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Sample records for prp gene sequence

  1. Sequence polymorphism of PrP exon 3 gene in Istrian and crossbred sheep

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    Ino Curik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphisms in sheep PrP (prion protein gene are known for scrapie susceptibility. We sequenced part of PrP exon 3 gene in 92 autochthonous Istrian (IS and 38 crossbred sheep (CBS. ARQ, ARR and AHQ alleles were predominant with frequency of 0.674 (0.526, 0.228 (0.132 and 0.082 (0.263 in IS (CBS, respectively, while VRQ (0.011 in IS and ARH (0.005 in IS and 0.079 in CBS alleles were rare. We also found non-synonymous mutations at codons 112 (M→T, 127 (G→S and 143 (H→R, and synonymous mutations at codons 231 (R and 237 (L. Additional mutations were associated only with AHQ, ARH and ARQ alleles. The polymorphism of PrP gene in IS was not critical with respect to scrapie susceptibility and with some efforts number of “favourable” genotypes can be increased.

  2. Propionate catabolism in Salmonella typhimurium LT2: two divergently transcribed units comprise the prp locus at 8.5 centisomes, prpR encodes a member of the sigma-54 family of activators, and the prpBCDE genes constitute an operon.

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    Horswill, A R; Escalante-Semerena, J C

    1997-02-01

    We present the initial genetic and biochemical characterization of the propionate (prp) locus at 8.5 centisomes of the Salmonella typhimurium LT2 chromosome (T. A. Hammelman et al., FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 137: 233-239, 1996). In this paper, we report the nucleotide sequences of two divergently transcribed transcriptional units. One unit is comprised of the prpR gene (1,626 bp) encoding a member of the sigma-54 family of transcriptional activators; the second unit contains an operon of four genes designated prpB (888 bp), prpC (1,170 bp), prpD (1,452 bp), and prpE (1,923 bp). The heme biosynthetic gene hemB was shown by DNA sequencing to be located immediately downstream of the prpBCDE operon; hemB is divergently transcribed from prpBCDE and is separated from prpE by a 66-bp gap. In addition, we demonstrate the involvement of PrpB, PrpC, and PrpD in propionate catabolism by complementation analysis of mutants using plasmids carrying a single prp gene under the control of the arabinose-responsive P(BAD) promoter. Expression of prpB to high levels was deleterious to the growth of a prp+ strain on minimal medium supplemented with propionate as a carbon and energy source. We also report the cloning and overexpression of prpB, prpC, prpD, and prpE in the T7 system. PrpB, PrpC, PrpD, and PrpE had molecular masses of ca. 32, ca. 44, ca. 53, and ca. 70 kDa, respectively. PrpB showed homology to carboxyphosphonoenolpyruvate phosphonomutase of Streptomyces hygroscopicus and to its homolog in the carnation Dianthus caryophyllus; PrpC was homologous to both archaeal and bacterial citrate synthases; PrpD showed homology to yeast and Bacillus subtilis proteins of unknown function; PrpE showed homology to acetyl coenzyme A synthetases. We identified a sigma-54 (RpoN)-dependent promoter with a consensus RpoN binding site upstream of the initiating methionine codon of prpB, the promoter-proximal gene of the prp operon. Consistent with this finding, an rpoN prp+ mutant failed to use

  3. Early embryonic gene expression profiling of zebrafish prion protein (Prp2 morphants.

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    Rasoul Nourizadeh-Lillabadi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Prion protein (PRNP/Prp plays a crucial role in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs like Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD, scrapie and mad cow disease. Notwithstanding the importance in human and animal disease, fundamental aspects of PRNP/Prp function and transmission remains unaccounted for. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The zebrafish (Danio rerio genome contains three Prp encoding genes assigned prp1, prp2 and prp3. Currently, the second paralogue is believed to be the most similar to the mammalian PRNP gene in structure and function. Functional studies of the PRNP gene ortholog was addressed by prp2 morpholino (MO knockdown experiments. Investigation of Prp2 depleted embryos revealed high mortality and apoptosis at 24 hours post fertilization (hpf as well as impaired brain and neuronal development. In order to elucidate the underlying mechanisms, a genome-wide transcriptome analysis was carried out in viable 24 hpf morphants. The resulting changes in gene expression profiles revealed 249 differently expressed genes linked to biological processes like cell death, neurogenesis and embryonic development. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The current study contributes to the understanding of basic Prp functions and demonstrates that the zebrafish is an excellent model to address the role of Prp in vertebrates. The gene knockdown of prp2 indicates an essential biological function for the zebrafish ortholog with a morphant phenotype that suggests a neurodegenerative action and gene expression effects which are apoptosis related and effects gene networks controlling neurogenesis and embryo development.

  4. Cotton PRP5 gene encoding a proline-rich protein is involved in fiber development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen-Liang; Zhang, De-Jing; Wu, Yan-Feng; Qin, Li-Xia; Huang, Geng-Qing; Li, Juan; Li, Long; Li, Xue-Bao

    2013-07-01

    Proline-rich proteins contribute to cell wall structure of specific cell types and are involved in plant growth and development. In this study, a fiber-specific gene, GhPRP5, encoding a proline-rich protein was functionally characterized in cotton. GhPRP5 promoter directed GUS expression only in trichomes of both transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants. The transgenic Arabidopsis plants with overexpressing GhPRP5 displayed reduced cell growth, resulting in smaller cell size and consequently plant dwarfs, in comparison with wild type plants. In contrast, knock-down of GhPRP5 expression by RNA interference in cotton enhanced fiber development. The fiber length of transgenic cotton plants was longer than that of wild type. In addition, some genes involved in fiber elongation and wall biosynthesis of cotton were up-regulated or down-regulated in the transgenic cotton plants owing to suppression of GhPRP5. Collectively, these data suggested that GhPRP5 protein as a negative regulator participates in modulating fiber development of cotton.

  5. The MsPRP2 promoter enables strong heterologous gene expression in a root-specific manner and is enhanced by overexpression of Alfin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winicov, Ilga; Valliyodan, Babu; Xue, Lingru; Hoober, J Kenneth

    2004-10-01

    Promoter specificity and efficiency of utilization are essential for endogenous and transgene expression. Selective root expression remains to be defined in terms of both promoter elements and transcription factors that provide high levels of ubiquitous expression. We characterized expression from the MsPRP2 promoter with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter transgene in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and found that a promoter fragment (+1 to -652 bp) retained the root and callus specificity of the endogenous MsPRP2 gene and hence this promoter fragment contains elements necessary for root-specific expression. The strong ubiquitous expression obtained from this promoter was comparable to that of the CaMV 35S promoter in roots and was enhanced by transgenic overexpression of Alfin 1, a root- and callus-specific transcription factor in alfalfa. No transgenic expression was obtained in leaves with this promoter in the presence or absence of Alfin 1. The increased expression of GFP in alfalfa containing the Alfin 1 transgene confirms the function of Alfin 1 binding sites in the MsPRP2 promoter fragment and also indicates that Alfin 1 concentrations are limiting for maximal expression in calli and roots. These findings characterize the MsPRP2 promoter as a novel root- and callus-specific promoter of plant origin that can be used as an effective tool for strong root-directed gene expression. In addition, we have demonstrated that the signal sequence of MsPRP2 can be used for efficient secretion of transgene products from callus and roots.

  6. Expression of the promoter of HyPRP, an embryo-specific gene from Zea mays in maize and tobacco transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    José-Estanyol, Matilde; Pérez, Pascual; Puigdomènech, Pere

    2005-08-15

    zmHyPRP is a gene specifically expressed in maize immature embryos where its transcripts are mainly observed in the scutellum. It has been shown that zmHyPRP expression in the embryo is arrested when ABA levels increase at the beginning of the maturation stage. Here we report the ability of 2 Kb zmHyPRP promoter to reproduce the zmHyPRP gene specific expression pattern in the maize embryo and its repression by ABA at the end of the morphogenetic process. Three different approaches have been used, transient particle bombardment of maize immature excised embryos and stable transformation of maize and tobacco plants with a construct containing 2 Kb of zmHyPRP promoter fused to the GUS gene. This construct has shown to confer specific expression to maize and tobacco embryos but in tobacco expression in the embryo was very low. The same construct was also negatively regulated by ABA in embryos of both species. This suggests that 2 Kb of the zmHyPRP promoter contain all regulatory elements sufficient to confer the developmental expression patterns of the gene characterized to date.

  7. Hyperuricemic PRP in Tendon Cells

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    I. Andia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-rich plasma (PRP is injected within tendons to stimulate healing. Metabolic alterations such as the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, or hyperuricemia could hinder the therapeutic effect of PRP. We hypothesise that tendon cells sense high levels of uric acid and this could modify their response to PRP. Tendon cells were treated with allogeneic PRPs for 96 hours. Hyperuricemic PRP did not hinder the proliferative actions of PRP. The gene expression pattern of inflammatory molecules in response to PRP showed absence of IL-1b and COX1 and modest expression of IL6, IL8, COX2, and TGF-b1. IL8 and IL6 proteins were secreted by tendon cells treated with PRP. The synthesis of IL6 and IL8 proteins induced by PRP is decreased significantly in the presence of hyperuricemia (P = 0.017 and P = 0.012, resp.. Concerning extracellular matrix, PRP-treated tendon cells displayed high type-1 collagen, moderate type-3 collagen, decorin, and hyaluronan synthase-2 expression and modest expression of scleraxis. Hyperuricemia modified the expression pattern of extracellular matrix proteins, upregulating COL1 (P = 0.036 and COMP (P = 0.012 and downregulating HAS2 (P = 0.012. Positive correlations between TGF-b1 and type-1 collagen (R = 0.905, P = 0.002 and aggrecan (R = 0.833, P = 0.010 and negative correlations between TGF-b1 and IL6 synthesis (R = −0.857, P = 0.007 and COX2 (R = −0.810, P = 0.015 were found.

  8. GHRH, PRP-PACAP and GHRHR Target Sequencing via an Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine Reveals an Association with Growth in Orange-Spotted Grouper (Epinephelus coioides

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    Liang Guo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH and the receptor, GHRHR, constitute important components of the hypothalamus-pituitary growth axis and act on the downstream growth hormone (GH. PACAP-related peptide/pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PRP-PACAP is a paralog of GHRH. These genes all play key roles in development and growth patterns. To improve the quality of cultured fish strains, natural genetic variation must be examined and understood. A mixed linear model has been widely used in association mapping, taking the population structures and pairwise kinship patterns into consideration. In this study, a mass cross population of orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides was examined. These candidate genes were found to harbor low nucleotide diversity (θw from 0.00154 to 0.00388 and linkage disequilibrium levels (delay of 50% within 2 kbp. Association mapping was employed, and two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (KR269823.1:g.475A>C and KR269823.1:g.2143T>C were found to be associated with growth (false discovery rate Q < 0.05, explaining 9.0%–17.0% of the phenotypic variance. The association of KR269823.1:g.2143T>C was also found via haplotype-based association (p < 0.05. The identified associations offer new insights into gene functions, and the associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs may be used for breeding purposes.

  9. Manipulating the Prion Protein Gene Sequence and Expression Levels with CRISPR/Cas9.

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    Lech Kaczmarczyk

    Full Text Available The mammalian prion protein (PrP, encoded by Prnp is most infamous for its central role in prion diseases, invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans, food animals, and animals in the wild. However, PrP is also hypothesized to be an important receptor for toxic protein conformers in Alzheimer's disease, and is associated with other clinically relevant processes such as cancer and stroke. Thus, key insights into important clinical areas, as well as into understanding PrP functions in normal physiology, can be obtained from studying transgenic mouse models and cell culture systems. However, the Prnp locus is difficult to manipulate by homologous recombination, making modifications of the endogenous locus rarely attempted. Fortunately in recent years genome engineering technologies, like TALENs or CRISPR/Cas9 (CC9, have brought exceptional new possibilities for manipulating Prnp. Herein, we present our observations made during systematic experiments with the CC9 system targeting the endogenous mouse Prnp locus, to either modify sequences or to boost PrP expression using CC9-based synergistic activation mediators (SAMs. It is our hope that this information will aid and encourage researchers to implement gene-targeting techniques into their research program.

  10. PRP8 inteins in species of the genus Botrytis and other ascomycetes.

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    Bokor, Annika A M; Kohn, Linda M; Poulter, Russell T M; van Kan, Jan A L

    2012-03-01

    The mobile elements termed inteins have a sporadic distribution in microorganisms. It is unclear how these elements are maintained. Inteins are intervening protein sequences that autocatalytically excise themselves from a precursor. Excision is a post-translational process referred to as 'protein splicing' in which the sequences flanking the intein are ligated, reforming the mature host protein. Some inteins contain a homing endonuclease domain (HEG) that is proposed to facilitate propagation of the intein element within a gene pool. We have previously demonstrated that the HEG of the PRP8 intein is highly active during meiosis in Botrytis cinerea. Here we analysed the Prp8 gene status in 21 additional Botrytis species to obtain insight into the mode of intein inheritance within the Botrytis lineage. Of the 21 species, 15 contained a PRP8 intein whereas six did not. The analysis was extended to closely related (Sclerotiniaceae) and distantly related (Ascomycota) taxa, focussing on evolutionary diversification of the PRP8 intein, including their possible acquisition by horizontal transfer and loss by deletion. Evidence was obtained for the occurrence of genetic footprints of previous intein occupation. There is no compelling evidence of horizontal transfer among species. Three distinct states of the Prp8 allele were identified, distributed over different orders within the Ascomycota: an occupied allele; an empty allele that was never occupied; an empty allele that was presumably previously occupied, from which the intein was precisely deleted. The presence of the genetic footprint identifies 20 species (including Neurospora crassa, Magnaporthe oryzae and Fusarium oxysporum) that previously contained the intein but have lost it entirely, while only 18 species (including Podospora anserina and Fusarium graminearum) appear never to have contained a PRP8 intein. The analysis indicates that inteins may be maintained in an equilibrium state. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier

  11. GmPRP2 promoter drives root-preferential expression in transgenic Arabidopsis and soybean hairy roots.

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    Chen, Li; Jiang, Bingjun; Wu, Cunxiang; Sun, Shi; Hou, Wensheng; Han, Tianfu

    2014-09-16

    Promoters play important roles in gene expression and function. There are three basic types of promoters: constitutive, specific, and inducible. Constitutive promoters are widely used in genetic engineering, but these promoters have limitations. Inducible promoters are activated by specific inducers. Tissue-specific promoters are a type of specific promoters that drive gene expression in specific tissues or organs. Here, we cloned and characterized the GmPRP2 promoter from soybean. The expression pattern indicated that this promoter is root-preferential in transgenic Arabidopsis and the hairy roots of soybean. It can be used to improve the root resistance or tolerance to pathogens, pests, malnutrition and other abiotic stresses which cause extensive annual losses in soybean production. The GmPRP2 promoter (GmPRP2p-1062) was isolated from soybean cv. Williams 82. Sequence analysis revealed that this promoter contains many cis-acting elements, including root-specific motifs. The GmPRP2p-1062 and its 5'-deletion fragments were fused with the GUS reporter gene and introduced into Arabidopsis and the hairy roots of soybean to further determine promoter activity. Histochemical analysis in transgenic Arabidopsis showed that GUS activity was mainly detected in roots and hypocotyls in all deletion fragments except GmPRP2p-471 (a 5'-deletion fragment of GmPRP2p-1062 with 471 bp length). GUS activity was higher in transgenic Arabidopsis and hairy roots with GmPRP2p-1062 and GmPRP2p-852 (a 5'-deletion fragment of GmPRP2p-1062 with 852 bp length) constructs than the other two constructs. GUS activity was enhanced by NaCl, PEG, IAA and JM treatments and decreased by SA, ABA and GA treatments in transgenic Arabidopsis. GmPRP2p-1062 is a root-preferential promoter, and its core fragment for root-preferential expression might lie between -369 and +1. GmPRP2p-852 may be useful in the genetic engineering of novel soybean cultivars in the future.

  12. Sequence Classification: 890604 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available scriptional coactivator SKIP, can activate transcription of a reporter gene; interacts with splicing factors Prp22p and Prp46p; Prp45p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6319287 ...

  13. Changes in allele and genotype frequencies of PrP gene in breeds of sheep in Slovakia between 2004 and 2015

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    Milan Margetín

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to analyze the changes in allele and genotype frequencies of PrP gene in auction purebred rams of various breeds in Slovakia between 2004 and 2015. Male genotyping was done within the National Scrapie Eradication Programme by the certified laboratories. Positive changes in all breeds were found during the analyzed period. As a result of strict positive selection for ARR allele and strict negative selection for VRQ and ARQ alleles in most numerous Improved Valachian (IV and Tsigai (TS breeds, 94.7 % (IV and 95.7 % (TS of animals were included in the first and second risk (R1 and R2 groups in 2015. Frequencies of ARR allele were above 0.9 in specialized meat breeds. In Lacaune breed, frequencies of ARR, ARQ and VRQ alleles were 0.896, 0.117 and 0.003 in 2015. All purebred East Friesian males were included in R1 and R2 groups in 2015.

  14. Disease gene identification strategies for exome sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilissen, C.; Hoischen, A.; Brunner, H.G.; Veltman, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Next generation sequencing can be used to search for Mendelian disease genes in an unbiased manner by sequencing the entire protein-coding sequence, known as the exome, or even the entire human genome. Identifying the pathogenic mutation amongst thousands to millions of genomic variants is a major

  15. Synaptotagmin gene content of the sequenced genomes

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    Craxton Molly

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synaptotagmins exist as a large gene family in mammals. There is much interest in the function of certain family members which act crucially in the regulated synaptic vesicle exocytosis required for efficient neurotransmission. Knowledge of the functions of other family members is relatively poor and the presence of Synaptotagmin genes in plants indicates a role for the family as a whole which is wider than neurotransmission. Identification of the Synaptotagmin genes within completely sequenced genomes can provide the entire Synaptotagmin gene complement of each sequenced organism. Defining the detailed structures of all the Synaptotagmin genes and their encoded products can provide a useful resource for functional studies and a deeper understanding of the evolution of the gene family. The current rapid increase in the number of sequenced genomes from different branches of the tree of life, together with the public deposition of evolutionarily diverse transcript sequences make such studies worthwhile. Results I have compiled a detailed list of the Synaptotagmin genes of Caenorhabditis, Anopheles, Drosophila, Ciona, Danio, Fugu, Mus, Homo, Arabidopsis and Oryza by examining genomic and transcript sequences from public sequence databases together with some transcript sequences obtained by cDNA library screening and RT-PCR. I have compared all of the genes and investigated the relationship between plant Synaptotagmins and their non-Synaptotagmin counterparts. Conclusions I have identified and compared 98 Synaptotagmin genes from 10 sequenced genomes. Detailed comparison of transcript sequences reveals abundant and complex variation in Synaptotagmin gene expression and indicates the presence of Synaptotagmin genes in all animals and land plants. Amino acid sequence comparisons indicate patterns of conservation and diversity in function. Phylogenetic analysis shows the origin of Synaptotagmins in multicellular eukaryotes and their

  16. Ubiquitin ligase gp78 targets unglycosylated prion protein PrP for ubiquitylation and degradation.

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    Jia Shao

    Full Text Available Prion protein PrP is a central player in several devastating neurodegenerative disorders, including mad cow disease and Creutzfeltd-Jacob disease. Conformational alteration of PrP into an aggregation-prone infectious form PrPSc can trigger pathogenic events. How levels of PrP are regulated is poorly understood. Human PrP is known to be degraded by the proteasome, but the specific proteolytic pathway responsible for PrP destruction remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the ubiquitin ligase gp78, known for its role in protein quality control, is critical for unglycosylated PrP ubiquitylation and degradation. Furthermore, C-terminal sequences of PrP protein are crucial for its ubiquitylation and degradation. Our study reveals the first ubiquitin ligase specifically involved in prion protein PrP degradation and PrP sequences crucial for its turnover. Our data may lead to a new avenue to control PrP level and pathogenesis.

  17. Can PRP effectively treat injured tendons?

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    Wang, James H-C

    2014-01-01

    PRP is widely used to treat tendon and other tissue injuries in orthopaedics and sports medicine; however, the efficacy of PRP treatment on injured tendons is highly controversial. In this commentary, I reason that there are many PRP- and patient-related factors that influence the outcomes of PRP treatment on injured tendons. Therefore, more basic science studies are needed to understand the mechanism of PRP on injured tendons. Finally, I suggest that better understanding of the PRP action mechanism will lead to better use of PRP for the effective treatment of tendon injuries in clinics.

  18. Interaction of the human prion PrP(106-126) sequence with copper(II), manganese(II), and zinc(II): NMR and EPR studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaggelli, Elena; Bernardi, Francesca; Molteni, Elena; Pogni, Rebecca; Valensin, Daniela; Valensin, Gianni; Remelli, Maurizio; Luczkowski, Marek; Kozlowski, Henryk

    2005-01-26

    The synthetic peptide encompassing residues 106-126 (PrP106-126, KTNMKHMAGAAAAGAVVGGLG) of the human prion protein was considered for its binding properties toward copper(II), manganese(II) and zinc(II) at pH 5.7. 1H and 13C 1D spectra, 1H spin-lattice relaxation rates, and 1H-15N and 1H-13C HSQC 2D experiments were obtained in the absence and in the presence of metal ions. While Zn(II) was found to yield negligible effects upon any NMR parameter, metal-peptide association was demonstrated by the paramagnetic effects of Cu(II) and Mn(II) upon 1D and 2D spectra. Delineation of structures of metal complexes was sought by interpreting the paramagnetic effect on 1H spin-lattice relaxation rates. Exchange of peptide molecules from the metal coordination sphere was shown to provide sizable contribution to the observed relaxation rates. Such contribution was calculated in the case of Cu(II); whereas the faster paramagnetic rates of peptide molecules bound to Mn(II) were determining spin-lattice relaxation rates almost exclusively dominated by exchange. Proton-metal distances were therefore evaluated in the case of the Cu(II) complex only and used as restraints in molecular dynamics calculations where from the structure of the complex was obtained. The peptide was shown to bind copper through the imidazole nitrogen and the ionized amide nitrogen of His-111 and the amino-terminal group with the terminal carboxyl stabilizing the coordination sphere through ionic interactions. The data were interpreted as to demonstrate that the hydrophobic C-terminal region was not affecting the copper-binding properties of the peptide and that this hydrophobic tail is left free to interact with other target molecules. As for the complex with Mn(II), qualitative information was obtained on carbonyl oxygens of Gly-124 and Leu-125, beyond the terminal Gly-126 carboxyl, being at close distance from the metal ion, that also interacts, most likely, through a hydrogen bond of metal-bound water

  19. HGF mediates the anti-inflammatory effects of PRP on injured tendons.

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    Jianying Zhang

    Full Text Available Platelet-rich plasma (PRP containing hepatocyte growth factor (HGF and other growth factors are widely used in orthopaedic/sports medicine to repair injured tendons. While PRP treatment is reported to decrease pain in patients with tendon injury, the mechanism of this effect is not clear. Tendon pain is often associated with tendon inflammation, and HGF is known to protect tissues from inflammatory damages. Therefore, we hypothesized that HGF in PRP causes the anti-inflammatory effects. To test this hypothesis, we performed in vitro experiments on rabbit tendon cells and in vivo experiments on a mouse Achilles tendon injury model. We found that addition of PRP or HGF decreased gene expression of COX-1, COX-2, and mPGES-1, induced by the treatment of tendon cells in vitro with IL-1β. Further, the treatment of tendon cell cultures with HGF antibodies reduced the suppressive effects of PRP or HGF on IL-1β-induced COX-1, COX-2, and mPGES-1 gene expressions. Treatment with PRP or HGF almost completely blocked the cellular production of PGE2 and the expression of COX proteins. Finally, injection of PRP or HGF into wounded mouse Achilles tendons in vivo decreased PGE2 production in the tendinous tissues. Injection of platelet-poor plasma (PPP however, did not reduce PGE2 levels in the wounded tendons, but the injection of HGF antibody inhibited the effects of PRP and HGF. Further, injection of PRP or HGF also decreased COX-1 and COX-2 proteins. These results indicate that PRP exerts anti-inflammatory effects on injured tendons through HGF. This study provides basic scientific evidence to support the use of PRP to treat injured tendons because PRP can reduce inflammation and thereby reduce the associated pain caused by high levels of PGE2.

  20. Polymorphism of the PrP prion protein gene in Polish Merino and old-type Polish Merino from Brylewo flock

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    Niżnikowski Roman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted on Polish Merino (143♀ and 39♂ and old-type Polish Merino sheep (176♀ and 61♂ in Brylewo flock (Wielkopolskie Province. The examined sheep were at the age of one year. Prion protein (PrP genotype was determined in all animals. In both breeds four alleles (ARR, ARQ, AHQ, VRQ were found. Highly significant effect of breed and insignificant impact of gender within breed was observed in regard to the frequency of occurrence of alleles and genotypes susceptible to classical scrapie in the sheep. Eight different PrP genotypes in Polish Merino and nine genotypes in old-type Polish Merino were identified. Very high frequency of ARR/ARR genotype in old-type Polish Merino and high frequency of ARR/ARQ genotype in Polish Merino were found, with relatively significant frequency of occurrence of the genotypes containing VRQ allele. In old-type Polish Merino, three animals (of both genders had VRQ/VRQ genotype. Breeding work involving elimination of animals encoding valine at codon 136, and introduction of rams with ARR allele to the population increased the frequency of occurrence of ARR/ARR genotype and ARR allele in the population of old-type Polish Merino. To improve the distribution of the genotypes genetically resistant to scrapie in the flock of Polish Merino only rams with ARR/ARR genotype were left. This guarantees an increase in the frequency of occurrence of genotypes genetically resistant to scrapie in the offspring.

  1. The nucleotide sequences of two leghemoglobin genes from soybean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiborg, O; Hyldig-Nielsen, J J; Jensen, E O

    1982-01-01

    We present the complete nucleotide sequences of two leghemoglobin genes isolated from soybean DNA. Both genes contain three intervening sequences in identical positions. Comparison of the coding sequences with known amino-acid sequences of soybean leghemoglobins suggest that the two genes corresp...

  2. Sequence analysis of cereal sucrose synthase genes and isolation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-10-18

    Oct 18, 2007 ... comparative analysis of grass genomes and as a source of beneficial genes for agriculture. Recent studies have shown that ... sequencing of sucrose synthase gene fragment from sor- ghum using primers designed at their ... Sequencing was carried out by Sanger dideoxy DNA sequencing method. Results.

  3. Gene mining a marama bean expressed sequence tags (ESTs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The authors reported the identification of genes associated with embryonic development and microsatellite sequences. The future direction will entail characterization of these genes using gene over-expression and mutant assays. Key words: Namibia, simple sequence repeats (SSR), data mining, homology searches, ...

  4. Gene Sequencing May Reveal Risks for Rare Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166875.html Gene Sequencing May Reveal Risks for Rare Diseases But ... this study, the researchers analyzed nearly 5,000 genes associated with rare genetic conditions in 50 healthy ...

  5. Crystal Structure of the C-terminal Domain of Splicing Factor Prp8 Carrying Retinitis Pigmentosa Mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang,L.; Shen, J.; Guarnieri, M.; Heroux, A.; Yang, K.; Zhao, R.

    2007-01-01

    Prp8 is a critical pre-mRNA splicing factor. Prp8 is proposed to help form and stabilize the spliceosome catalytic core and to be an important regulator of spliceosome activation. Mutations in human Prp8 (hPrp8) cause a severe form of the genetic disorder retinitis pigmentosa, RP13. Understanding the molecular mechanism of Prp8's function in pre-mRNA splicing and RP13 has been hindered by its large size (over 2000 amino acids) and remarkably low-sequence similarity with other proteins. Here we present the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain (the last 273 residues) of Caenorhabditis elegans Prp8 (cPrp8). The core of the C-terminal domain is an / structure that forms the MPN (Mpr1, Pad1 N-terminal) fold but without Zn{sup 2+} coordination. We propose that the C-terminal domain is a protein interaction domain instead of a Zn{sup 2+}-dependent metalloenzyme as proposed for some MPN proteins. Mapping of RP13 mutants on the Prp8 structure suggests that these residues constitute a binding surface between Prp8 and other partner(s), and the disruption of this interaction provides a plausible molecular mechanism for RP13.

  6. Using shotgun sequence data to find active restriction enzyme genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Posfai, Janos; Morgan, Richard D.; Vincze, Tamas; Roberts, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Whole genome shotgun sequence analysis has become the standard method for beginning to determine a genome sequence. The preparation of the shotgun sequence clones is, in fact, a biological experiment. It determines which segments of the genome can be cloned into Escherichia coli and which cannot. By analyzing the complete set of sequences from such an experiment, it is possible to identify genes lethal to E. coli. Among this set are genes encoding restriction enzymes which, when active in E. coli, lead to cell death by cleaving the E. coli genome at the restriction enzyme recognition sites. By analyzing shotgun sequence data sets we show that this is a reliable method to detect active restriction enzyme genes in newly sequenced genomes, thereby facilitating functional annotation. Active restriction enzyme genes have been identified, and their activity demonstrated biochemically, in the sequenced genomes of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, Bacillus cereus ATCC 10987 and Methylococcus capsulatus. PMID:18988632

  7. Nucleotide sequence of the gene for human prothrombin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degen, S.J.F.; Davie, E.W.

    1987-09-22

    A human genomic DNA library was screened for the gene coding for human prothrombin with a cDNA coding for the human protein. Eighty-one positive lambda phage were identified, and three were chosen for further characterization. These three phage hybridized with 5' and/or 3' probes prepared from the prothrombin cDNA. The complete DNA sequence of 21 kilobases of the human prothrombin gene was determined and included a 4.9-kilobase region that was previously sequenced. The gene for human prothrombin contains 14 exons separated by 13 intervening sequences. The exons range in size from 25 to 315 base pairs, while the introns range from 84 to 9447 base pairs. Ninety percent of the gene is composed of intervening sequence. All the intron splice junctions are consistent with sequences found in other eukaryotic genes, except for the presence of GC rather than GT on the 5' end of intervening sequence L. Thirty copies of Alu repetitive DNA and two copies of partial KpnI repeats were identified in clusters within several of the intervening sequences, and these repeats represent 40% of the DNA sequence of the gene. The size, distribution, and sequence homology of the introns within the gene were the compared to those of the genes for the other vitamin K dependent proteins and several other serine proteases.

  8. Sequencing genes in silico using single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xinyi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advent of high throughput sequencing technology has enabled the 1000 Genomes Project Pilot 3 to generate complete sequence data for more than 906 genes and 8,140 exons representing 697 subjects. The 1000 Genomes database provides a critical opportunity for further interpreting disease associations with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs discovered from genetic association studies. Currently, direct sequencing of candidate genes or regions on a large number of subjects remains both cost- and time-prohibitive. Results To accelerate the translation from discovery to functional studies, we propose an in silico gene sequencing method (ISS, which predicts phased sequences of intragenic regions, using SNPs. The key underlying idea of our method is to infer diploid sequences (a pair of phased sequences/alleles at every functional locus utilizing the deep sequencing data from the 1000 Genomes Project and SNP data from the HapMap Project, and to build prediction models using flanking SNPs. Using this method, we have developed a database of prediction models for 611 known genes. Sequence prediction accuracy for these genes is 96.26% on average (ranges 79%-100%. This database of prediction models can be enhanced and scaled up to include new genes as the 1000 Genomes Project sequences additional genes on additional individuals. Applying our predictive model for the KCNJ11 gene to the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC Type 2 diabetes cohort, we demonstrate how the prediction of phased sequences inferred from GWAS SNP genotype data can be used to facilitate interpretation and identify a probable functional mechanism such as protein changes. Conclusions Prior to the general availability of routine sequencing of all subjects, the ISS method proposed here provides a time- and cost-effective approach to broadening the characterization of disease associated SNPs and regions, and facilitating the prioritization of candidate

  9. Coding sequences of functioning human genes derived entirely from mobile element sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britten, Roy J.

    2004-01-01

    Among all of the many examples of mobile elements or “parasitic sequences” that affect the function of the human genome, this paper describes several examples of functioning genes whose sequences have been almost completely derived from mobile elements. There are many examples where the synthetic coding sequences of observed mRNA sequences are made up of mobile element sequences, to an extent of 80% or more of the length of the coding sequences. In the examples described here, the genes have named functions, and some of these functions have been studied. It appears that each of the functioning genes was originally formed from mobile elements and that in some process of molecular evolution a coding sequence was derived that could be translated into a protein that is of some importance to human biology. In one case (AD7C), the coding sequence is 99% made up of a cluster of Alu sequences. In another example, the gene BNIP3 coding sequence is 97% made up of sequences from an apparent human endogenous retrovirus. The Syncytin gene coding sequence appears to be made from an endogenous retrovirus envelope gene. PMID:15546984

  10. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis of core gene of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Pakistan, more than 10 million people are living with hepatitis C virus (HCV) with high morbidity and mortality. The aims of the present study are to report HCV core gene sequences from Pakistani population and perform their sequence comparison/phylogenetic analysis. The core gene of HCV has been cloned from six ...

  11. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis of core gene of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-07-19

    Jul 19, 2010 ... In Pakistan, more than 10 million people are living with hepatitis C virus (HCV) with high morbidity and mortality. The aims of the present study are to report HCV core gene sequences from Pakistani population and perform their sequence comparison/phylogenetic analysis. The core gene of HCV has.

  12. Nucleotide sequence of the yeast SUC2 gene for invertase.

    OpenAIRE

    Taussig, R; Carlson, M.

    1983-01-01

    The yeast SUC2 gene is a structural gene for both the secreted and intracellular forms of invertase. We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the coding region and the 5' and 3' flanking regions. The coding regions for the signal peptide-containing precursor to secreted invertase and for the intracellular invertase begin at different initiation codons within the SUC2 gene but share the same reading frame. The amino acid sequences predicted for the two forms of invertase from the nucleoti...

  13. Human papillomavirus gene sequences in washed human sperm deoxyribonucleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, P J; Su, B C; Kalugdan, T; Seraj, I M; Tredway, D R; King, A

    1994-05-01

    The present study demonstrated the presence of HPV gene sequences in Percoll-washed sperm cells using polymerase chain reaction primers targeting smaller gene regions. Up to 64% of the sperm specimens were shown to contain gene sequences indicative of the presence of HPV. Human papillomavirus type 16 was detected about twice as often as HPV type 18. The results suggest the possible role of sperm as a vector for HPV.

  14. PRP and Articular Cartilage: A Clinical Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marmotti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The convincing background of the recent studies, investigating the different potentials of platelet-rich plasma, offers the clinician an appealing alternative for the treatment of cartilage lesions and osteoarthritis. Recent evidences in literature have shown that PRP may be helpful both as an adjuvant for surgical treatment of cartilage defects and as a therapeutic tool by intra-articular injection in patients affected by osteoarthritis. In this review, the authors introduce the trophic and anti-inflammatory properties of PRP and the different products of the available platelet concentrates. Then, in a complex scenario made of a great number of clinical variables, they resume the current literature on the PRP applications in cartilage surgery as well as the use of intra-articular PRP injections for the conservative treatment of cartilage degenerative lesions and osteoarthritis in humans, available as both case series and comparative studies. The result of this review confirms the fascinating biological role of PRP, although many aspects yet remain to be clarified and the use of PRP in a clinical setting has to be considered still exploratory.

  15. Portable Radiation Package (PRP) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, R Michael [Remote Measurements and Research Company, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2017-08-03

    The Portable Radiation Package (PRP) was developed to provide basic radiation information in locations such as ships at sea where proper exposure is remote and difficult, the platform is in motion, and azimuth alignment is not fixed. Development of the PRP began at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in the mid-1990s and versions of it were deployed on ships in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Nauru-99 project. The PRP was deployed on ships in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Sensor Intercomparison for Marine Biological and Interdisciplinary Ocean Studies (SIMBIOS) program. Over the years the measurements have remained the same while the post-processing data analysis, especially for the FRSR, has evolved. This document describes the next-generation Portable Radiation Package (PRP2) that was developed for the DOE ARM Facility, under contract no. 9F-31462 from Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The PRP2 has the same scientific principles that were well validated in prior studies, but has upgraded electronic hardware. The PRP2 approach is completely modular, both in hardware and software. Each sensor input is treated as a separate serial stream into the data collection computer. In this way the operator has complete access to each component of the system for purposes of error checking, calibration, and maintenance. The resulting system is more reliable, easier to install in complex situations, and more amenable to upgrade.

  16. A Probabilistic Genome-Wide Gene Reading Frame Sequence Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Christian Theil; Mørk, Søren

    We introduce a new type of probabilistic sequence model, that model the sequential composition of reading frames of genes in a genome. Our approach extends gene finders with a model of the sequential composition of genes at the genome-level -- effectively producing a sequential genome annotation...... as output. The model can be used to obtain the most probable genome annotation based on a combination of i: a gene finder score of each gene candidate and ii: the sequence of the reading frames of gene candidates through a genome. The model --- as well as a higher order variant --- is developed and tested...... using the probabilistic logic programming language and machine learning system PRISM - a fast and efficient model prototyping environment, using bacterial gene finding performance as a benchmark of signal strength. The model is used to prune a set of gene predictions from an underlying gene finder...

  17. Phase-defined complete sequencing of the HLA genes by next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Jinam, Timothy A; Mitsunaga, Shigeki; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Inoue, Ituro

    2013-05-28

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region, the 3.8-Mb segment of the human genome at 6p21, has been associated with more than 100 different diseases, mostly autoimmune diseases. Due to the complex nature of HLA genes, there are difficulties in elucidating complete HLA gene sequences especially HLA gene haplotype structures by the conventional sequencing method. We propose a novel, accurate, and cost-effective method for generating phase-defined complete sequencing of HLA genes by using indexed multiplex next generation sequencing. A total of 33 HLA homozygous samples, 11 HLA heterozygous samples, and 3 parents-child families were subjected to phase-defined HLA gene sequencing. We applied long-range PCR to amplify six HLA genes (HLA-A, -C, -B, DRB1, -DQB1, and -DPB1) followed by transposase-based library construction and multiplex sequencing with the MiSeq sequencer. Paired-end reads (2 × 250 bp) derived from the sequencer were aligned to the six HLA gene segments of UCSC hg19 allowing at most 80 bases mismatch. For HLA homozygous samples, the six amplicons of an individual were pooled and simultaneously sequenced and mapped as an individual-tagging method. The paired-end reads were aligned to corresponding genes of UCSC hg19 and unambiguous, continuous sequences were obtained. For HLA heterozygous samples, each amplicon was separately sequenced and mapped as a gene-tagging method. After alignments, we detected informative paired-end reads harboring SNVs on both forward and reverse reads that are used to separate two chromosomes and to generate two phase-defined sequences in an individual. Consequently, we were able to determine the phase-defined HLA gene sequences from promoter to 3'-UTR and assign up to 8-digit HLA allele numbers, regardless of whether the alleles are rare or novel. Parent-child trio-based sequencing validated our sequencing and phasing methods. Our protocol generated phased-defined sequences of the entire HLA genes, resulting in high

  18. Comparison of methods for genomic localization of gene trap sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrin Thomas E

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene knockouts in a model organism such as mouse provide a valuable resource for the study of basic biology and human disease. Determining which gene has been inactivated by an untargeted gene trapping event poses a challenging annotation problem because gene trap sequence tags, which represent sequence near the vector insertion site of a trapped gene, are typically short and often contain unresolved residues. To understand better the localization of these sequences on the mouse genome, we compared stand-alone versions of the alignment programs BLAT, SSAHA, and MegaBLAST. A set of 3,369 sequence tags was aligned to build 34 of the mouse genome using default parameters for each algorithm. Known genome coordinates for the cognate set of full-length genes (1,659 sequences were used to evaluate localization results. Results In general, all three programs performed well in terms of localizing sequences to a general region of the genome, with only relatively subtle errors identified for a small proportion of the sequence tags. However, large differences in performance were noted with regard to correctly identifying exon boundaries. BLAT correctly identified the vast majority of exon boundaries, while SSAHA and MegaBLAST missed the majority of exon boundaries. SSAHA consistently reported the fewest false positives and is the fastest algorithm. MegaBLAST was comparable to BLAT in speed, but was the most susceptible to localizing sequence tags incorrectly to pseudogenes. Conclusion The differences in performance for sequence tags and full-length reference sequences were surprisingly small. Characteristic variations in localization results for each program were noted that affect the localization of sequence at exon boundaries, in particular.

  19. Regulatory sequence of cupin family gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Elizabeth; Teoh, Thomas

    2017-07-25

    This invention is in the field of plant biology and agriculture and relates to novel seed specific promoter regions. The present invention further provide methods of producing proteins and other products of interest and methods of controlling expression of nucleic acid sequences of interest using the seed specific promoter regions.

  20. [Pyruvate oxidase gene from Streptococcus sanguis: molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, B; Zhang, R; Zhang, J; Qian, W; Zhang, Y

    2001-09-01

    To clone and sequence the gene of pyruvate oxidase (Sopox) from Streptococcus sanguis. The PCR primers for Sopox gene were designed and synthesized according to the sequence of pyruvate oxidase (spxB) gene of S. pneumonia. The amplified PCR product was cloned into pUC18 and then subcloned into M13mp18 and M13mp19. The DNA sequence of the gene was analyzed. Sopox gene was successfully amplified from S. sanguis ATCC10557. The nucleotide sequence of the whole gene was revealed to be 1788 base pairs with one open reading frame coding pyruvate oxidase with 591 amino acid residuals. The clone and DNA sequence of Sopox gene were obtained which could serve as a foundation on which to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of hydrogen peroxide production and its regulation by oral streptococci.

  1. A human gut microbial gene catalogue established by metagenomic sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, J.; Li, R.; Raes, J.; Arumugam, M.; Tims, S.; Vos, de W.M.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2010-01-01

    To understand the impact of gut microbes on human health and well-being it is crucial to assess their genetic potential. Here we describe the Illumina-based metagenomic sequencing, assembly and characterization of 3.3 million non-redundant microbial genes, derived from 576.7 gigabases of sequence,

  2. Sequence analysis of cereal sucrose synthase genes and isolation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-10-18

    Oct 18, 2007 ... Full Length Research Paper. Sequence analysis of cereal sucrose synthase genes and isolation of sorghum sucrose synthase gene fragment. T. Sivasudha1* and P. A. Kumar2. 1Department of Environmental Biotechnology, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchy-620 024, India. 2NRC on Plant Biotechnology, ...

  3. [Sequencing technology in gene diagnosis and its application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yibin, Guo

    2014-11-01

    The study of gene mutation is one of the hot topics in the field of life science nowadays, and the related detection methods and diagnostic technology have been developed rapidly. Sequencing technology plays an indispensable role in the definite diagnosis and classification of genetic diseases. In this review, we summarize the research progress in sequencing technology, evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of 1(st) ~3(rd) generation of sequencing technology, and describe its application in gene diagnosis. Also we made forecasts and prospects on its development trend.

  4. A novel hierarchical clustering algorithm for gene sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Dan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clustering DNA sequences into functional groups is an important problem in bioinformatics. We propose a new alignment-free algorithm, mBKM, based on a new distance measure, DMk, for clustering gene sequences. This method transforms DNA sequences into the feature vectors which contain the occurrence, location and order relation of k-tuples in DNA sequence. Afterwards, a hierarchical procedure is applied to clustering DNA sequences based on the feature vectors. Results The proposed distance measure and clustering method are evaluated by clustering functionally related genes and by phylogenetic analysis. This method is also compared with BlastClust, CD-HIT-EST and some others. The experimental results show our method is effective in classifying DNA sequences with similar biological characteristics and in discovering the underlying relationship among the sequences. Conclusions We introduced a novel clustering algorithm which is based on a new sequence similarity measure. It is effective in classifying DNA sequences with similar biological characteristics and in discovering the relationship among the sequences.

  5. Pigeonpea Hybrid-Proline-Rich Protein (CcHyPRP) Confers Biotic and Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Transgenic Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellacheruvu, Sunitha; Tamirisa, Srinath; Vudem, Dashavantha Reddy; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the overexpression of Cajanus cajan hybrid-proline-rich protein encoding gene (CcHyPRP) in rice which resulted in increased tolerance to both abiotic and biotic stresses. Compared to the control plants, the transgenic rice lines, expressing CcHyPRP, exhibited high-level tolerance against major abiotic stresses, viz., drought, salinity, and heat, as evidenced by increased biomass, chlorophyll content, survival rate, root, and shoot growth. Further, transgenic rice lines showed increased panicle size and grain number compared to the control plants under different stress conditions. The CcHyPRP transgenics, as compared to the control, revealed enhanced activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes and reduced malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Expression pattern of CcHyPRP::GFP fusion-protein confirmed its predominant localization in cell walls. Moreover, the CcHyPRP transgenics, as compared to the control, exhibited increased resistance to the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe grisea which causes blast disease in rice. Higher levels of bZIP and endochitinase transcripts as well as endochitinase activity were observed in transgenic rice compared to the control plants. The overall results demonstrate the intrinsic role of CcHyPRP in conferring multiple stress tolerance at the whole-plant level. The multipotent CcHyPRP seems promising as a prime candidate gene to fortify crop plants for enhanced tolerance/resistance to different stress factors. PMID:26834756

  6. Microsatellite Instability Use in Mismatch Repair Gene Sequence Variant Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryony A. Thompson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Inherited mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes (MMR can cause MMR deficiency and increased susceptibility to colorectal and endometrial cancer. Microsatellite instability (MSI is the defining molecular signature of MMR deficiency. The clinical classification of identified MMR gene sequence variants has a direct impact on the management of patients and their families. For a significant proportion of cases sequence variants of uncertain clinical significance (also known as unclassified variants are identified, constituting a challenge for genetic counselling and clinical management of families. The effect on protein function of these variants is difficult to interpret. The presence or absence of MSI in tumours can aid in determining the pathogenicity of associated unclassified MMR gene variants. However, there are some considerations that need to be taken into account when using MSI for variant interpretation. The use of MSI and other tumour characteristics in MMR gene sequence variant classification will be explored in this review.

  7. Accumulation of proteinase K-resistant prion protein (PrP) is restricted by the expression level of normal PrP in mice inoculated with a mouse-adapted strain of the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease agent.

    OpenAIRE

    Sakaguchi, S; Katamine, S.; Shigematsu, K.; Nakatani, A; Moriuchi, R.; Nishida, N.; Kurokawa, K; Nakaoke, R; Sato, H; Jishage, K

    1995-01-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a transmissible neurodegenerative disease of humans caused by an unidentified infectious agent, the prion. To determine whether there was an involvement of the host-encoded prion protein (PrPc) in CJD development and prion propagation, mice heterozygous (PrP+/-) or homozygous (PrP-/-) for a disrupted PrP gene were established and inoculated with the mouse-adapted CJD agent. In keeping with findings of previous studies using other lines of PrP-less mice inocu...

  8. Targeted myocardial gene expression in failing hearts by RNA sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajari Dhar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myocardial recovery with left ventricular assist device (LVAD therapy is highly variable and difficult to predict. Next generation ribonucleic acid (RNA sequencing is an innovative, rapid, and quantitative approach to gene expression profiling in small amounts of tissue. Our primary goal was to identify baseline transcriptional profiles in non-ischemic cardiomyopathies that predict myocardial recovery in response to LVAD therapy. We also sought to verify transcriptional differences between failing and non-failing human hearts. Methods RNA was isolated from failing (n = 16 and non-failing (n = 8 human hearts. RNA from each patient was reverse transcribed and quantitatively sequenced on the personal genome machine (PGM sequencer (Ion torrent for 95 heart failure candidate genes. Coverage analysis as well as mapping the reads and alignment was done using the Ion Torrent Browser Suite™. Differential expression analyses were conducted by empirical analysis of digital gene expression data in R (edgeR to identify differential expressed genes between failing and non-failing groups, and between responder and non-responder groups respectively. Targeted cardiac gene messenger RNA (mRNA expression was analyzed in proportion to the total number of reads. Gene expression profiles from the PGM sequencer were validated by performing RNA sequencing (RNAseq with the Illumina Hiseq2500 sequencing system. Results The failing sample population was 75% male with an average age of 50 and a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF of 16%. Myosin light chain kinase (MYLK and interleukin (IL-6 genes expression were significantly higher in LVAD responders compared to non-responders. Thirty-six cardiac genes were expressed differentially between failing and non-failing hearts (23 decreased, 13 elevated. MYLK, Beta-1 adrenergic receptor (ADRB1 and myosin heavy chain (MYH-6 expression were among those significantly decreased in failing hearts

  9. Sequence Variability in Staphylococcal Enterotoxin Genes seb, sec, and sed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Johler

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ingestion of staphylococcal enterotoxins preformed by Staphylococcus aureus in food leads to staphylococcal food poisoning, the most prevalent foodborne intoxication worldwide. There are five major staphylococcal enterotoxins: SEA, SEB, SEC, SED, and SEE. While variants of these toxins have been described and were linked to specific hosts or levels or enterotoxin production, data on sequence variation is still limited. In this study, we aim to extend the knowledge on promoter and gene variants of the major enterotoxins SEB, SEC, and SED. To this end, we determined seb, sec, and sed promoter and gene sequences of a well-characterized set of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus strains originating from foodborne outbreaks, human infections, human nasal colonization, rabbits, and cattle. New nucleotide sequence variants were detected for all three enterotoxins and a novel amino acid sequence variant of SED was detected in a strain associated with human nasal colonization. While the seb promoter and gene sequences exhibited a high degree of variability, the sec and sed promoter and gene were more conserved. Interestingly, a truncated variant of sed was detected in all tested sed harboring rabbit strains. The generated data represents a further step towards improved understanding of strain-specific differences in enterotoxin expression and host-specific variation in enterotoxin sequences.

  10. Sequence Variability in Staphylococcal Enterotoxin Genes seb, sec, and sed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johler, Sophia; Sihto, Henna-Maria; Macori, Guerrino; Stephan, Roger

    2016-06-01

    Ingestion of staphylococcal enterotoxins preformed by Staphylococcus aureus in food leads to staphylococcal food poisoning, the most prevalent foodborne intoxication worldwide. There are five major staphylococcal enterotoxins: SEA, SEB, SEC, SED, and SEE. While variants of these toxins have been described and were linked to specific hosts or levels or enterotoxin production, data on sequence variation is still limited. In this study, we aim to extend the knowledge on promoter and gene variants of the major enterotoxins SEB, SEC, and SED. To this end, we determined seb, sec, and sed promoter and gene sequences of a well-characterized set of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus strains originating from foodborne outbreaks, human infections, human nasal colonization, rabbits, and cattle. New nucleotide sequence variants were detected for all three enterotoxins and a novel amino acid sequence variant of SED was detected in a strain associated with human nasal colonization. While the seb promoter and gene sequences exhibited a high degree of variability, the sec and sed promoter and gene were more conserved. Interestingly, a truncated variant of sed was detected in all tested sed harboring rabbit strains. The generated data represents a further step towards improved understanding of strain-specific differences in enterotoxin expression and host-specific variation in enterotoxin sequences.

  11. Fusion genes and their discovery using high throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annala, M J; Parker, B C; Zhang, W; Nykter, M

    2013-11-01

    Fusion genes are hybrid genes that combine parts of two or more original genes. They can form as a result of chromosomal rearrangements or abnormal transcription, and have been shown to act as drivers of malignant transformation and progression in many human cancers. The biological significance of fusion genes together with their specificity to cancer cells has made them into excellent targets for molecular therapy. Fusion genes are also used as diagnostic and prognostic markers to confirm cancer diagnosis and monitor response to molecular therapies. High-throughput sequencing has enabled the systematic discovery of fusion genes in a wide variety of cancer types. In this review, we describe the history of fusion genes in cancer and the ways in which fusion genes form and affect cellular function. We also describe computational methodologies for detecting fusion genes from high-throughput sequencing experiments, and the most common sources of error that lead to false discovery of fusion genes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Diverse nucleotide compositions and sequence fluctuation in Rubisco protein genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Todd; Dehipawala, S.; Cheung, E.; Bienaime, R.; Ye, J.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Schneider, P.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2011-10-01

    The Rubisco protein-enzyme is arguably the most abundance protein on Earth. The biology dogma of transcription and translation necessitates the study of the Rubisco genes and Rubisco-like genes in various species. Stronger correlation of fractal dimension of the atomic number fluctuation along a DNA sequence with Shannon entropy has been observed in the studied Rubisco-like gene sequences, suggesting a more diverse evolutionary pressure and constraints in the Rubisco sequences. The strategy of using metal for structural stabilization appears to be an ancient mechanism, with data from the porphobilinogen deaminase gene in Capsaspora owczarzaki and Monosiga brevicollis. Using the chi-square distance probability, our analysis supports the conjecture that the more ancient Rubisco-like sequence in Microcystis aeruginosa would have experienced very different evolutionary pressure and bio-chemical constraint as compared to Bordetella bronchiseptica, the two microbes occupying either end of the correlation graph. Our exploratory study would indicate that high fractal dimension Rubisco sequence would support high carbon dioxide rate via the Michaelis- Menten coefficient; with implication for the control of the whooping cough pathogen Bordetella bronchiseptica, a microbe containing a high fractal dimension Rubisco-like sequence (2.07). Using the internal comparison of chi-square distance probability for 16S rRNA (~ E-22) versus radiation repair Rec-A gene (~ E-05) in high GC content Deinococcus radiodurans, our analysis supports the conjecture that high GC content microbes containing Rubisco-like sequence are likely to include an extra-terrestrial origin, relative to Deinococcus radiodurans. Similar photosynthesis process that could utilize host star radiation would not compete with radiation resistant process from the biology dogma perspective in environments such as Mars and exoplanets.

  13. A human gut microbial gene catalogue established by metagenomic sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    dos Santos, Marcelo Bertalan Quintanilha; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2010-01-01

    To understand the impact of gut microbes on human health and well-being it is crucial to assess their genetic potential. Here we describe the Illumina-based metagenomic sequencing, assembly and characterization of 3.3 million non-redundant microbial genes, derived from 576.7 gigabases of sequence...... gut metagenome and the minimal gut bacterial genome in terms of functions present in all individuals and most bacteria, respectively....

  14. Gene-Based Sequence Diversity Analysis of Field Pea (Pisum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Runchun; Johnson, Richard; Seres, Andrea; Kiss, Gyorgy; Ambrose, Mike J.; Knox, Maggie R.; Ellis, T. H. Noel; Flavell, Andrew J.

    2007-01-01

    Sequence diversity of 39 dispersed gene loci was analyzed in 48 diverse individuals representative of the genus Pisum. The different genes show large variation in diversity parameters, suggesting widely differing levels of selection and a high overall diversity level for the species. The data set yields a genetic diversity tree whose deep branches, involving wild samples, are preserved in a tree derived from a polymorphic retrotransposon insertions in an identical sample set. Thus, gene regions and intergenic “junk DNA” share a consistent picture for the genomic diversity of Pisum, despite low linkage disequilibrium in wild and landrace germplasm, which might be expected to allow independent evolution of these very different DNA classes. Additional lines of evidence indicate that recombination has shuffled gene haplotypes efficiently within Pisum, despite its high level of inbreeding and widespread geographic distribution. Trees derived from individual gene loci show marked differences from each other, and genetic distance values between sample pairs show high standard deviations. Sequence mosaic analysis of aligned sequences identifies nine loci showing evidence for intragenic recombination. Lastly, phylogenetic network analysis confirms the non-treelike structure of Pisum diversity and indicates the major germplasm classes involved. Overall, these data emphasize the artificiality of simple tree structures for representing genomic sequence variation within Pisum and emphasize the need for fine structure haplotype analysis to accurately define the genetic structure of the species. PMID:18073431

  15. Automated cleaning and pre-processing of immunoglobulin gene sequences from high-throughput sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miri eMichaeli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available High throughput sequencing (HTS yields tens of thousands to millions of sequences that require a large amount of pre-processing work to clean various artifacts. Such cleaning cannot be performed manually. Existing programs are not suitable for immunoglobulin (Ig genes, which are variable and often highly mutated. This paper describes Ig-HTS-Cleaner (Ig High Throughput Sequencing Cleaner, a program containing a simple cleaning procedure that successfully deals with pre-processing of Ig sequences derived from HTS, and Ig-Indel-Identifier (Ig Insertion – Deletion Identifier, a program for identifying legitimate and artifact insertions and/or deletions (indels. Our programs were designed for analyzing Ig gene sequences obtained by 454 sequencing, but they are applicable to all types of sequences and sequencing platforms. Ig-HTS-Cleaner and Ig-Indel-Identifier have been implemented in Java and saved as executable JAR files, supported on Linux and MS Windows. No special requirements are needed in order to run the programs, except for correctly constructing the input files as explained in the text. The programs' performance has been tested and validated on real and simulated data sets.

  16. Characterization of genomic sequence of a drought-resistant gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    abiotic stress and developmental processes in plants. Indi- vidual members of SnRK2 ... species. Materials and methods. Plant materials. Common wheat cultivar 'Chinese Spring' was used for iso- lation and gene structure analysis of TaSnRK2.7 genomic sequences. A set of ... Water stress experiments. Wheat seeds were ...

  17. High throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nierychlo, Marta; Larsen, Poul; Jørgensen, Mads Koustrup

    S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing has been developed over the past few years and is now ready to use for more comprehensive studies related to plant operation and optimization thanks to short analysis time, low cost, high throughput, and high taxonomic resolution. In this study we show how 16S r...

  18. Quantitative modeling of a gene's expression from its intergenic sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samee, Md Abul Hassan; Sinha, Saurabh

    2014-03-01

    Modeling a gene's expression from its intergenic locus and trans-regulatory context is a fundamental goal in computational biology. Owing to the distributed nature of cis-regulatory information and the poorly understood mechanisms that integrate such information, gene locus modeling is a more challenging task than modeling individual enhancers. Here we report the first quantitative model of a gene's expression pattern as a function of its locus. We model the expression readout of a locus in two tiers: 1) combinatorial regulation by transcription factors bound to each enhancer is predicted by a thermodynamics-based model and 2) independent contributions from multiple enhancers are linearly combined to fit the gene expression pattern. The model does not require any prior knowledge about enhancers contributing toward a gene's expression. We demonstrate that the model captures the complex multi-domain expression patterns of anterior-posterior patterning genes in the early Drosophila embryo. Altogether, we model the expression patterns of 27 genes; these include several gap genes, pair-rule genes, and anterior, posterior, trunk, and terminal genes. We find that the model-selected enhancers for each gene overlap strongly with its experimentally characterized enhancers. Our findings also suggest the presence of sequence-segments in the locus that would contribute ectopic expression patterns and hence were "shut down" by the model. We applied our model to identify the transcription factors responsible for forming the stripe boundaries of the studied genes. The resulting network of regulatory interactions exhibits a high level of agreement with known regulatory influences on the target genes. Finally, we analyzed whether and why our assumption of enhancer independence was necessary for the genes we studied. We found a deterioration of expression when binding sites in one enhancer were allowed to influence the readout of another enhancer. Thus, interference between enhancer

  19. Thermodynamics-based models of transcriptional regulation with gene sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuqiang; Shen, Yanyan; Hu, Jinxing

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative models of gene regulatory activity have the potential to improve our mechanistic understanding of transcriptional regulation. However, the few models available today have been based on simplistic assumptions about the sequences being modeled or heuristic approximations of the underlying regulatory mechanisms. In this work, we have developed a thermodynamics-based model to predict gene expression driven by any DNA sequence. The proposed model relies on a continuous time, differential equation description of transcriptional dynamics. The sequence features of the promoter are exploited to derive the binding affinity which is derived based on statistical molecular thermodynamics. Experimental results show that the proposed model can effectively identify the activity levels of transcription factors and the regulatory parameters. Comparing with the previous models, the proposed model can reveal more biological sense.

  20. Selection for gene junction sequences important for VSV transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinzman, Edward E; Barr, John N; Wertz, Gail W

    2008-10-25

    The heptauridine tract at each gene end and intergenic region (IGR) at the gene junctions of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) have effects on synthesis of the downstream mRNA, independent of their respective roles in termination of the upstream mRNA. To investigate the role of the U tract and the IGR in downstream gene transcription, we altered the N/P gene junction of infectious VSV such that transcription levels would be affected and result in altered molar ratios of the N and P proteins, which are critical for optimal viral RNA replication. The changes included extended IGRs between the N and P genes and shortening the length of the heptauridine tract upstream of the P gene start. Viruses having various combinations of these changes were recovered from cDNA and selective pressure for efficient viral replication was applied by sequential passage in cell culture. The replicative ability and sequence at the altered intergenic junctions were monitored throughout the passages to compare the effects of the changes at the IGR and U tract. VSV variants with wild-type U tracts upstream of the P gene replicated to levels similar to wt VSV. Variants with shortened U tracts were reduced in their ability to replicate. With passage, populations emerged that replicated to higher levels. Sequence analysis revealed that mutations had been selected for in these populations that increased the length of the U tract. This correlated with an increase in abundance of P mRNA and protein to provide improved N:P protein molar ratios. Extended IGRs resulted in decreased downstream transcription but the effect was not as extensive as that caused by shortened U tracts. Extended IGRs were not selected against in 5 passages. Our results indicate that the size of the upstream gene end U tract is an important determinant of efficient downstream gene transcription in infectious virus.

  1. Gene organization and sequence analyses of transfer RNA genes in Trypanosomatid parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myler Peter J

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The protozoan pathogens Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi (the Tritryps are parasites that produce devastating human diseases. These organisms show very unusual mechanisms of gene expression, such as polycistronic transcription. We are interested in the study of tRNA genes, which are transcribed by RNA polymerase III (Pol III. To analyze the sequences and genomic organization of tRNA genes and other Pol III-transcribed genes, we have performed an in silico analysis of the Tritryps genome sequences. Results Our analysis indicated the presence of 83, 66 and 120 genes in L. major, T. brucei and T. cruzi, respectively. These numbers include several previously unannotated selenocysteine (Sec tRNA genes. Most tRNA genes are organized into clusters of 2 to 10 genes that may contain other Pol III-transcribed genes. The distribution of genes in the L. major genome does not seem to be totally random, like in most organisms. While the majority of the tRNA clusters do not show synteny (conservation of gene order between the Tritryps, a cluster of 13 Pol III genes that is highly syntenic was identified. We have determined consensus sequences for the putative promoter regions (Boxes A and B of the Tritryps tRNA genes, and specific changes were found in tRNA-Sec genes. Analysis of transcription termination signals of the tRNAs (clusters of Ts showed differences between T. cruzi and the other two species. We have also identified several tRNA isodecoder genes (having the same anticodon, but different sequences elsewhere in the tRNA body in the Tritryps. Conclusion A low number of tRNA genes is present in Tritryps. The overall weak synteny that they show indicates a reduced importance of genome location of Pol III genes compared to protein-coding genes. The fact that some of the differences between isodecoder genes occur in the internal promoter elements suggests that differential control of the expression of some

  2. Sequence and chromosomal localization of the mouse brevican gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauch, U; Meyer, H; Brakebusch, C

    1997-01-01

    Brevican is a brain-specific proteoglycan belonging to the aggrecan family. Phage clones containing the complete mouse brevican open reading frame of 2649 bp and the complete 3'-untranslated region of 341 bp were isolated from a mouse brain cDNA library, and cosmid clones containing the mouse......-intron structure reflected the structural organization of the multidomain protein brevican. No consensus TATA sequence was found upstream of the first exon, and RNase protection experiments revealed multiple transcriptional start sites for the brevican gene. The first part of the sequence of intron 8 corresponded...

  3. Biased distribution of DNA uptake sequences towards genome maintenance genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, T.; Rodland, E.A.; Lagesen, K.

    2004-01-01

    Repeated sequence signatures are characteristic features of all genomic DNA. We have made a rigorous search for repeat genomic sequences in the human pathogens Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae and found that by far the most frequent 9-10mers residing within...... in these organisms. Pasteurella multocida also displayed high frequencies of a putative DUS identical to that previously identified in H. influenzae and with a skewed distribution towards genome maintenance genes, indicating that this bacterium might be transformation competent under certain conditions....

  4. Periodontal tissue regeneration with PRP incorporated gelatin hydrogel sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Dai; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Sato, Soh

    2015-10-20

    Gelatin hydrogels have been designed and prepared for the controlled release of the transforming growth factor (TGF-b1) and the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB). PRP (Platelet rich plasma) contains many growth factors including the PDGF and TGF-b1. The objective of this study was to evaluate the regeneration of periodontal tissue following the controlled release of growth factors in PRP. For the periodontal ligament cells and osteoblast, PRP of different concentrations was added. The assessment of DNA, mitochondrial activity and ALP activity were measured. To evaluate the TGF-β1 release from PRP incorporated gelatin sponge, amounts of TGF-β1 in each supernatant sample were determined by the ELISA. Transplantation experiments to prepare a bone defect in a rat alveolar bone were an implanted gelatin sponge incorporated with different concentration PRP. In DNA assay and MTT assay, after the addition of PRP to the periodontal ligament cells and osteoblast, the cell count and mitochondrial activity had increased the most in the group with the addition of 5  ×  PRP. In the ALP assay, after the addition of PRP to the periodontal ligament cells, the cell activity had increased the most in the group with the addition of 3  ×  PRP. In the transplantation, the size of the bone regenerated in the defect with 3  ×  PRP incorporated gelatin sponge was larger than that of the other group.

  5. Variations in CCL3L gene cluster sequence and non-specific gene copy numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edberg Jeffrey C

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Copy number variations (CNVs of the gene CC chemokine ligand 3-like1 (CCL3L1 have been implicated in HIV-1 susceptibility, but the association has been inconsistent. CCL3L1 shares homology with a cluster of genes localized to chromosome 17q12, namely CCL3, CCL3L2, and, CCL3L3. These genes are involved in host defense and inflammatory processes. Several CNV assays have been developed for the CCL3L1 gene. Findings Through pairwise and multiple alignments of these genes, we have shown that the homology between these genes ranges from 50% to 99% in complete gene sequences and from 70-100% in the exonic regions, with CCL3L1 and CCL3L3 being identical. By use of MEGA 4 and BioEdit, we aligned sense primers, anti-sense primers, and probes used in several previously described assays against pre-multiple alignments of all four chemokine genes. Each set of probes and primers aligned and matched with overlapping sequences in at least two of the four genes, indicating that previously utilized RT-PCR based CNV assays are not specific for only CCL3L1. The four available assays measured median copies of 2 and 3-4 in European and African American, respectively. The concordance between the assays ranged from 0.44-0.83 suggesting individual discordant calls and inconsistencies with the assays from the expected gene coverage from the known sequence. Conclusions This indicates that some of the inconsistencies in the association studies could be due to assays that provide heterogenous results. Sequence information to determine CNV of the three genes separately would allow to test whether their association with the pathogenesis of a human disease or phenotype is affected by an individual gene or by a combination of these genes.

  6. NEXT-GENERATION GENE SEQUENCING AND ITS APPLICATIONS IN ONCOHEMATOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Barkhatov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The review bears on basic principles and technologies of next-generation sequencing (NGS, as well as its applications for detection of gene mutations in leukemic cells. We discuss some novel data concerning NGS approach to studies of genetic heterogeneity in myeloproliferative disorders, detection of high-risk genes, including drug resistance mutations, epigenomic changes associated with leukemias, as well as molecular aspects of clonal evolution. A special section concerns basic problems with bioinformatics and adequate analysis of large digital databases obtained with NGS approach. Optimal choice of appropriate software is of utmost importance for adequate retrieval and interpretation of the NGS data.

  7. Identification of four Indian ascidians based on COI gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffarali, H Abdul; Akram, Soban; Arshan, Kaleem Ml

    2016-10-11

    DNA barcoding involving the sequencing of a short mitochondrial DNA segment, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) gene, is a specialized technique for the identification of species even at the early embryonic and larval stages, which is quite difficult in morphology-based taxonomy. Ascidians are sessile invertebrate chordates possessing numerous biochemical as well as pharmacological activities. In this study, a total of 36 ascidian samples belonging to the family Didemnidae were sequenced for a 650 bp region of the mitochondrial COI gene. All the species were represented by multiple specimens. The barcode sequences showed no stop-codons and indels in the alignments. The aligned sequences were submitted in Barcode submission tool, NCBI, and the accession numbers were obtained. The minimum intraspecific distance was found to be 0.00% and the maximum was 2.23%. Mean Kimura 2-parameter (K2P) distances within-species, genus, and family were 0.88, 5.98, and 20.03%, respectively. The mean interspecific distance is more than the mean intraspecific divergence, which indicates efficiency of DNA barcoding for identification of ascidians.

  8. Identification of rat genes by TWINSCAN gene prediction, RT-PCR, and direct sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Jia Qian; Shteynberg, David; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan

    2004-01-01

    The publication of a draft sequence of a third mammalian genome--that of the rat--suggests a need to rethink genome annotation. New mammalian sequences will not receive the kind of labor-intensive annotation efforts that are currently being devoted to human. In this paper, we demonstrate...... in the single-intron experiment. Spliced sequences were amplified in 46 cases (34%). We conclude that this procedure for elucidating gene structures with native cDNA sequences is cost-effective and will become even more so as it is further optimized....

  9. Nuclear Weapon Personnel Reliability Program (PRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-25

    amphetamines, barbiturates, or other narcotic drugs not prescribed by proper medical authorities, and anabolic steroids shall render an individual...Hallucinogens e. Cannabis f Anabolic Steroids Total C.3. Serious offense decertifications by type (continued) PRP Position Category Crit Cont Crit Cont Crit...States Code (c) DoD Directive 1010.4, "Alcohol and Drug Abuse by C TE. DoD Personnel," August 25, 1980 NO02 1 9 9 3 (d) DoD Directive 5210.56, "Use of

  10. Cloning and sequencing the genes encoding goldfish and carp ependymin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, D S; Shashoua, V E

    1994-04-20

    Ependymins (EPNs) are brain glycoproteins thought to function in optic nerve regeneration and long-term memory consolidation. To date, epn genes have been characterized in two orders of teleost fish. In this study, polymerase chain reactions (PCR) were used to amplify the complete 1.6-kb epn genes, gf-I and cc-I, from genomic DNA of Cypriniformes, goldfish and carp, respectively. Amplified bands were cloned and sequenced. Each gene consists of six exons and five introns. The exon portion of gf-I encodes a predicted 215-amino-acid (aa) protein previously characterized as GF-I, while cc-I encodes a predicted 215-aa protein 95% homologous to GF-I.

  11. Technology development for gene discovery and full-length sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcelo Bento Soares

    2004-07-19

    In previous years, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, we developed methods for construction of normalized and subtracted cDNA libraries, and constructed hundreds of high-quality libraries for production of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs). Our clones were made widely available to the scientific community through the IMAGE Consortium, and millions of ESTs were produced from our libraries either by collaborators or by our own sequencing laboratory at the University of Iowa. During this grant period, we focused on (1) the development of a method for preferential cloning of tissue-specific and/or rare transcripts, (2) its utilization to expedite EST-based gene discovery for the NIH Mouse Brain Molecular Anatomy Project, (3) further development and optimization of a method for construction of full-length-enriched cDNA libraries, and (4) modification of a plasmid vector to maximize efficiency of full-length cDNA sequencing by the transposon-mediated approach. It is noteworthy that the technology developed for preferential cloning of rare mRNAs enabled identification of over 2,000 mouse transcripts differentially expressed in the hippocampus. In addition, the method that we optimized for construction of full-length-enriched cDNA libraries was successfully utilized for the production of approximately fifty libraries from the developing mouse nervous system, from which over 2,500 full-ORF-containing cDNAs have been identified and accurately sequenced in their entirety either by our group or by the NIH-Mammalian Gene Collection Program Sequencing Team.

  12. Detection and sequence analysis of accessory gene regulator genes of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ananda Chitra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (SP is the major pathogenic species of dogs involved in a wide variety of skin and soft tissue infections. The accessory gene regulator (agr locus of Staphylococcus aureus has been extensively studied, and it influences the expression of many virulence genes. It encodes a two-component signal transduction system that leads to down-regulation of surface proteins and up-regulation of secreted proteins during in vitro growth of S. aureus. The objective of this study was to detect and sequence analyzing the AgrA, B, and D of SP isolated from canine skin infections. Materials and Methods: In this study, we have isolated and identified SP from canine pyoderma and otitis cases by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and confirmed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Primers for SP agrA and agrBD genes were designed using online primer designing software and BLAST searched for its specificity. Amplification of the agr genes was carried out for 53 isolates of SP by PCR and sequencing of agrA, B, and D were carried out for five isolates and analyzed using DNAstar and Mega5.2 software. Results: A total of 53 (59% SP isolates were obtained from 90 samples. 15 isolates (28% were confirmed to be methicillinresistant SP (MRSP with the detection of the mecA gene. Accessory gene regulator A, B, and D genes were detected in all the SP isolates. Complete nucleotide sequences of the above three genes for five isolates were submitted to GenBank, and their accession numbers are from KJ133557 to KJ133571. AgrA amino acid sequence analysis showed that it is mainly made of alpha-helices and is hydrophilic in nature. AgrB is a transmembrane protein, and AgrD encodes the precursor of the autoinducing peptide (AIP. Sequencing of the agrD gene revealed that the 5 canine SP strains tested could be divided into three Agr specificity groups (RIPTSTGFF, KIPTSTGFF, and RIPISTGFF based on the putative AIP produced by each strain

  13. Sequence analysis of the porcine IFNAR1 and IFNGR2 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeb, T; Dolle, K; Haase, B

    2006-01-01

    A porcine BAC clone harboring the tightly linked IFNAR1 and IFNGR2 genes was identified by comparative analysis of the publicly available porcine BAC end sequences. The complete 168,835 bp insert sequence of this clone was determined. Sequence comparisons of the genomic sequence with EST sequences from public databases were performed and allowed a detailed annotation of the IFNAR1 and IFNGR2 genes. The analyzed genes showed a conserved genomic organization with their known mammalian orthologs, however the sequence conservation of these genes across species was relatively low. In addition to the IFNAR1 and IFNGR2 genes, which were completely sequenced, the analyzed BAC clone also contained parts of an orphan gene encoding a putative transmembrane protein (TMEM50B). In contrast to the IFNAR1 and IFNGR2 genes the sequence conservation of the TMEM50B gene across different mammalian species was extremely high. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. The fate of PrP GPI-anchor signal peptide is modulated by P238S pathogenic mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guizzunti, Gianni; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are localized to the plasma membrane via a C-terminally linked GPI anchor. The GPI anchor is added concomitantly to the cleavage of the carboxy-terminal GPI-anchor signal sequence, thereby causing the release of a C-terminal hydrophobic peptide, whose fate has not yet been investigated. Here we followed the fate of the GPI-attachment signal of the prion protein (PrP), a protein implicated in various types of transmissible neurodegenerative spongiform encephalopathies (TSE). The PrP GPI-anchor signal sequence shows a remarkable and unusual degree of conservation across the species and contains two point mutations (M232R/T and P238S) that are responsible for genetic forms of prion disorders. We show that the PrP GPI-anchor signal peptide (SP), but not the one from an unrelated GPI-anchored protein (folate receptor), undergoes degradation via the proteasome. Moreover, the P238S point mutation partially protects the PrP GPI-anchor SP from degradation. Our data provide the first attempt to address the fate of a GPI-anchor SP and identify a role for the P238S mutation, suggesting the possibility that the PrP GPI-anchor SP could play a role in neurodegenerative prion diseases. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. [Partial gene clone and nif gene homologous sequence analysis of Streptococcus sanguis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y; Wang, H; Jin, C; Sun, K

    1999-02-01

    To analyze the sequence of Streptococcus sanguis chromosome which contains one DNA fragment of 800 base pairs (bp) and discuss Streptococcus sanguis biological features of heredity. Streptococcus DNA of 800-bp genetic fragment was cloned and analyzed by using eukaryotic expression vector. By Genbank database, it showed that the 800-bp genetic sequence was highly homologous with other bacterial nifS and nifU gene, and the highest homologous score was 114. This nif gene of ATCC 10556 strain may correlate with nutrient metabolism and peroxide hydrogen release of Streptococcus sanguis.

  16. Mining Association Rules in Dengue Gene Sequence with Latent Periodicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marimuthu Thangam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The mining of periodic patterns in dengue database is an interesting research problem that can be used for predicting the future evolution of dengue viruses. In this paper, we propose an algorithm called Recurrence Finder (RECFIN that uses the suffix tree for detecting the periodic patterns of dengue gene sequence. Also, the RECFIN finds the presence of palindrome which indicates the possibilities of formation of proteins. Further, this paper computes the periodicity of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of any length. The periodicity based association rules are used to diagnose the type of dengue. The time complexity of the proposed algorithm is O(n2. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach by comparing the experimental results performed on dengue virus serotypes dataset with NCBI-BLAST algorithm.

  17. From genes to markers: exploiting gene sequence information to develop tools for plant breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Melissa; Mather, Diane E

    2014-01-01

    Once the sequence is known for a gene of interest, it is usually possible to design markers to detect polymorphisms within the gene. Such markers can be particularly useful in plant breeding, especially if they detect the causal polymorphism within the gene and are diagnostic of the phenotype. In this chapter, we (1) discuss how gene sequences are obtained and aligned and how polymorphic sites can be identified or predicted; (2) explain the principles of PCR primer design and PCR amplification and provide guidelines for their application in the design and testing of markers; (3) discuss detection methods for presence/absence (dominant) polymorphisms, length polymorphisms and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs); and (4) outline some of the factors that affect the utility of markers in plant breeding and explain how markers can be evaluated (validated) for use in plant breeding.

  18. SEQUENCING AND SEQUENCE ANALYSIS OF MYOSTATIN GENE IN THE EXON 1 OF THE CAMEL (CAMELUS DROMEDARIUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. SHAH, A. S. QURESHI1, M. REISSMANN2 AND H. J. SCHWARTZ3

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Myostatin, also called growth differentiation factor-8 (GDF-8, is a member of the mammalian growth transforming family (TGF-beta superfamily, which is expressed specifically in developing an adult skeletal muscle. Muscular hypertrophy allele (mh allele in the double muscle breeds involved mutation within the myostatin gene. Genomic DNA was isolated from the camel hair using NucleoSpin Tissue kit. Two animals of each of the six breeds namely, Marecha, Dhatti, Larri, Kohi, Sakrai and Cambelpuri were used for sequencing. For PCR amplification of the gene, a primer pair was designed from homolog regions of already published sequences of farm animals from GenBank. Results showed that camel myostatin possessed more than 90% homology with that of cattle, sheep and pig. Camel formed separate cluster from the pig in spite of having high homology (98% and showed 94% homology with cattle and sheep as reported in literature. Sequence analysis of the PCR amplified part of exon 1 (256 bp of the camel myostatin was identical among six camel breeds.

  19. Gene panel sequencing in Brazilian patients with retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Kárita Antunes; Salles, Mariana Vallim; Whitebirch, Chris; Chiang, John; Sallum, Juliana Maria Ferraz

    2017-01-01

    Retinal dystrophies constitute a group of diseases characterized by clinical variability and pronounced genetic heterogeneity. Retinitis pigmentosa is the most common subtype of hereditary retinal dystrophy and is characterized by a progressive loss of peripheral field vision (Tunnel Vision), eventual loss of central vision, and progressive night blindness. The characteristics of the fundus changes include bone-spicule formations, attenuated blood vessels, reduced and/or abnormal electroretinograms, changes in structure imaged by optical coherence tomography, and subjective changes in visual function. The different syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of retinal dystrophies can be attributed to mutations in more than 250 genes. Molecular diagnosis for patients with retinitis pigmentosa has been hampered by extreme genetic and clinical heterogeneity between retinitis pigmentosa and other forms of retinal dystrophies. Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are among the most promising techniques to identify pathogenic variations in retinal dystrophies. The purpose of this study was to discover the molecular diagnosis for Brazilian patients clinically diagnosed with a retinitis pigmentosa pattern of inheritance by using NGS technologies. Sixteen patients with the clinical diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa were included in the study. Their DNA was sequenced in a panel with 132 genes related to retinal dystrophies using the Illumina® platform. Sequence analysis and variation calling was performed using Soft Genetics®, NextGene, and Geneticist Assistant software. The criteria for pathogenicity analysis were established according to the results of prediction programs (Polyphen 2, Mutation taster and MetaCore™) and comparison of pathogenic variations found with databases. The identified potentially pathogenic variations were all confirmed by Sanger sequencing. There were 89 variations predicted as pathogenic, but only 10 of them supported the conclusion of the

  20. International interlaboratory study comparing single organism 16S rRNA gene sequencing data: Beyond consensus sequence comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan D. Olson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the results from an interlaboratory sequencing study for which we developed a novel high-resolution method for comparing data from different sequencing platforms for a multi-copy, paralogous gene. The combination of PCR amplification and 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rRNA sequencing has revolutionized bacteriology by enabling rapid identification, frequently without the need for culture. To assess variability between laboratories in sequencing 16S rRNA, six laboratories sequenced the gene encoding the 16S rRNA from Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain EDL933 and Listeria monocytogenes serovar 4b strain NCTC11994. Participants performed sequencing methods and protocols available in their laboratories: Sanger sequencing, Roche 454 pyrosequencing®, or Ion Torrent PGM®. The sequencing data were evaluated on three levels: (1 identity of biologically conserved position, (2 ratio of 16S rRNA gene copies featuring identified variants, and (3 the collection of variant combinations in a set of 16S rRNA gene copies. The same set of biologically conserved positions was identified for each sequencing method. Analytical methods using Bayesian and maximum likelihood statistics were developed to estimate variant copy ratios, which describe the ratio of nucleotides at each identified biologically variable position, as well as the likely set of variant combinations present in 16S rRNA gene copies. Our results indicate that estimated variant copy ratios at biologically variable positions were only reproducible for high throughput sequencing methods. Furthermore, the likely variant combination set was only reproducible with increased sequencing depth and longer read lengths. We also demonstrate novel methods for evaluating variable positions when comparing multi-copy gene sequence data from multiple laboratories generated using multiple sequencing technologies.

  1. Sequencing of neuroblastoma identifies chromothripsis and defects in neuritogenesis genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Jan J; Koster, Jan; Zwijnenburg, Danny A; van Sluis, Peter; Valentijn, Linda J; van der Ploeg, Ida; Hamdi, Mohamed; van Nes, Johan; Westerman, Bart A; van Arkel, Jennemiek; Ebus, Marli E; Haneveld, Franciska; Lakeman, Arjan; Schild, Linda; Molenaar, Piet; Stroeken, Peter; van Noesel, Max M; Ora, Ingrid; Santo, Evan E; Caron, Huib N; Westerhout, Ellen M; Versteeg, Rogier

    2012-02-22

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood tumour of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system. The pathogenesis has for a long time been quite enigmatic, as only very few gene defects were identified in this often lethal tumour. Frequently detected gene alterations are limited to MYCN amplification (20%) and ALK activations (7%). Here we present a whole-genome sequence analysis of 87 neuroblastoma of all stages. Few recurrent amino-acid-changing mutations were found. In contrast, analysis of structural defects identified a local shredding of chromosomes, known as chromothripsis, in 18% of high-stage neuroblastoma. These tumours are associated with a poor outcome. Structural alterations recurrently affected ODZ3, PTPRD and CSMD1, which are involved in neuronal growth cone stabilization. In addition, ATRX, TIAM1 and a series of regulators of the Rac/Rho pathway were mutated, further implicating defects in neuritogenesis in neuroblastoma. Most tumours with defects in these genes were aggressive high-stage neuroblastomas, but did not carry MYCN amplifications. The genomic landscape of neuroblastoma therefore reveals two novel molecular defects, chromothripsis and neuritogenesis gene alterations, which frequently occur in high-risk tumours.

  2. Candidate Genes for Nonsyndromic Cleft Palate Detected by Exome Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoebel, A K; Drichel, D; van de Vorst, M; Böhmer, A C; Sivalingam, S; Ishorst, N; Klamt, J; Gölz, L; Alblas, M; Maaser, A; Keppler, K; Zink, A M; Dixon, M J; Dixon, J; Hemprich, A; Kruse, T; Graf, I; Dunsche, A; Schmidt, G; Daratsianos, N; Nowak, S; Aldhorae, K A; Nöthen, M M; Knapp, M; Thiele, H; Gilissen, C; Reutter, H; Hoischen, A; Mangold, E; Ludwig, K U

    2017-10-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft palate only (nsCPO) is a facial malformation that has a livebirth prevalence of 1 in 2,500. Research suggests that the etiology of nsCPO is multifactorial, with a clear genetic component. To date, genome-wide association studies have identified only 1 conclusive common variant for nsCPO, that is, a missense variant in the gene grainyhead-like-3 ( GRHL3). Thus, the underlying genetic causes of nsCPO remain largely unknown. The present study aimed at identifying rare variants that might contribute to nsCPO risk, via whole-exome sequencing (WES), in multiply affected Central European nsCPO pedigrees. WES was performed in 2 affected first-degree relatives from each family. Variants shared between both individuals were analyzed for their potential deleterious nature and a low frequency in the general population. Genes carrying promising variants were annotated for 1) reported associations with facial development, 2) multiple occurrence of variants, and 3) expression in mouse embryonic palatal shelves. This strategy resulted in the identification of a set of 26 candidate genes that were resequenced in 132 independent nsCPO cases and 623 independent controls of 2 different ethnicities, using molecular inversion probes. No rare loss-of-function mutation was identified in either WES or resequencing step. However, we identified 2 or more missense variants predicted to be deleterious in each of 3 genes ( ACACB, PTPRS, MIB1) in individuals from independent families. In addition, the analyses identified a novel variant in GRHL3 in 1 patient and a variant in CREBBP in 2 siblings. Both genes underlie different syndromic forms of CPO. A plausible hypothesis is that the apparently nonsyndromic clefts in these 3 patients might represent hypomorphic forms of the respective syndromes. In summary, the present study identified rare variants that might contribute to nsCPO risk and suggests candidate genes for further investigation.

  3. EvoTol: a protein-sequence based evolutionary intolerance framework for disease-gene prioritization

    OpenAIRE

    Rackham, Owen?J.?L.; Shihab, Hashem A.; Johnson, Michael R.; Petretto, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Methods to interpret personal genome sequences are increasingly required. Here, we report a novel framework (EvoTol) to identify disease-causing genes using patient sequence data from within protein coding-regions. EvoTol quantifies a gene's intolerance to mutation using evolutionary conservation of protein sequences and can incorporate tissue-specific gene expression data. We apply this framework to the analysis of whole-exome sequence data in epilepsy and congenital heart disease, and demon...

  4. Platlet Rich Plasma (PRP) Improves Fat Grafting Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modarressi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Autologous fat transfer offers many qualities of a ideal soft tissue filler. Main advantages of fat grafting ensue from the fact that the lipoaspirate tissue is an abundant source of regenerative pluripotential cells. However, the reported rates of fat cell survival vary greatly in the medical literature (10-90%). Different techniques of harvesting, processing, and reinjecting the fat cells are so claimed to be responsible for these differences, without any agreement concerning the best way to process. To address this important disadvantage, we propose the addition of autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) which is known as a natural reservoir of growth factors stimulating tissue repair and regeneration. This approach is completely autologous and immediately employed without any type of preconditioning. Platelets rich plasma (PRP) preparation included bleeding of 8 ml of blood from patient's peripheral vein in Regen Lab© tubes containing sodium citrate anticoagulant. The whole blood was centrifugated at 1500 g during 3 min. As Regen-tubes contained a special gel separator, 99 % of red blood cells were discarded from the plasma at the bottom of the gel, and >90% of platelets were harvested in 4 ml of plasma on the top of the gel, called the platelet-rich plasma (PRP). The purified fat prepared by Coleman technique was mixed with different amount of PRP for in vitro, in vivo (mice) and clinical experiments: >50% of PRP for skin rejuvenation, superficial scars correction, infraorbital region, ..., and for 20% of PRP with 80% of purified fat for deep filler indication (nasolabial folds, lips, or soft tissue defect). In vitro studies demonstrated that PRP increased fat cells survival rate and stem cells differentiation. Animal models showed that fat graft survival rate was significantly increased by addition of PRP. Several clinical cases confirmed the improvement of wound healing and fat grafting survival in facial reconstruction and aesthetic cases by association of

  5. Identification of novel hereditary cancer genes by whole exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolenko, Anna P; Suspitsin, Evgeny N; Kuligina, Ekatherina Sh; Bizin, Ilya V; Frishman, Dmitrij; Imyanitov, Evgeny N

    2015-12-28

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) provides a powerful tool for medical genetic research. Several dozens of WES studies involving patients with hereditary cancer syndromes have already been reported. WES led to breakthrough in understanding of the genetic basis of some exceptionally rare syndromes; for example, identification of germ-line SMARCA4 mutations in patients with ovarian hypercalcemic small cell carcinomas indeed explains a noticeable share of familial aggregation of this disease. However, studies on common cancer types turned out to be more difficult. In particular, there is almost a dozen of reports describing WES analysis of breast cancer patients, but none of them yet succeeded to reveal a gene responsible for the significant share of missing heritability. Virtually all components of WES studies require substantial improvement, e.g. technical performance of WES, interpretation of WES results, mode of patient selection, etc. Most of contemporary investigations focus on genes with autosomal dominant mechanism of inheritance; however, recessive and oligogenic models of transmission of cancer susceptibility also need to be considered. It is expected that the list of medically relevant tumor-predisposing genes will be rapidly expanding in the next few years. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular Cloning and Sequencing of Hemoglobin-Beta Gene of Channel Catfish, Ictalurus Punctatus Rafinesque

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Hemoglobin-y gene of channel catfish , lctalurus punctatus, was cloned and sequenced . Total RNA from head kidneys was isolated, reverse transcribed and amplified . The sequence of the channel catfish hemoglobin-y gene consists of 600 nucleotides . Analysis of the nucleotide sequence reveals one o...

  7. Bacteriocin production and gene sequencing analysis from vaginal Lactobacillus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyancheva, Galina; Marzotto, Marta; Dellaglio, Franco; Torriani, Sandra

    2014-09-01

    The human vagina is a complex and dynamic ecosystem containing an abundance of microorganisms. In women of childbearing age, this system is dominated by Lactobacillus spp. In the present work, seventeen newly isolated vaginal strains were identified by 16S rDNA sequencing and were investigated for their antimicrobial properties. Twelve of the isolated Lactobacillus strains showed activity against one or more microorganisms. Six and five of them produced substances that inhibited the growth of two different Klebsiella strains and Staphylococcus aureus, respectively. Two lactobacilli strains were active against an Escherichia coli strain, one isolate was active against an Enterococus faecalis strain and another lactobacilli strain showed antimicrobial activity against a Candida parapsilosis strain. The nature of the active compounds was additionally studied, and the presence of bacteriocin-like substances was proved. The genes related to the bacteriocin production in three of the newly isolated strains were identified and sequenced. The presence of gassericin A operon in the genome of the species Lactobacillus crispatus was described for the first time. The presence of antimicrobial activity contributes to their possible use as potential probiotic strains after further research.

  8. Poly purine.pyrimidine sequences upstream of the beta-galactosidase gene affect gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahmachari Samir K

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poly purine.pyrimidine sequences have the potential to adopt intramolecular triplex structures and are overrepresented upstream of genes in eukaryotes. These sequences may regulate gene expression by modulating the interaction of transcription factors with DNA sequences upstream of genes. Results A poly purine.pyrimidine sequence with the potential to adopt an intramolecular triplex DNA structure was designed. The sequence was inserted within a nucleosome positioned upstream of the β-galactosidase gene in yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, between the cycl promoter and gal 10Upstream Activating Sequences (UASg. Upon derepression with galactose, β-galactosidase gene expression is reduced 12-fold in cells carrying single copy poly purine.pyrimidine sequences. This reduction in expression is correlated with reduced transcription. Furthermore, we show that plasmids carrying a poly purine.pyrimidine sequence are not specifically lost from yeast cells. Conclusion We propose that a poly purine.pyrimidine sequence upstream of a gene affects transcription. Plasmids carrying this sequence are not specifically lost from cells and thus no additional effort is needed for the replication of these sequences in eukaryotic cells.

  9. The Clinical Significance of Unknown Sequence Variants in BRCA Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calò, Valentina; Bruno, Loredana; Paglia, Laura La; Perez, Marco; Margarese, Naomi [Department of Surgery and Oncology, Regional Reference Center for the Biomolecular Characterization and Genetic Screening of Hereditary Tumors, University of Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy); Gaudio, Francesca Di [Department of Medical Biotechnologies and Legal Medicine, University of Palermo, Palermo (Italy); Russo, Antonio, E-mail: lab-oncobiologia@usa.net [Department of Surgery and Oncology, Regional Reference Center for the Biomolecular Characterization and Genetic Screening of Hereditary Tumors, University of Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy)

    2010-09-10

    Germline mutations in BRCA1/2 genes are responsible for a large proportion of hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancers. Many highly penetrant predisposition alleles have been identified and include frameshift or nonsense mutations that lead to the translation of a truncated protein. Other alleles contain missense mutations, which result in amino acid substitution and intronic variants with splicing effect. The discovery of variants of uncertain/unclassified significance (VUS) is a result that can complicate rather than improve the risk assessment process. VUSs are mainly missense mutations, but also include a number of intronic variants and in-frame deletions and insertions. Over 2,000 unique BRCA1 and BRCA2 missense variants have been identified, located throughout the whole gene (Breast Cancer Information Core Database (BIC database)). Up to 10–20% of the BRCA tests report the identification of a variant of uncertain significance. There are many methods to discriminate deleterious/high-risk from neutral/low-risk unclassified variants (i.e., analysis of the cosegregation in families of the VUS, measure of the influence of the VUSs on the wild-type protein activity, comparison of sequence conservation across multiple species), but only an integrated analysis of these methods can contribute to a real interpretation of the functional and clinical role of the discussed variants. The aim of our manuscript is to review the studies on BRCA VUS in order to clarify their clinical relevance.

  10. Isolation and characterization of strong gene regulatory sequences from apple, Malus x domestica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaart, J.G.; Tinnenbroek, I.E.M.; Krens, F.A.

    2011-01-01

    For the strong expression of genes in plant tissue, the availability of specific gene regulatory sequences is desired. We cloned promoter and terminator sequences of an apple (Malus x domestica) ribulose biphosphate carboxylase small subunit gene (MdRbcS), which is known for its high expression and

  11. Cloning and sequencing of a cellobiohydrolase gene from Trichoderma harzianum FP108

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick Guilfoile; Ron Burns; Zu-Yi Gu; Matt Amundson; Fu-Hsian Chang

    1999-01-01

    A cbbl cellobiohydrolase gene was cloned and sequenced from the fungus Trichoderrna harzianum FP108. The cloning was performed by PCR amplification of T. harzianum genomic DNA, using PCR primers whose sequence was based on the cbbl gene from Tricboderma reesei. The 3' end of the gene was isolated by inverse...

  12. Cloning, sequencing and expression of a xylanase gene from the maize pathogen Helminthosporium turcicum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degefu, Y.; Paulin, L.; Lübeck, Peter Stephensen

    2001-01-01

    A gene encoding an endoxylanase from the phytopathogenic fungus Helminthosporium turcicum Pass. was cloned and sequenced. The entire nucleotide sequence of a 1991 bp genomic fragment containing an endoxylanase gene was determined. The xylanase gene of 795 bp, interrupted by two introns of 52 and ...

  13. Sequencing 16S rRNA gene fragments using the PacBio SMRT DNA sequencing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloss, Patrick D; Jenior, Matthew L; Koumpouras, Charles C; Westcott, Sarah L; Highlander, Sarah K

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, microbial ecologists have largely abandoned sequencing 16S rRNA genes by the Sanger sequencing method and have instead adopted highly parallelized sequencing platforms. These new platforms, such as 454 and Illumina's MiSeq, have allowed researchers to obtain millions of high quality but short sequences. The result of the added sequencing depth has been significant improvements in experimental design. The tradeoff has been the decline in the number of full-length reference sequences that are deposited into databases. To overcome this problem, we tested the ability of the PacBio Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) DNA sequencing platform to generate sequence reads from the 16S rRNA gene. We generated sequencing data from the V4, V3-V5, V1-V3, V1-V5, V1-V6, and V1-V9 variable regions from within the 16S rRNA gene using DNA from a synthetic mock community and natural samples collected from human feces, mouse feces, and soil. The mock community allowed us to assess the actual sequencing error rate and how that error rate changed when different curation methods were applied. We developed a simple method based on sequence characteristics and quality scores to reduce the observed error rate for the V1-V9 region from 0.69 to 0.027%. This error rate is comparable to what has been observed for the shorter reads generated by 454 and Illumina's MiSeq sequencing platforms. Although the per base sequencing cost is still significantly more than that of MiSeq, the prospect of supplementing reference databases with full-length sequences from organisms below the limit of detection from the Sanger approach is exciting.

  14. Sequencing 16S rRNA gene fragments using the PacBio SMRT DNA sequencing system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick D. Schloss

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 10 years, microbial ecologists have largely abandoned sequencing 16S rRNA genes by the Sanger sequencing method and have instead adopted highly parallelized sequencing platforms. These new platforms, such as 454 and Illumina’s MiSeq, have allowed researchers to obtain millions of high quality but short sequences. The result of the added sequencing depth has been significant improvements in experimental design. The tradeoff has been the decline in the number of full-length reference sequences that are deposited into databases. To overcome this problem, we tested the ability of the PacBio Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT DNA sequencing platform to generate sequence reads from the 16S rRNA gene. We generated sequencing data from the V4, V3–V5, V1–V3, V1–V5, V1–V6, and V1–V9 variable regions from within the 16S rRNA gene using DNA from a synthetic mock community and natural samples collected from human feces, mouse feces, and soil. The mock community allowed us to assess the actual sequencing error rate and how that error rate changed when different curation methods were applied. We developed a simple method based on sequence characteristics and quality scores to reduce the observed error rate for the V1–V9 region from 0.69 to 0.027%. This error rate is comparable to what has been observed for the shorter reads generated by 454 and Illumina’s MiSeq sequencing platforms. Although the per base sequencing cost is still significantly more than that of MiSeq, the prospect of supplementing reference databases with full-length sequences from organisms below the limit of detection from the Sanger approach is exciting.

  15. Candidate gene analysis and exome sequencing confirm LBX1 as a susceptibility gene for idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauers, Anna; Wang, Jingwen; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Simony, Ane; Danielsson, Aina; Åkesson, Kristina; Ohlin, Acke; Halldin, Klas; Grabowski, Pawel; Tenne, Max; Laivuori, Hannele; Dahlman, Ingrid; Andersen, Mikkel; Christensen, Steen Bach; Karlsson, Magnus K; Jiao, Hong; Kere, Juha; Gerdhem, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Idiopathic scoliosis is a spinal deformity affecting approximately 3% of otherwise healthy children or adolescents. The etiology is still largely unknown but has an important genetic component. Genome-wide association studies have identified a number of common genetic variants that are significantly associated with idiopathic scoliosis in Asian and Caucasian populations, rs11190870 close to the LBX1 gene being the most replicated finding. The aim of the present study was to investigate the genetics of idiopathic scoliosis in a Scandinavian cohort by performing a candidate gene study of four variants previously shown to be associated with idiopathic scoliosis and exome sequencing of idiopathic scoliosis patients with a severe phenotype to identify possible novel scoliosis risk variants. This was a case control study. A total of 1,739 patients with idiopathic scoliosis and 1,812 controls were included. The outcome measure was idiopathic scoliosis. The variants rs10510181, rs11190870, rs12946942, and rs6570507 were genotyped in 1,739 patients with idiopathic scoliosis and 1,812 controls. Exome sequencing was performed on pooled samples from 100 surgically treated idiopathic scoliosis patients. Novel or rare missense, nonsense, or splice site variants were selected for individual genotyping in the 1,739 cases and 1,812 controls. In addition, the 5'UTR, noncoding exon and promoter regions of LBX1, not covered by exome sequencing, were Sanger sequenced in the 100 pooled samples. Of the four candidate genes, an intergenic variant, rs11190870, downstream of the LBX1 gene, showed a highly significant association to idiopathic scoliosis in 1,739 cases and 1,812 controls (p=7.0×10(-18)). We identified 20 novel variants by exome sequencing after filtration and an initial genotyping validation. However, we could not verify any association to idiopathic scoliosis in the large cohort of 1,739 cases and 1,812 controls. We did not find any variants in the 5'UTR, noncoding exon and

  16. Targeted Sequencing Reveals Large-Scale Sequence Polymorphism in Maize Candidate Genes for Biomass Production and Composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses M Muraya

    Full Text Available A major goal of maize genomic research is to identify sequence polymorphisms responsible for phenotypic variation in traits of economic importance. Large-scale detection of sequence variation is critical for linking genes, or genomic regions, to phenotypes. However, due to its size and complexity, it remains expensive to generate whole genome sequences of sufficient coverage for divergent maize lines, even with access to next generation sequencing (NGS technology. Because methods involving reduction of genome complexity, such as genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS, assess only a limited fraction of sequence variation, targeted sequencing of selected genomic loci offers an attractive alternative. We therefore designed a sequence capture assay to target 29 Mb genomic regions and surveyed a total of 4,648 genes possibly affecting biomass production in 21 diverse inbred maize lines (7 flints, 14 dents. Captured and enriched genomic DNA was sequenced using the 454 NGS platform to 19.6-fold average depth coverage, and a broad evaluation of read alignment and variant calling methods was performed to select optimal procedures for variant discovery. Sequence alignment with the B73 reference and de novo assembly identified 383,145 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, of which 42,685 were non-synonymous alterations and 7,139 caused frameshifts. Presence/absence variation (PAV of genes was also detected. We found that substantial sequence variation exists among genomic regions targeted in this study, which was particularly evident within coding regions. This diversification has the potential to broaden functional diversity and generate phenotypic variation that may lead to new adaptations and the modification of important agronomic traits. Further, annotated SNPs identified here will serve as useful genetic tools and as candidates in searches for phenotype-altering DNA variation. In summary, we demonstrated that sequencing of captured DNA is a powerful

  17. Facilitating genome navigation : survey sequencing and dense radiation-hybrid gene mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hitte, C; Madeoy, J; Kirkness, EF; Priat, C; Lorentzen, TD; Senger, F; Thomas, D; Derrien, T; Ramirez, C; Scott, C; Evanno, G; Pullar, B; Cadieu, E; Oza, [No Value; Lourgant, K; Jaffe, DB; Tacher, S; Dreano, S; Berkova, N; Andre, C; Deloukas, P; Fraser, C; Lindblad-Toh, K; Ostrander, EA; Galibert, F

    Accurate and comprehensive sequence coverage for large genomes has been restricted to only a few species of specific interest. Lower sequence coverage (survey sequencing) of related species can yield a wealth of information about gene content and putative regulatory elements. But survey sequences

  18. Characterization of fusion genes and the significantly expressed fusion isoforms in breast cancer by hybrid sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Weirather, Jason L.; Afshar, Pegah Tootoonchi; Clark, Tyson A.; Tseng, Elizabeth; Powers, Linda S.; Underwood, Jason G.; Zabner, Joseph; Korlach, Jonas; Wong, Wing Hung; Au, Kin Fai

    2015-01-01

    We developed an innovative hybrid sequencing approach, IDP-fusion, to detect fusion genes, determine fusion sites and identify and quantify fusion isoforms. IDP-fusion is the first method to study gene fusion events by integrating Third Generation Sequencing long reads and Second Generation Sequencing short reads. We applied IDP-fusion to PacBio data and Illumina data from the MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Compared with the existing tools, IDP-fusion detects fusion genes at higher precision and ...

  19. Sequence of the dog immunoglobulin alpha and epsilon constant region genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, M.; Selinger, D.; Mark, G.E.; Hollis, G.F.; Hickey, G.J. [Merck Research Labs., Rathway, NJ (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The immunoglobulin alpha (IGHAC) and epsilon (IGHEC) germline constant region genes were isolated from a dog liver genomic DNA library. Sequence analysis indicates that the dog IGHEC gene is encoded by four exons spread out over 1.7 kilobases (kb). The IGHAC sequence encompasses 1.5 kb and includes all three constant region coding exons. The complete exon/intron sequence of these genes is described. 28 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Molecular Phylogenetics of the Genus Trichosporon Inferred from Mitochondrial Cytochrome b Gene Sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Swarajit Kumar; Wang, Li; Yokoyama, Koji; Nishimura, Kazuko

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b) genes of 42 strains representing 23 species of the genus Trichosporon were partially sequenced to determine their molecular phylogenetic relationships. Almost half of the 22 strains investigated (from 11 different species) contained introns in their sequences. Analysis of a 396-bp coding sequence from each strain of Trichosporon under investigation showed a total of 141 (35.6%) variable nucleotide sites. A phylogenetic tree based on the cyt b gene sequences ...

  1. Isolation of laccase gene-specific sequences from white rot and brown rot fungi by PCR.

    OpenAIRE

    D'Souza, T M; Boominathan, K; Reddy, C A

    1996-01-01

    Degenerate primers corresponding to the consensus sequences of the copper-binding regions in the N-terminal domains of known basidiomycete laccases were used to isolate laccase gene-specific sequences from strains representing nine genera of wood rot fungi. All except three gave the expected PCR product of about 200 bp. Computer searches of the databases identified the sequence of each of the PCR products analyzed as a laccase gene sequence, suggesting the specificity of the primers. PCR prod...

  2. A next-generation sequencing gene panel (MiamiOtoGenes) for comprehensive analysis of deafness genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Demet; Yan, Denise; Bademci, Guney; Feng, Yong; Guo, Shengru; Foster, Joseph; Blanton, Susan; Tekin, Mustafa; Liu, Xuezhong

    2016-03-01

    Extreme genetic heterogeneity along with remarkable variation in the distribution of causative variants across in different ethnicities makes single gene testing inefficient for hearing loss. We developed a custom capture/next-generation sequencing gene panel of 146 known deafness genes with a total target size of approximately 1 MB. The genes were identified by searching databases including Hereditary Hearing Loss Homepage, the Human Genome Mutation Database (HGMD), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) and most recent peer-reviewed publications related to the genetics of deafness. The design covered all coding exons, UTRs and 25 bases of intronic flanking sequences for each exon. To validate our panel, we used 6 positive controls with variants in known deafness genes and 8 unsolved samples from individuals with hearing loss. Mean coverage of the targeted exons was 697X. On average, each sample had 99.8%, 96.2% and 92.7% of the targeted region coverage of 1X, 50X and 100X reads, respectively. Analysis detected all known variants in nuclear genes. These results prove the accuracy and reliability of the custom capture experiment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis of core gene of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nucleotides and deduced amino acid sequence comparison of six isolates was performed with each other and with two HCV genotype 3a type examples reported from Japan. Phylogenetic tree of HCV core sequences was constructed using CLC software. Nucleotides sequence comparison showed that our sequences ...

  4. Origin of a novel protein-coding gene family with similar signal sequence in Schistosoma japonicum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mbanefo, Evaristus Chibunna; Chuanxin, Yu; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Shuaibu, Mohammed Nasir; Boamah, Daniel; Kirinoki, Masashi; Hayashi, Naoko; Chigusa, Yuichi; Osada, Yoshio; Hamano, Shinjiro; Hirayama, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    ...). To find the mechanism underlying the origination of these genes with similar core promoter regions and signal sequence, we adopted an integrated approach utilizing whole genome, transcriptome...

  5. Sequence analysis of the gtfC gene from Streptococcus mutans GS-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, S; Shiroza, T; Kuramitsu, H K

    1988-09-15

    The nucleotide sequence of the gtfC gene, which codes for glucosyltransferase synthesizing both water-soluble and water-insoluble glucans, and its flanking regions from Streptococcus mutans GS-5, was determined. Although the gtfC gene (4218 bp) is preceded by a Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence, a promoter-like sequence for this gene could not be identified. The gtfC gene product composed of 1375 amino acid residues (approx. 153 kDa) is generally hydrophilic with three small hydrophobic domains. Two direct repeating units were found near the C terminus of the peptide. The gtfC gene has extensive homology with the previously sequenced gtfB gene. The homologous regions correspond to the signal sequence, an internal region, and the direct repeating units of the peptide. An open reading frame preceded by an SD sequence and followed by an inverted repeat sequence was found immediately downstream from the gtfC gene. The combined sequences of the gtfB and gtfC genes as well as flanking regions suggest that the two gtf genes and the small downstream coding region could be coordinately expressed within an operon. The possible evolution of the gtfC gene in S. mutans GS-5 is also discussed.

  6. Cloning and sequencing of the alcohol dehydrogenase II gene from Zymomonas mobilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Conway, Tyrrell

    1992-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase II gene from Zymomonas mobilis has been cloned and sequenced. This gene can be expressed at high levels in other organisms to produce acetaldehyde or to convert acetaldehyde to ethanol.

  7. Characterization of sulphonamide-resistant Escherichia coli using comparison of sul2 gene sequences and multilocus sequence typing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trobos, Margarita; Christensen, Henrik; Sunde, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    The sul2 gene encodes sulphonamide resistance (Sul(R)) and is commonly found in Escherichia coli from different hosts. We typed E coli isolates by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and compared the results to sequence variation of sul2, in order to investigate the relation to host origin of patho...... horizontal transfer of sul2.......The sul2 gene encodes sulphonamide resistance (Sul(R)) and is commonly found in Escherichia coli from different hosts. We typed E coli isolates by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and compared the results to sequence variation of sul2, in order to investigate the relation to host origin...... of pathogenic and commensal E coli strains and to investigate whether transfer of sul2 into different genomic lineages has happened multiple times. Sixty-eight E coli isolated in Denmark and Norway from different hosts and years were MLST typed and sul2 PCR products were sequenced and compared. PFGE...

  8. Defining reference sequences for Nocardia species by similarity and clustering analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequence data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal Helal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The intra- and inter-species genetic diversity of bacteria and the absence of 'reference', or the most representative, sequences of individual species present a significant challenge for sequence-based identification. The aims of this study were to determine the utility, and compare the performance of several clustering and classification algorithms to identify the species of 364 sequences of 16S rRNA gene with a defined species in GenBank, and 110 sequences of 16S rRNA gene with no defined species, all within the genus Nocardia. METHODS: A total of 364 16S rRNA gene sequences of Nocardia species were studied. In addition, 110 16S rRNA gene sequences assigned only to the Nocardia genus level at the time of submission to GenBank were used for machine learning classification experiments. Different clustering algorithms were compared with a novel algorithm or the linear mapping (LM of the distance matrix. Principal Components Analysis was used for the dimensionality reduction and visualization. RESULTS: The LM algorithm achieved the highest performance and classified the set of 364 16S rRNA sequences into 80 clusters, the majority of which (83.52% corresponded with the original species. The most representative 16S rRNA sequences for individual Nocardia species have been identified as 'centroids' in respective clusters from which the distances to all other sequences were minimized; 110 16S rRNA gene sequences with identifications recorded only at the genus level were classified using machine learning methods. Simple kNN machine learning demonstrated the highest performance and classified Nocardia species sequences with an accuracy of 92.7% and a mean frequency of 0.578. CONCLUSION: The identification of centroids of 16S rRNA gene sequence clusters using novel distance matrix clustering enables the identification of the most representative sequences for each individual species of Nocardia and allows the quantitation of inter- and intra

  9. Defining Reference Sequences for Nocardia Species by Similarity and Clustering Analyses of 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helal, Manal; Kong, Fanrong; Chen, Sharon C. A.; Bain, Michael; Christen, Richard; Sintchenko, Vitali

    2011-01-01

    Background The intra- and inter-species genetic diversity of bacteria and the absence of ‘reference’, or the most representative, sequences of individual species present a significant challenge for sequence-based identification. The aims of this study were to determine the utility, and compare the performance of several clustering and classification algorithms to identify the species of 364 sequences of 16S rRNA gene with a defined species in GenBank, and 110 sequences of 16S rRNA gene with no defined species, all within the genus Nocardia. Methods A total of 364 16S rRNA gene sequences of Nocardia species were studied. In addition, 110 16S rRNA gene sequences assigned only to the Nocardia genus level at the time of submission to GenBank were used for machine learning classification experiments. Different clustering algorithms were compared with a novel algorithm or the linear mapping (LM) of the distance matrix. Principal Components Analysis was used for the dimensionality reduction and visualization. Results The LM algorithm achieved the highest performance and classified the set of 364 16S rRNA sequences into 80 clusters, the majority of which (83.52%) corresponded with the original species. The most representative 16S rRNA sequences for individual Nocardia species have been identified as ‘centroids’ in respective clusters from which the distances to all other sequences were minimized; 110 16S rRNA gene sequences with identifications recorded only at the genus level were classified using machine learning methods. Simple kNN machine learning demonstrated the highest performance and classified Nocardia species sequences with an accuracy of 92.7% and a mean frequency of 0.578. Conclusion The identification of centroids of 16S rRNA gene sequence clusters using novel distance matrix clustering enables the identification of the most representative sequences for each individual species of Nocardia and allows the quantitation of inter- and intra

  10. Motif-grafted antibodies containing the replicative interface of cellular PrP are specific for PrPSc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroncini, Gianluca; Kanu, Nnennaya; Solforosi, Laura; Abalos, Gil; Telling, Glenn C; Head, Mark; Ironside, James; Brockes, Jeremy P; Burton, Dennis R; Williamson, R Anthony

    2004-07-13

    Prion diseases are closely associated with the conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) to an abnormal conformer (PrPSc) [Prusiner, S. B. (1998) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95, 13363-13383]. Monoclonal antibodies that bind epitopes comprising residues 96-104 and 133-158 of PrPC potently inhibit this process, presumably by preventing heterodimeric association of PrPC and PrPSc, and suggest that these regions of PrPC may be critical components of the PrPC-PrPSc replicative interface. We reasoned that transplanting PrP sequence corresponding to these regions into a suitable carrier molecule, such as an antibody, could impart specific recognition of disease-associated forms of PrP. To test this hypothesis, polypeptides containing PrP sequence between residues 89-112 or 136-158 were used to replace the extended heavy chain complementarity-determining region 3 of an IgG antibody specific for the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1. Herein the resulting engineered PrP-IgGs are shown to bind specifically to infective fractions of PrP in mouse, human, and hamster prion-infected tissues, but not to PrPC, other cellular components, or the HIV-1 envelope. PrPSc reactivity was abolished when the sequence of the PrP 89-112 and 136-158 grafts was mutated, scrambled, or N-terminally truncated. Our findings suggest that residues within the 89-112 and 136-158 segments of PrPC are key components of one face of the PrPC-PrPSc complex. PrPSc-specific antibodies produced by the approach described may find widespread application in the study of prion biology and replication and in the detection of infectious prions in human and animal materials.

  11. Gene content and density in banana ( Musa acuminata) as revealed by genomic sequencing of BAC clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aert, R; Sági, L; Volckaert, G

    2004-06-01

    The complete sequence of Musa acuminata bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones is presented and, consequently, the first analysis of the banana genome organization. One clone (MuH9) is 82,723 bp long with an overall G+C content of 38.2%. Twelve putative protein-coding sequences were identified, representing a gene density of one per 6.9 kb, which is slightly less than that previously reported for Arabidopsis but similar to rice. One coding sequence was identified as a partial M. acuminata malate synthase, while the remaining sequences showed a similarity to predicted or hypothetical proteins identified in genome sequence data. A second BAC clone (MuG9) is 73,268 bp long with an overall G+C content of 38.5%. Only seven putative coding regions were discovered, representing a gene density of only one gene per 10.5 kb, which is strikingly lower than that of the first BAC. One coding sequence showed significant homology to the soybean ribonucleotide reductase (large subunit). A transition point between coding regions and repeated sequences was found at approximately 45 kb, separating the coding upstream BAC end from its downstream end that mainly contained transposon-like sequences and regions similar to known repetitive sequences of M. acuminata. This gene organization resembles Gramineae genome sequences, where genes are clustered in gene-rich regions separated by gene-poor DNA containing abundant transposons.

  12. Novel primers for complete mitochondrial cytochrome b gene sequencing in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Ashwin; Fitak, Robert R; Munguia-Vega, Adrian; Culver, Melanie

    2012-03-01

    Sequence-based species identification relies on the extent and integrity of sequence data available in online databases such as GenBank. When identifying species from a sample of unknown origin, partial DNA sequences obtained from the sample are aligned against existing sequences in databases. When the sequence from the matching species is not present in the database, high-scoring alignments with closely related sequences might produce unreliable results on species identity. For species identification in mammals, the cytochrome b (cyt b) gene has been identified to be highly informative; thus, large amounts of reference sequence data from the cyt b gene are much needed. To enhance availability of cyt b gene sequence data on a large number of mammalian species in GenBank and other such publicly accessible online databases, we identified a primer pair for complete cyt b gene sequencing in mammals. Using this primer pair, we successfully PCR amplified and sequenced the complete cyt b gene from 40 of 44 mammalian species representing 10 orders of mammals. We submitted 40 complete, correctly annotated, cyt b protein coding sequences to GenBank. To our knowledge, this is the first single primer pair to amplify the complete cyt b gene in a broad range of mammalian species. This primer pair can be used for the addition of new cyt b gene sequences and to enhance data available on species represented in GenBank. The availability of novel and complete gene sequences as high-quality reference data can improve the reliability of sequence-based species identification. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Unresolved orthology and peculiar coding sequence properties of lamprey genes: the KCNA gene family as test case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuraku Shigehiro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In understanding the evolutionary process of vertebrates, cyclostomes (hagfishes and lamprey occupy crucial positions. Resolving molecular phylogenetic relationships of cyclostome genes with gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates genes is indispensable in deciphering both the species tree and gene trees. However, molecular phylogenetic analyses, especially those including lamprey genes, have produced highly discordant results between gene families. To efficiently scrutinize this problem using partial genome assemblies of early vertebrates, we focused on the potassium voltage-gated channel, shaker-related (KCNA family, whose members are mostly single-exon. Results Seven sea lamprey KCNA genes as well as six elephant shark genes were identified, and their orthologies to bony vertebrate subgroups were assessed. In contrast to robustly supported orthology of the elephant shark genes to gnathostome subgroups, clear orthology of any sea lamprey gene could not be established. Notably, sea lamprey KCNA sequences displayed unique codon usage pattern and amino acid composition, probably associated with exceptionally high GC-content in their coding regions. This lamprey-specific property of coding sequences was also observed generally for genes outside this gene family. Conclusions Our results suggest that secondary modifications of sequence properties unique to the lamprey lineage may be one of the factors preventing robust orthology assessments of lamprey genes, which deserves further genome-wide validation. The lamprey lineage-specific alteration of protein-coding sequence properties needs to be taken into consideration in tackling the key questions about early vertebrate evolution.

  14. Cloning and sequencing of the bovine gastrin gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, T; Rehfeld, J F; Olsen, Jørgen

    1989-01-01

    In order to deduce the primary structure of bovine preprogastrin we therefore sequenced a gastrin DNA clone isolated from a bovine liver cosmid library. Bovine preprogastrin comprises 104 amino acids and consists of a signal peptide, a 37 amino acid spacer-sequence, the gastrin-34 sequence followed...

  15. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis of core gene of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-07-19

    Jul 19, 2010 ... Our sequences and sequences from Japan are grouped into same cluster in the phylogenetic tree. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis showed that our isolates have high homology with Japanese isolates. Key words: Hepatitis C virus, core, phylogenetic analysis, Pakistan. INTRODUCTION.

  16. Gene discovery in the hamster: a comparative genomics approach for gene annotation by sequencing of hamster testis cDNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oduru, Sreedhar; Campbell, Janee L; Karri, SriTulasi; Hendry, William J; Khan, Shafiq A; Williams, Simon C

    2003-01-01

    Background Complete genome annotation will likely be achieved through a combination of computer-based analysis of available genome sequences combined with direct experimental characterization of expressed regions of individual genomes. We have utilized a comparative genomics approach involving the sequencing of randomly selected hamster testis cDNAs to begin to identify genes not previously annotated on the human, mouse, rat and Fugu (pufferfish) genomes. Results 735 distinct sequences were analyzed for their relatedness to known sequences in public databases. Eight of these sequences were derived from previously unidentified genes and expression of these genes in testis was confirmed by Northern blotting. The genomic locations of each sequence were mapped in human, mouse, rat and pufferfish, where applicable, and the structure of their cognate genes was derived using computer-based predictions, genomic comparisons and analysis of uncharacterized cDNA sequences from human and macaque. Conclusion The use of a comparative genomics approach resulted in the identification of eight cDNAs that correspond to previously uncharacterized genes in the human genome. The proteins encoded by these genes included a new member of the kinesin superfamily, a SET/MYND-domain protein, and six proteins for which no specific function could be predicted. Each gene was expressed primarily in testis, suggesting that they may play roles in the development and/or function of testicular cells. PMID:12783626

  17. Gene discovery in the hamster: a comparative genomics approach for gene annotation by sequencing of hamster testis cDNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Shafiq A

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complete genome annotation will likely be achieved through a combination of computer-based analysis of available genome sequences combined with direct experimental characterization of expressed regions of individual genomes. We have utilized a comparative genomics approach involving the sequencing of randomly selected hamster testis cDNAs to begin to identify genes not previously annotated on the human, mouse, rat and Fugu (pufferfish genomes. Results 735 distinct sequences were analyzed for their relatedness to known sequences in public databases. Eight of these sequences were derived from previously unidentified genes and expression of these genes in testis was confirmed by Northern blotting. The genomic locations of each sequence were mapped in human, mouse, rat and pufferfish, where applicable, and the structure of their cognate genes was derived using computer-based predictions, genomic comparisons and analysis of uncharacterized cDNA sequences from human and macaque. Conclusion The use of a comparative genomics approach resulted in the identification of eight cDNAs that correspond to previously uncharacterized genes in the human genome. The proteins encoded by these genes included a new member of the kinesin superfamily, a SET/MYND-domain protein, and six proteins for which no specific function could be predicted. Each gene was expressed primarily in testis, suggesting that they may play roles in the development and/or function of testicular cells.

  18. Fusion genes and their discovery using high throughput sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Annala, M.; Parker, B.; Zhang, W.; Nykter, M.

    2013-01-01

    Fusion genes are hybrid genes that combine parts of two or more original genes. They can form as a result of chromosomal rearrangements or abnormal transcription, and have been shown to act as drivers of malignant transformation and progression in many human cancers. The biological significance of fusion genes together with their specificity to cancer cells has made them into excellent targets for molecular therapy. Fusion genes are also used as diagnostic and prognostic markers to confirm ca...

  19. Candidate gene analysis and exome sequencing confirm LBX1 as a susceptibility gene for idiopathic scoliosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grauers, Anna; Wang, Jingwen; Einarsdottir, Elisabet

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Idiopathic scoliosis is a spinal deformity affecting approximately 3% of otherwise healthy children or adolescents. The etiology is still largely unknown but has an important genetic component. Genome-wide association studies have identified a number of common genetic variants...... that are significantly associated with idiopathic scoliosis in Asian and Caucasian populations, rs11190870 close to the LBX1 gene being the most replicated finding. PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the genetics of idiopathic scoliosis in a Scandinavian cohort by performing a candidate gene study...... of four variants previously shown to be associated with idiopathic scoliosis and exome sequencing of idiopathic scoliosis patients with a severe phenotype to identify possible novel scoliosis risk variants. STUDY DESIGN: This was a case control study. PATIENT SAMPLE: A total of 1,739 patients...

  20. [Sequencing of cytochrome C oxidase 1 gene of Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T; Zhan, B; Hawdon, J M; Gong, X; Xiao, S; Shan, Q; Feng, Z; Hotez, P J

    1999-01-01

    To identify the genetic diversity between Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus. Mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) gene was amplified from genomic DNA of human hookworms collected from infected patients in Hejiang County, Sichuan Province, and the purified PCR products were directly sequenced by using Licor auto-sequencer. The PCR products were about 700 bp. Alignment of CO1 gene fragment sequences showed 89.7% similarity between Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus, but still certain nucleotide variations (10.3%) existed. CO1 gene sequence can be used as a marker to identify the two species of human hookworms.

  1. Group A Streptococcal Vir Types Are M-Protein Gene (emm) Sequence Type Specific

    OpenAIRE

    Gardiner, Don L.; Goodfellow, Alison M.; Martin, Diana R.; Sriprakash, Kadaba S.

    1998-01-01

    The M-protein genes (emm genes) of 103 separate impetiginous Streptococcus pyogenes isolates were sequenced and the sequence types were compared to the types obtained by Vir typing. Vir typing is based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of a 4- to 7-kb pathogenicity island encoding emm and other virulence genes. By using both HaeIII and HinfI to generate RFLP profiles, complete concordance between Vir type and emm sequence type was found. Comparison of the emm sequenc...

  2. Characterization and Amplification of Gene-Based Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) Markers in Date Palm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongli; Keremane, Manjunath; Prakash, Channapatna S; He, Guohao

    2017-01-01

    The paucity of molecular markers limits the application of genetic and genomic research in date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.). Availability of expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences in date palm may provide a good resource for developing gene-based markers. This study characterizes a substantial fraction of transcriptome sequences containing simple sequence repeats (SSRs) from the EST sequences in date palm. The EST sequences studied are mainly homologous to those of Elaeis guineensis and Musa acuminata. A total of 911 gene-based SSR markers, characterized with functional annotations, have provided a useful basis not only for discovering candidate genes and understanding genetic basis of traits of interest but also for developing genetic and genomic tools for molecular research in date palm, such as diversity study, quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping, and molecular breeding. The procedures of DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of these gene-based SSR markers, and gel electrophoresis of PCR products are described in this chapter.

  3. BAGET: a web server for the effortless retrieval of prokaryotic gene context and sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberto, Jacques

    2008-02-01

    BAGET (Bacterial and Archaeal Gene Exploration Tool) is a web service designed to facilitate extraction, by molecular geneticists and phylogeneticists, of specific gene and protein sequences from completely determined prokaryotic genomes. Upon selection of a particular prokaryotic organism and gene, two levels of visual gene context information are provided on a single dynamic page: (i) a graphical representation of a user defined portion of the chromosome centered on the gene of interest and (ii) the DNA sequence of the query gene, of the immediate neighboring genes and the intergenic regions each identified by a consistent color code. The aminoacid sequence is provided for protein-coding query genes. Query results can be exported as a rich text format (RTF) word processor file for printing, archival or further analysis. http://archaea.u-psud.fr/bin/baget.dll.

  4. EvoTol: a protein-sequence based evolutionary intolerance framework for disease-gene prioritization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackham, Owen J L; Shihab, Hashem A; Johnson, Michael R; Petretto, Enrico

    2015-03-11

    Methods to interpret personal genome sequences are increasingly required. Here, we report a novel framework (EvoTol) to identify disease-causing genes using patient sequence data from within protein coding-regions. EvoTol quantifies a gene's intolerance to mutation using evolutionary conservation of protein sequences and can incorporate tissue-specific gene expression data. We apply this framework to the analysis of whole-exome sequence data in epilepsy and congenital heart disease, and demonstrate EvoTol's ability to identify known disease-causing genes is unmatched by competing methods. Application of EvoTol to the human interactome revealed networks enriched for genes intolerant to protein sequence variation, informing novel polygenic contributions to human disease. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Sequence analysis of putative swrW gene required for surfactant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2012-07-17

    Jul 17, 2012 ... sequences from local strains analyzed through bioinformatics showed high confidence prediction of serrawettin. Database comparison analysis resulted to high similarity of the nucleotide sequence to the. swrW gene of 88 to 94%, the homologous protein sequence to the serrawettin W1 synthetase protein.

  6. A unique DNA repair and recombination gene (recN) sequence for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-04-23

    Apr 23, 2013 ... Ribosomal gene sequences are a popular choice for identification of bacterial species and, often, for making phylogenetic interpretations. Although very popular, the sequences of 16S rDNA and 16-23S intergenic sequences often fail to differentiate closely related species of bacteria. The availability of ...

  7. A unique DNA repair and recombination gene (recN) sequence for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ribosomal gene sequences are a popular choice for identification of bacterial species and, often, for making phylogenetic interpretations. Although very popular, the sequences of 16S rDNA and 16-23S intergenic sequences often fail to differentiate closely related species of bacteria. The availability of complete genome ...

  8. Structural analysis of DNA sequence: evidence for lateral gene transfer in Thermotoga maritima

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worning, Peder; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Nelson, K. E.

    2000-01-01

    The recently published complete DNA sequence of the bacterium Thermotoga maritima provides evidence, based on protein sequence conservation, for lateral gene transfer between Archaea and Bacteria. We introduce a new method of periodicity analysis of DNA sequences, based on structural parameters......, which brings independent evidence for the lateral gene transfer in the genome of T.maritima, The structural analysis relates the Archaea-like DNA sequences to the genome of Pyrococcus horikoshii. Analysis of 24 complete genomic DNA sequences shows different periodicity patterns for organisms...

  9. DNA sequence of the lactose operon: the lacA gene and the transcriptional termination region.

    OpenAIRE

    Hediger, M A; Johnson, D F; Nierlich, D P; Zabin, I

    1985-01-01

    The lac operon of Escherichia coli spans approximately 5300 base pairs and includes the lacZ, lacY, and lacA genes in addition to the operator, promoter, and transcription termination regions. We report here the sequence of the lacA gene and the region distal to it, confirming the sequence of thiogalactoside transacetylase and completing the sequence of the lac operon. The lacA gene is characterized by use of rare codons, suggesting an origin from a plasmid, transposon, or virus gene. UUG is ...

  10. Molecular characterization, sequence analysis and tissue expression of a porcine gene – MOSPD2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The full-length cDNA sequence of a porcine gene, MOSPD2, was amplified using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends method based on a pig expressed sequence tag sequence which was highly homologous to the coding sequence of the human MOSPD2 gene. Sequence prediction analysis revealed that the open reading frame of this gene encodes a protein of 491 amino acids that has high homology with the motile sperm domain-containing protein 2 (MOSPD2 of five species: horse (89%, human (90%, chimpanzee (89%, rhesus monkey (89% and mouse (85%; thus, it could be defined as a porcine MOSPD2 gene. This novel porcine gene was assigned GeneID: 100153601. This gene is structured in 15 exons and 14 introns as revealed by computer-assisted analysis. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that the porcine MOSPD2 gene has a closer genetic relationship with the MOSPD2 gene of horse. Tissue expression analysis indicated that the porcine MOSPD2 gene is generally and differentially expressed in the spleen, muscle, skin, kidney, lung, liver, fat and heart. Our experiment is the first to establish the primary foundation for further research on the porcine MOSPD2 gene.

  11. Sequence variants of the LCORL gene and its association with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    construct DNA pool, which was used as the template to amplify LCORL. The PCR products were sequenced by Gen-. Script (Shanghai, China). Sequences were analysed using the. DNASTAR software to search polymorphic loci. The SNPs were genotyped by PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and ...

  12. Disparate sequence characteristics of the Erysiphe graminis f.sp. hordei glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, S.K.; Justesen, A.F.; Giese, H.

    1997-01-01

    The Erysiphe graminis f.sp.. hordei (Egh) glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gpd) gene was isolated and characterized. It contains typical promoter elements and has three introns, one of which is positioned in the 5' untranslated region of the gene. The deduced aminoacid sequence has 87% s...... and plant genes in sequence mixtures. The Egh gpd promoter appears to be superior to that of the Egh beta-tubulin gene (tub2) for driving the E. coli beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene in transformation experiments....

  13. Cloning and sequencing of the allophycocyanin genes from Spirulina maxima (Cyanophyta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Song; Hiroyuki, Kojima; Yoshikazu, Kawata; Shin-Ichi, Yano; Zeng, Cheng-Kui

    1998-03-01

    The genes coding for the α-and β-subunit of allophycocyanin ( apcA and apcB) from the cyanophyte Spirulina maxima were cloned and sequenced. The results revealed 44.4% of nucleotide sequence similarity and 30.4% of similarity of deduced amino acid sequence between them. The amino acid sequence identities between S. maxima and S. platensis are 99.4% for α subunit and 100% for β subunit.

  14. Manipulating the Prion Protein Gene Sequence and Expression Levels with CRISPR/Cas9

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaczmarczyk, Lech; Mende, Ylva; Zevnik, Branko; Jackson, Walker S

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian prion protein (PrP, encoded by Prnp) is most infamous for its central role in prion diseases, invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans, food animals, and animals in the wild...

  15. [A co-dominant molecular marker of fusarium wilt resistance gene I-2 derived from gene sequence in tomato].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuan-Cang; Zou, Yan-Min

    2008-07-01

    Sequence-specific PCR primers, I-2/5F and I-2/5R were designed according to the sequence from 3 132 bp to 3 765 bp in I-2 gene. With them a 633 bp fragment was amplified from 03F-7 with a genotype of I-2 / I-2, 693 bp fragment from Moneymaker with a genotype of i-2/ i-2, and both fragments from Tebao with heterozygous genotype I-2 / i -2. These two specific fragments were cloned and sequenced. The results from multiple sequence alignment showed that the 633 bp fragment from 03F-7 was identical with the sequence from 3 132 bp to 3 765 bp in I-2 gene. Compared with the sequence of I-2 gene, there were a large number of mutations and a 60 bp fragment inserted in susceptible alleles. The PCR primer combination, I-2/5F and I-2/5R can be used to distinguish homozygous resistant, heterozygous and homozygous susceptible materials, and it is a functional co-dominant marker in I-2 gene selection. Moreover, this marker was employed on 16 major tomato varieties for I-2 locus genotyping, in which half of the varieties contain I-2 gene, and only one variety is homozygous resistant. In addition, simultaneous detection system for I-2 and Tm-2(2) was established by a single PCR and a Hind III digestion. It provides a powerful tool for multiple genes selection in tomato breeding program.

  16. Mouse mammary tumor virus-like gene sequences are present in lung patient specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Padilla Cristina

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have reported on the presence of Murine Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV-like gene sequences in human cancer tissue specimens. Here, we search for MMTV-like gene sequences in lung diseases including carcinomas specimens from a Mexican population. This study was based on our previous study reporting that the INER51 lung cancer cell line, from a pleural effusion of a Mexican patient, contains MMTV-like env gene sequences. Results The MMTV-like env gene sequences have been detected in three out of 18 specimens studied, by PCR using a specific set of MMTV-like primers. The three identified MMTV-like gene sequences, which were assigned as INER6, HZ101, and HZ14, were 99%, 98%, and 97% homologous, respectively, as compared to GenBank sequence accession number AY161347. The INER6 and HZ-101 samples were isolated from lung cancer specimens, and the HZ-14 was isolated from an acute inflammatory lung infiltrate sample. Two of the env sequences exhibited disruption of the reading frame due to mutations. Conclusion In summary, we identified the presence of MMTV-like gene sequences in 2 out of 11 (18% of the lung carcinomas and 1 out of 7 (14% of acute inflamatory lung infiltrate specimens studied of a Mexican Population.

  17. Cloning and sequence analysis of hyaluronoglucosaminidase (nagH gene of Clostridium chauvoei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj K. Dangi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Blackleg disease is caused by Clostridium chauvoei in ruminants. Although virulence factors such as C. chauvoei toxin A, sialidase, and flagellin are well characterized, hyaluronidases of C. chauvoei are not characterized. The present study was aimed at cloning and sequence analysis of hyaluronoglucosaminidase (nagH gene of C. chauvoei. Materials and Methods: C. chauvoei strain ATCC 10092 was grown in ATCC 2107 media and confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR using the primers specific for 16-23S rDNA spacer region. nagH gene of C. chauvoei was amplified and cloned into pRham-SUMO vector and transformed into Escherichia cloni 10G cells. The construct was then transformed into E. cloni cells. Colony PCR was carried out to screen the colonies followed by sequencing of nagH gene in the construct. Results: PCR amplification yielded nagH gene of 1143 bp product, which was cloned in prokaryotic expression system. Colony PCR, as well as sequencing of nagH gene, confirmed the presence of insert. Sequence was then subjected to BLAST analysis of NCBI, which confirmed that the sequence was indeed of nagH gene of C. chauvoei. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequence showed that it is closely related to Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium paraputrificum. Conclusion: The gene for virulence factor nagH was cloned into a prokaryotic expression vector and confirmed by sequencing.

  18. The nucleotide sequence of a carboxymethylcellulase gene from Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J; Gilbert, H J

    1988-07-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the gene coding for one of the carboxymethylcellulases (CMCase), expressed by Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa, has been determined. The structural gene consists of an open reading frame, commencing with an ATG start codon, of 2886 base pairs followed by a TAA stop codon. The gene was shown to code for a signal peptide which closely resembles the signal peptides of other secreted proteins. Unlike most Pseudomonas genes, the CMCase sequence does not have a high G + C (51%) content and there is no marked preference for codons ending in G or C. Upstream of the structural gene there are no sequences which bear a strong resemblance to consensus Escherichia coli promoters. A sequence is present, however, which exhibits homology to the consensus DNA sequence that binds the catabolic activator protein (CAP). Bal31 deletions of the structural gene revealed the extent by which the gene could be modified and still encode a functional CMCase. Subclones of the cellulase gene have been constructed in pUC18 and pUC19. One of the resultant plasmids, pJHS1 directs a 20-fold increase in CMCase synthesis, when compared to the original construct, pJHH2. Analysis of cells harbouring pJHS1 showed the cellulase polypeptide to have a molecular weight of 106000. This is in close agreement with the predicted size of the enzyme deduced from the nucleotide sequence data.

  19. The Arabidopsis Root Transcriptome by Serial Analysis of Gene Expression. Gene Identification Using the Genome Sequence1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fizames, Cécile; Muños, Stéphane; Cazettes, Céline; Nacry, Philippe; Boucherez, Jossia; Gaymard, Frédéric; Piquemal, David; Delorme, Valérie; Commes, Thérèse; Doumas, Patrick; Cooke, Richard; Marti, Jacques; Sentenac, Hervé; Gojon, Alain

    2004-01-01

    Large-scale identification of genes expressed in roots of the model plant Arabidopsis was performed by serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), on a total of 144,083 sequenced tags, representing at least 15,964 different mRNAs. For tag to gene assignment, we developed a computational approach based on 26,620 genes annotated from the complete sequence of the genome. The procedure selected warrants the identification of the genes corresponding to the majority of the tags found experimentally, with a high level of reliability, and provides a reference database for SAGE studies in Arabidopsis. This new resource allowed us to characterize the expression of more than 3,000 genes, for which there is no expressed sequence tag (EST) or cDNA in the databases. Moreover, 85% of the tags were specific for one gene. To illustrate this advantage of SAGE for functional genomics, we show that our data allow an unambiguous analysis of most of the individual genes belonging to 12 different ion transporter multigene families. These results indicate that, compared with EST-based tag to gene assignment, the use of the annotated genome sequence greatly improves gene identification in SAGE studies. However, more than 6,000 different tags remained with no gene match, suggesting that a significant proportion of transcripts present in the roots originate from yet unknown or wrongly annotated genes. The root transcriptome characterized in this study markedly differs from those obtained in other organs, and provides a unique resource for investigating the functional specificities of the root system. As an example of the use of SAGE for transcript profiling in Arabidopsis, we report here the identification of 270 genes differentially expressed between roots of plants grown either with NO3- or NH4NO3 as N source. PMID:14730065

  20. Integrated protein function prediction by mining function associations, sequences, and protein-protein and gene-gene interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Renzhi; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-01-15

    Protein function prediction is an important and challenging problem in bioinformatics and computational biology. Functionally relevant biological information such as protein sequences, gene expression, and protein-protein interactions has been used mostly separately for protein function prediction. One of the major challenges is how to effectively integrate multiple sources of both traditional and new information such as spatial gene-gene interaction networks generated from chromosomal conformation data together to improve protein function prediction. In this work, we developed three different probabilistic scores (MIS, SEQ, and NET score) to combine protein sequence, function associations, and protein-protein interaction and spatial gene-gene interaction networks for protein function prediction. The MIS score is mainly generated from homologous proteins found by PSI-BLAST search, and also association rules between Gene Ontology terms, which are learned by mining the Swiss-Prot database. The SEQ score is generated from protein sequences. The NET score is generated from protein-protein interaction and spatial gene-gene interaction networks. These three scores were combined in a new Statistical Multiple Integrative Scoring System (SMISS) to predict protein function. We tested SMISS on the data set of 2011 Critical Assessment of Function Annotation (CAFA). The method performed substantially better than three base-line methods and an advanced method based on protein profile-sequence comparison, profile-profile comparison, and domain co-occurrence networks according to the maximum F-measure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Familial CJD associated PrP mutants within transmembrane region induced Ctm-PrP retention in ER and triggered apoptosis by ER stress in SH-SY5Y cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic prion diseases are linked to point and inserted mutations in the prion protein (PrP gene that are presumed to favor conversion of the cellular isoform of PrP (PrP(C to the pathogenic one (PrP(Sc. The pathogenic mechanisms and the subcellular sites of the conversion are not completely understood. Here we introduce several PRNP gene mutations (such as, PrP-KDEL, PrP-3AV, PrP-A117V, PrP-G114V, PrP-P102L and PrP-E200K into the cultured cells in order to explore the pathogenic mechanism of familial prion disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address the roles of aberrant retention of PrP in endoplasmic reticulum (ER, the recombinant plasmids expressing full-length human PrP tailed with an ER signal peptide at the COOH-terminal (PrP-KDEL and PrP with three amino acids exchange in transmembrane region (PrP-3AV were constructed. In the preparations of transient transfections, 18-kD COOH-terminal proteolytic resistant fragments (Ctm-PrP were detected in the cells expressing PrP-KDEL and PrP-3AV. Analyses of the cell viabilities in the presences of tunicamycin and brefeldin A revealed that expressions of PrP-KDEL and PrP-3AV sensitized the transfected cells to ER stress stimuli. Western blots and RT-PCR identified the clear alternations of ER stress associated events in the cells expressing PrP-KDEL and PrP-3AV that induced ER mediated apoptosis by CHOP and caspase-12 apoptosis pathway. Moreover, several familial CJD related PrP mutants were transiently introduced into the cultured cells. Only the mutants within the transmembrane region (G114V and A117V induced the formation of Ctm-PrP and caused the ER stress, while the mutants outside the transmembrane region (P102L and E200K failed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The data indicate that the retention of PrP in ER through formation of Ctm-PrP results in ER stress and cell apoptosis. The cytopathic activities caused by different familial CJD associated PrP mutants may vary, among them

  2. Sequence analysis of cereal sucrose synthase genes and isolation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    comparative analysis of grass genomes and as a source of beneficial genes for agriculture. Recent studies have shown that there is conservation of gene order at the chromosome level in rice, sorghum and maize. Therefore, a high-resolution alignment between these genomes will be needed to utilize them constructively ...

  3. Characterization of upstream sequences from the 8S globulin gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seeds rich in protein in nature, are ideal bioreactors for economic production and storage of valueadded recombinant proteins and enzymes for industries. The upstream region of the seed storage protein gene is able to provide an attractive promoter for seed-specific expression of heterologous genes. Our previous ...

  4. GAVIN : Gene-Aware Variant INterpretation for medical sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velde, K Joeri; de Boer, Eddy N; van Diemen, Cleo C; Sikkema-Raddatz, Birgit; Abbott, Kristin M; Knopperts, Alain; Franke, Lude; Sijmons, Rolf H; de Koning, Tom J; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sinke, Richard J; Swertz, Morris A

    2017-01-01

    We present Gene-Aware Variant INterpretation (GAVIN), a new method that accurately classifies variants for clinical diagnostic purposes. Classifications are based on gene-specific calibrations of allele frequencies from the ExAC database, likely variant impact using SnpEff, and estimated

  5. Sequencing of neuroblastoma identifies chromothripsis and defects in neuritogenesis genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Molenaar (Jan); J. Koster (Jan); D. Zwijnenburg (Danny); P. van Sluis (Peter); L.J. Valentijn (Linda); I. van der Ploeg (Ida); M. Hamdi (Mohamed); J. van Nes (Johan); B.A. Westerman (Bart); J. van Arkel (Jennemiek); M.E. Ebus; F. Haneveld (Franciska); A. Lakeman (Arjan); L. Schild (Linda); P. Molenaar (Piet); P. Stroeken (Peter); M.M. van Noesel (Max); I. Øra (Ingrid); J.P. di Santo (James); H.N. Caron (Huib); E.M. Westerhout (Ellen); R. Versteeg (Rogier)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractNeuroblastoma is a childhood tumour of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system. The pathogenesis has for a long time been quite enigmatic, as only very few gene defects were identified in this often lethal tumour. Frequently detected gene alterations are limited to MYCN amplification

  6. Disorders of sex development: insights from targeted gene sequencing of a large international patient cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggers, Stefanie; Sadedin, Simon; van den Bergen, Jocelyn A; Robevska, Gorjana; Ohnesorg, Thomas; Hewitt, Jacqueline; Lambeth, Luke; Bouty, Aurore; Knarston, Ingrid M; Tan, Tiong Yang; Cameron, Fergus; Werther, George; Hutson, John; O'Connell, Michele; Grover, Sonia R; Heloury, Yves; Zacharin, Margaret; Bergman, Philip; Kimber, Chris; Brown, Justin; Webb, Nathalie; Hunter, Matthew F; Srinivasan, Shubha; Titmuss, Angela; Verge, Charles F; Mowat, David; Smith, Grahame; Smith, Janine; Ewans, Lisa; Shalhoub, Carolyn; Crock, Patricia; Cowell, Chris; Leong, Gary M; Ono, Makato; Lafferty, Antony R; Huynh, Tony; Visser, Uma; Choong, Catherine S; McKenzie, Fiona; Pachter, Nicholas; Thompson, Elizabeth M; Couper, Jennifer; Baxendale, Anne; Gecz, Jozef; Wheeler, Benjamin J; Jefferies, Craig; MacKenzie, Karen; Hofman, Paul; Carter, Philippa; King, Richard I; Krausz, Csilla; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M A; Looijenga, Leendert; Drop, Sten; Riedl, Stefan; Cools, Martine; Dawson, Angelika; Juniarto, Achmad Zulfa; Khadilkar, Vaman; Khadilkar, Anuradha; Bhatia, Vijayalakshmi; Dũng, Vũ Chí; Atta, Irum; Raza, Jamal; Thi Diem Chi, Nguyen; Hao, Tran Kiem; Harley, Vincent; Koopman, Peter; Warne, Garry; Faradz, Sultana; Oshlack, Alicia; Ayers, Katie L; Sinclair, Andrew H

    2016-11-29

    Disorders of sex development (DSD) are congenital conditions in which chromosomal, gonadal, or phenotypic sex is atypical. Clinical management of DSD is often difficult and currently only 13% of patients receive an accurate clinical genetic diagnosis. To address this we have developed a massively parallel sequencing targeted DSD gene panel which allows us to sequence all 64 known diagnostic DSD genes and candidate genes simultaneously. We analyzed DNA from the largest reported international cohort of patients with DSD (278 patients with 46,XY DSD and 48 with 46,XX DSD). Our targeted gene panel compares favorably with other sequencing platforms. We found a total of 28 diagnostic genes that are implicated in DSD, highlighting the genetic spectrum of this disorder. Sequencing revealed 93 previously unreported DSD gene variants. Overall, we identified a likely genetic diagnosis in 43% of patients with 46,XY DSD. In patients with 46,XY disorders of androgen synthesis and action the genetic diagnosis rate reached 60%. Surprisingly, little difference in diagnostic rate was observed between singletons and trios. In many cases our findings are informative as to the likely cause of the DSD, which will facilitate clinical management. Our massively parallel sequencing targeted DSD gene panel represents an economical means of improving the genetic diagnostic capability for patients affected by DSD. Implementation of this panel in a large cohort of patients has expanded our understanding of the underlying genetic etiology of DSD. The inclusion of research candidate genes also provides an invaluable resource for future identification of novel genes.

  7. Prp22 and spliceosome components regulate chromatin dynamics in germ-line polyploid cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Klusza

    Full Text Available During Drosophila oogenesis, the endopolyploid nuclei of germ-line nurse cells undergo a dramatic shift in morphology as oogenesis progresses; the easily-visible chromosomes are initially polytenic during the early stages of oogenesis before they transiently condense into a distinct '5-blob' configuration, with subsequent dispersal into a diffuse state. Mutations in many genes, with diverse cellular functions, can affect the ability of nurse cells to fully decondense their chromatin, resulting in a '5-blob arrest' phenotype that is maintained throughout the later stages of oogenesis. However, the mechanisms and significance of nurse-cell (NC chromatin dispersal remain poorly understood. Here, we report that a screen for modifiers of the 5-blob phenotype in the germ line isolated the spliceosomal gene peanuts, the Drosophila Prp22. We demonstrate that reduction of spliceosomal activity through loss of peanuts promotes decondensation defects in NC nuclei during mid-oogenesis. We also show that the Prp38 spliceosomal protein accumulates in the nucleoplasm of nurse cells with impaired peanuts function, suggesting that spliceosomal recycling is impaired. Finally, we reveal that loss of additional spliceosomal proteins impairs the full decondensation of NC chromatin during later stages of oogenesis, suggesting that individual spliceosomal subcomplexes modulate expression of the distinct subset of genes that are required for correct morphology in endopolyploid nurse cells.

  8. Prp22 and Spliceosome Components Regulate Chromatin Dynamics in Germ-Line Polyploid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klusza, Stephen; Novak, Amanda; Figueroa, Shirelle; Palmer, William; Deng, Wu-Min

    2013-01-01

    During Drosophila oogenesis, the endopolyploid nuclei of germ-line nurse cells undergo a dramatic shift in morphology as oogenesis progresses; the easily-visible chromosomes are initially polytenic during the early stages of oogenesis before they transiently condense into a distinct ‘5-blob’ configuration, with subsequent dispersal into a diffuse state. Mutations in many genes, with diverse cellular functions, can affect the ability of nurse cells to fully decondense their chromatin, resulting in a ‘5-blob arrest’ phenotype that is maintained throughout the later stages of oogenesis. However, the mechanisms and significance of nurse-cell (NC) chromatin dispersal remain poorly understood. Here, we report that a screen for modifiers of the 5-blob phenotype in the germ line isolated the spliceosomal gene peanuts, the Drosophila Prp22. We demonstrate that reduction of spliceosomal activity through loss of peanuts promotes decondensation defects in NC nuclei during mid-oogenesis. We also show that the Prp38 spliceosomal protein accumulates in the nucleoplasm of nurse cells with impaired peanuts function, suggesting that spliceosomal recycling is impaired. Finally, we reveal that loss of additional spliceosomal proteins impairs the full decondensation of NC chromatin during later stages of oogenesis, suggesting that individual spliceosomal subcomplexes modulate expression of the distinct subset of genes that are required for correct morphology in endopolyploid nurse cells. PMID:24244416

  9. Description and interpretation of various SNPs identified by BRCA2 gene sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Negura

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Molecular diagnosis for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC involves systematic DNA sequencing of predisposition genes like BRCA1 or BRCA2. Deleterious mutations within such genes are responsible for developing the disease, but other sequence variants can also be identified. Common Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs are usually present in human genome, defining alleles whose frequencies widely vary in different populations. Either intragenic or intronic, silent or generating aminoacid substitutions, SNPs cannot be afforded themselves a predisposition status. However, prevalent SNPs can be used to define gene haplotypes, with also various frequencies. Since some mutation can easily be assigned to haplotypes (such is the case for BRCA1 gene, SNPs can therefore provide usual information in interpreting gene mutations effects on hereditary predisposition to cancer. Here we describe 10 BRCA2 SNPs identified by complete gene sequencing

  10. Comparative genomic sequence analysis of the human and mouse cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Rachel E.; Jamison, D. Curtis; Touchman, Jeffrey W.; Chissoe, Stephanie L.; Braden Maduro, Valerie V.; Bouffard, Gerard G.; Dietrich, Nicole L.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M.; Iyer, Leslie M.; Weintraub, Lauren A.; Cotton, Marc; Courtney, Laura; Edwards, Jennifer; Maupin, Rachel; Ozersky, Philip; Rohlfing, Theresa; Wohldmann, Patricia; Miner, Tracie; Kemp, Kimberley; Kramer, Jason; Korf, Ian; Pepin, Kimberlie; Antonacci-Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert S.; Minx, Patrick; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Wilson, Richard K.; Waterston, Robert H.; Miller, Webb; Green, Eric D.

    2000-01-01

    The identification of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) in 1989 represents a landmark accomplishment in human genetics. Since that time, there have been numerous advances in elucidating the function of the encoded protein and the physiological basis of cystic fibrosis. However, numerous areas of cystic fibrosis biology require additional investigation, some of which would be facilitated by information about the long-range sequence context of the CFTR gene. For example, the latter might provide clues about the sequence elements responsible for the temporal and spatial regulation of CFTR expression. We thus sought to establish the sequence of the chromosomal segments encompassing the human CFTR and mouse Cftr genes, with the hope of identifying conserved regions of biologic interest by sequence comparison. Bacterial clone-based physical maps of the relevant human and mouse genomic regions were constructed, and minimally overlapping sets of clones were selected and sequenced, eventually yielding ≈1.6 Mb and ≈358 kb of contiguous human and mouse sequence, respectively. These efforts have produced the complete sequence of the ≈189-kb and ≈152-kb segments containing the human CFTR and mouse Cftr genes, respectively, as well as significant amounts of flanking DNA. Analyses of the resulting data provide insights about the organization of the CFTR/Cftr genes and potential sequence elements regulating their expression. Furthermore, the generated sequence reveals the precise architecture of genes residing near CFTR/Cftr, including one known gene (WNT2/Wnt2) and two previously unknown genes that immediately flank CFTR/Cftr. PMID:10655503

  11. Comparative genome sequencing of drosophila pseudoobscura: Chromosomal, gene and cis-element evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, Stephen; Liu, Yue; Bettencourt, Brian R.; Hradecky, Pavel; Letovsky, Stan; Nielsen, Rasmus; Thornton, Kevin; Todd, Melissa J.; Chen, Rui; Meisel, Richard P.; Couronne, Olivier; Hua, Sujun; Smith, Mark A.; Bussemaker, Harmen J.; van Batenburg, Marinus F.; Howells, Sally L.; Scherer, Steven E.; Sodergren, Erica; Matthews, Beverly B.; Crosby, Madeline A.; Schroeder, Andrew J.; Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel; Rives, Catherine M.; Metzker, Michael L.; Muzny, Donna M.; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Havlak, Paul; Durbin, K. James; Egan, Amy; Gill, Rachel; Hume, Jennifer; Morgan, Margaret B.; Miner, George; Hamilton, Cerissa; Huang, Yanmei; Waldron, Lenee; Verduzco, Daniel; Blankenburg, Kerstin P.; Dubchak, Inna; Noor, Mohamed A.F.; Anderson, Wyatt; White, Kevin P.; Clark, Andrew G.; Schaeffer, Stephen W.; Gelbart, William; Weinstock, George M.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2004-04-01

    The genome sequence of a second fruit fly, D. pseudoobscura, presents an opportunity for comparative analysis of a primary model organism D. melanogaster. The vast majority of Drosophila genes have remained on the same arm, but within each arm gene order has been extensively reshuffled leading to the identification of approximately 1300 syntenic blocks. A repetitive sequence is found in the D. pseudoobscura genome at many junctions between adjacent syntenic blocks. Analysis of this novel repetitive element family suggests that recombination between offset elements may have given rise to many paracentric inversions, thereby contributing to the shuffling of gene order in the D. pseudoobscura lineage. Based on sequence similarity and synteny, 10,516 putative orthologs have been identified as a core gene set conserved over 35 My since divergence. Genes expressed in the testes had higher amino acid sequence divergence than the genome wide average consistent with the rapid evolution of sex-specific proteins. Cis-regulatory sequences are more conserved than control sequences between the species but the difference is slight, suggesting that the evolution of cis-regulatory elements is flexible. Overall, a picture of repeat mediated chromosomal rearrangement, and high co-adaptation of both male genes and cis-regulatory sequences emerges as important themes of genome divergence between these species of Drosophila.

  12. Large-scale 16S gene assembly using metagenomics shotgun sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Feng; Wang, Zicheng; Wang, Ying; Zhou, Jizhong; Chen, Ting

    2017-05-15

    Combining a 16S rRNA (16S) gene database with metagenomic shotgun sequences promises unbiased identification of known and novel microbes. To achieve this, we herein report reference-based ribosome assembly (RAMBL), a computational pipeline, which integrates taxonomic tree search and Dirichlet process clustering to reconstruct full-length 16S gene sequences from metagenomic sequencing data with high accuracy. By benchmarking against the synthetic and real shotgun sequences, we demonstrated that full-length 16S gene assemblies of RAMBL were a good proxy for known and putative microbes, including Candidate Phyla Radiation. We found that 30-40% of bacteria genera in the terrestrial and intestinal biomes have no closely related genome sequences. We also observed that RAMBL was able to generate a more accurate determination of environmental microbial diversity and yield better disease classification, suggesting that full-length 16S gene assemblies are a powerful alternative to marker gene set and 16S short reads. RAMBL first realizes the access to full-length 16S gene sequences in the near-terabase-scale metagenomic shotgun sequences, which markedly improve metagenomic data analysis and interpretation. RAMBL is available at https://github.com/homopolymer/RAMBL for academic use. zengfeng@xmu.edu.cn. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  13. Prokaryotic genes in eukaryotic genome sequences: when to infer horizontal gene transfer and when to suspect an actual microbe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artamonova, Irena I; Lappi, Tanya; Zudina, Liudmila; Mushegian, Arcady R

    2015-07-01

    Assessment of phylogenetic positions of predicted gene and protein sequences is a routine step in any genome project, useful for validating the species' taxonomic position and for evaluating hypotheses about genome evolution and function. Several recent eukaryotic genome projects have reported multiple gene sequences that were much more similar to homologues in bacteria than to any eukaryotic sequence. In the spirit of the times, horizontal gene transfer from bacteria to eukaryotes has been invoked in some of these cases. Here, we show, using comparative sequence analysis, that some of those bacteria-like genes indeed appear likely to have been horizontally transferred from bacteria to eukaryotes. In other cases, however, the evidence strongly indicates that the eukaryotic DNA sequenced in the genome project contains a sample of non-integrated DNA from the actual bacteria, possibly providing a window into the host microbiome. Recent literature suggests also that common reagents, kits and laboratory equipment may be systematically contaminated with bacterial DNA, which appears to be sampled by metagenome projects non-specifically. We review several bioinformatic criteria that help to distinguish putative horizontal gene transfers from the admixture of genes from autonomously replicating bacteria in their hosts' genome databases or from the reagent contamination. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Identification of a precursor genomic segment that provided a sequence unique to glycophorin B and E genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onda, M.; Kudo, S.; Fukuda, M. (La Jolla Cancer Research Foundation, CA (United States)); Rearden, A. (Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla (United States)); Mattei, G.M. (Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, Marseilles (France))

    1993-08-01

    Human glycophorin A, B, and E (GPA, GPB, and GPE) genes belong to a gene family located at the long arm of chromosome 4. These three genes are homologous from the 5'-flanking sequence to the Alu sequence, which is 1 kb downstream from the exon encoding the transmembrane domain. Analysis of the Alu sequence and flanking direct repeat sequences suggested that the GPA gene most closely resembles the ancestral gene, whereas the GPB and GPE gene arose by homologous recombination within the Alu sequence, acquiring 3' sequences from an unrelated precursor genomic segment. Here the authors describe the identification of this putative precursor genomic segment. A human genomic library was screened by using the sequence of the 3' region of the GPB gene as a probe. The genomic clones isolated were found to contain an Alu sequence that appeared to be involved in the recombination. Downstream from the Alu sequence, the nucleotide sequence of the precursor genomic segment is almost identical to that of the GPB or GPE gene. In contrast, the upstream sequence of the genomic segment differs entirely from that of the GPA, GPB, and GPE genes. Conservation of the direct repeats flanking the Alu sequence of the genomic segment strongly suggests that the sequence of this genomic segment has been maintained during evolution. This identified genomic segment was found to reside downstream from the GPA gene by both gene mapping and in situ chromosomal localization. The precursor genomic segment was also identified in the orangutan genome, which is known to lack GPB and GPE genes. These results indicate that one of the duplicated ancestral glycophorin genes acquired a unique 3' sequence by unequal crossing-over through its Alu sequence and the further downstream Alu sequence present in the duplicated gene. Further duplication and divergence of this gene yielded the GPB and GPE genes. 37 refs., 5 figs.

  15. PRP: The Proven Solution for Cleaning Up Oil Spills

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The basic technology behind PRP is thousands of microcapsules, tiny balls of beeswax with hollow centers. Water cannot penetrate the microcapsule s cell, but oil is absorbed right into the beeswax spheres as they float on the water s surface. This way, the contaminants, chemical compounds that originally come from crude oil such as fuels, motor oils, or petroleum hydrocarbons, are caught before they settle. PRP works well as a loose powder for cleaning up contaminants in lakes and other ecologically fragile areas. The powder can be spread over a contaminated body of water or soil, and it will absorb contaminants, contain them in isolation, and dispose of them safely. In water, it is important that PRP floats and keeps the oil on the surface, because, even if oil exposure is not immediately lethal, it can cause long-term harm if allowed to settle. Bottom-dwelling fish exposed to compounds released after oil spills may develop liver disease, in addition to reproductive and growth problems. This use of PRP is especially effective for environmental cleanup in sensitive areas like coral reefs and mangroves.

  16. The Prp19 complex directly functions in mitotic spindle assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Jennifer C; Tegha-Dunghu, Justus; Dräger, Stefanie; Will, Cindy L; Lührmann, Reinhard; Gruss, Oliver J

    2013-01-01

    The conserved Prp19 (pre-RNA processing 19) complex is required for pre-mRNA splicing in eukaryotic nuclei. Recent RNAi screens indicated that knockdown of Prp19 complex subunits strongly delays cell proliferation. Here we show that knockdown of the smallest subunit, BCAS2/Spf27, destabilizes the entire complex and leads to specific mitotic defects in human cells. These could result from splicing failures in interphase or reflect a direct function of the complex in open mitosis. Using Xenopus extracts, in which cell cycle progression and spindle formation can be reconstituted in vitro, we tested Prp19 complex functions during a complete cell cycle and directly in open mitosis. Strikingly, immunodepletion of the complex either before or after interphase significantly reduces the number of intact spindles, and increases the percentage of spindles with lower microtubule density and impaired metaphase alignment of chromosomes. Our data identify the Prp19 complex as the first spliceosome subcomplex that directly contributes to mitosis in vertebrates independently of its function in interphase.

  17. The Prp19 complex directly functions in mitotic spindle assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C Hofmann

    Full Text Available The conserved Prp19 (pre-RNA processing 19 complex is required for pre-mRNA splicing in eukaryotic nuclei. Recent RNAi screens indicated that knockdown of Prp19 complex subunits strongly delays cell proliferation. Here we show that knockdown of the smallest subunit, BCAS2/Spf27, destabilizes the entire complex and leads to specific mitotic defects in human cells. These could result from splicing failures in interphase or reflect a direct function of the complex in open mitosis. Using Xenopus extracts, in which cell cycle progression and spindle formation can be reconstituted in vitro, we tested Prp19 complex functions during a complete cell cycle and directly in open mitosis. Strikingly, immunodepletion of the complex either before or after interphase significantly reduces the number of intact spindles, and increases the percentage of spindles with lower microtubule density and impaired metaphase alignment of chromosomes. Our data identify the Prp19 complex as the first spliceosome subcomplex that directly contributes to mitosis in vertebrates independently of its function in interphase.

  18. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for knee disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Mohammad; Kundra, Rik

    2017-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous blood product with platelet concentrations above baseline values. The process involves the extraction of blood from the patient which is then centrifuged to obtain a concentrated suspension of platelets by plasmapheresis. It then undergoes a two-stage centrifugation process to separate the solid and liquid components of the anticoagulated blood. PRP owes its therapeutic use to the growth factors released by the platelets which are claimed to possess multiple regenerative properties. In the knee, PRP has been used in patients with articular cartilage pathology, ligamentous and meniscal injuries. There is a growing body of evidence to support its use in selected indications and this review looks at the most recent evidence. We also look at the current UK National Institute of Health & Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines with respect to osteoarthritis and the use of PRP in the knee. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2:28–34. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.2.160004. PMID:28607768

  19. Do autologous blood and PRP injections effectively treat tennis elbow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widstrom, Luke; Slattengren, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Both approaches reduce pain, but the improvement with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is not clinically meaningful. Autologous blood injections (ABIs) are more effective than corticosteroid injections for reducing pain and disability in patients with tennis elbow in both the short and long term.

  20. Isolation and sequencing of the cryIC-like delta endotoxin gene from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolation and sequencing of the cryIC-like delta endotoxin gene from Egyptian strains of Bacillus thuringiensis toxic against Lepidoptera. ME Elkashef, AM Heikal, MEDM Solliman, MI Kobeasy, HA El-Shemy ...

  1. Sequence and molecular analysis of the Rhizobium etli glsA gene, encoding a thermolabile glutaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, J; Huerta-Saquero, A; Du Pont, G; Durán, S

    1999-03-19

    We sequenced a 2.1 kb fragment of DNA carrying the structural glsA gene, which codes for the Rhizobium etli thermolabile glutaminase (A). The glsA gene complements the R. etli LM16 mutant that lacks glutaminase A activity, and is expressed in the heterologous host Sinorhizobium meliloti. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of 309 residues, with a calculated molecular mass of 33 kDa. The amino acid sequence shares 53% and 43% identity with two hypothetical glutaminases of E. coli; 42% identity with liver-type; 38% identity with kidney-type glutaminase; 41% and 40% identity hypothetical glutaminases of Bacillus subtilis; and 41% and 37% identity with two putative glutaminases of Caenorhabditis elegans. The glsA gene represents the first glutaminase gene cloned and sequenced in prokaryotes.

  2. Cloning and sequencing of phenol oxidase 1 (pox1) gene from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-02-21

    Feb 21, 2011 ... The gene (pox1) encoding a phenol oxidase 1 from Pleurotus ostreatus was sequenced and the corresponding ... codon; pox 1, phenol oxidase 1; DNA, deoxyribonucleic acid;. ORF, opening ...... cytochrome c6. Analysis of ...

  3. Human prion protein (PrP) 219K is converted to PrPSc but shows heterozygous inhibition in variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizume, Masaki; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Teruya, Kenta; Ohashi, Hiroaki; Ironside, James W; Mohri, Shirou; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki

    2009-02-06

    Prion protein gene (PRNP) E219K is a human polymorphism commonly occurring in Asian populations but is rarely found in patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Thus the polymorphism E219K has been considered protective against sporadic CJD. The corresponding mouse prion protein (PrP) polymorphism variant (mouse PrP 218K) is not converted to the abnormal isoform (PrP(Sc)) and shows a dominant negative effect on wild-type PrP conversion. To define the conversion activity of this human molecule, we herein established knock-in mice with human PrP 219K and performed a series of transmission experiments with human prions. Surprisingly, the human PrP 219K molecule was converted to PrP(Sc) in variant CJD infection, and the conversion occurred more efficiently than PrP 219E molecule. Notably the knock-in mice with PRNP codon 219E/K showed the least efficient conversion compared with their hemizygotes with PRNP codon 219E/0 or codon 219K/0, or homozygotes with PRNP codon 219E/E or codon 219K/K. This phenomenon indicated heterozygous inhibition. This heterozygous inhibition was observed also in knock-in mice with PRNP codon 129M/V genotype. In addition to variant CJD infection, the human PrP 219K molecule is conversion-competent in transmission experiments with sporadic CJD prions. Therefore, the protective effect of PRNP E219K against sporadic CJD might be due to heterozygous inhibition.

  4. Estimating variation within the genes and inferring the phylogeny of 186 sequenced diverse Escherichia coli genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaas, Rolf Sommer; Rundsten, Carsten Friis; Ussery, David

    2012-01-01

    for creating better phylogenies, for determination of molecular clocks and for improved typing techniques. Results We find 3,051 gene clusters/families present in at least 95% of the genomes and 1,702 gene clusters present in 100% of the genomes. The former 'soft core' of about 3,000 gene families is perhaps...... more biologically relevant, especially considering that many of these genome sequences are draft quality. The E. coli pan-genome for this set of isolates contains 16,373 gene clusters. A core-gene tree, based on alignment and a pan-genome tree based on gene presence/absence, maps the relatedness...... of the 186 sequenced E. coli genomes. The core-gene tree displays high confidence and divides the E. coli strains into the observed MLST type clades and also separates defined phylotypes. Conclusion The results of comparing a large and diverse E. coli dataset support the theory that reliable and good...

  5. Sequence variants of the LCORL gene and its association with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y. J. HAN

    Using CRS-PCR method for genotyping, which has the SNPs primers containing one or two nucleotide mismatches that can discriminate sequence variations by the means of using restriction enzymes. In their respective restriction enzymes, the PCR products were digested at dif- ferent temperatures, resolved the digested ...

  6. RESEARCH ARTICLE Sequence variants of the LCORL gene and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    polymorphism) and CRS-PCR (created restriction rite PCR) methods in the Qinchuan beef cattle breed (n = 450). Using CRS-PCR method for genotyping, which was the. SNPs primers containing one or two nucleotide mismatches that we can discriminate sequence variations by the means of using restriction enzymes.

  7. Sequence analysis of mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    restriction fragment length polymorphism; RAPD, random amplified polymorphic DNA; An. step, Anopheles stephensi; An. quad,. Anopheles ... interesting feature of the sequences was a stretch of Ts that distinguished between Aedes and Culex on the one hand, and ... genome structure and complexity of mosquito species.

  8. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the cat myostatin gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... MEF3, MTBF, PAX3, SMAD, HBOX, HOMF and TEAF motifs. Comparative analysis for some motifs showed both conservations and differences among cat, horse, porcine and human. Key words: Cat, myostatin 5'-regulatory region, molecular cloning, sequence analysis and comparison, transcription factor binding sites.

  9. How the sequence of a gene can tune its translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredrick, Kurt; Ibba, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Sixty-one codons specify 20 amino acids, offering cells many options for encoding a polypeptide sequence. Two new studies (Cannarrozzi et al., 2010; Tuller et al., 2010) now foster the idea that patterns of codon usage can control ribosome speed, fine-tuning translation to increase the efficiency...

  10. Characterization of upstream sequences from the 8S globulin gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-21

    Sep 21, 2011 ... heterologous proteins in plants to act as a bioreactor, the putative seed-specific promoter of 8S .... Sequences near the start codon showed much .... Plant Mol. Biol. 24(2): 261-272. Kohli A, Griffiths S, Palacios N, Twyman RM, Vain P, Laurie DA,. Christou P (1999). Molecular characterization of transforming ...

  11. Sequence analysis of mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mosquitoes are vectors for the transmission of many human pathogens that include viruses, nematodes and protozoa. For the understanding of their vectorial capacity, identification of disease carrying and refractory strains is essential. Recently, molecular taxonomic techniques have been utilized for this purpose. Sequence ...

  12. Quantitative Comparisons of 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Libraries from Environmental Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, David R.; Furlong, Michelle A.; Rathbun, Stephen L.; Whitman, William B.

    2001-01-01

    To determine the significance of differences between clonal libraries of environmental rRNA gene sequences, differences between homologous coverage curves, CX(D), and heterologous coverage curves, CXY(D), were calculated by a Cramér-von Mises-type statistic and compared by a Monte Carlo test procedure. This method successfully distinguished rRNA gene sequence libraries from soil and bioreactors and correctly failed to find differences between libraries of the same composition. PMID:11526051

  13. Quantitative Comparisons of 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Libraries from Environmental Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Singleton, David R.; Furlong, Michelle A.; Rathbun, Stephen L; William B. Whitman

    2001-01-01

    To determine the significance of differences between clonal libraries of environmental rRNA gene sequences, differences between homologous coverage curves, CX(D), and heterologous coverage curves, CXY(D), were calculated by a Cramér-von Mises-type statistic and compared by a Monte Carlo test procedure. This method successfully distinguished rRNA gene sequence libraries from soil and bioreactors and correctly failed to find differences between libraries of the same composition.

  14. Nucleotide sequence of the coat protein gene of the Skierniewice isolate of plum pox virus (PPV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wypijewski, K.; Musial, W.; Augustyniak, J. [Uniwersytet Adama Mickiewicza, Poznan (Poland); Malinowski, T. [Research Institute of Pomology and Floriculture, Skierniewice (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    The coat protein (CP) gene of the Skierniewice isolate of plum pox virus (PPV-S) has been amplified using the reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence of the gene and the deduced amino-acid sequences of PPV-S CP were compared with those of other PPV strains. The nucleotide sequence showed very high homology to most of the published sequences. The motif: Asp-Ala-Gly (DAG), important for the aphid transmissibility, was present in the amino-acid sequence. Our isolate did not react in ELISA with monoclonal antibodies MAb06 supposed to be specific for PPV-D. (author). 32 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. Trichinella pseudospiralis vs. T. spiralis thymidylate synthase gene structure and T. pseudospiralis thymidylate synthase retrogene sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Thymidylate synthase is a housekeeping gene, designated ancient due to its role in DNA synthesis and ubiquitous phyletic distribution. The genomic sequences were characterized coding for thymidylate synthase in two species of the genus Trichinella, an encapsulating T. spiralis and a non-encapsulating T. pseudospiralis. Methods Based on the sequence of parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis thymidylate synthase cDNA, PCR techniques were employed. Results Each of the respective gene structures encompassed 6 exons and 5 introns located in conserved sites. Comparison with the corresponding gene structures of other eukaryotic species revealed lack of common introns that would be shared among selected fungi, nematodes, mammals and plants. The two deduced amino acid sequences were 96% identical. In addition to the thymidylate synthase gene, the intron-less retrocopy, i.e. a processed pseudogene, with sequence identical to the T. spiralis gene coding region, was found to be present within the T. pseudospiralis genome. This pseudogene, instead of the gene, was confirmed by RT-PCR to be expressed in the parasite muscle larvae. Conclusions Intron load, as well as distribution of exon and intron phases in thymidylate synthase genes from various sources, point against the theory of gene assembly by the primordial exon shuffling and support the theory of evolutionary late intron insertion into spliceosomal genes. Thymidylate synthase pseudogene expressed in T. pseudospiralis muscle larvae is designated a retrogene. PMID:24716800

  16. Trichinella pseudospiralis vs. T. spiralis thymidylate synthase gene structure and T. pseudospiralis thymidylate synthase retrogene sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagielska, Elżbieta; Płucienniczak, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Magdalena; Dowierciał, Anna; Rode, Wojciech

    2014-04-09

    Thymidylate synthase is a housekeeping gene, designated ancient due to its role in DNA synthesis and ubiquitous phyletic distribution. The genomic sequences were characterized coding for thymidylate synthase in two species of the genus Trichinella, an encapsulating T. spiralis and a non-encapsulating T. pseudospiralis. Based on the sequence of parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis thymidylate synthase cDNA, PCR techniques were employed. Each of the respective gene structures encompassed 6 exons and 5 introns located in conserved sites. Comparison with the corresponding gene structures of other eukaryotic species revealed lack of common introns that would be shared among selected fungi, nematodes, mammals and plants. The two deduced amino acid sequences were 96% identical. In addition to the thymidylate synthase gene, the intron-less retrocopy, i.e. a processed pseudogene, with sequence identical to the T. spiralis gene coding region, was found to be present within the T. pseudospiralis genome. This pseudogene, instead of the gene, was confirmed by RT-PCR to be expressed in the parasite muscle larvae. Intron load, as well as distribution of exon and intron phases in thymidylate synthase genes from various sources, point against the theory of gene assembly by the primordial exon shuffling and support the theory of evolutionary late intron insertion into spliceosomal genes. Thymidylate synthase pseudogene expressed in T. pseudospiralis muscle larvae is designated a retrogene.

  17. Protein genes in repetitive sequence-antifreeze glycoproteins in Atlantic cod genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xuan; Yang, Chun; Fevolden, Svein-Erik; Cheng, C-H Christina

    2012-07-02

    Highly repetitive sequences are the bane of genome sequence assembly, and the short read lengths produced by current next generation sequencing technologies further exacerbates this obstacle. An adopted practice is to exclude repetitive sequences in genome data assembly, as the majority of repeats lack protein-coding genes. However, this could result in the exclusion of important genotypes in newly sequenced non-model species. The absence of the antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGP) gene family in the recently sequenced Atlantic cod genome serves as an example. The Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) genome was assembled entirely from Roche 454 short reads, demonstrating the feasibility of this approach. However, a well-known major adaptive trait, the AFGP, essential for survival in frigid Arctic marine habitats was absent in the annotated genome. To assess whether this resulted from population difference, we performed Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA from multiple individuals from the North East Arctic cod population that the sequenced cod belonged, and verified that the AFGP genotype is indeed present. We searched the raw assemblies of the Atlantic cod using our G. morhua AFGP gene, and located partial AFGP coding sequences in two sequence scaffolds. We found these two scaffolds constitute a partial genomic AFGP locus through comparative sequence analyses with our newly assembled genomic AFGP locus of the related polar cod, Boreogadus saida. By examining the sequence assembly and annotation methodologies used for the Atlantic cod genome, we deduced the primary cause of the absence of the AFGP gene family from the annotated genome was the removal of all repetitive Roche 454 short reads before sequence assembly, which would exclude most of the highly repetitive AFGP coding sequences. Secondarily, the model teleost genomes used in projection annotation of the Atlantic cod genome have no antifreeze trait, perpetuating the unawareness that the AFGP gene family is missing. We

  18. Isolation and sequencing of seven Sox genes from the lacertid lizard Eremias breuchleyi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jie

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Sox family of genes shares a high sequence similarity with the HMG box region of the human Y chromosomal gene, SRY. We used highly degenerate primers to clone and sequence seven Eremias breuchleyi Sox genes (EbSox2, EbSox3, EbSox4, EbSox11, EbSox12, EbSox14 and EbSox21. A database search for the cloned sequences revealed the following percentage identity with the homologous human SOX genes: EbSox2 = 96%, EbSox3 = 88%, EbSox4 = 94%, EbSox11 = 99%, EbSox12 = 96%, EbSox14 = 98%, EbSox21 = 97%. Cluster analysis indicates that they seem to belong to group B and group C of Sox gene family, respectively.

  19. Cloning and sequence analysis of chitin synthase gene fragments of Demodex mites*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ya-e; Wang, Zheng-hang; Xu, Yang; Xu, Ji-ru; Liu, Wen-yan; Wei, Meng; Wang, Chu-ying

    2012-01-01

    To our knowledge, few reports on Demodex studied at the molecular level are available at present. In this study our group, for the first time, cloned, sequenced and analyzed the chitin synthase (CHS) gene fragments of Demodex folliculorum, Demodex brevis, and Demodex canis (three isolates from each species) from Xi’an China, by designing specific primers based on the only partial sequence of the CHS gene of D. canis from Japan, retrieved from GenBank. Results show that amplification was successful only in three D. canis isolates and one D. brevis isolate out of the nine Demodex isolates. The obtained fragments were sequenced to be 339 bp for D. canis and 338 bp for D. brevis. The CHS gene sequence similarities between the three Xi’an D. canis isolates and one Japanese D. canis isolate ranged from 99.7% to 100.0%, and those between four D. canis isolates and one D. brevis isolate were 99.1%–99.4%. Phylogenetic trees based on maximum parsimony (MP) and maximum likelihood (ML) methods shared the same clusters, according with the traditional classification. Two open reading frames (ORFs) were identified in each CHS gene sequenced, and their corresponding amino acid sequences were located at the catalytic domain. The relatively conserved sequences could be deduced to be a CHS class A gene, which is associated with chitin synthesis in the integument of Demodex mites. PMID:23024043

  20. Cloning and sequence analysis of chitin synthase gene fragments of Demodex mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ya-e; Wang, Zheng-hang; Xu, Yang; Xu, Ji-ru; Liu, Wen-yan; Wei, Meng; Wang, Chu-ying

    2012-10-01

    To our knowledge, few reports on Demodex studied at the molecular level are available at present. In this study our group, for the first time, cloned, sequenced and analyzed the chitin synthase (CHS) gene fragments of Demodex folliculorum, Demodex brevis, and Demodex canis (three isolates from each species) from Xi'an China, by designing specific primers based on the only partial sequence of the CHS gene of D. canis from Japan, retrieved from GenBank. Results show that amplification was successful only in three D. canis isolates and one D. brevis isolate out of the nine Demodex isolates. The obtained fragments were sequenced to be 339 bp for D. canis and 338 bp for D. brevis. The CHS gene sequence similarities between the three Xi'an D. canis isolates and one Japanese D. canis isolate ranged from 99.7% to 100.0%, and those between four D. canis isolates and one D. brevis isolate were 99.1%-99.4%. Phylogenetic trees based on maximum parsimony (MP) and maximum likelihood (ML) methods shared the same clusters, according with the traditional classification. Two open reading frames (ORFs) were identified in each CHS gene sequenced, and their corresponding amino acid sequences were located at the catalytic domain. The relatively conserved sequences could be deduced to be a CHS class A gene, which is associated with chitin synthesis in the integument of Demodex mites.

  1. Mumps virus F gene and HN gene sequencing as a molecular tool to study mumps virus transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouma, Sigrid; Cremer, Jeroen; Parkkali, Saara; Veldhuijzen, Irene; van Binnendijk, Rob S; Koopmans, Marion P G

    2016-11-01

    Various mumps outbreaks have occurred in the Netherlands since 2004, particularly among persons who had received 2 doses of measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination. Genomic typing of pathogens can be used to track outbreaks, but the established genotyping of mumps virus based on the small hydrophobic (SH) gene sequences did not provide sufficient resolution. Therefore, we expanded the sequencing to include fusion (F) gene and haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) gene sequences in addition to the SH gene sequences from 109 mumps virus genotype G strains obtained between 2004 and mid 2015 in the Netherlands. When the molecular information from these 3 genes was combined, we were able to identify separate mumps virus clusters and track mumps virus transmission. The analyses suggested that multiple mumps virus introductions occurred in the Netherlands between 2004 and 2015 resulting in several mumps outbreaks throughout this period, whereas during some local outbreaks the molecular data pointed towards endemic circulation. Combined analysis of epidemiological data and sequence data collected in 2015 showed good support for the phylogenetic clustering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [The SNPs analysis of encoding sequence of interacting factor gene in Chinese population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang; Zhang, Qing-jiong; Xiao, Xue-shan; Li, Jia-zhang; Zhang, Feng-sheng; Li, Shi-qiang; Li, Wei; Li, Tuo; Jia, Xiao-yun; Guo, Li; Guo, Xiang-ming

    2003-10-01

    To screen the variations of TG interacting factor(TGIF) gene in encoding sequence in Chinese high myopia patients and normal controls and to analyze the SNPs of TGIF gene encoding sequence in Chinese population. Genomic DNA was collected from 204 probands with high myopia and 112 unrelated persons without high myopia. The coding sequences of TGIF gene in 316 subjects were analyzed by using exon-by-exon PCR heteroduplex-SSCP analysis and sequencing. There were 3 types of SNP and one single nucleotide mutation in the coding sequence of TGIF gene: IVS-2 nt350 G --> T(36/204), codon140 CCA --> CCG; Pro140Pro codon163 CCG --> CTG;Pro163Leu and codon126 GTG --> GCG; Val126Ala(1/204). The SNPs of codon140 CCA --> CCG and codon163 CCG --> CTG were composed of 3 alleles and 5 genotypes in Chinese population which abide by Hardy-Weinberg law. There was no evidence to prove that mutations in the TGIF gene are responsible for the high myopia in Chinese. Three SNPs of coding sequence TGIF gene in Chinese population abide by Hardy-Weinberg law.

  3. [Cloning and sequencing of the papA gene from uropathogenic Escherichia coli 4030 strain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinggang; Zhang, Jingping; Zhao, Chuncheng; Zhu, Jianguo

    2008-09-01

    Cloning and sequencing of the papA gene from uropathogenic Escherichia coli 4030 strain to investigate the differences of the sequences of the papA of UPEC4030 strain and the ones of related genes, in order to make whether or not it was a new genotype. Cloning and sequencing methods were used to analyze the sequence of the papA of UPEC4030 strain in comparison with related sequences. The sequence analysis of papA revealed a 722 bp gene and encode 192 amino acid polypeptide. The overall homology of the papA genes between UPEC4030 and the standard strains of ten F types were 36.11%-77.95% and 22.20%-78.34% at nucleotide and deduced amino acid levels. The homology between the sequence of the reverse primers and the corresponding sequence of UPEC4030 papA was 10%-66.67%. The results confirmed that UPEC4030 strain contained a novel papA variant. UPEC4030 strain could contain an unknown papA variant or the novel genotype. The pathogenic mechanism and epidemiology related need to be further studied.

  4. A 5.8S nuclear ribosomal RNA gene sequence database: applications to ecology and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullings, K. W.; Vogler, D. R.

    1998-01-01

    We complied a 5.8S nuclear ribosomal gene sequence database for animals, plants, and fungi using both newly generated and GenBank sequences. We demonstrate the utility of this database as an internal check to determine whether the target organism and not a contaminant has been sequenced, as a diagnostic tool for ecologists and evolutionary biologists to determine the placement of asexual fungi within larger taxonomic groups, and as a tool to help identify fungi that form ectomycorrhizae.

  5. Complete sequence and gene organization of the mitochondrial genome for Hubbard's sportive lemur (Lepilemur hubbardorum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Runhua; Shore, Gary D; Brenneman, Rick A; Engberg, Shannon E; Sitzmann, Brandon D; Bailey, Carolyn A; Kimmel, Lisa M; Randriamampionona, Richard; Ranaivoarisoa, Jean Freddy; Louis, Edward E

    2010-09-15

    The complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome of Hubbard's or Zombitse sportive lemur (Lepilemur hubbardorum) was generated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, primer-walking sequencing and fragment cloning. Comparative analyses of Hubbard's sportive lemur were conducted with available complete mitochondrial genome sequences from eight other lemur species. The mitochondrial genome of Hubbard's sportive lemur is 16,854 base pairs (bp) and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, two ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and one control region. Three rare start codons were found, in which GTG is the start codon for the ATPase 6 subunit gene (ATP), ATC for the NADH dehydrogenase (ND) 2 subunit gene, and ATT for the ND5 subunit gene. In the control region, sequence analysis found one repetitive unit between conserved sequence blocks (CSB)-1 and CSB-2 for L. hubbardorum. Comparative analysis of eight other lemur species showed different repetitive units between and outside of these two blocks. According to the phylogenetic analysis of the 12 heavy-strand encoded protein-coding genes, all nine lemur species representative of four lemuriformes families were monophyletic. This template and the newly designed primers described in this study will allow scientists to generate comparative sequences for all sportive lemurs to validate phylogenetic discrepancies in the genus Lepilemur and to evaluate evolutionary and biogeographic models. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Automated tools for comparative sequence analysis of genic regions using the GenePalette application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew F; Posakony, James W; Rebeiz, Mark

    2017-09-01

    Comparative sequence analysis methods, such as phylogenetic footprinting, represent one of the most effective ways to decode regulatory sequence functions based upon DNA sequence information alone. The laborious task of assembling orthologous sequences to perform these comparisons is a hurdle to these analyses, which is further aggravated by the relative paucity of tools for visualization of sequence comparisons in large genic regions. Here, we describe a second-generation implementation of the GenePalette DNA sequence analysis software to facilitate comparative studies of gene function and regulation. We have developed an automated module called OrthologGrabber (OG) that performs BLAT searches against the UC Santa Cruz genome database to identify and retrieve segments homologous to a region of interest. Upon acquisition, sequences are compared to identify high-confidence anchor-points, which are graphically displayed. The visualization of anchor-points alongside other DNA features, such as transcription factor binding sites, allows users to precisely examine whether a binding site of interest is conserved, even if the surrounding region exhibits poor sequence identity. This approach also aids in identifying orthologous segments of regulatory DNA, facilitating studies of regulatory sequence evolution. As with previous versions of the software, GenePalette 2.1 takes the form of a platform-independent, single-windowed interface that is simple to use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification of genes in anonymous DNA sequences. Annual performance report, February 1, 1991--January 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, C.A.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this project is the development of practical software to automate the identification of genes in anonymous DNA sequences from the human, and other higher eukaryotic genomes. A software system for automated sequence analysis, gm (gene modeler) has been designed, implemented, tested, and distributed to several dozen laboratories worldwide. A significantly faster, more robust, and more flexible version of this software, gm 2.0 has now been completed, and is being tested by operational use to analyze human cosmid sequence data. A range of efforts to further understand the features of eukaryoyic gene sequences are also underway. This progress report also contains papers coming out of the project including the following: gm: a Tool for Exploratory Analysis of DNA Sequence Data; The Human THE-LTR(O) and MstII Interspersed Repeats are subfamilies of a single widely distruted highly variable repeat family; Information contents and dinucleotide compostions of plant intron sequences vary with evolutionary origin; Splicing signals in Drosophila: intron size, information content, and consensus sequences; Integration of automated sequence analysis into mapping and sequencing projects; Software for the C. elegans genome project.

  8. The Intolerance of Regulatory Sequence to Genetic Variation Predicts Gene Dosage Sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavé Petrovski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Noncoding sequence contains pathogenic mutations. Yet, compared with mutations in protein-coding sequence, pathogenic regulatory mutations are notoriously difficult to recognize. Most fundamentally, we are not yet adept at recognizing the sequence stretches in the human genome that are most important in regulating the expression of genes. For this reason, it is difficult to apply to the regulatory regions the same kinds of analytical paradigms that are being successfully applied to identify mutations among protein-coding regions that influence risk. To determine whether dosage sensitive genes have distinct patterns among their noncoding sequence, we present two primary approaches that focus solely on a gene's proximal noncoding regulatory sequence. The first approach is a regulatory sequence analogue of the recently introduced residual variation intolerance score (RVIS, termed noncoding RVIS, or ncRVIS. The ncRVIS compares observed and predicted levels of standing variation in the regulatory sequence of human genes. The second approach, termed ncGERP, reflects the phylogenetic conservation of a gene's regulatory sequence using GERP++. We assess how well these two approaches correlate with four gene lists that use different ways to identify genes known or likely to cause disease through changes in expression: 1 genes that are known to cause disease through haploinsufficiency, 2 genes curated as dosage sensitive in ClinGen's Genome Dosage Map, 3 genes judged likely to be under purifying selection for mutations that change expression levels because they are statistically depleted of loss-of-function variants in the general population, and 4 genes judged unlikely to cause disease based on the presence of copy number variants in the general population. We find that both noncoding scores are highly predictive of dosage sensitivity using any of these criteria. In a similar way to ncGERP, we assess two ensemble-based predictors of regional noncoding

  9. Characterization of genomic sequence of a drought-resistant gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hong Ying Zhang1 2 Wei Li3 Xin Guo Mao1 Rui Lian Jing1. The National Key Facility for Crop Gene Resources and Genetic Improvement, Institute of Crop Science, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100081, People's Republic of China; College of Tobacco Science, Henan Agricultural University, ...

  10. Haplotype combination of the bovine PCSK1 gene sequence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prohormone convertase subtilisin/kexin type 1 gene. (PCSK1) plays a role in body mass control. Recent associa- tion studies have shown that three common nonsynonymous. SNPs are linked to increase risk of obesity and therefore it has been the focus of this study. Hence, in this study, polymorphisms of the bovine ...

  11. Genomic structure and nucleotide sequence of the p55 gene of the puffer fish Fugu rubripes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elgar, G.; Rattray, F.; Greystrong, J.; Brenner, S. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    1995-06-10

    The p55 gene, which codes for a 55-kDa erythrocyte membrane protein, has been cloned and sequenced from the genome of the Japanese puffer fish Fugu rubripes (Fugu). This organism has the smallest recorded vertebrate genome and therefore provides an efficient way to sequence genes at the genomic level. The gene encoding p55 covers 5.5 kb from the beginning to the end of the coding sequence, four to six times smaller than the estimated size of the human gene, and is encoded by 12 exons. The structure of this gene has not been previously elucidated, but from this and other data we would predict a similar or identical structure in mammals. The predicted amino acid sequence of this gene in Fugu, coding for a polypeptide of 467 amino acids, is very similar to that of the human gene with the exception of the first two exons, which differ considerably. The predicted Fugu protein has a molecular weight (52.6 kDa compared with 52.3 kDa) and an isoelectric point very similar to those of human p55. In human, the p55 gene lies in the gene-dense Xq28 region, just 30 kb 3{prime} to the Factor VIII gene, and is estimated to cover 20-30 kb. Its 5{prime} end is associated with a CpG island, although there is no evidence that this is the case in Fugu. The small size of genes in Fugu and the high coding homology that they share with their mammalian equivalents, both in structure and sequence, make this compact vertebrate genome an ideal model for genomic studies. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Sequencing and mapping hemoglobin gene clusters in the australian model dasyurid marsupial sminthopsis macroura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Leo, A.A.; Wheeler, D.; Lefevre, C.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Hope, R.; Kuliwaba, J.; Nicholas, K.R.; Westermanc, M.; Graves, J.A.M.

    2004-07-26

    Comparing globin genes and their flanking sequences across many species has allowed globin gene evolution to be reconstructed in great detail. Marsupial globin sequences have proved to be of exceptional significance. A previous finding of a beta-like omega gene in the alpha cluster in the tammar wallaby suggested that the alpha and beta cluster evolved via genome duplication and loss rather than tandem duplication. To confirm and extend this important finding we isolated and sequenced BACs containing the alpha and beta loci from the distantly related Australian marsupial Sminthopsis macroura. We report that the alpha gene lies in the same BAC as the beta-like omega gene, implying that the alpha-omega juxtaposition is likely to be conserved in all marsupials. The LUC7L gene was found 3' of the S. macroura alpha locus, a gene order shared with humans but not mouse, chicken or fugu. Sequencing a BAC contig that contained the S. macroura beta globin and epsilon globin loci showed that the globin cluster is flanked by olfactory genes, demonstrating a gene arrangement conserved for over 180 MY. Analysis of the region 5' to the S. macroura epsilon globin gene revealed a region similar to the eutherian LCR, containing sequences and potential transcription factor binding sites with homology to eutherian hypersensitive sites 1 to 5. FISH mapping of BACs containing S. macroura alpha and beta globin genes located the beta globin cluster on chromosome 3q and the alpha locus close to the centromere on 1q, resolving contradictory map locations obtained by previous radioactive in situ hybridization.

  13. RNA Sequencing Revealed Numerous Polyketide Synthase Genes in the Harmful Dinoflagellate Karenia mikimotoi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Kimura

    Full Text Available The dinoflagellate Karenia mikimotoi forms blooms in the coastal waters of temperate regions and occasionally causes massive fish and invertebrate mortality. This study aimed to elucidate the toxic effect of K. mikimotoi on marine organisms by using the genomics approach; RNA-sequence libraries were constructed, and data were analyzed to identify toxin-related genes. Next-generation sequencing produced 153,406 transcript contigs from the axenic culture of K. mikimotoi. BLASTX analysis against all assembled contigs revealed that 208 contigs were polyketide synthase (PKS sequences. Thus, K. mikimotoi was thought to have several genes encoding PKS metabolites and to likely produce toxin-like polyketide molecules. Of all the sequences, approximately 30 encoded eight PKS genes, which were remarkably similar to those of Karenia brevis. Our phylogenetic analyses showed that these genes belonged to a new group of PKS type-I genes. Phylogenetic and active domain analyses showed that the amino acid sequence of four among eight Karenia PKS genes was not similar to any of the reported PKS genes. These PKS genes might possibly be associated with the synthesis of polyketide toxins produced by Karenia species. Further, a homology search revealed 10 contigs that were similar to a toxin gene responsible for the synthesis of saxitoxin (sxtA in the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense. These contigs encoded A1-A3 domains of sxtA genes. Thus, this study identified some transcripts in K. mikimotoi that might be associated with several putative toxin-related genes. The findings of this study might help understand the mechanism of toxicity of K. mikimotoi and other dinoflagellates.

  14. Detecting Sequence Homology at the Gene Cluster Level with MultiGeneBlast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, Marnix H.; Takano, Eriko; Breitling, Rainer; Nowick, Katja

    The genes encoding many biomolecular systems and pathways are genomically organized in operons or gene clusters. With MultiGeneBlast, we provide a user-friendly and effective tool to perform homology searches with operons or gene clusters as basic units, instead of single genes. The

  15. Neural network predicts sequence of TP53 gene based on DNA chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spicker, J.S.; Wikman, F.; Lu, M.L.

    2002-01-01

    We have trained an artificial neural network to predict the sequence of the human TP53 tumor suppressor gene based on a p53 GeneChip. The trained neural network uses as input the fluorescence intensities of DNA hybridized to oligonucleotides on the surface of the chip and makes between zero...

  16. Sequencing analysis reveals a unique gene organization in the gyrB region of Mycoplasma hominis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Søren; Christiansen, Gunna

    1994-01-01

    The homolog of the gyrB gene, which has been reported to be present in the vicinity of the initiation site of replication in bacteria, was mapped on the Mycoplasma hominis genome, and the region was subsequently sequenced. Five open reading frames were identified flanking the gyrB gene, one...

  17. Effect of 5'-flanking sequence deletions on expression of the human insulin gene in transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fromont-Racine, M; Bucchini, D; Madsen, O

    1990-01-01

    Expression of the human insulin gene was examined in transgenic mouse lines carrying the gene with various lengths of DNA sequences 5' to the transcription start site (+1). Expression of the transgene was demonstrated by 1) the presence of human C-peptide in urine, 2) the presence of specific...... of the transgene was observed in cell types other than beta-islet cells....

  18. Nucleotide sequence of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens octopine Ti plasmid-encoded tmr gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidekamp, F.; Dirkse, W.G.; Hille, J.; Ormondt, H. van

    1983-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the tmr gene, encoded by the octopine Ti plasmid from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (pTiAch5), was determined. The T-DNA, which encompasses this gene, is involved in tumor formation and maintenance, and probably mediates the cytokinin-independent growth of transformed plant

  19. Characterizing embryonic gene expression patterns in the mouse using nonredundant sequence-based selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sousa-Nunes, Rita; Rana, Amer Ahmed; Kettleborough, Ross

    2003-01-01

    steps of axial specification and tissue patterning in the mouse. To avoid examining the same gene more than once, and to exclude potentially ubiquitously expressed housekeeping genes, cDNA sequence was derived from 1978 clones of the Endoderm library. These yielded 1440 distinct cDNAs, of which 123...

  20. Bacterial metabarcoding by 16S rRNA gene ion torrent amplicon sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Elio; Gianese, Giulio; Giuliano, Giovanni; Fiore, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    Ion Torrent is a next generation sequencing technology based on the detection of hydrogen ions produced during DNA chain elongation; this technology allows analyzing and characterizing genomes, genes, and species. Here, we describe an Ion Torrent procedure applied to the metagenomic analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons to study the bacterial diversity in food and environmental samples.

  1. IS21-558 insertion sequences are involved in the mobility of the multiresistance gene cfr

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehrenberg, Corinna; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Schwarz, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    was detected on the ca. 43-kb plasmid pSCFS6 in S. warneri and S. simulans isolates. Sequence analysis of a 22,010-bp segment revealed that the new Tn558 variant harbored an additional resistance gene region integrated into the tnpC reading frame. This resistance gene region consisted of the clindamycin...

  2. Sequence variations in human ZP genes as potential modifiers of zona pellucida architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pökkylä, Reeta-Maria; Lakkakorpi, Jouni Tapani; Nuojua-Huttunen, Sinikka Helena; Tapanainen, Juha Samuli

    2011-06-30

    To examine putative associations between zona pellucida (ZP) anomalies and sequence variations in genes expressing structural ZP glycoprotein components, sequence data of 31 volunteers participating in IVF treatments were obtained and analyzed together with morphologic data of the respective oocytes. Our results suggest that some of the most frequent zona anomalies may be at least partly explained by sequence variations in genes expressing the four human ZP proteins, especially those in ZP2 and ZP3. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Cloning and analyzing of the cDNA sequence of CHS-A gene of Narcissus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yin Yi; Shen, Ming Shan; Chen, Liang; Li, Peng; Chen, Mu Zhuan

    2002-09-01

    Chalcone synthase (CHS) is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of all classes of flavonoids. The production of flower pigment is specifically regulated by the activity of CHS. We cloned the cDNA sequence of CHS-A gene from Narcissus by PCR and analyzed the coding sequence of gene. The result demonstrated that the sequence of the coding region was 1167bp, encoding a protein of 389 amino acid which was more than 80% homology with CHS of the other 8 plants, such as Nicotine abacus and Solana tuberosum.

  4. Decreased hernia recurrence using autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) with Strattice™ mesh in a rodent ventral hernia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eps, Jeffrey; Fernandez-Moure, Joseph; Cabrera, Fernando; Wang, Xin; Karim, Azim; Corradetti, Bruna; Chan, Paige; Dunkin, Brian; Tasciotti, Ennio; Weiner, Bradley; Ellsworth, Warren

    2016-08-01

    Recurrence after ventral hernia repair (VHR) remains a multifactorial problem still plaguing surgeons today. Some of the many contributing factors include mechanical strain, poor tissue-mesh integration, and degradation of matrices. The high recurrence rate witnessed with the use of acellular dermal matrices (ADM) for definitive hernia repair has reduced their use largely to bridging repair and breast reconstruction. Modalities that improve classic cellular metrics of successful VHR could theoretically result in improved rates of hernia recurrence; autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may represent one such tool, but has been underinvestigated for this purpose. Lewis rats (32) had chronic ventral hernias created surgically and then repaired with Strattice™ mesh alone (control) or mesh + autologous PRP. Samples were harvested at 3 and 6 months postoperatively and compared for gross, histologic, and molecular outcomes of: neovascularization, tissue incorporation, peritoneal adhesions, hernia recurrence, and residual mesh thickness. Compared to control at 3 months postoperatively, PRP-treated rats displayed significantly more neovascularization of implanted mesh and considerable upregulation of both angiogenic genes (vEGF 2.73-fold, vWF 2.21-fold) and myofibroblastic genes (αSMA 9.68-fold, FSP-1 3.61-fold, Col1a1 3.32-fold, Col31a1 3.29-fold). Histologically, they also showed enhanced tissue deposition/ingrowth and diminished chronic immune cell infiltration. Peritoneal adhesions were less severe at both 3 (1.88 vs. 2.94) and 6 months (1.63 vs. 2.75) by Modified Hopkins Adhesion Scoring. PRP-treated rats experienced decreased hernia recurrence at 6 months (0/10 vs. 7/10) and had significantly improved ADM preservation as evidenced by quantification of residual mesh thickness. PRP is an autologous source of pro-regenerative growth factors and chemokines uniquely suited to soft tissue wound healing. When applied to a model of chronic VHR, it incites enhanced

  5. The sequence of the human phosducin gene (PDC) and its 5[prime]-flanking region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Toshiaki; Kikuchi, Takanobu; Shinohara, Toshimichi (National Eye Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1994-01-15

    Phosducin, a principal protein of retinal photoreceptor cells, modulates the phototransduction cascade by interacting with transducin. Recently, it has been reported that phosducin is a protein virtually identical to the G-protein inhibitor protein (GIP) in brain. Here, the authors have sequenced the complete human gene (PDC) and 2215 bp of its 5[prime]-flanking region. The gene is 18 kb in length and has four exons and three introns. The splicing sites for donor and acceptor are in good agreement with the GT/AG rule. Comparative studies of human and mouse phosducin revealed highly homologous sequences. Both the human phosducin gene and a mutant gene locus for Usher syndrome type II have been assigned to chromosome 1q25-q32. The association of this gene with a human disease locus suggests that phosducin may be a potential candidate gene for this disorder. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  6. [Characterization of Black and Dichothrix Cyanobacteria Based on the 16S Ribosomal RNA Gene Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Maya

    2010-01-01

    My project focuses on characterizing different cyanobacteria in thrombolitic mats found on the island of Highborn Cay, Bahamas. Thrombolites are interesting ecosystems because of the ability of bacteria in these mats to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and mineralize it as calcium carbonate. In the future they may be used as models to develop carbon sequestration technologies, which could be used as part of regenerative life systems in space. These thrombolitic communities are also significant because of their similarities to early communities of life on Earth. I targeted two cyanobacteria in my research, Dichothrix spp. and whatever black is, since they are believed to be important to carbon sequestration in these thrombolitic mats. The goal of my summer research project was to molecularly identify these two cyanobacteria. DNA was isolated from each organism through mat dissections and DNA extractions. I ran Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR) to amplify the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene in each cyanobacteria. This specific gene is found in almost all bacteria and is highly conserved, meaning any changes in the sequence are most likely due to evolution. As a result, the 16S rRNA gene can be used for bacterial identification of different species based on the sequence of their 16S rRNA gene. Since the exact sequence of the Dichothrix gene was unknown, I designed different primers that flanked the gene based on the known sequences from other taxonomically similar cyanobacteria. Once the 16S rRNA gene was amplified, I cloned the gene into specialized Escherichia coli cells and sent the gene products for sequencing. Once the sequence is obtained, it will be added to a genetic database for future reference to and classification of other Dichothrix sp.

  7. Transcriptome sequencing in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies fusion genes associated with distinct DNA methylation profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marincevic-Zuniga, Yanara; Dahlberg, Johan; Nilsson, Sara; Raine, Amanda; Nystedt, Sara; Lindqvist, Carl Mårten; Berglund, Eva C; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Cavelier, Lucia; Forestier, Erik; Heyman, Mats; Lönnerholm, Gudmar; Nordlund, Jessica; Syvänen, Ann-Christine

    2017-08-14

    Structural chromosomal rearrangements that lead to expressed fusion genes are a hallmark of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this study, we performed transcriptome sequencing of 134 primary ALL patient samples to comprehensively detect fusion transcripts. We combined fusion gene detection with genome-wide DNA methylation analysis, gene expression profiling, and targeted sequencing to determine molecular signatures of emerging ALL subtypes. We identified 64 unique fusion events distributed among 80 individual patients, of which over 50% have not previously been reported in ALL. Although the majority of the fusion genes were found only in a single patient, we identified several recurrent fusion gene families defined by promiscuous fusion gene partners, such as ETV6, RUNX1, PAX5, and ZNF384, or recurrent fusion genes, such as DUX4-IGH. Our data show that patients harboring these fusion genes displayed characteristic genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression signatures in addition to distinct patterns in single nucleotide variants and recurrent copy number alterations. Our study delineates the fusion gene landscape in pediatric ALL, including both known and novel fusion genes, and highlights fusion gene families with shared molecular etiologies, which may provide additional information for prognosis and therapeutic options in the future.

  8. Transcriptome sequencing in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies fusion genes associated with distinct DNA methylation profiles

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    Yanara Marincevic-Zuniga

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural chromosomal rearrangements that lead to expressed fusion genes are a hallmark of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. In this study, we performed transcriptome sequencing of 134 primary ALL patient samples to comprehensively detect fusion transcripts. Methods We combined fusion gene detection with genome-wide DNA methylation analysis, gene expression profiling, and targeted sequencing to determine molecular signatures of emerging ALL subtypes. Results We identified 64 unique fusion events distributed among 80 individual patients, of which over 50% have not previously been reported in ALL. Although the majority of the fusion genes were found only in a single patient, we identified several recurrent fusion gene families defined by promiscuous fusion gene partners, such as ETV6, RUNX1, PAX5, and ZNF384, or recurrent fusion genes, such as DUX4-IGH. Our data show that patients harboring these fusion genes displayed characteristic genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression signatures in addition to distinct patterns in single nucleotide variants and recurrent copy number alterations. Conclusion Our study delineates the fusion gene landscape in pediatric ALL, including both known and novel fusion genes, and highlights fusion gene families with shared molecular etiologies, which may provide additional information for prognosis and therapeutic options in the future.

  9. [Analysis and authentication of chloroplast matK gene sequences of Herba Dendrobii].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; He, Tao; Chun, Ze

    2009-09-01

    To compare the characteristic of chloroplast matK gene sequences of different Herba Dendrobium species and to authenticate inspected species, the matK gene sequences of 12 species (including 22 materials) and outgroup were amplified, cloned, and sequenced. Genomic DNA of Dendrobium plants was extracted using modified cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) method. The matK gene sequences were about 1 410 bp in length. The variable sites were 51 while the parsim-informative sites were 11. There were nucleotides insertions and deletions in some species, in addition to transitions and transversions, such as in D. denneanum and D.chrysotoxum. Interspecies and different populations (varieties) of Dendrobium could be distinguished on phylogeny tree. The average genetic distance was 0.008, and the maximal and minimal genetic distances between Dendrobium species were 0.014 and 0.003, respectively. There were 8-20 variable sites between Dendrobium species. The genetic distance between populations (varieties) was 0.001, and there were 1-5 variable sites. Moreover, the 4 inspected materials were successfully authenticated. The database of chloroplast matK gene sequences of 12 species of Herba Dendrobii and inspected species could be used for the molecular authentication between Dendrobium species and populations. The matK gene sequence could be used as molecular maker for authentication of Herba Dendrobium.

  10. Molecular Phylogenetics of the Genus Trichosporon Inferred from Mitochondrial Cytochrome b Gene Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Swarajit Kumar; Wang, Li; Yokoyama, Koji; Nishimura, Kazuko

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b) genes of 42 strains representing 23 species of the genus Trichosporon were partially sequenced to determine their molecular phylogenetic relationships. Almost half of the 22 strains investigated (from 11 different species) contained introns in their sequences. Analysis of a 396-bp coding sequence from each strain of Trichosporon under investigation showed a total of 141 (35.6%) variable nucleotide sites. A phylogenetic tree based on the cyt b gene sequences revealed that all species of Trichosporon except Trichosporon domesticum and Trichosporon montevideense had species-specific cyt b genes. Trichosporon sp. strain CBS 5581 was identified as Trichosporon pullulans, and one clinical isolate, IFM 48794, was identified as Trichosporon faecale. Analysis of 132-bp deduced amino acid sequences showed a total of 34 (25.75%) variable amino acid sites. T. domesticum and T. montevideense, Trichosporon asahii and Trichosporon asteroides, and Trichosporon gracile and Trichosporon guehoae had identical amino acid sequences. A phylogenetic tree constructed with the ascomycetes Saccharomyces douglasii and Candida glabrata taken as outgroup species and including representative species from closely related genera species of Trichosporon clustered with other basidiomycetous yeasts that contain xylose in their cell wall compositions. These results indicate the effectiveness of mitochondrial cyt b gene sequences for both species identification and the phylogenetic analysis of Trichosporon species. PMID:16207980

  11. Strategies for exome and genome sequence data analysis in disease-gene discovery projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Peter N; Krawitz, P; Mundlos, S

    2011-08-01

    In whole-exome sequencing (WES), target capture methods are used to enrich the sequences of the coding regions of genes from fragmented total genomic DNA, followed by massively parallel, 'next-generation' sequencing of the captured fragments. Since its introduction in 2009, WES has been successfully used in several disease-gene discovery projects, but the analysis of whole-exome sequence data can be challenging. In this overview, we present a summary of the main computational strategies that have been applied to identify novel disease genes in whole-exome data, including intersect filters, the search for de novo mutations, and the application of linkage mapping or inference of identity-by-descent (IBD) in family studies. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. A novel method to discover fluoroquinolone antibiotic resistance (qnr) genes in fragmented nucleotide sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulund, Fredrik; Johnning, Anna; Pereira, Mariana Buongermino; Larsson, D G Joakim; Kristiansson, Erik

    2012-12-11

    Broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotics are central in modern health care and are used to treat and prevent a wide range of bacterial infections. The recently discovered qnr genes provide a mechanism of resistance with the potential to rapidly spread between bacteria using horizontal gene transfer. As for many antibiotic resistance genes present in pathogens today, qnr genes are hypothesized to originate from environmental bacteria. The vast amount of data generated by shotgun metagenomics can therefore be used to explore the diversity of qnr genes in more detail. In this paper we describe a new method to identify qnr genes in nucleotide sequence data. We show, using cross-validation, that the method has a high statistical power of correctly classifying sequences from novel classes of qnr genes, even for fragments as short as 100 nucleotides. Based on sequences from public repositories, the method was able to identify all previously reported plasmid-mediated qnr genes. In addition, several fragments from novel putative qnr genes were identified in metagenomes. The method was also able to annotate 39 chromosomal variants of which 11 have previously not been reported in literature. The method described in this paper significantly improves the sensitivity and specificity of identification and annotation of qnr genes in nucleotide sequence data. The predicted novel putative qnr genes in the metagenomic data support the hypothesis of a large and uncharacterized diversity within this family of resistance genes in environmental bacterial communities. An implementation of the method is freely available at http://bioinformatics.math.chalmers.se/qnr/.

  13. A novel method to discover fluoroquinolone antibiotic resistance (qnr genes in fragmented nucleotide sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boulund Fredrik

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotics are central in modern health care and are used to treat and prevent a wide range of bacterial infections. The recently discovered qnr genes provide a mechanism of resistance with the potential to rapidly spread between bacteria using horizontal gene transfer. As for many antibiotic resistance genes present in pathogens today, qnr genes are hypothesized to originate from environmental bacteria. The vast amount of data generated by shotgun metagenomics can therefore be used to explore the diversity of qnr genes in more detail. Results In this paper we describe a new method to identify qnr genes in nucleotide sequence data. We show, using cross-validation, that the method has a high statistical power of correctly classifying sequences from novel classes of qnr genes, even for fragments as short as 100 nucleotides. Based on sequences from public repositories, the method was able to identify all previously reported plasmid-mediated qnr genes. In addition, several fragments from novel putative qnr genes were identified in metagenomes. The method was also able to annotate 39 chromosomal variants of which 11 have previously not been reported in literature. Conclusions The method described in this paper significantly improves the sensitivity and specificity of identification and annotation of qnr genes in nucleotide sequence data. The predicted novel putative qnr genes in the metagenomic data support the hypothesis of a large and uncharacterized diversity within this family of resistance genes in environmental bacterial communities. An implementation of the method is freely available at http://bioinformatics.math.chalmers.se/qnr/.

  14. Nucleotide Sequence of the Protective Antigen Gene of Bacillus Anthracis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-02

    interactions with eucaryotic cells , p. 189-198. In P. Greengard and G. A. Robinson (ed.), Advances in cyclic nucleotide and protein phosphorylation...biological activity of * PA produced by the recombinants were tested by a Western blot * procedure and the CFO cell elongation assay, respectively (14... cell elongation assay (20; data not shown). To determine the location ard direction of transcription of the PA gene, the 4.2-kb ins’nrt was excised

  15. SCALE: modeling allele-specific gene expression by single-cell RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuchao; Zhang, Nancy R; Li, Mingyao

    2017-04-26

    Allele-specific expression is traditionally studied by bulk RNA sequencing, which measures average expression across cells. Single-cell RNA sequencing allows the comparison of expression distribution between the two alleles of a diploid organism and the characterization of allele-specific bursting. Here, we propose SCALE to analyze genome-wide allele-specific bursting, with adjustment of technical variability. SCALE detects genes exhibiting allelic differences in bursting parameters and genes whose alleles burst non-independently. We apply SCALE to mouse blastocyst and human fibroblast cells and find that cis control in gene expression overwhelmingly manifests as differences in burst frequency.

  16. Sequence analysis of the capsid gene of Aichi viruses detected from Japan, Bangladesh, Thailand, and Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ngan Thi Kim; Trinh, Quang Duy; Khamrin, Pattara; Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Dey, Shuvra Kanti; Phan, Tung Gia; Hoang, Le Phuc; Maneekarn, Niwat; Okitsu, Shoko; Mizuguchi, Masashi; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2008-07-01

    Sequence analysis of the capsid gene of Aichi viruses was performed on 12 strains detected in Japan, Bangladesh, Thailand, and Vietnam during 2002-2005. The phylogenetic tree constructed from 17 nucleotide sequences of the capsid gene of the strains studied and reference strains demonstrated that Aichi virus strains clustered into two branches. A classification of Aichi viruses based on the capsid gene was proposed, in which lineage I consists of the Aichi virus strains detected from Japan, Thailand, Vietnam, and Germany, and lineage II includes Bangladeshi strains and a Brazilian strain.

  17. Haplotypes and Sequence Variation in the Ovine Adiponectin Gene (ADIPOQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Ming An

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The adiponectin gene (ADIPOQ plays an important role in energy homeostasis. In this study five separate regions (regions 1 to 5 of ovine ADIPOQ were analysed using PCR-SSCP. Four different PCR-SSCP patterns (A1-D1, A2-D2 were detected in region-1 and region-2, respectively, with seven and six SNPs being revealed. In region-3, three different patterns (A3-C3 and three SNPs were observed. Two patterns (A4-B4, A5-B5 and two and one SNPs were observed in region-4 and region-5, respectively. In total, nineteen SNPs were detected, with five of them in the coding region and two (c.46T/C and c.515G/A putatively resulting in amino acid changes (p.Tyr16His and p.Lys172Arg. In region-1, -2 and -3 of 316 sheep from eight New Zealand breeds, variants A1, A2 and A3 were the most common, although variant frequencies differed in the eight breeds. Across region-1 and region-3, nine haplotypes were identified and haplotypes A1-A3, A1-C3, B1-A3 and B1-C3 were most common. These results indicate that the ADIPOQ gene is polymorphic and suggest that further analysis is required to see if the variation in the gene is associated with animal production traits.

  18. Protecting effect of PrP codons M142 and K222 in goats orally challenged with bovine spongiform encephalopathy prions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fast, C.; Goldmann, W.; Berthon, P.; Tauscher, Kerstin; Andréoletti, O.; Lantier, I.; Rossignol, C.; Bossers, A.; Jacobs, J.G.; Hunter, N.; Groschup, Martin H.; Lantier, F.; Langeveld, J.P.M.

    2017-01-01

    Breeding towards genetic resistance to prion disease is effective in eliminating scrapie. In sheep, classical forms of scrapie have been eradicated almost completely in several countries by breeding programs using a prion protein (PrP) gene (PRNP) amino acid polymorphism. For goats, field and

  19. PrP0\\0 mice show behavioral abnormalities that suggest PrPC has a role in maintaining the cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background/Introduction. PrPC is highly conserved among mammals, but its natural function is unclear. Prnp ablated mice (PrP0/0) appear to develop normally and are able to reproduce. These observations seem to indicate that the gene is not essential for viability, in spite of it being highly conse...

  20. Reanalysis of RNA-sequencing data reveals several additional fusion genes with multiple isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangaspeska, Sara; Hultsch, Susanne; Edgren, Henrik; Nicorici, Daniel; Murumägi, Astrid; Kallioniemi, Olli

    2012-01-01

    RNA-sequencing and tailored bioinformatic methodologies have paved the way for identification of expressed fusion genes from the chaotic genomes of solid tumors. We have recently successfully exploited RNA-sequencing for the discovery of 24 novel fusion genes in breast cancer. Here, we demonstrate the importance of continuous optimization of the bioinformatic methodology for this purpose, and report the discovery and experimental validation of 13 additional fusion genes from the same samples. Integration of copy number profiling with the RNA-sequencing results revealed that the majority of the gene fusions were promoter-donating events that occurred at copy number transition points or involved high-level DNA-amplifications. Sequencing of genomic fusion break points confirmed that DNA-level rearrangements underlie selected fusion transcripts. Furthermore, a significant portion (>60%) of the fusion genes were alternatively spliced. This illustrates the importance of reanalyzing sequencing data as gene definitions change and bioinformatic methods improve, and highlights the previously unforeseen isoform diversity among fusion transcripts.

  1. Cloning and sequencing of adhesion protein gene of Trichomonas gallinae from pigeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, F; Li, G Q; Su, R Q; Liang, G; Chen, Z H; Hicham, W

    2010-02-26

    The adhesion protein (AP) gene of Trichomonas gallinae from pigeon was cloned and sequenced. The first-strand cDNA of the AP gene of T. gallinae from pigeon was amplified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with total RNA extracting kit and cloned in the vector pMD18-T. The recombinant plasmid was identified by PCR and restriction endonuclease, and the positive clone was sequenced and analysed by comparing the sequence similarity with other sequences in the GenBank. The AP gene of T. gallinae had a length of 1032bp, which contained a complete open reading frame (ORF) of 930bp long, coding for 309 amino acids. The sequence analysis revealed that the homology with three AP genes of Trichomonas vaginalis (i.e., TVU87096, TVU87097 and TVU87098) was 94.2%, 92.6% and 92.0%, respectively. It is concluded that the successfully cloned AP gene from T. gallinae will provide the basis for the expression of the AP gene in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and the preparation of its recombinant protein.

  2. Gene discovery and transcript analyses in the corn smut pathogen Ustilago maydis: expressed sequence tag and genome sequence comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saville Barry J

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ustilago maydis is the basidiomycete fungus responsible for common smut of corn and is a model organism for the study of fungal phytopathogenesis. To aid in the annotation of the genome sequence of this organism, several expressed sequence tag (EST libraries were generated from a variety of U. maydis cell types. In addition to utility in the context of gene identification and structure annotation, the ESTs were analyzed to identify differentially abundant transcripts and to detect evidence of alternative splicing and anti-sense transcription. Results Four cDNA libraries were constructed using RNA isolated from U. maydis diploid teliospores (U. maydis strains 518 × 521 and haploid cells of strain 521 grown under nutrient rich, carbon starved, and nitrogen starved conditions. Using the genome sequence as a scaffold, the 15,901 ESTs were assembled into 6,101 contiguous expressed sequences (contigs; among these, 5,482 corresponded to predicted genes in the MUMDB (MIPS Ustilago maydis database, while 619 aligned to regions of the genome not yet designated as genes in MUMDB. A comparison of EST abundance identified numerous genes that may be regulated in a cell type or starvation-specific manner. The transcriptional response to nitrogen starvation was assessed using RT-qPCR. The results of this suggest that there may be cross-talk between the nitrogen and carbon signalling pathways in U. maydis. Bioinformatic analysis identified numerous examples of alternative splicing and anti-sense transcription. While intron retention was the predominant form of alternative splicing in U. maydis, other varieties were also evident (e.g. exon skipping. Selected instances of both alternative splicing and anti-sense transcription were independently confirmed using RT-PCR. Conclusion Through this work: 1 substantial sequence information has been provided for U. maydis genome annotation; 2 new genes were identified through the discovery of 619

  3. Genomic sequence around butterfly wing development genes: annotation and comparative analysis.

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    Inês C Conceição

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Analysis of genomic sequence allows characterization of genome content and organization, and access beyond gene-coding regions for identification of functional elements. BAC libraries, where relatively large genomic regions are made readily available, are especially useful for species without a fully sequenced genome and can increase genomic coverage of phylogenetic and biological diversity. For example, no butterfly genome is yet available despite the unique genetic and biological properties of this group, such as diversified wing color patterns. The evolution and development of these patterns is being studied in a few target species, including Bicyclus anynana, where a whole-genome BAC library allows targeted access to large genomic regions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We characterize ∼1.3 Mb of genomic sequence around 11 selected genes expressed in B. anynana developing wings. Extensive manual curation of in silico predictions, also making use of a large dataset of expressed genes for this species, identified repetitive elements and protein coding sequence, and highlighted an expansion of Alcohol dehydrogenase genes. Comparative analysis with orthologous regions of the lepidopteran reference genome allowed assessment of conservation of fine-scale synteny (with detection of new inversions and translocations and of DNA sequence (with detection of high levels of conservation of non-coding regions around some, but not all, developmental genes. CONCLUSIONS: The general properties and organization of the available B. anynana genomic sequence are similar to the lepidopteran reference, despite the more than 140 MY divergence. Our results lay the groundwork for further studies of new interesting findings in relation to both coding and non-coding sequence: 1 the Alcohol dehydrogenase expansion with higher similarity between the five tandemly-repeated B. anynana paralogs than with the corresponding B. mori orthologs, and 2 the high

  4. Next generation sequencing approach for detecting 491 fusion genes from human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urakami, Kenichi; Shimoda, Yuji; Ohshima, Keiichi; Nagashima, Takeshi; Serizawa, Masakuni; Tanabe, Tomoe; Saito, Junko; Usui, Tamiko; Watanabe, Yuko; Naruoka, Akane; Ohnami, Sumiko; Ohnami, Shumpei; Mochizuki, Tohru; Kusuhara, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) of the genomes of cancer cells is contributing to new discoveries that illuminate the mechanisms of tumorigenesis. To this end, the International Cancer Genome Consortium and The Cancer Genome Atlas are investigating novel alterations of genes that will define the pathways and mechanisms of the development and growth of cancers. These efforts contribute to the development of innovative pharmaceuticals as well as to the introduction of genome sequencing as a component of personalized medicine. In particular, chromosomal translocations that fuse coding sequences serve as important pharmaceutical targets and diagnostic markers given their association with tumorigenesis. Although increasing numbers of fusion genes are being discovered using NGS, the methodology used to identify such fusion genes is complicated, expensive, and requires relatively large samples. Here, to address these problems, we describe the design and development of a panel of 491 fusion genes that performed well in the analysis of cultured human cancer cell lines and 600 clinical tumor specimens.

  5. Characterization of fusion genes and the significantly expressed fusion isoforms in breast cancer by hybrid sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weirather, Jason L; Afshar, Pegah Tootoonchi; Clark, Tyson A; Tseng, Elizabeth; Powers, Linda S; Underwood, Jason G; Zabner, Joseph; Korlach, Jonas; Wong, Wing Hung; Au, Kin Fai

    2015-10-15

    We developed an innovative hybrid sequencing approach, IDP-fusion, to detect fusion genes, determine fusion sites and identify and quantify fusion isoforms. IDP-fusion is the first method to study gene fusion events by integrating Third Generation Sequencing long reads and Second Generation Sequencing short reads. We applied IDP-fusion to PacBio data and Illumina data from the MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Compared with the existing tools, IDP-fusion detects fusion genes at higher precision and a very low false positive rate. The results show that IDP-fusion will be useful for unraveling the complexity of multiple fusion splices and fusion isoforms within tumorigenesis-relevant fusion genes. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. [Sequence analysis of LEAFY homologous gene from Dendrobium moniliforme and application for identification of medicinal Dendrobium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wen-Rui; Hou, Bei-Wei; Guan, Jing-Jiao; Luo, Jing; Ding, Xiao-Yu

    2013-04-01

    The LEAFY (LFY) homologous gene of Dendrobium moniliforme (L.) Sw. was cloned by new primers which were designed based on the conservative region of known sequences of orchid LEAFY gene. Partial LFY homologous gene was cloned by common PCR, then we got the complete LFY homologous gene Den LFY by Tail-PCR. The complete sequence of DenLFY gene was 3 575 bp which contained three exons and two introns. Using BLAST method, comparison analysis among the exon of LFY homologous gene indicted that the DenLFY gene had high identity with orchids LFY homologous, including the related fragment of PhalLFY (84%) in Phalaenopsis hybrid cultivar, LFY homologous gene in Oncidium (90%) and in other orchid (over 80%). Using MP analysis, Dendrobium is found to be the sister to Oncidium and Phalaenopsis. Homologous analysis demonstrated that the C-terminal amino acids were highly conserved. When the exons and introns were separately considered, exons and the sequence of amino acid were good markers for the function research of DenLFY gene. The second intron can be used in authentication research of Dendrobium based on the length polymorphism between Dendrobium moniliforme and Dendrobium officinale.

  7. Variant view: visualizing sequence variants in their gene context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferstay, Joel A; Nielsen, Cydney B; Munzner, Tamara

    2013-12-01

    Scientists use DNA sequence differences between an individual's genome and a standard reference genome to study the genetic basis of disease. Such differences are called sequence variants, and determining their impact in the cell is difficult because it requires reasoning about both the type and location of the variant across several levels of biological context. In this design study, we worked with four analysts to design a visualization tool supporting variant impact assessment for three different tasks. We contribute data and task abstractions for the problem of variant impact assessment, and the carefully justified design and implementation of the Variant View tool. Variant View features an information-dense visual encoding that provides maximal information at the overview level, in contrast to the extensive navigation required by currently-prevalent genome browsers. We provide initial evidence that the tool simplified and accelerated workflows for these three tasks through three case studies. Finally, we reflect on the lessons learned in creating and refining data and task abstractions that allow for concise overviews of sprawling information spaces that can reduce or remove the need for the memory-intensive use of navigation.

  8. Sequence diversities of serine-aspartate repeat genes among Staphylococcus aureus isolates from different hosts presumably by horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Huping; Lu, Hong; Zhao, Xin

    2011-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is recognized as one of the major forces for bacterial genome evolution. Many clinically important bacteria may acquire virulence factors and antibiotic resistance through HGT. The comparative genomic analysis has become an important tool for identifying HGT in emerging pathogens. In this study, the Serine-Aspartate Repeat (Sdr) family has been compared among different sources of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) to discover sequence diversities within their genomes. Four sdr genes were analyzed for 21 different S. aureus strains and 218 mastitis-associated S. aureus isolates from Canada. Comparative genomic analyses revealed that S. aureus strains from bovine mastitis (RF122 and mastitis isolates in this study), ovine mastitis (ED133), pig (ST398), chicken (ED98), and human methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) (TCH130, MRSA252, Mu3, Mu50, N315, 04-02981, JH1 and JH9) were highly associated with one another, presumably due to HGT. In addition, several types of insertion and deletion were found in sdr genes of many isolates. A new insertion sequence was found in mastitis isolates, which was presumably responsible for the HGT of sdrC gene among different strains. Moreover, the sdr genes could be used to type S. aureus. Regional difference of sdr genes distribution was also indicated among the tested S. aureus isolates. Finally, certain associations were found between sdr genes and subclinical or clinical mastitis isolates. Certain sdr gene sequences were shared in S. aureus strains and isolates from different species presumably due to HGT. Our results also suggest that the distributional assay of virulence factors should detect the full sequences or full functional regions of these factors. The traditional assay using short conserved regions may not be accurate or credible. These findings have important implications with regard to animal husbandry practices that may inadvertently enhance the contact of human and animal bacterial

  9. Sequence diversities of serine-aspartate repeat genes among Staphylococcus aureus isolates from different hosts presumably by horizontal gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huping Xue

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Horizontal gene transfer (HGT is recognized as one of the major forces for bacterial genome evolution. Many clinically important bacteria may acquire virulence factors and antibiotic resistance through HGT. The comparative genomic analysis has become an important tool for identifying HGT in emerging pathogens. In this study, the Serine-Aspartate Repeat (Sdr family has been compared among different sources of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus to discover sequence diversities within their genomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Four sdr genes were analyzed for 21 different S. aureus strains and 218 mastitis-associated S. aureus isolates from Canada. Comparative genomic analyses revealed that S. aureus strains from bovine mastitis (RF122 and mastitis isolates in this study, ovine mastitis (ED133, pig (ST398, chicken (ED98, and human methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA (TCH130, MRSA252, Mu3, Mu50, N315, 04-02981, JH1 and JH9 were highly associated with one another, presumably due to HGT. In addition, several types of insertion and deletion were found in sdr genes of many isolates. A new insertion sequence was found in mastitis isolates, which was presumably responsible for the HGT of sdrC gene among different strains. Moreover, the sdr genes could be used to type S. aureus. Regional difference of sdr genes distribution was also indicated among the tested S. aureus isolates. Finally, certain associations were found between sdr genes and subclinical or clinical mastitis isolates. CONCLUSIONS: Certain sdr gene sequences were shared in S. aureus strains and isolates from different species presumably due to HGT. Our results also suggest that the distributional assay of virulence factors should detect the full sequences or full functional regions of these factors. The traditional assay using short conserved regions may not be accurate or credible. These findings have important implications with regard to animal husbandry practices that may

  10. Sequence analysis of the ERCC2 gene regions in human, mouse, and hamster reveals three linked genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamerdin, J.E.; Stilwagen, S.A.; Ramirez, M.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-15

    The ERCC2 (excision repair cross-complementing rodent repair group 2) gene product is involved in transcription-coupled repair as an integral member of the basal transcription factor BTF2/TFIIH complex. Defects in this gene can result in three distinct human disorders, namely the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D, trichothiodystrophy, and Cockayne syndrome. We report the comparative analysis of 91.6 kb of new sequence including 54.3 kb encompassing the human ERCC2 locus, the syntenic region in the mouse (32.6 kb), and a further 4.7 kb of sequence 3{prime} of the previously reported ERCC2 region in the hamster. In addition to ERCC2, our analysis revealed the presence of two previously undescribed genes in all three species. The first is centromeric (in the human) to ERCC2 and is most similar to the kinesin light chain gene in sea urchin. The second gene is telomeric (in the human) to ERCC2 and contains a motif found in ankyrins, some cell proteins, and transcription factors. Multiple EST matches to this putative new gene indicate that it is expressed in several human tissues, including breast. The identification and description of two new genes provides potential candidate genes for disorders mapping to this region of 19q13.2. 42 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Two New PRP Conjugate Gradient Algorithms for Minimization Optimization Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Gonglin; Duan, Xiabin; Liu, Wenjie; Wang, Xiaoliang; Cui, Zengru; Sheng, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Two new PRP conjugate Algorithms are proposed in this paper based on two modified PRP conjugate gradient methods: the first algorithm is proposed for solving unconstrained optimization problems, and the second algorithm is proposed for solving nonlinear equations. The first method contains two aspects of information: function value and gradient value. The two methods both possess some good properties, as follows: 1) βk ≥ 0 2) the search direction has the trust region property without the use of any line search method 3) the search direction has sufficient descent property without the use of any line search method. Under some suitable conditions, we establish the global convergence of the two algorithms. We conduct numerical experiments to evaluate our algorithms. The numerical results indicate that the first algorithm is effective and competitive for solving unconstrained optimization problems and that the second algorithm is effective for solving large-scale nonlinear equations.

  12. Two New PRP Conjugate Gradient Algorithms for Minimization Optimization Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonglin Yuan

    Full Text Available Two new PRP conjugate Algorithms are proposed in this paper based on two modified PRP conjugate gradient methods: the first algorithm is proposed for solving unconstrained optimization problems, and the second algorithm is proposed for solving nonlinear equations. The first method contains two aspects of information: function value and gradient value. The two methods both possess some good properties, as follows: 1 βk ≥ 0 2 the search direction has the trust region property without the use of any line search method 3 the search direction has sufficient descent property without the use of any line search method. Under some suitable conditions, we establish the global convergence of the two algorithms. We conduct numerical experiments to evaluate our algorithms. The numerical results indicate that the first algorithm is effective and competitive for solving unconstrained optimization problems and that the second algorithm is effective for solving large-scale nonlinear equations.

  13. Identification of fusion genes in breast cancer by paired-end RNA-sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgren, Henrik; Murumagi, Astrid; Kangaspeska, Sara; Nicorici, Daniel; Hongisto, Vesa; Kleivi, Kristine; Rye, Inga H; Nyberg, Sandra; Wolf, Maija; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kallioniemi, Olli

    2011-01-01

    Until recently, chromosomal translocations and fusion genes have been an underappreciated class of mutations in solid tumors. Next-generation sequencing technologies provide an opportunity for systematic characterization of cancer cell transcriptomes, including the discovery of expressed fusion genes resulting from underlying genomic rearrangements. We applied paired-end RNA-seq to identify 24 novel and 3 previously known fusion genes in breast cancer cells. Supported by an improved bioinformatic approach, we had a 95% success rate of validating gene fusions initially detected by RNA-seq. Fusion partner genes were found to contribute promoters (5' UTR), coding sequences and 3' UTRs. Most fusion genes were associated with copy number transitions and were particularly common in high-level DNA amplifications. This suggests that fusion events may contribute to the selective advantage provided by DNA amplifications and deletions. Some of the fusion partner genes, such as GSDMB in the TATDN1-GSDMB fusion and IKZF3 in the VAPB-IKZF3 fusion, were only detected as a fusion transcript, indicating activation of a dormant gene by the fusion event. A number of fusion gene partners have either been previously observed in oncogenic gene fusions, mostly in leukemias, or otherwise reported to be oncogenic. RNA interference-mediated knock-down of the VAPB-IKZF3 fusion gene indicated that it may be necessary for cancer cell growth and survival. In summary, using RNA-sequencing and improved bioinformatic stratification, we have discovered a number of novel fusion genes in breast cancer, and identified VAPB-IKZF3 as a potential fusion gene with importance for the growth and survival of breast cancer cells.

  14. Identification and nucleotide sequence of the thymidine kinase gene of Shope fibroma virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upton, C.; McFadden, G.

    1986-12-01

    The thymidine kinase (TK) gene of Shope fibroma virus (SFV), a tumorigenic leporipoxvirus, was localized within the viral genome with degenerate oligonucleotide probes. These probes were constructed to two regions of high sequence conservation between the vaccinia virus TK gene and those of several known eucaryotic cellular TK genes, including human, mouse, hamster, and chicken TK genes. The oligonucleotide probes initially localized the SFV TK gene 50 kilobases (kb) from the right terminus of the 160-kb SFV genome within the 9.5-kb BamHI-HindIII fragment E. Fine-mapping analysis indicated that the TK Gene was within a 1.2-kb AvaI-HaeIII fragment, and DNA sequencing of this region revealed an open reading frame capable of encoding a polypeptide of 187 amino acids possessing considerable homology to the TK genes of the vaccinia, variola, and monkeypox orthopoxviruses and also to a variety of cellular TK genes. Homology matrix analysis and homology scores suggest that the SFV TK gene has diverged significantly from its counterpart members in the orthopoxvirus genus. Nevertheless, the presence of conserved upstream open reading frames on the 5' side of all of the poxvirus TK genes indicates a similarity of functional organization between the orthopoxviruses and leporipoxviruses. These data suggest a common ancestral origin for at least some of the unique internal regions of the leporipoxviruses and orthopoxviruses as exemplified by SFV and vaccinia virus, respectively.

  15. Citrus plastid-related gene profiling based on expressed sequence tag analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tercilio Calsa Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Plastid-related sequences, derived from putative nuclear or plastome genes, were searched in a large collection of expressed sequence tags (ESTs and genomic sequences from the Citrus Biotechnology initiative in Brazil. The identified putative Citrus chloroplast gene sequences were compared to those from Arabidopsis, Eucalyptus and Pinus. Differential expression profiling for plastid-directed nuclear-encoded proteins and photosynthesis-related gene expression variation between Citrus sinensis and Citrus reticulata, when inoculated or not with Xylella fastidiosa, were also analyzed. Presumed Citrus plastome regions were more similar to Eucalyptus. Some putative genes appeared to be preferentially expressed in vegetative tissues (leaves and bark or in reproductive organs (flowers and fruits. Genes preferentially expressed in fruit and flower may be associated with hypothetical physiological functions. Expression pattern clustering analysis suggested that photosynthesis- and carbon fixation-related genes appeared to be up- or down-regulated in a resistant or susceptible Citrus species after Xylella inoculation in comparison to non-infected controls, generating novel information which may be helpful to develop novel genetic manipulation strategies to control Citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC.

  16. A flexible and economical barcoding approach for highly multiplexed amplicon sequencing of diverse target genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig W. Herbold

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available High throughput sequencing of phylogenetic and functional gene amplicons provides tremendous insight into the structure and functional potential of complex microbial communities. Here, we introduce a highly adaptable and economical PCR approach to barcoding and pooling libraries of numerous target genes. In this approach, we replace gene- and sequencing platform-specific fusion primers with general, interchangeable barcoding primers, enabling nearly limitless customized barcode-primer combinations. Compared to barcoding with long fusion primers, our multiple-target gene approach is more economical because it overall requires lower number of primers and is based on short primers with generally lower synthesis and purification costs. To highlight our approach, we pooled over 900 different small-subunit rRNA and functional gene amplicon libraries obtained from various environmental or host-associated microbial community samples into a single, paired-end Illumina MiSeq run. Although the amplicon regions ranged in size from approximately 290 to 720 bp, we found no significant systematic sequencing bias related to amplicon length or gene target. Our results indicate that this flexible multiplexing approach produces large, diverse and high quality sets of amplicon sequence data for modern studies in microbial ecology.

  17. Complexity of genetic sequences modified by horizontal gene transfer and degraded-DNA uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremberger, George; Dehipawala, S.; Nguyen, A.; Cheung, E.; Sullivan, R.; Holden, T.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2015-09-01

    Horizontal gene transfer has been a major vehicle for efficient transfer of genetic materials among living species and could be one of the sources for noncoding DNA incorporation into a genome. Our previous study of lnc- RNA sequence complexity in terms of fractal dimension and information entropy shows a tight regulation among the studied genes in numerous diseases. The role of sequence complexity in horizontal transferred genes was investigated with Mealybug in symbiotic relation with a 139K genome microbe and Deinococcus radiodurans as examples. The fractal dimension and entropy showed correlation R-sq of 0.82 (N = 6) for the studied Deinococcus radiodurans sequences. For comparison the Deinococcus radiodurans oxidative stress tolerant catalase and superoxide dismutase genes under extracellular dGMP growth condition showed R-sq ~ 0.42 (N = 6); and the studied arsenate reductase horizontal transferred genes for toxicity survival in several microorganisms showed no correlation. Simulation results showed that R-sq transferred genes in Mealybug. The mild correlation of R-sq ~ 0.5 for fractal dimension versus transcription level in the studied Deinococcus radiodurans sequences upon extracellular dGMP growth condition would suggest that lower fractal dimension with less electron density fluctuation favors higher transcription level.

  18. Dual redundant sequencing strategy: Full-length gene characterisation of 1056 novel and confirmatory HLA alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, V; Zweiniger, C; Surendranath, V; Lang, K; Schöfl, G; Dahl, A; Winkler, S; Lange, V; Böhme, I; Schmidt, A H

    2017-08-01

    The high-throughput department of DKMS Life Science Lab encounters novel human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles on a daily basis. To characterise these alleles, we have developed a system to sequence the whole gene from 5'- to 3'-UTR for the HLA loci A, B, C, DQB1 and DPB1 for submission to the European Molecular Biology Laboratory - European Nucleotide Archive (EMBL-ENA) and the IPD-IMGT/HLA Database. Our workflow is based on a dual redundant sequencing strategy. Using shotgun sequencing on an Illumina MiSeq instrument and single molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing on a PacBio RS II instrument, we are able to achieve highly accurate HLA full-length consensus sequences. Remaining conflicts are resolved using the R package DR2S (Dual Redundant Reference Sequencing). Given the relatively high throughput of this strategy, we have developed the semi-automated web service TypeLoader, to aid in the submission of sequences to the EMBL-ENA and the IPD-IMGT/HLA Database. In the IPD-IMGT/HLA Database release 3.24.0 (April 2016; prior to the submission of the sequences described here), only 5.2% of all known HLA alleles have been fully characterised together with intronic and UTR sequences. So far, we have applied our strategy to characterise and submit 1056 HLA alleles, thereby more than doubling the number of fully characterised alleles. Given the increasing application of next generation sequencing (NGS) for full gene characterisation in clinical practice, extending the HLA database concomitantly is highly desirable. Therefore, we propose this dual redundant sequencing strategy as a workflow for submission of novel full-length alleles and characterisation of sequences that are as yet incomplete. This would help to mitigate the predominance of partially known alleles in the database. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. X-exome sequencing of 405 unresolved families identifies seven novel intellectual disability genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, H; Haas, S A; Chelly, J

    2016-01-01

    pathogenic variants in established XLID genes. In 19 families, we detected likely causative protein truncating and missense variants in 7 novel and validated XLID genes (CLCN4, CNKSR2, FRMPD4, KLHL15, LAS1L, RLIM and USP27X) and potentially deleterious variants in 2 novel candidate XLID genes (CDK16 and TAF1......X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. During the past two decades in excess of 100 X-chromosome ID genes have been identified. Yet, a large number of families mapping to the X-chromosome remained unresolved suggesting that more XLID genes...... of known XLID genes by Sanger sequencing. In total, 745 X-chromosomal genes were screened. After stringent filtering, a total of 1297 non-recurrent exonic variants remained for prioritization. Co-segregation analysis of potential clinically relevant changes revealed that 80 families (20%) carried...

  20. Novel noncontiguous duplications identified with a comprehensive mutation analysis in the DMD gene by DMD gene-targeted sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Wang, Huanhuan; Xiao, Bing; Wei, Wei; Liu, Yu; Ye, Hui; Ying, Xiaomin; Chen, Yingwei; Liu, Xiaoqing; Ji, Xing; Sun, Yu

    2018-03-01

    Genomic rearrangements, such as intragenic deletions and duplications, are the most prevalent types of mutation in the DMD gene, and DMD mutations underlie Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). Using multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and DMD gene-targeted sequencing, we performed a molecular characterization of two cases of complex noncontiguous duplication rearrangements that involved inverted duplications. The breakpoint sequences were analyzed to investigate the mechanisms of the rearrangement. The two cases shared the same duplication events (Dup-nml-Dup/inv), and both involved microhomology and small insertions at the breakpoints. Additionally, in case 1, SNP sequencing results indicated that the de novo duplication mutation arose in the allele that originated from the grandfather. This study has identified a novel type of DMD complex rearrangement and provides insight into the molecular basis of this genomic rearrangement. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Whole exome sequencing reveals concomitant mutations of multiple FA genes in individual Fanconi anemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lixian; Yuan, Weiping; Zeng, Huimin; Zhou, Quanquan; Wei, Wei; Zhou, Jianfeng; Li, Miaomiao; Wang, Xiaomin; Xu, Mingjiang; Yang, Fengchun; Yang, Yungui; Cheng, Tao; Zhu, Xiaofan

    2014-05-15

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare inherited genetic syndrome with highly variable clinical manifestations. Fifteen genetic subtypes of FA have been identified. Traditional complementation tests for grouping studies have been used generally in FA patients and in stepwise methods to identify the FA type, which can result in incomplete genetic information from FA patients. We diagnosed five pediatric patients with FA based on clinical manifestations, and we performed exome sequencing of peripheral blood specimens from these patients and their family members. The related sequencing data were then analyzed by bioinformatics, and the FANC gene mutations identified by exome sequencing were confirmed by PCR re-sequencing. Homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations of FANC genes were identified in all of the patients. The FA subtypes of the patients included FANCA, FANCM and FANCD2. Interestingly, four FA patients harbored multiple mutations in at least two FA genes, and some of these mutations have not been previously reported. These patients' clinical manifestations were vastly different from each other, as were their treatment responses to androstanazol and prednisone. This finding suggests that heterozygous mutation(s) in FA genes could also have diverse biological and/or pathophysiological effects on FA patients or FA gene carriers. Interestingly, we were not able to identify de novo mutations in the genes implicated in DNA repair pathways when the sequencing data of patients were compared with those of their parents. Our results indicate that Chinese FA patients and carriers might have higher and more complex mutation rates in FANC genes than have been conventionally recognized. Testing of the fifteen FANC genes in FA patients and their family members should be a regular clinical practice to determine the optimal care for the individual patient, to counsel the family and to obtain a better understanding of FA pathophysiology.

  2. Complete genome sequence of Fer-de-Lance Virus reveals a novel gene in reptilian Paramyxoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurath, G.; Batts, W.N.; Ahne, W.; Winton, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    The complete RNA genome sequence of the archetype reptilian paramyxovirus, Fer-de-Lance virus (FDLV), has been determined. The genome is 15,378 nucleotides in length and consists of seven nonoverlapping genes in the order 3??? N-U-P-M-F-HN-L 5???, coding for the nucleocapsid, unknown, phospho-, matrix, fusion, hemagglutinin-neuraminidase, and large polymerase proteins, respectively. The gene junctions contain highly conserved transcription start and stop signal sequences and tri-nucleotide intergenic regions similar to those of other Paramyxoviridae. The FDLV P gene expression strategy is like that of rubulaviruses, which express the accessory V protein from the primary transcript and edit a portion of the mRNA to encode P and I proteins. There is also an overlapping open reading frame potentially encoding a small basic protein in the P gene. The gene designated U (unknown), encodes a deduced protein of 19.4 kDa that has no counterpart in other paramyxoviruses and has no similarity with sequences in the National Center for Biotechnology Information database. Active transcription of the U gene in infected cells was demonstrated by Northern blot analysis, and bicistronic N-U mRNA was also evident. The genomes of two other snake paramyxovirus genotypes were also found to have U genes, with 11 to 16% nucleotide divergence from the FDLV U gene. Pairwise comparisons of amino acid identities and phylogenetic analyses of all deduced FDLV protein sequences with homologous sequences from other Paramyxoviridae indicate that FDLV represents a new genus within the subfamily Paramyxovirinae. We suggest the name Ferlavirus for the new genus, with FDLV as the type species.

  3. Isolation of laccase gene-specific sequences from white rot and brown rot fungi by PCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Souza, T.M.; Boominathan, K.; Reddy, C.A. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Degenerate primers corresponding to the consensus sequences of the copper-binding regions in the N-terminal domains of known basidiomycete laccases were used to isolate laccase gene-specific sequences from strains representing nine genera of wood rot fungi. All except three gave the expected PCR product of about 200 bp. Computer searches of the databases identified the sequences of each of the PCR product of about 200 bp. Computer searches of the databases identified the sequence of each of the PCR products analyzed as a laccase gene sequence, suggesting the specificity of the primers. PCR products of the white rot fungi Ganoderma lucidum, Phlebia brevispora, and Trametes versicolor showed 65 to 74% nucleotide sequence similarity to each other; the similarity in deduced amino acid sequences was 83 to 91%. The PCR products of Lentinula edodes and Lentinus tigrinus, on the other hand, showed relatively low nucleotide and amino acid similarities (58 to 64 and 62 to 81%, respectively); however, these similarities were still much higher than when compared with the corresponding regions in the laccases of the ascomycete fungi Aspergillus nidulans and Neurospora crassa. A few of the white rot fungi, as well as Gloeophyllum trabeum, a brown rot fungus, gave a 144-bp PCR fragment which had a nucleotide sequence similarity of 60 to 71%. Demonstration of laccase activity in G. trabeum and several other brown rot fungi was of particular interest because these organisms were not previously shown to produce laccases. 36 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Preliminary study on mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene sequences and phylogeny of flatfishes (Pleuronectiformes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Feng; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Peijun; Xiang, Jianhai

    2005-09-01

    A 605 bp section of mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene from Paralichthys olivaceus, Pseudorhombus cinnamomeus, Psetta maxima and Kareius bicoloratus, which represent 3 families of Order Pleuronectiformes was amplified by PCR and sequenced to show the molecular systematics of Pleuronectiformes for comparison with related gene sequences of other 6 flatfish downloaded from GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis based on genetic distance from related gene sequences of 10 flatfish showed that this method was ideal to explore the relationship between species, genera and families. Phylogenetic trees set-up is based on neighbor-joining, maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood methods that accords to the general rule of Pleuronectiformes evolution. But they also resulted in some confusion. Unlike data from morphological characters, P. olivaceus clustered with K. bicoloratus, but P. cinnamomeus did not cluster with P. olivaceus, which is worth further studying.

  5. A Primer for Disease Gene Prioritization Using Next-Generation Sequencing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuoguo Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput next-generation sequencing (NGS technology produces a tremendous amount of raw sequence data. The challenges for researchers are to process the raw data, to map the sequences to genome, to discover variants that are different from the reference genome, and to prioritize/rank the variants for the question of interest. The recent development of many computational algorithms and programs has vastly improved the ability to translate sequence data into valuable information for disease gene identification. However, the NGS data analysis is complex and could be overwhelming for researchers who are not familiar with the process. Here, we outline the analysis pipeline and describe some of the most commonly used principles and tools for analyzing NGS data for disease gene identification.

  6. CLINICAL PROGRESS IN INHERITED RETINAL DEGENERATIONS: GENE THERAPY CLINICAL TRIALS AND ADVANCES IN GENETIC SEQUENCING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafler, Brian P

    2017-03-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies are a significant cause of vision loss and are characterized by the loss of photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Mutations in approximately 250 genes cause inherited retinal degenerations with a high degree of genetic heterogeneity. New techniques in next-generation sequencing are allowing the comprehensive analysis of all retinal disease genes thus changing the approach to the molecular diagnosis of inherited retinal dystrophies. This review serves to analyze clinical progress in genetic diagnostic testing and implications for retinal gene therapy. A literature search of PubMed and OMIM was conducted to relevant articles in inherited retinal dystrophies. Next-generation genetic sequencing allows the simultaneous analysis of all the approximately 250 genes that cause inherited retinal dystrophies. Reported diagnostic rates range are high and range from 51% to 57%. These new sequencing tools are highly accurate with sensitivities of 97.9% and specificities of 100%. Retinal gene therapy clinical trials are underway for multiple genes including RPE65, ABCA4, CHM, RS1, MYO7A, CNGA3, CNGB3, ND4, and MERTK for which a molecular diagnosis may be beneficial for patients. Comprehensive next-generation genetic sequencing of all retinal dystrophy genes is changing the paradigm for how retinal specialists perform genetic testing for inherited retinal degenerations. Not only are high diagnostic yields obtained, but mutations in genes with novel clinical phenotypes are also identified. In the era of retinal gene therapy clinical trials, identifying specific genetic defects will increasingly be of use to identify patients who may enroll in clinical studies and benefit from novel therapies.

  7. Molecular Identification and Sequencing of Mannose Binding Protein (MBP Gene of Acanthamoeba palestinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rezaeian

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Acanthamoeba keratitis develops by pathogenic Acanthamoeba such as A. pal­es­tinen­sis. Indeed this species is one of the known causative agents of amoebic keratitis in Iran. Mannose Binding Protein (MBP is the main pathogenicity factors for developing this sight threatening disease. We aimed to characterize MBP gene in pathogenic Acanthamoeba isolates such as A. palestinensis."nMethods: This experimental research was performed in the School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran during 2007-2008.  A. palestinensis was grown on 2% non-nutrient agar overlaid with Escherichia coli. DNA extraction was performed using phenol-chloroform method. PCR reaction and amplification were done using specific primer pairs of MBP. The amplified fragment were purified and sequenced. Finally, the obtained fragment was deposited in the gene data bank."nResults: A 900 bp PCR-product was recovered after PCR reaction. Sequence analysis of the purified PCR product revealed a gene with 943 nucleotides. Homology analysis of the ob­tained sequence showed 81% similarity with the available MBP gene in the gene data bank. The fragment was deposited in the gene data bank under accession number EU678895"nConclusion: MBP is known as the most important factor in Acanthamoeba pathogenesis cas­cade. Therefore, characterization of this gene can aid in developing better therapeutic agents and even immunization of high-risk people.

  8. Differentiation of Xylella fastidiosa strains via multilocus sequence analysis of environmentally mediated genes (MLSA-E).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jennifer K; Havird, Justin C; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2012-03-01

    Isolates of the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa are genetically very similar, but studies on their biological traits have indicated differences in virulence and infection symptomatology. Taxonomic analyses have identified several subspecies, and phylogenetic analyses of housekeeping genes have shown broad host-based genetic differences; however, results are still inconclusive for genetic differentiation of isolates within subspecies. This study employs multilocus sequence analysis of environmentally mediated genes (MLSA-E; genes influenced by environmental factors) to investigate X. fastidiosa relationships and differentiate isolates with low genetic variability. Potential environmentally mediated genes, including host colonization and survival genes related to infection establishment, were identified a priori. The ratio of the rate of nonsynonymous substitutions to the rate of synonymous substitutions (dN/dS) was calculated to select genes that may be under increased positive selection compared to previously studied housekeeping genes. Nine genes were sequenced from 54 X. fastidiosa isolates infecting different host plants across the United States. Results of maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian phylogenetic (BP) analyses are in agreement with known X. fastidiosa subspecies clades but show novel within-subspecies differentiation, including geographic differentiation, and provide additional information regarding host-based isolate variation and specificity. dN/dS ratios of environmentally mediated genes, though fastidiosa isolates. Discovering the genetic relationships between X. fastidiosa isolates will provide new insights into the epidemiology of populations of X. fastidiosa, allowing improved disease management in economically important crops.

  9. Sperm competition shapes gene expression and sequence evolution in the ocellated wrasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Rebecca; Wright, Alison E; Marsh-Rollo, Susan E; Nugent, Bridget M; Alonzo, Suzanne H; Mank, Judith E

    2017-01-01

    Gene expression differences between males and females often underlie sexually dimorphic phenotypes, and the expression levels of genes that are differentially expressed between the sexes are thought to respond to sexual selection. Most studies on the transcriptomic response to sexual selection treat sexual selection as a single force, but postmating sexual selection in particular is expected to specifically target gonadal tissue. The three male morphs of the ocellated wrasse (Symphodus ocellatus) make it possible to test the role of postmating sexual selection in shaping the gonadal transcriptome. Nesting males hold territories and have the highest reproductive success, yet we detected feminization of their gonadal gene expression compared to satellite males. Satellite males are less brightly coloured and experience more intense sperm competition than nesting males. In line with postmating sexual selection affecting gonadal gene expression, we detected a more masculinized expression profile in satellites. Sneakers are the lowest quality males and showed both de-masculinization and de-feminization of gene expression. We also detected higher rates of gene sequence evolution of male-biased genes compared to unbiased genes, which could at least in part be explained by positive selection. Together, these results reveal the potential for postmating sexual selection to drive higher rates of gene sequence evolution and shape the gonadal transcriptome profile. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Hunting down frame shifts: Ecological analysis of diverse functional gene sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal eStrejcek

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Functional gene ecological analyses using amplicon sequencing can be challenging as translated sequences are often burdened with shifted reading frames. The aim of this work was to evaluate several bioinformatics tools designed to correct errors which arise during sequencing in an effort to reduce the number of frame-shifts (FS. Genes encoding for alpha subunits of biphenyl (bphA and benzoate (benA dioxygenases were used as model sequences. FrameBot, a FS correction tool, was able to reduce the number of detected FS to zero. However, up to 43.1% of sequences were discarded by FrameBot as non-specific targets. Therefore, we proposed a de novo mode of FrameBot for FS correction, which works on a similar basis as common chimera identifying platforms and is not dependent on reference sequences. By nature of FrameBot de novo design, it is crucial to provide it with data as error free as possible. We tested the ability of several publicly available correction tools to decrease the number of errors in the data sets. The combination of Maximum Expected Error (MEE filtering and single linkage pre-clustering (SLP proved the most efficient read procession. Applying FrameBot de novo on the processed data enabled analysis of BphA sequences with minimal losses of potentially functional sequences not homologous to those previously known. This experiment also demonstrated the extensive diversity of dioxygenases in soil. A script which performs FrameBot de novo is presented in the supplementary material to the study and the tool was implemented into FunGene Pipeline available at http://fungene.cme.msu.edu/FunGenePipeline/ and https://github.com/rdpstaff/Framebot.

  11. Analysis and comparison of fragrant gene sequence in some rice cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karami Noushafarin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the fragrant trait in rice (Oryza sativa L. is largely controlled by fgr gene on chromosome 8 and it has been specified that the existence of an 8 bp deletion and three single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in exon 7 is effective on this trait. In this study, sequence alignment analysis of fgr exon7 on chromosome 8 for 11 different fragrant and non-fragrant cultivars revealed that 5 aromatic rice cultivars carried 3 SNPs and 8 bp deletion in exon7 which terminates prematurely at a TAA stop codon. However, 5 of the non-aromatics showed a sequence identical to the published Nipponbare, being non-fragrant Japonica variety sequence. An exception among them was Bejar, which had 8 bp deletion and 3SNPs but it was non-aromatic. Sequencing can determine nucleotide alignment of a gene and give beneficial information about gene function. In silico prediction showed proteins sequences alignment of fgr gene for Khazar and Domsiah genotypes were different. Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase complete enzyme belongs to Khazar non-fragrant genotype that has complete length and 503 amino acids while non-functional BADH2 enzyme for Domsiah fragrant genotype has 251 amino acids that result in accumulate 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline (2AP and produces aroma in fragrant genotypes.

  12. Phylogeny of ruminants secretory ribonuclease gene sequences of pronghorn (Antilocapra americana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beintema, Jaap J; Breukelman, Heleen J; Dubois, Jean-Yves F; Warmels, Hayo W

    2003-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses based on primary structures of mammalian ribonucleases, indicated that three homologous enzymes (pancreatic, seminal and brain ribonucleases) present in the bovine species are the results of gene duplication events, which occurred in the ancestor of the ruminants after divergence from other artiodactyls. In this paper sequences are presented of genes encoding pancreatic and brain-type ribonuclease genes of pronghorn (Antilocapra americana). The seminal-type ribonuclease gene could not be detected in this species, neither by PCR amplification nor by Southern blot analyses, indicating that it may be deleted completely in this species. Previously we demonstrated of a study of amino acid sequences of pancreatic ribonucleases of a large number of ruminants the monophyly of bovids and cervids, and that pronghorn groups with giraffe. Here we present phylogenetic analyses of nucleotide sequences of ribonucleases and other molecules from ruminant species and compare these with published data. Chevrotain (Tragulus) always groups with the other ruminants as separate taxon from the pecora or true ruminants. Within the pecora the relationships between Bovidae, Cervidae, Giraffidae, and pronghorn (Antilocapra) cannot be decided with certainty, although in the majority of analyses Antilocapra diverges first, separately or joined with giraffe. Broad taxon sampling and investigation of specific sequence features may be as important for reliable conclusions in phylogeny as the lengths of analyzed sequences.

  13. Nucleotide sequences of immunoglobulin eta genes of chimpanzee and orangutan: DNA molecular clock and hominoid evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakoyama, Y.; Hong, K.J.; Byun, S.M.; Hisajima, H.; Ueda, S.; Yaoita, Y.; Hayashida, H.; Miyata, T.; Honjo, T.

    1987-02-01

    To determine the phylogenetic relationships among hominoids and the dates of their divergence, the complete nucleotide sequences of the constant region of the immunoglobulin eta-chain (C/sub eta1/) genes from chimpanzee and orangutan have been determined. These sequences were compared with the human eta-chain constant-region sequence. A molecular clock (silent molecular clock), measured by the degree of sequence divergence at the synonymous (silent) positions of protein-encoding regions, was introduced for the present study. From the comparison of nucleotide sequences of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin and ..beta..- and delta-globulin genes between humans and Old World monkeys, the silent molecular clock was calibrated: the mean evolutionary rate of silent substitution was determined to be 1.56 x 10/sup -9/ substitutions per site per year. Using the silent molecular clock, the mean divergence dates of chimpanzee and orangutan from the human lineage were estimated as 6.4 +/- 2.6 million years and 17.3 +/- 4.5 million years, respectively. It was also shown that the evolutionary rate of primate genes is considerably slower than those of other mammalian genes.

  14. [Study on molecular phylogeny of Schistosoma bovis based on mitochondrial DNA sequence and gene order].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jing-ying; Cai, Lian-shun; Mitsuru, Nagataki; Shinji, Tokuhiro; Jarilla Blanca, R; Masaaki, Shimada; Blair, David; Takeshi, Agatsuma

    2010-08-01

    To determine the nucleotide sequence of the partial mitochondrial (mt) genome and the order of the mitochondrial protein-coding genes for Schistosoma bovis for analysis of possible phylogenetic position of this species in the genus Schistosoma. The genomic DNA of adult worms were extracted by the GNT-K method. The target regions were amplified by PCR using a degenerated primer and specific primer. The PCR products were purified before ligating into the pGEM1 T-vector system. Recombinant plasmids were amplified in Escherichia coli, extracted and purified using routine methods. The nucleotide sequences were determined with an ABI PRISM 3100-Avant DNA sequencer using a BigDye Terminators v3.1 Cycle Sequencing Kit (Applied Bio-systems, CA, U.S.A.) with two T-vector specific primers (T7 and SP6). Positive colonies were sequenced with two internal specific primers to obtain the full sequence of each fragment on both strands by means of primer walking. Sequences of related schistosomes were retrieved from GenBank and aligned with our data. Gene trees were constructed using neighbor joining methods. The nucleotide sequence was determined and the gene order of this region in S. bovis was found as follows: NADHdehydrogenase4 (nad4)-trnQ (Gln)-trnK(Lys)-NADH dehydrogenase 3(nad3)-trnD (Asp)-NADH dehydrogenase 1(nad1). The gene order covering such region of S. bovis was similar to that of the African Schistosoma species, but strikingly different from the Asian species. Phylogenetic trees inferred from the alignment including partial nad4, nad3, partial nad1 and partial nad4+nad3+nad1 sequence for other 8 Schistosoma spp., respectively, revealed that S. bovis is placed proximally to S. haematobium in the African sub-group, which is identical with those placed by gene order in the African clade. The mtDNA analysis based on mitochondrial DNA sequence and the gene order strongly support the hypothesis that S. bovis belongs to the African schistosome clade rather than the Asian

  15. Successful Recovery of Nuclear Protein-Coding Genes from Small Insects in Museums Using Illumina Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasenko, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we explore high-throughput Illumina sequencing of nuclear protein-coding, ribosomal, and mitochondrial genes in small, dried insects stored in natural history collections. We sequenced one tenebrionid beetle and 12 carabid beetles ranging in size from 3.7 to 9.7 mm in length that have been stored in various museums for 4 to 84 years. Although we chose a number of old, small specimens for which we expected low sequence recovery, we successfully recovered at least some low-copy nuclear protein-coding genes from all specimens. For example, in one 56-year-old beetle, 4.4 mm in length, our de novo assembly recovered about 63% of approximately 41,900 nucleotides in a target suite of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments, and 70% using a reference-based assembly. Even in the least successfully sequenced carabid specimen, reference-based assembly yielded fragments that were at least 50% of the target length for 34 of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments. Exploration of alternative references for reference-based assembly revealed few signs of bias created by the reference. For all specimens we recovered almost complete copies of ribosomal and mitochondrial genes. We verified the general accuracy of the sequences through comparisons with sequences obtained from PCR and Sanger sequencing, including of conspecific, fresh specimens, and through phylogenetic analysis that tested the placement of sequences in predicted regions. A few possible inaccuracies in the sequences were detected, but these rarely affected the phylogenetic placement of the samples. Although our sample sizes are low, an exploratory regression study suggests that the dominant factor in predicting success at recovering nuclear protein-coding genes is a high number of Illumina reads, with success at PCR of COI and killing by immersion in ethanol being secondary factors; in analyses of only high-read samples, the primary significant explanatory variable was body length, with small beetles

  16. Successful Recovery of Nuclear Protein-Coding Genes from Small Insects in Museums Using Illumina Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kojun Kanda

    Full Text Available In this paper we explore high-throughput Illumina sequencing of nuclear protein-coding, ribosomal, and mitochondrial genes in small, dried insects stored in natural history collections. We sequenced one tenebrionid beetle and 12 carabid beetles ranging in size from 3.7 to 9.7 mm in length that have been stored in various museums for 4 to 84 years. Although we chose a number of old, small specimens for which we expected low sequence recovery, we successfully recovered at least some low-copy nuclear protein-coding genes from all specimens. For example, in one 56-year-old beetle, 4.4 mm in length, our de novo assembly recovered about 63% of approximately 41,900 nucleotides in a target suite of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments, and 70% using a reference-based assembly. Even in the least successfully sequenced carabid specimen, reference-based assembly yielded fragments that were at least 50% of the target length for 34 of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments. Exploration of alternative references for reference-based assembly revealed few signs of bias created by the reference. For all specimens we recovered almost complete copies of ribosomal and mitochondrial genes. We verified the general accuracy of the sequences through comparisons with sequences obtained from PCR and Sanger sequencing, including of conspecific, fresh specimens, and through phylogenetic analysis that tested the placement of sequences in predicted regions. A few possible inaccuracies in the sequences were detected, but these rarely affected the phylogenetic placement of the samples. Although our sample sizes are low, an exploratory regression study suggests that the dominant factor in predicting success at recovering nuclear protein-coding genes is a high number of Illumina reads, with success at PCR of COI and killing by immersion in ethanol being secondary factors; in analyses of only high-read samples, the primary significant explanatory variable was body length

  17. Sequence and regulation of a gene encoding a human 89-kilodalton heat shock protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickey, E.; Brandon, S.E.; Weber, L.A.; Lloyd, D.

    1989-06-01

    Vertebrate cells synthesize two forms of the 82- to 90-kilodalton heat shock protein that are encoded by distinct gene families. In HeLa cells, both proteins (hsp89/alpha/ and hspio/beta/) are abundant under normal growth conditions and are synthesized at increased rates in response to heat stress. Only the larger form, hsp89/alpha/, is induced by the adenovirus E1A gene product. The authors have isolated a human hsp89/alpha/ gene that shows complete sequence identity with heat- and E1A-inducible cDNA used as a hybridization probe. The 5'-flanking region contained overlapping and inverted consensus heat shock control elements that can confer heat-inducible expression n a /beta/-globin reporter gene. The gene contained 10 intervening sequences. The first intron was located adjacent to the translation start codon, an arrangement also found in the Drosophila hsp82 gene. The spliced mRNA sequence contained a single open reading frame encoding an 84,564-dalton polypeptide showing high homology with the hsp82 to hsp90 proteins of other organisms. The deduced hsp89/alpha/ protein sequence differed from the human hsp89/beta/ sequence reported elsewhere in at least 99 out of the 732 amino acids. Transcription of the hsp89/alpha/ gene was induced by serum during normal cell growth, but expression did not appear to be restricted to a particular stage of the cell cycles. hsp89/alpha/ mRNA was considerably more stable than the mRNA encoding hsp70, which can account for the higher constitutive rate of hsp89 synthesis in unstressed cells.

  18. Unique Trichomonas vaginalis gene sequences identified in multinational regions of Northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Feng, Meng; Wang, Xiaolan; Fu, Yongfeng; Ma, Cailing; Cheng, Xunjia

    2017-07-24

    Trichomonas vaginalis (T. vaginalis) is a flagellated protozoan parasite that infects humans worldwide. This study determined the sequence of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene of T. vaginalis infecting both females and males in Xinjiang, China. Samples from 73 females and 28 males were collected and confirmed for infection with T. vaginalis, a total of 110 sequences were identified when the T. vaginalis 18S ribosomal RNA gene was sequenced. These sequences were used to prepare a phylogenetic network. The rooted network comprised three large clades and several independent branches. Most of the Xinjiang sequences were in one group. Preliminary results suggest that Xinjiang T. vaginalis isolates might be genetically unique, as indicated by the sequence of their 18S ribosomal RNA gene. Low migration rate of local people in this province may contribute to a genetic conservativeness of T. vaginalis. The unique genetic feature of our isolates may suggest a different clinical presentation of trichomoniasis, including metronidazole susceptibility, T. vaginalis virus or Mycoplasma co-infection characteristics. The transmission and evolution of Xinjiang T. vaginalis is of interest and should be studied further. More attention should be given to T. vaginalis infection in both females and males in Xinjiang.

  19. Metazoan Remaining Genes for Essential Amino Acid Biosynthesis: Sequence Conservation and Evolutionary Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor R. Costa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Essential amino acids (EAA consist of a group of nine amino acids that animals are unable to synthesize via de novo pathways. Recently, it has been found that most metazoans lack the same set of enzymes responsible for the de novo EAA biosynthesis. Here we investigate the sequence conservation and evolution of all the metazoan remaining genes for EAA pathways. Initially, the set of all 49 enzymes responsible for the EAA de novo biosynthesis in yeast was retrieved. These enzymes were used as BLAST queries to search for similar sequences in a database containing 10 complete metazoan genomes. Eight enzymes typically attributed to EAA pathways were found to be ubiquitous in metazoan genomes, suggesting a conserved functional role. In this study, we address the question of how these genes evolved after losing their pathway partners. To do this, we compared metazoan genes with their fungal and plant orthologs. Using phylogenetic analysis with maximum likelihood, we found that acetolactate synthase (ALS and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT diverged from the expected Tree of Life (ToL relationships. High sequence conservation in the paraphyletic group Plant-Fungi was identified for these two genes using a newly developed Python algorithm. Selective pressure analysis of ALS and BHMT protein sequences showed higher non-synonymous mutation ratios in comparisons between metazoans/fungi and metazoans/plants, supporting the hypothesis that these two genes have undergone non-ToL evolution in animals.

  20. cDNA sequences reveal considerable gene prediction inaccuracy in the Plasmodium falciparum genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valenzuela Jesus G

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The completion of the Plasmodium falciparum genome represents a milestone in malaria research. The genome sequence allows for the development of genome-wide approaches such as microarray and proteomics that will greatly facilitate our understanding of the parasite biology and accelerate new drug and vaccine development. Designing and application of these genome-wide assays, however, requires accurate information on gene prediction and genome annotation. Unfortunately, the genes in the parasite genome databases were mostly identified using computer software that could make some erroneous predictions. Results We aimed to obtain cDNA sequences to examine the accuracy of gene prediction in silico. We constructed cDNA libraries from mixed blood stages of P. falciparum parasite using the SMART cDNA library construction technique and generated 17332 high-quality expressed sequence tags (EST, including 2198 from primer-walking experiments. Assembly of our sequence tags produced 2548 contigs and 2671 singletons versus 5220 contigs and 5910 singletons when our EST were assembled with EST in public databases. Comparison of all the assembled EST/contigs with predicted CDS and genomic sequences in the PlasmoDB database identified 356 genes with predicted coding sequences fully covered by EST, including 85 genes (23.6% with introns incorrectly predicted. Careful automatic software and manual alignments found an additional 308 genes that have introns different from those predicted, with 152 new introns discovered and 182 introns with sizes or locations different from those predicted. Alternative spliced and antisense transcripts were also detected. Matching cDNA to predicted genes also revealed silent chromosomal regions, mostly at subtelomere regions. Conclusion Our data indicated that approximately 24% of the genes in the current databases were predicted incorrectly, although some of these inaccuracies could represent alternatively

  1. Cloning and Sequence Analysis of the Cellobiohydrolase I Genes from Some Basidiomycetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharachchikumbura, Sajeewa S. N.; Wongkham, Shannaphimon; Sysouphanthong, Phongeun; Phookamsak, Rungtiwa; Hyde, Kevin D.

    2012-01-01

    Genes encoding the cellobiohydrolase enzyme (CBHI), designated as cbhI, were isolated from the basidiomycetes Auricularia fuscosuccinea, Pleurotus giganteus, P. eryngii, P. ostreatus, and P. sajor-caju. Initially, the fungal genomic DNA was extracted using a modified cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) protocol and used as a DNA template. The cbhI genes were then amplified and cloned using the pGEM-T Easy Vector Systems. The sizes of these PCR amplicons were between 700~800 bp. The DNA sequences obtained were similar showing high identity to the cbhI gene family. These cbhI genes were partial consisting of three coding regions and two introns. The deduced amino acid sequences exhibited significant similarity to those of fungal CBHI enzymes belonging to glycosyl hydrolase family 7. PMID:22870052

  2. ESPRIT: A Method for Defining Soluble Expression Constructs in Poorly Understood Gene Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Philippe J; Hart, Darren J

    2017-01-01

    Production of soluble, purifiable domains or multi-domain fragments of proteins is a prerequisite for structural biology and other applications. When target sequences are poorly annotated, or when there are few similar sequences available for alignments, identification of domains can be problematic. A method called expression of soluble proteins by random incremental truncation (ESPRIT) addresses this problem by high-throughput automated screening of tens of thousands of enzymatically truncated gene fragments. Rare soluble constructs are identified by experimental screening, and the boundaries revealed by DNA sequencing.

  3. Influences on gene expression in vivo by a Shine-Dalgarno sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Haining; Zhao, Qing; Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto I

    2006-01-01

    The Shine-Dalgarno (SD+: 5'-AAGGAGG-3') sequence anchors the mRNA by base pairing to the 16S rRNA in the small ribosomal subunit during translation initiation. We have here compared how an SD+ sequence influences gene expression, if located upstream or downstream of an initiation codon...... sites compete for ribosomes that bind to an SD+ located between them. A minor positive contribution to upstream initiation resulting from 3' to 5' ribosomal diffusion along the mRNA is suggested. Analysis of the E. coli K12 genome suggests that the SD+ or SD-like sequences are systematically avoided...

  4. Complete sequence and gene organization of the mitochondrial genome of Asio flammeus (Strigiformes, strigidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanan; Song, Tao; Pan, Tao; Sun, Xiaonan; Sun, Zhonglou; Qian, Lifu; Zhang, Baowei

    2016-07-01

    The complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome was determined for Asio flammeus, which is distributed widely in geography. The length of the complete mitochondrial genome was 18,966 bp, containing 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), and 1 non-coding region (D-loop). All the genes were distributed on the H-strand, except for the ND6 subunit gene and eight tRNA genes which were encoded on the L-strand. The D-loop of A. flammeus contained many tandem repeats of varying lengths and repeat numbers. The molecular-based phylogeny showed that our species acted as the sister group to A. capensis and the supported Asio was the monophyletic group.

  5. Biologic: Gene circuits and feedback in an introductory physics sequence for biology and premedical students

    CERN Document Server

    Cahn, S B

    2013-01-01

    Two synthetic gene circuits -- the genetic toggle switch and the repressilator -- are analyzed quantitatively and discussed in the context of an educational module on gene circuits and feedback that constitutes the final topic of a year-long introductory physics sequence, aimed at biology and premedical undergraduate students. The genetic toggle switch consists of two genes, each of whose protein product represses the other's expression, while the repressilator consists of three genes, each of whose protein product represses the next gene's expression. Analytic, numerical, and electronic treatments of the genetic toggle switch shows that this gene circuit realizes bistability. A simplified treatment of the repressilator reveals that this circuit can realize sustained oscillations. In both cases, a "phase diagram" is obtained, that specifies the region of parameter space in which bistability or oscillatory behavior, respectively, occurs.

  6. Local synteny and codon usage contribute to asymmetric sequence divergence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene duplicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergthorsson Ulfar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duplicated genes frequently experience asymmetric rates of sequence evolution. Relaxed selective constraints and positive selection have both been invoked to explain the observation that one paralog within a gene-duplicate pair exhibits an accelerated rate of sequence evolution. In the majority of studies where asymmetric divergence has been established, there is no indication as to which gene copy, ancestral or derived, is evolving more rapidly. In this study we investigated the effect of local synteny (gene-neighborhood conservation and codon usage on the sequence evolution of gene duplicates in the S. cerevisiae genome. We further distinguish the gene duplicates into those that originated from a whole-genome duplication (WGD event (ohnologs versus small-scale duplications (SSD to determine if there exist any differences in their patterns of sequence evolution. Results For SSD pairs, the derived copy evolves faster than the ancestral copy. However, there is no relationship between rate asymmetry and synteny conservation (ancestral-like versus derived-like in ohnologs. mRNA abundance and optimal codon usage as measured by the CAI is lower in the derived SSD copies relative to ancestral paralogs. Moreover, in the case of ohnologs, the faster-evolving copy has lower CAI and lowered expression. Conclusions Together, these results suggest that relaxation of selection for codon usage and gene expression contribute to rate asymmetry in the evolution of duplicated genes and that in SSD pairs, the relaxation of selection stems from the loss of ancestral regulatory information in the derived copy.

  7. Mutation analysis of HSFY gene by DNA sequencing in Turkish men with idiopathic infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Semerci, C Nur; Alataş, Erkan; Sılan, Fatma; N. Lale, Şatıroğlu Tufan; Dodurga, Yavuz; Şatıroğlu, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In this study we planned to HSFY gene mutations in Turkish infertile men with azoospermia, oligospermia and/or poor motility/morphology. METHODS: From three distinct medical centers, 41 Turkish infertile men were contributed to this study. The patients had no endocrine or obstructive causes of spermatogenic failure and no Y microdeletion, and had normal karyotype were included the study. Mutation analysis of the HSFY gene was performed by DNA sequencing. RESULTS: No varian...

  8. Nucleotide sequence of the traI (helicase I) gene from the sex factor F.

    OpenAIRE

    Bradshaw, H.D.; Traxler, B A; Minkley, E G; Nester, E W; Gordon, M P

    1990-01-01

    A 6.9-kilobase region of the Escherichia coli F plasmid containing the 3' half of the traD gene and the entire traI gene (encodes the TraI protein, DNA helicase I and TraI, a polypeptide arising from an internal in-frame translational start in traI) has been sequenced. A previously unidentified open reading frame (tentatively trbH) lies between traD and traI.

  9. Nucleotide sequence of the traI (helicase I) gene from the sex factor F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, H D; Traxler, B A; Minkley, E G; Nester, E W; Gordon, M P

    1990-07-01

    A 6.9-kilobase region of the Escherichia coli F plasmid containing the 3' half of the traD gene and the entire traI gene (encodes the TraI protein, DNA helicase I and TraI, a polypeptide arising from an internal in-frame translational start in traI) has been sequenced. A previously unidentified open reading frame (tentatively trbH) lies between traD and traI.

  10. Comparative genomic sequence analysis of the human and mouse cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator genes

    OpenAIRE

    Ellsworth, Rachel E.; Jamison, D. Curtis; Touchman, Jeffrey W.; Chissoe, Stephanie L.; Braden Maduro, Valerie V.; Bouffard, Gerard G.; Dietrich, Nicole L.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M.; Iyer, Leslie M.; Weintraub, Lauren A.; Cotton, Marc; Courtney, Laura; Edwards, Jennifer; Maupin, Rachel; Ozersky, Philip

    2000-01-01

    The identification of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) in 1989 represents a landmark accomplishment in human genetics. Since that time, there have been numerous advances in elucidating the function of the encoded protein and the physiological basis of cystic fibrosis. However, numerous areas of cystic fibrosis biology require additional investigation, some of which would be facilitated by information about the long-range sequence context of the CFTR gene. Fo...

  11. Identification of hornet silk gene with a characteristic repetitive sequence in Vespa simillima xanthoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Tsunenori; Kojima, Katsura; Zhang, Qiang; Sezutsu, Hideki

    2012-01-01

    Vssilk 5 is a gene encoding a component protein of the silk produced by the larvae of the yellow hornet (Vespa simillima, Vespinae, Vespidae). In this study, we deduced the complete cDNA sequence of Vssilk 5. It was found that 2 silk proteins, Vssilk 5 N and Vssilk 5 C, in the cocoon of the yellow hornet are both encoded by the Vssilk 5 gene. Vssilk 5 N and 5 C are the N- and C-terminal regions, respectively, of the Vssilk 5 pro-protein (Vssilk 5p). The complete amino acid sequences of Vssilk 5 N and Vssilk 5 C were deduced. Although a non-repetitive amino acid sequence and coiled-coil structure are properties common to the major components of silk proteins produced by the larvae of the social superfamilies Apoidea and Vespoidea of the Apocrita, nearly the entire sequence of Vssilk 5 C consisted of a repeated sequence of amino acids, and the calculated coiled-coil probability for this protein was low. Vssilk 5 N is a protein without a repetitive amino acid sequence and has a low coiled-coil probability. Moreover, we found a water soluble protein, Vssilk 5S that is likely segmented from Vssilk 5 C and contains an N-terminal sequence identical to that of Vssilk 5 C. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficient Nucleic Acid Extraction and 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing for Bacterial Community Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anahtar, Melis N; Bowman, Brittany A; Kwon, Douglas S

    2016-04-14

    There is a growing appreciation for the role of microbial communities as critical modulators of human health and disease. High throughput sequencing technologies have allowed for the rapid and efficient characterization of bacterial communities using 16S rRNA gene sequencing from a variety of sources. Although readily available tools for 16S rRNA sequence analysis have standardized computational workflows, sample processing for DNA extraction remains a continued source of variability across studies. Here we describe an efficient, robust, and cost effective method for extracting nucleic acid from swabs. We also delineate downstream methods for 16S rRNA gene sequencing, including generation of sequencing libraries, data quality control, and sequence analysis. The workflow can accommodate multiple samples types, including stool and swabs collected from a variety of anatomical locations and host species. Additionally, recovered DNA and RNA can be separated and used for other applications, including whole genome sequencing or RNA-seq. The method described allows for a common processing approach for multiple sample types and accommodates downstream analysis of genomic, metagenomic and transcriptional information.

  13. Isolation of laccase gene-specific sequences from white rot and brown rot fungi by PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, T M; Boominathan, K; Reddy, C A

    1996-10-01

    Degenerate primers corresponding to the consensus sequences of the copper-binding regions in the N-terminal domains of known basidiomycete laccases were used to isolate laccase gene-specific sequences from strains representing nine genera of wood rot fungi. All except three gave the expected PCR product of about 200 bp. Computer searches of the databases identified the sequence of each of the PCR products analyzed as a laccase gene sequence, suggesting the specificity of the primers. PCR products of the white rot fungi Ganoderma lucidum, Phlebia brevispora, and Trametes versicolor showed 65 to 74% nucleotide sequence similarity to each other; the similarity in deduced amino acid sequences was 83 to 91%. The PCR products of Lentinula edodes and Lentinus tigrinus, on the other hand, showed relatively low nucleotide and amino acid similarities (58 to 64 and 62 to 81%, respectively); however, these similarities were still much higher than when compared with the corresponding regions in the laccases of the ascomycete fungi Aspergillus nidulans and Neurospora crassa. A few of the white rot fungi, as well as Gloeophyllum trabeum, a brown rot fungus, gave a 144-bp PCR fragment which had a nucleotide sequence similarity of 60 to 71%. Demonstration of laccase activity in G. trabeum and several other brown rot fungi was of particular interest because these organisms were not previously shown to produce laccases.

  14. Identification of Mycobacterium spp. of veterinary importance using rpoB gene sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies conducted on Mycobacterium spp. isolated from human patients indicate that sequencing of a 711 bp portion of the rpoB gene can be useful in assigning a species identity, particularly for members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). Given that MAC are important pathogens in livestock, companion animals, and zoo/exotic animals, we were interested in evaluating the use of rpoB sequencing for identification of Mycobacterium isolates of veterinary origin. Results A total of 386 isolates, collected over 2008 - June 2011 from 378 animals (amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals) underwent PCR and sequencing of a ~ 711 bp portion of the rpoB gene; 310 isolates (80%) were identified to the species level based on similarity at ≥ 98% with a reference sequence. The remaining 76 isolates (20%) displayed Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis was the species most frequently isolated from specimens from pigs, cervids, companion animals, cattle, and exotic/zoo animals. Conclusions rpoB sequencing proved useful in identifying Mycobacterium isolates of veterinary origin to clade, species, or subspecies levels, particularly for assemblages (such as the MAC) where 16S rRNA sequencing alone is not adequate to demarcate these taxa. rpoB sequencing can represent a cost-effective identification tool suitable for routine use in the veterinary diagnostic laboratory. PMID:22118247

  15. Sequence characterisation of deletion breakpoints in the dystrophin gene by PCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbs, S.; Sandhu, S.; Bobrow, M. [Guy`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1994-09-01

    Partial deletions of the dystrophin gene account for 65% of cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A high proportion of these structural changes are generated by new mutational events, and lie predominantly within two `hotspot` regions, yet the underlying reasons for this are not known. We are characterizing and sequencing the regions surrounding deletion breakpoints in order to: (i) investigate the mechanisms of deletion mutation, and (ii) enable the design of PCR assays to specifically amplify mutant and normal sequences, allowing us to search for the presence of somatic mosaicism in appropriate family members. Using this approach we have been able to demonstrate the presence of somatic mosaicism in a maternal grandfather of a DMD-affected male, deleted for exons 49-50. Three deletions, namely of exons 48-49, 49-50, and 50, have been characterized using a PCR approach that avoids any cloning procedures. Breakpoints were initially localized to within regions of a few kilobases using Southern blot restriction analyses with exon-specific probes and PCR amplification of exonic and intronic loci. Sequencing was performed directly on PCR products: (i) mutant sequences were obtained from long-range or inverse-PCR across the deletion junction fragments, and (ii) normal sequences were obtained from the products of standard PCR, vectorette PCR, or inverse-PCR performed on YACs. Further characterization of intronic sequences will allow us to amplify and sequence across other deletion breakpoints and increase our knowledge of the mechanisms of mutation in the dystophin gene.

  16. Detection of MMTV-like LTR and LTR-env gene sequences in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Pelisson, I; Melana, S M; Holland, J F; Pogo, B G

    2001-05-01

    We have previously reported, using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the presence of a 660 bp sequence homologous to the env gene of MMTV in 38% of the human breast cancers studied, but not in normal breasts nor in other tumors or tissues. We have now investigated the presence of MMTV-like LTR sequences in human breast cancer and normal breast tissue. Primers were selected to amplify a 630 bp sequence homologous to MMTV, but not to the endogenous retrovirus HERV-K10. This sequence was detected in 41.5% of the breast cancers and none of the normal breasts. A larger 1.2 kb LTR fragment was also amplified with high homology to MMTV. Finally, a 1.6 kb fragment containing env and LTR sequences was amplified, cloned and sequenced from breast cancer DNA. The human LTRs were highly homologous to MMTV contain enhancer and promoter elements, the glucocorticoid responsive element (GRE) and the superantigen (Sag) sequences. Presence of functional sequences implies involvement in transcriptional regulation, whereas presence of an env-LTR sequence indicates contiguity within the genome of a potential provirus. Their presence in breast cancer DNA, but not in normal tissue, suggest an exogenous origin.

  17. Whole exome sequencing coupled with unbiased functional analysis reveals new Hirschsprung disease genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Hongsheng; Schriemer, Duco; Cheng, William W; Chauhan, Rajendra K; Antiňolo, Guillermo; Berrios, Courtney; Bleda, Marta; Brooks, Alice S; Brouwer, Rutger W W; Burns, Alan J; Cherny, Stacey S; Dopazo, Joaquin; Eggen, Bart J L; Griseri, Paola; Jalloh, Binta; Le, Thuy-Linh; Lui, Vincent C H; Luzón-Toro, Berta; Matera, Ivana; Ngan, Elly S W; Pelet, Anna; Ruiz-Ferrer, Macarena; Sham, Pak C; Shepherd, Iain T; So, Man-Ting; Sribudiani, Yunia; Tang, Clara S M; van den Hout, Mirjam C G N; van der Linde, Herma C; van Ham, Tjakko J; van IJcken, Wilfred F J; Verheij, Joke B G M; Amiel, Jeanne; Borrego, Salud; Ceccherini, Isabella; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Tam, Paul K H; Garcia-Barceló, Maria-Mercè; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2017-03-08

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), which is congenital obstruction of the bowel, results from a failure of enteric nervous system (ENS) progenitors to migrate, proliferate, differentiate, or survive within the distal intestine. Previous studies that have searched for genes underlying HSCR have focused on ENS-related pathways and genes not fitting the current knowledge have thus often been ignored. We identify and validate novel HSCR genes using whole exome sequencing (WES), burden tests, in silico prediction, unbiased in vivo analyses of the mutated genes in zebrafish, and expression analyses in zebrafish, mouse, and human. We performed de novo mutation (DNM) screening on 24 HSCR trios. We identify 28 DNMs in 21 different genes. Eight of the DNMs we identified occur in RET, the main HSCR gene, and the remaining 20 DNMs reside in genes not reported in the ENS. Knockdown of all 12 genes with missense or loss-of-function DNMs showed that the orthologs of four genes (DENND3, NCLN, NUP98, and TBATA) are indispensable for ENS development in zebrafish, and these results were confirmed by CRISPR knockout. These genes are also expressed in human and mouse gut and/or ENS progenitors. Importantly, the encoded proteins are linked to neuronal processes shared by the central nervous system and the ENS. Our data open new fields of investigation into HSCR pathology and provide novel insights into the development of the ENS. Moreover, the study demonstrates that functional analyses of genes carrying DNMs are warranted to delineate the full genetic architecture of rare complex diseases.

  18. Effectiveness of polyene antibiotics in treatment of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy in transgenic mice expressing Syrian hamster PrP only in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaimay, R; Race, R; Chesebro, B

    1999-04-01

    To date very few drugs have favorably influenced the course of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. In previous studies, the polyene antibiotics amphotericin B (AmB) and MS-8209 prolonged the incubation time in Syrian hamsters of the 263K strain of scrapie, but AmB had no effect against other scrapie strains in Syrian hamsters. In the present experiments using transgenic mice expressing Syrian hamster PrP in neurons only, MS-8209 extended the life spans of animals infected with the 263K strain but not the DY strain. AmB was effective against both 263K and DY and prevented death in 18% of DY-infected animals. The AmB effect against strain 263K was more prominent in mice whose endogenous PrP gene had been inactivated by homologous recombination. It was unclear whether this difference was due to a change in the duration of the disease or to possible interactive effects between the mouse PrP gene and the drugs themselves. The effectiveness of treatment after intracerebral scrapie infection in transgenic mice expressing PrP only in neurons suggested that neurons are important sites of action for these drugs.

  19. WebScipio: An online tool for the determination of gene structures using protein sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waack Stephan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obtaining the gene structure for a given protein encoding gene is an important step in many analyses. A software suited for this task should be readily accessible, accurate, easy to handle and should provide the user with a coherent representation of the most probable gene structure. It should be rigorous enough to optimise features on the level of single bases and at the same time flexible enough to allow for cross-species searches. Results WebScipio, a web interface to the Scipio software, allows a user to obtain the corresponding coding sequence structure of a here given a query protein sequence that belongs to an already assembled eukaryotic genome. The resulting gene structure is presented in various human readable formats like a schematic representation, and a detailed alignment of the query and the target sequence highlighting any discrepancies. WebScipio can also be used to identify and characterise the gene structures of homologs in related organisms. In addition, it offers a web service for integration with other programs. Conclusion WebScipio is a tool that allows users to get a high-quality gene structure prediction from a protein query. It offers more than 250 eukaryotic genomes that can be searched and produces predictions that are close to what can be achieved by manual annotation, for in-species and cross-species searches alike. WebScipio is freely accessible at http://www.webscipio.org.

  20. Sequencing and transcriptional analysis of the biosynthesis gene cluster of abscisic acid-producing Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Tao; Shu, Dan; Yang, Jie; Ding, Zhong-Tao; Tan, Hong

    2014-09-29

    Botrytis cinerea is a model species with great importance as a pathogen of plants and has become used for biotechnological production of ABA. The ABA cluster of B. cinerea is composed of an open reading frame without significant similarities (bcaba3), followed by the genes (bcaba1 and bcaba2) encoding P450 monooxygenases and a gene probably coding for a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (bcaba4). In B. cinerea ATCC58025, targeted inactivation of the genes in the cluster suggested at least three genes responsible for the hydroxylation at carbon atom C-1' and C-4' or oxidation at C-4' of ABA. Our group has identified an ABA-overproducing strain, B. cinerea TB-3-H8. To differentiate TB-3-H8 from other B. cinerea strains with the functional ABA cluster, the DNA sequence of the 12.11-kb region containing the cluster of B. cinerea TB-3-H8 was determined. Full-length cDNAs were also isolated for bcaba1, bcaba2, bcaba3 and bcaba4 from B. cinerea TB-3-H8. Sequence comparison of the four genes and their flanking regions respectively derived from B. cinerea TB-3-H8, B05.10 and T4 revealed that major variations were located in intergenic sequences. In B. cinerea TB-3-H8, the expression profiles of the four function genes under ABA high-yield conditions were also analyzed by real-time PCR.

  1. Quantitative gene expression profiles in real time from expressed sequence tag databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funari, Vincent A; Voevodski, Konstantin; Leyfer, Dimitry; Yerkes, Laura; Cramer, Donald; Tolan, Dean R

    2010-01-01

    An accumulation of expressed sequence tag (EST) data in the public domain and the availability of bioinformatic programs have made EST gene expression profiling a common practice. However, the utility and validity of using EST databases (e.g., dbEST) has been criticized, particularly for quantitative assessment of gene expression. Problems with EST sequencing errors, library construction, EST annotation, and multiple paralogs make generation of specific and sensitive qualitative arid quantitative expression profiles a concern. In addition, most EST-derived expression data exists in previously assembled databases. The Virtual Northern Blot (VNB) (http: //tlab.bu.edu/vnb.html) allows generation, evaluation, and optimization of expression profiles in real time, which is especially important for alternatively spliced, novel, or poorly characterized genes. Representative gene families with variable nucleotide sequence identity, tissue specificity, and levels of expression (bcl-xl, aldoA, and cyp2d9) are used to assess the quality of VNB's output. The profiles generated by VNB are more sensitive and specific than those constructed with ESTs listed in preindexed databases at UCSC and NCBI. Moreover, quantitative expression profiles produced by VNB are comparable to quantization obtained from Northern blots and qPCR. The VNB pipeline generates real-time gene expression profiles for single-gene queries that are both qualitatively and quantitatively reliable.

  2. Seminal-type ribonuclease genes in ruminants, sequence conservation without protein expression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleineidam, R G; Jekel, P A; Beintema, J J; Situmorang, P

    1999-04-29

    Bovine seminal ribonuclease (BS-RNase) is an interesting enzyme both for functional and structural reasons. The enzyme is the product of a gene duplication that occurred in an ancestral ruminant. It is possible to demonstrate the presence of seminal-type genes in all other investigated ruminant species, but they are not expressed and show features of pseudogenes. In this paper we report the determination of two pancreatic and one seminal-type ribonuclease gene sequences of swamp-type water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis). The two pancreatic sequences encode proteins with identical amino acid sequences as previously determined for the enzymes isolated from swamp-type and river-type water buffalo, respectively. The seminal-type sequence has no pseudogene features and codes for an enzyme with no unusual features compared with the active bovine enzyme, except for the replacement of one of the cysteines which takes part in the two intersubunit disulfide bridges. However, Western blotting demonstrates the presence of only small amounts of the pancreatic enzymes in water buffalo semen, suggesting that also in this species the seminal-type sequence is not expressed. But it is still possible that the gene is expressed somewhere else in the body or during development. Reconstruction of seminal-type ribonuclease sequences in ancestors of Bovinae and Bovidae indicates no serious abnormalities in the encoded proteins and leads us to the hypothesis that the ruminant seminal-type ribonuclease gene has not come to expression during most of its evolutionary history, but did not exhibit a high evolutionary rate that is generally observed in pseudogenes.

  3. Transcriptome sequencing and expression analysis of terpenoid biosynthesis genes in Litsea cubeba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao-Jiao; Wang, Yang-Dong; Chen, Yi-Cun; Lin, Li-Yuan; Wu, Qing-Ke

    2013-01-01

    Aromatic essential oils extracted from fresh fruits of Litsea cubeba (Lour.) Pers., have diverse medical and economic values. The dominant components in these essential oils are monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of terpenoid biosynthesis is essential for improving the yield and quality of terpenes. However, the 40 available L. cubeba nucleotide sequences in the public databases are insufficient for studying the molecular mechanisms. Thus, high-throughput transcriptome sequencing of L. cubeba is necessary to generate large quantities of transcript sequences for the purpose of gene discovery, especially terpenoid biosynthesis related genes. Using Illumina paired-end sequencing, approximately 23.5 million high-quality reads were generated. De novo assembly yielded 68,648 unigenes with an average length of 834 bp. A total of 38,439 (56%) unigenes were annotated for their functions, and 35,732 and 25,806 unigenes could be aligned to the GO and COG database, respectively. By searching against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database (KEGG), 16,130 unigenes were assigned to 297 KEGG pathways, and 61 unigenes, which contained the mevalonate and 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathways, could be related to terpenoid backbone biosynthesis. Of the 12,963 unigenes, 285 were annotated to the terpenoid pathways using the PlantCyc database. Additionally, 14 terpene synthase genes were identified from the transcriptome. The expression patterns of the 16 genes related to terpenoid biosynthesis were analyzed by RT-qPCR to explore their putative functions. RNA sequencing was effective in identifying a large quantity of sequence information. To our knowledge, this study is the first exploration of the L. cubeba transcriptome, and the substantial amount of transcripts obtained will accelerate the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of essential oils biosynthesis. The results may help improve future genetic and genomics

  4. Transcriptome sequencing and expression analysis of terpenoid biosynthesis genes in Litsea cubeba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Jiao Han

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aromatic essential oils extracted from fresh fruits of Litsea cubeba (Lour. Pers., have diverse medical and economic values. The dominant components in these essential oils are monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of terpenoid biosynthesis is essential for improving the yield and quality of terpenes. However, the 40 available L. cubeba nucleotide sequences in the public databases are insufficient for studying the molecular mechanisms. Thus, high-throughput transcriptome sequencing of L. cubeba is necessary to generate large quantities of transcript sequences for the purpose of gene discovery, especially terpenoid biosynthesis related genes. RESULTS: Using Illumina paired-end sequencing, approximately 23.5 million high-quality reads were generated. De novo assembly yielded 68,648 unigenes with an average length of 834 bp. A total of 38,439 (56% unigenes were annotated for their functions, and 35,732 and 25,806 unigenes could be aligned to the GO and COG database, respectively. By searching against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database (KEGG, 16,130 unigenes were assigned to 297 KEGG pathways, and 61 unigenes, which contained the mevalonate and 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathways, could be related to terpenoid backbone biosynthesis. Of the 12,963 unigenes, 285 were annotated to the terpenoid pathways using the PlantCyc database. Additionally, 14 terpene synthase genes were identified from the transcriptome. The expression patterns of the 16 genes related to terpenoid biosynthesis were analyzed by RT-qPCR to explore their putative functions. CONCLUSION: RNA sequencing was effective in identifying a large quantity of sequence information. To our knowledge, this study is the first exploration of the L. cubeba transcriptome, and the substantial amount of transcripts obtained will accelerate the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of essential oils biosynthesis. The

  5. [Identification of APEC genes expressed in vivo by selective capture of transcribed sequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Gao, Song; Wang, Xiao-quan; Jiao, Xin-an; Liu, Xiu-fan

    2007-06-01

    Direct screening of bacterial genes expressed during infection in the host is limited, because isolation of bacterial transcripts from host tissues necessitates separation from the abundance of host RNA. Selective capture of transcribed sequences (SCOTS) allows the selective capture of bacterial cDNA derived from infected tissues using hybridization to biotinylated bacterial genomic DNA. Avian pathogenic E. coli strain E037 (serogroup O78) was used in a chicken infection model to identify bacterial genes that are expressed in infected tissues. Three-week-old white leghorn specific-pathogen-free chickens were inoculated into the right thoracic air sac with a 0.1 mL suspension containing 10(7) CFU of APEC strain E037. Total RNA was isolated from infected tissues (pericardium and air sacs) 6 or 24h postinfection and converted to cDNAs. By using the cDNA selection method of selective capture of transcribed sequences and enrichment for the isolation of pathogen-specific (non-pathogenic E. coli K-12 strain ) transcripts, pathogen-specific cDNAs were identified. Randomly chosen cDNA clones derived from transcripts in the air sacs or pericardium were selected and sequenced. The clones, termed aec, contained numerous APEC-specific sequences. Among the distinct 31 aec clones, pathogen-specific clones contained sequences homologous to known and novel putative bacterial virulence gene products involved in adherence, iron transport, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis, plasmid replication and conjugation, putative phage encoded products, and gene products of unknown function. Overall, the current study provided a means to identify novel pathogen-specific genes expressed in vivo and insight regarding the global gene expression of a pathogenic E. coli strain in a natural animal host during the infectious process.

  6. Sequence variation in two protein-coding genes correlates with mycelial compatibility groupings in Sclerotium rolfsii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remesal, Efrén; Landa, Blanca B; Jiménez-Gasco, María Del Mar; Navas-Cortés, Juan A

    2013-05-01

    Populations of Sclerotium rolfsii, the causal organism of Sclerotium root-rot on a wide range of hosts, can be placed into mycelial compatibility groups (MCGs). In this study, we evaluated three different molecular approaches to unequivocally identify each of 12 previously identified MCGs. These included restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and sequence analysis of two protein-coding genes: translation elongation factor 1α (EF1α) and RNA polymerase II subunit two (RPB2). A collection of 238 single-sclerotial isolates representing 12 MCGs of S. rolfsii were obtained from diseased sugar beet plants from Chile, Italy, Portugal, and Spain. ITS-RFLP analysis using four restriction enzymes (AluI, HpaII, RsaI, and MboI) displayed a low degree of variability among MCGs. Only three different restriction profiles were identified among S. rolfsii isolates, with no correlation to MCG or to geographic origin. Based on nucleotide polymorphisms, the RPB2 gene was more variable among MCGs compared with the EF1α gene. Thus, 10 of 12 MCGs could be characterized utilizing the RPB2 region only, while the EF1α region resolved 7 MCGs. However, the analysis of combined partial sequences of EF1α and RPB2 genes allowed discrimination among each of the 12 MCGs. All isolates belonging to the same MCG showed identical nucleotide sequences that differed by at least in one nucleotide from a different MCG. The consistency of our results to identify the MCG of a given S. rolfsii isolate using the combined sequences of EF1α and RPB2 genes was confirmed using blind trials. Our study demonstrates that sequence variation in the protein-coding genes EF1α and RPB2 may be exploited as a diagnostic tool for MCG typing in S. rolfsii as well as to identify previously undescribed MCGs.

  7. Prp19 Arrests Cell Cycle via Cdc5L in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Renzheng; Xue, Ruyi; Qu, Di; Yin, Jie; Shen, Xi-Zhong

    2017-04-07

    Pre-mRNA processing factor 19 (Prp19) is involved in many cellular events including pre-mRNA processing and DNA damage response. Recently, it has been identified as a candidate oncogene in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the role of Prp19 in tumor biology is still elusive. Here, we reported that Prp19 arrested cell cycle in HCC cells via regulating G2/M transition. Mechanistic insights revealed that silencing Prp19 inhibited the expression of cell division cycle 5-like (Cdc5L) via repressing the translation of Cdc5L mRNA and facilitating lysosome-mediated degradation of Cdc5L in HCC cells. Furthermore, we found that silencing Prp19 induced cell cycle arrest could be partially resumed by overexpressing Cdc5L. This work implied that Prp19 participated in mitotic progression and thus could be a promising therapeutic target of HCC.

  8. MYO7A and USH2A gene sequence variants in Italian patients with Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodi, Andrea; Mariottini, Alessandro; Passerini, Ilaria; Murro, Vittoria; Tachyla, Iryna; Bianchi, Benedetta; Menchini, Ugo; Torricelli, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the spectrum of sequence variants in the MYO7A and USH2A genes in a group of Italian patients affected by Usher syndrome (USH). Thirty-six Italian patients with a diagnosis of USH were recruited. They received a standard ophthalmologic examination, visual field testing, optical coherence tomography (OCT) scan, and electrophysiological tests. Fluorescein angiography and fundus autofluorescence imaging were performed in selected cases. All the patients underwent an audiologic examination for the 0.25-8,000 Hz frequencies. Vestibular function was evaluated with specific tests. DNA samples were analyzed for sequence variants of the MYO7A gene (for USH1) and the USH2A gene (for USH2) with direct sequencing techniques. A few patients were analyzed for both genes. In the MYO7A gene, ten missense variants were found; three patients were compound heterozygous, and two were homozygous. Thirty-four USH2A gene variants were detected, including eight missense variants, nine nonsense variants, six splicing variants, and 11 duplications/deletions; 19 patients were compound heterozygous, and three were homozygous. Four MYO7A and 17 USH2A variants have already been described in the literature. Among the novel mutations there are four USH2A large deletions, detected with multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technology. Two potentially pathogenic variants were found in 27 patients (75%). Affected patients showed variable clinical pictures without a clear genotype-phenotype correlation. Ten variants in the MYO7A gene and 34 variants in the USH2A gene were detected in Italian patients with USH at a high detection rate. A selective analysis of these genes may be valuable for molecular analysis, combining diagnostic efficiency with little time wastage and less resource consumption.

  9. DNMT3A GENE POINT MUTATIONS DETECTION IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA PATIENTS USING SEQUENCING TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Vinogradov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to estimate the frequency of DNMT3A gene exons 18–26 point mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients (pts using target automatic sequencing technique.Material and Methods. Bone marrow and peripheral blood samples were obtained from 34 AML pts aged 21 to 64, who were treated in Sverdlovsk Regional Hematological Centre (Ekaterinburg during the period 2012–2014. Distribution of the pts according to FAB-classification was as follows: AML M0 – 3, M1 – 1, M2 – 12, M3 – 3, M4 – 10, M5 – 2, M6 – 1, M7 – 1, blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm – 1. Total RNA was extracted from leukemic cells and subjected to reverse transcription. DNMT3A gene exons 18–26 were amplified by PCR. Detection of mutations in DNMT3A gene was performed by direct sequencing. Sequencing was realized using an automatic genetic analyzer ABI Prism 310.Results. The average frequency of functionally significant point mutations in DNMT3A gene exons 18– 26 among the treated AML pts was 5.9%. They were detected in morphological subgroups M2 and M4(according to WHO classification. The average frequency of DNMT3A gene exons 18–26 point mutations among the AML M2 and M4 pts without chromosomal aberrations and TP53 gene point mutations was 14.3%. In both cases there were samples in which DNMT3A gene mutations were accompanied by molecular lesions of NPM1, KRAS and WT1 genes. AML pts with DNMT3A gene exons 18–26 point mutations characterized by poor response to standard chemotherapeutic regimens and unfavorable prognosis.

  10. An Efficient Method for Identifying Gene Fusions by Targeted RNA Sequencing from Fresh Frozen and FFPE Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolnick, Jonathan A; Dimon, Michelle; Wang, I-Ching; Huelga, Stephanie C; Amorese, Douglas A

    2015-01-01

    Fusion genes are known to be key drivers of tumor growth in several types of cancer. Traditionally, detecting fusion genes has been a difficult task based on fluorescent in situ hybridization to detect chromosomal abnormalities. More recently, RNA sequencing has enabled an increased pace of fusion gene identification. However, RNA-Seq is inefficient for the identification of fusion genes due to the high number of sequencing reads needed to detect the small number of fusion transcripts present in cells of interest. Here we describe a method, Single Primer Enrichment Technology (SPET), for targeted RNA sequencing that is customizable to any target genes, is simple to use, and efficiently detects gene fusions. Using SPET to target 5701 exons of 401 known cancer fusion genes for sequencing, we were able to identify known and previously unreported gene fusions from both fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue RNA in both normal tissue and cancer cells.

  11. An Efficient Method for Identifying Gene Fusions by Targeted RNA Sequencing from Fresh Frozen and FFPE Samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan A Scolnick

    Full Text Available Fusion genes are known to be key drivers of tumor growth in several types of cancer. Traditionally, detecting fusion genes has been a difficult task based on fluorescent in situ hybridization to detect chromosomal abnormalities. More recently, RNA sequencing has enabled an increased pace of fusion gene identification. However, RNA-Seq is inefficient for the identification of fusion genes due to the high number of sequencing reads needed to detect the small number of fusion transcripts present in cells of interest. Here we describe a method, Single Primer Enrichment Technology (SPET, for targeted RNA sequencing that is customizable to any target genes, is simple to use, and efficiently detects gene fusions. Using SPET to target 5701 exons of 401 known cancer fusion genes for sequencing, we were able to identify known and previously unreported gene fusions from both fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue RNA in both normal tissue and cancer cells.

  12. Nucleotide sequence and characterization of a Bacillus subtilis gene encoding a flagellar switch protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Zuberi, A R; Bischoff, D S; Ordal, G W

    1991-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the Bacillus subtilis fliM gene has been determined. This gene encodes a 38-kDa protein that is homologous to the FliM flagellar switch proteins of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. Expression of this gene in Che+ cells of E. coli and B. subtilis interferes with normal chemotaxis. The nature of the chemotaxis defect is dependent upon the host used. In B. subtilis, overproduction of FliM generates mostly nonmotile cells. Those cells that are motile switch ...

  13. X-exome sequencing of 405 unresolved families identifies seven novel intellectual disability genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, H; Haas, S A; Chelly, J

    2016-01-01

    X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. During the past two decades in excess of 100 X-chromosome ID genes have been identified. Yet, a large number of families mapping to the X-chromosome remained unresolved suggesting that more XLID genes...... with established roles in cognitive function and intellectual disability in particular. We suggest that systematic sequencing of all X-chromosomal genes in a cohort of patients with genetic evidence for X-chromosome locus involvement may resolve up to 58% of Fragile X-negative cases....

  14. Distribution of Genes and Repetitive Elements in the Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Genome Estimated Using BAC Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad S. Coates

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Feeding damage caused by the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, is destructive to corn plants in North America and Europe where control remains challenging due to evolution of resistance to chemical and transgenic toxins. A BAC library, DvvBAC1, containing 109,486 clones with 104±34.5 kb inserts was created, which has an ~4.56X genome coverage based upon a 2.58 Gb (2.80 pg flow cytometry-estimated haploid genome size. Paired end sequencing of 1037 BAC inserts produced 1.17 Mb of data (~0.05% genome coverage and indicated ~9.4 and 16.0% of reads encode, respectively, endogenous genes and transposable elements (TEs. Sequencing genes within BAC full inserts demonstrated that TE densities are high within intergenic and intron regions and contribute to the increased gene size. Comparison of homologous genome regions cloned within different BAC clones indicated that TE movement may cause haplotype variation within the inbred strain. The data presented here indicate that the D. virgifera virgifera genome is large in size and contains a high proportion of repetitive sequence. These BAC sequencing methods that are applicable for characterization of genomes prior to sequencing may likely be valuable resources for genome annotation as well as scaffolding.

  15. [Phylogenetic relationship among some groups of orthopteran based on complete sequences of the mitochondrial COI gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hong-Juan; Huang, Yuan

    2012-06-01

    Complete sequences of the COI gene were used to reconstruct the phylogenetic relationship among 56 species from Orthoptera. We also analyzed the reliability of Orthoptera phylogenetic relationship using translated amino acid sequences of the COI genes. The COI sequences were divided into three data sets on the basis of different codon positions to calculate the Partitioned Bremer support (PBS), and to test the phylogenetic signal in different codon positions of protein-coding genes. The result supports the monophyly of Caelifera and Ensifera; but the monophyly of Acrididae, Catantopidae, Oedipodidae, Arcypteridae and Gomphoceridae are not supported. The P-distances among families vary from 0.107 to 0.153, which are smaller than those of other families, being consist with the classification that these 5 families should be merged into one family (Acrididae). Chrotogonidae and Pyrgomorphidae belong to the superfamily Pyrgomorphoidea. Pamphagidae should be a family alone consistent with Otte's taxonomic system. According to the PBS values, the 3rd and 1st codon positions contribution more for the Phylogenetic tree branches than the 2nd, and longer sequences contain more informative sites. We further demonstrated that it is feasible for phylogenetic studies at family level to use the genetic distances among COI sequences from different species of Orthopera.

  16. Sequence variation in the Mc1r gene for a group of polymorphic snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Christian L; Rabosky, Alison R Davis; Chippindale, Paul T

    2013-01-25

    Studying the genetic factors underlying phenotypic traits can provide insight into dynamics of selection and molecular basis of adaptation, but this goal can be difficult for non-model organisms without extensive genomic resources. However, sequencing candidate genes for the trait of interest can facilitate the study of evolutionary genetics in natural populations. We sequenced the melanocortin-1 receptor (Mc1r) to study the genetic basis of color polymorphism in a group of snake species with variable black banding, the genera Sonora, Chilomeniscus, and Chionactis. Mc1r is an important gene in the melanin synthesis pathway and is associated with ecologically important variation in color pattern in birds, mammals, and other squamate reptiles. We found that Mc1r nucleotide sequence was variable and that within our focal Sonora species, there are both fixed and heterozygous nucleotide substitutions that result in an amino acid change and selection analyses indicated that Mc1r sequence was likely under purifying selection. However, we did not detect any statistical association with the presence or absence of black bands. Our results agree with other studies that have found no role for sequence variation in Mc1r and highlight the importance of comparative data for studying the phenotypic associations of candidate genes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Selection is not required to produce invariant T-cell receptor gamma-gene junctional sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asarnow, D M; Cado, D; Raulet, D H

    1993-03-11

    Recombination of V-, D- and J-gene segments can generate an enormous diversity of T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) gene sequences. Although many gamma delta T cells fully exploit this diversification process, those in the epidermal and vaginal epithelium do not, predominantly expressing invariant gamma delta receptors in which the V-(D)-J junctional sequences in almost all the productive rearrangements are identical. The almost exclusive use of identical TCRs by cells in these sites is thought to reflect recognition of a stress-induced autologous antigen. To explain the prevalence of the invariant junctional sequences, it has been proposed that thymic selection operates on a population of originally diverse progenitor cells, resulting in a homogeneous repertoire. Alternatively the invariant sequences may result from biases in the recombination machinery in the fetal thymic progenitors of these cells. We report here the use of mice into which mutated TCR gamma-gene rearrangement substrates have been introduced as transgenes to demonstrate directly that the canonical TCR V gamma 3-J gamma 1 and V gamma 4-J gamma 1 sequences occur at high frequency in the absence of the possibility of selection for the protein products.

  18. Intraarticular Injections of Platelet-rich Plasma (PRP) in the Management of Knee Osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    E. Carlos RODRIGUEZ-MERCHAN

    2013-01-01

      The clinical use of PRP therapy in the practical setting of orthopaedic fields is increasing partly because of the accessibility of devices that are used in outpatient preparation and delivery. Another reason is the strong advertisement of PRP procedures as the ultimate treatment and novel technology for knee problems by a few orthopaedic surgeons based on claims of abundant scientific evidence. Hence, PubMed articles related to the clinical use of PRP in knee osteoarthritis were searched u...

  19. The Splicing Factor Prp43p, a DEAH Box ATPase, Functions in Ribosome Biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeds, Nina B.; Small, Eliza C.; Hiley, Shawna L.; Hughes, Timothy R.; Staley, Jonathan P.

    2006-01-01

    Biogenesis of the small and large ribosomal subunits requires modification, processing, and folding of pre-rRNA to yield mature rRNA. Here, we report that efficient biogenesis of both small- and large-subunit rRNAs requires the DEAH box ATPase Prp43p, a pre-mRNA splicing factor. By steady-state analysis, a cold-sensitive prp43 mutant accumulates 35S pre-rRNA and depletes 20S, 27S, and 7S pre-rRNAs, precursors to the small- and large-subunit rRNAs. By pulse-chase analysis, the prp43 mutant is defective in the formation of 20S and 27S pre-rRNAs and in the accumulation of 18S and 25S mature rRNAs. Wild-type Prp43p immunoprecipitates pre-rRNAs and mature rRNAs, indicating a direct role in ribosome biogenesis. The Prp43p-Q423N mutant immunoprecipitates 27SA2 pre-rRNA threefold more efficiently than the wild type, suggesting a critical role for Prp43p at the earliest stages of large-subunit biogenesis. Consistent with an early role for Prp43p in ribosome biogenesis, Prp43p immunoprecipitates the majority of snoRNAs; further, compared to the wild type, the prp43 mutant generally immunoprecipitates the snoRNAs more efficiently. In the prp43 mutant, the snoRNA snR64 fails to methylate residue C2337 in 27S pre-rRNA, suggesting a role in snoRNA function. We propose that Prp43p promotes recycling of snoRNAs and biogenesis factors during pre-rRNA processing, similar to its recycling role in pre-mRNA splicing. The dual function for Prp43p in the cell raises the possibility that ribosome biogenesis and pre-mRNA splicing may be coordinately regulated. PMID:16382143

  20. Rapid identification of rice blast resistance gene by specific length amplified fragment sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Excavation of resistance genes is one of the most effective and environment-friendly measures to control the devastating rice disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae. Many resistance genes have been mapped and characterized in the last century. Nevertheless, only a few of the total resistance genes could be really applied in the rice breeding program. Huazhan (HZ is a new native rice restorer line developed in China and widely used in hybrid rice in recent years. HZ and its crossed combinations usually show a broad spectrum of resistance against rice blast in different rice ecosystems in China. Dissection of the genetic background of HZ is very useful for its further application. In this study, a combined method based on bulked segregation analysis (BSA and specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq was used to identify blast resistance gene(s in HZ. A total of 56,187 SLAFs labels were captured and 9051 polymorphic SLAFs markers were analysed and procured in this study. One trait associated with candidate resistance genes region on chromosome 12 overlapping 10.2–17.6 Mb has been identified, in which 10 NBS-LRR (nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat coding genes were used as resistance gene candidates. Our result indicated that SLAF-seq with BSA is a rapid and effective method for initial identification of blast resistance genes. The identification of resistance gene in HZ will improve its molecular breeding and resistance variety application.

  1. Isolation and sequencing of the cryIC-like delta endotoxin gene from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2012-02-16

    Feb 16, 2012 ... Key words: Bacillus thuringiensis, cryIC gene, plant transformation, Bt toxins, DNA sequencing. INTRODUCTION. Naturally ... insecticidal effect on a number of insects (Gill et al.,. 1992). There are nine groups of ..... amino acid residues and contained a potential repeat motif. The deduced amino acids ...

  2. Haplotypes of bovine FoxO1 gene sequence variants and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 92; Online resources. Haplotypes of bovine FoxO1 gene sequence variants and association with growth traits in Qinchuan cattle. Yujia Sun Jing Xue Wenjiao Guo Mingxun Li Yongzhen Huang Xianyong Lan Chuzhao Lei Chunlei Zhang Hong Chen. Volume 92 Online resources ...

  3. Sequence variation in TgROP7 gene among Toxoplasma gondii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toxoplasma gondii can infect a wide range of hosts including mammals and birds, causing toxoplasmosis which is one of the most common parasitic zoonoses worldwide. The present study examined sequence variation in rhoptry 7 (ROP7) gene among different T. gondii isolates from different hosts and geographical ...

  4. Cloning and sequencing of phenol oxidase 1 (pox1) gene from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The isolated gene is flanked by an upstream region called the promoter (399 bp) prior to the start codon (ATG). The putative metalresponsive ... The nucleotide sequence of cDNA (pox1- cDNA) was found to contain an ORF of 1590 bp capable of coding for a protein of 529 amino acid residues. The signal peptide was ...

  5. Patterns of nucleotide sequence variation in ICAM1 and TNF genes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have studied DNA sequence variation in and around the genes ICAM1 and TNF, which play functional and correlated roles in inflammatory processes and immune cell responses, in 12 diverse ethnic groups of India, with a view to investigating the relative roles of demographic history and natural selection in shaping the ...

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of 23S rRNA gene sequences of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuoyo Aghomotsegin

    2016-08-31

    Aug 31, 2016 ... from various geographical regions were studied by analysis of the 23S rRNA sequences. .... used in PCR amplification and Big Dye Terminator v3.1 cycle ... Data analysis. The reference 23S rRNA gene of R. leguminosarum (AF207785.1) was retrieved from NCBI site (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/). The.

  7. Nucleotide sequences of the genes encoding fructosebisphosphatase and phosphoribulokinase from Xanthobacter flavus H4-14

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Wilhelmus; Enequist, H.G.; Terpstra, Peter; Dijkhuizen, L.

    1990-01-01

    The genes encoding fructosebisphosphatase and phosphoribulokinase present on a 2.5 kb SalI fragment from Xanthobacter flavus H4-14 were sequenced. Two large open reading frames (ORFs) were identified, preceded by plausible ribosome-binding sites. The ORFs were transcribed in the same direction and

  8. Sequence variants in the CLDN14 gene associate with kidney stones and bone mineral density.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thorleifsson, G.; Holm, H.; Edvardsson, V.; Walters, G.B.; Styrkarsdottir, U.; Gudbjartsson, D.F.; Sulem, P.; Halldorsson, B.V.; Vegt, F. de; D'Ancona, F.C.H.; Heijer, M. den; Franzson, L.; Christiansen, C.; Alexandersen, P.; Rafnar, T.; Kristjansson, K.; Sigurdsson, G.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Bodvarsson, M.; Indridason, O.S.; Palsson, R.; Kong, A.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Stefansson, K.

    2009-01-01

    Kidney stone disease is a common condition. To search for sequence variants conferring risk of kidney stones, we conducted a genome-wide association study in 3,773 cases and 42,510 controls from Iceland and The Netherlands. We discovered common, synonymous variants in the CLDN14 gene that associate

  9. Analysis of sequence variation underlying tissue-specific transcription factor binding and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lower, Karen M; De Gobbi, Marco; Hughes, Jim R; Derry, Christopher J; Ayyub, Helena; Sloane-Stanley, Jacqueline A; Vernimmen, Douglas; Garrick, David; Gibbons, Richard J; Higgs, Douglas R

    2013-08-01

    Although mutations causing monogenic disorders most frequently lie within the affected gene, sequence variation in complex disorders is more commonly found in noncoding regions. Furthermore, recent genome- wide studies have shown that common DNA sequence variants in noncoding regions are associated with "normal" variation in gene expression resulting in cell-specific and/or allele-specific differences. The mechanism by which such sequence variation causes changes in gene expression is largely unknown. We have addressed this by studying natural variation in the binding of key transcription factors (TFs) in the well-defined, purified cell system of erythropoiesis. We have shown that common polymorphisms frequently directly perturb the binding sites of key TFs, and detailed analysis shows how this causes considerable (~10-fold) changes in expression from a single allele in a tissue-specific manner. We also show how a SNP, located at some distance from the recognized TF binding site, may affect the recruitment of a large multiprotein complex and alter the associated chromatin modification of the variant regulatory element. This study illustrates the principles by which common sequence variation may cause changes in tissue-specific gene expression, and suggests that such variation may underlie an individual's propensity to develop complex human genetic diseases. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  10. CLONING AND SEQUENCING OF PSEUDOMONAS GENES DETERMINING SODIUM DODECYL-SULFATE BIODEGRADATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DAVISON, J; BRUNEL, F; PHANOPOULOS, A; PROZZI, D; TERPSTRA, P

    1992-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of two genes involved in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) degradation, by Pseudomonas, have been determined. One of these, sdsA, codes for an alkyl sulfatase (58 957 Da) and has similarity (31.8% identity over a 201-amino acid stretch) to the N terminus of a predicted protein of

  11. 16S rRNA gene sequence and phylogenetic tree of lactobacillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lactobacilli are ubiquitous in nature and in humans they play a very significant role in the general health maintenance of the host. Identification of lactobacilli has previously been based on culturedependent methods and recently molecular techniques involving gene sequencing are now the 'gold standard'. Scarce ...

  12. EST sequencing and gene expression profiling of cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yu-Ping; Liu, Wei; Xia, Han; Su, Lei; Zhao, Chuan-Zhi; Wan, Shu-Bo; Wang, Xing-Jun

    2010-10-01

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is one of the most important oil crops in the world. However, biotechnological based improvement of peanut is far behind many other crops. It is critical and urgent to establish the biotechnological platform for peanut germplasm innovation. In this study, a peanut seed cDNA library was constructed to establish the biotechnological platform for peanut germplasm innovation. About 17,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were sequenced and used for further investigation. Among which, 12.5% were annotated as metabolic related and 4.6% encoded transcription or post-transcription factors. ESTs encoding storage protein and enzymes related to protein degradation accounted for 28.8% and formed the largest group of the annotated ESTs. ESTs that encoded stress responsive proteins and pathogen-related proteins accounted for 5.6%. ESTs that encoded unknown proteins or showed no hit in the GenBank nr database accounted for 20.1% and 13.9%, respectively. A total number of 5066 EST sequences were selected to make a cDNA microarray. Expression analysis revealed that these sequences showed diverse expression patterns in peanut seeds, leaves, stems, roots, flowers, and gynophores. We also analyzed the gene expression pattern during seed development. Genes that were upregulated (≥twofold) at 15, 25, 35, and 45 days after pegging (DAP) were found and compared with 70 DAP. The potential value of these genes and their promoters in the peanut gene engineering study is discussed.

  13. cDNA sequencing of fragments from fibrinolytic gene (F-4) from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A fibrinolytic anticoagulant (F-4) was previously isolated by Daoud et al; (1986) from Cerastes cerastes venom. In this study, isolation and sequencing of gene fragments of this F-4 protein was attempted. Primers utilized in the polymerase chain reactions were obtained from two sources: P1, a primer that was previously used ...

  14. Discovery and functional prioritization of Parkinson's disease candidate genes from large-scale whole exome sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Jansen (Iris); Ye, H. (Hui); Heetveld, S. (Sasja); Lechler, M.C. (Marie C.); Michels, H. (Helen); Seinstra, R.I. (Renée I.); Lubbe, S.J. (Steven J.); Drouet, V. (Valérie); S. Lesage (Suzanne); E. Majounie (Elisa); Gibbs, J.R. (J.Raphael); M.A. Nalls (Michael); M. Ryten (Mina); Botia, J.A. (Juan A.); J. Vandrovcova (Jana); J. Simón-Sánchez (Javier); Castillo-Lizardo, M. (Melissa); P. Rizzu (Patrizia); Blauwendraat, C. (Cornelis); Chouhan, A.K. (Amit K.); Li, Y. (Yarong); Yogi, P. (Puja); N. Amin (Najaf); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); Morris, H.R. (Huw R.); Brice, A. (Alexis); A. Singleton (Andrew); David, D.C. (Della C.); Nollen, E.A. (Ellen A.); A. Jain (Ashok); J.M. Shulman; P. Heutink (Peter); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); S. Arepalli (Sampath); J. Brooks (Janet); Price, R. (Ryan); Nicolas, A. (Aude); S. Chong (Sean); M.R. Cookson (Mark); A. Dillman (Allissa); M. Moore (Matt); B.J. Traynor (Bryan); A. Singleton (Andrew); V. Plagnol (Vincent); Nicholas W Wood,; U.-M. Sheerin (Una-Marie); Jose M Bras,; K. Charlesworth (Kate); M. Gardner (Mac); R. Guerreiro (Rita); D. Trabzuni (Danyah); Hardy, J. (John); M. Sharma; M. Saad (Mohamad); Javier Simón-Sánchez,; C. Schulte (Claudia); J.C. Corvol (Jean-Christophe); Dürr, A. (Alexandra); M. Vidailhet (M.); S. Sveinbjörnsdóttir (Sigurlaug); R.A. Barker (Roger); Caroline H Williams-Gray,; Y. Ben-Shlomo; H.W. Berendse (Henk W.); K.D. van Dijk (Karin); D. Berg (Daniela); K. Brockmann; K.D. Wurster (Kathrin); Mätzler, W. (Walter); Gasser, T. (Thomas); M. Martinez (Maria); R.M.A. de Bie (Rob); A. Biffi (Alessandro); D. Velseboer (Daan); B.R. Bloem (Bastiaan); B. Post (Bart); M. Wickremaratchi (Mirdhu); B. van de Warrenburg (Bart); Z. Bochdanovits (Zoltan); M. von Bonin (Malte); H. Pétursson (Hjörvar); O. Riess (Olaf); D.J. Burn (David); Lubbe, S. (Steven); Cooper, J.M. (J Mark); N.H. McNeill (Nathan); Schapira, A. (Anthony); Lungu, C. (Codrin); Chen, H. (Honglei); Dong, J. (Jing); Chinnery, P.F. (Patrick F.); G. Hudson (Gavin); Clarke, C.E. (Carl E.); C. Moorby (Catriona); C. Counsell (Carl); P. Damier (Philippe); J.-F. Dartigues; P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); E. Gray (Emma); T. Edkins (Ted); Hunt, S.E. (Sarah E.); S.C. Potter (Simon); A. Tashakkori-Ghanbaria (Avazeh); G. Deuschl (Günther); D. Lorenz (Delia); D.T. Dexter (David); F. Durif (Frank); J. Evans (Jonathan Mark); Langford, C. (Cordelia); T. Foltynie (Thomas); A.M. Goate (Alison); C. Harris (Clare); J.J. van Hilten (Jacobus); A. Hofman (Albert); J.R. Hollenbeck (John R.); J.L. Holton (Janice); Hu, M. (Michele); X. Huang (Xiaohong); Illig, T. (Thomas); P.V. Jónsson (Pálmi); J.-C. Lambert; S.S. O'Sullivan (Sean); T. Revesz (Tamas); K. Shaw (Karen); A.J. Lees (Andrew); P. Lichtner (Peter); P. Limousin (Patricia); G. Lopez; Escott-Price, V. (Valentina); J. Pearson (Justin); N. Williams (Nigel); E. Mudanohwo (Ese); J.S. Perlmutter (Joel); Pollak, P. (Pierre); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); S.J. Sawcer (Stephen); H. Scheffer (Hans); I. Shoulson (Ira); L. Shulman (Lee); Smith, C. (Colin); R. Walker (Robert); C.C.A. Spencer (Chris C.); A. Strange (Amy); H. Stefansson (Hreinn); F. Bettella (Francesco); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); Stockton, J.D. (Joanna D.); D. Talbot; C.M. Tanner (Carlie); F. Tison (François); S. Winder-Rhodes (Sophie); K.P. Bhatia (Kailash)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Whole-exome sequencing (WES) has been successful in identifying genes that cause familial Parkinson's disease (PD). However, until now this approach has not been deployed to study large cohorts of unrelated participants. To discover rare PD susceptibility variants, we

  15. Molecular cloning, sequence characteristics, and tissue expression analysis of ECE1 gene in Tibetan pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Dong; Zhang, Jian; Li, Chuan-Hao; Xu, Hai-Peng; Chen, Wei; Zeng, Yong-Qing; Wang, Hui

    2015-10-25

    Low air pressure and low oxygen partial pressure at high altitude seriously affect the survival and development of human beings and animals. ECE1 is a recently discovered gene that is involved in anti-hypoxia, but the full-length cDNA sequence has not been obtained. For a better understanding of the structure and function of the ECE1 gene and to study its effect in Tibetan pig, the cDNA of the ECE1 gene from the muscle of Tibetan pig was cloned, sequenced and characterized. The ECE1 full-length cDNA sequence consists of 2262 bp coding sequence (CDS) that encodes 753 amino acids with a molecular mass of 85,449 kD, 2 bp 5'UTR and 1507 bp 3'UTR. In addition, the phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that the Tibetan pig ECE1 has a closer genetic relationship and evolution distance with the land mammals ECE1. Furthermore, analysis by qPCR showed that the ECE1 transcript is constitutively expressed in the 10 tissues tested: the liver, subcutaneous fat, kidney, muscle, stomach, heart, brain, spleen, pancreas, and lung. These results serve as a foundation for further insight into the Tibetan pig ECE1 gene. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Gene ontology based characterization of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of Brassica rapa cv. Osome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasan, Senthil Kumar Thamil; Park, Jong-In; Ahmed, Nasar Uddin; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Lee, In-Ho; Cho, Yong-Gu; Lim, Yong-Pyo; Kang, Kwon-Kyoo; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2013-07-01

    Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa) is widely recognized for its economic importance and contribution to human nutrition but abiotic and biotic stresses are main obstacle for its quality, nutritional status and production. In this study, 3,429 Express Sequence Tag (EST) sequences were generated from B. rapa cv. Osome cDNA library and the unique transcripts were classified functionally using a gene ontology (GO) hierarchy, Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG). KEGG orthology and the structural domain data were obtained from the biological database for stress related genes (SRG). EST datasets provided a wide outlook of functional characterization of B. rapa cv. Osome. In silico analysis revealed % 83 of ESTs to be well annotated towards reeds one dimensional concept. Clustering of ESTs returned 333 contigs and 2,446 singlets, giving a total of 3,284 putative unigene sequences. This dataset contained 1,017 EST sequences functionally annotated to stress responses and from which expression of randomly selected SRGs were analyzed against cold, salt, drought, ABA, water and PEG stresses. Most of the SRGs showed differentially expression against these stresses. Thus, the EST dataset is very important for discovering the potential genes related to stress resistance in Chinese cabbage, and can be of useful resources for genetic engineering of Brassica sp.

  17. Sequence diversity and differential expression of major phenylpropanoid-flavonoid biosynthetic genes among three mango varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Van L T; Innes, David J; Shaw, P Nicholas; Monteith, Gregory R; Gidley, Michael J; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2015-07-30

    Mango fruits contain a broad spectrum of phenolic compounds which impart potential health benefits; their biosynthesis is catalysed by enzymes in the phenylpropanoid-flavonoid (PF) pathway. The aim of this study was to reveal the variability in genes involved in the PF pathway in three different mango varieties Mangifera indica L., a member of the family Anacardiaceae: Kensington Pride (KP), Irwin (IW) and Nam Doc Mai (NDM) and to determine associations with gene expression and mango flavonoid profiles. A close evolutionary relationship between mango genes and those from the woody species poplar of the Salicaceae family (Populus trichocarpa) and grape of the Vitaceae family (Vitis vinifera), was revealed through phylogenetic analysis of PF pathway genes. We discovered 145 SNPs in total within coding sequences with an average frequency of one SNP every 316 bp. Variety IW had the highest SNP frequency (one SNP every 258 bp) while KP and NDM had similar frequencies (one SNP every 369 bp and 360 bp, respectively). The position in the PF pathway appeared to influence the extent of genetic diversity of the encoded enzymes. The entry point enzymes phenylalanine lyase (PAL), cinnamate 4-mono-oxygenase (C4H) and chalcone synthase (CHS) had low levels of SNP diversity in their coding sequences, whereas anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) showed the highest SNP frequency followed by flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H). Quantitative PCR revealed characteristic patterns of gene expression that differed between mango peel and flesh, and between varieties. The combination of mango expressed sequence tags and availability of well-established reference PF biosynthetic genes from other plant species allowed the identification of coding sequences of genes that may lead to the formation of important flavonoid compounds in mango fruits and facilitated characterisation of single nucleotide polymorphisms between varieties. We discovered an association between the extent of sequence variation and

  18. secA1 Gene Sequence Polymorphisms for Species Identification of Nocardia Species and Recognition of Intraspecies Genetic Diversity▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fanrong; Wang, Huiping; Zhang, Erqing; Sintchenko, Vitali; Xiao, Meng; Sorrell, Tania C.; Chen, Xiaoyou; Chen, Sharon C.-A.

    2010-01-01

    Sequence analysis of the Nocardia essential secretory protein SecA1 gene (secA1) for species identification of 120 American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) and clinical isolates of Nocardia (16 species) was studied in comparison with 5′-end 606-bp 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Species determination by both methods was concordant for all 10 ATCC strains. secA1 gene sequencing provided the same species identification as 16S rRNA gene analysis for 94/110 (85.5%) clinical isolates. However, 40 (42.6%) isolates had sequences with Nocardia cyriacigeorgica (96.6 to 98.9% similarity) and 4 Nocardia veterana (91.5 to 98.9% similarity) strains. Discrepant species identification was obtained for 16 (14.5%) clinical isolates, including 13/23 Nocardia nova strains (identified as various Nocardia species by secA1 sequencing) and 1 isolate each of Nocardia abscessus (identified as Nocardia asiatica), Nocardia elegans (Nocardia africana), and Nocardia transvalensis (Nocardia blacklockiae); both secA1 gene sequence analysis and deduced amino acid sequence analysis determined the species to be different from those assigned by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The secA1 locus showed high sequence diversity (66 sequence or genetic types versus 40 16S rRNA gene sequence types), which was highest for N. nova (14 secA1 sequence types), followed by Nocardia farcinica and N. veterana (n = 7 each); there was only a single sequence type among eight Nocardia paucivorans strains. The secA1 locus has potential for species identification as an adjunct to 16S rRNA gene sequencing but requires additional deduced amino acid sequence analysis. It may be a suitable marker for phylogenetic/subtyping studies. PMID:20810768

  19. SFM: A novel sequence-based fusion method for disease genes identification and prioritization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Abdulaziz; Moghadam Charkari, Nasrollah

    2015-10-21

    The identification of disease genes from human genome is of great importance to improve diagnosis and treatment of disease. Several machine learning methods have been introduced to identify disease genes. However, these methods mostly differ in the prior knowledge used to construct the feature vector for each instance (gene), the ways of selecting negative data (non-disease genes) where there is no investigational approach to find them and the classification methods used to make the final decision. In this work, a novel Sequence-based fusion method (SFM) is proposed to identify disease genes. In this regard, unlike existing methods, instead of using a noisy and incomplete prior-knowledge, the amino acid sequence of the proteins which is universal data has been carried out to present the genes (proteins) into four different feature vectors. To select more likely negative data from candidate genes, the intersection set of four negative sets which are generated using distance approach is considered. Then, Decision Tree (C4.5) has been applied as a fusion method to combine the results of four independent state-of the-art predictors based on support vector machine (SVM) algorithm, and to make the final decision. The experimental results of the proposed method have been evaluated by some standard measures. The results indicate the precision, recall and F-measure of 82.6%, 85.6% and 84, respectively. These results confirm the efficiency and validity of the proposed method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Defining the Sequence Elements and Candidate Genes for the Coloboma Mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Robb

    Full Text Available The chicken coloboma mutation exhibits features similar to human congenital developmental malformations such as ocular coloboma, cleft-palate, dwarfism, and polydactyly. The coloboma-associated region and encoded genes were investigated using advanced genomic, genetic, and gene expression technologies. Initially, the mutation was linked to a 990 kb region encoding 11 genes; the application of the genetic and genomic tools led to a reduction of the linked region to 176 kb and the elimination of 7 genes. Furthermore, bioinformatics analyses of capture array-next generation sequence data identified genetic elements including SNPs, insertions, deletions, gaps, chromosomal rearrangements, and miRNA binding sites within the introgressed causative region relative to the reference genome sequence. Coloboma-specific variants within exons, UTRs, and splice sites were studied for their contribution to the mutant phenotype. Our compiled results suggest three genes for future studies. The three candidate genes, SLC30A5 (a zinc transporter, CENPH (a centromere protein, and CDK7 (a cyclin-dependent kinase, are differentially expressed (compared to normal embryos at stages and in tissues affected by the coloboma mutation. Of these genes, two (SLC30A5 and CENPH are considered high-priority candidate based upon studies in other vertebrate model systems.

  1. Network-Informed Gene Ranking Tackles Genetic Heterogeneity in Exome-Sequencing Studies of Monogenic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dand, Nick; Schulz, Reiner; Weale, Michael E; Southgate, Laura; Oakey, Rebecca J; Simpson, Michael A; Schlitt, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Genetic heterogeneity presents a significant challenge for the identification of monogenic disease genes. Whole-exome sequencing generates a large number of candidate disease-causing variants and typical analyses rely on deleterious variants being observed in the same gene across several unrelated affected individuals. This is less likely to occur for genetically heterogeneous diseases, making more advanced analysis methods necessary. To address this need, we present HetRank, a flexible gene-ranking method that incorporates interaction network data. We first show that different genes underlying the same monogenic disease are frequently connected in protein interaction networks. This motivates the central premise of HetRank: those genes carrying potentially pathogenic variants and whose network neighbors do so in other affected individuals are strong candidates for follow-up study. By simulating 1,000 exome sequencing studies (20,000 exomes in total), we model varying degrees of genetic heterogeneity and show that HetRank consistently prioritizes more disease-causing genes than existing analysis methods. We also demonstrate a proof-of-principle application of the method to prioritize genes causing Adams-Oliver syndrome, a genetically heterogeneous rare disease. An implementation of HetRank in R is available via the Website http://sourceforge.net/p/hetrank/. © 2015 The Authors. **Human Mutation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Resolution of the African hominoid trichotomy by use of a mitochondrial gene sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruvolo, M.; Disotell, T.R.; Allard, M.W. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Brown, W.M. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States)); Honeycutt, R.L. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station (United States))

    1991-02-15

    Mitochondrial DNA sequences encoding the cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene have been determined for five primate species, siamang (Hylobates syndactylus), lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla), pygmy chimpanzee (Pan paniscus), crab-eating macaque (Macaca fascicularis), and green monkey (Cercopithecus aethiops), and compared with published sequences of other primate and nonprimate species. Comparisons of cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene sequences provide clear-cut evidence from the mitochondrial genome for the separation of the African ape trichotomy into two evolutionary lineages, one leading to gorillas and the other to humans and chimpanzees. Several different tree-building methods support this same phylogenetic tree topology. The comparisons also yield trees in which a substantial length separates the divergence point of gorillas from that of humans and chimpanzees, suggesting that the lineage most immediately ancestral to humans and chimpanzees may have been in existence for a relatively long time.

  3. [A molecular phylogeny of Shennongjia white bear based on mitochondrial cytochrome b gene sequence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Juan; Zhang, Zhi-Min; Liu, Zhong-Lai; Xiong, Guo-Mei

    2006-10-01

    The phylogenetic relationship of Shennongjia white bear has been an open question. Total DNA was extracted and sequenced from hair and feces of Shennongjia white bear. Based on the partial Cyt b gene sequence obtained from the samples, the authors aligned them using the Clustal W software program. The MEGA software was used to analyze the divergences and base substitutions of the partial Cyt b gene among the 11 species: Shennongjia white bear, Selenarctos thibetanus, Euarctos americanus, Helarctos malayanus, Ursus arctos, Thalarctos maritimus, Melursus ursinus, Procyon lotor, Ailuropoda melanoleuca, Ailurus fulgens and Tremarctos ornatus. The phylogenetic trees constructed by multiple methods (NJ and MP) supported nearly the same topology. Our molecular results show that the sequence divergence between Shennongjia white bear and Asiatic black bear (Selenarctos thibetanus) is lower than that between other species.

  4. [Characterization of 5S rRNA gene sequence and secondary structure in gymnosperms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhan-Lin; Zhang, Da-Ming; Wang, Xiao-Ru

    2003-01-01

    In higher plants the primary and the secondary structures of 5S ribosomal RNA gene are considered highly conservative. Little is known about the 5S rRNA gene structure, organization and variation in gyimnosperms. In this study we analyzed sequence and structure variation of 5S rRNA gene in Pinus through cloning and sequencing multiple copies of 5S rDNA repeats from individual trees of five pines, P. bungeana, P. tabulaeformis, P. yunnanensis, P. massoniana and P. densata. Pinus bungeana is from the subgenus Strobus while the other four are from the subgenus Pinus (diploxylon pines). Our results revealed variations in both primary and secondary structure among copies of 5S rDNA within individual genomes and between species. 5S rRNA gene in Pinus is 120 bp long in most of the 122 clones we sequenced except for one or two deletions in three clones. Among these clones 50 unique sequences were identified and they were shared by different pine species. Our sequences were compared to 13 sequences each representing a different gymnosperm species, and to six sequences representing both angiosperm monocots and dicots. Average sequence similarity was 97.1% among Pinus species and 94.3% between Pinus and other gymnosperms. Between gymnosperms and angiosperms the sequence similarity decreased to 88.1%. Similar to other molecular data, significant sequence divergence was found between the two Pinus subgenera. The 5S gene tree (neighbor-joining tree) grouped the four diploxylon pines together and separated them distinctly from P. bungeana. Comparison of sequence divergence within individuals and between species suggested that concerted evolution has been very weak especially after the divergence of the four diploxylon pines. The phylogenetic information contained in the 5S rRNA gene is limited due to its shorter length and the difficulties in identifying orthologous and paralogous copies of rDNA multigene family further complicate its phylogenetic application. Pinus densata is a

  5. Multidimensional metrics for estimating phage abundance, distribution, gene density, and sequence coverage in metagenomes

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    Ramy Karam Aziz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Phages are the most abundant biological entities on Earth and play major ecological roles, yet the current sequenced phage genomes do not adequately represent their diversity, and little is known about the abundance and distribution of these sequenced genomes in nature. Although the study of phage ecology has benefited tremendously from the emergence of metagenomic sequencing, a systematic survey of phage genes and genomes in various ecosystems is still lacking, and fundamental questions about phage biology, lifestyle, and ecology remain unanswered. To address these questions and improve comparative analysis of phages in different metagenomes, we screened a core set of publicly available metagenomic samples for sequences related to completely sequenced phages using the web tool, Phage Eco-Locator. We then adopted and deployed an array of mathematical and statistical metrics for a multidimensional estimation of the abundance and distribution of phage genes and genomes in various ecosystems. Experiments using those metrics individually showed their usefulness in emphasizing the pervasive, yet uneven, distribution of known phage sequences in environmental metagenomes. Using these metrics in combination allowed us to resolve phage genomes into clusters that correlated with their genotypes and taxonomic classes as well as their ecological properties. We propose adding this set of metrics to current metaviromic analysis pipelines, where they can provide insight regarding phage mosaicism, habitat specificity, and evolution.

  6. DNA sequence of the lactose operon: the lacA gene and the transcriptional termination region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hediger, M A; Johnson, D F; Nierlich, D P; Zabin, I

    1985-10-01

    The lac operon of Escherichia coli spans approximately 5300 base pairs and includes the lacZ, lacY, and lacA genes in addition to the operator, promoter, and transcription termination regions. We report here the sequence of the lacA gene and the region distal to it, confirming the sequence of thiogalactoside transacetylase and completing the sequence of the lac operon. The lacA gene is characterized by use of rare codons, suggesting an origin from a plasmid, transposon, or virus gene. UUG is the translation initiation codon. A preliminary examination of 3' end of the lac messenger in the region distal to the lacA gene indicates several endpoints. A predominant one is located at the 3' end of a G + C-rich hairpin structure, which may be involved in termination of transcription or in post-transcriptional processing. An open reading frame of 702 base pairs is present on the complementary strand downstream from lacA.

  7. Expressed sequences tags of the anther smut fungus, Microbotryum violaceum, identify mating and pathogenicity genes

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    Devier Benjamin

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The basidiomycete fungus Microbotryum violaceum is responsible for the anther-smut disease in many plants of the Caryophyllaceae family and is a model in genetics and evolutionary biology. Infection is initiated by dikaryotic hyphae produced after the conjugation of two haploid sporidia of opposite mating type. This study describes M. violaceum ESTs corresponding to nuclear genes expressed during conjugation and early hyphal production. Results A normalized cDNA library generated 24,128 sequences, which were assembled into 7,765 unique genes; 25.2% of them displayed significant similarity to annotated proteins from other organisms, 74.3% a weak similarity to the same set of known proteins, and 0.5% were orphans. We identified putative pheromone receptors and genes that in other fungi are involved in the mating process. We also identified many sequences similar to genes known to be involved in pathogenicity in other fungi. The M. violaceum EST database, MICROBASE, is available on the Web and provides access to the sequences, assembled contigs, annotations and programs to compare similarities against MICROBASE. Conclusion This study provides a basis for cloning the mating type locus, for further investigation of pathogenicity genes in the anther smut fungi, and for comparative genomics.

  8. Two Lamprey Hedgehog Genes Share Non-Coding Regulatory Sequences and Expression Patterns with Gnathostome Hedgehogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekker, Marc; Hadzhiev, Yavor; Müller, Ferenc; Casane, Didier; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) genes play major roles in animal development and studies of their evolution, expression and function point to major differences among chordates. Here we focused on Hh genes in lampreys in order to characterize the evolution of Hh signalling at the emergence of vertebrates. Screening of a cosmid library of the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis and searching the preliminary genome assembly of the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus indicate that lampreys have two Hh genes, named Hha and Hhb. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that Hha and Hhb are lamprey-specific paralogs closely related to Sonic/Indian Hh genes. Expression analysis indicates that Hha and Hhb are expressed in a Sonic Hh-like pattern. The two transcripts are expressed in largely overlapping but not identical domains in the lamprey embryonic brain, including a newly-described expression domain in the nasohypophyseal placode. Global alignments of genomic sequences and local alignment with known gnathostome regulatory motifs show that lamprey Hhs share conserved non-coding elements (CNE) with gnathostome Hhs albeit with sequences that have significantly diverged and dispersed. Functional assays using zebrafish embryos demonstrate gnathostome-like midline enhancer activity for CNEs contained in intron2. We conclude that lamprey Hh genes are gnathostome Shh-like in terms of expression and regulation. In addition, they show some lamprey-specific features, including duplication and structural (but not functional) changes in the intronic/regulatory sequences. PMID:20967201

  9. Mutation spectrum of six genes in Chinese phenylketonuria patients obtained through next-generation sequencing.

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    Ying Gu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The identification of gene variants plays an important role in the diagnosis of genetic diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To develop a rapid method for the diagnosis of phenylketonuria (PKU and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4 deficiency, we designed a multiplex, PCR-based primer panel to amplify all the exons and flanking regions (50 bp average of six PKU-associated genes (PAH, PTS, GCH1, QDPR, PCBD1 and GFRP. The Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM System was used to detect mutations in all the exons of these six genes. We tested 93 DNA samples from blood specimens from 35 patients and their parents (32 families and 26 healthy adults. Using strict bioinformatic criteria, this sequencing data provided, on average, 99.14% coverage of the 39 exons at more than 70-fold mean depth of coverage. We found 23 previously documented variants in the PAH gene and six novel mutations in the PAH and PTS genes. A detailed analysis of the mutation spectrum of these patients is described in this study. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. In conclusion, benchtop next-generation sequencing technology can be used to detect mutations in monogenic diseases and can detect both point mutations and indels with high sensitivity, fidelity and throughput at a lower cost than conventional methods in clinical applications.

  10. Gorilla MHC class I gene and sequence variation in a comparative context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Jörg B; Bergl, Richard A; Vigilant, Linda

    2017-05-01

    Comparisons of MHC gene content and diversity among closely related species can provide insights into the evolutionary mechanisms shaping immune system variation. After chimpanzees and bonobos, gorillas are humans' closest living relatives; but in contrast, relatively little is known about the structure and variation of gorilla MHC class I genes (Gogo). Here, we combined long-range amplifications and long-read sequencing technology to analyze full-length MHC class I genes in 35 gorillas. We obtained 50 full-length genomic sequences corresponding to 15 Gogo-A alleles, 4 Gogo-Oko alleles, 21 Gogo-B alleles, and 10 Gogo-C alleles including 19 novel coding region sequences. We identified two previously undetected MHC class I genes related to Gogo-A and Gogo-B, respectively, thereby illustrating the potential of this approach for efficient and highly accurate MHC genotyping. Consistent with their phylogenetic position within the hominid family, individual gorilla MHC haplotypes share characteristics with humans and chimpanzees as well as orangutans suggesting a complex history of the MHC class I genes in humans and the great apes. However, the overall MHC class I diversity appears to be low further supporting the hypothesis that gorillas might have experienced a reduction of their MHC repertoire.

  11. Sequence variation in human succinate dehydrogenase genes: evidence for long-term balancing selection on SDHA

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    Lawrence Elizabeth C

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Balancing selection operating for long evolutionary periods at a locus is characterized by the maintenance of distinct alleles because of a heterozygote or rare-allele advantage. The loci under balancing selection are distinguished by their unusually high polymorphism levels. In this report, we provide statistical and comparative genetic evidence suggesting that the SDHA gene is under long-term balancing selection. SDHA encodes the major catalytical subunit (flavoprotein, Fp of the succinate dehydrogenase enzyme complex (SDH; mitochondrial complex II. The inhibition of Fp by homozygous SDHA mutations or by 3-nitropropionic acid poisoning causes central nervous system pathologies. In contrast, heterozygous mutations in SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD, the other SDH subunit genes, cause hereditary paraganglioma (PGL tumors, which show constitutive activation of pathways induced by oxygen deprivation (hypoxia. Results We sequenced the four SDH subunit genes (10.8 kb in 24 African American and 24 European American samples. We also sequenced the SDHA gene (2.8 kb in 18 chimpanzees. Increased nucleotide diversity distinguished the human SDHA gene from its chimpanzee ortholog and from the PGL genes. Sequence analysis uncovered two common SDHA missense variants and refuted the previous suggestions that these variants originate from different genetic loci. Two highly dissimilar SDHA haplotype clusters were present in intermediate frequencies in both racial groups. The SDHA variation pattern showed statistically significant deviations from neutrality by the Tajima, Fu and Li, Hudson-Kreitman-Aguadé, and Depaulis haplotype number tests. Empirically, the elevated values of the nucleotide diversity (% π = 0.231 and the Tajima statistics (D = 1.954 in the SDHA gene were comparable with the most outstanding cases for balancing selection in the African American population. Conclusion The SDHA gene has a strong signature of balancing selection. The

  12. Sequencing, physical organization and kinetic expression of the patulin biosynthetic gene cluster from Penicillium expansum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannous, Joanna; El Khoury, Rhoda; Snini, Selma P; Lippi, Yannick; El Khoury, André; Atoui, Ali; Lteif, Roger; Oswald, Isabelle P; Puel, Olivier

    2014-10-17

    Patulin is a polyketide-derived mycotoxin produced by numerous filamentous fungi. Among them, Penicillium expansum is by far the most problematic species. This fungus is a destructive phytopathogen capable of growing on fruit, provoking the blue mold decay of apples and producing significant amounts of patulin. The biosynthetic pathway of this mycotoxin is chemically well-characterized, but its genetic bases remain largely unknown with only few characterized genes in less economic relevant species. The present study consisted of the identification and positional organization of the patulin gene cluster in P. expansum strain NRRL 35695. Several amplification reactions were performed with degenerative primers that were designed based on sequences from the orthologous genes available in other species. An improved genome Walking approach was used in order to sequence the remaining adjacent genes of the cluster. RACE-PCR was also carried out from mRNAs to determine the start and stop codons of the coding sequences. The patulin gene cluster in P. expansum consists of 15 genes in the following order: patH, patG, patF, patE, patD, patC, patB, patA, patM, patN, patO, patL, patI, patJ, and patK. These genes share 60-70% of identity with orthologous genes grouped differently, within a putative patulin cluster described in a non-producing strain of Aspergillus clavatus. The kinetics of patulin cluster genes expression was studied under patulin-permissive conditions (natural apple-based medium) and patulin-restrictive conditions (Eagle's minimal essential medium), and demonstrated a significant association between gene expression and patulin production. In conclusion, the sequence of the patulin cluster in P. expansum constitutes a key step for a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to patulin production in this fungus. It will allow the role of each gene to be elucidated, and help to define strategies to reduce patulin production in apple-based products. Copyright

  13. Genetic variability of Myzus persicae nicotianae densovirus based on partial NS and VP gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, X R; Tang, S H; Tang, Z Q; Yang, X M; Wang, X W; Wang, X F; Xu, P J; Ren, G W

    2016-11-21

    We previously described a novel densovirus [Myzus persicae nicotianae densovirus (MpnDV)] infecting M. persicae nicotianae (Hemiptera: Aphididae) with 34% prevalence. This single-stranded DNA virus has a 5480-nucleotide ambisense genome and belongs to the Densovirinae subfamily within the family Parvoviridae. In the present study, we estimated the genetic diversity of MpnDV using partial nonstructural protein (NS) and capsid protein (VP) gene sequences from 10 locations in China. First, we identified MpnDV-positive samples by amplifying a 445-bp fragment with primers MpDVF/MpDVR. Subsequently, we amplified and sequenced COI genes with primers MpCOIF/ MpCOIR, and partial NS and VP sequences with primers MpnDVF1/MpnDVR1. The respective 655-, 1461-, and 423-bp COI, NS, and VP fragments were used to analyze the genetic diversity of MpnDV using MEGA 6.0 and DnaSP 5.0. The high level of identity shared by all COI sequences (>99%) suggested that the aphids sampled were of the same species, and indicated population homogeneity across the 10 locations investigated. The nucleotide diversity of MpnDV sequences (0.0020 ± 0.0025) was significantly higher than that of the COI genes (0.0002 ± 0.0005). The pairwise fixation index for MpnDV was 0.832, and the total gene flow was 0.05. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the MpnDV haplotypes clustered according to geographical location, except for those from the Liaoning and Shanxi provinces. In conclusion, MpnDV demonstrated a low level of gene flow and high genetic diversity, suggesting that it is vertically transmitted, and implying that endosymbiotic viruses could be used as markers in studies of insect population genetics.

  14. Sequence signatures involved in targeting the male-specific lethal complex to X-chromosomal genes in Drosophila melanogaster

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    Philip Philge

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Drosophila melanogaster, the dosage-compensation system that equalizes X-linked gene expression between males and females, thereby assuring that an appropriate balance is maintained between the expression of genes on the X chromosome(s and the autosomes, is at least partially mediated by the Male-Specific Lethal (MSL complex. This complex binds to genes with a preference for exons on the male X chromosome with a 3' bias, and it targets most expressed genes on the X chromosome. However, a number of genes are expressed but not targeted by the complex. High affinity sites seem to be responsible for initial recruitment of the complex to the X chromosome, but the targeting to and within individual genes is poorly understood. Results We have extensively examined X chromosome sequence variation within five types of gene features (promoters, 5' UTRs, coding sequences, introns, 3' UTRs and intergenic sequences, and assessed its potential involvement in dosage compensation. Presented results show that: the X chromosome has a distinct sequence composition within its gene features; some of the detected variation correlates with genes targeted by the MSL-complex; the insulator protein BEAF-32 preferentially binds upstream of MSL-bound genes; BEAF-32 and MOF co-localizes in promoters; and that bound genes have a distinct sequence composition that shows a 3' bias within coding sequence. Conclusions Although, many strongly bound genes are close to a high affinity site neither our promoter motif nor our coding sequence signatures show any correlation to HAS. Based on the results presented here, we believe that there are sequences in the promoters and coding sequences of targeted genes that have the potential to direct the secondary spreading of the MSL-complex to nearby genes.

  15. Characterization of medicinal Epimedium species by 5S rRNA gene spacer sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ye; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Leung, Ping-Chung; Shi, Dawen; Shaw, Pang-Chui

    2004-03-01

    Sequences of 5S rRNA gene spacer were used to identify Epimedium brevicornu Maxim., E. sagittatum (Sieb. et Zucc.) Maxim., E. wushanense T. S. Ying, E. pubescens Maxim., and E. koreanum Nakai. These species are listed as source plants of Chinese medicine 'Ying Yang Huo' in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia. The neighbor-joining method was used in a sequence analysis of Epimedium species. A position-specific nucleotide was found in the 5S rRNA gene spacer for E. pubescens, E. wushanense, and E. brevicornu. A 19-bp deletion was found for E. koreanum in the 5S rRNA gene spacer. E. koreanum was most divergent from the other four endemic Chinese species of Epimedium.

  16. Sequencing and analysis of the gene-rich space of cowpea

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    Cheung Foo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cowpea, Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp., is one of the most important food and forage legumes in the semi-arid tropics because of its drought tolerance and ability to grow on poor quality soils. Approximately 80% of cowpea production takes place in the dry savannahs of tropical West and Central Africa, mostly by poor subsistence farmers. Despite its economic and social importance in the developing world, cowpea remains to a large extent an underexploited crop. Among the major goals of cowpea breeding and improvement programs is the stacking of desirable agronomic traits, such as disease and pest resistance and response to abiotic stresses. Implementation of marker-assisted selection and breeding programs is severely limited by a paucity of trait-linked markers and a general lack of information on gene structure and organization. With a nuclear genome size estimated at ~620 Mb, the cowpea genome is an ideal target for reduced representation sequencing. Results We report here the sequencing and analysis of the gene-rich, hypomethylated portion of the cowpea genome selectively cloned by methylation filtration (MF technology. Over 250,000 gene-space sequence reads (GSRs with an average length of 610 bp were generated, yielding ~160 Mb of sequence information. The GSRs were assembled, annotated by BLAST homology searches of four public protein annotation databases and four plant proteomes (A. thaliana, M. truncatula, O. sativa, and P. trichocarpa, and analyzed using various domain and gene modeling tools. A total of 41,260 GSR assemblies and singletons were annotated, of which 19,786 have unique GenBank accession numbers. Within the GSR dataset, 29% of the sequences were annotated using the Arabidopsis Gene Ontology (GO with the largest categories of assigned function being catalytic activity and metabolic processes, groups that include the majority of cellular enzymes and components of amino acid, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. A

  17. X-exome sequencing of 405 unresolved families identifies seven novel intellectual disability genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, H; Haas, S A; Chelly, J

    2016-01-01

    with established roles in cognitive function and intellectual disability in particular. We suggest that systematic sequencing of all X-chromosomal genes in a cohort of patients with genetic evidence for X-chromosome locus involvement may resolve up to 58% of Fragile X-negative cases.......X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. During the past two decades in excess of 100 X-chromosome ID genes have been identified. Yet, a large number of families mapping to the X-chromosome remained unresolved suggesting that more XLID genes...... or loci are yet to be identified. Here, we have investigated 405 unresolved families with XLID. We employed massively parallel sequencing of all X-chromosome exons in the index males. The majority of these males were previously tested negative for copy number variations and for mutations in a subset...

  18. The mitochondrial genome of Anopheles quadrimaculatus species A: complete nucleotide sequence and gene organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, S E; Cockburn, A F; Seawright, J A

    1993-12-01

    The complete sequence (15,455 bp) of the mitochondrial DNA of the mosquito Anopheles quadrimaculatus species A is reported. This genome is compact and very A+T rich (77.4% A+T). It contains genes for 2 ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), 22 transfer RNAs (tRNAs), and 13 subunits of the mitochondrial inner membrane respiratory complexes. The gene arrangement is the same as in Drosophila yakuba, except that the positions of two contiguous tRNAs are reversed and a third tRNA is transcribed from the complementary strand. Protein-coding genes, rRNAs, and most tRNAs were similar to D. yakuba. Two tRNAs had nonstandard secondary structures comparable with those of nematode mitochondrial tRNAs. The very small putative control region (625 bp) contains no sequence motifs similar to those used in vertebrates and other insects for initiation of transcription and replication.

  19. Identification of metastasis driver genes by massive parallel sequencing of successive steps of breast cancer progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke

    2018-01-01

    Cancer results from alterations at essential genomic sites and is characterized by uncontrolled cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis. Identification of driver genes of metastatic progression is essential, as metastases, not primary tumors, are fatal. To gain insight into the mutational...... concordance between different steps of malignant progression we performed exome sequencing and validation with targeted deep sequencing of successive steps of malignant progression from pre-invasive stages to asynchronous distant metastases in six breast cancer patients. Using the ratio of non......-synonymous to synonymous mutations, a surprisingly large number of cancer driver genes, ranging between 3 and 145, were estimated to confer a selective advantage in the studied primary tumors. We report a substantial amount of metastasis specific mutations and a number of novel putative metastasis driver genes. Most...

  20. DNA sequence heterogeneity of Campylobacter jejuni CJIE4 prophages and expression of prophage genes.

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    Clifford G Clark

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni carry temperate bacteriophages that can affect the biology or virulence of the host bacterium. Known effects include genomic rearrangements and resistance to DNA transformation. C. jejuni prophage CJIE1 shows sequence variability and variability in the content of morons. Homologs of the CJIE1 prophage enhance both adherence and invasion to cells in culture and increase the expression of a specific subset of bacterial genes. Other C. jejuni temperate phages have so far not been well characterized. In this study we describe investigations into the DNA sequence variability and protein expression in a second prophage, CJIE4. CJIE4 sequences were obtained de novo from DNA sequencing of five C. jejuni isolates, as well as from whole genome sequences submitted to GenBank by other research groups. These CJIE4 DNA sequences were heterogenous, with several different insertions/deletions (indels in different parts of the prophage genome. Two variants of a 3-4 kb region inserted within CJIE4 had different gene content that distinguished two major conserved CJIE4 prophage families. Additional indels were detected throughout the prophage. Detection of proteins in the five isolates characterized in our laboratory in isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ experiments indicated that prophage proteins within each of the two large indel variants were expressed during growth of the bacteria on Mueller Hinton agar plates. These proteins included the extracellular DNase associated with resistance to DNA transformation and prophage repressor proteins. Other proteins associated with known or suspected roles in prophage biology were also expressed from CJIE4, including capsid protein, the phage integrase, and MazF, a type II toxin-antitoxin system protein. Together with the results previously obtained for the CJIE1 prophage these results demonstrate that sequence variability and expression of moron genes are both general

  1. Core Gene Set As the Basis of Multilocus Sequence Analysis of the Subclass Actinobacteridae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adékambi, Toïdi; Butler, Ray W.; Hanrahan, Finnian; Delcher, Arthur L.; Drancourt, Michel; Shinnick, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Comparative genomic sequencing is shedding new light on bacterial identification, taxonomy and phylogeny. An in silico assessment of a core gene set necessary for cellular functioning was made to determine a consensus set of genes that would be useful for the identification, taxonomy and phylogeny of the species belonging to the subclass Actinobacteridae which contained two orders Actinomycetales and Bifidobacteriales. The subclass Actinobacteridae comprised about 85% of the actinobacteria families. The following recommended criteria were used to establish a comprehensive gene set; the gene should (i) be long enough to contain phylogenetically useful information, (ii) not be subject to horizontal gene transfer, (iii) be a single copy (iv) have at least two regions sufficiently conserved that allow the design of amplification and sequencing primers and (v) predict whole-genome relationships. We applied these constraints to 50 different Actinobacteridae genomes and made 1,224 pairwise comparisons of the genome conserved regions and gene fragments obtained by using Sequence VARiability Analysis Program (SVARAP), which allow designing the primers. Following a comparative statistical modeling phase, 3 gene fragments were selected, ychF, rpoB, and secY with R2>0.85. Selected sets of broad range primers were tested from the 3 gene fragments and were demonstrated to be useful for amplification and sequencing of 25 species belonging to 9 genera of Actinobacteridae. The intraspecies similarities were 96.3–100% for ychF, 97.8–100% for rpoB and 96.9–100% for secY among 73 strains belonging to 15 species of the subclass Actinobacteridae compare to 99.4–100% for 16S rRNA. The phylogenetic topology obtained from the combined datasets ychF+rpoB+secY was globally similar to that inferred from the 16S rRNA but with higher confidence. It was concluded that multi-locus sequence analysis using core gene set might represent the first consensus and valid approach for

  2. GeneImp: Fast Imputation to Large Reference Panels Using Genotype Likelihoods from Ultralow Coverage Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiliopoulou, Athina; Colombo, Marco; Orchard, Peter; Agakov, Felix; McKeigue, Paul

    2017-05-01

    We address the task of genotype imputation to a dense reference panel given genotype likelihoods computed from ultralow coverage sequencing as inputs. In this setting, the data have a high-level of missingness or uncertainty, and are thus more amenable to a probabilistic representation. Most existing imputation algorithms are not well suited for this situation, as they rely on prephasing for computational efficiency, and, without definite genotype calls, the prephasing task becomes computationally expensive. We describe GeneImp, a program for genotype imputation that does not require prephasing and is computationally tractable for whole-genome imputation. GeneImp does not explicitly model recombination, instead it capitalizes on the existence of large reference panels-comprising thousands of reference haplotypes-and assumes that the reference haplotypes can adequately represent the target haplotypes over short regions unaltered. We validate GeneImp based on data from ultralow coverage sequencing (0.5×), and compare its performance to the most recent version of BEAGLE that can perform this task. We show that GeneImp achieves imputation quality very close to that of BEAGLE, using one to two orders of magnitude less time, without an increase in memory complexity. Therefore, GeneImp is the first practical choice for whole-genome imputation to a dense reference panel when prephasing cannot be applied, for instance, in datasets produced via ultralow coverage sequencing. A related future application for GeneImp is whole-genome imputation based on the off-target reads from deep whole-exome sequencing. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  3. Sequence-Based Introgression Mapping Identifies Candidate White Mold Tolerance Genes in Common Bean

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    Sujan Mamidi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available White mold, caused by the necrotrophic fungus (Lib. de Bary, is a major disease of common bean ( L.. WM7.1 and WM8.3 are two quantitative trait loci (QTL with major effects on tolerance to the pathogen. Advanced backcross populations segregating individually for either of the two QTL, and a recombinant inbred (RI population segregating for both QTL were used to fine map and confirm the genetic location of the QTL. The QTL intervals were physically mapped using the reference common bean genome sequence, and the physical intervals for each QTL were further confirmed by sequence-based introgression mapping. Using whole-genome sequence data from susceptible and tolerant DNA pools, introgressed regions were identified as those with significantly higher numbers of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs relative to the whole genome. By combining the QTL and SNP data, WM7.1 was located to a 660-kb region that contained 41 gene models on the proximal end of chromosome Pv07, while the WM8.3 introgression was narrowed to a 1.36-Mb region containing 70 gene models. The most polymorphic candidate gene in the WM7.1 region encodes a BEACH-domain protein associated with apoptosis. Within the WM8.3 interval, a receptor-like protein with the potential to recognize pathogen effectors was the most polymorphic gene. The use of gene and sequence-based mapping identified two candidate genes whose putative functions are consistent with the current model of pathogenicity.

  4. Identification of miRNAs and their target genes in developing soybean seeds by deep sequencing

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    Chen Shou-Yi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs regulate gene expression by mediating gene silencing at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels in higher plants. miRNAs and related target genes have been widely studied in model plants such as Arabidopsis and rice; however, the number of identified miRNAs in soybean (Glycine max is limited, and global identification of the related miRNA targets has not been reported in previous research. Results In our study, a small RNA library and a degradome library were constructed from developing soybean seeds for deep sequencing. We identified 26 new miRNAs in soybean by bioinformatic analysis and further confirmed their expression by stem-loop RT-PCR. The miRNA star sequences of 38 known miRNAs and 8 new miRNAs were also discovered, providing additional evidence for the existence of miRNAs. Through degradome sequencing, 145 and 25 genes were identified as targets of annotated miRNAs and new miRNAs, respectively. GO analysis indicated that many of the identified miRNA targets may function in soybean seed development. Additionally, a soybean homolog of Arabidopsis SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SLIENCING 3 (AtSGS3 was detected as a target of the newly identified miRNA Soy_25, suggesting the presence of feedback control of miRNA biogenesis. Conclusions We have identified large numbers of miRNAs and their related target genes through deep sequencing of a small RNA library and a degradome library. Our study provides more information about the regulatory network of miRNAs in soybean and advances our understanding of miRNA functions during seed development.

  5. DriverDB: an exome sequencing database for cancer driver gene identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei-Chung; Chung, I-Fang; Chen, Chen-Yang; Sun, Hsing-Jen; Fen, Jun-Jeng; Tang, Wei-Chun; Chang, Ting-Yu; Wong, Tai-Tong; Wang, Hsei-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Exome sequencing (exome-seq) has aided in the discovery of a huge amount of mutations in cancers, yet challenges remain in converting oncogenomics data into information that is interpretable and accessible for clinical care. We constructed DriverDB (http://ngs.ym.edu.tw/driverdb/), a database which incorporates 6079 cases of exome-seq data, annotation databases (such as dbSNP, 1000 Genome and Cosmic) and published bioinformatics algorithms dedicated to driver gene/mutation identification. We provide two points of view, 'Cancer' and 'Gene', to help researchers to visualize the relationships between cancers and driver genes/mutations. The 'Cancer' section summarizes the calculated results of driver genes by eight computational methods for a specific cancer type/dataset and provides three levels of biological interpretation for realization of the relationships between driver genes. The 'Gene' section is designed to visualize the mutation information of a driver gene in five different aspects. Moreover, a 'Meta-Analysis' function is provided so researchers may identify driver genes in customer-defined samples. The novel driver genes/mutations identified hold potential for both basic research and biotech applications.

  6. Driver Gene Mutations in Stools of Colorectal Carcinoma Patients Detected by Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armengol, Gemma; Sarhadi, Virinder K; Ghanbari, Reza; Doghaei-Moghaddam, Masoud; Ansari, Reza; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Puolakkainen, Pauli; Kokkola, Arto; Malekzadeh, Reza; Knuutila, Sakari

    2016-07-01

    Detection of driver gene mutations in stool DNA represents a promising noninvasive approach for screening colorectal cancer (CRC). Amplicon-based next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a good option to study mutations in many cancer genes simultaneously and from a low amount of DNA. Our aim was to assess the feasibility of identifying mutations in 22 cancer driver genes with Ion Torrent technology in stool DNA from a series of 65 CRC patients. The assay was successful in 80% of stool DNA samples. NGS results showed 83 mutations in cancer driver genes, 29 hotspot and 54 novel mutations. One to five genes were mutated in 75% of cases. TP53, KRAS, FBXW7, and SMAD4 were the top mutated genes, consistent with previous studies. Of samples with mutations, 54% presented concomitant mutations in different genes. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway genes were mutated in 70% of samples, with 58% having alterations in KRAS, NRAS, or BRAF. Because mutations in these genes can compromise the efficacy of epidermal growth factor receptor blockade in CRC patients, identifying mutations that confer resistance to some targeted treatments may be useful to guide therapeutic decisions. In conclusion, the data presented herein show that NGS procedures on stool DNA represent a promising tool to detect genetic mutations that could be used in the future for diagnosis, monitoring, or treating CRC. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Sequence variability in the coat protein gene of two groups of banana bunchy top isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanitchakorn, R; Harding, R M; Dale, J L

    2000-01-01

    Complete nucleotide sequences of the coat protein gene (DNA-3) of banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) were obtained from five geographical isolates by PCR. Analysis of these sequences revealed two distinct groups of BBTV isolates with those from the Philippines, Taiwan and Vietnam forming the Asian group while the South Pacific/African group consisted of isolates from Australia, Burundi and Fiji. At the nucleotide level, the sequences of DNA-3 were more similar between isolates from the same group (maximum 5.86%) than between members of the two different groups (maximum 13.05%). At the amino acid level, the BBTV coat protein remained highly conserved, with a maximum of bananas. The high level of conservation in the BBTV coat protein suggests that any of the DNA-3 sequences presented in this study would probably be equally effective as transgene in attempts to generate transgenic banana plants with resistance to both groups of BBTV isolates.

  8. A sweetpotato gene index established by de novo assembly of pyrosequencing and Sanger sequences and mining for gene-based microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solis Julio

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L. Lam., a hexaploid outcrossing crop, is an important staple and food security crop in developing countries in Africa and Asia. The availability of genomic resources for sweetpotato is in striking contrast to its importance for human nutrition. Previously existing sequence data were restricted to around 22,000 expressed sequence tag (EST sequences and ~ 1,500 GenBank sequences. We have used 454 pyrosequencing to augment the available gene sequence information to enhance functional genomics and marker design for this plant species. Results Two quarter 454 pyrosequencing runs used two normalized cDNA collections from stems and leaves from drought-stressed sweetpotato clone Tanzania and yielded 524,209 reads, which were assembled together with 22,094 publically available expressed sequence tags into 31,685 sets of overlapping DNA segments and 34,733 unassembled sequences. Blastx comparisons with the UniRef100 database allowed annotation of 23,957 contigs and 15,342 singletons resulting in 24,657 putatively unique genes. Further, 27,119 sequences had no match to protein sequences of UniRef100database. On the basis of this gene index, we have identified 1,661 gene-based microsatellite sequences, of which 223 were selected for testing and 195 were successfully amplified in a test panel of 6 hexaploid (I. batatas and 2 diploid (I. trifida accessions. Conclusions The sweetpotato gene index is a useful source for functionally annotated sweetpotato gene sequences that contains three times more gene sequence information for sweetpotato than previous EST assemblies. A searchable version of the gene index, including a blastn function, is available at http://www.cipotato.org/sweetpotato_gene_index.

  9. REVIEW: Species definition of procaryotes based on 16S rRNA and protein coding genes sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARTINI PANGASTUTI

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Until now it is complicated for demarcating species of prokaryotes. The 16S rRNA gene sequence provide phylogenetic basis for classification. It has been widely accepted that more than 97% similarity in 16S rRNA gene sequence is a species definition for prokaryotes. However, this criterion can not correspond to real ecological unit, thus can not reveal the functional diversity in nature. The interaction with the environment is defined at the level of functional genes, not 16S rRNA gene. Protein-coding genes sequence can be expected to disclose much previously unknown ecological population of prokaryotes. These are the genes that determine the role of the species. Sequence similarity in multiple protein-coding genes is recommended as a primary criterion for demarcating taxa.

  10. Reconstrucción mamaria mediante lipoinfiltrado enriquecido con PRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jarrah

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos una serie de pacientes con mastectomía a las que hemos realizado reconstrucción mamaria con infiltraciones de grasa (lipoinfiltrado enriquecida con plasma rico en plaquetas (PRP como único procedimiento, o como paso previo a la colocación de un implante mamario. El objetivo de este trabajo es presentar una alternativa a la reconstrucción mamaria con colgajos libres o pediculados en mamas sometidas a radioterapia; también, una revisión detallada de los pasos a seguir para la realización de este procedimiento, que van desde la extracción de sangre para la posterior obtención del PRP, hasta la técnica de infiltración de grasa enriquecida con dichos factores en la mama intervenida. Con esta técnica de enriquecimiento de la grasa hemos logrado mejores resultados y mayor permanencia de los injertos grasos. Evaluando los postoperatorios de las pacientes sometidas a este procedimiento, hemos observado que se necesitan de 2 a 3 tiempos de lipoinfiltrado para obtener buena cobertura y mejoría de la calidad de piel como paso previo a la colocación del implante en este tipo de pacientes.

  11. Sequencing rare marine actinomycete genomes reveals high density of unique natural product biosynthetic gene clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorn, Michelle A.; Alanjary, Mohammad M.; Aguinaldo, Kristen; Korobeynikov, Anton; Podell, Sheila; Patin, Nastassia; Lincecum, Tommie; Jensen, Paul R.; Ziemert, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Traditional natural product discovery methods have nearly exhausted the accessible diversity of microbial chemicals, making new sources and techniques paramount in the search for new molecules. Marine actinomycete bacteria have recently come into the spotlight as fruitful producers of structurally diverse secondary metabolites, and remain relatively untapped. In this study, we sequenced 21 marine-derived actinomycete strains, rarely studied for their secondary metabolite potential and under-represented in current genomic databases. We found that genome size and phylogeny were good predictors of biosynthetic gene cluster diversity, with larger genomes rivalling the well-known marine producers in the Streptomyces and Salinispora genera. Genomes in the Micrococcineae suborder, however, had consistently the lowest number of biosynthetic gene clusters. By networking individual gene clusters into gene cluster families, we were able to computationally estimate the degree of novelty each genus contributed to the current sequence databases. Based on the similarity measures between all actinobacteria in the Joint Genome Institute's Atlas of Biosynthetic gene Clusters database, rare marine genera show a high degree of novelty and diversity, with Corynebacterium, Gordonia, Nocardiopsis, Saccharomonospora and Pseudonocardia genera representing the highest gene cluster diversity. This research validates that rare marine actinomycetes are important candidates for exploration, as they are relatively unstudied, and their relatives are historically rich in secondary metabolites. PMID:27902408

  12. Whole-exome sequencing identifies rare pathogenic variants in new predisposition genes for familial colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Vila-Casadesús, Maria; Garre, Pilar; Lozano, Juan José; Pristoupilova, Anna; Beltran, Sergi; Muñoz, Jenifer; Ocaña, Teresa; Balaguer, Francesc; López-Cerón, Maria; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Franch-Expósito, Sebastià; Piqué, Josep M; Castells, Antoni; Carracedo, Angel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Abulí, Anna; Bessa, Xavier; Andreu, Montserrat; Bujanda, Luis; Caldés, Trinidad; Castellví-Bel, Sergi

    2015-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is an important cause of mortality in the developed world. Hereditary forms are due to germ-line mutations in APC, MUTYH, and the mismatch repair genes, but many cases present familial aggregation but an unknown inherited cause. The hypothesis of rare high-penetrance mutations in new genes is a likely explanation for the underlying predisposition in some of these familial cases. Exome sequencing was performed in 43 patients with colorectal cancer from 29 families with strong disease aggregation without mutations in known hereditary colorectal cancer genes. Data analysis selected only very rare variants (0-0.1%), producing a putative loss of function and located in genes with a role compatible with cancer. Variants in genes previously involved in hereditary colorectal cancer or nearby previous colorectal cancer genome-wide association study hits were also chosen. Twenty-eight final candidate variants were selected and validated by Sanger sequencing. Correct family segregation and somatic studies were used to categorize the most interesting variants in CDKN1B, XRCC4, EPHX1, NFKBIZ, SMARCA4, and BARD1. We identified new potential colorectal cancer predisposition variants in genes that have a role in cancer predisposition and are involved in DNA repair and the cell cycle, which supports their putative involvement in germ-line predisposition to this neoplasm.

  13. Network‐Informed Gene Ranking Tackles Genetic Heterogeneity in Exome‐Sequencing Studies of Monogenic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Reiner; Weale, Michael E.; Southgate, Laura; Oakey, Rebecca J.; Simpson, Michael A.; Schlitt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genetic heterogeneity presents a significant challenge for the identification of monogenic disease genes. Whole‐exome sequencing generates a large number of candidate disease‐causing variants and typical analyses rely on deleterious variants being observed in the same gene across several unrelated affected individuals. This is less likely to occur for genetically heterogeneous diseases, making more advanced analysis methods necessary. To address this need, we present HetRank, a flexible gene‐ranking method that incorporates interaction network data. We first show that different genes underlying the same monogenic disease are frequently connected in protein interaction networks. This motivates the central premise of HetRank: those genes carrying potentially pathogenic variants and whose network neighbors do so in other affected individuals are strong candidates for follow‐up study. By simulating 1,000 exome sequencing studies (20,000 exomes in total), we model varying degrees of genetic heterogeneity and show that HetRank consistently prioritizes more disease‐causing genes than existing analysis methods. We also demonstrate a proof‐of‐principle application of the method to prioritize genes causing Adams‐Oliver syndrome, a genetically heterogeneous rare disease. An implementation of HetRank in R is available via the Website http://sourceforge.net/p/hetrank/. PMID:26394720

  14. Sequencing rare marine actinomycete genomes reveals high density of unique natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorn, Michelle A; Alanjary, Mohammad M; Aguinaldo, Kristen; Korobeynikov, Anton; Podell, Sheila; Patin, Nastassia; Lincecum, Tommie; Jensen, Paul R; Ziemert, Nadine; Moore, Bradley S

    2016-12-01

    Traditional natural product discovery methods have nearly exhausted the accessible diversity of microbial chemicals, making new sources and techniques paramount in the search for new molecules. Marine actinomycete bacteria have recently come into the spotlight as fruitful producers of structurally diverse secondary metabolites, and remain relatively untapped. In this study, we sequenced 21 marine-derived actinomycete strains, rarely studied for their secondary metabolite potential and under-represented in current genomic databases. We found that genome size and phylogeny were good predictors of biosynthetic gene cluster diversity, with larger genomes rivalling the well-known marine producers in the Streptomyces and Salinispora genera. Genomes in the Micrococcineae suborder, however, had consistently the lowest number of biosynthetic gene clusters. By networking individual gene clusters into gene cluster families, we were able to computationally estimate the degree of novelty each genus contributed to the current sequence databases. Based on the similarity measures between all actinobacteria in the Joint Genome Institute's Atlas of Biosynthetic gene Clusters database, rare marine genera show a high degree of novelty and diversity, with Corynebacterium, Gordonia, Nocardiopsis, Saccharomonospora and Pseudonocardia genera representing the highest gene cluster diversity. This research validates that rare marine actinomycetes are important candidates for exploration, as they are relatively unstudied, and their relatives are historically rich in secondary metabolites.

  15. Sequence variations of NKX2-5 and HAND1 genes in patients with atrial isomerism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatemi, Ali Can; Güleç, Cağrı; Cine, Naci; Vural, Burçak; Hatırnaz, Ozden; Sayitoğlu, Müge; Oztunç, Funda; Saltık, Levent; Kansız, Erhan; Erginel Ünaltuna, Nihan

    2011-06-01

    Atrial isomerism is a congenital disorder, which is characterized by lateralization defects in normally asymmetrical developing organs like the heart. Atrial isomerism is supposed to be caused by molecular defects during early development. The NKX2-5 is a cardiac specific transcription factor, which initiates and regulates downstream transcriptional cascades of cardiogenesis. The HAND1 is another transcription factor expressed in the heart, and it is characterized by an asymmetrical pattern of expression. In this study, we aimed to test whether mutations in NKX2-5 and HAND1 genes play a role in the etiology of atrial isomerism. This case-control study consisted of 70 patients who underwent surgical treatment for congenital heart defects including atrial isomerism, 80 healthy subjects (HAND1 gene) and 40 healthy subjects (NKX2-5 gene). All exons and exon-intron boundaries of NKX2-5 and HAND1 genes were analyzed by SSCP, and suspected samples were sequenced for mutation analysis. Digestion with appropriate restriction enzymes was performed for analysis of known mutations and polymorphisms. The frequencies of the alleles and the genotypes were compared among patient and control groups using the Chi-square and the Fisher tests when appropriate. In intronic region of HAND1 gene, we identified a C>G substitution both in patients and controls. Frequency of mutant allele (11, 42%) was found higher (p=0.046) in patient group than that of the control group (2.5%). Association between atrial isomerism and genotypes with mutant allele was found borderline significant (p=0.054). In NKX2-5 gene, we identified heterozygous Q170X (Gln170ter) mutation in one patient. We did not found any correlation between defined sequence variations and clinical properties of the patients. Our results suggest that mutations or sequence variations in HAND1 or NKX2-5 genes may play role in etiology or pathogenesis of atrial isomerism.

  16. Identification of expressed resistance gene-like sequences by data mining in 454-derived transcriptomic sequences of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhanji; Crampton, Mollee; Todd, Antonette; Kalavacharla, Venu

    2012-03-23

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is one of the most important legumes in the world. Several diseases severely reduce bean production and quality; therefore, it is very important to better understand disease resistance in common bean in order to prevent these losses. More than 70 resistance (R) genes which confer resistance against various pathogens have been cloned from diverse plant species. Most R genes share highly conserved domains which facilitates the identification of new candidate R genes from the same species or other species. The goals of this study were to isolate expressed R gene-like sequences (RGLs) from 454-derived transcriptomic sequences and expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of common bean, and to develop RGL-tagged molecular markers. A data-mining approach was used to identify tentative P. vulgaris R gene-like sequences from approximately 1.69 million 454-derived sequences and 116,716 ESTs deposited in GenBank. A total of 365 non-redundant sequences were identified and named as common bean (P. vulgaris = Pv) resistance gene-like sequences (PvRGLs). Among the identified PvRGLs, about 60% (218 PvRGLs) were from 454-derived sequences. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis confirmed that PvRGLs were actually expressed in the leaves of common bean. Upon comparison to P. vulgaris genomic sequences, 105 (28.77%) of the 365 tentative PvRGLs could be integrated into the existing common bean physical map. Based on the syntenic blocks between common bean and soybean, 237 (64.93%) PvRGLs were anchored on the P. vulgaris genetic map and will need to be mapped to determine order. In addition, 11 sequence-tagged-site (STS) and 19 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) molecular markers were developed for 25 unique PvRGLs. In total, 365 PvRGLs were successfully identified from 454-derived transcriptomic sequences and ESTs available in GenBank and about 65% of PvRGLs were integrated into the common bean genetic map. A total of 30

  17. Identification of expressed resistance gene-like sequences by data mining in 454-derived transcriptomic sequences of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is one of the most important legumes in the world. Several diseases severely reduce bean production and quality; therefore, it is very important to better understand disease resistance in common bean in order to prevent these losses. More than 70 resistance (R) genes which confer resistance against various pathogens have been cloned from diverse plant species. Most R genes share highly conserved domains which facilitates the identification of new candidate R genes from the same species or other species. The goals of this study were to isolate expressed R gene-like sequences (RGLs) from 454-derived transcriptomic sequences and expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of common bean, and to develop RGL-tagged molecular markers. Results A data-mining approach was used to identify tentative P. vulgaris R gene-like sequences from approximately 1.69 million 454-derived sequences and 116,716 ESTs deposited in GenBank. A total of 365 non-redundant sequences were identified and named as common bean (P. vulgaris = Pv) resistance gene-like sequences (PvRGLs). Among the identified PvRGLs, about 60% (218 PvRGLs) were from 454-derived sequences. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis confirmed that PvRGLs were actually expressed in the leaves of common bean. Upon comparison to P. vulgaris genomic sequences, 105 (28.77%) of the 365 tentative PvRGLs could be integrated into the existing common bean physical map. Based on the syntenic blocks between common bean and soybean, 237 (64.93%) PvRGLs were anchored on the P. vulgaris genetic map and will need to be mapped to determine order. In addition, 11 sequence-tagged-site (STS) and 19 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) molecular markers were developed for 25 unique PvRGLs. Conclusions In total, 365 PvRGLs were successfully identified from 454-derived transcriptomic sequences and ESTs available in GenBank and about 65% of PvRGLs were integrated into the common

  18. Identification of expressed resistance gene-like sequences by data mining in 454-derived transcriptomic sequences of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhanji

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. is one of the most important legumes in the world. Several diseases severely reduce bean production and quality; therefore, it is very important to better understand disease resistance in common bean in order to prevent these losses. More than 70 resistance (R genes which confer resistance against various pathogens have been cloned from diverse plant species. Most R genes share highly conserved domains which facilitates the identification of new candidate R genes from the same species or other species. The goals of this study were to isolate expressed R gene-like sequences (RGLs from 454-derived transcriptomic sequences and expressed sequence tags (ESTs of common bean, and to develop RGL-tagged molecular markers. Results A data-mining approach was used to identify tentative P. vulgaris R gene-like sequences from approximately 1.69 million 454-derived sequences and 116,716 ESTs deposited in GenBank. A total of 365 non-redundant sequences were identified and named as common bean (P. vulgaris = Pv resistance gene-like sequences (PvRGLs. Among the identified PvRGLs, about 60% (218 PvRGLs were from 454-derived sequences. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR analysis confirmed that PvRGLs were actually expressed in the leaves of common bean. Upon comparison to P. vulgaris genomic sequences, 105 (28.77% of the 365 tentative PvRGLs could be integrated into the existing common bean physical map. Based on the syntenic blocks between common bean and soybean, 237 (64.93% PvRGLs were anchored on the P. vulgaris genetic map and will need to be mapped to determine order. In addition, 11 sequence-tagged-site (STS and 19 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS molecular markers were developed for 25 unique PvRGLs. Conclusions In total, 365 PvRGLs were successfully identified from 454-derived transcriptomic sequences and ESTs available in GenBank and about 65% of PvRGLs were integrated

  19. Complete exon sequencing of all known Usher syndrome genes greatly improves molecular diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacombe Didier

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Usher syndrome (USH combines sensorineural deafness with blindness. It is inherited in an autosomal recessive mode. Early diagnosis is critical for adapted educational and patient management choices, and for genetic counseling. To date, nine causative genes have been identified for the three clinical subtypes (USH1, USH2 and USH3. Current diagnostic strategies make use of a genotyping microarray that is based on the previously reported mutations. The purpose of this study was to design a more accurate molecular diagnosis tool. Methods We sequenced the 366 coding exons and flanking regions of the nine known USH genes, in 54 USH patients (27 USH1, 21 USH2 and 6 USH3. Results Biallelic mutations were detected in 39 patients (72% and monoallelic mutations in an additional 10 patients (18.5%. In addition to biallelic mutations in one of the USH genes, presumably pathogenic mutations in another USH gene were detected in seven patients (13%, and another patient carried monoallelic mutations in three different USH genes. Notably, none of the USH3 patients carried detectable mutations in the only known USH3 gene, whereas they all carried mutations in USH2 genes. Most importantly, the currently used microarray would have detected only 30 of the 81 different mutations that we found, of which 39 (48% were novel. Conclusions Based on these results, complete exon sequencing of the currently known USH genes stands as a definite improvement for molecular diagnosis of this disease, which is of utmost importance in the perspective of gene therapy.

  20. Molecular Diagnostics of Gliomas Using Next Generation Sequencing of a Glioma-Tailored Gene Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacher, Angela; Kaulich, Kerstin; Stepanow, Stefanie; Wolter, Marietta; Köhrer, Karl; Felsberg, Jörg; Malzkorn, Bastian; Reifenberger, Guido

    2017-03-01

    Current classification of gliomas is based on histological criteria according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system. Over the past years, characteristic genetic profiles have been identified in various glioma types. These can refine tumor diagnostics and provide important prognostic and predictive information. We report on the establishment and validation of gene panel next generation sequencing (NGS) for the molecular diagnostics of gliomas. We designed a glioma-tailored gene panel covering 660 amplicons derived from 20 genes frequently aberrant in different glioma types. Sensitivity and specificity of glioma gene panel NGS for detection of DNA sequence variants and copy number changes were validated by single gene analyses. NGS-based mutation detection was optimized for application on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens including small stereotactic biopsy samples. NGS data obtained in a retrospective analysis of 121 gliomas allowed for their molecular classification into distinct biological groups, including (i) isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (IDH) 1 or 2 mutant astrocytic gliomas with frequent α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) and tumor protein p53 (TP53) gene mutations, (ii) IDH mutant oligodendroglial tumors with 1p/19q codeletion, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation and frequent Drosophila homolog of capicua (CIC) gene mutation, as well as (iii) IDH wildtype glioblastomas with frequent TERT promoter mutation, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) mutation and/or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) amplification. Oligoastrocytic gliomas were genetically assigned to either of these groups. Our findings implicate gene panel NGS as a promising diagnostic technique that may facilitate integrated histological and molecular glioma classification. © 2016 International Society of Neuropathology.

  1. Codon usage bias in 5' terminal coding sequences reveals distinct enrichment of gene functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiling; Rahman, Siddiq Ur; Mao, Yuanhui; Xu, Xiaodong; Tao, Shiheng

    2017-10-01

    Codon bias at the 5' terminal of coding sequence (CDS) is known to be distinct from the rest of the CDS. A number of events occur in this short region to regulate early translation elongation and co-translational translocation. In the genes encoding secretory proteins, there is a special signal sequence which has a higher occurrence of rare codons. In this study, we analyzed codon bias of secretory genes in several eukaryotes. The results showed that secretory genes in the species except mammals had a higher occurrence of rare codons in the 5' terminal of CDS, and the bias was greater than the same region of non-secretory genes. GO analysis revealed that secretory genes containing rare codon clusters in different regions were responsible for various roles in gene functions. Moreover, codon bias in the region encoding the hydrophobic region of protein is similar in secretory and non-secretory genes, indicating that codon bias in secretory genes was partly influenced by amino acid bias. Rare codon clusters are found more frequently in specific regions, and continuous rare codons are not favoured probably because they will increase the probability of ribosome collision and drop-off. Based on ribosome profiling data, there is no significant difference in the average translation efficiencies between rare and optimal codons. Higher ribosomal density in the 5' terminal may result from ribosome pausing which could be involved in different translation events. These findings collectively provided rich information on codon bias in secretory genes, which may shed light on the co-effect of codon bias, mRNA structure and tRNA abundance in translational regulations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Whole exome sequencing identifies novel candidate genes that modify chronic obstructive pulmonary disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruse, Shannon; Moreau, Michael; Bromberg, Yana; Jang, Jun-Ho; Wang, Nan; Ha, Hongseok; Picchi, Maria; Lin, Yong; Langley, Raymond J; Qualls, Clifford; Klensney-Tait, Julia; Zabner, Joseph; Leng, Shuguang; Mao, Jenny; Belinsky, Steven A; Xing, Jinchuan; Nyunoya, Toru

    2016-01-07

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by an irreversible airflow limitation in response to inhalation of noxious stimuli, such as cigarette smoke. However, only 15-20 % smokers manifest COPD, suggesting a role for genetic predisposition. Although genome-wide association studies have identified common genetic variants that are associated with susceptibility to COPD, effect sizes of the identified variants are modest, as is the total heritability accounted for by these variants. In this study, an extreme phenotype exome sequencing study was combined with in vitro modeling to identify COPD candidate genes. We performed whole exome sequencing of 62 highly susceptible smokers and 30 exceptionally resistant smokers to identify rare variants that may contribute to disease risk or resistance to COPD. This was a cross-sectional case-control study without therapeutic intervention or longitudinal follow-up information. We identified candidate genes based on rare variant analyses and evaluated exonic variants to pinpoint individual genes whose function was computationally established to be significantly different between susceptible and resistant smokers. Top scoring candidate genes from these analyses were further filtered by requiring that each gene be expressed in human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs). A total of 81 candidate genes were thus selected for in vitro functional testing in cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-exposed HBECs. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing experiments, we showed that silencing of several candidate genes augmented CSE-induced cytotoxicity in vitro. Our integrative analysis through both genetic and functional approaches identified two candidate genes (TACC2 and MYO1E) that augment cigarette smoke (CS)-induced cytotoxicity and, potentially, COPD susceptibility.

  3. Mitochondrial targeting sequence variants of the CHCHD2 gene are a risk for Lewy body disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogaki, Kotaro; Koga, Shunsuke; Heckman, Michael G; Fiesel, Fabienne C; Ando, Maya; Labbé, Catherine; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Moussaud-Lamodière, Elisabeth L; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I; Walton, Ronald L; Strongosky, Audrey J; Uitti, Ryan J; McCarthy, Allan; Lynch, Timothy; Siuda, Joanna; Opala, Grzegorz; Rudzinska, Monika; Krygowska-Wajs, Anna; Barcikowska, Maria; Czyzewski, Krzysztof; Puschmann, Andreas; Nishioka, Kenya; Funayama, Manabu; Hattori, Nobutaka; Parisi, Joseph E; Petersen, Ronald C; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Boeve, Bradley F; Springer, Wolfdieter; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Dickson, Dennis W; Ross, Owen A

    2015-12-08

    To assess the role of CHCHD2 variants in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and Lewy body disease (LBD) in Caucasian populations. All exons of the CHCHD2 gene were sequenced in a US Caucasian patient-control series (878 PD, 610 LBD, and 717 controls). Subsequently, exons 1 and 2 were sequenced in an Irish series (355 PD and 365 controls) and a Polish series (394 PD and 350 controls). Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence studies were performed on pathologic LBD cases with rare CHCHD2 variants. We identified 9 rare exonic variants of unknown significance. These variants were more frequent in the combined group of PD and LBD patients compared to controls (0.6% vs 0.1%, p = 0.013). In addition, the presence of any rare variant was more common in patients with LBD (2.5% vs 1.0%, p = 0.050) compared to controls. Eight of these 9 variants were located within the gene's mitochondrial targeting sequence. Although the role of variants of the CHCHD2 gene in PD and LBD remains to be further elucidated, the rare variants in the mitochondrial targeting sequence may be a risk factor for Lewy body disorders, which may link CHCHD2 to other genetic forms of parkinsonism with mitochondrial dysfunction. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. Analysis of mutations in the entire coding sequence of the factor VIII gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidichadani, S.I.; Lanyon, W.G.; Connor, J.M. [Glascow Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hemophilia A is a common X-linked recessive disorder of bleeding caused by deleterious mutations in the gene for clotting factor VIII. The large size of the factor VIII gene, the high frequency of de novo mutations and its tissue-specific expression complicate the detection of mutations. We have used a combination of RT-PCR of ectopic factor VIII transcripts and genomic DNA-PCRs to amplify the entire essential sequence of the factor VIII gene. This is followed by chemical mismatch cleavage analysis and direct sequencing in order to facilitate a comprehensive search for mutations. We describe the characterization of nine potentially pathogenic mutations, six of which are novel. In each case, a correlation of the genotype with the observed phenotype is presented. In order to evaluate the pathogenicity of the five missense mutations detected, we have analyzed them for evolutionary sequence conservation and for their involvement of sequence motifs catalogued in the PROSITE database of protein sites and patterns.

  5. SERPINA1 Full-Gene Sequencing Identifies Rare Mutations Not Detected in Targeted Mutation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Rondell P; Dina, Michelle A; Howe, Sarah C; Butz, Malinda L; Willkomm, Kurt S; Murray, David L; Snyder, Melissa R; Rumilla, Kandelaria M; Halling, Kevin C; Highsmith, W Edward

    2015-11-01

    Genetic α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is characterized by low serum AAT levels and the identification of causal mutations or an abnormal protein. It needs to be distinguished from deficiency because of nongenetic causes, and diagnostic delay may contribute to worse patient outcome. Current routine clinical testing assesses for only the most common mutations. We wanted to determine the proportion of unexplained cases of AAT deficiency that harbor causal mutations not identified through current standard allele-specific genotyping and isoelectric focusing (IEF). All prospective cases from December 1, 2013, to October 1, 2014, with a low serum AAT level not explained by allele-specific genotyping and IEF were assessed through full-gene sequencing with a direct sequencing method for pathogenic mutations. We reviewed the results using American Council of Medical Genetics criteria. Of 3523 cases, 42 (1.2%) met study inclusion criteria. Pathogenic or likely pathogenic mutations not identified through clinical testing were detected through full-gene sequencing in 16 (38%) of the 42 cases. Rare mutations not detected with current allele-specific testing and IEF underlie a substantial proportion of genetic AAT deficiency. Full-gene sequencing, therefore, has the ability to improve accuracy in the diagnosis of AAT deficiency. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Utility of low-copy nuclear gene sequences in plant phylogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Tao

    2002-01-01

    Low-copy nuclear genes in plants are a rich source of phylogenetic information. They hold a great potential to improve the robustness of phylogenetic reconstruction at all taxonomic levels, especially where universal markers such as cpDNA and nrDNA are unable to generate strong phylogenetic hypotheses. Low-copy nuclear genes, however, remain underused in plant phylogenetic studies due to practical and theoretical complications in unraveling the evolutionary dynamics of nuclear gene families. The lack of the universal markers or universal PCR primers of low-copy nuclear genes has also hampered their phylogenetic utility. It has recently become clear that low-copy nuclear genes are particularly helpful in resolving close interspecific relationships and in reconstructing allopolyploidization in plants. Gene markers that are widely, if not universally, useful have begun to emerge. Although utilizing low-copy nuclear genes usually requires extra lab work such as designing PCR primers, PCR-cloning, and/or Southern blotting, rapid accumulation of gene sequences in the databases and advances in cloning techniques have continued to make such studies more feasible. With the growing number of theoretical studies devoted to the gene tree and species tree problem, a solid foundation for reconstructing complex plant phylogenies based on multiple gene trees began to build. It is also realized increasingly that fast evolving introns of the low-copy nuclear genes will provide much needed phylogenetic information around the species boundary and allow us to address fundamental questions concerning processes of plant speciation. Phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary analyses of developmentally important genes will add a new dimension to systematic and evolutionary studies of plant diversity.

  7. Organization and sequences of genes for the subunits of ATP synthase in the thermophilic cyanobacterium Synechococcus 6716

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Walraven, H. S.; Lutter, R.; Walker, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    The sequences of the genes for the nine subunits of ATP synthase in the thermophilic cyanobacterium Synechococcus 6716 have been determined. The genes were identified by comparison of the encoded proteins with sequences of ATP synthase subunits in other species, and confirmed for subunits alpha,

  8. Cloning and sequence analysis of genes encoding Staphylococcus hyicus exfoliative toxin types A, B, C, and D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrens, Peter; Andresen, Lars Ole

    2004-01-01

    Exfoliative toxins produced by certain strains of Staphylococcus hyicus mediate exudative epidermitis in pigs. In this study the genes coding for four different exfoliative toxin from S. hyicus (ExhA, ExhB, ExhC, and ExhD) were cloned and sequenced. The coding sequence of the four toxin genes ran...

  9. Breaking the 1000-gene barrier for Mimivirus using ultra-deep genome and transcriptome sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claverie Jean-Michel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mimivirus, a giant dsDNA virus infecting Acanthamoeba, is the prototype of the mimiviridae family, the latest addition to the family of the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs. Its 1.2 Mb-genome was initially predicted to encode 917 genes. A subsequent RNA-Seq analysis precisely mapped many transcript boundaries and identified 75 new genes. Findings We now report a much deeper analysis using the SOLiD™ technology combining RNA-Seq of the Mimivirus transcriptome during the infectious cycle (202.4 Million reads, and a complete genome re-sequencing (45.3 Million reads. This study corrected the genome sequence and identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms. Our results also provided clear evidence of previously overlooked transcription units, including an important RNA polymerase subunit distantly related to Euryarchea homologues. The total Mimivirus gene count is now 1018, 11% greater than the original annotation. Conclusions This study highlights the huge progress brought about by ultra-deep sequencing for the comprehensive annotation of virus genomes, opening the door to a complete one-nucleotide resolution level description of their transcriptional activity, and to the realistic modeling of the viral genome expression at the ultimate molecular level. This work also illustrates the need to go beyond bioinformatics-only approaches for the annotation of short protein and non-coding genes in viral genomes.

  10. Identification and characterization of rhizospheric microbial diversity by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Mubeen, Samavia; Khan, SamiUllah; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Khalid, Nauman; Suleria, Hafiz Ansar Rasul; Bano, Asghari; Mumtaz, Abdul Samad

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, samples of rhizosphere and root nodules were collected from different areas of Pakistan to isolate plant growth promoting rhizobacteria. Identification of bacterial isolates was made by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and taxonomical confirmation on EzTaxon Server. The identified bacterial strains were belonged to 5 genera i.e. Ensifer, Bacillus, Pseudomona, Leclercia and Rhizobium. Phylogenetic analysis inferred from 16S rRNA gene sequences showed the evolutionary relationship of bacterial strains with the respective genera. Based on phylogenetic analysis, some candidate novel species were also identified. The bacterial strains were also characterized for morphological, physiological, biochemical tests and glucose dehydrogenase (gdh) gene that involved in the phosphate solublization using cofactor pyrroloquinolone quinone (PQQ). Seven rhizoshperic and 3 root nodulating stains are positive for gdh gene. Furthermore, this study confirms a novel association between microbes and their hosts like field grown crops, leguminous and non-leguminous plants. It was concluded that a diverse group of bacterial population exist in the rhizosphere and root nodules that might be useful in evaluating the mechanisms behind plant microbial interactions and strains QAU-63 and QAU-68 have sequence similarity of 97 and 95% which might be declared as novel after further taxonomic characterization.

  11. Zooplankton diversity analysis through single-gene sequencing of a community sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida Mutsumi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oceans cover more than 70% of the earth's surface and are critical for the homeostasis of the environment. Among the components of the ocean ecosystem, zooplankton play vital roles in energy and matter transfer through the system. Despite their importance, understanding of zooplankton biodiversity is limited because of their fragile nature, small body size, and the large number of species from various taxonomic phyla. Here we present the results of single-gene zooplankton community analysis using a method that determines a large number of mitochondrial COI gene sequences from a bulk zooplankton sample. This approach will enable us to estimate the species richness of almost the entire zooplankton community. Results A sample was collected from a depth of 721 m to the surface in the western equatorial Pacific off Pohnpei Island, Micronesia, with a plankton net equipped with a 2-m2 mouth opening. A total of 1,336 mitochondrial COI gene sequences were determined from the cDNA library made from the sample. From the determined sequences, the occurrence of 189 species of zooplankton was estimated. BLASTN search results showed high degrees of similarity (>98% between the query and database for 10 species, including holozooplankton and merozooplankton. Conclusion In conjunction with the Census of Marine Zooplankton and Barcode of Life projects, single-gene zooplankton community analysis will be a powerful tool for estimating the species richness of zooplankton communities.

  12. A novel hybrid gene prediction method employing protein multiple sequence alignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Oliver; Kollmar, Martin; Stanke, Mario; Waack, Stephan

    2011-03-15

    As improved DNA sequencing techniques have increased enormously the speed of producing new eukaryotic genome assemblies, the further development of automated gene prediction methods continues to be essential. While the classification of proteins into families is a task heavily relying on correct gene predictions, it can at the same time provide a source of additional information for the prediction, complementary to those presently used. We extended the gene prediction software AUGUSTUS by a method that employs block profiles generated from multiple sequence alignments as a protein signature to improve the accuracy of the prediction. Equipped with profiles modelling human dynein heavy chain (DHC) proteins and other families, AUGUSTUS was run on the genomic sequences known to contain members of these families. Compared with AUGUSTUS' ab initio version, the rate of genes predicted with high accuracy showed a dramatic increase. The AUGUSTUS project web page is located at http://augustus.gobics.de, with the executable program as well as the source code available for download.

  13. Identification and characterization of rhizospheric microbial diversity by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Naveed

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, samples of rhizosphere and root nodules were collected from different areas of Pakistan to isolate plant growth promoting rhizobacteria. Identification of bacterial isolates was made by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and taxonomical confirmation on EzTaxon Server. The identified bacterial strains were belonged to 5 genera i.e. Ensifer, Bacillus, Pseudomona, Leclercia and Rhizobium. Phylogenetic analysis inferred from 16S rRNA gene sequences showed the evolutionary relationship of bacterial strains with the respective genera. Based on phylogenetic analysis, some candidate novel species were also identified. The bacterial strains were also characterized for morphological, physiological, biochemical tests and glucose dehydrogenase (gdh gene that involved in the phosphate solublization using cofactor pyrroloquinolone quinone (PQQ. Seven rhizoshperic and 3 root nodulating stains are positive for gdh gene. Furthermore, this study confirms a novel association between microbes and their hosts like field grown crops, leguminous and non-leguminous plants. It was concluded that a diverse group of bacterial population exist in the rhizosphere and root nodules that might be useful in evaluating the mechanisms behind plant microbial interactions and strains QAU-63 and QAU-68 have sequence similarity of 97 and 95% which might be declared as novel after further taxonomic characterization.

  14. Sequence analysis of the core gene of 14 hepatitis C virus genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukh, J; Purcell, R H; Miller, R H

    1994-01-01

    We previously sequenced the 5' noncoding region of 44 isolates of hepatitis C virus (HCV), as well as the envelope 1 (E1) gene of 51 HCV isolates, and provided evidence for the existence of at least 6 major genetic groups consisting of at least 12 minor genotypes of HCV (i.e., genotypes I/1a, II/1b, III/2a, IV/2b, 2c, V/3a, 4a-4d, 5a, and 6a). We now report the complete nucleotide sequence of the putative core (C) gene of 52 HCV isolates that represent all of these 12 genotypes as well as two additional genotypes provisionally designated 4e and 4f that we identified in this study. The phylogenetic analysis of the C gene sequences was in agreement with that of the E1 gene sequences. A major division in the genetic distance was observed between HCV isolates of genotype 2 and those of the other genotypes in analysis of both the E1 and C genes. The C gene sequences of 9 genotypes have not been reported previously (i.e., genotypes 2c, 4a-4f, 5a, and 6a). Our analysis indicates that the C gene-based methods currently used to determine the HCV genotype, such as PCR with genotype-specific primers, should be revised in light of these data. We found that the predicted C gene was exactly 573 nt long in all 52 HCV isolates, with an N-terminal start codon and no in-frame stop codons. The nucleotide and predicted amino acid identities of the C gene sequences were in the range of 79.4-99.0% and 85.3-100%, respectively. Furthermore, we mapped universally conserved, as well as genotype-specific, nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the C gene. The predicted C proteins of the different HCV genotypes shared the following features: (i) high content of proline residues, (ii) high content of arginine and lysine residues located primarily in three domains with 10 such residues invariant at positions 39-62, (iii) a cluster of 5 conserved tryptophan residues, (iv) two nuclear localization signals and a DNA-binding motif, (v) a potential phosphorylation site with a serine

  15. [Analyses of coding sequence point mutation and polymorphism of TGFBI gene in Chinese patients with keratoconus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    GUAN, Tao; MA, Zhang-wei; DING, Shi-ping

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the point mutations and polymorphisms of transforming growth factor beta-induced gene (TGFBI) in Chinese patients with keratoconus and discuss the relationship between the feature of gene mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms of TGFBI gene and keratoconus. Polymerase chain reaction single strand conformation polymorphism and DNA direct sequencing were performed in 30 keratoconus cases and 30 healthy controls. All 17 exons of the TGFBI gene were analyzed for point mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. Totally two heterozygous nucleotide changes were identified in exon 12 of the TGFBI gene. The codon 535 is changed from GGA to TGA in 1 patient, leading to a substitution of glycine to a stop codon at the protein level (G535X). The codon 540 is changed from TTT to TTC in 2 patients and 1 control individual, resulting in a nonsense mutation (F54F), and is a single nucleotide polymorphism of the gene. Mutation and polymorphisms of the TGFBI gene were detected in Chinese patients with keratoconus in this study. The results suggest that TGFBI gene might play an important role in the pathogenesis of keratoconus.

  16. Patterns of homoeologous gene expression shown by RNA sequencing in hexaploid bread wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Lindsey J; Belfield, Eric J; Jiang, Caifu; Brown, Carly; Mithani, Aziz; Harberd, Nicholas P

    2014-04-11

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) has a large, complex and hexaploid genome consisting of A, B and D homoeologous chromosome sets. Therefore each wheat gene potentially exists as a trio of A, B and D homoeoloci, each of which may contribute differentially to wheat phenotypes. We describe a novel approach combining wheat cytogenetic resources (chromosome substitution 'nullisomic-tetrasomic' lines) with next generation deep sequencing of gene transcripts (RNA-Seq), to directly and accurately identify homoeologue-specific single nucleotide variants and quantify the relative contribution of individual homoeoloci to gene expression. We discover, based on a sample comprising ~5-10% of the total wheat gene content, that at least 45% of wheat genes are expressed from all three distinct homoeoloci. Most of these genes show strikingly biased expression patterns in which expression is dominated by a single homoeolocus. The remaining ~55% of wheat genes are expressed from either one or two homoeoloci only, through a combination of extensive transcriptional silencing and homoeolocus loss. We conclude that wheat is tending towards functional diploidy, through a variety of mechanisms causing single homoeoloci to become the predominant source of gene transcripts. This discovery has profound consequences for wheat breeding and our understanding of wheat evolution.

  17. Patterns of homoeologous gene expression shown by RNA sequencing in hexaploid bread wheat.

    KAUST Repository

    Leach, Lindsey J

    2014-04-11

    BACKGROUND: Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) has a large, complex and hexaploid genome consisting of A, B and D homoeologous chromosome sets. Therefore each wheat gene potentially exists as a trio of A, B and D homoeoloci, each of which may contribute differentially to wheat phenotypes. We describe a novel approach combining wheat cytogenetic resources (chromosome substitution \\'nullisomic-tetrasomic\\' lines) with next generation deep sequencing of gene transcripts (RNA-Seq), to directly and accurately identify homoeologue-specific single nucleotide variants and quantify the relative contribution of individual homoeoloci to gene expression. RESULTS: We discover, based on a sample comprising ~5-10% of the total wheat gene content, that at least 45% of wheat genes are expressed from all three distinct homoeoloci. Most of these genes show strikingly biased expression patterns in which expression is dominated by a single homoeolocus. The remaining ~55% of wheat genes are expressed from either one or two homoeoloci only, through a combination of extensive transcriptional silencing and homoeolocus loss. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that wheat is tending towards functional diploidy, through a variety of mechanisms causing single homoeoloci to become the predominant source of gene transcripts. This discovery has profound consequences for wheat breeding and our understanding of wheat evolution.

  18. Gene discovery in the threatened elkhorn coral: 454 sequencing of the Acropora palmata transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas R Polato

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cnidarians, including corals and anemones, offer unique insights into metazoan evolution because they harbor genetic similarities with vertebrates beyond that found in model invertebrates and retain genes known only from non-metazoans. Cataloging genes expressed in Acropora palmata, a foundation-species of reefs in the Caribbean and western Atlantic, will advance our understanding of the genetic basis of ecologically important traits in corals and comes at a time when sequencing efforts in other cnidarians allow for multi-species comparisons. RESULTS: A cDNA library from a sample enriched for symbiont free larval tissue was sequenced on the 454 GS-FLX platform. Over 960,000 reads were obtained and assembled into 42,630 contigs. Annotation data was acquired for 57% of the assembled sequences. Analysis of the assembled sequences indicated that 83-100% of all A. palmata transcripts were tagged, and provided a rough estimate of the total number genes expressed in our samples (~18,000-20,000. The coral annotation data contained many of the same molecular components as in the Bilateria, particularly in pathways associated with oxidative stress and DNA damage repair, and provided evidence that homologs of p53, a key player in DNA repair pathways, has experienced selection along the branch separating Cnidaria and Bilateria. Transcriptome wide screens of paralog groups and transition/transversion ratios highlighted genes including: green fluorescent proteins, carbonic anhydrase, and oxidative stress proteins; and functional groups involved in protein and nucleic acid metabolism, and the formation of structural molecules. These results provide a starting point for study of adaptive evolution in corals. CONCLUSIONS: Currently available transcriptome data now make comparative studies of the mechanisms underlying coral's evolutionary success possible. Here we identified candidate genes that enable corals to maintain genomic integrity despite

  19. Gene identification and protein classification in microbial metagenomic sequence data via incremental clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Weizhong

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification and study of proteins from metagenomic datasets can shed light on the roles and interactions of the source organisms in their communities. However, metagenomic datasets are characterized by the presence of organisms with varying GC composition, codon usage biases etc., and consequently gene identification is challenging. The vast amount of sequence data also requires faster protein family classification tools. Results We present a computational improvement to a sequence clustering approach that we developed previously to identify and classify protein coding genes in large microbial metagenomic datasets. The clustering approach can be used to identify protein coding genes in prokaryotes, viruses, and intron-less eukaryotes. The computational improvement is based on an incremental clustering method that does not require the expensive all-against-all compute that was required by the original approach, while still preserving the remote homology detection capabilities. We present evaluations of the clustering approach in protein-coding gene identification and classification, and also present the results of updating the protein clusters from our previous work with recent genomic and metagenomic sequences. The clustering results are available via CAMERA, (http://camera.calit2.net. Conclusion The clustering paradigm is shown to be a very useful tool in the analysis of microbial metagenomic data. The incremental clustering method is shown to be much faster than the original approach in identifying genes, grouping sequences into existing protein families, and also identifying novel families that have multiple members in a metagenomic dataset. These clusters provide a basis for further studies of protein families.

  20. [High throughput-targeted sequencing panel for exploring radiosensitivity associated genes in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Y; Hu, C X; Song, D A; Li, S Q; Zhou, L H; Jiang, X D

    2017-08-23

    Objective: To explore radiosensitivity-associated genes in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma by targeted sequencing panel. Methods: The peripheral blood from 22 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients received radiotherapy alone were collected, respectively. The genomic DNA (gDNA) of peripheral blood was extracted and used to create a library of gDNA restriction fragments. The gDNA restriction fragments were hybridized to the HaloPlex probe capture library, which comprises 356 cancer genes selected from the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (Cosmic) database of 2011 updated edition. The sequencing data were aligned by the Genome Analysis Toolkit GATK (version 3.0) and Picar. The single nucleotide polymorphism and inserted-deletion (SNP/InDel) variations were annotated by online database. The pathway enrichment was analyzed by Ingenuity Pathway analysis (IPA). Moreover, according to the short-period curative effect, 22 patients were divided into two groups: the radiation- sensitivity group (CR+ PR) and the radiation-resistant group (PD+ SD). The nonsynonymous mutation sites were statistically analyzed and the genes associated with radiosensitivity of ESCC were screened. Results: More than 97% sequencing reads were aligned to human genome reference sequence and more than 90% sequencing reads were the target sequences. SNP/InDel database annotation results showed that the mutations of 22 cases mainly distributed in exons, and the mutant types were mainly missense and synonymous single nucleotide variant (SNV). There were 23 genes of high-frequency mutation associated with esophageal cancer. Pathway enrichment by IPA showed that 3 pathways were associated with the development of esophageal cancer, which were roles of BRCA1 in DNA damage response pathway, DNA double-strand break repair by non-homologous end joining pathway and ATM signaling pathway. According to the curative effect, five genes including mismatch repair system component (PMS1

  1. Combined Analysis of ChIP Sequencing and Gene Expression Dataset in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengfei; Jiang, Wenhua; Zhou, Shiyong; Gao, Jun; Zhang, Huilai

    2017-04-01

    Breast cancer is a common malignancy in women and contribute largely to the cancer related death. The purpose of this study is to confirm the roles of GATA3 and identify potential biomarkers of breast cancer. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation combined with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq) (GSM1642515) and gene expression profiles (GSE24249) were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. Bowtie2 and MACS2 were used for the mapping and peak calling of the ChIP-Seq data respectively. ChIPseeker, a R bioconductor package was adopted for the annotation of the enriched peaks. For the gene expression profiles, we used affy and limma package to do normalization and differential expression analysis. The genes with fold change >2 and adjusted P-Value ChIP-Seq and gene expression profiles. The Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) was used for the functional enrichment analysis of overlapping genes between the target genes and differential expression genes (DEGs). What's more, the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of the overlapping genes was obtained through the Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD). A total of 46,487 peaks were identified for GATA3 and out of which, 3256 ones were found to located at -3000 ~ 0 bp from the transcription start sites (TSS) of their nearby gene. A total of 236 down- and 343 up-regulated genes were screened out in GATA3 overexpression breast cancer samples compared with those in control. The combined analysis of ChIP-Seq and gene expression dataset showed GATA3 act as a repressor in breast cancer. Besides, 68 overlaps were obtained between the DEGs and genes included in peaks located at -3000 ~ 0 bp from TSS. Gene Ontology (GO) terms and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways related to cancer progression and gene regulation were found to be enriched in those overlaps. In the PPI network, NDRG1, JUP and etc. were found to directly interact with large number of

  2. Sequence analysis of tyrosinase gene in ocular and oculocutaneous albinism patients: introducing three novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khordadpoor-Deilamani, Faravareh; Akbari, Mohammad Taghi; Karimipoor, Morteza; Javadi, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Albinism is a heterogeneous genetic disorder of melanin synthesis that results in hypopigmented eyes (in patients with ocular albinism) or hair, skin, and eyes (in individuals with oculocutaneous albinism). It is associated with decreased visual acuity, nystagmus, strabismus, and photophobia. The tyrosinase gene is known to be involved in both oculocutaneous albinism and autosomal recessive ocular albinism. In this study, we aimed to screen the mutations in the TYR gene in the nonsyndromic OCA and autosomal recessive ocular albinism patients from Iran. The tyrosinase gene was examined in 23 unrelated patients with autosomal recessive ocular albinism or nonsyndromic OCA using DNA sequencing and bioinformatics analysis. TYR gene mutations were identified in 14 (app. 60%) albinism patients. We found 10 mutations, 3 of which were novel. No mutation was found in our ocular albinism patients, but one of them was heterozygous for the p.R402Q polymorphism.

  3. Analysis of breast cancer metastasis candidate genes from next generation-sequencing via systematic functional genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomstrøm, Monica Marie

    2016-01-01

    ) and non-CSCs. The main goal of this project was to functionally characterize a set of candidate genes recovered from next-generation sequencing analysis for their role in breast cancer metastasis formation. The starting gene set comprised 104 gene variants; i.e. 57 wildtype and 47 mutated variants. During...... the project, the aim was to generate a panel of genetically identical (“isogenic”) MCF7 breast cancer cell lines with inducible overexpression of the gene variants, and to analyze these for effects on breast cancer growth and invasion in vitro under standardized conditions. Moreover, it was aimed at acquiring......Metastatic breast cancer remains an incurable disease accounting for the vast majority of deaths from breast cancer. Understanding the molecular mechanisms for metastatic spread is important to improve diagnosis and for generating starting points for novel treatment strategies. Inhibition...

  4. Whole exome sequencing identification of novel candidate genes in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Cindy; Sanchez, Angie V; Shen, Lishuang; Davoudi, Samaneh; Ahmadi, Tina; Navarro-Gomez, Daniel; Chen, Ching J; Hancock, Heather; Penman, Alan; Hoadley, Suzanne; Consugar, Mark; Restrepo, Carlos; Shah, Vinay A; Arboleda-Velasquez, Joseph F; Sobrin, Lucia; Gai, Xiaowu; Kim, Leo A

    2017-05-09

    Rare or novel gene variants in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy may contribute to disease development. We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) on patients at the phenotypic extremes of diabetic retinal complications: 57 patients diagnosed with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) as cases and 13 patients with no diabetic retinopathy despite at least 10years of type 2 diabetes as controls. Thirty-one out of the 57 cases and all 13 controls were from the African American Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Study (AA). The rest of the cases were of mixed ethnicities (ME). WES identified 721 candidate genes with rare or novel non-synonymous variants found in at least one case with PDR and not present in any controls. After filtering for genes with null alleles in greater than two cases, 28 candidate genes were identified in our ME cases and 16 genes were identified in our AA cases. Our analysis showed rare and novel variants within these genes that could contribute to the development of PDR, including rare non-synonymous variants in FAM132A, SLC5A9, ZNF600, and TMEM217. We also found previously unidentified variants in VEGFB and APOB. We found that VEGFB, VPS13B, PHF21A, NAT1, ZNF600, PKHD1L1 expression was reduced in human retinal endothelial cells (HRECs) cultured under high glucose conditions. In an exome sequence analysis of patients with PDR, we identified variants in genes that could contribute to pathogenesis. Six of these genes were further validated and found to have reduced expression in HRECs under high glucose conditions, suggestive of an important role in the development of PDR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding LipL21 in the vaccinal leptospira serovars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasoul Hoseinpur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease in humans and animals, caused by the bacterium Leptospira interrogans. Gene expressing LipL21 is one of the genes identified in the bacterium, existing only in the pathogenic strains. The aim of this study was to cloning and analyzing the sequence of the gene encoding surface lipoprotein, LipL21, in five vaccinal leptospira serovars in Iran. Material and Methods: Pathogenic Leptospira interrogans serovars were cultured in EMJH medium with 10% rabbit serum. After genomic DNA extraction, PCR with specific primers was employed and the resulting product inserted in a vector then transferred into E. Coli DH5&alpha. The recombinant plasmids were finally sent for sequencing. Results: The analysis of gene lipL21 in domestic vaccinal serovars and comparison of them with other serovars in the GenBank database revealed that three vaccinal serovars serjo hardjo, canicola and pomona had 100% similarity with each other and grippotyphosa serovar had the highest difference with the vaccinal serovars. In general, the results showed that this gene is a highly conserved gene in the domestic vaccinal serovars and serovars in the GenBank database with more than 95.7 percent similarity. Conclusion: These results showed that the gene, lipL21, is highly conserved in the vaccinal serovars (similarities > 96.4 %. Therefore, the gene encoding surface protein LipL21 can serve as a useful serologic test with high specificity and sensitivity for diagnosis of leptospirosis in clinical samples and in future as an effective subunit vaccine candidate to be used.

  6. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of mock microbial populations- impact of DNA extraction method, primer choice and sequencing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouhy, Fiona; Clooney, Adam G; Stanton, Catherine; Claesson, Marcus J; Cotter, Paul D

    2016-06-24

    Next-generation sequencing platforms have revolutionised our ability to investigate the microbiota composition of complex environments, frequently through 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the bacterial component of the community. Numerous factors, including DNA extraction method, primer sequences and sequencing platform employed, can affect the accuracy of the results achieved. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of these three factors on 16S rRNA gene sequencing results, using mock communities and mock community DNA. The use of different primer sequences (V4-V5, V1-V2 and V1-V2 degenerate primers) resulted in differences in the genera and species detected. The V4-V5 primers gave the most comparable results across platforms. The three Ion PGM primer sets detected more of the 20 mock community species than the equivalent MiSeq primer sets. Data generated from DNA extracted using the 2 extraction methods were very similar. Microbiota compositional data differed depending on the primers and sequencing platform that were used. The results demonstrate the risks in comparing data generated using different sequencing approaches and highlight the merits of choosing a standardised approach for sequencing in situations where a comparison across multiple sequencing runs is required.

  7. Transcriptome Sequencing Identified Genes and Gene Ontologies Associated with Early Freezing Tolerance in Maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhao; Hu, Guanghui; Liu, Xiangfeng; Zhou, Yao; Li, Yu; Zhang, Xu; Yuan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Qian; Yang, Deguang; Wang, Tianyu; Zhang, Zhiwu

    2016-01-01

    Originating in a tropical climate, maize has faced great challenges as cultivation has expanded to the majority of the world's temperate zones. In these zones, frost and cold temperatures are major factors that prevent maize from reaching its full yield potential. Among 30 elite maize inbred lines adapted to northern China, we identified two lines of extreme, but opposite, freezing tolerance levels—highly tolerant and highly sensitive. During the seedling stage of these two lines, we used RNA-seq to measure changes in maize whole genome transcriptome before and after freezing treatment. In total, 19,794 genes were expressed, of which 4550 exhibited differential expression due to either treatment (before or after freezing) or line type (tolerant or sensitive). Of the 4550 differently expressed genes, 948 exhibited differential expression due to treatment within line or lines under freezing condition. Analysis of gene ontology found that these 948 genes were significantly enriched for binding functions (DNA binding, ATP binding, and metal ion binding), protein kinase activity, and peptidase activity. Based on their enrichment, literature support, and significant levels of differential expression, 30 of these 948 genes were selected for quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) validation. The validation confirmed our RNA-Seq-based findings, with squared correlation coefficients of 80% and 50% in the tolerance and sensitive lines, respectively. This study provided valuable resources for further studies to enhance understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying maize early freezing response and enable targeted breeding strategies for developing varieties with superior frost resistance to achieve yield potential. PMID:27774095

  8. Immune gene discovery by expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis of hemocytes in the ridgetail white prawn Exopalaemon carinicauda

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Yafei; Liu, Ping; Li, Jitao; Li, Jian; Chen, Ping

    2013-01-01

    The ridgetail white prawn Exopalaemon carinicauda is one of the most important commercial species in eastern China. However, little information of immune genes in E.?carinicauda has been reported. To identify distinctive genes associated with immunity, an expressed sequence tag (EST) library was constructed from hemocytes of E.?carinicauda. A total of 3411 clones were sequenced, yielding 2853 ESTs and the average sequence length is 436 bp. The cluster and assembly analysis yielded 1053 unique...

  9. Deep RNA sequencing analysis of readthrough gene fusions in human prostate adenocarcinoma and reference samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nacu Serban

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Readthrough fusions across adjacent genes in the genome, or transcription-induced chimeras (TICs, have been estimated using expressed sequence tag (EST libraries to involve 4-6% of all genes. Deep transcriptional sequencing (RNA-Seq now makes it possible to study the occurrence and expression levels of TICs in individual samples across the genome. Methods We performed single-end RNA-Seq on three human prostate adenocarcinoma samples and their corresponding normal tissues, as well as brain and universal reference samples. We developed two bioinformatics methods to specifically identify TIC events: a targeted alignment method using artificial exon-exon junctions within 200,000 bp from adjacent genes, and genomic alignment allowing splicing within individual reads. We performed further experimental verification and characterization of selected TIC and fusion events using quantitative RT-PCR and comparative genomic hybridization microarrays. Results Targeted alignment against artificial exon-exon junctions yielded 339 distinct TIC events, including 32 gene pairs with multiple isoforms. The false discovery rate was estimated to be 1.5%. Spliced alignment to the genome was less sensitive, finding only 18% of those found by targeted alignment in 33-nt reads and 59% of those in 50-nt reads. However, spliced alignment revealed 30 cases of TICs with intervening exons, in addition to distant inversions, scrambled genes, and translocations. Our findings increase the catalog of observed TIC gene pairs by 66%. We verified 6 of 6 predicted TICs in all prostate samples, and 2 of 5 predicted novel distant gene fusions, both private events among 54 prostate tumor samples tested. Expression of TICs correlates with that of the upstream gene, which can explain the prostate-specific pattern of some TIC events and the restriction of the SLC45A3-ELK4 e4-e2 TIC to ERG-negative prostate samples, as confirmed in 20 matched prostate tumor and normal

  10. Isolation of nine gene sequences induced by silica in murine macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segade, F.; Claudio, E.; Wrobel, K.; Ramos, S.; Lazo, P.S. [Oviedo Univ., Oviedo (Spain)

    1995-03-01

    Macrophage activation by silica is the initial step in the development of silicosis. To identify genes that might be involved in silica-mediated activation, RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages were treated with silica for 48 h, and a subtracted cDNA library enriched for silica-induced genes (SIG) was constructed and differently screened. Nine cDNA clones (designated SIG-12, -14, -20, -41, -61, -81, -91, and -111) were partially sequenced and compared with sequences in GenBank/EMBL databases. SIG-12, -14, and -20 corresponded to the genes for ribosomal proteins L13A, L32, and L26, respectively. SIG-61 is the mouse homologue of p21 RhoC. SIG-91 is identical to the 67-kDa high-affinity laminin receptor. Four genes were not identified and are novel. All of the mRNAs corresponding to the nine cloned cDNAs were inducible by silica. Steady-state levels of mRNAs in RAW 264.7 cells treated with various macrophage activators and inducers of signal transduction pathways were determined. A complex pattern of induction and repression was found, indicating that upon phagocytosis of silica particles, many regulatory mechanisms of genes expression are simultaneously triggered. 55 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Isolation, partial length sequence and expression of steroid inducible hps 70 gene from Rhizopus nigricans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernila, B; Cresnar, B; Breskvar, K

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that filamentous fungus Rhizopus nigricans responds to addition of different steroids into growth medium with induction of hydroxylation system and that some steroids provoke stress response. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether those steroids provoke induction of Hsp70 gene(s), well studied markers of stress response in different cells and organisms. The expression studies of fungal Hsp70 gene(s) using Northern blot analysis showed that fungal hsp70 mRNA was upregulated after treatment of mycelia with deoxycorticosterone and testosterone, but not after exposure to progesterone. In addition, expression of fungal Hsp70 mRNA was elevated after exposure of mycelia to heat shock (32 degrees C), ethanol, heavy metal (CuSO4), and oxidative stressor (H2O2), whereas treatment of mycelia with osmotic stressor (KCl) didn't have any influence on stress protein expression. The partial nucleotide sequence and deduced amino acid sequence homology search revealed that the cDNA clone (lambda hs20/2), isolated from cDNA library prepared from heat shock treated fungal mycelia, contained Hsp70 gene of DnaK subfamily.

  12. Phylogenetic Relationships of Pseudorasbora, Pseudopungtungia, and Pungtungia (Teleostei; Cypriniformes; Gobioninae Inferred from Multiple Nuclear Gene Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keun-Yong Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gobionine species belonging to the genera Pseudorasbora, Pseudopungtungia, and Pungtungia (Teleostei; Cypriniformes; Cyprinidae have been heavily studied because of problems on taxonomy, threats of extinction, invasion, and human health. Nucleotide sequences of three nuclear genes, that is, recombination activating protein gene 1 (rag1, recombination activating gene 2 (rag2, and early growth response 1 gene (egr1, from Pseudorasbora, Pseudopungtungia, and Pungtungia species residing in China, Japan, and Korea, were analyzed to elucidate their intergeneric and interspecific phylogenetic relationships. In the phylogenetic tree inferred from their multiple gene sequences, Pseudorasbora, Pseudopungtungia and Pungtungia species ramified into three phylogenetically distinct clades; the “tenuicorpa” clade composed of Pseudopungtungia tenuicorpa, the “parva” clade composed of all Pseudorasbora species/subspecies, and the “herzi” clade composed of Pseudopungtungia nigra, and Pungtungia herzi. The genus Pseudorasbora was recovered as monophyletic, while the genus Pseudopungtungia was recovered as polyphyletic. Our phylogenetic result implies the unstable taxonomic status of the genus Pseudopungtungia.

  13. Using machine learning to predict gene expression and discover sequence motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuejing

    Recently, large amounts of experimental data for complex biological systems have become available. We use tools and algorithms from machine learning to build data-driven predictive models. We first present a novel algorithm to discover gene sequence motifs associated with temporal expression patterns of genes. Our algorithm, which is based on partial least squares (PLS) regression, is able to directly model the flow of information, from gene sequence to gene expression, to learn cis regulatory motifs and characterize associated gene expression patterns. Our algorithm outperforms traditional computational methods e.g. clustering in motif discovery. We then present a study of extending a machine learning model for transcriptional regulation predictive of genetic regulatory response to Caenorhabditis elegans. We show meaningful results both in terms of prediction accuracy on the test experiments and biological information extracted from the regulatory program. The model discovers DNA binding sites ab initio. We also present a case study where we detect a signal of lineage-specific regulation. Finally we present a comparative study on learning predictive models for motif discovery, based on different boosting algorithms: Adaptive Boosting (AdaBoost), Linear Programming Boosting (LPBoost) and Totally Corrective Boosting (TotalBoost). We evaluate and compare the performance of the three boosting algorithms via both statistical and biological validation, for hypoxia response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  14. Human case of bacteremia caused by Streptococcus canis sequence type 9 harboring the scm gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniyama, Daisuke; Abe, Yoshihiko; Sakai, Tetsuya; Kikuchi, Takahide; Takahashi, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus canis (Sc) is a zoonotic pathogen that is transferred mainly from companion animals to humans. One of the major virulence factors in Sc is the M-like protein encoded by the scm gene, which is involved in anti-phagocytic activities, as well as the recruitment of plasminogen to the bacterial surface in cooperation with enolase, and the consequent enhancement of bacterial transmigration and survival. This is the first reported human case of uncomplicated bacteremia following a dog bite, caused by Streptococcus canis harboring the scm gene. The similarity of the 16S rRNA from the infecting species to that of the Sc type strain, as well as the amplification of the species-specific cfg gene, encoding a co-hemolysin, was used to confirm the species identity. Furthermore, the isolate was confirmed as sequence type 9. The partial scm gene sequence harbored by the isolate was closely related to those of other two Sc strains. While this isolate did not possess the erm(A), erm(B), or mef(A), macrolide/lincosamide resistance genes, it was not susceptible to azithromycin: its susceptibility was intermediate. Even though human Sc bacteremia is rare, clinicians should be aware of this microorganism, as well as Pasteurella sp., Prevotella sp., and Capnocytophaga sp., when examining and treating patients with fever who maintain close contact with companion animals.

  15. Sequence variants in four genes underlying Bardet-Biedl syndrome in consanguineous families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Asmat; Umair, Muhammad; Yousaf, Maryam; Khan, Sher Alam; Nazim-ud-din, Muhammad; Shah, Khadim; Ahmad, Farooq; Azeem, Zahid; Ali, Ghazanfar; Alhaddad, Bader; Rafique, Afzal; Jan, Abid; Haack, Tobias B.; Strom, Tim M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Ghous, Tahseen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the molecular basis of Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) in five consanguineous families of Pakistani origin. Methods Linkage in two families (A and B) was established to BBS7 on chromosome 4q27, in family C to BBS8 on chromosome 14q32.1, and in family D to BBS10 on chromosome 12q21.2. Family E was investigated directly with exome sequence analysis. Results Sanger sequencing revealed two novel mutations and three previously reported mutations in the BBS genes. These mutations include two deletions (c.580_582delGCA, c.1592_1597delTTCCAG) in the BBS7 gene, a missense mutation (p.Gln449His) in the BBS8 gene, a frameshift mutation (c.271_272insT) in the BBS10 gene, and a nonsense mutation (p.Ser40*) in the MKKS (BBS6) gene. Conclusions Two novel mutations and three previously reported variants, identified in the present study, further extend the body of evidence implicating BBS6, BBS7, BBS8, and BBS10 in causing BBS. PMID:28761321

  16. Delineation of the species Haemophilus influenzae by phenotype, multilocus sequence phylogeny, and detection of marker genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels; Overballe, MD; Kilian, Mogens

    2009-01-01

    branching cluster, intermingled with strains of "H. intermedius" and cryptic genospecies biotype IV. Although H. influenzae is phenotypically more homogenous than some other Haemophilus species, the genetic diversity and multicluster structure of strains traditionally associated with H. influenzae make...... genospecies biotype IV, and the never formally validated species "Haemophilus intermedius". Multilocus sequence phylogeny based on six housekeeping genes separated a cluster encompassing the type and the reference strains of H. influenzae from 31 more distantly related strains. Comparison of 16S rRNA gene...

  17. Inactivation of expression of two genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with the external guide sequence methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Xudong; Ko, Jae-hyeong; Altman, Sidney

    2011-01-01

    The artificial inhibition of expression of genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is not a widespread, useful phenomenon. The external guide sequence (EGS) technology, which is well-proven in bacteria and mammalian cells in tissue culture and in mice, can also be utilized in yeast. The TOP2 and SRG1 genes can be inhibited by ∼30% with EGSs in vivo. Results in vitro also show convenient cleavage of the relevant transcripts by RNase P and appropriate EGSs. The feasible constructs shown to date have ...

  18. Cloning and sequencing of Pseudomonas genes determining sodium dodecyl sulfate biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, J; Brunel, F; Phanopoulos, A; Prozzi, D; Terpstra, P

    1992-05-01

    The nucleotide sequences of two genes involved in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) degradation, by Pseudomonas, have been determined. One of these, sdsA, codes for an alkyl sulfatase (58,957 Da) and has similarity (31.8% identity over a 201-amino acid stretch) to the N terminus of a predicted protein of unknown function from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The other gene, sdsB, codes for a positive activator protein (33,600 Da) that has extensive similarity with the lysR family of helix-turn-helix DNA-binding activator proteins.

  19. Ribosomal RNA gene sequences confirm that protistan endoparasite of larval cod Gadus morhua is Ichthyodinium sp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Alf; Meyer, Stefan; Overton, Julia Lynne

    2010-01-01

    An enigmatic protistan endoparasite found in eggs and larvae of cod Gadus morhua and turbot Psetta maxima was isolated from Baltic cod larvae, and DNA was extracted for sequencing of the parasite's small Subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene. The endoparasite has previously been suggested...... to be related to Ichthyodinium chabelardi, a dinoflagellate-like protist that parasitizes yolk sacs of embryos and larvae of a variety of fish species. Comparison of a 1535 bp long fragment of the SSU rRNA gene of the cod endoparasite showed absolute identify with I. chabelardi, demonstrating that the 2...

  20. Massive sequencing of 70 genes reveals a myriad of missing genes or mechanisms to be uncovered in hereditary spastic paraplegias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Sara; Raymond, Laure; Mairey, Mathilde; Coutinho, Paula; Brandão, Eva; Ribeiro, Paula; Loureiro, José Leal; Sequeiros, Jorge; Brice, Alexis; Alonso, Isabel; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSP) are neurodegenerative disorders characterized by lower limb spasticity and weakness that can be complicated by other neurological or non-neurological signs. Despite a high genetic heterogeneity (>60 causative genes), 40–70% of the families remain without a molecular diagnosis. Analysis of one of the pioneer cohorts of 193 HSP families generated in the early 1990s in Portugal highlighted that SPAST and SPG11 are the most frequent diagnoses. We have now explored 98 unsolved families from this series using custom next generation sequencing panels analyzing up to 70 candidate HSP genes. We identified the likely disease-causing variant in 20 of the 98 families with KIF5A being the most frequently mutated gene. We also found 52 variants of unknown significance (VUS) in 38% of the cases. These new diagnoses resulted in 42% of solved cases in the full Portuguese cohort (81/193). Segregation of the variants was not always compatible with the presumed inheritance, indicating that the analysis of all HSP genes regardless of the inheritance mode can help to explain some cases. Our results show that there is still a large set of unknown genes responsible for HSP and most likely novel mechanisms or inheritance modes leading to the disease to be uncovered, but this will require international collaborative efforts, particularly for the analysis of VUS. PMID:28832565

  1. Prp43p Is a DEAH-Box Spliceosome Disassembly Factor Essential for Ribosome Biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, D. Joshua; Nagel, Roland J.; Ares, Manuel; Stevens, Scott W.

    2006-01-01

    The known function of the DEXH/D-box protein Prp43p is the removal of the U2, U5, and U6 snRNPs from the postsplicing lariat-intron ribonucleoprotein complex. We demonstrate that affinity-purified Prp43p-associated material includes the expected spliceosomal components; however, we also identify several preribosomal complexes that are specifically purified with Prp43p. Conditional prp43 mutant alleles confer a 35S pre-rRNA processing defect, with subsequent depletion of 27S and 20S precursors. Upon a shift to a nonpermissive temperature, both large and small-ribosomal-subunit proteins accumulate in the nucleolus of prp43 mutants. Pulse-chase analysis demonstrates delayed kinetics of 35S, 27S, and 20S pre-rRNA processing with turnover of these intermediates. Microarray analysis of pre-mRNA splicing defects in prp43 mutants shows a very mild effect, similar to that of nonessential pre-mRNA splicing factors. Prp43p is the first DEXH/D-box protein shown to function in both RNA polymerase I and polymerase II transcript metabolism. Its essential function is in its newly characterized role in ribosome biogenesis of both ribosomal subunits, positioning Prp43p to regulate both pre-mRNA splicing and ribosome biogenesis. PMID:16382144

  2. wzi Gene Sequencing, a Rapid Method for Determination of Capsular Type for Klebsiella Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passet, Virginie; Haugaard, Anita Björk; Babosan, Anamaria; Kassis-Chikhani, Najiby; Struve, Carsten; Decré, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Pathogens of the genus Klebsiella have been classified into distinct capsular (K) types for nearly a century. K typing of Klebsiella species still has important applications in epidemiology and clinical microbiology, but the serological method has strong practical limitations. Our objective was to evaluate the sequencing of wzi, a gene conserved in all capsular types of Klebsiella pneumoniae that codes for an outer membrane protein involved in capsule attachment to the cell surface, as a simple and rapid method for the prediction of K type. The sequencing of a 447-nucleotide region of wzi distinguished the K-type reference strains with only nine exceptions. A reference wzi sequence database was created by the inclusion of multiple strains representing K types associated with high virulence and multidrug resistance. A collection of 119 prospective clinical isolates of K. pneumoniae were then analyzed in parallel by wzi sequencing and classical K typing. Whereas K typing achieved typeability for 81% and discrimination for 94.4% of the isolates, these figures were 98.1% and 98.3%, respectively, for wzi sequencing. The prediction of K type once the wzi allele was known was 94%. wzi sequencing is a rapid and simple method for the determination of the K types of most K. pneumoniae clinical isolates. PMID:24088853

  3. Recommendations for the Involvement of Patient Research Partners (PRP) in OMERACT Working Groups. A Report from the OMERACT 2014 Working Group on PRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Peter P; de Wit, Maarten; Bingham, Clifton O; Kirwan, John R; Leong, Amye; March, Lyn M; Montie, Pam; Scholte-Voshaar, Marieke; Gossec, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Patient participation in research is increasing; however, practical guidelines to enhance this participation are lacking. Specifically within the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) organization, although patients have participated in OMERACT meetings since 2002, consensus about the procedures for involving patients in working groups has not been formalized. The objective is to develop a set of recommendations regarding patient research partner (PRP) involvement in research working groups. We conducted a systematic literature review on recommendations/guidelines of PRP involvement in research; elaborated a structured consensus process involving multiple participants to develop a set of recommendations; and sought endorsement of recommendations by OMERACT. In the 18 articles included in the literature review, there was general agreement on the broad concepts for recommendations covering PRP involvement in research although they were heterogeneous in detail. Most considered PRP involvement in all phases of research with early engagement, training, and support important, but details on the content were scarce. This review informed a larger consensus-building process regarding PRP inclusion in OMERACT research. Three overarching principles and 8 recommendations were developed, discussed, and refined at OMERACT 2014. The guiding principles were endorsed during the OMERACT plenary session. These recommendations for PRP involvement in OMERACT research reinforce the importance of patient participation throughout the research process as integral members. Although the applicability of the recommendations in other research contexts should be assessed, the generalizability is expected to be high. Future research should evaluate their implementation and their effect on outcome development.

  4. Rapid high resolution genotyping of Francisella tularensis by whole genome sequence comparison of annotated genes ("MLST+".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus H Antwerpen

    Full Text Available The zoonotic disease tularemia is caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis. This pathogen is considered as a category A select agent with potential to be misused in bioterrorism. Molecular typing based on DNA-sequence like canSNP-typing or MLVA has become the accepted standard for this organism. Due to the organism's highly clonal nature, the current typing methods have reached their limit of discrimination for classifying closely related subpopulations within the subspecies F. tularensis ssp. holarctica. We introduce a new gene-by-gene approach, MLST+, based on whole genome data of 15 sequenced F. tularensis ssp. holarctica strains and apply this approach to investigate an epidemic of lethal tularemia among non-human primates in two animal facilities in Germany. Due to the high resolution of MLST+ we are able to demonstrate that three independent clones of this highly infectious pathogen were responsible for these spatially and temporally restricted outbreaks.

  5. Cloning, sequence and expression of the lactate dehydrogenase gene from the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium vivax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut-Balik, Dilek; Akbulut, Ekrem; Shoemark, Debbie K; Celik, Venhar; Moreton, Kathleen M; Sessions, Richard B; Holbrook, J John; Brady, R Leo

    2004-07-01

    Increased drug resistance to anti-malarials highlights the need for the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of malaria. To this end, the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) gene was cloned and sequenced from genomic DNA of Plasmodium vivax ( PvLDH) Belem strain. The 316 amino acid protein-coding region of the PvLDH gene was inserted into the prokaryotic expression vector pKK223-3 and a 34 kDa protein with LDH activity was expressed in E. coli. Structural differences between human LDHs and PfLDH make the latter an attractive target for inhibitors leading to novel anti-malarial drugs. The sequence similarity between PvLDH and PfLDH (90% residue identity and no insertions or deletions) indicate that the same approach could be applied to Plasmodium vivax, the most common human malaria parasite in the world.

  6. Rapid high resolution genotyping of Francisella tularensis by whole genome sequence comparison of annotated genes ("MLST+").

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antwerpen, Markus H; Prior, Karola; Mellmann, Alexander; Höppner, Sebastian; Splettstoesser, Wolf D; Harmsen, Dag

    2015-01-01

    The zoonotic disease tularemia is caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis. This pathogen is considered as a category A select agent with potential to be misused in bioterrorism. Molecular typing based on DNA-sequence like canSNP-typing or MLVA has become the accepted standard for this organism. Due to the organism's highly clonal nature, the current typing methods have reached their limit of discrimination for classifying closely related subpopulations within the subspecies F. tularensis ssp. holarctica. We introduce a new gene-by-gene approach, MLST+, based on whole genome data of 15 sequenced F. tularensis ssp. holarctica strains and apply this approach to investigate an epidemic of lethal tularemia among non-human primates in two animal facilities in Germany. Due to the high resolution of MLST+ we are able to demonstrate that three independent clones of this highly infectious pathogen were responsible for these spatially and temporally restricted outbreaks.

  7. A Case of Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense Infection as Confirmed by Mitochondrial COX1 Gene Sequence Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Hyun; Eom, Keeseon S.; Park, Min Sun; Kwon, Oh Kyoung; Kim, Hyo Sun

    2013-01-01

    Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense has been reported in Korea as Diphyllobothrium latum because of their close morphologic resemblance. We have identified a human case of D. nihonkaiense infection using the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cox1) gene sequence analysis. On 18 February 2012, a patient who had consumed raw fish a month earlier visited our outpatient clinic with a long tapeworm parasite excreted in the feces. The body of the segmented worm was 2 m long and divided into the scolex (head) and proglottids. It was morphologically close to D. nihonkaiense and D. latum. The cox1 gene analysis showed 99.4% (340/342 bp) homology with D. nihonkaiense but only 91.8% (314/342 bp) homology with D. latum. The present study suggested that the Diphyllobothrium spp. infection in Korea should be analyzed with specific DNA sequence for an accurate species identification. PMID:24039292

  8. Existence of a True Phosphofructokinase in Bacillus sphaericus: Cloning and Sequencing of the pfk Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alice, Alejandro F.; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Sánchez-Rivas, Carmen

    2002-01-01

    Some strains of Bacillus sphaericus are entomopathogenic to mosquito larvae, which transmit diseases, such as filariasis and malaria, affecting millions of people worldwide. This species is unable to use hexoses and pentoses as unique carbon sources, which was proposed to be due to the lack of glycolytic enzymes, such as 6-phosphofructokinase (PFK). In this study, PFK activity was detected and the pfk gene was cloned and sequenced. Furthermore, this gene was shown to be present in strains belonging to all the homology groups of this heterogeneous species, in which PFK activity was also detected. A careful sequence analysis revealed the conservation of different catalytic and regulatory residues, as well as the enzyme's phylogenetic affiliation with the family of allosteric ATP-PFK enzymes. PMID:12450869

  9. Identification of genes in anonymous DNA sequences. Final report: Report period, 15 April 1993--15 April 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    This Report concludes the DOE Human Genome Program project, ``Identification of Genes in Anonymous DNA Sequence.`` The central goals of this project have been (1) understanding the problem of identifying genes in anonymous sequences, and (2) development of tools, primarily the automated identification system gm, for identifying genes. The activities supported under the previous award are summarized here to provide a single complete report on the activities supported as part of the project from its inception to its completion.

  10. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the Legionella micdadei mip gene, encoding a 30-kilodalton analog of the Legionella pneumophila Mip protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Cianciotto, N P; Hindersson, P

    1991-01-01

    After the demonstration of analogs of the Legionella pneumophila macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip) protein in other Legionella species, the Legionella micdadei mip gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. DNA sequence analysis of the L. micdadei mip gene contained in the plasmid p...... homology with the mip-like genes of several Legionella species. Furthermore, amino acid sequence comparisons revealed significant homology to two eukaryotic proteins with isomerase activity (FK506-binding proteins)....

  11. Low-pass shotgun sequencing of the barley genome facilitates rapid identification of genes, conserved non-coding sequences and novel repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graner Andreas

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Barley has one of the largest and most complex genomes of all economically important food crops. The rise of new short read sequencing technologies such as Illumina/Solexa permits such large genomes to be effectively sampled at relatively low cost. Based on the corresponding sequence reads a Mathematically Defined Repeat (MDR index can be generated to map repetitive regions in genomic sequences. Results We have generated 574 Mbp of Illumina/Solexa sequences from barley total genomic DNA, representing about 10% of a genome equivalent. From these sequences we generated an MDR index which was then used to identify and mark repetitive regions in the barley genome. Comparison of the MDR plots with expert repeat annotation drawing on the information already available for known repetitive elements revealed a significant correspondence between the two methods. MDR-based annotation allowed for the identification of dozens of novel repeat sequences, though, which were not recognised by hand-annotation. The MDR data was also used to identify gene-containing regions by masking of repetitive sequences in eight de-novo sequenced bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clones. For half of the identified candidate gene islands indeed gene sequences could be identified. MDR data were only of limited use, when mapped on genomic sequences from the closely related species Triticum monococcum as only a fraction of the repetitive sequences was recognised. Conclusion An MDR index for barley, which was obtained by whole-genome Illumina/Solexa sequencing, proved as efficient in repeat identification as manual expert annotation. Circumventing the labour-intensive step of producing a specific repeat library for expert annotation, an MDR index provides an elegant and efficient resource for the identification of repetitive and low-copy (i.e. potentially gene-containing sequences regions in uncharacterised genomic sequences. The restriction that a particular

  12. Comparison of inherently essential genes of Porphyromonas gingivalis identified in two transposon-sequencing libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcherson, J A; Gogeneni, H; Yoder-Himes, D; Hendrickson, E L; Hackett, M; Whiteley, M; Lamont, R J; Scott, D A

    2016-08-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative anaerobe and keystone periodontal pathogen. A mariner transposon insertion mutant library has recently been used to define 463 genes as putatively essential for the in vitro growth of P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 in planktonic culture (Library 1). We have independently generated a transposon insertion mutant library (Library 2) for the same P. gingivalis strain and herein compare genes that are putatively essential for in vitro growth in complex media, as defined by both libraries. In all, 281 genes (61%) identified by Library 1 were common to Library 2. Many of these common genes are involved in fundamentally important metabolic pathways, notably pyrimidine cycling as well as lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan, pantothenate and coenzyme A biosynthesis, and nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism. Also in common are genes encoding heat-shock protein homologues, sigma factors, enzymes with proteolytic activity, and the majority of sec-related protein export genes. In addition to facilitating a better understanding of critical physiological processes, transposon-sequencing technology has the potential to identify novel strategies for the control of P. gingivalis infections. Those genes defined as essential by two independently generated TnSeq mutant libraries are likely to represent particularly attractive therapeutic targets. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. RNA Sequencing Reveals Xyr1 as a Transcription Factor Regulating Gene Expression beyond Carbohydrate Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Xyr1 has been demonstrated to be the main transcription activator of (hemicellulases in the well-known cellulase producer Trichoderma reesei. This study comprehensively investigates the genes regulated by Xyr1 through RNA sequencing to produce the transcription profiles of T. reesei Rut-C30 and its xyr1 deletion mutant (Δxyr1, cultured on lignocellulose or glucose. xyr1 deletion resulted in 467 differentially expressed genes on inducing medium. Almost all functional genes involved in (hemicellulose degradation and many transporters belonging to the sugar porter family in the major facilitator superfamily (MFS were downregulated in Δxyr1. By contrast, all differentially expressed protease, lipase, chitinase, some ATP-binding cassette transporters, and heat shock protein-encoding genes were upregulated in Δxyr1. When cultured on glucose, a total of 281 genes were expressed differentially in Δxyr1, most of which were involved in energy, solute transport, lipid, amino acid, and monosaccharide as well as secondary metabolism. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed that the intracellular β-glucosidase bgl2, the putative nonenzymatic cellulose-attacking gene cip1, the MFS lactose transporter lp, the nmrA-like gene, endo T, the acid protease pepA, and the small heat shock protein hsp23 were probable Xyr1-targets. These results might help elucidate the regulation system for synthesis and secretion of (hemicellulases in T. reesei Rut-C30.

  14. Multiple, non-allelic, intein-coding sequences in eukaryotic RNA polymerase genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butler Margaret I

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inteins are self-splicing protein elements. They are translated as inserts within host proteins that excise themselves and ligate the flanking portions of the host protein (exteins with a peptide bond. They are encoded as in-frame insertions within the genes for the host proteins. Inteins are found in all three domains of life and in viruses, but have a very sporadic distribution. Only a small number of intein coding sequences have been identified in eukaryotic nuclear genes, and all of these are from ascomycete or basidiomycete fungi. Results We identified seven intein coding sequences within nuclear genes coding for the second largest subunits of RNA polymerase. These sequences were found in diverse eukaryotes: one is in the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase I (RPA2 from the ascomycete fungus Phaeosphaeria nodorum, one is in the RNA polymerase III (RPC2 of the slime mould Dictyostelium discoideum and four intein coding sequences are in RNA polymerase II genes (RPB2, one each from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the zygomycete fungus Spiromyces aspiralis and the chytrid fungi Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and Coelomomyces stegomyiae. The remaining intein coding sequence is in a viral relic embedded within the genome of the oomycete Phytophthora ramorum. The Chlamydomonas and Dictyostelium inteins are the first nuclear-encoded inteins found outside of the fungi. These new inteins represent a unique dataset: they are found in homologous proteins that form a paralogous group. Although these paralogues diverged early in eukaryotic evolution, their sequences can be aligned over most of their length. The inteins are inserted at multiple distinct sites, each of which corresponds to a highly conserved region of RNA polymerase. This dataset supports earlier work suggesting that inteins preferentially occur in highly conserved regions of their host proteins. Conclusion The identification of these new inteins

  15. Advancing Eucalyptus genomics: identification and sequencing of lignin biosynthesis genes from deep-coverage BAC libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudrna David

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eucalyptus species are among the most planted hardwoods in the world because of their rapid growth, adaptability and valuable wood properties. The development and integration of genomic resources into breeding practice will be increasingly important in the decades to come. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries are key genomic tools that enable positional cloning of important traits, synteny evaluation, and the development of genome framework physical maps for genetic linkage and genome sequencing. Results We describe the construction and characterization of two deep-coverage BAC libraries EG_Ba and EG_Bb obtained from nuclear DNA fragments of E. grandis (clone BRASUZ1 digested with HindIII and BstYI, respectively. Genome coverages of 17 and 15 haploid genome equivalents were estimated for EG_Ba and EG_Bb, respectively. Both libraries contained large inserts, with average sizes ranging from 135 Kb (Eg_Bb to 157 Kb (Eg_Ba, very low extra-nuclear genome contamination providing a probability of finding a single copy gene ≥ 99.99%. Libraries were screened for the presence of several genes of interest via hybridizations to high-density BAC filters followed by PCR validation. Five selected BAC clones were sequenced and assembled using the Roche GS FLX technology providing the whole sequence of the E. grandis chloroplast genome, and complete genomic sequences of important lignin biosynthesis genes. Conclusions The two E. grandis BAC libraries described in this study represent an important milestone for the advancement of Eucalyptus genomics and forest tree research. These BAC resources have a highly redundant genome coverage (> 15×, contain large average inserts and have a very low percentage of clones with organellar DNA or empty vectors. These publicly available BAC libraries are thus suitable for a broad range of applications in genetic and genomic research in Eucalyptus and possibly in related species of Myrtaceae

  16. Moloney murine sarcoma virus MuSVts110 DNA: cloning, nucleotide sequence, and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huai, L; Chiocca, S M; Gilbreth, M A; Ainsworth, J R; Bishop, L A; Murphy, E C

    1992-09-01

    We have cloned Moloney murine sarcoma virus (MuSV) MuSVts110 DNA by assembly of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified segments of integrated viral DNA from infected NRK cells (6m2 cells) and determined its complete sequence. Previously, by direct sequencing of MuSVts110 RNA transcribed in 6m2 cells, we established that the thermosensitive RNA splicing phenotype uniquely characteristic of MuSVts110 results from a deletion of 1,487 nucleotides of progenitor MuSV-124 sequences. As anticipated, the sequence obtained in this study contained precisely this same deletion. In addition, several other unexpected sequence differences were found between MuSVts110 and MuSV-124. For example, in the noncoding region upstream of the gag gene, MuSVts110 DNA contained a 52-nucleotide tract typical of murine leukemia virus rather than MuSV-124, suggesting that MuSVts110 originated as a MuSV-helper murine leukemia virus recombinant during reverse transcription rather than from a straightforward deletion within MuSV-124. In addition, both MuSVts110 long terminal repeats contained head-to-tail duplications of eight nucleotides in the U3 region. Finally, seven single-nucleotide substitutions were found scattered throughout MuSVts110 DNA. Three of the nucleotide substitutions were in the gag gene, resulting in one coding change in p15 and one in p30. All of the remaining nucleotide changes were found in the noncoding region between the 5' long terminal repeat and the gag gene. In NIH 3T3 cells transfected with the cloned MuSVts110 DNA, the pattern of viral RNA expression conformed with that observed in cells infected with authentic MuSVts110 virus in that viral RNA splicing was 30 to 40% efficient at growth temperatures between 28 and 33 degrees C but reduced to trace levels above 37 degrees C.

  17. An abundance of ubiquitously expressed genes revealed by tissue transcriptome sequence data.

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    Daniel Ramsköld

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The parts of the genome transcribed by a cell or tissue reflect the biological processes and functions it carries out. We characterized the features of mammalian tissue transcriptomes at the gene level through analysis of RNA deep sequencing (RNA-Seq data across human and mouse tissues and cell lines. We observed that roughly 8,000 protein-coding genes were ubiquitously expressed, contributing to around 75% of all mRNAs by message copy number in most tissues. These mRNAs encoded proteins that were often intracellular, and tended to be involved in metabolism, transcription, RNA processing or translation. In contrast, genes for secreted or plasma membrane proteins were generally expressed in only a subset of tissues. The distribution of expression levels was broad but fairly continuous: no support was found for the concept of distinct expression classes of genes. Expression estimates that included reads mapping to coding exons only correlated better with qRT-PCR data than estimates which also included 3' untranslated regions (UTRs. Muscle and liver had the least complex transcriptomes, in that they expressed predominantly ubiquitous genes and a large fraction of the transcripts came from a few highly expressed genes, whereas brain, kidney and testis expressed more complex transcriptomes with the vast majority of genes expressed and relatively small contributions from the most expressed genes. mRNAs expressed in brain had unusually long 3'UTRs, and mean 3'UTR length was higher for genes involved in development, morphogenesis and signal transduction, suggesting added complexity of UTR-based regulation for these genes. Our results support a model in which variable exterior components feed into a large, densely connected core composed of ubiquitously expressed intracellular proteins.

  18. Cloning and sequence analysis of H. contortus HC58cDNA gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The complete coding sequence of Hemonchus contortus HC58cDNA was generated by rapid amplification of cDNA ends and polymerase chain reaction using primers based on the 5\\' and 3\\' ends of the parasite mRNA, accession no. AF305964. The HC58cDNA gene was 851bp long, with open reading frame of 717bp, ...

  19. DriverDB: an exome sequencing database for cancer driver gene identification

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Wei-Chung; Chung, I-Fang; Chen, Chen-Yang; Sun, Hsing-Jen; Fen, Jun-Jeng; Tang, Wei-Chun; Chang, Ting-Yu; Wong, Tai-Tong; Wang, Hsei-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Exome sequencing (exome-seq) has aided in the discovery of a huge amount of mutations in cancers, yet challenges remain in converting oncogenomics data into information that is interpretable and accessible for clinical care. We constructed DriverDB (http://ngs.ym.edu.tw/driverdb/), a database which incorporates 6079 cases of exome-seq data, annotation databases (such as dbSNP, 1000 Genome and Cosmic) and published bioinformatics algorithms dedicated to driver gene/mutation identification. We ...

  20. GLASS: assisted and standardized assessment of gene variations from Sanger sequence trace data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Karol; Bystry, Vojtech; Reigl, Tomas; Demko, Martin; Krejci, Adam; Touloumenidou, Tasoula; Stalika, Evangelia; Tichy, Boris; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Pospisilova, Sarka; Malcikova, Jitka; Darzentas, Nikos

    2017-12-01

    Sanger sequencing is still being employed for sequence variant detection by many laboratories, especially in a clinical setting. However, chromatogram interpretation often requires manual inspection and in some cases, considerable expertise. We present GLASS, a web-based Sanger sequence trace viewer, editor, aligner and variant caller, built to assist with the assessment of variations in 'curated' or user-provided genes. Critically, it produces a standardized variant output as recommended by the Human Genome Variation Society. GLASS is freely available at http://bat.infspire.org/genomepd/glass/ with source code at https://github.com/infspiredBAT/GLASS. nikos.darzentas@gmail.com or malcikova.jitka@fnbrno.cz. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  1. Whole-exome sequencing for the identification of susceptibility genes of Kashin-Beck disease.

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    Zhenxing Yang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify and investigate the susceptibility genes of Kashin-Beck disease (KBD in Chinese population. METHODS: Whole-exome capturing and sequencing technology was used for the detection of genetic variations in 19 individuals from six families with high incidence of KBD. A total of 44 polymorphisms from 41 genes were genotyped from a total of 144 cases and 144 controls by using MassARRAY under the standard protocol from Sequenom. Association was applied on the data by using PLINK1.07. RESULTS: In the sequencing stage, each sample showed approximately 70-fold coverage, thus covering more than 99% of the target regions. Among the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs used in the transmission disequilibrium test, 108 had a p-value of <0.01, whereas 1056 had a p-value of <0.05. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes(KEGG pathway analysis indicates that these SNPs focus on three major pathways: regulation of actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, and metabolic pathways. In the validation stage, single locus effects revealed that two of these polymorphisms (rs7745040 and rs9275295 in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DRB1 gene and one polymorphism (rs9473132 in CD2-associated protein (CD2AP gene have a significant statistical association with KBD. CONCLUSIONS: HLA-DRB1 and CD2AP gene were identified to be among the susceptibility genes of KBD, thus supporting the role of the autoimmune response in KBD and the possibility of shared etiology between osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and KBD.

  2. Exome sequencing identifies three novel candidate genes implicated in intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, Zehra; Iqbal, Zafar; Azam, Maleeha; Ayub, Humaira; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; Gilissen, Christian; Ali, Syeda Hafiza Benish; Riaz, Moeen; Veltman, Joris A; Pfundt, Rolph; van Bokhoven, Hans; Qamar, Raheel

    2014-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is a major health problem mostly with an unknown etiology. Recently exome sequencing of individuals with ID identified novel genes implicated in the disease. Therefore the purpose of the present study was to identify the genetic cause of ID in one syndromic and two non-syndromic Pakistani families. Whole exome of three ID probands was sequenced. Missense variations in two plausible novel genes implicated in autosomal recessive ID were identified: lysine (K)-specific methyltransferase 2B (KMT2B), zinc finger protein 589 (ZNF589), as well as hedgehog acyltransferase (HHAT) with a de novo mutation with autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. The KMT2B recessive variant is the first report of recessive Kleefstra syndrome-like phenotype. Identification of plausible causative mutations for two recessive and a dominant type of ID, in genes not previously implicated in disease, underscores the large genetic heterogeneity of ID. These results also support the viewpoint that large number of ID genes converge on limited number of common networks i.e. ZNF589 belongs to KRAB-domain zinc-finger proteins previously implicated in ID, HHAT is predicted to affect sonic hedgehog, which is involved in several disorders with ID, KMT2B associated with syndromic ID fits the epigenetic module underlying the Kleefstra syndromic spectrum. The association of these novel genes in three different Pakistani ID families highlights the importance of screening these genes in more families with similar phenotypes from different populations to confirm the involvement of these genes in pathogenesis of ID.

  3. Analysis of the hybrid proline-rich protein families from seven plant species suggests rapid diversification of their sequences and expression patterns

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    Fischer Lukáš

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant hybrid proline-rich proteins (HyPRPs are putative cell wall proteins consisting, usually, of a repetitive proline-rich (PR N-terminal domain and a conserved eight-cysteine motif (8 CM C-terminal domain. Understanding the evolutionary dynamics of HyPRPs might provide not only insight into their so far elusive function, but also a model for other large protein families in plants. Results We have performed a phylogenetic analysis of HyPRPs from seven plant species, including representatives of gymnosperms and both monocot and dicot angiosperms. Every species studied possesses a large family of 14–52 HyPRPs. Angiosperm HyPRPs exhibit signs of recent major diversification involving, at least in Arabidopsis and rice, several independent tandem gene multiplications. A distinct subfamily of relatively well-conserved C-type HyPRPs, often with long hydrophobic PR domains, has been identified. In most of gymnosperm (pine HyPRPs, diversity appears within the C-type group while angiosperms have only a few of well-conserved C-type representatives. Atypical (glycine-rich or extremely short N-terminal domains apparently evolved independently in multiple lineages of the HyPRP family, possibly via inversion or loss of sequences encoding proline-rich domains. Expression profiles of potato and Arabidopsis HyPRP genes exhibit instances of both overlapping and complementary organ distribution. The diversified non-C-type HyPRP genes from recently amplified chromosomal clusters in Arabidopsis often share their specialized expression profiles. C-type genes have broader expression patterns in both species (potato and Arabidopsis, although orthologous genes exhibit some differences. Conclusion HyPRPs represent a dynamically evolving protein family apparently unique to seed plants. We suggest that ancestral HyPRPs with long proline-rich domains produced the current diversity through ongoing gene duplications accompanied by shortening

  4. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of a phenylalanine ammonia-lyase gene from dendrobium.

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    Qing Jin

    Full Text Available In this study, a phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL gene was cloned from Dendrobium candidum using homology cloning and RACE. The full-length sequence and catalytic active sites that appear in PAL proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum are also found: PAL cDNA of D. candidum (designated Dc-PAL1, GenBank No. JQ765748 has 2,458 bps and contains a complete open reading frame (ORF of 2,142 bps, which encodes 713 amino acid residues. The amino acid sequence of DcPAL1 has more than 80% sequence identity with the PAL genes of other plants, as indicated by multiple alignments. The dominant sites and catalytic active sites, which are similar to that showing in PAL proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum, are also found in DcPAL1. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that DcPAL is more closely related to PALs from orchidaceae plants than to those of other plants. The differential expression patterns of PAL in protocorm-like body, leaf, stem, and root, suggest that the PAL gene performs multiple physiological functions in Dendrobium candidum.

  5. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of a phenylalanine ammonia-lyase gene from dendrobium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qing; Yao, Yao; Cai, Yongping; Lin, Yi

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) gene was cloned from Dendrobium candidum using homology cloning and RACE. The full-length sequence and catalytic active sites that appear in PAL proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum are also found: PAL cDNA of D. candidum (designated Dc-PAL1, GenBank No. JQ765748) has 2,458 bps and contains a complete open reading frame (ORF) of 2,142 bps, which encodes 713 amino acid residues. The amino acid sequence of DcPAL1 has more than 80% sequence identity with the PAL genes of other plants, as indicated by multiple alignments. The dominant sites and catalytic active sites, which are similar to that showing in PAL proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum, are also found in DcPAL1. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that DcPAL is more closely related to PALs from orchidaceae plants than to those of other plants. The differential expression patterns of PAL in protocorm-like body, leaf, stem, and root, suggest that the PAL gene performs multiple physiological functions in Dendrobium candidum.

  6. Use of gene sequence analyses and genome comparisons for yeast systematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtzman, Cletus P

    2014-02-01

    Detection, identification and classification of yeasts have undergone a major transformation in the past decade and a half following application of gene sequence analyses and genome comparisons. Development of a database (barcode) of easily determined gene sequences from domains 1 and 2 (D1/D2) of large subunit rRNA and from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) now permits many laboratories to identify species accurately and this has led to a doubling in the number of known species of yeasts over the past decade. Phylogenetic analysis of gene sequences has resulted in major revision of yeast systematics, resulting in redefinition of nearly all genera. Future work calls for application of genomics to refine our understanding of the species concept and to provide a better understanding of the boundaries of genera and higher levels of classification. This increased understanding of phylogeny is expected to allow prediction of the genetic potential of various clades and species for biotechnological applications and adaptation to environmental changes.

  7. Deep sequencing reveals a novel class of bidirectional promoters associated with neuronal genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hai Yang; He, Liu; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2014-06-10

    Comprehensive annotation of transcripts expressed in a given tissue is a critical step towards the understanding of regulatory and functional pathways that shape the transcriptome. Here, we reconstructed a cumulative transcriptome of the human prefrontal cortex (PFC) based on approximately 300 million strand-specific RNA sequence (RNA-seq) reads collected at different stages of postnatal development. We find that more than 50% of reconstructed transcripts represent novel transcriptome elements, including 8,343 novel exons and exon extensions of annotated coding genes, 11,217 novel antisense transcripts and 29,541 novel intergenic transcripts or their fragments showing canonical features of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Our analysis further led to a surprising discovery of a novel class of bidirectional promoters (NBiPs) driving divergent transcription of mRNA and novel lncRNA pairs and displaying a distinct set of sequence and epigenetic features. In contrast to known bidirectional and unidirectional promoters, NBiPs are strongly associated with genes involved in neuronal functions and regulated by neuron-associated transcription factors. Taken together, our results demonstrate that large portions of the human transcriptome remain uncharacterized. The distinct sequence and epigenetic features of NBiPs, as well as their specific association with neuronal genes, further suggest existence of regulatory pathways specific to the human brain.

  8. Investigation of horizontal gene transfer of pathogenicity islands in Escherichia coli using next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerer, Maxim; Fischer, Wolfgang; Schubert, Sören

    2017-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) contributes to the evolution of bacteria. All extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) harbour pathogenicity islands (PAIs), however relatively little is known about the acquisition of these PAIs. Due to these islands, ExPEC have properties to colonize and invade its hosts efficiently. Even though these PAIs are known to be acquired by HGT, only very few PAIs do carry mobilization and transfer genes required for the transmission by HGT. In this study, we apply for the first time next-generation sequencing (NGS) and in silico analyses in combination with in vitro experiments to decipher the mechanisms of PAI acquisition in ExPEC. For this, we investigated three neighbouring E. coli PAIs, namely the high-pathogenicity island (HPI), the pks and the serU island. As these PAIs contain no mobilization and transfer genes, they are immobile and dependent on transfer vehicles. By whole genome sequencing of the entire E. coli reference (ECOR) collection and by applying a phylogenetic approach we could unambiguously demonstrate that these PAIs are transmitted not only vertically, but also horizontally. Furthermore, we could prove in silico that distinct groups of PAIs were transferred "en bloc" in conjunction with the neighbouring chromosomal backbone. We traced this PAI transfer in vitro using an F' plasmid. Different lengths of transferred DNA were exactly detectable in the sequenced transconjugants indicating NGS as a powerful tool for determination of PAI transfer.

  9. Identification of DCX gene mutation in lissencephaly spectrum with subcortical band heterotopia using whole exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Mi-Ae; Woo, Hye In; Kim, Jong-Won; Lee, Jeehun; Ki, Chang-Seok

    2013-05-01

    Malformations of cortical development include a wide range of brain developmental anomalies that commonly lead to developmental delay and epilepsy. Lissencephaly and subcortical band heterotopia are major malformations of cortical development due to abnormal neuronal migration and several genes have been identified including ARX, DCX, LIS1, RELN, TUBA1A, and VLDLR. Traditionally, genetic testing for lissencephaly and subcortical band heterotopia has been done in the order of the probability of detection of mutation according to the radiologic features, but the success rate could be variable with this time-consuming approach. In this study we used whole-exome sequencing to identify mutations in a 5-year-old girl with lissencephaly spectrum with subcortical band heterotopia. After excluding lissencephaly-related genes, one deleterious mutation (NM_178153.2:c.665C > T, p.Thr222Ile) in the DCX gene was identified. Further Sanger sequencing validated the variant in the patient but not in both parents indicating a de novo mutation. The present report demonstrates that whole-exome sequencing may be a useful tool for the identification of mutations in patients with lissencephaly and subcortical band heterotopias as well as malformations of cortical development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Sequence Analysis of Bitter Taste Receptor Gene Repertoires in Different Ruminant Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro Ferreira, Ana; Tomás Marques, Andreia; Bhide, Mangesh; Cubric-Curik, Vlatka; Hollung, Kristin; Knight, Christopher Harold; Raundrup, Katrine; Lippolis, John; Palmer, Mitchell; Sales-Baptista, Elvira; Araújo, Susana Sousa; de Almeida, André Martinho

    2015-01-01

    Bitter taste has been extensively studied in mammalian species and is associated with sensitivity to toxins and with food choices that avoid dangerous substances in the diet. At the molecular level, bitter compounds are sensed by bitter taste receptor proteins (T2R) present at the surface of taste receptor cells in the gustatory papillae. Our work aims at exploring the phylogenetic relationships of T2R gene sequences within different ruminant species. To accomplish this goal, we gathered a collection of ruminant species with different feeding behaviors and for which no genome data is available: American bison, chamois, elk, European bison, fallow deer, goat, moose, mouflon, muskox, red deer, reindeer and white tailed deer. The herbivores chosen for this study belong to different taxonomic families and habitats, and hence, exhibit distinct foraging behaviors and diet preferences. We describe the first partial repertoires of T2R gene sequences for these species obtained by direct sequencing. We then consider the homology and evolutionary history of these receptors within this ruminant group, and whether it relates to feeding type classification, using MEGA software. Our results suggest that phylogenetic proximity of T2R genes corresponds more to the traditional taxonomic groups of the species rather than reflecting a categorization by feeding strategy. PMID:26061084

  11. Nucleotide sequences and characterization of haemolysin genes from Aeromonas hydrophila and Aeromonas sobria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirono, I; Aoki, T; Asao, T; Kozaki, S

    1992-12-01

    Extracellular haemolysin is thought to be one of the important virulence factors in Aeromonas infection. Two extracellular haemolysin genes (AHH3 and AHH4) from Aeromonas hydrophila strain 28SA, one (AHH5) from A. hydrophila strain AH-1 and one (ASA1) from Aeromonas sobria strain 33 were cloned into cosmid and plasmid vector DNA in Escherichia coli. The nucleotide sequences of the open reading frames of AHH3 and AHH4 are both 1476 basepairs (bp), whereas AHH5 and ASA1 are 1455 and 1467 bp in length, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences of AHH3, AHH4, AHH5 and the previously reported aerolysin from A. hydrophila showed a significant degree of sequence homology of over 90% each. The amino acid identity of the ASA1 haemolysin and those from A. hydrophila and Aeromonas trota aerolysins ranged from 58-68%. From DNA hybridization analysis using our cloned haemolysin genes as probes, we found that the AHH5 and ASA1 DNA probes hybridized with about 31 and 75% strains of motile Aeromonas species, respectively. The activity of haemolysins of cloned genes were different in medium agar containing various erythrocytes.

  12. Sequence variation in the androgen receptor gene is not a common determinant of male sexual orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macke, J.P.; Nathans, J.; King, V.L. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)); Hu, N.; Hu, S.; Hamer, D.; Bailey, M. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)); Brown, T. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1993-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that DNA sequence variation in the androgen receptor gene plays a causal role in the development of male sexual orientation, the authors have (1) measured the degree of concordance of androgen receptor alleles in 36 pairs of homosexual brothers, (2) compared the lengths of polyglutamine and polyglycine tracts in the amino-terminal domain of the androgen receptor in a sample of 197 homosexual males and 213 unselected subjects, and (3) screened the entire androgen receptor coding region for sequence variation by PCR and denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and/or single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis in 20 homosexual males with homosexual or bisexual brothers and one homosexual male with no homosexual brothers, and screened the amino-terminal domain of the receptor for sequence variation in an additional 44 homosexual males, 37 of whom had one or more first- or second-degree male relatives who were either homosexual or bisexual. These analyses show that (1) homosexual brothers are as likely to be discordant as concordant for androgen receptor alleles; (2) there are no large-scale differences between the distributions of polyglycine or polyglutamine tract lengths in the homosexual and control groups; and (3) coding region sequence variation is not commonly found within the androgen receptor gene of homosexual men. The DGGE screen identified two rare amino acid substitutions, ser[sup 205] -to-arg and glu[sup 793]-to-asp, the biological significance of which is unknown. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Cloning and Characterization of a Human Genomic Sequence that Alleviates Repeat-Induced Gene Silencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Fukuma

    Full Text Available Plasmids bearing a mammalian replication initiation region (IR and a nuclear matrix attachment region (MAR are spontaneously amplified in transfected mammalian cells, and such amplification generates chromosomal homogeneously staining regions (HSRs or extrachromosomal double minutes (DMs. This method provides a novel, efficient, and rapid way to establish cells that stably produce high levels of recombinant proteins. However, because IR/MAR plasmids are amplified as repeats, they are frequently targeted by repeat-induced gene silencing (RIGS, which silences a variety of repeated sequences in transgenes and the genome. To address this problem, we developed a novel screening system using the IR/MAR plasmid to isolate human genome sequences that alleviate RIGS. The screen identified a 3,271 bp sequence (B-3-31 that elevated transgene expression without affecting the amplification process. Neither non-B structure (i.e., the inverted repeats or bending nor known epigenetic modifier elements such as MARs, insulators, UCOEs, or STARs could explain the anti-silencing activity of B-3-31. Instead, the activity was distributed throughout the entire B-3-31 sequence, which was extremely A/T-rich and CpG-poor. Because B-3-31 effectively and reproducibly alleviated RIGS of repeated genes, it could be used to increase recombinant protein production.

  14. Ubiquitous cyanobacterial podoviruses in the global oceans unveiled through viral DNA polymerase gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sijun; Wilhelm, Steven W; Jiao, Nianzhi; Chen, Feng

    2010-10-01

    As a major cyanophage group, cyanobacterial podoviruses are important in regulating the biomass and population structure of picocyanobacteria in the ocean. However, little is known about their biogeography in the open ocean. This study represents the first survey of the biodiversity of cyanopodoviruses in the global oceans based on the viral encoded DNA polymerase (pol) gene. A total of 303 DNA pol sequences were amplified by PCR from 10 virus communities collected in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans and the South China Sea. At least five subclusters of cyanopodoviruses were identified in these samples, and one subcluster (subcluster VIII) was found in all sampling sites and comprised approximately 50% of total sequences. The diversity index based on the DNA pol gene sequences recovered through PCR suggests that cyanopodoviruses are less diverse in these oceanic samples than in a previously studied estuarine environment. Although diverse podoviruses were present in the global ocean, each sample was dominated by one major group of cyanopodoviruses. No clear biogeographic patterns were observed using statistical analysis. A metagenomic analysis based on the Global Ocean Sampling database indicates that other types of cyanopodovirus-like DNA pol sequences were present in the global ocean. Together, our study results suggest that cyanopodoviruses are widely distributed in the ocean but their community composition varies with local environments.

  15. Sequence analysis of candidate genes in two Roma families with severe tooth agenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriková Dana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective tooth agenesis is the most common congenital disorder affecting the formation of dentition in humans. Both its forms (hypodontia and more severe oligodontia can be found either in isolated form and they can be associated with systemic condition (syndromic tooth agenesis. In addition to previously known genes (PAX9, MSX1 and AXIN2 mutations in EDA, EDARADD and WNT10 gene were recently found to be involved in isolated forms of tooth agenesis. The objective of this study was to characterize the phenotype of affected members in two large families of Roma origin segregating severe isolated tooth agenesis with very variable phenotype and to perform mutation analysis of seven genes with aim to find causal mutation. 26 family members were clinically examined and coding regions of seven genes (MSX1, PAX9, AXIN2, EDA, EDAR, EDARADD and WNT10A were sequenced. With exclusion of third molars, average number of missing teeth was 8.2 ± 4.9 in family 1 and 7.1 ± 2.3 in family 2. The most frequently missing teeth were maxillary lateral incisors and first premolars and mandibular central incisors. Sequencing revealed four potentially damaging variants (g.Ala40Gly in MSX1, g.Ala240Pro in PAX9, g.Pro50Ser in AXIN2 and g.Met9Ile in EDARADD; however, none of them was present in all affected family members. Variable phenotype in both families examined in this study is in favour of heterogeneous genetic cause of tooth agenesis in these families: possible interaction of several defected genes, sequence variants in regulatory regions and additional environmental factors is assumed.

  16. Medical Sequencing of Candidate Genes for Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip and Palate.

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    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Nonsyndromic or isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P occurs in wide geographic distribution with an average birth prevalence of 1/700. We used direct sequencing as an approach to study candidate genes for CL/P. We report here the results of sequencing on 20 candidate genes for clefts in 184 cases with CL/P selected with an emphasis on severity and positive family history. Genes were selected based on expression patterns, animal models, and/or role in known human clefting syndromes. For seven genes with identified coding mutations that are potentially etiologic, we performed linkage disequilibrium studies as well in 501 family triads (affected child/mother/father. The recently reported MSX1 P147Q mutation was also studied in an additional 1,098 cleft cases. Selected missense mutations were screened in 1,064 controls from unrelated individuals on the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH diversity cell line panel. Our aggregate data suggest that point mutations in these candidate genes are likely to contribute to 6% of isolated clefts, particularly those with more severe phenotypes (bilateral cleft of the lip with cleft palate. Additional cases, possibly due to microdeletions or isodisomy, were also detected and may contribute to clefts as well. Sequence analysis alone suggests that point mutations in FOXE1, GLI2, JAG2, LHX8, MSX1, MSX2, SATB2, SKI, SPRY2, and TBX10 may be rare causes of isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate, and the linkage disequilibrium data support a larger, as yet unspecified, role for variants in or near MSX2, JAG2, and SKI. This study also illustrates the need to test large numbers of controls to distinguish rare polymorphic variants and prioritize functional studies for rare point mutations.

  17. The composite of bone marrow concentrate and PRP as an alternative to autologous bone grafting.

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    Mohssen Hakimi

    Full Text Available One possible alternative to the application of autologous bone grafts represents the use of autologous bone marrow concentrate (BMC. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the potency of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP in combination with BMC. In 32 mini-pigs a metaphyseal critical-size defect was surgically created at the proximal tibia. The animals were allocated to four treatment groups of eight animals each (1. BMC+CPG group, 2. BMC+CPG+PRP group, 3. autograft group, 4. CPG group. In the BMC+CPG group the defect was filled with autologous BMC in combination with calcium phosphate granules (CPG, whereas in the BMC+CPG+PRP group the defect was filled with the composite of autologous BMC, CPG and autologous PRP. In the autograft group the defect was filled with autologous cancellous graft, whereas in the CPG group the defect was filled with CPG solely. After 6 weeks radiological and histomorphometrical analysis showed significantly more new bone formation in the BMC+CPG+PRP group compared to the BMC+CPG group and the CPG group. There were no significant differences between the BMC+CPG+PRP group and the autograft group. In the PRP platelets were enriched significantly about 4.7-fold compared to native blood. In BMC the count of mononuclear cells increased significantly (3.5-fold compared to the bone marrow aspirate. This study demonstrates that the composite of BMC+CPG+PRP leads to a significantly higher bone regeneration of critical-size defects at the proximal tibia in mini-pigs than the use of BMC+CPG without PRP. Furthermore, within the limits of the present study the composite BMC+CPG+PRP represents a comparable alternative to autologous bone grafting.

  18. Structural and functional analysis of the human spliceosomal DEAD-box helicase Prp28

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    Möhlmann, Sina [Georg-August-University Göttingen, Justus-von-Liebig Weg 11, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Mathew, Rebecca [Max-Planck-Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Neumann, Piotr; Schmitt, Andreas [Georg-August-University Göttingen, Justus-von-Liebig Weg 11, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Lührmann, Reinhard [Max-Planck-Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Ficner, Ralf, E-mail: rficner@uni-goettingen.de [Georg-August-University Göttingen, Justus-von-Liebig Weg 11, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    The crystal structure of the helicase domain of the human spliceosomal DEAD-box protein Prp28 was solved by SAD. The binding of ADP and ATP by Prp28 was studied biochemically and analysed with regard to the crystal structure. The DEAD-box protein Prp28 is essential for pre-mRNA splicing as it plays a key role in the formation of an active spliceosome. Prp28 participates in the release of the U1 snRNP from the 5′-splice site during association of the U5·U4/U6 tri-snRNP, which is a crucial step in the transition from a pre-catalytic spliceosome to an activated spliceosome. Here, it is demonstrated that the purified helicase domain of human Prp28 (hPrp28ΔN) binds ADP, whereas binding of ATP and ATPase activity could not be detected. ATP binding could not be observed for purified full-length hPrp28 either, but within an assembled spliceosomal complex hPrp28 gains ATP-binding activity. In order to understand the structural basis for the ATP-binding deficiency of isolated hPrp28, the crystal structure of hPrp28ΔN was determined at 2.0 Å resolution. In the crystal the helicase domain adopts a wide-open conformation, as the two RecA-like domains are extraordinarily displaced from the productive ATPase conformation. Binding of ATP is hindered by a closed conformation of the P-loop, which occupies the space required for the γ-phosphate of ATP.

  19. Resolving arthropod phylogeny: exploring phylogenetic signal within 41 kb of protein-coding nuclear gene sequence.

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    Regier, Jerome C; Shultz, Jeffrey W; Ganley, Austen R D; Hussey, April; Shi, Diane; Ball, Bernard; Zwick, Andreas; Stajich, Jason E; Cummings, Michael P; Martin, Joel W; Cunningham, Clifford W

    2008-12-01

    This study attempts to resolve relationships among and within the four basal arthropod lineages (Pancrustacea, Myriapoda, Euchelicerata, Pycnogonida) and to assess the widespread expectation that remaining phylogenetic problems will yield to increasing amounts of sequence data. Sixty-eight regions of 62 protein-coding nuclear genes (approximately 41 kilobases (kb)/taxon) were sequenced for 12 taxonomically diverse arthropod taxa and a tardigrade outgroup. Parsimony, likelihood, and Bayesian analyses of total nucleotide data generally strongly supported the monophyly of each of the basal lineages represented by more than one species. Other relationships within the Arthropoda were also supported, with support levels depending on method of analysis and inclusion/exclusion of synonymous changes. Removing third codon positions, where the assumption of base compositional homogeneity was rejected, altered the results. Removing the final class of synonymous mutations--first codon positions encoding leucine and arginine, which were also compositionally heterogeneous--yielded a data set that was consistent with a hypothesis of base compositional homogeneity. Furthermore, under such a data-exclusion regime, all 68 gene regions individually were consistent with base compositional homogeneity. Restricting likelihood analyses to nonsynonymous change recovered trees with strong support for the basal lineages but not for other groups that were variably supported with more inclusive data sets. In a further effort to increase phylogenetic signal, three types of data exploration were undertaken. (1) Individual genes were ranked by their average rate of nonsynonymous change, and three rate categories were assigned--fast, intermediate, and slow. Then, bootstrap analysis of each gene was performed separately to see which taxonomic groups received strong support. Five taxonomic groups were strongly supported independently by two or more genes, and these genes mostly belonged to the slow

  20. A method for identifying alternative or cryptic donor splice sites within gene and mRNA sequences. Comparisons among sequences from vertebrates, echinoderms and other groups.

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    Buckley, Katherine M; Florea, Liliana D; Smith, L Courtney

    2009-07-16

    As the amount of genome sequencing data grows, so does the problem of computational gene identification, and in particular, the splicing signals that flank exon borders. Traditional methods for identifying splicing signals have been created and optimized using sequences from model organisms, mostly vertebrate and yeast species. However, as genome sequencing extends across the animal kingdom and includes various invertebrate species, the need for mechanisms to recognize splice signals in these organisms increases as well. With that aim in mind, we generated a model for identifying donor and acceptor splice sites that was optimized using sequences from the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. This model was then used to assess the possibility of alternative or cryptic splicing within the highly variable immune response gene family known as 185/333. A donor splice site model was generated from S. purpuratus sequences that incorporates non-adjacent dependences among positions within the 9 nt splice signal and uses position weight matrices to determine the probability that the site is used for splicing. The Purpuratus model was shown to predict splice signals better than a similar model created from vertebrate sequences. Although the Purpuratus model was able to correctly predict the true splice sites within the 185/333 genes, no evidence for alternative or trans-gene splicing was observed. The data presented herein describe the first published analyses of echinoderm splice sites and suggest that the previous methods of identifying splice signals that are based largely on vertebrate sequences may be insufficient. Furthermore, alternative or trans-gene splicing does not appear to be acting as a diversification mechanism in the 185/333 gene family.

  1. A method for identifying alternative or cryptic donor splice sites within gene and mRNA sequences. Comparisons among sequences from vertebrates, echinoderms and other groups

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    Florea Liliana D

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the amount of genome sequencing data grows, so does the problem of computational gene identification, and in particular, the splicing signals that flank exon borders. Traditional methods for identifying splicing signals have been created and optimized using sequences from model organisms, mostly vertebrate and yeast species. However, as genome sequencing extends across the animal kingdom and includes various invertebrate species, the need for mechanisms to recognize splice signals in these organisms increases as well. With that aim in mind, we generated a model for identifying donor and acceptor splice sites that was optimized using sequences from the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. This model was then used to assess the possibility of alternative or cryptic splicing within the highly variable immune response gene family known as 185/333. Results A donor splice site model was generated from S. purpuratus sequences that incorporates non-adjacent dependences among positions within the 9 nt splice signal and uses position weight matrices to determine the probability that the site is used for splicing. The Purpuratus model was shown to predict splice signals better than a similar model created from vertebrate sequences. Although the Purpuratus model was able to correctly predict the true splice sites within the 185/333 genes, no evidence for alternative or trans-gene splicing was observed. Conclusion The data presented herein describe the first published analyses of echinoderm splice sites and suggest that the previous methods of identifying splice signals that are based largely on vertebrate sequences may be insufficient. Furthermore, alternative or trans-gene splicing does not appear to be acting as a diversification mechanism in the 185/333 gene family.

  2. In silico phylogenetic and virulence gene profile analyses of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli genome sequences

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    Thaís C.G. Rojas

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC infections are responsible for significant losses in the poultry industry worldwide. A zoonotic risk has been attributed to APEC strains because they present similarities to extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC associated with illness in humans, mainly urinary tract infections and neonatal meningitis. Here, we present in silico analyses with pathogenic E. coli genome sequences, including recently available APEC genomes. The phylogenetic tree, based on multi-locus sequence typing (MLST of seven housekeeping genes, revealed high diversity in the allelic composition. Nevertheless, despite this diversity, the phylogenetic tree was able to cluster the different pathotypes together. An in silico virulence gene profile was also determined for each of these strains, through the presence or absence of 83 well-known virulence genes/traits described in pathogenic E. coli strains. The MLST phylogeny and the virulence gene profiles demonstrated a certain genetic similarity between Brazilian APEC strains, APEC isolated in the United States, UPEC (uropathogenic E. coli and diarrheagenic strains isolated from humans. This correlation corroborates and reinforces the zoonotic potential hypothesis proposed to APEC.

  3. Identification of functional SNPs in the 5-prime flanking sequences of human genes

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    Lenhard Boris

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over 4 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are currently reported to exist within the human genome. Only a small fraction of these SNPs alter gene function or expression, and therefore might be associated with a cell phenotype. These functional SNPs are consequently important in understanding human health. Information related to functional SNPs in candidate disease genes is critical for cost effective genetic association studies, which attempt to understand the genetics of complex diseases like diabetes, Alzheimer's, etc. Robust methods for the identification of functional SNPs are therefore crucial. We report one such experimental approach. Results Sequence conserved between mouse and human genomes, within 5 kilobases of the 5-prime end of 176 GPCR genes, were screened for SNPs. Sequences flanking these SNPs were scored for transcription factor binding sites. Allelic pairs resulting in a significant score difference were predicted to influence the binding of transcription factors (TFs. Ten such SNPs were selected for mobility shift assays (EMSA, resulting in 7 of them exhibiting a reproducible shift. The full-length promoter regions with 4 of the 7 SNPs were cloned in a Luciferase based plasmid reporter system. Two out of the 4 SNPs exhibited differential promoter activity in several human cell lines. Conclusions We propose a method for effective selection of functional, regulatory SNPs that are located in evolutionary conserved 5-prime flanking regions (5'-FR regions of human genes and influence the activity of the transcriptional regulatory region. Some SNPs behave differently in different cell types.

  4. Homozygous sequence variants in the WNT10B gene underlie split hand/foot malformation

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    Asmat Ullah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Split-hand/split-foot malformation (SHFM, also known as ectrodactyly is a rare genetic disorder. It is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of limb malformations characterized by absence/hypoplasia and/or median cleft of hands and/or feet. To date, seven genes underlying SHFM have been identified. This study described four consanguineous families (A-D segregating SHFM in an autosomal recessive manner. Linkage in the families was established to chromosome 12p11.1–q13.13 harboring WNT10B gene. Sequence analysis identified a novel homozygous nonsense variant (p.Gln154* in exon 4 of the WNT10B gene in two families (A and B. In the other two families (C and D, a previously reported variant (c.300_306dupAGGGCGG; p.Leu103Argfs*53 was detected. This study further expands the spectrum of the sequence variants reported in the WNT10B gene, which result in the split hand/foot malformation.

  5. Novel Gene Expression Profile of Women with Intrinsic Skin Youthfulness by Whole Transcriptome Sequencing.

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    Xu, Jin; Spitale, Robert C; Guan, Linna; Flynn, Ryan A; Torre, Eduardo A; Li, Rui; Raber, Inbar; Qu, Kun; Kern, Dale; Knaggs, Helen E; Chang, Howard Y; Chang, Anne Lynn S

    2016-01-01

    While much is known about genes that promote aging, little is known about genes that protect against or prevent aging, particularly in human skin. The main objective of this study was to perform an unbiased, whole transcriptome search for genes that associate with intrinsic skin youthfulness. To accomplish this, healthy women (n = 122) of European descent, ages 18-89 years with Fitzpatrick skin type I/II were examined for facial skin aging parameters and clinical covariates, including smoking and ultraviolet exposure. Skin youthfulness was defined as the top 10% of individuals whose assessed skin aging features were most discrepant with their chronological ages. Skin biopsies from sun-protected inner arm were subjected to 3'-end sequencing for expression quantification, with results verified by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Unbiased clustering revealed gene expression signatures characteristic of older women with skin youthfulness (n = 12) compared to older women without skin youthfulness (n = 33), after accounting for gene expression changes associated with chronological age alone. Gene set analysis was performed using Genomica open-access software. This study identified a novel set of candidate skin youthfulness genes demonstrating differences between SY and non-SY group, including pleckstrin homology like domain family A member 1 (PHLDA1) (p = 2.4x10-5), a follicle stem cell marker, and hyaluronan synthase 2-anti-sense 1 (HAS2-AS1) (p = 0.00105), a non-coding RNA that is part of the hyaluronan synthesis pathway. We show that immunologic gene sets are the most significantly altered in skin youthfulness (with the most significant gene set p = 2.4x10-5), suggesting the immune system plays an important role in skin youthfulness, a finding that has not previously been recognized. These results are a valuable resource from which multiple future studies may be undertaken to better understand the mechanisms that promote skin youthfulness

  6. Targeted Gene Next-Generation Sequencing in Chinese Children with Chronic Pancreatitis and Acute Recurrent Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yuan; Yuan, Wentao; Yu, Bo; Guo, Yan; Xu, Xu; Wang, Xinqiong; Yu, Yi; Yu, Yi; Gong, Biao; Xu, Chundi

    2017-12-01

    To identify causal mutations in certain genes in children with acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) or chronic pancreatitis (CP). After patients were enrolled (CP, 55; ARP, 14) and their clinical characteristics were investigated, we performed next-generation sequencing to detect nucleotide variations among the following 10 genes: cationic trypsinogen protease serine 1 (PRSS1), serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR), chymotrypsin C (CTRC), calcium-sensing receptor (CASR), cathepsin B (CTSB), keratin 8 (KRT8), CLAUDIN 2 (CLDN2), carboxypeptidase A1 (CPA1), and ATPase type 8B member 1 (ATP8B1). Mutations were searched against online databases to obtain information on the cause of the diseases. Certain novel mutations were analyzed using the SIFT2 and Polyphen-2 to predict the effect on protein function. There were 45 patients with CP and 10 patients with ARP who harbored 1 or more mutations in these genes; 45 patients had at least 1 mutation related to pancreatitis. Mutations were observed in the PRSS1, SPINK1, and CFTR genes in 17 patients, the CASR gene in 5 patients, and the CTSB, CTRC, and KRT8 genes in 1 patient. Mutations were not found in the CLDN, CPA1, or ATP8B1 genes. We found that mutations in SPINK1 may increase the risk of pancreatic duct stones (OR, 11.07; P = .003). The patients with CFTR mutations had a higher level of serum amylase (316.0 U/L vs 92.5 U/L; P = .026). Mutations, especially those in PRSS1, SPINK1, and CFTR, accounted for the major etiologies in Chinese children with CP or ARP. Children presenting mutations in the SPINK1 gene may have a higher risk of developing pancreatic duct stones. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cattle MHC genes DOA and DOB: sequence polymorphisms and assignments to the class IIb region.

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    Gelhaus, A; Förster, B

    2001-06-01

    In a study of the genetic polymorphism of the second exons of the cattle DOA and DOB genes, two and four allelic variants were detected, respectively. In the predicted amino acid sequence, the DOA polymorphism corresponded to variation at the respective residue position, whereas the nucleotide substitutions in the DOB gene were non-informative. PCR-RFLP assays were developed for DOA and DOB typing, and both loci were genetically mapped to the BoLA class IIb region by linkage analysis in the International Bovine Reference Panel. The single nucleotide polymorphisms detected in the BoLA-DOA and -DOB genes enable these loci to be used as markers in genetic trait analyses.

  8. Exome sequencing of Pakistani consanguineous families identifies 30 novel candidate genes for recessive intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazuddin, S; Hussain, M; Razzaq, A; Iqbal, Z; Shahzad, M; Polla, D L; Song, Y; van Beusekom, E; Khan, A A; Tomas-Roca, L; Rashid, M; Zahoor, M Y; Wissink-Lindhout, W M; Basra, M A R; Ansar, M; Agha, Z; van Heeswijk, K; Rasheed, F; Van de Vorst, M; Veltman, J A; Gilissen, C; Akram, J; Kleefstra, T; Assir, M Z; Grozeva, D; Carss, K; Raymond, F L; O'Connor, T D; Riazuddin, S A; Khan, S N; Ahmed, Z M; de Brouwer, A P M; van Bokhoven, H; Riazuddin, S

    2016-07-26

    Intellectual disability (ID) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder, affecting 1-3% of the general population. Although research into the genetic causes of ID has recently gained momentum, identification of pathogenic mutations that cause autosomal recessive ID (ARID) has lagged behind, predominantly due to non-availability of sizeable families. Here we present the results of exome sequencing in 121 large consanguineous Pakistani ID families. In 60 families, we identified homozygous or compound heterozygous DNA variants in a single gene, 30 affecting reported ID genes and 30 affecting novel candidate ID genes. Potential pathogenicity of these alleles was supported by co-segregation with the phenotype, low frequency in control populations and the application of stringent bioinformatics analyses. In another eight families segregation of multiple pathogenic variants was observed, affecting 19 genes that were either known or are novel candidates for ID. Transcriptome profiles of normal human brain tissues showed that the novel candidate ID genes formed a network significantly enriched for transcriptional co-expression (Pnovel ID genes directly interact with previously reported ID proteins in six known pathways essential for cognitive function (Pgenes involved in ARID, and provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms and the transcriptome map of ID.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 26 July 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.109.

  9. Identification of specific gene sequences conserved in contemporary epidemic strains of Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Su; Besser, Thomas E; Hancock, Dale D; Porwollik, Steffen; McClelland, Michael; Call, Douglas R

    2006-11-01

    Genetic elements specific to recent and contemporary epidemic strains of Salmonella enterica were identified using comparative genomic analysis. Two epidemic multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains, MDR Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium definitive phage type 104 (DT104) and cephalosporin-resistant MDR Salmonella enterica serovar Newport, and an epidemic pansusceptible strain, Salmonella serovar Typhimurium DT160, were subjected to Salmonella gene microarray and suppression subtractive hybridization analyses. Their genome contents were compared with those of coexisting sporadic strains matched by serotype, geographic and temporal distribution, and host species origin. These paired comparisons revealed that epidemic strains of S. enterica had specific genes and gene regions that were shared by isolates of the same subtype. Most of these gene sequences are related to mobile genetic elements, including phages, plasmids, and plasmid-like and transposable elements, and some genes may encode proteins conferring growth or survival advantages. The emergence of epidemic MDR strains may therefore be associated with the presence of fitness-associated genetic factors in addition to their antimicrobial resistance genes.

  10. Gene length and detection bias in single cell RNA sequencing protocols [version 1; referees: 2 approved

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    Belinda Phipson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Single cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq has rapidly gained popularity for profiling transcriptomes of hundreds to thousands of single cells. This technology has led to the discovery of novel cell types and revealed insights into the development of complex tissues. However, many technical challenges need to be overcome during data generation. Due to minute amounts of starting material, samples undergo extensive amplification, increasing technical variability. A solution for mitigating amplification biases is to include unique molecular identifiers (UMIs, which tag individual molecules. Transcript abundances are then estimated from the number of unique UMIs aligning to a specific gene, with PCR duplicates resulting in copies of the UMI not included in expression estimates. Methods: Here we investigate the effect of gene length bias in scRNA-Seq across a variety of datasets that differ in terms of capture technology, library preparation, cell types and species. Results: We find that scRNA-seq datasets that have been sequenced using a full-length transcript protocol exhibit gene length bias akin to bulk RNA-seq data. Specifically, shorter genes tend to have lower counts and a higher rate of dropout. In contrast, protocols that include UMIs do not exhibit gene length bias, with a mostly uniform rate of dropout across genes of varying length. Across four different scRNA-Seq datasets profiling mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs, we found the subset of genes that are only detected in the UMI datasets tended to be shorter, while the subset of genes detected only in the full-length datasets tended to be longer. Conclusions: We find that the choice of scRNA-seq protocol influences the detection rate of genes, and that full-length datasets exhibit gene-length bias. In addition, despite clear differences between UMI and full-length transcript data, we illustrate that full-length and UMI data can be combined to reveal the underlying biology

  11. Evolutionary meta-analysis of solanaceous resistance gene and solanum resistance gene analog sequences and a practical framework for cross-species comparisons.

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    Quirin, Edmund A; Mann, Harpartap; Meyer, Rachel S; Traini, Alessandra; Chiusano, Maria Luisa; Litt, Amy; Bradeen, James M

    2012-05-01

    Cross-species comparative genomics approaches have been employed to map and clone many important disease resistance (R) genes from Solanum species-especially wild relatives of potato and tomato. These efforts will increase with the recent release of potato genome sequence and the impending release of tomato genome sequence. Most R genes belong to the prominent nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR) class and conserved NBS-LRR protein motifs enable survey of the R gene space of a plant genome by generation of resistance gene analogs (RGA), polymerase chain reaction fragments derived from R genes. We generated a collection of 97 RGA from the disease-resistant wild potato S. bulbocastanum, complementing smaller collections from other Solanum species. To further comparative genomics approaches, we combined all known Solanum RGA and cloned solanaceous NBS-LRR gene sequences, nearly 800 sequences in total, into a single meta-analysis. We defined R gene diversity bins that reflect both evolutionary relationships and DNA cross-hybridization results. The resulting framework is amendable and expandable, providing the research community with a common vocabulary for present and future study of R gene lineages. Through a series of sequence and hybridization experiments, we demonstrate that all tested R gene lineages are of ancient origin, are shared between Solanum species, and can be successfully accessed via comparative genomics approaches.

  12. Gene ontology-based protein function prediction by using sequence composition information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qiwen; Zhou, Shuigeng; Deng, Lei; Guan, Jihong

    2010-06-01

    The prediction of protein function is a difficult and important problem in computational biology. In this study, an efficient method is presented to predict protein function with sequence composition information. Four kinds of basic building blocks of protein sequences are investigated, including N-grams, binary profiles, PFAM domains and InterPro domains. The protein sequences are mapped into high-dimensional vectors by using the occurrence frequencies of each kind of building blocks. The resulting vectors are then taken as input to support vector machine to predict their function based on gene ontology. Experiments are conducted over the subset of GOA database. The experimental results show that the protein function can be predicted from primary sequence information. The method based on InterPro domains outperforms the other building blocks, and gets an overall accuracy of 0.87 and ROC score is 0.93. We also demonstrate that the use of feature extraction algorithms such as latent semantic analysis and nonnegative matrix factorization, can efficiently remove noise and improve the prediction efficiency without significantly degrading the performance. The results obtained here are helpful for the prediction of protein function by using only sequence information.

  13. Development and analytical validation of a 25-gene next generation sequencing panel that includes the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes to assess hereditary cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judkins, Thaddeus; Leclair, Benoît; Bowles, Karla; Gutin, Natalia; Trost, Jeff; McCulloch, James; Bhatnagar, Satish; Murray, Adam; Craft, Jonathan; Wardell, Bryan; Bastian, Mark; Mitchell, Jeffrey; Chen, Jian; Tran, Thanh; Williams, Deborah; Potter, Jennifer; Jammulapati, Srikanth; Perry, Michael; Morris, Brian; Roa, Benjamin; Timms, Kirsten

    2015-04-02

    Germline DNA mutations that increase the susceptibility of a patient to certain cancers have been identified in various genes, and patients can be screened for mutations in these genes to assess their level of risk for developing cancer. Traditional methods using Sanger sequencing focus on small groups of genes and therefore are unable to screen for numerous genes from several patients simultaneously. The goal of the present study was to validate a 25-gene panel to assess genetic risk for cancer in 8 different tissues using next generation sequencing (NGS) techniques. Twenty-five genes associated with hereditary cancer syndromes were selected for development of a panel to screen for risk of these cancers using NGS. In an initial technical assessment, NGS results for BRCA1 and BRCA2 were compared with Sanger sequencing in 1864 anonymized DNA samples from patients who had undergone previous clinical testing. Next, the entire gene panel was validated using parallel NGS and Sanger sequencing in 100 anonymized DNA samples. Large rearrangement analysis was validated using NGS, microarray comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analyses (MLPA). NGS identified 15,877 sequence variants, while Sanger sequencing identified 15,878 in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 comparison study of the same regions. Based on these results, the NGS process was refined prior to the validation of the full gene panel. In the validation study, NGS and Sanger sequencing were 100% concordant for the 3,923 collective variants across all genes for an analytical sensitivity of the NGS assay of >99.92% (lower limit of 95% confidence interval). NGS, microarray CGH and MLPA correctly identified all expected positive and negative large rearrangement results for the 25-gene panel. This study provides a thorough validation of the 25-gene NGS panel and indicates that this analysis tool can be used to collect clinically significant information related to risk of

  14. Gene Expression Profiling of Development and Anthocyanin Accumulation in Kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis Based on Transcriptome Sequencing.

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    Wenbin Li

    Full Text Available Red-fleshed kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis Planch. 'Hongyang' is a promising commercial cultivar due to its nutritious value and unique flesh color, derived from vitamin C and anthocyanins. In this study, we obtained transcriptome data of 'Hongyang' from seven developmental stages using Illumina sequencing. We mapped 39-54 million reads to the recently sequenced kiwifruit genome and other databases to define gene structure, to analyze alternative splicing, and to quantify gene transcript abundance at different developmental stages. The transcript profiles throughout red kiwifruit development were constructed and analyzed, with a focus on the biosynthesis and metabolism of compounds such as phytohormones, sugars, starch and L-ascorbic acid, which are indispensable for the development and formation of quality fruit. Candidate genes for these pathways were identified through MapMan and phylogenetic analysis. The transcript levels of genes involved in sucrose and starch metabolism were consistent with the change in soluble sugar and starch content throughout kiwifruit development. The metabolism of L-ascorbic acid was very active, primarily through the L-galactose pathway. The genes responsible for the accumulation of anthocyanin in red kiwifruit were identified, and their expression levels were investigated during kiwifruit development. This survey of gene expression during kiwifruit development paves the way for further investigation of the development of this uniquely colored and nutritious fruit and reveals which factors are needed for high quality fruit formation. This transcriptome data and its analysis will be useful for improving kiwifruit genome annotation, for basic fruit molecular biology research, and for kiwifruit breeding and improvement.

  15. Cloning, mapping and nucleotide sequencing of a gene encoding a universal stress protein in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, T; Neidhardt, F C

    1992-11-01

    The response of non-differentiating bacteria to nutrient starvation is complex and includes the sequential synthesis of starvation-inducible proteins. Although starvation for different individual nutrients generally provokes unique and individual patterns of protein expression, some starvation stimulons share member proteins. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the synthesis of a small (13.5 kDa) cytoplasmic protein in Escherichia coli was greatly increased during growth inhibition caused by the exhaustion of any of a variety of nutrients (carbon, nitrogen, phosphate, sulphate, required amino acid) or by the presence of a variety of toxic agents including heavy metals, oxidants, acids and antibiotics. To determine further the mode of regulation of the protein designated UspA (universal stress protein A) we cloned the gene encoding the protein by the technique of reverse genetics. We isolated the protein from a preparative two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel, determined its N-terminal amino acid sequence, and used this sequence to construct a degenerate oligonucleotide probe. Two phages of the Kohara library were found to contain the gene which then was subcloned from the DNA in the overlapping region of these two clones. The amino acid sequence, deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the uspA gene, shows no significant homology with any other known protein. The uspA gene maps at 77 min on the E. coli W3110 chromosome, and is transcribed in a clockwise direction. The increase in the level of UspA during growth arrest was found to be primarily a result of transcriptional activation of the corresponding gene. The induction was independent of the RelA/SpoT, RpoH, KatF, OmpR, AppY, Lrp, PhoB and H-NS proteins during stress conditions that are known to induce or activate these global regulators. The -10 and -35 regions upstream of the transcriptional start site of the uspA gene are characteristic of a sigma 70-dependent promoter.

  16. Allelic Diversity and Population Structure in Oenococcus oeni as Determined from Sequence Analysis of Housekeeping Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de las Rivas, Blanca; Marcobal, Ángela; Muñoz, Rosario

    2004-01-01

    Oenococcus oeni is the organism of choice for promoting malolactic fermentation in wine. The population biology of O. oeni is poorly understood and remains unclear. For a better understanding of the mode of genetic variation within this species, we investigated by using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) with the gyrB, pgm, ddl, recP, and mleA genes the genetic diversity and genetic relationships among 18 O. oeni strains isolated in various years from wines of the United States, France, Germany, Spain, and Italy. These strains have also been characterized by ribotyping and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the PCR-amplified 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic spacer region (ISR). Ribotyping grouped the strains into two groups; however, the RFLP analysis of the ISRs showed no differences in the strains analyzed. In contrast, MLST in oenococci had a good discriminatory ability, and we have found a higher genetic diversity than indicated by ribotyping analysis. All sequence types were represented by a single strain, and all the strains could be distinguished from each other because they had unique combinations of alleles. Strains assumed to be identical showed the same sequence type. Phylogenetic analyses indicated a panmictic population structure in O. oeni. Sequences were analyzed for evidence of recombination by split decomposition analysis and analysis of clustered polymorphisms. All results indicated that recombination plays a major role in creating the genetic heterogeneity of O. oeni. A low standardized index of association value indicated that the O. oeni genes analyzed are close to linkage equilibrium. This study constitutes the first step in the development of an MLST method for O. oeni and the first example of the application of MLST to a nonpathogenic food production bacteria. PMID:15574919

  17. Extensive sequence variation in rice blast resistance gene Pi54 makes it broad spectrum in nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shallu eThakur

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rice blast resistant gene, Pi54 cloned from rice line, Tetep, is effective against diverse isolates of Magnaporthe oryzae. In this study, we prospected the allelic variants of the dominant blast resistance gene from a set of 92 rice lines to determine the nucleotide diversity, pattern of its molecular evolution, phylogenetic relationships and evolutionary dynamics, and to develop allele specific markers. High quality sequences were generated for homologs of Pi54 gene. Using comparative sequence analysis, InDels of variable sizes in all the alleles were observed. Profiling of the selected sites of SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism and amino acids (N sites ≥ 10 exhibited constant frequency distribution of mutational and substitutional sites between the resistance and susceptible rice lines, respectively. A total of 50 new haplotypes based on the nucleotide polymorphism was also identified. A unique haplotype (H_3 was found to be linked to all the resistant alleles isolated from indica rice lines. Unique leucine zipper and tyrosine sulfation sites were identified in the predicted Pi54 proteins. Selection signals were observed in entire coding sequence of resistance alleles, as compared to LRR domains for susceptible alleles. This is a maiden report of extensive variability of Pi54 alleles in different landraces and cultivated varieties, possibly, attributing broad-spectrum resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae. The sequence variation in two consensus region: 163 bp and 144 bp were used for the development of allele specific DNA markers. Validated markers can be used for the selection and identification of better allele(s and their introgression in commercial rice cultivars employing marker assisted selection.

  18. Cloning and sequencing of kojibiose phosphorylase gene from Thermoanaerobacter brockii ATCC35047.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takuo; Maruta, Kazuhiko; Mukai, Kazuhisa; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Nishimoto, Tomoyuki; Kubota, Michio; Fukuda, Shigeharu; Kurimoto, Masashi; Tsujisaka, Yoshio

    2004-01-01

    A gene encoding kojibiose phosphorylase was cloned from Thermoanaerobacter brockii ATCC35047. The kojP gene encodes a polypeptide of 775 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence was homologous to those of trehalose phosphorylase from T. brockii and maltose phosphorylases from Bacillus sp. and Lactobacillus brevis with 35%, 29% and 28% identities, respectively. Kojibiose phosphorylase was efficiently overexpressed in Escherichia coli JM109. The DNA sequence of 3956 bp analyzed in this study contains three open reading frames (ORFs) downstream of kojP. The four ORFs, kojP, kojE, kojF, and kojG, form a gene cluster. The amino acid sequences deduced from kojE and kojF are similar to those of the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of a sugar-binding periplasmic protein from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4. Furthermore, the amino acid sequence deduced from kojG is similar to that of a permease of the ABC-type sugar transport systems from T. tengcongensis MB4. Each of three amino acid substitutions, D362N, K614Q and E642Q, caused a complete loss of kojibiose phosphorylase activity. These results suggest that D362, K614 and E642 play an important role in catalysis. Another mutation, D459N, increased K(m) values for kojibiose (7-fold that for the wild type), beta-G1P (11-fold) and glucose (7-fold), whereas K(m) for inorganic phosphate was minimally affected by this mutation, suggesting that D459 may be involved in the binding to saccharides.

  19. DNA sequence and pattern of expression of the sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus) alpha-tubulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianguzza, F; Di Bernardo, M G; Sollazzo, M; Palla, F; Ciaccio, M; Carra, E; Spinelli, G

    1989-01-01

    To study the molecular aspects of the regulation of transcription of a multigene family, we have isolated and sequenced cDNA and genomic clones coding for the alpha-tubulin of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. Two cDNA clones, P alpha 10 and P alpha 4, contain respectively the coding information for 391 C-terminal and for 338 N-terminal amino acids of the 452 residues that constitute the complete protein. They show silent nucleotide substitutions only, suggesting that P alpha 10 and P alpha 4 represent the cloned copies of two allelic gene transcripts, which encode for two alpha-tubulin isoforms with identical amino acid sequence in the region of the overlap. The comparison of the predicted amino acid sequence of the composite P alpha 4-10 and of the mouse M alpha-6 (Villasante et al., Mol Cell Biol 1986; 6:2409-2419) reveals a conservation of 97% between the two polypeptides. By RNA blotting hybridization six major alpha-tubulin transcripts were identified. Two, of 3.5 kb and 2.0 kb, are expressed in the unfertilized eggs and during early cleavage. The other two maternal mRNAs, of 2.4 kb and 1.8 kb, are expressed in both early and late cleavage embryos, but in the intestine the 1.8 kb RNA, which specifically reacted with the 3' specific probe of the P alpha 10 cDNA, is the only transcript detected. Finally, the 1.5 kb and 1.9 kb mRNAs represent the transcription of stage- and tissue-specific genes, respectively. In fact, the former becomes detectable at blastula stage and accumulates during late development, whereas the latter is found in the testis only. The sequence data of the 3' terminus of the alpha-3 genomic clone suggests that it encodes for a divergent alpha-tubulin, and it most probably corresponds to the testis-specific gene.

  20. Sequence tolerance of the phage lambda PRM promoter: implications for evolution of gene regulatory circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalowski, Christine B; Short, Megan D; Little, John W

    2004-12-01

    Much of the gene regulatory circuitry of phage lambda centers on a complex region called the O(R) region. This approximately 100-bp region is densely packed with regulatory sites, including two promoters and three repressor-binding sites. The dense packing of this region is likely to impose severe constraints on its ability to change during evolution, raising the question of how the specific arrangement of sites and their exact sequences could evolve to their present form. Here we ask whether the sequence of a cis-acting site can be widely varied while retaining its function; if it can, evolution could proceed by a larger number of paths. To help address this question, we developed a lambda cloning vector that allowed us to clone fragments spanning the O(R) region. By using this vector, we carried out intensive mutagenesis of the P(RM) promoter, which drives expression of CI repressor and is activated by CI itself. We made a pool of fragments in which 8 of the 12 positions in the -35 and -10 regions were randomized and cloned this pool into the vector, making a pool of P(RM) variant phage. About 10% of the P(RM) variants were able to lysogenize, suggesting that the lambda regulatory circuitry is compatible with a wide range of P(RM) sequences. Analysis of several of these phages indicated a range of behaviors in prophage induction. Several isolates had induction properties similar to those of the wild type, and their promoters resembled the wild type in their responses to CI. We term this property of different sequences allowing roughly equivalent function "sequence tolerance " and discuss its role in the evolution of gene regulatory circuitry.

  1. YB-1 represses AP1-dependent gene transactivation and interacts with an AP-1 DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Shaija; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Bernstein, Lori R

    2005-06-15

    Involvement of the AP-1 (activator protein-1) transcription factor has been demonstrated previously in the regulation of cell proliferation and cell-cycle progression, in the control of cell migration, invasion and metastasis, and in signal transduction, stress responsiveness, DNA replication and DNA repair. YB-1 (Y-box-binding protein-1) has also been implicated in many of these processes. However, the mechanism by which YB-1 mediates these processes is poorly understood. In the present study, we report that overexpression of a transfected gene encoding YB-1 in human HeLa cervical carcinoma cells significantly represses the transactivation of a minimal AP-1 reporter construct in response to the tumour promoter PMA. YB-1 also represses mRNA expression and PMA-induced promoter transactivation of the endogenous AP-1 target gene encoding matrix metalloproteinase-12 (metalloelastase). YB-1 transrepression of both the minimal and matrix metalloproteinase-12 promoter reporter constructs is dependent on the AP-1 sequence. To identify new nuclear proteins that bind specifically to the AP-1 DNA-binding site, we devised a DNA-affinity-chromatography-based assay termed NAPSTER (nucleotide-affinity preincubation specificity test of recognition) and discovered a 49 kDa protein from human cancer cells that binds in a sequence-specific manner to the AP-1 DNA sequence. By tandem MS fragmentation sequencing analyses we determined that p49 is a YB-1. Immunoblotting of the NAPSTER-purified p49 protein using anti-YB-1 antibodies confirmed YB-1 binding to the AP-1 DNA sequence, as did gel mobility-supershift assays using YB-1 antibodies. This is the first report of YB-1 transrepression and interaction at the AP-1 DNA-binding site.

  2. Revised Mimivirus major capsid protein sequence reveals intron-containing gene structure and extra domain

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    Suzan-Monti Marie

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acanthamoebae polyphaga Mimivirus (APM is the largest known dsDNA virus. The viral particle has a nearly icosahedral structure with an internal capsid shell surrounded with a dense layer of fibrils. A Capsid protein sequence, D13L, was deduced from the APM L425 coding gene and was shown to be the most abundant protein found within the viral particle. However this protein remained poorly characterised until now. A revised protein sequence deposited in a database suggested an additional N-terminal stretch of 142 amino acids missing from the original deduced sequence. This result led us to investigate the L425 gene structure and the biochemical properties of the complete APM major Capsid protein. Results This study describes the full length 3430 bp Capsid coding gene and characterises the 593 amino acids long corresponding Capsid protein 1. The recombinant full length protein allowed the production of a specific monoclonal antibody able to detect the Capsid protein 1 within the viral particle. This protein appeared to be post-translationnally modified by glycosylation and phosphorylation. We proposed a secondary structure prediction of APM Capsid protein 1 compared to the Capsid protein structure of Paramecium Bursaria Chlorella Virus 1, another member of the Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA virus family. Conclusion The characterisation of the full length L425 Capsid coding gene of Acanthamoebae polyphaga Mimivirus provides new insights into the structure of the main Capsid protein. The production of a full length recombinant protein will be useful for further structural studies.

  3. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a nucleoprotein gene sequence of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, C.K.; Deering, R.E.; Higman, K.H.; Oshima, K.H.; O'Hara, P.J.; Winton, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction [PCR) was used to amplify a portion of the nucleoprotein [NI gene of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). Using a published sequence for the Round Butte isolate of IHNV, a pair of PCR pnmers was synthesized that spanned a 252 nucleotide region of the N gene from residue 319 to residue 570 of the open reading frame. This region included a 30 nucleotide target sequence for a synthetic oligonucleotide probe developed for detection of IHNV N gene messenger RNA. After 25 cycles of amplification of either messenger or genomic RNA, the PCR product (DNA) of the expected size was easily visible on agarose gels stained with ethidium bromide. The specificity of the amplified DNA was confirmed by Southern and dot-blot analysis using the biotinylated oligonucleotide probe. The PCR was able to amplify the N gene sequence of purified genomic RNA from isolates of IHNV representing 5 different electropherotypes. Using the IHNV primer set, no PCR product was obtained from viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus RNA, but 2 higher molecular weight products were synthesized from hirame rhabdovirus RNA that did not hybridize with the biotinylated probe. The PCR could be efficiently performed with all IHNV genomic RNA template concentrations tested (1 ng to 1 pg). The lowest level of sensitivity was not determined. The PCR was used to amplify RNA extracted from infected cell cultures and selected tissues of Infected rainbow trout. The combination of PCR and nucleic acid probe promises to provide a detection method for IHNV that is rapid, h~ghly specific, and sensitive.

  4. Diagnostic Yield and Novel Candidate Genes by Exome Sequencing in 152 Consanguineous Families With Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Miriam S; Tawamie, Hasan; Buchert, Rebecca; Hosny Gebril, Ola; Froukh, Tawfiq; Thiel, Christian; Uebe, Steffen; Ekici, Arif B; Krumbiegel, Mandy; Zweier, Christiane; Hoyer, Juliane; Eberlein, Karolin; Bauer, Judith; Scheller, Ute; Strom, Tim M; Hoffjan, Sabine; Abdelraouf, Ehab R; Meguid, Nagwa A; Abboud, Ahmad; Al Khateeb, Mohammed Ayman; Fakher, Mahmoud; Hamdan, Saber; Ismael, Amina; Muhammad, Safia; Abdallah, Ebtessam; Sticht, Heinrich; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Reis, André; Abou Jamra, Rami

    2017-03-01

    Autosomal recessive inherited neurodevelopmental disorders are highly heterogeneous, and many, possibly most, of the disease genes are still unknown. To promote the identification of disease genes through confirmation of previously described genes and presentation of novel candidates and provide an overview of the diagnostic yield of exome sequencing in consanguineous families. Autozygosity mapping in families and exome sequencing of index patients were performed in 152 consanguineous families (the parents descended from a same ancestor) with at least 1 offspring with intellectual disability (ID). The study was conducted from July 1, 2008, to June 30, 2015, and data analysis was conducted from July 1, 2015, to August 31, 2016. Of the 152 consanguineous families enrolled, 1 child (in 45 families [29.6%]) or multiple children (107 families [70.4%]) had ID; additional features were present in 140 of the families (92.1%). The mean (SD) age of the children was 10.3 (9.0) years, and 171 of 297 (57.6%) were male. In 109 families (71.7%), potentially protein-disrupting and clinically relevant variants were identified. Of these, a clear clinical genetic diagnosis was made in 56 families (36.8%) owing to 57 (likely) pathogenic variants in 50 genes already established in neurodevelopmental disorders (46 autosomal recessive, 2 X-linked, and 2 de novo) or in 7 previously proposed recessive candidates. In 5 of these families, potentially treatable disorders were diagnosed (mutations in PAH, CBS, MTHFR, CYP27A1, and HIBCH), and in 1 family, 2 disease-causing homozygous variants in different genes were identified. In another 48 families (31.6%), 52 convincing recessive variants in candidate genes that were not previously reported in regard to neurodevelopmental disorders were identified. Of these, 14 were homozygous and truncating in GRM7, STX1A, CCAR2, EEF1D, GALNT2, SLC44A1, LRRIQ3, AMZ2, CLMN, SEC23IP, INIP, NARG2, FAM234B, and TRAP1. The diagnostic yield was higher in

  5. Metatranscriptome Sequencing Reveals Insights into the Gene Expression and Functional Potential of Rumen Wall Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyne Mann

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbiota of the rumen wall constitute an important niche of rumen microbial ecology and their composition has been elucidated in different ruminants during the last years. However, the knowledge about the function of rumen wall microbes is still limited. Rumen wall biopsies were taken from three fistulated dairy cows under a standard forage-based diet and after 4 weeks of high concentrate feeding inducing a subacute rumen acidosis (SARA. Extracted RNA was used for metatranscriptome sequencing using Illumina HiSeq sequencing technology. The gene expression of the rumen wall microbial community was analyzed by mapping 35 million sequences against the Kyoto Encyclopedia for Genes and Genomes (KEGG database and determining differentially expressed genes. A total of 1,607 functional features were assigned with high expression of genes involved in central metabolism, galactose, starch and sucrose metabolism. The glycogen phosphorylase (EC:2.4.1.1 which degrades (1->4-alpha-D-glucans was among the highest expressed genes being transcribed by 115 bacterial genera. Energy metabolism genes were also highly expressed, including the pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (EC:2.7.9.1 involved in pyruvate metabolism, which was covered by 177 genera. Nitrogen metabolism genes, in particular glutamate dehydrogenase (EC:1.4.1.4, glutamine synthetase (EC:6.3.1.2 and glutamate synthase (EC:1.4.1.13, EC:1.4.1.14 were also found to be highly expressed and prove rumen wall microbiota to be actively involved in providing host-relevant metabolites for exchange across the rumen wall. In addition, we found all four urease subunits (EC:3.5.1.5 transcribed by members of the genera Flavobacterium, Corynebacterium, Helicobacter, Clostridium, and Bacillus, and the dissimilatory sulfate reductase (EC 1.8.99.5 dsrABC, which is responsible for the reduction of sulfite to sulfide. We also provide in situ evidence for cellulose and cellobiose degradation, a key step in fiber-rich feed

  6. Discovery and characterization of medaka miRNA genes by next generation sequencing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sung-Chou; Chan, Wen-Ching; Ho, Meng-Ru; Tsai, Kuo-Wang; Hu, Ling-Yueh; Lai, Chun-Hung; Hsu, Chun-Nan; Hwang, Pung-Pung; Lin, Wen-chang

    2010-12-02

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous non-protein-coding RNA genes which exist in a wide variety of organisms, including animals, plants, virus and even unicellular organisms. Medaka (Oryzias latipes) is a useful model organism among vertebrate animals. However, no medaka miRNAs have been investigated systematically. It is beneficial to conduct a genome-wide miRNA discovery study using the next generation sequencing (NGS) technology, which has emerged as a powerful sequencing tool for high-throughput analysis. In this study, we adopted ABI SOLiD platform to generate small RNA sequence reads from medaka tissues, followed by mapping these sequence reads back to medaka genome. The mapped genomic loci were considered as candidate miRNAs and further processed by a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. As result, we identified 599 novel medaka pre-miRNAs, many of which were found to encode more than one isomiRs. Besides, additional minor miRNAs (also called miRNA star) can be also detected with the improvement of sequencing depth. These quantifiable isomiRs and minor miRNAs enable us to further characterize medaka miRNA genes in many aspects. First of all, many medaka candidate pre-miRNAs position close to each other, forming many miRNA clusters, some of which are also conserved across other vertebrate animals. Secondly, during miRNA maturation, there is an arm selection preference of mature miRNAs within precursors. We observed the differences on arm selection preference between our candidate pre-miRNAs and their orthologous ones. We classified these differences into three categories based on the distribution of NGS reads. Finally, we also investigated the relationship between conservation status and expression level of miRNA genes. We concluded that the evolutionally conserved miRNAs were usually the most abundant ones. Medaka is a widely used model animal and usually involved in many biomedical studies, including the ones on development biology. Identifying and

  7. Intraarticular Injections of Platelet-rich Plasma (PRP) in the Management of Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos

    2013-09-01

    The clinical use of PRP therapy in the practical setting of orthopaedic fields is increasing partly because of the accessibility of devices that are used in outpatient preparation and delivery. Another reason is the strong advertisement of PRP procedures as the ultimate treatment and novel technology for knee problems by a few orthopaedic surgeons based on claims of abundant scientific evidence. Hence, PubMed articles related to the clinical use of PRP in knee osteoarthritis were searched using the key words: PRP, knee and osteoarthritis in order to study these claims. A total of 20 reports were found directly related to the topic. The aforementioned clinical studies suggest that intraarticular injections of PRP could have preventive effects against osteoarthritis progression. However, presently there is no clear evidence from well-designed clinical trials that intraarticular injections of PRP are efficacious in osteoarthritis. Therefore, at this time the efficacy of PRP requires more investigation, wherein better scientific studies should be performed that include high powered randomized controlled trials.

  8. Augmenting tendon and ligament repair with platelet-rich plasma (PRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ting; Zhang, Chang-Qing; Wang, James H-C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Tendon and ligament injuries (TLI) commonly occur in athletes and non-athletes alike, and remarkably debilitate patients’ athletic and personal abilities. Current clinical treatments, such as reconstruction surgeries, do not adequately heal these injuries and often result in the formation of scar tissue that is prone to re-injury. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a widely used alternative option that is also safe because of its autologous nature. PRP contains a number of growth factors that are responsible for its potential to heal TLIs effectively. In this review, we provide a comprehensive report on PRP. While basic science studies in general indicate the potential of PRP to treat TLIs effectively, a review of existing literature on the clinical use of PRP for the treatment of TLIs indicates a lack of consensus due to varied treatment outcomes. This suggests that current PRP treatment protocols for TLIs may not be optimal, and that not all TLIs may be effectively treated with PRP. Certainly, additional basic science studies are needed to develop optimal treatment protocols and determine those TLI conditions that can be treated effectively. PMID:24367773

  9. Myc-oncogene inactivating effect by proline rich polypeptide (PRP-1) in chondrosarcoma JJ012 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galoian, Karina; Scully, Sean; Galoyan, Armen

    2009-02-01