety of techniques, including immunohistochemistry (IHC and western blotting (WB, for which a wide range of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are commercially available. The objective of this study was to test and compare the efficacy of monoclonal antibodiesF89/160.1.5, F99/97.6.1, and P4 and polyclonal antibodies M52 and R486 in the detection of PrPSc in lymphoid and CNS tissue samples by using IHC. Positive and negative control samples of sheep brain and tonsils were provided by the Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency (AHVLA, UK. The IHC examination of CNS samples with both monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies confirmed the granular deposition of PrPSc in the neurons of the positive control tissues. However, while the monoclonal antibodies did not produce positive reactions in the negative controls, the polyclonal antibodies showed some non-specific staining. The testing of positive control tonsil samples with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies identified positive control-specific reactions, whereas the negative control tissues were IHC-negative with all antibodies, although P4 and the polyclonal antibodies produced some background staining. In summary, although the polyclonal antibodies may be more accessible, their use is not advisable because of possible false positive reactions. The polyclonal antibody M52 was able to identify PrPC in brain and spleen samples by WB but other lymphoid tissues were negative.

  11. The architecture of PrPSc: Threading secondary structure elements into the 4-rung ß-solenoid scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: We propose to exploit the wealth of theoretical and experimental constraints to develop a structure of the infectious prion (hamster PrP27-30). Recent cryo-EM based evidence has determined that PrPSc is a 4-rung ß-solenoid (Vázquez-Fernández et al. 2016, PLoS Pathog. 12(9): e1005835). This ev...

  12. Transcriptome analysis of CNS immediately before and after the detection of PrP(Sc) in SSBP/1 sheep scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossner, Anton G; Hopkins, John

    2014-10-10

    Sheep scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE), progressive and fatal neurodegenerative diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) linked to the accumulation of misfolded prion protein, PrP(Sc). New Zealand Cheviot sheep, homozygous for the VRQ genotype of the PRNP gene are most susceptible with an incubation period of 193 days with SSBP/1 scrapie. However, the earliest time point that PrP(Sc) can be detected in the CNS is 125 days (D125). The aim of this study was to quantify changes to the transcriptome of the thalamus and obex (medulla) at times immediately before (D75) and after (D125) PrP(Sc) was detected. Affymetrix gene arrays were used to quantify gene expression in the thalamus and Illumina DGE-tag profiling for obex. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis was used to help describe the biological processes of scrapie pathology. Neurological disease and Cancer were common Bio Functions in each tissue at D75; inflammation and cell death were major processes at D125. Several neurological receptors were significantly increased at D75 (e.g. CHRNA6, GRM1, HCN2), which might be clues to the molecular basis of psychiatric changes associated with TSEs. No genes were significantly differentially expressed at both D75 and D125 and there was no progression of events from earlier to later time points. This implies that there is no simple linear progression of pathological or molecular events. There seems to be a step-change between D75 and D125, correlating with the detection of PrP(Sc), resulting in the involvement of different pathological processes in later TSE disease. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A new method for the characterization of strain-specific conformational stability of protease-sensitive and protease-resistant PrPSc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirisinu, Laura; Di Bari, Michele; Marcon, Stefano; Vaccari, Gabriele; D'Agostino, Claudia; Fazzi, Paola; Esposito, Elena; Galeno, Roberta; Langeveld, Jan; Agrimi, Umberto; Nonno, Romolo

    2010-09-14

    Although proteinacious in nature, prions exist as strains with specific self-perpetuating biological properties. Prion strains are thought to be associated with different conformers of PrP(Sc), a disease-associated isoform of the host-encoded cellular protein (PrP(C)). Molecular strain typing approaches have been developed which rely on the characterization of protease-resistant PrP(Sc). However, PrP(Sc) is composed not only of protease-resistant but also of protease-sensitive isoforms. The aim of this work was to develop a protocol for the molecular characterization of both, protease-resistant and protease-sensitive PrP(Sc) aggregates. We first set up experimental conditions which allowed the most advantageous separation of PrP(C) and PrP(Sc) by means of differential centrifugation. The conformational solubility and stability assay (CSSA) was then developed by measuring PrP(Sc) solubility as a function of increased exposure to GdnHCl. Brain homogenates from voles infected with human and sheep prion isolates were analysed by CSSA and showed strain-specific conformational stabilities, with mean [GdnHCl](1/2) values ranging from 1.6 M for MM2 sCJD to 2.1 for scrapie and to 2.8 M for MM1/MV1 sCJD and E200K gCJD. Interestingly, the rank order of [GdnHCl](1/2) values observed in the human and sheep isolates used as inocula closely matched those found following transmission in voles, being MM1 sCJD the most resistant (3.3 M), followed by sheep scrapie (2.2 M) and by MM2 sCJD (1.6 M). In order to test the ability of CSSA to characterise protease-sensitive PrP(Sc), we analysed sheep isolates of Nor98 and compared them to classical scrapie isolates. In Nor98, insoluble PrP(Sc) aggregates were mainly protease-sensitive and showed a conformational stability much lower than in classical scrapie. Our results show that CSSA is able to reveal strain-specified PrP(Sc) conformational stabilities of protease-resistant and protease-sensitive PrP(Sc) and that it is a valuable tool for

  14. A new method for the characterization of strain-specific conformational stability of protease-sensitive and protease-resistant PrPSc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Pirisinu

    Full Text Available Although proteinacious in nature, prions exist as strains with specific self-perpetuating biological properties. Prion strains are thought to be associated with different conformers of PrP(Sc, a disease-associated isoform of the host-encoded cellular protein (PrP(C. Molecular strain typing approaches have been developed which rely on the characterization of protease-resistant PrP(Sc. However, PrP(Sc is composed not only of protease-resistant but also of protease-sensitive isoforms. The aim of this work was to develop a protocol for the molecular characterization of both, protease-resistant and protease-sensitive PrP(Sc aggregates. We first set up experimental conditions which allowed the most advantageous separation of PrP(C and PrP(Sc by means of differential centrifugation. The conformational solubility and stability assay (CSSA was then developed by measuring PrP(Sc solubility as a function of increased exposure to GdnHCl. Brain homogenates from voles infected with human and sheep prion isolates were analysed by CSSA and showed strain-specific conformational stabilities, with mean [GdnHCl](1/2 values ranging from 1.6 M for MM2 sCJD to 2.1 for scrapie and to 2.8 M for MM1/MV1 sCJD and E200K gCJD. Interestingly, the rank order of [GdnHCl](1/2 values observed in the human and sheep isolates used as inocula closely matched those found following transmission in voles, being MM1 sCJD the most resistant (3.3 M, followed by sheep scrapie (2.2 M and by MM2 sCJD (1.6 M. In order to test the ability of CSSA to characterise protease-sensitive PrP(Sc, we analysed sheep isolates of Nor98 and compared them to classical scrapie isolates. In Nor98, insoluble PrP(Sc aggregates were mainly protease-sensitive and showed a conformational stability much lower than in classical scrapie. Our results show that CSSA is able to reveal strain-specified PrP(Sc conformational stabilities of protease-resistant and protease-sensitive PrP(Sc and that it is a valuable tool

  15. Relationships between PrPSc stability and incubation time for United States scrapie isolates in a natural host system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrentas, Catherine E; Greenlee, Justin J; Tatum, Trudy L; Nicholson, Eric M

    2012-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), including scrapie in sheep (Ovis aries), are fatal neurodegenerative diseases caused by the misfolding of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into a â-rich conformer (PrP(Sc)) that accumulates into higher-order structures in the brain and other tissues. Distinct strains of TSEs exist, characterized by different pathologic profiles upon passage into rodents and representing distinct conformations of PrP(Sc). One biochemical method of distinguishing strains is the stability of PrP(Sc) as determined by unfolding in guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl), which is tightly and positively correlated with the incubation time of disease upon passage into mice. Here, we utilize a rapid, protease-free version of the stability assay to characterize naturally occurring scrapie samples, including a fast-acting scrapie inoculum for which incubation time is highly dependent on the amino acid at codon 136 of the prion protein. We utilize the stability methodology to identify the presence of two distinct isolates in the inoculum, and compare isolate properties to those of a host-stabilized reference scrapie isolate (NADC 13-7) in order to assess the stability/incubation time correlation in a natural host system. We demonstrate the utility of the stability methodology in characterizing TSE isolates throughout serial passage in livestock, which is applicable to a range of natural host systems, including strains of bovine spongiform encephalopathy and chronic wasting disease.

  16. Immunohistochemical study of PrPSc distribution in neural and extraneural tissues of two cats with feline spongiform encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wunderlin Sabina S

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two domestic shorthair cats presenting with progressive hind-limb ataxia and increased aggressiveness were necropsied and a post mortem diagnosis of Feline Spongiform Encephalopathy (FSE was made. A wide spectrum of tissue samples was collected and evaluated histologically and immunohistologically for the presence of PrPSc. Results Histopathological examination revealed a diffuse vacuolation of the grey matter neuropil with the following areas being most severely affected: corpus geniculatum medialis, thalamus, gyrus dentatus of the hippocampus, corpus striatum, and deep layers of the cerebral and cerebellar cortex as well as in the brain stem. In addition, a diffuse glial reaction involving astrocytes and microglia and intraneuronal vacuolation in a few neurons in the brain stem was present. Heavy PrPSc immunostaining was detected in brain, retina, optic nerve, pars nervosa of the pituitary gland, trigeminal ganglia and small amounts in the myenteric plexus of the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum and slightly in the medulla of the adrenal gland. Conclusion The PrPSc distribution within the brain was consistent with that described in other FSE-affected cats. The pattern of abnormal PrP in the retina corresponded to that found in a captive cheetah with FSE, in sheep with scrapie and was similar to nvCJD in humans.

  17. Ubiquitin, a central component of selective cytoplasmic proteolysis, is linked to proteins residing at the locus of non-selective proteolysis, the vacuole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simeon, Angela; Klei, Ida J. van der; Veenhuis, Marten; Wolf, Dieter H.

    1992-01-01

    Ubiquitin, an evolutionary highly conserved protein, is known to be involved in selective proteolysis in the cytoplasm. Here we show that ubiquitin-protein conjugates are also found in the yeast vacuole. Mutants defective in the major vacuolar endopeptidases, proteinase yscA and yscB, lead to

  18. Protein misfolding cyclic amplification corroborates the absence of PrP(Sc) accumulation in placenta from foetuses with the ARR/ARQ genotype in natural scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, María Carmen; Eraña, Hasier; Castilla, Joaquín; Acín, Cristina; Vargas, Antonia; Badiola, Juan José; Monleón, Eva

    2017-05-01

    Ovine scrapie is a worldwide spread prion disease that is transmitted horizontally under field conditions. Placenta from scrapie-infected ewes is an important source of infection, since this tissue can accumulate high amounts of PrP(Sc) depending on the foetal genotype. Therefore, placentas carrying susceptible foetuses can accumulate PrP(Sc) but there is not PrP(Sc) accumulation in presence of foetuses with at least one ARR haplotype. In scrapie eradication programs, ARR/ARR males are used for breeding to increase the resistant progeny and reduce the horizontal transmission of the disease through the placenta. The development of highly sensitive techniques, that allow the detection of minimal amounts of PrP(Sc), has caused many secretions/excretions and tissues that had previously been deemed negative to be relabeled as positive for PrP(Sc). This has raised concerns about the possible presence of minimal amounts of PrP(Sc) in placentas from ARR foetuses that conventional techniques had indicated were negative. In the present study we examined 30 placentas from a total of 23 gestations; 15 gestations resulted from naturally ARQ/ARQ scrapie-infected ewes mated with ARR/ARR rams. The absence of PrP(Sc) in placentas carrying the foetal ARR haplotype (n=19) was determined by IDEXX HerdChek scrapie/BSE Antigen EIA Test, Prionics(®)-Check WESTERN and corroborated by the highly sensitive Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification technique (PMCA). By immunohistochemistry, several unspecific stainings that might mislead a diagnosis were observed. The results of the present study support that using ARR/ARR males in scrapie eradication programs efficiently decreases the spreading of the agent in the environment via shed placentas. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Influence of phallotoxins and metal ions on the rate of proteolysis of actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, J; Wieland, T

    1978-05-16

    The rate of proteolytic degradation of rabbit skeletal muscle actin by trypsin, alpha-chymotrypsin, and, mainly, subtilisin was followed by dual wavelength spectroscopy at 285 nm by reference at 320 nm. Phalloidin and phallacidin, two toxic bicyclic heptapeptides from the mushroom Amanita phalloides, protect F-actin against degradation by the proteolytic enzymes. G-actin, which does not combine with phalloidin when maintained in the monomeric state by working at low ionic strength, and bovine serum albumin, which also has no affinity to the toxin, are hydrolyzed at the same rates in the presence or absence of phalloidin. The proteolysis of F-actin is distinctly retarded by KCl alone, i.e., without phalloidin, whereas Mg2+ or Ca2+ as sole cations permit a rather high rate of hydrolysis. An even faster degradation of F-actin by subtilisin is observed in the presence of Mg2+ plus cytochalasin B. Adenosine diphosphate and triphosphate have no influence on the rate of the enzymatic degradation. The S sulfoxide of phalloidin, the nontoxic diastereomer of the toxic R form, exerts only a limited inhibitory effect on the enzymatic hydrolysis; secophalloidin, another nontoxic derivative, which does not bind to F-actin has practically no effect.

  20. Sialylation of prion protein controls the rate of prion amplification, the cross-species barrier, the ratio of PrPSc glycoform and prion infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katorcha, Elizaveta; Makarava, Natallia; Savtchenko, Regina; D'Azzo, Alessandra; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2014-09-01

    The central event underlying prion diseases involves conformational change of the cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C)) into the disease-associated, transmissible form (PrP(Sc)). Pr(PC) is a sialoglycoprotein that contains two conserved N-glycosylation sites. Among the key parameters that control prion replication identified over the years are amino acid sequence of host PrP(C) and the strain-specific structure of PrPSc. The current work highlights the previously unappreciated role of sialylation of PrP(C) glycans in prion pathogenesis, including its role in controlling prion replication rate, infectivity, cross-species barrier and PrP(Sc) glycoform ratio. The current study demonstrates that undersialylated PrP(C) is selected during prion amplification in Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification (PMCAb) at the expense of oversialylated PrP(C). As a result, PMCAb-derived PrP(Sc) was less sialylated than brain-derived PrP(Sc). A decrease in PrPSc sialylation correlated with a drop in infectivity of PMCAb-derived material. Nevertheless, enzymatic de-sialylation of PrP(C) using sialidase was found to increase the rate of PrP(Sc) amplification in PMCAb from 10- to 10,000-fold in a strain-dependent manner. Moreover, de-sialylation of PrP(C) reduced or eliminated a species barrier of for prion amplification in PMCAb. These results suggest that the negative charge of sialic acid controls the energy barrier of homologous and heterologous prion replication. Surprisingly, the sialylation status of PrP(C) was also found to control PrP(Sc) glycoform ratio. A decrease in Pr(PC) sialylation levels resulted in a higher percentage of the diglycosylated glycoform in PrP(Sc). 2D analysis of charge distribution revealed that the sialylation status of brain-derived PrP(C) differed from that of spleen-derived PrP(C). Knocking out lysosomal sialidase Neu1 did not change the sialylation status of brain-derived PrP(C), suggesting that Neu1 is not responsible for desialylation of Pr

  1. Sialylation of prion protein controls the rate of prion amplification, the cross-species barrier, the ratio of PrPSc glycoform and prion infectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizaveta Katorcha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The central event underlying prion diseases involves conformational change of the cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C into the disease-associated, transmissible form (PrP(Sc. Pr(PC is a sialoglycoprotein that contains two conserved N-glycosylation sites. Among the key parameters that control prion replication identified over the years are amino acid sequence of host PrP(C and the strain-specific structure of PrPSc. The current work highlights the previously unappreciated role of sialylation of PrP(C glycans in prion pathogenesis, including its role in controlling prion replication rate, infectivity, cross-species barrier and PrP(Sc glycoform ratio. The current study demonstrates that undersialylated PrP(C is selected during prion amplification in Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification (PMCAb at the expense of oversialylated PrP(C. As a result, PMCAb-derived PrP(Sc was less sialylated than brain-derived PrP(Sc. A decrease in PrPSc sialylation correlated with a drop in infectivity of PMCAb-derived material. Nevertheless, enzymatic de-sialylation of PrP(C using sialidase was found to increase the rate of PrP(Sc amplification in PMCAb from 10- to 10,000-fold in a strain-dependent manner. Moreover, de-sialylation of PrP(C reduced or eliminated a species barrier of for prion amplification in PMCAb. These results suggest that the negative charge of sialic acid controls the energy barrier of homologous and heterologous prion replication. Surprisingly, the sialylation status of PrP(C was also found to control PrP(Sc glycoform ratio. A decrease in Pr(PC sialylation levels resulted in a higher percentage of the diglycosylated glycoform in PrP(Sc. 2D analysis of charge distribution revealed that the sialylation status of brain-derived PrP(C differed from that of spleen-derived PrP(C. Knocking out lysosomal sialidase Neu1 did not change the sialylation status of brain-derived PrP(C, suggesting that Neu1 is not responsible for desialylation of Pr

  2. Building phenomenological models that relate proteolysis in pork muscles to temperature, water and salt content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkouss, Rami; Safa, Hassan; Gatellier, Philippe; Lebert, André; Mirade, Pierre-Sylvain

    2014-05-15

    Throughout dry-cured ham production, salt and water content, pH and temperature are key factors affecting proteolysis, one of the main biochemical processes influencing sensory properties and final quality of the product. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of these variables (except pH) on the time course of proteolysis in laboratory-prepared pork meat samples. Based on a Doehlert design, samples of five different types of pork muscle were prepared, salted, dried and placed at different temperatures, and sampled at different times for quantification of proteolysis. Statistical analysis of the experimental results showed that the proteolysis index (PI) was correlated positively with temperature and water content, but negatively with salt content. Applying response surface methodology and multiple linear regressions enabled us to build phenomenological models relating PI to water and salt content, and to temperature. These models could then be integrated into a 3D numerical ham model, coupling salt and water transfers to proteolysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nitric oxide inhibits calpain-mediated proteolysis of talin in skeletal muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, T. J.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that nitric oxide can inhibit cytoskeletal breakdown in skeletal muscle cells by inhibiting calpain cleavage of talin. The nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside prevented many of the effects of calcium ionophore on C(2)C(12) muscle cells, including preventing talin proteolysis and release into the cytosol and reducing loss of vinculin, cell detachment, and loss of cellular protein. These results indicate that nitric oxide inhibition of calpain protected the cells from ionophore-induced proteolysis. Calpain inhibitor I and a cell-permeable calpastatin peptide also protected the cells from proteolysis, confirming that ionophore-induced proteolysis was primarily calpain mediated. The activity of m-calpain in a casein zymogram was inhibited by sodium nitroprusside, and this inhibition was reversed by dithiothreitol. Previous incubation with the active site-targeted calpain inhibitor I prevented most of the sodium nitroprusside-induced inhibition of m-calpain activity. These data suggest that nitric oxide inhibited m-calpain activity via S-nitrosylation of the active site cysteine. The results of this study indicate that nitric oxide produced endogenously by skeletal muscle and other cell types has the potential to inhibit m-calpain activity and cytoskeletal proteolysis.

  4. Limited proteolysis of beta 2-microglobulin at Lys-58 by complement component C1s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Holst; Roepstorff, P; Thim, L

    1990-01-01

    a modified form of beta 2-microglobulin with a two-chain structure. The C-terminal Lys-58 in the A chain is highly susceptible to removal by a carboxypeptidase-B-like activity causing the formation of des-Lys58-beta 2-microglobulin. This is the first demonstration of a noncomplement protein substrate......We have now demonstrated that activated complement component C1s cleaves beta 2-microglobulin at the position identical to that at which beta 2-microglobulin is cleaved in serum of patients suffering from lung cancer. The main cleavage is in the disulphide loop C-terminal to Lys-58, generating...... for the proteolytic activity of C1s. The C1s-induced cleavage of beta 2-microglobulin can be inhibited in the presence of C1 esterase inhibitor, demonstrating a regulatory function of C1 esterase inhibitor in the C1s-induced cleavage of beta 2-microglobulin....

  5. Limited tryptic proteolysis of the benzodiazepine binding proteins in different species reveals structural homologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, W; Lentes, K U; Schmitz, E; Propping, P; Hebebrand, J

    1988-12-01

    Peptide mapping can be used to elucidate further the structural similarities of the benzodiazepine binding proteins in different vertebrate species. Crude synaptic membrane preparations were photoaffinity-labeled with [3H]flunitrazepam and subsequently degraded with various concentrations of trypsin. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by fluorography allowed a comparison of the molecular weights of photolabeled peptides in different species. Tryptic degradation led to a common peptide of 40K in all species investigated, a finding indicating that the benzodiazepine binding proteins are structurally homologous in higher bony fishes and tetrapods.

  6. Human laminin isolated in a nearly intact, biologically active form from placenta by limited proteolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U; Albrechtsen, R; Manthorpe, M

    1983-01-01

    fragments cross-reacted with rat laminin in immunodiffusion and enzyme immunoassay, and a polyclonal antiserum against the fragments reacted with basement membranes in tissues in a manner identical with the 4E10 antibody. Electron microscopic images of the human peptic fragments showed structures similar......A protein with properties of laminin has been isolated from human placental extracts by using monoclonal antibodies. Placental tissue was extracted with 0.5 M NaCl and high molecular weight proteins were isolated from the extract by salt precipitation and gel filtration on Sepharose 6B......, was characterized in detail. This monoclonal antibody reacted with human laminin as shown by several lines of evidence. Immunoprecipitation from metabolically labeled culture media of a human amniotic epithelial cell line with the 4E10 antibody followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis...

  7. Laser-light backscattering response to water content and proteolysis in dry-cured ham

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fulladosa, E.; Rubio-Celorio, M.; Skytte, Jacob Lercke

    2017-01-01

    of laser incidence) and to analyse the laser-light backscattering changes caused by additional hot air drying and proteolysis of dry-cured ham slices. The feasibility of the technology to determine water content and proteolysis (which is related to textural characteristics) of commercial sliced dry...... was only detected when the water content was decreased (618 mm(2) per 1% weight loss). Changes on scattering of light profiles were only observed when the water content changed. Although there is a good correlation between water content and LBI parameters when analysing commercial samples, proteolysis...... index has an important effect on the response. This fact hinder estimation of dry-cured ham composition and textural characteristics of dry-cured ham. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  8. Motif-grafted antibodies containing the replicative interface of cellular PrP are specific for PrPSc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroncini, Gianluca; Kanu, Nnennaya; Solforosi, Laura; Abalos, Gil; Telling, Glenn C; Head, Mark; Ironside, James; Brockes, Jeremy P; Burton, Dennis R; Williamson, R Anthony

    2004-07-13

    Prion diseases are closely associated with the conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) to an abnormal conformer (PrPSc) [Prusiner, S. B. (1998) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95, 13363-13383]. Monoclonal antibodies that bind epitopes comprising residues 96-104 and 133-158 of PrPC potently inhibit this process, presumably by preventing heterodimeric association of PrPC and PrPSc, and suggest that these regions of PrPC may be critical components of the PrPC-PrPSc replicative interface. We reasoned that transplanting PrP sequence corresponding to these regions into a suitable carrier molecule, such as an antibody, could impart specific recognition of disease-associated forms of PrP. To test this hypothesis, polypeptides containing PrP sequence between residues 89-112 or 136-158 were used to replace the extended heavy chain complementarity-determining region 3 of an IgG antibody specific for the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1. Herein the resulting engineered PrP-IgGs are shown to bind specifically to infective fractions of PrP in mouse, human, and hamster prion-infected tissues, but not to PrPC, other cellular components, or the HIV-1 envelope. PrPSc reactivity was abolished when the sequence of the PrP 89-112 and 136-158 grafts was mutated, scrambled, or N-terminally truncated. Our findings suggest that residues within the 89-112 and 136-158 segments of PrPC are key components of one face of the PrPC-PrPSc complex. PrPSc-specific antibodies produced by the approach described may find widespread application in the study of prion biology and replication and in the detection of infectious prions in human and animal materials.

  9. Cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1) is elevated in prion disease and affects PrPC and PrPSc concentrations in cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajeev; McClain, Denise; Young, Rebecca; Carlson, George A

    2008-06-01

    Prion diseases are transmissible neurodegenerative disorders of prion protein (PrP) conformation. Prion replication by conversion of benign PrPC isoforms into disease-specific PrPSc isoforms is intimately involved in prion disease pathogenesis and may be initiated in cholesterol-rich caveolae-like domains (CLD). Concentrations of the cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette A1 protein (ABCA1) are elevated in pre-clinical scrapie prion-infected mice and in prion-infected cells in vitro. Elevation of ABCA1 in prion-infected brain is not a direct consequence of local PrPSc accumulation, indeed levels of ABCA1 are comparable in brain regions that differ dramatically in the amount of PrPSc. Similarly, ABCA1 concentrations are identical in normal mice, transgenic mice overexpressing PrP and PrP knockout mice. In contrast, PrPC and PrPSc levels, but not Prnp mRNA, were increased by overexpression of ABCA1 in N2a neuroblastoma cells and scrapie prion-infected N2a cells (ScN2a). Conversely, RNAi-mediated knock down of Abca1 expression decreased the concentrations of PrPC in N2a cells and of PrPSc in ScN2a cells. These results suggest that ABCA1's effects on PrPC levels are post-translational and may reflect an increase in of PrPC stability, mediated either indirectly by increasing membrane cholesterol and CLD formation or by other functions of ABCA1. The increased supply of PrPC available for conversion would lead to increased PrPSc formation.

  10. Incidence and spectrum of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease variants with mixed phenotype and co-occurrence of PrPSc types: an updated classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parchi, Piero; Strammiello, Rosaria; Notari, Silvio; Giese, Armin; Langeveld, Jan P M; Ladogana, Anna; Zerr, Inga; Roncaroli, Federico; Cras, Patrich; Ghetti, Bernardino; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Kretzschmar, Hans; Capellari, Sabina

    2009-11-01

    Six subtypes of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with distinctive clinico-pathological features have been identified largely based on two types of the abnormal prion protein, PrP(Sc), and the methionine (M)/valine (V) polymorphic codon 129 of the prion protein. The existence of affected subjects showing mixed phenotypic features and concurrent PrP(Sc) types has been reported but with inconsistencies among studies in both results and their interpretation. The issue currently complicates diagnosis and classification of cases and also has implications for disease pathogenesis. To explore the issue in depth, we carried out a systematic regional study in a large series of 225 cases. PrP(Sc) types 1 and 2 concurrence was detected in 35% of cases and was higher in MM than in MV or VV subjects. The deposition of either type 1 or 2, when concurrent, was not random and always characterized by the coexistence of phenotypic features previously described in the pure subtypes. PrP(Sc) type 1 accumulation and related pathology predominated in MM and MV cases, while the type 2 phenotype prevailed in VVs. Neuropathological examination best identified the mixed types 1 and 2 features in MMs and most MVs, and also uniquely revealed the co-occurrence of pathological variants sharing PrP(Sc) type 2. In contrast, molecular typing best detected the concurrent PrP(Sc) types in VV subjects and MV cases with kuru plaques. The present data provide an updated disease classification and are of importance for future epidemiologic and transmission studies aimed to identify etiology and extent of strain variation in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

  11. Prion Seeding Activities of Mouse Scrapie Strains with Divergent PrPSc Protease Sensitivities and Amyloid Plaque Content Using RT-QuIC and eQuIC

    OpenAIRE

    Vascellari, Sarah; Orrù, Christina D.; Hughson, Andrew G.; King, Declan; Barron, Rona; Wilham, Jason M.; Baron, Gerald S.; Race, Brent; Pani, Alessandra; Caughey, Byron

    2012-01-01

    Different transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE)-associated forms of prion protein (e.g. PrP(Sc)) can vary markedly in ultrastructure and biochemical characteristics, but each is propagated in the host. PrP(Sc) propagation involves conversion from its normal isoform, PrP(C), by a seeded or templated polymerization mechanism. Such a mechanism is also the basis of the RT-QuIC and eQuIC prion assays which use recombinant PrP (rPrP(Sen)) as a substrate. These ultrasensitive detection assay...

  12. Immobilization of trypsin on miniature incandescent bulbs for infrared-assisted proteolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Huimin; Bao, Huimin; Zhang, Luyan; Chen, Gang, E-mail: gangchen@fudan.edu.cn

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • Trypsin was immobilized on miniature incandescent bulbs via chitosan coating. • The bulbs acted as enzymatic reactors and the generators of infrared radiation. • The bulb bioreactors were successfully employed in infrared-assisted proteolysis. • The proteolysis could accomplish within 5 min with high sequence coverages. - Abstract: A novel efficient proteolysis approach was developed based on trypsin-immobilized miniature incandescent bulbs and infrared (IR) radiation. Trypsin was covalently immobilized in the chitosan coating on the outer surface of miniature incandescent bulbs with the aid of glutaraldehyde. When an illuminated enzyme-immobilized bulb was immersed in protein solution, the emitted IR radiation could trigger and accelerate heterogeneous protein digestion. The feasibility and performance of the novel proteolysis approach were demonstrated by the digestion of hemoglobin (HEM), cytochrome c (Cyt-c), lysozyme (LYS), and ovalbumin (OVA) and the digestion time was significantly reduced to 5 min. The obtained digests were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS with the sequence coverages of 91%, 77%, 80%, and 52% for HEM, Cyt-c, LYS, and OVA (200 ng μL{sup −1} each), respectively. The suitability of the prepared bulb bioreactors to complex proteins was demonstrated by digesting human serum.

  13. A primary study on texture modification and proteolysis of mao-tofu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    microstructure of mao-tofu was monitored by texture analyzer and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Proteolysis occurred during fermentation was evaluated by SDS-PAGE and chemical analysis. Results from Texture Profile Analysis showed that adhesiveness of mao-tofu had an increase trend while hardness, ...

  14. Effects of natural plant tenderizers on proteolysis and texture of dry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OPTIMUS ATS

    2013-09-18

    Sep 18, 2013 ... Key words: Dry sausages, wild boar meat, plant enzymes, proteolysis, texture, sensory properties. INTRODUCTION. The technology of ... Stanton and Light, 1987; Dransfield and Etherington,. 1981; Naveena et al., 2004; ... For example Sullivan et al. (2010) studied the tenderization effects of seven enzyme.

  15. Proteolysis produced within biofilms of bacterial isolates from raw milk tankers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Koon Hoong; Flint, Steve; Palmer, Jon; Andrewes, Paul; Bremer, Phil; Lindsay, Denise

    2012-06-15

    In this study, six bacterial isolates that produced thermo-resistant enzymes isolated from the internal surfaces of raw milk tankers were evaluated for their ability to produce proteolysis within either single culture biofilms or co-culture biofilms. Biofilms were formed in an in vitro model system that simulated the upper internal surface of a raw milk tanker during a typical summer's day of milk collection in New Zealand. The bacterial isolates were further evaluated for their ability to form biofilms at 25, 30 and 37°C. Mutual and competitive effects were observed in some of the co-culture biofilms, with all isolates being able to form biofilms in either single culture or co-culture at the three temperatures. The proteolysis was also evaluated in both biofilms and corresponding planktonic cultures. The proteolysis per cell decreased as the temperature of incubation (20-37°C) increased. Furthermore, mutualistic interactions in terms of proteolysis were observed when cultures were grown as co-culture biofilms. This is the first study to show that proteolytic enzymes can be produced in biofilms on the internal surfaces of raw milk tankers. This has important implications for the cleaning and the temperature control of raw milk transport tankers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Proteolysis-independent down-regulation of DELLA repression by the gibberellin receptor GID1

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents evidence for proteolysis-independent regulation of DELLA repression of gibberellin (GA) signaling in Arabidopsis. DELLA proteins are negative regulators of GA responses including seed germination, stem elongation, and fertility. GA can stimulate GA responses by causing proteolys...

  17. Effects of energy deficit, dietary protein, and feeding on intracellular regulators of skeletal muscle proteolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examined ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis and associated gene expression in normal-23 weight adults consuming varying levels of dietary protein during short-term energy deficit. 24 Using a randomized-bock design, 32 men and 7 women were assigned to diets providing protein 25 at 0.8 (RDA), 1...

  18. Hyperosmotic Stress Induces Tau Proteolysis by Caspase-3 Activation in SH-SY5Y Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivera-Santa Catalina, Marta; Caballero-Bermejo, Montaña; Argent, Ricardo; Alonso, Juan C; Cuenda, Ana; Lorenzo, María J; Centeno, Francisco

    2016-12-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and other related tauopathies. In this subset of neurodegenerative disorders, Tau auto-assembles into insoluble fibrils that accumulate in neurons as paired helical filaments (PHFs), promoting cellular dysfunction and cytotoxic effects. Growing evidence suggests that abnormal post-translational regulation, mainly hyperphosphorylation and aberrant cleavage, drives Tau to this pathological state. In this work we show that sorbitol-induced hyperosmotic stress promotes Tau proteolysis in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The appearance of cleaved Tau was preceded by the activation of μ-calpain, the proteasome system and caspase-3. Tau proteolysis was completely prevented by caspase-3 inhibition but unaffected by neither the proteasome system nor μ-calpain activity blockade. Concomitantly, hyperosmotic stress induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells, which was efficiently avoided by the inhibition of caspase-3 activity. Altogether, our results provide the first evidence that Tau protein is susceptible to caspase-3 proteolysis under hyperosmotic stress and suggest a positive relationship between Tau proteolysis and apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2781-2790, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Histopathological growth pattern, proteolysis and angiogenesis in chemonaive patients resected for multiple colorectal liver metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eefsen, Rikke Løvendahl; Van den Eynden, Gert G; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterise growth patterns, proteolysis, and angiogenesis in colorectal liver metastases from chemonaive patients with multiple liver metastases. Twenty-four patients were included in the study, resected for a median of 2.6 metastases. The growth pattern distrib...

  20. Plasma membrane invaginations containing clusters of full-length PrPSc are an early form of prion-associated neuropathology in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godsave, Susan F; Wille, Holger; Pierson, Jason; Prusiner, Stanley B; Peters, Peter J

    2013-06-01

    During prion disease, cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is refolded into a pathogenic isoform (PrP(Sc)) that accumulates in the central nervous system and causes neurodegeneration and death. We used immunofluorescence, quantitative cryo-immunogold EM, and tomography to detect nascent, full-length PrP(Sc) in the hippocampus of prion-infected mice from early preclinical disease stages onward. Comparison of uninfected and infected brains showed that sites containing full-length PrP(Sc) could be recognized in the neuropil by bright spots and streaks of immunofluorescence on semi-thin (200-nm) sections, and by clusters of cryo-immunogold EM labeling. PrP(Sc) was found mainly on neuronal plasma membranes, most strikingly on membrane invaginations and sites of cell-to-cell contact, and was evident by 65 days postinoculation, or 54% of the incubation period to terminal disease. Both axons and dendrites in the neuropil were affected. We hypothesize that closely apposed plasma membranes provide a favorable environment for prion conversion and intercellular prion transfer. Only a small proportion of clustered PrP immunogold labeling was found at synapses, indicating that synapses are not targeted specifically in prion disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Relationship of PrPSc molecular properties with incubation time in a natural prion disease host: a characterization of three isolates of U.S. sheep scrapie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determination of aspects of tertiary and quaternary structure of PrPSc associated with differences in disease presentation in the host is a key area of interest in the prion field. Previously, we determined that a U.S. scrapie isolate (136-VDEP) with a short incubation time upon passage in sheep als...

  2. Incidence and spectrum of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease variants with mixed phenotype and co-occurrence of PrPSc types: an updated classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parchi, P.; Strammiello, R.; Notari, S.; Giese, A.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Ladogana, A.; Zerr, I.; Roncaroli, F.; Cras, P.; Ghetti, B.; Pocchiari, M.; Kretzschmar, H.; Capellari, S.

    2009-01-01

    Six subtypes of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with distinctive clinico-pathological features have been identified largely based on two types of the abnormal prion protein, PrPSc, and the methionine (M)/valine (V) polymorphic codon 129 of the prion protein. The existence of affected subjects

  3. A new method for the Characterization of Strain-Specific Conformational Stability of Protease-Sensitive and Protease Resistant PrPSc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pirisinu, L.; Bari, Di M.; Marcon, S.; Vaccari, G.; Agostino, D' C.; Fazzi, P.; Esposito, E.; Cardone, F.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Agrimi, U.; Nonno, R.

    2010-01-01

    Although proteinacious in nature, prions exist as strains with specific self-perpetuating biological properties. Prion strains are thought to be associated with different conformers of PrPSc, a disease-associated isoform of the host-encoded cellular protein (PrPC). Molecular strain typing approaches

  4. PrPc does not mediate internalization of PrPSc but is required at an early stage for de novo prion infection of Rov cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet, Sophie; Daude, Nathalie; Courageot, Marie-Pierre; Chapuis, Jérôme; Laude, Hubert; Vilette, Didier

    2007-10-01

    We have studied the interactions of exogenous prions with an epithelial cell line inducibly expressing PrPc protein and permissive to infection by a sheep scrapie agent. We demonstrate that abnormal PrP (PrPSc) and prion infectivity are efficiently internalized in Rov cells, whether or not PrPc is expressed. At odds with earlier studies implicating cellular heparan sulfates in PrPSc internalization, we failed to find any involvement of such molecules in Rov cells, indicating that prions can enter target cells by several routes. We further show that PrPSc taken up in the absence of PrPc was unable to promote efficient prion multiplication once PrPc expression was restored in the cells. This observation argues that interaction of PrPSc with PrPc has to occur early, in a specific subcellular compartment(s), and is consistent with the view that the first prion multiplication events may occur at the cell surface.

  5. PrPc Does Not Mediate Internalization of PrPSc but Is Required at an Early Stage for De Novo Prion Infection of Rov Cells▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet, Sophie; Daude, Nathalie; Courageot, Marie-Pierre; Chapuis, Jérôme; Laude, Hubert; Vilette, Didier

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the interactions of exogenous prions with an epithelial cell line inducibly expressing PrPc protein and permissive to infection by a sheep scrapie agent. We demonstrate that abnormal PrP (PrPSc) and prion infectivity are efficiently internalized in Rov cells, whether or not PrPc is expressed. At odds with earlier studies implicating cellular heparan sulfates in PrPSc internalization, we failed to find any involvement of such molecules in Rov cells, indicating that prions can enter target cells by several routes. We further show that PrPSc taken up in the absence of PrPc was unable to promote efficient prion multiplication once PrPc expression was restored in the cells. This observation argues that interaction of PrPSc with PrPc has to occur early, in a specific subcellular compartment(s), and is consistent with the view that the first prion multiplication events may occur at the cell surface. PMID:17626095

  6. Glimepiride reduces the expression of PrPc, prevents PrPSc formation and protects against prion mediated neurotoxicity in cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive Bate

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A hallmark of the prion diseases is the conversion of the host-encoded cellular prion protein (PrP(C into a disease related, alternatively folded isoform (PrP(Sc. The accumulation of PrP(Sc within the brain is associated with synapse loss and ultimately neuronal death. Novel therapeutics are desperately required to treat neurodegenerative diseases including the prion diseases. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Treatment with glimepiride, a sulphonylurea approved for the treatment of diabetes mellitus, induced the release of PrP(C from the surface of prion-infected neuronal cells. The cell surface is a site where PrP(C molecules may be converted to PrP(Sc and glimepiride treatment reduced PrP(Sc formation in three prion infected neuronal cell lines (ScN2a, SMB and ScGT1 cells. Glimepiride also protected cortical and hippocampal neurones against the toxic effects of the prion-derived peptide PrP82-146. Glimepiride treatment significantly reduce both the amount of PrP82-146 that bound to neurones and PrP82-146 induced activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A(2 (cPLA(2 and the production of prostaglandin E(2 that is associated with neuronal injury in prion diseases. Our results are consistent with reports that glimepiride activates an endogenous glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-phospholipase C which reduced PrP(C expression at the surface of neuronal cells. The effects of glimepiride were reproduced by treatment of cells with phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PI-PLC and were reversed by co-incubation with p-chloromercuriphenylsulphonate, an inhibitor of endogenous GPI-PLC. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, these results indicate that glimepiride may be a novel treatment to reduce PrP(Sc formation and neuronal damage in prion diseases.

  7. Short communication: effect of kefir grains on proteolysis of major milk proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, I M P L V O; Pinho, O; Monteiro, D; Faria, S; Cruz, S; Perreira, A; Roque, A C; Tavares, P

    2010-01-01

    The effect of kefir grains on the proteolysis of major milk proteins in milk kefir and in a culture of kefir grains in pasteurized cheese whey was followed by reverse phase-HPLC analysis. The reduction of kappa-, alpha-, and beta-caseins (CN), alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA), and beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) contents during 48 and 90 h of incubation of pasteurized milk (100mL) and respective cheese whey with kefir grains (6 and 12 g) at 20 degrees C was monitored. Significant proteolysis of alpha-LA and kappa-, alpha-, and beta-caseins was observed. The effect of kefir amount (6 and 12 g/100mL) was significant for alpha-LA and alpha- and beta-CN. alpha-Lactalbumin and beta-CN were more easily hydrolyzed than alpha-CN. No significant reduction was observed with respect to beta-LG concentration for 6 and 12 g of kefir in 100mL of milk over 48 h, indicating that no significant proteolysis was carried out. Similar results were observed when the experiment was conducted over 90 h. Regarding the cheese whey kefir samples, similar behavior was observed for the proteolysis of alpha-LA and beta-LG: alpha-LA was hydrolyzed between 60 and 90% after 12h (for 6 and 12 g of kefir) and no significant beta-LG proteolysis occurred. The proteolytic activity of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts in kefir community was evaluated. Kefir milk prepared under normal conditions contained peptides from proteolysis of alpha-LA and kappa-, alpha-, and beta-caseins. Hydrolysis is dependent on the kefir:milk ratio and incubation time. beta-Lactoglobulin is not hydrolyzed even when higher hydrolysis time is used. Kefir grains are not appropriate as adjunct cultures to increase beta-LG digestibility in whey-based or whey-containing foods. Copyright 2010 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Monitoring of Enzymatic Proteolysis Using Self-Assembled Quantum Dot-Protein Substrate Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron R. Clapp

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We have previously utilized hybrid semiconductor quantum dot- (QD- peptide substrates for monitoring of enzymatic proteolysis. In this report, we expand on this sensing strategy to further monitor protein-protease interactions. We utilize QDs self-assembled with multiple copies of dye-labeled proteins as substrates for the sensing of protease activity. Detection of proteolysis is based on changes in the rate of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET between the QDs and the proximal dye-labeled proteins following protein digestion by added enzyme. Our study focused on two representative proteolytic enzymes: the cysteine protease papain and the serine protease endoproteinase K. Analysis of the enzymatic digestion allowed us to estimate minimal values for the enzymatic activities of each enzyme used. Mechanisms of enzymatic inhibition were also inferred from the FRET data collected in the presence of inhibitors. Potential applications of this technology include drug discovery assays and in vivo cellular monitoring of enzymatic activity.

  9. Peptides Displayed as High Density Brush Polymers Resist Proteolysis and Retain Bioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We describe a strategy for rendering peptides resistant to proteolysis by formulating them as high-density brush polymers. The utility of this approach is demonstrated by polymerizing well-established cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and showing that the resulting polymers are not only resistant to proteolysis but also maintain their ability to enter cells. The scope of this design concept is explored by studying the proteolytic resistance of brush polymers composed of peptides that are substrates for either thrombin or a metalloprotease. Finally, we demonstrate that the proteolytic susceptibility of peptide brush polymers can be tuned by adjusting the density of the polymer brush and offer in silico models to rationalize this finding. We contend that this strategy offers a plausible method of preparing peptides for in vivo use, where rapid digestion by proteases has traditionally restricted their utility. PMID:25314576

  10. Far infrared-assisted encapsulation of filter paper strips in poly(methyl methacrylate) for proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiwen; Bao, Huimin; Zhang, Luyan; Chen, Gang

    2016-02-01

    Filter paper strips were enclosed between two poly(methyl methacrylate) plates to fabricate paper-packed channel microchips under pressure in the presence of far infrared irradiation. After the enclosed paper strip was oxidized by periodate, trypsin was covalently immobilized in them to fabricate microfluidic proteolysis bioreactor. The feasibility and performance of the unique bioreactor were demonstrated by digesting BSA and lysozyme. The results were comparable to those of conventional in-solution proteolysis while the digestion time was significantly reduced to ∼18 s. The suitability of the microfluidic paper-based bioreactors to complex proteins was demonstrated by digesting human serum. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. The Golgi apparatus regulates cGMP-dependent protein kinase I compartmentation and proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shin; Chen, Jingsi; Cornog, Katherine H; Zhang, Huili; Roberts, Jesse D

    2015-06-01

    cGMP-dependent protein kinase I (PKGI) is an important effector of cGMP signaling that regulates vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype and proliferation. PKGI has been detected in the perinuclear region of cells, and recent data indicate that proprotein convertases (PCs) typically resident in the Golgi apparatus (GA) can stimulate PKGI proteolysis and generate a kinase fragment that localizes to the nucleus and regulates gene expression. However, the role of the endomembrane system in PKGI compartmentation and processing is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that PKGI colocalizes with endoplasmic reticulum (ER), ER-Golgi intermediate compartment, GA cisterna, and trans-Golgi network proteins in pulmonary artery SMC and cell lines. Moreover, PKGI localizes with furin, a trans-Golgi network-resident PC known to cleave PKGI. ER protein transport influences PKGI localization because overexpression of a constitutively inactive Sar1 transgene caused PKGI retention in the ER. Additionally, PKGI appears to reside within the GA because PKGI immunoreactivity was determined to be resistant to cytosolic proteinase K treatment in live cells. The GA appears to play a role in PKGI proteolysis because overexpression of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-associated cGMP kinase substrate, not only tethered heterologous PKGI-β to the ER and decreased its localization to the GA, but also diminished PKGI proteolysis and nuclear translocation. Also, inhibiting intra-GA protein transport with monensin was observed to decrease PKGI cleavage. These studies detail a role for the endomembrane system in regulating PKGI compartmentation and proteolysis. Moreover, they support the investigation of mechanisms regulating PKGI-dependent nuclear cGMP signaling in the pulmonary vasculature with Golgi dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Proteolysis of the peanut allergen Ara h 1 by an endogenous aspartic protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Karl A; Tan-Wilson, Anna

    2015-11-01

    The 7S and 11S globulins of peanuts are subjected to proteolysis two days after seed imbibition, with Ara h 1 and the arachin acidic chains being among the first storage proteins to be mobilized. Proteolytic activity was greatest at pH 2.6-3 and is inhibited by pepstatin A, characteristic of an aspartic protease. This activity persists in seedling cotyledons up to at least 8 days after imbibition. In vitro proteolysis of Ara h 1 at pH 2.6 by extracts of cotyledons from seedlings harvested 24 h after seed imbibition generates newly appearing bands on SDS-PAGE. Partial sequences of Ara h 1 that were obtained through LC-MS/MS analysis of in-gel trypsin digests of those bands, combined with information on fragment size, suggest that proteolysis begins in the region that links the two cupin domains to produce two 33/34 kD fragments, each one encompassing an intact cupin domain. The later appearance of two 18 and 10/11 kD fragments can be explained by proteolysis within an exposed site in the cupin domains of each of the 33/34 kD fragments. The same or similar proteolytic activity was observed in developing seeds, but Ara h 1 remains intact through seed maturation. This is partly explained by the observation that acidification of the protein storage vacuoles, demonstrated by vacuolar accumulation of acridine orange that was dissipated by a membrane-permeable base, occurs only after germination. These findings suggest a method for use of the seed aspartic protease in reducing peanut allergy due to Ara h 1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Discovery of Anti-Hypertensive Oligopeptides from Adlay Based on In Silico Proteolysis and Virtual Screening

    OpenAIRE

    Liansheng Qiao; Bin Li; Yankun Chen; Lingling Li; Xi Chen; Lingzhi Wang; Fang Lu; Ganggang Luo; Gongyu Li; Yanling Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Adlay (Coix larchryma-jobi L.) was the commonly used Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) with high content of seed storage protein. The hydrolyzed bioactive oligopeptides of adlay have been proven to be anti-hypertensive effective components. However, the structures and anti-hypertensive mechanism of bioactive oligopeptides from adlay were not clear. To discover the definite anti-hypertensive oligopeptides from adlay, in silico proteolysis and virtual screening were implemented to obtain poten...

  14. The DegraBase: a database of proteolysis in healthy and apoptotic human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Emily D; Seaman, Julia E; Agard, Nick; Hsu, Gerald W; Julien, Olivier; Mahrus, Sami; Nguyen, Huy; Shimbo, Kazutaka; Yoshihara, Hikari A I; Zhuang, Min; Chalkley, Robert J; Wells, James A

    2013-03-01

    Proteolysis is a critical post-translational modification for regulation of cellular processes. Our lab has previously developed a technique for specifically labeling unmodified protein N termini, the α-aminome, using the engineered enzyme, subtiligase. Here we present a database, called the DegraBase (http://wellslab.ucsf.edu/degrabase/), which compiles 8090 unique N termini from 3206 proteins directly identified in subtiligase-based positive enrichment mass spectrometry experiments in healthy and apoptotic human cell lines. We include both previously published and unpublished data in our analysis, resulting in a total of 2144 unique α-amines identified in healthy cells, and 6990 in cells undergoing apoptosis. The N termini derive from three general categories of proteolysis with respect to cleavage location and functional role: translational N-terminal methionine processing (∼10% of total proteolysis), sites close to the translational N terminus that likely represent removal of transit or signal peptides (∼25% of total), and finally, other endoproteolytic cuts (∼65% of total). Induction of apoptosis causes relatively little change in the first two proteolytic categories, but dramatic changes are seen in endoproteolysis. For example, we observed 1706 putative apoptotic caspase cuts, more than double the total annotated sites in the CASBAH and MEROPS databases. In the endoproteolysis category, there are a total of nearly 3000 noncaspase nontryptic cleavages that are not currently reported in the MEROPS database. These studies significantly increase the annotation for all categories of proteolysis in human cells and allow public access for investigators to explore interesting proteolytic events in healthy and apoptotic human cells.

  15. The DegraBase: A Database of Proteolysis in Healthy and Apoptotic Human Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Emily D.; Seaman, Julia E.; Agard, Nick; Hsu, Gerald W.; Julien, Olivier; Mahrus, Sami; Nguyen, Huy; Shimbo, Kazutaka; Yoshihara, Hikari A. I.; Zhuang, Min; Chalkley, Robert J.; Wells, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Proteolysis is a critical post-translational modification for regulation of cellular processes. Our lab has previously developed a technique for specifically labeling unmodified protein N termini, the α-aminome, using the engineered enzyme, subtiligase. Here we present a database, called the DegraBase (http://wellslab.ucsf.edu/degrabase/), which compiles 8090 unique N termini from 3206 proteins directly identified in subtiligase-based positive enrichment mass spectrometry experiments in healthy and apoptotic human cell lines. We include both previously published and unpublished data in our analysis, resulting in a total of 2144 unique α-amines identified in healthy cells, and 6990 in cells undergoing apoptosis. The N termini derive from three general categories of proteolysis with respect to cleavage location and functional role: translational N-terminal methionine processing (∼10% of total proteolysis), sites close to the translational N terminus that likely represent removal of transit or signal peptides (∼25% of total), and finally, other endoproteolytic cuts (∼65% of total). Induction of apoptosis causes relatively little change in the first two proteolytic categories, but dramatic changes are seen in endoproteolysis. For example, we observed 1706 putative apoptotic caspase cuts, more than double the total annotated sites in the CASBAH and MEROPS databases. In the endoproteolysis category, there are a total of nearly 3000 noncaspase nontryptic cleavages that are not currently reported in the MEROPS database. These studies significantly increase the annotation for all categories of proteolysis in human cells and allow public access for investigators to explore interesting proteolytic events in healthy and apoptotic human cells. PMID:23264352

  16. The DegraBase: A Database of Proteolysis in Healthy and Apoptotic Human Cells*

    OpenAIRE

    Crawford, Emily D.; Seaman, Julia E.; Agard, Nick; Hsu, Gerald W.; Julien, Olivier; Mahrus, Sami; Nguyen, Huy; Shimbo, Kazutaka; Yoshihara, Hikari A. I.; Zhuang, Min; Chalkley, Robert J.; Wells, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Proteolysis is a critical post-translational modification for regulation of cellular processes. Our lab has previously developed a technique for specifically labeling unmodified protein N termini, the α-aminome, using the engineered enzyme, subtiligase. Here we present a database, called the DegraBase (http://wellslab.ucsf.edu/degrabase/), which compiles 8090 unique N termini from 3206 proteins directly identified in subtiligase-based positive enrichment mass spectrometry experiments in healt...

  17. Myocardial overexpression of TIMP3 after myocardial infarction exerts beneficial effects by promoting angiogenesis and suppressing early proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takawale, Abhijit; Zhang, Pu; Azad, Abul; Wang, Wang; Wang, Xiuhua; Murray, Allan G; Kassiri, Zamaneh

    2017-08-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) results in loss of cardiomyocytes, adverse extracellular matrix (ECM) and structural remodeling, and left ventricular (LV) dilation and dysfunction. Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMPs) inhibit matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), the main regulators of ECM turnover. TIMPs also have MMP-independent functions. TIMP3 levels are reduced in the heart within 24 h of MI in mice. We investigated if overexpression of TIMP3 post-MI limits adverse remodeling and LV dilation and dysfunction. MI was induced by left anterior descending coronary artery ligation in 10- to 12-wk-old male C57BL/6J mice, and adenoviral constructs expressing human (h)TIMP3 (Ad-hTIMP3) or no TIMP (Ad-Null) were injected in the peri-infarct zone (5.4 × 107 plaque-forming units/heart, 5 injections/heart). Cardiac function assessed by echocardiography showed improved LV physiology and reduced LV dilation after TIMP3 overexpression compared with the Ad-Null-MI group. Post-MI adverse remodeling was attenuated in the Ad-hTIMP3-MI group, as assessed by greater cardiomyocyte density, less infarct expansion, and ECM disruption. TIMP3 overexpression blunted the early rise in proteolytic activities post-MI. A higher density of coronary arteries and a greater number of proliferating endothelial cells were detected in the infarct and peri-infarct regions in the Ad-hTIMP3-MI group compared with the Ad-Null-MI group. In vitro three-dimensional angiogenesis assay confirmed that recombinant TIMP3 promotes angiogenesis in human endothelial cells, although biphasically and in a dose-dependent manner. Intriguingly, overexpression of Ad-hTIMP3 at 10-fold higher concentration had no beneficial effects, consistent with antiangiogenic effects of TIMP3 at higher doses. In conclusion, optimal overexpression of TIMP3 can be a promising therapeutic approach to limit adverse post-MI remodeling by dually inhibiting early proteolysis and promoting angiogenesis.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Here, we report that

  18. Sedimentation, proteolytic activity and proteolysis of whole UHT milk during storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Lúcia de Oliveira Pinto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The UHT milk destabilization during storage may be assigned, among other factors, to the activity of endogenous and, or bacterial proteases. This technological problem is a major obstacle in the dairy chain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microbiological quality of raw milk and its effect on the formation of sediment, degree of proteolysis and proteolytic activity of whole UHT during storage. Mean counts of mesophilic bacteria, psychrotrophic, psychrotrophic proteolytic and Pseudomonas spp. from samples of raw milk were respectively 5.5 x 106 CFU/mL, 3.0 x 106 CFU/mL, 8.0 x 105 CFU/mL and 1.1 x 106 CFU/mL. The UHT treatment has reduced 93.2% of proteolytic activity detected comparing to the proteolytic activity of raw milk. The increase in sediment mass, degree of proteolysis and proteolytic activity of whole UHT milk has been detected during storage. All UHT milk samples have presented low count of mesophilic bacteria and remained thermally stable without evidence of gelation. Considering the residual activity of proteases in UHT milk and its relevance to sedimentation, proteolytic activity and proteolysis, the use of raw milk with low levels of proteolytic psychrotrophic bacteria hould be considered to prevent technological problems as sedimentation and gelation, which reduce significantly product acceptance by consumers besides causing industrial losses.

  19. Increased proteolysis of collagen in an in vitro tensile overload tendon model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Thomas L; Labow, Rosalind S; Avery, Nicholas C; Lee, J Michael

    2007-11-01

    Presently, there is a lack of fundamental understanding regarding changes in collagen's molecular state due to mechanical damage. The bovine tail tendon (BTT; steers approximately 30 months) was characterized and used as an in vitro model for investigating the effect of tensile mechanical overload on collagen susceptibility to proteolysis by acetyltrypsin and alpha-chymotrypsin. Two strain rates with a 1000-fold difference (0.01 and 10 s(-1)) were used, since molecular mechanisms that determine mechanical behavior were presumed to be strain rate dependent. First, it was determined that the BTTs were normal but immature tendons. Water content and collagen content (approx. 60% of wet weight and 80% of dry weight, respectively) and mechanical properties were all within the expected range. The collagen crosslinking was dominated by the intermediate crosslink hydroxylysinonorleucine. Second, tensile overload damage significantly enhanced proteolysis by acetyltrypsin and, to a lesser degree, by alpha-chymotrypsin. Interestingly, proteolysis by acetyltrypsin was greatest for specimens ruptured at 0.01 s(-1) and seemed to occur throughout the specimen. Understanding damage is important for insight into injuries (as in sports and trauma) and for better understanding of collagen fiber stability, durability, and damage mechanisms, aiding in the development of durable tissue-based products for mechanically demanding surgical applications.

  20. Functional and Evolutionary Analyses Identify Proteolysis as a General Mechanism for NLRP1 Inflammasome Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Chavarría-Smith

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Inflammasomes are cytosolic multi-protein complexes that initiate immune responses to infection by recruiting and activating the Caspase-1 protease. Human NLRP1 was the first protein shown to form an inflammasome, but its physiological mechanism of activation remains unknown. Recently, specific variants of mouse and rat NLRP1 were found to be activated upon N-terminal cleavage by the anthrax lethal factor protease. However, agonists for other NLRP1 variants, including human NLRP1, are not known, and it remains unclear if they are also activated by proteolysis. Here we demonstrate that two mouse NLRP1 paralogs (NLRP1AB6 and NLRP1BB6 are also activated by N-terminal proteolytic cleavage. We also demonstrate that proteolysis within a specific N-terminal linker region is sufficient to activate human NLRP1. Evolutionary analysis of primate NLRP1 shows the linker/cleavage region has evolved under positive selection, indicative of pathogen-induced selective pressure. Collectively, these results identify proteolysis as a general mechanism of NLRP1 inflammasome activation that appears to be contributing to the rapid evolution of NLRP1 in rodents and primates.

  1. Extracellular proteolysis in structural and functional plasticity of mossy fiber synapses in hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz eWiera

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Brain is continuously altered in response to experience and environmental changes. One of the underlying mechanisms is synaptic plasticity, which is manifested by modification of synapse structure and function. It is becoming clear that regulated extracellular proteolysis plays a pivotal role in the structural and functional remodeling of synapses during brain development, learning and memory formation. Clearly, plasticity mechanisms may substantially differ between projections. Mossy fiber synapses onto CA3 pyramidal cells display several unique functional features, including pronounced short-term facilitation, a presynaptically expressed LTP that is independent of NMDAR activation, and NMDA-dependent metaplasticity. Moreover, structural plasticity at mossy fiber synapses ranges from the reorganization of projection topology after hippocampus-dependent learning, through intrinsically different dynamic properties of synaptic boutons to pre- and postsynaptic structural changes accompanying LTP induction. Although concomitant functional and structural plasticity in this pathway strongly suggests a role of extracellular proteolysis, its impact only starts to be investigated in this projection. In the present report, we review the role of extracellular proteolysis in various aspects of synaptic plasticity in hippocampal mossy fiber synapses. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that among perisynaptic proteases, tPA/plasmin system, β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1 and metalloproteinases play a crucial role in shaping plastic changes in this projection. We discuss recent advances and emerging hypotheses on the roles of proteases in mechanisms underlying mossy fiber target specific synaptic plasticity and memory formation.

  2. Proteolysis in miniature cheddar-type cheeses manufactured using extracts from the crustacean Munida as coagulant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossano, R; Piraino, P; D'Ambrosio, A; O'connell, O F; Ungaro, N; McSweeney, P L H; Riccio, P

    2005-11-04

    Miniature (20 g) Cheddar-type cheeses were manufactured using enzymes extracted from the crustacean Munida or chymosin as coagulant. Cheeses were ripened at 8 degrees C and samples were collected for analysis after 2, 6 and 12 weeks. Proteolysis was assessed by urea-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, which showed that cheeses manufactured with the Munida extracts had a higher extent of degradation of beta-casein than cheeses made using chymosin as coagulant. Patterns of proteolysis were also obtained by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight (MALDI-ToF) mass spectrometry. In general, the products of proteolysis were more complex in cheese made using the Munida extracts than in cheese made by chymosin as coagulant. Statistical analysis of results clearly discriminated the cheeses on the basis of coagulant used. Molecular mass of peptides found in cheese made using Munida extracts were similar to those of peptides commonly detected in cheeses made using chymosin as coagulant.

  3. New concepts in molecular imaging: non-invasive MRI spotting of proteolysis using an Overhauser effect switch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Mellet

    Full Text Available Proteolysis, involved in many processes in living organisms, is tightly regulated in space and time under physiological conditions. However deregulation can occur with local persistent proteolytic activities, e.g. in inflammation, cystic fibrosis, tumors, or pancreatitis. Furthermore, little is known about the role of many proteases, hence there is a need of new imaging methods to visualize specifically normal or disease-related proteolysis in intact bodies.In this paper, a new concept for non invasive proteolysis imaging is proposed. Overhauser-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (OMRI at 0.2 Tesla was used to monitor the enzymatic hydrolysis of a nitroxide-labeled protein. In vitro, image intensity switched from 1 to 25 upon proteolysis due to the associated decrease in the motional correlation time of the substrate. The OMRI experimental device used in this study is consistent with protease imaging in mice at 0.2 T without significant heating. Simulations show that this enzymatic-driven OMRI signal switch can be obtained at lower frequencies suitable for larger animals or humans.The method is highly sensitive and makes possible proteolysis imaging in three dimensions with a good spatial resolution. Any protease could be targeted specifically through the use of taylor-made cleavable macromolecules. At short term OMRI of proteolysis may be applied to basic research as well as to evaluate therapeutic treatments in small animal models of experimental diseases.

  4. Mouse Prion Protein (PrP) Segment 100 to 104 Regulates Conversion of PrPC to PrPSc in Prion-Infected Neuroblastoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Hideyuki; Okemoto-Nakamura, Yuko; Shinkai-Ouchi, Fumiko; Hanada, Kentaro; Yamakawa, Yoshio

    2012-01-01

    Prion diseases are characterized by the replicative propagation of disease-associated forms of prion protein (PrPSc; PrP refers to prion protein). The propagation is believed to proceed via two steps; the initial binding of the normal form of PrP (PrPC) to PrPSc and the subsequent conversion of PrPC to PrPSc. We have explored the two-step model in prion-infected mouse neuroblastoma (ScN2a) cells by focusing on the mouse PrP (MoPrP) segment 92-GGTHNQWNKPSKPKTN-107, which is within a region previously suggested to be part of the binding interface or shown to differ in its accessibility to anti-PrP antibodies between PrPC and PrPSc. Exchanging the MoPrP segment with the corresponding chicken PrP segment (106-GGSYHNQKPWKPPKTN-121) revealed the necessity of MoPrP residues 99 to 104 for the chimeras to achieve the PrPSc state, while segment 95 to 98 was replaceable with the chicken sequence. An alanine substitution at position 100, 102, 103, or 104 of MoPrP gave rise to nonconvertible mutants that associated with MoPrPSc and interfered with the conversion of endogenous MoPrPC. The interference was not evoked by a chimera (designated MCM2) in which MoPrP segment 95 to 104 was changed to the chicken sequence, though MCM2 associated with MoPrPSc. Incubation of the cells with a synthetic peptide composed of MoPrP residues 93 to 107 or alanine-substituted cognates did not inhibit the conversion, whereas an anti-P8 antibody recognizing the above sequence in PrPC reduced the accumulation of PrPSc after 10 days of incubation of the cells. These results suggest the segment 100 to 104 of MoPrPC plays a key role in conversion after binding to MoPrPSc. PMID:22398286

  5. Antibody proteolysis: a common picture emerging from plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donini, Marcello; Lombardi, Raffaele; Lonoce, Chiara; Di Carli, Mariasole; Marusic, Carla; Morea, Veronica; Di Micco, Patrizio

    2015-01-01

    We have recently characterized the degradation profiles of 2 human IgG1 monoclonal antibodies, the tumor-targeting mAb H10 and the anti-HIV mAb 2G12. Both mAbs were produced in plants either as stable transgenics or using a transient expression system based on leaf agroinfiltration. The purified antibodies were separated by 1DE and protein bands were characterized by N-terminal sequencing. The proteolytic cleavage sites identified in the heavy chain (HC) of both antibodies were localized in 3 inter-domain regions, suggesting that the number of proteolytic cleavage events taking place in plants is limited. One of the cleavage sites, close to the hinge region, was common to both antibodies.

  6. Proteolysis of the major yolk glycoproteins is regulated by acidification of the yolk platelets in sea urchin embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallya, S K; Partin, J S; Valdizan, M C; Lennarz, W J

    1992-06-01

    The precise function of the yolk platelets of sea urchin embryos during early development is unknown. We have shown previously that the chemical composition of the yolk platelets remains unchanged in terms of phospholipid, triglyceride, hexose, sialic acid, RNA, and total protein content after fertilization and early development. However, the platelet is not entirely static because the major 160-kD yolk glycoprotein YP-160 undergoes limited, step-wise proteolytic cleavage during early development. Based on previous studies by us and others, it has been postulated that yolk platelets become acidified during development, leading to the activation of a cathepsin B-like yolk proteinase that is believed to be responsible for the degradation of the major yolk glycoprotein. To investigate this possibility, we studied the effect of addition of chloroquine, which prevents acidification of lysosomes. Consistent with the postulated requirement for acidification, it was found that chloroquine blocked YP-160 breakdown but had no effect on embryonic development. To directly test the possibility that acidification of the yolk platelets over the course of development temporally correlated with YP-160 proteolysis, we added 3-(2,4-dinitroanilo)-3-amino-N-methyldipropylamine (DAMP) to eggs or embryos. This compound localizes to acidic organelles and can be detected in these organelles by EM. The results of these studies revealed that yolk platelets did, in fact, become transiently acidified during development. This acidification occurred at the same time as yolk protein proteolysis, i.e., at 6 h after fertilization (64-cell stage) in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and at 48 h after fertilization (late gastrula) in L. pictus. Furthermore, the pH value at the point of maximal acidification of the yolk platelets in vivo was equal to the pH optimum of the enzyme measured in vitro, indicating that this acidification is sufficient to activate the enzyme. For both S. purpuratus and

  7. Regulation of IGF binding protein proteolysis by pregnancy-associated plasma protein-ARegulation of IGF binding protein proteolysis by pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaidamauskas, Ervinas

    During his PhD studies, Ervinas Gaidamauskas researched the proteins pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) and its homologue PAPP-A2 in vitro. As suggested by its name, PAPP-A plays an important role in pregnancy and fetal development. Additionally, recent studies indicate a newly...... recognised role for PAPP-A in ageing and in the development of age-related disease. PAPP-A is a secreted metalloproteinase that cleaves insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs). Ervinas Gaidamauskas studied the mechanism of IGF-modulated proteolysis of IGFBPs by PAPP-A and the structural...... determinants for cleavage. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), he also analysed the intermodular structural organisation of the C-terminal domain of PAPP-A involved in substrate binding. Detailed knowledge of interactions between PAPP-A and its substrates is required to understand the modulatory role...

  8. Detection of PrPSc in lung and mammary gland is favored by the presence of Visna/maedi virus lesions in naturally coinfected sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Eider; Monleón, Eva; Bolea, Rosa; Acín, Cristina; Pérez, Marta; Alvarez, Neila; Leginagoikoa, Iratxe; Juste, Ramón; Minguijón, Esmeralda; Reina, Ramsés; Glaria, Idoia; Berriatua, Eduardo; de Andrés, Damián; Badiola, Juan José; Amorena, Beatriz; Luján, Lluís

    2010-01-01

    There are few reports on the pathogenesis of scrapie (Sc) and Visna/maedi virus (VMV) coinfections. The aim of this work was to study in vivo as well as post mortem both diseases in 91 sheep. Diagnosis of Sc and VMV infections allowed the distribution of animals into five groups according to the presence (+) or absence (-) of infection by Sc and VMV: Sc-/VMV-, Sc-/VMV+, Sc+/VMV- and Sc+/VMV+. The latter was divided into two subgroups, with and without VMV-induced lymphoid follicle hyperplasia (LFH), respectively. In both the lung and mammary gland, PrPSc deposits were found in the germinal center of hyperplasic lymphoid follicles in the subgroup of Sc+/VMV+ having VMV-induced LFH. This detection was always associated with (and likely preceded by) PrPSc observation in the corresponding lymph nodes. No PrPSc was found in other VMV-associated lesions. Animals suffering from scrapie had a statistically significantly lower mean age than the scrapie free animals at the time of death, with no apparent VMV influence. ARQ/ARQ genotype was the most abundant among the 91 ewes and the most frequent in scrapie-affected sheep. VMV infection does not seem to influence the scrapie risk group distribution among animals from the five groups established in this work. Altogether, these data indicate that certain VMV-induced lesions can favor PrPSc deposits in Sc non-target organs such as the lung and the mammary gland, making this coinfection an interesting field that warrants further research for a better comprehension of the pathogenesis of both diseases. © The authors, INRA/EDP Sciences, 2010.

  9. Prion Strain Differences in Accumulation of PrPSc on Neurons and Glia Are Associated with Similar Expression Profiles of Neuroinflammatory Genes: Comparison of Three Prion Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, James A; Striebel, James F; Rangel, Alejandra; Woods, Tyson; Phillips, Katie; Peterson, Karin E; Race, Brent; Chesebro, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    Misfolding and aggregation of host proteins are important features of the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, frontotemporal dementia and prion diseases. In all these diseases, the misfolded protein increases in amount by a mechanism involving seeded polymerization. In prion diseases, host prion protein is misfolded to form a pathogenic protease-resistant form, PrPSc, which accumulates in neurons, astroglia and microglia in the CNS. Here using dual-staining immunohistochemistry, we compared the cell specificity of PrPSc accumulation at early preclinical times post-infection using three mouse scrapie strains that differ in brain regional pathology. PrPSc from each strain had a different pattern of cell specificity. Strain 22L was mainly associated with astroglia, whereas strain ME7 was mainly associated with neurons and neuropil. In thalamus and cortex, strain RML was similar to 22L, but in substantia nigra, RML was similar to ME7. Expression of 90 genes involved in neuroinflammation was studied quantitatively using mRNA from thalamus at preclinical times. Surprisingly, despite the cellular differences in PrPSc accumulation, the pattern of upregulated genes was similar for all three strains, and the small differences observed correlated with variations in the early disease tempo. Gene upregulation correlated with activation of both astroglia and microglia detected in early disease prior to vacuolar pathology or clinical signs. Interestingly, the profile of upregulated genes in scrapie differed markedly from that seen in two acute viral CNS diseases (LaCrosse virus and BE polytropic Friend retrovirus) that had reactive gliosis at levels similar to our prion-infected mice.

  10. Fate of pathological prion (PrP(sc)92-138) in soil and water: prion-clay nanoparticle molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapron, Yves; Charlet, Laurent; Sahai, Nita

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic prion protein scrapie (PrP(sc)) may contaminate soils for decades and remain in water in colloidal suspension, providing infection pathways for animals through the inhalation of ingested dust and soil particles, and drinking water. We used molecular dynamics simulations to understand the strong binding mechanism of this pathogenic peptide with clay mineral surfaces and compared our results to experimental works. We restricted our model to the moiety PrP(92-138), which is a portion of the whole PrP(sc) molecule responsible for infectivity and modeled it using explicit solvating water molecules in contact with a pyrophyllite cleavage plane. Pyrophyllite is taken as a model for common soil clay, but it has no permanent structural charge. However, partial residual negative charges occur on the cleavage plane slab surface due to a slab charge unbalance. The charge is isotropic in 2D and it was balanced with K(+) ions. After partially removing potassium ions, the peptide anchors to the clay surface via up to 10 hydrogen bonds, between protonated lysine or histidine residues and the oxygen atoms of the siloxane cavities. Our results provide insight to the mechanism responsible for the strong association between the PrP(sc) peptide and clay nanoparticles and the associations present in contaminated soil and water which may lead to the infection of animals.

  11. An assessment of the efficiency of PrPsc detection in rectal mucosa and third-eyelid biopsies from animals infected with scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monleón, Eva; Garza, Ma Carmen; Sarasa, Rocío; Alvarez-Rodriguez, Javier; Bolea, Rosa; Monzón, Marta; Vargas, M Antonia; Badiola, Juan José; Acín, Cristina

    2011-01-27

    In classical scrapie, detection of PrPsc on lymphoreticular system is used for the in vivo and post mortem diagnosis of the disease. However, the sensitivity of this methodology is not well characterised because the magnitude and duration of lymphoid tissue involvement can vary considerably. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficiency of detecting PrPsc in rectal mucosa and third-eyelid biopsies. A total of 474 genetically susceptible sheep and 24 goats from three scrapie infected flocks were included in this study. A sample from rectal mucosa and a sample from third-eyelid lymphoid tissue were collected from each animal. Biopsy samples were fixed in formaldehyde and processed for immunohistochemical examination. Animals with negative biopsy results were studied more closely through a post mortem examination of central nervous and lymphoreticular systems and if there was a positive result, additional biopsy sections were further tested. The sensitivity of rectal mucosa and third-eyelid assays were 36% and 40% respectively on initial examination but increased to 48% and 44% respectively after retesting. The results of this field study show a high percentage of infected animals that do not have detectable levels of PrPsc in the biopsied lymphoid tissue, due mainly to the relatively high number of animals with minimal or no involvement of lymphoid tissue in the pathogenesis of the disease. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. cAMP-dependent proteolysis of GATA-6 is linked to JNK-signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushijima, Hironori [Department of Molecular Biology, School of Pharmacy, Iwate Medical University, 2-1-1, Nishitokuta, Yahaba, Shiwagun, Iwate 028-3694 (Japan); Maeda, Masatomo, E-mail: mmaeda@iwate-med.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Biology, School of Pharmacy, Iwate Medical University, 2-1-1, Nishitokuta, Yahaba, Shiwagun, Iwate 028-3694 (Japan)

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A JNK inhibitor SP600125 inhibited cAMP-dependent proteolysis of GATA-6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of a JNK activator anisomycin on the proteolysis was examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anisomycin stimulated the export of nuclear GATA-6 into the cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JNK activated the CRM1 mediated nuclear export of GATA-6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JNK further stimulated slowly the degradation of GATA-6 by cytoplasmic proteasomes. -- Abstract: A JNK inhibitor SP600125 inhibited cAMP-dependent proteolysis of GATA-6 by proteasomes around its IC50. We further examined the effects of SP600125 on the degradation of GATA-6 in detail, since an activator of JNK (anisomycin) is available. Interestingly, anisomycin immediately stimulated the export of nuclear GATA-6 into the cytoplasm, and then the cytoplasmic content of GATA-6 decreased slowly through degradation by proteasomes. Such an effect of anisomycin was inhibited by SP600125, indicating that the observed phenomenon might be linked to the JNK signaling pathway. The inhibitory effect of SP600125 could not be ascribed to the inhibition of PKA, since phosphorylation of CREB occurred in the presence of dbcAMP and SP600125. The nuclear export of GATA-6 was inhibited by leptomycin B, suggesting that CRM1-mediated export could be activated by anisomycin. Furthermore, it seems likely that the JNK activated by anisomycin may stimulate not only the nuclear export of GATA-6 through CRM1 but also the degradation of GATA-6 by cytoplasmic proteasomes. In contrast, A-kinase might activate only the latter process through JNK.

  13. Short communication: Effect of subclinical mastitis on proteolysis in ovine milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-De Olives, A; Le Roux, Y; Rubert-Alemán, J; Peris, C; Molina, M P

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of intramammary infection (IMI) on the endogenous proteolysis of milk. Four control checks were carried out in the half-udder milk of 10 ewes that acquired unilateral subclinical mastitis. Two of these checks were conducted before the infection was established and 2 after. Ten healthy ewes were tested as a control group. The presence of a subclinical IMI involved an increase of the products of casein hydrolysis, the proteose-peptone (p-p) fraction and minor (m) caseins, and a decrease of β-casein. As a result, a significant increase in the proteolysis index (PI), calculated as the ratio of m-casein to the sum of caseins (α + β + κ), took place. α-Casein and κ-casein were not significantly affected by IMI. Correlations confirmed the scenario: log(10) of somatic cell count (SCC) was positively correlated with p-p content and negatively with β-casein, whereas log(10) SCC was not correlated with α-casein or κ-casein. On the other hand, p-p content was positively correlated with m-casein and PI and negatively with β-casein, but no correlation was detected between p-p content and α- or κ-casein. Furthermore, between casein fractions, m-casein was only significantly correlated with β-casein. These results suggest that use of indices of proteolysis of caseins such as p-p, m-casein, and PI, could be applied together with SCC to evaluate the cheese-making quality of milk. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of high-gradient magnetic fishing for reducing proteolysis during fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maury, Trine Lütken; Ottow, Kim Ekelund; Brask, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Proteolysis during fermentation may have a severe impact on the yield and quality of a secreted product. In the current study, we demonstrate the use of high-gradient magnetic fishing (HGMF) as an efficient alternative to the more conventional methods of preventing proteolytic degradation....... Bacitracin-linked magnetic affinity adsorbents were employed directly in a fermenter during Bacillus licheniformis cultivation to remove trace amounts of unwanted proteases. The constructed magnetic adsorbents had excellent, highly specific binding characteristics in the fermentation broth (K(d) = 1...

  15. Predictions of Cleavability of Calpain Proteolysis by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis Using Newly Determined Cleavage Sites and Catalytic Efficiencies of an Oligopeptide Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkai-Ouchi, Fumiko; Koyama, Suguru; Ono, Yasuko; Hata, Shoji; Ojima, Koichi; Shindo, Mayumi; duVerle, David; Ueno, Mika; Kitamura, Fujiko; Doi, Naoko; Takigawa, Ichigaku; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    Calpains are intracellular Ca(2+)-regulated cysteine proteases that are essential for various cellular functions. Mammalian conventional calpains (calpain-1 and calpain-2) modulate the structure and function of their substrates by limited proteolysis. Thus, it is critically important to determine the site(s) in proteins at which calpains cleave. However, the calpains' substrate specificity remains unclear, because the amino acid (aa) sequences around their cleavage sites are very diverse. To clarify calpains' substrate specificities, 84 20-mer oligopeptides, corresponding to P10-P10' of reported cleavage site sequences, were proteolyzed by calpains, and the catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) were globally determined by LC/MS. This analysis revealed 483 cleavage site sequences, including 360 novel ones. Thekcat/Kms for 119 sites ranged from 12.5-1,710 M(-1)s(-1) Although most sites were cleaved by both calpain-1 and -2 with a similarkcat/Km, sequence comparisons revealed distinct aa preferences at P9-P7/P2/P5'. The aa compositions of the novel sites were not statistically different from those of previously reported sites as a whole, suggesting calpains have a strict implicit rule for sequence specificity, and that the limited proteolysis of intact substrates is because of substrates' higher-order structures. Cleavage position frequencies indicated that longer sequences N-terminal to the cleavage site (P-sites) were preferred for proteolysis over C-terminal (P'-sites). Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses using partial least-squares regression and >1,300 aa descriptors achievedkcat/Kmprediction withr= 0.834, and binary-QSAR modeling attained an 87.5% positive prediction value for 132 reported calpain cleavage sites independent of our model construction. These results outperformed previous calpain cleavage predictors, and revealed the importance of the P2, P3', and P4' sites, and P1-P2 cooperativity. Furthermore, using our binary-QSAR model

  16. Prion seeding activities of mouse scrapie strains with divergent PrPSc protease sensitivities and amyloid plaque content using RT-QuIC and eQuIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vascellari, Sarah; Orrù, Christina D; Hughson, Andrew G; King, Declan; Barron, Rona; Wilham, Jason M; Baron, Gerald S; Race, Brent; Pani, Alessandra; Caughey, Byron

    2012-01-01

    Different transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE)-associated forms of prion protein (e.g. PrP(Sc)) can vary markedly in ultrastructure and biochemical characteristics, but each is propagated in the host. PrP(Sc) propagation involves conversion from its normal isoform, PrP(C), by a seeded or templated polymerization mechanism. Such a mechanism is also the basis of the RT-QuIC and eQuIC prion assays which use recombinant PrP (rPrP(Sen)) as a substrate. These ultrasensitive detection assays have been developed for TSE prions of several host species and sample tissues, but not for murine models which are central to TSE pathogenesis research. Here we have adapted RT-QuIC and eQuIC to various murine prions and evaluated how seeding activity depends on glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring and the abundance of amyloid plaques and protease-resistant PrP(Sc) (PrP(Res)). Scrapie brain dilutions up to 10(-8) and 10(-13) were detected by RT-QuIC and eQuIC, respectively. Comparisons of scrapie-affected wild-type mice and transgenic mice expressing GPI anchorless PrP showed that, although similar concentrations of seeding activity accumulated in brain, the heavily amyloid-laden anchorless mouse tissue seeded more rapid reactions. Next we compared seeding activities in the brains of mice with similar infectivity titers, but widely divergent PrP(Res) levels. For this purpose we compared the 263K and 139A scrapie strains in transgenic mice expressing P101L PrP(C). Although the brains of 263K-affected mice had little immunoblot-detectable PrP(Res), RT-QuIC indicated that seeding activity was comparable to that associated with a high-PrP(Res) strain, 139A. Thus, in this comparison, RT-QuIC seeding activity correlated more closely with infectivity than with PrP(Res) levels. We also found that eQuIC, which incorporates a PrP(Sc) immunoprecipitation step, detected seeding activity in plasma from wild-type and anchorless PrP transgenic mice inoculated with 22L, 79A and/or RML

  17. Prion seeding activities of mouse scrapie strains with divergent PrPSc protease sensitivities and amyloid plaque content using RT-QuIC and eQuIC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Vascellari

    Full Text Available Different transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE-associated forms of prion protein (e.g. PrP(Sc can vary markedly in ultrastructure and biochemical characteristics, but each is propagated in the host. PrP(Sc propagation involves conversion from its normal isoform, PrP(C, by a seeded or templated polymerization mechanism. Such a mechanism is also the basis of the RT-QuIC and eQuIC prion assays which use recombinant PrP (rPrP(Sen as a substrate. These ultrasensitive detection assays have been developed for TSE prions of several host species and sample tissues, but not for murine models which are central to TSE pathogenesis research. Here we have adapted RT-QuIC and eQuIC to various murine prions and evaluated how seeding activity depends on glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI anchoring and the abundance of amyloid plaques and protease-resistant PrP(Sc (PrP(Res. Scrapie brain dilutions up to 10(-8 and 10(-13 were detected by RT-QuIC and eQuIC, respectively. Comparisons of scrapie-affected wild-type mice and transgenic mice expressing GPI anchorless PrP showed that, although similar concentrations of seeding activity accumulated in brain, the heavily amyloid-laden anchorless mouse tissue seeded more rapid reactions. Next we compared seeding activities in the brains of mice with similar infectivity titers, but widely divergent PrP(Res levels. For this purpose we compared the 263K and 139A scrapie strains in transgenic mice expressing P101L PrP(C. Although the brains of 263K-affected mice had little immunoblot-detectable PrP(Res, RT-QuIC indicated that seeding activity was comparable to that associated with a high-PrP(Res strain, 139A. Thus, in this comparison, RT-QuIC seeding activity correlated more closely with infectivity than with PrP(Res levels. We also found that eQuIC, which incorporates a PrP(Sc immunoprecipitation step, detected seeding activity in plasma from wild-type and anchorless PrP transgenic mice inoculated with 22L, 79A and/or RML

  18. CpG oligodeoxynucleotide-enhanced humoral immune response and production of antibodies to prion protein PrPSc in mice immunized with 139A scrapie-associated fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinner, Daryl S; Kascsak, Regina B; Lafauci, Giuseppe; Meeker, Harry C; Ye, Xuemin; Flory, Michael J; Kim, Jae Il; Schuller-Levis, Georgia B; Levis, William R; Wisniewski, Thomas; Carp, Richard I; Kascsak, Richard J

    2007-06-01

    Prion diseases are characterized by conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) to a protease-resistant conformer, the srapie form of PrP (PrP(Sc)). Humoral immune responses to nondenatured forms of PrP(Sc) have never been fully characterized. We investigated whether production of antibodies to PrP(Sc) could occur in PrP null (Prnp(-/-)) mice and further, whether innate immune stimulation with the TLR9 agonist CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) 1826 could enhance this process. Whether such stimulation could raise anti-PrP(Sc) antibody levels in wild-type (Prnp(+/+)) mice was also investigated. Prnp(-/-) and Prnp(+/+) mice were immunized with nondenatured 139A scrapie-associated fibrils (SAF), with or without ODN 1826, and were tested for titers of PrP-specific antibodies. In Prnp(-/-) mice, inclusion of ODN 1826 in the immunization regime increased anti-PrP titers more than 13-fold after two immunizations and induced, among others, antibodies to an N-terminal epitope, which were only present in the immune repertoire of mice receiving ODN 1826. mAb 6D11, derived from such a mouse, reacts with the N-terminal epitope QWNK in native and denatured forms of PrP(Sc) and recombinant PrP and exhibits a K(d) in the 10(-)(11) M range. In Prnp(+/+) mice, ODN 1826 increased anti-PrP levels as much as 84% after a single immunization. Thus, ODN 1826 potentiates adaptive immune responses to PrP(Sc) in 139A SAF-immunized mice. These results represent the first characterization of humoral immune responses to nondenatured, infectious PrP(Sc) and suggest methods for optimizing the generation of mAbs to PrP(Sc), many of which could be used for diagnosis and treatment of prion diseases.

  19. The electrophoretic mobility of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor: effects of proteolysis and cigarette smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockley, R.A.; Afford, S.C.; Brunett, D.

    1982-04-01

    The electrophoretic mobility of purified alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor was compared with that of carbamoylated transferrin. The results ranged from 64.0 to 68.9% of the distance moved by the transferrin and was increased by cigarette smoke solution (range 70.4% to 75.0% of carbamoylated transferrin). The addition of leucocyte elastase produced a change in electrophoretic mobility only in the presence of excess enzyme when mobility fell (58.0 to 62.0%) and was associated with complete and not partial loss of inhibitory activity. No further change was seen over 24 h. Studies on sputum showed a wide range of mobility from 68.0 to 45.0% but only those with a mobility greater than 64.0% retained any inhibitory capacity against porcine pancreatic elastase. However, several samples had a mobility lower than that produced by proteolysis with leucocyte elastase and some showed continuing reduction with time. It is suggested that this is due to proteolysis by more than one enzyme.

  20. Bystander protein protects potential vaccine-targeting ligands against intestinal proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Fabian; Bade, Steffen; Hirst, Timothy R; Frey, Andreas

    2009-07-20

    Endowing mucosal vaccines with ligands that target antigen to mucosal lymphoid tissues may improve immunization efficacy provided that the ligands withstand the proteolytic environment of the gastro-intestinal tract until they reach their destination. Our aim was to investigate whether and how three renowned ligands - Ulex europaeus agglutinin I and the B subunits of cholera toxin and E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin - master this challenge. We assessed the digestive power of natural murine intestinal fluid (natIF) using assays for trypsin, chymotrypsin and pancreatic elastase along with a test for nonspecific proteolysis. The natIF was compared with simulated murine intestinal fluid (simIF) that resembled the trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase activities of its natural counterpart but lacked or contained albumins as additional protease substrates. The ligands were exposed to the digestive fluids and degradation was determined. The studies revealed that (i) the three pancreatic endoproteases constitute only one third of the total protease activity of natIF and (ii) the ligands resist proteolysis in natIF and protein-enriched simIF over 3 h but (iii) are partially destroyed in simIF that lacks additional protease substrate. We assume that the proteins of natIF are preferred substrates for the intestinal proteases and thus can protect vaccine-targeting ligands from destruction.

  1. Proteolysis of proBDNF is a key regulator in the formation of memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Barnes

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available It is essential to understand the molecular processes underlying long-term memory to provide therapeutic targets of aberrant memory that produce pathological behaviour in humans. Under conditions of recall, fully-consolidated memories can undergo reconsolidation or extinction. These retrieval-mediated memory processes may rely on distinct molecular processes. The cellular mechanisms initiating the signature molecular events are not known. Using infusions of protein synthesis inhibitors, antisense oligonucleotide targeting brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF mRNA or tPA-STOP (an inhibitor of the proteolysis of BDNF protein into the hippocampus of the awake rat, we show that acquisition and extinction of contextual fear memory depended on the increased and decreased proteolysis of proBDNF (precursor BDNF in the hippocampus, respectively. Conditions of retrieval that are known to initiate the reconsolidation of contextual fear memory, a BDNF-independent memory process, were not correlated with altered proBDNF cleavage. Thus, the processing of BDNF was associated with the acquisition of new information and the updating of information about a salient stimulus. Furthermore, the differential requirement for the processing of proBDNF by tPA in distinct memory processes suggest that the molecular events actively engaged to support the storage and/or the successful retrieval of memory depends on the integration of ongoing experience with past learning.

  2. The role of extracellular proteolysis in synaptic plasticity of the central nervous system 

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    Anna Konopka

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM of the central nervous system has a specific structure and protein composition that are different from those in other organs. Today we know that the ECM not only provides physical scaffolding for the neurons and glia, but also actively modifies their functions. Over the last two decades, a growing body of research evidence has been collected, suggesting an important role of ECM proteolysis in synaptic plasticity of the brain. So far the majority of data concern two large families of proteases: the serine proteases and the matrix metalloproteinases. The members of these families are localized at the synapses, and are secreted into the extracellular space in an activity-dependent manner. The proteases remodel the local environment as well as influencing synapse structure and function. The structural modifications induced by proteases include shape and size changes, as well as synapse elimination, and synaptogenesis. The functional changes include modifications of receptor function in the postsynaptic part of the synapse, as well as the potentiation or depression of neurotransmitter secretion by the presynaptic site. The present review summarizes the current view on the role of extracellular proteolysis in the physiological synaptic plasticity underlying the phenomena of learning and memory, as well as in the pathological plasticity occurring during epileptogenesis or development of drug addiction. 

  3. Proteolysis of Sardine (Sardina pilchardus and Anchovy (Stolephorus commersonii by Commercial Enzymes in Saline Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chau Minh Le

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fish sauce production is a very long process and there is a great interest in shortening it. Among the different strategies to speed up this process, the addition of external proteases could be a solution. This study focuses on the eff ect of two commercial enzymes (Protamex and Protex 51FP on the proteolysis of two fish species traditionally converted into fish sauce: sardine and anchovy, by comparison with classical autolysis. Hydrolysis reactions were conducted with fresh fish at a temperature of 30 °C and under different saline conditions (from 0 to 30 % NaCl. Hydrolysis degree and liquefaction of the raw material were used to follow the process. As expected, the proteolysis decreased with increasing amount of salt. Regarding the fi sh species, higher rate of liquefaction and higher hydrolysis degree were obtained with anchovy. Between the two proteases, Protex 51FP gave better results with both fi sh types. This study demonstrates that the addition of commercial proteases could be helpful for the liquefaction of fi sh and cleavage of peptide bonds that occur during fi sh sauce production and thus speed up the production process.

  4. Yield, changes in proteolysis, and sensory quality of Prato cheese produced with different coagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, L S; Merheb-Dini, C; Gomes, E; da Silva, R; Gigante, M L

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research was to compare the effect of 2 fungal proteases, one that is already commercially established as a milk-clotting agent and another produced at the laboratory scale, on Prato cheese composition, protein and fat recovery, yield, and sensory characteristics. Cheeses were produced according to the traditional protocol, using protease from the fungus Thermomucor indicae-seudaticae N31 and commercial coagulant from Rhizomucor spp. as clotting agents. A 2×6 factorial design with 3 replications was performed: 2 levels of coagulants and 6 levels of storage time. After 5, 12, 19, 33, 43, and 53d of refrigerated storage (12°C), cheeses were monitored for proteolysis, firmness, and casein degradation by capillary electrophoresis. Sensory acceptance was evaluated after 29d of manufacturing. The different coagulants did not statistically affect Prato cheese composition, protein and fat recovery, and yield. Both cheeses presented good sensory acceptance. Proteolysis increased and firmness decreased for both cheeses during the storage time, as expected for Prato cheese. Caseins were well separated by capillary electrophoresis and the results showed, with good resolution, that the cheeses exhibited similar protein hydrolysis profile. Both cheeses presented good sensory acceptance. The gathered data showed that the protease from T. indicae-seudaticae N31 presented similar action compared with the commercial enzyme, indicating its efficiency as clotting agent for Prato cheese manufacture. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of energy deficit, dietary protein, and feeding on intracellular regulators of skeletal muscle proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, John W; Margolis, Lee M; McClung, James P; Cao, Jay J; Murphy, Nancy E; Sauter, Edward R; Combs, Gerald F; Young, Andrew J; Pasiakos, Stefan M

    2013-12-01

    This study was undertaken to characterize the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) response to varied dietary protein intake, energy deficit (ED), and consumption of a mixed meal. A randomized, controlled trial of 39 adults consuming protein at 0.8 (recommended dietary allowance [RDA]), 1.6 (2×-RDA), or 2.4 (3×-RDA) g · kg(-1) · d(-1) for 31 d. A 10-d weight maintenance (WM) period was followed by 21 d of 40% ED. Ubiquitin (Ub)-mediated proteolysis and associated gene expression were assessed in the postabsorptive (fasted) and postprandial (fed; 480 kcal, 20 g protein) states after WM and ED by using muscle biopsies, fluorescence-based assays, immunoblot analysis, and real-time qRT-PCR. In the assessment of UPS responses to varied protein intakes, ED, and feeding, the RDA, WM, and fasted measures served as appropriate controls. ED resulted in the up-regulation of UPS-associated gene expression, as mRNA expression of the atrogenes muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF1) and atrogin-1 were 1.2- and 1.3-fold higher (Pregardless of dietary protein and energy manipulations. Independent of habitual protein intake and despite increased MuRF1 and atrogin-1 mRNA expression during ED, consuming a protein-containing mixed meal attenuates Ub-mediated proteolysis.

  6. Analyses of Protease Resistance and Aggregation State of Abnormal Prion Protein across the Spectrum of Human Prions*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saverioni, Daniela; Notari, Silvio; Capellari, Sabina; Poggiolini, Ilaria; Giese, Armin; Kretzschmar, Hans A.; Parchi, Piero

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases are characterized by tissue accumulation of a misfolded, β-sheet-enriched isoform (scrapie prion protein (PrPSc)) of the cellular prion protein (PrPC). At variance with PrPC, PrPSc shows a partial resistance to protease digestion and forms highly aggregated and detergent-insoluble polymers, two properties that have been consistently used to distinguish the two proteins. In recent years, however, the idea that PrPSc itself comprises heterogeneous species has grown. Most importantly, a putative proteinase K (PK)-sensitive form of PrPSc (sPrPSc) is being increasingly investigated for its possible role in prion infectivity, neurotoxicity, and strain variability. The study of sPrPSc, however, remains technically challenging because of the need of separating it from PrPC without using proteases. In this study, we have systematically analyzed both PK resistance and the aggregation state of purified PrPSc across the whole spectrum of the currently characterized human prion strains. The results show that PrPSc isolates manifest significant strain-specific differences in their PK digestion profile that are only partially explained by differences in the size of aggregates, suggesting that other factors, likely acting on PrPSc aggregate stability, determine its resistance to proteolysis. Fully protease-sensitive low molecular weight aggregates were detected in all isolates but in a limited proportion of the overall PrPSc (i.e. PrPSc in the biogenesis of prion strains. Finally, we highlight the limitations of current operational definitions of sPrPSc and of the quantitative analytical measurements that are not based on the isolation of a fully PK-sensitive PrPSc form. PMID:23897825

  7. Prion Infectivity Plateaus and Conversion to Symptomatic Disease Originate from Falling Precursor Levels and Increased Levels of Oligomeric PrPSc Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Charles E; van der Merwe, Jacques; Kim, Chae; Haldiman, Tracy; McKenzie, Debbie; Safar, Jiri G; Westaway, David

    2015-12-01

    In lethal prion neurodegenerative diseases, misfolded prion proteins (PrP(Sc)) replicate by redirecting the folding of the cellular prion glycoprotein (PrP(C)). Infections of different durations can have a subclinical phase with constant levels of infectious particles, but the mechanisms underlying this plateau and a subsequent exit to overt clinical disease are unknown. Using tandem biophysical techniques, we show that attenuated accumulation of infectious particles in presymptomatic disease is preceded by a progressive fall in PrP(C) level, which constricts replication rate and thereby causes the plateau effect. Furthermore, disease symptoms occurred at the threshold associated with increasing levels of small, relatively less protease-resistant oligomeric prion particles (oPrP(Sc)). Although a hypothetical lethal isoform of PrP cannot be excluded, our data argue that diminishing residual PrP(C) levels and continuously increasing levels of oPrP(Sc) are crucial determinants in the transition from presymptomatic to symptomatic prion disease. Prions are infectious agents that cause lethal brain diseases; they arise from misfolding of a cell surface protein, PrP(C) to a form called PrP(Sc). Prion infections can have long latencies even though there is no protective immune response. Accumulation of infectious prion particles has been suggested to always reach the same plateau in the brain during latent periods, with clinical disease only occurring when hypothetical toxic forms (called PrP(L) or TPrP) begin to accumulate. We show here that infectivity plateaus arise because PrP(C) precursor levels become downregulated and that the duration of latent periods can be accounted for by the level of residual PrP(C), which transduces a toxic effect, along with the amount of oligomeric forms of PrP(Sc). Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Chemical and proteolysis-derived changes during long-term storage of lactose-hydrolyzed ultrahigh-temperature (UHT) milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Therese; Jensen, Hanne B; Sundekilde, Ulrik K; Clausen, Morten R; Eggers, Nina; Larsen, Lotte B; Ray, Colin; Andersen, Henrik J; Bertram, Hanne C

    2014-11-19

    Proteolytic activity in milk may release bitter-tasting peptides and generate free amino terminals that react with carbohydrates, which initiate Maillard reaction. Ultrahigh temperature (UHT) heat treatment inactivates the majority of proteolytic enzymes in milk. In lactose-hydrolyzed milk a β-galactosidase preparation is applied to the milk after heat treatment, which has proteolytic side activities that may induce quality deterioration of long-term-stored milk. In the present study proteolysis, glycation, and volatile compound formation were investigated in conventional (100% lactose), filtered (60% lactose), and lactose-hydrolyzed (UHT milk using reverse phase high-pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, proton nuclear magnetic resonance, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Proteolysis was observed in all milk types. However, the degree of proteolysis was significantly higher in the lactose-hydrolyzed milk compared to the conventional and filtered milk. The proteins most prone to proteolysis were β-CN and αs1-CN, which were clearly hydrolyzed after approximately 90 days of storage in the lactose-hydrolyzed milk.

  9. Subcritical Water Hydrolysis Effectively Reduces the In Vitro Seeding Activity of PrPSc but Fails to Inactivate the Infectivity of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Yuichi; Yoshioka, Miyako; Okada, Hiroyuki; Takata, Eri; Masujin, Kentaro; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Shimozaki, Noriko; Yamamura, Tomoaki; Yokoyama, Takashi; Mohri, Shirou; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The global outbreak of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) has been attributed to the recycling of contaminated meat and bone meals (MBMs) as feed supplements. The use of MBMs has been prohibited in many countries; however, the development of a method for inactivating BSE prions could enable the efficient and safe use of these products as an organic resource. Subcritical water (SCW), which is water heated under pressure to maintain a liquid state at temperatures below the critical temperature (374°C), exhibits strong hydrolytic activity against organic compounds. In this study, we examined the residual in vitro seeding activity of protease-resistant prion protein (PrPSc) and the infectivity of BSE prions after SCW treatments. Spinal cord homogenates prepared from BSE-infected cows were treated with SCW at 230-280°C for 5-7.5 min and used to intracerebrally inoculate transgenic mice overexpressing bovine prion protein. Serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (sPMCA) analysis detected no PrPSc in the SCW-treated homogenates, and the mice treated with these samples survived for more than 700 days without any signs of disease. However, sPMCA analyses detected PrPSc accumulation in the brains of all inoculated mice. Furthermore, secondary passage mice, which inoculated with brain homogenates derived from a western blotting (WB)-positive primary passage mouse, died after an average of 240 days, similar to mice inoculated with untreated BSE-infected spinal cord homogenates. The PrPSc accumulation and vacuolation typically observed in the brains of BSE-infected mice were confirmed in these secondary passage mice, suggesting that the BSE prions maintained their infectivity after SCW treatment. One late-onset case, as well as asymptomatic but sPMCA-positive cases, were also recognized in secondary passage mice inoculated with brain homogenates from WB-negative but sPMCA-positive primary passage mice. These results indicated that SCW-mediated hydrolysis was

  10. Leucine affects the fibroblastic Vero cells stimulating the cell proliferation and modulating the proteolysis process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Estela Maria; Gomes-Marcondes, Maria Cristina Cintra

    2010-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids, especially leucine, exert regulatory influences on protein and carbohydrate metabolism, ribosome biogenesis and gene expression. This study investigated the effects of leucine in fibroblastic cells analysing viability, proliferation, morphology, proteolysis enzymes activities and protein turnover. After exposure to culture medium enriched with 25 or 50 microM leucine for 24, 48 and 72 h, Vero cells have no alterations on viability and morphology. Leucine-treated cells showed increase on alkaline phosphatase activity and proliferation. The protein synthesis was slightly increased, whereas the protein degradation showed a deep reduction after leucine incubation. The chymotrypsin-like, cathepsin B and H and calpain activities were decreased in leucine-treated cells. In conclusion, the proteolytic pathways and the total protein degradation were modulated by leucine in Vero cells. Our observations support the concept that Vero cells may represent a new model for protein turnover study.

  11. Cross-system excision of chaperone-mediated proteolysis in chaperone-assisted recombinant protein production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Alonso, Mónica; Villaverde, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Main Escherichia coli cytosolic chaperones such as DnaK are key components of the control quality network designed to minimize the prevalence of polypeptides with aberrant conformations. This is achieved by both favoring refolding activities but also stimulating proteolytic degradation of folding reluctant species. This last activity is responsible for the decrease of the proteolytic stability of recombinant proteins when co-produced along with DnaK, where an increase in solubility might be associated to a decrease in protein yield. However, when DnaK and its co-chaperone DnaJ are co-produced in cultured insect cells or whole insect larvae (and expectedly, in other heterologous hosts), only positive, folding-related effects of these chaperones are observed, in absence of proteolysis-mediated reduction of recombinant protein yield. PMID:21326941

  12. Tetanus toxin action: inhibition of neurotransmitter release linked to synaptobrevin proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, E; Edelmann, L; Chou, J H; Binz, T; Yamasaki, S; Eisel, U; Baumert, M; Südhof, T C; Niemann, H; Jahn, R

    1992-12-15

    Tetanus toxin is a potent neurotoxin that inhibits the release of neurotransmitters from presynaptic nerve endings. The mature toxin is composed of a heavy and a light chain that are linked via a disulfide bridge. After entry of tetanus toxin into the cytoplasm, the released light chain causes block of neurotransmitter release. Recent evidence suggests that the L-chain may act as a metalloendoprotease. Here we demonstrate that blockade of neurotransmission by tetanus toxin in isolated nerve terminals is associated with a selective proteolysis of synaptobrevin, an integral membrane protein of synaptic vesicles. No other proteins appear to be affected by tetanus toxin. In addition, recombinant light chain selectively cleaves synaptobrevin when incubated with purified synaptic vesicles. Our data suggest that cleavage of synaptobrevin is the molecular mechanism of tetanus toxin action.

  13. MBTPS2 mutations cause defective regulated intramembrane proteolysis in X-linked osteogenesis imperfecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindert, Uschi; Cabral, Wayne A.; Ausavarat, Surasawadee; Tongkobpetch, Siraprapa; Ludin, Katja; Barnes, Aileen M.; Yeetong, Patra; Weis, Maryann; Krabichler, Birgit; Srichomthong, Chalurmpon; Makareeva, Elena N.; Janecke, Andreas R.; Leikin, Sergey; Röthlisberger, Benno; Rohrbach, Marianne; Kennerknecht, Ingo; Eyre, David R.; Suphapeetiporn, Kanya; Giunta, Cecilia; Marini, Joan C.; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a collagen-related bone dysplasia. We identified an X-linked recessive form of OI caused by defects in MBTPS2, which encodes site-2 metalloprotease (S2P). MBTPS2 missense mutations in two independent kindreds with moderate/severe OI cause substitutions at highly conserved S2P residues. Mutant S2P has normal stability, but impaired functioning in regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) of OASIS, ATF6 and SREBP transcription factors, consistent with decreased proband secretion of type I collagen. Further, hydroxylation of the collagen lysine residue (K87) critical for crosslinking is reduced in proband bone tissue, consistent with decreased lysyl hydroxylase 1 in proband osteoblasts. Reduced collagen crosslinks presumptively undermine bone strength. Also, proband osteoblasts have broadly defective differentiation. These mutations provide evidence that RIP plays a fundamental role in normal bone development. PMID:27380894

  14. A redox switch shapes the Lon protease exit pore to facultatively regulate proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishii, Wataru; Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Muramatsu, Tomonari; Kojima, Masaki; Kihara, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    The Lon AAA+ protease degrades damaged or misfolded proteins in its intramolecular chamber. Its activity must be precisely controlled, but the mechanism by which Lon is regulated in response to different environments is not known. Facultative anaerobes in the Enterobacteriaceae family, mostly symbionts and pathogens, encounter both anaerobic and aerobic environments inside and outside the host's body, respectively. The bacteria characteristically have two cysteine residues on the Lon protease (P) domain surface that unusually form a disulfide bond. Here we show that the cysteine residues act as a redox switch of Lon. Upon disulfide bond reduction, the exit pore of the P-domain ring narrows by ∼30%, thus interrupting product passage and decreasing activity by 80%; disulfide bonding by oxidation restores the pore size and activity. The redox switch (E°' = -227 mV) is appropriately tuned to respond to variation between anaerobic and aerobic conditions, thus optimizing the cellular proteolysis level for each environment.

  15. The Use of in situ Proteolysis in the Crystallization of Murine CstF-77

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai,Y.; Auperin, T.; Tong, L.

    2007-01-01

    The cleavage-stimulation factor (CstF) is required for the cleavage of the 3'-end of messenger RNA precursors in eukaryotes. During structure determination of the 77 kDa subunit of the murine CstF complex (CstF-77), it was serendipitously discovered that a solution infected by a fungus was crucial for the crystallization of this protein. CstF-77 was partially proteolyzed during crystallization; this was very likely to have been catalyzed by a protease secreted by the fungus. It was found that the fungal protease can be replaced by subtilisin and this in situ proteolysis protocol produced crystals of sufficient size for structural studies. After an extensive search, it was found that 55% glucose can be used as a cryoprotectant while maintaining the diffraction quality of the crystals; most other commonly used cryoprotectants were detrimental to the diffraction quality.

  16. Discovery of Anti-Hypertensive Oligopeptides from Adlay Based on In Silico Proteolysis and Virtual Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Liansheng; Li, Bin; Chen, Yankun; Li, Lingling; Chen, Xi; Wang, Lingzhi; Lu, Fang; Luo, Ganggang; Li, Gongyu; Zhang, Yanling

    2016-12-14

    Adlay (Coix larchryma-jobi L.) was the commonly used Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) with high content of seed storage protein. The hydrolyzed bioactive oligopeptides of adlay have been proven to be anti-hypertensive effective components. However, the structures and anti-hypertensive mechanism of bioactive oligopeptides from adlay were not clear. To discover the definite anti-hypertensive oligopeptides from adlay, in silico proteolysis and virtual screening were implemented to obtain potential oligopeptides, which were further identified by biochemistry assay and molecular dynamics simulation. In this paper, ten sequences of adlay prolamins were collected and in silico hydrolyzed to construct the oligopeptide library with 134 oligopeptides. This library was reverse screened by anti-hypertensive pharmacophore database, which was constructed by our research team and contained ten anti-hypertensive targets. Angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) was identified as the main potential target for the anti-hypertensive activity of adlay oligopeptides. Three crystal structures of ACE were utilized for docking studies and 19 oligopeptides were finally identified with potential ACE inhibitory activity. According to mapping features and evaluation indexes of pharmacophore and docking, three oligopeptides were selected for biochemistry assay. An oligopeptide sequence, NPATY (IC50 = 61.88 ± 2.77 µM), was identified as the ACE inhibitor by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) assay. Molecular dynamics simulation of NPATY was further utilized to analyze interactive bonds and key residues. ALA354 was identified as a key residue of ACE inhibitors. Hydrophobic effect of VAL518 and electrostatic effects of HIS383, HIS387, HIS513 and Zn2+ were also regarded as playing a key role in inhibiting ACE activities. This study provides a research strategy to explore the pharmacological mechanism of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) proteins based on in silico

  17. The Improvement of The Endogenous Antioxidant Property of Stone Fish (Actinopyga lecanora Tissue Using Enzymatic Proteolysis

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    Sara Bordbar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The stone fish (Actinopyga lecanora ethanolic and methanolic tissue extracts were investigated for total phenolic contents (TPCs as well as antioxidant activity using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH• radical scavenging activity and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP assays. Both extracts showed low amount of phenolics (20.33 to 17.03 mg of gallic acid equivalents/100 g dried sample and moderate antioxidant activity (39% to 34%  DPPH• radical scavenging activity and 23.95 to 22.30 mmol/100 mL FeSO4 FRAP value. Enzymatic proteolysis was carried out in order to improve the antioxidant activity using six commercially available proteases under their optimum conditions. The results revealed that the highest increase in antioxidant activity up to 85% was obtained for papain-generated proteolysate, followed by alcalase (77%, trypsin (75%, pepsin (68%, bromelain (68%, and flavourzyme (50% as measured by DPPH• radical scavenging activity, whilst for the FRAP value, the highest increase in the antioxidant activity up to 39.2 mmol/100 mL FeSO4 was obtained for alcalase-generated proteolysate, followed by papain (29.5 mmol/100 mL FeSO4, trypsin (23.2 mmol/100 mL FeSO4, flavourzyme (24.7 mmol/100 mL FeSO4, bromelain (22.9 mmol/100 mL FeSO4, and pepsin (20.8 mmol/100 mL FeSO4. It is obvious that proteolysis of stone fish tissue by proteolytic enzymes can considerably enhance its antioxidant activity.

  18. Prognostic Value of Proteolysis Indexes in the Formation of Diabetic Retinopathy

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    S.V. Ziablitsev

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the study on the violations in the proteolysis system of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM and diabetic retinopathy (DR. We have evaluated the levels of matrix metalloproteinase‑9 (MMP‑9 and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase‑1 (TIMP‑1 in the blood and in the aqueous humor (AH of patients with type 2 DM by means of immunoenzyme method (Bender Medsystems, Austria. The changes in proteolysis system were detected in patients with DR and type 2 DM, they consisted in the increase in the levels of MMP‑9 and TIMP‑1 in the blood and AH in patients both with no signs of DR and with any its stage, compared to the levels of these parameters in patients without diabetes. It was found that MMP‑9 level in the AH and DM type 2 duration have an impact on the probability of developing diabetic macular edema (DME. At the level of MMP‑9 ≥ 105 ng/ml and duration of type 2 DM ≥ 10 years, the risk of developing DME is 100 %. The probability of proliferative DR in patients with type 2 DM over four years of follow-up is influenced: by the level of MMP‑9 in the AH, stage of DR at baseline and duration of DM type 2. When the level of MMP‑9 is ≥ 100 ng/ml, type 2 DM duration ≥ 10 years and there are no signs of DR at the beginning of the observation, the probability of proliferative DR is 85.9 %.

  19. Ubiquitin-Like Proteasome System Represents a Eukaryotic-Like Pathway for Targeted Proteolysis in Archaea

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    Xian Fu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms of targeted proteolysis in archaea are poorly understood, yet they may have deep evolutionary roots shared with the ubiquitin-proteasome system of eukaryotic cells. Here, we demonstrate in archaea that TBP2, a TATA-binding protein (TBP modified by ubiquitin-like isopeptide bonds, is phosphorylated and targeted for degradation by proteasomes. Rapid turnover of TBP2 required the functions of UbaA (the E1/MoeB/ThiF homolog of archaea, AAA ATPases (Cdc48/p97 and Rpt types, a type 2 JAB1/MPN/MOV34 metalloenzyme (JAMM/MPN+ homolog (JAMM2, and 20S proteasomes. The ubiquitin-like protein modifier small archaeal modifier protein 2 (SAMP2 stimulated the degradation of TBP2, but SAMP2 itself was not degraded. Analysis of the TBP2 fractions that were not modified by ubiquitin-like linkages revealed that TBP2 had multiple N termini, including Met1-Ser2, Ser2, and Met1-Ser2(p [where (p represents phosphorylation]. The evidence suggested that the Met1-Ser2(p form accumulated in cells that were unable to degrade TBP2. We propose a model in archaea in which the attachment of ubiquitin-like tags can target proteins for degradation by proteasomes and be controlled by N-terminal degrons. In support of a proteolytic mechanism that is energy dependent and recycles the ubiquitin-like protein tags, we find that a network of AAA ATPases and a JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease are required, in addition to 20S proteasomes, for controlled intracellular proteolysis.

  20. Discovery of Anti-Hypertensive Oligopeptides from Adlay Based on In Silico Proteolysis and Virtual Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Liansheng; Li, Bin; Chen, Yankun; Li, Lingling; Chen, Xi; Wang, Lingzhi; Lu, Fang; Luo, Ganggang; Li, Gongyu; Zhang, Yanling

    2016-01-01

    Adlay (Coix larchryma-jobi L.) was the commonly used Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) with high content of seed storage protein. The hydrolyzed bioactive oligopeptides of adlay have been proven to be anti-hypertensive effective components. However, the structures and anti-hypertensive mechanism of bioactive oligopeptides from adlay were not clear. To discover the definite anti-hypertensive oligopeptides from adlay, in silico proteolysis and virtual screening were implemented to obtain potential oligopeptides, which were further identified by biochemistry assay and molecular dynamics simulation. In this paper, ten sequences of adlay prolamins were collected and in silico hydrolyzed to construct the oligopeptide library with 134 oligopeptides. This library was reverse screened by anti-hypertensive pharmacophore database, which was constructed by our research team and contained ten anti-hypertensive targets. Angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) was identified as the main potential target for the anti-hypertensive activity of adlay oligopeptides. Three crystal structures of ACE were utilized for docking studies and 19 oligopeptides were finally identified with potential ACE inhibitory activity. According to mapping features and evaluation indexes of pharmacophore and docking, three oligopeptides were selected for biochemistry assay. An oligopeptide sequence, NPATY (IC50 = 61.88 ± 2.77 µM), was identified as the ACE inhibitor by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) assay. Molecular dynamics simulation of NPATY was further utilized to analyze interactive bonds and key residues. ALA354 was identified as a key residue of ACE inhibitors. Hydrophobic effect of VAL518 and electrostatic effects of HIS383, HIS387, HIS513 and Zn2+ were also regarded as playing a key role in inhibiting ACE activities. This study provides a research strategy to explore the pharmacological mechanism of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) proteins based on in silico

  1. Protection of recombinant mammalian antibodies from development-dependent proteolysis in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana.

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    Stéphanie Robert

    Full Text Available The expression of clinically useful proteins in plants has been bolstered by the development of high-yielding systems for transient protein expression using agroinfiltration. There is a need now to know more about how host plant development and metabolism influence the quantity and quality of recombinant proteins. Endogenous proteolysis is a key determinant of the stability and yield of recombinant proteins in plants. Here we characterised cysteine (C1A and aspartate (A1 protease profiles in leaves of the widely used expression host Nicotiana benthamiana, in relation with the production of a murine IgG, C5-1, targeted to the cell secretory pathway. Agroinfiltration significantly altered the distribution of C1A and A1 proteases along the leaf age gradient, with a correlation between leaf age and the level of proteolysis in whole-cell and apoplast protein extracts. The co-expression of tomato cystatin SlCYS8, an inhibitor of C1A proteases, alongside C5-1 increased antibody yield by nearly 40% after the usual 6-days incubation period, up to ~3 mg per plant. No positive effect of SlCYS8 was observed in oldest leaves, in line with an increased level of C1A protease activity and a very low expression rate of the inhibitor. By contrast, C5-1 yield was greater by an additional 40% following 8- to 10-days incubations in younger leaves, where high SlCYS8 expression was maintained. These findings confirm that the co-expression of recombinant protease inhibitors is a promising strategy for increasing recombinant protein yields in plants, but that further opportunity exists to improve this approach by addressing the influence of leaf age and proteases of other classes.

  2. The improvement of the endogenous antioxidant property of stone fish (Actinopyga lecanora) tissue using enzymatic proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordbar, Sara; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Abdul Hamid, Azizah; Abdul Manap, Mohd Yazid; Anwar, Farooq; Saari, Nazamid

    2013-01-01

    The stone fish (Actinopyga lecanora) ethanolic and methanolic tissue extracts were investigated for total phenolic contents (TPCs) as well as antioxidant activity using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH(•)) radical scavenging activity and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Both extracts showed low amount of phenolics (20.33 to 17.03 mg of gallic acid equivalents/100 g dried sample) and moderate antioxidant activity (39% to 34% DPPH(•) radical scavenging activity and 23.95 to 22.30 mmol/100 mL FeSO4 FRAP value). Enzymatic proteolysis was carried out in order to improve the antioxidant activity using six commercially available proteases under their optimum conditions. The results revealed that the highest increase in antioxidant activity up to 85% was obtained for papain-generated proteolysate, followed by alcalase (77%), trypsin (75%), pepsin (68%), bromelain (68%), and flavourzyme (50%) as measured by DPPH(•) radical scavenging activity, whilst for the FRAP value, the highest increase in the antioxidant activity up to 39.2 mmol/100 mL FeSO4 was obtained for alcalase-generated proteolysate, followed by papain (29.5 mmol/100 mL FeSO4), trypsin (23.2 mmol/100 mL FeSO4), flavourzyme (24.7 mmol/100 mL FeSO4), bromelain (22.9 mmol/100 mL FeSO4), and pepsin (20.8 mmol/100 mL FeSO4). It is obvious that proteolysis of stone fish tissue by proteolytic enzymes can considerably enhance its antioxidant activity.

  3. The NF-κB Inhibitor Curcumin Blocks Sepsis-Induced Muscle Proteolysis

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    Vitaliy Poylin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We tested the hypothesis that treatment of rats with curcumin prevents sepsis-induced muscle protein degradation. In addition, we determined the influence of curcumin on different proteolytic pathways that are activated in septic muscle (i.e., ubiquitin-proteasome-, calpain-, and cathepsin L-dependent proteolysis and examined the role of NF-κB and p38/MAP kinase inactivation in curcumin-induced inhibition of muscle protein breakdown. Rats were made septic by cecal ligation and puncture or were sham-operated. Groups of rats were treated with three intraperitoneal doses (600 mg/kg of curcumin or corresponding volumes of solvent. Protein breakdown rates were measured as release of tyrosine from incubated extensor digitorum longus muscles. Treatment with curcumin prevented sepsis-induced increase in muscle protein breakdown. Surprisingly, the upregulated expression of the ubiquitin ligases atrogin-1 and MuRF1 was not influenced by curcumin. When muscles from septic rats were treated with curcumin in vitro, proteasome-, calpain-, and cathepsin L-dependent protein breakdown rates were reduced, and nuclear NF-κB/p65 expression and activity as well as levels of phosphorylated (activated p38 were decreased. Results suggest that sepsis-induced muscle proteolysis can be blocked by curcumin and that this effect may, at least in part, be caused by inhibited NF-κB and p38 activities. The results also suggest that there is not an absolute correlation between changes in muscle protein breakdown rates and changes in atrogin-1 and MuRF1 expression during treatment of muscle wasting.

  4. The interpretation of disease phenotypes to identify TSE strains in mice: characterisation of BSE using PrPSc distribution patterns in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corda, Erica; Beck, Katy E; Sallis, Rosemary E; Vickery, Christopher M; Denyer, Margaret; Webb, Paul R; Bellworthy, Susan J; Spencer, Yvonne I; Simmons, Marion M; Spiropoulos, John

    2012-12-17

    In individual animals affected by transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, different disease phenotypes can be identified which are attributed to different strains of the agent. In the absence of reliable technology to fully characterise the agent, classification of disease phenotype has been used as a strain typing tool which can be applied in any host. This approach uses standardised data on biological parameters, established for a single host, to allow comparison of different prion sources. Traditionally prion strain characterisation in wild type mice is based on incubation periods and lesion profiles after the stabilisation of the agent into the new host which requires serial passages. Such analysis can take many years, due to prolonged incubation periods. The current study demonstrates that the PrPSc patterns produced by one serial passage in wild type mice of bovine or ovine BSE were consistent, stable and showed minimal and predictable differences from mouse-stabilised reference strains. This biological property makes PrPSc deposition pattern mapping a powerful tool in the identification and definition of TSE strains on primary isolation, making the process of characterisation faster and cheaper than a serial passage protocol. It can be applied to individual mice and therefore it is better suited to identify strain diversity within single inocula in case of co-infections or identify strains in cases where insufficient mice succumb to disease for robust lesion profiles to be constructed. The detailed description presented in this study provides a reference document for identifying BSE in wild type mice.

  5. Variation in Chst8 gene expression level affects PrPC to PrPSc conversion efficiency in prion-infected Mov cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Renaud; Chantepie, Sandrine; Chapuis, Jérôme; Le-Duc, Aurélien; Maftah, Abderrahman; Papy-Garcia, Dulcé; Laude, Hubert; Petit, Jean-Michel; Gallet, Paul-François

    2011-10-28

    The conversion of the endogenous cellular prion protein to an abnormally folded isoform is a hallmark of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. It occurs when a misfolded prion protein contacts the cellular PrP. Among the molecular partners suggested to be involved in the misfolding process, the glycosaminoglycans seem to be good candidates. The present study was aimed to examine a possible link between PrP conversion efficiency and transcript level of Chst8 gene that encodes the carbohydrate N-acetylgalactosamine 4-O-sulfotransferase 8. Mov cells expressing ovine PrP were transfected with shRNA directed against Chst8 transcripts. Resulting clones were characterized for their Chst8 and Prnp transcript levels, and for their content in sulfated glycosaminoglycans, more particularly sulfated chondroitins. Unexpectedly, the decreased amount of Chst8 transcript induced an increase of the chondroitin sulfate percentage among total GAGs, with an increased amount of 4-O-sulfation of GalNAc residues. Upon to infection by a sheep prion, a slight amount of PrP(Sc) was observed, which rapidly disappeared upon subpassaging. Together, these findings indicate that the Chst8 transcript level affects the glycosaminoglycan environment of the cellular prion protein, and as a consequence its ability for conversion into PrP(Sc). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Methionine sulfoxides on PrPSc: a prion-specific covalent signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canello, Tamar; Engelstein, Roni; Moshel, Ofra; Xanthopoulos, Konstantinos; Juanes, María E; Langeveld, Jan; Sklaviadis, Theodoros; Gasset, Maria; Gabizon, Ruth

    2008-08-26

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders believed to be transmitted by PrP (Sc), an aberrant form of the membrane protein PrP (C). In the absence of an established form-specific covalent difference, the infectious properties of PrP (Sc) were uniquely ascribed to the self-perpetuation properties of its aberrant fold. Previous sequencing of the PrP chain isolated from PrP(27-30) showed the oxidation of some methionine residues; however, at that time, these findings were ascribed to experimental limitations. Using the unique recognition properties of alphaPrP mAb IPC2, protein chemistry, and state of the art mass spectrometry, we now show that while a large fraction of the methionine residues in brain PrP (Sc) are present as methionine sulfoxides this modification could not be found on brain PrP (C) as well as on its recombinant models. In particular, the pattern of oxidation of M213 with respect to the glycosylation at N181 of PrP (Sc) differs both within and between species, adding another diversity factor to the structure of PrP (Sc) molecules. Our results pave the way for the production of prion-specific reagents in the form of antibodies against oxidized PrP chains which can serve in the development of both diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. In addition, we hypothesize that the accumulation of PrP (Sc) and thereafter the pathogenesis of prion disease may result from the poor degradation of oxidized aberrantly folded PrP.

  7. Oral inoculation of neonatal Suffolk sheep with the agent of classical scrapie results in PrPSc accumulation in sheep with the PRNP ARQ/ARQ but not the ARQ/ARR genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background Scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy that can be transmitted amongst susceptible sheep. The prion protein gene (PRNP) profoundly influences the susceptibility of sheep to the scrapie agent. Findings This study reports the failure to detect PrPSc in nervous or lymphoid tis...

  8. Effects of plant enzyme inactivation or sterilization on lipolysis and proteolysis in alfalfa silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, W R; Long, R J; Guo, X S

    2013-04-01

    This experiment studied the contribution of plant enzymes and microbial activity on lipolysis and proteolysis in ensiled alfalfa. Before ensiling, the wilted alfalfa was treated with plant enzyme inactivation by autoclaving or with sterilization by γ-ray irradiation. The treated alfalfa was then inoculated with commercial lactic acid bacteria inoculants and ensiled for 40 d. Alfalfa without treatment was ensiled as the control. The content of total fatty acid (FA) after ensiling decreased 43% in the control silage and 28% in the γ-ray-treated silage, but did not change in the autoclave-treated silage. Among the major FA (C16:0, C18:2n-6, C18:3n-3), a considerable increase was observed in proportion of C16:0 in the control silage as compared with fresh alfalfa; conversely, decreases in proportions of C18:2n-6 and C18:3n-3 occurred during ensilage. Silage treated with γ-ray radiation at ensiling had a smaller proportion of C16:0 and greater proportions of C18:2n-6 and C18:3n-3 than control silage. Autoclave treatment further decreased proportions of C16:0 and most of the other FA, and increased C18:2n-6 and C18:3n-3 proportions in comparison with γ-ray treatment. Proportions of C16:0, C18:2n-6, C18:3n-3 and other detected FA (except for the proportion of C15:0) did not differ between fresh forage and autoclave-treated silage. Remarkably, smaller nonprotein nitrogen content was observed in the autoclave-treated silage compared with the γ ray-treated silage or the control silage. These results indicated that an extensive lipolysis occurred during ensiling of alfalfa, and plant enzymes played a major role in lipolysis and proteolysis. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Discovery of Anti-Hypertensive Oligopeptides from Adlay Based on In Silico Proteolysis and Virtual Screening

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    Liansheng Qiao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Adlay (Coix larchryma-jobi L. was the commonly used Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM with high content of seed storage protein. The hydrolyzed bioactive oligopeptides of adlay have been proven to be anti-hypertensive effective components. However, the structures and anti-hypertensive mechanism of bioactive oligopeptides from adlay were not clear. To discover the definite anti-hypertensive oligopeptides from adlay, in silico proteolysis and virtual screening were implemented to obtain potential oligopeptides, which were further identified by biochemistry assay and molecular dynamics simulation. In this paper, ten sequences of adlay prolamins were collected and in silico hydrolyzed to construct the oligopeptide library with 134 oligopeptides. This library was reverse screened by anti-hypertensive pharmacophore database, which was constructed by our research team and contained ten anti-hypertensive targets. Angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE was identified as the main potential target for the anti-hypertensive activity of adlay oligopeptides. Three crystal structures of ACE were utilized for docking studies and 19 oligopeptides were finally identified with potential ACE inhibitory activity. According to mapping features and evaluation indexes of pharmacophore and docking, three oligopeptides were selected for biochemistry assay. An oligopeptide sequence, NPATY (IC50 = 61.88 ± 2.77 µM, was identified as the ACE inhibitor by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC assay. Molecular dynamics simulation of NPATY was further utilized to analyze interactive bonds and key residues. ALA354 was identified as a key residue of ACE inhibitors. Hydrophobic effect of VAL518 and electrostatic effects of HIS383, HIS387, HIS513 and Zn2+ were also regarded as playing a key role in inhibiting ACE activities. This study provides a research strategy to explore the pharmacological mechanism of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM proteins based on

  10. Effects of in vitro ozone treatment on proteolysis of purified rubisco from two hybrid poplar clones. [Populus maximowizii x trichocarpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landry, L.G.; Pell, E.J. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (USA))

    1989-04-01

    Plants exposed to ozone (O{sub 3}) exhibited symptoms of premature senescence, including early decline in quantity of rubisco. O{sub 3}-induced oxidation may cause changes in protein conformation of rubisco, resulting in enhanced proteolysis. To test this hypothesis, rubisco was purified from two hybrid clones of Populus maximowizii x trichocarpa, clones 388 and 245, and treated in vitro with O{sub 3} or air. Rubisco was then challenged with bromelain, papain, chymotrypsin, carboxypeptidase A, or endoproteinase Glu-C and percent degradation measured by SDS-PAGE and densitometric scanning of the gels. Degree of rubisco sensitivity to oxidation may be related to available sulfhydryl (SH) groups on the protein. The number of SH groups in native and denatured rubisco was measured for purified rubisco of both clones by DTNB titration method. The relationship between sensitivity to proteolysis and number and availability of SH groups is discussed.

  11. Determination of protein-carbonyls and ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis as biomarkers of oxidative-stress in bivalvia and anthozoa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Stephen Thomas

    2002-07-01

    between species. PC=Os can be detected by DNPH-reactivity/Western blotting assay in host A. agaricites. UPCs can be assayed via Western blotting and immunohistochemistry in host and zooxanthellae tissues of A. agaricites, depth-dependant differential expression is suggested. These data suggest that differential capacities to mitigate oxidative-stress play a role in setting species distribution limits and that selective proteolysis can be considered an important defence against free-radical mediated protein oxidation. (author)

  12. Propofol Ameliorates Calpain-induced Collapsin Response Mediator Protein-2 Proteolysis in Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yun; Jian, Min-Yu; Wang, Yun-Zhen; Han, Ru-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP2), a multifunctional cytosolic protein highly expressed in the brain, is degraded by calpain following traumatic brain injury (TBI), possibly inhibiting posttraumatic neurite regeneration. Lipid peroxidation (LP) is involved in triggering postinjury CRMP2 proteolysis. We examined the hypothesis that propofol could attenuate LP, calpain-induced CRMP2 degradation, and brain injury after TBI. Methods: A unilateral moderate controlled cortical impact injury was induced in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The animals were randomly divided into seven groups: Sham control group, TBI group, TBI + propofol groups (including propofol 1 h, 2 h, and 4 h groups), TBI + U83836E group and TBI + fat emulsion group. The LP inhibitor U83836E was used as a control to identify that antioxidation partially accounts for the potential neuroprotective effects of propofol. The solvent of propofol, fat emulsion, was used as the vehicle control. Ipsilateral cortex tissues were harvested at 24 h post-TBI. Immunofluorescent staining, Western blot analysis, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling were used to evaluate LP, calpain activity, CRMP2 proteolysis and programmed cell death. The data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and a paired t-test. Results: Propofol and U83836E significantly ameliorated the CRMP2 proteolysis. In addition, both propofol and U83836E significantly decreased the ratio of 145-kDa αII-spectrin breakdown products to intact 270-kDa spectrin, the 4-hydroxynonenal expression and programmed cell death in the pericontusional cortex at 24 h after TBI. There was no difference between the TBI group and the fat emulsion group. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that propofol postconditioning alleviates calpain-mediated CRMP2 proteolysis and provides neuroprotective effects following moderate TBI potentially by counteracting LP and reducing calpain activation

  13. Intrinsic thermal sensing controls proteolysis of Yersinia virulence regulator RovA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Herbst

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens, which alternate between environmental reservoirs and a mammalian host, frequently use thermal sensing devices to adjust virulence gene expression. Here, we identify the Yersinia virulence regulator RovA as a protein thermometer. Thermal shifts encountered upon host entry lead to a reversible conformational change of the autoactivator, which reduces its DNA-binding functions and renders it more susceptible for proteolysis. Cooperative binding of RovA to its target promoters is significantly reduced at 37 degrees C, indicating that temperature control of rovA transcription is primarily based on the autoregulatory loop. Thermally induced reduction of DNA-binding is accompanied by an enhanced degradation of RovA, primarily by the Lon protease. This process is also subject to growth phase control. Studies with modified/chimeric RovA proteins indicate that amino acid residues in the vicinity of the central DNA-binding domain are important for proteolytic susceptibility. Our results establish RovA as an intrinsic temperature-sensing protein in which thermally induced conformational changes interfere with DNA-binding capacity, and secondarily render RovA susceptible to proteolytic degradation.

  14. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth W. Fearnley

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A–VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor–ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145 promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes.

  15. Histopathological Growth Pattern, Proteolysis and Angiogenesis in Chemonaive Patients Resected for Multiple Colorectal Liver Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikke Løvendahl Eefsen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to characterise growth patterns, proteolysis, and angiogenesis in colorectal liver metastases from chemonaive patients with multiple liver metastases. Twenty-four patients were included in the study, resected for a median of 2.6 metastases. The growth pattern distribution was 25.8% desmoplastic, 33.9% pushing, and 21% replacement. In 20 patients, identical growth patterns were detected in all metastases, but in 8 of these patients, a second growth pattern was also present in one or two of the metastases. In the remaining 4 patients, no general growth pattern was observed, although none of the liver metastases included more than two growth patterns. Overall, a mixed growth pattern was demonstrated in 19.3% of the liver metastases. Compared to metastases with pushing, those with desmoplastic growth pattern had a significantly up-regulated expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (P=0.0008. Angiogenesis was most pronounced in metastases with a pushing growth pattern in comparison to those with desmoplastic (P=0.0007 and replacement growth pattern (P=0.021. Although a minor fraction of the patients harboured metastases with different growth patterns, we observed a tendency toward growth pattern uniformity in the liver metastases arising in the same patient. The result suggests that the growth pattern of liver metastases is not a random phenomenon.

  16. Identification of novel secreted proteases during extracellular proteolysis by dermatophytes at acidic pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriranganadane, Dev; Waridel, Patrice; Salamin, Karine; Feuermann, Marc; Mignon, Bernard; Staib, Peter; Neuhaus, Jean-Marc; Quadroni, Manfredo; Monod, Michel

    2011-11-01

    The dermatophytes are a group of closely related fungi which are responsible for the great majority of superficial mycoses in humans and animals. Among various potential virulence factors, their secreted proteolytic activity attracts a lot of attention. Most dermatophyte-secreted proteases which have so far been isolated in vitro are neutral or alkaline enzymes. However, inspection of the recently decoded dermatophyte genomes revealed many other hypothetical secreted proteases, in particular acidic proteases similar to those characterized in Aspergillus spp. The validation of such genome predictions instigated the present study on two dermatophyte species, Microsporum canis and Arthroderma benhamiae. Both fungi were found to grow well in a protein medium at acidic pH, accompanied by extracellular proteolysis. Shotgun MS analysis of secreted protein revealed fundamentally different protease profiles during fungal growth in acidic versus neutral pH conditions. Most notably, novel dermatophyte-secreted proteases were identified at acidic pH such as pepsins, sedolisins and acidic carboxypeptidases. Therefore, our results not only support genome predictions, but demonstrate for the first time the secretion of acidic proteases by dermatophytes. Our findings also suggest the existence of different pathways of protein degradation into amino acids and short peptides in these highly specialized pathogenic fungi. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Granzyme B-dependent proteolysis acts as a switch to enhance the proinflammatory activity of IL-1α.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Afonina, Inna S

    2011-10-21

    Granzyme B is a cytotoxic lymphocyte-derived protease that plays a central role in promoting apoptosis of virus-infected target cells, through direct proteolysis and activation of constituents of the cell death machinery. However, previous studies have also implicated granzymes A and B in the production of proinflammatory cytokines, via a mechanism that remains undefined. Here we show that IL-1α is a substrate for granzyme B and that proteolysis potently enhanced the biological activity of this cytokine in vitro as well as in vivo. Consistent with this, compared with full-length IL-1α, granzyme B-processed IL-1α exhibited more potent activity as an immunoadjuvant in vivo. Furthermore, proteolysis of IL-1α within the same region, by proteases such as calpain and elastase, was also found to enhance its biological potency. Thus, IL-1α processing by multiple immune-related proteases, including granzyme B, acts as a switch to enhance the proinflammatory properties of this cytokine.

  18. Dietary L-Lysine Suppresses Autophagic Proteolysis and Stimulates Akt/mTOR Signaling in the Skeletal Muscle of Rats Fed a Low-Protein Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomonori; Ito, Yoshiaki; Nagasawa, Takashi

    2015-09-23

    Amino acids, especially L-leucine, regulate protein turnover in skeletal muscle and have attracted attention as a means of increasing muscle mass in people suffering from malnutrition, aging (sarcopenia), or a bedridden state. We previously showed that oral administration of L-lysine (Lys) by gavage suppressed proteolysis in skeletal muscles of fasted rats. However, the intake of Lys in the absence of other dietary components is unlikely in a non-experimental setting, and other dietary components may interfere with the suppressive effect of Lys on proteolysis. We supplemented Lys to a 10% casein diet and investigated the effect of Lys on proteolysis and autophagy, a major proteolytic system, in the skeletal muscle of rats. The rate of proteolysis was evaluated from 3-methylhisitidine (MeHis) released from isolated muscles, in plasma, and excreted in urine. Supplementing lysine with the 10% casein diet decreased the rate of proteolysis induced by intake of a low-protein diet. The upregulated autophagy activity [light chain 3 (LC3)-II/total LC3] caused by a low-protein diet was reduced, and the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway was activated by Lys. Importantly, continuous feeding of a Lys-rich 10% casein diet for 15 days increased the masses of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles. Taken together, supplementation of Lys to a low-protein diet suppresses autophagic proteolysis through the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, and continuous feeding of a Lys-rich diet may increase skeletal muscle mass.

  19. Human prion protein (PrP) 219K is converted to PrPSc but shows heterozygous inhibition in variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizume, Masaki; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Teruya, Kenta; Ohashi, Hiroaki; Ironside, James W; Mohri, Shirou; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki

    2009-02-06

    Prion protein gene (PRNP) E219K is a human polymorphism commonly occurring in Asian populations but is rarely found in patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Thus the polymorphism E219K has been considered protective against sporadic CJD. The corresponding mouse prion protein (PrP) polymorphism variant (mouse PrP 218K) is not converted to the abnormal isoform (PrP(Sc)) and shows a dominant negative effect on wild-type PrP conversion. To define the conversion activity of this human molecule, we herein established knock-in mice with human PrP 219K and performed a series of transmission experiments with human prions. Surprisingly, the human PrP 219K molecule was converted to PrP(Sc) in variant CJD infection, and the conversion occurred more efficiently than PrP 219E molecule. Notably the knock-in mice with PRNP codon 219E/K showed the least efficient conversion compared with their hemizygotes with PRNP codon 219E/0 or codon 219K/0, or homozygotes with PRNP codon 219E/E or codon 219K/K. This phenomenon indicated heterozygous inhibition. This heterozygous inhibition was observed also in knock-in mice with PRNP codon 129M/V genotype. In addition to variant CJD infection, the human PrP 219K molecule is conversion-competent in transmission experiments with sporadic CJD prions. Therefore, the protective effect of PRNP E219K against sporadic CJD might be due to heterozygous inhibition.

  20. Prion protein gene variability in Spanish goats. Inference through susceptibility to classical scrapie strains and pathogenic distribution of peripheral PrP(sc..

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    Cristina Acín

    Full Text Available Classical scrapie is a neurological disorder of the central nervous system (CNS characterized by the accumulation of an abnormal, partially protease resistant prion protein (PrP(sc in the CNS and in some peripheral tissues in domestic small ruminants. Whereas the pathological changes and genetic susceptibility of ovine scrapie are well known, caprine scrapie has been less well studied. We report here a pathological study of 13 scrapie-affected goats diagnosed in Spain during the last 9 years. We used immunohistochemical and biochemical techniques to discriminate between classical and atypical scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE. All the animals displayed PrP(sc distribution patterns and western blot characteristics compatible with classical scrapie. In addition, we determined the complete open reading frame sequence of the PRNP in these scrapie-affected animals. The polymorphisms observed were compared with those of the herd mates (n = 665 and with the frequencies of healthy herds (n = 581 of native Spanish goats (Retinta, Pirenaica and Moncaina and other worldwide breeds reared in Spain (Saanen, Alpine and crossbreed. In total, sixteen polymorphic sites were identified, including the known amino acid substitutions at codons G37V, G127S, M137I, I142M, H143R, R151H, R154H, R211Q, Q222K, G232W, and P240S, and new polymorphisms at codons G74D, M112T, R139S, L141F and Q215R. In addition, the known 42, 138 and 179 silent mutations were detected, and one new one is reported at codon 122. The genetic differences observed in the population studied have been attributed to breed and most of the novel polymorphic codons show frequencies lower than 5%. This work provides the first basis of polymorphic distribution of PRNP in native and worldwide goat breeds reared in Spain.

  1. Impact of microbial cultures on proteolysis and release of bioactive peptides in fermented milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves-López, Clemencia; Serio, Annalisa; Paparella, Antonello; Martuscelli, Maria; Corsetti, Aldo; Tofalo, Rosanna; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed at evaluating co-cultures of selected microorganisms for their proteolytic activity and capability to produce fermented milk enriched with ACE-inhibitory (ACEI) peptides. Selected yeasts (Torulaspora delbruekii KL66A, Galactomyces geotrichum KL20B, Pichia kudriavzevii KL84A and Kluyveromyces marxianus KL26A) and lactic acid bacteria strains (Lactobacillus plantarum LAT03, Lb. plantarum KLAT01 and the not virulent Enterococcus faecalis KE06) were screened as single cultures for their capacity of releasing ACEI peptides without producing bitter taste. Three strains cultures (yeast, Lb. plantarum and E. faecalis) were performed to evaluate the combined impact on microbial growth, lactic acid production, citric acid consumption, proteolysis, ACEI activity, and bitter taste after 36 h of fermentation at 28 °C. While G. geotrichum KL20B showed a strong stimulating effect on Lb. plantarum strains and the production of peptides with ACEI activity, the presence of T. delbruekii KL26A in the cultures was deleterious both to ACEI activity and product taste. The most effective combination was P. kudriavzevii KL84A, Lb. plantarum LAT3, E. faecalis KL06, which showed the highest ACEI activity (IC50 = 30.63 ± 1.11 μg ml(-1)) and gave no bitter taste for 7 days at 6 °C. Our results highlight the importance of choosing the strains combination carefully, to obtain a high yield of ACEI activity without bitter taste. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of proteolysis during Cheddar cheese aging on the detection of milk protein residues by ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivens, Katherine O; Baumert, Joseph L; Hutkins, Robert L; Taylor, Steve L

    2017-03-01

    Cow milk is a common allergenic food, and cow milk-derived cheese retains an appreciable level of allergenicity. The specific and sensitive detection of milk protein residues in foods is needed to protect milk-allergic consumers from exposure to undeclared milk protein residues contained in foods made with milk or milk-derived ingredients or made on shared equipment or in shared facilities with milk or milk-derived ingredients. However, during cheese ripening, milk proteins are degraded by chymosin and milk-derived and bacterial proteases. Commercial allergen-detection methods are not validated for the detection of residues in fermented or hydrolyzed products. The objective of this research was to evaluate commercially available milk ELISA kits for their capability to detect milk protein residues in aged Cheddar cheese. Cheddar cheese was manufactured at a local dairy plant and was aged at 5°C for 24 mo, with samples removed at various time points throughout aging. Milk protein residues and protein profiles were measured using 4 commercial milk ELISA kits and sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE. The ELISA data revealed a 90% loss of milk protein residue signal between the youngest and oldest Cheddar cheese samples (0.5 and 24 mo, respectively). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE analysis showed protein degradation throughout aging, with the highest level of proteolysis observed at 24 mo. Results suggest that current commercial milk ELISA methods can detect milk protein residues in young Cheddar cheese, but the detection signal dramatically decreases during aging. The 4 evaluated ELISA kits were not capable of detecting trace levels of milk protein residues in aged cheese. Reliable detection of allergen residues in fermented food products is critical for upholding allergen-control programs, maintaining product safety, and protecting allergic consumers. Furthermore, this research suggests a novel use of ELISA kits to monitor protein degradation as an indication of cheese ripening

  3. Matriptase activation connects tissue factor-dependent coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, Sylvain M; Szabo, Roman; Lee, Melody; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Craik, Charles S; Bugge, Thomas H; Camerer, Eric

    2016-06-23

    The coagulation cascade is designed to sense tissue injury by physical separation of the membrane-anchored cofactor tissue factor (TF) from inactive precursors of coagulation proteases circulating in plasma. Once TF on epithelial and other extravascular cells is exposed to plasma, sequential activation of coagulation proteases coordinates hemostasis and contributes to host defense and tissue repair. Membrane-anchored serine proteases (MASPs) play critical roles in the development and homeostasis of epithelial barrier tissues; how MASPs are activated in mature epithelia is unknown. We here report that proteases of the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation transactivate the MASP matriptase, thus connecting coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling. Exposure of TF-expressing cells to factors (F) VIIa and Xa triggered the conversion of latent pro-matriptase to an active protease, which in turn cleaved the pericellular substrates protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) and pro-urokinase. An activation pathway-selective PAR2 mutant resistant to direct cleavage by TF:FVIIa and FXa was activated by these proteases when cells co-expressed pro-matriptase, and matriptase transactivation was necessary for efficient cleavage and activation of wild-type PAR2 by physiological concentrations of TF:FVIIa and FXa. The coagulation initiation complex induced rapid and prolonged enhancement of the barrier function of epithelial monolayers that was dependent on matriptase transactivation and PAR2 signaling. These observations suggest that the coagulation cascade engages matriptase to help coordinate epithelial defense and repair programs after injury or infection, and that matriptase may contribute to TF-driven pathogenesis in cancer and inflammation.

  4. Carbohydrate binding and resistance to proteolysis control insecticidal activity of Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu-Salzman, K; Shade, R E; Koiwa, H; Salzman, R A; Narasimhan, M; Bressan, R A; Hasegawa, P M; Murdock, L L

    1998-12-08

    Griffonia simplicifolia leaf lectin II (GSII), a plant defense protein against certain insects, consists of an N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc)-binding large subunit with a small subunit having sequence homology to class III chitinases. Much of the insecticidal activity of GSII is attributable to the large lectin subunit, because bacterially expressed recombinant large subunit (rGSII) inhibited growth and development of the cowpea bruchid, Callosobruchus maculatus (F). Site-specific mutations were introduced into rGSII to generate proteins with altered GlcNAc binding, and the different rGSII proteins were evaluated for insecticidal activity when added to the diet of the cowpea bruchid. At pH 5.5, close to the physiological pH of the cowpea bruchid midgut lumen, rGSII recombinant proteins were categorized as having high (rGSII, rGSII-Y134F, and rGSII-N196D mutant proteins), low (rGSII-N136D), or no (rGSII-D88N, rGSII-Y134G, rGSII-Y134D, and rGSII-N136Q) GlcNAc-binding activity. Insecticidal activity of the recombinant proteins correlated with their GlcNAc-binding activity. Furthermore, insecticidal activity correlated with the resistance to proteolytic degradation by cowpea bruchid midgut extracts and with GlcNAc-specific binding to the insect digestive tract. Together, these results establish that insecticidal activity of GSII is functionally linked to carbohydrate binding, presumably to the midgut epithelium or the peritrophic matrix, and to biochemical stability of the protein to digestive proteolysis.

  5. Time-Course of Muscle Mass Loss, Damage, and Proteolysis in Gastrocnemius following Unloading and Reloading: Implications in Chronic Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Chacon-Cabrera

    Full Text Available Disuse muscle atrophy is a major comorbidity in patients with chronic diseases including cancer. We sought to explore the kinetics of molecular mechanisms shown to be involved in muscle mass loss throughout time in a mouse model of disuse muscle atrophy and recovery following immobilization.Body and muscle weights, grip strength, muscle phenotype (fiber type composition and morphometry and muscle structural alterations, proteolysis, contractile proteins, systemic troponin I, and mitochondrial content were assessed in gastrocnemius of mice exposed to periods (1, 2, 3, 7, 15 and 30 days of non-invasive hindlimb immobilization (plastic splint, I cohorts and in those exposed to reloading for different time-points (1, 3, 7, 15, and 30 days, R cohorts following a seven-day period of immobilization. Groups of control animals were also used.Compared to non-exposed controls, muscle weight, limb strength, slow- and fast-twitch cross-sectional areas, mtDNA/nDNA, and myosin content were decreased in mice of I cohorts, whereas tyrosine release, ubiquitin-proteasome activity, muscle injury and systemic troponin I levels were increased. Gastrocnemius reloading following splint removal improved muscle mass loss, strength, fiber atrophy, injury, myosin content, and mtDNA/nDNA, while reducing ubiquitin-proteasome activity and proteolysis.A consistent program of molecular and cellular events leading to reduced gastrocnemius muscle mass and mitochondrial content and reduced strength, enhanced proteolysis, and injury, was seen in this non-invasive mouse model of disuse muscle atrophy. Unloading of the muscle following removal of the splint significantly improved the alterations seen during unloading, characterized by a specific kinetic profile of molecular events involved in muscle regeneration. These findings have implications in patients with chronic diseases including cancer in whom physical activity may be severely compromised.

  6. Reliance of Wolbachia on High Rates of Host Proteolysis Revealed by a Genome-Wide RNAi Screen of Drosophila Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Pamela M; Serbus, Laura R; Debec, Alain; Codina, Adan; Bray, Walter; Guichet, Antoine; Lokey, R Scott; Sullivan, William

    2017-04-01

    Wolbachia are gram-negative, obligate, intracellular bacteria carried by a majority of insect species worldwide. Here we use a Wolbachia-infected Drosophila cell line and genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screening to identify host factors that influence Wolbachia titer. By screening an RNAi library targeting 15,699 transcribed host genes, we identified 36 candidate genes that dramatically reduced Wolbachia titer and 41 that increased Wolbachia titer. Host gene knockdowns that reduced Wolbachia titer spanned a broad array of biological pathways including genes that influenced mitochondrial function and lipid metabolism. In addition, knockdown of seven genes in the host ubiquitin and proteolysis pathways significantly reduced Wolbachia titer. To test the in vivo relevance of these results, we found that drug and mutant inhibition of proteolysis reduced levels of Wolbachia in the Drosophila oocyte. The presence of Wolbachia in either cell lines or oocytes dramatically alters the distribution and abundance of ubiquitinated proteins. Functional studies revealed that maintenance of Wolbachia titer relies on an intact host Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation pathway (ERAD). Accordingly, electron microscopy studies demonstrated that Wolbachia is intimately associated with the host ER and dramatically alters the morphology of this organelle. Given Wolbachia lack essential amino acid biosynthetic pathways, the reliance of Wolbachia on high rates of host proteolysis via ubiquitination and the ERAD pathways may be a key mechanism for provisioning Wolbachia with amino acids. In addition, the reliance of Wolbachia on the ERAD pathway and disruption of ER morphology suggests a previously unsuspected mechanism for Wolbachia's potent ability to prevent RNA virus replication. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  7. Differences in the expression of genes involved in skeletal muscle proteolysis between broiler and layer chicks during food deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saneyasu, Takaoki; Kimura, Sayaka; Inui, Mariko; Yoshimoto, Yu; Honda, Kazuhisa; Kamisoyama, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Genetic selection results in a higher growth rate and meat yield in broiler chickens than in layer chickens. We herein demonstrated differences in the effects of 24 h of fasting on the expression of genes involved in skeletal muscle proteolysis between broiler and layer chicks. The mRNA levels of proteolysis-related genes were analyzed in the pectoralis major muscle of 14-day-old chicks after 0 or 24 h of fasting. The mRNA levels of ubiquitin ligases such as atrogin-1 and muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF-1) as well as transcription factor forkhead box class O (FOXO) 1 were significantly increased by fasting in broiler and layer chicks, suggesting that the FOXO1-induced ubiquitin-proteasome system, a major proteolytic system in skeletal muscles, was activated by fasting in both chicks. The mRNA levels of atrogin-1 were significantly lower in broiler chicks than in layer chicks after fasting. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 were significantly decreased by fasting in layer chicks, but not in broiler chicks. The mRNA levels of FOXO3 were significantly increased by fasting in layer chicks, but not in broiler chicks. Therefore, the ubiquitin-proteasome system did not appear to have been fully upregulated in broiler chicks. These results suggest that differences in the expression of genes related to the ubiquitin-proteasome system in skeletal muscle proteolysis between broiler and layer chicks during food deprivation are one of the causes of the high growth rate in broiler chickens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The splicing factor U2AF65 stabilizes TRF1 protein by inhibiting its ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeonghee; Chung, In Kwon, E-mail: topoviro@yonsei.ac.kr

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Identification of U2AF65 as a novel TRF1-interacting protein. •U2AF65 stabilizes TRF1 protein by inhibiting its ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. •U2AF65 interferes with the interaction between TRF1 and Fbx4. •U2AF65 represents a new route for modulating TRF1 function at telomeres. -- Abstract: The human telomeric protein TRF1 is a component of the six-subunit protein complex shelterin, which provides telomere protection by organizing the telomere into a high-order structure. TRF1 functions as a negative regulator of telomere length by controlling the access of telomerase to telomeres. Thus, the cellular abundance of TRF1 at telomeres should be maintained and tightly regulated to ensure proper telomere function. Here, we identify U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) auxiliary factor 65 (U2AF65), an essential pre-mRNA splicing factor, as a novel TRF1-interacting protein. U2AF65 interacts with TRF1 in vitro and in vivo and is capable of stabilizing TRF1 protein by inhibiting its ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. We also found that U2AF65 interferes with the interaction between TRF1 and Fbx4, an E3 ubiquitin ligase for TRF1. Depletion of endogenous U2AF65 expression by short interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced the stability of endogenous TRF1 whereas overexpression of U2AF65 significantly extended the half-life of TRF1. These findings demonstrate that U2AF65 plays a critical role in regulating the level of TRF1 through physical interaction and ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. Hence, U2AF65 represents a new route for modulating TRF1 function at telomeres.

  9. Botulinum neurotoxin C mutants reveal different effects of syntaxin or SNAP-25 proteolysis on neuromuscular transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Giulia; Sikorra, Stefan; Rummel, Andreas; Krez, Nadja; Duregotti, Elisa; Negro, Samuele; Henke, Tina; Rossetto, Ornella; Binz, Thomas; Pirazzini, Marco

    2017-08-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype C (BoNT/C) is a neuroparalytic toxin associated with outbreaks of animal botulism, particularly in birds, and is the only BoNT known to cleave two different SNARE proteins, SNAP-25 and syntaxin. BoNT/C was shown to be a good substitute for BoNT/A1 in human dystonia therapy because of its long lasting effects and absence of neuromuscular damage. Two triple mutants of BoNT/C, namely BoNT/C S51T/R52N/N53P (BoNT/C α-51) and BoNT/C L200W/M221W/I226W (BoNT/C α-3W), were recently reported to selectively cleave syntaxin and have been used here to evaluate the individual contribution of SNAP-25 and syntaxin cleavage to the effect of BoNT/C in vivo. Although BoNT/C α-51 and BoNT/C α-3W toxins cleave syntaxin with similar efficiency, we unexpectedly found also cleavage of SNAP-25, although to a lesser extent than wild type BoNT/C. Interestingly, the BoNT/C mutants exhibit reduced lethality compared to wild type toxin, a result that correlated with their residual activity against SNAP-25. In spite of this, a local injection of BoNT/C α-51 persistently impairs neuromuscular junction activity. This is due to an initial phase in which SNAP-25 cleavage causes a complete blockade of neurotransmission, and to a second phase of incomplete impairment ascribable to syntaxin cleavage. Together, these results indicate that neuroparalysis of BoNT/C at the neuromuscular junction is due to SNAP-25 cleavage, while the proteolysis of syntaxin provides a substantial, but incomplete, neuromuscular impairment. In light of this evidence, we discuss a possible clinical use of BoNT/C α-51 as a botulinum neurotoxin endowed with a wide safety margin and a long lasting effect.

  10. Dual Vulnerability of Tau to Calpains and Caspase-3 Proteolysis Under Neurotoxic and Neurodegenerative Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Cheng Liu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Axonally specific microtubule-associated protein tau is an important component of neurofibrillary tangles found in AD (Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathy diseases such as CTE (chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Such tau aggregate is found to be hyperphosphorylated and often proteolytically fragmented. Similarly, tau is degraded following TBI (traumatic brain injury. In the present study, we examined the dual vulnerability of tau to calpain and caspase-3 under neurotoxic and neurodegenerative conditions. We first identified three novel calpain cleavage sites in rat tau (four-repeat isoform as Ser130 ↓ Lys131, Gly157 ↓ Ala158 and Arg380 ↓ Glu381. Fragment-specific antibodies to target the major calpain-mediated TauBDP-35K (35 kDa tau-breakdown product and the caspase-mediated TauBDP-45K respectively were developed. In rat cerebrocortical cultures treated with excitotoxin [NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate], tau is significantly degraded into multiple fragments, including a dominant signal of calpain-mediated TauBDP-35K with minimal caspase-mediated TauBDP-45K. Following apoptosis-inducing EDTA treatment, tau was truncated only to TauBDP-48K/45K-exclusively by caspase. Cultures treated with another apoptosis inducer STS (staurosporine, dual fragmentation by calpain (TauBDP-35K and caspase-3 (TauBDP-45K was observed. Tau was also fragmented in injured rat cortex following TBI in vivo to BDPs of 45-42 kDa (minor, 35 kDa and 15 kDa, followed by TauBDP-25K. Calpain-mediated TauBDP-35K-specific antibody confirmed robust signals in the injured cortex, while caspase-mediated TauBDP-45K-specific antibody only detected faint signals. Furthermore, intravenous administration of a calpain-specific inhibitor SNJ-1945 strongly suppressed the TauBDP-35K formation. Taken together, these results suggest that tau protein is dually vulnerable to calpain and caspase-3 proteolysis under different neurotoxic and injury conditions.

  11. Dynamic assembly, localization and proteolysis of the Bacillus subtilis SMC complex

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    Rinn Cornelia

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SMC proteins are key components of several protein complexes that perform vital tasks in different chromosome dynamics. Bacterial SMC forms a complex with ScpA and ScpB that is essential for chromosome arrangement and segregation. The complex localizes to discrete centres on the nucleoids that during most of the time of the cell cycle localize in a bipolar manner. The complex binds to DNA and condenses DNA in an as yet unknown manner. Results We show that in vitro, ScpA and ScpB form different complexes with each other, among which the level of the putative 2 ScpA/4 ScpB complex showed a pronounced decrease in level upon addition of SMC protein. Different mutations of the ATPase-binding pocket of SMC reduced, but did not abolish interaction of mutant SMC with ScpA and ScpB. The loss of SMC ATPase activity led to a loss of function in vivo, and abolished proper localization of the SMC complex. The formation of bipolar SMC centres was also lost after repression of gyrase activity, and was abnormal during inhibition of replication, resulting in single central clusters. Resumption of replication quickly re-established bipolar SMC centres, showing that proper localization depends on ongoing replication. We also found that the SMC protein is subject to induced proteolysis, most strikingly as cells enter stationary phase, which is partly achieved by ClpX and LonA proteases. Atomic force microscopy revealed the existence of high order rosette-like SMC structures in vitro, which might explain the formation of the SMC centres in vivo. Conclusion Our data suggest that a ScpA/ScpB sub-complex is directly recruited into the SMC complex. This process does not require SMC ATPase activity, which, however, appears to facilitate loading of ScpA and ScpB. Thus, the activity of SMC could be regulated through binding and release of ScpA and ScpB, which has been shown to affect SMC ATPase activity. The proper bipolar localization of the SMC

  12. Variable levels of 37-kDa/67-kDa laminin receptor (RPSA) mRNA in ovine tissues: potential contribution to the regulatory processes of PrPSc propagation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jun-Wen; Su, Xiao-Ou; Li, Yu-Xing; Yang, Jian-Min; Wang, Yi-Qin; Kouadir, Mohammed; Zhou, Xiang-Mei; Yang, Li-Feng; Yin, Xiao-Min; Zhao, De-Ming

    2009-01-01

    The 37-kDa laminin receptor precursor/67-kDa laminin receptor (LRP/LR, also known as ribosomal protein SA, RPSA) has been reported to be involved in cancer development and prion internalization. Previous studies have shown that the LRP/LR is expressed in a wide variety of tissues. In particular, expression of LRP/LR mRNA may be closely related to the degree of PrP(Sc) propagation. This study presents a detailed investigation of the LRP/LR mRNA expression levels in eleven normal ovine tissues. Using real-time quantitative PCR, the highest LRP/LR expression was found in neocortex (p < 0.05). Slightly lower levels were found in the heart and obex. Intermediate levels were seen in hippocampus, cerebellum, spleen, thalamus, mesenteric lymph node, and the lowest levels were present in liver, kidney, and lung. In general, the LRP/LR mRNA levels were much higher in neuronal tissues than in peripheral tissues. The observation that differences in LRP/LR mRNA expression levels are consistent with the corresponding variation in PrP(Sc) accumulation suggests that the 37-kDa/67-kDa laminin receptor may be involved in the regulation of PrP(Sc) propagation.

  13. High-pressure improves enzymatic proteolysis and the release of peptides with angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitory and antioxidant activities from lentil proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Mora, P; Peñas, E; Frias, J; Gomez, R; Martinez-Villaluenga, C

    2015-03-15

    Angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and antioxidant peptides are receiving attention due to their beneficial effects in the prevention/treatment of hypertension. The objective was to explore the effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HP) on proteolysis by different proteases and the release of bioactive peptides from lentil proteins. Pressurisation (100-300 MPa) enhanced the hydrolytic efficiency of Protamex, Savinase and Corolase 7089 compared to Alcalase. Proteolysis at 300 MPa led to a complete degradation of lentil proteins and increased peptide (antioxidant activities that were retained upon in vitro gastrointestinal digestion. The peptides responsible for the multifunctional properties of S300 hydrolysate were identified as different fragments from storage proteins and the allergen Len c 1. These results support the potential of HP as a technology for the cost-effective production of bioactive peptides from lentil proteins during enzymatic proteolysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Vip3Ag4 Insecticidal Protoxin from Bacillus thuringiensis Adopts A Tetrameric Configuration That Is Maintained on Proteolysis

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    Leopoldo Palma

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Vip3 proteins produced during vegetative growth by strains of the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis show insecticidal activity against lepidopteran insects with a mechanism of action that may involve pore formation and apoptosis. These proteins are promising supplements to our arsenal of insecticidal proteins, but the molecular details of their activity are not understood. As a first step in the structural characterisation of these proteins, we have analysed their secondary structure and resolved the surface topology of a tetrameric complex of the Vip3Ag4 protein by transmission electron microscopy. Sites sensitive to proteolysis by trypsin are identified and the trypsin-cleaved protein appears to retain a similar structure as an octomeric complex comprising four copies each of the ~65 kDa and ~21 kDa products of proteolysis. This processed form of the toxin may represent the active toxin. The quality and monodispersity of the protein produced in this study make Vip3Ag4 a candidate for more detailed structural analysis using cryo-electron microscopy.

  15. Effect of pulsed electric field on the proteolysis of cold boned beef M. Longissimus lumborum and M. Semimembranosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwandy, Via; Carne, Alan; van de Ven, Remy; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din A; Hopkins, David L

    2015-02-01

    The effects of pulsed electric field (PEF) and ageing (3, 7, 14 and 21 days) on the shear force, protein profile, and post-mortem proteolysis of beef loins (M. Longissimus lumborum, LL) and topsides (M. Semimembranosus, SM) were investigated using a range of pulsed electric field treatments [voltages (5 and 10 kV) and frequencies (20, 50, and 90 Hz)]. PEF treatment decreased the shear force of beef LL and SM muscles by up to 19%. The reduction in the shear force in the LL was not affected by the treatment intensity whereas the reduction in the SM was dependent on PEF frequency. PEF treated beef loins showed increased proteolysis, both early post-mortem and during subsequent post-mortem storage reflected by increased degradation of troponin-T and desmin. The most prominent troponin-T degradation was found in samples treated with 5 kV-90 Hz, 10 kV-20 Hz at day 3 and day 7 post-treatment in addition to 10 kV-50 Hz in subsequent post-treatment times. The degradation of desmin in PEF treated beef loins increased with ageing time.

  16. Establishing quantitative real-time quaking-induced conversion (qRT-QuIC) for highly sensitive detection and quantification of PrPSc in prion-infected tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Song; Mitteregger-Kretzschmar, Gerda; Giese, Armin; Kretzschmar, Hans A

    2013-08-02

    PrPSc, the only known constituent of prions, the infectious agents causing prion diseases, can be detected by real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC). However, there is no efficient method to quantify the amount of PrPSc by RT-QuIC. Here we introduce quantitative RT-QuIC (qRT-QuIC) to quantify with high accuracy minute amounts of PrPSc in the brain and various peripheral tissues at levels far below detection by in vivo transmission. PrPSc is relatively resistant to treatment with proteinase K (PK). However, as there can also be a fraction of pathological PrP that is digested by PK, we use the term PrP27-30 to denote to the amount of PrPSc that can be detected by immunoblot after PK treatment. qRT-QuIC is based upon the quantitative correlation between the seeded amount of PrP27-30 and the lag time to the start of the conversion reaction detected by RT-QuIC. By seeding known amounts of PrP27-30 quantified by immunoblot into qRT-QuIC a standard calibration curve can be obtained. Based on this calibration curve, seeded undetermined amounts of PrP27-30 can be directly calculated. qRT-QuIC allowed to quantify PrP27-30 concentrations at extremely low levels as low as 10-15.5 g PrP27-30, which corresponds to 0.001 LD50 units obtained by in vivo i.c. transmission studies. We find that PrP27-30 concentration increases steadily in the brain after inoculation and can be detected at various time points during the incubation period in peripheral organs (spleen, heart, muscle, liver, kidney) in two experimental scrapie strains (RML, ME7) in the mouse. We suggest that an automatic quantitative system to measure disease progression as well as prion contamination of organs, blood and food product is feasible. Moreover, the concept of qRT-QuIC should be applicable to measure other disease-associated proteins rich in β-pleated structures (amyloid) that bind ThT and that show seeded aggregation.

  17. Characterisation of cysteine proteinases responsible for digestive proteolysis in guts of larval Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera) by expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bown, D.P.; Wilkinson, H.S.; Jongsma, M.A.; Gatehouse, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Cysteine proteinases are the major class of enzymes responsible for digestive proteolysis in western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera), a serious pest of maize. A larval gut extract hydrolysed typical cathepsin substrates, such as Z-phe-arg-AMC and Z-arg-arg-AMC, and hydrolysis was inhibited by

  18. Soluble phenolic compounds in different cultivars of red clover and alfalfa, and their implication for protection against proteolysis and ammonia production in ruminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Red clover contains phenolic compounds with roles in inhibiting proteolysis and loss of amino acids as ammonia. Alfalfa has been found to have lower concentrations of phenolic compounds, but few alfalfa and red clover cultivars have been compared for phenolic content. Total soluble phenolic compou...

  19. Reducing fat levels in cheddar-like goat cheese: impact on proteolysis and rheological properties over 6 months of refrigerated storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development of low-fat goat cheeses that appeal to health conscious consumers requires information on how the reduction of fat affects the quality traits of the cheese, such as its proteolysis and rheology. Goat milk samples containing 3.6, 2.0, 1.0, and <0.5% fat were processed into full-fat (F...

  20. PROTEOLYSIS DURING MANUFACTURE AND RIPENING/STORING OF “OLOMOUCKÉ TVARŮŽKY” CHEESE (PGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vendula Pachlová

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-two free amino acid (FAA concentrations were observed during manufacture (1st, 3rd and 7th days of production and ripening period (42 days storing at 8°C of “Olomoucké tvarůžky” (PGI, smear acid cheese. Sensory attributes were also analysed during ripening period. The free amino acids were determined by means of ion-exchange chromatography. The development of the individual FAA content positively correlated with the ripening period (r = 0.7734–0.9229; P < 0.01.The results gave information about the development precursors (FAA of typically sensory active compound in “Olomoucké tvarůžky” (PGI during its production and especially ripening. In conclusion, we found that free amino acid concentration as finally products of proteolysis are positive with improved flavour.

  1. The emerging regulatory potential of SCFMet30 -mediated polyubiquitination and proteolysis of the Met4 transcriptional activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekaran Srikripa

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The yeast SCFMet30 ubiquitin ligase plays a critical role in cell division by regulating the Met4 transcriptional activator of genes that control the uptake and assimilation of sulfur into methionine and S-adenosyl-methionine. The initial view on how SCFMet30 performs its function has been driven by the assumption that SCFMet30 acts exclusively as Met4 inhibitor when high levels of methionine drive an accumulation of cysteine. We revisit this model in light of the growing evidence that SCFMet30 can also activate Met4. The notion that Met4 can be inhibited or activated depending on the sulfur metabolite context is not new, but for the first time both aspects have been linked to SCFMet30, creating an interesting regulatory paradigm in which polyubiquitination and proteolysis of a single transcriptional activator can play different roles depending on context. We discuss the emerging molecular basis and the implications of this new regulatory phenomenon.

  2. Proteolysis of chloroplast proteins is responsible for accumulation of free amino acids in dark-treated tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiyong; Fu, Xiumin; Mei, Xin; Zhou, Ying; Cheng, Sihua; Zeng, Lanting; Dong, Fang; Yang, Ziyin

    2017-03-22

    Shade management (dark treatment) on tea (Camellia sinensis) plants is a common approach to improve free amino acids in raw materials of tea leaves. However, the reason for amino acid accumulation in dark-treated tea leaves is still unknown. In the present study, dark treatment significantly increased content of free amino acids and reduced content of soluble proteins in tea leaves. Quantitative proteomics analysis showed that most enzymes involved in biosyntheses of amino acids were down-accumulated by dark treatment. Chloroplast numbers reduced in dark-treated leaves and the content of soluble proteins reduced in the chloroplasts isolated from dark-treated leaves compared to control. These suggest that proteolysis of chloroplast proteins contributed to amino acid accumulation in dark-treated leaves. Two chloroplasts proteases, ATP-dependent Clp protease proteolytic subunit 3 and protease Do-like 2, were up-accumulated in dark-treated leaves. This study firstly elucidated the mechanism of accumulation of amino acids in dark-treated tea leaves. Effect of dark on crop growth has been widely studied, while less attention has been paid to effect of dark on quality-related metabolites in crops. Shade management (dark treatment) on tea plants is a common approach to improve free amino acids in tea leaves. However, the reason for accumulation of free amino acids in dark-treated tea leaves is still unknown. In the present study, an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis was performed and the results revealed the accumulation of free amino acids in dark-treated tea leaves was not due to activation of biosyntheses of amino acids, but resulted from proteolysis of chloroplast proteins. The information will advance our understanding of formation of quality or function-related metabolites in agricultural crops exposed to dark stress/shade management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Intramembrane proteolysis of GXGD-type aspartyl proteases is slowed by a familial Alzheimer disease-like mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluhrer, Regina; Fukumori, Akio; Martin, Lucas; Grammer, Gudula; Haug-Kröper, Martina; Klier, Bärbel; Winkler, Edith; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Condron, Margaret M; Teplow, David B; Steiner, Harald; Haass, Christian

    2008-10-31

    More than 150 familial Alzheimer disease (FAD)-associated missense mutations in presenilins (PS1 and PS2), the catalytic subunit of the gamma-secretase complex, cause aberrant amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) production, by increasing the relative production of the highly amyloidogenic 42-amino acid variant. The molecular mechanism behind this pathological activity is unclear, and different possibilities ranging from a gain of function to a loss of function have been discussed. gamma-Secretase, signal peptide peptidase (SPP) and SPP-like proteases (SPPLs) belong to the same family of GXGD-type intramembrane cleaving aspartyl proteases and share several functional similarities. We have introduced the FAD-associated PS1 G384A mutation, which occurs within the highly conserved GXGD motif of PS1 right next to the catalytically critical aspartate residue, into the corresponding GXGD motif of the signal peptide peptidase-like 2b (SPPL2b). Compared with wild-type SPPL2b, mutant SPPL2b slowed intramembrane proteolysis of tumor necrosis factor alpha and caused a relative increase of longer intracellular cleavage products. Because the N termini of the secreted counterparts remain unchanged, the mutation selectively affects the liberation of the intracellular processing products. In vitro experiments demonstrate that the apparent accumulation of longer intracellular cleavage products is the result of slowed sequential intramembrane cleavage. The longer cleavage products are still converted to shorter peptides, however only after prolonged incubation time. This suggests that FAD-associated PS mutation may also result in reduced intramembrane cleavage of beta-amyloid precursor protein (betaAPP). Indeed, in vitro experiments demonstrate slowed intramembrane proteolysis by gamma-secretase containing PS1 with the G384A mutation. As compared with wild-type PS1, the mutation selectively slowed Abeta40 production, whereas Abeta42 generation remained unaffected. Thus, the PS1 G384A

  4. A naturally occurring C-terminal fragment of the prion protein (PrP) delays disease and acts as a dominant-negative inhibitor of PrPSc formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westergard, Laura; Turnbaugh, Jessie A; Harris, David A

    2011-12-23

    The cellular prion protein (PrPC) undergoes constitutive proteolytic cleavage between residues 111/112 to yield a soluble N-terminal fragment (N1) and a membrane-anchored C-terminal fragment (C1). The C1 fragment represents the major proteolytic fragment of PrPC in brain and several cell types. To explore the role of C1 in prion disease, we generated Tg(C1) transgenic mice expressing this fragment (PrP(Δ23-111)) in the presence and absence of endogenous PrP. In contrast to several other N-terminally deleted forms of PrP, the C1 fragment does not cause a spontaneous neurological disease in the absence of endogenous PrP. Tg(C1) mice inoculated with scrapie prions remain healthy and do not accumulate protease-resistant PrP, demonstrating that C1 is not a substrate for conversion to PrPSc (the disease-associated isoform). Interestingly, Tg(C1) mice co-expressing C1 along with wild-type PrP (either endogenous or encoded by a second transgene) become ill after scrapie inoculation, but with a dramatically delayed time course compared with mice lacking C1. In addition, accumulation of PrPSc was markedly slowed in these animals. Similar effects were produced by a shorter C-terminal fragment of PrP(Δ23-134). These results demonstrate that C1 acts as dominant-negative inhibitor of PrPSc formation and accumulation of neurotoxic forms of PrP. Thus, C1, a naturally occurring fragment of PrPC, might play a modulatory role during the course of prion diseases. In addition, enhancing production of C1, or exogenously administering this fragment, represents a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of prion diseases.

  5. Dissociation between transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) infectivity and proteinase K-resistant PrP(Sc) levels in peripheral tissue from a murine transgenic model of TSE disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobie, Karen; Barron, Rona

    2013-05-01

    Most current diagnostic tests for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) rely on the presence of proteinase K (PK)-resistant PrP(Sc) (PrP-res) in postmortem tissues as an indication of TSE disease. However, a number of studies have highlighted a discrepancy between TSE infectivity and PrP-res levels in both natural and experimental cases of TSE disease. Previously, we have shown high TSE infectivity levels in the brain tissue of mice that have a clinical TSE disease with associated vacuolar pathology but little or no detectable PrP-res. Here, the levels of TSE infectivity and PrP-res within a peripheral tissue of this mouse model were investigated. Biochemical analysis showed that low levels of PrP-res were present in the spleen tissue in comparison to the levels observed in the spleen of mice infected with ME7 or 79A. However, upon subpassage of brain and spleen tissue from clinically ill mice with little or no PrP-res detectable, similar short incubation periods to disease were observed, indicating that infectivity levels were similarly high in both tissues. Thus, the discrepancy between PrP-res and TSE infectivity was also present in the peripheral tissues of this disease model. This result indicates that peripheral tissues can contain higher levels of infectivity given the correct combination of host species, PrP genotype, and TSE agent. Therefore, the assumption that the levels of peripheral infectivity are lower than those in the central nervous system is not always correct, and this could have implications for current food safety regulations.

  6. Biochemical features of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor CD97 related to its auto-proteolysis and HeLa cell attachment activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-Yun; Liu, Xiao-Fang; Yang, Yang; Yang, Lin-Lin; Liu, Kai-Wen; Tang, Yu-Bo; Zhang, Min; Tan, Min-Jia; Cheng, Shan-Mei; Xu, Ye-Chun; Yang, Huai-Yu; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Song, Gao-Jie; Huang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    CD97 belongs to the adhesion GPCR family characterized by a long ECD linked to the 7TM via a GPCR proteolytic site (GPS) and plays important roles in modulating cell migration and invasion. CD97 (EGF1-5) is a splicing variant of CD97 that recognizes a specific ligand chondroitin sulfate on cell membranes and the extracellular matrix. The aim of this study was to elucidate the extracellular molecular basis of the CD97 EGF1-5 isoform in protein expression, auto-proteolysis and cell adhesion, including epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain, GPCR autoproteolysis-inducing (GAIN) domain, as well as GPS mutagenesis and N-glycosylation. Both wild-type (WT) CD97-ECD and its truncated, GPS mutated, PNGase F-deglycosylated, and N-glycosylation site mutated forms were expressed and purified. The auto-proteolysis of the proteins was analyzed with Western blotting and SDS-PAGE. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and molecular modeling were used to determine a structural profile of the properly expressed receptor. Potential N-glycosylation sites were identified using MS and were modulated with PNGase F digestion and glyco-site mutations. A flow cytometry-based HeLa cell attachment assay was used for all aforementioned CD97 variants to elucidate the molecular basis of CD97-HeLa interactions. A unique concentration-dependent GPS auto-proteolysis was observed in CD97 EGF1-5 isoform with the highest concentration (4 mg/mL) per sample was self-cleaved much faster than the lower concentration (0.1 mg/mL), supporting an intermolecular mechanism of auto-proteolysis that is distinct to the reported intramolecular mechanism for other CD97 isoforms. N-glycosylation affected the auto-proteolysis of CD97 EGF1-5 isoform in a similar way as the other previously reported CD97 isoforms. SAXS data for WT and deglycosylated CD97ECD revealed a spatula-like shape with GAIN and EGF domains constituting the body and handle, respectively. Structural modeling indicated a potential interaction

  7. Functional mechanics of the plant defensive Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II: resistance to proteolysis is independent of glycoconjugate binding in the insect gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu-Salzman, K; Salzman, R A

    2001-10-01

    Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II (GSII) is a plant defensive protein that significantly delays development of the cowpea bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus (F.). Previous structure/function analysis by site-directed mutagenesis indicated that carbohydrate binding and resistance to insect gut proteolysis are required for the anti-insect activity of this lectin. However, whether there is a causal link between carbohydrate binding and resistance to insect metabolism remains unknown. Two proteases principally responsible for digestive proteolysis in third and fourth instar larvae of C. maculatus were purified by activated thiol sepharose chromatography and resolved as cathepsin L-like proteases, based on N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis. Digestion of bacterially expressed recombinant GSII (rGSII) and its mutant protein variants with the purified gut proteases indicates that carbohydrate binding, presumably to a target ligand in insect gut, and proteolytic resistance are independent properties of rGSII, and that both facilitate its efficacy as a plant defensive molecule.

  8. Activated thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa) attenuates breast cancer cell metastatic behaviors through inhibition of plasminogen activation and extracellular proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzi, Zainab A; Lanoue, Danielle; El-Youssef, Mouhanned; Romagnuolo, Rocco; Tubman, Janice; Cavallo-Medved, Dora; Porter, Lisa A; Boffa, Michael B

    2016-05-24

    Thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) is a plasma zymogen, which can be converted to activated TAFI (TAFIa) through proteolytic cleavage by thrombin, plasmin, and most effectively thrombin in complex with the endothelial cofactor thrombomodulin (TM). TAFIa is a carboxypeptidase that cleaves carboxyl terminal lysine and arginine residues from protein and peptide substrates, including plasminogen-binding sites on cell surface receptors. Carboxyl terminal lysine residues play a pivotal role in enhancing cell surface plasminogen activation to plasmin. Plasmin has many critical functions including cleaving components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), which enhances invasion and migration of cancer cells. We therefore hypothesized that TAFIa could act to attenuate metastasis. To assess the role of TAFIa in breast cancer metastasis, in vitro migration and invasion assays, live cell proteolysis and cell proliferation using MDA-MB-231 and SUM149 cells were carried out in the presence of a TAFIa inhibitor, recombinant TAFI variants, or soluble TM. Inhibition of TAFIa with potato tuber carboxypeptidase inhibitor increased cell invasion, migration and proteolysis of both cell lines, whereas addition of TM resulted in a decrease in all these parameters. A stable variant of TAFIa, TAFIa-CIIYQ, showed enhanced inhibitory effects on cell invasion, migration and proteolysis. Furthermore, pericellular plasminogen activation was significantly decreased on the surface of MDA-MB-231 and SUM149 cells following treatment with various concentrations of TAFIa. Taken together, these results indicate a vital role for TAFIa in regulating pericellular plasminogen activation and ultimately ECM proteolysis in the breast cancer microenvironment. Enhancement of TAFI activation in this microenvironment may be a therapeutic strategy to inhibit invasion and prevent metastasis of breast cancer cells.

  9. Impact of the ageing process on the intensity of post mortem proteolysis and tenderness of beef from crossbreeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moczkowska Małgorzata

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was the evaluation of the effect of ageing on the extent of myofibrillar proteins degradation and tenderness of beef in different crossbreeds, BB × HF and SM × HF, from which the musculus semitendinosus was obtained. The pH value, basic composition of meat, and colour parameters were determined on the 3rd d post mortem. The Warner Bratzler shear force and the extent of protein degradation were evaluated in regard to the effect of ageing time. Meat of BB × HF crossbreed had a lower amount of intramuscular fat and higher protein content (P ≤ 0.05. The shear force decreased with ageing time in the case of both crossbreeds. However, the highest values were noted in SM × HF crossbreed on days 3 and 7 of ageing. The differences in proteolysis of myofibrillar proteins and polypeptides, determined by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis, were observed between crossbreeds and the ageing time. A significant decrease in desmin and increased levels of 49-46 kDa and 32-27 kDa polypeptides (products of proteolytic degradation were observed with an increasing ageing time. In addition, the rate of increase in the amount of 32-27 kDa polypeptides was more significant in BB × HF crossbreed. The data obtained showed that tenderness and the extent of protein degradation are associated with ageing process and animals’ genotype.

  10. Influence of the Probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM
and Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 on Proteolysis Patterns
of Edam Cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichosz, Grażyna; Nalepa, Beata; Kowalska, Marika

    2014-01-01

    Summary The objective of this study is to determine the viability of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 in Edam cheese as well as the effect of probiotic bacteria on paracasein proteolysis and changes in the water activity during ripening. The use of probiotics L. rhamnosus HN001 and L. acidophilus NCFM in Edam cheese slightly changed its chemical composition, but the change was not significant. The pH values were significantly correlated with the changes in Lactobacillus count (R=–0.807) and the level of phosphotungstic acid-soluble nitrogen compounds in total nitrogen (PTA-SN/TN) (R=0.775). After 10 weeks of ripening, the highest level of trichloroacetic acid-soluble nitrogen compounds in total nitrogen (TCA-SN/TN) was observed in the cheese containing L. rhamnosus HN001 (11.87%) and slightly lower level in the cheese containing L. acidophilus NCFM (7.60%) and control cheese (6.24%). The highest level of PTA-SN/TN fraction was noted in cheese containing L. acidophilus NCFM (3.48%) but the lowest level was observed in control cheese (2.24%) after ten weeks of ripening. The changes in the levels of PTA-SN/TN (R=–0.813) and TCA-SN/TN (R=–0.717) fractions were significantly (pcheeses were characterized by high counts of L. rhamnosus HN001 and L. acidophilus NCFM during ten weeks of ripening. PMID:27904317

  11. A novel Meloidogyne graminicola effector, MgGPP, is secreted into host cells and undergoes glycosylation in concert with proteolysis to suppress plant defenses and promote parasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiansong; Lin, Borong; Huang, Qiuling; Hu, Lili; Zhuo, Kan; Liao, Jinling

    2017-04-01

    Plant pathogen effectors can recruit the host post-translational machinery to mediate their post-translational modification (PTM) and regulate their activity to facilitate parasitism, but few studies have focused on this phenomenon in the field of plant-parasitic nematodes. In this study, we show that the plant-parasitic nematode Meloidogyne graminicola has evolved a novel effector, MgGPP, that is exclusively expressed within the nematode subventral esophageal gland cells and up-regulated in the early parasitic stage of M. graminicola. The effector MgGPP plays a role in nematode parasitism. Transgenic rice lines expressing MgGPP become significantly more susceptible to M. graminicola infection than wild-type control plants, and conversely, in planta, the silencing of MgGPP through RNAi technology substantially increases the resistance of rice to M. graminicola. Significantly, we show that MgGPP is secreted into host plants and targeted to the ER, where the N-glycosylation and C-terminal proteolysis of MgGPP occur. C-terminal proteolysis promotes MgGPP to leave the ER, after which it is transported to the nucleus. In addition, N-glycosylation of MgGPP is required for suppressing the host response. The research data provide an intriguing example of in planta glycosylation in concert with proteolysis of a pathogen effector, which depict a novel mechanism by which parasitic nematodes could subjugate plant immunity and promote parasitism and may present a promising target for developing new strategies against nematode infections.

  12. Effect of Aloe vera (Aloe barbadensis Miller) on survivability, extent of proteolysis and ACE inhibition of potential probiotic cultures in fermented milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basannavar, Santosh; Pothuraju, Ramesh; Sharma, Raj Kumar

    2014-10-01

    In the present investigation, the effect of Aloe vera gel powder on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity, extent of proteolysis during fermentation and survival of Lactobacillus casei NCDC19 during storage of fermented milk was studied. Among the different cultures screened for ACE inhibitory activity, Lactobacillus casei NCDC 19 exhibited the highest ACE inhibition (approx. 40%) as well as extent of proteolysis (0.37, Abs₃₄₀). In the presence of Aloe vera (0.5% and 1% w/v) an increase in extent of proteolysis (0.460 ± 0.047 and 0.480 ± 0.027) and percent ACE inhibitory activity (44.32 ± 2.83 and 47.52 ± 1.83) was observed in comparison to control. Aloe vera powder addition also led to an increase in viable counts (>11 log cfu mL⁻¹) of L. casei NCDC 19 in fermented milk during storage for 7 days and the counts were maintained in sufficiently higher numbers. The study suggests Aloe vera to be a good functional ingredient which can be further explored for different health attributes. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. TACKLING UNWANTED PROTEOLYSIS IN PLANT PRODUCTION HOSTS USED FOR MOLECULAR FARMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar Mandal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Although the field of molecular farming has significantly matured over the last years, some obstacles still need to be resolved. A major limiting factor for a broader application of plant hosts for the production of valuable recombinant proteins is the low yield of intact recombinant proteins. These low yields are at least in part due to the action of endogenous plant proteases on the foreign recombinant proteins. This mini review will present the current knowledge of the proteolytic enzymes involved in the degradation of different target proteins and strategies that are applied to suppress undesirable proteolytic activities in order to safeguard recombinant proteins during the production process.

  14. Myofibrillar proteolysis in response to voluntary or electrically stimulated muscle contractions in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M; Trappe, T; Crameri, R M

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge about the effects of exercise on myofibrillar protein breakdown in human subjects is limited. Our purpose was to measure the changes in the degradation of myofibrillar proteins in response to different ways of eliciting muscle contractions using the local interstitial 3-methyl-histidine......Knowledge about the effects of exercise on myofibrillar protein breakdown in human subjects is limited. Our purpose was to measure the changes in the degradation of myofibrillar proteins in response to different ways of eliciting muscle contractions using the local interstitial 3-methyl...... contractions (ES). Microdialysis probes were placed in m. vastus lateralis in both the legs immediately after, and 1 and 3 days post-exercise. Interstitial 3-MH was higher in ES vs VOL immediately after exercise (Pexercise no difference between the two exercise types was observed...... enhanced after ES compared with VOL immediately after exercise, while the level of 3-MH did not change in the post-exercise period after VOL. These results indicate that the local myofibrillar breakdown is accelerated after ES associated with severe myofiber damage....

  15. Proteolysis in meat tenderization from the point of view of each single protein: A proteomic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lana, Alessandro; Zolla, Lello

    2016-09-16

    Muscle has to undergo a number of biochemical changes to become the final product, and, once become meat, needs to develop the proper organoleptic peculiarities, including tenderness. Tenderness depends on multiple factors, intervening throughout the production chain, from animal's birth till the end of meat aging. Given the striking number of variables, it is not an exaggeration to affirm that meat coming from each individual is a 'unique' meat. So, the process of meat tenderization follows different paths; meat derived from different animals shows its own evolution, but underneath the wide variability, all these individual developments follow a standard template: in other words, there are some boundaries that limit the possible variations. This review wants to give a comprehensive idea of the concept of meat tenderness, in particular focusing on the two protein classes that are among the most important direct responsibles for tenderization: sarcomeric proteins and proteolytic enzymes. We will review the most recent and significant data acquired on each protein, pointing the attention on the results collected by means of the 'omics' technologies, and underlining the possible role of markers in the frame of meat tenderness. Our review discusses the evidences collected by means of the 'omics' technologies about the proteolytic mechanisms that act in the muscle-to-meat conversion process, leading the muscle to reach the acceptable tenderness of the eatable meat. We consider the proteolytic enzymes and their substrate individually, summarizing the most significant data from the omic approach, and discussing their possible role of marker of tenderness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of the Probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 on Proteolysis Patterns of Edam Cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Cichosz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to determine the viability of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 in Edam cheese as well as the effect of probiotic bacteria on paracasein proteolysis and changes in the water activity during ripening. The use of probiotics L. rhamnosus HN001 and L. acidophilus NCFM in Edam cheese slightly changed its chemical composition, but the change was not significant. The pH values were significantly correlated with the changes in Lactobacillus count (R=–0.807 and the level of phosphotungstic acid-soluble nitrogen compounds in total nitrogen (PTA-SN/TN (R=0.775. After 10 weeks of ripening, the highest level of trichloroacetic acid-soluble nitrogen compounds in total nitrogen (TCA-SN/TN was observed in the cheese containing L. rhamnosus HN001 (11.87 % and slightly lower level in the cheese containing L. acidophilus NCFM (7.60 % and control cheese (6.24 %. The highest level of PTA-SN/TN fraction was noted in cheese containing L. acidophilus NCFM (3.48 % but the lowest level was observed in control cheese (2.24 % after ten weeks of ripening. The changes in the levels of PTA-SN/TN (R=–0.813 and TCA-SN/TN (R=–0.717 fractions were signifi cantly (p<0.05 correlated with the viability of probiotic counts. Water activity (aw strongly correlated with the PTA-SN/TN level (R=–0.824 and bacteria viability (R=–0.728. All of the analyzed cheeses were characterized by high counts of L. rhamnosus HN001 and L. acidophilus NCFM during ten weeks of ripening.

  17. Exosome-related multi-pass transmembrane protein TSAP6 is a target of rhomboid protease RHBDD1-induced proteolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhua Wan

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that rhomboid domain containing 1 (RHBDD1, a mammalian rhomboid protease highly expressed in the testis, can cleave the Bcl-2 protein Bik. In this study, we identified a multi-pass transmembrane protein, tumor suppressor activated pathway-6 (TSAP6 as a potential substrate of RHBDD1. RHBDD1 was found to induce the proteolysis of TSAP6 in a dose- and activity-dependent manner. The cleavage of TSAP6 was not restricted to its glycosylated form and occurred in three different regions. In addition, mass spectrometry and mutagenesis analyses both indicated that the major cleavage site laid in the C-terminal of the third transmembrane domain of TSAP6. A somatic cell knock-in approach was used to genetically inactivate the endogenous RHBDD1 in HCT116 and RKO colon cancer cells. Exosome secretion was significantly elevated when RHBDD1 was inactivated in the two cells lines. The increased exosome secretion was verfied through the detection of certain exosomal components, including Tsg101, Tf-R, FasL and Trail. In addition, the elevation of exosome secretion by RHBDD1 inactivation was reduced when TSAP6 was knocked down, indicating that the role of RHBDD1 in regulating exosomal trafficking is very likely to be TSAP6-dependent. We found that the increase in FasL and Trail increased exosome-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that RHBDD1 is involved in the regulation of a nonclassical exosomal secretion pathway through the restriction of TSAP6.

  18. Exosome-Related Multi-Pass Transmembrane Protein TSAP6 Is a Target of Rhomboid Protease RHBDD1-Induced Proteolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chunhua; Fu, Jun; Wang, Yong; Miao, Shiying; Song, Wei; Wang, Linfang

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported that rhomboid domain containing 1 (RHBDD1), a mammalian rhomboid protease highly expressed in the testis, can cleave the Bcl-2 protein Bik. In this study, we identified a multi-pass transmembrane protein, tumor suppressor activated pathway-6 (TSAP6) as a potential substrate of RHBDD1. RHBDD1 was found to induce the proteolysis of TSAP6 in a dose- and activity-dependent manner. The cleavage of TSAP6 was not restricted to its glycosylated form and occurred in three different regions. In addition, mass spectrometry and mutagenesis analyses both indicated that the major cleavage site laid in the C-terminal of the third transmembrane domain of TSAP6. A somatic cell knock-in approach was used to genetically inactivate the endogenous RHBDD1 in HCT116 and RKO colon cancer cells. Exosome secretion was significantly elevated when RHBDD1 was inactivated in the two cells lines. The increased exosome secretion was verfied through the detection of certain exosomal components, including Tsg101, Tf-R, FasL and Trail. In addition, the elevation of exosome secretion by RHBDD1 inactivation was reduced when TSAP6 was knocked down, indicating that the role of RHBDD1 in regulating exosomal trafficking is very likely to be TSAP6-dependent. We found that the increase in FasL and Trail increased exosome-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that RHBDD1 is involved in the regulation of a nonclassical exosomal secretion pathway through the restriction of TSAP6. PMID:22624035

  19. TGF-β inhibits alveolar protein transport by promoting shedding, regulated intramembrane proteolysis, and transcriptional downregulation of megalin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzocchi, Luciana C; Vohwinkel, Christine U; Mayer, Konstantin; Herold, Susanne; Morty, Rory E; Seeger, Werner; Vadász, István

    2017-11-01

    Disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier is a hallmark of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) that leads to the accumulation of protein-rich edema in the alveolar space, often resulting in comparable protein concentrations in alveolar edema and plasma and causing deleterious remodeling. Patients who survive ARDS have approximately three times lower protein concentrations in the alveolar edema than nonsurvivors; thus the ability to remove excess protein from the alveolar space may be critical for a positive outcome. We have recently shown that clearance of albumin from the alveolar space is mediated by megalin, a 600-kDa transmembrane endocytic receptor and member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor superfamily. In the currents study, we investigate the molecular mechanisms by which transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), a key molecule of ARDS pathogenesis, drives downregulation of megalin expression and function. TGF-β treatment led to shedding and regulated intramembrane proteolysis of megalin at the cell surface and to a subsequent increase in intracellular megalin COOH-terminal fragment abundance resulting in transcriptional downregulation of megalin. Activity of classical protein kinase C enzymes and γ-secretase was required for the TGF-β-induced megalin downregulation. Furthermore, TGF-β-induced shedding of megalin was mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-2, -9, and -14. Silencing of either of these MMPs stabilized megalin at the cell surface after TGF-β treatment and restored normal albumin transport. Moreover, a direct interaction of megalin with MMP-2 and -14 was demonstrated, suggesting that these MMPs may function as novel sheddases of megalin. Further understanding of these mechanisms may lead to novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of ARDS. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Optimized verification method for detection of an albumin-sulfur mustard adduct at Cys(34) using a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometer after direct plasma proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Harald; Siegert, Markus; Gandor, Felix; Gawlik, Michael; Kranawetvogl, Andreas; Karaghiosoff, Konstantin; Thiermann, Horst

    2016-02-26

    The vesicant sulfur mustard (SM) is a banned chemical warfare agent that is controlled by the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW). Bioanalytical procedures are mandatory for proving an alleged use and incorporation of SM into the body. We herein present the development and application of a novel optimized procedure suitable for qualitative verification analysis of plasma targeting the SM-adduct of human serum albumin (HSA) alkylated at the cysteine(34) residue. Diluted human plasma is directly mixed with pronase in an ultrafiltration device (10kDa cut-off) for proteolysis (4h, 37°C). Following ultrafiltration the filtrate is diluted and analyzed by microbore liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization high resolution tandem-mass spectrometry (μLC-ESI HR MS/MS) targeting the alkylated dipeptide hydroxyethylthioethyl-CysPro (HETE-CP). A hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer provided high mass spectrometric resolution in the MS/MS mode enabling highest selectivity and sensitivity (lower limit of detection corresponding to 9.8nM SM in plasma). Kinetics of HETE-CP formation from heparin-, citrate-, and EDTA-plasma as well as serum are presented and the influence of different EDTA and pronase concentrations was characterized. The novel procedure was applied to plasma samples provided by the OPCW as well as to patientś plasma derived from real cases of SM-poisoning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Current limiters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loescher, D.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Systems Surety Assessment Dept.; Noren, K. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1996-09-01

    The current that flows between the electrical test equipment and the nuclear explosive must be limited to safe levels during electrical tests conducted on nuclear explosives at the DOE Pantex facility. The safest way to limit the current is to use batteries that can provide only acceptably low current into a short circuit; unfortunately this is not always possible. When it is not possible, current limiters, along with other design features, are used to limit the current. Three types of current limiters, the fuse blower, the resistor limiter, and the MOSFET-pass-transistor limiters, are used extensively in Pantex test equipment. Detailed failure mode and effects analyses were conducted on these limiters. Two other types of limiters were also analyzed. It was found that there is no best type of limiter that should be used in all applications. The fuse blower has advantages when many circuits must be monitored, a low insertion voltage drop is important, and size and weight must be kept low. However, this limiter has many failure modes that can lead to the loss of over current protection. The resistor limiter is simple and inexpensive, but is normally usable only on circuits for which the nominal current is less than a few tens of milliamperes. The MOSFET limiter can be used on high current circuits, but it has a number of single point failure modes that can lead to a loss of protective action. Because bad component placement or poor wire routing can defeat any limiter, placement and routing must be designed carefully and documented thoroughly.

  2. A novel Meloidogyne graminicola effector, MgGPP, is secreted into host cells and undergoes glycosylation in concert with proteolysis to suppress plant defenses and promote parasitism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiansong Chen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Plant pathogen effectors can recruit the host post-translational machinery to mediate their post-translational modification (PTM and regulate their activity to facilitate parasitism, but few studies have focused on this phenomenon in the field of plant-parasitic nematodes. In this study, we show that the plant-parasitic nematode Meloidogyne graminicola has evolved a novel effector, MgGPP, that is exclusively expressed within the nematode subventral esophageal gland cells and up-regulated in the early parasitic stage of M. graminicola. The effector MgGPP plays a role in nematode parasitism. Transgenic rice lines expressing MgGPP become significantly more susceptible to M. graminicola infection than wild-type control plants, and conversely, in planta, the silencing of MgGPP through RNAi technology substantially increases the resistance of rice to M. graminicola. Significantly, we show that MgGPP is secreted into host plants and targeted to the ER, where the N-glycosylation and C-terminal proteolysis of MgGPP occur. C-terminal proteolysis promotes MgGPP to leave the ER, after which it is transported to the nucleus. In addition, N-glycosylation of MgGPP is required for suppressing the host response. The research data provide an intriguing example of in planta glycosylation in concert with proteolysis of a pathogen effector, which depict a novel mechanism by which parasitic nematodes could subjugate plant immunity and promote parasitism and may present a promising target for developing new strategies against nematode infections.

  3. Toxoplasma gondii infection shifts dendritic cells into an amoeboid rapid migration mode encompassing podosome dissolution, secretion of TIMP-1, and reduced proteolysis of extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ólafsson, Einar B; Varas-Godoy, Manuel; Barragan, Antonio

    2018-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) infected by Toxoplasma gondii rapidly acquire a hypermigratory phenotype that promotes systemic parasite dissemination by a "Trojan horse" mechanism in mice. Recent paradigms of leukocyte migration have identified the amoeboid migration mode of DCs as particularly suited for rapid locomotion in extracellular matrix and tissues. Here, we have developed a microscopy-based high-throughput approach to assess motility and matrix degradation by Toxoplasma-challenged murine and human DCs. DCs challenged with T. gondii exhibited dependency on metalloproteinase activity for hypermotility and transmigration but, strikingly, also dramatically reduced pericellular proteolysis. Toxoplasma-challenged DCs up-regulated expression and secretion of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) and their supernatants impaired matrix degradation by naïve DCs and by-stander DCs dose dependently. Gene silencing of TIMP-1 by short hairpin RNA restored matrix degradation activity in Toxoplasma-infected DCs. Additionally, dissolution of podosome structures in parasitised DCs coincided with abrogated matrix degradation. Toxoplasma lysates inhibited pericellular proteolysis in a MyD88-dependent fashion whereas abrogated proteolysis persevered in Toxoplasma-infected MyD88-deficient DCs. This indicated that both TLR/MyD88-dependent and TLR/MyD88-independent signalling pathways mediated podosome dissolution and the abrogated matrix degradation. We report that increased TIMP-1 secretion and cytoskeletal rearrangements encompassing podosome dissolution are features of Toxoplasma-induced hypermigration of DCs with an impact on matrix degradation. Jointly, the data highlight how an obligate intracellular parasite orchestrates key regulatory cellular processes consistent with non-proteolytic amoeboid migration of the vehicle cells that facilitate its dissemination. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Limiting Skepticism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella; Symons, John

    2011-01-01

    Skeptics argue that the acquisition of knowledge is impossible given the standing possibility of error. We present the limiting convergence strategy for responding to skepticism and discuss the relationship between conceivable error and an agent’s knowledge in the limit. We argue that the skeptic...

  5. Lysine Residues Are Not Required for Proteasome-Mediated Proteolysis of the Auxin/Indole Acidic Acid Protein IAA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkerson, Jonathan; Kelley, Dior R; Tam, Raymond; Estelle, Mark; Callis, Judy

    2015-06-01

    Although many ubiquitin-proteasome substrates have been characterized in plants, very little is known about the corresponding ubiquitin attachment(s) underlying regulated proteolysis. Current dogma asserts that ubiquitin is typically covalently attached to a substrate through an isopeptide bond between the ubiquitin carboxy terminus and a substrate lysyl amino group. However, nonlysine (non-Lys) ubiquitin attachment has been observed in other eukaryotes, including the N terminus, cysteine, and serine/threonine modification. Here, we investigate site(s) of ubiquitin attachment on indole-3-acetic acid1 (IAA1), a short-lived Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (Aux/IAA) family member. Most Aux/IAA proteins function as negative regulators of auxin responses and are targeted for degradation after ubiquitination by the ubiquitin ligase SCF(TIR1/AFB) (for S-Phase Kinase-Associated Protein1, Cullin, F-box [SCF] with Transport Inhibitor Response1 [TIR1]/Auxin Signaling F-box [AFB]) by an interaction directly facilitated by auxin. Surprisingly, using a Histidine-Hemaglutinin (HIS(6x)-HA(3x)) epitope-tagged version expressed in vivo, Lys-less IAA1 was ubiquitinated and rapidly degraded in vivo. Lys-substituted versions of IAA1 localized to the nucleus as Yellow Fluorescent Protein fusions and interacted with both TIR1 and IAA7 in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid experiments, indicating that these proteins were functional. Ubiquitination on both HIS(6x)-HA(3x)-IAA1 and Lys-less HIS(6x)-HA(3x)-IAA1 proteins was sensitive to sodium hydroxide treatment, indicative of ubiquitin oxyester formation on serine or threonine residues. Additionally, base-resistant forms of ubiquitinated IAA1 were observed for HIS(6x)-HA(3x)-IAA1, suggesting additional lysyl-linked ubiquitin on this protein. Characterization of other Aux/IAA proteins showed that they have diverse degradation rates, adding additional complexity to auxin signaling. Altogether, these data

  6. Proteolysis-Dependent Remodeling of the Tubulin Homolog FtsZ at the Division Septum in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marissa G Viola

    Full Text Available During bacterial cell division a dynamic protein structure called the Z-ring assembles at the septum. The major protein in the Z-ring in Escherichia coli is FtsZ, a tubulin homolog that polymerizes with GTP. FtsZ is degraded by the two-component ATP-dependent protease ClpXP. Two regions of FtsZ, located outside of the polymerization domain in the unstructured linker and at the C-terminus, are important for specific recognition and degradation by ClpXP. We engineered a synthetic substrate containing green fluorescent protein (Gfp fused to an extended FtsZ C-terminal tail (residues 317-383, including the unstructured linker and the C-terminal conserved region, but not the polymerization domain, and showed that it is sufficient to target a non-native substrate for degradation in vitro. To determine if FtsZ degradation regulates Z-ring assembly during division, we expressed a full length Gfp-FtsZ fusion protein in wild type and clp deficient strains and monitored fluorescent Z-rings. In cells deleted for clpX or clpP, or cells expressing protease-defective mutant protein ClpP(S97A, Z-rings appear normal; however, after photobleaching a region of the Z-ring, fluorescence recovers ~70% more slowly in cells without functional ClpXP than in wild type cells. Gfp-FtsZ(R379E, which is defective for degradation by ClpXP, also assembles into Z-rings that recover fluorescence ~2-fold more slowly than Z-rings containing Gfp-FtsZ. In vitro, ClpXP cooperatively degrades and disassembles FtsZ polymers. These results demonstrate that ClpXP is a regulator of Z-ring dynamics and that the regulation is proteolysis-dependent. Our results further show that FtsZ-interacting proteins in E. coli fine-tune Z-ring dynamics.

  7. Proteolysis in hyperthermophilic microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Donald E.; Shockley, Keith R.; Chang, Lara S.; Levy, Ryan D.; Michel, Joshua K.; Conners, Shannon B.; Kelly, Robert M.

    2002-01-01

    Proteases are found in every cell, where they recognize and break down unneeded or abnormal polypeptides or peptide-based nutrients within or outside the cell. Genome sequence data can be used to compare proteolytic enzyme inventories of different organisms as they relate to physiological needs for protein modification and hydrolysis. In this review, we exploit genome sequence data to compare hyperthermophilic micro...

  8. Inverse Limits

    CERN Document Server

    Ingram, WT

    2012-01-01

    Inverse limits provide a powerful tool for constructing complicated spaces from simple ones. They also turn the study of a dynamical system consisting of a space and a self-map into a study of a (likely more complicated) space and a self-homeomorphism. In four chapters along with an appendix containing background material the authors develop the theory of inverse limits. The book begins with an introduction through inverse limits on [0,1] before moving to a general treatment of the subject. Special topics in continuum theory complete the book. Although it is not a book on dynamics, the influen

  9. Viability and contribution to proteolysis of an adjunct culture of Lactobacillus plantarum in two model cheese systems: cheddar cheese-type and soft-cheese type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milesi, M M; McSweeney, P L H; Hynes, E R

    2008-09-01

    The influence of the cheese-making process, ripening conditions and primary starter on the viability and proteolytic activity of an adjunct culture of Lactobacillus plantarum I91 was assessed in two miniature cheese models, representative of Cremoso Argentino and Cheddar cheeses. Cheeses with and without adjunct culture were made under controlled microbiological conditions and sampled during ripening for physicochemical and microbiological analyses. The addition of lactobacilli neither contributed to acid production nor caused changes to the composition of the cheeses. The strain studied exhibited good development and survival and showed a similar growth pattern in both cheese matrices. The adjunct culture caused changes to secondary proteolysis of both cheese types, which were evidenced by modification of peptide profiles and the increase in the levels of some individual amino acids as well as the total content of free amino acids. The changes observed were consistent with the acceleration of proteolysis in the two cheese models assayed. Lactobacillus plantarum I91 has desirable and robust technological properties, which makes it a suitable adjunct culture for cheese-making. Other cultures and environmental conditions prevailing in the food may affect the viability of adjunct cultures and its biochemical activities; this is the first report describing the successful performance of an adjunct culture of Lact. plantarum I91 in two different model cheese systems.

  10. How three adventitious lactic acid bacteria affect proteolysis and organic acid production in model Portuguese cheeses manufactured from several milk sources and two alternative coagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, C I; Neto, D M; Capucho, J C; Gião, M S; Gomes, A M P; Malcata, F X

    2010-04-01

    Model cheeses were manufactured according to a full factorial experimental design to help shed light on the individual and combined roles played by 3 native lactic acid bacteria (Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis, Lactobacillus brevis, and Lactobacillus plantarum) upon proteolysis and organic acid evolution in cheese. The model cheeses were manufactured according to a generally representative Portuguese artisanal protocol, but the (ubiquitous) adventitious microflora in the cheesemaking milk were removed via sterilization before manufacture; therefore, the specific effects of only those lactic acid bacteria selected were monitored. In addition, 2 types of coagulant (animal and plant) and 3 types of cheesemaking milk (cow, sheep, and goat) were assessed to determine their influence on the final characteristics of the model cheeses. The nature of the coagulant appeared to be essential during the first stage of proteolysis as expected, whereas the contribution of those bacteria to the pools of total free AA and organic acids was crucial afterward. This was especially so in terms of the differences observed in the metabolisms of lactic acid (in the case of Lactococcus spp.) as well as acetic and citric acids (in the case of Lactobacillus spp.). Copyright (c) 2010 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The UPEC pore-forming toxin α-hemolysin triggers proteolysis of host proteins to disrupt cell adhesion, inflammatory, and survival pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Bijaya K; Mulvey, Matthew A

    2012-01-19

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), which are the leading cause of both acute and chronic urinary tract infections, often secrete a labile pore-forming toxin known as α-hemolysin (HlyA). We show that stable insertion of HlyA into epithelial cell and macrophage membranes triggers degradation of the cytoskeletal scaffolding protein paxillin and other host regulatory proteins, as well as components of the proinflammatory NFκB signaling cascade. Proteolysis of these factors requires host serine proteases, and paxillin degradation specifically involves the serine protease mesotrypsin. The induced activation of mesotrypsin by HlyA is preceded by redistribution of mesotrypsin precursors from the cytosol into foci along microtubules and within nuclei. HlyA intoxication also stimulated caspase activation, which occurred independently of effects on host serine proteases. HlyA-induced proteolysis of host proteins likely allows UPEC to not only modulate epithelial cell functions, but also disable macrophages and suppress inflammatory responses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. In vitro toxicity of perfluorooctane sulfonate on rat liver hepatocytes: probability of distructive binding to CYP 2E1 and involvement of cellular proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khansari, Mehdi Rajabnia; Yousefsani, Bahareh Sadat; Kobarfard, Farzad; Faizi, Mehrdad; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2017-10-01

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), an anthropogenic fluorosurfactant, is one of the most common global pollutants. PFOS is used in various consumer products to provide soil, oil, and water resistance to materials used in clothing, upholstery, and food packaging. PFOS is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic to mammalian species. In this study, the cellular mechanisms involved in PFOS hepatotoxicity were evaluated. For this purpose, we determined oxidative stress markers including cell lysis, ROS generation, lipid peroxidation, glutathione depletion, mitochondrial membrane potential decrease, lysosomal membrane leakiness, and cellular proteolysis. Our results demonstrated that PFOS liver cytotoxicity was associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and lipid peroxidation in isolated rat hepatocytes. Incubation of hepatocytes with PFOS caused rapid depletion of hepatocyte glutathione (GSH), an important marker of cellular oxidative stress. Most of the PFOS-induced GSH depletion could be attributed to the expulsion of glutathione disulfide (GSSG). PFOS hepatotoxicity was inhibited by antioxidants and ROS scavengers, mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore sealing agents, and endocytosis inhibitors. Our results suggest that PFOS hepatotoxicity might be the result of oxidative stress-induced lysosomal membrane leakiness and cellular proteolysis in rat hepatocytes.

  13. Decreased rate of protein synthesis, caspase-3 activity, and ubiquitin-proteasome proteolysis in soleus muscles from growing rats fed a low-protein, high-carbohydrate diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batistela, Emanuele; Pereira, Mayara Peron; Siqueira, Juliany Torres; Paula-Gomes, Silvia; Zanon, Neusa Maria; Oliveira, Eduardo Brandt; Navegantes, Luiz Carlos Carvalho; Kettelhut, Isis C; Andrade, Claudia Marlise Balbinotti; Kawashita, Nair Honda; Baviera, Amanda Martins

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in the rates of both protein synthesis and breakdown, and the activation of intracellular effectors that control these processes in soleus muscles from growing rats fed a low-protein, high-carbohydrate (LPHC) diet for 15 days. The mass and the protein content, as well as the rate of protein synthesis, were decreased in the soleus from LPHC-fed rats. The availability of amino acids was diminished, since the levels of various essential amino acids were decreased in the plasma of LPHC-fed rats. Overall rate of proteolysis was also decreased, explained by reductions in the mRNA levels of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1, ubiquitin conjugates, proteasome activity, and in the activity of caspase-3. Soleus muscles from LPHC-fed rats showed increased insulin sensitivity, with increased levels of insulin receptor and phosphorylation levels of AKT, which probably explains the inhibition of both the caspase-3 activity and the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The fall of muscle proteolysis seems to represent an adaptive response that contributes to spare proteins in a condition of diminished availability of dietary amino acids. Furthermore, the decreased rate of protein synthesis may be the driving factor to the lower muscle mass gain in growing rats fed the LPHC diet.

  14. JNK signaling pathway regulates sorbitol-induced Tau proteolysis and apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells by targeting caspase-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivera Santa-Catalina, Marta; Caballero Bermejo, Montaña; Argent, Ricardo; Alonso, Juan C; Centeno, Francisco; Lorenzo, María J

    2017-11-07

    Growing evidence suggests that Diabetes Mellitus increases the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. It is well known that hyperglycemia, a key feature of Diabetes Mellitus, may induce plasma osmolarity disturbances. Both hyperglycemia and hyperosmolarity promote the altered post-translational regulation of microtubule-associated protein Tau. Interestingly, abnormal hyperphosphorylation and cleavage of Tau have been proven to lead to the genesis of filamentous structures referred to as neurofibrillary tangles, the main pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. We have previously described that hyperosmotic stress induced by sorbitol promotes Tau proteolysis and apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells via caspase-3 activation. In order to gain insights into the regulatory mechanisms of such processes, in this work we explored the intracellular signaling pathways that regulate these events. We found that sorbitol treatment significantly enhanced the activation of conventional families of MAPK in SH-SY5Y cells. Tau proteolysis was completely prevented by JNK inhibition but not affected by either ERK1/2 or p38 MAPK blockade. Moreover, inhibition of JNK, but not ERK1/2 or p38 MAPK, efficiently prevented sorbitol-induced apoptosis and caspase-3 activation. In summary, we provide evidence that JNK signaling pathway is an upstream regulator of hyperosmotic stress-induced Tau cleavage and apoptosis in SH-SY5Y through the control of caspase-3 activation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Metabolic and morphological alterations induced by proteolysis-inducing factor from Walker tumour-bearing rats in C2C12 myotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tisdale Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with advanced cancer suffer from cachexia, which is characterised by a marked weight loss, and is invariably associated with the presence of tumoral and humoral factors which are mainly responsible for the depletion of fat stores and muscular tissue. Methods In this work, we used cytotoxicity and enzymatic assays and morphological analysis to examine the effects of a proteolysis-inducing factor (PIF-like molecule purified from ascitic fluid of Walker tumour-bearing rats (WF, which has been suggested to be responsible for muscle atrophy, on cultured C2C12 muscle cells. Results WF decreased the viability of C2C12 myotubes, especially at concentrations of 20–25 μg.mL-1. There was an increase in the content of the pro-oxidant malondialdehyde, and a decrease in antioxidant enzyme activity. Myotubes protein synthesis decreased and protein degradation increased together with an enhanced in the chymotrypsin-like enzyme activity, a measure of functional proteasome activity, after treatment with WF. Morphological alterations such as cell retraction and the presence of numerous cells in suspension were observed, particularly at high WF concentrations. Conclusion These results indicate that WF has similar effects to those of proteolysis-inducing factor, but is less potent than the latter. Further studies are required to determine the precise role of WF in this experimental model.

  16. Dopamine induces apoptosis in APPswe-expressing Neuro2A cells following Pepstatin-sensitive proteolysis of APP in acid compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnin, Monica; Ozzano, Matteo; Bellio, Natascia; Fiorentino, Ilaria; Follo, Carlo; Isidoro, Ciro

    2012-08-30

    A pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the presence within neurons and the interneuronal space of aggregates of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides that originate from an abnormal proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). The aspartyl proteases that initiate this processing act in the Golgi and endosomal compartments. Here, we show that the neurotransmitter dopamine stimulates the rapid endocytosis and processing of APP and induces apoptosis in neuroblastoma Neuro2A cells over-expressing transgenic human APP (Swedish mutant). Apoptosis could be prevented by impairing Pepstatin-sensitive and acid-dependent proteolysis of APP within endosomal-lysosomal compartments. The γ-secretase inhibitor L685,458 and the α-secretase stimulator phorbol ester elicited protection from dopamine-induced proteolysis of APP and cell toxicity. Our data shed lights on the mechanistic link between dopamine excitotoxicity, processing of APP and neuronal cell death. Since AD often associates with parkinsonian symptoms, which is suggestive of dopaminergic neurodegeneration, the present data provide the rationale for the therapeutic use of lysosomal activity inhibitors such as chloroquine or Pepstatin A to alleviate the progression of AD leading to onset of parkinsonism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Studies on regulation of IGF (insulin-like growth factor)-binding protein (IGFBP) 4 proteolysis by pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) in cells treated with phorbol ester.

    OpenAIRE

    Sivanandam, Arun S; Mohan, Subburaman; Kita, Hirohito; Kapur, Sanjay; Chen, Shin-Tai; Linkhart, Thomas A; Bagi, Gyorgy; Baylink, David J; Qin, Xuezhong

    2004-01-01

    PAPP-A (pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A) is produced by hSFs (human skin fibroblasts) and hOBs (human osteoblasts) and enhances the mitogenic activity of IGFs (insulin-like growth factors) by degradation of IGFBP-4 (insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 4). PKC (protein kinase C) activation in these cells led to reduction in IGFBP-4 proteolysis. This study was undertaken to determine the mechanism by which activation of PKC suppresses IGFBP-4 proteolysis. Treatment of hSFs/hOBs wit...

  18. α2β1 integrin affects metastatic potential of ovarian carcinoma spheroids by supporting disaggregation and proteolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ackland Margaret

    2007-01-01

    /MMP9 with no such activation of MMP's observed in monolayer cells. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated enhanced expression of α2 and diminution of α6 integrin subunits in spheroids versus monolayer cells. No change in the expression of α3, αv and β1 subunits was evident. Conversely, except for αv integrin, a 1.5–7.5-fold decrease in α2, α3, α6 and β1 integrin subunit expression was observed in IOSE29 cells within 2 days. Neutralizing antibodies against α2, β1 subunits and α2β1 integrin inhibited disaggregation as well as activation of MMPs in spheroids. Conclusion Our results suggest that enhanced expression of α2β1 integrin may influence spheroid disaggregation and proteolysis responsible for the peritoneal dissemination of ovarian carcinoma. This may indicate a new therapeutic target for the suppression of the peritoneal metastasis associated with advanced ovarian carcinomas.

  19. Limits on $\

    CERN Document Server

    Perego, D L

    2002-01-01

    A limit on the tau neutrino mass is obtained using all the $Z^{0} \\to \\tau^{+} \\tau^{-}$ data collected at LEP by the DELPHI detector between 1992 and 1995. In this analysis events in which one of the taus decays into one charged particle, while the second $\\tau$ decays into f{}ive charged pions (1-5 topology) have been used. The neutrino mass is determined from a bidimensional \\fit ~on the invariant mass $m^{*}_{5 \\pi}$ and on the energy $E_{5 \\pi}$ of the f{}ive $\\pi^{\\pm}$ system. The result found is $m_{\

  20. Effect of processing on proteolysis and biogenic amines formation in a Portuguese traditional dry-fermented ripened sausage "Chouriço Grosso de Estremoz e Borba PGI".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseiro, L C; Gomes, A; Gonçalves, H; Sol, M; Cercas, R; Santos, C

    2010-01-01

    The influence of alternative drying environmental conditions on the proteolysis of a traditional Portuguese fermented sausage was evaluated, in relation to different ripening periods. Traditional sausages (batch T) had lower pH than counterparts (batch M), with differences (Palanine>taurine>serine>valine and taurine>alanine>leucine>serine>valine sequences in the former product from batches T and M, respectively, and, coincidently, the same sequence for both batches in the later (serine>leucine>alanine>proline>valine). Such effect on FAA concentrations led to a distinct (P<0.05) expression of sweet, bitter, acidic and aged sensorial attributes between batches, in S8 and S9 products. BA typical quantitative sequences varied between batches according to the ripening stage, with differences in S6 and S7 end products also reflecting the distinct microbial development rates and profiles observed. Overall, the total BA mean concentration was higher (P<0.05) in products from batch T.

  1. Chk1 regulates the S phase checkpoint by coupling the physiological turnover and ionizing radiation-induced accelerated proteolysis of Cdc25A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Claus Storgaard; Syljuåsen, Randi G; Falck, Jacob

    2003-01-01

    Chk1 kinase coordinates cell cycle progression and preserves genome integrity. Here, we show that chemical or genetic ablation of human Chk1 triggered supraphysiological accumulation of the S phase-promoting Cdc25A phosphatase, prevented ionizing radiation (IR)-induced degradation of Cdc25A......, and caused radioresistant DNA synthesis (RDS). The basal turnover of Cdc25A operating in unperturbed S phase required Chk1-dependent phosphorylation of serines 123, 178, 278, and 292. IR-induced acceleration of Cdc25A proteolysis correlated with increased phosphate incorporation into these residues generated...... by a combined action of Chk1 and Chk2 kinases. Finally, phosphorylation of Chk1 by ATM was required to fully accelerate the IR-induced degradation of Cdc25A. Our results provide evidence that the mammalian S phase checkpoint functions via amplification of physiologically operating, Chk1-dependent mechanisms....

  2. IGF dependent modulation of IGF binding protein (IGFBP) proteolysis by pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A): multiple PAPP-A-IGFBP interaction sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaidamauskas, Ervinas; Gyrup, Claus; Boldt, Henning B; Schack, Vivien R; Overgaard, Michael T; Laursen, Lisbeth S; Oxvig, Claus

    2013-03-01

    Pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) is a local regulator of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) bioavailability in physiological systems, but many structural and functional aspects of the metzincin metalloproteinase remain to be elucidated. PAPP-A cleaves IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-4 and IGFBP-5. Cleavage of IGFBP-4, but not IGFBP-5, depends on the binding of IGF before proteolysis by PAPP-A can occur. The paralogue PAPP-A2 has two substrates among the six IGFBPs: IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5. Sets of chimeric proteins between IGFBP-4 and -5, and IGFBP-3 and -5 were constructed to investigate the structural requirements for IGF modulation. At the proteinase level, we investigated the importance of individual acidic amino acids positioned in the proteolytic domain of PAPP-A for proteolytic activity against IGFBP-4 and -5. Interaction between PAPP-A and its substrates was analyzed by surface plasmon resonance. We provide data suggesting that the C-terminal domain of the IGFBPs is responsible for IGF-dependent modulation of access to the scissile bond. Loss or reduction of IGFBP proteolysis by PAPP-A was observed upon mutation of residues positioned in the unique 63-residue stretch separating the zinc and Met-turn motifs, and in the short sequence following the Met-turn methionine. A model of the proteolytic domain of PAPP-A suggests the presence of structural calcium ions in the C-terminal subdomain, implicated in IGFBP substrate interactions. Detailed knowledge of interactions between PAPP-A and its substrates is required to understand the modulatory role of PAPP-A on IGF receptor stimulation.

  3. Predicting the effect of proteolysis on ruminal crude protein degradation of legume and grass silages using near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, P C; Brehm, N M; Combs, D K; Bauman, L M; Peters, J B; Undersander, D J

    1999-04-01

    Two studies were conducted to assess whether routine applications of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy could predict the effects of silage proteolysis on ruminal crude protein (CP) degradation of legume and grass silages. A preliminary study was conducted to assess the effect of laboratory drying method on ruminal CP degradation of silages. Thirty legume and grass silages were freeze-, oven-, or microwave-dried and incubated in situ in the ventral rumen of three ruminally cannulated cows for 24 h. Freeze-drying was considered least likely to alter ruminal CP degradation of the silages; therefore, oven- and microwave-drying were compared using first-order regression with freeze-drying. Oven-drying for 48 h at 55 degrees C compared favorably (R2 = 0.84) with freeze-drying. Microwave-drying resulted in a large bias (2.84 g/10(-1) kg of CP) and was poorly related (R2 = 0.48) to freeze-drying. In a second study, alfalfa and timothy were cut at three maturities and allowed to wilt for 0, 10, 24, 32, 48, and 54 h. Forages were ensiled in triplicate cylindrical mini silos and allowed to ferment for 120 d. After fermentation, silages were oven-dried, ground, and scanned on a near-infrared reflectance spectrophotometer. Duplicate, dried, 2-mm ground silage samples were incubated in the ventral rumen of three ruminally cannulated cows for 24 h. Forage species, maturity, and wilting time significantly affected 24-h ruminal CP degradation of the silages. Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy accurately predicted (R2 = 0.91) 24-h ruminal CP degradation of silages. Data suggest near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy can accurately assess the effects of forage species, maturity, and wilting time (proteolysis) on 24-h ruminal CP degradation of legume and grass silages.

  4. Calpain- and caspase-mediated alphaII-spectrin and tau proteolysis in rat cerebrocortical neuronal cultures after ecstasy or methamphetamine exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Matthew W; Zheng, Wenrong; Kobeissy, Firas H; Cheng Liu, Ming; Hayes, Ronald L; Gold, Mark S; Larner, Stephen F; Wang, Kevin K W

    2007-08-01

    Abuse of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or Ecstasy) and methamphetamine (Meth or Speed) is a growing international problem with an estimated 250 million users of psychoactive drugs worldwide. It is important to demonstrate and understand the mechanism of neurotoxicity so potential prevention and treatment therapies can be designed. In this study rat primary cerebrocortical neuron cultures were challenged with MDMA and Meth (1 or 2 mM) for 24 and 48 h and compared to the excitotoxin N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). The neurotoxicity of these drugs, as assessed by microscopy, lactate dehydrogenase release and immunoblot, was shown to be both dose- and time-dependent. Immunoblot analysis using biomarkers of cell death showed significant proteolysis of both alphaII-spectrin and tau proteins. Breakdown products of alphaII-spectrin (SBDPs) of 150, 145, and 120 kDa and tau breakdown products (TBDPs) of 45, 32, 26, and 14 kDa were observed. The use of the protease inhibitors calpain inhibitor SJA6017 and caspase inhibitors z-VAD-fmk and Z-D-DCB, attenuated drug-induced alphaII-spectrin and tau proteolysis. The calpain inhibitor reduced the calpain-induced breakdown products SBDP145 and TBDP14, but there was an offset increase in the caspase-mediated breakdown products SBDP120 and TBDP45. The caspase inhibitors, on the other hand, decreased SBDP120 and TBDP45. These data suggest that both MDMA and Meth trigger concerted proteolytic attacks of the structural proteins by both calpain and caspase family of proteases. The ability of the protease inhibitors to reduce the damage caused by these drugs suggests that the treatment arsenal could include similar drugs as possible tools to combat the drug-induced neurotoxicity in vivo.

  5. Pathogen-mediated proteolysis of the cell death regulator RIPK1 and the host defense modulator RIPK2 in human aortic endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés G Madrigal

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is the primary etiologic agent of periodontal disease that is associated with other human chronic inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis. The ability of P. gingivalis to invade and persist within human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC has been postulated to contribute to a low to moderate chronic state of inflammation, although how this is specifically achieved has not been well defined. In this study, we demonstrate that P. gingivalis infection of HAEC resulted in the rapid cleavage of receptor interacting protein 1 (RIPK1, a mediator of tumor necrosis factor (TNF receptor-1 (TNF-R1-induced cell activation or death, and RIPK2, a key mediator of both innate immune signaling and adaptive immunity. The cleavage of RIPK1 or RIPK2 was not observed in cells treated with apoptotic stimuli, or cells stimulated with agonists to TNF-R1, nucleotide oligomerization domain receptor 1(NOD1, NOD2, Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 or TLR4. P. gingivalis-induced cleavage of RIPK1 and RIPK2 was inhibited in the presence of a lysine-specific gingipain (Kgp inhibitor. RIPK1 and RIPK2 cleavage was not observed in HAEC treated with an isogenic mutant deficient in the lysine-specific gingipain, confirming a role for Kgp in the cleavage of RIPK1 and RIPK2. Similar proteolysis of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP was observed. We also demonstrated direct proteolysis of RIPK2 by P. gingivalis in a cell-free system which was abrogated in the presence of a Kgp-specific protease inhibitor. Our studies thus reveal an important role for pathogen-mediated modification of cellular kinases as a potential strategy for bacterial persistence within target host cells, which is associated with low-grade chronic inflammation, a hallmark of pathogen-mediated chronic inflammatory disorders.

  6. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP)-mediated cell differentiation to proteolysis mechanism networks from human normal adjacent tissues to lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Huang, Juxiang; Jiang, Minghu; Diao, Haizhen; Zhou, Huilei; Li, Xiaohe; Chen, Qingchun; Jiang, Zhenfu; Feng, Haitao; Wolfl, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    To understand cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) mechanism network from human normal adjacent tissues to lung adenocarcinoma. COMP complete different activated (all no positive correlation, Pearson CC lung adenocarcinoma compared with lower human normal adjacent tissues from the corresponding COMP-stimulated (≥0.25) or inhibited (Pearson CC ≤ -0.25) overlapping molecules of Pearson correlation coefficient (CC) and GRNInfer, respectively. COMP complete different activated and inhibited (all no positive correlation, Pearson CC lung adenocarcinoma and lower human normal adjacent tissues were constructed by integration of Pearson CC, GRNInfer and GO. As visualized by integration of GO, KEGG, GenMAPP, BioCarta and Disease, we deduced COMP complete different activated and inhibited network in higher lung adenocarcinoma and lower human normal adjacent tissues. As visualized by GO, KEGG, GenMAPP, BioCarta and disease database integration, we proposed mainly that the mechanism and function of COMP complete different activated network in higher lung adenocarcinoma was involved in COMP activation with matrix-localized insulin-like factor coupling carboxypeptidase to metallopeptidase-induced proteolysis, whereas the corresponding inhibited network in lower human normal adjacent tissues participated in COMP inhibition with nucleus-localized vasculogenesis, B and T cell differentiation and neural endocrine factors coupling pyrophosphatase-mediated proteolysis. However, COMP complete different inhibited network in higher lung adenocarcinoma included COMP inhibition with nucleus-localized chromatin maintenance, licensing and assembly factors coupling phosphatase-inhibitor to cytokinesis regulators-mediated cell differentiation, whereas the corresponding activated network in lower human normal adjacent tissues contained COMP activation with cytolplasm-localized translation elongation factor coupling fucosyltransferase to ubiquitin-protein ligase-induced cell

  7. Effect of Limited Hydrolysis on Traditional Soy Protein Concentrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana B. Pesic

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of limited proteolysis of soy protein concentrate on proteinextractability, the composition of the extractable proteins, their emulsifying properties andsome nutritional properties were investigated. Traditional concentrate (alcohol leachedconcentrate was hydrolyzed using trypsin and pepsin as hydrolytic agents. Significantdifferences in extractable protein composition between traditional concentrate and theirhydrolysates were observed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE and by SDSPAGE.All hydrolysates showed better extractability than the original protein concentrate,whereas significantly better emulsifying properties were noticed at modified concentratesobtained by trypsin induced hydrolysis. These improved properties are the result of twosimultaneous processes, dissociation and degradation of insoluble alcohol-induced proteinaggregates. Enzyme induced hydrolysis had no influence on trypsin-inibitor activity, andsignificantly reduced phytic acid content.

  8. Oral inoculation of neonatal Suffolk sheep with the agent of classical scrapie results in PrP(Sc) accumulation in sheep with the PRNP ARQ/ARQ but not the ARQ/ARR genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Justin J; Smith, Jodi D; Hamir, Amir N

    2016-04-01

    Scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy that can be transmitted amongst susceptible sheep. The prion protein gene (PRNP) profoundly influences the susceptibility of sheep to the scrapie agent. This study reports the failure to detect PrP(Sc) in nervous or lymphoid tissues of Suffolk sheep of the PRNP ARQ/ARR genotype after oral inoculation with a U.S. scrapie isolate. Lambs were inoculated within the first 24 h of birth with 1 ml of a 10% (wt./vol.) brain homogenate derived from a clinically affected ARQ/ARQ sheep. The inoculated sheep were observed daily throughout the experiment for clinical signs suggestive of scrapie until they were necropsied at 86 months post inoculation. Tissues were collected for examination by immunohistochemistry and enzyme immunoassay, but all failed to demonstrate evidence of scrapie infection. Neonatal sheep of the ARQ/ARQ genotype receiving the same inoculum developed scrapie within 24 months. Lambs of the ARQ/ARR genotype that received the same inoculum by intracranial inoculation develop scrapie with a prolonged incubation period and with abnormal prion present within the central nervous system, but not peripheral lymphoid tissues. Results of this study suggest that ARQ/ARR sheep are resistant to oral infection with the scrapie isolate used even during the neonatal period. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Proteolysis of the major yolk glycoproteins is regulated by acidification of the yolk platelets in sea urchin embryos

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    The precise function of the yolk platelets of sea urchin embryos during early development is unknown. We have shown previously that the chemical composition of the yolk platelets remains unchanged in terms of phospholipid, triglyceride, hexose, sialic acid, RNA, and total protein content after fertilization and early development. However, the platelet is not entirely static because the major 160-kD yolk glycoprotein YP-160 undergoes limited, step-wise proteolytic cleavage during early develop...

  10. Proteomic Investigations of Proteases Involved in Cotyledon Senescence: A Model to Explore the Genotypic Variability of Proteolysis Machinery Associated with Nitrogen Remobilization Efficiency during the Leaf Senescence of Oilseed Rape

    OpenAIRE

    Marine Poret; Balakumaran Chandrasekar; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.; Laurent Coquet; Thierry Jouenne; Jean-Christophe Avice

    2017-01-01

    Oilseed rape is characterized by a low nitrogen remobilization efficiency during leaf senescence, mainly due to a lack of proteolysis. Because cotyledons are subjected to senescence, it was hypothesized that contrasting protease activities between genotypes may be distinguishable early in the senescence of cotyledons. To verify this assumption, our goals were to (i) characterize protease activities in cotyledons between two genotypes with contrasting nitrogen remobilization efficiency (Ténor ...

  11. 7-Dehydrocholesterol–dependent proteolysis of HMG-CoA reductase suppresses sterol biosynthesis in a mouse model of Smith-Lemli-Opitz/RSH syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzky, Barbara U.; Moebius, Fabian F.; Asaoka, Hitoshi; Waage-Baudet, Heather; Xu, Liwen; Xu, Guorong; Maeda, Nobuyo; Kluckman, Kimberly; Hiller, Sylvia; Yu, Hongwei; Batta, Ashok K.; Shefer, Sarah; Chen, Thomas; Salen, Gerald; Sulik, Kathleen; Simoni, Robert D.; Ness, Gene C.; Glossmann, Hartmut; Patel, Shailendra B.; Tint, G.S.

    2001-01-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz/RSH syndrome (SLOS), a relatively common birth-defect mental-retardation syndrome, is caused by mutations in DHCR7, whose product catalyzes an obligate step in cholesterol biosynthesis, the conversion of 7-dehydrocholesterol to cholesterol. A null mutation in the murine Dhcr7 causes an identical biochemical defect to that seen in SLOS, including markedly reduced tissue cholesterol and total sterol levels, and 30- to 40-fold elevated concentrations of 7-dehydrocholesterol. Prenatal lethality was not noted, but newborn homozygotes breathed with difficulty, did not suckle, and died soon after birth with immature lungs, enlarged bladders, and, frequently, cleft palates. Despite reduced sterol concentrations in Dhcr7–/– mice, mRNA levels for 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, the rate-controlling enzyme for sterol biosynthesis, the LDL receptor, and SREBP-2 appeared neither elevated nor repressed. In contrast to mRNA, protein levels and activities of HMG-CoA reductase were markedly reduced. Consistent with this finding, 7-dehydrocholesterol accelerates proteolysis of HMG-CoA reductase while sparing other key proteins. These results demonstrate that in mice without Dhcr7 activity, accumulated 7-dehydrocholesterol suppresses sterol biosynthesis posttranslationally. This effect might exacerbate abnormal development in SLOS by increasing the fetal cholesterol deficiency. PMID:11560960

  12. Latent and active polyphenol oxidase (PPO) in red clover (Trifolium pratense) and use of a low PPO mutant to study the role of PPO in proteolysis reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Ana L; Minchin, Frank R; Michaelson-Yeates, Terry P T; Lee, Michael R F; Morris, Phillip

    2008-04-23

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity in leaf extracts of wild type (WT) red clover and a mutant line expressing greatly reduced levels of PPO (LP red clover) has been characterized. Both latent and active forms of PPO were present, with the latent being the predominant form. PPO enzyme and substrate (phaselic acid) levels fluctuated over a growing season and were not correlated. Protease activation of latent PPO was demonstrated; however, the rate was too low to have an immediate effect following extraction. A novel, more rapid PPO activation mechanism by the enzyme's own substrate was identified. Rates of protein breakdown and amino acid release were significantly higher in LP red clover extracts compared with WT extracts, with 20 versus 6% breakdown of total protein and 1.9 versus 0.4 mg/g FW of free amino acids released over 24 h, respectively. Inclusion of ascorbic acid increased the extent of protein breakdown. Free phenol content decreased during a 24 h incubation of WT red clover extracts, whereas protein-bound phenol increased and high molecular weight protein species were formed. Inhibition of proteolysis occurred during wilting and ensilage of WT compared with LP forage (1.9 vs 5 and 17 vs 21 g/kg of DM free amino acids for 24 h wilted forage and 90 day silage, respectively). This study shows that whereas constitutive red clover PPO occurs predominantly in the latent form, this fraction can contribute to reducing protein breakdown in crude extracts and during ensilage.

  13. Novel UBQLN2 mutations linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and atypical hereditary spastic paraplegia phenotype through defective HSP70-mediated proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teyssou, Elisa; Chartier, Laura; Amador, Maria-Del-Mar; Lam, Roselina; Lautrette, Géraldine; Nicol, Marie; Machat, Selma; Da Barroca, Sandra; Moigneu, Carine; Mairey, Mathilde; Larmonier, Thierry; Saker, Safaa; Dussert, Christelle; Forlani, Sylvie; Fontaine, Bertrand; Seilhean, Danielle; Bohl, Delphine; Boillée, Séverine; Meininger, Vincent; Couratier, Philippe; Salachas, François; Stevanin, Giovanni; Millecamps, Stéphanie

    2017-10-01

    Mutations in UBQLN2 have been associated with rare cases of X-linked juvenile and adult forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and ALS linked to frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Here, we report 1 known (c.1489C>T, p.Pro497Ser, P497S) and 3 novel (c.1481C>T, p.Pro494Leu, P494L; c.1498C>T, p.Pro500Ser, P500S; and c.1516C>G, p.Pro506Ala, P506A) missense mutations in the PXX domain of UBQLN2 in familial motor neuron diseases including ALS and spastic paraplegia (SP). A novel missense mutation (c.1462G>A, p.Ala488Thr, A488T) adjacent to this hotspot UBQLN2 domain was identified in a sporadic case of ALS. These mutations are conserved in mammals, are absent from ExAC and gnomAD browsers, and are predicted to be deleterious by SIFT in silico analysis. Patient lymphoblasts carrying a UBQLN2 mutation showed absence of ubiquilin-2 accumulation, disrupted binding with HSP70, and impaired autophagic pathway. Our results confirm the role of PXX repeat in ALS pathogenesis, show that UBQLN2-linked disease can manifest like a SP phenotype, evidence a highly reduced disease penetrance in females carrying UBQLN2 mutations, which is important information for genetic counseling, and underline the pivotal role of ubiquilin-2 in proteolysis regulation pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. N-lactoyl-amino acids are ubiquitous metabolites that originate from CNDP2-mediated reverse proteolysis of lactate and amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Robert S; Addie, Ruben; Merkx, Remco; Fish, Alexander; Mahakena, Sunny; Bleijerveld, Onno B; Altelaar, Maarten; IJlst, Lodewijk; Wanders, Ronald J; Borst, P; van de Wetering, Koen

    2015-05-26

    Despite technological advances in metabolomics, large parts of the human metabolome are still unexplored. In an untargeted metabolomics screen aiming to identify substrates of the orphan transporter ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 5 (ABCC5), we identified a class of mammalian metabolites, N-lactoyl-amino acids. Using parallel protein fractionation in conjunction with shotgun proteomics on fractions containing N-lactoyl-Phe-forming activity, we unexpectedly found that a protease, cytosolic nonspecific dipeptidase 2 (CNDP2), catalyzes their formation. N-lactoyl-amino acids are ubiquitous pseudodipeptides of lactic acid and amino acids that are rapidly formed by reverse proteolysis, a process previously considered to be negligible in vivo. The plasma levels of these metabolites strongly correlate with plasma levels of lactate and amino acid, as shown by increased levels after physical exercise and in patients with phenylketonuria who suffer from elevated Phe levels. Our approach to identify unknown metabolites and their biosynthesis has general applicability in the further exploration of the human metabolome.

  15. UV-induced proteolysis of RNA polymerase II is mediated by VCP/p97 segregase and timely orchestration by Cockayne syndrome B protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinshan; Zhu, Qianzheng; Wani, Gulzar; Wani, Altaf A

    2017-02-14

    RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) acts as a damage sensor for transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) and undergoes proteolytic clearance from damaged chromatin by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Here, we report that Valosin-containing protein (VCP)/p97, a druggable oncotarget, is essential for RNAPII's proteolytic clearance in mammalian cells. We show that inhibition of VCP/p97, or siRNA-mediated ablation of VCP/p97 and its cofactors UFD1 and UBXD7 severely impairs ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced RNAPII degradation. VCP/p97 interacts with RNAPII, and the interaction is enhanced by Cockayne syndrome B protein (CSB). However, the VCP/p97-mediated RNAPII proteolysis occurs independent of CSB. Surprisingly, CSB enhances UVR-induced RNAPII ubiquitination but delays its turnover. Additionally, VCP/p97-mediated RNAPII turnover occurs with and without Von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor protein (pVHL), a known substrate receptor of Elongin E3 ubiquitin ligase for RNAPII. Moreover, pVHL re-expression improves cell viability following UVR. Whereas, VCP/p97 inhibition decreases cell viability and enhances a low-dose UVR killing in presence of pVHL. These findings reveal a function of VCP/p97 segregase in UVR-induced RNAPII degradation in mammalian cells, and suggest a role of CSB in coordinating VCP/p97-mediated extraction of ubiquitinated RNAPII and CSB itself from chromatin.

  16. The Role of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Proteolysis Site Cleavage of Polycystin-1 in Renal Physiology and Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Trudel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycystin-1 (PC1 plays an essential role in renal tubular morphogenesis, and PC1 dysfunction causes human autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. A fundamental characteristic of PC1 is post-translational modification via cleavage at the juxtamembrane GPCR proteolysis site (GPS motif that is part of the larger GAIN domain. Given the considerable biochemical complexity of PC1 molecules generated in vivo by this process, GPS cleavage has several profound implications on the intracellular trafficking and localization in association with their particular function. The critical nature of GPS cleavage is further emphasized by the increasing numbers of PKD1 mutations that significantly affect this cleavage process. The GAIN domain with the GPS motif therefore represents the key structural element with fundamental importance for PC1 and might be polycystic kidney disease’s (PKD Achilles’ heel in a large spectrum of PKD1 missense mutations. We highlight the central roles of PC1 cleavage for the regulation of its biogenesis, intracellular trafficking and function, as well as its significance in polycystic kidney disease.

  17. Insulin does not stimulate muscle protein synthesis during increased plasma branched-chain amino acids alone but still decreases whole body proteolysis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everman, Sarah; Meyer, Christian; Tran, Lee; Hoffman, Nyssa; Carroll, Chad C; Dedmon, William L; Katsanos, Christos S

    2016-10-01

    Insulin stimulates muscle protein synthesis when the levels of total amino acids, or at least the essential amino acids, are at or above their postabsorptive concentrations. Among the essential amino acids, branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) have the primary role in stimulating muscle protein synthesis and are commonly sought alone to stimulate muscle protein synthesis in humans. Fourteen healthy young subjects were studied before and after insulin infusion to examine whether insulin stimulates muscle protein synthesis in relation to the availability of BCAA alone. One half of the subjects were studied in the presence of postabsorptive BCAA concentrations (control) and the other half in the presence of increased plasma BCAA (BCAA). Compared with that prior to the initiation of the insulin infusion, fractional synthesis rate of muscle protein (%/h) did not change (P > 0.05) during insulin in either the control (0.04 ± 0.01 vs 0.05 ± 0.01) or the BCAA (0.05 ± 0.02 vs. 0.05 ± 0.01) experiments. Insulin decreased (P BCAA (0.89 ± 0.07 vs 0.61 ± 0.03) experiments, but the change was not different between the two experiments (P > 0.05). In conclusion, insulin does not stimulate muscle protein synthesis in the presence of increased circulating levels of plasma BCAA alone. Insulin's suppressive effect on proteolysis is observed independently of the levels of circulating plasma BCAA. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. A high-throughput method for measurement of glycohemoglobin in blood samples utilizing laser-accelerated proteolysis and MALDI-TOF MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lanting; Zang, Wenjuan; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2016-02-01

    Glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is a useful marker for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. Commercial column separation methods for HbA1c measurement were lacking throughput and sometimes interfered with hemoglobin variants. In this work, we developed a high-throughput and specific method for HbA1c by quantitative measurement of N-terminal peptides (NT method). Two thousand specimens could be measured in 8 h. The high-throughput was achieved by using a fast analysis of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and an efficient proteolysis accelerated by laser irradiation. An intensity ratio of glycosylated to non-glycosylated hemoglobin N-terminal peptides was used to calculate the HbA1c level in blood. Interference from Hb variants of N-terminal peptides could be excluded by a highly accurate mass selection. The coefficient of variation (CV) of intra-assay precision was 9.8 and 9.9%, respectively. The CVs of inter-assay precision over 20 days were 9.1 and 8.4%, respectively. Measurement results were well correlated with the commercially available column method (r = 0.995). The NT method is promising for large-scale screening for diabetes mellitus among people.

  19. Enhancement of 9α-Hydroxy-4-androstene-3,17-dione Production from Soybean Phytosterols by Deficiency of a Regulated Intramembrane Proteolysis Metalloprotease in Mycobacterium neoaurum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Liang-Bin; Sun, Wan-Ju; Liu, Yong-Jun; Wang, Feng-Qing; Wei, Dong-Zhi

    2017-12-06

    Modification of the sterol catabolism pathway in mycobacteria may result in the accumulation of some valuable steroid pharmaceutical intermediates, such as 9α-hydroxy-4-androstene-3,17-dione (9-OHAD). In previous work, sigma factor D (SigD) was identified as a negative factor of the 9-OHAD production in Mycobacterium neoaurum. Here, the deficiency of rip1 putatively coding for a regulated intramembrane proteolysis metalloprotease (Rip1), which could cleave the negative regulator of SigD (anti-SigD), enhanced the transcription of some key genes (choM1, kshA, and hsd4A) in the sterol catabolic pathway. Furthermore, the deletion of rip1 increased the consumption of phytosterols by 37.8% after 96 h of growth in M. neoaurum. The production of 9-OHAD in the engineered M. neoaurumΔkstD1ΔkstD2ΔkstD3Δrip1 (MnΔk123Δrip1) strain was ultimately increased by 27.3% compared to that in its parental strain M. neoaurumΔkstD1ΔkstD2ΔkstD3 (MnΔk123). This study further confirms the important role of SigD-related factors in the catabolism of sterols.

  20. American lobster Cathepsin D, an aspartic peptidase resistant to proteolysis and active in organic solvents, non-ionic detergents and salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Siordia, Ivan; Rojo-Arreola, Liliana; Navarrete Del Toro, María de Los Angeles; García-Carreño, Fernando

    2017-10-05

    Suitable peptidases for biotechnological applications are those active at low temperature, in organic solvents, detergents or proteolytic additives. American lobster cathepsin D1 (CD1) is an enzyme highly efficient at 5-50°C and at pH 2.5-5.5. We assessed the effect of common industrial additives on CD1 activity. CD1 was isolated from lobster gastric fluid by chromatography. The proteolytic activity was measured using a fluorogenic specific substrate and the conformation by intrinsic fluorescence. Non-ionic detergents Tween-20 and Triton X-100 stabilize the peptidase activity. Ethanol, methanol and isopropanol [5-15% (v/v)] increased the enzyme activity up to 80%. The enzyme is active until 2.5M urea and is resistant to proteolysis by papain and renin. In this work, a crustacean peptidase that remains active when exposed to different chemical and proteolytic additives is reported, evincing that crustaceans are a good model for discovery of novel stable peptidases for future pharmaceutical, cosmetic and alimentary applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Immobilization of trypsin in the layer-by-layer coating of graphene oxide and chitosan on in-channel glass fiber for microfluidic proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Huimin; Chen, Qiwen; Zhang, Luyan; Chen, Gang

    2011-12-21

    In this report, trypsin was immobilized in the layer-by-layer (LBL) coating of graphene oxide (GO) and chitosan on a piece of glass fiber to fabricate microchip bioreactor for efficient proteolysis. LBL deposition driven by electrostatic forces easily took place on the surface of the glass fiber, providing mild environmental conditions so that the denaturation and autolysis of the immobilized trypsin was minimized. Prior to use, a piece of the prepared trypsin-immobilized glass fiber was inserted into the channel of a microchip to form a core-changeable bioreactor. The novel GO-based bioreactor can be regenerated by changing its fiber core. The feasibility and performance of the unique bioreactor were demonstrated by the tryptic digestion of bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, cytochrome c, and hemoglobin and the digestion time was significantly reduced to less than 10 s. The obtained digests were identified by MALDI-TOF MS. The digestion performance of the core-changeable GO-based microchip bioreactor was comparable to that of 12-h in-solution tryptic digestion. The novel microchip bioreactor is simple and efficient, offering great promise for high-throughput protein identification.

  2. Citric acid production by Candida strains under intracellular nitrogen limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastassiadis, S; Aivasidis, A; Wandrey, C

    2002-10-01

    A suitable strain and important factors influencing citric acid formation in yeasts were identified. Candida oleophila ATCC 20177 was chosen as the best citric acid producer from several Candida strains. Yields of 50 g/l citric acid were produced in shake flask and 80 g/l in fed-batch fermentations with 1.5 and 3 g/l NH(4)Cl under non-optimized conditions. Ammonium nitrogen was identified as the limiting substrate for citrate formation. Citric acid excretion begins a few hours after exhaustion of nitrogen in the medium. The importance of intracellular nitrogen limitation was clarified by elemental analysis of C. oleophila biomass. The nitrogen content of C. oleophila biomass decreased from 7.45% during the growth phase to 3.96% in the production phase. The biomass contained less carbon and more trace elements in the growth phase compared with the production phase. Relatively high intracellular NH(4)(+) concentration of about 1.2 mg/g biomass (~37.4 mM) was found during the production phase. The low intracellular nitrogen content and increase of intracellular NH(4)(+) concentration, possibly caused by proteolysis following extracellular nitrogen exhaustion, trigger citric acid production. Intracellular nitrogen limitation and the increase in intracellular NH(4)(+) concentration are the most important factors influencing citric acid formation in yeasts.

  3. Aspergillus Oryzae S2 α-Amylase Domain C Involvement in Activity and Specificity: In Vivo Proteolysis, Molecular and Docking Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahnoun, Mouna; Jemli, Sonia; Trabelsi, Sahar; Ayadi, Leila; Bejar, Samir

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that Aspergillus oryzae strain S2 had produced two α-amylase isoforms named AmyA and AmyB. The apparent molecular masses revealed by SDS-PAGE were 50 and 42 kDa, respectively. Yet AmyB has a higher catalytic efficiency. Based on a monitoring study of the α-amylase production in both the presence and absence of different protease inhibitors, a chymotrypsin proteolysis process was detected in vivo generating AmyB. A. oryzae S2 α-amylase gene was amplified, cloned and sequenced. The sequence analysis revealed nine exons, eight introns and an encoding open reading frame of 1500 bp corresponding to AmyA isoform. The amino-acid sequence analysis revealed aY371 potential chymotrypsin cleaving site, likely to be the AmyB C-Terminal end and two other potential sites at Y359, and F379. A zymogram with a high acrylamide concentration was used. It highlighted two other closed apparent molecular mass α-amylases termed AmyB1 and AmyB2 reaching40 kDa and 43 kDa. These isoforms could be possibly generated fromY359, and F379secondary cut, respectively. The molecular modeling study showed that AmyB preserved the (β/α)8 barrel domain and the domain B but lacked the C-terminal domain C. The contact map analysis and the docking studies strongly suggested a higher activity and substrate binding affinity for AmyB than AmyA which was previously experimentally exhibited. This could be explained by the easy catalytic cleft accessibility. PMID:27101008

  4. Oxidative and proteolysis-related parameters of skeletal muscle from hamsters with experimental pulmonary emphysema: a comparison between papain and elastase induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunnquell, Cláudia R; Vieira, Nichelle A; Sábio, Laís R; Sczepanski, Felipe; Cecchini, Alessandra L; Cecchini, Rubens; Guarnier, Flávia A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether emphysema induced by elastase or papain triggers the same effects on skeletal muscle, related to oxidative stress and proteolysis, in hamsters. For this purpose, we evaluated pulmonary lesions, body weight, muscle loss, oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, total and oxidized glutathiones, chemiluminescence stimulated by tert-butyl hydroperoxide and carbonyl proteins), chymotrypsin-like and calpain-like proteolytic activities and muscle fibre cross-sectional area in the gastrocnemius muscles of emphysemic hamsters. Two groups of animals received different intratracheal inductions of experimental emphysema: by 40 mg/ml papain (EP) or 5.2 IU/100 g animal (EE) elastase (n = 10 animals/group). The control group received intratracheal instillation of 300 μl sterile NaCl 0.9%. Compared with the control group, the EP group had reduced muscle weight (18.34%) and the EE group had increased muscle weight (8.37%). Additionally, tert-butyl hydroperoxide-initiated chemiluminescence, carbonylated proteins and chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity were all elevated in the EP group compared to the CS group, while total glutathione was decreased compared to the EE group. The EE group showed more fibres with increased cross-sectional areas and increased calpain-like activity. Together, these data show that elastase and papain, when used to induce experimental models of emphysema, lead to different speeds and types of adaptation. These findings provide more information on choosing a suitable experimental model for studying skeletal muscle adaptations in emphysema. PMID:26102076

  5. The proteolysis adaptor, NblA, binds to the N-terminus of β-phycocyanin: Implications for the mechanism of phycobilisome degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Amelia Y; Bricker, William P; Zhang, Hao; Weisz, Daniel A; Gross, Michael L; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2017-04-01

    Phycobilisome (PBS) complexes are massive light-harvesting apparati in cyanobacteria that capture and funnel light energy to the photosystem. PBS complexes are dynamically degraded during nutrient deprivation, which causes severe chlorosis, and resynthesized during nutrient repletion. PBS degradation occurs rapidly after nutrient step down, and is specifically triggered by non-bleaching protein A (NblA), a small proteolysis adaptor that facilitates interactions between a Clp chaperone and phycobiliproteins. Little is known about the mode of action of NblA during PBS degradation. In this study, we used chemical cross-linking coupled with LC-MS/MS to investigate the interactions between NblA and phycobiliproteins. An isotopically coded BS(3) cross-linker captured a protein interaction between NblA and β-phycocyanin (PC). LC-MS/MS analysis identified the amino acid residues participating in the binding reaction, and demonstrated that K(52) in NblA is cross-linked to T(2) in β-PC. These results were modeled onto the existing crystal structures of NblA and PC by protein docking simulations. Our data indicate that the C-terminus of NblA fits in an open groove of β-PC, a region located inside the central hollow cavity of a PC rod. NblA may mediate PBS degradation by disrupting the structural integrity of the PC rod from within the rod. In addition, M(1)-K(44) and M(1)-K(52) cross-links between the N-terminus of NblA and the C-terminus of NblA are consistent with the NblA crystal structure, confirming that the purified NblA is structurally and biologically relevant. These findings provide direct evidence that NblA physically interacts with β-PC.

  6. SILAC-Pulse Proteolysis: A Mass Spectrometry-Based Method for Discovery and Cross-Validation in Proteome-Wide Studies of Ligand Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Jagat; Fitzgerald, Michael C.

    2014-12-01

    Reported here is the use of stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) and pulse proteolysis (PP) for detection and quantitation of protein-ligand binding interactions on the proteomic scale. The incorporation of SILAC into PP enables the PP technique to be used for the unbiased detection and quantitation of protein-ligand binding interactions in complex biological mixtures (e.g., cell lysates) without the need for prefractionation. The SILAC-PP technique is demonstrated in two proof-of-principle experiments using proteins in a yeast cell lysate and two test ligands including a well-characterized drug, cyclosporine A (CsA), and a non-hydrolyzable adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analogue, adenylyl imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). The well-known tight-binding interaction between CsA and cyclophilin A was successfully detected and quantified in replicate analyses, and a total of 33 proteins from a yeast cell lysate were found to have AMP-PNP-induced stability changes. In control experiments, the method's false positive rate of protein target discovery was found to be in the range of 2.1% to 3.6%. SILAC-PP and the previously reported stability of protein from rates of oxidation (SPROX) technique both report on the same thermodynamic properties of proteins and protein-ligand complexes. However, they employ different probes and mass spectrometry-based readouts. This creates the opportunity to cross-validate SPROX results with SILAC-PP results, and vice-versa. As part of this work, the SILAC-PP results obtained here were cross-validated with previously reported SPROX results on the same model systems to help differentiate true positives from false positives in the two experiments.

  7. Cooperation of two ADAMTS metalloproteases in closure of the mouse palate identifies a requirement for versican proteolysis in regulating palatal mesenchyme proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Hiroyuki; Nelson, Courtney M.; Somerville, Robert P. T.; Mielke, Katrina; Dixon, Laura J.; Powell, Kimerly; Apte, Suneel S.

    2010-01-01

    We have identified a role for two evolutionarily related, secreted metalloproteases of the ADAMTS family, ADAMTS20 and ADAMTS9, in palatogenesis. Adamts20 mutations cause the mouse white-spotting mutant belted (bt), whereas Adamts9 is essential for survival beyond 7.5 days gestation (E7.5). Functional overlap of Adamts9 with Adamts20 was identified using Adamts9+/–;bt/bt mice, which have a fully penetrant cleft palate. Palate closure was delayed, although eventually completed, in both Adamts9+/–;bt/+ and bt/bt mice, demonstrating cooperation of these genes. Adamts20 is expressed in palatal mesenchyme, whereas Adamts9 is expressed exclusively in palate microvascular endothelium. Palatal shelves isolated from Adamts9+/–;bt/bt mice fused in culture, suggesting an intact epithelial TGFβ3 signaling pathway. Cleft palate resulted from a temporally specific delay in palatal shelf elevation and growth towards the midline. Mesenchyme of Adamts9+/–;bt/bt palatal shelves had reduced cell proliferation, a lower cell density and decreased processing of versican (VCAN), an extracellular matrix (ECM) proteoglycan and ADAMTS9/20 substrate, from E13.5 to E14.5. Vcan haploinsufficiency led to greater penetrance of cleft palate in bt mice, with a similar defect in palatal shelf extension as Adamts9+/–;bt/bt mice. Cell density was normal in bt/bt;Vcanhdf/+ mice, consistent with reduced total intact versican in ECM, but impaired proliferation persisted in palate mesenchyme, suggesting that ADAMTS-cleaved versican is required for cell proliferation. These findings support a model in which cooperative versican proteolysis by ADAMTS9 in vascular endothelium and by ADAMTS20 in palate mesenchyme drives palatal shelf sculpting and extension. PMID:21041365

  8. The activity of σV, an extracytoplasmic function σ factor of Bacillus subtilis, is controlled by regulated proteolysis of the anti-σ factor RsiV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Jessica L; Williams, Kyle B; Ellermeier, Craig D

    2013-07-01

    During growth in the environment, bacteria encounter stresses which can delay or inhibit their growth. To defend against these stresses, bacteria induce both resistance and repair mechanisms. Many bacteria regulate these resistance mechanisms using a group of alternative σ factors called extracytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factors. ECF σ factors represent the largest and most diverse family of σ factors. Here, we demonstrate that the activation of a member of the ECF30 subfamily of ECF σ factors, σ(V) in Bacillus subtilis, is controlled by the proteolytic destruction of the anti-σ factor RsiV. We will demonstrate that the degradation of RsiV and, thus, the activation of σ(V) requires multiple proteolytic steps. Upon exposure to the inducer lysozyme, the extracellular domain of RsiV is removed by an unknown protease, which cleaves at site 1. This cleavage is independent of PrsW, the B. subtilis site 1 protease, which cleaves the anti-σ factor RsiW. Following cleavage by the unknown protease, the N-terminal portion of RsiV requires further processing, which requires the site 2 intramembrane protease RasP. Our data indicate that the N-terminal portion of RsiV from amino acid 1 to 60, which lacks the extracellular domain, is constitutively degraded unless RasP is absent, indicating that RasP cleavage is constitutive. This suggests that the regulatory step in RsiV degradation and, thus, σ(V) activation are controlled at the level of the site 1 cleavage. Finally, we provide evidence that increased resistance to lysozyme decreases σ(V) activation. Collectively, these data provide evidence that the mechanism for σ(V) activation in B. subtilis is controlled by regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) and requires the site 2 protease RasP.

  9. Reduction of low grade inflammation restores blunting of postprandial muscle anabolism and limits sarcopenia in old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieu, Isabelle; Magne, Hugues; Savary-Auzeloux, Isabelle; Averous, Julien; Bos, Cécile; Peyron, M A; Combaret, Lydie; Dardevet, Dominique

    2009-11-15

    Ageing is characterized by a decline in muscle mass that could be explained by a defect in the regulation of postprandial muscle protein metabolism. Indeed, the stimulatory effect of food intake on protein synthesis and its inhibitory effect on proteolysis is blunted in old muscles from both animals and humans. Recently, low grade inflammation has been suspected to be one of the factors responsible for the decreased sensitivity of muscle protein metabolism to food intake. This study was undertaken to examine the effect of long-term prevention of low grade inflammation on muscle protein metabolism during ageing. Old rats (20 months of age) were separated into two groups: a control group and a group (IBU) in which low grade inflammation had been reduced with a non-steroidal anti inflammatory drug (ibuprofen). After 5 months of treatment, inflammatory markers and cytokine levels were significantly improved in treated old rats when compared with the controls: -22.3% fibrinogen, -54.2% alpha2-macroglobulin, +12.6% albumin, -59.6% IL(6) and -45.9% IL(1beta) levels. As expected, food intake had no effect on muscle protein synthesis or muscle proteolysis in controls whereas it significantly increased muscle protein synthesis by 24.8% and significantly decreased proteolysis in IBU rats. The restoration of muscle protein anabolism at the postprandial state by controlling the development of low grade inflammation in old rats significantly decreased muscle mass loss between 20 and 25 months of age. In conclusion, the observations made in this study have identified low grade inflammation as an important target for pharmacological, nutritional and lifestyle interventions that aim to limit sarcopenia and muscle weakness in the rapidly growing elderly population in Europe and North America.

  10. Lysine Residues Are Not Required for Proteasome-Mediated Proteolysis of the Auxin/Indole Acidic Acid Protein IAA11[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkerson, Jonathan; Estelle, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Although many ubiquitin-proteasome substrates have been characterized in plants, very little is known about the corresponding ubiquitin attachment(s) underlying regulated proteolysis. Current dogma asserts that ubiquitin is typically covalently attached to a substrate through an isopeptide bond between the ubiquitin carboxy terminus and a substrate lysyl amino group. However, nonlysine (non-Lys) ubiquitin attachment has been observed in other eukaryotes, including the N terminus, cysteine, and serine/threonine modification. Here, we investigate site(s) of ubiquitin attachment on indole-3-acetic acid1 (IAA1), a short-lived Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (Aux/IAA) family member. Most Aux/IAA proteins function as negative regulators of auxin responses and are targeted for degradation after ubiquitination by the ubiquitin ligase SCFTIR1/AFB (for S-Phase Kinase-Associated Protein1, Cullin, F-box [SCF] with Transport Inhibitor Response1 [TIR1]/Auxin Signaling F-box [AFB]) by an interaction directly facilitated by auxin. Surprisingly, using a Histidine-Hemaglutinin (HIS6x-HA3x) epitope-tagged version expressed in vivo, Lys-less IAA1 was ubiquitinated and rapidly degraded in vivo. Lys-substituted versions of IAA1 localized to the nucleus as Yellow Fluorescent Protein fusions and interacted with both TIR1 and IAA7 in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid experiments, indicating that these proteins were functional. Ubiquitination on both HIS6x-HA3x-IAA1 and Lys-less HIS6x-HA3x-IAA1 proteins was sensitive to sodium hydroxide treatment, indicative of ubiquitin oxyester formation on serine or threonine residues. Additionally, base-resistant forms of ubiquitinated IAA1 were observed for HIS6x-HA3x-IAA1, suggesting additional lysyl-linked ubiquitin on this protein. Characterization of other Aux/IAA proteins showed that they have diverse degradation rates, adding additional complexity to auxin signaling. Altogether, these data indicate that Aux

  11. Pronounced energy restriction with elevated protein intake results in no change in proteolysis and reductions in skeletal muscle protein synthesis that are mitigated by resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hector, Amy J; McGlory, Chris; Damas, Felipe; Mazara, Nicole; Baker, Steven K; Phillips, Stuart M

    2018-01-01

    Preservation of lean body mass (LBM) may be important during dietary energy restriction (ER) and requires equal rates of muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and muscle protein breakdown (MPB). Currently, the relative contribution of MPS and MPB to the loss of LBM during ER in humans is unknown. We aimed to determine the impact of dietary protein intake and resistance exercise on MPS and MPB during a controlled short-term energy deficit. Adult men (body mass index, 28.6 ± 0.6 kg/m 2 ; age 22 ± 1 yr) underwent 10 d of 40%-reduced energy intake while performing unilateral resistance exercise and consuming lower protein (1.2 g/kg/d, n = 12) or higher protein (2.4 g/kg/d, n = 12). Pre- and postintervention testing included dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, primed constant infusion of ring -[ 13 C 6 ]phenylalanine, and 15 [N]phenylalanine to measure acute postabsorptive MPS and MPB; D 2 O to measure integrated MPS; and gene and protein expression. There was a decrease in acute MPS after ER (higher protein, 0.059 ± 0.006 to 0.051 ± 0.009%/h; lower protein, 0.061 ± 0.005 to 0.045 ± 0.006%/h; P resistance exercise (higher protein, 0.067 ± 0.01%/h; lower protein, 0.061 ± 0.006%/h), and integrated MPS followed a similar pattern. There was no change in MPB (energy balance, 0.080 ± 0.01%/hr; ER rested legs, 0.078 ± 0.008%/hr; ER exercised legs, 0.079 ± 0.006%/hr). We conclude that a reduction in MPS is the main mechanism that underpins LBM loss early in ER in adult men.-Hector, A. J., McGlory, C., Damas, F., Mazara, N., Baker, S. K., Phillips, S. M. Pronounced energy restriction with elevated protein intake results in no change in proteolysis and reductions in skeletal muscle protein synthesis that are mitigated by resistance exercise. © FASEB.

  12. EpCAM-regulated intramembrane proteolysis induces a cancer stem cell-like gene signature in hepatitis B virus-infected hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Saravana Kumar Kailasam; Zhang, Hao; Diab, Ahmed; Pascuzzi, Pete E; Lefrançois, Lydie; Fares, Nadim; Bancel, Brigitte; Merle, Philippe; Andrisani, Ourania

    2016-11-01

    Hepatocytes in which the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is replicating exhibit loss of the chromatin modifying polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), resulting in re-expression of specific, cellular PRC2-repressed genes. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is a PRC2-repressed gene, normally expressed in hepatic progenitors, but re-expressed in hepatic cancer stem cells (hCSCs). Herein, we investigated the functional significance of EpCAM re-expression in HBV-mediated hepatocarcinogenesis. Employing molecular approaches (transfections, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, immunoblotting, qRT-PCR), we investigated the role of EpCAM-regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) in HBV replicating cells in vitro, and in liver tumors from HBV X/c-myc mice and chronically HBV infected patients. EpCAM undergoes RIP in HBV replicating cells, activating canonical Wnt signaling. Transfection of Wnt-responsive plasmid expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) identified a GFP + population of HBV replicating cells. These GFP+/Wnt+ cells exhibited cisplatin- and sorafenib-resistant growth resembling hCSCs, and increased expression of pluripotency genes NANOG, OCT4, SOX2, and hCSC markers BAMBI, CD44 and CD133. These genes are referred as EpCAM RIP and Wnt-induced hCSC-like gene signature. Interestingly, this gene signature is also overexpressed in liver tumors of X/c-myc bitransgenic mice. Clinically, a group of HBV-associated hepatocellular carcinomas was identified, exhibiting elevated expression of the hCSC-like gene signature and associated with reduced overall survival post-surgical resection. The hCSC-like gene signature offers promise as prognostic tool for classifying subtypes of HBV-induced HCCs. Since EpCAM RIP and Wnt signaling drive expression of this hCSC-like signature, inhibition of these pathways can be explored as therapeutic strategy for this subtype of HBV-associated HCCs. In this study, we provide evidence for a molecular mechanism by which chronic infection by

  13. Mechanisms of NMDA Receptor- and Voltage-Gated L-Type Calcium Channel-Dependent Hippocampal LTP Critically Rely on Proteolysis That Is Mediated by Distinct Metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiera, Grzegorz; Nowak, Daria; van Hove, Inge; Dziegiel, Piotr; Moons, Lieve; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2017-02-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) is widely perceived as a memory substrate and in the hippocampal CA3-CA1 pathway, distinct forms of LTP depend on NMDA receptors (nmdaLTP) or L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (vdccLTP). LTP is also known to be effectively regulated by extracellular proteolysis that is mediated by various enzymes. Herein, we investigated whether in mice hippocampal slices these distinct forms of LTP are specifically regulated by different metalloproteinases (MMPs). We found that MMP-3 inhibition or knock-out impaired late-phase LTP in the CA3-CA1 pathway. Interestingly, late-phase LTP was also decreased by MMP-9 blockade. When both MMP-3 and MMP-9 were inhibited, both early- and late-phase LTP was impaired. Using immunoblotting, in situ zymography, and immunofluorescence, we found that LTP induction was associated with an increase in MMP-3 expression and activity in CA1 stratum radiatum. MMP-3 inhibition and knock-out prevented the induction of vdccLTP, with no effect on nmdaLTP. L-type channel-dependent LTP is known to be impaired by hyaluronic acid digestion. We found that slice treatment with hyaluronidase occluded the effect of MMP-3 blockade on LTP, further confirming a critical role for MMP-3 in this form of LTP. In contrast to the CA3-CA1 pathway, LTP in the mossy fiber-CA3 projection did not depend on MMP-3, indicating the pathway specificity of the actions of MMPs. Overall, our study indicates that the activation of perisynaptic MMP-3 supports L-type channel-dependent LTP in the CA1 region, whereas nmdaLTP depends solely on MMP-9. Various types of long-term potentiation (LTP) are correlated with distinct phases of memory formation and retrieval, but the underlying molecular signaling pathways remain poorly understood. Extracellular proteases have emerged as key players in neuroplasticity phenomena. The present study found that L-type calcium channel-dependent LTP in the CA3-CA1 hippocampal projection is critically regulated by the activity

  14. HOME Income Limits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HOME Income Limits are calculated using the same methodology that HUD uses for calculating the income limits for the Section 8 program. These limits are based on HUD...

  15. Adaptive limit margin detection and limit avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavrucuk, Ilkay

    This thesis concerns the development of methods, algorithms, and control laws for the development of an adaptive flight envelope protection system to be used for both manned and unmanned aircraft. The proposed method lifts the requirement for detailed a priori information of aircraft dynamics by enabling adaptation to system uncertainty. The system can be used for limits that can be either measured or related to selected measurable quantities. Specifically, an adaptive technique for predicting limit margins and calculating the corresponding allowable control or controller command margins of an aircraft is described in an effort to enable true carefree maneuvering. This new approach utilizes adaptive neural network based loops for the approximation of required aircraft dynamics. For limits that reach their maximum value in steady state, a constructed estimator model is used to predict the maneuvering quasi-steady response behavior---the so called dynamic trim---of the limit parameters and the corresponding control or command margins. Linearly Parameterized Neural Networks as well as Single Hidden Layer Neural Networks are used for on-line adaptation. The approach does not require any off-line training of the neural networks, instead all learning is achieved during flight. Lyapunov based weight update laws are derived. The method is extended for multi-channelled control limiting for aircraft subject to multiple limits, and for automatic control and command limiting for UAV's. Simulation evaluations of the method using a linear helicopter model and a nonlinear Generalized Tiltrotor Simulation (GTRSIM) model are presented. Limit avoidance methods are integrated and tested through the implementation of an artificial pilot model and an active-stick controller model for tactile cueing in the tiltrotor simulation, GTRSIM. Load factor, angle-of-attack, and torque limits are considered as examples. Similarly, the method is applied to the Georgia Tech's Yamaha R-Max (GTMax

  16. Limit of Blank, Limit of Detection and Limit of Quantitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, David A; Pry, Terry

    2008-01-01

    Summary Limit of Blank (LoB), Limit of Detection (LoD), and Limit of Quantitation (LoQ) are terms used to describe the smallest concentration of a measurand that can be reliably measured by an analytical procedure.LoB is the highest apparent analyte concentration expected to be found when replicates of a blank sample containing no analyte are tested.LoB = meanblank + 1.645(SDblank)LoD is the lowest analyte concentration likely to be reliably distinguished from the LoB and at which detection is feasible. LoD is determined by utilising both the measured LoB and test replicates of a sample known to contain a low concentration of analyte.LoD = LoB + 1.645(SD low concentration sample)LoQ is the lowest concentration at which the analyte can not only be reliably detected but at which some predefined goals for bias and imprecision are met. The LoQ may be equivalent to the LoD or it could be at a much higher concentration. PMID:18852857

  17. VT Limited Access Highways

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — A limited-access road, known by various terms worldwide, including limited-access highway, dual carriageway, expressway, and partial controlled access highway, is a...

  18. Robust test limits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Willem/Wim; Kallenberg, W.C.M.; Otten, G.D.

    1997-01-01

    Because of inaccuracies of the measurement process inspection of manufactured parts requires test limits which are more strict than the given specification limits. Test limits derived under the assumption of normality for product characteristics turn out to violate the prescribed bound on the

  19. Assessment of proteolysis and sensory characteristics of prato cheese with adjunct cultureAvaliação da proteólise e das características sensoriais de queijo prato com cultura adjunta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Cristina Bizam Vianna

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Influence of adjunct cultures on the chemical and sensory characteristics, and proteolysis of Prato cheese was investigated. Cheeses were manufactured using a commercial starter culture and Lactobacillus strains (Lactobacillus plantarum or Lactobacillus helveticus as adjunct cultures. Control cheeses lacked the adjunct culture. The chemical composition was analyzed at day 5 after manufacture and the proteolysis at days 5, 25, 45 and 65 of ripening. The sensory acceptance was assessed at 60 days. A split-plot design was used and the complete experiment was carried out in triplicate. The results were evaluated by ANOVA and Tukey’s test test at 5% significance level. There were no significant differences in chemical composition among the cheeses. A significant increase in proteolysis occurred during ripening period for the cheeses with adjunct culture when compared to cheeses without adjunct culture. Cheese with Lactobacillus helveticus showed higher scores for flavor, texture and purchase intent compared with the others treatments. Use of adjunct Lactobacillus suggests that the proteolysis of Prato cheese should be accelerated in order to reduce ripening period. A influência de culturas adjuntas sobre as características químicas e sensoriais, e sobre a proteólise do queijo Prato foi avaliada. Os queijos foram fabricados com cultura starter comercial e cepas de Lactobacillus (Lactobacillus plantarum ou Lactobacillus helveticus como culturas adjuntas. Os queijos controle não foram adicionados de cultura adjunta. A composição química foi analisada no dia 5 após a fabricação e a proteólise nos dias 5, 25, 45 e 65 de maturação. A aceitação sensorial foi avaliada em 60 dias. Um delineamento de parcelas subdivididas foi utilizado e o experimento completo foi realizado em triplicata. Os resultados foram avaliados pela análise de variância e teste de Tukey no nível de 5% de probabilidade. Os queijos não apresentaram diferen

  20. Limits to Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Janne Hedegaard

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I will argue that a theoretical identification of the limit to inclusion is needed in the conceptual identification of inclusion. On the one hand, inclusion is formulated as a vision that is, in principle, limitless. On the other hand, there seems to be an agreement that inclusion has a limit in the pedagogical practice. However,…

  1. Modeling Complex Time Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Svatos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyze complexity of time limits we can find especially in regulated processes of public administration. First we review the most popular process modeling languages. There is defined an example scenario based on the current Czech legislature which is then captured in discussed process modeling languages. Analysis shows that the contemporary process modeling languages support capturing of the time limit only partially. This causes troubles to analysts and unnecessary complexity of the models. Upon unsatisfying results of the contemporary process modeling languages we analyze the complexity of the time limits in greater detail and outline lifecycles of a time limit using the multiple dynamic generalizations pattern. As an alternative to the popular process modeling languages there is presented PSD process modeling language, which supports the defined lifecycles of a time limit natively and therefore allows keeping the models simple and easy to understand.

  2. ACA Federal Upper Limits

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Affordable Care Act Federal Upper Limits (FUL) based on the weighted average of the most recently reported monthly average manufacturer price (AMP) for...

  3. Limited Denial of Participation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — A Limited Denial of Participation (LDP) is an action taken by a HUD Field Office or the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Single Family (DASSF) or Multifamily (DASMF)...

  4. Limited Income and Resources

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Information for those with limited income and resources (those who may qualify for or already have the Low Income Subsidy to lower their prescription drug coverage...

  5. Limits on panspermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkarev, N. G.

    2017-04-01

    Problems related to the origin of life and the role of migration of the dust component in the Galaxy and between galaxies in the spreading life are discussed. Limits on possible distances between points of action of panspermia are derived.

  6. Nuclear Test Limitations Issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mahoney, Rob

    2000-01-01

    .... It also summarizes public views concerning test limitations and the nuclear stockpile. The second portion of the paper appraises issues that developed during consideration of the CTBT that involve 1...

  7. SIS - Annual Catch Limit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Annual Catch Limit (ACL) dataset within the Species Information System (SIS) contains information and data related to management reference points and catch data.

  8. HOME Rent Limits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — In accordance with 24 CFR Part 92.252, HUD provides maximum HOME rent limits. The maximum HOME rents are the lesser of: The fair market rent for existing housing for...

  9. HUD Program Income Limits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — Income limits used to determine the income eligibility of applicants for assistance under three programs authorized by the National Housing Act. These programs are...

  10. Xenotransplantation: Perspectives and limits

    OpenAIRE

    Hammer, Claus

    2001-01-01

    Xenotransplantation faces the dilemma of an unlimited supply of cells, tissues and organs on the one hand and severe obstacles and limits on the other. One reason for the limitations is that the source animal of choice, the pig, and the human recipient separated 90 million years ago during evolution, a time in which biological characteristics such as anatomy, physiology and immunology have had much time to drift far apart. The acceptance of such an evolutionary widely divergent organ, especia...

  11. Altruism and Reproductive Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey J. Fitzgerald

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We examined how different types of reproductive limitations — functional (schizoid personality disorder and schizophrenia, physical (malnutrition, and sexual (bisexuality and homosexuality — influenced altruistic intentions toward hypothetical target individuals of differing degrees of relatedness (r = 0, .25, and .50. Participants were 312 undergraduate students who completed a questionnaire on altruism toward hypothetical friends, half-siblings, and siblings with these different types of reproductive limitations. Genetic relatedness and reproductive limitations did not influence altruistic decision-making when the cost of altruism was low but did as the cost of altruism increased, with participants being more likely to help a sibling over a half-sibling and a half-sibling over a friend. Participants also indicated they were more likely to help a healthy (control person over people with a reproductive limitation. Of the three types of reproductive limitations, functional limitations had the strongest effect on altruistic decision-making, indicating that people were less likely to help those who exhibit abnormal social behavior.

  12. Thermal physiology and vertical zonation of intertidal animals: optima, limits, and costs of living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somero, George N

    2002-08-01

    Temperature's pervasive effects on physiological systems are reflected in the suite of temperature-adaptive differences observed among species from different thermal niches, such as species with different vertical distributions (zonations) along the subtidal to intertidal gradient. Among the physiological traits that exhibit adaptive variation related to vertical zonation are whole organism thermal tolerance, heart function, mitochondrial respiration, membrane static order (fluidity), action potential generation, protein synthesis, heat-shock protein expression, and protein thermal stability. For some, but not all, of these thermally sensitive traits acclimatization leads to adaptive shifts in thermal optima and limits. The costs associated with repairing thermal damage and adapting systems through acclimatization may contribute importantly to energy budgets. These costs arise from such sources as: (i) activation and operation of the heat-shock response, (ii) replacement of denatured proteins that have been removed through proteolysis, (iii) restructuring of cellular membranes ("homeoviscous" adaptation), and (iv) pervasive shifts in gene expression (as gauged by using DNA microarray techniques). The vertical zonation observed in rocky intertidal habitats thus may reflect two distinct yet closely related aspects of thermal physiology: (i) intrinsic interspecific differences in temperature sensitivities of physiological systems, which establish thermal optima and tolerance limits for species; and (ii) 'cost of living' considerations arising from sub-lethal perturbation of these physiological systems, which may establish an energetics-based limitation to the maximal height at which a species can occur. Quantifying the energetic costs arising from heat stress represents an important challenge for future investigations.

  13. Fundamental Limits of Cooperation

    CERN Document Server

    Lozano, Angel; Andrews, Jeffrey G

    2012-01-01

    Cooperation is viewed as a key ingredient for interference management in wireless systems. This paper shows that cooperation has fundamental limitations. The main result is that even full cooperation between transmitters cannot in general change an interference-limited network to a noise-limited network. The key idea is that there exists a spectral efficiency upper bound that is independent of the transmit power. First, a spectral efficiency upper bound is established for systems that rely on pilot-assisted channel estimation; in this framework, cooperation is shown to be possible only within clusters of limited size, which are subject to out-of-cluster interference whose power scales with that of the in-cluster signals. Second, an upper bound is also shown to exist when cooperation is through noncoherent communication; thus, the spectral efficiency limitation is not a by-product of the reliance on pilot-assisted channel estimation. Consequently, existing literature that routinely assumes the high-power spect...

  14. Information-limiting correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Bote, Rubén; Beck, Jeffrey; Kanitscheider, Ingmar; Pitkow, Xaq; Latham, Peter; Pouget, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Computational strategies used by the brain strongly depend on the amount of information that can be stored in population activity, which in turn strongly depends on the pattern of noise correlations. In vivo, noise correlations tend to be positive and proportional to the similarity in tuning properties. Such correlations are thought to limit information, which has led to the suggestion that decorrelation increases information. In contrast, we found, analytically and numerically, that decorrelation does not imply an increase in information. Instead, the only information-limiting correlations are what we refer to as differential correlations: correlations proportional to the product of the derivatives of the tuning curves. Unfortunately, differential correlations are likely to be very small and buried under correlations that do not limit information, making them particularly difficult to detect. We found, however, that the effect of differential correlations on information can be detected with relatively simple decoders. PMID:25195105

  15. Quantum-Limited Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Truong, Gar-Wing; May, Eric F; Stace, Thomas M; Luiten, Andre N

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy has an illustrious history delivering serendipitous discoveries and providing a stringent testbed for new physical predictions, including applications from trace materials detection, to understanding the atmospheres of stars and planets, and even constraining cosmological models. Reaching fundamental-noise limits permits optimal extraction of spectroscopic information from an absorption measurement. Here we demonstrate a quantum-limited spectrometer that delivers high-precision measurements of the absorption lineshape. These measurements yield a ten-fold improvement in the accuracy of the excited-state (6P$_{1/2}$) hyperfine splitting in Cs, and reveals a breakdown in the well-known Voigt spectral profile. We develop a theoretical model that accounts for this breakdown, explaining the observations to within the shot-noise limit. Our model enables us to infer the thermal velocity-dispersion of the Cs vapour with an uncertainty of 35ppm within an hour. This allows us to determine a value for Boltzm...

  16. Quantum-limit spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ficek, Zbigniew

    2017-01-01

    This book covers the main ideas, methods, and recent developments of quantum-limit optical spectroscopy and applications to quantum information, resolution spectroscopy, measurements beyond quantum limits, measurement of decoherence, and entanglement. Quantum-limit spectroscopy lies at the frontier of current experimental and theoretical techniques, and is one of the areas of atomic spectroscopy where the quantization of the field is essential to predict and interpret the existing experimental results. Currently, there is an increasing interest in quantum and precision spectroscopy both theoretically and experimentally, due to significant progress in trapping and cooling of single atoms and ions. This progress allows one to explore in the most intimate detail the ways in which light interacts with atoms and to measure spectral properties and quantum effects with high precision. Moreover, it allows one to perform subtle tests of quantum mechanics on the single atom and single photon scale which were hardly eve...

  17. Limits to Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottey, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The author reflects briefly on what limited degree of global ecological stability and human cultural stability may be achieved, provided that humanity retains hope and does not give way to despair or hide in denial. These thoughts were triggered by a recent conference on International Stability and Systems Engineering. (Contains 5 notes.)

  18. Limitation of Auditors' Liability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik; Foged-Ladefoged, Lise Kolding

    2014-01-01

    The article examines the question of whether rules on the limitation of auditors’ liability within the perspective of EU law are needed, and if so, which rules can provide an appropriate balance between the potential injured party’s interests and those of the auditing sector, including with respect...

  19. Smoothness of limit functors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Annual Meetings · Mid Year Meetings · Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 125; Issue 2. Smoothness of limit functors. Benedictus Margaux. Volume 125 Issue 2 May 2015 pp 161-165 ...

  20. Limited data speaker identification

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    speaker verification task of 10 sec training and testing data followed in NIST speaker recogni- tion evaluations (NIST 2003). Existing .... UBM as model, all for speaker identification under limited training and testing data. The second contribution is the ..... In that condition we benefit more by combining only those integrated ...

  1. Beta limits for torsatrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, F.; Betancourt, O.; Garabedian, P.; Shohet, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    An ideal magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and stability code is used to study ballooning modes in torsatrons. The most dangerous modes turn out to be those with low poloidal and toroidal wave numbers. Beta limits for equilibrium and stability are determined for an [unk] = 2 ultimate torsatron with large [unk] = 1 and [unk] = 3 sidebands. PMID:16592941

  2. Proteolysis-induced N-terminal ectodomain shedding of the integral membrane glycoprotein CUB domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1) is accompanied by tyrosine phosphorylation of its C-terminal domain and recruitment of Src and PKCdelta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yaowu; Wortmann, Andreas; Burke, Les J; Reid, Janet C; Adams, Mark N; Abdul-Jabbar, Ibtissam; Quigley, James P; Leduc, Richard; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Hooper, John D

    2010-08-20

    CUB-domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1) is an integral membrane glycoprotein with potential as a marker and therapeutic target for a number of cancers. Here we examine mechanisms regulating cellular processing of CDCP1. By analyzing cell lines exclusively passaged non-enzymatically and through use of a panel of protease inhibitors, we demonstrate that full-length 135 kDa CDCP1 is post-translationally processed in a range of cell lines by a mechanism involving serine protease activity, generating a C-terminal 70-kDa fragment. Immunopurification and N-terminal sequencing of this cell-retained fragment and detailed mutagenesis, show that proteolytic processing of CDCP1 occurs at two sites, Arg-368 and Lys-369. We show that the serine protease matriptase is an efficient, but not essential, cellular processor of CDCP1 at Arg-368. Importantly, we also demonstrate that proteolysis induces tyrosine phosphorylation of 70-kDa CDCP1 and recruitment of Src and PKCdelta to this fragment. In addition, Western blot and mass spectroscopy analyses show that an N-terminal 65-kDa CDCP1 ectodomain is shed intact from the cell surface. These data provide new insights into mechanisms regulating CDCP1 and suggest that the biological role of this protein and, potentially, its function in cancer, may be mediated by both 70-kDa cell retained and 65-kDa shed fragments, as well as the full-length 135-kDa protein.

  3. Age Limit of Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Amy Peykoff; Hackell, Jesse M

    2017-09-01

    Pediatrics is a multifaceted specialty that encompasses children's physical, psychosocial, developmental, and mental health. Pediatric care may begin periconceptionally and continues through gestation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood. Although adolescence and young adulthood are recognizable phases of life, an upper age limit is not easily demarcated and varies depending on the individual patient. The establishment of arbitrary age limits on pediatric care by health care providers should be discouraged. The decision to continue care with a pediatrician or pediatric medical or surgical subspecialist should be made solely by the patient (and family, when appropriate) and the physician and must take into account the physical and psychosocial needs of the patient and the abilities of the pediatric provider to meet these needs. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Smoothness of limit functors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indian Acad. Sci. (Math. Sci.) Vol. 125, No. 2, May 2015, pp. 161–165. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Smoothness of limit functors. BENEDICTUS MARGAUX. Laboratoire de Recherche “Princess .... On the same vein, the coaction cλ : A[X] → A[X][t±1] is defined 'at a finite level', that is, there exists α1 ≥ α0 and a Aα1 ...

  5. Limits of Nuclear Stability

    CERN Document Server

    Nerlo-Pomorska, B; Kleban, M

    2003-01-01

    The modern version of the liquid-drop model (LSD) is compared with the macroscopic part of the binding energy evaluated within the Hartree-Fock- Bogoliubov procedure with the Gogny force and the relativistic mean field theory. The parameters of a liquid-drop like mass formula which approximate on the average the self-consistent results are compared with other models. The limits of nuclear stability predicted by these models are discussed.

  6. Limits of social mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Alex; Cebrian, Manuel; Dsouza, Sohan; Moro, Esteban; Pentland, Alex; Rahwan, Iyad

    2013-04-16

    The Internet and social media have enabled the mobilization of large crowds to achieve time-critical feats, ranging from mapping crises in real time, to organizing mass rallies, to conducting search-and-rescue operations over large geographies. Despite significant success, selection bias may lead to inflated expectations of the efficacy of social mobilization for these tasks. What are the limits of social mobilization, and how reliable is it in operating at these limits? We build on recent results on the spatiotemporal structure of social and information networks to elucidate the constraints they pose on social mobilization. We use the DARPA Network Challenge as our working scenario, in which social media were used to locate 10 balloons across the United States. We conduct high-resolution simulations for referral-based crowdsourcing and obtain a statistical characterization of the population recruited, geography covered, and time to completion. Our results demonstrate that the outcome is plausible without the presence of mass media but lies at the limit of what time-critical social mobilization can achieve. Success relies critically on highly connected individuals willing to mobilize people in distant locations, overcoming the local trapping of diffusion in highly dense areas. However, even under these highly favorable conditions, the risk of unsuccessful search remains significant. These findings have implications for the design of better incentive schemes for social mobilization. They also call for caution in estimating the reliability of this capability.

  7. Marketing with limited budget

    OpenAIRE

    Smirnova, Daria

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research-based thesis was to get an idea how managers of two small resembling hotels of a specific region deal with marketing process with a limited budget. In addition, the aim of the thesis was to examine if hotel managers who were interviewed perceive marketing only in the way of ‘promotion’ rather than marketing research, marketing mix and marketing environment theories. It was also found out if hotel managers of those hotels consider marketing as a key to successful h...

  8. Limitations of Expert Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Serpil Salaçin

    1997-01-01

    Limitations of Expert Evidence Edited by Stephen Leadbeatter MB ChB MCRPath ISBN 1 86016 029 8 Printed in Great Britain by Cathedral Print Services Ltd, Salisbury, 1996 Kitap 25 Ekim 1994 te The Royal College of Physicians ve The Royal College of Pathologists tarafından düzenlenen konferanstan sonra hekimlere ve avukatlara konuyu tartışmaya açmak için basılmış. Bilirkişi görüşünün temel filozofisinin, bu görevi yapanlar ve bu hizmeti alanların yapabileceklerin...

  9. Limitation of Auditors' Liability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik; Foged-Ladefoged, Lise Kolding

    2014-01-01

    The article examines the question of whether rules on the limitation of auditors’ liability within the perspective of EU law are needed, and if so, which rules can provide an appropriate balance between the potential injured party’s interests and those of the auditing sector, including with respect...... to the fact that the insurance premiums associated with an unlimited liability must of course make the auditor’s tasks more expensive. Relevant EU recommendations and a comparative glance at other EU countries’ proposed solutions to the problem are included....

  10. Search with Limited Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-01

    D-R1-76 122 SERCH WITH ’LIMITED RESOURCES(U) DUKE UNIV DURHM NC i/i DEPTOF COMPUTER SCIENCE D C MUTCHLER FEB 83 CS11983-1 USI FE AFOSR-TR-83-i154...over all possible S" g ame trees. How to weight this average has not yet been specified. It is reasonable. glven the lack of additional information, to...complete binary 0-1 tree can be described by two parameters: P a number of goal nodes with value ŕ". and vt = number of goal nodes. This Justifies

  11. Perturbation of the Secondary Structure of the Scrapie Prion Protein Under Conditions that Alter Infectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasset, Maria; Baldwin, Michael A.; Fletterick, Robert J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    1993-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of the scrapie prion protein (PrPSc) generates PrP 27-30, which polymerizes into amyloid. By attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, PrP 27-30 polymers contained 54% β-sheet, 25% α-helix, 10% turns, and 11% random coil; dispersion into detergent-lipid-protein-complexes preserved infectivity and secondary structure. Almost 60% of the β-sheet was low-frequency infrared-absorbing, reflecting intermolecular aggregation. Decreased low-frequency β-sheet and increased turn content were found after SDS/PAGE, which disassembled the amyloid polymers, denatured PrP 27-30, and diminished scrapie infectivity. Acid-induced transitions were reversible, whereas alkali produced an irreversible transition centered at pH 10 under conditions that diminished infectivity. Whether PrPSc synthesis involves a transition in the secondary structure of one or more domains of the cellular prion protein from α-helical, random coil, or turn into β-sheet remains to be established.

  12. (Limiting the greenhouse effect)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rayner, S.

    1991-01-07

    Traveler attended the Dahlem Research Conference organized by the Freien Universitat, Berlin. The subject of the conference was Limiting the Greenhouse Effect: Options for Controlling Atmospheric CO{sub 2} Accumulation. Like all Dahlem workshops, this was a meeting of scientific experts, although the disciplines represented were broader than usual, ranging across anthropology, economics, international relations, forestry, engineering, and atmospheric chemistry. Participation by scientists from developing countries was limited. The conference was divided into four multidisciplinary working groups. Traveler acted as moderator for Group 3 which examined the question What knowledge is required to tackle the principal social and institutional barriers to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions'' The working rapporteur was Jesse Ausubel of Rockefeller University. Other working groups examined the economic costs, benefits, and technical feasibility of options to reduce emissions per unit of energy service; the options for reducing energy use per unit of GNP; and the significant of linkage between strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and other goals. Draft reports of the working groups are appended. Overall, the conference identified a number of important research needs in all four areas. It may prove particularly important in bringing the social and institutional research needs relevant to climate change closer to the forefront of the scientific and policy communities than hitherto.

  13. Limits to biofuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, S.

    2013-06-01

    Biofuel production is dependent upon agriculture and forestry systems, and the expectations of future biofuel potential are high. A study of the global food production and biofuel production from edible crops implies that biofuel produced from edible parts of crops lead to a global deficit of food. This is rather well known, which is why there is a strong urge to develop biofuel systems that make use of residues or products from forest to eliminate competition with food production. However, biofuel from agro-residues still depend upon the crop production system, and there are many parameters to deal with in order to investigate the sustainability of biofuel production. There is a theoretical limit to how much biofuel can be achieved globally from agro-residues and this amounts to approximately one third of todays' use of fossil fuels in the transport sector. In reality this theoretical potential may be eliminated by the energy use in the biomass-conversion technologies and production systems, depending on what type of assessment method is used. By surveying existing studies on biofuel conversion the theoretical limit of biofuels from 2010 years' agricultural production was found to be either non-existent due to energy consumption in the conversion process, or up to 2-6000TWh (biogas from residues and waste and ethanol from woody biomass) in the more optimistic cases.

  14. Limits to biofuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johansson S.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Biofuel production is dependent upon agriculture and forestry systems, and the expectations of future biofuel potential are high. A study of the global food production and biofuel production from edible crops implies that biofuel produced from edible parts of crops lead to a global deficit of food. This is rather well known, which is why there is a strong urge to develop biofuel systems that make use of residues or products from forest to eliminate competition with food production. However, biofuel from agro-residues still depend upon the crop production system, and there are many parameters to deal with in order to investigate the sustainability of biofuel production. There is a theoretical limit to how much biofuel can be achieved globally from agro-residues and this amounts to approximately one third of todays’ use of fossil fuels in the transport sector. In reality this theoretical potential may be eliminated by the energy use in the biomass-conversion technologies and production systems, depending on what type of assessment method is used. By surveying existing studies on biofuel conversion the theoretical limit of biofuels from 2010 years’ agricultural production was found to be either non-existent due to energy consumption in the conversion process, or up to 2–6000TWh (biogas from residues and waste and ethanol from woody biomass in the more optimistic cases.

  15. Symmorphosis through dietary regulation: a combinatorial role for proteolysis, autophagy and protein synthesis in normalising muscle metabolism and function of hypertrophic mice after acute starvation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Collins-Hooper

    Full Text Available Animals are imbued with adaptive mechanisms spanning from the tissue/organ to the cellular scale which insure that processes of homeostasis are preserved in the landscape of size change. However we and others have postulated that the degree of adaptation is limited and that once outside the normal levels of size fluctuations, cells and tissues function in an aberant manner. In this study we examine the function of muscle in the myostatin null mouse which is an excellent model for hypertrophy beyond levels of normal growth and consequeces of acute starvation to restore mass. We show that muscle growth is sustained through protein synthesis driven by Serum/Glucocorticoid Kinase 1 (SGK1 rather than Akt1. Furthermore our metabonomic profiling of hypertrophic muscle shows that carbon from nutrient sources is being channelled for the production of biomass rather than ATP production. However the muscle displays elevated levels of autophagy and decreased levels of muscle tension. We demonstrate the myostatin null muscle is acutely sensitive to changes in diet and activates both the proteolytic and autophagy programmes and shutting down protein synthesis more extensively than is the case for wild-types. Poignantly we show that acute starvation which is detrimental to wild-type animals is beneficial in terms of metabolism and muscle function in the myostatin null mice by normalising tension production.

  16. Limits of Lubrication in

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, David Dam

    using plain mineral oil is possible without any lubricant breakdown. In deep drawing, 2mm stainless steel blanks can be drawn to drawing ratio of DR=2.0 over a die entry radius of rd=3mm again using a plain mineral oil containing no additives. In stretch forming, friction is reduced considerably...... of temperature and contact pressure. The numerical models have been calibrated regarding friction and thermal contact resistance based on experimental results from actual testing conditions. It has been found that predictions of limits of lubrication are possible by numerical means and that the FE...... based on analysis of the appearing backstroke force, which is very sensitive to tribological changes in the punch/workpiece interface, hence to lubricant breakdown. Fundamental studies of pick-up development in punching and blanking show that cold-welding of workpiece particles initially start...

  17. Personal Freedom beyond Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Fernando Sellés

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work we distinguish between freedom in the human manifestations (intelligence, will,actions and personal freedom in the personal intimacy. This second is beyond the freedom reached bythe classic and modern thought, since it takes root in the personnel act of being. Because of it, it is not possible to characterize this freedom like the classic description as ‘domain over the own acts’, becauseit is a description of ‘categorial’ order; neither like present day ‘autonomy’ or ‘independence’, becausethe existence of one person alone is impossible, since ‘person’ means relation, personal free openingto other persons, description of the ‘transcendental’ order and, therefore, to the margin of limits.

  18. Photomask Limitations And Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, John G.

    1989-07-01

    In the vast world of integrated circuits mask making is often taken for granted. This was particularly true a decade ago when the availability of a commercial a-beam machine, MEBES, considerably improved the accuracy of photomasks and simplified the manufacturing process. At present we have the capability to meet today's needs [~ 0.9 micron design rules] but we do not have the capabilities for the next reduction in design rules [~ 0.5 micron in ~1990/1]. Pattern generators, resist, measuring equipment, and defect detection are all suspect as we push photomask tolerances into the sub-micron region. This talk will review some of the limitations in today's photomask fabrication and some of the opportunuities that lie ahead.

  19. Universal Limit on Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousso, Raphael

    2017-10-01

    I derive a universal upper bound on the capacity of any communication channel between two distant systems. The Holevo quantity, and hence the mutual information, is at most of order E Δ t /ℏ, where E is the average energy of the signal, and Δ t is the amount of time for which detectors operate. The bound does not depend on the size or mass of the emitting and receiving systems, nor on the nature of the signal. No restrictions on preparing and processing the signal are imposed. As an example, I consider the encoding of information in the transverse or angular position of a signal emitted and received by systems of arbitrarily large cross section. In the limit of a large message space, quantum effects become important even if individual signals are classical, and the bound is upheld.

  20. Site-specific proteolysis of the MALP-404 lipoprotein determines the release of a soluble selective lipoprotein-associated motif-containing fragment and alteration of the surface phenotype of Mycoplasma fermentans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kelley L; Wise, Kim S

    2002-03-01

    The mature MALP-404 surface lipoprotein of Mycoplasma fermentans comprises a membrane-anchored N-terminal lipid-modified region responsible for macrophage activation (P. F. Mühlradt, M. Kiess, H. Meyer, R. Süssmuth, and G. Jung, J. Exp. Med. 185:1951-1958, 1997) and an external hydrophilic region that contains the selective lipoprotein-associated (SLA) motif defining a family of lipoproteins from diverse but selective prokaryotes, including mycoplasmas (M. J. Calcutt, M. F. Kim, A. B. Karpas, P. F. Mühlradt, and K. S. Wise, Infect. Immun. 67:760-771, 1999). This family generally corresponds to a computationally defined group of orthologs containing the basic membrane protein (BMP) domain. Two discrete lipid-modified forms of the abundant MALP product which vary dramatically in ratio among isolates of M. fermentans occur on the mycoplasma surface: (i) MALP-404, the full-length mature product, and (ii) MALP-2, the Toll-like receptor 2-mediated macrophage-activating lipopeptide containing the N-terminal 14 residues of the mature lipoprotein. The role of posttranslational processing in the biogenesis of MALP-2 from the prototype MALP-404 SLA-containing lipoprotein was investigated. Detergent phase fractionation of cell-bound products and N-terminal sequencing of a newly discovered released fragment (RF) demonstrated that MALP-404 was subject to site-specific proteolysis between residues 14 and 15 of the mature lipoprotein, resulting in the cell-bound MALP-2 and soluble RF products. This previously unknown mechanism of posttranslational processing among mycoplasmas suggests that specific cleavage of some surface proteins may confer efficient "secretion" of extracellular products by these organisms, with concurrent changes in the surface phenotype. This newly identified form of variation may have significant implications for host adaptation by mycoplasmas, as well as other pathogens expressing lipoproteins of the SLA (BMP) family.

  1. Stimulators of mineralization limit the invasive phenotype of human osteosarcoma cells by a mechanism involving impaired invadopodia formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Cmoch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteosarcoma (OS is a highly aggressive bone cancer affecting children and young adults. Growing evidence connects the invasive potential of OS cells with their ability to form invadopodia (structures specialized in extracellular matrix proteolysis. RESULTS: In this study, we tested the hypothesis that commonly used in vitro stimulators of mineralization limit the invadopodia formation in OS cells. Here we examined the invasive potential of human osteoblast-like cells (Saos-2 and osteolytic-like (143B OS cells treated with the stimulators of mineralization (ascorbic acid and B-glycerophosphate and observed a significant difference in response of the tested cells to the treatment. In contrast to 143B cells, osteoblast-like cells developed a mineralization phenotype that was accompanied by a decreased proliferation rate, prolongation of the cell cycle progression and apoptosis. On the other hand, stimulators of mineralization limited osteolytic-like OS cell invasiveness into collagen matrix. We are the first to evidence the ability of 143B cells to degrade extracellular matrix to be driven by invadopodia. Herein, we show that this ability of osteolytic-like cells in vitro is limited by stimulators of mineralization. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrates that mineralization competency determines the invasive potential of cancer cells. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which stimulators of mineralization regulate and execute invadopodia formation would reveal novel clinical targets for treating osteosarcoma.

  2. Limitations of Expert Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serpil Salaçin

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Limitations of Expert Evidence Edited by Stephen Leadbeatter MB ChB MCRPath ISBN 1 86016 029 8 Printed in Great Britain by Cathedral Print Services Ltd, Salisbury, 1996 Kitap 25 Ekim 1994 te The Royal College of Physicians ve The Royal College of Pathologists tarafından düzenlenen konferanstan sonra hekimlere ve avukatlara konuyu tartışmaya açmak için basılmış. Bilirkişi görüşünün temel filozofisinin, bu görevi yapanlar ve bu hizmeti alanların yapabileceklerinin sınırlarının tartışılması amaçlanmış.Seksen altı sayfadan oluşan kitabın fiatı on iki İngiliz Sterlini. Kitap üç bölüm ve bunların altında toplanan on ana başlıktan oluşmakta. Elinize aldığınızda küçük boyutu ve anlaşılır dili ile hemen okunup bitirelecek kitaplardan sanılıyor. En azından ben böyle düşünmüştüm. Ancak daha L A Tuınberg ve A J Bellinham’ın ön yazısında ben çarpıldım. Değerli yazarların kaleme aldığı başlıklar ve gündeme getirdiği tartışmaların tüm Adli Bilimlerle uğraşanların dikkatle okuması gereken cinsten olduğu kanısındayım. Birinci bölüm The Legal Perspective iki anabaşlıktan oluşuyor, The Criminal legal perspective Honour Judje Martin Stephens tarafından yazılmış,bilirkişi olarak görev yapabilmek için belgelenmiş bir eğitim olması gerektiği, mahkemelerde ya da yazılı raporlarda verilebilecek görüşlerin incelikleri tartışılmış. Bu bölümün ikinci anabaşlığı The civil legal perspective avukat Jennifer Cummin tarafından yazılmış. Toplum gözünde bilirkişinin anlamı ve mahkemenin bilirkişi görüşünü değişmez bilimsel doğru gibi algılayarak düştüğü bilimsel yanılgı ve raporlardaki kavram farkı dile getirilmiş. İkinci Bölüm The Medical And Scientific Perspective başlığı altında Roger C Evans MD Clinical evidence başlığında toplumun hasta tedavisi ve bilirkişilik hizmetinden beklentilerinin unrealistik olduğu ve

  3. (67/68)Ga-labeling agent that liberates (67/68)Ga-NOTA-methionine by lysosomal proteolysis of parental low molecular weight polypeptides to reduce renal radioactivity levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Tomoya; Rokugawa, Takemi; Kinoshita, Mai; Nemoto, Souki; Fransisco Lazaro, Guerra Gomez; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Arano, Yasushi

    2014-11-19

    The renal localization of gallium-67 or gallium-68 ((67/68)Ga)-labeled low molecular weight (LMW) probes such as peptides and antibody fragments constitutes a problem in targeted imaging. Wu et al. previously showed that (67)Ga-labeled S-2-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (SCN-Bz-NOTA)-conjugated methionine ((67)Ga-NOTA-Met) was rapidly excreted from the kidney in urine following lysosomal proteolysis of the parental (67)Ga-NOTA-Bz-SCN-disulfide-stabilized Fv fragment (Bioconjugate Chem., (1997) 8, 365-369). In the present study, a new (67/68)Ga-labeling reagent for LMW probes that liberates (67/68)Ga-NOTA-Met was designed, synthesized, and evaluated using longer-lived (67)Ga in order to reduce renal radioactivity levels. We employed a methionine-isoleucine (MI) dipeptide bond as the cleavable linkage. The amine residue of MI was coupled with SCN-Bz-NOTA for (67)Ga-labeling, while the carboxylic acid residue of MI was derivatized to maleimide for antibody conjugation in order to synthesize NOTA-MI-Mal. A Fab fragment of the anti-Her2 antibody was thiolated with iminothiolane, and NOTA-MI-Mal was conjugated with the antibody fragment by maleimide-thiol chemistry. The Fab fragment was also conjugated with SCN-Bz-NOTA (NOTA-Fab) for comparison. (67)Ga-NOTA-MI-Fab was obtained at radiochemical yields of over 95% and was stable in murine serum for 24 h. In the biodistribution study using normal mice, (67)Ga-NOTA-MI-Fab registered significantly lower renal radioactivity levels from 1 to 6 h postinjection than those of (67)Ga-NOTA-Fab. An analysis of urine samples obtained 6 h after the injection of (67)Ga-NOTA-MI-Fab showed that the majority of radioactivity was excreted as (67)Ga-NOTA-Met. In the biodistribution study using tumor-bearing mice, the tumor to kidney ratios of (67)Ga-NOTA-MI-Fab were 4 times higher (6 h postinjection) than those of (67)Ga-NOTA-Fab. Although further studies including the structure of radiometabolites and

  4. Identification of Genes Regulated by Proteolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Hutchison Cancer Research Center, November 12, 2002. Novel targets upstream of the proteasome. Continuing Medical Education Program on Novel Anticancer...increased abun- "Phosphorylation of S126 in addition to S124 was also detected dance of unmodified Cdc25A (lanes 9-12). The peptideat lower levels. ac...of substrate motifs for human Chkl man somatic cells. Mol. Cell. Biol. (in press). and hCdsl/Chk2 by the oriented peptide library approach. J. Zeng, Y

  5. Regulated Proteolysis of Arabidopsis Argonaute1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kausika, Swathi Pranavi

    on the function of poorly characterized N domain. Arabidopsis thaliana AGO1 is a peripheral membrane protein and membrane association is important for function. Previous studies in the model plant showed that mutation in the N domain resulted in reduced levels of AGO1 at the membrane. In this study we use N...

  6. Complex regulation controls Neurogenin3 proteolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Roark

    2012-10-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS is known to be responsible for the rapid turnover of many transcription factors, where half-life is held to be critical for regulation of transcriptional activity. However, the stability of key transcriptional regulators of development is often very poorly characterised. Neurogenin 3 (Ngn3 is a basic helix–loop–helix transcription factor that plays a central role in specification and differentiation of endocrine cells of the pancreas and gut, as well as spermatogonia and regions of the brain. Here we demonstrate that Ngn3 protein stability is regulated by the ubiquitin proteasome system and that Ngn3 can be ubiquitylated on lysines, the N-terminus and, highly unusually, on non-canonical residues including cysteines and serines/threonines. Rapid turnover of Ngn3 is regulated both by binding to its heterodimeric partner E protein and by the presence of cdk inhibitors. We show that protein half-life does appear to regulate the activity of Ngn3 in vivo, but, unlike the related transcription factor c-myc, ubiquitylation on canonical sites is not a requirement for transcriptional activity of Ngn3. Hence, we characterise an important new level of Ngn3 post-translational control, which may regulate its transcriptional activity.

  7. SnapShot: Cartography of Intramembrane Proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Siniša

    2016-12-15

    Intramembrane proteases hydrolyze peptide bonds within the cell membrane as the decision-making step of various signaling pathways or during general proteostasis. Although initially thought to be rare, fourteen proteases from four superfamilies are now known to be distributed among nearly every membrane compartment of a human cell. Each protease is endowed with specific enzymatic properties that determine both substrate choice and outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Charter Halibut Limited Access Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This limited access system limits the number of charter vessels that may participate in the guided sport fishery for halibut in area 2C and 3A. NMFS issues a charter...

  9. Guidelines for setting speed limits

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wium, DJW

    1986-02-01

    Full Text Available A method is described for setting the speed limit for a particular road section. Several speed limits based on different criteria are described for each of nine traffic and road factors. The most appropriate speed limit for each relevant factor...

  10. Interference and memory capacity limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endress, Ansgar D; Szabó, Szilárd

    2017-10-01

    Working memory (WM) is thought to have a fixed and limited capacity. However, the origins of these capacity limitations are debated, and generally attributed to active, attentional processes. Here, we show that the existence of interference among items in memory mathematically guarantees fixed and limited capacity limits under very general conditions, irrespective of any processing assumptions. Assuming that interference (a) increases with the number of interfering items and (b) brings memory performance to chance levels for large numbers of interfering items, capacity limits are a simple function of the relative influence of memorization and interference. In contrast, we show that time-based memory limitations do not lead to fixed memory capacity limitations that are independent of the timing properties of an experiment. We show that interference can mimic both slot-like and continuous resource-like memory limitations, suggesting that these types of memory performance might not be as different as commonly believed. We speculate that slot-like WM limitations might arise from crowding-like phenomena in memory when participants have to retrieve items. Further, based on earlier research on parallel attention and enumeration, we suggest that crowding-like phenomena might be a common reason for the 3 major cognitive capacity limitations. As suggested by Miller (1956) and Cowan (2001), these capacity limitations might arise because of a common reason, even though they likely rely on distinct processes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Material limitations on the detection limit in refractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skafte-Pedersen, Peder; Nunes, Pedro S; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the detection limit for refractometric sensors relying on high-Q optical cavities and show that the ultimate classical detection limit is given by min {Δn} ≳ η, with n + iη being the complex refractive index of the material under refractometric investigation. Taking finite Q factors and filling fractions into account, the detection limit declines. As an example we discuss the fundamental limits of silicon-based high-Q resonators, such as photonic crystal resonators, for sensing in a bio-liquid environment, such as a water buffer. In the transparency window (λ ≳ 1100 nm) of silicon the detection limit becomes almost independent on the filling fraction, while in the visible, the detection limit depends strongly on the filling fraction because the silicon absorbs strongly.

  12. Material Limitations on the Detection Limit in Refractometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Asger Mortensen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the detection limit for refractometric sensors relying on high-Q optical cavities and show that the ultimate classical detection limit is given by min {Δn} ≳ η with n + iη being the complex refractive index of the material under refractometric investigation. Taking finite Q factors and filling fractions into account, the detection limit declines. As an example we discuss the fundamental limits of silicon-based high-Q resonators, such as photonic crystal resonators, for sensing in a bio-liquid environment, such as a water buffer. In the transparency window (λ ≳ 1100 nm of silicon the detection limit becomes almost independent on the filling fraction, while in the visible, the detection limit depends strongly on the filling fraction because the silicon absorbs strongly.

  13. Thermodynamic limit for coherence-limited solar power conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashaal, Heylal; Gordon, Jeffrey M.

    2014-09-01

    The spatial coherence of solar beam radiation is a key constraint in solar rectenna conversion. Here, we present a derivation of the thermodynamic limit for coherence-limited solar power conversion - an expansion of Landsberg's elegant basic bound, originally limited to incoherent converters at maximum flux concentration. First, we generalize Landsberg's work to arbitrary concentration and angular confinement. Then we derive how the values are further lowered for coherence-limited converters. The results do not depend on a particular conversion strategy. As such, they pertain to systems that span geometric to physical optics, as well as classical to quantum physics. Our findings indicate promising potential for solar rectenna conversion.

  14. Material limitations on the detection limit in refractometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skafte-Pedersen, Peder; Nunes, Pedro; Xiao, Sanshui

    2009-01-01

    and filling fractions into account, the detection limit declines. As an example we discuss the fundamental limits of silicon-based high-Q resonators, such as photonic crystal resonators, for sensing in a bio-liquid environment, such as a water buffer. In the transparency window (λ ≳ 1100 nm) of silicon...

  15. Limit cycles in quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemann, Patrick

    2015-04-27

    In this thesis we investigate Limit Cycles in Quantum Systems. Limit cycles are a renormalization group (RG) topology. When degrees of freedom are integrated out, the coupling constants flow periodically in a closed curve. The presence of limit cycles is restricted by the necessary condition of discrete scale invariance. A signature of discrete scale invariance and limit cycles is log-periodic behavior. The first part of this thesis is concerned with the study of limit cycles with the similarity renormalization group (SRG). Limit cycles are mainly investigated within conventional renormalization group frameworks, where degrees of freedom, which are larger than a given cutoff, are integrated out. In contrast, in the SRG potentials are unitarily transformed and thereby obtain a band-diagonal structure. The width of the band structure can be regarded as an effective cutoff. We investigate the appearance of limit cycles in the SRG evolution. Our aim is to extract signatures as well as the scaling factor of the limit cycle. We consider the 1/R{sup 2}-potential in a two-body system and a three-body system with large scattering lengths. Both systems display a limit cycle. Besides the frequently used kinetic energy generator we apply the exponential and the inverse generator. In the second part of this thesis, Limit Cycles at Finite Density, we examine the pole structure of the scattering amplitude for distinguishable fermions at zero temperature in the medium. Unequal masses and a filled Fermi sphere for each fermion species are considered. We focus on negative scattering lengths and the unitary limit. The properties of the three-body spectrum in the medium and implications for the phase structure of ultracold Fermi gases are discussed.

  16. New Limit on CPT Violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geer, S.; Marriner, J.; Martens, M.; Ray, R. E.; Streets, J.; Wester, W.; Hu, M.; Snow, G. R.; Armstrong, T.; Buchanan, C. (and others)

    2000-01-24

    A search for antiproton decay has been made at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator. Limits are placed on fifteen antiproton decay modes. The results are used to place limits on the characteristic mass scale m{sub X} that could be associated with CPT violation accompanied by baryon number violation. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  17. Regularity of conservative inductive limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kucera

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A sequentially complete inductive limit of Fréchet spaces is regular, see [3]. With a minor modification, this property can be extended to inductive limits of arbitrary locally convex spaces under an additional assumption of conservativeness.

  18. Space-charge limited photocurrent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihailetchi, VD; Wildeman, J; Blom, PWM

    2005-01-01

    In 1971 Goodman and Rose predicted the occurrence of a fundamental electrostatic limit for the photocurrent in semiconductors at high light intensities. Blends of conjugated polymers and fullerenes are an ideal model system to observe this space-charge limit experimentally, since they combine an

  19. Tachyons in the Galilean limit

    OpenAIRE

    Batlle, Carles; Gomis, Joaquim; Mezincescu, Luca; Townsend, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The Souriau massless Galilean particle of “colour” k and spin s is shown to be the Galilean limit of the Souriau tachyon of mass m = ik and spin s . We compare and contrast this result with the Galilean limit of the Nambu-Goto string and Green-Schwarz superstring.

  20. Tachyons in the Galilean limit

    OpenAIRE

    Batlle Arnau, Carles; Gomis Torné, Joaquin; Mezincescu, Luca; Townsend, Paul K.

    2017-01-01

    The Souriau massless Galilean particle of "colour" $k$ and spin $s$ is shown to be the Galilean limit of the Souriau tachyon of mass $m = ik$ and spin $s$. We compare and contrast this result with the recent Galilean limit of the Nambu-Goto string and the Green-Schwarz superstring.

  1. Interpreting Recruitment Limitation in Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.S. Clark; B. Beckage; P. Camill; B. Cleveland; J. HilleRisLambers; J. Lichter; J. McLachlan; J. Mohan; P. Wyckoff

    1999-01-01

    Studies of tree recruitment are many, but they provide few general insights into the role of recruitment limitation for population dynamics. That role depends on the vital rates (transitions) from seed production to sapling stages and on overall population growth. To determine the state of our understanding of recruitment limitation we examined how well we can estimate...

  2. Solubility limits on radionuclide dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1984-12-31

    This paper examines the effects of solubility in limiting dissolution rates of a number of important radionuclides from spent fuel and high-level waste. Two simple dissolution models were used for calculations that would be characteristics of a Yucca Mountain repository. A saturation-limited dissolution model, in which the water flowing through the repository is assumed to be saturated with each waste element, is very conservative in that it overestimates dissolution rates. A diffusion-limited dissolution model, in which element-dissolution rates are limited by diffusion of waste elements into water flowing past the waste, is more realistic, but it is subject to some uncertainty at this time. Dissolution rates of some elements (Pu, Am, Sn, Th, Zr, Sm) are always limited by solubility. Dissolution rates of other elements (Cs, Tc, Np, Sr, C, I) are never solubility limited; their release would be limited by dissolution of the bulk waste form. Still other elements (U, Cm, Ni, Ra) show solubility-limited dissolution under some conditions. 9 references, 3 tables.

  3. A response to: Limitations within "The Limits to Tree Height".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, George W; Sillett, Stephen C

    2009-02-01

    Here we respond to the communication in American Journal of Botany (96: 542-544 in this issue) by Netting, who proposes several ways in which our paper "The Limits to Tree Height" (Nature 428: 851-854) may have erred in estimating the biophysical limits to height growth in Sequoia sempervirens. We first explain that because embolism repair requires long time periods and is generally incomplete, xylem vulnerability characteristics offer a sound basis for estimating performance limits in woody plants. We reaffirm our earlier use of vertical gradients of foliar carbon isotope composition with new data for S. sempervirens. We support these arguments with reference to studies in other tree species. We take exception with Netting's view that the turgor pressure-cell expansion relationship for Zea mays is applicable to S. sempervirens. Finally, we second Netting's call for more work on carbon allocation vis a vis height growth limits.

  4. Toward the Atomic Structure of PrPSc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jose A; Jiang, Lin; Eisenberg, David S

    2017-09-01

    In this review, we detail our current knowledge of PrP Sc structure on the basis of structural and computational studies. We discuss the progress toward an atomic resolution description of PrP Sc and results from the broader field of amyloid studies that may further inform our knowledge of this structure. Moreover, we summarize work that investigates the role of PrP Sc structure in its toxicity, transmissibility, and species specificity. We look forward to an atomic model of PrP Sc , which is expected to bring diagnostics and/or therapeutics to the field of prion disease. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  5. The Limits of Exercise Physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabriel, Brendan M; Zierath, Juleen R

    2017-01-01

    Many of the established positive health benefits of exercise have been documented by historical discoveries in the field of exercise physiology. These investigations often assess limits: the limits of performance, or the limits of exercise-induced health benefits. Indeed, several key findings have...... been informed by studying highly trained athletes, in addition to healthy or unhealthy people. Recent progress has been made in regard to skeletal muscle metabolism and personalized exercise regimes. In this perspective, we review some of the historical milestones of exercise physiology, discuss how...... these inform contemporary knowledge, and speculate on future questions....

  6. Efeito do uso de cultura adjunta (Lactobacillus helveticus na proteólise, propriedades viscoelásticas e aceitação sensorial de queijo prato light Effect of adjunct culture (Lactobacillus helveticus on proteolysis, viscoelastic properties and sensory acceptance of reduced fat prato cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Maciel V. Barros

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available A proteólise, as propriedades viscoelásticas e a aceitação sensorial de queijo prato light fabricado com e sem adição de cultura adjunta (CAD foram avaliadas. Os queijos foram fabricados a partir de leite microfiltrado. Dois tratamentos foram testados em duplicata: o queijo controle foi fabricado apenas com cultura mesófila tradicional (acidificante e aromatizante, e o outro foi fabricado com adição de CAD (Lactobacillus helveticus, além da cultura tradicional. A composição dos queijos foi determinada no quinto dia após a fabricação. A proteólise e as propriedades reológicas foram avaliadas nos dias 5, 25 e 45 após a fabricação. Os parâmetros viscoelásticos foram obtidos a partir de testes de relaxação. As amostras foram avaliadas sensorialmente por meio de testes de aceitação. Não houve diferença significativa (p>0,05 na composição dos queijos. Os índices de profundidade de proteólise foram significativamente (p0,05. Nos testes de aceitação sensorial, o queijo produzido com CAD obteve notas significativamente (pProteolysis, viscoelastic properties and sensory acceptance of reduced fat Prato cheeses made with and without adjunt culture (AC were evaluated. The cheeses were made from microfiltered milk. Two different treatments were replicated twice: control cheese was made only with traditional starter, while the other was made with the addition of both AC (Lactobacillus helveticus and traditional starter. Cheese composition was determined after 5 days of manufacture. Proteolysis and rheological properties were evaluated after 5, 25 and 45 days. Viscoelastic parameters were obtained using relaxation tests. Cheese sensory properties were evaluated using acceptability tests. There was no statistical difference (p>0,05 in cheese composition. The proteolysis depth indexes were significantly higher (p0.05 in viscoelastic parameters for cheeses made with and without AC. Sensory acceptability tests indicated significant

  7. Composição, proteólise, capacidade de derretimento e formação de "blisters" do queijo mussarela obtido pelos métodos tradicional e de ultrafiltração: composition, proteolysis, melting capacity and blisters formation Mozzarella by ultrafiltration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia D. Pizaia

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi comparar a composição, a proteólise, a capacidade de derretimento e a formação de "blisters" (bolhas em queijos tipo Mussarela fabricados com retentado de leite (MR de fator de concentração volumétrica (FCV de 2,34:1, com um queijo Mussarela padrão (MP fabricado com leite não ultrafiltrado. Foi realizado um ensaio de produção com 3 lotes de MR e um lote de MP. Determinou-se a composição do leite, retentado, soro, água de filagem e queijos e a proteólise, a capacidade de derretimento e a formação de "blisters" nos queijos com 7, 15, 30 e 60 dias de armazenamento refrigerado. MRs apresentaram maiores valores de pH e de porcentagem de cinzas e de proteína total e menores porcentagens de acidez titulável, gordura, gordura no extrato seco e sal quando comparadas a MP. Durante o tempo de estocagem, as MRs apresentaram menor proteólise e capacidade de derretimento, em todas as datas analisadas. A porcentagem de área coberta por 'blisters" na pizza e o diâmetro médio dos mesmos foram maiores na MP durante o primeiro mês de estocagem e depois ambos os tipos de queijos apresentaram comportamentos similares para estes 2 parâmetros.The objective of this research was to compare the composition, proteolysis, melting capacity and blisters formation in Mozzarella cheese manufactured with milk retentate (MR of a volumetric concentration factor (FCV of 2.34:1, with a standard Mozzarella cheese (MP manufactured with non ultrafiltrated milk. It was realized one production assay with 3 batches of MRs and one of MP. It was evaluated the milk, retentate, whey, stretching water and cheeses composition and the proteolysis, melting capacity and the blisters formation on cheeses with 7, 15, 30 and 60 days of refrigerates storage. MRs presented larger pH, ash and total protein contents and lower titratable acidity and fat, fat on dry matter and salt contents when compared to MP. Along the storage time the MRs

  8. The limits of cosmic shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitching, Thomas D.; Alsing, Justin; Heavens, Alan F.; Jimenez, Raul; McEwen, Jason D.; Verde, Licia

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we discuss the commonly used limiting cases, or approximations, for two-point cosmic-shear statistics. We discuss the most prominent assumptions in this statistic: the flat-sky (small angle limit), the Limber (Bessel-to-delta function limit) and the Hankel transform (large ℓ-mode limit) approximations; that the vast majority of cosmic-shear results to date have used simultaneously. We find that the combined effect of these approximations can suppress power by ≳ 1 per cent on scales of ℓ ≲ 40. A fully non-approximated cosmic-shear study should use a spherical-sky, non-Limber-approximated power spectrum analysis and a transform involving Wigner small-d matrices in place of the Hankel transform. These effects, unaccounted for, would constitute at least 11 per cent of the total budget for systematic effects for a power spectrum analysis of a Euclid-like experiment; but they are unnecessary.

  9. Multifamily Tax Subsidy Income Limits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — Multifamily Tax Subsidy Projects (MTSP) Income Limits were developed to meet the requirements established by the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 (Public...

  10. Brassicas limited in weed control

    OpenAIRE

    Kristiansen, P

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses the limitations of using brassica cover crops for weed control. A brief overview of the role of cover crops is provided, followed by a short review of research looking at brassica cover crops.

  11. Major Limitations of Satellite images

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Wassai, Firouz A.; Kalyankar, N. V.

    2013-01-01

    Remote sensing has proven to be a powerful tool for the monitoring of the Earth surface to improve our perception of our surroundings has led to unprecedented developments in sensor and information technologies. However, technologies for effective use of the data and for extracting useful information from the data of Remote sensing are still very limited since no single sensor combines the optimal spectral, spatial and temporal resolution. This paper briefly reviews the limitations of satelli...

  12. Preliminary disposal limits, plume interaction factors, and final disposal limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2018-01-11

    In the 2008 E-Area Performance Assessment (PA), each final disposal limit was constructed as the product of a preliminary disposal limit and a plume interaction factor. The following mathematical development demonstrates that performance objectives are generally expected to be satisfied with high confidence under practical PA scenarios using this method. However, radionuclides that experience significant decay between a disposal unit and the 100-meter boundary, such as H-3 and Sr-90, can challenge performance objectives, depending on the disposed-of waste composition, facility geometry, and the significance of the plume interaction factor. Pros and cons of analyzing single disposal units or multiple disposal units as a group in the preliminary disposal limits analysis are also identified.

  13. Generalized Geometric Quantum Speed Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Paiva Pires

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The attempt to gain a theoretical understanding of the concept of time in quantum mechanics has triggered significant progress towards the search for faster and more efficient quantum technologies. One of such advances consists in the interpretation of the time-energy uncertainty relations as lower bounds for the minimal evolution time between two distinguishable states of a quantum system, also known as quantum speed limits. We investigate how the nonuniqueness of a bona fide measure of distinguishability defined on the quantum-state space affects the quantum speed limits and can be exploited in order to derive improved bounds. Specifically, we establish an infinite family of quantum speed limits valid for unitary and nonunitary evolutions, based on an elegant information geometric formalism. Our work unifies and generalizes existing results on quantum speed limits and provides instances of novel bounds that are tighter than any established one based on the conventional quantum Fisher information. We illustrate our findings with relevant examples, demonstrating the importance of choosing different information metrics for open system dynamics, as well as clarifying the roles of classical populations versus quantum coherences, in the determination and saturation of the speed limits. Our results can find applications in the optimization and control of quantum technologies such as quantum computation and metrology, and might provide new insights in fundamental investigations of quantum thermodynamics.

  14. Derived limits for surface contamination

    CERN Document Server

    Wrixon, A D; Linsley, G S; White, D F

    1979-01-01

    Derived limits (DLs) for surface contamination were first established for use in the nuclear energy industry where a wide variety of radionuclides is encountered. They were later used in factories, hospitals, and universities, where the radionuclides used are normally fewer in number, either known or readily identifiable, and often of low toxicity. In these situations the current limits are frequently over-restrictive. This report describes a reassessment of the values in the light of more recent information on the possible pathways of exposure and the dose equivalent limits given in ICRP Publication 26. The reassessment is prompted also by the introduction of SI units. The results of the reassessment are used to produce a classification of DLs for all radionuclides for active and inactive area surfaces and for skin.

  15. Bayesian versus frequentist upper limits

    CERN Document Server

    Rover, Christian; Prix, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    While gravitational waves have not yet been measured directly, data analysis from detection experiments commonly includes an upper limit statement. Such upper limits may be derived via a frequentist or Bayesian approach; the theoretical implications are very different, and on the technical side, one notable difference is that one case requires maximization of the likelihood function over parameter space, while the other requires integration. Using a simple example (detection of a sinusoidal signal in white Gaussian noise), we investigate the differences in performance and interpretation, and the effect of the "trials factor", or "look-elsewhere effect".

  16. Flux limiters and Eddington factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomraning, G.C.

    1982-01-01

    In this paper a closure scheme for the first two angular moments of the time-dependent equation of transfer is presented, either via an Eddington factor which leads to a telegrapher's description, or via a Fick's law which leads to a diffusion description. Points discussed include boundary conditions (both an extension of the classic Marshak-Milne condition and those arising from a boundary layer analysis), the flux limiting feature of the diffusion approximation, and the reduction of the theory to asymptotic diffusion theory in the steady state limit.

  17. The Limits of Collaborative Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewkowicz, Jo A.; Nunan, David

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development of a collaborative evaluation model and its application to a curricular innovation project within a secondary school system in Hong Kong. Focuses on the limits of collaboration in long-term evaluation projects with multiple stakeholders. (Author/VWL)

  18. Energy Conservative Limit Cycle Oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stramigioli, Stefano; van Dijk, Michel

    This paper shows how globally attractive limit cycle oscillations can be induced in a system with a nonlinear feedback element. Based on the same principle as the Van der Pol oscillator, the feedback behaves as a negative damping for low velocities but as an ordinary damper for high velocities. This

  19. Limitations of existing web services

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Limitations of existing web services. Uploading or downloading large data. Serving too many user from single source. Difficult to provide computer intensive job. Depend on internet and its bandwidth. Security of data in transition. Maintain confidentiality of data ...

  20. Landscape genetics and limiting factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel A. Cushman; Andrew J. Shirk; Erin L. Landguth

    2013-01-01

    Population connectivity is mediated by the movement of organisms or propagules through landscapes. However, little is known about how variation in the pattern of landscape mosaics affects the detectability of landscape genetic relationships. The goal of this paper is to explore the impacts of limiting factors on landscape genetic processes using simulation...

  1. 77 FR 76841 - Lending Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... surplus if the loan is fully secured. Section 5(u)(1) of the Home Owners' Loan Act (HOLA), 12 U.S.C. 1464...) of HOLA, 12 U.S.C. 1464(u)(2), includes exceptions to the lending limits for certain loans made by savings associations. These HOLA provisions apply to both Federal and state-chartered savings associations...

  2. 78 FR 37930 - Lending Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ...' Loan Act (HOLA), 12 U.S.C. 1464(u)(1), provides that section 5200 of the Revised Statutes ``shall apply....'' In addition, section 5(u)(2) of HOLA, 12 U.S.C. 1464(u)(2), includes exceptions to the lending limits for certain loans made by savings associations. These HOLA provisions apply to both Federal and state...

  3. 77 FR 37265 - Lending Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ...)(1) of the Home Owners' Loan Act (HOLA), 12 U.S.C. 1464(u)(1), provides that section 5200 of the... applies to ] national banks.'' In addition, section 5(u)(2) of HOLA, 12 U.S.C. 1464(u)(2), includes exceptions to the lending limits for certain loans made by savings associations. These HOLA provisions apply...

  4. Limited-Access Heart Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... perform videoscopic surgery with even greater precision. In robotic-assisted surgery, surgeons make several small incisions in the chest ... As with other kinds of limited-access surgery, robotic-assisted surgery can mean shorter hospital stays and recovery times ...

  5. LIMITS OF THE EARTH BIOSPHERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel KUDRNA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of the state of CO2 accumulation in the atmosphere demands knowledge on possibilities of the biosphere – its photosynthetizing apparatus, conditions and limits of absorption. A decisive precondition is to determine relation of CO2 accumulation by photosynthesis in dependence on the water balance, especially on its control quantity – transpiration, which is stabilized by supporting of underground waters.

  6. Historical Drawbacks of Limited Liability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Boyle

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Limited liability is a human invention which has facilitated enormous economic growth around the world, particularly since the time of its general application in advanced countries during the nineteenth century. The individual legal identity of companies, coupled with the limited liability of their owners, has provided protection for investors from the risks associated with their investments. It has thus contributed to increase the sources of capital available to finance projects which might otherwise have been considered unviable. However, the legal protection offered to investors has negative consequences for other participants in economies. Speculation in stock markets often damages society. It is very important to study the drawbacks of limited liability and to suggest modifications to achieve a more stable, less volatile, economic growth in the world. Although this article goes to some lengths to recognise the work of authors who emphasise the positive historical economic contribution of limited lability, its main objective is to provoke a reflection around texts which point out the drawbacks and propose solutions.

  7. Characterization of Truncated Forms of Abnormal Prion Protein in Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notari, S.; Strammiello, R.; Capellari, S.; Giese, A.; Cescatti, M.; Grassi, J.; Ghetti, B.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Zou, W.Q.; Gambetti, P.; Kretzschmar, H.A.; Parchi, P.

    2008-01-01

    In prion disease, the abnormal conformer of the cellular prion protein, PrPSc, deposits in fibrillar protein aggregates in brain and other organs. Limited exposure of PrPSc to proteolytic digestion in vitro generates a core fragment of 19-21 kDa, named PrP27-30, which is also found in vivo. Recent

  8. Accurate test limits under prescribed consumer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Willem/Wim; Arts, G.R.J.; Kallenberg, W.C.M.

    1997-01-01

    Measurement errors occurring during inspection of manufactured parts force producers to replace specification limits by slightly more strict test limits. Here accurate test limits are presented which maximize the yield while limiting the fraction of defectives reaching the consumer.

  9. Limit of crustal drilling depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.S. Zhao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Deep drilling is becoming the direct and the most efficient means in exploiting deep mineral resources, facilitating to understanding the earthquake mechanism and performing other scientific researches on the Earth's crust. In order to understand the limit of drilling depth in the Earth's crust, we first conducted tests on granite samples with respect to the borehole deformation and stability under high temperature and high pressure using the triaxial servo-controlled rock testing system. Then the critical temperature-pressure coupling conditions that result in borehole instability are derived. Finally, based on the testing results obtained and the requirements for the threshold values of borehole deformations during deep drilling, the limit of drilling depth in the Earth's crust is formulated with ground temperature.

  10. Classical Limit and Quantum Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losada, Marcelo; Fortin, Sebastian; Holik, Federico

    2018-02-01

    The analysis of the classical limit of quantum mechanics usually focuses on the state of the system. The general idea is to explain the disappearance of the interference terms of quantum states appealing to the decoherence process induced by the environment. However, in these approaches it is not explained how the structure of quantum properties becomes classical. In this paper, we consider the classical limit from a different perspective. We consider the set of properties of a quantum system and we study the quantum-to-classical transition of its logical structure. The aim is to open the door to a new study based on dynamical logics, that is, logics that change over time. In particular, we appeal to the notion of hybrid logics to describe semiclassical systems. Moreover, we consider systems with many characteristic decoherence times, whose sublattices of properties become distributive at different times.

  11. Classical Limit and Quantum Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losada, Marcelo; Fortin, Sebastian; Holik, Federico

    2017-10-01

    The analysis of the classical limit of quantum mechanics usually focuses on the state of the system. The general idea is to explain the disappearance of the interference terms of quantum states appealing to the decoherence process induced by the environment. However, in these approaches it is not explained how the structure of quantum properties becomes classical. In this paper, we consider the classical limit from a different perspective. We consider the set of properties of a quantum system and we study the quantum-to-classical transition of its logical structure. The aim is to open the door to a new study based on dynamical logics, that is, logics that change over time. In particular, we appeal to the notion of hybrid logics to describe semiclassical systems. Moreover, we consider systems with many characteristic decoherence times, whose sublattices of properties become distributive at different times.

  12. Hydrodynamic Limit for Interacting Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Masi, A.; Galves, A.; Löcherbach, E.; Presutti, E.

    2015-02-01

    This paper studies the hydrodynamic limit of a stochastic process describing the time evolution of a system with N neurons with mean-field interactions produced both by chemical and by electrical synapses. This system can be informally described as follows. Each neuron spikes randomly following a point process with rate depending on its membrane potential. At its spiking time, the membrane potential of the spiking neuron is reset to the value 0 and, simultaneously, the membrane potentials of the other neurons are increased by an amount of potential . This mimics the effect of chemical synapses. Additionally, the effect of electrical synapses is represented by a deterministic drift of all the membrane potentials towards the average value of the system. We show that, as the system size N diverges, the distribution of membrane potentials becomes deterministic and is described by a limit density which obeys a non linear PDE which is a conservation law of hyperbolic type.

  13. Surfactants at the Design Limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajka, Adam; Hazell, Gavin; Eastoe, Julian

    2015-08-04

    This article analyzes how the individual structural elements of surfactant molecules affect surface properties, in particular, the point of reference defined by the limiting surface tension at the aqueous cmc, γcmc. Particular emphasis is given to how the chemical nature and structure of the hydrophobic tails influence γcmc. By comparing the three different classes of surfactants, fluorocarbon, silicone, and hydrocarbon, a generalized surface packing index is introduced which is independent of the chemical nature of the surfactants. This parameter ϕcmc represents the volume fraction of surfactant chain fragments in a surface film at the aqueous cmc. It is shown that ϕcmc is a useful index for understanding the limiting surface tension of surfactants and can be useful for designing new superefficient surfactants.

  14. Nuclear Structure at the Limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarewicz, W.

    1998-01-12

    One of the frontiers of today�s nuclear science is the �journey to the limits� of atomic charge and nuclear mass, of neutron-to-proton ratio, and of angular momentum. The tour to the limits is not only a quest for new, exciting phenomena, but the new data are expected, as well, to bring qualitatively new information about the fundamental properties of the nucleonic many-body system, the nature of the nuclear interaction, and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this series of lectures, current developments in nuclear structure at the limits are discussed from a theoretical perspective, mainly concentrating on medium-mass and heavy nuclei.

  15. Limitation and life in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Marvin; Smith, T. Scott

    1986-08-01

    ``The Earth is the very quintescence of the human condition...,'' says Hannah Arendt. Georg Simmel writes: ``The stranger is by nature no `owner of soil'—soil not only in the physical, but also in the figurative sense of a life-substance which is fixed, if not in a point in space, at least in an ideal point of social environment.'' How will no longer being Earthbound affect persons' experience of themselves and of others? Space colonization offers an opportunity for new self-definition by the alteration of existing limits. Thus ``limitation'' is a useful concept for exploring the physical, social and psychological significance of the colonization of space. Will people seek the security of routine, of convention, of hierarchy as in the military model governing our present-day astronauts? or will they seek to maximize the freedom inherent in extraordinary living conditions—as bohemians, deviants, travelers?

  16. Adiabatic limit in perturbation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Epstein, H

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that, with correct mass and wave function renormalization, the time-ordered products for Wick polynomials T(L(y/sub 1/)...L(y/sub n/)) constructed by a method outlined in a previous paper (Epstein and Glaser, 1970) are such that the vectors of the form integral T(L(y/sub 1/)...L(y/sub n/)) g(y/sub 1/)...g(y/sub n/) psi dy/sub 1/...dy/sub n/ have limits when g tends to a constant, provided psi is chosen in a suitable dense domain. It follows that the S-matrix has unitary adiabatic limit as an operator-valued formal power series in Fock space. (4 refs).

  17. Limit laws for exponential families

    OpenAIRE

    Balkema, August A.; Klüppelberg, Claudia; Resnick, Sidney I.

    1999-01-01

    For a real random variable [math] with distribution function [math] , define ¶ [math] ¶ The distribution [math] generates a natural exponential family of distribution functions [math] , where ¶ [math] ¶ We study the asymptotic behaviour of the distribution functions [math] as [math] increases to [math] . If [math] then [math] pointwise on [math] . It may still be possible to obtain a non-degenerate weak limit law [math] by choosing suitable scaling and centring constants [math] an...

  18. Rationality and concept of limit

    OpenAIRE

    LECORRE, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    International audience; We present a didactic situation aimed at the formal definition (delta-epsilon) of the limit of a function; the experimentation of this didactic situation has been made many times with French students in the last year of high school and the first year of university using ''scientific debates'' between students. From an excerpt of the script of an experimentation, we study the evolution of students' reasoning. We specifically study the kinds of rationalities used by stud...

  19. Summary of Dissolved Concentration Limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yueting Chen

    2001-06-11

    According to the Technical Work Plan titled Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR (CRWMS M&O 2000a), the purpose of this study is to perform abstractions on solubility limits of radioactive elements based on the process-level information and thermodynamic databases provided by Natural Environment Program Operations (NEPO) and Waste Package Operations (WPO). The scope of this analysis is to produce solubility limits as functions, distributions, or constants for all transported radioactive elements identified by the Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) radioisotope screening. Results from an expert elicitation for solubility limits of most radioactive elements were used in the previous Total System Performance Assessments (TSPAs). However, the elicitation conducted in 1993 does not meet the criteria set forth by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) due to lack of documentation and traceability (Kotra et al. 1996, Section 3). Therefore, at the Waste Form Abstraction Workshop held on February 2-4, 1999, at Albuquerque, New Mexico, the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) decided to develop geochemical models to study solubility for the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository. WPO/NEPO is to develop process-level solubility models, including review and compilation of relevant thermodynamic data. PAO's responsibility is to perform abstractions based on the process models and chemical conditions and to produce solubility distributions or response surfaces applicable to the proposed repository. The results of this analysis and conceptual model will feed the performance assessment for Total System Performance Assessment--Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) and Total System Performance Assessment--License Application (TSPA-LA), and to the Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report section on concentration limits.

  20. Problems of anthropogenic tritium limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kochetkov О.A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article contains the current situation in respect to the environmental concentrations of anthropogenic and natural tritium. There are presented and analyzed domestic standards for НТО of all Radiation Safety Standards (NRB, as well as the regulations analyzed for tritium in drinking water taken in other countries today. This article deals with the experience of limitation of tritium and focuses on the main problem of rationing of tritium — rationing of organically bound tritium.

  1. MHD limit cycles on FTU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucella, G.; Giovannozzi, E.; Buratti, P.; Cianfarani, C.

    2017-11-01

    The development of low-order tearing modes during density ramp-up in the high density regime on the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade is characterized by an initial ordinary stage, with a ‘one-to-one’ relation between mode amplitude and frequency, followed by the formation, on the amplitude/frequency plane, of ‘limit cycles’ with increasing area up to disruption for density limit if the density continues to grow. A critical mode amplitude for transition from smooth to cyclic behavior has been observed in experiments performed changing the line-averaged density, and the existence of such a threshold has been confirmed in experiments of real time control of tearing mode in the high density regime by means of electron cyclotron resonance heating. The amplitude and frequency modulations of the observed m/n=2/1 tearing mode (m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode number, respectively) occur in few milliseconds, which is not in agreement with the diffusion resistive time of about two hundred milliseconds expected on the q=2 resonance from the non-linear theory. The origin of such modulations has been investigated, taking into account that in the high amplitude stages of the mode temporal evolution it is difficult to discriminate between non-linear effects and mode coupling mechanisms. Our analysis suggests that the formation of limit cycles could be due to a recursive island fragmentation, with a sort of self-healing phenomenon; in fact the island distortion increases before amplitude drops. Concerning the interaction with modes of different helicity, our experiments seem to indicate that the presence of the q=3 resonance in the plasma is necessary for the occurrence of deep and regular limit cycles for the 2/1 tearing mode.

  2. Heisenberg Limit Superradiant Superresolving Metrology

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Da-Wei; Scully, Marlan O.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a superradiant metrology technique to achieve the Heisenberg limit super-resolving displacement measurement by encoding multiple light momenta into a three-level atomic ensemble. We use $2N$ coherent pulses to prepare a single excitation superradiant state in a superposition of two timed Dicke states that are $4N$ light momenta apart in momentum space. The phase difference between these two states induced by a uniform displacement of the atomic ensemble has $1/4N$ sensitivity. Expe...

  3. BEYOND THE LIMITS OF CRISIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Ionescu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The recurrence of economic crises serves to illustrate the limits of neoclassical economics and the contemporary established models. The study of complex systems, evolutionary economics and interdisciplinary research offers the possibility of new developments. The concept of emergence represents an insightful argument against the well-planned and ordered nature of the social sciences universe. Complex systems research represents the viable alternative for sustainable growth in the following decades.

  4. Limits to global groundwater consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, I.; Van Beek, L. P.; Sutanudjaja, E.; Wada, Y.; Bierkens, M. F.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater is the largest accessible freshwater resource worldwide and is of critical importance for irrigation, and so for global food security. For many regions of the world where groundwater abstraction exceeds groundwater recharge, persistent groundwater depletion occurs. A direct consequence of depletion is falling groundwater levels, reducing baseflows to rivers, harming ecosystems. Also, pumping costs increase, wells dry up and land subsidence can occur. Water demands are expected to increase further due to growing population, economic development and climate change, posing the urgent question how sustainable current water abstractions are worldwide and where and when these abstractions approach conceivable limits with all the associated problems. Here, we estimated past and future trends (1960-2050) in groundwater levels resulting from changes in abstractions and climate and predicted when limits of groundwater consumption are reached. We explored these limits by predicting where and when groundwater levels drop that low that groundwater becomes unattainable for abstractions and how river flows are affected. Water availabilities, abstractions, and lateral groundwater flows are simulated (5 arcmin. resolution) using a coupled version of the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB and a groundwater model based on MODFLOW. The groundwater model includes a parameterization of the worlds confined and unconfined aquifer systems, needed for a realistic simulation of groundwater head dynamics. Results show that, next to the existing regions experiencing groundwater depletion (like India, Pakistan, Central Valley) new regions will develop, e.g. Southern Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. Using a limit that reflects present-day feasibility of groundwater abstraction, we estimate that in 2050 groundwater becomes unattainable for 20% of the global population, mainly in the developing countries and pumping cost will increase significantly. Largest impacts are found

  5. Proposed Thermal Limits for Divers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    recommended minimum inspired gas temperature as a function of depth, or pressure of the respired gas. Braithwaite, 1972. 4 m ersion ( diuresis and...levels of indicators of generalized stress, such as corticoids and catecholamines in blood and a greater urine content of such substances or their...stress that can be limiting io. underwater operations. it may be produced by diuresis , by a lack of ingest I water, or by a loss of water through

  6. IONIC LIQUIDS: PREPARATIONS AND LIMITATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzulkefly Kuang Abdullah

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Ionic liquids are considered as an ideal alternative to volatile organic solvents and chemical industries in the future,because they are non-volatile. Ionic liquids are also considered as new novel chemical agents and widely regarded as agreener alternative to many commonly used solvents. Ionic liquids have been studied for a wide range of syntheticapplications and have attracted considerable interest for use as electrolytes in the areas of organic synthesis, catalysis,solar cell, fuel cells, electrodeposition and supercapacitors. However, some ionic liquids suffer from more or less somedrawbacks such as toxicity, preparation and high cost in the process for use. Most recently, three types of ionic liquidsare attracted much attentions specifically traditional ionic liquid, protic ionic liquid and deep eutectic solvent, wheretheir preparation, mechanism and limitation were differentiated. However, those liquids are having their ownadvantages and limitations based on applications. Traditional ionic liquid and protic ionic liquid are highly cost andtoxic for applied engineering research, but they consist of micro-biphasic systems composed of ionic compounds whichhave more varieties in the applications. The deep eutectic solvent is very economic for large-scale possessing but thereare only limited ionic mixtures to certain application such as electrochemistry.

  7. Revisiting non-relativistic limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Kristan [C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, SUNY Stony Brook,Stony Brook, NY 11794-3840 (United States); Karch, Andreas [Department of Physics, University of Washington,Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    We show that the full spurionic symmetry of Galilean-invariant field theories can be deduced when those theories are the limits of relativistic parents. Under the limit, the non-relativistic daughter couples to Newton-Cartan geometry together with all of the symmetries advocated in previous work, including the recently revived Milne boosts. Our limit is a covariant version of the usual one, where we start with a gapped relativistic theory with a conserved charge, turn on a chemical potential equal to the rest mass of the lightest charged state, and then zoom in to the low energy sector. This procedure gives a simple physical interpretation for the Milne boosts. Our methods even apply when there is a magnetic moment, which is known to modify the non-relativistic symmetry transformations. We focus on two examples. Free scalars are used to demonstrate the basic procedure, whereas hydrodynamics is used in order to exhibit the power of this approach in a fully dynamical setting, correcting several inaccuracies in the existing literature.

  8. Time-limited optimal dynamics beyond the Quantum Speed Limit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Das, Kunal K.; Arlt, Jan

    2015-01-01

    by a time-varying control. The problem is addressed in the framework of Hilbert space geometry offering an intuitive interpretation of optimal control algorithms. This approach leads to a necessary criterion for control optimality applicable as a measure of algorithm convergence. The time fidelity trade......-off expressed in terms of the direct Hilbert velocity provides a robust prediction of the quantum speed limit and allows to adapt the control optimization such that it yields a predefined fidelity. The results are verified numerically in a multilevel system with a constrained Hamiltonian, and a classification...

  9. Time limited optimal dynamics beyond the Quantum Speed Limit

    OpenAIRE

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Das, Kunal K.; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob F.; Opatrný, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    The quantum speed limit sets the minimum time required to transfer a quantum system completely into a given target state. At shorter times the higher operation speed has to be paid with a loss of fidelity. Here we quantify the trade-off between the fidelity and the duration in a system driven by a time-varying control. The problem is addressed in the framework of Hilbert space geometry offering an intuitive interpretation of optimal control algorithms. This approach is applied to non-uniform ...

  10. Investigating fuel-cell transport limitations using hydrogen limiting current

    OpenAIRE

    Spingler, FB; Phillips, A; Schuler, T; Tucker, MC; Weber, AZ

    2017-01-01

    © 2017 Hydrogen Energy Publications LLC Reducing mass-transport losses in polymer-electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) is essential to increase their power density and reduce overall stack cost. At the same time, cost also motivates the reduction in expensive precious-metal catalysts, which results in higher local transport losses in the catalyst layers. In this paper, we use a hydrogen-pump limiting-current setup to explore the gas-phase transport losses through PEFC catalyst layers and various ga...

  11. Limits to the growth debate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, L.

    The first two major studies sponsored by the club of Rome were the report of the Meadows team at MIT, The Limits to Growth, published in 1972, and the Mesarovic and Pestel report, Mankind at the Turning Point, published in 1974. When the Club of Rome met in Philadelphia in April of 1976, its pronouncements reflected a frame of mind quite different from that of 1972. Recently, Herman Kahn and his colleagues at the Hudson Institute have published The Next 200 Years, a book evidently inspired as much by antagonism to the limits-to-growth school of thought as by affirmative faith in its own vision of technological optimism. The author discusses the content of the studies and summarizes his own position in four areas. (1) While no trend of growth of anything can continue indefinitely in the real world, there are not global physical limits to economic growth within a time frame susceptible to plausible foresight or relevant to policy making. (2) In some world regions, notably South Asia and tropical Africa, population growth rates do indeed threaten to create a kind of Malthusian trap, and the rapid reduction of fertility is critically important to their development prospects and urgent in time. (3) For other parts of the world, both rates and directions of growth will be more influenced by changes in preferences for consumption and in attitudes toward production than by physical constraints, although higher energy costs and environmental pressures will also be important influences in generating such changes in growth patterns. (4) Probable changes in directions of growth will generate new and important issues in international economic and political relations, with both dangers and opportunities for the evolving world order. (MCW)

  12. Limits and Accuracy in Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Ososkov, G A

    2001-01-01

    Methods of determination of the limit attainable accuracy in measurements are expounded on the basis of the probability theory and the mathematical statistics. Distribution-free and parametric methods, point and interval estimations of the unknown parameters are discussed. The connection between maximum likelihood method and least squares method is shown. A special section is devoted to robust estimations and to resolution of digital signals. It is demonstrated how the Cramer-Rao inequality determines the lower-bound for the accuracy of measurements.

  13. Combination trading with limit orders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Schellhorn

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available We model the exchange of commodities that are contingent upon each other, when traders place mostly limit orders. Examples include: 1 a market of financial futures where future spreads are also traded, 2 a market of mutual funds and stocks, 3 a market of options and stocks, under the viewpoint that they are both combinations of Arrow-Debreu securities. We prove that consistent prices are optimal. We develop a fixed-point algorithm to compute an optimal price and allocation. The algorithm combines ideas from contraction mapping theory and from homotopy theory. It is much faster than a traditional linear programming approach.

  14. The limits of endurance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noakes, Timothy David

    2006-09-01

    A skeletal design which favours running and walking, including the greatest ratio of leg length to body weight of any mammal; the ability to sweat and so to exercise vigorously in the heat; and greater endurance than all land mammals other than the Alaskan Husky, indicates that humans evolved as endurance animals. The development of tools to accurately measure time and distance in the nineteenth century inspired some humans to define the limits of this special capacity. Beginning with Six-Day Professional Pedestrian Races in London and New York in the 1880s, followed a decade later by Six-Day Professional Cycling Races - the immediate precursor of the first six-day Tour de France Cycliste race in 1903, which itself inspired the 1928 and 1929 4,960 km "Bunion Derbies" between Los Angeles and New York across the breadth of the United States of America - established those unique sporting events that continue to challenge the modern limits of human endurance. But an analysis of the total energy expenditure achieved by athletes competing in those events establishes that none approaches those reached by another group - the explorers of the heroic age of polar exploration in the early twentieth century. Thus the greatest recorded human endurance performances occurred during the Antarctic sledding expeditions led by Robert Scott in 1911/12 and Ernest Shackleton in 1914/16. By man-hauling sleds for 10 hours daily for approximately 159 and 160 consecutive days respectively, members of those expeditions would have expended close to a total of 1,000,000 kcal. By comparison completing a Six-Day Pedestrian event (55,000 kcal) or the Tour de France (168,000 kcal), or cycling (180,000 kcal) or running (340,000 kcal) across America, requires a considerably smaller total energy expenditure. Thus the limits of human endurance were set at the start of the twentieth century and have not recently been approached. Given good health and an adequate food supply to prevent starvation and

  15. Electroweak bubble wall speed limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bödeker, Dietrich; Moore, Guy D.

    2017-05-01

    In extensions of the Standard Model with extra scalars, the electroweak phase transition can be very strong, and the bubble walls can be highly relativistic. We revisit our previous argument that electroweak bubble walls can "run away," that is, achieve extreme ultrarelativistic velocities γ ~ 1014. We show that, when particles cross the bubble wall, they can emit transition radiation. Wall-frame soft processes, though suppressed by a power of the coupling α, have a significance enhanced by the γ-factor of the wall, limiting wall velocities to γ ~ 1/α. Though the bubble walls can move at almost the speed of light, they carry an infinitesimal share of the plasma's energy.

  16. Large networks and graph limits

    CERN Document Server

    Lovász, László

    2012-01-01

    Recently, it became apparent that a large number of the most interesting structures and phenomena of the world can be described by networks. Developing a mathematical theory of very large networks is an important challenge. This book describes one recent approach to this theory, the limit theory of graphs, which has emerged over the last decade. The theory has rich connections with other approaches to the study of large networks, such as "property testing" in computer science and regularity partition in graph theory. It has several applications in extremal graph theory, including the exact for

  17. CSS3 pushing the limits

    CERN Document Server

    Greig, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Push CSS3 and your design skills to the limit-and beyond! Representing an evolutionary leap forward for CSS, CSS3 is chock-full of new capabilities that dramatically expand the boundaries of what a styling language can do. But many of those new features remain undocumented, making it difficult to learn what they are and how to use them to create the sophisticated sites and web apps clients demand and users have grown to expect. Until now. This book introduces you to all of CSS3's new and advanced features, and, with the help of dozens of real-world examples and live

  18. Nanofabrication principles, capabilities and limits

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    This second edition of Nanofabrication is one of the most comprehensive introductions on nanofabrication technologies and processes. A practical guide and reference, this book introduces readers to all of the developed technologies that are capable of making structures below 100nm. The principle of each technology is introduced and illustrated with minimum mathematics involved. Also analyzed are the capabilities of each technology in making sub-100nm structures, and the limits of preventing a technology from going further down the dimensional scale. This book provides readers with a toolkit that will help with any of their nanofabrication challenges.

  19. Limitations on practical quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassard; Lutkenhaus; Mor; Sanders

    2000-08-07

    We provide limits to practical quantum key distribution, taking into account channel losses, a realistic detection process, and imperfections in the "qubits" sent from the sender to the receiver. As we show, even quantum key distribution with perfect qubits might not be achievable over long distances when the other imperfections are taken into account. Furthermore, existing experimental schemes (based on weak pulses) currently do not offer unconditional security for the reported distances and signal strength. Finally we show that parametric down-conversion offers enhanced performance compared to its weak coherent pulse counterpart.

  20. Modern Cosmology: Assumptions and Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jai-Chan

    2012-06-01

    Physical cosmology tries to understand the Universe at large with its origin and evolution. Observational and experimental situations in cosmology do not allow us to proceed purely based on the empirical means. We examine in which sense our cosmological assumptions in fact have shaped our current cosmological worldview with consequent inevitable limits. Cosmology, as other branches of science and knowledge, is a construct of human imagination reflecting the popular belief system of the era. The question at issue deserves further philosophic discussions. In Whitehead's words, ``philosophy, in one of its functions, is the critic of cosmologies.'' (Whitehead 1925).

  1. Limits of search filter development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczynski, Nancy L; Lokker, Cynthia; McKibbon, Kathleen Ann; Hobson, Nicholas; Haynes, R Brian

    2016-01-01

    The research attempted to develop search filters for biomedical literature databases that improve retrieval of studies of clinical relevance for the nursing and rehabilitation professions. Diagnostic testing framework compared machine-culled and practitioner-nominated search terms with a hand-tagged clinical literature database. We were unable to: (1) develop filters for nursing, likely because of the overlapping and expanding scope of practice for nurses in comparison with medical professionals, or (2) develop filters for rehabilitation, because of its broad scope and the profession's multifaceted understanding of "health and ability." We found limitations on search filter development for these health professions: nursing and rehabilitation.

  2. The weak coupling limit as a quantum functional central limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardi, L.; Frigerio, A.; Lu, Y. G.

    1990-08-01

    We show that, in the weak coupling limit, the laser model process converges weakly in the sense of the matrix elements to a quantum diffusion whose equation is explicitly obtained. We prove convergence, in the same sense, of the Heisenberg evolution of an observable of the system to the solution of a quantum Langevin equation. As a corollary of this result, via the quantum Feynman-Kac technique, one can recover previous results on the quantum master equation for reduced evolutions of open systems. When applied to some particular model (e.g. the free Boson gas) our results allow to interpret the Lamb shift as an Ito correction term and to express the pumping rates in terms of quantities related to the original Hamiltonian model.

  3. Does climate limit species richness by limiting individual species’ ranges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher-Lalonde, Véronique; Kerr, Jeremy T.; Currie, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Broad-scale geographical variation in species richness is strongly correlated with climate, yet the mechanisms underlying this correlation are still unclear. We test two broad classes of hypotheses to explain this pattern. Bottom-up hypotheses propose that the environment determines individual species’ ranges. Ranges then sum up to yield species richness patterns. Top-down hypotheses propose that the environment limits the number of species that occur in a region, but not which ones. We test these two classes of hypotheses using a natural experiment: seasonal changes in environmental variables and seasonal range shifts of 625 migratory birds in the Americas. We show that richness seasonally tracks the environment. By contrast, individual species’ geographical distributions do not. Rather, species occupy different sets of environmental conditions in two seasons. Our results are inconsistent with extant bottom-up hypotheses. Instead, a top-down mechanism appears to constrain the number of species that can occur in a given region. PMID:24352946

  4. The limits of human performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneke, Ralph; Böning, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    Human performance, defined by mechanical resistance and distance per time, includes human, task and environmental factors, all interrelated. It requires metabolic energy provided by anaerobic and aerobic metabolic energy sources. These sources have specific limitations in the capacity and rate to provide re-phosphorylation energy, which determines individual ratios of aerobic and anaerobic metabolic power and their sustainability. In healthy athletes, limits to provide and utilize metabolic energy are multifactorial, carefully matched and include a safety margin imposed in order to protect the integrity of the human organism under maximal effort. Perception of afferent input associated with effort leads to conscious or unconscious decisions to modulate or terminate performance; however, the underlying mechanisms of cerebral control are not fully understood. The idea to move borders of performance with the help of biochemicals is two millennia old. Biochemical findings resulted in highly effective substances widely used to increase performance in daily life, during preparation for sport events and during competition, but many of them must be considered as doping and therefore illegal. Supplements and food have ergogenic potential; however, numerous concepts are controversially discussed with respect to legality and particularly evidence in terms of usefulness and risks. The effect of evidence-based nutritional strategies on adaptations in terms of gene and protein expression that occur in skeletal muscle during and after exercise training sessions is widely unknown. Biochemical research is essential for better understanding of the basic mechanisms causing fatigue and the regulation of the dynamic adaptation to physical and mental training.

  5. Hamiltonian mechanics limits microscopic engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglin, James; Gilz, Lukas; Thesing, Eike

    2015-05-01

    We propose a definition of fully microscopic engines (micro-engines) in terms of pure mechanics, without reference to thermodynamics, equilibrium, or cycles imposed by external control, and without invoking ergodic theory. This definition is pragmatically based on the observation that what makes engines useful is energy transport across a large ratio of dynamical time scales. We then prove that classical and quantum mechanics set non-trivial limits-of different kinds-on how much of the energy that a micro-engine extracts from its fuel can be converted into work. Our results are not merely formal; they imply manageable design constraints on micro-engines. They also suggest the novel possibility that thermodynamics does not emerge from mechanics in macroscopic regimes, but rather represents the macroscopic limit of a generalized theory, valid on all scales, which governs the important phenomenon of energy transport across large time scale ratios. We propose experimental realizations of the dynamical mechanisms we identify, with trapped ions and in Bose-Einstein condensates (``motorized bright solitons'').

  6. Semiclassical limit and quantum chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecheminant, P.

    1993-02-01

    In this paper we present the field on which R. Rammal was working in the last moments of his life : quantum chaos. The behavior of various distributions is investigated numerically for different planar billiards in presence of a magnetic field or not. We find exponential laws for the distributions of the trajectory lengths, of the algebraic areas, and of the number of boundary reflections. These results support the conjecture that the signature of the classical chaotic scattering in the quantum description is the appearance of fluctuations of the S-matrix (or conductance for ballistic conductors) in the semiclassical limit. Dans cet article, nous présentons le domaine sur lequel R. Rammal travaillait dans les derniers moments de sa vie : le chaos quantique. Nous étudions numériquement le comportement de plusieurs distributions pour des billards avec ou sans champ magnétique. Nous trouvons des lois exponentielles pour la distribution des longueurs des trajectoires, pour celle de la surface balayée par la particule et ainsi que pour la distribution du nombre de réflections sur les parois du billard. Ces résultats confortent l'hypothèse que la signature de la diffusion classiquement chaotique dans le domaine quantique est l'apparition de fluctuations de la matrice S (ou de conductance pour des conducteurs ballistiques) dans la limite semiclassique.

  7. Mathematical methods for hydrodynamic limits

    CERN Document Server

    Masi, Anna

    1991-01-01

    Entropy inequalities, correlation functions, couplings between stochastic processes are powerful techniques which have been extensively used to give arigorous foundation to the theory of complex, many component systems and to its many applications in a variety of fields as physics, biology, population dynamics, economics, ... The purpose of the book is to make theseand other mathematical methods accessible to readers with a limited background in probability and physics by examining in detail a few models where the techniques emerge clearly, while extra difficulties arekept to a minimum. Lanford's method and its extension to the hierarchy of equations for the truncated correlation functions, the v-functions, are presented and applied to prove the validity of macroscopic equations forstochastic particle systems which are perturbations of the independent and of the symmetric simple exclusion processes. Entropy inequalities are discussed in the frame of the Guo-Papanicolaou-Varadhan technique and of theKipnis-Oll...

  8. Moral Limits of the Market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    2017-01-01

    Scholars and the practice community unanimously advocate sustainable balanced and sensitive tourism development. Engaging with locals and setting up public-private partnerships are frequently championed. This working paper introduces a set of lenses in the moral philosophy tradition and argues...... that the current pragmatic solutions to sustainable tourism development could not resolve issues of authenticity, equity, rights and fairness. There are three in-built moral limits in the tourism market, and namely: the market assumes it can price everything including culture and nature; the market distributes...... welfare through one's ability to pay rather than one's needs; and the market is structured in ways that benefit some groups more than others. The so-called solutions are compromises, and are tainted ideologically and politically. This work-in-progress is merely a starting point to a longer discussion...

  9. Reverse Flow Pressure Limiting Aperture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilatos

    2000-01-01

    The reverse flow pressure limiting aperture is a device that creates and sustains a substantial gas pressure difference between two chambers connected via an aperture. The aperture is surrounded by an annular orifice leading to a third chamber. The third chamber is maintained at a relatively high pressure that forces gas to flow through the annular aperture into the first of said two chambers. The ensuing gas flow develops into a supersonic annular gas jet, the core of which is coaxial with the central aperture. A pumping action is created at the core of the jet and any gas molecules leaking through the aperture from the second chamber are entrained and forced into the first chamber, thus creating a substantial pressure difference between the first and second chamber.

  10. THE LIMITS OF ESP TESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norica-Felicia BUCUR

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Global market forces have determined not only higher education institutions all over the world to include ESP courses in their curriculum to enhance their students’ future employability, but also public and private organisations to offer their employees the opportunity to attend ESP courses in order to meet the continuously growing ESP needs. From this perspective, ESP compentence could become a subcomponent of one of the key competences for lifelong learning, communication in foreign languages. Therefore assessing ESP competence seems to acquire paramount importance since stakeholders need accurate information about the ESP learners’ abilities to cope with specific language tasks. This article offers a concise overview of the principles and practices of ESP assessment, a detailed description of the features of ESP tests, while focusing particularly on the limits of ESP tests in order to identify possible solutions to overcome them.

  11. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE 'JEUNE GENEVOIS'

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    On Thursday, September 7, 2000, all restaurants, cafétérias and kiosques will be closed except for restaurant no. 1 and its cafétéria (COOP - building 501 - Meyrin) which will provide a limited service from 8h00 to 21h00. Hot meals will be served from 11h30 to 14h00 and from 18h00 to 19h30. For technical reasons, restaurant no. 2 and its cafétéria (DSR - building 504 - Meyrin) will remain closed on Friday, September 8. They will resume their normal activities on Monday, September 11, 2000. The other restaurants, cafétérias and kiosques will offer their normal service as from Friday, September 8.

  12. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE : EASTER WEEKEND

    CERN Multimedia

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee

    2002-01-01

    As Friday, March 29 and Monday, April 1st, 2002 are CERN holidays, restaurants no. 1 (COOP : Bldg. 501- Meyrin) and no. 3 (Avenance : Bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed and will remain so on Saturday and Sunday, March 30 - 31. They will reopen on Tuesday, April 2 at 7h00. During these four days, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 2 (DSR : Bldg. 504 - Meyrin) from 8h00 to 21h00 with hot meals served from 11h30 to 14h00 and from 18h00 to 19h30. On Thursday, March 28, all three restaurants will operate according to the usual times except for restaurant no. 1 which will close at 21h00 instead of 1 o'clock in the morning.   Restaurant Supervisory Committee, tel. 77551

  13. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE : EASTER WEEKEND

    CERN Multimedia

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee

    2002-01-01

    As Friday 29 March and Monday 1st April 2002 are CERN holidays, restaurants no. 1 (COOP, bldg. 501- Meyrin) and no. 3 (Avenance, bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed and will remain so on Saturday and Sunday 30-31 March. They will reopen on Tuesday 2 April at 7h00. During these four days, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 2 (DSR, bldg. 504 - Meyrin) from 8h00 to 21h00 with hot meals served from 11h30 to 14h00 and from 18h00 to 19h30. On Thursday 28 March, all three restaurants will operate according to the usual times except for restaurant no. 1 which will close at 21h00 instead of 1 o'clock in the morning. Restaurant Supervisory Committee Tel. 77551

  14. Homotopy limits, completions and localizations

    CERN Document Server

    Bousfield, Aldridge K

    1972-01-01

    The main purpose of part I of these notes is to develop for a ring R a functional notion of R-completion of a space X. For R=Zp and X subject to usual finiteness condition, the R-completion coincides up to homotopy, with the p-profinite completion of Quillen and Sullivan; for R a subring of the rationals, the R-completion coincides up to homotopy, with the localizations of Quillen, Sullivan and others. In part II of these notes, the authors have assembled some results on towers of fibrations, cosimplicial spaces and homotopy limits which were needed in the discussions of part I, but which are of some interest in themselves.

  15. Pericytes limit tumor cell metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xian, Xiaojie; Håkansson, Joakim; Ståhlberg, Anders

    2006-01-01

    Previously we observed that neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) deficiency in beta tumor cells facilitates metastasis into distant organs and local lymph nodes. Here, we show that NCAM-deficient beta cell tumors grew leaky blood vessels with perturbed pericyte-endothelial cell-cell interactions...... the microvessel wall. To directly address whether pericyte dysfunction increases the metastatic potential of solid tumors, we studied beta cell tumorigenesis in primary pericyte-deficient Pdgfb(ret/ret) mice. This resulted in beta tumor cell metastases in distant organs and local lymph nodes, demonstrating a role...... and deficient perivascular deposition of ECM components. Conversely, tumor cell expression of NCAM in a fibrosarcoma model (T241) improved pericyte recruitment and increased perivascular deposition of ECM molecules. Together, these findings suggest that NCAM may limit tumor cell metastasis by stabilizing...

  16. Prostatic carcinoma: limited field irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rounsaville, M.C.; Green, J.P.; Vaeth, J.M.; Purdon, R.P.; Heltzel, M.M.

    1987-07-01

    This is a retrospective study of 251 patients with histologically proven adenocarcinoma treated primarily with limited field radiotherapy techniques, under the principle direction of authors JMV and JPG, between 1968 and 1981 in San Francisco, California. All patients are followed for a minimum of 3 years; mean follow-up is 7.3 years. Routine clinical staging procedures included: HandP, digital prostate exam, cystoscopy, biopsy, blood studies including serum acid phosphatase, and imaging studies including chest X ray, IVP, bone survey or radionucleotide bone scan, and in recent years, pelvic CT scans. Twelve patients are Stage A1, 37-Stage A2, 50-Stage B, 140-Stage C1 and 12-Stage C2. Ninety percent of all cases and 85% of Stage C patients were treated with limited fields to the prostate and periprostatic volume only. Total doses were prescribed at midplane or isocenter and were generally 6500-7000 cGy, daily doses of 180-200 cGy, 5 days per week. Actuarial 5- and 10-year survival rates are: entire population-69% and 47%; Stage A1-74% and 50%; Stage A2-81% and 67%; Stage B-84% and 53%; Stage C1-63% and 42%; Stage C2-32% and 11%. The 5- and 10-year disease-free actuarial survivals are: entire population-71% and 50%; Stage A1-89% and 74%; Stage A2-82% and 69%; Stage B-71% and 52%; Stage C1-67% and 44%; Stage C2-0%. Sites of recurrence, alone or as a component of the failure pattern are: 37 (15%) local, 11 (4%) symptomatic regional recurrence (lower extremity edema, pelvic pain/sciatica, hydroureteronephrosis), and 87 (35%) distant metastasis. Seven (3%) had unknown sites of failure. Local-regional failure occurred in 42% of Stage C2 patients.

  17. Permissible limit for mandibular expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoyoshi, Mitsuru; Shirai, Sawa; Yano, Shinya; Nakanishi, Kotoe; Shimizu, Noriyoshi

    2005-04-01

    In recent years, mandibular expansion has been increasingly performed in conjunction with orthodontic treatment. Lateral tipping of the molars associated with mandibular expansion should, however, be considered, because excessive expansion may result in excessive buccal tooth inclination, which may disturb the occlusal relationship. This study was conducted to quantitatively clarify molar movement during mandibular expansion using the Schwarz appliance to determine the permissible limit of mandibular expansion as a clinical index for inclination movement. Inclinations in the masticatory surface of the first molar and intermolar width were measured before expansion (T1), after expansion (T2), and before edgewise treatment (T3). Lower plaster models from 29 subjects treated with expansion plates were used and compared with models from 11 control subjects with normal occlusion. The average treatment change (T1-T2) in intermolar width was 5.42 mm (standard deviation 1.98), and the average angle of buccal tooth inclination was 10.16 degrees (standard deviation 3.83). No significant correlation was found between age prior to treatment and the treatment period when they were compared with the intermolar width increments and inclination angles. There was a significant positive correlation between retention duration and the amount of expansion. The regression coefficient of the angle of buccal tooth inclination during expansion to the increment of the intermolar width was approximately 0.2. This means that 1 mm of expansion is accompanied by 5 degrees of molar lateral tipping. This coefficient is clinically useful for estimating the permissible limit for mandibular expansion.

  18. Pure Phase Solubility Limits: LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Stockman

    2001-01-26

    The natural and engineered system at Yucca Mountain (YM) defines the site-specific conditions under which one must determine to what extent the engineered and the natural geochemical barriers will prevent the release of radioactive material from the repository. Most important mechanisms for retention or enhancement of radionuclide transport include precipitation or co-precipitation of radionuclide-bearing solid phases (solubility limits), complexation in solution, sorption onto surfaces, colloid formation, and diffusion. There may be many scenarios that could affect the near-field environment, creating chemical conditions more aggressive than the conditions presented by the unperturbed system (such as pH changes beyond the range of 6 to 9 or significant changes in the ionic strength of infiltrated waters). For an extended period of time, the near-field water composition may be quite different and more extreme in pH, ionic strength, and CO{sub 2} partial pressure (or carbonate concentration) than waters at some distance from the repository. Reducing conditions, high pH (up to 11), and low carbonate concentration may be present in the near-field after reaction of infiltrating groundwater with engineered barrier systems, such as cementitious materials. In the far-field, conditions are controlled by the rock-mass buffer providing a near-neutral, oxidizing, low-ionic-strength environment that controls radionuclide solubility limits and sorption capacities. There is the need for characterization of variable chemical conditions that affect solubility, speciation, and sorption reactions. Modeling of the groundwater chemistry is required and leads to an understanding of solubility and speciation of the important radionuclides. Because experimental studies cannot be performed under the numerous potential chemical conditions, solubility limitations must rely on geochemical modeling of the radionuclide's chemistry. Fundamental thermodynamic properties, such as solubility

  19. Changing ideas of global limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddy, D

    1984-03-02

    In this discussion of changing ideas of global limits, attention is directed to world trade, moral restraint, and the "green revolution." A fresh look at the work of those who first considered population problems, e.gg., Malthur, can help make some sense of the population problems the world faces today. Malthus, writing in the late 1700s, concluded that population multiplies with each generation. He saw that food production was limited by the amount of available cropland and that the more people there are, the less food they will have to eat -- assuming that all available cropland is planted. This grim view of the future led Malthus to oppose government aid to the poor maintaining that such assistance would only encourage poor people to have large families. His solution was "moral restratin," seeing it as the duty of each individual to refrain from marriage until he was able to support his children. At the time this advice seemed cruel and Malthus was bitterly attacked by writers everywhere in Europe. Karl Marx and other ctitics of Malthus believed that poverty was caused by unjust governments and the selfishness of the rich. Marx clamied that the problem was too few jobs rather than too many people. The dire predictions of Malthus were soon forgotten as manufacturing industries began to transform the economies of Western Europe in the 1800s. Along with soaring economic growth came a host of developments that improved people's lives, e.g., better transportation, better sanitiation and nutrition, and better medicine. New inventions helped farmers fo produce more food. Next came the "demographic transition." Population grew quickly in Europe and North America as people became healthier and lived longer. Gradually, people in the industrial nations began deciding to have smaller families to enable them to afford an even higher living standard. By the late 1920s birthrates in Europe and the US had dropped so low that mention of the "population problem" usually referred

  20. Limits to Drift Chamber Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Riegler, Werner

    1998-01-01

    ATLAS (A Large Toroidal LHC Apparatus) will be a general-purpose experiment at the Large Hadron Collider that will be operational at CERN in the year 2004. The ATLAS muon spectrometer aims for a momentum resolution of 10% for a transverse momentum of pT=1TeV. The precision tracking devices in the muon system will be high pressure drift tubes (MDTs) with a single wire resolution of 1100 chambers covering an area of ≈ 2500m2. The high counting rates in the spectrometer as well as the aim for excellent spatial resolution and high efficiency put severe constraints on the MDT operating parameters. This work describes a detailed study of all the resolution limiting factors in the ATLAS environment. A ’full chain’ simulation of the MDT response to photons and charged particles as well as quantitative comparisons with measurements was performed. The good agreement between simulation and measurements resulted in a profound understanding of the drift chamber processes and the individual contributions to the spat...