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Sample records for proximodistal patterning genes

  1. The expression of the proximodistal axis patterning genes Distal-less and dachshund in the appendages of Glomeris marginata (Myriapoda: Diplopoda) suggests a special role of these genes in patterning the head appendages

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prpic, Nikola-Michael; Tautz, Diethard

    2003-01-01

    ...) axis of the developing legs. In order to study PD axis formation in the appendages of the pill millipede Glomeris marginata, we have isolated homologues of these four genes and have studied their expression patterns...

  2. The expression of the proximodistal axis patterning genes Distal-less and dachshund in the appendages of Glomeris marginata (Myriapoda: Diplopoda) suggests a special role of these genes in patterning the head appendages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prpic, Nikola-Michael; Tautz, Diethard

    2003-08-01

    The genes Distal-less, dachshund, extradenticle, and homothorax have been shown in Drosophila to be among the earliest genes that define positional values along the proximal-distal (PD) axis of the developing legs. In order to study PD axis formation in the appendages of the pill millipede Glomeris marginata, we have isolated homologues of these four genes and have studied their expression patterns. In the trunk legs, there are several differences to Drosophila, but the patterns are nevertheless compatible with a conserved role in defining positional values along the PD axis. However, their role in the head appendages is apparently more complex. Distal-less in the mandible and maxilla is expressed in the forming sensory organs and, thus, does not seem to be involved in PD axis patterning. We could not identify in the mouthparts components that are homologous to the distal parts of the trunk legs and antennnae. Interestingly, there is also a transient premorphogenetic expression of Distal-less in the second antennal and second maxillary segment, although no appendages are eventually formed in these segments. The dachshund gene is apparently involved both in PD patterning as well as in sensory organ development in the antenna, maxilla, and mandible. Strong dachshund expression is specifically correlated with the tooth-like part of the mandible, a feature that is shared with other mandibulate arthropods. homothorax is expressed in the proximal and medial parts of the legs, while extradenticle RNA is only seen in the proximal region. This overlap of expression corresponds to the functional overlap between extradenticle and homothorax in Drosophila.

  3. Iroquois genes influence proximo-distal morphogenesis during rat lung development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.G. van Tuyl (Minke); J. Liu (Jason); F. Groenman (Frederick); R. Ridsdale (Ross); R.N.N. Han (Robin N.); V. Venkatesh (Vikram); D. Tibboel (Dick); M.R. Post (Martin)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractLung development is a highly regulated process directed by mesenchymal-epithelial interactions, which coordinate the temporal and spatial expression of multiple regulatory factors required for proper lung formation. The Iroquois homeobox (Irx) genes have been implicated in the patterning

  4. Wnt-5a and Wnt-7a are expressed in the developing chick limb bud in a manner suggesting roles in pattern formation along the proximodistal and dorsoventral axes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dealy, C N; Roth, A; Ferrari, D; Brown, A M; Kosher, R A

    1993-10-01

    The Wnt gene family encodes a group of secreted signalling molecules that have been implicated in the regulation of cell fate and pattern formation during embryogenesis. We have examined the patterns of expression of two members of the chicken Wnt family, Wnt-5a and Wnt-7a, during development of the chick limb bud. Wnt-5a is expressed in the apical ectodermal ridge which directs outgrowth of limb mesoderm. Wnt-5a also exhibits three quantitatively distinct domains of expression along the proximodistal (PD) axis of the limb mesoderm that may correspond to the regions which will give rise to the three distinct PD segments of the limb, the autopod, zeugopod, and stylopod. In contrast, Wnt-7a expression in the limb bud is specifically limited to the dorsal ectoderm. These observations suggest possible roles for Wnt-5a and Wnt-7a in pattern formation along the PD and dorsoventral axes of the developing chick limb bud. In addition, Wnt-5a and Wnt-7a exhibit spatially discrete domains of expression in several other regions of the chick embryo consistent with developmental roles for these genes in a variety of other tissues.

  5. Gene expression reveals evidence for EGFR-dependent proximal-distal limb patterning in a myriapod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Ralf

    2017-05-01

    Evolution of segmented limbs is one of the key innovations of Arthropoda, allowing development of functionally specific specialized head and trunk appendages, a major factor behind their unmatched evolutionary success. Proximodistal limb patterning is controlled by two regulatory networks in the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster, and other insects. The first is represented by the function of the morphogens Wingless (Wg) and Decapentaplegic (Dpp); the second by the EGFR-signaling cascade. While the role of Wg and Dpp has been studied in a wide range of arthropods representing all main branches, that is, Pancrustacea (= Hexapoda + Crustacea), Myriapoda and Chelicerata, investigation of the potential role of EGFR-signaling is restricted to insects (Hexapoda). Gene expression analysis of Egfr, its potential ligands, and putative downstream factors in the pill millipede Glomeris marginata (Myriapoda: Diplopoda), reveals that-in at least mandibulate arthropods-EGFR-signaling is likely a conserved regulatory mechanism in proximodistal limb patterning. © 2017 The Authors. Evolution and Development Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Dorsoventral and Proximodistal Hippocampal Processing Account for the Influences of Sleep and Context on Memory (Reconsolidation: A Connectionist Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Lines

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The context in which learning occurs is sufficient to reconsolidate stored memories and neuronal reactivation may be crucial to memory consolidation during sleep. The mechanisms of context-dependent and sleep-dependent memory (reconsolidation are unknown but involve the hippocampus. We simulated memory (reconsolidation using a connectionist model of the hippocampus that explicitly accounted for its dorsoventral organization and for CA1 proximodistal processing. Replicating human and rodent (reconsolidation studies yielded the following results. (1 Semantic overlap between memory items and extraneous learning was necessary to explain experimental data and depended crucially on the recurrent networks of dorsal but not ventral CA3. (2 Stimulus-free, sleep-induced internal reactivations of memory patterns produced heterogeneous recruitment of memory items and protected memories from subsequent interference. These simulations further suggested that the decrease in memory resilience when subjects were not allowed to sleep following learning was primarily due to extraneous learning. (3 Partial exposure to the learning context during simulated sleep (i.e., targeted memory reactivation uniformly increased memory item reactivation and enhanced subsequent recall. Altogether, these results show that the dorsoventral and proximodistal organization of the hippocampus may be important components of the neural mechanisms for context-based and sleep-based memory (reconsolidations.

  7. Five patellar proximodistal positioning indices compared in clinically normal Greenland sled dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miles, James E; Dickow, Marlene; Nielsen, Dorte H

    2012-01-01

    Patellar luxation in large-breed dogs is associated with abnormal proximodistal patellar positioning. Using a clinically normal population of Greenland sled dogs, measurement reliability and the effect of limb position were compared for five patellar proximodistal positioning indices based...... on the Insall-Salvati (IS), modified Insall-Salvati (mIS), de Carvalho (dC), patellotrochlear (PT) and Blackburne-Peel (BP) indices. Indices were measured at one knee angle in 44 dogs and two knee angles in 10 dogs. Index susceptibility to error was modelled for different errors in knee angle estimation. Two...

  8. Gecko CD59 Is Implicated in Proximodistal Identity during Tail Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shengjuan; Zhou, Weijuan; Liu, Yan; Wang, Yingjie; Gu, Qing; Gu, Yun; Dong, Yingying; Liu, Mei; Gu, Xingxing; Ding, Fei; Gu, Xiaosong

    2011-01-01

    Several adult reptiles, such as Gekko japonicus, have the ability to precisely re-create a missing tail after amputation. To ascertain the associated acquisition of positional information from blastemal cells and the underlying molecular mechanism of tail regeneration, a candidate molecule CD59 was isolated from gecko. CD59 transcripts displayed a graded expression in the adult gecko spinal cord with the highest level in the anterior segment, with a stable expression along the normal tail. After tail amputation, CD59 transcripts in the spinal cord proximal to the injury sites increased markedly at 1 day and 2 weeks; whereas in the regenerating blastema, strong CD59 positive signals were detected in the blastemal cells anterior to the blastema, with a gradual decrease along the proximodistal (PD) axis. When treated with RA following amputation, CD59 transcripts in the blastema were up-regulated. PD confrontation assays revealed that the proximal blastema engulfed the distal one after in vitro culture, and rabbit-anti human CD59 antibody was able to block this PD engulfment. Overexpression of the CD59 during tail regeneration causes distal blastemal cells to translocate to a more proximal location. Our results suggest that position identity is not restricted to amphibian limb regeneration, but has already been established in tail blastema of reptiles. The CD59, a cell surface molecule, acted as a determinant of proximal–distal cell identity. PMID:21464923

  9. Gene Insertion Patterns and Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vain, Philippe; Thole, Vera

    During the past 25 years, the molecular analysis of transgene insertion patterns and sites in plants has greatly contributed to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying transgene integration, expression, and stability in the nuclear genome. Molecular characterization is also an essential step in the safety assessment of genetically modified crops. This chapter describes the standard experimental procedures used to analyze transgene insertion patterns and loci in cereals and grasses transformed using Agrobacterium tumefaciens or direct transfer of DNA. Methods and protocols enabling the determination of the number and configuration of transgenic loci via a combination of inheritance studies, polymerase chain reaction, and Southern analyses are presented. The complete characterization of transgenic inserts in plants is, however, a holistic process relying on a wide variety of experimental approaches. In this chapter, these additional approaches are not detailed but references to relevant bibliographic records are provided.

  10. Transcriptome analysis reveals novel patterning and pigmentation genes underlying Heliconius butterfly wing pattern variation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hines, Heather M; Papa, Riccardo; Ruiz, Mayte; Papanicolaou, Alexie; Wang, Charles; Nijhout, H Frederik; McMillan, W Owen; Reed, Robert D

    2012-01-01

    .... Positional cloning and candidate gene studies have identified a handful of regulatory and pigmentation genes implicated in Heliconius wing pattern variation, but little is known about the greater...

  11. Unsupervised fuzzy pattern discovery in gene expression data

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Gene PK; Chan, Keith CC; Wong, Andrew KC

    2011-01-01

    Background Discovering patterns from gene expression levels is regarded as a classification problem when tissue classes of the samples are given and solved as a discrete-data problem by discretizing the expression levels of each gene into intervals maximizing the interdependence between that gene and the class labels. However, when class information is unavailable, discovering gene expression patterns becomes difficult. Methods For a gene pool with large number of genes, we first cluster the ...

  12. Unsupervised fuzzy pattern discovery in gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gene P K; Chan, Keith C C; Wong, Andrew K C

    2011-01-01

    Discovering patterns from gene expression levels is regarded as a classification problem when tissue classes of the samples are given and solved as a discrete-data problem by discretizing the expression levels of each gene into intervals maximizing the interdependence between that gene and the class labels. However, when class information is unavailable, discovering gene expression patterns becomes difficult. For a gene pool with large number of genes, we first cluster the genes into smaller groups. In each group, we use the representative gene, one with highest interdependence with others in the group, to drive the discretization of the gene expression levels of other genes. Treating intervals as discrete events, association patterns of events can be discovered. If the gene groups obtained are crisp gene clusters, significant patterns overlapping different gene clusters cannot be found. This paper presents a new method of "fuzzifying" the crisp gene clusters to overcome such problem. To evaluate the effectiveness of our approach, we first apply the above described procedure on a synthetic data set and then a gene expression data set with known class labels. The class labels are not being used in both analyses but used later as the ground truth in a classificatory problem for assessing the algorithm's effectiveness in fuzzy gene clustering and discretization. The results show the efficacy of the proposed method. The existence of correlation among continuous valued gene expression levels suggests that certain genes in the gene groups have high interdependence with other genes in the group. Fuzzification of a crisp gene cluster allows the cluster to take in genes from other clusters so that overlapping relationship among gene clusters could be uncovered. Hence, previously unknown hidden patterns resided in overlapping gene clusters are discovered. From the experimental results, the high order patterns discovered reveal multiple gene interaction patterns in cancerous

  13. Transcriptome analysis reveals novel patterning and pigmentation genes underlying Heliconius butterfly wing pattern variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hines Heather M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heliconius butterfly wing pattern diversity offers a unique opportunity to investigate how natural genetic variation can drive the evolution of complex adaptive phenotypes. Positional cloning and candidate gene studies have identified a handful of regulatory and pigmentation genes implicated in Heliconius wing pattern variation, but little is known about the greater developmental networks within which these genes interact to pattern a wing. Here we took a large-scale transcriptomic approach to identify the network of genes involved in Heliconius wing pattern development and variation. This included applying over 140 transcriptome microarrays to assay gene expression in dissected wing pattern elements across a range of developmental stages and wing pattern morphs of Heliconius erato. Results We identified a number of putative early prepattern genes with color-pattern related expression domains. We also identified 51 genes differentially expressed in association with natural color pattern variation. Of these, the previously identified color pattern “switch gene” optix was recovered as the first transcript to show color-specific differential expression. Most differentially expressed genes were transcribed late in pupal development and have roles in cuticle formation or pigment synthesis. These include previously undescribed transporter genes associated with ommochrome pigmentation. Furthermore, we observed upregulation of melanin-repressing genes such as ebony and Dat1 in non-melanic patterns. Conclusions This study identifies many new genes implicated in butterfly wing pattern development and provides a glimpse into the number and types of genes affected by variation in genes that drive color pattern evolution.

  14. Global analysis of patterns of gene expression during Drosophila embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomancak, Pavel; Berman, Benjamin P; Beaton, Amy; Weiszmann, Richard; Kwan, Elaine; Hartenstein, Volker; Celniker, Susan E; Rubin, Gerald M

    2007-01-01

    Cell and tissue specific gene expression is a defining feature of embryonic development in multi-cellular organisms. However, the range of gene expression patterns, the extent of the correlation of expression with function, and the classes of genes whose spatial expression are tightly regulated have been unclear due to the lack of an unbiased, genome-wide survey of gene expression patterns. We determined and documented embryonic expression patterns for 6,003 (44%) of the 13,659 protein-coding genes identified in the Drosophila melanogaster genome with over 70,000 images and controlled vocabulary annotations. Individual expression patterns are extraordinarily diverse, but by supplementing qualitative in situ hybridization data with quantitative microarray time-course data using a hybrid clustering strategy, we identify groups of genes with similar expression. Of 4,496 genes with detectable expression in the embryo, 2,549 (57%) fall into 10 clusters representing broad expression patterns. The remaining 1,947 (43%) genes fall into 29 clusters representing restricted expression, 20% patterned as early as blastoderm, with the majority restricted to differentiated cell types, such as epithelia, nervous system, or muscle. We investigate the relationship between expression clusters and known molecular and cellular-physiological functions. Nearly 60% of the genes with detectable expression exhibit broad patterns reflecting quantitative rather than qualitative differences between tissues. The other 40% show tissue-restricted expression; the expression patterns of over 1,500 of these genes are documented here for the first time. Within each of these categories, we identified clusters of genes associated with particular cellular and developmental functions.

  15. The Roles and Evolutionary Patterns of Intronless Genes in Deuterostomes

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    Ming Zou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Genes without introns are a characteristic feature of prokaryotes, but there are still a number of intronless genes in eukaryotes. To study these eukaryotic genes that have prokaryotic architecture could help to understand the evolutionary patterns of related genes and genomes. Our analyses revealed a number of intronless genes that reside in 6 deuterostomes (sea urchin, sea squirt, zebrafish, chicken, platypus, and human. We also determined the conservation for each intronless gene in archaea, bacteria, fungi, plants, metazoans, and other eukaryotes. Proportions of intronless genes that are inherited from the common ancestor of archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes in these species were consistent with their phylogenetic positions, with more proportions of ancient intronless genes residing in more primitive species. In these species, intronless genes belong to different cellular roles and gene ontology (GO categories, and some of these functions are very basic. Part of intronless genes is derived from other intronless genes or multiexon genes in each species. In conclusion, we showed that a varying number and proportion of intronless genes reside in these 6 deuterostomes, and some of them function importantly. These genes are good candidates for subsequent functional and evolutionary analyses specifically.

  16. Comparison of gene expression patterns between porcine cumulus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UPuser

    1 Department of Gene and Cell Engineering, Institute of Animal Science, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences,. Beijing 100094 ... quantitative RT-PCR methods, we compared the mRNA expression patterns in porcine oocytes from two ... Keywords: Differential gene expression, DD-RT-PCR, porcine oocytes, cumulus.

  17. Comparison of gene expression patterns between porcine cumulus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previous studies of the three genes suggested that they are mainly involved in oestrogen receptor regulation, membrane trafficking, organelle transport, cellular signalling and some other cellular processes. These results suggest that the aberrant of gene expression patterns detected in the oocytes of NOs compared with ...

  18. Resistance Pattern and Detection of Metallo-beta-lactamase Genes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-23

    6 days ago ... Resistance Pattern and Detection of Metallo-beta-lactamase Genes in Clinical Isolates of. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Central Nigeria Tertiary Hospital. Niger. J Clin Pract 2018 ... last resort when dealing with MDR Gram-negative bacteria, but there .... no change in the antibiotics susceptibility pattern of.

  19. Expression patterns of cadherin genes in Drosophila oogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Zartman, Jeremiah J.; Kanodia, Jitendra S.; Yakoby, Nir; Schafer, Xenia; Watson, Colin; Schlichting, Karin; Dahmann, Christian; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2008-01-01

    In Drosophila oogenesis, the follicular epithelium that envelops the oocyte is patterned by a small set of inductive signals and gives rise to an elaborate three-dimensional eggshell. Several eggshell structures provide sensitive readouts of the patterning signals, but the formation of these structures is still poorly understood. In other systems, epithelial morphogenesis is guided by the spatial patterning of cell adhesion and cytoskeleton genes. As a step towards developing a comprehensive ...

  20. Proteomic and gene expression patterns of keratoconus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkasubhra Ghosh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratoconus is a progressive corneal thinning disease associated with significant tissue remodeling activities and activation of a variety of signaling networks. However, it is not understood how differential gene and protein expression direct function in keratoconus corneas to drive the underlying pathology, ectasia. Research in the field has focused on discovering differentially expressed genes and proteins and quantifying their levels and activities in keratoconus patient samples. In this study, both microarray analysis of total ribonucleic acid (RNA and whole proteome analyses are carried out using corneal epithelium and tears from keratoconus patients and compared to healthy controls. A number of structural proteins, signaling molecules, cytokines, proteases, and enzymes have been found to be deregulated in keratoconus corneas. Together, the data provide clues to the complex process of corneal degradation which suggest novel ways to clinically diagnose and manage the disease. This review will focus on discussing these recent advances in the knowledge of keratoconus biology from a gene expression and function point-of-view.

  1. Rhythmic diel pattern of gene expression in juvenile maize leaf.

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    Maciej Jończyk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Numerous biochemical and physiological parameters of living organisms follow a circadian rhythm. Although such rhythmic behavior is particularly pronounced in plants, which are strictly dependent on the daily photoperiod, data on the molecular aspects of the diurnal cycle in plants is scarce and mostly concerns the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we studied the leaf transcriptome in seedlings of maize, an important C4 crop only distantly related to A. thaliana, throughout a cycle of 10 h darkness and 14 h light to look for rhythmic patterns of gene expression. RESULTS: Using DNA microarrays comprising ca. 43,000 maize-specific probes we found that ca. 12% of all genes showed clear-cut diel rhythms of expression. Cluster analysis identified 35 groups containing from four to ca. 1,000 genes, each comprising genes of similar expression patterns. Perhaps unexpectedly, the most pronounced and most common (concerning the highest number of genes expression maxima were observed towards and during the dark phase. Using Gene Ontology classification several meaningful functional associations were found among genes showing similar diel expression patterns, including massive induction of expression of genes related to gene expression, translation, protein modification and folding at dusk and night. Additionally, we found a clear-cut tendency among genes belonging to individual clusters to share defined transcription factor-binding sequences. CONCLUSIONS: Co-expressed genes belonging to individual clusters are likely to be regulated by common mechanisms. The nocturnal phase of the diurnal cycle involves gross induction of fundamental biochemical processes and should be studied more thoroughly than was appreciated in most earlier physiological studies. Although some general mechanisms responsible for the diel regulation of gene expression might be shared among plants, details of the diurnal regulation of gene expression seem to differ

  2. Evolutionary rate patterns of the Gibberellin pathway genes

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    Zhang Fu-min

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of molecular evolutionary patterns of different genes within metabolic pathways allows us to determine whether these genes are subject to equivalent evolutionary forces and how natural selection shapes the evolution of proteins in an interacting system. Although previous studies found that upstream genes in the pathway evolved more slowly than downstream genes, the correlation between evolutionary rate and position of the genes in metabolic pathways as well as its implications in molecular evolution are still less understood. Results We sequenced and characterized 7 core structural genes of the gibberellin biosynthetic pathway from 8 representative species of the rice tribe (Oryzeae to address alternative hypotheses regarding evolutionary rates and patterns of metabolic pathway genes. We have detected significant rate heterogeneity among 7 GA pathway genes for both synonymous and nonsynonymous sites. Such rate variation is mostly likely attributed to differences of selection intensity rather than differential mutation pressures on the genes. Unlike previous argument that downstream genes in metabolic pathways would evolve more slowly than upstream genes, the downstream genes in the GA pathway did not exhibited the elevated substitution rate and instead, the genes that encode either the enzyme at the branch point (GA20ox or enzymes catalyzing multiple steps (KO, KAO and GA3ox in the pathway had the lowest evolutionary rates due to strong purifying selection. Our branch and codon models failed to detect signature of positive selection for any lineage and codon of the GA pathway genes. Conclusion This study suggests that significant heterogeneity of evolutionary rate of the GA pathway genes is mainly ascribed to differential constraint relaxation rather than the positive selection and supports the pathway flux theory that predicts that natural selection primarily targets enzymes that have the greatest control on fluxes.

  3. NuGO contributions to GenePattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groot, P J; Reiff, C; Mayer, C; Müller, M

    2008-12-01

    NuGO, the European Nutrigenomics Organization, utilizes 31 powerful computers for, e.g., data storage and analysis. These so-called black boxes (NBXses) are located at the sites of different partners. NuGO decided to use GenePattern as the preferred genomic analysis tool on each NBX. To handle the custom made Affymetrix NuGO arrays, new NuGO modules are added to GenePattern. These NuGO modules execute the latest Bioconductor version ensuring up-to-date annotations and access to the latest scientific developments. The following GenePattern modules are provided by NuGO: NuGOArrayQualityAnalysis for comprehensive quality control, NuGOExpressionFileCreator for import and normalization of data, LimmaAnalysis for identification of differentially expressed genes, TopGoAnalysis for calculation of GO enrichment, and GetResultForGo for retrieval of information on genes associated with specific GO terms. All together, these NuGO modules allow comprehensive, up-to-date, and user friendly analysis of Affymetrix data. A special feature of the NuGO modules is that for analysis they allow the use of either the standard Affymetrix or the MBNI custom CDF-files, which remap probes based on current knowledge. In both cases a .chip-file is created to enable GSEA analysis. The NuGO GenePattern installations are distributed as binary Ubuntu (.deb) packages via the NuGO repository.

  4. Expression patterns of cadherin genes in Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zartman, Jeremiah J; Kanodia, Jitendra S; Yakoby, Nir; Schafer, Xenia; Watson, Colin; Schlichting, Karin; Dahmann, Christian; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y

    2009-01-01

    In Drosophila oogenesis, the follicular epithelium that envelops the oocyte is patterned by a small set of inductive signals and gives rise to an elaborate three-dimensional eggshell. Several eggshell structures provide sensitive readouts of the patterning signals, but the formation of these structures is still poorly understood. In other systems, epithelial morphogenesis is guided by the spatial patterning of cell adhesion and cytoskeleton genes. As a step towards developing a comprehensive description of patterning events leading to eggshell morphogenesis, we report the expression of Drosophila cadherins, calcium-dependent adhesion molecules that are repeatedly used throughout development. We found that 9/17 of Drosophila cadherins are expressed in the follicular epithelium in dynamic patterns during oogenesis. In late oogenesis, the expression patterns of cadherin genes in the main body follicle cells is summarized using a compact set of simple geometric shapes, reflecting the integration of the EGFR and DPP inductive signals. The multi-layered composite patterning of the cadherins is hypothesized to play a key role in the formation of the eggshell. Of particular note is the complex patterning of the region of the follicular epithelium that gives rise to the dorsal appendages, which are tubular structures that serve as respiratory organs for the developing embryo.

  5. Inferring Gene Regulatory Networks Using Conditional Regulation Pattern to Guide Candidate Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fei; Gao, Lin; Ye, Yusen; Hu, Yuxuan; He, Ruijie

    2016-01-01

    Combining path consistency (PC) algorithms with conditional mutual information (CMI) are widely used in reconstruction of gene regulatory networks. CMI has many advantages over Pearson correlation coefficient in measuring non-linear dependence to infer gene regulatory networks. It can also discriminate the direct regulations from indirect ones. However, it is still a challenge to select the conditional genes in an optimal way, which affects the performance and computation complexity of the PC algorithm. In this study, we develop a novel conditional mutual information-based algorithm, namely RPNI (Regulation Pattern based Network Inference), to infer gene regulatory networks. For conditional gene selection, we define the co-regulation pattern, indirect-regulation pattern and mixture-regulation pattern as three candidate patterns to guide the selection of candidate genes. To demonstrate the potential of our algorithm, we apply it to gene expression data from DREAM challenge. Experimental results show that RPNI outperforms existing conditional mutual information-based methods in both accuracy and time complexity for different sizes of gene samples. Furthermore, the robustness of our algorithm is demonstrated by noisy interference analysis using different types of noise.

  6. Genome-wide patterns of Arabidopsis gene expression in nature.

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    Christina L Richards

    Full Text Available Organisms in the wild are subject to multiple, fluctuating environmental factors, and it is in complex natural environments that genetic regulatory networks actually function and evolve. We assessed genome-wide gene expression patterns in the wild in two natural accessions of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and examined the nature of transcriptional variation throughout its life cycle and gene expression correlations with natural environmental fluctuations. We grew plants in a natural field environment and measured genome-wide time-series gene expression from the plant shoot every three days, spanning the seedling to reproductive stages. We find that 15,352 genes were expressed in the A. thaliana shoot in the field, and accession and flowering status (vegetative versus flowering were strong components of transcriptional variation in this plant. We identified between ∼110 and 190 time-varying gene expression clusters in the field, many of which were significantly overrepresented by genes regulated by abiotic and biotic environmental stresses. The two main principal components of vegetative shoot gene expression (PC(veg correlate to temperature and precipitation occurrence in the field. The largest PC(veg axes included thermoregulatory genes while the second major PC(veg was associated with precipitation and contained drought-responsive genes. By exposing A. thaliana to natural environments in an open field, we provide a framework for further understanding the genetic networks that are deployed in natural environments, and we connect plant molecular genetics in the laboratory to plant organismal ecology in the wild.

  7. NuGO contributions to GenePattern

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de P.J.; Reiff, C.; Mayer, C.; Müller, M.R.

    2008-01-01

    NuGO, the European Nutrigenomics Organization, utilizes 31 powerful computers for, e.g., data storage and analysis. These so-called black boxes (NBXses) are located at the sites of different partners. NuGO decided to use GenePattern as the preferred genomic analysis tool on each NBX. To handle the

  8. Patterns of expression of cell wall related genes in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima D.U.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Our search for genes related to cell wall metabolism in the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database (http://sucest.lbi.dcc.unicamp.br resulted in 3,283 reads (1% of the total reads which were grouped into 459 clusters (potential genes with an average of 7.1 reads per cluster. To more clearly display our correlation coefficients, we constructed surface maps which we used to investigate the relationship between cell wall genes and the sugarcane tissues libraries from which they came. The only significant correlations that we found between cell wall genes and/or their expression within particular libraries were neutral or synergetic. Genes related to cellulose biosynthesis were from the CesA family, and were found to be the most abundant cell wall related genes in the SUCEST database. We found that the highest number of CesA reads came from the root and stem libraries. The genes with the greatest number of reads were those involved in cell wall hydrolases (e.g. beta-1,3-glucanases, xyloglucan endo-beta-transglycosylase, beta-glucosidase and endo-beta-mannanase. Correlation analyses by surface mapping revealed that the expression of genes related to biosynthesis seems to be associated with the hydrolysis of hemicelluloses, pectin hydrolases being mainly associated with xyloglucan hydrolases. The patterns of cell wall related gene expression in sugarcane based on the number of reads per cluster reflected quite well the expected physiological characteristics of the tissues. This is the first work to provide a general view on plant cell wall metabolism through the expression of related genes in almost all the tissues of a plant at the same time. For example, developing flowers behaved similarly to both meristematic tissues and leaf-root transition zone tissues. Besides providing a basis for future research on the mechanisms of plant development which involve the cell wall, our findings will provide valuable tools for plant engineering in the

  9. Bare bones pattern formation: a core regulatory network in varying geometries reproduces major features of vertebrate limb development and evolution.

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    Jianfeng Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Major unresolved questions regarding vertebrate limb development concern how the numbers of skeletal elements along the proximodistal (P-D and anteroposterior (A-P axes are determined and how the shape of a growing limb affects skeletal element formation. There is currently no generally accepted model for these patterning processes, but recent work on cartilage development (chondrogenesis indicates that precartilage tissue self-organizes into nodular patterns by cell-molecular circuitry with local auto-activating and lateral inhibitory (LALI properties. This process is played out in the developing limb in the context of a gradient of fibroblast growth factor (FGF emanating from the apical ectodermal ridge (AER. RESULTS: We have simulated the behavior of the core chondrogenic mechanism of the developing limb in the presence of an FGF gradient using a novel computational environment that permits simulation of LALI systems in domains of varying shape and size. The model predicts the normal proximodistal pattern of skeletogenesis as well as distal truncations resulting from AER removal. Modifications of the model's parameters corresponding to plausible effects of Hox proteins and formins, and of the reshaping of the model limb, bud yielded simulated phenotypes resembling mutational and experimental variants of the limb. Hypothetical developmental scenarios reproduce skeletal morphologies with features of fossil limbs. CONCLUSIONS: The limb chondrogenic regulatory system operating in the presence of a gradient has an inherent, robust propensity to form limb-like skeletal structures. The bare bones framework can accommodate ancillary gene regulatory networks controlling limb bud shaping and establishment of Hox expression domains. This mechanism accounts for major features of the normal limb pattern and, under variant geometries and different parameter values, those of experimentally manipulated, genetically aberrant and evolutionary early

  10. Bare bones pattern formation: a core regulatory network in varying geometries reproduces major features of vertebrate limb development and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Yong-Tao; Alber, Mark S; Newman, Stuart A

    2010-05-28

    Major unresolved questions regarding vertebrate limb development concern how the numbers of skeletal elements along the proximodistal (P-D) and anteroposterior (A-P) axes are determined and how the shape of a growing limb affects skeletal element formation. There is currently no generally accepted model for these patterning processes, but recent work on cartilage development (chondrogenesis) indicates that precartilage tissue self-organizes into nodular patterns by cell-molecular circuitry with local auto-activating and lateral inhibitory (LALI) properties. This process is played out in the developing limb in the context of a gradient of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) emanating from the apical ectodermal ridge (AER). We have simulated the behavior of the core chondrogenic mechanism of the developing limb in the presence of an FGF gradient using a novel computational environment that permits simulation of LALI systems in domains of varying shape and size. The model predicts the normal proximodistal pattern of skeletogenesis as well as distal truncations resulting from AER removal. Modifications of the model's parameters corresponding to plausible effects of Hox proteins and formins, and of the reshaping of the model limb, bud yielded simulated phenotypes resembling mutational and experimental variants of the limb. Hypothetical developmental scenarios reproduce skeletal morphologies with features of fossil limbs. The limb chondrogenic regulatory system operating in the presence of a gradient has an inherent, robust propensity to form limb-like skeletal structures. The bare bones framework can accommodate ancillary gene regulatory networks controlling limb bud shaping and establishment of Hox expression domains. This mechanism accounts for major features of the normal limb pattern and, under variant geometries and different parameter values, those of experimentally manipulated, genetically aberrant and evolutionary early forms, with no requirement for an independent

  11. Control of growth and positional information by the graded vestigial expression pattern in the wing of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena-Lopez, L A; García-Bellido, A

    2006-09-12

    The size and shape of organs depend on cellular processes such as cell proliferation, cell survival, and spatial arrangement of cells. In turn, all of these processes are a consequence of positional identity of individual cells in whole organs. Links of positional information with organ growth and pattern expression of genes is a little-addressed question. We show that differences in vestigial expression between neighboring cells of the wing blade autonomously and nonautonomously affect cell proliferation along the proximo-distal axis. On the other hand, uniform expression of vestigial inhibits cell proliferation and also perturbs the shape of wing blade altering the preferential orientation of cell divisions. Our observations provide evidence that local cell interactions, triggered by differences in vestigial expression between neighboring cells, confer positional values operating in the control of growth and shape of the wing.

  12. Automated gene expression pattern annotation in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Zhao, Xinlin; Lin, Binbin; Zeng, Tao; Ji, Shuiwang; Ye, Jieping

    2015-01-01

    Brain tumor is a fatal central nervous system disease that occurs in around 250,000 people each year globally and it is the second cause of cancer in children. It has been widely acknowledged that genetic factor is one of the significant risk factors for brain cancer. Thus, accurate descriptions of the locations of where the relative genes are active and how these genes express are critical for understanding the pathogenesis of brain tumor and for early detection. The Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas is a project on gene expression over the course of mouse brain development stages. Utilizing mouse models allows us to use a relatively homogeneous system to reveal the genetic risk factor of brain cancer. In the Allen atlas, about 435,000 high-resolution spatiotemporal in situ hybridization images have been generated for approximately 2,100 genes and currently the expression patterns over specific brain regions are manually annotated by experts, which does not scale with the continuously expanding collection of images. In this paper, we present an efficient computational approach to perform automated gene expression pattern annotation on brain images. First, the gene expression information in the brain images is captured by invariant features extracted from local image patches. Next, we adopt an augmented sparse coding method, called Stochastic Coordinate Coding, to construct high-level representations. Different pooling methods are then applied to generate gene-level features. To discriminate gene expression patterns at specific brain regions, we employ supervised learning methods to build accurate models for both binary-class and multi-class cases. Random undersampling and majority voting strategies are utilized to deal with the inherently imbalanced class distribution within each annotation task in order to further improve predictive performance. In addition, we propose a novel structure-based multi-label classification approach, which makes use of label

  13. Inferring patterns of migration from gene frequencies under equilibrium conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufto, J; Engen, S; Hindar, K

    1996-12-01

    A new maximum likelihood method to simultaneously estimate the parameters of any migration pattern from gene frequencies in stochastic equilibrium is developed, based on a model of multivariate genetic drift in a subdivided population. Motivated by simulations of this process in the simplified case of two subpopulations, problems related to the nuisance parameter q, the equilibrium gene frequency, are eliminated by conditioning on the observed mean gene frequency. The covariance matrix of this conditional distribution is calculated by constructing an abstract process that mimics the behavior of the original process in the subspace of interest. The approximation holds as long as there is limited differentiation between subpopulations. The bias and variance of estimates of long-range and short-range migration in a finite stepping stone model are evaluated by fitting the model to simulated data with known values of the parameters. Possible ecological extensions of the model are discussed.

  14. Histone modification pattern evolution after yeast gene duplication

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    Zou Yangyun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene duplication and subsequent functional divergence especially expression divergence have been widely considered as main sources for evolutionary innovations. Many studies evidenced that genetic regulatory network evolved rapidly shortly after gene duplication, thus leading to accelerated expression divergence and diversification. However, little is known whether epigenetic factors have mediated the evolution of expression regulation since gene duplication. In this study, we conducted detailed analyses on yeast histone modification (HM, the major epigenetics type in this organism, as well as other available functional genomics data to address this issue. Results Duplicate genes, on average, share more common HM-code patterns than random singleton pairs in their promoters and open reading frames (ORF. Though HM-code divergence between duplicates in both promoter and ORF regions increase with their sequence divergence, the HM-code in ORF region evolves slower than that in promoter region, probably owing to the functional constraints imposed on protein sequences. After excluding the confounding effect of sequence divergence (or evolutionary time, we found the evidence supporting the notion that in yeast, the HM-code may co-evolve with cis- and trans-regulatory factors. Moreover, we observed that deletion of some yeast HM-related enzymes increases the expression divergence between duplicate genes, yet the effect is lower than the case of transcription factor (TF deletion or environmental stresses. Conclusions Our analyses demonstrate that after gene duplication, yeast histone modification profile between duplicates diverged with evolutionary time, similar to genetic regulatory elements. Moreover, we found the evidence of the co-evolution between genetic and epigenetic elements since gene duplication, together contributing to the expression divergence between duplicate genes.

  15. Divergent RNA Localisation Patterns of Maternal Genes Regulating Embryonic Patterning in the Butterfly Pararge aegeria.

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    Jean-Michel Carter

    Full Text Available The maternal effect genes responsible for patterning the embryo along the antero-posterior (AP axis are broadly conserved in insects. The precise function of these maternal effect genes is the result of the localisation of their mRNA in the oocyte. The main developmental mechanisms involved have been elucidated in Drosophila melanogaster, but recent studies have shown that other insect orders often diverge in RNA localisation patterns. A recent study has shown that in the butterfly Pararge aegeria the distinction between blastodermal embryonic (i.e. germ band and extra-embryonic tissue (i.e. serosa is already specified in the oocyte during oogenesis in the ovariole, long before blastoderm cellularisation. To examine the extent by which a female butterfly specifies and patterns the AP axis within the region fated to be the germ band, and whether she specifies a germ plasm, we performed in situ hybridisation experiments on oocytes in P. aegeria ovarioles and on early embryos. RNA localisation of the following key maternal effect genes were investigated: caudal (cad, orthodenticle (otd, hunchback (hb and four nanos (nos paralogs, as well as TDRD7 a gene containing a key functional domain (OST-HTH/LOTUS shared with oskar. TDRD7 was mainly confined to the follicle cells, whilst hb was exclusively zygotically transcribed. RNA of some of the nos paralogs, otd and cad revealed complex localisation patterns within the cortical region prefiguring the germ band (i.e. germ cortex. Rather interestingly, otd was localised within and outside the anterior of the germ cortex. Transcripts of nos-O formed a distinct granular ring in the middle of the germ cortex possibly prefiguring the region where germline stem cells form. These butterfly RNA localisation patterns are highly divergent with respect to other insects, highlighting the diverse ways in which different insect orders maternally regulate early embryogenesis of their offspring.

  16. Divergent RNA Localisation Patterns of Maternal Genes Regulating Embryonic Patterning in the Butterfly Pararge aegeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jean-Michel; Gibbs, Melanie; Breuker, Casper J

    2015-01-01

    The maternal effect genes responsible for patterning the embryo along the antero-posterior (AP) axis are broadly conserved in insects. The precise function of these maternal effect genes is the result of the localisation of their mRNA in the oocyte. The main developmental mechanisms involved have been elucidated in Drosophila melanogaster, but recent studies have shown that other insect orders often diverge in RNA localisation patterns. A recent study has shown that in the butterfly Pararge aegeria the distinction between blastodermal embryonic (i.e. germ band) and extra-embryonic tissue (i.e. serosa) is already specified in the oocyte during oogenesis in the ovariole, long before blastoderm cellularisation. To examine the extent by which a female butterfly specifies and patterns the AP axis within the region fated to be the germ band, and whether she specifies a germ plasm, we performed in situ hybridisation experiments on oocytes in P. aegeria ovarioles and on early embryos. RNA localisation of the following key maternal effect genes were investigated: caudal (cad), orthodenticle (otd), hunchback (hb) and four nanos (nos) paralogs, as well as TDRD7 a gene containing a key functional domain (OST-HTH/LOTUS) shared with oskar. TDRD7 was mainly confined to the follicle cells, whilst hb was exclusively zygotically transcribed. RNA of some of the nos paralogs, otd and cad revealed complex localisation patterns within the cortical region prefiguring the germ band (i.e. germ cortex). Rather interestingly, otd was localised within and outside the anterior of the germ cortex. Transcripts of nos-O formed a distinct granular ring in the middle of the germ cortex possibly prefiguring the region where germline stem cells form. These butterfly RNA localisation patterns are highly divergent with respect to other insects, highlighting the diverse ways in which different insect orders maternally regulate early embryogenesis of their offspring.

  17. Deep phylogenomics of a tandem-repeat galectin regulating appendicular skeletal pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Ramray; Chakraborty, Mahul; Glimm, Tilmann; Stewart, Thomas A; Newman, Stuart A

    2016-08-18

    A multiscale network of two galectins Galectin-1 (Gal-1) and Galectin-8 (Gal-8) patterns the avian limb skeleton. Among vertebrates with paired appendages, chondrichthyan fins typically have one or more cartilage plates and many repeating parallel endoskeletal elements, actinopterygian fins have more varied patterns of nodules, bars and plates, while tetrapod limbs exhibit tandem arrays of few, proximodistally increasing numbers of elements. We applied a comparative genomic and protein evolution approach to understand the origin of the galectin patterning network. Having previously observed a phylogenetic constraint on Gal-1 structure across vertebrates, we asked whether evolutionary changes of Gal-8 could have critically contributed to the origin of the tetrapod pattern. Translocations, duplications, and losses of Gal-8 genes in Actinopterygii established them in different genomic locations from those that the Sarcopterygii (including the tetrapods) share with chondrichthyans. The sarcopterygian Gal-8 genes acquired a potentially regulatory non-coding motif and underwent purifying selection. The actinopterygian Gal-8 genes, in contrast, did not acquire the non-coding motif and underwent positive selection. These observations interpreted through the lens of a reaction-diffusion-adhesion model based on avian experimental findings can account for the distinct endoskeletal patterns of cartilaginous, ray-finned, and lobe-finned fishes, and the stereotypical limb skeletons of tetrapods.

  18. VESPUCCI: exploring patterns of gene expression in grapevine

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    Marco eMoretto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale transcriptional studies aim to decipher the dynamic cellular responses to a stimulus, like different environmental conditions. In the era of high-throughput omics biology, the most used technologies for these purposes are microarray and RNA-Seq, whose data are usually required to be deposited in public repositories upon publication. Such repositories have the enormous potential to provide a comprehensive view of how different experimental conditions lead to expression changes, by comparing gene expression across all possible measured conditions. Unfortunately, this task is greatly impaired by differences among experimental platforms that make direct comparisons difficult.In this paper we present the Vitis Expression Studies Platform Using COLOMBOS Compendia Instances (VESPUCCI, a gene expression compendium for grapevine which was built by adapting an approach originally developed for bacteria, and show how it can be used to investigate complex gene expression patterns. We integrated nearly all publicly available microarray and RNA-Seq expression data: 1608 gene expression samples from 10 different technological platforms. Each sample has been manually annotated using a controlled vocabulary developed ad hoc to ensure both human readability and computational tractability. Expression data in the compendium can be visually explored using several tools provided by the web interface or can be programmatically accessed using the REST interface. VESPUCCI is freely accessible at http://vespucci.colombos.fmach.it.

  19. Global patterns of diversity and selection in human tyrosinase gene.

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    Georgi Hudjashov

    Full Text Available Global variation in skin pigmentation is one of the most striking examples of environmental adaptation in humans. More than two hundred loci have been identified as candidate genes in model organisms and a few tens of these have been found to be significantly associated with human skin pigmentation in genome-wide association studies. However, the evolutionary history of different pigmentation genes is rather complex: some loci have been subjected to strong positive selection, while others evolved under the relaxation of functional constraints in low UV environment. Here we report the results of a global study of the human tyrosinase gene, which is one of the key enzymes in melanin production, to assess the role of its variation in the evolution of skin pigmentation differences among human populations. We observe a higher rate of non-synonymous polymorphisms in the European sample consistent with the relaxation of selective constraints. A similar pattern was previously observed in the MC1R gene and concurs with UV radiation-driven model of skin color evolution by which mutations leading to lower melanin levels and decreased photoprotection are subject to purifying selection at low latitudes while being tolerated or even favored at higher latitudes because they facilitate UV-dependent vitamin D production. Our coalescent date estimates suggest that the non-synonymous variants, which are frequent in Europe and North Africa, are recent and have emerged after the separation of East and West Eurasian populations.

  20. PaGenBase: a pattern gene database for the global and dynamic understanding of gene function.

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    Jian-Bo Pan

    Full Text Available Pattern genes are a group of genes that have a modularized expression behavior under serial physiological conditions. The identification of pattern genes will provide a path toward a global and dynamic understanding of gene functions and their roles in particular biological processes or events, such as development and pathogenesis. In this study, we present PaGenBase, a novel repository for the collection of tissue- and time-specific pattern genes, including specific genes, selective genes, housekeeping genes and repressed genes. The PaGenBase database is now freely accessible at http://bioinf.xmu.edu.cn/PaGenBase/. In the current version (PaGenBase 1.0, the database contains 906,599 pattern genes derived from the literature or from data mining of more than 1,145,277 gene expression profiles in 1,062 distinct samples collected from 11 model organisms. Four statistical parameters were used to quantitatively evaluate the pattern genes. Moreover, three methods (quick search, advanced search and browse were designed for rapid and customized data retrieval. The potential applications of PaGenBase are also briefly described. In summary, PaGenBase will serve as a resource for the global and dynamic understanding of gene function and will facilitate high-level investigations in a variety of fields, including the study of development, pathogenesis and novel drug discovery.

  1. Gene expression patterns of invertase gene families and modulation of the inhibitor gene in tomato sucrose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y L; Zhang, A H; Jiang, J

    2013-01-24

    Patterns of gene expression in the different types of sucrose metabolism in the tomato are highly variable and heritable. This genetic variation causes considerable functional differences. We examined the patterns of expression of invertase (Inv) gene families and an invertase inhibitor (INH) gene involved in elongating roots, hypocotyls, and fruit of the tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Micro-Tom and L. chmielewskii) through a real-time quantitative PCR analysis. We found that the Lin6 gene plays an important role in the vegetative growth stage. Lin5 and Lin7 did not express in Micro-Tom, but did express in L. chmielewskii. Overall relative expression levels of sucrose Inv gene families were significantly lower in L. chmielewskii during the reproductive growth stage than in Micro-Tom, being up to hundreds of times lower. It was not expressed in the dissepiment in L. chmielewskii. We suggest that differences in sucrose accumulation in tomato fruit is mainly due to differentially expressed invertase gene families at the later fruit growth stages.

  2. Comprehensive analysis of gene expression patterns of hedgehog-related genes

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    Baillie David

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Caenorhabditis elegans genome encodes ten proteins that share sequence similarity with the Hedgehog signaling molecule through their C-terminal autoprocessing Hint/Hog domain. These proteins contain novel N-terminal domains, and C. elegans encodes dozens of additional proteins containing only these N-terminal domains. These gene families are called warthog, groundhog, ground-like and quahog, collectively called hedgehog (hh-related genes. Previously, the expression pattern of seventeen genes was examined, which showed that they are primarily expressed in the ectoderm. Results With the completion of the C. elegans genome sequence in November 2002, we reexamined and identified 61 hh-related ORFs. Further, we identified 49 hh-related ORFs in C. briggsae. ORF analysis revealed that 30% of the genes still had errors in their predictions and we improved these predictions here. We performed a comprehensive expression analysis using GFP fusions of the putative intergenic regulatory sequence with one or two transgenic lines for most genes. The hh-related genes are expressed in one or a few of the following tissues: hypodermis, seam cells, excretory duct and pore cells, vulval epithelial cells, rectal epithelial cells, pharyngeal muscle or marginal cells, arcade cells, support cells of sensory organs, and neuronal cells. Using time-lapse recordings, we discovered that some hh-related genes are expressed in a cyclical fashion in phase with molting during larval development. We also generated several translational GFP fusions, but they did not show any subcellular localization. In addition, we also studied the expression patterns of two genes with similarity to Drosophila frizzled, T23D8.1 and F27E11.3A, and the ortholog of the Drosophila gene dally-like, gpn-1, which is a heparan sulfate proteoglycan. The two frizzled homologs are expressed in a few neurons in the head, and gpn-1 is expressed in the pharynx. Finally, we compare the

  3. Patterns of nucleotides that flank substitutions in human orthologous genes

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    Huang Zhuoran

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence context is an important aspect of base mutagenesis, and three-base periodicity is an intrinsic property of coding sequences. However, how three-base periodicity is influenced in the vicinity of substitutions is still unclear. The effect of context on mutagenesis should be revealed in the usage of nucleotides that flank substitutions. Relative entropy (also known as Kullback-Leibler divergence is useful for finding unusual patterns in biological sequences. Results Using relative entropy, we visualized the periodic patterns in the context of substitutions in human orthologous genes. Neighbouring patterns differed both among substitution categories and within a category that occurred at three codon positions. Transition tended to occur in periodic sequences relative to transversion. Periodic signals were stronger in a set of flanking sequences of substitutions that occurred at the third-codon positions than in those that occurred at the first- or second-codon positions. To determine how the three-base periodicity was affected near the substitution sites, we fitted a sine model to the values of the relative entropy. A sine of period equal to 3 is a good approximation for the three-base periodicity at sites not in close vicinity to some substitutions. These periods were interrupted near the substitution site and then reappeared away from substitutions. A comparative analysis between the native and codon-shuffled datasets suggested that the codon usage frequency was not the sole origin of the three-base periodicity, implying that the native order of codons also played an important role in this periodicity. Synonymous codon shuffling revealed that synonymous codon usage bias was one of the factors responsible for the observed three-base periodicity. Conclusions Our results offer an efficient way to illustrate unusual periodic patterns in the context of substitutions and provide further insight into the origin of three

  4. Human speech- and reading-related genes display partially overlapping expression patterns in the marmoset brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Masaki; Okanoya, Kazuo; Koike, Taku; Sasaki, Erika; Okano, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Shigeru; Iriki, Atsushi

    2014-06-01

    Language is a characteristic feature of human communication. Several familial language impairments have been identified, and candidate genes for language impairments already isolated. Studies comparing expression patterns of these genes in human brain are necessary to further understanding of these genes. However, it is difficult to examine gene expression in human brain. In this study, we used a non-human primate (common marmoset; Callithrix jacchus) as a biological model of the human brain to investigate expression patterns of human speech- and reading-related genes. Expression patterns of speech disorder- (FoxP2, FoxP1, CNTNAP2, and CMIP) and dyslexia- (ROBO1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319) related genes were analyzed. We found the genes displayed overlapping expression patterns in the ocular, auditory, and motor systems. Our results enhance understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying language impairments. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. MetaMine – A tool to detect and analyse gene patterns in their environmental context

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    Kottmann Renzo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modern sequencing technologies allow rapid sequencing and bioinformatic analysis of genomes and metagenomes. With every new sequencing project a vast number of new proteins become available with many genes remaining functionally unclassified based on evidences from sequence similarities alone. Extending similarity searches with gene pattern approaches, defined as genes sharing a distinct genomic neighbourhood, have shown to significantly improve the number of functional assignments. Further functional evidences can be gained by correlating these gene patterns with prevailing environmental parameters. MetaMine was developed to approach the large pool of unclassified proteins by searching for recurrent gene patterns across habitats based on key genes. Results MetaMine is an interactive data mining tool which enables the detection of gene patterns in an environmental context. The gene pattern search starts with a user defined environmentally interesting key gene. With this gene a BLAST search is carried out against the Microbial Ecological Genomics DataBase (MEGDB containing marine genomic and metagenomic sequences. This is followed by the determination of all neighbouring genes within a given distance and a search for functionally equivalent genes. In the final step a set of common genes present in a defined number of distinct genomes is determined. The gene patterns found are associated with their individual pattern instances describing gene order and directions. They are presented together with information about the sample and the habitat. MetaMine is implemented in Java and provided as a client/server application with a user-friendly graphical user interface. The system was evaluated with environmentally relevant genes related to the methane-cycle and carbon monoxide oxidation. Conclusion MetaMine offers a targeted, semi-automatic search for gene patterns based on expert input. The graphical user interface of Meta

  6. Correlation-maximizing surrogate gene space for visual mining of gene expression patterns in developing barley endosperm tissue

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    Usadel Björn

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Micro- and macroarray technologies help acquire thousands of gene expression patterns covering important biological processes during plant ontogeny. Particularly, faithful visualization methods are beneficial for revealing interesting gene expression patterns and functional relationships of coexpressed genes. Such screening helps to gain deeper insights into regulatory behavior and cellular responses, as will be discussed for expression data of developing barley endosperm tissue. For that purpose, high-throughput multidimensional scaling (HiT-MDS, a recent method for similarity-preserving data embedding, is substantially refined and used for (a assessing the quality and reliability of centroid gene expression patterns, and for (b derivation of functional relationships of coexpressed genes of endosperm tissue during barley grain development (0–26 days after flowering. Results Temporal expression profiles of 4824 genes at 14 time points are faithfully embedded into two-dimensional displays. Thereby, similar shapes of coexpressed genes get closely grouped by a correlation-based similarity measure. As a main result, by using power transformation of correlation terms, a characteristic cloud of points with bipolar sandglass shape is obtained that is inherently connected to expression patterns of pre-storage, intermediate and storage phase of endosperm development. Conclusion The new HiT-MDS-2 method helps to create global views of expression patterns and to validate centroids obtained from clustering programs. Furthermore, functional gene annotation for developing endosperm barley tissue is successfully mapped to the visualization, making easy localization of major centroids of enriched functional categories possible.

  7. Binary Gene Expression Patterning of the Molt Cycle: The Case of Chitin Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abehsera, Shai; Glazer, Lilah; Tynyakov, Jenny; Plaschkes, Inbar; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered; Khalaila, Isam; Aflalo, Eliahu D.; Sagi, Amir

    2015-01-01

    In crustaceans, like all arthropods, growth is accompanied by a molting cycle. This cycle comprises major physiological events in which mineralized chitinous structures are built and degraded. These events are in turn governed by genes whose patterns of expression are presumably linked to the molting cycle. To study these genes we performed next generation sequencing and constructed a molt-related transcriptomic library from two exoskeletal-forming tissues of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus, namely the gastrolith and the mandible cuticle-forming epithelium. To simplify the study of such a complex process as molting, a novel approach, binary patterning of gene expression, was employed. This approach revealed that key genes involved in the synthesis and breakdown of chitin exhibit a molt-related pattern in the gastrolith-forming epithelium. On the other hand, the same genes in the mandible cuticle-forming epithelium showed a molt-independent pattern of expression. Genes related to the metabolism of glucosamine-6-phosphate, a chitin precursor synthesized from simple sugars, showed a molt-related pattern of expression in both tissues. The binary patterning approach unfolds typical patterns of gene expression during the molt cycle of a crustacean. The use of such a simplifying integrative tool for assessing gene patterning seems appropriate for the study of complex biological processes. PMID:25919476

  8. Binary gene expression patterning of the molt cycle: the case of chitin metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shai Abehsera

    Full Text Available In crustaceans, like all arthropods, growth is accompanied by a molting cycle. This cycle comprises major physiological events in which mineralized chitinous structures are built and degraded. These events are in turn governed by genes whose patterns of expression are presumably linked to the molting cycle. To study these genes we performed next generation sequencing and constructed a molt-related transcriptomic library from two exoskeletal-forming tissues of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus, namely the gastrolith and the mandible cuticle-forming epithelium. To simplify the study of such a complex process as molting, a novel approach, binary patterning of gene expression, was employed. This approach revealed that key genes involved in the synthesis and breakdown of chitin exhibit a molt-related pattern in the gastrolith-forming epithelium. On the other hand, the same genes in the mandible cuticle-forming epithelium showed a molt-independent pattern of expression. Genes related to the metabolism of glucosamine-6-phosphate, a chitin precursor synthesized from simple sugars, showed a molt-related pattern of expression in both tissues. The binary patterning approach unfolds typical patterns of gene expression during the molt cycle of a crustacean. The use of such a simplifying integrative tool for assessing gene patterning seems appropriate for the study of complex biological processes.

  9. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shen-Ju; Wang, Chindi; Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Niou, Zhen-Xian; Lin, Chih-Hsu; Li, Ker-Chau; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2016-01-20

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorporate spatial dependency. To overcome those limitations, we proposed a computational method to detect recurrent patterns in the spatial-temporal gene expression data of developing mouse brains. We demonstrated that regional distinction in brain development could be revealed by localized gene expression patterns. The patterns expressed in the forebrain, medullary and pontomedullary, and basal ganglia are enriched with genes involved in forebrain development, locomotory behavior, and dopamine metabolism respectively. In addition, the timing of global gene expression patterns reflects the general trends of molecular events in mouse brain development. Furthermore, we validated functional implications of the inferred patterns by showing genes sharing similar spatial-temporal expression patterns with Lhx2 exhibited differential expression in the embryonic forebrains of Lhx2 mutant mice. These analysis outcomes confirm the utility of recurrent expression patterns in studying brain development.

  10. MADS-box gene evolution-structure and transcription patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Bo; Pedersen, Louise B; Skipper, Martin

    2002-01-01

    This study presents a phylogenetic analysis of 198 MADS-box genes based on 420 parsimony-informative characters. The analysis includes only MIKC genes; therefore several genes from gymnosperms and pteridophytes are excluded. The strict consensus tree identifies all major monophyletic groups known...

  11. Multilineage differentiation of porcine bone marrow stromal cells associated with specific gene expression pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, Lijin; Zou, Xuenong; Chen, Li

    2008-01-01

    genes. However, it is not fully clear whether multilineage differentiation (osteogenesis, chondrogenesis, and adipogenesis) of BMSC is associated with a specific gene expression pattern. In the present study, we investigated the gene expression pattern of representative transcription factors and marker...... differentiation was induced in cell pellet culture by expression of sox9, type 2 collagen, and aggrecan. Cbfa1 and PPARγ2 were inhibited in chondrogenic medium. These results indicate that the differentiation potential of BMSC to a particular mesenchymal lineage relies upon specific gene expression pattern...

  12. Patterns of prokaryotic lateral gene transfers affecting parasitic microbial eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsmark, Cecilia; Foster, Peter G; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The influence of lateral gene transfer on gene origins and biology in eukaryotes is poorly understood compared with those of prokaryotes. A number of independent investigations focusing on specific genes, individual genomes, or specific functional categories from various eukaryotes have...... indicated that lateral gene transfer does indeed affect eukaryotic genomes. However, the lack of common methodology and criteria in these studies makes it difficult to assess the general importance and influence of lateral gene transfer on eukaryotic genome evolution. RESULTS: We used a phylogenomic...... approach to systematically investigate lateral gene transfer affecting the proteomes of thirteen, mainly parasitic, microbial eukaryotes, representing four of the six eukaryotic super-groups. All of the genomes investigated have been significantly affected by prokaryote-to-eukaryote lateral gene transfers...

  13. The strength of intron donor splice sites in human genes displays a bell-shaped pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Kai; Wernersson, Rasmus; Brunak, Søren

    2011-01-01

    during spliceosome assembly are fused and in tandem are transcribed and spliced into a single mature mRNA sequence. In their splice site patterns, these genes individually seem to deviate from the convex pattern, offering a possible rationale behind their fusion into a single transcript.......MOTIVATION: The gene concept has recently changed from the classical one protein notion into a much more diverse picture, where overlapping or fused transcripts, alternative transcription initiation, and genes within genes, add to the complexity generated by alternative splicing. Increased...... understanding of the mechanisms controlling pre-mRNA splicing is thus important for a wide range of aspects relating to gene expression. RESULTS: We have discovered a convex gene delineating pattern in the strength of 5' intron splice sites. When comparing the strengths of >18 000 intron containing Human genes...

  14. Distinct Patterns of Gene Gain and Loss: Diverse Evolutionary Modes of NBS-Encoding Genes in Three Solanaceae Crop Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Lan-Hua; Zhou, Guang-Can; Sun, Xiao-Qin; Lei, Zhao; Zhang, Yan-Mei; Xue, Jia-Yu; Hang, Yue-Yu

    2017-05-05

    Plant resistance conferred by nucleotide binding site (NBS)-encoding resistance genes plays a key role in the defense against various pathogens throughout the entire plant life cycle. However, comparative analyses for the systematic evaluation and determination of the evolutionary modes of NBS-encoding genes among Solanaceae species are rare. In this study, 447, 255, and 306 NBS-encoding genes were identified from the genomes of potato, tomato, and pepper, respectively. These genes usually clustered as tandem arrays on chromosomes; few existed as singletons. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that three subclasses [TNLs (TIR-NBS-LRR), CNLs (CC-NBS-LRR), and RNLs (RPW8-NBS-LRR)] each formed a monophyletic clade and were distinguished by unique exon/intron structures and amino acid motif sequences. By comparing phylogenetic and systematic relationships, we inferred that the NBS-encoding genes in the present genomes of potato, tomato, and pepper were derived from 150 CNL, 22 TNL, and 4 RNL ancestral genes, and underwent independent gene loss and duplication events after speciation. The NBS-encoding genes therefore exhibit diverse and dynamic evolutionary patterns in the three Solanaceae species, giving rise to the discrepant gene numbers observed today. Potato shows a "consistent expansion" pattern, tomato exhibits a pattern of "first expansion and then contraction," and pepper presents a "shrinking" pattern. The earlier expansion of CNLs in the common ancestor led to the dominance of this subclass in gene numbers. However, RNLs remained at low copy numbers due to their specific functions. Along the evolutionary process of NBS-encoding genes in Solanaceae, species-specific tandem duplications contributed the most to gene expansions. Copyright © 2017 Qian et al.

  15. Evolution and Expression Patterns of TCP Genes in Asparagales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrigal, Yesenia; Alzate, Juan F.; Pabón-Mora, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    CYCLOIDEA-like genes are involved in the symmetry gene network, limiting cell proliferation in the dorsal regions of bilateral flowers in core eudicots. CYC-like and closely related TCP genes (acronym for TEOSINTE BRANCHED1, CYCLOIDEA, and PROLIFERATION CELL FACTOR) have been poorly studied in Asparagales, the largest order of monocots that includes both bilateral flowers in Orchidaceae (ca. 25.000 spp) and radially symmetrical flowers in Hypoxidaceae (ca. 200 spp). With the aim of assessing TCP gene evolution in the Asparagales, we isolated TCP-like genes from publicly available databases and our own transcriptomes of Cattleya trianae (Orchidaceae) and Hypoxis decumbens (Hypoxidaceae). Our matrix contains 452 sequences representing the three major clades of TCP genes. Besides the previously identified CYC specific core eudicot duplications, our ML phylogenetic analyses recovered an early CIN-like duplication predating all angiosperms, two CIN-like Asparagales-specific duplications and a duplication prior to the diversification of Orchidoideae and Epidendroideae. In addition, we provide evidence of at least three duplications of PCF-like genes in Asparagales. While CIN-like and PCF-like genes have multiplied in Asparagales, likely enhancing the genetic network for cell proliferation, CYC-like genes remain as single, shorter copies with low expression. Homogeneous expression of CYC-like genes in the labellum as well as the lateral petals suggests little contribution to the bilateral perianth in C. trianae. CIN-like and PCF-like gene expression suggests conserved roles in cell proliferation in leaves, sepals and petals, carpels, ovules and fruits in Asparagales by comparison with previously reported functions in core eudicots and monocots. This is the first large scale analysis of TCP-like genes in Asparagales that will serve as a platform for in-depth functional studies in emerging model monocots. PMID:28144250

  16. Trainable Gene Regulation Networks with Applications to Drosophila Pattern Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjolsness, Eric

    2000-01-01

    This chapter will very briefly introduce and review some computational experiments in using trainable gene regulation network models to simulate and understand selected episodes in the development of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. For details the reader is referred to the papers introduced below. It will then introduce a new gene regulation network model which can describe promoter-level substructure in gene regulation. As described in chapter 2, gene regulation may be thought of as a combination of cis-acting regulation by the extended promoter of a gene (including all regulatory sequences) by way of the transcription complex, and of trans-acting regulation by the transcription factor products of other genes. If we simplify the cis-action by using a phenomenological model which can be tuned to data, such as a unit or other small portion of an artificial neural network, then the full transacting interaction between multiple genes during development can be modelled as a larger network which can again be tuned or trained to data. The larger network will in general need to have recurrent (feedback) connections since at least some real gene regulation networks do. This is the basic modeling approach taken, which describes how a set of recurrent neural networks can be used as a modeling language for multiple developmental processes including gene regulation within a single cell, cell-cell communication, and cell division. Such network models have been called "gene circuits", "gene regulation networks", or "genetic regulatory networks", sometimes without distinguishing the models from the actual modeled systems.

  17. A topographical map of spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, Eileen E M

    2008-05-01

    A recent study by Folkes et al. in Cell generated a 3D atlas of gene expression for the Drosophila blastoderm embryo using a new approach for image registration. This virtual embryo allows in silico multiplexing of in situ hybridizations and lays the groundwork for new insights into gene regulatory networks.

  18. Different patterns of gene expression in rice varieties undergoing a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some genes specifically up-regulated in infected 9804-Rxo1 were defenserelated, including the genes encoding pathogenesis-related protein, terpene synthase family, transcription factors (TFs) AP2 domain containing protein, myb-like deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)- binding domain containing protein, and C2H2-type ...

  19. Hox genes define distinct progenitor sub-domains within the second heart field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Nicolas; Roux, Marine; Ryckebüsch, Lucile; Niederreither, Karen; Dollé, Pascal; Moon, Anne; Capecchi, Mario; Zaffran, Stéphane

    2011-05-15

    Much of the heart, including the atria, right ventricle and outflow tract (OFT) is derived from a progenitor cell population termed the second heart field (SHF) that contributes progressively to the embryonic heart during cardiac looping. Several studies have revealed anterior-posterior patterning of the SHF, since the anterior region (anterior heart field) contributes to right ventricular and OFT myocardium whereas the posterior region gives rise to the atria. We have previously shown that Retinoic Acid (RA) signal participates to this patterning. We now show that Hoxb1, Hoxa1, and Hoxa3, as downstream RA targets, are expressed in distinct sub-domains within the SHF. Our genetic lineage tracing analysis revealed that Hoxb1, Hoxa1 and Hoxa3-expressing cardiac progenitor cells contribute to both atria and the inferior wall of the OFT, which subsequently gives rise to myocardium at the base of pulmonary trunk. By contrast to Hoxb1(Cre), the contribution of Hoxa1-enhIII-Cre and Hoxa3(Cre)-labeled cells is restricted to the distal regions of the OFT suggesting that proximo-distal patterning of the OFT is related to SHF sub-domains characterized by combinatorial Hox genes expression. Manipulation of RA signaling pathways showed that RA is required for the correct deployment of Hox-expressing SHF cells. This report provides new insights into the regulatory gene network in SHF cells contributing to the atria and sub-pulmonary myocardium. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Gene Expression Patterns Associated With Histopathology in Toxic Liver Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Danielle L; AbdulHameed, Mohamed Diwan M; Tawa, Gregory J; Baer, Christine E; Permenter, Matthew G; McDyre, Bonna C; Dennis, William E; Boyle, Molly H; Hobbs, Cheryl A; Streicker, Michael A; Snowden, Bobbi S; Lewis, John A; Wallqvist, Anders; Stallings, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    Toxic industrial chemicals induce liver injury, which is difficult to diagnose without invasive procedures. Identifying indicators of end organ injury can complement exposure-based assays and improve predictive power. A multiplexed approach was used to experimentally evaluate a panel of 67 genes predicted to be associated with the fibrosis pathology by computationally mining DrugMatrix, a publicly available repository of gene microarray data. Five-day oral gavage studies in male Sprague Dawley rats dosed with varying concentrations of 3 fibrogenic compounds (allyl alcohol, carbon tetrachloride, and 4,4'-methylenedianiline) and 2 nonfibrogenic compounds (bromobenzene and dexamethasone) were conducted. Fibrosis was definitively diagnosed by histopathology. The 67-plex gene panel accurately diagnosed fibrosis in both microarray and multiplexed-gene expression assays. Necrosis and inflammatory infiltration were comorbid with fibrosis. ANOVA with contrasts identified that 51 of the 67 predicted genes were significantly associated with the fibrosis phenotype, with 24 of these specific to fibrosis alone. The protein product of the gene most strongly correlated with the fibrosis phenotype PCOLCE (Procollagen C-Endopeptidase Enhancer) was dose-dependently elevated in plasma from animals administered fibrogenic chemicals (P liver injury and may suggest bridging biomarkers for molecular mediators linked to histopathology. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  1. Comparative transcriptomics of three Poaceae species reveals patterns of gene expression evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Rebecca M; Gowda, Malali; Moghe, Gaurav; Lin, Haining; Vaillancourt, Brieanne; Shiu, Shin-Han; Jiang, Ning; Robin Buell, C

    2012-08-01

    The Poaceae family, also known as the grasses, includes agronomically important cereal crops such as rice, maize, sorghum, and wheat. Previous comparative studies have shown that much of the gene content is shared among the grasses; however, functional conservation of orthologous genes has yet to be explored. To gain an understanding of the genome-wide patterns of evolution of gene expression across reproductive tissues, we employed a sequence-based approach to compare analogous transcriptomes in species representing three Poaceae subgroups including the Pooideae (Brachypodium distachyon), the Panicoideae (sorghum), and the Ehrhartoideae (rice). Our transcriptome analyses reveal that only a fraction of orthologous genes exhibit conserved expression patterns. A high proportion of conserved orthologs include genes that are upregulated in physiologically similar tissues such as leaves, anther, pistil, and embryo, while orthologs that are highly expressed in seeds show the most diverged expression patterns. More generally, we show that evolution of gene expression profiles and coding sequences in the grasses may be linked. Genes that are highly and broadly expressed tend to be conserved at the coding sequence level while genes with narrow expression patterns show accelerated rates of sequence evolution. We further show that orthologs in syntenic genomic blocks are more likely to share correlated expression patterns compared with non-syntenic orthologs. These findings are important for agricultural improvement because sequence information is transferred from model species, such as Brachypodium, rice, and sorghum to crop plants without sequenced genomes. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Patterns of gene expression in the sheep heart during the perinatal period revealed by transcriptomic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Elaine M; Rabaglino, M Belen; Antolic, Andrew; Wood, Charles E; Keller-Wood, Maureen

    2015-09-01

    Septa from sheep hearts at 130 days gestation, term, and 14-day-old lambs were used to model the changes in gene expression patterns during the perinatal period using Agilent 15k ovine microarrays. We used Bioconductor for R to model five major patterns of coexpressed genes. Gene ontology and transcription factor analyses using Webgestalt modeled the biological significances and transcription factors of the gene expression patterns. Modeling indicated a decreased expression of genes associated with anatomical development and differentiation during this period, whereas those associated with increased protein synthesis and growth associated with maturation of the endoplasmic reticulum rose to term but did not further increase from the near term expression. Expression of genes associated with cell responsiveness, for example, immune responses, decreased at term but expression returned by postnatal day 14. Changes in genes related to metabolism showed differential substrate-associated patterns: those related to carbohydrate metabolism rose to term and remained stable thereafter, whereas those associated with fatty acid oxidation facility rose throughout the period. The timing of many of these maturational processes was earlier in relation to birth than in the rodent. The importance of the transcription factors, estrogen-related receptors, and v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog was also highlighted in the pattern of gene expression during development of the perinatal sheep heart. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Gene evolutionary trajectories and GC patterns driven by recombination in Zea mays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitha Sundararajan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recombination occurring during meiosis is critical for creating genetic variation and plays an essential role in plant evolution. In addition to creating novel gene combinations, recombination can affect genome structure through altering GC patterns. In maize (Zea mays and other grasses, another intriguing GC pattern exists. Maize genes show a bimodal GC content distribution that has been attributed to nucleotide bias in the third, or wobble, position of the codon. Recombination may be an underlying driving force given that recombination sites are often associated with high GC content. Here we explore the relationship between recombination and genomic GC patterns by comparing GC gene content at each of the three codon positions (GC1, GC2, and GC3, collectively termed GCx to instances of a variable GC-rich motif that underlies double strand break (DSB hotspots and to meiocyte-specific gene expression. Surprisingly, GCx bimodality in maize cannot be fully explained by the codon wobble hypothesis. High GCx genes show a strong overlap with the DSB hotspot motif, possibly providing a mechanism for the high evolutionary rates seen in these genes. On the other hand, genes that are turned on in meiosis (early prophase I are biased against both high GCx genes and genes with the DSB hotspot motif, possibly allowing important meiotic genes to avoid DSBs. Our data suggests a strong link between the GC-rich motif underlying DSB hotspots and high GCx genes.

  4. Influence of Genetic Variations in Selenoprotein Genes on the Pattern of Gene Expression after Supplementation with Brazil Nuts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina L. S. Donadio

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se is an essential micronutrient for human health. Its beneficial effects are exerted by selenoproteins, which can be quantified in blood and used as molecular biomarkers of Se status. We hypothesize that the presence of genetic polymorphisms in selenoprotein genes may: (1 influence the gene expression of specific selenoproteins and (2 influence the pattern of global gene expression after Brazil nut supplementation. The study was conducted with 130 healthy volunteers in Sao Paulo, Brazil, who consumed one Brazil nut (300 μg/Se a day for eight weeks. Gene expression of GPX1 and SELENOP and genotyping were measured by real-time PCR using TaqMan Assays. Global gene expression was assessed by microarray using Illumina HumanHT-12 v4 BeadChips. Brazil nut supplementation significantly increased GPX1 mRNA expression only in subjects with CC genotype at rs1050450 (p < 0.05. SELENOP mRNA expression was significantly higher in A-carriers at rs7579 either before or after supplementation (p < 0.05. Genotype for rs713041 in GPX4 affected the pattern of blood cell global gene expression. Genetic variations in selenoprotein genes modulated both GPX1 and SELENOP selenoprotein gene expression and global gene expression in response to Brazil nut supplementation.

  5. Hox and ParaHox gene expression in early body plan patterning of polyplacophoran mollusks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Martin; Wollesen, Tim; Wanninger, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Molecular developmental studies of various bilaterians have shown that the identity of the anteroposterior body axis is controlled by Hox and ParaHox genes. Detailed Hox and ParaHox gene expression data are available for conchiferan mollusks, such as gastropods (snails and slugs) and cephalopods (squids and octopuses), whereas information on the putative conchiferan sister group, Aculifera, is still scarce (but see Fritsch et al., 2015 on Hox gene expression in the polyplacophoran Acanthochitona crinita). In contrast to gastropods and cephalopods, the Hox genes in polyplacophorans are expressed in an anteroposterior sequence similar to the condition in annelids and other bilaterians. Here, we present the expression patterns of the Hox genes Lox5, Lox4, and Lox2, together with the ParaHox gene caudal (Cdx) in the polyplacophoran A. crinita. To localize Hox and ParaHox gene transcription products, we also investigated the expression patterns of the genes FMRF and Elav, and the development of the nervous system. Similar to the other Hox genes, all three Acr-Lox genes are expressed in an anteroposterior sequence. Transcripts of Acr-Cdx are seemingly present in the forming hindgut at the posterior end. The expression patterns of both the central class Acr-Lox genes and the Acr-Cdx gene are strikingly similar to those in annelids and nemerteans. In Polyplacophora, the expression patterns of the Hox and ParaHox genes seem to be evolutionarily highly conserved, while in conchiferan mollusks these genes are co-opted into novel functions that might have led to evolutionary novelties, at least in gastropods and cephalopods. © 2016 The Authors. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. (TG/CAn repeats in human gene families: abundance and selective patterns of distribution according to function and gene length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Srinivasan

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Creation of human gene families was facilitated significantly by gene duplication and diversification. The (TG/CAn repeats exhibit length variability, display genome-wide distribution, and are abundant in the human genome. Accumulation of evidences for their multiple functional roles including regulation of transcription and stimulation of recombination and splicing elect them as functional elements. Here, we report analysis of the distribution of (TG/CAn repeats in human gene families. Results The 1,317 human gene families were classified into six functional classes. Distribution of (TG/CAn repeats were analyzed both from a global perspective and from a stratified perspective based on their biological properties. The number of genes with repeats decreased with increasing repeat length and several genes (53% had repeats of multiple types in various combinations. Repeats were positively associated with the class of Signaling and communication whereas, they were negatively associated with the classes of Immune and related functions and of Information. The proportion of genes with (TG/CAn repeats in each class was proportional to the corresponding average gene length. The repeat distribution pattern in large gene families generally mirrored the global distribution pattern but differed particularly for Collagen gene family, which was rich in repeats. The position and flanking sequences of the repeats of Collagen genes showed high conservation in the Chimpanzee genome. However the majority of these repeats displayed length polymorphism. Conclusion Positive association of repeats with genes of Signaling and communication points to their role in modulation of transcription. Negative association of repeats in genes of Information relates to the smaller gene length, higher expression and fundamental role in cellular physiology. In genes of Immune and related functions negative association of repeats perhaps relates to the smaller gene

  7. Regulation of Gene Expression Patterns in Mosquito Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sourav; Saha, Tusar T; Johnson, Lisa; Zhao, Bo; Ha, Jisu; White, Kevin P; Girke, Thomas; Zou, Zhen; Raikhel, Alexander S

    2015-08-01

    In multicellular organisms, development, growth and reproduction require coordinated expression of numerous functional and regulatory genes. Insects, in addition to being the most speciose animal group with enormous biological and economical significance, represent outstanding model organisms for studying regulation of synchronized gene expression due to their rapid development and reproduction. Disease-transmitting female mosquitoes have adapted uniquely for ingestion and utilization of the huge blood meal required for swift reproductive events to complete egg development within a 72-h period. We investigated the network of regulatory factors mediating sequential gene expression in the fat body, a multifunctional organ analogous to the vertebrate liver and adipose tissue, of the female Aedes aegypti mosquito. Transcriptomic and bioinformatics analyses revealed that ~7500 transcripts are differentially expressed in four sequential waves during the 72-h reproductive period. A combination of RNA-interference gene-silencing and in-vitro organ culture identified the major regulators for each of these waves. Amino acids (AAs) regulate the first wave of gene activation between 3 h and 12 h post-blood meal (PBM). During the second wave, between 12 h and 36 h, most genes are highly upregulated by a synergistic action of AAs, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and the Ecdysone-Receptor (EcR). Between 36 h and 48 h, the third wave of gene activation-regulated mainly by HR3-occurs. Juvenile Hormone (JH) and its receptor Methoprene-Tolerant (Met) are major regulators for the final wave between 48 h and 72 h. Each of these key regulators also has repressive effects on one or more gene sets. Our study provides a better understanding of the complexity of the regulatory mechanisms related to temporal coordination of gene expression during reproduction. We have detected the novel function of 20E/EcR responsible for transcriptional repression. This study also reveals the previously

  8. Regulation of Gene Expression Patterns in Mosquito Reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lisa; Zhao, Bo; Ha, Jisu; White, Kevin P.; Girke, Thomas; Zou, Zhen; Raikhel, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, development, growth and reproduction require coordinated expression of numerous functional and regulatory genes. Insects, in addition to being the most speciose animal group with enormous biological and economical significance, represent outstanding model organisms for studying regulation of synchronized gene expression due to their rapid development and reproduction. Disease-transmitting female mosquitoes have adapted uniquely for ingestion and utilization of the huge blood meal required for swift reproductive events to complete egg development within a 72-h period. We investigated the network of regulatory factors mediating sequential gene expression in the fat body, a multifunctional organ analogous to the vertebrate liver and adipose tissue, of the female Aedes aegypti mosquito. Transcriptomic and bioinformatics analyses revealed that ~7500 transcripts are differentially expressed in four sequential waves during the 72-h reproductive period. A combination of RNA-interference gene-silencing and in-vitro organ culture identified the major regulators for each of these waves. Amino acids (AAs) regulate the first wave of gene activation between 3 h and 12 h post-blood meal (PBM). During the second wave, between 12 h and 36 h, most genes are highly upregulated by a synergistic action of AAs, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and the Ecdysone-Receptor (EcR). Between 36 h and 48 h, the third wave of gene activation—regulated mainly by HR3—occurs. Juvenile Hormone (JH) and its receptor Methoprene-Tolerant (Met) are major regulators for the final wave between 48 h and 72 h. Each of these key regulators also has repressive effects on one or more gene sets. Our study provides a better understanding of the complexity of the regulatory mechanisms related to temporal coordination of gene expression during reproduction. We have detected the novel function of 20E/EcR responsible for transcriptional repression. This study also reveals the previously

  9. Patterns of human gene expression variance show strong associations with signaling network hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komurov, Kakajan; Ram, Prahlad T

    2010-11-12

    Understanding organizational principles of cellular networks is one of the central goals of systems biology. Although much has been learnt about gene expression programs under specific conditions, global patterns of expressional variation (EV) of genes and their relationship to cellular functions and physiological responses is poorly understood. To understand global principles of relationship between transcriptional regulation of human genes and their functions, we have leveraged large-scale datasets of human gene expression measurements across a wide spectrum of cell conditions. We report that human genes are highly diverse in terms of their EV; while some genes have highly variable expression pattern, some seem to be relatively ubiquitously expressed across a wide range of conditions. The wide spectrum of gene EV strongly correlates with the positioning of proteins within the signaling network hierarchy, such that, secreted extracellular receptor ligands and membrane receptors have the highest EV, and intracellular signaling proteins have the lowest EV in the genome. Our analysis shows that this pattern of EV reflects functional centrality: proteins with highly specific signaling functions are modulated more frequently than those with highly central functions in the network, which is also consistent with previous studies on tissue-specific gene expression. Interestingly, these patterns of EV along the signaling network hierarchy have significant correlations with promoter architectures of respective genes. Our analyses suggest a generic systems level mechanism of regulation of the cellular signaling network at the transcriptional level.

  10. Patterns of human gene expression variance show strong associations with signaling network hierarchy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Prahlad T

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding organizational principles of cellular networks is one of the central goals of systems biology. Although much has been learnt about gene expression programs under specific conditions, global patterns of expressional variation (EV of genes and their relationship to cellular functions and physiological responses is poorly understood. Results To understand global principles of relationship between transcriptional regulation of human genes and their functions, we have leveraged large-scale datasets of human gene expression measurements across a wide spectrum of cell conditions. We report that human genes are highly diverse in terms of their EV; while some genes have highly variable expression pattern, some seem to be relatively ubiquitously expressed across a wide range of conditions. The wide spectrum of gene EV strongly correlates with the positioning of proteins within the signaling network hierarchy, such that, secreted extracellular receptor ligands and membrane receptors have the highest EV, and intracellular signaling proteins have the lowest EV in the genome. Our analysis shows that this pattern of EV reflects functional centrality: proteins with highly specific signaling functions are modulated more frequently than those with highly central functions in the network, which is also consistent with previous studies on tissue-specific gene expression. Interestingly, these patterns of EV along the signaling network hierarchy have significant correlations with promoter architectures of respective genes. Conclusion Our analyses suggest a generic systems level mechanism of regulation of the cellular signaling network at the transcriptional level.

  11. Geographical patterns of adaptation within a species' range : Interactions between drift and gene flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alleaume-Benharira, M; Pen, IR; Ronce, O

    We use individual-based stochastic simulations and analytical deterministic predictions to investigate the interaction between drift, natural selection and gene flow on the patterns of local adaptation across a fragmented species' range under clinally varying selection. Migration between populations

  12. Network Security via Biometric Recognition of Patterns of Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Harry C.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular biology provides the ability to implement forms of information and network security completely outside the bounds of legacy security protocols and algorithms. This paper addresses an approach which instantiates the power of gene expression for security. Molecular biology provides a rich source of gene expression and regulation mechanisms, which can be adopted to use in the information and electronic communication domains. Conventional security protocols are becoming increasingly vulnerable due to more intensive, highly capable attacks on the underlying mathematics of cryptography. Security protocols are being undermined by social engineering and substandard implementations by IT organizations. Molecular biology can provide countermeasures to these weak points with the current security approaches. Future advances in instruments for analyzing assays will also enable this protocol to advance from one of cryptographic algorithms to an integrated system of cryptographic algorithms and real-time expression and assay of gene expression products.

  13. Network Security via Biometric Recognition of Patterns of Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Harry C.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular biology provides the ability to implement forms of information and network security completely outside the bounds of legacy security protocols and algorithms. This paper addresses an approach which instantiates the power of gene expression for security. Molecular biology provides a rich source of gene expression and regulation mechanisms, which can be adopted to use in the information and electronic communication domains. Conventional security protocols are becoming increasingly vulnerable due to more intensive, highly capable attacks on the underlying mathematics of cryptography. Security protocols are being undermined by social engineering and substandard implementations by IT (Information Technology) organizations. Molecular biology can provide countermeasures to these weak points with the current security approaches. Future advances in instruments for analyzing assays will also enable this protocol to advance from one of cryptographic algorithms to an integrated system of cryptographic algorithms and real-time assays of gene expression products.

  14. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain

    OpenAIRE

    Shen-Ju Chou; Chindi Wang; Nardnisa Sintupisut; Zhen-Xian Niou; Chih-Hsu Lin; Ker-Chau Li; Chen-Hsiang Yeang

    2016-01-01

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorp...

  15. An efficient method for mining cross-timepoint gene regulation sequential patterns from time course gene expression datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chun-Pei; Liu, Yu-Cheng; Tsai, Yi-Lin; Tseng, Vincent S

    2013-01-01

    Observation of gene expression changes implying gene regulations using a repetitive experiment in time course has become more and more important. However, there is no effective method which can handle such kind of data. For instance, in a clinical/biological progression like inflammatory response or cancer formation, a great number of differentially expressed genes at different time points could be identified through a large-scale microarray approach. For each repetitive experiment with different samples, converting the microarray datasets into transactional databases with significant singleton genes at each time point would allow sequential patterns implying gene regulations to be identified. Although traditional sequential pattern mining methods have been successfully proposed and widely used in different interesting topics, like mining customer purchasing sequences from a transactional database, to our knowledge, the methods are not suitable for such biological dataset because every transaction in the converted database may contain too many items/genes. In this paper, we propose a new algorithm called CTGR-Span (Cross-Timepoint Gene Regulation Sequential pattern) to efficiently mine CTGR-SPs (Cross-Timepoint Gene Regulation Sequential Patterns) even on larger datasets where traditional algorithms are infeasible. The CTGR-Span includes several biologically designed parameters based on the characteristics of gene regulation. We perform an optimal parameter tuning process using a GO enrichment analysis to yield CTGR-SPs more meaningful biologically. The proposed method was evaluated with two publicly available human time course microarray datasets and it was shown that it outperformed the traditional methods in terms of execution efficiency. After evaluating with previous literature, the resulting patterns also strongly correlated with the experimental backgrounds of the datasets used in this study. We propose an efficient CTGR-Span to mine several biologically

  16. Gene promoter methylation patterns throughout the process of cervical carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Nan; Nijhuis, Esther R.; Volders, Haukeline H.; Eijsink, Jasper J. H.; Lendvai, Agnes; Zhang, Bo; Hollema, Harry; Schuuring, Ed; Wisman, G. Bea A.; van der Zee, Ate G. J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To determine methylation status of nine genes, previously described to be frequently methylated in cervical cancer, in squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL). Methods: QMSP was performed in normal cervix, low-grade ( L) SIL, high-grade (H) SIL, adenocarcinomas and squamous cell cervical

  17. Comparison of gene expression patterns between porcine cumulus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UPuser

    min at 72 °C. The housekeeping gene, β-actin, was employed as an internal control to test the RT-PCR efficiency and normalization. Reactions consisting of RT-PCR reaction mixture without added sample template were always included to ensure absence of contamination. The amplified cDNAs were electrophoresed on ...

  18. Allozyme frequency distribution patterns at two gene loci of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Allozyme diversity at the gene loci of the Phosphoglucomutase and Fumarate hydratase enzymes were studied in cowpea landraces,with accession numbers 87/139, 87/142, 87/157, 87/30, 87/37, 87/55, 87/77, 87/81, and 87/83. Leaf protein of the accessions were extracted and subjected to starch gel electrophoresis.

  19. Characterizing embryonic gene expression patterns in the mouse using nonredundant sequence-based selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sousa-Nunes, Rita; Rana, Amer Ahmed; Kettleborough, Ross

    2003-01-01

    steps of axial specification and tissue patterning in the mouse. To avoid examining the same gene more than once, and to exclude potentially ubiquitously expressed housekeeping genes, cDNA sequence was derived from 1978 clones of the Endoderm library. These yielded 1440 distinct cDNAs, of which 123...

  20. Differential gene expression patterns of the developing and adult cornea compared to the lens and tendon

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Feng; Lee, Seakwoo; Schumacher, Michael; Jun, Albert; Chakravarti, Shukti

    2008-01-01

    The cornea continues to mature after birth to develop a fully functional, refractive and protective barrier tissue. Here we investigated the complex biological events underlying this process by profiling global genome-wide gene expression patterns of the immature postnatal day 10 and seven week-old adult mouse cornea. The lens and tendon were included in the study to increase the specificity of genes identified as up regulated in the corneal samples. Notable similarities in gene expression be...

  1. Spatial patterns of gene expression in the olfactory bulb

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, David M.; Yang, Yee Hwa; Scolnick, Jonathan A.; Brunet, Lisa J.; Marsh, Heather; Peng, Vivian; Okazaki, Yasushi; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Speed, Terence P.; Ngai, John

    2004-01-01

    How olfactory sensory neurons converge on spatially invariant glomeruli in the olfactory bulb is largely unknown. In one model, olfactory sensory neurons interact with spatially restricted guidance cues in the bulb that orient and guide them to their target. Identifying differentially expressed molecules in the olfactory bulb has been extremely difficult, however, hindering a molecular analysis of convergence. Here, we describe several such genes that have been identified in a screen that com...

  2. Hunting complex differential gene interaction patterns across molecular contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mingzhou; Zhang, Yang; Katzaroff, Alexia J; Edgar, Bruce A; Buttitta, Laura

    2014-04-01

    Heterogeneity in genetic networks across different signaling molecular contexts can suggest molecular regulatory mechanisms. Here we describe a comparative chi-square analysis (CPχ(2)) method, considerably more flexible and effective than other alternatives, to screen large gene expression data sets for conserved and differential interactions. CPχ(2) decomposes interactions across conditions to assess homogeneity and heterogeneity. Theoretically, we prove an asymptotic chi-square null distribution for the interaction heterogeneity statistic. Empirically, on synthetic yeast cell cycle data, CPχ(2) achieved much higher statistical power in detecting differential networks than alternative approaches. We applied CPχ(2) to Drosophila melanogaster wing gene expression arrays collected under normal conditions, and conditions with overexpressed E2F and Cabut, two transcription factor complexes that promote ectopic cell cycling. The resulting differential networks suggest a mechanism by which E2F and Cabut regulate distinct gene interactions, while still sharing a small core network. Thus, CPχ(2) is sensitive in detecting network rewiring, useful in comparing related biological systems.

  3. The SOD gene family in tomato: identification, phylogenetic relationships and expression patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    kun feng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Superoxide dismutases (SODs are critical antioxidant enzymes that protect organisms from reactive oxygen species (ROS caused by adverse conditions, and have been widely found in the cytoplasm, chloroplasts, and mitochondria of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. is an important economic crop and is cultivated worldwide. However, abiotic and biotic stresses severely hinder growth and development of the plant, which affects the production and quality of the crop. To reveal the potential roles of SOD genes under various stresses, we performed a systematic analysis of the tomato SOD gene family and analyzed the expression patterns of SlSOD genes in response to abiotic stresses at the whole-genome level. The characteristics of the SlSOD gene family were determined by analyzing gene structure, conserved motifs, chromosomal distribution, phylogenetic relationships, and expression patterns. We determined that there are at least nine SOD genes in tomato, including four Cu/ZnSODs, three FeSODs, and one MnSOD, and they are unevenly distributed on 12 chromosomes. Phylogenetic analyses of SOD genes from tomato and other plant species were separated into two groups with a high bootstrap value, indicating that these SOD genes were present before the monocot-dicot split. Additionally, many cis-elements that respond to different stresses were found in the promoters of nine SlSOD genes. Gene expression analysis based on RNA-seq data showed that most genes were expressed in all tested tissues, with the exception of SlSOD6 and SlSOD8, which were only expressed in young fruits. Microarray data analysis showed that most members of the SlSOD gene family were altered under salt- and drought-stress conditions. This genome-wide analysis of SlSOD genes helps to clarify the function of SlSOD genes under different stress conditions and provides information to aid in further understanding the evolutionary relationships of SOD genes in plants.

  4. Expression pattern of the expanded noggin gene family in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, M Dolores; Saló, Emili; Cebrià, Francesc

    2009-04-01

    Noggin genes are mainly known as inhibitors of the Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signalling pathway. Noggin genes play an important role in various developmental processes such as axis formation and neural differentiation. In vertebrates, inhibition of the BMP pathway is usually carried out together with other inhibitory molecules: chordin and follistatin. Recently, it has been shown in planarians that the BMP pathway has a conserved function in the maintenance and re-establishment of the dorsoventral axis during homeostasis and regeneration. In an attempt to further characterize the BMP pathway in this model we have undertaken an in silico search of noggin genes in the genome of Schmidtea mediterranea. In contrast to other systems in which between one and four noggin genes have been reported, ten genes containing a noggin domain are present in S. mediterranea. These genes have been classified into two groups: noggin genes (two genes) and noggin-like genes (eight genes). Noggin-like genes are characterized by the presence of an insertion of 50-60 amino acids in the middle of the noggin domain. Here, we report the characterization of this expanded family of noggin genes in planarians as well as their expression patterns in both intact and regenerating animals. In situ hybridizations show that planarian noggin genes are expressed in a variety of cell types located in different regions of the planarian body.

  5. Microarray Data Analysis of Space Grown Arabidopsis Leaves for Genes Important in Vascular Patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzeal, A. J.; Wyatt, S. E.; Parsons-Wingerter, P.

    2016-01-01

    Venation patterning in leaves is a major determinant of photosynthesis efficiency because of its dependency on vascular transport of photoassimilates, water, and minerals. Arabidopsis thaliana grown in microgravity show delayed growth and leaf maturation. Gene expression data from the roots, hypocotyl, and leaves of A. thaliana grown during spaceflight vs. ground control analyzed by Affymetrix microarray are available through NASAs GeneLab (GLDS-7). We analyzed the data for differential expression of genes in leaves resulting from the effects of spaceflight on vascular patterning. Two genes were found by preliminary analysis to be upregulated during spaceflight that may be related to vascular formation. The genes are responsible for coding an ARGOS like protein (potentially affecting cell elongation in the leaves), and an F-boxkelch-repeat protein (possibly contributing to protoxylem specification). Further analysis that will focus on raw data quality assessment and a moderated t-test may further confirm upregulation of the two genes and/or identify other gene candidates. Plants defective in these genes will then be assessed for phenotype by the mapping and quantification of leaf vascular patterning by NASAs VESsel GENeration (VESGEN) software to model specific vascular differences of plants grown in spaceflight.

  6. Differential gene expression patterns between smokers and non‐smokers: cause or consequence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Rick; Brooks, Andy; Willemsen, Gonneke; van Grootheest, Gerard; de Geus, Eco; Smit, Jan H.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The molecular mechanisms causing smoking‐induced health decline are largely unknown. To elucidate the molecular pathways involved in cause and consequences of smoking behavior, we conducted a genome‐wide gene expression study in peripheral blood samples targeting 18 238 genes. Data of 743 smokers, 1686 never smokers and 890 ex‐smokers were available from two population‐based cohorts from the Netherlands. In addition, data of 56 monozygotic twin pairs discordant for ever smoking were used. One hundred thirty‐two genes were differentially expressed between current smokers and never smokers (P expression of these 132 genes was classified into reversible (94 genes), slowly reversible (31 genes), irreversible (6 genes) or inconclusive (1 gene). Expression of 6 of the 132 genes (three reversible and three slowly reversible) was confirmed to be reactive to smoking as they were differentially expressed in monozygotic pairs discordant for smoking. Cis‐expression quantitative trait loci for GPR56 and RARRES3 (downregulated in smokers) were associated with increased number of cigarettes smoked per day in a large genome‐wide association meta‐analysis, suggesting a causative effect of GPR56 and RARRES3 expression on smoking behavior. In conclusion, differential gene expression patterns in smokers are extensive and cluster in several underlying disease pathways. Gene expression differences seem mainly direct consequences of smoking, and largely reversible after smoking cessation. However, we also identified DNA variants that may influence smoking behavior via the mediating gene expression. PMID:26594007

  7. Limb patterning genes and heterochronic development of the emu wing bud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig A. Smith

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The forelimb of the flightless emu is a vestigial structure, with greatly reduced wing elements and digit loss. To explore the molecular and cellular mechanisms associated with the evolution of vestigial wings and loss of flight in the emu, key limb patterning genes were examined in developing embryos. Methods Limb development was compared in emu versus chicken embryos. Immunostaining for cell proliferation markers was used to analyze growth of the emu forelimb and hindlimb buds. Expression patterns of limb patterning genes were studied, using whole-mount in situ hybridization (for mRNA localization and RNA-seq (for mRNA expression levels. Results The forelimb of the emu embryo showed heterochronic development compared to that in the chicken, with the forelimb bud being retarded in its development. Early outgrowth of the emu forelimb bud is characterized by a lower level of cell proliferation compared the hindlimb bud, as assessed by PH3 immunostaining. In contrast, there were no obvious differences in apoptosis in forelimb versus hindlimb buds (cleaved caspase 3 staining. Most key patterning genes were expressed in emu forelimb buds similarly to that observed in the chicken, but with smaller expression domains. However, expression of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh mRNA, which is central to anterior–posterior axis development, was delayed in the emu forelimb bud relative to other patterning genes. Regulators of Shh expression, Gli3 and HoxD13, also showed altered expression levels in the emu forelimb bud. Conclusions These data reveal heterochronic but otherwise normal expression of most patterning genes in the emu vestigial forelimb. Delayed Shh expression may be related to the small and vestigial structure of the emu forelimb bud. However, the genetic mechanism driving retarded emu wing development is likely to rest within the forelimb field of the lateral plate mesoderm, predating the expression of patterning genes.

  8. Dynamic patterns of expression for genes regulating cytokinin metabolism and signaling during rice inflorescence development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamburenko, Maria V.; Kieber, Joseph J.

    2017-01-01

    Inflorescence development in cereals, including such important crops as rice, maize, and wheat, directly affects grain number and size and is a key determinant of yield. Cytokinin regulates meristem size and activity and, as a result, has profound effects on inflorescence development and architecture. To clarify the role of cytokinin action in inflorescence development, we used the NanoString nCounter system to analyze gene expression in the early stages of rice panicle development, focusing on 67 genes involved in cytokinin biosynthesis, degradation, and signaling. Results point toward key members of these gene families involved in panicle development and indicate that the expression of many genes involved in cytokinin action differs between the panicle and vegetative tissues. Dynamic patterns of gene expression suggest that subnetworks mediate cytokinin action during different stages of panicle development. The variation of expression during panicle development is greater among genes encoding proteins involved in cytokinin metabolism and negative regulators of the pathway than for the genes in the primary response pathway. These results provide insight into the expression patterns of genes involved in cytokinin action during inflorescence development in a crop of agricultural importance, with relevance to similar processes in other monocots. The identification of subnetworks of genes expressed at different stages of early panicle development suggests that manipulation of their expression could have substantial effects on inflorescence architecture. PMID:28419168

  9. Dynamic patterns of expression for genes regulating cytokinin metabolism and signaling during rice inflorescence development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria V Yamburenko

    Full Text Available Inflorescence development in cereals, including such important crops as rice, maize, and wheat, directly affects grain number and size and is a key determinant of yield. Cytokinin regulates meristem size and activity and, as a result, has profound effects on inflorescence development and architecture. To clarify the role of cytokinin action in inflorescence development, we used the NanoString nCounter system to analyze gene expression in the early stages of rice panicle development, focusing on 67 genes involved in cytokinin biosynthesis, degradation, and signaling. Results point toward key members of these gene families involved in panicle development and indicate that the expression of many genes involved in cytokinin action differs between the panicle and vegetative tissues. Dynamic patterns of gene expression suggest that subnetworks mediate cytokinin action during different stages of panicle development. The variation of expression during panicle development is greater among genes encoding proteins involved in cytokinin metabolism and negative regulators of the pathway than for the genes in the primary response pathway. These results provide insight into the expression patterns of genes involved in cytokinin action during inflorescence development in a crop of agricultural importance, with relevance to similar processes in other monocots. The identification of subnetworks of genes expressed at different stages of early panicle development suggests that manipulation of their expression could have substantial effects on inflorescence architecture.

  10. Expression pattern of Piwi-like genes in adult Myzostoma cirriferum (Annelida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigert, Anne; Helm, Conrad; Hausen, Harald; Zakrzewski, Anne-C; Bleidorn, Christoph

    2013-09-01

    Piwi-like genes are a subgroup of Argonaute genes which participate as gene regulators by gene silencing. In most bilaterians, such as mouse, human, insects, and zebrafish, their expression is mostly limited to gonadal stem cells. But there are some striking exceptions to this pattern; flatworms and acoels also express Piwi-like genes in somatic stem cells, due to their unique replacement system. Annelid species like Capitella teleta and Platynereis dumerilii express these genes in cells of the posterior growth zone as well as in gonadal stem cells. To investigate the expression pattern of Piwi-like genes in another annelid, we established in situ hybridization for adult Myzostoma cirriferum. Piwi-like gene transcripts recovered in an mRNA-seq library of pooled adult stages of M. cirriferum were expanded using RACE PCR, cloned and sequenced. ML analysis confirmed the identity of both transcripts as part of the Piwi1-like or Piwi2-like subfamily of Argonaute proteins. The results of in situ hybridization studies show that the expression of both Piwi-like genes, Mc-Piwi1 and Mc-Piwi2, is clearly located only in gonadal stem cells, and as such we did not find any evidence for the existence of a posterior growth zone nor expression in somatic stem cells.

  11. Dynamic patterns of expression for genes regulating cytokinin metabolism and signaling during rice inflorescence development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamburenko, Maria V; Kieber, Joseph J; Schaller, G Eric

    2017-01-01

    Inflorescence development in cereals, including such important crops as rice, maize, and wheat, directly affects grain number and size and is a key determinant of yield. Cytokinin regulates meristem size and activity and, as a result, has profound effects on inflorescence development and architecture. To clarify the role of cytokinin action in inflorescence development, we used the NanoString nCounter system to analyze gene expression in the early stages of rice panicle development, focusing on 67 genes involved in cytokinin biosynthesis, degradation, and signaling. Results point toward key members of these gene families involved in panicle development and indicate that the expression of many genes involved in cytokinin action differs between the panicle and vegetative tissues. Dynamic patterns of gene expression suggest that subnetworks mediate cytokinin action during different stages of panicle development. The variation of expression during panicle development is greater among genes encoding proteins involved in cytokinin metabolism and negative regulators of the pathway than for the genes in the primary response pathway. These results provide insight into the expression patterns of genes involved in cytokinin action during inflorescence development in a crop of agricultural importance, with relevance to similar processes in other monocots. The identification of subnetworks of genes expressed at different stages of early panicle development suggests that manipulation of their expression could have substantial effects on inflorescence architecture.

  12. Heterogeneous pattern of DNA methylation in developmentally important genes correlates with its chromatin conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Puja; Singh, Kiran; Sachan, Manisha

    2017-01-11

    DNA methylation is a major epigenetic modification, playing a crucial role in the development and differentiation of higher organisms. DNA methylation is also known to regulate transcription by gene repression. Various developmental genes such as c-mos, HoxB5, Sox11, and Sry show tissue-specific gene expression that was shown to be regulated by promoter DNA methylation. The aim of the present study is to investigate the establishment of chromatin marks (active or repressive) in relation to heterogeneous methylation in the promoter regions of these developmentally important genes. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays were performed to immuno-precipitate chromatin by antibodies against both active (H3K4me3) and repressive (H3K9me3) chromatin regions. The analysis of ChIP results showed that both the percentage input and fold enrichment of activated chromatin was higher in tissues expressing the respective genes as compared to the tissues not expressing the same set of genes. This was true for all the genes selected for the study (c-mos, HoxB5, Sox11, and Sry). These findings illustrate that inconsistent DNA methylation patterns (sporadic, mosaic and heterogeneous) may also influence gene regulation, thereby resulting in the modulation of chromatin conformation. These findings illustrate that various patterns of DNA methylation (asynchronous, mosaic and heterogeneous) correlates with chromatin modification, resulting in the gene regulation.

  13. Spatial patterns of denitrification and its functional genes in peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mander, Ülo; Ligi, Teele; Truu, Marika; Truu, Jaak; Pärn, Jaan; Egorov, Sergey; Järveoja, Järvi; Vohla, Christina; Maddison, Martin; Soosaar, Kaido; Oopkaup, Kristjan; Teemusk, Alar; Preem, Jens-Konrad; Uuemaa, Evelyn

    2014-05-01

    This study is aimed to analyse relationships between the environmental factors and the spatial distribution of the main functional genes nirS, nirK, and nosZ regulating the denitrification process. Variations in hydrological regime, soil temperature and peat quality have been taken into the consideration at both local and global scale. Measurements of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions using static chambers, groundwater analysis, gas and peat sampling for further laboratory analysis has been conducted in various peatlands in Iceland (two study areas, 2011), Transylvania/Romania (2012), Santa Catarina/Brazil (2012), Quebec/Canada (2012), Bashkortostan/Russian Federation (two study areas, 2012), Sichuan/China (2012), Estonia (two study areas, 2012), Florida/USA (2013, Sologne/France (2013), Jugra in West Siberia/Russia (2013), Uganda (2013), French Guyana (two study areas, 2013), Tasmania (two study areas, 2014) and New Zealand (two study areas, 2014). In each study area at least 2 transects along the groundwater depth gradient, one preferably in undisturbed, another one in drained area, and at least 3 rows of sampling sites (3-5 replicate chambers and 1 piezometer and soil sampling plot in each) in both has been established for studies. In each transect GHG emission was measured during 2-3 days in at least 5 sessions. In addition, organic sediments from the artificial riverine wetlands in Ohio/USA in 2009 and relevant gas emission studies have been used in the analyses. In the laboratories of Estonian University of Life Sciences and the University of Tartu, the peat chemical quality (pH, N, P, C, NH4, NO3) and N2O, CO2, and CH4 concentration in gas samples (50mL glass bottles and exetainers) were analysed. The peat samples for further pyrosequencing and qPCR analyses are stored in fridge by -22oC. This presentation will consider the variation of GHG emissions and hydrological conditions in the study sites. In addition, several selected biophysical factors will be taken

  14. Anterior Hox Genes in Cardiac Development and Great Artery Patterning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Laforest

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During early development, the heart tube grows by progressive addition of progenitor cells to the arterial and venous poles. These cardiac progenitor cells, originally identified in 2001, are located in the splanchnic mesoderm in a region termed the second heart field (SHF. Since its discovery, our view of heart development has been refined and it is well established that perturbation in the addition of SHF cells results in a spectrum of congenital heart defects. We have previously shown that anterior Hox genes, including Hoxb1, Hoxa1 and Hoxa3, are expressed in distinct subdomains of the SHF that contribute to atrial and subpulmonary myocardium. It is well known that Hox proteins exert their function through interaction with members of the TALE family, including Pbx and Meis factors. The expression profile of Pbx and Meis factors overlaps with that of anterior Hox factors in the embryonic heart, and recent data suggest that they may interact together during cardiac development. This review aims to bring together recent findings in vertebrates that strongly suggest an important function for Hox, Pbx and Meis factors in heart development and disease.

  15. Microarray Data Analysis of Space Grown Arabidopsis Leaves for Genes Important in Vascular Patterning. Analysis of Space Grown Arabidopsis with Microarray Data from GeneLab: Identification of Genes Important in Vascular Patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzel, A. J.; Wyatt, S. E.; Parsons-Wingerter, P.

    2016-01-01

    Venation patterning in leaves is a major determinant of photosynthesis efficiency because of its dependency on vascular transport of photo-assimilates, water, and minerals. Arabidopsis thaliana grown in microgravity show delayed growth and leaf maturation. Gene expression data from the roots, hypocotyl, and leaves of A. thaliana grown during spaceflight vs. ground control analyzed by Affymetrix microarray are available through NASA's GeneLab (GLDS-7). We analyzed the data for differential expression of genes in leaves resulting from the effects of spaceflight on vascular patterning. Two genes were found by preliminary analysis to be up-regulated during spaceflight that may be related to vascular formation. The genes are responsible for coding an ARGOS (Auxin-Regulated Gene Involved in Organ Size)-like protein (potentially affecting cell elongation in the leaves), and an F-box/kelch-repeat protein (possibly contributing to protoxylem specification). Further analysis that will focus on raw data quality assessment and a moderated t-test may further confirm up-regulation of the two genes and/or identify other gene candidates. Plants defective in these genes will then be assessed for phenotype by the mapping and quantification of leaf vascular patterning by NASA's VESsel GENeration (VESGEN) software to model specific vascular differences of plants grown in spaceflight.

  16. Patterns of evolutionary conservation of essential genes correlate with their compensability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Bergmiller

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Essential genes code for fundamental cellular functions required for the viability of an organism. For this reason, essential genes are often highly conserved across organisms. However, this is not always the case: orthologues of genes that are essential in one organism are sometimes not essential in other organisms or are absent from their genomes. This suggests that, in the course of evolution, essential genes can be rendered nonessential. How can a gene become non-essential? Here we used genetic manipulation to deplete the products of 26 different essential genes in Escherichia coli. This depletion results in a lethal phenotype, which could often be rescued by the overexpression of a non-homologous, non-essential gene, most likely through replacement of the essential function. We also show that, in a smaller number of cases, the essential genes can be fully deleted from the genome, suggesting that complete functional replacement is possible. Finally, we show that essential genes whose function can be replaced in the laboratory are more likely to be non-essential or not present in other taxa. These results are consistent with the notion that patterns of evolutionary conservation of essential genes are influenced by their compensability-that is, by how easily they can be functionally replaced, for example through increased expression of other genes.

  17. Evolution of the F-Box Gene Family in Euarchontoglires: Gene Number Variation and Selection Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ailan; Fu, Mingchuan; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Mao, Yuanhui; Li, Xiangchen; Tao, Shiheng

    2014-01-01

    F-box proteins are substrate adaptors used by the SKP1–CUL1–F-box protein (SCF) complex, a type of E3 ubiquitin ligase complex in the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). SCF-mediated ubiquitylation regulates proteolysis of hundreds of cellular proteins involved in key signaling and disease systems. However, our knowledge of the evolution of the F-box gene family in Euarchontoglires is limited. In the present study, 559 F-box genes and nine related pseudogenes were identified in eight genomes. Lineage-specific gene gain and loss events occurred during the evolution of Euarchontoglires, resulting in varying F-box gene numbers ranging from 66 to 81 among the eight species. Both tandem duplication and retrotransposition were found to have contributed to the increase of F-box gene number, whereas mutation in the F-box domain was the main mechanism responsible for reduction in the number of F-box genes, resulting in a balance of expansion and contraction in the F-box gene family. Thus, the Euarchontoglire F-box gene family evolved under a birth-and-death model. Signatures of positive selection were detected in substrate-recognizing domains of multiple F-box proteins, and adaptive changes played a role in evolution of the Euarchontoglire F-box gene family. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) distributions were found to be highly non-random among different regions of F-box genes in 1092 human individuals, with domain regions having a significantly lower number of non-synonymous SNPs. PMID:24727786

  18. Comprehensive analysis of the flowering genes in Chinese cabbage and examination of evolutionary pattern of CO-like genes in plant kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoming; Duan, Weike; Huang, Zhinan; Liu, Gaofeng; Wu, Peng; Liu, Tongkun; Li, Ying; Hou, Xilin

    2015-09-01

    In plants, flowering is the most important transition from vegetative to reproductive growth. The flowering patterns of monocots and eudicots are distinctly different, but few studies have described the evolutionary patterns of the flowering genes in them. In this study, we analysed the evolutionary pattern, duplication and expression level of these genes. The main results were as follows: (i) characterization of flowering genes in monocots and eudicots, including the identification of family-specific, orthologous and collinear genes; (ii) full characterization of CONSTANS-like genes in Brassica rapa (BraCOL genes), the key flowering genes; (iii) exploration of the evolution of COL genes in plant kingdom and construction of the evolutionary pattern of COL genes; (iv) comparative analysis of CO and FT genes between Brassicaceae and Grass, which identified several family-specific amino acids, and revealed that CO and FT protein structures were similar in B. rapa and Arabidopsis but different in rice; and (v) expression analysis of photoperiod pathway-related genes in B. rapa under different photoperiod treatments by RT-qPCR. This analysis will provide resources for understanding the flowering mechanisms and evolutionary pattern of COL genes. In addition, this genome-wide comparative study of COL genes may also provide clues for evolution of other flowering genes.

  19. Patterns of gene expression during Arabidopsis flower development from the time of initiation to maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Patrick T; Ó'Maoiléidigh, Diarmuid S; Drost, Hajk-Georg; Kwaśniewska, Kamila; Gabel, Alexander; Grosse, Ivo; Graciet, Emmanuelle; Quint, Marcel; Wellmer, Frank

    2015-07-01

    The formation of flowers is one of the main model systems to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that control developmental processes in plants. Although several studies have explored gene expression during flower development in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana on a genome-wide scale, a continuous series of expression data from the earliest floral stages until maturation has been lacking. Here, we used a floral induction system to close this information gap and to generate a reference dataset for stage-specific gene expression during flower formation. Using a floral induction system, we collected floral buds at 14 different stages from the time of initiation until maturation. Using whole-genome microarray analysis, we identified 7,405 genes that exhibit rapid expression changes during flower development. These genes comprise many known floral regulators and we found that the expression profiles for these regulators match their known expression patterns, thus validating the dataset. We analyzed groups of co-expressed genes for over-represented cellular and developmental functions through Gene Ontology analysis and found that they could be assigned specific patterns of activities, which are in agreement with the progression of flower development. Furthermore, by mapping binding sites of floral organ identity factors onto our dataset, we were able to identify gene groups that are likely predominantly under control of these transcriptional regulators. We further found that the distribution of paralogs among groups of co-expressed genes varies considerably, with genes expressed predominantly at early and intermediate stages of flower development showing the highest proportion of such genes. Our results highlight and describe the dynamic expression changes undergone by a large number of genes during flower development. They further provide a comprehensive reference dataset for temporal gene expression during flower formation and we demonstrate that it can be used to

  20. Analysis of Brassica rapa ESTs: gene discovery and expression patterns of AP2/ERF family genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jing; Xiong, Ai-Sheng; Peng, Ri-He; Gao, Feng; Zhu, Bo; Zhang, Jian; Fu, Xiao-Yan; Jin, Xiao-Feng; Chen, Jian-Min; Zhang, Zhen; Qiao, Yu-Shan; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2010-06-01

    Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis) is among the most important vegetables and is widely cultivated in world. Genes in the AP2/ERF family encode transcriptional regulators that serve a variety of functions in the plants. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) are created by partially sequencing randomly isolated gene transcripts and have proved valuable in molecular biology. Starting from the database with 142 947 ESTs of B. rapa, 62 putative AP2/ERF family genes were identified by in silico cloning using the conserved AP2/ERF domain amino acid sequence of Arabidopsis thaliana as a probe. Based on the number of AP2/ERF domains and functions of the genes, the AP2/ERF transcription factors from B. rapa were classified into four subfamilies (DREB, ERF, AP2 and RAV). Using large-scale available EST information as a source of expression data for digital expression profiling, differentially detected genes were identified among diverse plant tissues. Roots contained the largest number of transcripts of the AP2/ERF family genes, followed by leaves and seeds. Only a few of the 62 AP2/ERF family genes were detected in all tissues: most were detected only in some tissues but not in others. The maximum detected was that of BraERF-B2-5, and it was recorded from seed tissue.

  1. Genome-wide gene expression patterns in dikaryon of the basidiomycete fungus Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianxiang; Li, Huiru; Ding, Yatong; Qi, Yuancheng; Gao, Yuqian; Song, Andong; Shen, Jinwen; Qiu, Liyou

    Dikarya is a subkingdom of fungi that includes Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. The gene expression patterns of dikaryon are poorly understood. In this study, we bred a dikaryon DK13×3 by mating monokaryons MK13 and MK3, which were from the basidiospores of Pleurotus ostreatus TD300. Using RNA-Seq, we obtained the transcriptomes of the three strains. We found that the total transcript numbers in the transcriptomes of the three strains were all more than ten thousand, and the expression profile in DK13×3 was more similar to MK13 than MK3. However, the genes involved in macromolecule utilization, cellular material synthesis, stress-resistance and signal transduction were much more up-regulated in the dikaryon than its constituent monokaryons. All possible modes of differential gene expression, when compared to constituent monokaryons, including the presence/absence variation, and additivity/nonadditivity gene expression in the dikaryon may contribute to heterosis. By sequencing the urease gene poure sequences and mRNA sequences, we identified the monoallelic expression of the poure gene in the dikaryon, and its transcript was from the parental monokaryon MK13. Furthermore, we discovered RNA editing in the poure gene mRNA of the three strains. These results suggest that the gene expression patterns in dikaryons should be similar to that of diploids during vegetative growth. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Gene expression patterns associated with blood-feeding in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogan James R

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blood feeding, or hematophagy, is a behavior exhibited by female mosquitoes required both for reproduction and for transmission of pathogens. We determined the expression patterns of 3,068 ESTs, representing ~2,000 unique gene transcripts using cDNA microarrays in adult female Anopheles gambiae at selected times during the first two days following blood ingestion, at 5 and 30 min during a 40 minute blood meal and at 0, 1, 3, 5, 12, 16, 24 and 48 hours after completion of the blood meal and compared their expression to transcript levels in mosquitoes with access only to a sugar solution. Results In blood-fed mosquitoes, 413 unique transcripts, approximately 25% of the total, were expressed at least two-fold above or below their levels in the sugar-fed mosquitoes, at one or more time points. These differentially expressed gene products were clustered using k-means clustering into Early Genes, Middle Genes, and Late Genes, containing 144, 130, and 139 unique transcripts, respectively. Several genes from each group were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR in order to validate the microarray results. Conclusion The expression patterns and annotation of the genes in these three groups (Early, Middle, and Late genes are discussed in the context of female mosquitoes' physiological responses to blood feeding, including blood digestion, peritrophic matrix formation, egg development, and immunity.

  3. DNA methylation in an intron of the IBM1 histone demethylase gene stabilizes chromatin modification patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigal, Mélanie; Kevei, Zoltán; Pélissier, Thierry; Mathieu, Olivier

    2012-06-29

    The stability of epigenetic patterns is critical for genome integrity and gene expression. This highly coordinated process involves interrelated positive and negative regulators that impact distinct epigenetic marks, including DNA methylation and dimethylation at histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9me2). In Arabidopsis, mutations in the DNA methyltransferase MET1, which maintains CG methylation, result in aberrant patterns of other epigenetic marks, including ectopic non-CG methylation and the relocation of H3K9me2 from heterochromatin into gene-rich chromosome regions. Here, we show that the expression of the H3K9 demethylase IBM1 (increase in BONSAI methylation 1) requires DNA methylation. Surprisingly, the regulatory methylated region is contained in an unusually large intron that is conserved in IBM1 orthologues. The re-establishment of IBM1 expression in met1 mutants restored the wild-type H3K9me2 nuclear patterns, non-CG DNA methylation and transcriptional patterns at selected loci, which included DNA demethylase genes. These results provide a mechanistic explanation for long-standing puzzling observations in met1 mutants and reveal yet another layer of control in the interplay between DNA methylation and histone modification, which stabilizes DNA methylation patterns at genes.

  4. Cryptic species? Patterns of maternal and paternal gene flow in eight neotropical bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth L Clare

    Full Text Available Levels of sequence divergence at mitochondrial loci are frequently used in phylogeographic analysis and species delimitation though single marker systems cannot assess bi-parental gene flow. In this investigation I compare the phylogeographic patterns revealed through the maternally inherited mitochondrial COI region and the paternally inherited 7(th intron region of the Dby gene on the Y-chromosome in eight common Neotropical bat species. These species are diverse and include members of two families from the feeding guilds of sanguivores, nectarivores, frugivores, carnivores and insectivores. In each case, the currently recognized taxon is comprised of distinct, substantially divergent intraspecific mitochondrial lineages suggesting cryptic species complexes. In Chrotopterus auritus, and Saccopteryx bilineata I observed congruent patterns of divergence in both genetic regions suggesting a cessation of gene flow between intraspecific groups. This evidence supports the existence of cryptic species complexes which meet the criteria of the genetic species concept. In Glossophaga soricina two intraspecific groups with largely sympatric South American ranges show evidence for incomplete lineage sorting or frequent hybridization while a third group with a Central American distribution appears to diverge congruently at both loci suggesting speciation. Within Desmodus rotundus and Trachops cirrhosus the paternally inherited region was monomorphic and thus does not support or refute the potential for cryptic speciation. In Uroderma bilobatum, Micronycteris megalotis and Platyrrhinus helleri the gene regions show conflicting patterns of divergence and I cannot exclude ongoing gene flow between intraspecific groups. This analysis provides a comprehensive comparison across taxa and employs both maternally and paternally inherited gene regions to validate patterns of gene flow. I present evidence for previously unrecognized species meeting the criteria of

  5. Regulation of Chlamydia Gene Expression by Tandem Promoters with Different Temporal Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Christopher J; Tan, Ming

    2015-11-02

    Chlamydia is a genus of pathogenic bacteria with an unusual intracellular developmental cycle marked by temporal waves of gene expression. The three main temporal groups of chlamydial genes are proposed to be controlled by separate mechanisms of transcriptional regulation. However, we have noted genes with discrepancies, such as the early gene dnaK and the midcycle genes bioY and pgk, which have promoters controlled by the late transcriptional regulators EUO and σ(28). To resolve this issue, we analyzed the promoters of these three genes in vitro and in Chlamydia trachomatis bacteria grown in cell culture. Transcripts from the σ(28)-dependent promoter of each gene were detected only at late times in the intracellular infection, bolstering the role of σ(28) RNA polymerase in late gene expression. In each case, however, expression prior to late times was due to a second promoter that was transcribed by σ(66) RNA polymerase, which is the major form of chlamydial polymerase. These results demonstrate that chlamydial genes can be transcribed from tandem promoters with different temporal profiles, leading to a composite expression pattern that differs from the expression profile of a single promoter. In addition, tandem promoters allow a gene to be regulated by multiple mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, such as DNA supercoiling or late regulation by EUO and σ(28). We discuss how tandem promoters broaden the repertoire of temporal gene expression patterns in the chlamydial developmental cycle and can be used to fine-tune the expression of specific genes. Chlamydia is a pathogenic bacterium that is responsible for the majority of infectious disease cases reported to the CDC each year. It causes an intracellular infection that is characterized by coordinated expression of chlamydial genes in temporal waves. Chlamydial transcription has been shown to be regulated by DNA supercoiling, alternative forms of RNA polymerase, and transcription factors, but the number

  6. Expression Patterns of Glucose Transporter-1 Gene and Thyroid Specific Genes in Human Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sungeun; Chung, Junekey; Min Haesook and others

    2014-06-15

    The expression of glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) gene and those of major thyroid-specific genes were examined in papillary carcinoma tissues, and the expressions of these genes were compared with cancer differentiation grades. Twenty-four human papillary carcinoma tissues were included in this study. The expressions of Glut-1- and thyroid-specific genes [sodium/iodide symporter (NIS), thyroid peroxidase, thyroglobulin, TSH receptor and pendrin] were analyzed by RT-PCR. Expression levels were expressed as ratios versus the expression of beta-actin. Pathologic differentiation of papillary carcinoma was classified into a relatively well-differentiated group (n=13) and relatively less differentiated group (n=11). Glut-1 gene expression was significantly higher in the less differentiated group (0.66±0.04) than in the well-differentiated group (0.59±0.07). The expression levels of the NIS, PD and TG genes were significantly higher in the well-differentiated group (NIS: 0.67±0.20, PD: 0.65±0.21, TG: 0.74±0.16) than in the less differentiated group (NIS: 0.36±0.05, PD: 0.49±0.08, TG: 0.60±0.11), respectively. A significant negative correlation was found between Glut-1 and NIS expression, and positive correlations were found between NIS and TG, and between NIS and PD. The NIS, PD and TG genes were highly expressed in well-differentiated thyroid carcinomas, whereas the Glut-1 gene was highly expressed in less differentiated thyroid carcinomas. These findings provide a molecular rationale for the management of papillary carcinoma, especially in the selection of FDG PET or radioiodine whole-body scan and I-131-based therapy.

  7. Patterns of Bacterial and Archaeal Gene Expression through the Lower Amazon River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satinsky, Brandon M.; Smith, Christa B.; Sharma, Shalabh; Ward, Nicholas D.; Krusche, Alex V.; Richey, Jeffrey E.; Yager, Patricia L.; Crump, Byron C.; Moran, Mary Ann

    2017-08-08

    Analysis of metatranscriptomic and metagenomic datasets from the lower reaches of the Amazon River between Obidos and the river mouth revealed microbial transcript and gene pools dominated by Actinobacteria, Thaumarchaeota, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Planctomycetes. Three mainstem stations spanning a 625 km reach had similar gene expression patterns (transcripts gene copy-1) across a diverse suite of element cycling genes, but two tributary-influenced stations at the mouth of the Tapajos River and near the Tocantins River at Belem had distinct transcriptome composition and expression ratios, particularly for genes encoding light-related energy capture (higher) and iron acquisition and ammonia oxidation (lower). Environmental parameters that were useful predictors of gene expression ratios included concentrations of lignin phenols, suspended sediments, nitrate, phosphate, and particulate organic carbon and nitrogen. Similar to the gene expression data, these chemical properties reflected highly homogeneous mainstem stations punctuated by distinct tributary- influenced stations at Tapajos and Belem. Although heterotrophic processes were expected to dominate in the lower Amazon, transcripts from photosynthetic bacteria were abundant in tributary-influenced regions, and transcripts from Thaumarcheota taxa genetically capable of chemosynthetic ammonia oxidation accounted for up to 21% of the transcriptome at others. Based on regressions of transcript numbers against gene numbers, expression ratios of Thaumarchaeota populations were largely unchanged within the mainstem, suggesting a relatively minor role for gene regulation. These quantitative gene and transcript inventories detail a diverse array of energy acquisition strategies and metabolic capabilities for bacteria and archaea populations of the world’s largest river system.

  8. Phylogeny, gene structures, and expression patterns of the ERF gene family in soybean (Glycine max L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gaiyun; Chen, Ming; Chen, Xueping; Xu, Zhaoshi; Guan, Shan; Li, Lian-Cheng; Li, Aili; Guo, Jiaming; Mao, Long; Ma, Youzhi

    2008-01-01

    Members of the ERF transcription factor family play important roles in regulating gene expression in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. In soybean (Glycine max L.), however, only a few ERF genes have been studied so far. In this study, 98 unigenes that contained a complete AP2/ERF domain were identified from 63,676 unique sequences in the DFCI Soybean Gene Index database. The phylogeny, gene structures, and putative conserved motifs in soybean ERF proteins were analysed, and compared with those of Arabidopsis and rice. The members of the soybean ERF family were divided into 12 subgroups, similar to the case for Arabidopsis. AP2/ERF domains were conserved among soybean, Arabidopsis, and rice. Outside the AP2/ERF domain, many soybean-specific conserved motifs were detected. Expression analysis showed that nine unigenes belonging to six ERF family subgroups were induced by both biotic/abiotic stresses and hormone treatment, suggesting that they were involved in cross-talk between biotic and abiotic stress-responsive signalling pathways. Overexpression of two full-length genes from two different subgroups enhanced the tolerances to drought, salt stresses, and/or pathogen infection of the tobacco plants. These results will be useful for elucidating ERF gene-associated stress response signalling pathways in soybean.

  9. Insight into transcription factor gene duplication from Caenorhabditis elegans Promoterome-driven expression patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidal Marc

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The C. elegans Promoterome is a powerful resource for revealing the regulatory mechanisms by which transcription is controlled pan-genomically. Transcription factors will form the core of any systems biology model of genome control and therefore the promoter activity of Promoterome inserts for C. elegans transcription factor genes was examined, in vivo, with a reporter gene approach. Results Transgenic C. elegans strains were generated for 366 transcription factor promoter/gfp reporter gene fusions. GFP distributions were determined, and then summarized with reference to developmental stage and cell type. Reliability of these data was demonstrated by comparison to previously described gene product distributions. A detailed consideration of the results for one C. elegans transcription factor gene family, the Six family, comprising ceh-32, ceh-33, ceh-34 and unc-39 illustrates the value of these analyses. The high proportion of Promoterome reporter fusions that drove GFP expression, compared to previous studies, led to the hypothesis that transcription factor genes might be involved in local gene duplication events less frequently than other genes. Comparison of transcription factor genes of C. elegans and Caenorhabditis briggsae was therefore carried out and revealed very few examples of functional gene duplication since the divergence of these species for most, but not all, transcription factor gene families. Conclusion Examining reporter expression patterns for hundreds of promoters informs, and thereby improves, interpretation of this data type. Genes encoding transcription factors involved in intrinsic developmental control processes appear acutely sensitive to changes in gene dosage through local gene duplication, on an evolutionary time scale.

  10. Expression pattern and regulation of genes differ between fibroblasts of adhesion and normal human peritoneum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saed Ghassan M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Injury to the peritoneum during surgery is followed by a healing process that frequently results in the attachment of adjacent organs by a fibrous mass, referred commonly as adhesions. Because injuries to the peritoneum during surgery are inevitable, it is imperative that we understand the mechanisms of adhesion formation to prevent its occurrence. This requires thorough understanding of the molecular sequence that results in the attachment of injured peritoneum and the development of fibrous tissue. Recent data show that fibroblasts from the injured peritoneum may play a critical role in the formation of adhesion tissues. Therefore, identifying changes in gene expression pattern in the peritoneal fibroblasts during the process may provide clues to the mechanisms by which adhesion develop. Methods In this study, we compared expression patterns of larger number of genes in the fibroblasts isolated from adhesion and normal human peritoneum using gene filters. Contributions of TGF-beta1 and hypoxia in the altered expression of specific genes were also examined using a semiquantitative RT-PCR technique. Results Results show that several genes are differentially expressed between fibroblasts of normal and adhesion peritoneum and that the peritoneal fibroblast may acquire a different phenotype during adhesion formation. Genes that are differentially expressed between normal and adhesion fibroblasts encode molecules involved in cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, migration and factors regulating cytokines, transcription, translation and protein/vesicle trafficking. Conclusions Our data substantiate that adhesion formation is a multigenic phenomenon and not all changes in gene expression pattern between normal and adhesion fibroblasts are the function of TGF-beta1 and hypoxia that are known to influence adhesion formation. Analysis of the gene expression data in the perspective of known functions of genes connote to

  11. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases: chronic inflammation or disease specific patterns?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2007-01-01

    ) patients and healthy individuals were specific for the arthritic process or likewise altered in other chronic inflammatory diseases such as chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis, HT) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Using qPCR for 18 RA-discriminative genes, there were no significant...... differences in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (MNC) gene expression patterns between 15 newly diagnosed HT patients and 15 matched healthy controls. However, the MNC expression levels of five genes were significantly upregulated in 25 IBD patients, compared to 18 matched healthy controls (CD14, FACL2, FCN1...

  12. Modelling epigenetic regulation of gene expression in 12 human cell types reveals combinatorial patterns of cell-type-specific genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yiming; Qu, Wubin; Min, Bo; Liu, Zheyan; Chen, Changsheng; Zhang, Chenggang

    2014-06-01

    The maintenance of the diverse cell types in a multicellular organism is one of the fundamental mysteries of biology. Modelling the dynamic regulatory relationships between the histone modifications and the gene expression across the diverse cell types is essential for the authors to understand the mechanisms of the epigenetic regulation. Here, the authors thoroughly assessed the histone modification enrichment profiles at the promoters and constructed quantitative models between the histone modification abundances and the gene expression in 12 human cell types. The author's results showed that the histone modifications at the promoters exhibited remarkably cell-type-dependent variability in the cell-type-specific (CTS) genes. They demonstrated that the variable profiles of the modifications are highly predictive for the dynamic changes of the gene expression across all the cell types. Their findings revealed the close relationship between the combinatorial patterns of the histone modifications and the CTS gene expression. They anticipate that the findings and the methods they used in this study could provide useful information for the future studies of the regulatory roles of the histone modifications in the CTS genes.

  13. Coexpression Pattern Analysis of NPM1-Associated Genes in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengfeng Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1 plays an important role in ribosomal synthesis and malignancies, but NPM1 mutations occur rarely in the blast-crisis and chronic-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML patients. The NPM1-associated gene set (GCM_NPM1, in total 116 genes including NPM1, was chosen as the candidate gene set for the coexpression analysis. We wonder if NPM1-associated genes can affect the ribosomal synthesis and translation process in CML. Results. We presented a distribution-based approach for gene pair classification by identifying a disease-specific cutoff point that classified the coexpressed gene pairs into strong and weak coexpression structures. The differences in the coexpression patterns between the normal and the CML groups were reflected from the overall structure by performing two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Our developed method effectively identified the coexpression pattern differences from the overall structure: P  value=1.71×10-22<0.05 for the maximum deviation D=0.109. Moreover, we found that genes involved in the ribosomal synthesis and translation process tended to be coexpressed in the CML group. Conclusion. Our developed method can identify the coexpression difference between two different groups. Dysregulation of ribosomal synthesis and translation process may be related to the CML disease. Our significant findings may provide useful information for the novel CML mechanism exploration and cancer treatment.

  14. The Influence of Gene Expression Time Delays on Gierer–Meinhardt Pattern Formation Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Seirin Lee, S.

    2010-03-23

    There are numerous examples of morphogen gradients controlling long range signalling in developmental and cellular systems. The prospect of two such interacting morphogens instigating long range self-organisation in biological systems via a Turing bifurcation has been explored, postulated, or implicated in the context of numerous developmental processes. However, modelling investigations of cellular systems typically neglect the influence of gene expression on such dynamics, even though transcription and translation are observed to be important in morphogenetic systems. In particular, the influence of gene expression on a large class of Turing bifurcation models, namely those with pure kinetics such as the Gierer-Meinhardt system, is unexplored. Our investigations demonstrate that the behaviour of the Gierer-Meinhardt model profoundly changes on the inclusion of gene expression dynamics and is sensitive to the sub-cellular details of gene expression. Features such as concentration blow up, morphogen oscillations and radical sensitivities to the duration of gene expression are observed and, at best, severely restrict the possible parameter spaces for feasible biological behaviour. These results also indicate that the behaviour of Turing pattern formation systems on the inclusion of gene expression time delays may provide a means of distinguishing between possible forms of interaction kinetics. Finally, this study also emphasises that sub-cellular and gene expression dynamics should not be simply neglected in models of long range biological pattern formation via morphogens. © 2010 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  15. Evolutionary Pattern and Regulation Analysis to Support Why Diversity Functions Existed within PPAR Gene Family Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tianyu; Yan, Xiping; Wang, Guosong; Liu, Hehe; Gan, Xiang; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Jiwen; Li, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR) gene family members exhibit distinct patterns of distribution in tissues and differ in functions. The purpose of this study is to investigate the evolutionary impacts on diversity functions of PPAR members and the regulatory differences on gene expression patterns. 63 homology sequences of PPAR genes from 31 species were collected and analyzed. The results showed that three isolated types of PPAR gene family may emerge from twice times of gene duplication events. The conserved domains of HOLI (ligand binding domain of hormone receptors) domain and ZnF_C4 (C4 zinc finger in nuclear in hormone receptors) are essential for keeping basic roles of PPAR gene family, and the variant domains of LCRs may be responsible for their divergence in functions. The positive selection sites in HOLI domain are benefit for PPARs to evolve towards diversity functions. The evolutionary variants in the promoter regions and 3' UTR regions of PPARs result into differential transcription factors and miRNAs involved in regulating PPAR members, which may eventually affect their expressions and tissues distributions. These results indicate that gene duplication event, selection pressure on HOLI domain, and the variants on promoter and 3' UTR are essential for PPARs evolution and diversity functions acquired.

  16. Evolutionary Pattern and Regulation Analysis to Support Why Diversity Functions Existed within PPAR Gene Family Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyu Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR gene family members exhibit distinct patterns of distribution in tissues and differ in functions. The purpose of this study is to investigate the evolutionary impacts on diversity functions of PPAR members and the regulatory differences on gene expression patterns. 63 homology sequences of PPAR genes from 31 species were collected and analyzed. The results showed that three isolated types of PPAR gene family may emerge from twice times of gene duplication events. The conserved domains of HOLI (ligand binding domain of hormone receptors domain and ZnF_C4 (C4 zinc finger in nuclear in hormone receptors are essential for keeping basic roles of PPAR gene family, and the variant domains of LCRs may be responsible for their divergence in functions. The positive selection sites in HOLI domain are benefit for PPARs to evolve towards diversity functions. The evolutionary variants in the promoter regions and 3′ UTR regions of PPARs result into differential transcription factors and miRNAs involved in regulating PPAR members, which may eventually affect their expressions and tissues distributions. These results indicate that gene duplication event, selection pressure on HOLI domain, and the variants on promoter and 3′ UTR are essential for PPARs evolution and diversity functions acquired.

  17. Systematic expression analysis of Hox genes at adulthood reveals novel patterns in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutlet, Bertrand; Theys, Nicolas; Coste, Cécile; Ahn, Marie-Thérèse; Doshishti-Agolli, Konstantin; Lizen, Benoît; Gofflot, Françoise

    2016-04-01

    Hox proteins are key regulators of animal development, providing positional identity and patterning information to cells along the rostrocaudal axis of the embryo. Although their embryonic expression and function are well characterized, their presence and biological importance in adulthood remains poorly investigated. We provide here the first detailed quantitative and neuroanatomical characterization of the expression of the 39 Hox genes in the adult mouse brain. Using RT-qPCR we determined the expression of 24 Hox genes mainly in the brainstem of the adult brain, with low expression of a few genes in the cerebellum and the forebrain. Using in situ hybridization (ISH) we have demonstrated that expression of Hox genes is maintained in territories derived from the early segmental Hox expression domains in the hindbrain. Indeed, we show that expression of genes belonging to paralogy groups PG2-8 is maintained in the hindbrain derivatives at adulthood. The spatial colinearity, which characterizes the early embryonic expression of Hox genes, is still observed in sequential antero-posterior boundaries of expression. Moreover, the main mossy and climbing fibres precerebellar nuclei express PG2-8 Hox genes according to their migration origins. Second, ISH confirms the presence of Hox gene transcripts in territories where they are not detected during development, suggesting neo-expression in these territories in adulthood. Within the forebrain, we have mapped Hoxb1, Hoxb3, Hoxb4, Hoxd3 and Hoxa5 expression in restricted areas of the sensory cerebral cortices as well as in specific thalamic relay nuclei. Our data thus suggest a requirement of Hox genes beyond their role of patterning genes, providing a new dimension to their functional relevance in the central nervous system.

  18. Patterns of variation among distinct alleles of the Flag silk gene from Nephila clavipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Linden E; White, Sheryl; Nuñez-Farfán, Juan; Vargas, Jesus

    2007-02-20

    Spider silk proteins and their genes are very attractive to researchers in a wide range of disciplines because they permit linking many levels of organization. However, hypotheses of silk gene evolution have been built primarily upon single sequences of each gene each species, and little is known about allelic variation within a species. Silk genes are known for their repeat structure with high levels of homogenization of nucleotide and amino acid sequence among repeated units. One common explanation for this homogeneity is gene convergence. To test this model, we sequenced multiple alleles of one intron-exon segment from the Flag gene from four populations of the spider Nephila clavipes and compared the new sequences to a published sequence. Our analysis revealed very high levels of heterozygosity in this gene, with no pattern of population differentiation. There was no evidence of gene convergence within any of these alleles, with high levels of nucleotide and amino acid substitution among the repeating motifs. Our data suggest that minimally, there is relaxed selection on mutations in this gene and that there may actually be positive selection for heterozygosity.

  19. Mating patterns and gene flow in the neotropical epiphytic orchid, Laelia rubescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapnell, D W; Hamrick, J L

    2005-01-01

    Understanding mating patterns and gene movement in plant populations occupying highly disturbed landscapes is essential for insights into their long-term survival. We used allozyme genetic markers to examine mating patterns and to directly measure pollen flow in the Central American epiphytic orchid, Laelia rubescens. Study populations were located in disturbed, seasonally dry tropical forest in Costa Rica. Every flowering individual within 15 populations and 12-18 seedlings from each maternal individual were genotyped over two reproductive seasons. Strict correlated mating by orchids produces full-sib progeny arrays from which the multilocus diploid genotype of the pollen parent can be inferred. These paternity analyses produced detailed quantitative estimates of pollen movement within and among populations of this species. Although our data illustrate that mating patterns vary spatially and temporally among trees, among pastures, and between years, overall patterns were surprisingly consistent. Thirty-four per cent of the capsules produced in both years resulted from gene flow events. Where pollen parents were identified, pollen moved mean distances of 279 m and 519 m in 1999 and 2000 respectively and a maximum documented distance of 1034 m. A substantially larger floral display in 2000 corresponded to a marked increase in pollen dispersal distances. Smaller populations, which more closely resembled those in undisturbed forest, had higher rates of gene flow than the large populations that characterize disturbed sites. We predict the occurrence of greater gene flow between low-density populations occupying undisturbed habitats.

  20. Bioelectric gene and reaction networks: computational modelling of genetic, biochemical and bioelectrical dynamics in pattern regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietak, Alexis; Levin, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) describe interactions between gene products and transcription factors that control gene expression. In combination with reaction-diffusion models, GRNs have enhanced comprehension of biological pattern formation. However, although it is well known that biological systems exploit an interplay of genetic and physical mechanisms, instructive factors such as transmembrane potential (Vmem) have not been integrated into full GRN models. Here we extend regulatory networks to include bioelectric signalling, developing a novel synthesis: the bioelectricity-integrated gene and reaction (BIGR) network. Using in silico simulations, we highlight the capacity for Vmem to alter steady-state concentrations of key signalling molecules inside and out of cells. We characterize fundamental feedbacks where Vmem both controls, and is in turn regulated by, biochemical signals and thereby demonstrate Vmem homeostatic control, Vmem memory and Vmem controlled state switching. BIGR networks demonstrating hysteresis are identified as a mechanisms through which more complex patterns of stable Vmem spots and stripes, along with correlated concentration patterns, can spontaneously emerge. As further proof of principle, we present and analyse a BIGR network model that mechanistically explains key aspects of the remarkable regenerative powers of creatures such as planarian flatworms. The functional properties of BIGR networks generate the first testable, quantitative hypotheses for biophysical mechanisms underlying the stability and adaptive regulation of anatomical bioelectric pattern. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. Adipose gene expression patterns of weight gain suggest counteracting steroid hormone synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schothorst, van E.M.; Franssen-Hal, van N.L.W.; Schaap, M.M.; Pennings, J.; Hoebee, B.; Keijer, J.

    2005-01-01

    VAN SCHOTHORST, EVERT M., NICOLE FRANSSEN-VAN HAL, MIRJAM M. SCHAAP, JEROEN PENNINGS, BARBARA HOEBEE, AND JAAP KEIJER. Adipose gene expression patterns of weight gain suggest counteracting steroid hormone synthesis. Obes Res. 2005;13:1031-1041. Objective: To identify early molecular changes in

  2. Analysis of dysplasia in patients with Barrett's esophagus based on expression pattern of 90 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Sibu; Newton, Richard; Ross-Innes, Caryn S; Lao-Sirieix, Pierre; Krishnadath, Kausilia K; O'Donovan, Maria; Novelli, Marco; Wernisch, Lorenz; Bergman, Jacques; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

    2015-11-01

    Diagnoses of dysplasia, based on histologic analyses, dictate management decisions for patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE). However, there is much intra- and inter-observer variation in identification of dysplasia-particularly low-grade dysplasia. We aimed to identify a biomarker that could be used to assign patients with low-grade dysplasia to a low- or high-risk group. We performed a stringent histologic assessment of 150 frozen esophageal tissues samples collected from 4 centers in the United Kingdom (from 2000 through 2006). The following samples with homogeneous diagnoses were selected for gene expression profiling: 28 from patients with nondysplastic BE, 10 with low-grade dysplasia, 13 with high-grade dysplasia (HGD), and 8 from patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma. A leave-one-out cross-validation analysis was used identify a gene expression signature associated with HGD vs nondysplastic BE. Functional pathways associated with gene signature sets were identified using the MetaCore analysis. Gene expression signature sets were validated using gene expression data on BE and esophageal adenocarcinoma accessed through National Center for Biotechnology Information Gene Expression Omnibus, as well as a separate set of samples (n = 169) collected from patients who underwent endoscopy in the United Kingdom or the Netherlands and analyzed histologically. We identified an expression pattern of 90 genes that could separate nondysplastic BE tissues from those with HGD (P disease progression than those with a signature categorized as low risk (P = .047). We identified an expression pattern of 90 genes in esophageal tissues of patients with BE that was associated with low- or high-risk for disease progression. This pattern might be used in combination with histologic analysis of biopsy samples to stratify patients for treatment. It would be most beneficial for analysis of patients without definitive evidence of HGD but for whom early endoscopic intervention is

  3. Time-series pattern of gene expression profile in gentamycin-induced nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yunliang; Hong, Min; Li, Hua; Tang, Naping; Ma, Jing; Hsu, Ching-Hung; Dong, Wenxin

    2014-02-01

    There have been many studies investigating the genomic biomarker and/or molecular mechanism of nephrotoxicity using microarray. However, most of these researches were carried out by studying gene expression changes at one specific time point. As gene expression varies with time and disease stage, the current study investigated the time-series pattern of gene expression in a rat model using a typical nephrotoxic compound. Rats were administrated with 80 mg/kg gentamycin or saline by intramuscular injection for 14 consecutive days followed by a 28-d recovery. Rats were scarified on D2, D4, D8, D15 and Recovery Day (R29), when kidneys were obtained for whole-genome microarray analysis and histological examination. Urine was collected at each necropsy for kidney injury molecular-1 (KIM-1) analysis. The KIM-1 detection and histological examination confirmed the nephrotoxicity. After differentially expression genes (DEGs) identification, there were 4360 and 4323 regulated genes for females and males, respectively. However, few overlapping expression genes co-regluated at each time point were found. By principle component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster, the gene expression patterns were observed to be apparently associated with the disease stage. GO Annotation showed (1) immune response and related process, response to wounding, cell locomotion on D2; (2) cell death and apoptosis was also noted on D4; (3) processes of organic acid or carboxylic acid, apoptosis or cell death on D8 and D15; (4) processes of cell cycle, mitosis, division cell cycle on R29. In conclusion, the authors mapped the time-series gene expression patterns at the initiation, development and recovery stage of gentamycin-induced nephrotoxicity.

  4. Comparative Analysis of Cartilage Marker Gene Expression Patterns during Axolotl and Xenopus Limb Regeneration.

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    Kazumasa Mitogawa

    Full Text Available Axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum can completely regenerate lost limbs, whereas Xenopus laevis frogs cannot. During limb regeneration, a blastema is first formed at the amputation plane. It is thought that this regeneration blastema forms a limb by mechanisms similar to those of a developing embryonic limb bud. Furthermore, Xenopus laevis frogs can form a blastema after amputation; however, the blastema results in a terminal cone-shaped cartilaginous structure called a "spike." The causes of this patterning defect in Xenopus frog limb regeneration were explored. We hypothesized that differences in chondrogenesis may underlie the patterning defect. Thus, we focused on chondrogenesis. Chondrogenesis marker genes, type I and type II collagen, were compared in regenerative and nonregenerative environments. There were marked differences between axolotls and Xenopus in the expression pattern of these chondrogenesis-associated genes. The relative deficit in the chondrogenic capacity of Xenopus blastema cells may account for the absence of total limb regenerative capacity.

  5. Early Developmental and Evolutionary Origins of Gene Body DNA Methylation Patterns in Mammalian Placentas.

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    Diane I Schroeder

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 20-80 million years the mammalian placenta has taken on a variety of morphologies through both divergent and convergent evolution. Recently we have shown that the human placenta genome has a unique epigenetic pattern of large partially methylated domains (PMDs and highly methylated domains (HMDs with gene body DNA methylation positively correlating with level of gene expression. In order to determine the evolutionary conservation of DNA methylation patterns and transcriptional regulatory programs in the placenta, we performed a genome-wide methylome (MethylC-seq analysis of human, rhesus macaque, squirrel monkey, mouse, dog, horse, and cow placentas as well as opossum extraembryonic membrane. We found that, similar to human placenta, mammalian placentas and opossum extraembryonic membrane have globally lower levels of methylation compared to somatic tissues. Higher relative gene body methylation was the conserved feature across all mammalian placentas, despite differences in PMD/HMDs and absolute methylation levels. Specifically, higher methylation over the bodies of genes involved in mitosis, vesicle-mediated transport, protein phosphorylation, and chromatin modification was observed compared with the rest of the genome. As in human placenta, higher methylation is associated with higher gene expression and is predictive of genic location across species. Analysis of DNA methylation in oocytes and preimplantation embryos shows a conserved pattern of gene body methylation similar to the placenta. Intriguingly, mouse and cow oocytes and mouse early embryos have PMD/HMDs but their placentas do not, suggesting that PMD/HMDs are a feature of early preimplantation methylation patterns that become lost during placental development in some species and following implantation of the embryo.

  6. Early Developmental and Evolutionary Origins of Gene Body DNA Methylation Patterns in Mammalian Placentas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Diane I; Jayashankar, Kartika; Douglas, Kory C; Thirkill, Twanda L; York, Daniel; Dickinson, Pete J; Williams, Lawrence E; Samollow, Paul B; Ross, Pablo J; Bannasch, Danika L; Douglas, Gordon C; LaSalle, Janine M

    2015-08-01

    Over the last 20-80 million years the mammalian placenta has taken on a variety of morphologies through both divergent and convergent evolution. Recently we have shown that the human placenta genome has a unique epigenetic pattern of large partially methylated domains (PMDs) and highly methylated domains (HMDs) with gene body DNA methylation positively correlating with level of gene expression. In order to determine the evolutionary conservation of DNA methylation patterns and transcriptional regulatory programs in the placenta, we performed a genome-wide methylome (MethylC-seq) analysis of human, rhesus macaque, squirrel monkey, mouse, dog, horse, and cow placentas as well as opossum extraembryonic membrane. We found that, similar to human placenta, mammalian placentas and opossum extraembryonic membrane have globally lower levels of methylation compared to somatic tissues. Higher relative gene body methylation was the conserved feature across all mammalian placentas, despite differences in PMD/HMDs and absolute methylation levels. Specifically, higher methylation over the bodies of genes involved in mitosis, vesicle-mediated transport, protein phosphorylation, and chromatin modification was observed compared with the rest of the genome. As in human placenta, higher methylation is associated with higher gene expression and is predictive of genic location across species. Analysis of DNA methylation in oocytes and preimplantation embryos shows a conserved pattern of gene body methylation similar to the placenta. Intriguingly, mouse and cow oocytes and mouse early embryos have PMD/HMDs but their placentas do not, suggesting that PMD/HMDs are a feature of early preimplantation methylation patterns that become lost during placental development in some species and following implantation of the embryo.

  7. Functional Virtual Flow Cytometry: A Visual Analytic Approach for Characterizing Single-Cell Gene Expression Patterns

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    Zhi Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We presented a novel workflow for detecting distribution patterns in cell populations based on single-cell transcriptome study. With the fast adoption of single-cell analysis, a challenge to researchers is how to effectively extract gene features to meaningfully separate the cell population. Considering that coexpressed genes are often functionally or structurally related and the number of coexpressed modules is much smaller than the number of genes, our workflow uses gene coexpression modules as features instead of individual genes. Thus, when the coexpressed modules are summarized into eigengenes, not only can we interactively explore the distribution of cells but also we can promptly interpret the gene features. The interactive visualization is aided by a novel application of spatial statistical analysis to the scatter plots using a clustering index parameter. This parameter helps to highlight interesting 2D patterns in the scatter plot matrix (SPLOM. We demonstrated the effectiveness of the workflow using two large single-cell studies. In the Allen Brain scRNA-seq dataset, the visual analytics suggested a new hypothesis such as the involvement of glutamate metabolism in the separation of the brain cells. In a large glioblastoma study, a sample with a unique cell migration related signature was identified.

  8. Methods for simultaneously identifying coherent local clusters with smooth global patterns in gene expression profiles

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    Lee Yun-Shien

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hierarchical clustering tree (HCT with a dendrogram 1 and the singular value decomposition (SVD with a dimension-reduced representative map 2 are popular methods for two-way sorting the gene-by-array matrix map employed in gene expression profiling. While HCT dendrograms tend to optimize local coherent clustering patterns, SVD leading eigenvectors usually identify better global grouping and transitional structures. Results This study proposes a flipping mechanism for a conventional agglomerative HCT using a rank-two ellipse (R2E, an improved SVD algorithm for sorting purpose seriation by Chen 3 as an external reference. While HCTs always produce permutations with good local behaviour, the rank-two ellipse seriation gives the best global grouping patterns and smooth transitional trends. The resulting algorithm automatically integrates the desirable properties of each method so that users have access to a clustering and visualization environment for gene expression profiles that preserves coherent local clusters and identifies global grouping trends. Conclusion We demonstrate, through four examples, that the proposed method not only possesses better numerical and statistical properties, it also provides more meaningful biomedical insights than other sorting algorithms. We suggest that sorted proximity matrices for genes and arrays, in addition to the gene-by-array expression matrix, can greatly aid in the search for comprehensive understanding of gene expression structures. Software for the proposed methods can be obtained at http://gap.stat.sinica.edu.tw/Software/GAP.

  9. Study of defense genes expression profile pattern of wheat in response to infection by Mycosphaerella graminicola

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    Jalal Gholamnezhad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the effect of salicylic acid on the gene expression pattern of four enzymes; Phenylalanine ammonialyase, Polyphenol oxidase, Peroxidase and Catalase in wheat-Mycosphaerella graminicola pathosystem. For this reason, Salicylic Acid (2mm were sprayed on wheat in two-leaf stage before inoculation with the fungal pathogen. Sampling of the plants was done at five time points (0, 3, 6, 12 and 24 h after inoculation. The scanning of genes expression pattern of encoding enzymes were carried out by reverse northern dot blotting method. The results showed that within 24 hours post inoculation the gene expression of these enzymes significantly increased in this tolerant cultivar. SA enhanced the expression of Phenylalanine ammonialyase and Peroxidase genes in all time points. The expression of Polyphenol oxidase was increased by SA after 12h. On the other hand, increasing the expression level of these genes directly increases the activity of the enzymes which indicates direct role of these gens in plant defense system. SA caused a rapid rise in expression of Catalase gene, but this effect was not continued for 24h.

  10. Evolution of Daily Gene Co-expression Patterns from Algae to Plants

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    Pedro de los Reyes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Daily rhythms play a key role in transcriptome regulation in plants and microalgae orchestrating responses that, among other processes, anticipate light transitions that are essential for their metabolism and development. The recent accumulation of genome-wide transcriptomic data generated under alternating light:dark periods from plants and microalgae has made possible integrative and comparative analysis that could contribute to shed light on the evolution of daily rhythms in the green lineage. In this work, RNA-seq and microarray data generated over 24 h periods in different light regimes from the eudicot Arabidopsis thaliana and the microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Ostreococcus tauri have been integrated and analyzed using gene co-expression networks. This analysis revealed a reduction in the size of the daily rhythmic transcriptome from around 90% in Ostreococcus, being heavily influenced by light transitions, to around 40% in Arabidopsis, where a certain independence from light transitions can be observed. A novel Multiple Bidirectional Best Hit (MBBH algorithm was applied to associate single genes with a family of potential orthologues from evolutionary distant species. Gene duplication, amplification and divergence of rhythmic expression profiles seems to have played a central role in the evolution of gene families in the green lineage such as Pseudo Response Regulators (PRRs, CONSTANS-Likes (COLs, and DNA-binding with One Finger (DOFs. Gene clustering and functional enrichment have been used to identify groups of genes with similar rhythmic gene expression patterns. The comparison of gene clusters between species based on potential orthologous relationships has unveiled a low to moderate level of conservation of daily rhythmic expression patterns. However, a strikingly high conservation was found for the gene clusters exhibiting their highest and/or lowest expression value during the light transitions.

  11. Regulatory Divergence between Parental Alleles Determines Gene Expression Patterns in Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, Marie-Christine; Hueber, Yann; Dereeper, Alexis; Rialle, Stéphanie; Herrera, Juan-Carlos; Lashermes, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Both hybridization and allopolyploidization generate novel phenotypes by conciliating divergent genomes and regulatory networks in the same cellular context. To understand the rewiring of gene expression in hybrids, the total expression of 21,025 genes and the allele-specific expression of over 11,000 genes were quantified in interspecific hybrids and their parental species, Coffea canephora and Coffea eugenioides using RNA-seq technology. Between parental species, cis- and trans-regulatory divergences affected around 32% and 35% of analyzed genes, respectively, with nearly 17% of them showing both. The relative importance of trans-regulatory divergences between both species could be related to their low genetic divergence and perennial habit. In hybrids, among divergently expressed genes between parental species and hybrids, 77% was expressed like one parent (expression level dominance), including 65% like C. eugenioides. Gene expression was shown to result from the expression of both alleles affected by intertwined parental trans-regulatory factors. A strong impact of C. eugenioides trans-regulatory factors on the upregulation of C. canephora alleles was revealed. The gene expression patterns appeared determined by complex combinations of cis- and trans-regulatory divergences. In particular, the observed biased expression level dominance seemed to be derived from the asymmetric effects of trans-regulatory parental factors on regulation of alleles. More generally, this study illustrates the effects of divergent trans-regulatory parental factors on the gene expression pattern in hybrids. The characteristics of the transcriptional response to hybridization appear to be determined by the compatibility of gene regulatory networks and therefore depend on genetic divergences between the parental species and their evolutionary history. PMID:25819221

  12. Limited pattern of TCR delta chain gene rearrangement on the RNA level in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, J; Januszkiewicz, D; Pernak, M; Hertmanowska, H; Nowicka-Kujawska, K; Rembowska, J; Lewandowski, K; Nowak, T; Wender, M

    2001-01-01

    Susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS) is most likely affected by a number of genes, including HLA and T-cell receptor (TCR) genes. T cells expressing gamma/delta receptors seem to contribute to autoagression in MS, as evidenced by their localization in the MS plaques in the brain. The aim of this study was to analyse the TCRdelta chain gene rearrangement at the RNA (cDNA) level and compare to the DNA pattern rearrangement. TCRdelta gene rearrangement was analysed in MS patients and healthy individuals with the use of primers specific for Vdelta1-6 and Jdelta1 genes (at the DNA level) and specific for Vdelta1-6 and Cdelta1 genes (at the cDNA level). The size of PCR products was analysed on agarose gel and by ALF-Express (Pharmacia). Additionally, the lymphocyte surface immunophenotype was studied with specific monoclonal antibodies. At the DNA level a restricted pattern of Vdelta3-Jdelta1 and Vdelta5-Jdelta1 was found only in MS patients. Contrary to DNA, mono-, oligoclonal RNA (cDNA) rearrangements were limited to Vdelta1-Cdelta1, Vdelta2-Cdelta1 and Vdelta3-Cdelta1 only in MS patients as well. Surface immunophenotype analysis revealed in MS a much higher frequency of activated gamma/delta T lymphocytes, i.e. expressing HLA-DR and CD25. An elevated level of CD56 positive cells in MS was recorded. Mono-oligoclonal pattern of TCRdelta gene rearrangement at the RNA level, along with increase in activated gamma/delta T cells, strongly argue for a significant role of gamma/delta T lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of MS.

  13. One-Month Diesel Exhaust Inhalation Produces Hypertensive Gene Expression Pattern in Healthy Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottipolu, Reddy R.; Wallenborn, J. Grace; Karoly, Edward D.; Schladweiler, Mette C.; Ledbetter, Allen D.; Krantz, Todd; Linak, William P.; Nyska, Abraham; Johnson, Jo Anne; Thomas, Ronald; Richards, Judy E.; Jaskot, Richard H.; Kodavanti, Urmila P.

    2009-01-01

    Background Exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) is linked to vasoconstriction, endothelial dysfunction, and myocardial ischemia in compromised individuals. Objective We hypothesized that DE inhalation would cause greater inflammation, hematologic alterations, and cardiac molecular impairment in spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats than in healthy Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. Methods and results Male rats (12–14 weeks of age) were exposed to air or DE from a 30-kW Deutz engine at 500 or 2,000 μg/m3, 4 hr/day, 5 days/week for 4 weeks. Neutrophilic influx was noted in the lung lavage fluid of both strains, but injury markers were minimally changed. Particle-laden macrophages were apparent histologically in DE-exposed rats. Lower baseline cardiac anti-oxidant enzyme activities were present in SH than in WKY rats; however, no DE effects were noted. Cardiac mitochondrial aconitase activity decreased after DE exposure in both strains. Electron microscopy indicated abnormalities in cardiac mitochondria of control SH but no DE effects. Gene expression profiling demonstrated alterations in 377 genes by DE in WKY but none in SH rats. The direction of DE-induced changes in WKY mimicked expression pattern of control SH rats without DE. Most genes affected by DE were down-regulated in WKY. The same genes were down-regulated in SH without DE producing a hypertensive-like expression pattern. The down-regulated genes included those that regulate compensatory response, matrix metabolism, mitochondrial function, and oxidative stress response. No up-regulation of inflammatory genes was noted. Conclusions We provide the evidence that DE inhalation produces a hypertensive-like cardiac gene expression pattern associated with mitochondrial oxidative stress in healthy rats. PMID:19165385

  14. Patterns of homoeologous gene expression shown by RNA sequencing in hexaploid bread wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Lindsey J; Belfield, Eric J; Jiang, Caifu; Brown, Carly; Mithani, Aziz; Harberd, Nicholas P

    2014-04-11

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) has a large, complex and hexaploid genome consisting of A, B and D homoeologous chromosome sets. Therefore each wheat gene potentially exists as a trio of A, B and D homoeoloci, each of which may contribute differentially to wheat phenotypes. We describe a novel approach combining wheat cytogenetic resources (chromosome substitution 'nullisomic-tetrasomic' lines) with next generation deep sequencing of gene transcripts (RNA-Seq), to directly and accurately identify homoeologue-specific single nucleotide variants and quantify the relative contribution of individual homoeoloci to gene expression. We discover, based on a sample comprising ~5-10% of the total wheat gene content, that at least 45% of wheat genes are expressed from all three distinct homoeoloci. Most of these genes show strikingly biased expression patterns in which expression is dominated by a single homoeolocus. The remaining ~55% of wheat genes are expressed from either one or two homoeoloci only, through a combination of extensive transcriptional silencing and homoeolocus loss. We conclude that wheat is tending towards functional diploidy, through a variety of mechanisms causing single homoeoloci to become the predominant source of gene transcripts. This discovery has profound consequences for wheat breeding and our understanding of wheat evolution.

  15. The Bsister MADS gene FST determines ovule patterning and development of the zygotic embryo and endosperm.

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    Dong Sun Lee

    Full Text Available Many homeotic MADS-box genes have been identified as controllers of the floral transition and floral development. However, information regarding Bsister (Bs-function genes in monocots is still limited. Here, we describe the functional characterization of a Bs-group MADS-box gene FEMALE-STERILE (FST, whose frame-shift mutation (fst results in abnormal ovules and the complete abortion of zygotic embryos and endosperms in rice. Anatomical analysis showed that the defective development in the fst mutant exclusively occurred in sporophytic tissues including integuments, fertilized proembryos and endosperms. Analyses of the spatio-temporal expression pattern revealed that the prominent FST gene products accumulated in the inner integument, nucellar cell of the micropylar side, apical and base of the proembryos and free endosperm nuclei. Microarray and gene ontology analysis unraveled substantial changes in the expression level of many genes in the fst mutant ovules and seeds, with a subset of genes involved in several developmental and hormonal pathways appearing to be down-regulated. Using both forward and reverse genetics approaches, we demonstrated that rice FST plays indispensable roles and multiple functions during ovule and early seed development. These findings support a novel function for the Bs-group MADS-box genes in plants.

  16. Patterns of homoeologous gene expression shown by RNA sequencing in hexaploid bread wheat.

    KAUST Repository

    Leach, Lindsey J

    2014-04-11

    BACKGROUND: Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) has a large, complex and hexaploid genome consisting of A, B and D homoeologous chromosome sets. Therefore each wheat gene potentially exists as a trio of A, B and D homoeoloci, each of which may contribute differentially to wheat phenotypes. We describe a novel approach combining wheat cytogenetic resources (chromosome substitution \\'nullisomic-tetrasomic\\' lines) with next generation deep sequencing of gene transcripts (RNA-Seq), to directly and accurately identify homoeologue-specific single nucleotide variants and quantify the relative contribution of individual homoeoloci to gene expression. RESULTS: We discover, based on a sample comprising ~5-10% of the total wheat gene content, that at least 45% of wheat genes are expressed from all three distinct homoeoloci. Most of these genes show strikingly biased expression patterns in which expression is dominated by a single homoeolocus. The remaining ~55% of wheat genes are expressed from either one or two homoeoloci only, through a combination of extensive transcriptional silencing and homoeolocus loss. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that wheat is tending towards functional diploidy, through a variety of mechanisms causing single homoeoloci to become the predominant source of gene transcripts. This discovery has profound consequences for wheat breeding and our understanding of wheat evolution.

  17. Multispecies Analysis of Expression Pattern Diversification in the Recently Expanded Insect Ly6 Gene Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kohtaro; Hazbun, Alexis; Hijazi, Assia; Vreede, Barbara; Sucena, Élio

    2015-01-01

    Gene families often consist of members with diverse expression domains reflecting their functions in a wide variety of tissues. However, how the expression of individual members, and thus their tissue-specific functions, diversified during the course of gene family expansion is not well understood. In this study, we approached this question through the analysis of the duplication history and transcriptional evolution of a rapidly expanding subfamily of insect Ly6 genes. We analyzed different insect genomes and identified seven Ly6 genes that have originated from a single ancestor through sequential duplication within the higher Diptera. We then determined how the original embryonic expression pattern of the founding gene diversified by characterizing its tissue-specific expression in the beetle Tribolium castaneum, the butterfly Bicyclus anynana, and the mosquito Anopheles stephensi and those of its duplicates in three higher dipteran species, representing various stages of the duplication history (Megaselia abdita, Ceratitis capitata, and Drosophila melanogaster). Our results revealed that frequent neofunctionalization episodes contributed to the increased expression breadth of this subfamily and that these events occurred after duplication and speciation events at comparable frequencies. In addition, at each duplication node, we consistently found asymmetric expression divergence. One paralog inherited most of the tissue-specificities of the founder gene, whereas the other paralog evolved drastically reduced expression domains. Our approach attests to the power of combining a well-established duplication history with a comprehensive coverage of representative species in acquiring unequivocal information about the dynamics of gene expression evolution in gene families. PMID:25743545

  18. Of mice and men: divergence of gene expression patterns in kidney.

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    Lydie Cheval

    Full Text Available Since the development of methods for homologous gene recombination, mouse models have played a central role in research in renal pathophysiology. However, many published and unpublished results show that mice with genetic changes mimicking human pathogenic mutations do not display the human phenotype. These functional differences may stem from differences in gene expression between mouse and human kidneys. However, large scale comparison of gene expression networks revealed conservation of gene expression among a large panel of human and mouse tissues including kidneys. Because renal functions result from the spatial integration of elementary processes originating in the glomerulus and the successive segments constituting the nephron, we hypothesized that differences in gene expression profiles along the human and mouse nephron might account for different behaviors. Analysis of SAGE libraries generated from the glomerulus and seven anatomically defined nephron segments from human and mouse kidneys allowed us to identify 4644 pairs of gene orthologs expressed in either one or both species. Quantitative analysis shows that many transcripts are present at different levels in the two species. It also shows poor conservation of gene expression profiles, with less than 10% of the 4644 gene orthologs displaying a higher conservation of expression profiles than the neutral expectation (p<0.05. Accordingly, hierarchical clustering reveals a higher degree of conservation of gene expression patterns between functionally unrelated kidney structures within a given species than between cognate structures from the two species. Similar findings were obtained for sub-groups of genes with either kidney-specific or housekeeping functions. Conservation of gene expression at the scale of the whole organ and divergence at the level of its constituting sub-structures likely account for the fact that although kidneys assume the same global function in the two species

  19. Pattern recognition receptor genes expression profiling in indigenous chickens of India and White Leghorn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haunshi, S; Burramsetty, Arun Kumar; Kannaki, T R; Ravindra, K S Raja; Chatterjee, R N

    2017-09-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRR) such as Toll-like receptors, NOD-like receptors, RIG-I helicase receptors, and C-type lectin receptors play a critical role in innate immunity as a first line of defense against invading pathogens through recognition of pathogen and/or damage-associated molecular patterns. Genetic makeup of birds is known to play a role in resistance or susceptibility to various infectious diseases. Therefore, the present study was carried out to elucidate the differential expression of PRR and some of the cytokine genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of indigenous chicken breeds such as Ghagus and Nicobari and an exotic chicken breed, White Leghorn (WLH). The stability of expression of reference genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 3 breeds was first determined using NormFinder and BestKeeper programs. NormFinder determined B2M and G6PDH reference genes as the best combination with stability value of 0.38. Out of total 14 genes studied, expression of ten genes was found to be significantly different among 3 breeds after normalization with these reference genes. Ghagus breed showed higher level of expression of TLR1LB, TLR7, NOD1, NOD5, B-Lec, IFNβ, IL1β, and IL8 genes when compared to Nicobari breed. Further, Ghagus showed higher expression of TLR1LB, MDA5, LGP2, B-Lec, IL1β, and IL8 genes as compared to WLH breed. Higher expression of LGP2 and MDA5 genes was observed in Nicobari compared to the WLH breed while higher expression of TLR7, NOD1, NOD5, and IFNβ genes was observed in WLH as compared to Nicobari breed. No difference was observed in the expression of TLR1LA, TLR3, B-NK, and IFNα genes among 3 breeds. Study revealed significant breed effect in expression profile of PRR and some of the cytokine genes and Ghagus breed seems to have better expression profile of these genes linked to the innate immunity when compared to the WLH and Nicobar breeds. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  20. Variable gene dispersal conditions and spatial deforestation patterns can interact to affect tropical tree conservation outcomes.

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    Yamini Kashimshetty

    Full Text Available Tropical lowland rain forest (TLRF biodiversity is under threat from anthropogenic factors including deforestation which creates forest fragments of different sizes that can further undergo various internal patterns of logging. Such interventions can modify previous equilibrium abundance and spatial distribution patterns of offspring recruitment and/or pollen dispersal. Little is known about how these aspects of deforestation and fragmentation might synergistically affect TLRF tree recovery demographics and population genetics in newly formed forest fragments. To investigate these TLRF anthropogenic disturbance processes we used the computer program NEWGARDEN (NG, which models spatially-explicit, individual-based plant populations, to simulate 10% deforestation in six different spatial logging patterns for the plant functional type of a long-lived TLRF canopy tree species. Further, each logging pattern was analyzed under nine varying patterns of offspring versus pollen dispersal distances that could have arisen post-fragmentation. Results indicated that gene dispersal condition (especially via offspring had a greater effect on population growth and genetic diversity retention (explaining 98.5% and 88.8% of the variance respectively than spatial logging pattern (0.2% and 4.7% respectively, with 'Near' distance dispersal maximizing population growth and genetic diversity relative to distant dispersal. Within logged regions of the fragment, deforestation patterns closer to fragment borders more often exhibited lower population recovery rates and founding genetic diversity retention relative to more centrally located logging. These results suggest newly isolated fragments have populations that are more sensitive to the way in which their offspring and pollen dispersers are affected than the spatial pattern in which subsequent logging occurs, and that large variation in the recovery rates of different TLRF tree species attributable to altered gene

  1. Variable gene dispersal conditions and spatial deforestation patterns can interact to affect tropical tree conservation outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashimshetty, Yamini; Pelikan, Stephan; Rogstad, Steven H

    2015-01-01

    Tropical lowland rain forest (TLRF) biodiversity is under threat from anthropogenic factors including deforestation which creates forest fragments of different sizes that can further undergo various internal patterns of logging. Such interventions can modify previous equilibrium abundance and spatial distribution patterns of offspring recruitment and/or pollen dispersal. Little is known about how these aspects of deforestation and fragmentation might synergistically affect TLRF tree recovery demographics and population genetics in newly formed forest fragments. To investigate these TLRF anthropogenic disturbance processes we used the computer program NEWGARDEN (NG), which models spatially-explicit, individual-based plant populations, to simulate 10% deforestation in six different spatial logging patterns for the plant functional type of a long-lived TLRF canopy tree species. Further, each logging pattern was analyzed under nine varying patterns of offspring versus pollen dispersal distances that could have arisen post-fragmentation. Results indicated that gene dispersal condition (especially via offspring) had a greater effect on population growth and genetic diversity retention (explaining 98.5% and 88.8% of the variance respectively) than spatial logging pattern (0.2% and 4.7% respectively), with 'Near' distance dispersal maximizing population growth and genetic diversity relative to distant dispersal. Within logged regions of the fragment, deforestation patterns closer to fragment borders more often exhibited lower population recovery rates and founding genetic diversity retention relative to more centrally located logging. These results suggest newly isolated fragments have populations that are more sensitive to the way in which their offspring and pollen dispersers are affected than the spatial pattern in which subsequent logging occurs, and that large variation in the recovery rates of different TLRF tree species attributable to altered gene dispersal

  2. Evolution of genes associated with gynoecium patterning and fruit development in Solanaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Ramírez, Clara Inés; Plata-Arboleda, Sayonara; Pabón-Mora, Natalia

    2018-02-17

    The genetic basis of fruit development has been extensively studied in Arabidopsis, where major transcription factors controlling valve identity (i.e. FRUITFULL), replum development (i.e. REPLUMLESS) and the differentiation of the dehiscence zones (i.e. SHATTERPROOF, INDEHISCENT and ALCATRAZ) have been identified. This gene regulatory network in other flowering plants is influenced by duplication events during angiosperm diversification. Here we aim to characterize candidate fruit development genes in the Solanaceae and compare them with those of Brassicaceae. ALC/SPT, HEC/IND, RPL and AG/SHP homologues were isolated from publicly available databases and from our own transcriptomes of Brunfelsia australis and Streptosolen jamesonii. Maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses were performed for each of the gene lineages. Shifts in protein motifs, as well as expression patterns of all identified homologues, are shown in dissected floral organs and fruits in different developmental stages of four Solanaceae species exhibiting different fruit types. Each gene lineage has undergone different duplication time-points, resulting in very different genetic complements in the Solanaceae when compared with the Brassicaceae. In general, Solanaceae species have more copies of HEC1/2 and RPL than Brassicaceae, have fewer copies of SHP and the same number of copies of AG, ALC and SPT. Solanaceae lack IND orthologues, but have pre-duplication HEC3 homologues. The expression analyses showed opposite expression of SPT and ALC orthologues between dry- and fleshy-fruited species during fruit maturation. Fleshy-fruited species turn off RPL and SPT orthologues during maturation. The gynoecium patterning and fruit developmental genetic network in the Brassicaceae cannot be directly extrapolated to the Solanaceae. In Solanaceae ALC, SPT and RPL contribute differently to maturation of dry dehiscent and fleshy fruits, whereas HEC genes are not generally expressed in the gynoecium. RPL genes

  3. Expression Pattern of Class B Gene PAP3 in Flower Development of Pepper

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    Xin Li

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Class B gene APETALA3 (AP3 plays a key role in the development of petals and stamens. Here, we investigated the expression pattern of PAP3 gene (genbank accession number: HM104635 in the buds of cytoplasmic male sterility line 121A and its near-isogenic restorer line 121C at four developmental stages and analyzed the possible association between Class B genes and cytoplasmic male sterility of pepper. Semi-quantitative PCR and quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR as well as RNA in situ hybridization showed increased expression of PAP3 at late phase of anther development and its higher expression in restorer line compared with sterility line indicating PAP3’s role at late developmental stage of anther and suppressed expression in sterility line. RNA in situ hybridization showed Class B gene features: high abundance in stamen and petal; lower expression in pistil; no expression in sepal. Results of transient expression in onion epidermal cells also showed PAP3 localized in the nucleus, which is consistent with the expression pattern of transcription factors of MADS-box gene family.

  4. Intestinal ischemic preconditioning after ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat intestine: profiling global gene expression patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore-Olufemi, Stacey D; Olufemi, Shodimu-Emmanuel; Lott, Steve; Sato, Norio; Kozar, Rosemary A; Moore, Frederick A; Radhakrishnan, Ravi S; Shah, Shinil; Jimenez, Fernando; Kone, Bruce C; Cox, Charles S

    2010-07-01

    Intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury involves activation of inflammatory mediators, mucosal necrosis, ileus, and alteration in a variety of gene products. Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) reduced all the effects of intestinal injury seen in IR. In an effort to investigate the molecular mechanisms responsible for the protective effects afforded by IPC, we sought to characterize the global gene expression pattern in rats subjected to IPC in the setting of IR injury. Rats were randomized into five groups: (1) Sham, (2) IPC only (3) IR, (4) Early IPC + IR (IPC --> IR), and (5) Late IPC + IR (IPC --> 24 h --> IR). At 6 h after reperfusion, ileum was harvested for total RNA isolation, pooled, and analyzed on complementary DNA (cDNA) microarrays with validation using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Significance Analysis of Microarray (SAM) software was used to determine statistically significant changes in gene expression. Early IPC + IR had 5,167 induced and 4 repressed genes compared with the other groups. SAM analysis revealed 474 out of 10,000 genes differentially expressed among the groups. Early and Late IPC + IR had more genes involved in redox hemostasis, the immune/inflammatory response, and apoptosis than either the IPC only or IR alone groups. The transcriptional profile suggests that IPC exerts its protective effects by regulating the gene response to injury in the intestine.

  5. Patterns of Bacterial and Archaeal Gene Expression through the Lower Amazon River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon M. Satinsky

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of metatranscriptomic and metagenomic datasets from the lower reaches of the Amazon River between Óbidos and the river mouth revealed microbial transcript and gene pools dominated by Actinobacteria, Thaumarchaeota, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Planctomycetes. Three mainstem stations spanning a 625 km reach had similar gene expression patterns (transcripts gene copy−1 across a diverse suite of element cycling genes, but two tributary-influenced stations at the mouth of the Tapajós River and near the Tocantins River at Belém had distinct transcriptome composition and expression ratios, particularly for genes encoding light-related energy capture (higher and iron acquisition and ammonia oxidation (lower. Environmental parameters that were useful predictors of gene expression ratios included concentrations of lignin phenols, suspended sediments, nitrate, phosphate, and particulate organic carbon and nitrogen. Similar to the gene expression data, these chemical properties reflected highly homogeneous mainstem stations punctuated by distinct tributary-influenced stations at Tapajós and Belém. Although heterotrophic processes were expected to dominate in the lower Amazon, transcripts from photosynthetic bacteria were abundant in tributary-influenced regions, and transcripts from Thaumarcheota taxa genetically capable of chemosynthetic ammonia oxidation accounted for up to 21% of the transcriptome at others. Based on regressions of transcript numbers against gene numbers, expression ratios of Thaumarchaeota populations were largely unchanged within the mainstem, suggesting a relatively minor role for gene regulation. These quantitative gene and transcript inventories detail a diverse array of energy acquisition strategies and metabolic capabilities for bacteria and archaea populations of the world's largest river system.

  6. Unique splicing pattern of the TCF7L2 gene in human pancreatic islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osmark, P; Hansson, O; Jonsson, Anna Elisabet

    2009-01-01

    Intronic variation in the TCF7L2 gene exhibits the strongest association to type 2 diabetes observed to date, but the mechanism whereby this genetic variation translates into altered biological function is largely unknown. A possible explanation is a genotype-dependent difference in the complex s...... splicing pattern; however, this has not previously been characterised in pancreatic or insulin target tissues. Here, the detailed TCF7L2 splicing pattern in five human tissues is described and dependence on risk genotype explored....

  7. Genes expressed in specific areas of the human fetal cerebral cortex display distinct patterns of evolution.

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    Nelle Lambert

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The developmental mechanisms through which the cerebral cortex increased in size and complexity during primate evolution are essentially unknown. To uncover genetic networks active in the developing cerebral cortex, we combined three-dimensional reconstruction of human fetal brains at midgestation and whole genome expression profiling. This novel approach enabled transcriptional characterization of neurons from accurately defined cortical regions containing presumptive Broca and Wernicke language areas, as well as surrounding associative areas. We identified hundreds of genes displaying differential expression between the two regions, but no significant difference in gene expression between left and right hemispheres. Validation by qRTPCR and in situ hybridization confirmed the robustness of our approach and revealed novel patterns of area- and layer-specific expression throughout the developing cortex. Genes differentially expressed between cortical areas were significantly associated with fast-evolving non-coding sequences harboring human-specific substitutions that could lead to divergence in their repertoires of transcription factor binding sites. Strikingly, while some of these sequences were accelerated in the human lineage only, many others were accelerated in chimpanzee and/or mouse lineages, indicating that genes important for cortical development may be particularly prone to changes in transcriptional regulation across mammals. Genes differentially expressed between cortical regions were also enriched for transcriptional targets of FoxP2, a key gene for the acquisition of language abilities in humans. Our findings point to a subset of genes with a unique combination of cortical areal expression and evolutionary patterns, suggesting that they play important roles in the transcriptional network underlying human-specific neural traits.

  8. Characterization of the Fatty Acid Desaturase Genes in Cucumber: Structure, Phylogeny, and Expression Patterns.

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    Chun-Juan Dong

    Full Text Available Fatty acid desaturases (FADs introduce double bonds into the hydrocarbon chains of fatty acids to produce unsaturated fatty acids, and therefore play a critical role in plant development and acclimation to environmental stresses. In this study, 23 full-length FAD genes in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. were identified through database searches, including three CsFAB2 genes, two CsFAD2 genes, fourteen CsFAD5 genes, and one gene each for CsFAD3, CsFAD4, CsFAD6 and CsFAD7. These cucumber FAD genes were distributed on all seven chromosomes and two additional scaffolds. Based on a phylogenetic analysis, the cucumber FAD proteins were clustered into five subfamilies with their counterparts from other plants. Gene structures and protein sequences were considerably conserved in each subfamily. All three CsFAB2 proteins shared conserved structure with the known plant soluble FAD proteins. The other cucumber FADs belonged to the membrane-bound FADs and contained three highly conserved histidine boxes. Additionally, the putative endoplasmic reticulum retention signal was found at the C-termini of the CsFAD2 and CsFAD3 proteins, while the N-termini of CsFAD4, CsFAD5, CsFAD6, CsFAD7 and three CsFAB2s contained a predicted chloroplast signal peptide, which was consistent with their associated metabolic pathways. Furthermore, a gene expression analysis showed that CsFAD2 and CsFAD3 were universally expressed in all tested tissues, whereas the other cucumber FAD genes were preferentially expressed in the cotyledons or leaves. The tissue-specific expression patterns of cucumber FAD genes were correlated well with the differences in the fatty acid compositions ofroots and leaves. Finally, the cucumber FAD genes showed a cold-induced and heat-repressed expression pattern, although with distinct regulatory time courses among the different CsFAD members, which indicates the potential roles of the FADs in temperature stress resistance in cucumber.

  9. Characterization of the Fatty Acid Desaturase Genes in Cucumber: Structure, Phylogeny, and Expression Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chun-Juan; Cao, Ning; Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Shang, Qing-Mao

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid desaturases (FADs) introduce double bonds into the hydrocarbon chains of fatty acids to produce unsaturated fatty acids, and therefore play a critical role in plant development and acclimation to environmental stresses. In this study, 23 full-length FAD genes in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) were identified through database searches, including three CsFAB2 genes, two CsFAD2 genes, fourteen CsFAD5 genes, and one gene each for CsFAD3, CsFAD4, CsFAD6 and CsFAD7. These cucumber FAD genes were distributed on all seven chromosomes and two additional scaffolds. Based on a phylogenetic analysis, the cucumber FAD proteins were clustered into five subfamilies with their counterparts from other plants. Gene structures and protein sequences were considerably conserved in each subfamily. All three CsFAB2 proteins shared conserved structure with the known plant soluble FAD proteins. The other cucumber FADs belonged to the membrane-bound FADs and contained three highly conserved histidine boxes. Additionally, the putative endoplasmic reticulum retention signal was found at the C-termini of the CsFAD2 and CsFAD3 proteins, while the N-termini of CsFAD4, CsFAD5, CsFAD6, CsFAD7 and three CsFAB2s contained a predicted chloroplast signal peptide, which was consistent with their associated metabolic pathways. Furthermore, a gene expression analysis showed that CsFAD2 and CsFAD3 were universally expressed in all tested tissues, whereas the other cucumber FAD genes were preferentially expressed in the cotyledons or leaves. The tissue-specific expression patterns of cucumber FAD genes were correlated well with the differences in the fatty acid compositions ofroots and leaves. Finally, the cucumber FAD genes showed a cold-induced and heat-repressed expression pattern, although with distinct regulatory time courses among the different CsFAD members, which indicates the potential roles of the FADs in temperature stress resistance in cucumber.

  10. Patterns and Implications of Gene Gain and Loss in the Evolution of Prochlorococcus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, Alla; Kettler, Gregory C.; Martiny, Adam C.; Huang, Katherine; Zucker, Jeremy; Coleman, Maureen L.; Rodrigue, Sebastien; Chen, Feng; Lapidus, Alla; Ferriera, Steven; Johnson, Justin; Steglich, Claudia; Church, George M.; Richardson, Paul; Chisholm, Sallie W.

    2007-07-30

    Prochlorococcus is a marine cyanobacterium that numerically dominates the mid-latitude oceans and is the smallest known oxygenic phototroph. Numerous isolatesfrom diverse areas of the world's oceans have been studied and shown to be physiologically and genetically distinct. All isolates described thus far can be assigned to either a tightly clustered high-light (HL)-adapted clade, or a more divergent low-light (LL)-adapted group. The 16S rRNA sequences of the entire Prochlorococcus group differ by at most 3percent, and the four initially published genomes revealed patterns of genetic differentiation that help explain physiological differences among the isolates. Here we describe the genomes of eight newly sequenced isolates and combine them with the first four genomes for a comprehensive analysis of the core (shared by all isolates) and flexible genes of the Prochlorococcus group, and the patterns of loss and gain of the flexible genes over the course of evolution. There are 1,273 genes that represent the core shared by all 12 genomes. They are apparently sufficient, according to metabolic reconstruction, to encode a functional cell. We describe a phylogeny for all 12 isolates by subjecting their complete proteomes to three different phylogenetic analyses. For each non-core gene, we used a maximum parsimony method to estimate which ancestor likely first acquired or lost each gene. Many of the genetic differences among isolates, especially for genes involved in outer membrane synthesis and nutrient transport, are found within the same clade. Nevertheless, we identified some genes defining HL and LL ecotypes, and clades within these broad ecotypes, helping to demonstrate the basis of HL and LL adaptations in Prochlorococcus. Furthermore, our estimates of gene gain events allow us to identify highly variable genomic islands that are not apparent through simple pairwise comparisons. These results emphasize the functional roles, especially those connected to outer

  11. Metabolic syndrome influences cardiac gene expression pattern at the transcript level in male ZDF rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sárközy, Márta; Zvara, Agnes; Gyémánt, Nóra; Fekete, Veronika; Kocsis, Gabriella F; Pipis, Judit; Szűcs, Gergő; Csonka, Csaba; Puskás, László G; Ferdinandy, Péter; Csont, Tamás

    2013-01-15

    Metabolic syndrome (coexisting visceral obesity, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and hypertension) is a prominent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, however, its effect on cardiac gene expression pattern is unclear. Therefore, we examined the possible alterations in cardiac gene expression pattern in male Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats, a model of metabolic syndrome. Fasting blood glucose, serum insulin, cholesterol and triglyceride levels were measured at 6, 16, and 25 wk of age in male ZDF and lean control rats. Oral glucose tolerance test was performed at 16 and 25 wk of age. At week 25, total RNA was isolated from the myocardium and assayed by rat oligonucleotide microarray for 14921 genes. Expression of selected genes was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Fasting blood glucose, serum insulin, cholesterol and triglyceride levels were significantly increased, glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were impaired in ZDF rats compared to leans. In hearts of ZDF rats, 36 genes showed significant up-regulation and 49 genes showed down-regulation as compared to lean controls. Genes with significantly altered expression in the heart due to metabolic syndrome includes functional clusters of metabolism (e.g. 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A synthase 2; argininosuccinate synthetase; 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate-coenzyme A ligase), structural proteins (e.g. myosin IXA; aggrecan1), signal transduction (e.g. activating transcription factor 3; phospholipase A2; insulin responsive sequence DNA binding protein-1) stress response (e.g. heat shock 70kD protein 1A; heat shock protein 60; glutathione S-transferase Yc2 subunit), ion channels and receptors (e.g. ATPase, (Na+)/K+ transporting, beta 4 polypeptide; ATPase, H+/K+ transporting, nongastric, alpha polypeptide). Moreover some other genes with no definite functional clusters were also changed such as e.g. S100 calcium binding protein A3; ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1; interleukin 18. Gene ontology analysis

  12. Cell-specific DNA methylation patterns of retina-specific genes.

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    Shannath L Merbs

    Full Text Available Many studies have demonstrated that epigenetic mechanisms are important in the regulation of gene expression during embryogenesis, gametogenesis, and other forms of tissue-specific gene regulation. We sought to explore the possible role of epigenetics, specifically DNA methylation, in the establishment and maintenance of cell type-restricted gene expression in the retina. To assess the relationship between DNA methylation status and expression level of retinal genes, bisulfite sequence analysis of the 1000 bp region around the transcription start sites (TSS of representative rod and cone photoreceptor-specific genes and gene expression analysis were performed in the WERI and Y79 human retinoblastoma cell lines. Next, the homologous genes in mouse were bisulfite sequenced in the retina and in non-expressing tissues. Finally, bisulfite sequencing was performed on isolated photoreceptor and non-photoreceptor retinal cells isolated by laser capture microdissection. Differential methylation of rhodopsin (RHO, retinal binding protein 3 (RBP3, IRBP cone opsin, short-wave-sensitive (OPN1SW, cone opsin, middle-wave-sensitive (OPN1MW, and cone opsin, long-wave-sensitive (OPN1LW was found in the retinoblastoma cell lines that inversely correlated with gene expression levels. Similarly, we found tissue-specific hypomethylation of the promoter region of Rho and Rbp3 in mouse retina as compared to non-expressing tissues, and also observed hypomethylation of retinal-expressed microRNAs. The Rho and Rbp3 promoter regions were unmethylated in expressing photoreceptor cells and methylated in non-expressing, non-photoreceptor cells from the inner nuclear layer. A third regional hypomethylation pattern of photoreceptor-specific genes was seen in a subpopulation of non-expressing photoreceptors (Rho in cones from the Nrl -/- mouse and Opn1sw in rods. These results demonstrate that a number of photoreceptor-specific genes have cell-specific differential DNA

  13. Alternative Polyadenylation Patterns for Novel Gene Discovery and Classification in Cancer

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    Oguzhan Begik

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Certain aspects of diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of cancer patients are still important challenges to be addressed. Therefore, we propose a pipeline to uncover patterns of alternative polyadenylation (APA, a hidden complexity in cancer transcriptomes, to further accelerate efforts to discover novel cancer genes and pathways. Here, we analyzed expression data for 1045 cancer patients and found a significant shift in usage of poly(A signals in common tumor types (breast, colon, lung, prostate, gastric, and ovarian compared to normal tissues. Using machine-learning techniques, we further defined specific subsets of APA events to efficiently classify cancer types. Furthermore, APA patterns were associated with altered protein levels in patients, revealed by antibody-based profiling data, suggesting functional significance. Overall, our study offers a computational approach for use of APA in novel gene discovery and classification in common tumor types, with important implications in basic research, biomarker discovery, and precision medicine approaches.

  14. Anteroposterior Patterning of Gene Expression in the Human Infant Sclera: Chondrogenic Potential and Wnt Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seko, Yuko; Azuma, Noriyuki; Yokoi, Tadashi; Kami, Daisuke; Ishii, Ryuga; Nishina, Sachiko; Toyoda, Masashi; Shimokawa, Hitoyata; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2017-01-01

    Purpose/Aim: We sought to identify the anteroposterior spatial gene expression hierarchy in the human sclera to develop a hypothesis for axial elongation and deformity of the eyeball. We analyzed the global gene expression of human scleral cells derived from distinct parts of the human infant sclera obtained from surgically enucleated eyes with retinoblastoma, using Affymetrix GeneChip oligonucleotide arrays, and compared, in particular, gene expression levels between the anterior and posterior parts of the sclera. The ages of three donors were 10M, 4M, and 1Y9M. K-means clustering analysis of gene expression revealed that expression levels of cartilage-associated genes such as COLXIA and ACAN increased from the anterior to the posterior part of the sclera. Microarray analyses and RT-PCR data showed that the expression levels of MGP, COLXIA, BMP4, and RARB were significantly higher in the posterior than in the anterior sclera of two independent infant eyes. Conversely, expression levels of WNT2, DKK2, GREM1, and HOXB2 were significantly higher in the anterior sclera. Among several Wnt-family genes examined, WNT2B was found to be expressed at a significantly higher level in the posterior sclera, and the reverse order was observed for WNT2. The results of luciferase reporter assays suggested that a GSK-3β inhibitor stimulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling particularly strongly in the posterior sclera. The expression pattern of RARB, a myopia-related gene, was similar in three independent eyes. Chondrogenic potential was higher and Wnt/β-catenin signaling was more potently activated by a GSK-3β inhibitor in the posterior than in the anterior part of the human infant sclera. Although the differences in the gene expression profiles between the anterior and posterior sclera might be involved only in normal growth processes, this anteroposterior hierarchy in the sclera might contribute to disorders involving abnormal elongation and deformity of the eyeball, including myopia.

  15. Gene expression pattern of glucose transporters in the skeletal muscles of newly hatched chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamoto, Saki; Ijiri, Daichi; Kawaguchi, Mana; Nakashima, Kazuki; Ohtsuka, Akira

    2016-07-01

    The gene expression pattern of the glucose transporters (GLUT1, GLUT3, GLUT8, and GLUT12) among pectoralis major and minor, biceps femoris, and sartorius muscles from newly hatched chicks was examined. GLUT1 mRNA level was higher in pectoralis major muscle than in the other muscles. Phosphorylated AKT level was also high in the same muscle, suggesting a relationship between AKT and GLUT1 expression.

  16. Differential DNA methylation patterns of homeobox genes in proximal and distal colon epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnicle, Alan; Seoighe, Cathal; Golden, Aaron; Greally, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Region and cell-type specific differences in the molecular make up of colon epithelial cells have been reported. Those differences may underlie the region-specific characteristics of common colon epithelial diseases such as colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. DNA methylation is a cell-type specific epigenetic mark, essential for transcriptional regulation, silencing of repetitive DNA and genomic imprinting. Little is known about any region-specific variations in methylation patterns in human colon epithelial cells. Using purified epithelial cells and whole biopsies (n = 19) from human subjects, we generated epigenome-wide DNA methylation data (using the HELP-tagging assay), comparing the methylation signatures of the proximal and distal colon. We identified a total of 125 differentially methylated sites (DMS) mapping to transcription start sites of protein-coding genes, most notably several members of the homeobox (HOX) family of genes. Patterns of differential methylation were validated with MassArray EpiTYPER. We also examined DNA methylation in whole biopsies, applying a computational technique to deconvolve variation in methylation within cell types and variation in cell-type composition across biopsies. Including inferred epithelial proportions as a covariate in differential methylation analysis applied to the whole biopsies resulted in greater overlap with the results obtained from purified epithelial cells compared with when the covariate was not included. Results obtained from both approaches highlight region-specific methylation patterns of HOX genes in colonic epithelium. Regional variation in methylation patterns has implications for the study of diseases that exhibit regional expression patterns in the human colon, such as inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer. PMID:26812987

  17. Gaining insights into the codon usage patterns of TP53 gene across eight mammalian species.

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    Tarikul Huda Mazumder

    Full Text Available TP53 gene is known as the "guardian of the genome" as it plays a vital role in regulating cell cycle, cell proliferation, DNA damage repair, initiation of programmed cell death and suppressing tumor growth. Non uniform usage of synonymous codons for a specific amino acid during translation of protein known as codon usage bias (CUB is a unique property of the genome and shows species specific deviation. Analysis of codon usage bias with compositional dynamics of coding sequences has contributed to the better understanding of the molecular mechanism and the evolution of a particular gene. In this study, the complete nucleotide coding sequences of TP53 gene from eight different mammalian species were used for CUB analysis. Our results showed that the codon usage patterns in TP53 gene across different mammalian species has been influenced by GC bias particularly GC3 and a moderate bias exists in the codon usage of TP53 gene. Moreover, we observed that nature has highly favored the most over represented codon CTG for leucine amino acid but selected against the ATA codon for isoleucine in TP53 gene across all mammalian species during the course of evolution.

  18. Discovering gene expression patterns in time course microarray experiments by ANOVA-SCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nueda, María José; Conesa, Ana; Westerhuis, Johan A; Hoefsloot, Huub C J; Smilde, Age K; Talón, Manuel; Ferrer, Alberto

    2007-07-15

    Designed microarray experiments are used to investigate the effects that controlled experimental factors have on gene expression and learn about the transcriptional responses associated with external variables. In these datasets, signals of interest coexist with varying sources of unwanted noise in a framework of (co)relation among the measured variables and with the different levels of the studied factors. Discovering experimentally relevant transcriptional changes require methodologies that take all these elements into account. In this work, we develop the application of the Analysis of variance-simultaneous component analysis (ANOVA-SCA) Smilde et al. Bioinformatics, (2005) to the analysis of multiple series time course microarray data as an example of multifactorial gene expression profiling experiments. We denoted this implementation as ASCA-genes. We show how the combination of ANOVA-modeling and a dimension reduction technique is effective in extracting targeted signals from data by-passing structural noise. The methodology is valuable for identifying main and secondary responses associated with the experimental factors and spotting relevant experimental conditions. We additionally propose a novel approach for gene selection in the context of the relation of individual transcriptional patterns to global gene expression signals. We demonstrate the methodology on both real and synthetic datasets. ASCA-genes has been implemented in the statistical language R and is available at http://www.ivia.es/centrodegenomica/bioinformatics.htm. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  19. Adjusting breast cancer patient prognosis with non-HER2-gene patterns on chromosome 17.

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    Vassiliki Kotoula

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HER2 and TOP2A gene status are assessed for diagnostic and research purposes in breast cancer with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. However, FISH probes do not target only the annotated gene, while chromosome 17 (chr17 is among the most unstable chromosomes in breast cancer. Here we asked whether the status of specifically targeted genes on chr17 might help in refining prognosis of early high-risk breast cancer patients. METHODS: Copy numbers (CN for 14 genes on chr17, 4 of which were within and 10 outside the core HER2 amplicon (HER2- and non-HER2-genes, respectively were assessed with qPCR in 485 paraffin-embedded tumor tissue samples from breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy in the frame of two randomized phase III trials. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HER2-genes CN strongly correlated to each other (Spearman's rho >0.6 and were concordant with FISH HER2 status (Kappa 0.6697 for ERBB2 CN. TOP2A CN were not concordant with TOP2A FISH status (Kappa 0.1154. CN hierarchical clustering revealed distinct patterns of gains, losses and complex alterations in HER2- and non-HER2-genes associated with IHC4 breast cancer subtypes. Upon multivariate analysis, non-HER2-gene gains independently predicted for shorter disease-free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS in patients with triple-negative cancer, as compared to luminal and HER2-positive tumors (interaction p = 0.007 for DFS and p = 0.011 for OS. Similarly, non-HER2-gene gains were associated with worse prognosis in patients who had undergone breast-conserving surgery as compared to modified radical mastectomy (p = 0.004 for both DFS and OS. Non-HER2-gene losses were unfavorable prognosticators in patients with 1-3 metastatic nodes, as compared to those with 4 or more nodes (p = 0.017 for DFS and p = 0.001 for OS. CONCLUSIONS: TOP2A FISH and qPCR may not identify the same pathology on chr17q. Non-HER2 chr17 CN patterns may further predict outcome in breast cancer

  20. Distinctive Patterns of Evolution of the δ-Globin Gene (HBD) in Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moleirinho, Ana; Lopes, Alexandra M.; Seixas, Susana; Morales-Hojas, Ramiro; Prata, Maria J.; Amorim, António

    2015-01-01

    In most vertebrates, hemoglobin (Hb) is a heterotetramer composed of two dissimilar globin chains, which change during development according to the patterns of expression of α- and β-globin family members. In placental mammals, the β-globin cluster includes three early-expressed genes, ε(HBE)-γ(HBG)-ψβ(HBBP1), and the late expressed genes, δ (HBD) and β (HBB). While HBB encodes the major adult β-globin chain, HBD is weakly expressed or totally silent. Paradoxically, in human populations HBD shows high levels of conservation typical of genes under strong evolutionary constraints, possibly due to a regulatory role in the fetal-to-adult switch unique of Anthropoid primates. In this study, we have performed a comprehensive phylogenetic and comparative analysis of the two adult β-like globin genes in a set of diverse mammalian taxa, focusing on the evolution and functional divergence of HBD in primates. Our analysis revealed that anthropoids are an exception to a general pattern of concerted evolution in placental mammals, showing a high level of sequence conservation at HBD, less frequent and shorter gene conversion events. Moreover, this lineage is unique in the retention of a functional GATA-1 motif, known to be involved in the control of the developmental expression of the β-like globin genes. We further show that not only the mode but also the rate of evolution of the δ-globin gene in higher primates are strictly associated with the fetal/adult β-cluster developmental switch. To gain further insight into the possible functional constraints that have been shaping the evolutionary history of HBD in primates, we calculated dN/dS (ω) ratios under alternative models of gene evolution. Although our results indicate that HBD might have experienced different selective pressures throughout primate evolution, as shown by different ω values between apes and Old World Monkeys + New World Monkeys (0.06 versus 0.43, respectively), these estimates corroborated a

  1. Distinctive patterns of evolution of the δ-globin gene (HBD in primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Moleirinho

    Full Text Available In most vertebrates, hemoglobin (Hb is a heterotetramer composed of two dissimilar globin chains, which change during development according to the patterns of expression of α- and β-globin family members. In placental mammals, the β-globin cluster includes three early-expressed genes, ε(HBE-γ(HBG-ψβ(HBBP1, and the late expressed genes, δ (HBD and β (HBB. While HBB encodes the major adult β-globin chain, HBD is weakly expressed or totally silent. Paradoxically, in human populations HBD shows high levels of conservation typical of genes under strong evolutionary constraints, possibly due to a regulatory role in the fetal-to-adult switch unique of Anthropoid primates. In this study, we have performed a comprehensive phylogenetic and comparative analysis of the two adult β-like globin genes in a set of diverse mammalian taxa, focusing on the evolution and functional divergence of HBD in primates. Our analysis revealed that anthropoids are an exception to a general pattern of concerted evolution in placental mammals, showing a high level of sequence conservation at HBD, less frequent and shorter gene conversion events. Moreover, this lineage is unique in the retention of a functional GATA-1 motif, known to be involved in the control of the developmental expression of the β-like globin genes. We further show that not only the mode but also the rate of evolution of the δ-globin gene in higher primates are strictly associated with the fetal/adult β-cluster developmental switch. To gain further insight into the possible functional constraints that have been shaping the evolutionary history of HBD in primates, we calculated dN/dS (ω ratios under alternative models of gene evolution. Although our results indicate that HBD might have experienced different selective pressures throughout primate evolution, as shown by different ω values between apes and Old World Monkeys + New World Monkeys (0.06 versus 0.43, respectively, these estimates

  2. Epileptogenesis alters gene expression pattern in rats subjected to amygdala-dependent emotional learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majak, K; Dabrowski, M; Pitkänen, A

    2009-03-17

    Here we tested a hypothesis that epileptogenesis influences expression pattern of genes in the basolateral amygdala that are critical for fear conditioning. Whole genome molecular profiling of basolateral rat amygdala was performed to compare the transcriptome changes underlying fear learning in epileptogenic and control animals. Our analysis revealed that after fear conditioning procedure 26 genes were regulated differently in the basolateral amygdala of both groups. Thus, our study provides the first evidence that not only the damage to the neuronal pathways but also altered composition or activity level of molecular machinery responsible for formation of emotional memories within surviving pathways can contribute to impairment in emotional learning in epileptogenic animals. Understanding the function of those genes in emotional learning provides an attractive avenue for identification of novel drug targets for treatment of emotional disorders after epileptogenesis-inducing insult.

  3. Novel gene expression domains reveal early patterning of the Xenopus endoderm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ricardo M B; Mason, Julia; Lee, Monica; Amaya, Enrique; Zorn, Aaron M

    2003-08-01

    The endoderm gives rise the respiratory and digestive tract epithelia as well as associated organs such as the liver, lungs and pancreas. Investigations examining the molecular basis of embryonic endodermal patterning and organogenesis have been hampered by the lack of regionally expressed molecular markers in the early endoderm. By differentially screening an arrayed cDNA library, combined with an in situ hybridization screen we identified 13 new genes regionally expressed in the early tailbud endoderm of the Xenopus embryo. The putative proteins encoded by these cDNAs include a cell surface transporter, secreted proteins, a protease, a protease inhibitor, an RNA-binding protein, a phosphatase inhibitor and several enzymes. We find that the expression of these genes falls into one of three re-occurring domains in the tailbud embryo; (1). a ventral midgut, (2). posterior to the midgut and (3). in the dorsal endoderm beneath the notochord. Several of these genes are also regionally expressed at gastrula and neurula stages and appear to mark territories that were previously only predicted by the endoderm fate map. This indicates that there is significant positional identity in the early endoderm long before stages 28-32 when regional specification of the endoderm is thought to occur. These new genes provide valuable tools for studying endodermal patterning and organogenesis in Xenopus.

  4. Extracting biologically significant patterns from short time series gene expression data

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    McGinnis Thomas

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Time series gene expression data analysis is used widely to study the dynamics of various cell processes. Most of the time series data available today consist of few time points only, thus making the application of standard clustering techniques difficult. Results We developed two new algorithms that are capable of extracting biological patterns from short time point series gene expression data. The two algorithms, ASTRO and MiMeSR, are inspired by the rank order preserving framework and the minimum mean squared residue approach, respectively. However, ASTRO and MiMeSR differ from previous approaches in that they take advantage of the relatively few number of time points in order to reduce the problem from NP-hard to linear. Tested on well-defined short time expression data, we found that our approaches are robust to noise, as well as to random patterns, and that they can correctly detect the temporal expression profile of relevant functional categories. Evaluation of our methods was performed using Gene Ontology (GO annotations and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-chip data. Conclusion Our approaches generally outperform both standard clustering algorithms and algorithms designed specifically for clustering of short time series gene expression data. Both algorithms are available at http://www.benoslab.pitt.edu/astro/.

  5. Changes in Methylation Patterns of Kiss1 and Kiss1r Gene Promoters across Puberty

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    Amanda K. Wyatt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The initiation of mammalian puberty is underpinned by an increase in Kisspeptin (Kiss1 signaling via its receptor (Kiss1r/GPR54 on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons. Animals and humans with loss-of-function mutations in Kiss1 or Kiss1r fail to go through puberty. The timing of puberty is dependent on environmental factors, and malleability in puberty timing suggests a mechanism that can translate environmental signals into patterns of Kiss1/Kiss1r gene expression. Epigenetics is a powerful mechanism that can control gene expression in an environment-dependent manner. We investigated whether epigenetic DNA methylation is associated with gene expression changes at puberty. We used bisulfite-PCR-pyrosequencing to define the methylation in the promoters of Kiss1 and Kiss1r before and after puberty in female rats. Both Kiss1 and Kiss1r showed highly significant puberty-specific differential promoter methylation patterns. By identifying key differentially methylated residues associated with puberty, these findings will be important for further studies investigating the control of gene expression across the pubertal transition.

  6. Detecting splicing patterns in genes involved in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, Grégoire; Rousselin, Antoine; Goardon, Nicolas; Castéra, Laurent; Harter, Valentin; Legros, Angelina; Muller, Etienne; Fouillet, Robin; Brault, Baptiste; Smirnova, Anna S; Lemoine, Fréderic; de la Grange, Pierre; Guillaud-Bataille, Marine; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Houdayer, Claude; Bonnet, Françoise; Blanc-Fournier, Cécile; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Frebourg, Thierry; Martins, Alexandra; Vaur, Dominique; Krieger, Sophie

    2017-10-01

    Interpretation of variants of unknown significance (VUS) is a major challenge for laboratories performing molecular diagnosis of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC), especially considering that many genes are now known to be involved in this syndrome. One important way these VUS can have a functional impact is through their effects on RNA splicing. Here we present a custom RNA-Seq assay plus bioinformatics and biostatistics pipeline to analyse specifically alternative and abnormal splicing junctions in 11 targeted HBOC genes. Our pipeline identified 14 new alternative splices in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in addition to detecting the majority of known alternative spliced transcripts therein. We provide here the first global splicing pattern analysis for the other nine genes, which will enable a comprehensive interpretation of splicing defects caused by VUS in HBOC. Previously known splicing alterations were consistently detected, occasionally with a more complex splicing pattern than expected. We also found that splicing in the 11 genes is similar in blood and breast tissue, supporting the utility and simplicity of blood splicing assays. Our pipeline is ready to be integrated into standard molecular diagnosis for HBOC, but it could equally be adapted for an integrative analysis of any multigene disorder.

  7. Expression of Genes Involved in Drosophila Wing Morphogenesis and Vein Patterning Are Altered by Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia A.; Hosamani, Ravikumar; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Imaginal wing discs of Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) defined during embryogenesis ultimately result in mature wings of stereotyped (specific) venation patterning. Major regulators of wing disc development are the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF), Notch, Hedgehog (Hh), Wingless (Wg), and Dpp signaling pathways. Highly stereotyped vascular patterning is also characteristic of tissues in other organisms flown in space such as the mouse retina and leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. Genetic and other adaptations of vascular patterning to space environmental factors have not yet been systematically quantified, despite widespread recognition of their critical importance for terrestrial and microgravity applications. Here we report changes in gene expression with space flight related to Drosophila wing morphogenesis and vein patterning. In addition, genetically modified phenotypes of increasingly abnormal ectopic wing venation in the Drosophila wing1 were analyzed by NASA's VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) software2. Our goal is to further develop insightful vascular mappings associated with bioinformatic dimensions of genetic or other molecular phenotypes for correlation with genetic and other molecular profiling relevant to NASA's GeneLab and other Space Biology exploration initiatives.

  8. Gene expression in chicken reveals correlation with structural genomic features and conserved patterns of transcription in the terrestrial vertebrates.

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    Haisheng Nie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The chicken is an important agricultural and avian-model species. A survey of gene expression in a range of different tissues will provide a benchmark for understanding expression levels under normal physiological conditions in birds. With expression data for birds being very scant, this benchmark is of particular interest for comparative expression analysis among various terrestrial vertebrates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We carried out a gene expression survey in eight major chicken tissues using whole genome microarrays. A global picture of gene expression is presented for the eight tissues, and tissue specific as well as common gene expression were identified. A Gene Ontology (GO term enrichment analysis showed that tissue-specific genes are enriched with GO terms reflecting the physiological functions of the specific tissue, and housekeeping genes are enriched with GO terms related to essential biological functions. Comparisons of structural genomic features between tissue-specific genes and housekeeping genes show that housekeeping genes are more compact. Specifically, coding sequence and particularly introns are shorter than genes that display more variation in expression between tissues, and in addition intergenic space was also shorter. Meanwhile, housekeeping genes are more likely to co-localize with other abundantly or highly expressed genes on the same chromosomal regions. Furthermore, comparisons of gene expression in a panel of five common tissues between birds, mammals and amphibians showed that the expression patterns across tissues are highly similar for orthologous genes compared to random gene pairs within each pair-wise comparison, indicating a high degree of functional conservation in gene expression among terrestrial vertebrates. CONCLUSIONS: The housekeeping genes identified in this study have shorter gene length, shorter coding sequence length, shorter introns, and shorter intergenic regions, there seems

  9. DNA methylation patterns and gene expression associated with litter size in Berkshire pig placenta.

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    Jung Hye Hwang

    Full Text Available Increasing litter size is of great interest to the pig industry. DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification that regulates gene expression, resulting in livestock phenotypes such as disease resistance, milk production, and reproduction. We classified Berkshire pigs into two groups according to litter size and estimated breeding value: smaller (SLG and larger (LLG litter size groups. Genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression were analyzed using placenta genomic DNA and RNA to identify differentially methylated regions (DMRs and differentially expressed genes (DEGs associated with litter size. The methylation levels of CpG dinucleotides in different genomic regions were noticeably different between the groups, while global methylation pattern was similar, and excluding intergenic regions they were found the most frequently in gene body regions. Next, we analyzed RNA-Seq data to identify DEGs between the SLG and LLG groups. A total of 1591 DEGs were identified: 567 were downregulated and 1024 were upregulated in LLG compared to SLG. To identify genes that simultaneously exhibited changes in DNA methylation and mRNA expression, we integrated and analyzed the data from bisulfite-Seq and RNA-Seq. Nine DEGs positioned in DMRs were found. The expression of only three of these genes (PRKG2, CLCA4, and PCK1 was verified by RT-qPCR. Furthermore, we observed the same methylation patterns in blood samples as in the placental tissues by PCR-based methylation analysis. Together, these results provide useful data regarding potential epigenetic markers for selecting hyperprolific sows.

  10. Expression patterns of genes critical for BMP signaling pathway in developing human primary tooth germs.

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    Dong, Xiuqing; Shen, Bin; Ruan, Ningsheng; Guan, Zhen; Zhang, Yanding; Chen, YiPing; Hu, Xuefeng

    2014-12-01

    The developing murine tooth has been used as an excellent model system to study the molecular mechanism of organ development and regeneration. While the expression patterns of numerous regulatory genes have been examined and their roles have begun to be revealed in the developing murine tooth, little is known about gene expression and function in human tooth development. In order to unveil the molecular mechanisms that regulate human tooth morphogenesis, we examined the expression patterns of the major BMP signaling pathway molecules in the developing human tooth germ at the cap and bell stages by in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and real-time RT-PCR. Expression of BMP ligands and antagonist, including BMP2, BMP3, BMP4, BMP7, and NOOGGIN, exhibited uniform patterns in the tooth germs of incisor and molar at the cap and bell stages with stronger expression in the inner dental epithelium than that in the dental mesenchyme. Both type I and type II BMP receptors were present in widespread expression pattern in the whole-enamel organ and the dental mesenchyme with the strongest expression in inner dental epithelium at the cap and bell stages. SMAD4 and SMAD1/5/8 showed an expression pattern similar to that of BMP ligands with more intensive signals in the inner dental epithelium. Despite some unique and distinct patterns as compared to the mouse, the intensive expression of BMP signaling pathway molecules in the developing human tooth strongly suggests conserved functions of BMP signaling during human odontogenesis, such as in mediating tissue interactions and regulating differentiation and organization of odontogenic tissues. Our results provide an important set of documents for studying molecular regulatory mechanisms underlying tooth development and regeneration in humans.

  11. Genome array of hair follicle genes in lambskin with different patterns.

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    Wei Sun

    Full Text Available Hu sheep lambskin comes from a specific breed of sheep of China. Hu sheep are considered a protected breed by the Chinese government. The hair follicles of these sheep have three types of waves, large, medium, and small. There are only few histological reports of Hu sheep lambskin, and there are no modern molecular or biological studies, so the molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of hair follicles with different patterns are not currently known. The aim of this article was to study the molecular mechanism of the formation of these types of hair follicles in Hu sheep. Histological and microscopic analysis indicated that the number of follicles with small waves was not significantly higher than the number of follicles with large waves (P>0.05. The diameters of primary and secondary small-wave follicles were significantly smaller than those of large-wave follicles (P<0.05; P<0.01. The ratio between the number primary follicles and the number of secondary follicles was significantly higher among small-wave follicles than among large-wave follicles (P<0.05. Differentially expressed genes in the skin tissue were screened using an Agilent gene chip and RT-PCR. Differential expression analysis revealed 3 groups of large waves and small waves; 1067, 2071, and 3879 differentially expressed genes; and 137 genes common to all 3 groups. Differentially expressed genes were classified using gene ontology. They were found to be mainly involved in cell differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, growth, immune response, and ion transport. RT-PCR results of 4 differentially expressed genes were consistent with gene chip results. Combined with related literature, our results suggest that BMP7, MMP2, SNAI1, SFXN1, CDKNIC, MT3, and POU1F1 may have important effects on the formation of large-wave and small-wave hair follicles. This study may enrich knowledge of hair follicle development, and may identify the genes responsible for the formation of hair

  12. Global gene expression patterns in the post-pneumonectomy lung of adult mice

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    Ingenito Edward P

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adult mice have a remarkable capacity to regenerate functional alveoli following either lung resection or injury that exceeds the regenerative capacity observed in larger adult mammals. The molecular basis for this unique capability in mice is largely unknown. We examined the transcriptomic responses to single lung pneumonectomy in adult mice in order to elucidate prospective molecular signaling mechanisms used in this species during lung regeneration. Methods Unilateral left pneumonectomy or sham thoracotomy was performed under general anesthesia (n = 8 mice per group for each of the four time points. Total RNA was isolated from the remaining lung tissue at four time points post-surgery (6 hours, 1 day, 3 days, 7 days and analyzed using microarray technology. Results The observed transcriptomic patterns revealed mesenchymal cell signaling, including up-regulation of genes previously associated with activated fibroblasts (Tnfrsf12a, Tnc, Eln, Col3A1, as well as modulation of Igf1-mediated signaling. The data set also revealed early down-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine transcripts and up-regulation of genes involved in T cell development/function, but few similarities to transcriptomic patterns observed during embryonic or post-natal lung development. Immunohistochemical analysis suggests that early fibroblast but not myofibroblast proliferation is important during lung regeneration and may explain the preponderance of mesenchymal-associated genes that are over-expressed in this model. This again appears to differ from embryonic alveologenesis. Conclusion These data suggest that modulation of mesenchymal cell transcriptome patterns and proliferation of S100A4 positive mesenchymal cells, as well as modulation of pro-inflammatory transcriptome patterns, are important during post-pneumonectomy lung regeneration in adult mice.

  13. Distinguishing the Transcription Regulation Patterns in Promoters of Human Genes with Different Function or Evolutionary Age

    KAUST Repository

    Alam, Tanvir

    2012-07-01

    Distinguishing transcription regulatory patterns of different gene groups is a common problem in various bioinformatics studies. In this work we developed a methodology to deal with such a problem based on machine learning techniques. We applied our method to two biologically important problems related to detecting a difference in transcription regulation of: a/ protein-coding and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in human, as well as b/ a difference between primate-specific and non-primate-specific long non-coding RNAs. Our method is capable to classify RNAs using various regulatory features of genes that transcribe into these RNAs, such as nucleotide frequencies, transcription factor binding sites, de novo sequence motifs, CpG islands, repetitive elements, histone modification marks, and others. Ten-fold cross-validation tests suggest that our model can distinguish protein-coding and non-coding RNAs with accuracy above 80%. Twenty-fold cross-validation tests suggest that our model can distinguish primate-specific from non-primate-specific promoters of lncRNAs with accuracy above 80%. Consequently, we can hypothesize that transcription of the groups of genes mentioned above are regulated by different mechanisms. Feature selection techniques allowed us to reduce the number of features significantly while keeping the accuracy around 80%. Consequently, we can conclude that selected features play significant role in transcription regulation of coding and non-coding genes, as well as primate-specific and non-primate-specific lncRNA genes.

  14. Different gene expression patterns between leaves and flowers in Lonicera japonica revealed by transcriptome analysis

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    Libin eZhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The perennial and evergreen twining vine, Lonicera japonica is an important herbal medicine with great economic value. However, gene expression information for flowers and leaves of L. japonica remains elusive, which greatly impedes functional genomics research on this species. In this study, transcriptome profiles from leaves and flowers of L. japonica were examined using next-generation sequencing technology. A total of 239.41 million clean reads were used for de novo assembly with Trinity software, which generated 150,523 unigenes with N50 containing 947 bp. All the unigenes were annotated using Nr, SwissProt, COGs (Clusters of Orthologous Groups, GO (Gene Ontology and KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes databases. A total of 35,327 differentially expressed genes (DEGs, P≤0.05 between leaves and flowers were detected. Among them, a total of 6,602 DEGs were assigned with important biological processes including Metabolic process, Response to stimulus, Cellular process and etc. KEGG analysis showed that three possible enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of chlorogenic acid were up-regulated in flowers. Furthermore, the TF-based regulation network in L. japonica identified three differentially expressed transcription factors between leaves and flowers, suggesting distinct regulatory roles in L. japonica. Taken together, this study has provided a global picture of differential gene expression patterns between leaves and flowers in L japonica, providing a useful genomic resource that can also be used for functional genomics research on L. japonica in the future.

  15. Analysis of codon usage pattern of mitochondrial protein-coding genes in different hookworms.

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    Deb, Bornali; Uddin, Arif; Mazumder, Gulshana Akthar; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2017-11-20

    The phenomenon of unequal usage of synonymous codons encoding an amino acid in which some codons are more preferred to others is the codon usage bias (CUB) and it is species specific. Analysis of CUB helps in understanding evolution at molecular level and acquires significance in mRNA translation, design of transgenes and new gene discovery. In our current study, we analyzed synonymous codon usage pattern and the factors influencing it on mitochondrial protein coding genes of 6 different hookworms i.e. Ancylostoma ceylanicum, Ancylostoma duodenale, Necator americanus, Ancylostoma tubaeforme, Ancylostoma caninum and Uncinaria sanguinis as no work was reported yet. The effective number of codons for mitochondrial genes suggested that codon usage bias was high in most species. The GC content was lower than AT content i.e. genes were AT rich as indicated by nucleotide composition analysis. The overall nucleotide composition along with its composition at 3rd codon position and correspondence analysis suggested that both natural selection and mutation pressure might have affected the codon usage bias in mitochondrial genes. However, neutrality plot revealed that mutation pressure might have played a major role in A. ceylanicum while natural selection might have played the dominant role in Ancylostoma duodenale, Necator americanus, Ancylostoma tubaeforme, Ancylostoma caninum and Uncinaria sanguinis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Expression patterns, mutation detection and RNA interference of Rhopalosiphum padi voltage-gated sodium channel genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yayun; Peng, Xiong; Wang, Kang; Lin, Fangfei; Li, Yuting; Chen, Maohua

    2016-07-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) is the target of sodium-channel-blocking insecticides. Traditionally, animals were thought to have only one VGSC gene comprising a α-subunit with four homologous domains (DI-DIV). The present study showed that Rhopalosiphum padi, an economically important crop pest, owned a unique heterodimeric VGSC (H1 and H2 subunits) encoded by two genes (Rpvgsc1 and Rpvgsc2), which is unusual in insects and other animals. The open reading frame (ORF) of Rpvgsc1 consisted 1150 amino acids, and the ORF of Rpvgsc2 had 957 amino acids. Rpvgsc1 showed 64.1% amino acid identity to DI-DII of Drosophila melanogaster VGSC and Rpvgsc2 showed 64.0% amino acid identity to DIII-DIV of D. melanogaster VGSC. A M918L mutation previously reported in pyrethroids-resistant strains of other insects was found in the IIS4-S6 region of R. padi field sample. The two R. padi VGSC genes were expressed at all developmental stages and showed similar expression patterns after treatment with beta-cypermethrin. Knockdown of Rpvgsc1 or Rpvgsc2 caused significant reduction in mortality rate of R. padi after exposure to beta-cypermethrin. These findings suggest that the two R. padi VGSC genes are both functional genes.

  17. Two Lamprey Hedgehog Genes Share Non-Coding Regulatory Sequences and Expression Patterns with Gnathostome Hedgehogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekker, Marc; Hadzhiev, Yavor; Müller, Ferenc; Casane, Didier; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) genes play major roles in animal development and studies of their evolution, expression and function point to major differences among chordates. Here we focused on Hh genes in lampreys in order to characterize the evolution of Hh signalling at the emergence of vertebrates. Screening of a cosmid library of the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis and searching the preliminary genome assembly of the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus indicate that lampreys have two Hh genes, named Hha and Hhb. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that Hha and Hhb are lamprey-specific paralogs closely related to Sonic/Indian Hh genes. Expression analysis indicates that Hha and Hhb are expressed in a Sonic Hh-like pattern. The two transcripts are expressed in largely overlapping but not identical domains in the lamprey embryonic brain, including a newly-described expression domain in the nasohypophyseal placode. Global alignments of genomic sequences and local alignment with known gnathostome regulatory motifs show that lamprey Hhs share conserved non-coding elements (CNE) with gnathostome Hhs albeit with sequences that have significantly diverged and dispersed. Functional assays using zebrafish embryos demonstrate gnathostome-like midline enhancer activity for CNEs contained in intron2. We conclude that lamprey Hh genes are gnathostome Shh-like in terms of expression and regulation. In addition, they show some lamprey-specific features, including duplication and structural (but not functional) changes in the intronic/regulatory sequences. PMID:20967201

  18. Cell-type-specific gene expression patterns in the knee cartilage in an osteoarthritis rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korostynski, Michal; Malek, Natalia; Piechota, Marcin; Starowicz, Katarzyna

    2018-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative disease that leads to joint failure, pain, and disability. Gene regulation is implicated as a driver of the imbalance between the expression of catabolic and anabolic factors that eventually leads to the degeneration of osteoarthritic cartilage. In our model, knee-joint OA was induced in male Wistar rats by intra-articular sodium monoiodoacetate (MIA) injections. Whole-genome microarrays were used to analyse the alterations in gene expression during the time-course of OA development (at 2, 14, and 28 days post-injection) in rat knee joints. The identified co-expressed groups of genes were analysed for enriched regulatory mechanisms, functional classes, and cell-type-specific expression. This analysis revealed 272 regulated transcripts (ANOVA FDR  2). Functionally, the five major gene expression patterns (A-E) were connected to PPAR signalling and adipogenesis (in cluster A), WNT signalling (in cluster B), endochondral ossification (in cluster C), matrix metalloproteinases and the ACE/RAGE pathway (in cluster D), and the Toll-like receptor, and IL-1 signalling pathways (in cluster E). Moreover, the dynamic profiles of these transcriptional changes were assigned to cellular compartments of the knee joint. Classifying the molecular processes associated with the development of cartilage degeneration provides novel insight into the OA disease process. Our study identified groups of co-regulated genes that share functional relationships and that may play an important role in the early and intermediate stages of OA.

  19. The Biogeographic Pattern of Microbial Functional Genes along an Altitudinal Gradient of the Tibetan Pasture

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    Qi Qi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available As the highest place of the world, the Tibetan plateau is a fragile ecosystem. Given the importance of microbial communities in driving soil nutrient cycling, it is of interest to document the microbial biogeographic pattern here. We adopted a microarray-based tool named GeoChip 4.0 to investigate grassland microbial functional genes along an elevation gradient from 3200 to 3800 m above sea level open to free grazing by local herdsmen and wild animals. Interestingly, microbial functional diversities increase with elevation, so does the relative abundances of genes associated with carbon degradation, nitrogen cycling, methane production, cold shock and oxygen limitation. The range of Shannon diversities (10.27–10.58 showed considerably smaller variation than what was previously observed at ungrazed sites nearby (9.95–10.65, suggesting the important role of livestock grazing on microbial diversities. Closer examination showed that the dissimilarity of microbial community at our study sites increased with elevations, revealing an elevation-decay relationship of microbial functional genes. Both microbial functional diversity and the number of unique genes increased with elevations. Furthermore, we detected a tight linkage of greenhouse gas (CO2 and relative abundances of carbon cycling genes. Our biogeographic study provides insights on microbial functional diversity and soil biogeochemical cycling in Tibetan pastures.

  20. The Biogeographic Pattern of Microbial Functional Genes along an Altitudinal Gradient of the Tibetan Pasture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Qi; Zhao, Mengxin; Wang, Shiping; Ma, Xingyu; Wang, Yuxuan; Gao, Ying; Lin, Qiaoyan; Li, Xiangzhen; Gu, Baohua; Li, Guoxue; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng

    2017-06-13

    As the highest place of the world, the Tibetan plateau is a fragile ecosystem. Given the importance of microbial communities in driving soil nutrient cycling, it is of interest to document the microbial biogeographic pattern here. We adopted a microarray-based tool named GeoChip 4.0 to investigate grassland microbial functional genes along an elevation gradient from 3200 to 3800 m above sea level open to free grazing by local herdsmen and wild animals. Interestingly, microbial functional diversities increase with elevation, so does the relative abundances of genes associated with carbon degradation, nitrogen cycling, methane production, cold shock and oxygen limitation. The range of Shannon diversities (10.27–10.58) showed considerably smaller variation than what was previously observed at ungrazed sites nearby (9.95–10.65), suggesting the important role of livestock grazing on microbial diversities. Closer examination showed that the dissimilarity of microbial community at our study sites increased with elevations, revealing an elevation-decay relationship of microbial functional genes. Both microbial functional diversity and the number of unique genes increased with elevations. Furthermore, we detected a tight linkage of greenhouse gas (CO2) and relative abundances of carbon cycling genes. Our biogeographic study provides insights on microbial functional diversity and soil biogeochemical cycling in Tibetan pastures.

  1. Differential gene expression patterns during embryonic development of sea urchin exposed to triclosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jinik; Suh, Sung-Suk; Park, Mirye; Park, So Yun; Lee, Sukchan; Lee, Taek-Kyun

    2017-02-01

    Triclosan (TCS; 2,4,4'-trichloro-2'-hydroxydiphenyl ether) is a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent used in common industrial, personal care and household products which are eventually rinsed down the drain and discharged with wastewater effluent. It is therefore commonly found in the aquatic environment, leading to the continual exposure of aquatic organisms to TCS and the accumulation of the antimicrobial and its harmful degradation products in their bodies. Toxic effects of TCS on reproductive and developmental progression of some aquatic organisms have been suggested but the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been defined. We investigated the expression patterns of genes involved in the early development of TCS-treated sea urchin Strongylocentrotus nudus using cDNA microarrays. We observed that the predominant consequence of TCS treatment in this model system was the widespread repression of TCS-modulated genes. In particular, empty spiracles homeobox 1 (EMX-1), bone morphogenic protein, and chromosomal binding protein genes showed a significant decrease in expression in response to TCS. These results suggest that TCS can induce abnormal development of sea urchin embryos through the concomitant suppression of a number of genes that are necessary for embryonic differentiation in the blastula stage. Our data provide new insight into the crucial role of genes associated with embryonic development in response to TCS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 426-433, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. SPARCoC: a new framework for molecular pattern discovery and cancer gene identification.

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    Shiqian Ma

    Full Text Available It is challenging to cluster cancer patients of a certain histopathological type into molecular subtypes of clinical importance and identify gene signatures directly relevant to the subtypes. Current clustering approaches have inherent limitations, which prevent them from gauging the subtle heterogeneity of the molecular subtypes. In this paper we present a new framework: SPARCoC (Sparse-CoClust, which is based on a novel Common-background and Sparse-foreground Decomposition (CSD model and the Maximum Block Improvement (MBI co-clustering technique. SPARCoC has clear advantages compared with widely-used alternative approaches: hierarchical clustering (Hclust and nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF. We apply SPARCoC to the study of lung adenocarcinoma (ADCA, an extremely heterogeneous histological type, and a significant challenge for molecular subtyping. For testing and verification, we use high quality gene expression profiling data of lung ADCA patients, and identify prognostic gene signatures which could cluster patients into subgroups that are significantly different in their overall survival (with p-values < 0.05. Our results are only based on gene expression profiling data analysis, without incorporating any other feature selection or clinical information; we are able to replicate our findings with completely independent datasets. SPARCoC is broadly applicable to large-scale genomic data to empower pattern discovery and cancer gene identification.

  3. Discovering functional gene expression patterns in the metabolic network of Escherichia coli with wavelets transforms

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    Zapatka Marc

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technology produces gene expression data on a genomic scale for an endless variety of organisms and conditions. However, this vast amount of information needs to be extracted in a reasonable way and funneled into manageable and functionally meaningful patterns. Genes may be reasonably combined using knowledge about their interaction behaviour. On a proteomic level, biochemical research has elucidated an increasingly complete image of the metabolic architecture, especially for less complex organisms like the well studied bacterium Escherichia coli. Results We sought to discover central components of the metabolic network, regulated by the expression of associated genes under changing conditions. We mapped gene expression data from E. coli under aerobic and anaerobic conditions onto the enzymatic reaction nodes of its metabolic network. An adjacency matrix of the metabolites was created from this graph. A consecutive ones clustering method was used to obtain network clusters in the matrix. The wavelet method was applied on the adjacency matrices of these clusters to collect features for the classifier. With a feature extraction method the most discriminating features were selected. We yielded network sub-graphs from these top ranking features representing formate fermentation, in good agreement with the anaerobic response of hetero-fermentative bacteria. Furthermore, we found a switch in the starting point for NAD biosynthesis, and an adaptation of the l-aspartate metabolism, in accordance with its higher abundance under anaerobic conditions. Conclusion We developed and tested a novel method, based on a combination of rationally chosen machine learning methods, to analyse gene expression data on the basis of interaction data, using a metabolic network of enzymes. As a case study, we applied our method to E. coli under oxygen deprived conditions and extracted physiologically relevant patterns that represent an

  4. Genetic association study of circadian genes with seasonal pattern in bipolar disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffroy, Pierre Alexis; Lajnef, Mohamed; Bellivier, Frank; Jamain, Stéphane; Gard, Sébastien; Kahn, Jean-Pierre; Henry, Chantal; Leboyer, Marion; Etain, Bruno

    2015-05-19

    About one fourth of patients with bipolar disorders (BD) have depressive episodes with a seasonal pattern (SP) coupled to a more severe disease. However, the underlying genetic influence on a SP in BD remains to be identified. We studied 269 BD Caucasian patients, with and without SP, recruited from university-affiliated psychiatric departments in France and performed a genetic single-marker analysis followed by a gene-based analysis on 349 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning 21 circadian genes and 3 melatonin pathway genes. A SP in BD was nominally associated with 14 SNPs identified in 6 circadian genes: NPAS2, CRY2, ARNTL, ARNTL2, RORA and RORB. After correcting for multiple testing, using a false discovery rate approach, the associations remained significant for 5 SNPs in NPAS2 (chromosome 2:100793045-100989719): rs6738097 (pc = 0.006), rs12622050 (pc = 0.006), rs2305159 (pc = 0.01), rs1542179 (pc = 0.01), and rs1562313 (pc = 0.02). The gene-based analysis of the 349 SNPs showed that rs6738097 (NPAS2) and rs1554338 (CRY2) were significantly associated with the SP phenotype (respective Empirical p-values of 0.0003 and 0.005). The associations remained significant for rs6738097 (NPAS2) after Bonferroni correction. The epistasis analysis between rs6738097 (NPAS2) and rs1554338 (CRY2) suggested an additive effect. Genetic variations in NPAS2 might be a biomarker for a seasonal pattern in BD.

  5. Amygdala nuclei critical for emotional learning exhibit unique gene expression patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partin, Alexander C; Hosek, Matthew P; Luong, Jonathan A; Lella, Srihari K; Sharma, Sachein A R; Ploski, Jonathan E

    2013-09-01

    The amygdala is a heterogeneous, medial temporal lobe structure that has been implicated in the formation, expression and extinction of emotional memories. This structure is composed of numerous nuclei that vary in cytoarchitectonics and neural connections. In particular the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA), central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), and the basal (B) nucleus contribute an essential role to emotional learning. However, to date it is still unclear to what extent these nuclei differ at the molecular level. Therefore we have performed whole genome gene expression analysis on these nuclei to gain a better understanding of the molecular differences and similarities among these nuclei. Specifically the LA, CeA and B nuclei were laser microdissected from the rat brain, and total RNA was isolated from these nuclei and subjected to RNA amplification. Amplified RNA was analyzed by whole genome microarray analysis which revealed that 129 genes are differentially expressed among these nuclei. Notably gene expression patterns differed between the CeA nucleus and the LA and B nuclei. However gene expression differences were not considerably different between the LA and B nuclei. Secondary confirmation of numerous genes was performed by in situ hybridization to validate the microarray findings, which also revealed that for many genes, expression differences among these nuclei were consistent with the embryological origins of these nuclei. Knowing the stable gene expression differences among these nuclei will provide novel avenues of investigation into how these nuclei contribute to emotional arousal and emotional learning, and potentially offer new genetic targets to manipulate emotional learning and memory. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Are Hox genes ancestrally involved in axial patterning? Evidence from the hydrozoan Clytia hemisphaerica (Cnidaria.

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    Roxane Chiori

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The early evolution and diversification of Hox-related genes in eumetazoans has been the subject of conflicting hypotheses concerning the evolutionary conservation of their role in axial patterning and the pre-bilaterian origin of the Hox and ParaHox clusters. The diversification of Hox/ParaHox genes clearly predates the origin of bilaterians. However, the existence of a "Hox code" predating the cnidarian-bilaterian ancestor and supporting the deep homology of axes is more controversial. This assumption was mainly based on the interpretation of Hox expression data from the sea anemone, but growing evidence from other cnidarian taxa puts into question this hypothesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Hox, ParaHox and Hox-related genes have been investigated here by phylogenetic analysis and in situ hybridisation in Clytia hemisphaerica, an hydrozoan species with medusa and polyp stages alternating in the life cycle. Our phylogenetic analyses do not support an origin of ParaHox and Hox genes by duplication of an ancestral ProtoHox cluster, and reveal a diversification of the cnidarian HOX9-14 genes into three groups called A, B, C. Among the 7 examined genes, only those belonging to the HOX9-14 and the CDX groups exhibit a restricted expression along the oral-aboral axis during development and in the planula larva, while the others are expressed in very specialised areas at the medusa stage. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Cross species comparison reveals a strong variability of gene expression along the oral-aboral axis and during the life cycle among cnidarian lineages. The most parsimonious interpretation is that the Hox code, collinearity and conservative role along the antero-posterior axis are bilaterian innovations.

  7. Mapping dynamic histone acetylation patterns to gene expression in nanog-depleted murine embryonic stem cells.

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    Florian Markowetz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells (ESC have the potential to self-renew indefinitely and to differentiate into any of the three germ layers. The molecular mechanisms for self-renewal, maintenance of pluripotency and lineage specification are poorly understood, but recent results point to a key role for epigenetic mechanisms. In this study, we focus on quantifying the impact of histone 3 acetylation (H3K9,14ac on gene expression in murine embryonic stem cells. We analyze genome-wide histone acetylation patterns and gene expression profiles measured over the first five days of cell differentiation triggered by silencing Nanog, a key transcription factor in ESC regulation. We explore the temporal and spatial dynamics of histone acetylation data and its correlation with gene expression using supervised and unsupervised statistical models. On a genome-wide scale, changes in acetylation are significantly correlated to changes in mRNA expression and, surprisingly, this coherence increases over time. We quantify the predictive power of histone acetylation for gene expression changes in a balanced cross-validation procedure. In an in-depth study we focus on genes central to the regulatory network of Mouse ESC, including those identified in a recent genome-wide RNAi screen and in the PluriNet, a computationally derived stem cell signature. We find that compared to the rest of the genome, ESC-specific genes show significantly more acetylation signal and a much stronger decrease in acetylation over time, which is often not reflected in a concordant expression change. These results shed light on the complexity of the relationship between histone acetylation and gene expression and are a step forward to dissect the multilayer regulatory mechanisms that determine stem cell fate.

  8. Virulence-associated gene pattern of porcine and human Yersinia enterocolitica biotype 4 isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeberger, M; Brodard, I; Overesch, G

    2015-04-02

    Yersinia enterocolitica 4/O:3 is the most important human pathogenic bioserotype in Europe and the predominant pathogenic bioserotype in slaughter pigs. Although many studies on the virulence of Y. enterocolitica strains have showed a broad spectrum of detectable factors in pigs and humans, an analysis based on a strict comparative approach and serving to verify the virulence capability of porcine Y. enterocolitica as a source for human yersiniosis is lacking. Therefore, in the present study, strains of biotype (BT) 4 isolated from Swiss slaughter pig tonsils and feces and isolates from human clinical cases were compared in terms of their spectrum of virulence-associated genes (yadA, virF, ail, inv, rovA, ymoA, ystA, ystB and myfA). An analysis of the associated antimicrobial susceptibility pattern completed the characterization. All analyzed BT 4 strains showed a nearly similar pattern, comprising the known fundamental virulence-associated genes yadA, virF, ail, inv, rovA, ymoA, ystA and myfA. Only ystB was not detectable among all analyzed isolates. Importantly, neither the source of the isolates (porcine tonsils and feces, humans) nor the serotype (ST) had any influence on the gene pattern. From these findings, it can be concluded that the presence of the full complement of virulence genes necessary for human infection is common among porcine BT 4 strains. Swiss porcine BT 4 strains not only showed antimicrobial susceptibility to chloramphenicol, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, colistin, florfenicol, gentamicin, kanamycin, nalidixic acid, sulfamethoxazole, streptomycin, tetracycline and trimethoprim but also showed 100% antibiotic resistance to ampicillin. The human BT 4 strains revealed comparable results. However, in addition to 100% antibiotic resistance to ampicillin, 2 strains were resistant to chloramphenicol and nalidixic acid. Additionally, 1 of these strains was resistant to sulfamethoxazole. The results demonstrated that Y. enterocolitica BT 4

  9. Patterns of evolution of MHC class II genes of crows (Corvus suggest trans-species polymorphism

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    John A. Eimes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A distinguishing characteristic of genes that code for the major histocompatibility complex (MHC is that alleles often share more similarity between, rather than within species. There are two likely mechanisms that can explain this pattern: convergent evolution and trans-species polymorphism (TSP, in which ancient allelic lineages are maintained by balancing selection and retained by descendant species. Distinguishing between these two mechanisms has major implications in how we view adaptation of immune genes. In this study we analyzed exon 2 of the MHC class IIB in three passerine bird species in the genus Corvus: jungle crows (Corvus macrorhynchos japonensis American crows (C. brachyrhynchos and carrion crows (C. corone orientalis. Carrion crows and American crows are recently diverged, but allopatric, sister species, whereas carrion crows and jungle crows are more distantly related but sympatric species, and possibly share pathogens linked to MHC IIB polymorphisms. These patterns of evolutionary divergence and current geographic ranges enabled us to test for trans-species polymorphism and convergent evolution of the MHC IIB in crows. Phylogenetic reconstructions of MHC IIB sequences revealed several well supported interspecific clusters containing all three species, and there was no biased clustering of variants among the sympatric carrion crows and jungle crows. The topologies of phylogenetic trees constructed from putatively selected sites were remarkably different than those constructed from putatively neutral sites. In addition, trees constructed using non-synonymous substitutions from a continuous fragment of exon 2 had more, and generally more inclusive, supported interspecific MHC IIB variant clusters than those constructed from the same fragment using synonymous substitutions. These phylogenetic patterns suggest that recombination, especially gene conversion, has partially erased the signal of allelic ancestry in these species. While

  10. A maize CONSTANS-like gene, conz1, exhibits distinct diurnal expression patterns in varied photoperiods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Theresa A; Muslin, Elizabeth H; Dorweiler, Jane E

    2008-05-01

    Maize (Zea mays ssp. mays L.) was domesticated from teosinte (Z. mays L. ssp. parviglumis Iltis & Doebley), a plant requiring short day photoperiods to flower. While photoperiod sensitive landraces of maize exist, post-domestication breeding included efforts to grow maize in a broad range of latitudes. Thus, modern maize is often characterized as day-neutral because time to flower is relatively unaffected by photoperiod. We report the first identification of maize constans of Zea mays1 (conz1), a gene with extensive sequence homology to photoperiod genes CONSTANS (CO) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.) and Heading date1 (Hd1) in rice (Oryza sativa L.). conz1 maps to a syntenous chromosomal location relative to Hd1. Additionally, conz1 and two maize homologs of another photoperiod gene exhibit diurnal expression patterns notably similar to their Arabidopsis and rice homologs. The expression pattern of conz1 in long days is distinct from that observed in short days, suggesting that maize is able to discern variations in photoperiod and respond with differential expression of conz1. We offer models to reconcile the differential expression of conz1 with respect to the photoperiod insensitivity exhibited by temperate inbreds.

  11. Resistance patterns, ESBL genes, and genetic relatedness of Escherichia coli from dogs and owners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, A.C.; Barbosa, A.V.; Arais, L.R.; Ribeiro, P.F.; Carneiro, V.C.; Cerqueira, A.M.F.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from pet dogs can be considered a potential threat of infection for the human population. Our objective was to characterize the resistance pattern, extended spectrum beta-lactamase production and genetic relatedness of multiresistant E. coli strains isolated from dogs (n = 134), their owners (n = 134), and humans who claim to have no contact with dogs (n = 44, control), searching for sharing of strains. The strains were assessed for their genetic relatedness by phylogenetic grouping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Multiresistant E. coli strains were isolated from 42 (31.3%) fecal samples from pairs of dogs and owners, totaling 84 isolates, and from 19 (43.1%) control group subjects. The strains showed high levels of resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole regardless of host species or group of origin. The blaTEM, blaCTX-M, and blaSHV genes were detected in similar proportions in all groups. All isolates positive for bla genes were ESBL producers. The phylogenetic group A was the most prevalent, irrespective of the host species. None of the strains belonging to the B2 group contained bla genes. Similar resistance patterns were found for strains from dogs, owners and controls; furthermore, identical PFGE profiles were detected in four (9.5%) isolate pairs from dogs and owners, denoting the sharing of strains. Pet dogs were shown to be a potential household source of multiresistant E. coli strains. PMID:26887238

  12. Patterns of exon-intron architecture variation of genes in eukaryotic genomes

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    Chen Jian-Qun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The origin and importance of exon-intron architecture comprises one of the remaining mysteries of gene evolution. Several studies have investigated the variations of intron length, GC content, ordinal position in a gene and divergence. However, there is little study about the structural variation of exons and introns. Results We investigated the length, GC content, ordinal position and divergence in both exons and introns of 13 eukaryotic genomes, representing plant and animal. Our analyses revealed that three basic patterns of exon-intron variation were present in nearly all analyzed genomes (P Conclusion Although the factors contributing to these patterns have not been identified, our results provide three important clues: common factor(s exist and may shape both exons and introns; the ordinal reduction patterns may reflect a time-orderly evolution; and the larger first and last exons may be splicing-required. These clues provide a framework for elucidating mechanisms involved in the organization of eukaryotic genomes and particularly in building exon-intron structures.

  13. Characterizing genes with distinct methylation patterns in the context of protein-protein interaction network: application to human brain tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongsheng; Xu, Juan; Chen, Hong; Zhao, Zheng; Li, Shengli; Bai, Jing; Wu, Aiwei; Jiang, Chunjie; Wang, Yuan; Su, Bin; Li, Xia

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic mechanism involved in transcriptional control. However, how genes with different methylation patterns are assembled in the protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) remains a mystery. In the present study, we systematically dissected the characterization of genes with different methylation patterns in the PPIN. A negative association was detected between the methylation levels in the brain tissues and topological centralities. By focusing on two classes of genes with considerably different methylation levels in the brain tissues, namely the low methylated genes (LMGs) and high methylated genes (HMGs), we found that their organizing principles in the PPIN are distinct. The LMGs tend to be the center of the PPIN, and attacking them causes a more deleterious effect on the network integrity. Furthermore, the LMGs express their functions in a modular pattern and substantial differences in functions are observed between the two types of genes. The LMGs are enriched in the basic biological functions, such as binding activity and regulation of transcription. More importantly, cancer genes, especially recessive cancer genes, essential genes, and aging-related genes were all found more often in the LMGs. Additionally, our analysis presented that the intra-classes communications are enhanced, but inter-classes communications are repressed. Finally, a functional complementation was revealed between methylation and miRNA regulation in the human genome. We have elucidated the assembling principles of genes with different methylation levels in the context of the PPIN, providing key insights into the complex epigenetic regulation mechanisms.

  14. Growth pattern and body proportion in a female with short stature homeobox-containing gene overdosage and gonadal estrogen deficiency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ogata, T; Inokuchi, M; Ogawa, M

    2002-01-01

    Department of Pediatrics, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. t-ogata@po.iijnet.or.jp OBJECTIVE: To report on growth pattern and body proportion in the combination of short stature homeobox-containing gene...

  15. The Alcohol Dehydrogenase Gene Family in Melon (Cucumis melo L.: Bioinformatic Analysis and Expression Patterns

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    Yazhong eJin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH, encoded by multigene family in plants, play a critical role in plant growth, development, adaptation, fruit ripening and aroma production. Thirteen ADH genes were identified in melon genome, including 12 ADHs and one formaldehyde dehydrogenease (FDH, designated CmADH1-12 and CmFDH1, in which CmADH1 and CmADH2 have been isolated in Cantaloupe. ADH genes shared a lower identity with each other at the protein level and had different intron-exon structure at nucleotide level. No typical signal peptides were found in all CmADHs, and CmADH proteins might locate in the cytoplasm. The phylogenetic tree revealed that 13 ADH genes were divided into 3 groups respectively, namely long-, medium- and short-chain ADH subfamily, and CmADH1,3-11, which belongs to the medium-chain ADH subfamily, fell into 6 medium-chain ADH subgroups. CmADH12 may belong to the long-chain ADH subfamily, while CmFDH1 may be a Class III ADH and serve as an ancestral ADH in melon. Expression profiling revealed that CmADH1, CmADH2, CmADH10 and CmFDH1 were moderately or strongly expressed in different vegetative tissues and fruit at medium and late developmental stages, while CmADH8 and CmADH12 were highly expressed in fruit after 20 days. CmADH3 showed preferential expression in young tissues. CmADH4 only had slight expression in root. Promoter analysis revealed several motifs of CmADH genes involved in the gene expression modulated by various hormones, and the response pattern of CmADH genes to ABA, IAA and ethylene were different. These CmADHs were divided into ethylene-sensitive and –insensitive groups, and the functions of CmADHs were discussed.

  16. Genome-wide analysis of the sox family in the calcareous sponge Sycon ciliatum: multiple genes with unique expression patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, Sofia; Adamski, Marcin; Bergum, Brith; Guder, Corina; Jordal, Signe; Leininger, Sven; Zwafink, Christin; Rapp, Hans Tore; Adamska, Maja

    2012-07-23

    Sox genes are HMG-domain containing transcription factors with important roles in developmental processes in animals; many of them appear to have conserved functions among eumetazoans. Demosponges have fewer Sox genes than eumetazoans, but their roles remain unclear. The aim of this study is to gain insight into the early evolutionary history of the Sox gene family by identification and expression analysis of Sox genes in the calcareous sponge Sycon ciliatum. Calcaronean Sox related sequences were retrieved by searching recently generated genomic and transcriptome sequence resources and analyzed using variety of phylogenetic methods and identification of conserved motifs. Expression was studied by whole mount in situ hybridization. We have identified seven Sox genes and four Sox-related genes in the complete genome of Sycon ciliatum. Phylogenetic and conserved motif analyses showed that five of Sycon Sox genes represent groups B, C, E, and F present in cnidarians and bilaterians. Two additional genes are classified as Sox genes but cannot be assigned to specific subfamilies, and four genes are more similar to Sox genes than to other HMG-containing genes. Thus, the repertoire of Sox genes is larger in this representative of calcareous sponges than in the demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica. It remains unclear whether this is due to the expansion of the gene family in Sycon or a secondary reduction in the Amphimedon genome. In situ hybridization of Sycon Sox genes revealed a variety of expression patterns during embryogenesis and in specific cell types of adult sponges. In this study, we describe a large family of Sox genes in Sycon ciliatum with dynamic expression patterns, indicating that Sox genes are regulators in development and cell type determination in sponges, as observed in higher animals. The revealed differences between demosponge and calcisponge Sox genes repertoire highlight the need to utilize models representing different sponge lineages to describe

  17. Distinct patterns of gene and protein expression elicited by organophosphorus pesticides in Caenorhabditis elegans

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    Dennis William E

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The wide use of organophosphorus (OP pesticides makes them an important public health concern. Persistent effects of exposure and the mechanism of neuronal degeneration are continuing issues in OP toxicology. To elucidate early steps in the mechanisms of OP toxicity, we studied alterations in global gene and protein expression in Caenorhabditis elegans exposed to OPs using microarrays and mass spectrometry. We tested two structurally distinct OPs (dichlorvos and fenamiphos and employed a mechanistically different third neurotoxicant, mefloquine, as an out-group for analysis. Treatment levels used concentrations of chemical sufficient to prevent the development of 10%, 50% or 90% of mid-vulval L4 larvae into early gravid adults (EGA at 24 h after exposure in a defined, bacteria-free medium. Results After 8 h of exposure, the expression of 87 genes responded specifically to OP treatment. The abundance of 34 proteins also changed in OP-exposed worms. Many of the genes and proteins affected by the OPs are expressed in neuronal and muscle tissues and are involved in lipid metabolism, cell adhesion, apoptosis/cell death, and detoxification. Twenty-two genes were differentially affected by the two OPs; a large proportion of these genes encode cytochrome P450s, UDP-glucuronosyl/UDP-glucosyltransferases, or P-glycoproteins. The abundance of transcripts and the proteins they encode were well correlated. Conclusion Exposure to OPs elicits a pattern of changes in gene expression in exposed worms distinct from that of the unrelated neurotoxicant, mefloquine. The functional roles and the tissue location of the genes and proteins whose expression is modulated in response to exposure is consistent with the known effects of OPs, including damage to muscle due to persistent hypercontraction, neuronal cell death, and phase I and phase II detoxification. Further, the two different OPs evoked distinguishable changes in gene expression; about half

  18. Rhythms and synchronization patterns in gene expression in the Aedes aegypti mosquito

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    Carlson Jonathan O

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aedes aegypti is arguably the most studied of all mosquito species in the laboratory and is the primary vector of both Dengue and Yellow Fever flaviviruses in the field. A large number of transcriptional studies have been made in the species and these usually report transcript quantities observed at a certain age or stage of development. However, circadian oscillation is an important characteristic of gene expression in many animals and plants, modulating both their physiology and behavior. Circadian gene expression in mosquito species has been previously reported but for only a few genes directly involved in the function of the molecular clock. Results Herein we analyze the transcription profiles of 21,494 messenger RNAs using an Ae. aegypti Agilent® microarray. Transcripts were quantified in adult female heads at 24 hours and then again at 72 hours and eight subsequent time points spaced four hours apart. We document circadian rhythms in multiple molecular pathways essential for growth, development, immune response, detoxification/pesticide resistance. Circadian rhythms were also noted in ribosomal protein genes used for normalization in reverse transcribed PCR (RT-PCR to determine transcript abundance. We report pervasive oscillations and intricate synchronization patterns relevant to all known biological pathways. Conclusion These results argue strongly that transcriptional analyses either need to be made over time periods rather than confining analyses to a single time point or development stage or exceptional care needs to be made to synchronize all mosquitoes to be analyzed and compared among treatment groups.

  19. Identification and expression pattern of candidate olfactory genes in Chrysoperla sinica by antennal transcriptome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhao-Qun; Zhang, Shuai; Luo, Jun-Yu; Wang, Si-Bao; Wang, Chun-Yi; Lv, Li-Min; Dong, Shuang-Lin; Cui, Jin-Jie

    2015-09-01

    Chrysoperla sinica is one of the most prominent natural enemies of many agricultural pests. Host seeking in insects is strongly mediated by olfaction. Understanding the sophisticated olfactory system of insect antennae is crucial for studying the physiological bases of olfaction and could also help enhance the effectiveness of C. sinica in biological control. Obtaining olfactory genes is a research priority for investigating the olfactory system in this species. However, no olfaction sequence information is available for C. sinica. Consequently, we sequenced female- and male-antennae transcriptome of C. sinica. Many candidate chemosensory genes were identified, including 12 odorant-binding proteins (OBPs), 19 chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 37 odorant receptors (ORs), and 64 ionotropic receptors from C. sinica. The expression patterns of 12 OBPs, 19 CSPs and 37 ORs were determined by RT-PCR, and demonstrated antennae-dominantly expression of most OBP and OR genes. Our finding provided large scale genes for further investigation on the olfactory system of C. sinica at the molecular level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Zinc oxide nanoparticle exposure triggers different gene expression patterns in maize shoots and roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xun, Hongwei; Ma, Xintong; Chen, Jing; Yang, Zhongzhou; Liu, Bao; Gao, Xiang; Li, Guo; Yu, Jiamiao; Wang, Li; Pang, Jinsong

    2017-10-01

    The potential impacts of environmentally accumulated zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnOs) on plant growth have not been well studied. A transcriptome profile analysis of maize exposed to nZnOs showed that the genes in the shoots and roots responded differently. Although the number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the roots was greater than that in the shoots, the number of up- or down-regulated genes in both the shoots and roots was similar. The enrichment of gene ontology (GO) terms was also significantly different in the shoots and roots. The "nitrogen compound metabolism" and "cellular component" terms were specifically and highly up-regulated in the nZnO-exposed roots, whereas the categories "cellular metabolic process", "primary metabolic process" and "secondary metabolic process" were down-regulated in the exposed roots only. Our results revealed the DEG response patterns in maize shoots and roots after nZnO exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Extracting Fitness Relationships and Oncogenic Patterns among Driver Genes in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xindong; Gao, Lin; Jia, Songwei

    2017-12-25

    Driver mutation provides fitness advantage to cancer cells, the accumulation of which increases the fitness of cancer cells and accelerates cancer progression. This work seeks to extract patterns accumulated by driver genes ("fitness relationships") in tumorigenesis. We introduce a network-based method for extracting the fitness relationships of driver genes by modeling the network properties of the "fitness" of cancer cells. Colon adenocarcinoma (COAD) and skin cutaneous malignant melanoma (SKCM) are employed as case studies. Consistent results derived from different background networks suggest the reliability of the identified fitness relationships. Additionally co-occurrence analysis and pathway analysis reveal the functional significance of the fitness relationships with signaling transduction. In addition, a subset of driver genes called the "fitness core" is recognized for each case. Further analyses indicate the functional importance of the fitness core in carcinogenesis, and provide potential therapeutic opportunities in medicinal intervention. Fitness relationships characterize the functional continuity among driver genes in carcinogenesis, and suggest new insights in understanding the oncogenic mechanisms of cancers, as well as providing guiding information for medicinal intervention.

  2. ERK Oscillation-Dependent Gene Expression Patterns and Deregulation by Stress-Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, Katrina M.; Cummings, Brian S.; Shankaran, Harish; Scholpa, Natalie E.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2014-09-15

    Studies were undertaken to determine whether ERK oscillations regulate a unique subset of genes in human keratinocytes and subsequently, whether the p38 stress response inhibits ERK oscillations. A DNA microarray identified many genes that were unique to ERK oscillations, and network reconstruction predicted an important role for the mediator complex subunit 1 (MED1) node in mediating ERK oscillation-dependent gene expression. Increased ERK-dependent phosphorylation of MED1 was observed in oscillating cells compared to non-oscillating counterparts as validation. Treatment of keratinocytes with a p38 inhibitor (SB203580) increased ERK oscillation amplitudes and MED1 and phospho-MED1 protein levels. Bromate is a probable human carcinogen that activates p38. Bromate inhibited ERK oscillations in human keratinocytes and JB6 cells and induced an increase in phospho-p38 and decrease in phospho-MED1 protein levels. Treatment of normal rat kidney cells and primary salivary gland epithelial cells with bromate decreased phospho-MED1 levels in a reversible fashion upon treatment with p38 inhibitors (SB202190; SB203580). Our results indicate that oscillatory behavior in the ERK pathway alters homeostatic gene regulation patterns and that the cellular response to perturbation may manifest differently in oscillating vs non-oscillating cells.

  3. Reliable and rapid characterization of functional FCN2 gene variants reveals diverse geographical patterns

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    Ojurongbe Olusola

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ficolin-2 coded by FCN2 gene is a soluble serum protein and an innate immune recognition element of the complement system. FCN2 gene polymorphisms reveal distinct geographical patterns and are documented to alter serum ficolin levels and modulate disease susceptibility. Methods We employed a real-time PCR based on Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET method to genotype four functional SNPs including -986 G > A (#rs3124952, -602 G > A (#rs3124953, -4A > G (#rs17514136 and +6424 G > T (#rs7851696 in the ficolin-2 (FCN2 gene. We characterized the FCN2 variants in individuals representing Brazilian (n = 176, Nigerian (n = 180, Vietnamese (n = 172 and European Caucasian ethnicity (n = 165. Results We observed that the genotype distribution of three functional SNP variants (−986 G > A, -602 G > A and -4A > G differ significantly between the populations investigated (p p  Conclusions The observed distribution of the FCN2 functional SNP variants may likely contribute to altered serum ficolin levels and this may depend on the different disease settings in world populations. To conclude, the use of FRET based real-time PCR especially for FCN2 gene will benefit a larger scientific community who extensively depend on rapid, reliable method for FCN2 genotyping.

  4. A probabilistic coevolutionary biclustering algorithm for discovering coherent patterns in gene expression dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joung, Je-Gun; Kim, Soo-Jin; Shin, Soo-Yong; Zhang, Byoung-Tak

    2012-01-01

    Biclustering has been utilized to find functionally important patterns in biological problem. Here a bicluster is a submatrix that consists of a subset of rows and a subset of columns in a matrix, and contains homogeneous patterns. The problem of finding biclusters is still challengeable due to computational complex trying to capture patterns from two-dimensional features. We propose a Probabilistic COevolutionary Biclustering Algorithm (PCOBA) that can cluster the rows and columns in a matrix simultaneously by utilizing a dynamic adaptation of multiple species and adopting probabilistic learning. In biclustering problems, a coevolutionary search is suitable since it can optimize interdependent subcomponents formed of rows and columns. Furthermore, acquiring statistical information on two populations using probabilistic learning can improve the ability of search towards the optimum value. We evaluated the performance of PCOBA on synthetic dataset and yeast expression profiles. The results demonstrated that PCOBA outperformed previous evolutionary computation methods as well as other biclustering methods. Our approach for searching particular biological patterns could be valuable for systematically understanding functional relationships between genes and other biological components at a genome-wide level.

  5. CHM gene molecular analysis and X-chromosome inactivation pattern determination in two families with choroideremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Cano, Hector J; Garnica-Hayashi, Rosa E; Zenteno, Juan C

    2009-10-01

    Choroideremia is an X-linked recessive retinal dystrophy characterized by progressive loss of the photoreceptor, the retinal pigment epithelium, and the choriocapillaris layers which ultimately can result in blindness by the fifth decade of life. The disease is caused by mutations in the gene CHM, which encodes a protein involved in the regulation of intracellular vesicular traffic. Typically, hemizygous males are affected by the disease and female carriers are asymptomatic with only a diffuse mottled pattern of hyperpigmentation on funduscopy. Uncommon instances of fully affected females have been described previously and these cases are proposed to arise from an skewed Lyonization mechanism preferentially inactivating the X chromosome carrying the normal CHM allele. In this work, the clinical and molecular features of two Mexican families with choroideremia are described. A novel and a previously described CHM mutation were identified. X-chromosome inactivation assays were performed in a total of 12 heterozygous carriers from the two families. In an affected female from family A, a random X-inactivation pattern was demonstrated; on the other hand, in a female carrier from family B displaying a conspicuous pattern of pigment epithelium mottling at the peripheral retina, a skewed X-inactivation pattern was found. However, the X-chromosome preferentially inactivated in this female was the one carrying the mutated allele. Our results add to the genotypic spectrum in choroideremia and does not support a correlation between X-inactivation status and abnormal retinal phenotype in heterozygous female carriers from these two families.

  6. Intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG protein expression and gene fusion pattern in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Ja Hee; Park, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Cheol; Moon, Kyung Chul

    2017-10-01

    Prostate cancer is considered to be highly heterogeneous, with various morphologic features and biologic behaviors. The TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion is the most frequently observed genetic aberration in prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to elucidate the intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG gene fusion status. ERG immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed in samples from 168 prostate cancer patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy, and 40 cases showing ERG-positive IHC staining were selected for tissue microarray (TMA) construction. Two to six representative cores were selected from each tumor focus. In the cases with heterogeneous ERG IHC staining intensity, the areas showing different intensities were separately selected. Using the TMA blocks, IHC and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were conducted to evaluate the heterogeneity of ERG protein expression and ERG fusion gene patterns, respectively, in a single tumor focus. Heterogeneity of ERG IHC staining was defined as the simultaneous presence of negative and positive cores in the same tumor focus. Heterogeneity of ERG FISH was defined by the presence of cores with positive and negative FISH signals or cores with break-apart and interstitial deletion FISH signals in the same tumor focus. A total of 202 TMA cores were isolated from 40 ERG-positive cases. Of the 202 total cores, 19 were negative for ERG IHC staining, and 46 showed 1+, 52 showed 2+, and 85 showed 3+ ERG staining intensity. Eleven cores were negative for ERG FISH signal, 119 cores showed ERG break-apart FISH signals, and the remaining 72 cores revealed interstitial deletion. Intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG IHC staining was found in 20% (8/40) of cases, and intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG gene fusion pattern was found in 32.5% (13/40) of cases. In summary, this study showed significantly frequent intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG protein expression, gene fusion status and fusion pattern. This heterogeneity can be caused by the development

  7. Patterns of Transcript Abundance of Eukaryotic Biogeochemically-Relevant Genes in the Amazon River Plume.

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    Brian L Zielinski

    Full Text Available The Amazon River has the largest discharge of all rivers on Earth, and its complex plume system fuels a wide array of biogeochemical processes, across a large area of the western tropical North Atlantic. The plume thus stimulates microbial processes affecting carbon sequestration and nutrient cycles at a global scale. Chromosomal gene expression patterns of the 2.0 to 156 μm size-fraction eukaryotic microbial community were investigated in the Amazon River Plume, generating a robust dataset (more than 100 million mRNA sequences that depicts the metabolic capabilities and interactions among the eukaryotic microbes. Combining classical oceanographic field measurements with metatranscriptomics yielded characterization of the hydrographic conditions simultaneous with a quantification of transcriptional activity and identity of the community. We highlight the patterns of eukaryotic gene expression for 31 biogeochemically significant gene targets hypothesized to be valuable within forecasting models. An advantage to this targeted approach is that the database of reference sequences used to identify the target genes was selectively constructed and highly curated optimizing taxonomic coverage, throughput, and the accuracy of annotations. A coastal diatom bloom highly expressed nitrate transporters and carbonic anhydrase presumably to support high growth rates and enhance uptake of low levels of dissolved nitrate and CO2. Diatom-diazotroph association (DDA: diatoms with nitrogen fixing symbionts blooms were common when surface salinity was mesohaline and dissolved nitrate concentrations were below detection, and hence did not show evidence of nitrate utilization, suggesting they relied on ammonium transporters to aquire recently fixed nitrogen. These DDA blooms in the outer plume had rapid turnover of the photosystem D1 protein presumably caused by photodegradation under increased light penetration in clearer waters, and increased expression of silicon

  8. Comparative analysis of codon usage patterns and identification of predicted highly expressed genes in five Salmonella genomes

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    Mondal U

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To anlyse codon usage patterns of five complete genomes of Salmonella , predict highly expressed genes, examine horizontally transferred pathogenicity-related genes to detect their presence in the strains, and scrutinize the nature of highly expressed genes to infer upon their lifestyle. Methods: Protein coding genes, ribosomal protein genes, and pathogenicity-related genes were analysed with Codon W and CAI (codon adaptation index Calculator. Results: Translational efficiency plays a role in codon usage variation in Salmonella genes. Low bias was noticed in most of the genes. GC3 (guanine cytosine at third position composition does not influence codon usage variation in the genes of these Salmonella strains. Among the cluster of orthologous groups (COGs, translation, ribosomal structure biogenesis [J], and energy production and conversion [C] contained the highest number of potentially highly expressed (PHX genes. Correspondence analysis reveals the conserved nature of the genes. Highly expressed genes were detected. Conclusions: Selection for translational efficiency is the major source of variation of codon usage in the genes of Salmonella . Evolution of pathogenicity-related genes as a unit suggests their ability to infect and exist as a pathogen. Presence of a lot of PHX genes in the information and storage-processing category of COGs indicated their lifestyle and revealed that they were not subjected to genome reduction.

  9. Systematic variation in the pattern of gene paralog retention between the teleost superorders Ostariophysi and Acanthopterygii.

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    Garcia de la Serrana, Daniel; Mareco, Edson A; Johnston, Ian A

    2014-04-01

    Teleost fish underwent whole-genome duplication around 450 Ma followed by diploidization and loss of 80-85% of the duplicated genes. To identify a deep signature of this teleost-specific whole-genome duplication (TSGD), we searched for duplicated genes that were systematically and uniquely retained in one or other of the superorders Ostariophysi and Acanthopterygii. TSGD paralogs comprised 17-21% of total gene content. Some 2.6% (510) of TSGD paralogs were present as pairs in the Ostariophysi genomes of Danio rerio (Cypriniformes) and Astyanax mexicanus (Characiformes) but not in species from four orders of Acanthopterygii (Gasterosteiformes, Gasterosteus aculeatus; Tetraodontiformes, Tetraodon nigroviridis; Perciformes, Oreochromis niloticus; and Beloniformes, Oryzias latipes) where a single copy was identified. Similarly, 1.3% (418) of total gene number represented cases where TSGD paralogs pairs were systematically retained in the Acanthopterygian but conserved as a single copy in Ostariophysi genomes. We confirmed the generality of these results by phylogenetic and synteny analysis of 40 randomly selected linage-specific paralogs (LSPs) from each superorder and completed with the transcriptomes of three additional Ostariophysi species (Ictalurus punctatus [Siluriformes], Sinocyclocheilus species [Cypriniformes], and Piaractus mesopotamicus [Characiformes]). No chromosome bias was detected in TSGD paralog retention. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed significant enrichment of GO terms relative to the human GO SLIM database for "growth," "Cell differentiation," and "Embryo development" in Ostariophysi and for "Transport," "Signal Transduction," and "Vesicle mediated transport" in Acanthopterygii. The observed patterns of paralog retention are consistent with different diploidization outcomes having contributed to the evolution/diversification of each superorder.

  10. Inducible defenses stay up late: temporal patterns of immune gene expression in Tenebrio molitor.

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    Johnston, Paul R; Makarova, Olga; Rolff, Jens

    2013-12-06

    The course of microbial infection in insects is shaped by a two-stage process of immune defense. Constitutive defenses, such as engulfment and melanization, act immediately and are followed by inducible defenses, archetypically the production of antimicrobial peptides, which eliminate or suppress the remaining microbes. By applying RNAseq across a 7-day time course, we sought to characterize the long-lasting immune response to bacterial challenge in the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor, a model for the biochemistry of insect immunity and persistent bacterial infection. By annotating a hybrid de novo assembly of RNAseq data, we were able to identify putative orthologs for the majority of components of the conserved insect immune system. Compared with Tribolium castaneum, the most closely related species with a reference genome sequence and a manually curated immune system annotation, the T. molitor immune gene count was lower, with lineage-specific expansions of genes encoding serine proteases and their countervailing inhibitors accounting for the majority of the deficit. Quantitative mapping of RNAseq reads to the reference assembly showed that expression of genes with predicted functions in cellular immunity, wound healing, melanization, and the production of reactive oxygen species was transiently induced immediately after immune challenge. In contrast, expression of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides or components of the Toll signaling pathway and iron sequestration response remained elevated for at least 7 days. Numerous genes involved in metabolism and nutrient storage were repressed, indicating a possible cost of immune induction. Strikingly, the expression of almost all antibacterial peptides followed the same pattern of long-lasting induction, regardless of their spectra of activity, signaling possible interactive roles in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Johnston et al.

  11. A Hh-driven gene network controls specification, pattern and size of the Drosophila simple eyes.

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    Aguilar-Hidalgo, Daniel; Domínguez-Cejudo, María A; Amore, Gabriele; Brockmann, Anette; Lemos, María C; Córdoba, Antonio; Casares, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    During development, extracellular signaling molecules interact with intracellular gene networks to control the specification, pattern and size of organs. One such signaling molecule is Hedgehog (Hh). Hh is known to act as a morphogen, instructing different fates depending on the distance to its source. However, how Hh, when signaling across a cell field, impacts organ-specific transcriptional networks is still poorly understood. Here, we investigate this issue during the development of the Drosophila ocellar complex. The development of this sensory structure, which is composed of three simple eyes (or ocelli) located at the vertices of a triangular patch of cuticle on the dorsal head, depends on Hh signaling and on the definition of three domains: two areas of eya and so expression--the prospective anterior and posterior ocelli--and the intervening interocellar domain. Our results highlight the role of the homeodomain transcription factor engrailed (en) both as a target and as a transcriptional repressor of hh signaling in the prospective interocellar region. Furthermore, we identify a requirement for the Notch pathway in the establishment of en maintenance in a Hh-independent manner. Therefore, hh signals transiently during the specification of the interocellar domain, with en being required here for hh signaling attenuation. Computational analysis further suggests that this network design confers robustness to signaling noise and constrains phenotypic variation. In summary, using genetics and modeling we have expanded the ocellar gene network to explain how the interaction between the Hh gradient and this gene network results in the generation of stable mutually exclusive gene expression domains. In addition, we discuss some general implications our model may have in some Hh-driven gene networks.

  12. Evolutionary patterning of hemagglutinin gene sequence of 2009 H1N1 pandemic.

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    Banerjee, Rachana; Roy, Ayan; Ahmad, Fayaz; Das, Santasabuj; Basak, Surajit

    2012-01-01

    The 2009 H1N1 swine flu is the first pandemic in decades. Infectivity of the influenza virus for human host depends largely on its ability to evade antibodies specific for viral protein called hemagglutinin (HA) that mediates attachment to the host. In the present study we analysed large number of HA gene sequences available in Flu Database maintained at NCBI. Our sequence based analysis clearly demonstrates that the amino acid usage pattern may dramatically change during the course of evolution, and there exists a clear link between a particular pattern of amino acid usage of HA genes and its potential to become infectious. Structural studies revealed how binding efficiency between the HA and sialic acid may alter the pandemic potential of infection. Our work highlights the evolutionary significance and biochemical basis of the selective advantage of certain amino acids of HA in 2009 and provides a link between the characteristics changes in HA protein and their potential to pronounce a global menace to public health.

  13. Ancestral and derived attributes of the dlx gene repertoire, cluster structure and expression patterns in an African cichlid fish

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    Renz Adina J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cichlid fishes have undergone rapid, expansive evolutionary radiations that are manifested in the diversification of their trophic morphologies, tooth patterning and coloration. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie the cichlids' unique patterns of evolution requires a thorough examination of genes that pattern the neural crest, from which these diverse phenotypes are derived. Among those genes, the homeobox-containing Dlx gene family is of particular interest since it is involved in the patterning of the brain, jaws and teeth. Results In this study, we characterized the dlx genes of an African cichlid fish, Astatotilapia burtoni, to provide a baseline to later allow cross-species comparison within Cichlidae. We identified seven dlx paralogs (dlx1a, -2a, -4a, -3b, -4b, -5a and -6a, whose orthologies were validated with molecular phylogenetic trees. The intergenic regions of three dlx gene clusters (dlx1a-2a, dlx3b-4b, and dlx5a-6a were amplified with long PCR. Intensive cross-species comparison revealed a number of conserved non-coding elements (CNEs that are shared with other percomorph fishes. This analysis highlighted additional lineage-specific gains/losses of CNEs in different teleost fish lineages and a novel CNE that had previously not been identified. Our gene expression analyses revealed overlapping but distinct expression of dlx orthologs in the developing brain and pharyngeal arches. Notably, four of the seven A. burtoni dlx genes, dlx2a, dlx3b, dlx4a and dlx5a, were expressed in the developing pharyngeal teeth. Conclusion This comparative study of the dlx genes of A. burtoni has deepened our knowledge of the diversity of the Dlx gene family, in terms of gene repertoire, expression patterns and non-coding elements. We have identified possible cichlid lineage-specific changes, including losses of a subset of dlx expression domains in the pharyngeal teeth, which will be the targets of future functional

  14. Spatio-Temporal Expression Patterns of Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula Defensin-Like Genes

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    Nallu, Sumitha; Wang, Lin; Botanga, Christopher J.; Gomez, S. Karen; Costa, Liliana M.; Harrison, Maria J.; Samac, Deborah A.; Glazebrook, Jane; Katagiri, Fumiaki; Gutierrez-Marcos, Jose F.; VandenBosch, Kathryn A.

    2013-01-01

    Plant genomes contain several hundred defensin-like (DEFL) genes that encode short cysteine-rich proteins resembling defensins, which are well known antimicrobial polypeptides. Little is known about the expression patterns or functions of many DEFLs because most were discovered recently and hence are not well represented on standard microarrays. We designed a custom Affymetrix chip consisting of probe sets for 317 and 684 DEFLs from Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula, respectively for cataloging DEFL expression in a variety of plant organs at different developmental stages and during symbiotic and pathogenic associations. The microarray analysis provided evidence for the transcription of 71% and 90% of the DEFLs identified in Arabidopsis and Medicago, respectively, including many of the recently annotated DEFL genes that previously lacked expression information. Both model plants contain a subset of DEFLs specifically expressed in seeds or fruits. A few DEFLs, including some plant defensins, were significantly up-regulated in Arabidopsis leaves inoculated with Alternaria brassicicola or Pseudomonas syringae pathogens. Among these, some were dependent on jasmonic acid signaling or were associated with specific types of immune responses. There were notable differences in DEFL gene expression patterns between Arabidopsis and Medicago, as the majority of Arabidopsis DEFLs were expressed in inflorescences, while only a few exhibited root-enhanced expression. By contrast, Medicago DEFLs were most prominently expressed in nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Thus, our data document salient differences in DEFL temporal and spatial expression between Arabidopsis and Medicago, suggesting distinct signaling routes and distinct roles for these proteins in the two plant species. PMID:23527067

  15. Resistance patterns, ESBL genes, and genetic relatedness of Escherichia coli from dogs and owners.

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    Carvalho, A C; Barbosa, A V; Arais, L R; Ribeiro, P F; Carneiro, V C; Cerqueira, A M F

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from pet dogs can be considered a potential threat of infection for the human population. Our objective was to characterize the resistance pattern, extended spectrum beta-lactamase production and genetic relatedness of multiresistant E. coli strains isolated from dogs (n=134), their owners (n=134), and humans who claim to have no contact with dogs (n=44, control), searching for sharing of strains. The strains were assessed for their genetic relatedness by phylogenetic grouping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Multiresistant E. coli strains were isolated from 42 (31.3%) fecal samples from pairs of dogs and owners, totaling 84 isolates, and from 19 (43.1%) control group subjects. The strains showed high levels of resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole regardless of host species or group of origin. The blaTEM, blaCTX-M, and blaSHV genes were detected in similar proportions in all groups. All isolates positive for bla genes were ESBL producers. The phylogenetic group A was the most prevalent, irrespective of the host species. None of the strains belonging to the B2 group contained bla genes. Similar resistance patterns were found for strains from dogs, owners and controls; furthermore, identical PFGE profiles were detected in four (9.5%) isolate pairs from dogs and owners, denoting the sharing of strains. Pet dogs were shown to be a potential household source of multiresistant E. coli strains. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Spatio-temporal expression patterns of Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula defensin-like genes.

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    Mesfin Tesfaye

    Full Text Available Plant genomes contain several hundred defensin-like (DEFL genes that encode short cysteine-rich proteins resembling defensins, which are well known antimicrobial polypeptides. Little is known about the expression patterns or functions of many DEFLs because most were discovered recently and hence are not well represented on standard microarrays. We designed a custom Affymetrix chip consisting of probe sets for 317 and 684 DEFLs from Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula, respectively for cataloging DEFL expression in a variety of plant organs at different developmental stages and during symbiotic and pathogenic associations. The microarray analysis provided evidence for the transcription of 71% and 90% of the DEFLs identified in Arabidopsis and Medicago, respectively, including many of the recently annotated DEFL genes that previously lacked expression information. Both model plants contain a subset of DEFLs specifically expressed in seeds or fruits. A few DEFLs, including some plant defensins, were significantly up-regulated in Arabidopsis leaves inoculated with Alternaria brassicicola or Pseudomonas syringae pathogens. Among these, some were dependent on jasmonic acid signaling or were associated with specific types of immune responses. There were notable differences in DEFL gene expression patterns between Arabidopsis and Medicago, as the majority of Arabidopsis DEFLs were expressed in inflorescences, while only a few exhibited root-enhanced expression. By contrast, Medicago DEFLs were most prominently expressed in nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Thus, our data document salient differences in DEFL temporal and spatial expression between Arabidopsis and Medicago, suggesting distinct signaling routes and distinct roles for these proteins in the two plant species.

  17. Time course Analysis of Gene expression patterns in ZebrafIsh Eye during Optic Nerve Regeneration

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    Amy T. Mccurley

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well-established that neurons in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS are terminally differentiated and, if injured, will be unable to regenerate their connections. In contrast to mammals, zebrafish and other teleosts display a robust neuroregenerative response. Following optic nerve crush (ONX, retinal ganglion cells (RGC regrow their axons to synapse with topographically correct targets in the optic tectum, such that vision is restored in ~21 days. What accounts for these differences between teleostean and mammalian responses to neural injury is not fully understood. A time course analysis of global gene expression patterns in the zebrafish eye after ONX can help to elucidate cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to a successful neuroregeneration. To define different phases of regeneration after ONX, alpha tubulin 1 ( tuba1 and growth-associated protein 43 ( gap43 , markers previously shown to correspond to morphophological events, were measured by real time quantitative PCR (qPCR. Microarray analysis was then performed at defined intervals (6 hours, 1, 4, 12, and 21 days post-ONX and compared to SHAM. Results show that optic nerve damage induces multiple, phase-related transcriptional programs, with the maximum number of genes changed and highest fold-change occurring at 4 days. Several functional groups affected by optic nerve regeneration, including cell adhesion, apoptosis, cell cycle, energy metabolism, ion channel activity, and calcium signaling, were identified. Utilizing the whole eye allowed us to identify signaling contributions from the vitreous, immune and glial cells as well as the neural cells of the retina. Comparisons between our dataset and transcriptional profiles from other models of regeneration in zebrafish retina, heart and fin revealed a subset of commonly regulated transcripts, indicating shared mechanisms in different regenerating tissues. Knowledge of gene expression patterns in all

  18. Regulation of floral patterning and organ identity by Arabidopsis ERECTA-family receptor kinase genes.

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    Bemis, Shannon M; Lee, Jin Suk; Shpak, Elena D; Torii, Keiko U

    2013-12-01

    Due to the lack of cell migration, plant organogenesis relies on coordinated cell proliferation, cell growth, and differentiation. A flower possesses a complex structure, with sepals and petals constituting the perianth, and stamens and pistils where male and female gametophytes differentiate. While advances have been made in our understanding of gene regulatory networks controlling flower development, relatively little is known of how cell-cell coordination influences floral organ specification. The Arabidopsis ERECTA (ER)-family receptor kinases, ER, ER-LIKE1 (ERL1), and ERL2, regulate inflorescence architecture, organ shape, and epidermal stomatal patterning. Here it is reported that ER-family genes together regulate floral meristem organization and floral organ identity. The stem cell marker CLAVATA3 exhibits misplaced expression in the floral meristems of the er erl1 erl2 mutant. Strikingly, homeotic conversion of sepals to carpels was observed in er erl1 erl2 flowers. Consistently, ectopic expression of AGAMOUS, which determines carpel identity, was detected in er erl1 erl2 flower primordia. Among the known downstream components of ER-family receptor kinases in stomatal patterning, YODA (YDA) is also required for proper floral patterning. YDA and the ER-family show complex, synergistic genetic interactions: er erl1 erl2 yda quadruple mutant plants become extremely small, callus-like masses. While a constitutively active YDA fully rescues stomatal clustering in er erl1 erl2, it only partially rescues er erl1 erl2 flower defects. The study suggests that ER-family signalling is crucial for ensuring proper expression domains of floral meristem and floral organ identity determinants, and further implies the existence of a non-canonical downstream pathway.

  19. Conservation of ParaHox genes' function in patterning of the digestive tract of the marine gastropod Gibbula varia

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    Steiner Gerhard

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Presence of all three ParaHox genes has been described in deuterostomes and lophotrochozoans, but to date one of these three genes, Xlox has not been reported from any ecdysozoan taxa and both Xlox and Gsx are absent in nematodes. There is evidence that the ParaHox genes were ancestrally a single chromosomal cluster. Colinear expression of the ParaHox genes in anterior, middle, and posterior tissues of several species studied so far suggest that these genes may be responsible for axial patterning of the digestive tract. So far, there are no data on expression of these genes in molluscs. Results We isolated the complete coding sequences of the three Gibbula varia ParaHox genes, and then tested their expression in larval and postlarval development. In Gibbula varia, the ParaHox genes participate in patterning of the digestive tract and are expressed in some cells of the neuroectoderm. The expression of these genes coincides with the gradual formation of the gut in the larva. Gva-Gsx patterns potential neural precursors of cerebral ganglia as well as of the apical sensory organ. During larval development this gene is involved in the formation of the mouth and during postlarval development it is expressed in the precursor cells involved in secretion of the radula, the odontoblasts. Gva-Xolx and Gva-Cdx are involved in gut patterning in the middle and posterior parts of digestive tract, respectively. Both genes are expressed in some ventral neuroectodermal cells; however the expression of Gva-Cdx fades in later larval stages while the expression of Gva-Xolx in these cells persists. Conclusions In Gibbula varia the ParaHox genes are expressed during anterior-posterior patterning of the digestive system. This colinearity is not easy to spot during early larval stages because the differentiated endothelial cells within the yolk permanently migrate to their destinations in the gut. After torsion, Gsx patterns the mouth and foregut

  20. Characterization of Antimicrobial Resistance Patterns and Detection of Virulence Genes in Campylobacter Isolates in Italy

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    Di Giannatale, Elisabetta; Di Serafino, Gabriella; Zilli, Katiuscia; Alessiani, Alessandra; Sacchini, Lorena; Garofolo, Giuliano; Aprea, Giuseppe; Marotta, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter has developed resistance to several antimicrobial agents over the years, including macrolides, quinolones and fluoroquinolones, becoming a significant public health hazard. A total of 145 strains derived from raw milk, chicken faeces, chicken carcasses, cattle faeces and human faeces collected from various Italian regions, were screened for antimicrobial susceptibility, molecular characterization (SmaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis) and detection of virulence genes (sequencing and DNA microarray analysis). The prevalence of C. jejuni and C. coli was 62.75% and 37.24% respectively. Antimicrobial susceptibility revealed a high level of resistance for ciprofloxacin (62.76%), tetracycline (55.86%) and nalidixic acid (55.17%). Genotyping of Campylobacter isolates using PFGE revealed a total of 86 unique SmaI patterns. Virulence gene profiles were determined using a new microbial diagnostic microarray composed of 70-mer oligonucleotide probes targeting genes implicated in Campylobacter pathogenicity. Correspondence between PFGE and microarray clusters was observed. Comparisons of PFGE and virulence profiles reflected the high genetic diversity of the strains examined, leading us to speculate different degrees of pathogenicity inside Campylobacter populations. PMID:24556669

  1. Characterization of Antimicrobial Resistance Patterns and Detection of Virulence Genes in Campylobacter Isolates in Italy

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    Elisabetta Di Giannatale

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter has developed resistance to several antimicrobial agents over the years, including macrolides, quinolones and fluoroquinolones, becoming a significant public health hazard. A total of 145 strains derived from raw milk, chicken faeces, chicken carcasses, cattle faeces and human faeces collected from various Italian regions, were screened for antimicrobial susceptibility, molecular characterization (SmaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and detection of virulence genes (sequencing and DNA microarray analysis. The prevalence of C. jejuni and C. coli was 62.75% and 37.24% respectively. Antimicrobial susceptibility revealed a high level of resistance for ciprofloxacin (62.76%, tetracycline (55.86% and nalidixic acid (55.17%. Genotyping of Campylobacter isolates using PFGE revealed a total of 86 unique SmaI patterns. Virulence gene profiles were determined using a new microbial diagnostic microarray composed of 70-mer oligonucleotide probes targeting genes implicated in Campylobacter pathogenicity. Correspondence between PFGE and microarray clusters was observed. Comparisons of PFGE and virulence profiles reflected the high genetic diversity of the strains examined, leading us to speculate different degrees of pathogenicity inside Campylobacter populations.

  2. The Classification of Sini Decoction Pattern in Traditional Chinese Medicine by Gene Expression Profiling

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    Hung-Tsu Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the syndromes of the Sini decoction pattern (SDP, a common ZHENG in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM. The syndromes of SDP were correlated with various severe Yang deficiency related symptoms. To obtain a common profile for SDP, we distributed questionnaires to 300 senior clinical TCM practitioners. According to the survey, we concluded 2 sets of symptoms for SDP: (1 pulse feels deep or faint and (2 reversal cold of the extremities. Twenty-four individuals from Taipei City Hospital, Linsen Chinese Medicine Branch, Taiwan, were recruited. We extracted the total mRNA of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from the 24 individuals for microarray experiments. Twelve individuals (including 6 SDP patients and 6 non-SDP individuals were used as the training set to identify biomarkers for distinguishing the SDP and non-SDP groups. The remaining 12 individuals were used as the test set. The test results indicated that the gene expression profiles of the identified biomarkers could effectively distinguish the 2 groups by adopting a hierarchical clustering algorithm. Our results suggest the feasibility of using the identified biomarkers in facilitating the diagnosis of TCM ZHENGs. Furthermore, the gene expression profiles of biomarker genes could provide a molecular explanation corresponding to the ZHENG of TCM.

  3. Reflectin genes and development of iridophore patterns in Sepia officinalis embryos (Mollusca, Cephalopoda).

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    Andouche, Aude; Bassaglia, Yann; Baratte, Sébastien; Bonnaud, Laure

    2013-05-01

    In the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis, iridescence is known to play a role in patterning and communication. In iridophores, iridosomes are composed of reflectins, a protein family, which show great diversity in all cephalopod species. Iridosomes are established before hatching, but very little is known about how these cells are established, their distribution in embryos, or the contribution of each reflectin gene to iridosome structures. Six reflectin genes are expressed during the development of iridosomes in Sepia officinalis. We show that they are expressed in numerous parts of the body before hatching. Evidence of the colocalization of two different genes of reflectin was found. Curiously, reflectin mRNA expression was no longer detectable at the time of hatchling, while reflectin proteins were present and gave rise to visible iridescence. These data suggest that several different forms of reflectins are simultaneously used to produce iridescence in S. officinalis and that mRNA production and translation are decoupled in time during iridosome development. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Molecular cloning and expression patterns of the Vasa gene from Rana nigromaculata (Amphibia: Anura

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    Rui Jia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The Vasa protein is a member of the DEAD (Asp-Glu-Alu-Asp box family of ATP-dependent RNA helicases. The Vasa gene is specifically expressed in germ-line cells of many metazoans and is known to play a critical role in gametogenesis and reproductive regulation. In this paper, we isolate the full length cDNA sequence of the Vasa gene from the frog Rana nigromaculata Hallowell, 1861. The open reading frame (ORF encoding 398 amino acid residues has nine conserved motifs. According to the similarities at the amino acid sequenceythe phylogenetic analysis of Vasa gene was consistent with the evolution relationships from chordates to mammals. Furthermore, the expression pattern analysis of RnVasa mRNA, using the technique of Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR, showed a high level of transcripts in testis, ovary and kidney, whereas little to no signal was detected in other tissues, which suggests that it may play a role during gametogenesis.

  5. In silico analysis of stomach lineage specific gene set expression pattern in gastric cancer.

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    Pandi, Narayanan Sathiya; Suganya, Sivagurunathan; Rajendran, Suriliyandi

    2013-10-04

    Stomach lineage specific gene products act as a protective barrier in the normal stomach and their expression maintains the normal physiological processes, cellular integrity and morphology of the gastric wall. However, the regulation of stomach lineage specific genes in gastric cancer (GC) is far less clear. In the present study, we sought to investigate the role and regulation of stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) in GC. SLSGS was identified by comparing the mRNA expression profiles of normal stomach tissue with other organ tissue. The obtained SLSGS was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. Functional annotation analysis revealed that the SLSGS was enriched for digestive function and gastric epithelial maintenance. Employing a single sample prediction method across GC mRNA expression profiles identified the under expression of SLSGS in proliferative type and invasive type gastric tumors compared to the metabolic type gastric tumors. Integrative pathway activation prediction analysis revealed a close association between estrogen-α signaling and SLSGS expression pattern in GC. Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. In conclusion, our results highlight that estrogen mediated regulation of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type GC and prognostic factor in GC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Expression patterns of neural genes in Euperipatoides kanangrensis suggest divergent evolution of onychophoran and euarthropod neurogenesis.

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    Eriksson, Bo Joakim; Stollewerk, Angelika

    2010-12-28

    One of the controversial debates on euarthropod relationships centers on the question as to whether insects, crustaceans, and myriapods (Mandibulata) share a common ancestor or whether myriapods group with the chelicerates (Myriochelata). The debate was stimulated recently by studies in chelicerates and myriapods that show that neural precursor groups (NPGs) segregate from the neuroectoderm generating the nervous system, whereas in insects and crustaceans the nervous tissue is produced by stem cells. Do the shared neural characters of myriapods and chelicerates represent derived characters that support the Myriochelata grouping? Or do they rather reflect the ancestral pattern? Analyses of neurogenesis in a group closely related to euarthropods, the onychophorans, show that, similar to insects and crustaceans, single neural precursors are formed in the neuroectoderm, potentially supporting the Myriochelata hypothesis. Here we show that the nature and the selection of onychophoran neural precursors are distinct from euarthropods. The onychophoran nervous system is generated by the massive irregular segregation of single neural precursors, contrasting with the limited number and stereotyped arrangement of NPGs/stem cells in euarthropods. Furthermore, neural genes do not show the spatiotemporal pattern that sets up the precise position of neural precursors as in euarthropods. We conclude that neurogenesis in onychophorans largely does not reflect the ancestral pattern of euarthropod neurogenesis, but shows a mixture of derived characters and ancestral characters that have been modified in the euarthropod lineage. Based on these data and additional evidence, we suggest an evolutionary sequence of arthropod neurogenesis that is in line with the Mandibulata hypothesis.

  7. Distal-less and dachshund pattern both plesiomorphic and apomorphic structures in chelicerates: RNA interference in the harvestman Phalangium opilio (Opiliones).

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    Sharma, Prashant P; Schwager, Evelyn E; Giribet, Gonzalo; Jockusch, Elizabeth L; Extavour, Cassandra G

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of genetic mechanisms that can transform a morphological structure from a plesiomorphic (=primitive) state to an apomorphic (=derived) one is a cardinal objective of evolutionary developmental biology. However, this objective is often impeded for many lineages of interest by limitations in taxonomic sampling, genomic resources, or functional genetic methods. In order to investigate the evolution of appendage morphology within Chelicerata, the putative sister group of the remaining arthropods, we developed an RNA interference (RNAi) protocol for the harvestman Phalangium opilio. We silenced the leg gap genes Distal-less (Dll) and dachshund (dac) in the harvestman via zygotic injections of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), and used in situ hybridization to confirm RNAi efficacy. Consistent with the conserved roles of these genes in patterning the proximo-distal axis of arthropod appendages, we observed that embryos injected with Dll dsRNA lacked distal parts of appendages and appendage-like structures, such as the labrum, the chelicerae, the pedipalps, and the walking legs, whereas embryos injected with dac dsRNA lacked the medial podomeres femur and patella in the pedipalps and walking legs. In addition, we detected a role for these genes in patterning structures that do not occur in well-established chelicerate models (spiders and mites). Dll RNAi additionally results in loss of the preoral chamber, which is formed from pedipalpal and leg coxapophyses, and the ocularium, a dorsal outgrowth bearing the eyes. In one case, we observed that an embryo injected with dac dsRNA lacked the proximal segment of the chelicera, a plesiomorphic podomere that expresses dac in wild-type embryos. This may support the hypothesis that loss of the cheliceral dac domain underlies the transition to the two-segmented chelicera of derived arachnids. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Quadratic regression analysis for gene discovery and pattern recognition for non-cyclic short time-course microarray experiments

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    Getchell Thomas V

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cluster analyses are used to analyze microarray time-course data for gene discovery and pattern recognition. However, in general, these methods do not take advantage of the fact that time is a continuous variable, and existing clustering methods often group biologically unrelated genes together. Results We propose a quadratic regression method for identification of differentially expressed genes and classification of genes based on their temporal expression profiles for non-cyclic short time-course microarray data. This method treats time as a continuous variable, therefore preserves actual time information. We applied this method to a microarray time-course study of gene expression at short time intervals following deafferentation of olfactory receptor neurons. Nine regression patterns have been identified and shown to fit gene expression profiles better than k-means clusters. EASE analysis identified over-represented functional groups in each regression pattern and each k-means cluster, which further demonstrated that the regression method provided more biologically meaningful classifications of gene expression profiles than the k-means clustering method. Comparison with Peddada et al.'s order-restricted inference method showed that our method provides a different perspective on the temporal gene profiles. Reliability study indicates that regression patterns have the highest reliabilities. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that the proposed quadratic regression method improves gene discovery and pattern recognition for non-cyclic short time-course microarray data. With a freely accessible Excel macro, investigators can readily apply this method to their microarray data.

  9. Characterisation of the potential function of SVA retrotransposons to modulate gene expression patterns.

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    Savage, Abigail L; Bubb, Vivien J; Breen, Gerome; Quinn, John P

    2013-05-21

    Retrotransposons are a major component of the human genome constituting as much as 45%. The hominid specific SINE-VNTR-Alus are the youngest of these elements constituting 0.13% of the genome; they are therefore a practical and amenable group for analysis of both their global integration, polymorphic variation and their potential contribution to modulation of genome regulation. Consistent with insertion into active chromatin we have determined that SVAs are more prevalent in genic regions compared to gene deserts. The consequence of which, is that their integration has greater potential to have affects on gene regulation. The sequences of SVAs show potential for the formation of secondary structure including G-quadruplex DNA. We have shown that the human specific SVA subtypes (E-F1) show the greatest potential for forming G-quadruplexes within the central tandem repeat component in addition to the 5' 'CCCTCT' hexamer. We undertook a detailed analysis of the PARK7 SVA D, located in the promoter of the PARK7 gene (also termed DJ-1), in a HapMap cohort where we identified 2 variable number tandem repeat domains and 1 tandem repeat within this SVA with the 5' CCCTCT element being one of the variable regions. Functionally we were able to demonstrate that this SVA contains multiple regulatory elements that support reporter gene expression in vitro and further show these elements exhibit orientation dependency. Our data supports the hypothesis that SVAs integrate preferentially in to open chromatin where they could modify the existing transcriptional regulatory domains or alter expression patterns by a variety of mechanisms.

  10. Genetic pattern and gene localization of polydactyly in Beijing fatty chicken.

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    He, Chuan; Chen, Yongcan; Yang, Kaixuan; Zhai, Zhengxiao; Zhao, Wenjing; Liu, Shuyun; Ding, Jinmei; Dai, Ronghua; Yang, Lingyu; Xu, Ke; Zhou, Zhenxiang; Gu, Caiju; Huang, Qizhong; Meng, He

    2017-01-01

    Polydactyly, a common heritable limb malformation in vertebrates, is characterized by supernumerary digits. In chickens, basic characteristics and rough dominant genes have been explored in past decades; however, the elaborate pattern of inheritance and the determinant gene remain obscure. In this study, different types of polydactylism were classified by the numbers and the shapes of toes, including the newly defined subtypes of B' and G, for the Beijing fatty chicken, a native breed of chicken from China. Through experiments on hybridization, we demonstrated a complete dominant inheritance of polydactyly instead of an incomplete penetrance or genetic modification of the previous conjecture. In particular, by using the F2 population of the five-digit purebred line of Beijing fatty chicken backcrossed to Shiqiza chicken and by using restriction-site associated DNA based markers, we performed a genome-wide association study on the trait of polydactyly. Furthermore, whole genome resequencing strategy was applied to sweep SNPs across the whole genome. An outlier-based Fst approach was employed to search for signatures of selection, and results indicated that the determinant mutation was found in the region ranging from 8.3 Mb to 8.7 Mb, where the polydactyly candidate gene LMBR1 was located. The G/T mutation of rs80659072 was identified to be highly associated with polydactyly in our resequencing and was validated in random samples from an expanded population. Thus, we confirmed that LMBR1 was the causative gene of polydactyly in the Beijing fatty chicken by using GWAS with restriction-site associated DNA based markers and resequencing.

  11. Genetic pattern and gene localization of polydactyly in Beijing fatty chicken.

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    Chuan He

    Full Text Available Polydactyly, a common heritable limb malformation in vertebrates, is characterized by supernumerary digits. In chickens, basic characteristics and rough dominant genes have been explored in past decades; however, the elaborate pattern of inheritance and the determinant gene remain obscure. In this study, different types of polydactylism were classified by the numbers and the shapes of toes, including the newly defined subtypes of B' and G, for the Beijing fatty chicken, a native breed of chicken from China. Through experiments on hybridization, we demonstrated a complete dominant inheritance of polydactyly instead of an incomplete penetrance or genetic modification of the previous conjecture. In particular, by using the F2 population of the five-digit purebred line of Beijing fatty chicken backcrossed to Shiqiza chicken and by using restriction-site associated DNA based markers, we performed a genome-wide association study on the trait of polydactyly. Furthermore, whole genome resequencing strategy was applied to sweep SNPs across the whole genome. An outlier-based Fst approach was employed to search for signatures of selection, and results indicated that the determinant mutation was found in the region ranging from 8.3 Mb to 8.7 Mb, where the polydactyly candidate gene LMBR1 was located. The G/T mutation of rs80659072 was identified to be highly associated with polydactyly in our resequencing and was validated in random samples from an expanded population. Thus, we confirmed that LMBR1 was the causative gene of polydactyly in the Beijing fatty chicken by using GWAS with restriction-site associated DNA based markers and resequencing.

  12. Narcolepsy susceptibility gene CCR3 modulates sleep-wake patterns in mice.

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    Toyoda, Hiromi; Honda, Yoshiko; Tanaka, Susumu; Miyagawa, Taku; Honda, Makoto; Honda, Kazuki; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Kodama, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    Narcolepsy is caused by the loss of hypocretin (Hcrt) neurons and is associated with multiple genetic and environmental factors. Although abnormalities in immunity are suggested to be involved in the etiology of narcolepsy, no decisive mechanism has been established. We previously reported chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 3 (CCR3) as a novel susceptibility gene for narcolepsy. To understand the role of CCR3 in the development of narcolepsy, we investigated sleep-wake patterns of Ccr3 knockout (KO) mice. Ccr3 KO mice exhibited fragmented sleep patterns in the light phase, whereas the overall sleep structure in the dark phase did not differ between Ccr3 KO mice and wild-type (WT) littermates. Intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) promoted wakefulness and suppressed both REM and NREM sleep in the light phase in both Ccr3 KO and WT mice. Conversely, LPS suppressed wakefulness and promoted NREM sleep in the dark phase in both genotypes. After LPS administration, the proportion of time spent in wakefulness was higher, and the proportion of time spent in NREM sleep was lower in Ccr3 KO compared to WT mice only in the light phase. LPS-induced changes in sleep patterns were larger in Ccr3 KO compared to WT mice. Furthermore, we quantified the number of Hcrt neurons and found that Ccr3 KO mice had fewer Hcrt neurons in the lateral hypothalamus compared to WT mice. We found abnormalities in sleep patterns in the resting phase and in the number of Hcrt neurons in Ccr3 KO mice. These observations suggest a role for CCR3 in sleep-wake regulation in narcolepsy patients.

  13. Narcolepsy susceptibility gene CCR3 modulates sleep-wake patterns in mice.

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    Hiromi Toyoda

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy is caused by the loss of hypocretin (Hcrt neurons and is associated with multiple genetic and environmental factors. Although abnormalities in immunity are suggested to be involved in the etiology of narcolepsy, no decisive mechanism has been established. We previously reported chemokine (C-C motif receptor 3 (CCR3 as a novel susceptibility gene for narcolepsy. To understand the role of CCR3 in the development of narcolepsy, we investigated sleep-wake patterns of Ccr3 knockout (KO mice. Ccr3 KO mice exhibited fragmented sleep patterns in the light phase, whereas the overall sleep structure in the dark phase did not differ between Ccr3 KO mice and wild-type (WT littermates. Intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS promoted wakefulness and suppressed both REM and NREM sleep in the light phase in both Ccr3 KO and WT mice. Conversely, LPS suppressed wakefulness and promoted NREM sleep in the dark phase in both genotypes. After LPS administration, the proportion of time spent in wakefulness was higher, and the proportion of time spent in NREM sleep was lower in Ccr3 KO compared to WT mice only in the light phase. LPS-induced changes in sleep patterns were larger in Ccr3 KO compared to WT mice. Furthermore, we quantified the number of Hcrt neurons and found that Ccr3 KO mice had fewer Hcrt neurons in the lateral hypothalamus compared to WT mice. We found abnormalities in sleep patterns in the resting phase and in the number of Hcrt neurons in Ccr3 KO mice. These observations suggest a role for CCR3 in sleep-wake regulation in narcolepsy patients.

  14. Patterns of evolution and host gene mimicry in influenza and other RNA viruses.

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    Benjamin D Greenbaum

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the dinucleotide CpG is under-represented in the genomic DNA of many vertebrates. This is commonly thought to be due to the methylation of cytosine residues in this dinucleotide and the corresponding high rate of deamination of 5-methycytosine, which lowers the frequency of this dinucleotide in DNA. Surprisingly, many single-stranded RNA viruses that replicate in these vertebrate hosts also have a very low presence of CpG dinucleotides in their genomes. Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites and the evolution of a virus is inexorably linked to the nature and fate of its host. One therefore expects that virus and host genomes should have common features. In this work, we compare evolutionary patterns in the genomes of ssRNA viruses and their hosts. In particular, we have analyzed dinucleotide patterns and found that the same patterns are pervasively over- or under-represented in many RNA viruses and their hosts suggesting that many RNA viruses evolve by mimicking some of the features of their host's genes (DNA and likely also their corresponding mRNAs. When a virus crosses a species barrier into a different host, the pressure to replicate, survive and adapt, leaves a footprint in dinucleotide frequencies. For instance, since human genes seem to be under higher pressure to eliminate CpG dinucleotide motifs than avian genes, this pressure might be reflected in the genomes of human viruses (DNA and RNA viruses when compared to those of the same viruses replicating in avian hosts. To test this idea we have analyzed the evolution of the influenza virus since 1918. We find that the influenza A virus, which originated from an avian reservoir and has been replicating in humans over many generations, evolves in a direction strongly selected to reduce the frequency of CpG dinucleotides in its genome. Consistent with this observation, we find that the influenza B virus, which has spent much more time in the human population, has

  15. Tissue Restricted Splice Junctions Originate Not Only from Tissue-Specific Gene Loci, but Gene Loci with a Broad Pattern of Expression.

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    Matthew S Hestand

    Full Text Available Cellular mechanisms that achieve protein diversity in eukaryotes are multifaceted, including transcriptional components such as RNA splicing. Through alternative splicing, a single protein-coding gene can generate multiple mRNA transcripts and protein isoforms, some of which are tissue-specific. We have conducted qualitative and quantitative analyses of the Bodymap 2.0 messenger RNA-sequencing data from 16 human tissue samples and identified 209,363 splice junctions. Of these, 22,231 (10.6% were not previously annotated and 21,650 (10.3% were expressed in a tissue-restricted pattern. Tissue-restricted alternative splicing was found to be widespread, with approximately 65% of expressed multi-exon genes containing at least one tissue-specific splice junction. Interestingly, we observed many tissue-specific splice junctions not only in genes expressed in one or a few tissues, but also from gene loci with a broad pattern of expression.

  16. A strategy for full interrogation of prognostic gene expression patterns: exploring the biology of diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

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    Lisa M Rimsza

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiling yields quantitative data on gene expression used to create prognostic models that accurately predict patient outcome in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL. Often, data are analyzed with genes classified by whether they fall above or below the median expression level. We sought to determine whether examining multiple cut-points might be a more powerful technique to investigate the association of gene expression with outcome.We explored gene expression profiling data using variable cut-point analysis for 36 genes with reported prognostic value in DLBCL. We plotted two-group survival logrank test statistics against corresponding cut-points of the gene expression levels and smooth estimates of the hazard ratio of death versus gene expression levels. To facilitate comparisons we also standardized the expression of each of the genes by the fraction of patients that would be identified by any cut-point. A multiple comparison adjusted permutation p-value identified 3 different patterns of significance: 1 genes with significant cut-point points below the median, whose loss is associated with poor outcome (e.g. HLA-DR; 2 genes with significant cut-points above the median, whose over-expression is associated with poor outcome (e.g. CCND2; and 3 genes with significant cut-points on either side of the median, (e.g. extracellular molecules such as FN1.Variable cut-point analysis with permutation p-value calculation can be used to identify significant genes that would not otherwise be identified with median cut-points and may suggest biological patterns of gene effects.

  17. Rootstock-regulated gene expression patterns associated with fire blight resistance in apple

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    Jensen Philip J

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Desirable apple varieties are clonally propagated by grafting vegetative scions onto rootstocks. Rootstocks influence many phenotypic traits of the scion, including resistance to pathogens such as Erwinia amylovora, which causes fire blight, the most serious bacterial disease of apple. The purpose of the present study was to quantify rootstock-mediated differences in scion fire blight susceptibility and to identify transcripts in the scion whose expression levels correlated with this response. Results Rootstock influence on scion fire blight resistance was quantified by inoculating three-year old, orchard-grown apple trees, consisting of 'Gala' scions grafted to a range of rootstocks, with E. amylovora. Disease severity was measured by the extent of shoot necrosis over time. 'Gala' scions grafted to G.30 or MM.111 rootstocks showed the lowest rates of necrosis, while 'Gala' on M.27 and B.9 showed the highest rates of necrosis. 'Gala' scions on M.7, S.4 or M.9F56 had intermediate necrosis rates. Using an apple DNA microarray representing 55,230 unique transcripts, gene expression patterns were compared in healthy, un-inoculated, greenhouse-grown 'Gala' scions on the same series of rootstocks. We identified 690 transcripts whose steady-state expression levels correlated with the degree of fire blight susceptibility of the scion/rootstock combinations. Transcripts known to be differentially expressed during E. amylovora infection were disproportionately represented among these transcripts. A second-generation apple microarray representing 26,000 transcripts was developed and was used to test these correlations in an orchard-grown population of trees segregating for fire blight resistance. Of the 690 transcripts originally identified using the first-generation array, 39 had expression levels that correlated with fire blight resistance in the breeding population. Conclusions Rootstocks had significant effects on the fire blight

  18. Rootstock-regulated gene expression patterns associated with fire blight resistance in apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Philip J; Halbrendt, Noemi; Fazio, Gennaro; Makalowska, Izabela; Altman, Naomi; Praul, Craig; Maximova, Siela N; Ngugi, Henry K; Crassweller, Robert M; Travis, James W; McNellis, Timothy W

    2012-01-09

    Desirable apple varieties are clonally propagated by grafting vegetative scions onto rootstocks. Rootstocks influence many phenotypic traits of the scion, including resistance to pathogens such as Erwinia amylovora, which causes fire blight, the most serious bacterial disease of apple. The purpose of the present study was to quantify rootstock-mediated differences in scion fire blight susceptibility and to identify transcripts in the scion whose expression levels correlated with this response. Rootstock influence on scion fire blight resistance was quantified by inoculating three-year old, orchard-grown apple trees, consisting of 'Gala' scions grafted to a range of rootstocks, with E. amylovora. Disease severity was measured by the extent of shoot necrosis over time. 'Gala' scions grafted to G.30 or MM.111 rootstocks showed the lowest rates of necrosis, while 'Gala' on M.27 and B.9 showed the highest rates of necrosis. 'Gala' scions on M.7, S.4 or M.9F56 had intermediate necrosis rates. Using an apple DNA microarray representing 55,230 unique transcripts, gene expression patterns were compared in healthy, un-inoculated, greenhouse-grown 'Gala' scions on the same series of rootstocks. We identified 690 transcripts whose steady-state expression levels correlated with the degree of fire blight susceptibility of the scion/rootstock combinations. Transcripts known to be differentially expressed during E. amylovora infection were disproportionately represented among these transcripts. A second-generation apple microarray representing 26,000 transcripts was developed and was used to test these correlations in an orchard-grown population of trees segregating for fire blight resistance. Of the 690 transcripts originally identified using the first-generation array, 39 had expression levels that correlated with fire blight resistance in the breeding population. Rootstocks had significant effects on the fire blight susceptibility of 'Gala' scions, and rootstock-regulated gene

  19. THE ABERRANT PROMOTER HYPERMETHYLATION PATTERN OF THE ANTI - ANGIOGENIC TSP1 GENE IN EPITHELIAL OVARIAN CARCINOMA: AN INDIAN STUDY

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    Ramesh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The promoter hypermethylation patterns of Thrombospodin - 1 gene in 50 EOC patients were studied and the methylation pattern was correlated with various clinic pathological parameters. METHODS: The promoter hypermethylation pattern of the TSP - 1 gene was assessed using nested PCR and Methylation specific PCR. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: All the available data was statistically analyzed using the Chi square test or Fisher Exact Test on the SPSS software version 22.0 and a value <0.0 5 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Forty of the fifty ovarian carcinoma samples reported positive for methylation corresponding to a methylation frequency of 80%. A methylation frequency of 89.2%, 83.3% and 42.8% was observed in malignant , Low malignant potential (borderline and benign sample cohorts. CONCLUSION: From the results drawn from this study, it clearly shows that the anti angiogenic protein TSP - 1 is extensively hypermethylated in ovarian carcinoma and that it accumulates over t he progression of the disease from benign to malignant. As previous reports suggest that there is no evidence of mutation of this gene, promoter hypermethylation may be a crucial factor for the down regulation of the gene. Further by clubbing together the promoter hypermethylation pattern of TSP - 1 gene with hypermethylation patterns of other TSG may provide a better insight into the application of using methylation profiles of TSG as a biomarker in the detection of ovarian carcinoma.

  20. Identification of unique cis-element pattern on simulated microgravity treated Arabidopsis by in silico and gene expression

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    Soh, Hyuncheol; Choi, Yongsang; Lee, Taek-Kyun; Yeo, Up-Dong; Han, Kyeongsik; Auh, Chungkyun; Lee, Sukchan

    2012-08-01

    Arabidopsis gene expression microarray (44 K) was used to detect genes highly induced under simulated microgravity stress (SMS). Ten SMS-inducible genes were selected from the microarray data and these 10 genes were found to be abundantly expressed in 3-week-old plants. Nine out of the 10 SMS-inducible genes were also expressed in response to the three abiotic stresses of drought, touch, and wounding in 3-week-old Arabidopsis plants respectively. However, WRKY46 was elevated only in response to SMS. Six other WRKY genes did not respond to SMS. To clarify the characteristics of the genes expressed at high levels in response to SMS, 20 cis-elements in the promoters of the 40 selected genes including the 10 SMS-inducible genes, the 6 WRKY genes, and abiotic stress-inducible genes were analyzed and their spatial positions on each promoter were determined. Four cis-elements (M/T-G-T-P from MYB1AT or TATABOX5, GT1CONSENSUS, TATABOX5, and POLASIG1) showed a unique spatial arrangement in most SMS-inducible genes including WRKY46. Therefore the M/T-G-T-P cis-element patterns identified in the promoter of WRKY46 may play important roles in regulating gene expression in response to SMS. The presences of the cis-element patterns suggest that the order or spatial positioning of certain groups of cis-elements is more important than the existence or numbers of specific cis-elements. Taken together, our data indicate that WRKY46 is a novel SMS inducible transcription factor and the unique spatial arrangement of cis-elements shown in WRKY46 promoter may play an important role for its response to SMS.

  1. Identification of novel motif patterns to decipher the promoter architecture of co-expressed genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    López, Yosvany; Patil, Ashwini; Nakai, Kenta

    2013-10-16

    The understanding of the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation remains a challenge for molecular biologists in the post-genome era. It is hypothesized that the regulatory regions of genes expressed in the same tissue or cell type share a similar structure. Though several studies have analyzed the promoters of genes expressed in specific metazoan tissues or cells, little research has been done in plants. Hence finding specific patterns of motifs to explain the promoter architecture of co-expressed genes in plants could shed light on their transcription mechanism. We identified novel patterns of sets of motifs in promoters of genes co-expressed in four different plant structures (PSs) and in the entire plant in Arabidopsis thaliana. Sets of genes expressed in four PSs (flower, seed, root, shoot) and housekeeping genes expressed in the entire plant were taken from a database of co-expressed genes in A. thaliana. PS-specific motifs were predicted using three motif-discovery algorithms, 8 of which are novel, to the best of our knowledge. A support vector machine was trained using the average upstream distance of the identified motifs from the translation start site on both strands of binding sites. The correctly classified promoters per PS were used to construct specific patterns of sets of motifs to describe the promoter architecture of those co-expressed genes. The discovered PS-specific patterns were tested in the entire A. thaliana genome, correctly identifying 77.8%, 81.2%, 70.8% and 53.7% genes expressed in petal differentiation, synergid cells, root hair and trichome, as well as 88.4% housekeeping genes. We present five patterns of sets of motifs which describe the promoter architecture of co-expressed genes in five PSs with the ability to predict them from the entire A. thaliana genome. Based on these findings, we conclude that the positioning and orientation of transcription factor binding sites at specific distances from the translation start site is a

  2. Sox genes in the coral Acropora millepora: divergent expression patterns reflect differences in developmental mechanisms within the Anthozoa.

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    Shinzato, Chuya; Iguchi, Akira; Hayward, David C; Technau, Ulrich; Ball, Eldon E; Miller, David J

    2008-11-12

    Sox genes encode transcription factors that function in a wide range of developmental processes across the animal kingdom. To better understand both the evolution of the Sox family and the roles of these genes in cnidarians, we are studying the Sox gene complement of the coral, Acropora millepora (Class Anthozoa). Based on overall domain structures and HMG box sequences, the Acropora Sox genes considered here clearly fall into four of the five major Sox classes. AmSoxC is expressed in the ectoderm during development, in cells whose morphology is consistent with their assignment as sensory neurons. The expression pattern of the Nematostella ortholog of this gene is broadly similar to that of AmSoxC, but there are subtle differences--for example, expression begins significantly earlier in Acropora than in Nematostella. During gastrulation, AmSoxBb and AmSoxB1 transcripts are detected only in the presumptive ectoderm while AmSoxE1 transcription is restricted to the presumptive endoderm, suggesting that these Sox genes might play roles in germ layer specification. A third type B Sox gene, AmSoxBa, and a Sox F gene AmSoxF also have complex and specific expression patterns during early development. Each of these genes has a clear Nematostella ortholog, but in several cases the expression pattern observed in Acropora differs significantly from that reported in Nematostella. These differences in expression patterns between Acropora and Nematostella largely reflect fundamental differences in developmental processes, underscoring the diversity of mechanisms within the anthozoan Sub-Class Hexacorallia (Zoantharia).

  3. Sox genes in the coral Acropora millepora: divergent expression patterns reflect differences in developmental mechanisms within the Anthozoa

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    Technau Ulrich

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sox genes encode transcription factors that function in a wide range of developmental processes across the animal kingdom. To better understand both the evolution of the Sox family and the roles of these genes in cnidarians, we are studying the Sox gene complement of the coral, Acropora millepora (Class Anthozoa. Results Based on overall domain structures and HMG box sequences, the Acropora Sox genes considered here clearly fall into four of the five major Sox classes. AmSoxC is expressed in the ectoderm during development, in cells whose morphology is consistent with their assignment as sensory neurons. The expression pattern of the Nematostella ortholog of this gene is broadly similar to that of AmSoxC, but there are subtle differences – for example, expression begins significantly earlier in Acropora than in Nematostella. During gastrulation, AmSoxBb and AmSoxB1 transcripts are detected only in the presumptive ectoderm while AmSoxE1 transcription is restricted to the presumptive endoderm, suggesting that these Sox genes might play roles in germ layer specification. A third type B Sox gene, AmSoxBa, and a Sox F gene AmSoxF also have complex and specific expression patterns during early development. Each of these genes has a clear Nematostella ortholog, but in several cases the expression pattern observed in Acropora differs significantly from that reported in Nematostella. Conclusion These differences in expression patterns between Acropora and Nematostella largely reflect fundamental differences in developmental processes, underscoring the diversity of mechanisms within the anthozoan Sub-Class Hexacorallia (Zoantharia.

  4. Associations between dietary patterns and gene expression profiles of healthy men and women: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Diet regulates gene expression profiles by several mechanisms. The objective of this study was to examine gene expression in relation with dietary patterns. Methods Two hundred and fifty four participants from the greater Quebec City metropolitan area were recruited. Two hundred and ten participants completed the study protocol. Dietary patterns were derived from a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) by factor analysis. For 30 participants (in fasting state), RNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and expression levels of 47,231 mRNA transcripts were assessed using the Illumina Human-6 v3 Expression BeadChips®. Microarray data was pre-processed with Flexarray software and analysed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Results Two dietary patterns were identified. The Prudent dietary pattern was characterised by high intakes of vegetables, fruits, whole grain products and low intakes of refined grain products and the Western dietary pattern, by high intakes of refined grain products, desserts, sweets and processed meats. When individuals with high scores for the Prudent dietary pattern where compared to individuals with low scores, 2,083 transcripts were differentially expressed in men, 1,136 transcripts in women and 59 transcripts were overlapping in men and women. For the Western dietary pattern, 1,021 transcripts were differentially expressed in men with high versus low scores, 1,163 transcripts in women and 23 transcripts were overlapping in men and women. IPA reveals that genes differentially expressed for both patterns were present in networks related to the immune and/or inflammatory response, cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Conclusion Gene expression profiles were different according to dietary patterns, which probably modulate the risk of chronic diseases. Trial Registration NCT: NCT01343342 PMID:23398686

  5. Associations between dietary patterns and gene expression profiles of healthy men and women: a cross-sectional study.

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    Bouchard-Mercier, Annie; Paradis, Ann-Marie; Rudkowska, Iwona; Lemieux, Simone; Couture, Patrick; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2013-02-12

    Diet regulates gene expression profiles by several mechanisms. The objective of this study was to examine gene expression in relation with dietary patterns. Two hundred and fifty four participants from the greater Quebec City metropolitan area were recruited. Two hundred and ten participants completed the study protocol. Dietary patterns were derived from a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) by factor analysis. For 30 participants (in fasting state), RNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and expression levels of 47,231 mRNA transcripts were assessed using the Illumina Human-6 v3 Expression BeadChips®. Microarray data was pre-processed with Flexarray software and analysed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Two dietary patterns were identified. The Prudent dietary pattern was characterised by high intakes of vegetables, fruits, whole grain products and low intakes of refined grain products and the Western dietary pattern, by high intakes of refined grain products, desserts, sweets and processed meats. When individuals with high scores for the Prudent dietary pattern where compared to individuals with low scores, 2,083 transcripts were differentially expressed in men, 1,136 transcripts in women and 59 transcripts were overlapping in men and women. For the Western dietary pattern, 1,021 transcripts were differentially expressed in men with high versus low scores, 1,163 transcripts in women and 23 transcripts were overlapping in men and women. IPA reveals that genes differentially expressed for both patterns were present in networks related to the immune and/or inflammatory response, cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Gene expression profiles were different according to dietary patterns, which probably modulate the risk of chronic diseases. NCT: NCT01343342.

  6. Expression Pattern of a Homeotic Gene, HOXA5, in Normal Breast and in Breast Tumors

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    Gregory S. Henderson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Homeotic (HOX gene products are now known to be functionally associated with breast cancer biogenesis. Recent evidence has indicated that HOXA5 regulates both p53 and progesterone receptor expression levels in breast cancer cells. In addition, HOXA5 has been shown to interact and regulate the activity of another protein referred to as Twist. As homeotic genes play a pivotal role in development, we sought to decipher the expression pattern in both normal breast tissues and in breast carcinomas. Methods: RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry were performed, to assay the levels of HOXA5 expression, on a panel of normal breast tissue and its corresponding primary breast tumors. Results and Conclusions: We show that HOXA5 expression was maintained at stable levels at different reproductive stages of a woman's life, except during lactation. This evidence indicates that HOXA5 may play a role in maintaining the differentiated state within the breast epithelium. However, nearly 70% of all breast carcinomas had decreased HOXA5 protein levels as compared to normal breast tissues. In addition, we demonstrate that HOXA5 protein expression levels in breast carcinomas inversely co-relates with Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR expression. Furthermore, we found that the survival rate amongst the different low levels of HOXA5 expressing breast tumors was not significant, indicative of an early tumorigenesis process in the absence of innate levels of HOXA5 in normal breast cells.

  7. Transcriptomics reveal several gene expression patterns in the piezophile Desulfovibrio hydrothermalis in response to hydrostatic pressure.

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    Amira Amrani

    Full Text Available RNA-seq was used to study the response of Desulfovibrio hydrothermalis, isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal chimney on the East-Pacific Rise at a depth of 2,600 m, to various hydrostatic pressure growth conditions. The transcriptomic datasets obtained after growth at 26, 10 and 0.1 MPa identified only 65 differentially expressed genes that were distributed among four main categories: aromatic amino acid and glutamate metabolisms, energy metabolism, signal transduction, and unknown function. The gene expression patterns suggest that D. hydrothermalis uses at least three different adaptation mechanisms, according to a hydrostatic pressure threshold (HPt that was estimated to be above 10 MPa. Both glutamate and energy metabolism were found to play crucial roles in these mechanisms. Quantitation of the glutamate levels in cells revealed its accumulation at high hydrostatic pressure, suggesting its role as a piezolyte. ATP measurements showed that the energy metabolism of this bacterium is optimized for deep-sea life conditions. This study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms linked to hydrostatic pressure adaptation in sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  8. Gene Expression Patterns Underlying the Reinstatement of Plasticity in the Adult Visual System

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    Ettore Tiraboschi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The nervous system is highly sensitive to experience during early postnatal life, but this phase of heightened plasticity decreases with age. Recent studies have demonstrated that developmental-like plasticity can be reactivated in the visual cortex of adult animals through environmental or pharmacological manipulations. These findings provide a unique opportunity to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms of adult plasticity. Here we used the monocular deprivation paradigm to investigate large-scale gene expression patterns underlying the reinstatement of plasticity produced by fluoxetine in the adult rat visual cortex. We found changes, confirmed with RT-PCRs, in gene expression in different biological themes, such as chromatin structure remodelling, transcription factors, molecules involved in synaptic plasticity, extracellular matrix, and excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. Our findings reveal a key role for several molecules such as the metalloproteases Mmp2 and Mmp9 or the glycoprotein Reelin and open up new insights into the mechanisms underlying the reopening of the critical periods in the adult brain.

  9. Ditch network sustains functional connectivity and influences patterns of gene flow in an intensive agricultural landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre-Bac, L; Mony, C; Ernoult, A; Burel, F; Arnaud, J-F

    2016-02-01

    In intensive agricultural landscapes, plant species previously relying on semi-natural habitats may persist as metapopulations within landscape linear elements. Maintenance of populations' connectivity through pollen and seed dispersal is a key factor in species persistence in the face of substantial habitat loss. The goals of this study were to investigate the potential corridor role of ditches and to identify the landscape components that significantly impact patterns of gene flow among remnant populations. Using microsatellite loci, we explored the spatial genetic structure of two hydrochorous wetland plants exhibiting contrasting local abundance and different habitat requirements: the rare and regionally protected Oenanthe aquatica and the more commonly distributed Lycopus europaeus, in an 83 km(2) agricultural lowland located in northern France. Both species exhibited a significant spatial genetic structure, along with substantial levels of genetic differentiation, especially for L. europaeus, which also expressed high levels of inbreeding. Isolation-by-distance analysis revealed enhanced gene flow along ditches, indicating their key role in effective seed and pollen dispersal. Our data also suggested that the configuration of the ditch network and the landscape elements significantly affected population genetic structure, with (i) species-specific scale effects on the genetic neighborhood and (ii) detrimental impact of human ditch management on genetic diversity, especially for O. aquatica. Altogether, these findings highlighted the key role of ditches in the maintenance of plant biodiversity in intensive agricultural landscapes with few remnant wetland habitats.

  10. Functional redundancy of EGF-CFC genes in epiblast and extraembryonic patterning during early mouse embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jianhua; Shen, Michael M

    2010-06-01

    During early mouse embryogenesis, multiple patterning and differentiation events require the activity of Nodal, a ligand of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) family. Although Nodal signaling is known to require activity of EGF-CFC co-receptors in many contexts, it has been unclear whether all Nodal signaling in the early mouse embryo is EGF-CFC dependent. We have investigated the double null mutant phenotypes for the EGF-CFC genes Cripto and Cryptic, which encode co-receptors for Nodal, and have found that they have partially redundant functions in early mouse development. Expression of Cripto and Cryptic is non-overlapping prior to gastrulation, since Cripto is expressed solely in the epiblast whereas Cryptic is expressed in the primitive endoderm of the late blastocyst and the visceral endoderm after implantation. Despite these non-overlapping expression patterns, Cripto; Cryptic double mutants display severe defects in epiblast, extraembryonic ectoderm, and anterior visceral endoderm (AVE), resulting in phenotypes that are highly similar to those of Nodal null mutants. Our results indicate that both Cripto and Cryptic function non-cell-autonomously during normal development, and that most if not all Nodal activity in early mouse embryogenesis is EGF-CFC-dependent. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Immune-Related Gene Expression Patterns in GPV- or H9N2-Infected Goose Spleens

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    Shun Chen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Goose parvovirus (GPV and avian influenza virus subtype H9N2 are single-stranded DNA (ssDNA and single-stranded RNA (ssRNA viruses, respectively, both of which can spread in goslings and cause a significant economic loss. To explore the comprehensive transcriptome of GPV- or H9N2-infected goose spleens and to understand the immune responses induced by a DNA virus (GPV or a RNA virus (H9N2, RNA-seq was performed on the spleens of goslings at the fifth day post infection. In the present study, 2604 and 2409 differentially expressed unigenes were identified in the GPV- and H9N2-infected groups, respectively. Through KEGG pathway enrichment analyses, the up-regulated transcripts in the two virus-infected groups were mainly involved in immune-related pathways. In addition, the two virus-infected groups displayed similar expression patterns in the immune response pathways, including pattern-recognition receptor signaling pathways, the antigen processing and presentation pathway, the NF-κB signaling pathway and the JAK-STAT signaling pathway, as well as cytokines. Furthermore, most of the immune-related genes, particularly TLR7, TRAF3, Mx, TRIM25, CD4, and CD8α, increased in response to GPV and H9N2 infection. However, the depression of NF-κB signaling may be a mechanism by which the viruses evade the host immune system or a strategy to achieve immune homeostasis.

  12. Pattern and timing of diversification of the mammalian order Carnivora inferred from multiple nuclear gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eizirik, Eduardo; Murphy, William J; Koepfli, Klaus-Peter; Johnson, Warren E; Dragoo, Jerry W; Wayne, Robert K; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2010-07-01

    The mammalian order Carnivora has attracted the attention of scientists of various disciplines for decades, leading to intense interest in defining its supra-familial relationships. In the last few years, major changes to the topological structure of the carnivoran tree have been proposed and supported by various molecular data sets, radically changing the traditional view of family composition in this order. Although a sequence of molecular studies have established a growing consensus with respect to most inter-familial relationships, no analysis so far has included all carnivoran lineages (both feliform and caniform) in an integrated data set, so as to determine comparative patterns of diversification. Moreover, no study conducted thus far has estimated divergence dates among all carnivoran families, which is an important requirement in the attempt to understand the patterns and tempo of diversification in this group. In this study, we have investigated the phylogenetic relationships among carnivoran families, and performed molecular dating analyses of the inferred nodes. We assembled a molecular supermatrix containing 14 genes (7765 bp), most of which have not been previously used in supra-familial carnivoran phylogenetics, for 50 different genera representing all carnivoran families. Analysis of this data set led to consistent and robust resolution of all supra-familial nodes in the carnivoran tree, and allowed the construction of a molecular timescale for the evolution of this mammalian order. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Evolutionary pattern of mutation in the factor IX genes of great apes: How does it compare to the pattern of recent germline mutation in patients with hemophilia B?

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    Grouse, L.H.; Ketterling, R.P.; Sommer, S.S. [Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Most mutations causing hemophilia B have arisen within the past 150 years. By correcting for multiple biases, the underlying rates of spontaneous germline mutation have been estimated in the factor IX gene. From these rates, an underlying pattern of mutation has emerged. To determine if this pattern compares to a underlying pattern found in the great apes, sequence changes were determined in intronic regions of the factor IX gene. The following species were studied: Gorilla gorilla, Pan troglodytes (chimpanzee), Pongo pygmacus (orangutan) and Homo sapiens. Intronic sequences at least 200 bp from a splice junction were randomly chosen, amplified by cross-species PCR, and sequenced. These regions are expected to be subject to little if any selective pressure. Early diverged species of Old World monkeys were also studied to help determine the direction of mutational changes. A total of 62 sequence changes were observed. Initial data suggest that the average pattern since evolution of the great apes has a paucity of transitions at CpG dinucleotides and an excess of microinsertions to microdeletions when compared to the pattern observed in humans during the past 150 years (p<.05). A larger study is in progress to confirm these results.

  14. Expression patterns of genes involved in sugar metabolism and accumulation during apple fruit development.

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    Mingjun Li

    Full Text Available Both sorbitol and sucrose are imported into apple fruit from leaves. The metabolism of sorbitol and sucrose fuels fruit growth and development, and accumulation of sugars in fruit is central to the edible quality of apple. However, our understanding of the mechanisms controlling sugar metabolism and accumulation in apple remains quite limited. We identified members of various gene families encoding key enzymes or transporters involved in sugar metabolism and accumulation in apple fruit using homology searches and comparison of their expression patterns in different tissues, and analyzed the relationship of their transcripts with enzyme activities and sugar accumulation during fruit development. At the early stage of fruit development, the transcript levels of sorbitol dehydrogenase, cell wall invertase, neutral invertase, sucrose synthase, fructokinase and hexokinase are high, and the resulting high enzyme activities are responsible for the rapid utilization of the imported sorbitol and sucrose for fruit growth, with low levels of sugar accumulation. As the fruit continues to grow due to cell expansion, the transcript levels and activities of these enzymes are down-regulated, with concomitant accumulation of fructose and elevated transcript levels of tonoplast monosaccharide transporters (TMTs, MdTMT1 and MdTMT2; the excess carbon is converted into starch. At the late stage of fruit development, sucrose accumulation is enhanced, consistent with the elevated expression of sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS, MdSPS5 and MdSPS6, and an increase in its total activity. Our data indicate that sugar metabolism and accumulation in apple fruit is developmentally regulated. This represents a comprehensive analysis of the genes involved in sugar metabolism and accumulation in apple, which will serve as a platform for further studies on the functions of these genes and subsequent manipulation of sugar metabolism and fruit quality traits related to carbohydrates.

  15. Patterns of gene expression in atrophying skeletal muscles: response to food deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagoe, R. Thomas; Lecker, Stewart H.; Gomes, Marcelo; Goldberg, Alfred L.

    2002-01-01

    During fasting and many systemic diseases, muscle undergoes rapid loss of protein and functional capacity. To define the transcriptional changes triggering muscle atrophy and energy conservation in fasting, we used cDNA microarrays to compare mRNAs from muscles of control and food-deprived mice. Expression of >94% of genes did not change, but interesting patterns emerged among genes that were differentially expressed: 1) mRNAs encoding polyubiquitin, ubiquitin extension proteins, and many (but not all) proteasome subunits increased, which presumably contributes to accelerated protein breakdown; 2) a dramatic increase in mRNA for the ubiquitin ligase, atrogin-1, but not most E3s; 3) a significant suppression of mRNA for myosin binding protein H (but not other myofibrillar proteins) and IGF binding protein 5, which may favor cell protein loss; 4) decreases in mRNAs for several glycolytic enzymes and phosphorylase kinase subunits, and dramatic increases in mRNAs for pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 and glutamine synthase, which should promote glucose sparing and gluconeogenesis. During fasting, metallothionein mRNA increased dramatically, mRNAs for extracellular matrix components fell, and mRNAs that may favor cap-independent mRNA translation rose. Significant changes occurred in mRNAs for many growth-related proteins and transcriptional regulators. These transcriptional changes indicate a complex adaptive program that should favor protein degradation and suppress glucose oxidation in muscle. Similar analysis of muscles atrophying for other causes is allowing us to identify a set of atrophy-specific changes in gene expression.

  16. Evolutionary patterns of codon usage in the chloroplast gene rbcL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Dennis P; Herbeck, Joshua T

    2003-06-01

    In this study we reconstruct the evolution of codon usage bias in the chloroplast gene rbcL using a phylogeny of 92 green-plant taxa. We employ a measure of codon usage bias that accounts for chloroplast genomic nucleotide content, as an attempt to limit plausible explanations for patterns of codon bias evolution to selection- or drift-based processes. This measure uses maximum likelihood-ratio tests to compare the performance of two models, one in which a single codon is overrepresented and one in which two codons are overrepresented. The measure allowed us to analyze both the extent of bias in each lineage and the evolution of codon choice across the phylogeny. Despite predictions based primarily on the low G + C content of the chloroplast and the high functional importance of rbcL, we found large differences in the extent of bias, suggesting differential molecular selection that is clade specific. The seed plants and simple leafy liverworts each independently derived a low level of bias in rbcL, perhaps indicating relaxed selectional constraint on molecular changes in the gene. Overrepresentation of a single codon was typically plesiomorphic, and transitions to overrepresentation of two codons occurred commonly across the phylogeny, possibly indicating biochemical selection. The total codon bias in each taxon, when regressed against the total bias of each amino acid, suggested that twofold amino acids play a strong role in inflating the level of codon usage bias in rbcL, despite the fact that twofolds compose a minority of residues in this gene. Those amino acids that contributed most to the total codon usage bias of each taxon are known through amino acid knockout and replacement to be of high functional importance. This suggests that codon usage bias may be constrained by particular amino acids and, thus, may serve as a good predictor of what residues are most important for protein fitness.

  17. Expression patterns of genes involved in sugar metabolism and accumulation during apple fruit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingjun; Feng, Fengjuan; Cheng, Lailiang

    2012-01-01

    Both sorbitol and sucrose are imported into apple fruit from leaves. The metabolism of sorbitol and sucrose fuels fruit growth and development, and accumulation of sugars in fruit is central to the edible quality of apple. However, our understanding of the mechanisms controlling sugar metabolism and accumulation in apple remains quite limited. We identified members of various gene families encoding key enzymes or transporters involved in sugar metabolism and accumulation in apple fruit using homology searches and comparison of their expression patterns in different tissues, and analyzed the relationship of their transcripts with enzyme activities and sugar accumulation during fruit development. At the early stage of fruit development, the transcript levels of sorbitol dehydrogenase, cell wall invertase, neutral invertase, sucrose synthase, fructokinase and hexokinase are high, and the resulting high enzyme activities are responsible for the rapid utilization of the imported sorbitol and sucrose for fruit growth, with low levels of sugar accumulation. As the fruit continues to grow due to cell expansion, the transcript levels and activities of these enzymes are down-regulated, with concomitant accumulation of fructose and elevated transcript levels of tonoplast monosaccharide transporters (TMTs), MdTMT1 and MdTMT2; the excess carbon is converted into starch. At the late stage of fruit development, sucrose accumulation is enhanced, consistent with the elevated expression of sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS), MdSPS5 and MdSPS6, and an increase in its total activity. Our data indicate that sugar metabolism and accumulation in apple fruit is developmentally regulated. This represents a comprehensive analysis of the genes involved in sugar metabolism and accumulation in apple, which will serve as a platform for further studies on the functions of these genes and subsequent manipulation of sugar metabolism and fruit quality traits related to carbohydrates.

  18. Gene expression patterns specific to the regenerating limb of the Mexican axolotl

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    James R. Monaghan

    2012-07-01

    Salamander limb regeneration is dependent upon tissue interactions that are local to the amputation site. Communication among limb epidermis, peripheral nerves, and mesenchyme coordinate cell migration, cell proliferation, and tissue patterning to generate a blastema, which will form missing limb structures. An outstanding question is how cross-talk between these tissues gives rise to the regeneration blastema. To identify genes associated with epidermis-nerve-mesenchymal interactions during limb regeneration, we examined histological and transcriptional changes during the first week following injury in the wound epidermis and subjacent cells between three injury types; 1 a flank wound on the side of the animal that will not regenerate a limb, 2 a denervated limb that will not regenerate a limb, and 3 an innervated limb that will regenerate a limb. Early, histological and transcriptional changes were similar between the injury types, presumably because a common wound-healing program is employed across anatomical locations. However, some transcripts were enriched in limbs compared to the flank and are associated with vertebrate limb development. Many of these genes were activated before blastema outgrowth and expressed in specific tissue types including the epidermis, peripheral nerve, and mesenchyme. We also identified a relatively small group of transcripts that were more highly expressed in innervated limbs versus denervated limbs. These transcripts encode for proteins involved in myelination of peripheral nerves, epidermal cell function, and proliferation of mesenchymal cells. Overall, our study identifies limb-specific and nerve-dependent genes that are upstream of regenerative growth, and thus promising candidates for the regulation of blastema formation.

  19. Cloning, chromosome mapping and expression pattern of porcine PLIN and M6PRBP1 genes

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    Yang Zaiqing

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The PAT proteins, named after the three PLIN/ADRP/TIP47 (PAT proteins, PLIN for perilipin, ADRP for adipose differentiation-related protein and TIP47 for tail-interacting protein of 47 kDa, now officially named M6PRBP1 for mannose-6-phosphate receptor binding protein 1, is a set of intracellular lipid droplet binding proteins. They are localized in the outer membrane monolayer enveloping lipid droplets and are involved in the metabolism of intracellular lipid. This work describes the cloning and sequencing of porcine PLIN and M6PRBP1 cDNAs, the chromosome mapping of these two genes, as well as the expression pattern of porcine PAT genes. Sequence analysis shows that the porcine PLIN cDNA contains an open reading frame of 1551 bp encoding 516 amino acids and that the porcine M6PRBP1 cDNA contains a coding region of 1320 bp encoding 439 amino acids. Comparison of PLIN and M6PRBP1 amino-acid sequences among various species reveals that porcine and bovine proteins are the most conserved. Porcine PLIN and M6PRBP1 genes have been mapped to pig chromosomes 7 and 2, respectively, by radiation hybrid analysis using the IMpRH panel. Expression analyses in pig showed a high expression of PLIN mRNA in adipose tissue, M6PRBP1 mRNA in small intestine, kidney and spleen and ADRP mRNA in adipose tissue, lung and spleen.

  20. Global transcription analysis of Krebs tricarboxylic acid cycle mutants reveals an alternating pattern of gene expression and effects on hypoxic and oxidative genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCammon, Mark T; Epstein, Charles B; Przybyla-Zawislak, Beata; McAlister-Henn, Lee; Butow, Ronald A

    2003-03-01

    To understand the many roles of the Krebs tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in cell function, we used DNA microarrays to examine gene expression in response to TCA cycle dysfunction. mRNA was analyzed from yeast strains harboring defects in each of 15 genes that encode subunits of the eight TCA cycle enzymes. The expression of >400 genes changed at least threefold in response to TCA cycle dysfunction. Many genes displayed a common response to TCA cycle dysfunction indicative of a shift away from oxidative metabolism. Another set of genes displayed a pairwise, alternating pattern of expression in response to contiguous TCA cycle enzyme defects: expression was elevated in aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase mutants, diminished in alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and succinyl-CoA ligase mutants, elevated again in succinate dehydrogenase and fumarase mutants, and diminished again in malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase mutants. This pattern correlated with previously defined TCA cycle growth-enhancing mutations and suggested a novel metabolic signaling pathway monitoring TCA cycle function. Expression of hypoxic/anaerobic genes was elevated in alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase mutants, whereas expression of oxidative genes was diminished, consistent with a heme signaling defect caused by inadequate levels of the heme precursor, succinyl-CoA. These studies have revealed extensive responses to changes in TCA cycle function and have uncovered new and unexpected metabolic networks that are wired into the TCA cycle.

  1. Mitochondrial genome of Thais clavigera (Mollusca: Gastropoda): affirmation of the conserved, ancestral gene pattern within the mollusks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, Jang-Seu; Lee, Young-Mi; Jung, Sang-Oun; Horiguchi, Toshihiro; Cho, Hyeon-Seo; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2010-03-01

    Class Gastropoda includes a large number of described species, many with extensively rearranged mitochondrial genomes. We sequenced the mitogenome of the rock shell, Thais clavigera (Gastropoda: Muricidae), an intertidal snail, using long PCR with primers designed on the basis of expressed sequence tags. The mitogenome of T. clavigera consists of 2 rRNAs, 22 tRNAs, and 13 protein-coding genes, but no control region. Structural comparisons revealed that the order Sorbeoconcha, including T. clavigera, have nearly identical mitochondrial gene patterns. However, they have an inversion between a tRNA(Phe)-tRNA(Glu) cluster that comprises 21 genes, but most of the remaining structure is similar to the putative mollusk ground pattern. These findings will provide a better insight into mitochondrial gene rearrangement over the course of gastropod evolution. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. C-State: an interactive web app for simultaneous multi-gene visualization and comparative epigenetic pattern search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowpati, Divya Tej; Srivastava, Surabhi; Dhawan, Jyotsna; Mishra, Rakesh K

    2017-09-13

    Comparative epigenomic analysis across multiple genes presents a bottleneck for bench biologists working with NGS data. Despite the development of standardized peak analysis algorithms, the identification of novel epigenetic patterns and their visualization across gene subsets remains a challenge. We developed a fast and interactive web app, C-State (Chromatin-State), to query and plot chromatin landscapes across multiple loci and cell types. C-State has an interactive, JavaScript-based graphical user interface and runs locally in modern web browsers that are pre-installed on all computers, thus eliminating the need for cumbersome data transfer, pre-processing and prior programming knowledge. C-State is unique in its ability to extract and analyze multi-gene epigenetic information. It allows for powerful GUI-based pattern searching and visualization. We include a case study to demonstrate its potential for identifying user-defined epigenetic trends in context of gene expression profiles.

  3. Conservation and Expression Patterns Divergence of Ascorbic Acid d-mannose/l-galactose Pathway Genes in Brassica rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Weike; Ren, Jun; Li, Yan; Liu, Tongkun; Song, Xiaoming; Chen, Zhongwen; Huang, Zhinan; Hou, Xilin; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) participates in diverse biological processes, is regulated by multiple factors and is a potent antioxidant and cellular reductant. The D-Mannose/L-Galactose pathway is a major plant AsA biosynthetic pathway that is highly connected within biosynthetic networks, and generally conserved across plants. Previous work has shown that, although most genes of this pathway are expressed under standard growth conditions in Brassica rapa, some paralogs of these genes are not. We hypothesize that regulatory evolution in duplicate AsA pathway genes has occurred as an adaptation to environmental stressors, and that gene retention has been influenced by polyploidation events in Brassicas. To test these hypotheses, we explored the conservation of these genes in Brassicas and their expression patterns divergence in B. rapa. Similar retention and a high degree of gene sequence similarity were identified in B. rapa (A genome), B. oleracea (C genome) and B. napus (AC genome). However, the number of genes that encode the same type of enzymes varied among the three plant species. With the exception of GMP, which has nine genes, there were one to four genes that encoded the other enzymes. Moreover, we found that expression patterns divergence widely exists among these genes. (i) VTC2 and VTC5 are paralogous genes, but only VTC5 is influenced by FLC. (ii) Under light treatment, PMI1 co-regulates the AsA pool size with other D-Man/L-Gal pathway genes, whereas PMI2 is regulated only by darkness. (iii) Under NaCl, Cu(2+), MeJA and wounding stresses, most of the paralogs exhibit different expression patterns. Additionally, GME and GPP are the key regulatory enzymes that limit AsA biosynthesis in response to these treatments. In conclusion, our data support that the conservative and divergent expression patterns of D-Man/L-Gal pathway genes not only avoid AsA biosynthesis network instability but also allow B. rapa to better adapt to complex environments.

  4. Conservation and expression patterns divergence of ascorbic acid D-mannose/L-galactose pathway genes in Brassica rapa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weike eDuan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ascorbic acid (AsA participates in diverse biological processes, is regulated by multiple factors and is a potent antioxidant and cellular reductant. The D-mannose/L-galactose pathway is a major plant AsA biosynthetic pathway that is highly connected within biosynthetic networks, and generally conserved across plants. Previous work has shown that, although most genes of this pathway are expressed under standard growth conditions in Brassica rapa, some paralogs of these genes are not. We hypothesize that regulatory evolution in duplicate AsA pathway genes has occurred as an adaptation to environmental stressors, and that gene retention has been influenced by polyploidation events in Brassicas. To test these hypotheses, we explored the conservation of these genes in Brassicas and their expression patterns divergence in B. rapa. Similar retention and a high degree of gene sequence similarity were identified in B. rapa (A genome, Brassica oleracea (C genome and Brassica napus (AC genome. However, the number of genes that encode the same type of enzymes varied among the three plant species. With the exception of GMP, which has nine genes, there were one to four genes that encoded the other enzymes. Moreover, we found that expression patterns divergence widely exists among these genes. i VTC2 and VTC5 are paralogous genes, but only VTC5 is influenced by FLC. ii Under light treatment, PMI1 co-regulates the AsA pool size with other D-Man/L-Gal pathway genes, whereas PMI2 is regulated only by darkness. iii Under NaCl, Cu2+, MeJA and wounding stresses, most of the paralogs exhibit different expression patterns. Additionally, GME and GPP are the key regulatory enzymes that limit AsA biosynthesis in response to these treatments. In conclusion, our data support that the conservative and divergent expression patterns of D-Man/L-Gal pathway genes not only avoid AsA biosynthesis network instability but also allow B. rapa to better adapt to complex environments.

  5. The Vein Patterning 1 (VEP1 gene family laterally spread through an ecological network.

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    Rosa Tarrío

    Full Text Available Lateral gene transfer (LGT is a major evolutionary mechanism in prokaryotes. Knowledge about LGT--particularly, multicellular--eukaryotes has only recently started to accumulate. A widespread assumption sees the gene as the unit of LGT, largely because little is yet known about how LGT chances are affected by structural/functional features at the subgenic level. Here we trace the evolutionary trajectory of VEin Patterning 1, a novel gene family known to be essential for plant development and defense. At the subgenic level VEP1 encodes a dinucleotide-binding Rossmann-fold domain, in common with members of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR protein family. We found: i VEP1 likely originated in an aerobic, mesophilic and chemoorganotrophic α-proteobacterium, and was laterally propagated through nets of ecological interactions, including multiple LGTs between phylogenetically distant green plant/fungi-associated bacteria, and five independent LGTs to eukaryotes. Of these latest five transfers, three are ancient LGTs, implicating an ancestral fungus, the last common ancestor of land plants and an ancestral trebouxiophyte green alga, and two are recent LGTs to modern embryophytes. ii VEP1's rampant LGT behavior was enabled by the robustness and broad utility of the dinucleotide-binding Rossmann-fold, which provided a platform for the evolution of two unprecedented departures from the canonical SDR catalytic triad. iii The fate of VEP1 in eukaryotes has been different in different lineages, being ubiquitous and highly conserved in land plants, whereas fungi underwent multiple losses. And iv VEP1-harboring bacteria include non-phytopathogenic and phytopathogenic symbionts which are non-randomly distributed with respect to the type of harbored VEP1 gene. Our findings suggest that VEP1 may have been instrumental for the evolutionary transition of green plants to land, and point to a LGT-mediated 'Trojan Horse' mechanism for the evolution of

  6. Patterns in wetland microbial community composition and functional gene repertoire associated with methane emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shaomei; Malfatti, Stephanie A; McFarland, Jack W; Anderson, Frank E; Pati, Amrita; Huntemann, Marcel; Tremblay, Julien; Glavina del Rio, Tijana; Waldrop, Mark P; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; Tringe, Susannah G

    2015-05-19

    that mediate carbon cycling in wetlands is critical to accurately predicting their responses to changes in land management and climate. Here, we studied a restored wetland and revealed substantial spatial heterogeneity in biogeochemistry, methane production, and microbial communities, largely associated with the wetland hydraulic design. We observed patterns in microbial community composition and functions correlated with biogeochemistry and methane production, including diverse microorganisms involved in methane production and consumption. We found that methanogenesis gene abundance is inversely correlated with genes from pathways exploiting other electron acceptors, yet the ubiquitous presence of genes from all these pathways suggests that diverse electron acceptors contribute to the energetic balance of the ecosystem. These investigations represent an important step toward effective management of wetlands to reduce methane flux to the atmosphere and enhance belowground carbon storage. Copyright © 2015 He et al.

  7. Evolution and Expression Patterns of CYC/TB1 Genes in Anacyclus: Phylogenetic Insights for Floral Symmetry Genes in Asteraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Fuertes-Aguilar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Homologs of the CYC/TB1 gene family have been independently recruited many times across the eudicots to control aspects of floral symmetry The family Asteraceae exhibits the largest known diversification in this gene paralog family accompanied by a parallel morphological floral richness in its specialized head-like inflorescence. In Asteraceae, whether or not CYC/TB1 gene floral symmetry function is preserved along organismic and gene lineages is unknown. In this study, we used phylogenetic, structural and expression analyses focused on the highly derived genus Anacyclus (tribe Anthemidae to address this question. Phylogenetic reconstruction recovered eight main gene lineages present in Asteraceae: two from CYC1, four from CYC2 and two from CYC3-like genes. The species phylogeny was recovered in most of the gene lineages, allowing the delimitation of orthologous sets of CYC/TB1 genes in Asteraceae. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that in Anacyclus three of the four isolated CYC2 genes are more highly expressed in ray flowers. The expression of the four AcCYC2 genes overlaps in several organs including the ligule of ray flowers, as well as in anthers and ovules throughout development.

  8. Multi-allelic major effect genes interact with minor effect QTLs to control adaptive color pattern variation in Heliconius erato.

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    Riccardo Papa

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that relatively few genomic regions are repeatedly involved in the evolution of Heliconius butterfly wing patterns. Although this work demonstrates a number of cases where homologous loci underlie both convergent and divergent wing pattern change among different Heliconius species, it is still unclear exactly how many loci underlie pattern variation across the genus. To address this question for Heliconius erato, we created fifteen independent crosses utilizing the four most distinct color pattern races and analyzed color pattern segregation across a total of 1271 F2 and backcross offspring. Additionally, we used the most variable brood, an F2 cross between H. himera and the east Ecuadorian H. erato notabilis, to perform a quantitative genetic analysis of color pattern variation and produce a detailed map of the loci likely involved in the H. erato color pattern radiation. Using AFLP and gene based markers, we show that fewer major genes than previously envisioned control the color pattern variation in H. erato. We describe for the first time the genetic architecture of H. erato wing color pattern by assessing quantitative variation in addition to traditional linkage mapping. In particular, our data suggest three genomic intervals modulate the bulk of the observed variation in color. Furthermore, we also identify several modifier loci of moderate effect size that contribute to the quantitative wing pattern variation. Our results are consistent with the two-step model for the evolution of mimetic wing patterns in Heliconius and support a growing body of empirical data demonstrating the importance of major effect loci in adaptive change.

  9. X-linked gene transcription patterns in female and male in vivo, in vitro and cloned porcine individual blastocysts.

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    Chi-Hun Park

    Full Text Available To determine the presence of sexual dimorphic transcription and how in vitro culture environments influence X-linked gene transcription patterns in preimplantation embryos, we analyzed mRNA expression levels in in vivo-derived, in vitro-fertilized (IVF, and cloned porcine blastocysts. Our results clearly show that sex-biased expression occurred between female and male in vivo blastocysts in X-linked genes. The expression levels of XIST, G6PD, HPRT1, PGK1, and BEX1 were significantly higher in female than in male blastocysts, but ZXDA displayed higher levels in male than in female blastocysts. Although we found aberrant expression patterns for several genes in IVF and cloned blastocysts, similar sex-biased expression patterns (on average were observed between the sexes. The transcript levels of BEX1 and XIST were upregulated and PGK1 was downregulated in both IVF and cloned blastocysts compared with in vivo counterparts. Moreover, a remarkable degree of expression heterogeneity was observed among individual cloned embryos (the level of heterogeneity was similar in both sexes but only a small proportion of female IVF embryos exhibited variability, indicating that this phenomenon may be primarily caused by faulty reprogramming by the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT process rather than in vitro conditions. Aberrant expression patterns in cloned embryos of both sexes were not ameliorated by treatment with Scriptaid as a potent HDACi, although the blastocyst rate increased remarkably after this treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that female and male porcine blastocysts produced in vivo and in vitro transcriptional sexual dimorphisms in the selected X-linked genes and compensation of X-linked gene dosage may not occur at the blastocyst stage. Moreover, altered X-linked gene expression frequently occurred in porcine IVF and cloned embryos, indicating that X-linked gene regulation is susceptible to in vitro culture and the SCNT process

  10. THE SEGREGATION PATTERN OF INSECT RESISTANCE GENES IN THE PROGENIES AND CROSSES OF TRANSGENIC ROJOLELE RICE

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    Satoto Satoto

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Successful application of genetic transformation technique, especially in developing rice variety resistant to brown plant hopper and stem borer, will depend on transgene being expressed and the gene inherited in a stable and predictable manner. This study aimed to analyse transgene segregation pattern of the progenies and the crosses of transgenic rice cv. Rojolele harboring cry1Ab and gna genes. The third generation (T2 of fivetransgenic Rojolele events containing gna and/or cry1Ab were evaluated for two generations to identify the homozygous lines and to study their inheritance. The homozygous lines were selected based on the result of PCR technique. The segregation patterns of gna and cry1Ab were studied in eight F2 populations derived from Rojolele x transgenic Rojolele homozygous for cry1Ab and or gna and their reciprocal crosses. Data  resulted from PCR of F2 population were analysed using a Chi Square test. The study obtained six homozygous lines for gna, namely A22- 1-32, A22-1-37, C72-1-9, F11-1-48, K21-1-39, K21-1-48, and two homozygous lines for cry1Ab, namely K21-1-39 and K21- 1-48. Both cry1Ab and gna transgenes had been inherited through selfing and crossing with their wild type as indicated from the F1 containing gna and cry1Ab as many as 48.4% and 47.4%, respectively. In six of the eight crosses, gna was inherited in a 3:1 ratio consistent with Mendelian inheritance of a single dominant locus, while in the remaining two crosses, gna was segregated in a 1:1 ratio. The presence of cry1Ab in F2 populations also showed a 3:1 segregation ratio in all crosses. In the F2 population derived from F1 plant containing cry1Ab and gna, both transgenes segregated in a 9:3:3:1 dihybrid segregation ratio. This study will add to the diversity of genetic sources for insect resistance and allow further use of these transgenic lines for pyramiding resistance to brown plant hopper and stem borer or  separately in rice breeding programs whenever

  11. Heterogeneous expression pattern of tandem duplicated sHsps genes during fruit ripening in two tomato species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce, DP; Krsticevic, FJ; Ezpeleta, J.; Ponce, SD; Pratta, GR; Tapia, E.

    2016-04-01

    The small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) have been found to play a critical role in physiological stress conditions in protecting proteins from irreversible aggregation. To characterize the gene expression profile of four sHsps with a tandem gene structure arrangement in the domesticated Solanum lycopersicum (Heinz 1706) genome and its wild close relative Solanum pimpinellifolium (LA1589), differential gene expression analysis using RNA-Seq was conducted in three ripening stages in both cultivars fruits. Gene promoter analysis was performed to explain the heterogeneous pattern of gene expression found for these tandem duplicated sHsps. In silico analysis results contribute to refocus wet experiment analysis in tomato sHsp family proteins.

  12. Sex and strategy use matters for pattern separation, adult neurogenesis, and immediate early gene expression in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Shunya; Chow, Carmen; Lieblich, Stephanie E; Galea, Liisa A M

    2016-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) plays a crucial role for pattern separation, and there are sex differences in the regulation of neurogenesis. Although sex differences, favoring males, in spatial navigation have been reported, it is not known whether there are sex differences in pattern separation. The current study was designed to determine whether there are sex differences in the ability for separating similar or distinct patterns, learning strategy choice, adult neurogenesis, and immediate early gene (IEG) expression in the DG in response to pattern separation training. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats received a single injection of the DNA synthesis marker, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), and were tested for the ability of separating spatial patterns in a spatial pattern separation version of delayed nonmatching to place task using the eight-arm radial arm maze. Twenty-seven days following BrdU injection, rats received a probe trial to determine whether they were idiothetic or spatial strategy users. We found that male spatial strategy users outperformed female spatial strategy users only when separating similar, but not distinct, patterns. Furthermore, male spatial strategy users had greater neurogenesis in response to pattern separation training than all other groups. Interestingly, neurogenesis was positively correlated with performance on similar pattern trials during pattern separation in female spatial strategy users but negatively correlated with performance in male idiothetic strategy users. These results suggest that the survival of new neurons may play an important positive role for pattern separation of similar patterns in females. Furthermore, we found sex and strategy differences in IEG expression in the CA1 and CA3 regions in response to pattern separation. These findings emphasize the importance of studying biological sex on hippocampal function and neural plasticity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A parallel genetic algorithm for single class pattern classification and its application for gene expression profiling in Streptomyces coelicolor

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    Vohradsky Jiri

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of coordinately regulated genes according to the level of their expression during the time course of a process allows for discovering functional relationships among genes involved in the process. Results We present a single class classification method for the identification of genes of similar function from a gene expression time series. It is based on a parallel genetic algorithm which is a supervised computer learning method exploiting prior knowledge of gene function to identify unknown genes of similar function from expression data. The algorithm was tested with a set of randomly generated patterns; the results were compared with seven other classification algorithms including support vector machines. The algorithm avoids several problems associated with unsupervised clustering methods, and it shows better performance then the other algorithms. The algorithm was applied to the identification of secondary metabolite gene clusters of the antibiotic-producing eubacterium Streptomyces coelicolor. The algorithm also identified pathways associated with transport of the secondary metabolites out of the cell. We used the method for the prediction of the functional role of particular ORFs based on the expression data. Conclusion Through analysis of a time series of gene expression, the algorithm identifies pathways which are directly or indirectly associated with genes of interest, and which are active during the time course of the experiment.

  14. Mutation pattern in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase gene in 26 unrelated patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorechovský, I; Luo, L; Hertz, Jens Michael

    1997-01-01

    Mutation pattern was characterized in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase gene (BTK) in 26 patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia, the first described immunoglobulin deficiency, and was related to BTK expression. A total of 24 different mutations were identified. Most BTK mutations were found to resu...

  15. Nucleotide variability and linkage disequilibrium patterns in the porcine MUC4 gene

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    Yang Ming

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MUC4 is a type of membrane anchored glycoprotein and serves as the major constituent of mucus that covers epithelial surfaces of many tissues such as trachea, colon and cervix. MUC4 plays important roles in the lubrication and protection of the surface epithelium, cell proliferation and differentiation, immune response, cell adhesion and cancer development. To gain insights into the evolution of the porcine MUC4 gene, we surveyed the nucleotide variability and linkage disequilibrium (LD within this gene in Chinese indigenous breeds and Western commercial breeds. Results A total of 53 SNPs covering the MUC4 gene were genotyped on 5 wild boars and 307 domestic pigs representing 11 Chinese breeds and 3 Western breeds. The nucleotide variability, haplotype phylogeny and LD extent of MUC4 were analyzed in these breeds. Both Chinese and Western breeds had considerable nucleotide diversity at the MUC4 locus. Western pig breeds like Duroc and Large White have comparable nucleotide diversity as many of Chinese breeds, thus artificial selection for lean pork production have not reduced the genetic variability of MUC4 in Western commercial breeds. Haplotype phylogeny analyses indicated that MUC4 had evolved divergently in Chinese and Western pigs. The dendrogram of genetic differentiation between breeds generally reflected demographic history and geographical distribution of these breeds. LD patterns were unexpectedly similar between Chinese and Western breeds, in which LD usually extended less than 20 kb. This is different from the presumed high LD extent (more than 100 kb in Western commercial breeds. The significant positive Tajima’D, and Fu and Li’s D statistics in a few Chinese and Western breeds implied that MUC4 might undergo balancing selection in domestic breeds. Nevertheless, we cautioned that the significant statistics could be upward biased by SNP ascertainment process. Conclusions Chinese and Western breeds have

  16. Gene-expression patterns in peripheral blood classify familial breast cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolo, Stephen R; Andrulis, Irene L; Cohen, Adam L; Conner, Thomas; Moos, Philip J; Spira, Avrum E; Buys, Saundra S; Johnson, W Evan; Bild, Andrea H

    2015-11-04

    Women with a family history of breast cancer face considerable uncertainty about whether to pursue standard screening, intensive screening, or prophylactic surgery. Accurate and individualized risk-estimation approaches may help these women make more informed decisions. Although highly penetrant genetic variants have been associated with familial breast cancer (FBC) risk, many individuals do not carry these variants, and many carriers never develop breast cancer. Common risk variants have a relatively modest effect on risk and show limited potential for predicting FBC development. As an alternative, we hypothesized that additional genomic data types, such as gene-expression levels, which can reflect genetic and epigenetic variation, could contribute to classifying a person's risk status. Specifically, we aimed to identify common patterns in gene-expression levels across individuals who develop FBC. We profiled peripheral blood mononuclear cells from women with a family history of breast cancer (with or without a germline BRCA1/2 variant) and from controls. We used the support vector machines algorithm to differentiate between patients who developed FBC and those who did not. Our study used two independent datasets, a training set of 124 women from Utah (USA) and an external validation (test) set from Ontario (Canada) of 73 women (197 total). We controlled for expression variation associated with clinical, demographic, and treatment variables as well as lymphocyte markers. Our multigene biomarker provided accurate, individual-level estimates of FBC occurrence for the Utah cohort (AUC = 0.76 [0.67-84]) . Even at their lower confidence bounds, these accuracy estimates meet or exceed estimates from alternative approaches. Our Ontario cohort resulted in similarly high levels of accuracy (AUC = 0.73 [0.59-0.86]), thus providing external validation of our findings. Individuals deemed to have "high" risk by our model would have an estimated 2.4 times greater odds of

  17. Two metallothionein genes in Oxya chinensis: molecular characteristics, expression patterns and roles in heavy metal stress.

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    Yaoming Liu

    Full Text Available Metallothioneins (MTs are small, cysteine-rich, heavy metal-binding proteins involved in metal homeostasis and detoxification in living organisms. In the present study, we cloned two MT genes (OcMT1 and OcMT2 from Oxya chinensis, analyzed the expression patterns of the OcMT transcripts in different tissues and at varying developmental stages using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR, evaluated the functions of these two MTs using RNAi and recombinant proteins in an E. coli expression system. The full-length cDNAs of OcMT1 and OcMT2 encoded 40 and 64 amino acid residues, respectively. We found Cys-Cys, Cys-X-Cys and Cys-X-Y-Z-Cys motifs in OcMT1 and OcMT2. These motifs might serve as primary chelating sites, as in other organisms. These characteristics suggest that OcMT1 and OcMT2 may be involved in heavy metal detoxification by capturing the metals. Two OcMT were expressed at all developmental stages, and the highest levels were found in the eggs. Both transcripts were expressed in all eleven tissues examined, with the highest levels observed in the brain and optic lobes, followed by the fat body. The expression of OcMT2 was also relatively high in the ovaries. The functions of OcMT1 and OcMT2 were explored using RNA interference (RNAi and different concentrations and treatment times for the three heavy metals. Our results indicated that mortality increased significantly from 8.5% to 16.7%, and this increase was both time- and dose-dependent. To evaluate the abilities of these two MT proteins to confer heavy metal tolerance to E. coli, the bacterial cells were transformed with pET-28a plasmids containing the OcMT genes. The optical densities of both the MT-expressing and control cells decreased with increasing concentrations of CdCl2. Nevertheless, the survival rates of the MT-overexpressing cells were higher than those of the controls. Our results suggest that these two genes play important roles in heavy metal detoxification in O. chinensis.

  18. Two metallothionein genes in Oxya chinensis: molecular characteristics, expression patterns and roles in heavy metal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaoming; Wu, Haihua; Kou, Lihua; Liu, Xiaojian; Zhang, Jianzhen; Guo, Yaping; Ma, Enbo

    2014-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are small, cysteine-rich, heavy metal-binding proteins involved in metal homeostasis and detoxification in living organisms. In the present study, we cloned two MT genes (OcMT1 and OcMT2) from Oxya chinensis, analyzed the expression patterns of the OcMT transcripts in different tissues and at varying developmental stages using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), evaluated the functions of these two MTs using RNAi and recombinant proteins in an E. coli expression system. The full-length cDNAs of OcMT1 and OcMT2 encoded 40 and 64 amino acid residues, respectively. We found Cys-Cys, Cys-X-Cys and Cys-X-Y-Z-Cys motifs in OcMT1 and OcMT2. These motifs might serve as primary chelating sites, as in other organisms. These characteristics suggest that OcMT1 and OcMT2 may be involved in heavy metal detoxification by capturing the metals. Two OcMT were expressed at all developmental stages, and the highest levels were found in the eggs. Both transcripts were expressed in all eleven tissues examined, with the highest levels observed in the brain and optic lobes, followed by the fat body. The expression of OcMT2 was also relatively high in the ovaries. The functions of OcMT1 and OcMT2 were explored using RNA interference (RNAi) and different concentrations and treatment times for the three heavy metals. Our results indicated that mortality increased significantly from 8.5% to 16.7%, and this increase was both time- and dose-dependent. To evaluate the abilities of these two MT proteins to confer heavy metal tolerance to E. coli, the bacterial cells were transformed with pET-28a plasmids containing the OcMT genes. The optical densities of both the MT-expressing and control cells decreased with increasing concentrations of CdCl2. Nevertheless, the survival rates of the MT-overexpressing cells were higher than those of the controls. Our results suggest that these two genes play important roles in heavy metal detoxification in O. chinensis.

  19. Expression pattern of the septin gene family in acute myeloid leukemias with and without MLL-SEPT fusion genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, Joana; Cerveira, Nuno; Bizarro, Susana; Ribeiro, Franclim R.; Correia, Cecília; Torres, Lurdes; Lisboa, Susana; Vieira, Joana; Mariz, José M.; Norton, Lucília; Snijder, Simone; Mellink, Clemens H.; Buijs, Arjan; Shih, Lee-Yung; Strehl, Sabine; Micci, Francesca; Heim, Sverre; Teixeira, Manuel R.

    2010-01-01

    Septins are proteins associated with crucial steps in cell division and cellular integrity. In humans, 14 septin genes have been identified, of which five (SEPT2, SEPT5, SEPT6, SEPT9, and SEPT11) are known to participate in reciprocal translocations with the MLL gene in myeloid neoplasias. We have

  20. Transcriptome Analysis Revealed the Embryo-Induced Gene Expression Patterns in the Endometrium from Meishan and Yorkshire Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangnan Huang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The expression patterns in Meishan- and Yorkshire-derived endometrium during early (gestational day 15 and mid-gestation (gestational days 26 and 50 were investigated, respectively. Totally, 689 and 1649 annotated genes were identified to be differentially expressed in Meishan and Yorkshire endometrium during the three gestational stages, respectively. Hierarchical clustering analysis identified that, of the annotated differentially expressed genes (DEGs, 73 DEGs were unique to Meishan endometrium, 536 DEGs were unique to Yorkshire endometrium, and 228 DEGs were common in Meishan and Yorkshire endometriums. Subsequently, DEGs in each of the three types of expression patterns were grouped into four distinct categories according to the similarities in their temporal expression patterns. The expression patterns identified from the microarray analysis were validated by quantitative RT-PCR. The functional enrichment analysis revealed that the common DEGs were enriched in pathways of steroid metabolic process and regulation of retinoic acid receptor signaling. These unique DEGs in Meishan endometrium were involved in cell cycle and adherens junction. The DEGs unique to Yorkshire endometrium were associated with regulation of Rho protein signal transduction, maternal placenta development and cell proliferation. This study revealed the different gene expression patterns or pathways related to the endometrium remodeling in Meishan and Yorkshire pigs, respectively. These unique DEGs in either Meishan or Yorkshire endometriums may contribute to the divergence of the endometrium environment in the two pig breeds.

  1. Genome-wide prediction of functional gene-gene interactions inferred from patterns of genetic differentiation in mice and men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán Bochdanovits

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The human genome encodes a limited number of genes yet contributes to individual differences in a vast array of heritable traits. A possible explanation for the capacity our genome to generate this virtually unlimited range of phenotypic variation in complex traits is to assume functional interactions between genes. Therefore we searched two mammalian genomes to identify potential epistatic interactions by looking for co-adapted genes marked by excess two-locus genetic differentiation between populations/lineages using publicly available SNP genotype data. The practical motivation for this effort is to reduce the number of pair-wise tests that need to be performed in genome-wide association studies aimed at detecting GxG interactions, by focusing on pairs predicted to be more likely to jointly affect variation in complex traits. Hence, this approach generates a list of candidate interactions that can be empirically tested. In both the mouse and human data we observed two-locus genetic differentiation in excess of what can be expected from chance alone based on simulations. In an attempt to validate our hypothesis that pairs of genes showing excess genetic divergence represent potential functional interactions, we selected a small set of gene combinations postulated to be interacting based on our analyses and looked for a combined effect of the selected genes on variation in complex traits in both mice and man. In both cases the individual effect of the genes were not significant, instead we observed marginally significant interaction effects. These results show that genome wide searches for gene-gene interactions based on population genetic data are feasible and can generate interesting candidate gene pairs to be further tested for their contribution to phenotypic variation in complex traits.

  2. Genome-wide prediction of functional gene-gene interactions inferred from patterns of genetic differentiation in mice and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochdanovits, Zoltán; Sondervan, David; Perillous, Sophie; van Beijsterveldt, Toos; Boomsma, Dorret; Heutink, Peter

    2008-02-13

    The human genome encodes a limited number of genes yet contributes to individual differences in a vast array of heritable traits. A possible explanation for the capacity our genome to generate this virtually unlimited range of phenotypic variation in complex traits is to assume functional interactions between genes. Therefore we searched two mammalian genomes to identify potential epistatic interactions by looking for co-adapted genes marked by excess two-locus genetic differentiation between populations/lineages using publicly available SNP genotype data. The practical motivation for this effort is to reduce the number of pair-wise tests that need to be performed in genome-wide association studies aimed at detecting GxG interactions, by focusing on pairs predicted to be more likely to jointly affect variation in complex traits. Hence, this approach generates a list of candidate interactions that can be empirically tested. In both the mouse and human data we observed two-locus genetic differentiation in excess of what can be expected from chance alone based on simulations. In an attempt to validate our hypothesis that pairs of genes showing excess genetic divergence represent potential functional interactions, we selected a small set of gene combinations postulated to be interacting based on our analyses and looked for a combined effect of the selected genes on variation in complex traits in both mice and man. In both cases the individual effect of the genes were not significant, instead we observed marginally significant interaction effects. These results show that genome wide searches for gene-gene interactions based on population genetic data are feasible and can generate interesting candidate gene pairs to be further tested for their contribution to phenotypic variation in complex traits.

  3. Expression pattern of glycoside hydrolase genes in Lutzomyia longipalpis reveals key enzymes involved in larval digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline da Silva Moraes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis is the most important vector of American Visceral Leishmaniasis. Adults are phytophagous (males and females or blood feeders (females only, and larvae feed on solid detritus. Digestion in sand fly larvae has scarcely been studied, but some glycosidase activities putatively involved in microorganism digestion were already described. Nevertheless, the molecular nature of these enzymes, as the corresponding genes and transcripts, were not explored yet. Catabolism of microbial carbohydrates in insects generally involves β-1,3-glucanases, chitinases and digestive lysozymes. In this work, the transcripts of digestive β-1,3-glucanase and chitinases were identified in the L. longipalpis larvae throughout analysis of sequences and expression patterns of glycoside hydrolases families 16, 18 and 22. The activity of one i-type lysozyme was also registered. Interestingly, this lysozyme seems to play a role in immunity, rather than digestion. This is the first attempt to identify the molecular nature of sand fly larval digestive enzymes.

  4. Altered skeletal pattern of gene expression in response to spaceflight and hindlimb elevation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikle, D. D.; Harris, J.; Halloran, B. P.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1994-01-01

    Spaceflight leads to osteopenia, in part by inhibiting bone formation. Using an animal model (hindlimb elevation) that simulates the weightlessness of spaceflight, we and others showed a reversible inhibition of bone formation and bone mineralization. In this study, we have measured the mRNA levels of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR), alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin in the tibiae of rats flown aboard National Aeronautics and Space Administration Shuttle Flight STS-54 and compared the results with those obtained from their ground-based controls and from the bones of hindlimb-elevated animals. Spaceflight and hindlimb elevation transiently increase the mRNA levels for IGF-I, IGF-IR, and alkaline phosphatase but decrease the mRNA levels for osteocalcin. The changes in osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase mRNA levels are consistent with a shift toward decreased maturation, whereas the rise in IGF-I and IGF-IR mRNA levels may indicate a compensatory response to the fall in bone formation. We conclude that skeletal unloading during spaceflight or hindlimb elevation resets the pattern of gene expression in the osteoblast, giving it a less mature profile.

  5. Three Distinct Patterns of Histone H3Y41 Phosphorylation Mark Active Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Dawson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The JAK2 tyrosine kinase is a critical mediator of cytokine-induced signaling. It plays a role in the nucleus, where it regulates transcription by phosphorylating histone H3 at tyrosine 41 (H3Y41ph. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to massively parallel DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq to define the genome-wide pattern of H3Y41ph in human erythroid leukemia cells. Our results indicate that H3Y41ph is located at three distinct sites: (1 at a subset of active promoters, where it overlaps with H3K4me3, (2 at distal cis-regulatory elements, where it coincides with the binding of STAT5, and (3 throughout the transcribed regions of active, tissue-specific hematopoietic genes. Together, these data extend our understanding of this conserved and essential signaling pathway and provide insight into the mechanisms by which extracellular stimuli may lead to the coordinated regulation of transcription.

  6. Prey specialization may influence patterns of gene flow in wolves of the Canadian Northwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, L E; Nagy, J A; Larter, N C; Strobeck, C

    2001-12-01

    This study characterizes population genetic structure among grey wolves (Canis lupus) in northwestern Canada, and discusses potential physical and biological determinants of this structure. Four hundred and ninety-one grey wolves, from nine regions in the Yukon, Northwest Territories and British Columbia, were genotyped using nine microsatellite loci. Results indicate that wolf gene flow is reduced significantly across the Mackenzie River, most likely due to the north-south migration patterns of the barren-ground caribou herds that flank it. Furthermore, although Banks and Victoria Island wolves are genetically similar, they are distinct from mainland wolf populations across the Amundsen Gulf. However, low-level island-mainland wolf migration may occur in conjunction with the movements of the Dolphin-Union caribou herd. Whereas previous authors have examined isolation-by-distance in wolves, this study is the first to demonstrate correlations between genetic structure of wolf populations and the presence of topographical barriers between them. Perhaps most interesting is the possibility that these barriers reflect prey specialization by wolves in different regions.

  7. Tissue-Specific, Development-Dependent Phenolic Compounds Accumulation Profile and Gene Expression Pattern in Tea Plant [Camellia sinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiwei; Zhao, Lei; Meng, Fei; Wang, Yunsheng; Tan, Huarong; Yang, Hua; Wei, Chaoling; Wan, Xiaochun; Gao, Liping; Xia, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Phenolic compounds in tea plant [Camellia sinensis (L.)] play a crucial role in dominating tea flavor and possess a number of key pharmacological benefits on human health. The present research aimed to study the profile of tissue-specific, development-dependent accumulation pattern of phenolic compounds in tea plant. A total of 50 phenolic compounds were identified qualitatively using liquid chromatography in tandem mass spectrometry technology. Of which 29 phenolic compounds were quantified based on their fragmentation behaviors. Most of the phenolic compounds were higher in the younger leaves than that in the stem and root, whereas the total amount of proanthocyanidins were unexpectedly higher in the root. The expression patterns of 63 structural and regulator genes involved in the shikimic acid, phenylpropanoid, and flavonoid pathways were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and cluster analysis. Based on the similarity of their expression patterns, the genes were classified into two main groups: C1 and C2; and the genes in group C1 had high relative expression level in the root or low in the bud and leaves. The expression patterns of genes in C2-2-1 and C2-2-2-1 groups were probably responsible for the development-dependent accumulation of phenolic compounds in the leaves. Enzymatic analysis suggested that the accumulation of catechins was influenced simultaneously by catabolism and anabolism. Further research is recommended to know the expression patterns of various genes and the reason for the variation in contents of different compounds in different growth stages and also in different organs. PMID:23646127

  8. Tissue-specific, development-dependent phenolic compounds accumulation profile and gene expression pattern in tea plant [Camellia sinensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaolan; Liu, Yajun; Li, Weiwei; Zhao, Lei; Meng, Fei; Wang, Yunsheng; Tan, Huarong; Yang, Hua; Wei, Chaoling; Wan, Xiaochun; Gao, Liping; Xia, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Phenolic compounds in tea plant [Camellia sinensis (L.)] play a crucial role in dominating tea flavor and possess a number of key pharmacological benefits on human health. The present research aimed to study the profile of tissue-specific, development-dependent accumulation pattern of phenolic compounds in tea plant. A total of 50 phenolic compounds were identified qualitatively using liquid chromatography in tandem mass spectrometry technology. Of which 29 phenolic compounds were quantified based on their fragmentation behaviors. Most of the phenolic compounds were higher in the younger leaves than that in the stem and root, whereas the total amount of proanthocyanidins were unexpectedly higher in the root. The expression patterns of 63 structural and regulator genes involved in the shikimic acid, phenylpropanoid, and flavonoid pathways were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and cluster analysis. Based on the similarity of their expression patterns, the genes were classified into two main groups: C1 and C2; and the genes in group C1 had high relative expression level in the root or low in the bud and leaves. The expression patterns of genes in C2-2-1 and C2-2-2-1 groups were probably responsible for the development-dependent accumulation of phenolic compounds in the leaves. Enzymatic analysis suggested that the accumulation of catechins was influenced simultaneously by catabolism and anabolism. Further research is recommended to know the expression patterns of various genes and the reason for the variation in contents of different compounds in different growth stages and also in different organs.

  9. Patterns of evolutionary conservation of ascorbic acid-related genes following whole-genome triplication in Brassica rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Weike; Song, Xiaoming; Liu, Tongkun; Huang, Zhinan; Ren, Jun; Hou, Xilin; Du, Jianchang; Li, Ying

    2014-12-31

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) is an important antioxidant in plants and an essential vitamin for humans. Extending the study of AsA-related genes from Arabidopsis thaliana to Brassica rapa could shed light on the evolution of AsA in plants and inform crop breeding. In this study, we conducted whole-genome annotation, molecular-evolution and gene-expression analyses of all known AsA-related genes in B. rapa. The nucleobase-ascorbate transporter (NAT) gene family and AsA l-galactose pathway genes were also compared among plant species. Four important insights gained are that: 1) 102 AsA-related gene were identified in B. rapa and they mainly diverged 12-18 Ma accompanied by the Brassica-specific genome triplication event; 2) during their evolution, these AsA-related genes were preferentially retained, consistent with the gene dosage hypothesis; 3) the putative proteins were highly conserved, but their expression patterns varied; and 4) although the number of AsA-related genes is higher in B. rapa than in A. thaliana, the AsA contents and the numbers of expressed genes in leaves of both species are similar, the genes that are not generally expressed may serve as substitutes during emergencies. In summary, this study provides genome-wide insights into evolutionary history and mechanisms of AsA-related genes following whole-genome triplication in B. rapa. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  10. DNA methylation patterns of genes related to immune response in the different clinical forms of oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Aline Fernanda; de Resende, Renata Gonçalves; de Lacerda, Júlio César Tanos; Pereira, Núbia Braga; Melo, Leonardo Augusto; Diniz, Marina Gonçalves; Gomes, Carolina Cavalieri; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago

    2017-10-04

    The oral lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory disease. Although its aetiology is not well understood, the role of T lymphocytes in its inflammatory events is recognised. Identifying the epigenetic mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of this immune-mediated condition is fundamental for understanding the inflammatory reaction that occurs in the disease. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the methylation pattern of 21 immune response-related genes in the different clinical forms of oral lichen planus. A cross-sectional study was performed to analyse the DNA methylation patterns in three distinct groups of oral lichen planus: (i) reticular/plaque lesions; (ii) erosive lesions; (iii) normal oral mucosa (control group). After DNA extraction from biopsies, the samples were submitted to digestions by methylation-sensitive and methylation-dependent enzymes and double digestion. The relative percentage of methylated DNA for each gene was provided using real-time polymerase chain reaction arrays. Hypermethylation of the STAT5A gene was observed only in the control group (59.0%). A higher hypermethylation of the ELANE gene was found in reticular/plaque lesions (72.1%) compared to the erosive lesions (50.0%). Our results show variations in the methylation profile of immune response-related genes, according to the clinical type of oral lichen planus after comparing with the normal oral mucosa. Further studies are necessary to validate these findings using gene expression analysis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Comparative Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Different Expression Patterns in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae Strains with Putative Virulence-Relevant Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Du, Zhenglin; Huang, Liyu; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Zhou, Yongli; Li, Zhikang

    2013-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is the causal agent of rice bacterial blight, which is a major rice disease in tropical Asian countries. An attempt has been made to investigate gene expression patterns of three Xoo strains on the minimal medium XOM2, PXO99 (P6) and PXO86 (P2) from the Philippines, and GD1358 (C5) from China, which exhibited different virulence in 30 rice varieties, with putative virulence factors using deep sequencing. In total, 4,781 transcripts were identified in this study, and 1,151 and 3,076 genes were differentially expressed when P6 was compared with P2 and with C5, respectively. Our results indicated that Xoo strains from different regions exhibited distinctly different expression patterns of putative virulence-relevant genes. Interestingly, 40 and 44 genes involved in chemotaxis and motility exhibited higher transcript alterations in C5 compared with P6 and P2, respectively. Most other genes associated with virulence, including exopolysaccharide (EPS) synthesis, Hrp genes and type III effectors, including Xanthomonas outer protein (Xop) effectors and transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors, were down-regulated in C5 compared with P6 and P2. The data were confirmed by real-time quantitative RT-PCR, tests of bacterial motility, and enzyme activity analysis of EPS and xylanase. These results highlight the complexity of Xoo and offer new avenues for improving our understanding of Xoo-rice interactions and the evolution of Xoo virulence. PMID:23734193

  12. Dual DNA methylation patterns in the CNS reveal developmentally poised chromatin and monoallelic expression of critical genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhui Wang

    Full Text Available As a first step towards discovery of genes expressed from only one allele in the CNS, we used a tiling array assay for DNA sequences that are both methylated and unmethylated (the MAUD assay. We analyzed regulatory regions of the entire mouse brain transcriptome, and found that approximately 10% of the genes assayed showed dual DNA methylation patterns. They include a large subset of genes that display marks of both active and silent, i.e., poised, chromatin during development, consistent with a link between differential DNA methylation and lineage-specific differentiation within the CNS. Sixty-five of the MAUD hits and 57 other genes whose function is of relevance to CNS development and/or disorders were tested for allele-specific expression in F(1 hybrid clonal neural stem cell (NSC lines. Eight MAUD hits and one additional gene showed such expression. They include Lgi1, which causes a subtype of inherited epilepsy that displays autosomal dominance with incomplete penetrance; Gfra2, a receptor for glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor GDNF that has been linked to kindling epilepsy; Unc5a, a netrin-1 receptor important in neurodevelopment; and Cspg4, a membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan associated with malignant melanoma and astrocytoma in human. Three of the genes, Camk2a, Kcnc4, and Unc5a, show preferential expression of the same allele in all clonal NSC lines tested. The other six genes show a stochastic pattern of monoallelic expression in some NSC lines and bi-allelic expression in others. These results support the estimate that 1-2% of genes expressed in the CNS may be subject to allelic exclusion, and demonstrate that the group includes genes implicated in major disorders of the CNS as well as neurodevelopment.

  13. Infection of apple by apple stem grooving virus leads to extensive alterations in gene expression patterns but no disease symptoms.

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    Shanyi Chen

    Full Text Available To understand the molecular basis of viral diseases, transcriptome profiling has been widely used to correlate host gene expression change patterns with disease symptoms during viral infection in many plant hosts. We used infection of apple by Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV, which produces no disease symptoms, to assess the significance of host gene expression changes in disease development. We specifically asked the question of whether such asymptomatic infection is attributed to limited changes in host gene expression. Using RNA-seq, we identified a total of 184 up-regulated and 136 down-regulated genes in apple shoot cultures permanently infected by ASGV in comparison with virus-free shoot cultures. As in most plant hosts showing disease symptoms during viral infection, these differentially expressed genes encode known or putative proteins involved in cell cycle, cell wall biogenesis, response to biotic and abiotic stress, development and fruit ripening, phytohormone function, metabolism, signal transduction, transcription regulation, translation, transport, and photosynthesis. Thus, global host gene expression changes do not necessarily lead to virus disease symptoms. Our data suggest that the general approaches to correlate host gene expression changes under viral infection conditions to specific disease symptom, based on the interpretation of transcription profiling data and altered individual gene functions, may have limitations depending on particular experimental systems.

  14. Infection of apple by apple stem grooving virus leads to extensive alterations in gene expression patterns but no disease symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shanyi; Ye, Ting; Hao, Lu; Chen, Hui; Wang, Shaojie; Fan, Zaifeng; Guo, Liyun; Zhou, Tao

    2014-01-01

    To understand the molecular basis of viral diseases, transcriptome profiling has been widely used to correlate host gene expression change patterns with disease symptoms during viral infection in many plant hosts. We used infection of apple by Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV), which produces no disease symptoms, to assess the significance of host gene expression changes in disease development. We specifically asked the question of whether such asymptomatic infection is attributed to limited changes in host gene expression. Using RNA-seq, we identified a total of 184 up-regulated and 136 down-regulated genes in apple shoot cultures permanently infected by ASGV in comparison with virus-free shoot cultures. As in most plant hosts showing disease symptoms during viral infection, these differentially expressed genes encode known or putative proteins involved in cell cycle, cell wall biogenesis, response to biotic and abiotic stress, development and fruit ripening, phytohormone function, metabolism, signal transduction, transcription regulation, translation, transport, and photosynthesis. Thus, global host gene expression changes do not necessarily lead to virus disease symptoms. Our data suggest that the general approaches to correlate host gene expression changes under viral infection conditions to specific disease symptom, based on the interpretation of transcription profiling data and altered individual gene functions, may have limitations depending on particular experimental systems.

  15. Virulence gene profiling and antibiotic resistance pattern of Indian isolates of Pasteurella multocida of small ruminant origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, Laxmi N; Thomas, P; Gupta, S K; Priyadarshini, A; Kumar, S; Nagaleekar, Viswas Konasagara; Kumar, A; Singh, Vijendra P

    2015-02-01

    Pasteurellosis in small ruminants affects the livelihood of small and marginal farmers of India. The present study was undertaken to understand the trends in gene carriage and antibiotic resistance pattern of Pasteurella multocida isolates recovered from small ruminants over a period of 10 years in India. A total of 88 P. multocida isolates of small ruminant origin were subjected to virulence gene profiling for 19 genes by PCR and antibiogram study employing 17 different antibiotics. Virulence genes like exbB, exbD, tonB, oma87, sodA, sodC, nanB and plpB (100% prevalence) and ptfA and hsf-2 (>90% prevalence) were found to be uniformly distributed among isolates. Unexpectedly, a very high prevalence (95.45%) of pfhA gene was observed in the present study. Dermonecrotoxin gene (toxA) was observed in 48.9% of isolates with highest occurrence among serotype A isolates and interestingly, one of each isolate of serotype B and F were found to carry this gene. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed 17.04% isolates to be multidrug resistant. Amongst all the antibiotics tested, most of the P. multocida isolates were found to be susceptible to enrofloxacin and chloramphenicol. This study highlights novel epidemiological information on frequency and occurrence of virulence genes among Indian isolates from small ruminants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Transcriptome profiling in conifers and the PiceaGenExpress database show patterns of diversification within gene families and interspecific conservation in vascular gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raherison Elie

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conifers have very large genomes (13 to 30 Gigabases that are mostly uncharacterized although extensive cDNA resources have recently become available. This report presents a global overview of transcriptome variation in a conifer tree and documents conservation and diversity of gene expression patterns among major vegetative tissues. Results An oligonucleotide microarray was developed from Picea glauca and P. sitchensis cDNA datasets. It represents 23,853 unique genes and was shown to be suitable for transcriptome profiling in several species. A comparison of secondary xylem and phelloderm tissues showed that preferential expression in these vascular tissues was highly conserved among Picea spp. RNA-Sequencing strongly confirmed tissue preferential expression and provided a robust validation of the microarray design. A small database of transcription profiles called PiceaGenExpress was developed from over 150 hybridizations spanning eight major tissue types. In total, transcripts were detected for 92% of the genes on the microarray, in at least one tissue. Non-annotated genes were predominantly expressed at low levels in fewer tissues than genes of known or predicted function. Diversity of expression within gene families may be rapidly assessed from PiceaGenExpress. In conifer trees, dehydrins and late embryogenesis abundant (LEA osmotic regulation proteins occur in large gene families compared to angiosperms. Strong contrasts and low diversity was observed in the dehydrin family, while diverse patterns suggested a greater degree of diversification among LEAs. Conclusion Together, the oligonucleotide microarray and the PiceaGenExpress database represent the first resource of this kind for gymnosperm plants. The spruce transcriptome analysis reported here is expected to accelerate genetic studies in the large and important group comprised of conifer trees.

  17. A Hybrid One-Way ANOVA Approach for the Robust and Efficient Estimation of Differential Gene Expression with Multiple Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollah, Mohammad Manir Hossain; Jamal, Rahman; Mokhtar, Norfilza Mohd; Harun, Roslan; Mollah, Md Nurul Haque

    2015-01-01

    Identifying genes that are differentially expressed (DE) between two or more conditions with multiple patterns of expression is one of the primary objectives of gene expression data analysis. Several statistical approaches, including one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), are used to identify DE genes. However, most of these methods provide misleading results for two or more conditions with multiple patterns of expression in the presence of outlying genes. In this paper, an attempt is made to develop a hybrid one-way ANOVA approach that unifies the robustness and efficiency of estimation using the minimum β-divergence method to overcome some problems that arise in the existing robust methods for both small- and large-sample cases with multiple patterns of expression. The proposed method relies on a β-weight function, which produces values between 0 and 1. The β-weight function with β = 0.2 is used as a measure of outlier detection. It assigns smaller weights (≥ 0) to outlying expressions and larger weights (≤ 1) to typical expressions. The distribution of the β-weights is used to calculate the cut-off point, which is compared to the observed β-weight of an expression to determine whether that gene expression is an outlier. This weight function plays a key role in unifying the robustness and efficiency of estimation in one-way ANOVA. Analyses of simulated gene expression profiles revealed that all eight methods (ANOVA, SAM, LIMMA, EBarrays, eLNN, KW, robust BetaEB and proposed) perform almost identically for m = 2 conditions in the absence of outliers. However, the robust BetaEB method and the proposed method exhibited considerably better performance than the other six methods in the presence of outliers. In this case, the BetaEB method exhibited slightly better performance than the proposed method for the small-sample cases, but the the proposed method exhibited much better performance than the BetaEB method for both the small- and large-sample cases in

  18. A Hybrid One-Way ANOVA Approach for the Robust and Efficient Estimation of Differential Gene Expression with Multiple Patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Manir Hossain Mollah

    Full Text Available Identifying genes that are differentially expressed (DE between two or more conditions with multiple patterns of expression is one of the primary objectives of gene expression data analysis. Several statistical approaches, including one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, are used to identify DE genes. However, most of these methods provide misleading results for two or more conditions with multiple patterns of expression in the presence of outlying genes. In this paper, an attempt is made to develop a hybrid one-way ANOVA approach that unifies the robustness and efficiency of estimation using the minimum β-divergence method to overcome some problems that arise in the existing robust methods for both small- and large-sample cases with multiple patterns of expression.The proposed method relies on a β-weight function, which produces values between 0 and 1. The β-weight function with β = 0.2 is used as a measure of outlier detection. It assigns smaller weights (≥ 0 to outlying expressions and larger weights (≤ 1 to typical expressions. The distribution of the β-weights is used to calculate the cut-off point, which is compared to the observed β-weight of an expression to determine whether that gene expression is an outlier. This weight function plays a key role in unifying the robustness and efficiency of estimation in one-way ANOVA.Analyses of simulated gene expression profiles revealed that all eight methods (ANOVA, SAM, LIMMA, EBarrays, eLNN, KW, robust BetaEB and proposed perform almost identically for m = 2 conditions in the absence of outliers. However, the robust BetaEB method and the proposed method exhibited considerably better performance than the other six methods in the presence of outliers. In this case, the BetaEB method exhibited slightly better performance than the proposed method for the small-sample cases, but the the proposed method exhibited much better performance than the BetaEB method for both the small- and large

  19. Trabecular architecture of the manual elements reflects locomotor patterns in primates.

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    Stacey A Matarazzo

    Full Text Available The morphology of trabecular bone has proven sensitive to loading patterns in the long bones and metacarpal heads of primates. It is expected that we should also see differences in the manual digits of primates that practice different methods of locomotion. Primate proximal and middle phalanges are load-bearing elements that are held in different postures and experience different mechanical strains during suspension, quadrupedalism, and knuckle walking. Micro CT scans of the middle phalanx, proximal phalanx and the metacarpal head of the third ray were used to examine the pattern of trabecular orientation in Pan, Gorilla, Pongo, Hylobates and Macaca. Several zones, i.e., the proximal ends of both phalanges and the metacarpal heads, were capable of distinguishing between knuckle-walking, quadrupedal, and suspensory primates. Orientation and shape seem to be the primary distinguishing factors but differences in bone volume, isotropy index, and degree of anisotropy were seen across included taxa. Suspensory primates show primarily proximodistal alignment in all zones, and quadrupeds more palmar-dorsal orientation in several zones. Knuckle walkers are characterized by having proximodistal alignment in the proximal ends of the phalanges and a palmar-dorsal alignment in the distal ends and metacarpal heads. These structural differences may be used to infer locmotor propensities of extinct primate taxa.

  20. Trabecular architecture of the manual elements reflects locomotor patterns in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarazzo, Stacey A

    2015-01-01

    The morphology of trabecular bone has proven sensitive to loading patterns in the long bones and metacarpal heads of primates. It is expected that we should also see differences in the manual digits of primates that practice different methods of locomotion. Primate proximal and middle phalanges are load-bearing elements that are held in different postures and experience different mechanical strains during suspension, quadrupedalism, and knuckle walking. Micro CT scans of the middle phalanx, proximal phalanx and the metacarpal head of the third ray were used to examine the pattern of trabecular orientation in Pan, Gorilla, Pongo, Hylobates and Macaca. Several zones, i.e., the proximal ends of both phalanges and the metacarpal heads, were capable of distinguishing between knuckle-walking, quadrupedal, and suspensory primates. Orientation and shape seem to be the primary distinguishing factors but differences in bone volume, isotropy index, and degree of anisotropy were seen across included taxa. Suspensory primates show primarily proximodistal alignment in all zones, and quadrupeds more palmar-dorsal orientation in several zones. Knuckle walkers are characterized by having proximodistal alignment in the proximal ends of the phalanges and a palmar-dorsal alignment in the distal ends and metacarpal heads. These structural differences may be used to infer locmotor propensities of extinct primate taxa.

  1. Expression Patterns of ABC Transporter Genes in Fluconazole-Resistant Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohar, Atefeh Abdollahi; Badali, Hamid; Shokohi, Tahereh; Nabili, Mojtaba; Amirrajab, Nasrin; Moazeni, Maryam

    2017-04-01

    Clinical management of fungal diseases is compromised by the emergence of antifungal drug resistance in fungi, which leads to elimination of available drug classes as treatment options. An understanding of antifungal resistance at molecular level is, therefore, essential for the development of strategies to combat the resistance. This study presents the assessment of molecular mechanisms associated with fluconazole resistance in clinical Candida glabrata isolates originated from Iran. Taking seven distinct fluconazole-resistant C. glabrata isolates, real-time PCRs were performed to evaluate the alternations in the regulation of the genes involved in drug efflux including CgCDR1, CgCDR2, CgSNQ2, and CgERG11. Gain-of-function (GOF) mutations in CgPDR1 alleles were determined by DNA sequencing. Cross-resistance to fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole was observed in 2.5 % of the isolates. In the present study, six amino acid substitutions were identified in CgPdr1, among which W297R, T588A, and F575L were previously reported, whereas D243N, H576Y, and P915R are novel. CgCDR1 overexpression was observed in 57.1 % of resistant isolates. However, CgCDR2 was not co-expressed with CgCDR1. CgSNQ2 was upregulated in 71.4 % of the cases. CgERG11 overexpression does not seem to be associated with azole resistance, except for isolates that exhibited azole cross-resistance. The pattern of efflux pump gene upregulation was associated with GOF mutations observed in CgPDR1. These results showed that drug efflux mediated by adenosine-5-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporters, especially CgSNQ2 and CgCDR1, is the predominant mechanism of fluconazole resistance in Iranian isolates of C. glabrata. Since some novel GOF mutations were found here, this study also calls for research aimed at investigating other new GOF mutations to reveal the comprehensive understanding about efflux-mediated resistance to azole antifungal agents.

  2. Novel genes exhibit distinct patterns of function acquisition and network integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Genes are created by a variety of evolutionary processes, some of which generate duplicate copies of an entire gene, while others rearrange pre-existing genetic elements or co-opt previously non-coding sequence to create genes with 'novel' sequences. These novel genes are thought to contribute to distinct phenotypes that distinguish organisms. The creation, evolution, and function of duplicated genes are well-studied; however, the genesis and early evolution of novel genes are not well-characterized. We developed a computational approach to investigate these issues by integrating genome-wide comparative phylogenetic analysis with functional and interaction data derived from small-scale and high-throughput experiments. Results We examine the function and evolution of new genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We observed significant differences in the functional attributes and interactions of genes created at different times and by different mechanisms. Novel genes are initially less integrated into cellular networks than duplicate genes, but they appear to gain functions and interactions more quickly than duplicates. Recently created duplicated genes show evidence of adapting existing functions to environmental changes, while young novel genes do not exhibit enrichment for any particular functions. Finally, we found a significant preference for genes to interact with other genes of similar age and origin. Conclusions Our results suggest a strong relationship between how and when genes are created and the roles they play in the cell. Overall, genes tend to become more integrated into the functional networks of the cell with time, but the dynamics of this process differ significantly between duplicate and novel genes. PMID:21187012

  3. Wnt, Frizzled, and sFRP gene expression patterns during gastrulation in the starfish Patiria (Asterina) pectinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Narudo; Kuraishi, Ritsu; Kaneko, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    By the initial phase of gastrulation, Wnt pathway regulation mediates endomesoderm specification and establishes the animal-vegetal axis, thereby leading to proper gastrulation in starfish. To provide insight into the ancestral mechanism regulating deuterostome gastrulation, we identified the gene expression patterns of Wnt, Frizzled (Fz), and secreted frizzled-related protein (sFRP) family genes, which play a role in the initial stage of the Wnt pathway, in starfish Patiria (Asterina) pectinifera embryos using whole mount in situ hybridization. We identified ten Wnt, four Fz, and two sFRP paralogues. From the hatching blastula to the late gastrula stage, the majority of the Wnt genes and both Fz5/8 and sFRP1/5 were expressed in the posterior and anterior half of the embryo, respectively. Wnt8, Fz1, and Fz4 showed restricted expression in the lateral ectoderm. On the other hand, several genes were expressed de novo in the restricted domain of the archenteron at the late gastrula stage. These results suggest that the canonical and/or non-canonical Wnt pathway might implicate endomesoderm specification, anterior-posterior axis establishment, anterior-posterior patterning, and archenteron morphogenesis in the developmental context of starfish embryos. From comparison with the expression patterns observed in Patria miniata, we consider that the Wnt pathway is conserved among starfishes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Wing patterning genes and coevolution of Müllerian mimicry in Heliconius butterflies: Support from phylogeography, cophylogeny, and divergence times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyal Cuthill, Jennifer F; Charleston, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Examples of long-term coevolution are rare among free-living organisms. Müllerian mimicry in Heliconius butterflies had been suggested as a key example of coevolution by early genetic studies. However, research over the last two decades has been dominated by the idea that the best-studied comimics, H. erato and H. melpomene, did not coevolve at all. Recently sequenced genes associated with wing color pattern phenotype offer a new opportunity to resolve this controversy. Here, we test the hypothesis of coevolution between H. erato and H. melpomene using Bayesian multilocus analysis of five color pattern genes and five neutral genetic markers. We first explore the extent of phylogenetic agreement versus conflict between the different genes. Coevolution is then tested against three aspects of the mimicry diversifications: phylogenetic branching patterns, divergence times, and, for the first time, phylogeographic histories. We show that all three lines of evidence are compatible with strict coevolution of the diverse mimicry wing patterns, contrary to some recent suggestions. Instead, these findings tally with a coevolutionary diversification driven primarily by the ecological force of Müllerian mimicry. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  5. A first glimpse into the pattern and scale of gene transfer in the Apicomplexa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, J.L.; Mullapudi, N.; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Reports of plant-like and bacterial-like genes for a number of parasitic organisms, most notably those within the Apicomplexa and Kinetoplastida, have appeared in the literature over the last few years. Among the apicomplexan organisms, following discovery of the apicomplexan plastid (apicoplast)...... been acquired via horizontal gene transfer.......), the discovery of plant-like genes was less surprising although the extent of transfer and the relationship of transferred genes to the apicoplast remained unclear. We used new genome sequence data to begin a systematic examination of the extent and origin of transferred genes in the Apicomplexa combined...... with a phylogenomic approach to detect potential gene transfers in four apicomplexan genomes. We have detected genes of algal nuclear, chloroplast (cyanobacterial) and proteobacterial origin. Plant-like genes were detected in species not currently harbouring a plastid (e.g. Cryptosporidium parvum) and putatively...

  6. Altered expression pattern of clock genes in a rat model of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie; Bouzinova, Elena; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2016-01-01

    of clock gene expression in depressive patients many studies have reported single-nucleotide polymorphisms in clock genes in these patients. METHODS: In the present study we investigated whether a depression-like state in rats associates with alternations of the diurnal expression of clock genes......: The present results suggest that altered expression of investigated clock genes are likely to associate with the induction of a depression-like state in the CMS model...

  7. Accelerated variant of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: clinical behavior and gene expression pattern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisés Selman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is characterized by the insidious onset of dyspnea or cough. However, a subset of patients has a short duration of symptoms with rapid progression to end-stage disease. In this study, we evaluated clinical and molecular features of "rapid" and "slow" progressors with IPF. METHODS AND FINDINGS: 26 patients with 24 months of symptoms [slow progressors] were studied. Survival was analyzed by the Kaplan-Meyer method and proportional hazard's model. Lung microarrays and tissue proteins were measured in a subset of patients. No differences were found in age, physiologic impairment and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL cellular profile. There were more males (OR = 6.5; CI:1.4-29.5; p = 0.006 and smokers (OR = 3.04; CI:1.1-8.3; p = 0.04 in the rapid progressors group. Survival from the beginning of symptoms was significantly reduced in rapid progressors (HR = 9.0; CI:4.48-18.3; p2-fold increase of active matrix metalloproteinase-9, and induced a higher fibroblast migration compared with slow progressors and controls [238+/-98% versus 123+/-29% (p<0.05 and 30+/-17% (p<0.01]. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A subgroup of IPF patients, predominantly smoking males, display an accelerated clinical course and have a gene expression pattern that is different from those with slower progression and longer survival. These findings highlight the variability in the progression of IPF, and may explain, in part, the difficulty in obtaining significant and reproducible results in studies of therapeutic interventions in patients with IPF.

  8. The effects of MicroRNA transfections on global patterns of gene expression in ovarian cancer cells are functionally coordinated

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small RNAs that have been linked to a number of diseases including cancer. The potential application of miRNAs in the diagnostics and therapeutics of ovarian and other cancers is an area of intense interest. A current challenge is the inability to accurately predict the functional consequences of exogenous modulations in the levels of potentially therapeutic miRNAs. Methods In an initial effort to systematically address this issue, we conducted miRNA transfection experiments using two miRNAs (miR-7, miR-128). We monitored the consequent changes in global patterns of gene expression by microarray and quantitative (real-time) polymerase chain reaction. Network analysis of the expression data was used to predict the consequence of each transfection on cellular function and these predictions were experimentally tested. Results While ~20% of the changes in expression patterns of hundreds to thousands of genes could be attributed to direct miRNA-mRNA interactions, the majority of the changes are indirect, involving the downstream consequences of miRNA-mediated changes in regulatory gene expression. The changes in gene expression induced by individual miRNAs are functionally coordinated but distinct between the two miRNAs. MiR-7 transfection into ovarian cancer cells induces changes in cell adhesion and other developmental networks previously associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMT) and other processes linked with metastasis. In contrast, miR-128 transfection induces changes in cell cycle control and other processes commonly linked with cellular replication. Conclusions The functionally coordinated patterns of gene expression displayed by different families of miRNAs have the potential to provide clinicians with a strategy to treat cancers from a systems rather than a single gene perspective. PMID:22853714

  9. The effects of MicroRNA transfections on global patterns of gene expression in ovarian cancer cells are functionally coordinated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahab Shubin W

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small RNAs that have been linked to a number of diseases including cancer. The potential application of miRNAs in the diagnostics and therapeutics of ovarian and other cancers is an area of intense interest. A current challenge is the inability to accurately predict the functional consequences of exogenous modulations in the levels of potentially therapeutic miRNAs. Methods In an initial effort to systematically address this issue, we conducted miRNA transfection experiments using two miRNAs (miR-7, miR-128. We monitored the consequent changes in global patterns of gene expression by microarray and quantitative (real-time polymerase chain reaction. Network analysis of the expression data was used to predict the consequence of each transfection on cellular function and these predictions were experimentally tested. Results While ~20% of the changes in expression patterns of hundreds to thousands of genes could be attributed to direct miRNA-mRNA interactions, the majority of the changes are indirect, involving the downstream consequences of miRNA-mediated changes in regulatory gene expression. The changes in gene expression induced by individual miRNAs are functionally coordinated but distinct between the two miRNAs. MiR-7 transfection into ovarian cancer cells induces changes in cell adhesion and other developmental networks previously associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMT and other processes linked with metastasis. In contrast, miR-128 transfection induces changes in cell cycle control and other processes commonly linked with cellular replication. Conclusions The functionally coordinated patterns of gene expression displayed by different families of miRNAs have the potential to provide clinicians with a strategy to treat cancers from a systems rather than a single gene perspective.

  10. Expression of alternatively spliced sodium channel alpha-subunit genes. Unique splicing patterns are observed in dorsal root ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Christopher K; Castle, John; Garrett-Engele, Philip; Armour, Christopher D; Kan, Zhengyan; Tsinoremas, Nicholas; Johnson, Jason M

    2004-10-29

    Molecular medicine requires the precise definition of drug targets, and tools are now in place to provide genome-wide information on the expression and alternative splicing patterns of any known gene. DNA microarrays were used to monitor transcript levels of the nine well-characterized alpha-subunit sodium channel genes across a broad range of tissues from cynomolgus monkey, a non-human primate model. Alternative splicing of human transcripts for a subset of the genes that are expressed in dorsal root ganglia, SCN8A (Na(v)1.6), SCN9A (Na(v)1.7), and SCN11A (Na(v)1.9) was characterized in detail. Genomic sequence analysis among gene family paralogs and between cross-species orthologs suggested specific alternative splicing events within transcripts of these genes, all of which were experimentally confirmed in human tissues. Quantitative PCR revealed that certain alternative splice events are uniquely expressed in dorsal root ganglia. In addition to characterization of human transcripts, alternatively spliced sodium channel transcripts were monitored in a rat model for neuropathic pain. Consistent down-regulation of all transcripts was observed, as well as significant changes in the splicing patterns of SCN8A and SCN9A.

  11. Oocyte maturation and expression pattern of follicular genes during in-vitro culture of vitrified mouse pre-antral follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamalzaei, Parisa; Valojerdi, Mojtaba Rezazadeh; Ebrahimi, Bita; Farrokhi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the oocyte maturation rate and follicular genes expression pattern during in-vitro culture of vitrified mouse pre-antral follicles. Middle sized pre-antral follicles were isolated mechanically from the ovaries of pre-pubertal mice and distributed in vitrification and control groups. In the vitrification group, follicles were washed in equilibration and vitrification solutions and then were immersed in liquid nitrogen after loading on cryotop tips. After warming in descending concentrations of sucrose solutions, fresh and vitrified-warmed follicles were cultured for 13 days. Follicles survival rate and follicular genes expression were assessed during in vitro culture. Finally, at the end of the culture period oocytes maturation rate were compared in both groups. In the vitrification group, follicles survival rate was lower significantly comparing to the control group (P culture period, expression of some genes such as Gdf9, Bmp15, Tgfβ1 and BmprII were higher in the vitrification group (P culture period expression pattern of all follicular genes were similar in both groups. In conclusion, survival rate of cryotop vitrified pre-antral follicles reduced during culture period while oocytes maturation and follicular genes expression did not show any noticeable alteration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Gene expression patterns of spleen, lung and brain with different radiosensitivity in C57BL6 mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumder, Zahidur Rahman; Lee, Woo Jung; Bae, Sang Woo; Lee, Yun Sil [Laboratory of Radiation Effect, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Su Jae [Laboratory of Radiation Experimental Therapeutics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-12-15

    Although little information is available on the underlying mechanisms, various genetic factors have been associated with tissue-specific responses to radiation. In the present study, we explored the possibility whether organ specific gene expression is associated with radiosensitivity using samples from brain, lung and spleen. We examined intrinsic expression pattern of 23 genes in the organs by semi-quantitative RT-PCR method using both male and female C57BL/6 mice. Expression of p53 and p21, well known factors for governing sensitivity to radiation or chemotherapeutic agents, was not different among the organ types. Both higher expression of sialyltransferase, delta7-sterol reductase, leptin receptor splice variant form 12.1, and Cu/Zn SuperOxide Dismutase (SOD) and lower expression of alphaB crystalline were specific for spleen tissue. Expression level of glutathione peroxidase and APO-1 cell surface antigen gene in lung tissue was high, while that of Na, K-ATPase alpha-subunit, Cu/ZnSOD, and cyclin G was low. Brain, radioresistant organ, showed higher expression of Na, K-ATPase-subunit, cyclin G, and nucleolar protein hNop56 and lower expression of delta7-sterol reductase. The result revealed a potential correlation between gene expression patterns and organ sensitivity, and identified genes which might be responsible for organ sensitivity.

  13. Gene set enrichment analysis and expression pattern exploration implicate an involvement of neurodevelopmental processes in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühleisen, Thomas W; Reinbold, Céline S; Forstner, Andreas J; Abramova, Lilia I; Alda, Martin; Babadjanova, Gulja; Bauer, Michael; Brennan, Paul; Chuchalin, Alexander; Cruceanu, Cristiana; Czerski, Piotr M; Degenhardt, Franziska; Fischer, Sascha B; Fullerton, Janice M; Gordon, Scott D; Grigoroiu-Serbanescu, Maria; Grof, Paul; Hauser, Joanna; Hautzinger, Martin; Herms, Stefan; Hoffmann, Per; Kammerer-Ciernioch, Jutta; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Kogevinas, Manolis; Krasnov, Valery; Lacour, André; Laprise, Catherine; Leber, Markus; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lucae, Susanne; Maaser, Anna; Maier, Wolfgang; Martin, Nicholas G; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mayoral, Fermin; McKay, James D; Medland, Sarah E; Mitchell, Philip B; Moebus, Susanne; Montgomery, Grant W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Oruc, Lilijana; Pantelejeva, Galina; Pfennig, Andrea; Pojskic, Lejla; Polonikov, Alexey; Reif, Andreas; Rivas, Fabio; Rouleau, Guy A; Schenk, Lorena M; Schofield, Peter R; Schwarz, Markus; Streit, Fabian; Strohmaier, Jana; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Tiganov, Alexander S; Treutlein, Jens; Turecki, Gustavo; Vedder, Helmut; Witt, Stephanie H; Schulze, Thomas G; Rietschel, Marcella; Nöthen, Markus M; Cichon, Sven

    2018-03-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common and highly heritable disorder of mood. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several independent susceptibility loci. In order to extract more biological information from GWAS data, multi-locus approaches represent powerful tools since they utilize knowledge about biological processes to integrate functional sets of genes at strongly to moderately associated loci. We conducted gene set enrichment analyses (GSEA) using 2.3 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms, 397 Reactome pathways and 24,025 patients with BD and controls. RNA expression of implicated individual genes and gene sets were examined in post-mortem brains across lifespan. Two pathways showed a significant enrichment after correction for multiple comparisons in the GSEA: GRB2 events in ERBB2 signaling, for which 6 of 21 genes were BD associated (P FDR = 0.0377), and NCAM signaling for neurite out-growth, for which 11 out of 62 genes were BD associated (P FDR = 0.0451). Most pathway genes showed peaks of RNA co-expression during fetal development and infancy and mapped to neocortical areas and parts of the limbic system. Pathway associations were technically reproduced by two methods, although they were not formally replicated in independent samples. Gene expression was explored in controls but not in patients. Pathway analysis in large GWAS data of BD and follow-up of gene expression patterns in healthy brains provide support for an involvement of neurodevelopmental processes in the etiology of this neuropsychiatric disease. Future studies are required to further evaluate the relevance of the implicated genes on pathway functioning and clinical aspects of BD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Genome-Wide Prediction of Functional Gene-Gene Interactions Inferred from Patterns of Genetic Differentiation in Mice and Men.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bochdanovits, Z.; Sondervan, D.; Perillous, S.; van Beijsterveldt, C.E.M.; Boomsma, D.I.; Heutink, P.

    2008-01-01

    The human genome encodes a limited number of genes yet contribute to individual differences in a vast array of heritable traits. A possible explanation for the capacity our genome to generate this virtually unlimited range of phenotypic variation in complex traits to assume functional interactions

  15. Transcription pattern of p53-targeted DNA repair genes in the hypoxia-tolerant subterranean mole rat Spalax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Imad; Malik, Assaf; Manov, Irena; Joel, Alma; Band, Mark; Avivi, Aaron

    2013-04-12

    The tumor suppressor gene p53 induces growth arrest and/or apoptosis in response to DNA damage/hypoxia. Inactivation of p53 confers a selective advantage to tumor cells under a hypoxic microenvironment during tumor progression. The subterranean blind mole rat, Spalax, spends its life underground at low-oxygen tensions, hence developing a wide range of respiratory/molecular adaptations to hypoxic stress, including critical changes in p53 structure and signaling pathway. The highly conserved p53 Arg(R)-172 is substituted by lysine (K) in Spalax, identical with a tumor-associated mutation. Functionality assays revealed that Spalax p53 is unable to activate apoptotic target genes but is still capable of activating cell cycle arrest genes. Furthermore, we have shown that the transcription patterns of representative p53-induced genes (Apaf1 and Mdm2) in Spalax are influenced by hypoxia. Cell cycle arrest allows the cells to repair DNA damage via different DNA repair genes. We tested the transcription pattern of three p53-related DNA repair genes (p53R2, Mlh1, and Msh2) under normoxia and short-acute hypoxia in Spalax, C57BL/6 wild-type mice, and two strains of mutant C57BL/6 mice, each carrying a different mutation at the R172 position. Our results show that while wild-type/mutant mice exhibit strong hypoxia-induced reductions of repair gene transcript levels, no such inhibition is found in Spalax under hypoxia. Moreover, unlike mouse p53R2, Spalax p53R2 transcript levels are strongly elevated under hypoxia. These results suggest that critical repair functions, which are known to be inhibited under hypoxia in mice, remain active in Spalax, as part of its unique hypoxia tolerance mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification of temporal and region-specific myocardial gene expression patterns in response to infarction in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat-Vidal, Cristina; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Nonell, Lara; Puigdecanet, Eulàlia; Astier, Laura; Solé, Francesc; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms associated with pathophysiological changes in ventricular remodelling due to myocardial infarction (MI) remain poorly understood. We analyzed changes in gene expression by microarray technology in porcine myocardial tissue at 1, 4, and 6 weeks post-MI.MI was induced by coronary artery ligation in 9 female pigs (30-40 kg). Animals were randomly sacrificed at 1, 4, or 6 weeks post-MI (n = 3 per group) and 3 healthy animals were also included as control group. Total RNA from myocardial samples was hybridized to GeneChip® Porcine Genome Arrays. Functional analysis was obtained with the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) online tool. Validation of microarray data was performed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR).More than 8,000 different probe sets showed altered expression in the remodelling myocardium at 1, 4, or 6 weeks post-MI. Ninety-seven percent of altered transcripts were detected in the infarct core and 255 probe sets were differentially expressed in the remote myocardium. Functional analysis revealed 28 genes de-regulated in the remote myocardial region in at least one of the three temporal analyzed stages, including genes associated with heart failure (HF), systemic sclerosis and coronary artery disease. In the infarct core tissue, eight major time-dependent gene expression patterns were recognized among 4,221 probe sets commonly altered over time. Altered gene expression of ACVR2B, BID, BMP2, BMPR1A, LMNA, NFKBIA, SMAD1, TGFB3, TNFRSF1A, and TP53 were further validated.The clustering of similar expression patterns for gene products with related function revealed molecular footprints, some of them described for the first time, which elucidate changes in biological processes at different stages after MI.

  17. Identification of temporal and region-specific myocardial gene expression patterns in response to infarction in swine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Prat-Vidal

    Full Text Available Molecular mechanisms associated with pathophysiological changes in ventricular remodelling due to myocardial infarction (MI remain poorly understood. We analyzed changes in gene expression by microarray technology in porcine myocardial tissue at 1, 4, and 6 weeks post-MI.MI was induced by coronary artery ligation in 9 female pigs (30-40 kg. Animals were randomly sacrificed at 1, 4, or 6 weeks post-MI (n = 3 per group and 3 healthy animals were also included as control group. Total RNA from myocardial samples was hybridized to GeneChip® Porcine Genome Arrays. Functional analysis was obtained with the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA online tool. Validation of microarray data was performed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR.More than 8,000 different probe sets showed altered expression in the remodelling myocardium at 1, 4, or 6 weeks post-MI. Ninety-seven percent of altered transcripts were detected in the infarct core and 255 probe sets were differentially expressed in the remote myocardium. Functional analysis revealed 28 genes de-regulated in the remote myocardial region in at least one of the three temporal analyzed stages, including genes associated with heart failure (HF, systemic sclerosis and coronary artery disease. In the infarct core tissue, eight major time-dependent gene expression patterns were recognized among 4,221 probe sets commonly altered over time. Altered gene expression of ACVR2B, BID, BMP2, BMPR1A, LMNA, NFKBIA, SMAD1, TGFB3, TNFRSF1A, and TP53 were further validated.The clustering of similar expression patterns for gene products with related function revealed molecular footprints, some of them described for the first time, which elucidate changes in biological processes at different stages after MI.

  18. Systematic analysis of gene expression pattern in has-miR-197 over-expressed human uterine leiomyoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jing; Wu, Xiaoli; Fu, Ziyi; Tan, Jie; Xu, Qing

    2015-10-01

    Our previous study showed that the expression of miR-197 in leiomyoma was down-regulated compared with myometrium. Further, miR-197 has been identified to affect uterine leiomyoma cell proliferation, apoptosis, and metastasis ability, though the responsible molecular mechanism has not been well elucidated. In this study, we sought to determine the expression patterns of miR-197 targeted genes and to explore their potential functions, participating Pathways and the networks that are involved in the biological behavior of human uterine leiomyoma. After transfection of human uterine leiomyoma cells with miR-197, we confirmed the expression level of miR-197 using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), and we detected the gene expression profiles after miR-197 over-expression through DNA microarray analysis. Further, we performed GO and Pathway analysis. The dominantly dys-regulated genes, which were up- or down-regulated by more than 10-fold, compared with parental cells, were confirmed using qRT-PCR technology. Compared with the control group, miR-197 was up-regulated by 30-fold after miR-197 lentiviral transfection. The microarray data showed that 872 genes were dys-regulated by more than 2-fold in human uterine leiomyoma cells after miR-197 overexpression, including 537 up-regulated and 335 down-regulated genes. The GO analysis indicated that the dys-regulated genes were primarily involved in response to stimuli, multicellular organ processes, and the signaling of biological progression. Further, Pathway analysis data showed that these genes participated in regulating several signaling Pathways, including the JAK/STAT signaling Pathway, the Toll-like receptor signaling Pathway, and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction. The qRT-PCR results confirmed that 17 of the 66 selected genes, which were up- or down-regulated more than 10-fold by miR-197, were consistent with the microarray results, including tumorigenesis-related genes, such as DRT7, SLC549, SFMBT2, FLJ37956

  19. Genome-wide integration on transcription factors, histone acetylation and gene expression reveals genes co-regulated by histone modification patterns.

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    Yayoi Natsume-Kitatani

    Full Text Available N-terminal tails of H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 histone families are subjected to posttranslational modifications that take part in transcriptional regulation mechanisms, such as transcription factor binding and gene expression. Regulation mechanisms under control of histone modification are important but remain largely unclear, despite of emerging datasets for comprehensive analysis of histone modification. In this paper, we focus on what we call genetic harmonious units (GHUs, which are co-occurring patterns among transcription factor binding, gene expression and histone modification. We present the first genome-wide approach that captures GHUs by combining ChIP-chip with microarray datasets from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our approach employs noise-robust soft clustering to select patterns which share the same preferences in transcription factor-binding, histone modification and gene expression, which are all currently implied to be closely correlated. The detected patterns are a well-studied acetylation of lysine 16 of H4 in glucose depletion as well as co-acetylation of five lysine residues of H3 with H4 Lys12 and H2A Lys7 responsible for ribosome biogenesis. Furthermore, our method further suggested the recognition of acetylated H4 Lys16 being crucial to histone acetyltransferase ESA1, whose essential role is still under controversy, from a microarray dataset on ESA1 and its bypass suppressor mutants. These results demonstrate that our approach allows us to provide clearer principles behind gene regulation mechanisms under histone modifications and detect GHUs further by applying to other microarray and ChIP-chip datasets. The source code of our method, which was implemented in MATLAB (http://www.mathworks.com/, is available from the supporting page for this paper: http://www.bic.kyoto-u.ac.jp/pathway/natsume/hm_detector.htm.

  20. Inactivation of the Huntington's disease gene (Hdh impairs anterior streak formation and early patterning of the mouse embryo

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    Conlon Ronald A

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntingtin, the HD gene encoded protein mutated by polyglutamine expansion in Huntington's disease, is required in extraembryonic tissues for proper gastrulation, implicating its activities in nutrition or patterning of the developing embryo. To test these possibilities, we have used whole mount in situ hybridization to examine embryonic patterning and morphogenesis in homozygous Hdhex4/5 huntingtin deficient embryos. Results In the absence of huntingtin, expression of nutritive genes appears normal but E7.0–7.5 embryos exhibit a unique combination of patterning defects. Notable are a shortened primitive streak, absence of a proper node and diminished production of anterior streak derivatives. Reduced Wnt3a, Tbx6 and Dll1 expression signify decreased paraxial mesoderm and reduced Otx2 expression and lack of headfolds denote a failure of head development. In addition, genes initially broadly expressed are not properly restricted to the posterior, as evidenced by the ectopic expression of Nodal, Fgf8 and Gsc in the epiblast and T (Brachyury and Evx1 in proximal mesoderm derivatives. Despite impaired posterior restriction and anterior streak deficits, overall anterior/posterior polarity is established. A single primitive streak forms and marker expression shows that the anterior epiblast and anterior visceral endoderm (AVE are specified. Conclusion Huntingtin is essential in the early patterning of the embryo for formation of the anterior region of the primitive streak, and for down-regulation of a subset of dynamic growth and transcription factor genes. These findings provide fundamental starting points for identifying the novel cellular and molecular activities of huntingtin in the extraembryonic tissues that govern normal anterior streak development. This knowledge may prove to be important for understanding the mechanism by which the dominant polyglutamine expansion in huntingtin determines the loss of neurons in

  1. Computational gene expression profiling under salt stress reveals patterns of co-expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchita; Sharma, Ashok

    2016-03-01

    Plants respond differently to environmental conditions. Among various abiotic stresses, salt stress is a condition where excess salt in soil causes inhibition of plant growth. To understand the response of plants to the stress conditions, identification of the responsible genes is required. Clustering is a data mining technique used to group the genes with similar expression. The genes of a cluster show similar expression and function. We applied clustering algorithms on gene expression data of Solanum tuberosum showing differential expression in Capsicum annuum under salt stress. The clusters, which were common in multiple algorithms were taken further for analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) further validated the findings of other cluster algorithms by visualizing their clusters in three-dimensional space. Functional annotation results revealed that most of the genes were involved in stress related responses. Our findings suggest that these algorithms may be helpful in the prediction of the function of co-expressed genes.

  2. Computational gene expression profiling under salt stress reveals patterns of co-expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchita

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Plants respond differently to environmental conditions. Among various abiotic stresses, salt stress is a condition where excess salt in soil causes inhibition of plant growth. To understand the response of plants to the stress conditions, identification of the responsible genes is required. Clustering is a data mining technique used to group the genes with similar expression. The genes of a cluster show similar expression and function. We applied clustering algorithms on gene expression data of Solanum tuberosum showing differential expression in Capsicum annuum under salt stress. The clusters, which were common in multiple algorithms were taken further for analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA further validated the findings of other cluster algorithms by visualizing their clusters in three-dimensional space. Functional annotation results revealed that most of the genes were involved in stress related responses. Our findings suggest that these algorithms may be helpful in the prediction of the function of co-expressed genes.

  3. A comparative analysis on the synonymous codon usage pattern in viral functional genes and their translational initiation region of ASFV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian-Hua; Gao, Zong-Liang; Sun, Dong-Jie; Ding, Yao-Zhong; Zhang, Jie; Stipkovits, Laszlo; Szathmary, Susan; Pejsak, Zygmunt; Liu, Yong-Sheng

    2013-04-01

    The synonymous codon usage pattern of African swine fever virus (ASFV), the similarity degree of the synonymous codon usage between this virus and some organisms and the synonymous codon usage bias for the translation initiation region of viral functional genes in the whole genome of ASFV have been investigated by some simply statistical analyses. Although both GC12% (the GC content at the first and second codon positions) and GC3% (the GC content at the third codon position) of viral functional genes have a large fluctuation, the significant correlations between GC12 and GC3% and between GC3% and the first principal axis of principle component analysis on the relative synonymous codon usage of the viral functional genes imply that mutation pressure of ASFV plays an important role in the synonymous codon usage pattern. Turning to the synonymous codon usage of this virus, the codons with U/A end predominate in the synonymous codon family for the same amino acid and a weak codon usage bias in both leading and lagging strands suggests that strand compositional asymmetry does not take part in the formation of codon usage in ASFV. The interaction between the absolute codon usage bias and GC3% suggests that other selections take part in the formation of codon usage, except for the mutation pressure. It is noted that the similarity degree of codon usage between ASFV and soft tick is higher than that between the virus and the pig, suggesting that the soft tick plays a more important role than the pig in the codon usage pattern of ASFV. The translational initiation region of the viral functional genes generally have a strong tendency to select some synonymous codons with low GC content, suggesting that the synonymous codon usage bias caused by translation selection from the host takes part in modulating the translation initiation efficiency of ASFV functional genes.

  4. Phylogenomic analysis of UDP glycosyltransferase 1 multigene family in Linum usitatissimum identified genes with varied expression patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barvkar Vitthal T

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The glycosylation process, catalyzed by ubiquitous glycosyltransferase (GT family enzymes, is a prevalent modification of plant secondary metabolites that regulates various functions such as hormone homeostasis, detoxification of xenobiotics and biosynthesis and storage of secondary metabolites. Flax (Linum usitatissimum L. is a commercially grown oilseed crop, important because of its essential fatty acids and health promoting lignans. Identification and characterization of UDP glycosyltransferase (UGT genes from flax could provide valuable basic information about this important gene family and help to explain the seed specific glycosylated metabolite accumulation and other processes in plants. Plant genome sequencing projects are useful to discover complexity within this gene family and also pave way for the development of functional genomics approaches. Results Taking advantage of the newly assembled draft genome sequence of flax, we identified 137 UDP glycosyltransferase (UGT genes from flax using a conserved signature motif. Phylogenetic analysis of these protein sequences clustered them into 14 major groups (A-N. Expression patterns of these genes were investigated using publicly available expressed sequence tag (EST, microarray data and reverse transcription quantitative real time PCR (RT-qPCR. Seventy-three per cent of these genes (100 out of 137 showed expression evidence in 15 tissues examined and indicated varied expression profiles. The RT-qPCR results of 10 selected genes were also coherent with the digital expression analysis. Interestingly, five duplicated UGT genes were identified, which showed differential expression in various tissues. Of the seven intron loss/gain positions detected, two intron positions were conserved among most of the UGTs, although a clear relationship about the evolution of these genes could not be established. Comparison of the flax UGTs with orthologs from four other sequenced dicot

  5. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals whole-genome duplications and gene selection patterns in cultivated and wild Chrysanthemum species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, So Youn; Kwon, Soo-Jin; Lee, Tae-Ho; Jung, Jae-A; Kim, Jung Sun; Kang, Sang-Ho; Sohn, Seong-Han

    2017-11-01

    Comparative transcriptome analysis of wild and cultivated chrysanthemums provides valuable genomic resources and helps uncover common and divergent patterns of genome and gene evolution in these species. Plants are unique in that they employ polyploidy (or whole-genome duplication, WGD) as a key process for speciation and evolution. The Chrysanthemum genus is closely associated with hybridization and polyploidization, with Chrysanthemum species exhibiting diverse ploidy levels. The commercially important species, C. morifolium is an allohexaploid plant that is thought to have originated via the hybridization of several Chrysanthemum species, but the genomic and molecular evolutionary mechanisms remain poorly understood. In the present study, we sequenced and compared the transcriptomes of C. morifolium and the wild Korean diploid species, C. boreale. De novo transcriptome assembly revealed 11,318 genes in C. morifolium and 10,961 genes in C. boreale, whose functions were annotated by homology searches. An analysis of synonymous substitution rates (Ks) of paralogous and orthologous genes suggested that the two Chrysanthemum species commonly experienced the Asteraceae paleopolyploidization and recent genome duplication or triplication before the divergence of these species. Intriguingly, C. boreale probably underwent rapid diploidization, with a reduction in chromosome number, whereas C. morifolium maintained the original chromosome number. Analysis of the ratios of non-synonymous to synonymous nucleotide substitutions (Ka/Ks) between orthologous gene pairs indicated that 107 genes experienced positive selection, which may have been crucial for the adaptation, domestication, and speciation of Chrysanthemum.

  6. Pattern of the divergence of olfactory receptor genes during tetrapod evolution.

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    Takushi Kishida

    Full Text Available The olfactory receptor (OR multigene family is responsible for the sense of smell in vertebrate species. OR genes are scattered widely in our chromosomes and constitute one of the largest gene families in eutherian genomes. Some previous studies revealed that eutherian OR genes diverged mainly during early mammalian evolution. However, the exact period when, and the ecological reason why eutherian ORs strongly diverged has remained unclear. In this study, I performed a strict data mining effort for marsupial opossum OR sequences and bootstrap analyses to estimate the periods of chromosomal migrations and gene duplications of OR genes during tetrapod evolution. The results indicate that chromosomal migrations occurred mainly during early vertebrate evolution before the monotreme-placental split, and that gene duplications occurred mainly during early mammalian evolution between the bird-mammal split and marsupial-placental split, coinciding with the reduction of opsin genes in primitive mammals. It could be thought that the previous chromosomal dispersal allowed the OR genes to subsequently expand easily, and the nocturnal adaptation of early mammals might have triggered the OR gene expansion.

  7. The complete mitochondrial genome of the sea spider Achelia bituberculata (Pycnogonida, Ammotheidae: arthropod ground pattern of gene arrangement

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    Lee Yong-Seok

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phylogenetic position of pycnogonids is a long-standing and controversial issue in arthropod phylogeny. This controversy has recently been rekindled by differences in the conclusions based on neuroanatomical data concerning the chelifore and the patterns of Hox expression. The mitochondrial genome of a sea spider, Nymphon gracile (Pycnogonida, Nymphonidae, was recently reported in an attempt to address this issue. However, N. gracile appears to be a long-branch taxon on the phylogenetic tree and exhibits a number of peculiar features, such as 10 tRNA translocations and even an inversion of several protein-coding genes. Sequences of other pycnogonid mitochondrial genomes are needed if the position of pycnogonids is to be elucidated on this basis. Results The complete mitochondrial genome (15,474 bp of a sea spider (Achelia bituberculata belonging to the family Ammotheidae, which combines a number of anatomical features considered plesiomorphic with respect to other pycnogonids, was sequenced and characterized. The genome organization shows the features typical of most metazoan animal genomes (37 tightly-packed genes. The overall gene arrangement is completely identical to the arthropod ground pattern, with one exception: the position of the trnQ gene between the rrnS gene and the control region. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference trees inferred from the amino acid sequences of mitochondrial protein-coding genes consistently indicate that the pycnogonids (A. bituberculata and N. gracile may be closely related to the clade of Acari and Araneae. Conclusion The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of A. bituberculata (Family Ammotheidae and the previously-reported partial sequence of Endeis spinosa show the gene arrangement patterns typical of arthropods (Limulus-like, but they differ markedly from that of N. gracile. Phylogenetic analyses based on mitochondrial protein-coding genes showed that Pycnogonida may be

  8. The AERO system: a 3D-like approach for recording gene expression patterns in the whole mouse embryo.

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    Hirohito Shimizu

    Full Text Available We have recently constructed a web-based database of gene expression in the mouse whole embryo, EMBRYS (http://embrys.jp/embrys/html/MainMenu.html. To allow examination of gene expression patterns to the fullest extent possible, this database provides both photo images and annotation data. However, since embryos develop via an intricate process of morphogenesis, it would be of great value to track embryonic gene expression from a three dimensional perspective. In fact, several methods have been developed to achieve this goal, but highly laborious procedures and specific operational skills are generally required. We utilized a novel microscopic technique that enables the easy capture of rotational, 3D-like images of the whole embryo. In this method, a rotary head equipped with two mirrors that are designed to obtain an image tilted at 45 degrees to the microscope stage captures serial images at 2-degree intervals. By a simple operation, 180 images are automatically collected. These 2D images obtained at multiple angles are then used to reconstruct 3D-like images, termed AERO images. By means of this system, over 800 AERO images of 191 gene expression patterns were captured. These images can be easily rotated on the computer screen using the EMBRYS database so that researchers can view an entire embryo by a virtual viewing on a computer screen in an unbiased or non-predetermined manner. The advantages afforded by this approach make it especially useful for generating data viewed in public databases.

  9. Comprehensive immune transcriptomic analysis in bladder cancer reveals subtype specific immune gene expression patterns of prognostic relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Runhan; Tyryshkin, Kathrin; Graham, Charles H; Koti, Madhuri; Siemens, D Robert

    2017-09-19

    Recent efforts on genome wide profiling of muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) have led to its classification into distinct genomic and transcriptomic molecular subtypes that exhibit variability in prognosis. Evolving evidence from recent immunotherapy trials has demonstrated the significance of pre-existing tumour immune profiles that could guide treatment decisions. To identify immune gene expression patterns associated with the molecular subtypes, we performed a comprehensive in silico immune transcriptomic profiling, utilizing transcriptomic data from 347 MIBC cases from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). To investigate subtype-associated immune gene expression patterns, we assembled 924 immune response genes and specifically those involved in T-cell cytotoxicity and the Type I/II interferon pathways. A set of 157 ranked genes was able to distinguish the four subtypes in an unsupervised analysis in an original training cohort (n=122) and an expanded, validation cohort (n=225). The most common overrepresented pathways distinguishing the four molecular subtypes, included JAK/STAT signaling, Toll-like receptor signaling, interleukin signaling, and T-cell activation. Some of the most enriched biological processes were responses to IFN-γ, antigen processing and presentation, cytokine mediated signaling, hemopoeisis, cell proliferation and cellular defense response in the TCGA cluster IV. Our novel findings provide further insights into the association between genomic subtypes and immune activation in MIBC and may open novel opportunities for their exploitation towards precise treatment with immunotherapy.

  10. Altered expression patterns of lipid metabolism genes in an animal model of HCV core-related, nonobese, modest hepatic steatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Ming-Ling

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because the gene expression patterns of nonobese hepatic steatosis in affected patients remain unclear, we sought to explore these patterns using an animal model of nonobese hepatic steatosis. Methods We developed mice that conditionally express the hepatitis C virus (HCV core protein regulated by the tetracycline transactivator (tTA. Microarray analyses and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction were performed using liver samples of both the double transgenic mice (DTM, which express both the HCV core and tTA, and single transgenic mice (STM, which express tTA alone, at 2 months of age. Functional categories of genes with altered expression were classified using gene ontology programs. Serum glucose, lipid levels, and systemic blood pressure were also measured. Results Approximately 20–30% of hepatocytes from the DTM were steatotic. No significant differences were observed in the serum glucose, lipid content, or blood pressure levels between the DTM and STM. Gene expression analyses revealed Sterol-regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP pathway activation and dysregulation of the following genes involved in lipid metabolism: 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase 1, Apolipoprotein AII, Apolipoprotein CI, acyl-CoA thioesterase I, and fatty acid binding protein 1; in mitochondrial function: solute carrier family 25 member 25 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit II; in immune reaction: complement component 3, lymphocyte antigen 6 complex, locus A, lymphocyte antigen 6 complex, locus C, lymphocyte antigen 6 complex, locus D, and lymphocyte antigen 6 complex, locus E. Conclusion Some genes of lipid metabolism, mitochondrial function, and immune reaction and the SREBP pathway are involved in HCV core-related, nonobese, modest hepatic steatosis.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis and expression patterns of Pax genes in the onychophoran Euperipatoides rowelli reveal a novel bilaterian Pax subfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Franziska Anni; Schumann, Isabell; Hering, Lars; Mayer, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Pax family genes encode a class of transcription factors that regulate various developmental processes. To shed light on the evolutionary history of these genes in Panarthropoda (Onychophora + Tardigrada + Arthropoda), we analyzed the Pax repertoire in the embryonic and adult transcriptomes of the onychophoran Euperipatoides rowelli. Our data revealed homologs of all five major bilaterian Pax subfamilies in this species, including Pax2/5/8, Pax4/6, Pox-neuro, Pax1/9/Pox-meso, and Pax3/7. In addition, we identified a new Pax member, pax-α, which does not fall into any other known Pax subfamily but instead clusters in the heterogenic Pax-α/β clade containing deuterostome, ecdysozoan, and lophotrochozoan gene sequences. These findings suggest that the last common bilaterian ancestor possessed six rather than five Pax genes, which have been retained in the panarthropod lineage. The expression data of Pax orthologs in the onychophoran embryo revealed distinctive patterns, some of which might be related to their ancestral roles in the last common panarthropod ancestor, whereas others might be specific to the onychophoran lineage. The derived roles include, for example, an involvement of pax2/5/8, pox-neuro, and pax3/7 in onychophoran nephridiogenesis, and an additional function of pax2/5/8 in the formation of the ventral and preventral organs. Furthermore, our transcriptomic analyses suggest that at least some Pax genes, including pax6 and pax-α, are expressed in the adult onychophoran head, although the corresponding functions remain to be clarified. The remarkable diversity of the Pax expression patterns highlights the functional and evolutionary plasticity of these genes in panarthropods. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Development-related expression patterns of protein-coding and miRNA genes involved in porcine muscle growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F J; Jin, L; Guo, Y Q; Liu, R; He, M N; Li, M Z; Li, X W

    2014-11-27

    Muscle growth and development is associated with remarkable changes in protein-coding and microRNA (miRNA) gene expression. To determine the expression patterns of genes and miRNAs related to muscle growth and development, we measured the expression levels of 25 protein-coding and 16 miRNA genes in skeletal and cardiac muscles throughout 5 developmental stages by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The Short Time-Series Expression Miner (STEM) software clustering results showed that growth-related genes were downregulated at all developmental stages in both the psoas major and longissimus dorsi muscles, indicating their involvement in early developmental stages. Furthermore, genes related to muscle atrophy, such as forkhead box 1 and muscle ring finger, showed unregulated expression with increasing age, suggesting a decrease in protein synthesis during the later stages of skeletal muscle development. We found that development of the cardiac muscle was a complex process in which growth-related genes were highly expressed during embryonic development, but they did not show uniform postnatal expression patterns. Moreover, the expression level of miR-499, which enhances the expression of the β-myosin heavy chain, was significantly different in the psoas major and longissimus dorsi muscles, suggesting the involvement of miR-499 in the determination of skeletal muscle fiber types. We also performed correlation analyses of messenger RNA and miRNA expression. We found negative relationships between miR-486 and forkhead box 1, and miR-133a and serum response factor at all developmental stages, suggesting that forkhead box 1 and serum response factor are potential targets of miR-486 and miR-133a, respectively.

  13. Isolation and expression pattern of COR15b and KIN1 genes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    COR15b and KIN1 (COR 6.5) genes encode polypeptides of 15 KDa and 6.5 KDa, respectively. They are involved in the dehydration tolerance mechanisms and play important role under cold stress. cDNA sequences of COR15b and KIN1 genes were firstly isolated from leaves of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) and ...

  14. GENE EXPRESSION PATTERNS ASSOCIATED WITH INFERTILITY IN HUMAN AND RODENT MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modern genomic technologies such as DNA arrays provide the means to investigate molecular interactions at an unprecedented level, and arrays have been used to carry out gene expression profiling as a means of identifying candidate genes involved in molecular mechanisms underlying...

  15. Variation of DNA methylation patterns associated with gene expression in rice (Oryza sativa) exposed to cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Sheng Jun; Liu, Xue Song; Tao, Hua; Tan, Shang Kun; Chu, Shan Shan; Oono, Youko; Zhang, Xian Duo; Chen, Jian; Yang, Zhi Min

    2016-12-01

    We report genome-wide single-base resolution maps of methylated cytosines and transcriptome change in Cd-exposed rice. Widespread differences were identified in CG and non-CG methylation marks between Cd-exposed and Cd-free rice genomes. There are 2320 non-redundant differentially methylated regions detected in the genome. RNA sequencing revealed 2092 DNA methylation-modified genes differentially expressed under Cd exposure. More genes were found hypermethylated than those hypomethylated in CG, CHH and CHG (where H is A, C or T) contexts in upstream, gene body and downstream regions. Many of the genes were involved in stress response, metal transport and transcription factors. Most of the DNA methylation-modified genes were transcriptionally altered under Cd stress. A subset of loss of function mutants defective in DNA methylation and histone modification activities was used to identify transcript abundance of selected genes. Compared with wide type, mutation of MET1 and DRM2 resulted in general lower transcript levels of the genes under Cd stress. Transcripts of OsIRO2, OsPR1b and Os09g02214 in drm2 were significantly reduced. A commonly used DNA methylation inhibitor 5-azacytidine was employed to investigate whether DNA demethylation affected physiological consequences. 5-azacytidine provision decreased general DNA methylation levels of selected genes, but promoted growth of rice seedlings and Cd accumulation in rice plant. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The role of cortisol and interleukin-10 gene expression patterns in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of interleukin-10 genes were up-regulated at 4 hours post exercise and sustained till 24 hours post exercise (χ² = 50, P = 0.000). Post exercise stress activates the release of cortisol, and interleukin-10 genes to reinstate homeostasis through modulation of the immune response. Keywords: Homeostasis, immune response, ...

  17. Differential gene expression patterns of the developing and adult mouse cornea compared to the lens and tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Feng; Lee, Seakwoo; Schumacher, Michael; Jun, Albert; Chakravarti, Shukti

    2008-09-01

    The cornea continues to mature after birth to develop a fully functional, refractive and protective barrier tissue. Here we investigated the complex biological events underlying this process by profiling global genome-wide gene expression patterns of the immature postnatal day 10 and 7-week old adult mouse cornea. The lens and tendon were included in the study to increase the specificity of genes identified as upregulated in the corneal samples. Notable similarities in gene expression between the cornea and the tendon were in the mesenchymal extracellular matrix collagen (types I, III, V, VI) and proteoglycan (lumican, decorin and biglycan) genes. Expression similarities in the cornea and lens were limited to certain epithelial genes and the crystallins. Approximately 76 genes were over expressed in the cornea samples that showed basal expression levels in the lens and tendon. Thirty-two of these were novel with no known functions in the cornea. These include genes with a potential role in protection against oxidative stress (Dhcr24, Cdo1, Akr1b7, Prdx6), inflammation (Ltb4dh, Wdr1), ion transport (Pdzk1ip1, Slc12a2, Slc25a17) and transcription (Zfp36l3, Pdzk1ip1). Direct comparison of the cornea of two ages showed selective upregulation of 50 and 12 genes in the P10 and adult cornea, respectively. Of the upregulated P10 genes several encode extracellular matrix collagens and proteoglycans that are stable components of the adult cornea and their high transcriptional activity at P10 indicate a period of actie corneal growth and matrix deposition in the young cornea. Much less is known about the genes selectively over expressed in the adult cornea; some relate to immune response and innervations (Npy), and possibly to electron transport (Cyp24a1, Cyp2f2) and others of yet unknown functions in the cornea (Rgs10, Psmb8, Xlr4). This study detected expression of genes with known functions in the cornea, providing additional validation of the microarray experiments

  18. Ensemble attribute profile clustering: discovering and characterizing groups of genes with similar patterns of biological features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bissell MJ

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ensemble attribute profile clustering is a novel, text-based strategy for analyzing a user-defined list of genes and/or proteins. The strategy exploits annotation data present in gene-centered corpora and utilizes ideas from statistical information retrieval to discover and characterize properties shared by subsets of the list. The practical utility of this method is demonstrated by employing it in a retrospective study of two non-overlapping sets of genes defined by a published investigation as markers for normal human breast luminal epithelial cells and myoepithelial cells. Results Each genetic locus was characterized using a finite set of biological properties and represented as a vector of features indicating attributes associated with the locus (a gene attribute profile. In this study, the vector space models for a pre-defined list of genes were constructed from the Gene Ontology (GO terms and the Conserved Domain Database (CDD protein domain terms assigned to the loci by the gene-centered corpus LocusLink. This data set of GO- and CDD-based gene attribute profiles, vectors of binary random variables, was used to estimate multiple finite mixture models and each ensuing model utilized to partition the profiles into clusters. The resultant partitionings were combined using a unanimous voting scheme to produce consensus clusters, sets of profiles that co-occured consistently in the same cluster. Attributes that were important in defining the genes assigned to a consensus cluster were identified. The clusters and their attributes were inspected to ascertain the GO and CDD terms most associated with subsets of genes and in conjunction with external knowledge such as chromosomal location, used to gain functional insights into human breast biology. The 52 luminal epithelial cell markers and 89 myoepithelial cell markers are disjoint sets of genes. Ensemble attribute profile clustering-based analysis indicated that both lists

  19. Temporal expression pattern of genes during the period of sex differentiation in human embryonic gonads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mamsen, Linn S; Ernst, Emil H; Borup, Rehannah

    2017-01-01

    The precise timing and sequence of changes in expression of key genes and proteins during human sex-differentiation and onset of steroidogenesis was evaluated by whole-genome expression in 67 first trimester human embryonic and fetal ovaries and testis and confirmed by qPCR and immunohistochemistry...... was significantly higher in testis than ovaries. Gene expression was confirmed by IHC for GAGE, SOX9, AMH, CYP17A1, LIN28, WNT2B, ETV5 and GLI1. Gene expression was not associated with the maternal smoking habits. Collectively, a precise temporal determination of changes in expression of key genes involved in human...... sex-differentiation is defined, with identification of new genes of potential importance....

  20. Highly conserved gene order and numerous novel repetitive elements in genomic regions linked to wing pattern variation in Heliconius butterflies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halder Georg

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With over 20 parapatric races differing in their warningly colored wing patterns, the butterfly Heliconius erato provides a fascinating example of an adaptive radiation. Together with matching races of its co-mimic Heliconius melpomene, H. erato also represents a textbook case of Müllerian mimicry, a phenomenon where common warning signals are shared amongst noxious organisms. It is of great interest to identify the specific genes that control the mimetic wing patterns of H. erato and H. melpomene. To this end we have undertaken comparative mapping and targeted genomic sequencing in both species. This paper reports on a comparative analysis of genomic sequences linked to color pattern mimicry genes in Heliconius. Results Scoring AFLP polymorphisms in H. erato broods allowed us to survey loci at approximately 362 kb intervals across the genome. With this strategy we were able to identify markers tightly linked to two color pattern genes: D and Cr, which were then used to screen H. erato BAC libraries in order to identify clones for sequencing. Gene density across 600 kb of BAC sequences appeared relatively low, although the number of predicted open reading frames was typical for an insect. We focused analyses on the D- and Cr-linked H. erato BAC sequences and on the Yb-linked H. melpomene BAC sequence. A comparative analysis between homologous regions of H. erato (Cr-linked BAC and H. melpomene (Yb-linked BAC revealed high levels of sequence conservation and microsynteny between the two species. We found that repeated elements constitute 26% and 20% of BAC sequences from H. erato and H. melpomene respectively. The majority of these repetitive sequences appear to be novel, as they showed no significant similarity to any other available insect sequences. We also observed signs of fine scale conservation of gene order between Heliconius and the moth Bombyx mori, suggesting that lepidopteran genome architecture may be conserved

  1. Patterns of gene expression in a scleractinian coral undergoing natural bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneca, Francois O; Forêt, Sylvain; Ball, Eldon E; Smith-Keune, Carolyn; Miller, David J; van Oppen, Madeleine J H

    2010-10-01

    Coral bleaching is a major threat to coral reefs worldwide and is predicted to intensify with increasing global temperature. This study represents the first investigation of gene expression in an Indo-Pacific coral species undergoing natural bleaching which involved the loss of algal symbionts. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction experiments were conducted to select and evaluate coral internal control genes (ICGs), and to investigate selected coral genes of interest (GOIs) for changes in gene expression in nine colonies of the scleractinian coral Acropora millepora undergoing bleaching at Magnetic Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Among the six ICGs tested, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and the ribosomal protein genes S7 and L9 exhibited the most constant expression levels between samples from healthy-looking colonies and samples from the same colonies when severely bleached a year later. These ICGs were therefore utilised for normalisation of expression data for seven selected GOIs. Of the seven GOIs, homologues of catalase, C-type lectin and chromoprotein genes were significantly up-regulated as a result of bleaching by factors of 1.81, 1.46 and 1.61 (linear mixed models analysis of variance, P coral bleaching response genes. In contrast, three genes, including one putative ICG, showed highly variable levels of expression between coral colonies. Potential variation in microhabitat, gene function unrelated to the stress response and individualised stress responses may influence such differences between colonies and need to be better understood when designing and interpreting future studies of gene expression in natural coral populations.

  2. Contrasted patterns of selective pressure in three recent paralogous gene pairs in the Medicago genus (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho-Huu, Joan; Ronfort, Joëlle; De Mita, Stéphane; Bataillon, Thomas; Hochu, Isabelle; Weber, Audrey; Chantret, Nathalie

    2012-10-01

    Gene duplications are a molecular mechanism potentially mediating generation of functional novelty. However, the probabilities of maintenance and functional divergence of duplicated genes are shaped by selective pressures acting on gene copies immediately after the duplication event. The ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates in protein-coding sequences provides a means to investigate selective pressures based on genic sequences. Three molecular signatures can reveal early stages of functional divergence between gene copies: change in the level of purifying selection between paralogous genes, occurrence of positive selection, and transient relaxed purifying selection following gene duplication. We studied three pairs of genes that are known to be involved in an interaction with symbiotic bacteria and were recently duplicated in the history of the Medicago genus (Fabaceae). We sequenced two pairs of polygalacturonase genes (Pg11-Pg3 and Pg11a-Pg11c) and one pair of auxine transporter-like genes (Lax2-Lax4) in 17 species belonging to the Medicago genus, and sought for molecular signatures of differentiation between copies. Selective histories revealed by these three signatures of molecular differentiation were found to be markedly different between each pair of paralogs. We found sites under positive selection in the Pg11 paralogs while Pg3 has mainly evolved under purifying selection. The most recent paralogs examined Pg11a and Pg11c, are both undergoing positive selection and might be acquiring new functions. Lax2 and Lax4 paralogs are both under strong purifying selection, but still underwent a temporary relaxation of purifying selection immediately after duplication. This study illustrates the variety of selective pressures undergone by duplicated genes and the effect of age of the duplication. We found that relaxation of selective constraints immediately after duplication might promote adaptive divergence.

  3. Contrasting patterns of selection and drift between two categories of immune genes in prairie-chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateson, Zachary W; Whittingham, Linda A; Johnson, Jeff A; Dunn, Peter O

    2015-12-01

    Immune-receptor genes of the adaptive immune system, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), are involved in recognizing specific pathogens and are known to have high rates of adaptive evolution, presumably as a consequence of rapid co-evolution between hosts and pathogens. In contrast, many 'mediating' genes of the immune system do not interact directly with specific pathogens and are involved in signalling (e.g. cytokines) or controlling immune cell growth. As a consequence, we might expect stronger selection at immune-receptor than mediating genes, but these two types of genes have not been compared directly in wild populations. Here, we tested the hypothesis that selection differs between MHC (class I and II) and mediating genes by comparing levels of population differentiation across the range of greater prairie-chickens (Tympanuchus cupido). As predicted, there was stronger population differentiation and isolation by distance at immune receptor (MHC) than at either mediating genes or neutral microsatellites, suggesting a stronger role of local adaptation at the MHC. In contrast, mediating genes displayed weaker differentiation between populations than neutral microsatellites, consistent with selection favouring similar alleles across populations for mediating genes. In addition to selection, drift also had a stronger effect on immune receptor (MHC) than mediating genes as indicated by the stronger decline of MHC variation in relation to population size. This is the first study in the wild to show that the effects of selection and drift on immune genes vary across populations depending on their functional role. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Sex and tissue specific gene expression patterns identified following de novo transcriptomic analysis of the Norway lobster, Nephrops norvegicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotllant, Guiomar; Nguyen, Tuan Viet; Sbragaglia, Valerio; Rahi, Lifat; Dudley, Kevin J; Hurwood, David; Ventura, Tomer; Company, Joan B; Chand, Vincent; Aguzzi, Jacopo; Mather, Peter B

    2017-08-16

    The Norway lobster, Nephrops norvegicus, is economically important in European fisheries and is a key organism in local marine ecosystems. Despite multi-faceted scientific interest in this species, our current knowledge of genetic resources in this species remains very limited. Here, we generated a reference de novo transcriptome for N. norvegicus from multiple tissues in both sexes. Bioinformatic analyses were conducted to detect transcripts that were expressed exclusively in either males or females. Patterns were validated via RT-PCR. Sixteen N. norvegicus libraries were sequenced from immature and mature ovary, testis and vas deferens (including the masculinizing androgenic gland). In addition, eyestalk, brain, thoracic ganglia and hepatopancreas tissues were screened in males and both immature and mature females. RNA-Sequencing resulted in >600 million reads. De novo assembly that combined the current dataset with two previously published libraries from eyestalk tissue, yielded a reference transcriptome of 333,225 transcripts with an average size of 708 base pairs (bp), with an N50 of 1272 bp. Sex-specific transcripts were detected primarily in gonads followed by hepatopancreas, brain, thoracic ganglia, and eyestalk, respectively. Candidate transcripts that were expressed exclusively either in males or females were highlighted and the 10 most abundant ones were validated via RT-PCR. Among the most highly expressed genes were Serine threonine protein kinase in testis and Vitellogenin in female hepatopancreas. These results align closely with gene annotation results. Moreover, a differential expression heatmap showed that the majority of differentially expressed transcripts were identified in gonad and eyestalk tissues. Results indicate that sex-specific gene expression patterns in Norway lobster are controlled by differences in gene regulation pattern between males and females in somatic tissues. The current study presents the first multi-tissue reference

  5. Interplay of Noisy Gene Expression and Dynamics Explains Patterns of Bacterial Operon Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoshin, Oleg

    2011-03-01

    Bacterial chromosomes are organized into operons -- sets of genes co-transcribed into polycistronic messenger RNA. Hypotheses explaining the emergence and maintenance of operons include proportional co-regulation, horizontal transfer of intact ``selfish'' operons, emergence via gene duplication, and co-production of physically interacting proteins to speed their association. We hypothesized an alternative: operons can reduce or increase intrinsic gene expression noise in a manner dependent on the post-translational interactions, thereby resulting in selection for or against operons in depending on the network architecture. We devised five classes of two-gene network modules and show that the effects of operons on intrinsic noise depend on class membership. Two classes exhibit decreased noise with co-transcription, two others reveal increased noise, and the remaining one does not show a significant difference. To test our modeling predictions we employed bioinformatic analysis to determine the relationship gene expression noise and operon organization. The results confirm the overrepresentation of noise-minimizing operon architectures and provide evidence against other hypotheses. Our results thereby suggest a central role for gene expression noise in selecting for or maintaining operons in bacterial chromosomes. This demonstrates how post-translational network dynamics may provide selective pressure for organizing bacterial chromosomes, and has practical consequences for designing synthetic gene networks. This work is supported by National Institutes of Health grant 1R01GM096189-01.

  6. Gene sequence variations and expression patterns of mitochondrial genes are associated with the adaptive evolution of two Gynaephora species (Lepidoptera: Lymantriinae) living in different high-elevation environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi-Lin; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Tian-Xuan; Wang, Juan; Zhu, Qian-Hua; Chen, Jun-Yuan; Yuan, Ming-Long

    2017-04-30

    The adaptive evolution of animals to high-elevation environments has been extensively studied in vertebrates, while few studies have focused on insects. Gynaephora species (Lepidoptera: Lymantriinae) are endemic to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) and represent an important insect pest of alpine meadows. Here, we present a detailed comparative analysis of the mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) of two Gynaephora species inhabiting different high-elevation environments: G. alpherakii and G. menyuanensis. The results indicated that the general mitogenomic features (genome size, nucleotide composition, codon usage and secondary structures of tRNAs) were well conserved between the two species. All of mitochondrial protein-coding genes were evolving under purifying selection, suggesting that selection constraints may play a role in ensuring adequate energy production. However, a number of substitutions and indels were identified that altered the protein conformations of ATP8 and NAD1, which may be the result of adaptive evolution of the two Gynaephora species to different high-elevation environments. Levels of gene expression for nine mitochondrial genes in nine different developmental stages were significantly suppressed in G. alpherakii, which lives at the higher elevation (~4800m above sea level), suggesting that gene expression patterns could be modulated by atmospheric oxygen content and environmental temperature. These results enhance our understanding of the genetic bases for the adaptive evolution of insects endemic to the QTP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Bisphenol A Exposure May Induce Hepatic Lipid Accumulation via Reprogramming the DNA Methylation Patterns of Genes Involved in Lipid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Zhang-Hong; Pan, Jie-Xue; Jin, Lu-Yang; Xu, Hai-Yan; Yu, Tian-Tian; Ullah, Kamran; Rahman, Tanzil Ur; Ren, Jun; Cheng, Yi; Dong, Xin-Yan; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a role of bisphenol A (BPA) in metabolic disorders. However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. Using a mouse BPA exposure model, we investigated the effects of long-term BPA exposure on lipid metabolism and the underlying mechanisms. The male mice exposed to BPA (0.5 μg BPA /kg/day, a human relevant dose) for 10 months exhibited significant hepatic accumulation of triglycerides and cholesterol. The liver cells from the BPA-exposed mice showed significantly increased expression levels of the genes related to lipid synthesis. These liver cells showed decreased DNA methylation levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2, and increased expression levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2 that may upregulate the genes related to lipid synthesis. The expression levels of DNA methyltransferases were decreased in BPA-exposed mouse liver. Hepa1-6 cell line treated with BPA showed decreased expression levels of DNA methyltransferases and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. DNA methyltransferase knockdown in Hepa1-6 led to hypo-methylation and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. Our results suggest that long-term BPA exposure could induce hepatic lipid accumulation, which may be due to the epigenetic reprogramming of the genes involved in lipid metabolism, such as the alterations of DNA methylation patterns.

  8. Binary state pattern clustering: a digital paradigm for class and biomarker discovery in gene microarray studies of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Bradley J; Robinson, Peter N

    2006-06-01

    Class and biomarker discovery continue to be among the preeminent goals in gene microarray studies of cancer. We have developed a new data mining technique, which we call Binary State Pattern Clustering (BSPC) that is specifically adapted for these purposes, with cancer and other categorical datasets. BSPC is capable of uncovering statistically significant sample subclasses and associated marker genes in a completely unsupervised manner. This is accomplished through the application of a digital paradigm, where the expression level of each potential marker gene is treated as being representative of its discrete functional state. Multiple genes that divide samples into states along the same boundaries form a kind of gene-cluster that has an associated sample-cluster. BSPC is an extremely fast deterministic algorithm that scales well to large datasets. Here we describe results of its application to three publicly available oligonucleotide microarray datasets. Using an alpha-level of 0.05, clusters reproducing many of the known sample classifications were identified along with associated biomarkers. In addition, a number of simulations were conducted using shuffled versions of each of the original datasets, noise-added datasets, as well as completely artificial datasets. The robustness of BSPC was compared to that of three other publicly available clustering methods: ISIS, CTWC and SAMBA. The simulations demonstrate BSPC's substantially greater noise tolerance and confirm the accuracy of our calculations of statistical significance.

  9. Molecular characterization and expression pattern of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum ascorbate oxidase gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihua Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The complete coding sequence of one tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum gene, ascorbate oxidase (AO, was isolated by the application of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The tobacco AO gene consists of a 1722-bp open reading frame and encodes a protein of 573 amino acids. Sequence comparison analysis revealed that the tobacco AO protein shares high homology with the AO proteins of Lycopersicon esculentum (89%, Populus trichocarpa (75%, soybean (74%, castor bean (73% and peach (73%. The prediction of transmembrane helices showed that tobacco AO might be a transmembrane protein. The expression profile was studied and the results indicated that the tobacco AO gene was diversely expressed in different tobacco tissues, including leaves, stem, roots and flowers. Our experiment laid the grounds for further research on this tobacco gene.

  10. Altered expression pattern of clock genes in a rat model of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie; Bouzinova, Elena; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abnormalities in circadian rhythms may be causal factors in development of major depressive disorder. The biology underlying a causal relationship between circadian rhythm disturbances and depression is slowly being unraveled. Although there is no direct evidence of dysregulation...... of clock gene expression in depressive patients many studies have reported single-nucleotide polymorphisms in clock genes in these patients. METHODS: In the present study we investigated whether a depression-like state in rats associates with alternations of the diurnal expression of clock genes....... The validated chronic mild stress (CMS) animal model of depression was used to investigate rhythmic expression of three clock genes; Per1, Per2 and Bmal1. Brain and liver tissue was collected from 96 animals after 3.5 weeks of CMS (48 control and 48 depression-like rats) at 4 h sampling interval within 24 h. We...

  11. Modulation of gene expression by 3-iodothyronamine: genetic evidence for a lipolytic pattern

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mariotti, Veronica; Melissari, Erika; Iofrida, Caterina; Righi, Marco; Di Russo, Manuela; Donzelli, Riccardo; Saba, Alessandro; Frascarelli, Sabina; Chiellini, Grazia; Zucchi, Riccardo; Pellegrini, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    ..., particularly with regard to the modulation of lipid metabolism and body weight. To test this hypothesis we analysed gene expression profiles in adipose tissue and liver of eight rats chronically treated with T1AM...

  12. Spontaneously immortalised bovine mammary epithelial cells exhibit a distinct gene expression pattern from the breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Qianqian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spontaneous immortalisation of cultured mammary epithelial cells (MECs is an extremely rare event, and the molecular mechanism behind spontaneous immortalisation of MECs is unclear. Here, we report the establishment of a spontaneously immortalised bovine mammary epithelial cell line (BME65Cs and the changes in gene expression associated with BME65Cs cells. Results BME65Cs cells maintain the general characteristics of normal mammary epithelial cells in morphology, karyotype and immunohistochemistry, and are accompanied by the activation of endogenous bTERT (bovine Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase and stabilisation of the telomere. Currently, BME65Cs cells have been passed for more than 220 generations, and these cells exhibit non-malignant transformation. The expression of multiple genes was investigated in BME65Cs cells, senescent BMECs (bovine MECs cells, early passage BMECs cells and MCF-7 cells (a human breast cancer cell line. In comparison with early passage BMECs cells, the expression of senescence-relevant apoptosis-related gene were significantly changed in BME65Cs cells. P16INK4a was downregulated, p53 was low expressed and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio was reversed. Moreover, a slight upregulation of the oncogene c-Myc, along with an undetectable level of breast tumor-related gene Bag-1 and TRPS-1, was observed in BME65Cs cells while these genes are all highly expressed in MCF-7. In addition, DNMT1 is upregulated in BME65Cs. These results suggest that the inhibition of both senescence and mitochondrial apoptosis signalling pathways contribute to the immortality of BME65Cs cells. The expression of p53 and p16INK4a in BME65Cs was altered in the pattern of down-regulation but not "loss", suggesting that this spontaneous immortalization is possibly initiated by other mechanism rather than gene mutation of p53 or p16INK4a. Conclusions Spontaneously immortalised BME65Cs cells maintain many characteristics of normal BMEC cells and

  13. Spatio Temporal Expression Pattern of an Insecticidal Gene (cry2A in Transgenic Cotton Lines

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    Allah BAKHSH

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The production of transgenic plants with stable, high-level transgene expression is important for the success of crop improvement programs based on genetic engineering. The present study was conducted to evaluate genomic integration and spatio temporal expression of an insecticidal gene (cry2A in pre-existing transgenic lines of cotton. Genomic integration of cry2A was evaluated using various molecular approaches. The expression levels of cry2A were determined at vegetative and reproductive stages of cotton at regular intervals. These lines showed a stable integration of insecticidal gene in advance lines of transgenic cotton whereas gene expression was found variable with at various growth stages as well as in different plant parts throughout the season. The leaves of transgenic cotton were found to have maximum expression of cry2A gene followed by squares, bolls, anthers and petals. The protein level in fruiting part was less as compared to other parts showing inconsistency in gene expression. It was concluded that for culturing of transgenic crops, strategies should be developed to ensure the foreign genes expression efficient, consistent and in a predictable manner.

  14. Candida albicans Biofilms: a Developmental State Associated With Specific and Stable Gene Expression Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sánchez, Susana; Aubert, Sylvie; Iraqui, Ismaïl; Janbon, Guilhem; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; d'Enfert, Christophe

    2004-01-01

    Like many bacteria, yeast species can form biofilms on several surfaces. Candida albicans colonizes the surfaces of catheters, prostheses, and epithelia, forming biofilms that are extremely resistant to antifungal drugs. We have used transcript profiling to investigate the specific properties of C. albicans biofilms. Biofilm and planktonic cultures produced under different conditions of nutrient flow, aerobiosis, or glucose concentration were compared by overall gene expression correlation. Correlation was much higher between biofilms than planktonic populations irrespective of the growth conditions, indicating that biofilm populations formed in different environments display very similar and specific transcript profiles. A first cluster of 325 differentially expressed genes was identified. In agreement with the overrepresentation of amino acid biosynthesis genes in this cluster, Gcn4p, a regulator of amino acid metabolism, was shown to be required for normal biofilm growth. To identify biofilm-related genes that are independent of mycelial development, we studied the transcriptome of biofilms produced by a wild-type, hypha-producing strain and a cph1/cph1 efg1/efg1 strain defective for hypha production. This analysis identified a cluster of 317 genes expressed independently of hypha formation, whereas 86 genes were dependent on mycelial development. Both sets revealed the activation of the sulfur-amino acid biosynthesis pathway as a feature of C. albicans biofilms. PMID:15075282

  15. DNA methylation patterns of candidate genes regulated by thymine DNA glycosylase in patients with TP53 germline mutations

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    Fortes, F.P. [CIPE, Laboratrio de Oncogentica Molecular, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Kuasne, H. [CIPE, Laboratrio NeoGene, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Urologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Marchi, F.A. [CIPE, Laboratrio NeoGene, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Programa Inter-Institucional em Bioinformtica, Instituto de Matemtica e Estatstica, Universidade So Paulo, So Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miranda, P.M. [CIPE, Laboratrio NeoGene, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rogatto, S.R. [CIPE, Laboratrio NeoGene, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Urologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Achatz, M.I. [CIPE, Laboratrio de Oncogentica Molecular, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Oncogentica, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, So Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-04-28

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare, autosomal dominant, hereditary cancer predisposition disorder. In Brazil, the p.R337H TP53 founder mutation causes the variant form of LFS, Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome. The occurrence of cancer and age of disease onset are known to vary, even in patients carrying the same mutation, and several mechanisms such as genetic and epigenetic alterations may be involved in this variability. However, the extent of involvement of such events has not been clarified. It is well established that p53 regulates several pathways, including the thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) pathway, which regulates the DNA methylation of several genes. This study aimed to identify the DNA methylation pattern of genes potentially related to the TDG pathway (CDKN2A, FOXA1, HOXD8, OCT4, SOX2, and SOX17) in 30 patients with germline TP53mutations, 10 patients with wild-type TP53, and 10 healthy individuals. We also evaluated TDG expression in patients with adrenocortical tumors (ADR) with and without the p.R337H TP53 mutation. Gene methylation patterns of peripheral blood DNA samples assessed by pyrosequencing revealed no significant differences between the three groups. However, increased TDG expression was observed by quantitative reverse transcription PCR in p.R337H carriers with ADR. Considering the rarity of this phenotype and the relevance of these findings, further studies using a larger sample set are necessary to confirm our results.

  16. DNA methylation patterns of candidate genes regulated by thymine DNA glycosylase in patients with TP53 germline mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.P. Fortes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS is a rare, autosomal dominant, hereditary cancer predisposition disorder. In Brazil, the p.R337H TP53 founder mutation causes the variant form of LFS, Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome. The occurrence of cancer and age of disease onset are known to vary, even in patients carrying the same mutation, and several mechanisms such as genetic and epigenetic alterations may be involved in this variability. However, the extent of involvement of such events has not been clarified. It is well established that p53 regulates several pathways, including the thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG pathway, which regulates the DNA methylation of several genes. This study aimed to identify the DNA methylation pattern of genes potentially related to the TDG pathway (CDKN2A, FOXA1, HOXD8, OCT4, SOX2, and SOX17 in 30 patients with germline TP53 mutations, 10 patients with wild-type TP53, and 10 healthy individuals. We also evaluated TDG expression in patients with adrenocortical tumors (ADR with and without the p.R337H TP53 mutation. Gene methylation patterns of peripheral blood DNA samples assessed by pyrosequencing revealed no significant differences between the three groups. However, increased TDG expression was observed by quantitative reverse transcription PCR in p.R337H carriers with ADR. Considering the rarity of this phenotype and the relevance of these findings, further studies using a larger sample set are necessary to confirm our results.

  17. Interaction between VEGF receptor-2 gene polymorphisms and dietary patterns on blood glucose and lipid levels in Chinese Malaysian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Roseline Wai Kuan; Shidoji, Yoshihiro; Hon, Wei Min; Masaki, Motofumi

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of lifestyle-related chronic diseases is increasing and gene-diet interaction studies are limited among the Malaysian population. This study was conducted to evaluate the association and interaction effects of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2(VEGFR2) gene polymorphisms and dietary patterns on anthropometric and biochemical risk factors of chronic diseases in 179 Chinese Malaysian adults. Genotyping of rs1870377 and rs2071559 was performed by real-time PCR using TaqMan probes. Dietary patterns were constructed from the food frequency questionnaire using factor analysis. Anthropometric measurements: body mass index (BMI), systolic and diastolic blood pressure and biomarkers: blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and lipids were obtained. Two dietary patterns: 'Balanced diet' and 'Meat, rice and noodles diet' (MRND) were extracted. MRND was associated with higher BMI, blood pressure, blood glucose and lipids, while T alleles in both rs1870377 and rs2071559 were associated with higher blood lipids (p Chinese Malaysian adults. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Peripheral blood gene expression patterns discriminate among chronic inflammatory diseases and healthy controls and identify novel targets

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    Palatka Karoly

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic inflammatory diseases including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA afflict millions of people worldwide, but their pathogenesis is still not well understood. It is also not well known if distinct changes in gene expression characterize these diseases and if these patterns can discriminate between diseased and control patients and/or stratify the disease. The main focus of our work was the identification of novel markers that overlap among the 3 diseases or discriminate them from each other. Methods Diseased (n = 13, n = 15 and n = 12 in IBD, psoriasis and RA respectively and healthy patients (n = 18 were recruited based on strict inclusion and exclusion criteria; peripheral blood samples were collected by clinicians (30 ml in Venous Blood Vacuum Collection Tubes containing EDTA and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were separated by Ficoll gradient centrifugation. RNA was extracted using Trizol reagent. Gene expression data was obtained using TaqMan Low Density Array (TLDA containing 96 genes that were selected by an algorithm and the statistical analyses were performed in Prism by using non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test (P-values Results Here we show that using a panel of 96 disease associated genes and measuring mRNA expression levels in peripheral blood derived mononuclear cells; we could identify disease-specific gene panels that separate each disease from healthy controls. In addition, a panel of five genes such as ADM, AQP9, CXCL2, IL10 and NAMPT discriminates between all samples from patients with chronic inflammation and healthy controls. We also found genes that stratify the diseases and separate different subtypes or different states of prognosis in each condition. Conclusions These findings and the identification of five universal markers of chronic inflammation suggest that these diseases have a common background in

  19. Selective Landscapes in newt Immune Genes Inferred from Patterns of Nucleotide Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijarczyk, Anna; Dudek, Katarzyna; Babik, Wieslaw

    2016-12-31

    Host-pathogen interactions may result in either directional selection or in pressure for the maintenance of polymorphism at the molecular level. Hence signatures of both positive and balancing selection are expected in immune genes. Because both overall selective pressure and specific targets may differ between species, large-scale population genomic studies are useful in detecting functionally important immune genes and comparing selective landscapes between taxa. Such studies are of particular interest in amphibians, a group threatened worldwide by emerging infectious diseases. Here, we present an analysis of polymorphism and divergence of 634 immune genes in two lineages of Lissotriton newts: L. montandoni and L. vulgaris graecus Variation in newt immune genes has been shaped predominantly by widespread purifying selection and strong evolutionary constraint, implying long-term importance of these genes for functioning of the immune system. The two evolutionary lineages differ in the overall strength of purifying selection which can partially be explained by demographic history but may also signal differences in long-term pathogen pressure. The prevalent constraint notwithstanding, 23 putative targets of positive selection and 11 putative targets of balancing selection were identified. The latter were detected by composite tests involving the demographic model and further validated in independent population samples. Putative targets of balancing selection encode proteins which may interact closely with pathogens but include also regulators of immune response. The identified candidates will be useful for testing whether genes affected by balancing selection are more prone to interspecific introgression than other genes in the genome. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  20. The rates and patterns of deletions in the human factor IX gene

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    Ketterling, R.P.; Vielhaber, E.L.; Lind, T.J.; Thorland, E.C.; Sommer S.S. (Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States))

    1994-02-01

    Deletions are commonly observed in genes with either segments of highly homologous sequences or excessive gene length. However, in the factor IX gene and in most genes, deletions (of [ge]21 bp) are uncommon. The authors have analyzed DNA from 290 families with hemophilia B (203 independent mutations) and have found 12 deletions >20 bp. Eleven of these are >2 kb (range >3-163 kb), and one is 1.1 kb. The junctions of the four deletions that are completely contained within the factor IX gene have been determined. A novel mutation occurred in patient HB128: the data suggest that a 26.8-kb deletion occurred between two segments of alternating purines and pyrimidines and that a 2.3-kb sense strand segment derived from the deleted region was inserted. For a sample of 203 independent mutations, the authors estimate the [open quotes]baseline[close quotes] rates of deletional mutation per base pair per generation as a function of size. The rate for large (>2 kb)I deletions is exceedingly low. For every mutational event in which a given base is at the junction of a large deletion, there are an estimated 58 microdeletions (<20 bp) and 985 single-base substitutions at that base. Analysis of the nine reported deletion junctions in the factor IX gene literature reveals that (i) five are associated with inversion, orphan sequences, or sense strand insertions; (ii) four are simple deletions that display an excess of short direct repeats at their junctions; (iii) there is no dramatic clustering of junctions within the gene; and (iv) with the exception of alternating purines and pyrimidines, deletion junctions are not preferentially associated with repetitive DNA. 58 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Expression pattern of drought stress marker genes in soybean roots under two water deficit systems

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    Anna Cristina Neves-Borges

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of tolerance mechanisms for drought stress in soybean is fundamental to the understanding and development of tolerant varieties. Using in silico analysis, four marker genes involved in the classical ABA-dependent and ABA-independent pathways of drought response were identified in the Glycine max genome in the present work. The expression profiles of the marker genes ERD1-like, GmaxRD20A-like, GmaxRD22-like and GmaxRD29B-like were investigated by qPCR in root samples of drought sensitive and tolerant soybean cultivars (BR 16 and Embrapa 48, respectively, submitted to water deficit conditions in hydroponic and pot-based systems. Among the four putative soybean homologs to Arabidopsis genes investigated herein, only GmaxRD29B-like was not regulated by water deficit stress. Distinct expression profiles and different induction levels were observed among the genes, as well as between the two drought-inducing systems. Our results showed contrasting gene expression responses for the GmaxRD20A-like and GmaxRD22-like genes. GmaxRD20A-like was highly induced by continuous drought acclimating conditions, whereas GmaxRD22-like responses decreased after abrupt water deprivation. GmaxERD1-like showed a different expression profile for the cultivars in each system. Conversely, GmaxRD20A-like and GmaxRD22-like genes exhibited similar expression levels in tolerant plants in both systems.

  2. Evolution of the globin gene family in deuterostomes: lineage-specific patterns of diversification and attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Federico G; Opazo, Juan C; Hoogewijs, David; Hankeln, Thomas; Ebner, Bettina; Vinogradov, Serge N; Bailly, Xavier; Storz, Jay F

    2012-07-01

    In the Metazoa, globin proteins display an underlying unity in tertiary structure that belies an extraordinary diversity in primary structures, biochemical properties, and physiological functions. Phylogenetic reconstructions can reveal which of these functions represent novel, lineage-specific innovations, and which represent ancestral functions that are shared with homologous globin proteins in other eukaryotes and even prokaryotes. To date, our understanding of globin diversity in deuterostomes has been hindered by a dearth of genomic sequence data from the Ambulacraria (echinoderms + hemichordates), the sister group of chordates, and the phylum Xenacoelomorpha, which includes xenoturbellids, acoelomorphs, and nemertodermatids. Here, we report the results of a phylogenetic and comparative genomic analysis of the globin gene repertoire of deuterostomes. We first characterized the globin genes of the acorn worm, Saccoglossus kowalevskii, a representative of the phylum Hemichordata. We then integrated genomic sequence data from the acorn worm into a comprehensive analysis of conserved synteny and phylogenetic relationships among globin genes from representatives of the eight lineages that comprise the superphylum Deuterostomia. The primary aims were 1) to unravel the evolutionary history of the globin gene superfamily in deuterostomes and 2) to use the estimated phylogeny to gain insights into the functional evolution of deuterostome globins. Results of our analyses indicate that the deuterostome common ancestor possessed a repertoire of at least four distinct globin paralogs and that different subsets of these ancestral genes have been retained in each of the descendant organismal lineages. In each major deuterostome group, a different subset of ancestral precursor genes underwent lineage-specific expansions of functional diversity through repeated rounds of gene duplication and divergence. By integrating results of the phylogenetic analysis with available

  3. Modeling complex patterns of differential DNA methylation that associate with gene expression changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosberg, Christopher E; VanderKraats, Nathan D; Edwards, John R

    2017-05-19

    Numerous genomic studies are underway to determine which genes are abnormally regulated by DNA methylation in disease. However, we have a poor understanding of how disease-specific methylation changes affect expression. We thus developed an integrative analysis tool, Methylation-based Gene Expression Classification (ME-Class), to explain specific variation in methylation that associates with expression change. This model captures the complexity of methylation changes around a gene promoter. Using 17 whole-genome bisulfite sequencing and RNA-seq datasets from different tissues from the Roadmap Epigenomics Project, ME-Class significantly outperforms standard methods using methylation to predict differential gene expression change. To demonstrate its utility, we used ME-Class to analyze 32 datasets from different hematopoietic cell types from the Blueprint Epigenome project. Expression-associated methylation changes were predominantly found when comparing cells from distantly related lineages, implying that changes in the cell's transcriptional program precede associated methylation changes. Training ME-Class on normal-tumor pairs from The Cancer Genome Atlas indicated that cancer-specific expression-associated methylation changes differ from tissue-specific changes. We further show that ME-Class can detect functionally relevant cancer-specific, expression-associated methylation changes that are reversed upon the removal of methylation. ME-Class is thus a powerful tool to identify genes that are dysregulated by DNA methylation in disease. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Expression patterns of members of the ethylene signaling-related gene families in response to dehydration stresses in cassava.

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    Meng Yun Ren

    Full Text Available Drought is the one of the most important environment stresses that restricts crop yield worldwide. Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz is an important food and energy crop that has many desirable traits such as drought, heat and low nutrients tolerance. However, the mechanisms underlying drought tolerance in cassava are unclear. Ethylene signaling pathway, from the upstream receptors to the downstream transcription factors, plays important roles in environmental stress responses during plant growth and development. In this study, we used bioinformatics approaches to identify and characterize candidate Manihot esculenta ethylene receptor genes and transcription factor genes. Using computational methods, we localized these genes on cassava chromosomes, constructed phylogenetic trees and identified stress-responsive cis-elements within their 5' upstream regions. Additionally, we measured the trehalose and proline contents in cassava fresh leaves after drought, osmotic, and salt stress treatments, and then it was found that the regulation patterns of contents of proline and trehalose in response to various dehydration stresses were differential, or even the opposite, which shows that plant may take different coping strategies to deal with different stresses, when stresses come. Furthermore, expression profiles of these genes in different organs and tissues under non-stress and abiotic stress were investigated through quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR analyses in cassava. Expression profiles exhibited clear differences among different tissues under non-stress and various dehydration stress conditions. We found that the leaf and tuberous root tissues had the greatest and least responses, respectively, to drought stress through the ethylene signaling pathway in cassava. Moreover, tuber and root tissues had the greatest and least reponses to osmotic and salt stresses through ethylene signaling in cassava, respectively. These results show that these

  5. Expression patterns of members of the ethylene signaling-related gene families in response to dehydration stresses in cassava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Meng Yun; Feng, Ren Jun; Shi, Hou Rui; Lu, Li Fang; Yun, Tian Yan; Peng, Ming; Guan, Xiao; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Jing Yi; Zhang, Xi Yan; Li, Cheng Liang; Chen, Yan Jun; He, Peng; Zhang, Yin Dong; Xie, Jiang Hui

    2017-01-01

    Drought is the one of the most important environment stresses that restricts crop yield worldwide. Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is an important food and energy crop that has many desirable traits such as drought, heat and low nutrients tolerance. However, the mechanisms underlying drought tolerance in cassava are unclear. Ethylene signaling pathway, from the upstream receptors to the downstream transcription factors, plays important roles in environmental stress responses during plant growth and development. In this study, we used bioinformatics approaches to identify and characterize candidate Manihot esculenta ethylene receptor genes and transcription factor genes. Using computational methods, we localized these genes on cassava chromosomes, constructed phylogenetic trees and identified stress-responsive cis-elements within their 5' upstream regions. Additionally, we measured the trehalose and proline contents in cassava fresh leaves after drought, osmotic, and salt stress treatments, and then it was found that the regulation patterns of contents of proline and trehalose in response to various dehydration stresses were differential, or even the opposite, which shows that plant may take different coping strategies to deal with different stresses, when stresses come. Furthermore, expression profiles of these genes in different organs and tissues under non-stress and abiotic stress were investigated through quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses in cassava. Expression profiles exhibited clear differences among different tissues under non-stress and various dehydration stress conditions. We found that the leaf and tuberous root tissues had the greatest and least responses, respectively, to drought stress through the ethylene signaling pathway in cassava. Moreover, tuber and root tissues had the greatest and least reponses to osmotic and salt stresses through ethylene signaling in cassava, respectively. These results show that these plant tissues had

  6. Expression patterns of members of the ethylene signaling–related gene families in response to dehydration stresses in cassava

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hou Rui; Lu, Li Fang; Yun, Tian Yan; Peng, Ming; Guan, Xiao; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Jing Yi; Zhang, Xi Yan; Li, Cheng Liang; Chen, Yan Jun; He, Peng; Zhang, Yin Dong; Xie, Jiang Hui

    2017-01-01

    Drought is the one of the most important environment stresses that restricts crop yield worldwide. Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is an important food and energy crop that has many desirable traits such as drought, heat and low nutrients tolerance. However, the mechanisms underlying drought tolerance in cassava are unclear. Ethylene signaling pathway, from the upstream receptors to the downstream transcription factors, plays important roles in environmental stress responses during plant growth and development. In this study, we used bioinformatics approaches to identify and characterize candidate Manihot esculenta ethylene receptor genes and transcription factor genes. Using computational methods, we localized these genes on cassava chromosomes, constructed phylogenetic trees and identified stress-responsive cis-elements within their 5’ upstream regions. Additionally, we measured the trehalose and proline contents in cassava fresh leaves after drought, osmotic, and salt stress treatments, and then it was found that the regulation patterns of contents of proline and trehalose in response to various dehydration stresses were differential, or even the opposite, which shows that plant may take different coping strategies to deal with different stresses, when stresses come. Furthermore, expression profiles of these genes in different organs and tissues under non-stress and abiotic stress were investigated through quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses in cassava. Expression profiles exhibited clear differences among different tissues under non-stress and various dehydration stress conditions. We found that the leaf and tuberous root tissues had the greatest and least responses, respectively, to drought stress through the ethylene signaling pathway in cassava. Moreover, tuber and root tissues had the greatest and least reponses to osmotic and salt stresses through ethylene signaling in cassava, respectively. These results show that these plant tissues had

  7. Homeobox gene expression in Brachiopoda: the role of Not and Cdx in bodyplan patterning, neurogenesis, and germ layer specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenburger, Andreas; Martinez, Pedro; Wanninger, Andreas

    2011-10-01

    The molecular control that underlies brachiopod ontogeny is largely unknown. In order to contribute to this issue we analyzed the expression pattern of two homeobox containing genes, Not and Cdx, during development of the rhynchonelliform (i.e., articulate) brachiopod Terebratalia transversa. Not is a homeobox containing gene that regulates the formation of the notochord in chordates, while Cdx (caudal) is a ParaHox gene involved in the formation of posterior tissues of various animal phyla. The T. transversa homolog, TtrNot, is expressed in the ectoderm from the beginning of gastrulation until completion of larval development, which is marked by a three-lobed body with larval setae. Expression starts at gastrulation in two areas lateral to the blastopore and subsequently extends over the animal pole of the gastrula. With elongation of the gastrula, expression at the animal pole narrows to a small band, whereas the areas lateral to the blastopore shift slightly towards the future anterior region of the larva. Upon formation of the three larval body lobes, TtrNot expressing cells are present only in the posterior part of the apical lobe. Expression ceases entirely at the onset of larval setae formation. TtrNot expression is absent in unfertilized eggs, in embryos prior to gastrulation, and in settled individuals during and after metamorphosis. Comparison with the expression patterns of Not genes in other metazoan phyla suggests an ancestral role for this gene in gastrulation and germ layer (ectoderm) specification with co-opted functions in notochord formation in chordates and left/right determination in ambulacrarians and vertebrates. The caudal ortholog, TtrCdx, is first expressed in the ectoderm of the gastrulating embryo in the posterior region of the blastopore. Its expression stays stable in that domain until the blastopore is closed. Thereafter, the expression is confined to the ventral portion of the mantle lobe in the fully developed larva. No Ttr

  8. General implications for CpG hot spot mutations: methylation patterns of the human iduronate-2-sulfatase gene locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Orii, Koji O; Bi, Y; Gutierrez, Monica A; Nishioka, Tatsuo; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Kondo, Naomi; Orii, Tadao; Noguchi, Akihiko; Sly, William S

    2004-06-01

    The methylation pattern at CpG sites of a housekeeping gene correlates with the likelihood of mutation. Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type II, an X-linked disorder, results from the deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS). In these patients, over 35% of independent point mutations at the IDS gene locus were found at CpG sites as transitional events. To gain insight into the relationship between methylation status and CpG hot spot mutations, we investigated patterns of cytosine methylation in the entire IDS gene, except for introns 4-8. Bisulfite genomic sequencing was performed on the normal leukocyte DNA. Our data show that: 1) cytosine methylation at the CpG sites was extensive, except for those present from the promoter region to a portion of intron 3; 2) a sharp boundary of methylated-nonmethylated regions was observed at the 5'-flanking region, whereas a gradual change in methylation was observed in the 2.0-kb segment in the 3'-flanking region; 3) the boundary of the 5'-flanking region contained multiple Sp1 sites and the TATA box; 4) the CpG sites in exons 1 and 2 were hypomethylated and were associated only with rare transitional mutations, while the CpG sites in exon 3 were also hypomethylated, yet were associated with a high rate of transitional mutations; 5) there was no striking sex difference in the methylation patterns in active alleles; and, 6) the methylation in both strands was symmetrical, except at the boundary of methylated-unmethylated regions. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Age-associated gene expression in normal breast tissue mirrors qualitative age-at-incidence patterns for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirone, Jason R; D'Arcy, Monica; Stewart, Delisha A; Hines, William C; Johnson, Melissa; Gould, Michael N; Yaswen, Paul; Jerry, D Joseph; Smith Schneider, Sallie; Troester, Melissa A

    2012-10-01

    Age is the strongest breast cancer risk factor, with overall breast cancer risk increasing steadily beginning at approximately 30 years of age. However, while breast cancer risk is lower among younger women, young women's breast cancer may be more aggressive. Although, several genomic and epidemiologic studies have shown higher prevalence of aggressive, estrogen-receptor negative breast cancer in younger women, the age-related gene expression that predisposes to these tumors is poorly understood. Characterizing age-related patterns of gene expression in normal breast tissues may provide insights on etiology of distinct breast cancer subtypes that arise from these tissues. To identify age-related changes in normal breast tissue, 96 tissue specimens from patients with reduction mammoplasty, ages 14 to 70 years, were assayed by gene expression microarray. Significant associations between gene expression levels and age were identified for 802 probes (481 increased, 321 decreased with increasing age). Enriched functions included "aging of cells," "shape change," and "chemotaxis," and enriched pathways included Wnt/beta-catenin signaling, Ephrin receptor signaling, and JAK/Stat signaling. Applying the age-associated genes to publicly available tumor datasets, the age-associated pathways defined two groups of tumors with distinct survival. The hazard rates of young-like tumors mirrored that of high-grade tumors in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, providing a biologic link between normal aging and age-related tumor aggressiveness. These data show that studies of normal tissue gene expression can yield important insights about the pathways and biologic pressures that are relevant during tumor etiology and progression. 2012 AACR

  10. Differential Gene Expression Patterns in Developing Sexually Dimorphic Rat Brain Regions Exposed to Antiandrogenic, Estrogenic, or Complex Endocrine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lichtensteiger, Walter; Bassetti-Gaille, Catherine; Faass, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The study addressed the question whether gene expression patterns induced by different mixtures of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) administered in a higher dose range, corresponding to 450×, 200×, and 100× high-end human exposure levels, could be characterized in developing brain with respect...... to endocrine activity of mixture components, and which developmental processes were preferentially targeted. Three EDC mixtures, A-Mix (anti-androgenic mixture) with 8 antiandrogenic chemicals (di-n-butylphthalate, diethylhexylphthalate, vinclozolin, prochloraz, procymidone, linuron, epoxiconazole, and DDE), E...... area and ventromedial hypothalamus in all dose groups. Expression patterns were mixture, sex, and region specific. Effects of the analgesic drug paracetamol, which exhibits antiandrogenic activity in peripheral systems, differed from those of A-Mix. All mixtures had a strong, mixture-specific impact...

  11. Genome-wide patterns of gene expression during aging in the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Hui Wang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The primary means of reducing malaria transmission is through reduction in longevity in days of the adult female stage of the Anopheles vector. However, assessing chronological age is limited to crude physiologic methods which categorize the females binomially as either very young (nulliparous or not very young (parous. Yet the epidemiologically relevant reduction in life span falls within the latter category. Age-grading methods that delineate chronological age, using accurate molecular surrogates based upon gene expression profiles, will allow quantification of the longevity-reducing effects of vector control tools aimed at the adult, female mosquito. In this study, microarray analyses of gene expression profiles in the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae were conducted during natural senescence of females in laboratory conditions. Results showed that detoxification-related and stress-responsive genes were up-regulated as mosquitoes aged. A total of 276 transcripts had age-dependent expression, independently of blood feeding and egg laying events. Expression of 112 (40.6% of these transcripts increased or decreased monotonically with increasing chronologic age. Seven candidate genes for practical age assessment were tested by quantitative gene amplification in the An. gambiae G3 strain in a laboratory experiment and the Mbita strain in field enclosures set up in western Kenya under conditions closely resembling natural ones. Results were similar between experiments, indicating that senescence is marked by changes in gene expression and that chronological age can be gauged accurately and repeatedly with this method. These results indicate that the method may be suitable for accurate gauging of the age in days of field-caught, female An. gambiae.

  12. Gene expression patterns of sulfur starvation in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pendse Ninad D

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is a model microbe for studying biochemistry, genetics and molecular biology of photobiological processes. Importance of this bacterium in basic and applied research calls for a systematic, genome-wide description of its transcriptional regulatory capacity. Characteristic transcriptional responses to changes in the growth environment are expected to provide a scaffold for describing the Synechocystis transcriptional regulatory network as well as efficient means for functional annotation of genes in the genome. Results We designed, validated and used Synechocystis genome-wide oligonucleotide (70-mer microarray (representing 96.7% of all chromosomal ORFs annotated at the time of the beginning of this project to study transcriptional activity of the cyanobacterial genome in response to sulfur (S starvation. The microarray data were verified by quantitative RT-PCR. We made five main observations: 1 Transcriptional changes upon sulfate starvation were relatively moderate, but significant and consistent with growth kinetics; 2 S acquisition genes encoding for a high-affinity sulfate transporter were significantly induced, while decreased transcription of genes for phycobilisome, photosystems I and II, cytochrome b6/f, and ATP synthase indicated reduced light-harvesting and photosynthetic activity; 3 S starvation elicited transcriptional responses associated with general growth arrest and stress; 4 A large number of genes regulated by S availability encode hypothetical proteins or proteins of unknown function; 5 Hydrogenase structural and maturation accessory genes were not identified as differentially expressed, even though increased hydrogen evolution was observed. Conclusion The expression profiles recorded by using this oligonucleotide-based microarray platform revealed that during transition from the condition of plentiful S to S starvation, Synechocystis undergoes

  13. The POLARIS gene of Arabidopsis encodes a predicted peptide required for correct root growth and leaf vascular patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casson, Stuart A; Chilley, Paul M; Topping, Jennifer F; Evans, I Marta; Souter, Martin A; Lindsey, Keith

    2002-08-01

    The POLARIS (PLS) gene of Arabidopsis was identified as a promoter trap transgenic line, showing beta-glucuronidase fusion gene expression predominantly in the embryonic and seedling root, with low expression in aerial parts. Cloning of the PLS locus revealed that the promoter trap T-DNA had inserted into a short open reading frame (ORF). Rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR, RNA gel blot analysis, and RNase protection assays showed that the PLS ORF is located within a short ( approximately 500 nucleotides) auxin-inducible transcript and encodes a predicted polypeptide of 36 amino acid residues. pls mutants exhibit a short-root phenotype and reduced vascularization of leaves. pls roots are hyperresponsive to exogenous cytokinins and show increased expression of the cytokinin-inducible gene ARR5/IBC6 compared with the wild type. pls seedlings also are less responsive to the growth-inhibitory effects of exogenous auxin and show reduced expression of the auxin-inducible gene IAA1 compared with the wild type. The PLS peptide-encoding region of the cDNA partially complements the pls mutation and requires the PLS ORF ATG for activity, demonstrating the functionality of the peptide-encoding ORF. Ectopic expression of the PLS ORF reduces root growth inhibition by exogenous cytokinins and increases leaf vascularization. We propose that PLS is required for correct auxin-cytokinin homeostasis to modulate root growth and leaf vascular patterning.

  14. Altered gene expression pattern in the fatty liver dystrophy mouse reveals impaired insulin-mediated cytoskeleton dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingenspor, M; Xu, P; Cohen, R D; Welch, C; Reue, K

    1999-08-13

    The mouse fatty liver dystrophy (fld) mutation is characterized by transient hypertriglyceridemia and fatty liver during the neonatal period, followed by development of a peripheral neuropathy. To uncover the metabolic pathway that is disrupted by the fld mutation, we analyzed the altered pattern of gene expression in the fatty liver of fld neonates by representational difference analysis of cDNA. Differentially expressed genes detected include a novel member of the Ras superfamily of small GTP-binding proteins, a novel Ser/Thr kinase, and several actin cytoskeleton-associated proteins including actin, profilin, alpha-actinin, and myosin light chain. Because these proteins have a potential functional link in the propagation of hormone signals, we investigated cytoskeleton dynamics in fld cells in response to hormone treatment. These studies revealed that preadipocytes from fld mice exhibit impaired formation of actin membrane ruffles in response to insulin treatment. These findings suggest that the altered mRNA expression levels detected in fld tissue represent a compensatory response for the nonfunctional fld gene and that the fld gene product may be required for development of normal insulin response.

  15. SuperFly: a comparative database for quantified spatio-temporal gene expression patterns in early dipteran embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicin-Sain, Damjan; Pulido, Antonio Hermoso; Crombach, Anton; Wotton, Karl R.; Jiménez-Guri, Eva; Taly, Jean-François; Roma, Guglielmo; Jaeger, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    We present SuperFly (http://superfly.crg.eu), a relational database for quantified spatio-temporal expression data of segmentation genes during early development in different species of dipteran insects (flies, midges and mosquitoes). SuperFly has a special focus on emerging non-drosophilid model systems. The database currently includes data of high spatio-temporal resolution for three species: the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster, the scuttle fly Megaselia abdita and the moth midge Clogmia albipunctata. At this point, SuperFly covers up to 9 genes and 16 time points per species, with a total of 1823 individual embryos. It provides an intuitive web interface, enabling the user to query and access original embryo images, quantified expression profiles, extracted positions of expression boundaries and integrated datasets, plus metadata and intermediate processing steps. SuperFly is a valuable new resource for the quantitative comparative study of gene expression patterns across dipteran species. Moreover, it provides an interesting test set for systems biologists interested in fitting mathematical gene network models to data. Both of these aspects are essential ingredients for progress toward a more quantitative and mechanistic understanding of developmental evolution. PMID:25404137

  16. A Candida albicans gene expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in a distinct pattern of mRNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iborra, A; Sentandreu, R; Gozalbo, D

    1996-09-01

    Two plasmids (derived from YCplac22 and YEplac112) carrying a Candida albicans gene (including the 5' non-coding promoter sequences) coding for a 30 kDa membrane-bound protein, were used to transform Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. A 30 kDa protein was immunodetected by Western blot in the membrane fraction of transformants. Northern analysis showed the presence of three mRNA species (of about 1.1, 0.7 and 0.5 kb) hybridizing with the C. albicans gene as a probe. The same result was obtained using the 5' and 3' regions of the gene as probes, whereas only a 1.1 kb mRNA was found in C. albicans and none was detected in S. cerevisiae control transformants. Thus, heterologous expression of this gene in S. cerevisiae results in a distinct pattern of mRNA processing, either due to the location on plasmid vectors and/or to differences in the mRNA processing systems in the two microorganisms.

  17. Contrasting Patterns of Gene Flow for Amazonian Snakes That Actively Forage and Those That Wait in Ambush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fraga, Rafael; Lima, Albertina P; Magnusson, William E; Ferrão, Miquéias; Stow, Adam J

    2017-07-01

    Knowledge of genetic structure, geographic distance and environmental heterogeneity can be used to identify environmental features and natural history traits that influence dispersal and gene flow. Foraging mode is a trait that might predict dispersal capacity in snakes, because actively foragers typically have greater movement rates than ambush predators. Here, we test the hypothesis that 2 actively foraging snakes have higher levels of gene flow than 2 ambush predators. We evaluated these 4 co-distributed species of snakes in the Brazilian Amazon. Snakes were sampled along an 880 km transect from the central to the southwest of the Amazon basin, which covered a mosaic of vegetation types and seasonal differences in climate. We analyzed thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms to compare patterns of neutral gene flow based on isolation by geographic distance (IBD) and environmental resistance (IBR). We show that IBD and IBR were only evident in ambush predators, implying lower levels of dispersal than the active foragers. Therefore, gene flow was high enough in the active foragers analyzed here to prevent any build-up of spatial genotypic structure with respect to geographic distance and environmental heterogeneity. © The American Genetic Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Characterization and expression patterns of key ecdysteroid biosynthesis and signaling genes in a spider mite (Panonychus citri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Niu, Jin-Zhi; Zotti, Moises; Sun, Qin-Zhe; Zhu, Lin; Zhang, Jun; Liao, Chong-Yu; Dou, Wei; Wei, Dan-Dan; Wang, Jin-Jun; Smagghe, Guy

    2017-08-01

    Ecdysteroids play a crucial role in regulating molting in the phylum of Arthropoda and much is known with members of the subphylum of Hexapoda including the Insecta. However, this is still unclear in key pests as spider mites belonging to the subphylum of Chelicerata that originated earlier in the Cambrian period. In this study, we investigated 14 key genes of ecdysteroid biosynthesis and signaling and their expression over the different developmental stages in the citrus red mite, Panonychus citri (Acari: Stigmaeidae). P. citri is an economically important and widespread pest of citrus crops and it has five developmental stages of egg, larva, protonymph, deutonymph and adult. Typically, the expression of the ecdysteroid-synthesizing Halloween gene Spook (PcSpo) followed a positive zigzag-like pattern with a peak in the first half of each developmental stage and a drop in the second half prior to the molting to the next stage. Similar to PcSpo, PcDib, PcSad, PcRXR2, PcE75 and PcHR38 showed a positive zigzag-like expression pattern, while that of PcE78, PcHR3 and PcFTZ-F1 was opposite that we called a negative zigzag-like pattern. Silencing of the PcSpo gene by RNAi showed that molting was inhibited. Interestingly, we could rescue these RNAi effects by supplementing ponasterone A (PonA) and not by 20E, which is indicative that mites use PonA rather than 20E as ecdysteroid hormone. Modeling of the ecdysteroid receptor (PcEcR) hormone binding cavity also predicted binding of PonA, but showed a steric hindrance for 20E. We believe our data provide insight into the evolution and expression patterns of key ecdysteroid biosynthesis and signaling genes in a distant, non-insect species, and can become a foundation to develop new targets for controlling important agricultural pests such as spider mites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Regulation of Pattern Formation and Gene Amplification During Drosophila Oogenesis by the miR-318 microRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ge, Wanzhong; Deng, Qiannan; Guo, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Pattern formation during epithelial development requires the coordination of multiple signaling pathways. Here, we investigate the functions of an ovary-enriched miRNA, miR-318, in epithelial development during Drosophila oogenesis. miR-318 maternal loss-of-function mutants were female sterile...... signaling pathway activates expression of miR-318 and that miR-318 cooperates with Tramtrack69 (Ttk69) to control the switch from endocycling to chorion gene amplification during differentiation of the follicular epithelium. The multiple functions of miR-318 in oogenesis illustrate the importance of mi...

  20. Genetic structure in the Mediterranean seagrass Posidonia oceanica: disentangling past vicariance events from contemporary patterns of gene flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, I A; Innocenti, A M; Di Maida, G; Calvo, S; Migliaccio, M; Zambianchi, E; Pizzigalli, C; Arnaud-Haond, S; Duarte, C M; Serrao, E A; Procaccini, G

    2010-02-01

    The Mediterranean Sea is a two-basin system, with the boundary zone restricted to the Strait of Sicily and the narrow Strait of Messina. Two main population groups are recognized in the Mediterranean endemic seagrass Posidonia oceanica, corresponding to the Western and the Eastern basins. To address the nature of the East-West cleavage in P. oceanica, the main aims of this study were: (i) to define the genetic structure within the potential contact zone (i.e. the Strait of Sicily) and clarify the extent of gene flow between the two population groups, and (ii) to investigate the role of present water circulation patterns vs. past evolutionary events on the observed genetic pattern. To achieve these goals, we utilized SSR markers and we simulated, with respect to current regime, the possible present-day dispersal pattern of Posidonia floating fruits using 28-day numerical Lagrangian trajectories. The results obtained confirm the presence of the two main population groups, without any indices of reproductive isolation, with the break zone located at the level of the Southern tip of Calabria. The populations in the Strait of Sicily showed higher affinity with Western than with Eastern populations. This pattern of genetic structure probably reflects historical avenues of recolonization from relict glacial areas and past vicariance events, but seems to persist as a result of the low connectivity among populations via marine currents, as suggested by our dispersal simulation analysis.

  1. Patterns of genetic differentiation at MHC class I genes and microsatellites identify conservation units in the giant panda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Wan, Qiu-Hong; Yu, Bin; Ge, Yun-Fa; Fang, Sheng-Guo

    2013-10-22

    Evaluating patterns of genetic variation is important to identify conservation units (i.e., evolutionarily significant units [ESUs], management units [MUs], and adaptive units [AUs]) in endangered species. While neutral markers could be used to infer population history, their application in the estimation of adaptive variation is limited. The capacity to adapt to various environments is vital for the long-term survival of endangered species. Hence, analysis of adaptive loci, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, is critical for conservation genetics studies. Here, we investigated 4 classical MHC class I genes (Aime-C, Aime-F, Aime-I, and Aime-L) and 8 microsatellites to infer patterns of genetic variation in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and to further define conservation units. Overall, we identified 24 haplotypes (9 for Aime-C, 1 for Aime-F, 7 for Aime-I, and 7 for Aime-L) from 218 individuals obtained from 6 populations of giant panda. We found that the Xiaoxiangling population had the highest genetic variation at microsatellites among the 6 giant panda populations and higher genetic variation at Aime-MHC class I genes than other larger populations (Qinling, Qionglai, and Minshan populations). Differentiation index (FST)-based phylogenetic and Bayesian clustering analyses for Aime-MHC-I and microsatellite loci both supported that most populations were highly differentiated. The Qinling population was the most genetically differentiated. The giant panda showed a relatively higher level of genetic diversity at MHC class I genes compared with endangered felids. Using all of the loci, we found that the 6 giant panda populations fell into 2 ESUs: Qinling and non-Qinling populations. We defined 3 MUs based on microsatellites: Qinling, Minshan-Qionglai, and Daxiangling-Xiaoxiangling-Liangshan. We also recommended 3 possible AUs based on MHC loci: Qinling, Minshan-Qionglai, and Daxiangling-Xiaoxiangling-Liangshan. Furthermore, we recommend

  2. Effect of cadmium on 24-hour pattern in expression of redox enzyme and clock genes in rat medial basal hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Ortega, Vanesa; Cardinali, Daniel P; Fernández-Mateos, María P; Ríos-Lugo, María J; Scacchi, Pablo A; Esquifino, Ana I

    2010-04-01

    The effect of cadmium (Cd) in the brain has been attributed to an increase in reactive oxygen species in cells, particularly when high amounts of the metal are given. In this study we examined the effect of a low dose of Cd (7.5 microg/day) on 24-h changes in expression of redox pathway enzyme and circadian genes in rat medial basal hypothalamus (MBH). Rats receiving CdCl(2) (5 ppm in drinking water) or tap water for 1 month were killed at six different time intervals throughout a 24 h cycle. MBH mRNA levels were measured by real-time PCR analysis. In CdCl(2) treated rats a disruption of 24-h pattern of hypothalamic gene expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-1 and -2, heme oxygenase (HO)-1 and -2, Mn- superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase was detectable. Mean levels of MBH mRNA for HO-2, Mn-SOD and catalase augmented after Cd intake, whereas those of NOS-2 decreased. After CdCl(2) intake rats the 24-h pattern of clock gene expression in MBH seen in controls was significantly suppressed (Bmal1) or changed in phase (Per1, Per2, Cry2) while in the case of Clock significant 24-h variations were induced. The results are compatible with the view that a low amount of Cd given in tap water brought about significant changes in circadian expression of redox enzyme and clock genes in rat MBH.

  3. The effect of nutrition pattern alteration on Chlorella pyrenoidosa growth, lipid biosynthesis-related gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianhua; Cui, Yanbin; Zhou, Yang; Wan, Minxi; Wang, Weiliang; Xie, Jingli; Li, Yuanguang

    2014-07-01

    Heterotrophy to photoautotrophy transition leads to the accumulation of lipids in Chlorella, which has potential to produce both healthy food and biofuels. Therefore, it is of key interest to study the metabolism shift and gene expression changes that influenced by the transition. Both total and neutral lipids contents were increased rapidly within 48 h after the switch to light environment, from 24.5% and 18.0% to 35.3% and 27.4%, respectively, along with the sharp decline of starch from 42.3% to 10.4% during 24h photoinduction phase. By analyzing the correlation between lipid content and gene expression, results revealed several genes viz. me g3137, me g6562, pepc g6833, dgat g3280 and dgat g7566, which encode corresponding enzymes in the de novo lipid biosynthesis pathway, are highly related to lipid accumulation and might be exploited as target genes for genetic modification. These results represented the feasibility of lipid production through trophic converting cultivation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Transcript patterns of Phanerochaete chrysosporium genes in organopollutant contaminated soils and in wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amber. Vanden Wymelenberg; Bernard. Janse; Jill. Gaskell; Diane. Dietrich; Marcelo. Vallim; Dan. Cullen

    1998-01-01

    We describe here recent methods for quantitative assessment of specific P. chrysosporium mRNAs in organopollutant contaminated soils and in Aspen wood chips. Magnetic capture techniques were used to rapidly purify poly(A)-RNA, and quantitative RT-PCR protocols were developed for all known lignin peroxidase (lip) and cellobiohydrolase (cbh1) genes. The methodology is...

  5. Transcriptome and secretome analyses of Phanerochaete chrysosporium reveal complex patterns of gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amber J. Vanden Wymelenberg; Jill A. Gaskell; Michael D. Mozuch; Philip J. Kersten; Grzegorz Sabat; Diego Martinez; Daniel Cullen

    2009-01-01

    The wood decay basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium was grown under standard ligninolytic or cellulolytic conditions and subjected to whole-genome expression microarray analysis and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry of extracellular proteins. A total of 545 genes were flagged on the basis of significant changes in transcript accumulation and/or...

  6. Prediction of Bacillus weihenstephanensis acid resistance: The use of gene expression patterns to select potential biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desriac, N.; Postollec, F.; Coroller, L.; Sohier, D.; Abee, T.; Besten, den H.M.W.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to mild stress conditions can activate stress adaptation mechanisms and provide cross-resistance towards otherwise lethal stresses. In this study, an approach was followed to select molecular biomarkers (quantitative gene expressions) to predict induced acid resistance after exposure to

  7. Gene expression patterns, localization, and substrates of polyphenol oxidase in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) genes and their corresponding enzyme activity occur in many plants; natural PPO substrates and enzyme/substrate localization are less well characterized. Leaf and root PPO activity in Arabidopsis and five legumes were compared with high-PPO red clover (Trifolium pratense L.)...

  8. Patterns of nucleotide sequence variation in ICAM1 and TNF genes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have studied DNA sequence variation in and around the genes ICAM1 and TNF, which play functional and correlated roles in inflammatory processes and immune cell responses, in 12 diverse ethnic groups of India, with a view to investigating the relative roles of demographic history and natural selection in shaping the ...

  9. Distinct patterns of novel gene mutations in poor-prognostic stereotyped subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strefford, J C; Sutton, L-A; Baliakas, P

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed recurrent mutations of the NOTCH1, SF3B1 and BIRC3 genes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), especially among aggressive, chemorefractory cases. Nevertheless, it is currently unknown whether their presence may differ in subsets of patients carrying stereotyped B...

  10. Ethanol-related alterations in gene expression patterns in the developing murine hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Chanchal; Park, Kyoung Sun; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Chai, Young Gyu

    2015-08-01

    It is well known that consuming alcohol prior to and during pregnancy can cause harm to the developing fetus. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is a term commonly used to describe a range of disabilities that may arise from prenatal alcohol exposure such as fetal alcohol syndrome, partial fetal alcohol syndrome, alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorders, and alcohol-related birth defects. Here, we report that maternal binge alcohol consumption alters several important genes that are involved in nervous system development in the mouse hippocampus at embryonic day 18. Microarray analysis revealed that Nova1, Ntng1, Gal, Neurog2, Neurod2, and Fezf2 gene expressions are altered in the fetal hippocampus. Pathway analysis also revealed the association of the calcium signaling pathway in addition to other pathways with the differentially expressed genes during early brain development. Alteration of such important genes and dynamics of the signaling pathways may cause neurodevelopmental disorders. Our findings offer insight into the molecular mechanism involved in neurodevelopmental disorders associated with alcohol-related defects. © The Author 2015. Published by ABBS Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  11. Spatial- and temporal-restricted pattern for amelogenin gene expression during mouse molar tooth organogenesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M.L. Snead; W. Luo; E.C. Lau; H.C. Slavkin

    1988-01-01

    Position- and time-restricted amelogenin gene transcription was analysed in developing tooth organs using in situ hybridization with asymmetric complementary RNA probes produced from a cDNA specific to the mouse 26 × 10(3) Mr amelogenin...

  12. Differences in gene transcriptomic pattern of Plasmodium falciparum in children with cerebral malaria and asymptomatic carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almelli, Talleh; Nuel, Grégory; Bischoff, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    , transcriptional factor proteins, proteins implicated in protein transport, as well as Plasmodium conserved and hypothetical proteins. Interestingly, UPs A1, A2, A3 and UPs B1 of var genes were predominantly found in cerebral malaria-associated isolates and those containing architectural domains of DC4, DC5, DC13...

  13. Regulation of the spatiotemporal pattern of expression of the glutamine synthetase gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lie-Venema, H.; Hakvoort, T. B.; van Hemert, F. J.; Moorman, A. F.; Lamers, W. H.

    1998-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase, the enzyme that catalyzes the ATP-dependent conversion of glutamate and ammonia into glutamine, is expressed in a tissue-specific and developmentally controlled manner. The first part of this review focuses on its spatiotemporal pattern of expression, the factors that regulate

  14. Gene expression patterns of the coral Acropora millepora in response to contact with macroalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, T. L.; Rasher, D. B.; Snell, T. W.; Hay, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    Contact with macroalgae often causes coral mortality, but the roles of abrasion versus shading versus allelopathy in these interactions are rarely clear, and effects on gene expression are unknown. Identification of gene expression changes within corals in response to contact with macroalgae can provide insight into the mode of action of allelochemicals, as well as reveal transcriptional strategies of the coral that mitigate damage from this competitive interaction, enabling the coral to survive. Gene expression responses of the coral Acropora millepora after long-term (20 days) direct contact with macroalgae ( Chlorodesmis fastigiata, Dictyota bartayresiana, Galaxaura filamentosa, and Turbinaria conoides) and short-term (1 and 24 h) exposure to C. fastigiata thalli and their hydrophobic extract were assessed. After 20 days of exposure, T. conoides thalli elicited no significant change in visual bleaching or zooxanthellae PSII quantum yield within A. millepora nubbins, but stimulated the greatest alteration in gene expression of all treatments. Chlorodesmis fastigiata, D. bartayresiana, and G. filamentosa caused significant visual bleaching of coral nubbins and reduced the PSII quantum yield of associated zooxanthellae after 20 days, but elicited fewer changes in gene expression relative to T. conoides at day 20. To evaluate initial molecular processes leading to reduction of zooxanthella PSII quantum yield, visual bleaching, and coral death, short-term exposures to C. fastigiata thalli and hydrophobic extracts were conducted; these interactions revealed protein degradation and significant changes in catalytic and metabolic activity within 24 h of contact. These molecular responses are consistent with the hypothesis that allelopathic interactions lead to alteration of signal transduction and an imbalance between reactive oxidant species production and antioxidant capabilities within the coral holobiont. This oxidative imbalance results in rapid protein degradation

  15. Spatial patterns of antimicrobial resistance genes in a cross-sectional sample of pig farms with indoor non-organic production of finishers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkegård, Anna Camilla; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in pig populations is a public health concern. There is a lack of information of spatial distributions of AMR genes in pig populations at large scales. The objective of the study was to describe the spatial pattern of AMR genes in faecal samples from pig farms and t...

  16. Detection of changes in gene regulatory patterns, elicited by perturbations of the Hsp90 molecular chaperone complex, by visualizing multiple experiments with an animation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Echeverría Pablo C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To make sense out of gene expression profiles, such analyses must be pushed beyond the mere listing of affected genes. For example, if a group of genes persistently display similar changes in expression levels under particular experimental conditions, and the proteins encoded by these genes interact and function in the same cellular compartments, this could be taken as very strong indicators for co-regulated protein complexes. One of the key requirements is having appropriate tools to detect such regulatory patterns. Results We have analyzed the global adaptations in gene expression patterns in the budding yeast when the Hsp90 molecular chaperone complex is perturbed either pharmacologically or genetically. We integrated these results with publicly accessible expression, protein-protein interaction and intracellular localization data. But most importantly, all experimental conditions were simultaneously and dynamically visualized with an animation. This critically facilitated the detection of patterns of gene expression changes that suggested underlying regulatory networks that a standard analysis by pairwise comparison and clustering could not have revealed. Conclusions The results of the animation-assisted detection of changes in gene regulatory patterns make predictions about the potential roles of Hsp90 and its co-chaperone p23 in regulating whole sets of genes. The simultaneous dynamic visualization of microarray experiments, represented in networks built by integrating one's own experimental with publicly accessible data, represents a powerful discovery tool that allows the generation of new interpretations and hypotheses.

  17. Inherited cobalamin malabsorption. Mutations in three genes reveal functional and ethnic patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanner Stephan M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inherited malabsorption of cobalamin (Cbl causes hematological and neurological abnormalities that can be fatal. Three genes have been implicated in Cbl malabsorption; yet, only about 10% of ~400-500 reported cases have been molecularly studied to date. Recessive mutations in CUBN or AMN cause Imerslund-Gräsbeck Syndrome (IGS, while recessive mutations in GIF cause Intrinsic Factor Deficiency (IFD. IGS and IFD differ in that IGS usually presents with proteinuria, which is not observed in IFD. The genetic heterogeneity and numerous differential diagnoses make clinical assessment difficult. Methods We present a large genetic screening study of 154 families or patients with suspected hereditary Cbl malabsorption. Patients and their families have been accrued over a period spanning >12 years. Systematic genetic testing of the three genes CUBN, AMN, and GIF was accomplished using a combination of single strand conformation polymorphism and DNA and RNA sequencing. In addition, six genes that were contenders for a role in inherited Cbl malabsorption were studied in a subset of these patients. Results Our results revealed population-specific mutations, mutational hotspots, and functionally distinct regions in the three causal genes. We identified mutations in 126/154 unrelated cases (82%. Fifty-three of 126 cases (42% were mutated in CUBN, 45/126 (36% were mutated in AMN, and 28/126 (22% had mutations in GIF. We found 26 undescribed mutations in CUBN, 19 in AMN, and 7 in GIF for a total of 52 novel defects described herein. We excluded six other candidate genes as culprits and concluded that additional genes might be involved. Conclusions Cbl malabsorption is found worldwide and genetically complex. However, our results indicate that population-specific founder mutations are quite common. Consequently, targeted genetic testing has become feasible if ethnic ancestry is considered. These results will facilitate clinical and

  18. Decoding of exon splicing patterns in the human RUNX1-RUNX1T1 fusion gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinev, Vasily V; Migas, Alexandr A; Kirsanava, Aksana D; Mishkova, Olga A; Siomava, Natalia; Ramanouskaya, Tatiana V; Vaitsiankova, Alina V; Ilyushonak, Ilia M; Nazarov, Petr V; Vallar, Laurent; Aleinikova, Olga V

    2015-11-01

    The t(8;21) translocation is the most widespread genetic defect found in human acute myeloid leukemia. This translocation results in the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 fusion gene that produces a wide variety of alternative transcripts and influences the course of the disease. The rules of combinatorics and splicing of exons in the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 transcripts are not known. To address this issue, we developed an exon graph model of the fusion gene organization and evaluated its local exon combinatorics by the exon combinatorial index (ECI). Here we show that the local exon combinatorics of the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 gene follows a power-law behavior and (i) the vast majority of exons has a low ECI, (ii) only a small part is represented by "exons-hubs" of splicing with very high ECI values, and (iii) it is scale-free and very sensitive to targeted skipping of "exons-hubs". Stochasticity of the splicing machinery and preferred usage of exons in alternative splicing can explain such behavior of the system. Stochasticity may explain up to 12% of the ECI variance and results in a number of non-coding and unproductive transcripts that can be considered as a noise. Half-life of these transcripts is increased due to the deregulation of some key genes of the nonsense-mediated decay system in leukemia cells. On the other hand, preferred usage of exons may explain up to 75% of the ECI variability. Our analysis revealed a set of splicing-related cis-regulatory motifs that can explain "attractiveness" of exons in alternative splicing but only when they are considered together. Cis-regulatory motifs are guides for splicing trans-factors and we observed a leukemia-specific profile of expression of the splicing genes in t(8;21)-positive blasts. Altogether, our results show that alternative splicing of the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 transcripts follows strict rules and that the power-law component of the fusion gene organization confers a high flexibility to this process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  19. Anhedonic behavior in cryptochrome 2-deficient mice is paralleled by altered diurnal patterns of amygdala gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savalli, Giorgia; Diao, Weifei; Berger, Stefanie; Ronovsky, Marianne; Partonen, Timo; Pollak, Daniela D

    2015-07-01

    Mood disorders are frequently paralleled by disturbances in circadian rhythm-related physiological and behavioral states and genetic variants of clock genes have been associated with depression. Cryptochrome 2 (Cry2) is one of the core components of the molecular circadian machinery which has been linked to depression, both, in patients suffering from the disease and animal models of the disorder. Despite this circumstantial evidence, a direct causal relationship between Cry2 expression and depression has not been established. Here, a genetic mouse model of Cry2 deficiency (Cry2 (-/-) mice) was employed to test the direct relevance of Cry2 for depression-like behavior. Augmented anhedonic behavior in the sucrose preference test, without alterations in behavioral despair, was observed in Cry2 (-/-) mice. The novelty suppressed feeding paradigm revealed reduced hyponeophagia in Cry2 (-/-) mice compared to wild-type littermates. Given the importance of the amygdala in the regulation of emotion and their relevance for the pathophysiology of depression, potential alterations in diurnal patterns of basolateral amygdala gene expression in Cry2 (-/-) mice were investigated focusing on core clock genes and neurotrophic factor systems implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. Differential expression of the clock gene Bhlhe40 and the neurotrophic factor Vegfb were found in the beginning of the active (dark) phase in Cry2 (-/-) compared to wild-type animals. Furthermore, amygdala tissue of Cry2 (-/-) mice contained lower levels of Bdnf-III. Collectively, these results indicate that Cry2 exerts a critical role in the control of depression-related emotional states and modulates the chronobiological gene expression profile in the mouse amygdala.

  20. Abundant RNA editing sites of chloroplast protein-coding genes in Ginkgo biloba and an evolutionary pattern analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Peng; Huang, Sheng; Xiao, Guanghui; Zhang, Yuzhou; Yu, Jianing

    2016-12-01

    RNA editing is a posttranscriptional modification process that alters the RNA sequence so that it deviates from the genomic DNA sequence. RNA editing mainly occurs in chloroplasts and mitochondrial genomes, and the number of editing sites varies in terrestrial plants. Why and how RNA editing systems evolved remains a mystery. Ginkgo biloba is one of the oldest seed plants and has an important evolutionary position. Determining the patterns and distribution of RNA editing in the ancient plant provides insights into the evolutionary trend of RNA editing, and helping us to further understand their biological significance. In this paper, we investigated 82 protein-coding genes in the chloroplast genome of G. biloba and identified 255 editing sites, which is the highest number of RNA editing events reported in a gymnosperm. All of the editing sites were C-to-U conversions, which mainly occurred in the second codon position, biased towards to the U_A context, and caused an increase in hydrophobic amino acids. RNA editing could change the secondary structures of 82 proteins, and create or eliminate a transmembrane region in five proteins as determined in silico. Finally, the evolutionary tendencies of RNA editing in different gene groups were estimated using the nonsynonymous-synonymous substitution rate selection mode. The G. biloba chloroplast genome possesses the highest number of RNA editing events reported so far in a seed plant. Most of the RNA editing sites can restore amino acid conservation, increase hydrophobicity, and even influence protein structures. Similar purifying selections constitute the dominant evolutionary force at the editing sites of essential genes, such as the psa, some psb and pet groups, and a positive selection occurred in the editing sites of nonessential genes, such as most ndh and a few psb genes.

  1. Inferred vs realized patterns of gene flow: an analysis of population structure in the Andros Island Rock Iguana.

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    Giuliano Colosimo

    Full Text Available Ecological data, the primary source of information on patterns and rates of migration, can be integrated with genetic data to more accurately describe the realized connectivity between geographically isolated demes. In this paper we implement this approach and discuss its implications for managing populations of the endangered Andros Island Rock Iguana, Cyclura cychlura cychlura. This iguana is endemic to Andros, a highly fragmented landmass of large islands and smaller cays. Field observations suggest that geographically isolated demes were panmictic due to high, inferred rates of gene flow. We expand on these observations using 16 polymorphic microsatellites to investigate the genetic structure and rates of gene flow from 188 Andros Iguanas collected across 23 island sites. Bayesian clustering of specimens assigned individuals to three distinct genotypic clusters. An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA indicates that allele frequency differences are responsible for a significant portion of the genetic variance across the three defined clusters (Fst =  0.117, p<<0.01. These clusters are associated with larger islands and satellite cays isolated by broad water channels with strong currents. These findings imply that broad water channels present greater obstacles to gene flow than was inferred from field observation alone. Additionally, rates of gene flow were indirectly estimated using BAYESASS 3.0. The proportion of individuals originating from within each identified cluster varied from 94.5 to 98.7%, providing further support for local isolation. Our assessment reveals a major disparity between inferred and realized gene flow. We discuss our results in a conservation perspective for species inhabiting highly fragmented landscapes.

  2. Regulation of pattern formation and gene amplification during Drosophila oogenesis by the miR-318 microRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Wanzhong; Deng, Qiannan; Guo, Ting; Hong, Xin; Kugler, Jan-Michael; Yang, Xiaohang; Cohen, Stephen M

    2015-05-01

    Pattern formation during epithelial development requires the coordination of multiple signaling pathways. Here, we investigate the functions of an ovary-enriched miRNA, miR-318, in epithelial development during Drosophila oogenesis. mir-318 maternal loss-of-function mutants were female-sterile and laid eggs with abnormal morphology. Removal of mir-318 disrupted the dorsal-anterior follicle cell patterning, resulting in abnormal dorsal appendages. mir-318 mutant females also produced thin and fragile eggshells due to impaired chorion gene amplification. We provide evidence that the ecdysone signaling pathway activates expression of miR-318 and that miR-318 cooperates with Tramtrack69 to control the switch from endocycling to chorion gene amplification during differentiation of the follicular epithelium. The multiple functions of miR-318 in oogenesis illustrate the importance of miRNAs in maintaining cell fate and in promoting the developmental transition in the female follicular epithelium. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  3. Drosophila polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (DmPTB regulates dorso-ventral patterning genes in embryos.

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    Joseph Heimiller

    Full Text Available The Drosophila polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (dmPTB or hephaestus plays an important role during embryogenesis. A loss of function mutation, heph(03429, results in varied defects in embryonic developmental processes, leading to embryonic lethality. However, the suite of molecular functions that are disrupted in the mutant remains unknown. We have used an unbiased high throughput sequencing approach to identify transcripts that are misregulated in this mutant. Misregulated transcripts show evidence of significantly altered patterns of splicing (exon skipping, 5' and 3' splice site switching, alternative 5' ends, and mRNA level changes (up and down regulation. These findings are independently supported by reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR analysis and in situ hybridization. We show that a group of genes, such as Zerknüllt, z600 and screw are among the most upregulated in the mutant and have been functionally linked to dorso-ventral patterning and/or dorsal closure processes. Thus, loss of dmPTB function results in specific misregulated transcripts, including those that provide the missing link between the loss of dmPTB function and observed developmental defects in embryogenesis. This study provides the first comprehensive repertoire of genes affected in vivo in the heph mutant in Drosophila and offers insight into the role of dmPTB during embryonic development.

  4. A single dose of lysergic acid diethylamide influences gene expression patterns within the mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Charles D; Sanders-Bush, Elaine

    2002-05-01

    Hallucinogenic drugs such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) have profound effects on humans including hallucinations and detachment from reality. These remarkable behavioral effects have many similarities to the debilitating symptoms of neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. The effects of hallucinogens are thought to be mediated by serotonin receptor activation; however, how these drugs elicit the unusual behavioral effects remains largely a mystery, despite much research. We have undertaken the first comprehensive analysis of gene expression influenced by acute LSD administration in the mammalian brain. These studies represent a novel approach to elucidate the mechanism of action of this class of drugs. We have identified a number of genes that are predicted to be involved in the processes of synaptic plasticity, glutamatergic signaling and cytoskeletal architecture. Understanding these molecular events will lead to new insights into the etiology of disorders whose behavioral symptoms resemble the temporary effects of hallucinogenic drugs, and also may ultimately result in new therapies.

  5. Interdependence of environmental factors influencing reciprocal patterns of gene expression in virulent Borrelia burgdorferi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X; Goldberg, M S; Popova, T G; Schoeler, G B; Wikel, S K; Hagman, K E; Norgard, M V

    2000-09-01

    The paradigm for differential antigen expression in Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, is the reciprocal expression of its outer surface (lipo)proteins (Osp) A and C; as B. burgdorferi transitions from its arthropod vector into mammalian tissue, ospC is upregulated, and ospA is downregulated. In the current study, using B. burgdorferi cultivated under varying conditions in BSK-H medium, we found that a decrease in pH, in conjunction with increases in temperature (e.g. 34 degrees C or 37 degrees C) and cell density, acted interdependently for the reciprocal expression of ospC and ospA. The lower pH (6.8), which induced the reciprocal expression of ospC and ospA in BSK-H medium, correlated with a drop in pH from 7.4 to 6.8 of tick midgut contents during tick feeding. In addition to ospC and ospA, other genes were found to be regulated in reciprocal fashion. Such genes were either ospC-like (e.g. ospF, mlp-8 and rpoS) (group I) or ospA-like (lp6.6 and p22) (group II); changes in expression occurred at the mRNA level. That the expression of rpoS, encoding a putative stress-related alternative sigma factor (sigma(s)), was ospC-like suggested that the expression of some of the group I genes may be controlled through sigma(s). The combined results prompt a model that allows for predicting the regulation of other B. burgdorferi genes that may be involved in spirochaete transmission, virulence or mammalian host immune responses.

  6. Temporal patterns of gene expression in developing maize endosperm identified through transcriptome sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Guosheng; Wang, Dongfang; Yang, Ruolin; Logan, Kyle; Chen, Hao; Zhang, Shanshan; Skaggs, Megan I.; Lloyd, Alan; Burnett, William J.; Laurie, John D.; Hunter, Brenda G.; Dannenhoffer, Joanne M.; Larkins, Brian A.; Drews, Gary N; Wang, Xiangfeng

    2014-01-01

    In flowering plants, double fertilization gives rise to an embryo and the endosperm, an absorptive storage structure that supports embryogenesis and seedling germination. In cereal grains, endosperm comprises a large proportion of the mature seed, contains large amounts of carbohydrates and proteins, and is an important source of food, feed, and industrial raw materials. This study provides a comprehensive profile of the genes expressed in the early developing endosperm in maize. We also show...

  7. Berry intake changes hepatic gene expression and DNA methylation patterns associated with high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman-Lindén, Lovisa; Seki, Yoshinori; Storm, Petter; Jones, Helena A; Charron, Maureen J; Berger, Karin; Holm, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    The liver is a critical organ for regulation of energy homeostasis and fatty liver disease is closely associated with obesity and insulin resistance. We have previously found that lingonberries, blackcurrants and bilberries prevent, whereas açai berries exacerbate, the development of hepatic steatosis and obesity in the high-fat (HF)-fed C57BL/6J mouse model. In this follow-up study, we investigated the mechanisms behind these effects. Genome-wide hepatic gene expression profiling indicates that the protective effects of lingonberries and bilberries are accounted for by several-fold downregulation of genes involved in acute-phase and inflammatory pathways (e.g. Saa1, Cxcl1, Lcn2). In contrast, açai-fed mice exhibit marked upregulation of genes associated with steatosis (e.g. Cfd, Cidea, Crat) and lipid and cholesterol biosynthesis, which is in line with the exacerbation of HF-induced hepatic steatosis in these mice. In silico transcription factor analysis together with immunoblot analysis identified NF-κB, STAT3 and mTOR as upstream regulators involved in mediating the observed transcriptional effects. To gain further insight into mechanisms involved in the gene expression changes, the HELP-tagging assay was used to identify differentially methylated CpG sites. Compared to the HF control group, lingonberries induced genome-wide hypermethylation and specific hypermethylation of Ncor2, encoding the corepressor NCoR/SMRT implicated in the regulation of pathways of metabolic homeostasis and inflammation. We conclude that the beneficial metabolic effects of lingonberries and bilberries are associated with downregulation of inflammatory pathways, whereas for blackcurrants, exerting similar metabolic effects, different mechanisms of action appear to dominate. NF-κB, STAT3 and mTOR are potential targets of the health-promoting effects of berries. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Patterns of MADS-box gene expression mark flower-type development in Gerbera hybrida (Asteraceae

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    Teeri Teemu H

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inflorescence of the cut-flower crop Gerbera hybrida (Asteraceae consists of two principal flower types, ray and disc, which form a tightly packed head, or capitulum. Despite great interest in plant morphological evolution and the tractability of the gerbera system, very little is known regarding genetic mechanisms involved in flower type specification. Here, we provide comparative staging of ray and disc flower development and microarray screening for differentially expressed genes, accomplished via microdissection of hundreds of coordinately developing flower primordia. Results Using a 9K gerbera cDNA microarray we identified a number of genes with putative specificity to individual flower types. Intrestingly, several of these encode homologs of MADS-box transcription factors otherwise known to regulate flower organ development. From these and previously obtained data, we hypothesize the functions and protein-protein interactions of several gerbera MADS-box factors. Conclusion Our RNA expression results suggest that flower-type specific MADS protein complexes may play a central role in differential development of ray and disc flowers across the gerbera capitulum, and that some commonality is shared with known protein functions in floral organ determination. These findings support the intriguing conjecture that the gerbera flowering head is more than a mere floral analog at the level of gene regulation.

  9. Identification and expression pattern of a new carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase gene member from Bixa orellana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ávila, N. L.; Narváez-Zapata, J. A.; Ramírez-Benítez, J. E.; Aguilar-Espinosa, M. L.; Rivera-Madrid, R.

    2011-01-01

    Carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) are a class of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of a broad diversity of secondary metabolites known as apocarotenoids. In plants, CCDs are part of a genetic family with members which cleave specific double bonds of carotenoid molecules. CCDs are involved in the production of diverse and important metabolites such as vitamin A and abscisic acid (ABA). Bixa orellana L. is the main source of the natural pigment annatto or bixin, an apocarotenoid accumulated in large quantities in its seeds. Bixin biosynthesis has been studied and the involvement of a CCD has been confirmed in vitro. However, the CCD genes involved in the biosynthesis of the wide variety of apocarotenoids found in this plant have not been well documented. In this study, a new CCD1 gene member (BoCCD1) was identified and its expression was charaterized in different plant tissues of B. orellana plantlets and adult plants. The BoCCD1 sequence showed high homology with plant CCD1s involved mainly in the cleavage of carotenoids in several sites to generate multiple apocarotenoid products. Here, the expression profiles of the BoCCD1 gene were analysed and discussed in relation to total carotenoids and other important apocarotenoids such as bixin. PMID:21813796

  10. dNTP Supply Gene Expression Patterns after P53 Loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radivoyevitch, Tomas, E-mail: txr24@case.edu [Departments of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, General Medical Sciences (Oncology), and Pathology, Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Saunthararajah, Yogen [Department of Translational Hematology & Oncology Research, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Ave. R40, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States); Pink, John [Departments of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, General Medical Sciences (Oncology), and Pathology, Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Ferris, Gina [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Lent, Ian; Jackson, Mark; Junk, Damian [Departments of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, General Medical Sciences (Oncology), and Pathology, Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Kunos, Charles A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    Loss of the transcription factor p53 implies mRNA losses of target genes such as the p53R2 subunit of human ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). We hypothesized that other genes in the dNTP supply system would compensate for such p53R2 losses and looked for this in our own data and in data of the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). We found that the de novo dNTP supply system compensates for p53R2 losses with increases in RNR subunit R1, R2, or both. We also found compensatory increases in cytosolic deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) and thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) and in mitochondrial deoxyguanosine kinase (dGK), all of the salvage dNTP supply system; in contrast, the remaining mitochondrial salvage enzyme thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) decreased with p53 loss. Thus, TK2 may be more dedicated to meeting mitochondrial dNTP demands than dGK which may be more obligated to assist cytosolic dNTP supply in meeting nuclear DNA dNTP demands.

  11. Identification and expression pattern of a new carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase gene member from Bixa orellana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ávila, N L; Narváez-Zapata, J A; Ramírez-Benítez, J E; Aguilar-Espinosa, M L; Rivera-Madrid, R

    2011-11-01

    Carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) are a class of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of a broad diversity of secondary metabolites known as apocarotenoids. In plants, CCDs are part of a genetic family with members which cleave specific double bonds of carotenoid molecules. CCDs are involved in the production of diverse and important metabolites such as vitamin A and abscisic acid (ABA). Bixa orellana L. is the main source of the natural pigment annatto or bixin, an apocarotenoid accumulated in large quantities in its seeds. Bixin biosynthesis has been studied and the involvement of a CCD has been confirmed in vitro. However, the CCD genes involved in the biosynthesis of the wide variety of apocarotenoids found in this plant have not been well documented. In this study, a new CCD1 gene member (BoCCD1) was identified and its expression was charaterized in different plant tissues of B. orellana plantlets and adult plants. The BoCCD1 sequence showed high homology with plant CCD1s involved mainly in the cleavage of carotenoids in several sites to generate multiple apocarotenoid products. Here, the expression profiles of the BoCCD1 gene were analysed and discussed in relation to total carotenoids and other important apocarotenoids such as bixin.

  12. Comprehensive microarray-based analysis for stage-specific larval camouflage pattern-associated genes in the swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus

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    Futahashi Ryo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Body coloration is an ecologically important trait that is often involved in prey-predator interactions through mimicry and crypsis. Although this subject has attracted the interest of biologists and the general public, our scientific knowledge on the subject remains fragmentary. In the caterpillar of the swallowtail butterfly Papilio xuthus, spectacular changes in the color pattern are observed; the insect mimics bird droppings (mimetic pattern as a young larva, and switches to a green camouflage coloration (cryptic pattern in the final instar. Despite the wide variety and significance of larval color patterns, few studies have been conducted at a molecular level compared with the number of studies on adult butterfly wing patterns. Results To obtain a catalog of genes involved in larval mimetic and cryptic pattern formation, we constructed expressed sequence tag (EST libraries of larval epidermis for P. xuthus, and P. polytes that contained 20,736 and 5,376 clones, respectively, representing one of the largest collections available in butterflies. A comparison with silkworm epidermal EST information revealed the high expression of putative blue and yellow pigment-binding proteins in Papilio species. We also designed a microarray from the EST dataset information, analyzed more than five stages each for six markings, and confirmed spatial expression patterns by whole-mount in situ hybridization. Hence, we succeeded in elucidating many novel marking-specific genes for mimetic and cryptic pattern formation, including pigment-binding protein genes, the melanin-associated gene yellow-h3, the ecdysteroid synthesis enzyme gene 3-dehydroecdysone 3b-reductase, and Papilio-specific genes. We also found many cuticular protein genes with marking specificity that may be associated with the unique surface nanostructure of the markings. Furthermore, we identified two transcription factors, spalt and ecdysteroid signal-related E75, as genes

  13. Correlation between ability of biofilm formation with their responsible genes and MDR patterns in clinical and environmental Acinetobacter baumannii isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardbari, Ali Mohammadi; Arabestani, Mohammad Reza; Karami, Manoochehr; Keramat, Fariba; Alikhani, Mohammad Yousef; Bagheri, Kamran Pooshang

    2017-07-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii potential to form biofilm and exhibit multiple antibiotic resistances may be responsible in its survival in hospital environment. Accordingly, our study was aimed to determine the correlation between ability of biofilm formation and the frequency of biofilm related genes with antibiotic resistance phenotypes, and also the categorization of their patterns in clinical and environmental isolates. A total of 75 clinical and 32 environmental strains of the A. baumannii were collected and identified via API 20NE. Antibiotic susceptibility was evaluated by disk diffusion and microdilution broth methods. Biofilm formation assay was performed by microtiter plate method. OXA types and biofilm related genes including BlaOXA-51, BlaOXA-23, BlaOXA-24, BlaOXA-58, bap, blaPER-1, and ompA were amplified by PCR. The rate of MDR A. baumannii in clinical isolates (100%) was higher than environmental (81.2%) isolates (p biofilm producers in clinical and environmental isolates were 31.2%-58.7%, respectively. In the clinical and environmental isolates, the frequencies of ompA, blaRER-1 and bap genes were 100%, 53.3%, 82.7% and 100%, 37.5%, 84.4% respectively. Statistical analysis revealed a significant correlation between the frequency of MDR isolates and biofilm formation ability (p = 0.008). The high frequency of antibiotype I would be indicated that an outbreak has been happened earlier and an endemic strain is currently being settled in the hospital environment. It would be suggested that if there was no difference in the frequency of pattern I and biofilm formation ability between clinical and environmental isolates, it is a critical point representing the higher risk of bacterial transmission from environment to the patients. The resulting data would be assisted in the improvement of disinfection strategies to better control of nosocomial infections. One dominant resistance pattern has shown among clinical and environmental isolates. The frequency of

  14. Interferon-beta induces distinct gene expression response patterns in human monocytes versus T cells.

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    Noa Henig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Monocytes, which are key players in innate immunity, are outnumbered by neutrophils and lymphocytes among peripheral white blood cells. The cytokine interferon-β (IFN-β is widely used as an immunomodulatory drug for multiple sclerosis and its functional pathways in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs have been previously described. The aim of the present study was to identify novel, cell-specific IFN-β functions and pathways in tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α-activated monocytes that may have been missed in studies using PBMCs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Whole genome gene expression profiles of human monocytes and T cells were compared following in vitro priming to TNF-α and overnight exposure to IFN-β. Statistical analyses of the gene expression data revealed a cell-type-specific change of 699 transcripts, 667 monocyte-specific transcripts, 21 T cell-specific transcripts and 11 transcripts with either a difference in the response direction or a difference in the magnitude of response. RT-PCR revealed a set of differentially expressed genes (DEGs, exhibiting responses to IFN-β that are modulated by TNF-α in monocytes, such as RIPK2 and CD83, but not in T cells or PBMCs. Known IFN-β promoter response elements, such as ISRE, were enriched in T cell DEGs but not in monocyte DEGs. The overall directionality of the gene expression regulation by IFN-β was different in T cells and monocytes, with up-regulation more prevalent in T cells, and a similar extent of up and down-regulation recorded in monocytes. CONCLUSIONS: By focusing on the response of distinct cell types and by evaluating the combined effects of two cytokines with pro and anti-inflammatory activities, we were able to present two new findings First, new IFN-β response pathways and genes, some of which were monocytes specific; second, a cell-specific modulation of the IFN-β response transcriptome by TNF-α.

  15. Allele mining and selective patterns of Pi9 gene in a set of rice landraces from India

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    Jahangir Imam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Allelic variants of the broad-spectrum blast resistance gene, Pi9 (NBS-LRR region have been analyzed in Indian rice landraces. They were selected from the list of 338 rice landraces phenotyped in the rice blast nursery at central Rainfed Upland Rice Research Station, Hazaribag. Six of them were further selected on the basis of their resistance and susceptible pattern for virulence analysis and selective pattern study of Pi9 gene. The sequence analysis and phylogenetic study illustrated that such sequences are vastly homologous and clustered into two groups. All the blast resistance Pi9 alleles were grouped into one cluster, whereas Pi9 alleles of susceptible landraces formed another cluster even though these landraces have a low level of DNA polymorphisms. A total number of 136 polymorphic sites comprising of transitions, transversions and InDels were identified in the 2.9kb sequence of Pi9 alleles. Lower variation in the form of mutations (77 (Transition + Transversion, and InDels (59 were observed in the Pi9 alleles isolated from rice landraces studied. The results showed that the Pi9 alleles of the selected rice landraces were less variable, suggesting that the rice landraces would have been exposed to less number of pathotypes across the country. The positive Tajima’s D (0.33580, P > 0.10 (not significant was observed among the seven rice landraces, which suggests the balancing selection of Pi9 alleles. The value of synonymous substitution (-0.43337 was less than the non-synonymous substitution (0.78808. The greater non-synonymous substitution than the synonymous means that the coding region, mainly the LRR domain was under diversified selection. In this study, the Pi9 gene has been subjected to balancing selection with low nucleotide diversity which is different from the earlier reports, this may be because of the closeness of the rice landraces, cultivated in the same region and under low pathotype pressure.

  16. Phylogenetic Patterns of Codon Evolution in the ACTIN-DEPOLYMERIZING FACTOR/COFILIN (ADF/CFL) Gene Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Zokan, Eileen M; Dyer, Kelly A; Meagher, Richard B

    2015-01-01

    The actin-depolymerizing factor/cofilin (ADF/CFL) gene family encodes a diverse group of relatively small proteins. Once known strictly as modulators of actin filament dynamics, recent research has demonstrated that these proteins are involved in a variety of cellular processes, from signal transduction to the cytonuclear trafficking of actin. In both plant and animal lineages, expression patterns of paralogs in the ADF/CFL gene family vary among tissue types and developmental stages. In this study we use computational approaches to investigate the evolutionary forces responsible for the diversification of the ADF/CFL gene family. Estimating the rate of non-synonymous to synonymous mutations (dN/dS) across phylogenetic lineages revealed that the majority of ADF/CFL codon positions were under strong purifying selection, with rare episodic events of accelerated protein evolution. In both plants and animals these instances of accelerated evolution were ADF/CFL subclass specific, and all of the sites under selection were located in regions of the protein that could serve in new functional roles. We suggest these sites may have been important in the functional diversification of ADF/CFL proteins.

  17. Specific duplication and dorsoventrally asymmetric expression patterns of Cycloidea-like genes in zygomorphic species of Ranunculaceae.

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    Florian Jabbour

    Full Text Available Floral bilateral symmetry (zygomorphy has evolved several times independently in angiosperms from radially symmetrical (actinomorphic ancestral states. Homologs of the Antirrhinum majus Cycloidea gene (Cyc have been shown to control floral symmetry in diverse groups in core eudicots. In the basal eudicot family Ranunculaceae, there is a single evolutionary transition from actinomorphy to zygomorphy in the stem lineage of the tribe Delphinieae. We characterized Cyc homologs in 18 genera of Ranunculaceae, including the four genera of Delphinieae, in a sampling that represents the floral morphological diversity of this tribe, and reconstructed the evolutionary history of this gene family in Ranunculaceae. Within each of the two RanaCyL (Ranunculaceae Cycloidea-like lineages previously identified, an additional duplication possibly predating the emergence of the Delphinieae was found, resulting in up to four gene copies in zygomorphic species. Expression analyses indicate that the RanaCyL paralogs are expressed early in floral buds and that the duration of their expression varies between species and paralog class. At most one RanaCyL paralog was expressed during the late stages of floral development in the actinomorphic species studied whereas all paralogs from the zygomorphic species were expressed, composing a species-specific identity code for perianth organs. The contrasted asymmetric patterns of expression observed in the two zygomorphic species is discussed in relation to their distinct perianth architecture.

  18. Caterpillar color patterns are determined by a two-phase melanin gene prepatterning process: new evidence from tan and laccase2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futahashi, Ryo; Banno, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Haruhiko

    2010-01-01

    The larval color patterns in Lepidoptera exhibit splendid diversity, and identifying the genes responsible for pigment distribution is essential to understanding color-pattern evolution. The swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus, is a good candidate for analyzing marking-associated genes because its body markings change dramatically at the final molt. Moreover, the silkworm Bombyx mori is most suitable for identification of lab-generated color mutants because genome information and many color mutants are available. Here, we analyzed the expression pattern of 10 melanin-related genes in P. xuthus, and analyzed whether these genes were responsible for Bombyx larval color mutants. We found that seven genes correlated strongly with the stage-specific larval cuticular markings of P. xuthus, suggesting that, compared with Drosophila, more genes showed marking specificity in lepidopteran larvae. We newly found that the expression of both tan and laccase2 is strongly correlated with the larval black markings in both P. xuthus and B. mori. The results of F2 linkage analysis and mutant analysis strongly suggest that tan is the responsible gene for Bombyx larval color mutant rouge, and that tan is important in emphasizing black markings of lepidopteran larvae. Detailed comparison of temporal and spatial expression patt