WorldWideScience

Sample records for proximal ligand interactions

  1. Metal-ligand interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervin, Kent M.

    Experimental studies of the interactions of small transition-metal cluster anions with carbonyl ligands are reviewed and compared with neutral and cationic clusters. Under thermal conditions, the reaction rates of transition-metal clusters with carbon monoxide are measured as a function of cluster size. Saturation limits for carbon monoxide addition can be related to the geometric structures of the clusters. Both energy-resolved threshold collision-induced dissociation experiments and time-resolved photodissociation experiments are used to measure metal-carbonyl binding energies. For platinum and palladium trimer anions, the carbonyl binding energies are assigned to different geometric binding sites. Platinum and palladium cluster anions catalyse the oxidation of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide in a full catalytic cycle at thermal energies.

  2. Ligand-receptor Interactions by NMR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novak. P.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Today NMR spectroscopy is a method of choice for elucidation of interactions between biomolecules and the potential ligands. Knowledge on these interactions is an essential prerequisite for the rational drug design. The most important contribution of NMR to drug design a few years ago was the 3D structure determination of proteins. Besides delivering the 3D structures of the free proteins as a raw material for the modeling studies on ligand binding, NMR can directly yield valuable experimental data on the biologically important protein-ligand complexes. In addition to X-ray diffraction, NMR spectroscopy can provide information on the internal protein dynamics ordynamics of intermolecular interactions. Changes in NMR parameters allow us to detect ("SAR by NMR" and quantitatively determine binding affinities (titration, diffusion NMR experiments, etc. of potential ligands. Also, it is possible to determine the binding site and conformations of ligands, receptors and receptor-ligand complexes with the help of NMR methods such as tr-NOESY. Epitopes or functional groups responsible for binding of ligands to the receptor can be identified by employing STD or WaterLOGSY experiments. In this review are described some of the most frequent NMR methods for the characterization of the interactions between biomolecules and ligands, together with their advantages and disadvantages.

  3. Interactive orbital proximity operations planning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwald, Arthur J.; Ellis, Stephen R.

    1990-01-01

    An interactive graphical planning system for on-site planning of proximity operations in the congested multispacecraft environment about the space station is presented. The system shows the astronaut a bird's eye perspective of the space station, the orbital plane, and the co-orbiting spacecraft. The system operates in two operational modes: (1) a viewpoint mode, in which the astronaut is able to move the viewpoint around in the orbital plane to range in on areas of interest; and (2) a trajectory design mode, in which the trajectory is planned. Trajectory design involves the composition of a set of waypoints which result in a fuel-optimal trajectory which satisfies all operational constraints, such as departure and arrival constraints, plume impingement constraints, and structural constraints. The main purpose of the system is to present the trajectory and the constraints in an easily interpretable graphical format. Through a graphical interactive process, the trajectory waypoints are edited until all operational constraints are satisfied. A series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the system. Eight airline pilots with no prior background in orbital mechanics participated in the experiments. Subject training included a stand-alone training session of about 6 hours duration, in which the subjects became familiar with orbital mechanics concepts and performed a series of exercises to familiarize themselves with the control and display features of the system. They then carried out a series of production runs in which 90 different trajectory design situations were randomly addressed. The purpose of these experiments was to investigate how the planning time, planning efforts, and fuel expenditures were affected by the planning difficulty. Some results of these experiments are presented.

  4. Strong Ligand-Protein Interactions Derived from Diffuse Ligand Interactions with Loose Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    Many systems in biology rely on binding of ligands to target proteins in a single high-affinity conformation with a favorable ΔG. Alternatively, interactions of ligands with protein regions that allow diffuse binding, distributed over multiple sites and conformations, can exhibit favorable ΔG because of their higher entropy. Diffuse binding may be biologically important for multidrug transporters and carrier proteins. A fine-grained computational method for numerical integration of total binding ΔG arising from diffuse regional interaction of a ligand in multiple conformations using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach is presented. This method yields a metric that quantifies the influence on overall ligand affinity of ligand binding to multiple, distinct sites within a protein binding region. This metric is essentially a measure of dispersion in equilibrium ligand binding and depends on both the number of potential sites of interaction and the distribution of their individual predicted affinities. Analysis of test cases indicates that, for some ligand/protein pairs involving transporters and carrier proteins, diffuse binding contributes greatly to total affinity, whereas in other cases the influence is modest. This approach may be useful for studying situations where "nonspecific" interactions contribute to biological function.

  5. Interaction of calreticulin with CD40 ligand, TRAIL and Fas ligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus, K; Pagh, R T; Holmskov, U

    2007-01-01

    is utilized by many other functionally diverse molecules and in this work the interaction of calreticulin with C1q and structurally similar molecules was investigated. In addition to C1q and MBL, CD40 ligand (CD40L), tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and Fas ligand (FasL) were...... found to bind calreticulin strongly. A low level or no binding was observed for adiponectin, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), CD30L, surfactant protein-A and -D and collagen VIII. The interaction with calreticulin required a conformational change in CD40L, TRAIL and FasL and showed the same...

  6. Role of ligand-ligand vs. core-core interactions in gold nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milowska, Karolina Z; Stolarczyk, Jacek K

    2016-05-14

    The controlled assembly of ligand-coated gold nanoclusters (NCs) into larger structures paves the way for new applications ranging from electronics to nanomedicine. Here, we demonstrate through rigorous density functional theory (DFT) calculations employing novel functionals accounting for van der Waals forces that the ligand-ligand interactions determine whether stable assemblies can be formed. The study of NCs with different core sizes, symmetry forms, ligand lengths, mutual crystal orientations, and in the presence of a solvent suggests that core-to-core van der Waals interactions play a lesser role in the assembly. The dominant interactions originate from combination of steric effects, augmented by ligand bundling on NC facets, and related to them changes in electronic properties induced by neighbouring NCs. We also show that, in contrast to standard colloidal theory approach, DFT correctly reproduces the surprising experimental trends in the strength of the inter-particle interaction observed when varying the length of the ligands. The results underpin the importance of understanding NC interactions in designing gold NCs for a specific function.

  7. THERMODYNAMICS OF PROTEIN-LIGAND INTERACTIONS AND THEIR ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rummi Devi Saini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Physiological processes are controlled mainly by intermolecular recognition mechanisms which involve protein–protein and protein–ligand interactions with a high specificity and affinity to form a specific complex. Proteins being an important class of macromolecules in biological systems, it is important to understand their actions through binding to other molecules of proteins or ligands. In fact, the binding of low molecular weight ligands to proteins plays a significant role in regulating biological processes such as cellular metabolism and signal transmission. Therefore knowledge of the protein–ligand interactions and the knowledge of the mechanisms involved in the protein-ligand recognition and binding are key in understanding biology at molecular level which will facilitate the discovery, design, and development of drugs. In this review, the mechanisms involved in protein–ligand binding, the binding kinetics, thermodynamic concepts and binding driving forces are discussed. Thermodynamic mechanisms involved in a few important protein-ligand binding are described. Various spectroscopic, non-spectroscopic and computational method for analysis of protein–ligand binding are also discussed.

  8. Quantitative analysis of protein-ligand interactions by NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Ayako; Konuma, Tsuyoshi; Yanaka, Saeko; Sugase, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Protein-ligand interactions have been commonly studied through static structures of the protein-ligand complex. Recently, however, there has been increasing interest in investigating the dynamics of protein-ligand interactions both for fundamental understanding of the underlying mechanisms and for drug development. NMR is a versatile and powerful tool, especially because it provides site-specific quantitative information. NMR has widely been used to determine the dissociation constant (KD), in particular, for relatively weak interactions. The simplest NMR method is a chemical-shift titration experiment, in which the chemical-shift changes of a protein in response to ligand titration are measured. There are other quantitative NMR methods, but they mostly apply only to interactions in the fast-exchange regime. These methods derive the dissociation constant from population-averaged NMR quantities of the free and bound states of a protein or ligand. In contrast, the recent advent of new relaxation-based experiments, including R2 relaxation dispersion and ZZ-exchange, has enabled us to obtain kinetic information on protein-ligand interactions in the intermediate- and slow-exchange regimes. Based on R2 dispersion or ZZ-exchange, methods that can determine the association rate, kon, dissociation rate, koff, and KD have been developed. In these approaches, R2 dispersion or ZZ-exchange curves are measured for multiple samples with different protein and/or ligand concentration ratios, and the relaxation data are fitted to theoretical kinetic models. It is critical to choose an appropriate kinetic model, such as the two- or three-state exchange model, to derive the correct kinetic information. The R2 dispersion and ZZ-exchange methods are suitable for the analysis of protein-ligand interactions with a micromolar or sub-micromolar dissociation constant but not for very weak interactions, which are typical in very fast exchange. This contrasts with the NMR methods that are used

  9. Correcting binding parameters for interacting ligand-lattice systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervy, Jordan; Bicout, Dominique J.

    2017-07-01

    Binding of ligands to macromolecules is central to many functional and regulatory biological processes. Key parameters characterizing ligand-macromolecule interactions are the stoichiometry, inducing the number of ligands per macromolecule binding site, and the dissociation constant, quantifying the ligand-binding site affinity. Both these parameters can be obtained from analyses of classical saturation experiments using the standard binding equation that offers the great advantage of mathematical simplicity but becomes an approximation for situations of interest when a ligand binds and covers more than one single binding site on the macromolecule. Using the framework of car-parking problem with latticelike macromolecules where each ligand can cover simultaneously several consecutive binding sites, we showed that employing the standard analysis leads to underestimation of binding parameters, i.e., ligands appear larger than they actually are and their affinity is also greater than it is. Therefore, we have derived expressions allowing to determine the ligand size and true binding parameters (stoichiometry and dissociation constant) as a function of apparent binding parameters retrieved from standard saturation experiments.

  10. Calreticulin discriminates the proximal region at the N-glycosylation site of Glc1Man9GlcNAc2 ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Makoto; Adachi, Yuka [Department of Materials and Life Science, Seikei University, 3-3-1 Kichijoji-kita, Musashino, Tokyo 180-8633 (Japan); Ito, Yukishige [Synthetic Cellular Chemistry Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); ERATO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Ito Glycotrilogy Project, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Totani, Kiichiro, E-mail: ktotani@st.seikei.ac.jp [Department of Materials and Life Science, Seikei University, 3-3-1 Kichijoji-kita, Musashino, Tokyo 180-8633 (Japan)

    2015-10-23

    Calreticulin (CRT) is well known as a lectin-like chaperone that recognizes Glc1Man9GlcNAc2 (G1M9)-glycoproteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, whether CRT can directly interact with the aglycone moiety (protein portion) of the glycoprotein remains controversial. To improve our understanding of CRT interactions, structure-defined G1M9-derivatives with different aglycones (–OH, –Gly–NH{sub 2}, and –Gly–Glu–{sup t}Bu) were used as CRT ligands, and their interactions with recombinant CRT were analyzed using thermal shift analysis. The results showed that CRT binds strongly to a G1M9-ligand in the order –Gly–Glu–{sup t}Bu > –Gly–NH{sub 2} > –OH, which is the same as that of the reglucosylation of Man9GlcNAc2 (M9)-derivatives by the folding sensor enzyme UGGT (UDP-glucose: glycoprotein glucosyltransferase). Our results indicate that, similar to UGGT, CRT discriminates the proximal region at the N-glycosylation site, suggesting a similar mechanism mediating the recognition of aglycone moieties in the ER glycoprotein quality control system. - Highlights: • Glc1Man9GlcNAc2 (G1M9) ligands with different aglycones were chemically prepared. • Calreticulin (CRT) discriminates the aglycone of Glc1Man9GlcNAc2 (G1M9) ligand. • CRT binds with G1M9 ligands in a similar manner to folding sensor enzyme.

  11. Effects of electrostatic interactions on ligand dissociation kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbaş, Aykut; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera; Marko, John F.

    2018-02-01

    We study unbinding of multivalent cationic ligands from oppositely charged polymeric binding sites sparsely grafted on a flat neutral substrate. Our molecular dynamics simulations are suggested by single-molecule studies of protein-DNA interactions. We consider univalent salt concentrations spanning roughly a 1000-fold range, together with various concentrations of excess ligands in solution. To reveal the ionic effects on unbinding kinetics of spontaneous and facilitated dissociation mechanisms, we treat electrostatic interactions both at a Debye-Hückel (DH) (or implicit ions, i.e., use of an electrostatic potential with a prescribed decay length) level and by the more precise approach of considering all ionic species explicitly in the simulations. We find that the DH approach systematically overestimates unbinding rates, relative to the calculations where all ion pairs are present explicitly in solution, although many aspects of the two types of calculation are qualitatively similar. For facilitated dissociation (FD) (acceleration of unbinding by free ligands in solution) explicit-ion simulations lead to unbinding at lower free-ligand concentrations. Our simulations predict a variety of FD regimes as a function of free-ligand and ion concentrations; a particularly interesting regime is at intermediate concentrations of ligands where nonelectrostatic binding strength controls FD. We conclude that explicit-ion electrostatic modeling is an essential component to quantitatively tackle problems in molecular ligand dissociation, including nucleic-acid-binding proteins.

  12. Interactive orbital proximity operations planning system instruction and training guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwald, Arthur J.; Ellis, Stephen R.

    1994-01-01

    This guide instructs users in the operation of a Proximity Operations Planning System. This system uses an interactive graphical method for planning fuel-efficient rendezvous trajectories in the multi-spacecraft environment of the space station and allows the operator to compose a multi-burn transfer trajectory between orbit initial chaser and target trajectories. The available task time (window) of the mission is predetermined and the maneuver is subject to various operational constraints, such as departure, arrival, spatial, plume impingement, and en route passage constraints. The maneuvers are described in terms of the relative motion experienced in a space station centered coordinate system. Both in-orbital plane as well as out-of-orbital plane maneuvering is considered. A number of visual optimization aids are used for assisting the operator in reaching fuel-efficient solutions. These optimization aids are based on the Primer Vector theory. The visual feedback of trajectory shapes, operational constraints, and optimization functions, provided by user-transparent and continuously active background computations, allows the operator to make fast, iterative design changes that rapidly converge to fuel-efficient solutions. The planning tool is an example of operator-assisted optimization of nonlinear cost functions.

  13. Protein-Ligand Empirical Interaction Components for Virtual Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yuna; Wang, Weijun; Sun, Zhaoxi; Zhang, John Z H; Ji, Changge

    2017-08-28

    A major shortcoming of empirical scoring functions is that they often fail to predict binding affinity properly. Removing false positives of docking results is one of the most challenging works in structure-based virtual screening. Postdocking filters, making use of all kinds of experimental structure and activity information, may help in solving the issue. We describe a new method based on detailed protein-ligand interaction decomposition and machine learning. Protein-ligand empirical interaction components (PLEIC) are used as descriptors for support vector machine learning to develop a classification model (PLEIC-SVM) to discriminate false positives from true positives. Experimentally derived activity information is used for model training. An extensive benchmark study on 36 diverse data sets from the DUD-E database has been performed to evaluate the performance of the new method. The results show that the new method performs much better than standard empirical scoring functions in structure-based virtual screening. The trained PLEIC-SVM model is able to capture important interaction patterns between ligand and protein residues for one specific target, which is helpful in discarding false positives in postdocking filtering.

  14. Covalent heme attachment to the protein in human heme oxygenase-1 with selenocysteine replacing the His25 proximal iron ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yongying; Trnka, Michael J; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Ouellet, Hugues; Wang, Yongqiang; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2009-03-01

    To characterize heme oxygenase with a selenocysteine (SeCys) as the proximal iron ligand, we have expressed truncated human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) His25Cys, in which Cys-25 is the only cysteine, in the Escherichia coli cysteine auxotroph strain BL21(DE3)cys. Selenocysteine incorporation into the protein was demonstrated by both intact protein mass measurement and mass spectrometric identification of the selenocysteine-containing tryptic peptide. One selenocysteine was incorporated into approximately 95% of the expressed protein. Formation of an adduct with Ellman's reagent (DTNB) indicated that the selenocysteine in the expressed protein was in the reduced state. The heme-His25SeCys hHO-1 complex could be prepared by either (a) supplementing the overexpression medium with heme, or (b) reconstituting the purified apoprotein with heme. Under reducing conditions in the presence of imidazole, a covalent bond is formed by addition of the selenocysteine residue to one of the heme vinyl groups. No covalent bond is formed when the heme is replaced by mesoheme, in which the vinyls are replaced by ethyl groups. These results, together with our earlier demonstration that external selenolate ligands can transfer an electron to the iron [Y. Jiang, P.R. Ortiz de Montellano, Inorg. Chem. 47 (2008) 3480-3482 ], indicate that a selenyl radical is formed in the hHO-1 His25SeCys mutant that adds to a heme vinyl group.

  15. IgG-Fc-mediated effector functions: molecular definition of interaction sites for effector ligands and the role of glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferis, R; Lund, J; Pound, J D

    1998-06-01

    The Fc region of human IgG expresses interaction sites for many effector ligands. In this review the topographical distributions of ten of these sites are discussed in relation to functional requirement. It is apparent that interaction sites localised to the inter-CH2-CH3 domain region of the Fc allow for functional divalency, whereas sites localised to the hinge proximal region of the CH2 domain are functionally monovalent, with expression of the latter sites being particularly dependent on glycosylation. All x-ray crystal structures for Fc and Fc-ligand complexes report that the protein structure of the hinge proximal region of the CH2 domain is "disordered", suggesting "internal mobility". We propose a model in which such "internal mobility" results in the generation of a dynamic equilibrium between multiple conformers, certain of which express interaction sites specific to individual ligands. The emerging understanding of the influence of oligosaccharide/protein interactions on protein conformation and biological function of IgG antibodies suggests a potential to generate novel glycoforms of antibody molecules having unique profiles of effector functions.

  16. Affordable dual-sensing proximity sensor for touchless interactive systems

    KAUST Repository

    Nassar, Joanna M.; Diaz, Marlon C.; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    We report an ultra-low cost flexible proximity sensor using only off-the-shelf recyclable materials such as aluminum foil, napkin and double-sided tape. Unlike previous reports, our device structure exhibits two sensing capabilities in one platform

  17. Affordable dual-sensing proximity sensor for touchless interactive systems

    KAUST Repository

    Nassar, Joanna M.

    2016-09-13

    We report an ultra-low cost flexible proximity sensor using only off-the-shelf recyclable materials such as aluminum foil, napkin and double-sided tape. Unlike previous reports, our device structure exhibits two sensing capabilities in one platform, with outstanding long detection range of 20 cm and pressure sensitivity of 0.05 kPa. This is the first ever demonstration of a low-cost, accessible, and batch manufacturing process for pressure and proximity sensing on a singular platform. The mechanical flexibility of the sensor makes it possible to mount on various irregular platforms, which is vital in many areas, such as robotics, machine automation, vehicular technology and inspection tools.

  18. Measuring RNA-Ligand Interactions with Microscale Thermophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Michelle H; Hilimire, Thomas A; Sanders, Allix M; Schneekloth, John S

    2018-01-31

    In recent years, there has been dramatic growth in the study of RNA. RNA has gone from being known as an intermediate in the central dogma of molecular biology to a molecule with a large diversity of structure and function that is involved in all aspects of biology. As new functions are rapidly discovered, it has become clear that there is a need for RNA-targeting small molecule probes to investigate RNA biology and clarify the potential for therapeutics based on RNA-small molecule interactions. While a host of techniques exist to measure RNA-small molecule interactions, many of these have drawbacks that make them intractable for routine use and are often not broadly applicable. A newer technology called microscale thermophoresis (MST), which measures the directed migration of a molecule and/or molecule-ligand complex along a temperature gradient, can be used to measure binding affinities using very small amounts of sample. The high sensitivity of this technique enables measurement of affinity constants in the nanomolar and micromolar range. Here, we demonstrate how MST can be used to study a range of biologically relevant RNA interactions, including peptide-RNA interactions, RNA-small molecule interactions, and displacement of an RNA-bound peptide by a small molecule.

  19. Treeline proximity alters an alpine plant-herbivore interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illerbrun, Kurt; Roland, Jens

    2011-05-01

    Rising treeline threatens the size and contiguity of alpine meadows worldwide. As trees encroach into previously open habitat, the movement and population dynamics of above-treeline alpine species may be disrupted. This process is well documented in studies of the Rocky Mountain apollo butterfly (Parnassius smintheus). However, subtler consequences of treeline rise remain poorly understood. In this study, we examine whether treeline proximity affects feeding behaviour of P. smintheus larvae, due to altered habitat affecting the distribution and availability of their host plant, lance-leaved stonecrop (Sedum lanceolatum). Understanding differential larval exploitation of food resources in relation to the treeline is an important step in predicting the consequences of continued treeline rise. Parnassius smintheus larvae feed more intensively on S. lanceolatum away from the treeline despite the relative paucity of hosts in these areas, and despite higher fitness penalties associated with the plant's herbivory-induced chemical defenses. Sedum lanceolatum growing near the treeline is less attractive, and therefore represents a less significant resource for P. smintheus larvae than its abundance might imply. If treeline rise continues, we suggest that this pattern of altered resource exploitation may represent a mechanism by which larvae are adversely affected even while adult movement among and within meadows appears sufficient for maintaining population health, and total host availability seems ample.

  20. Monitoring ligand-receptor interactions by photonic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeney, Sylvia [M E Mueller Institute for Structural Biology, Biozentrum, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 70, Basel, 4056 (Switzerland); Mor, Flavio; Forro, Laszlo [Laboratory of Complex Matter Physics (LPMC), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Koszali, Roland [Institute for Information and Communication Technologies (IICT), University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland (HEIG-VD), Rue Galilee 15, CH 1401 Yverdon-les-bains (Switzerland); Moy, Vincent T, E-mail: sylvia.jeney@unibas.ch, E-mail: vmoy@miami.edu [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1600 NW 10th Avenue, Miami, FL 33136 (United States)

    2010-06-25

    We introduce a method for the acquisition of single molecule force measurements of ligand-receptor interactions using the photonic force microscope (PFM). Biotin-functionalized beads, manipulated with an optical trap, and a streptavidin-functionalized coverslip were used to measure the effect of different pulling forces on the lifetime of individual streptavidin-biotin complexes. By optimizing the design of the optical trap and selection of the appropriate bead size, pulling forces in excess of 50 pN were achieved. Based on the amplitude of three-dimensional (3D) thermal position fluctuations of the attached bead, we were able to select for a bead-coverslip interaction that was mediated by a single streptavidin-biotin complex. Moreover, the developed experimental system was greatly accelerated by automation of data acquisition and analysis. In force-dependent kinetic measurements carried out between streptavidin and biotin, we observed that the streptavidin-biotin complex exhibited properties of a catch bond, with the lifetime increasing tenfold when the pulling force increased from 10 to 20 pN. We also show that silica beads were more appropriate than polystyrene beads for the force measurements, as tethers, longer than 200 nm, could be extracted from polystyrene beads.

  1. Monitoring ligand-receptor interactions by photonic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeney, Sylvia; Mor, Flavio; Forro, Laszlo; Koszali, Roland; Moy, Vincent T

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a method for the acquisition of single molecule force measurements of ligand-receptor interactions using the photonic force microscope (PFM). Biotin-functionalized beads, manipulated with an optical trap, and a streptavidin-functionalized coverslip were used to measure the effect of different pulling forces on the lifetime of individual streptavidin-biotin complexes. By optimizing the design of the optical trap and selection of the appropriate bead size, pulling forces in excess of 50 pN were achieved. Based on the amplitude of three-dimensional (3D) thermal position fluctuations of the attached bead, we were able to select for a bead-coverslip interaction that was mediated by a single streptavidin-biotin complex. Moreover, the developed experimental system was greatly accelerated by automation of data acquisition and analysis. In force-dependent kinetic measurements carried out between streptavidin and biotin, we observed that the streptavidin-biotin complex exhibited properties of a catch bond, with the lifetime increasing tenfold when the pulling force increased from 10 to 20 pN. We also show that silica beads were more appropriate than polystyrene beads for the force measurements, as tethers, longer than 200 nm, could be extracted from polystyrene beads.

  2. Predicting Nanocrystal Shape through Consideration of Surface-Ligand Interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Bealing, Clive R.

    2012-03-27

    Density functional calculations for the binding energy of oleic acid-based ligands on Pb-rich {100} and {111} facets of PbSe nanocrystals determine the surface energies as a function of ligand coverage. Oleic acid is expected to bind to the nanocrystal surface in the form of lead oleate. The Wulff construction predicts the thermodynamic equilibrium shape of the PbSe nanocrystals. The equilibrium shape is a function of the ligand surface coverage, which can be controlled by changing the concentration of oleic acid during synthesis. The different binding energy of the ligand on the {100} and {111} facets results in different equilibrium ligand coverages on the facets, and a transition in the equilibrium shape from octahedral to cubic is predicted when increasing the ligand concentration during synthesis. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  3. Quantitative chemogenomics: machine-learning models of protein-ligand interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Claes R; Gustafsson, Mats G; Strömbergsson, Helena

    2011-01-01

    Chemogenomics is an emerging interdisciplinary field that lies in the interface of biology, chemistry, and informatics. Most of the currently used drugs are small molecules that interact with proteins. Understanding protein-ligand interaction is therefore central to drug discovery and design. In the subfield of chemogenomics known as proteochemometrics, protein-ligand-interaction models are induced from data matrices that consist of both protein and ligand information along with some experimentally measured variable. The two general aims of this quantitative multi-structure-property-relationship modeling (QMSPR) approach are to exploit sparse/incomplete information sources and to obtain more general models covering larger parts of the protein-ligand space, than traditional approaches that focuses mainly on specific targets or ligands. The data matrices, usually obtained from multiple sparse/incomplete sources, typically contain series of proteins and ligands together with quantitative information about their interactions. A useful model should ideally be easy to interpret and generalize well to new unseen protein-ligand combinations. Resolving this requires sophisticated machine-learning methods for model induction, combined with adequate validation. This review is intended to provide a guide to methods and data sources suitable for this kind of protein-ligand-interaction modeling. An overview of the modeling process is presented including data collection, protein and ligand descriptor computation, data preprocessing, machine-learning-model induction and validation. Concerns and issues specific for each step in this kind of data-driven modeling will be discussed. © 2011 Bentham Science Publishers

  4. Predicting Nanocrystal Shape through Consideration of Surface-Ligand Interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Bealing, Clive R.; Baumgardner, William J.; Choi, Joshua J.; Hanrath, Tobias; Hennig, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Density functional calculations for the binding energy of oleic acid-based ligands on Pb-rich {100} and {111} facets of PbSe nanocrystals determine the surface energies as a function of ligand coverage. Oleic acid is expected to bind

  5. Interactions of rare earth elements with bacteria and organic ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Takuo; Suzuki, Yoshinori; Nankawa, Takuya; Yoshida, Takahiro; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Kimura, Takaumi; Francis, Arokiasamy J.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the interactions of rare earth elements (REEs) Eu(III) and/or Ce(III, IV) with the common soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens and organic ligands, such as malic acid, citric acid, a siderophore (DFO), cellulose, chitin, and chitosan. Malic acid formed complexes with Eu(III), but degradation of malic acid was observed when the ratio of malic acid to Eu(III) was higher than 100. Citric acid formed a stoichiometric complex with Eu(III) that was not degraded by P. fluorescens. Adsorption of Eu(III) from the DFO complex occurred as a free ion dissociated from DFO and not as the Eu(III)-DFO complex. Cerium(III) was oxidized to Ce(IV) during complexation with DFO to form the Ce(IV)-DFO complex. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) analysis showed that cellulose, chitin, and chitosan, respectively, formed a weak complex, an inner-spherical complex, and an outer-spherical complex with Eu(III). This method also demonstrated that the coordination environment of Eu(III) adsorbed on P. fluorescens possessed similar characteristics to that of chitin, and revealed that adsorption of Eu(III) on P. fluorescens was through a multidentate and predominantly inner-spherical coordination

  6. Research Techniques Made Simple: Emerging Methods to Elucidate Protein Interactions through Spatial Proximity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Yonglu; Khavari, Paul A

    2017-12-01

    Interactions between proteins are essential for fundamental cellular processes, and the diversity of such interactions enables the vast variety of functions essential for life. A persistent goal in biological research is to develop assays that can faithfully capture different types of protein interactions to allow their study. A major step forward in this direction came with a family of methods that delineates spatial proximity of proteins as an indirect measure of protein-protein interaction. A variety of enzyme- and DNA ligation-based methods measure protein co-localization in space, capturing novel interactions that were previously too transient or low affinity to be identified. Here we review some of the methods that have been successfully used to measure spatially proximal protein-protein interactions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A method for fast energy estimation and visualization of protein-ligand interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Nobuo; Itai, Akiko; Iitaka, Yoichi

    1987-10-01

    A new computational and graphical method for facilitating ligand-protein docking studies is developed on a three-dimensional computer graphics display. Various physical and chemical properties inside the ligand binding pocket of a receptor protein, whose structure is elucidated by X-ray crystal analysis, are calculated on three-dimensional grid points and are stored in advance. By utilizing those tabulated data, it is possible to estimate the non-bonded and electrostatic interaction energy and the number of possible hydrogen bonds between protein and ligand molecules in real time during an interactive docking operation. The method also provides a comprehensive visualization of the local environment inside the binding pocket. With this method, it becomes easier to find a roughly stable geometry of ligand molecules, and one can therefore make a rapid survey of the binding capability of many drug candidates. The method will be useful for drug design as well as for the examination of protein-ligand interactions.

  8. Architecture effects on multivalent interactions by polypeptide-based multivalent ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang

    Multivalent interactions are characterized by the simultaneous binding between multiple ligands and multiple binding sites, either in solutions or at interfaces. In biological systems, most multivalent interactions occur between protein receptors and carbohydrate ligands through hydrogen-bonding and hydrophobic interactions. Compared with weak affinity binding between one ligand and one binding site, i.e. monovalent interaction, multivalent interactioins provide greater avidity and specificity, and therefore play unique roles in a broad range of biological activities. Moreover, the studies of multivalent interactions are also essential for producing effective inhibitors and effectors of biological processes that could have important therapeutic applications. Synthetic multivalent ligands have been designed to mimic the biological functions of natural multivalent interactions, and various types of scaffolds have been used to display multiple ligands, including small molecules, linear polymers, dendrimers, nanoparticle surfaces, monolayer surfaces and liposomes. Studies have shown that multivalent interactions can be highly affected by various architectural parameters of these multivalent ligands, including ligand identities, valencies, spacing, ligand densities, nature of linker arms, scaffold length and scaffold conformation. Most of these multivalent ligands are chemically synthesized and have limitations of controlling over sequence and conformation, which is a barrier for mimicking ordered and controlled natural biological systems. Therefore, multivalent ligands with precisely controlled architecture are required for improved structure-function relationship studies. Protein engineering methods with subsequent chemical coupling of ligands provide significant advantages of controlling over backbone conformation and functional group placement, and therefore have been used to synthesize recombinant protein-based materials with desired properties similar to natural

  9. NMR Studies of Protein Hydration and Protein-Ligand Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Yuan

    Water on the surface of a protein is called hydration water. Hydration water is known to play a crucial role in a variety of biological processes including protein folding, enzymatic activation, and drug binding. Although the significance of hydration water has been recognized, the underlying mechanism remains far from being understood. This dissertation employs a unique in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique to study the mechanism of protein hydration and the role of hydration in alcohol-protein interactions. Water isotherms in proteins are measured at different temperatures via the in-situ NMR technique. Water is found to interact differently with hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups on the protein. Water adsorption on hydrophilic groups is hardly affected by the temperature, while water adsorption on hydrophobic groups strongly depends on the temperature around 10 C, below which the adsorption is substantially reduced. This effect is induced by the dramatic decrease in the protein flexibility below 10 C. Furthermore, nanosecond to microsecond protein dynamics and the free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of protein hydration are studied as a function of hydration level and temperature. A crossover at 10 C in protein dynamics and thermodynamics is revealed. The effect of water at hydrophilic groups on protein dynamics and thermodynamics shows little temperature dependence, whereas water at hydrophobic groups has stronger effect above 10 C. In addition, I investigate the role of water in alcohol binding to the protein using the in-situ NMR detection. The isotherms of alcohols are first measured on dry proteins, then on proteins with a series of controlled hydration levels. The free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of alcohol binding are also determined. Two distinct types of alcohol binding are identified. On the one hand, alcohols can directly bind to a few specific sites on the protein. This type of binding is independent of temperature and can be

  10. KLIFS : a knowledge-based structural database to navigate kinase-ligand interaction space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Linden, O.P.J.; Kooistra, A.J.; Leurs, R.; de Esch, I.J.P.; de Graaf, C.

    2013-01-01

    Protein kinases regulate the majority of signal transduction pathways in cells and have become important targets for the development of designer drugs. We present a systematic analysis of kinase-ligand interactions in all regions of the catalytic cleft of all 1252 human kinase-ligand cocrystal

  11. Force spectroscopy studies on protein-ligand interactions: a single protein mechanics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaotang; Li, Hongbin

    2014-10-01

    Protein-ligand interactions are ubiquitous and play important roles in almost every biological process. The direct elucidation of the thermodynamic, structural and functional consequences of protein-ligand interactions is thus of critical importance to decipher the mechanism underlying these biological processes. A toolbox containing a variety of powerful techniques has been developed to quantitatively study protein-ligand interactions in vitro as well as in living systems. The development of atomic force microscopy-based single molecule force spectroscopy techniques has expanded this toolbox and made it possible to directly probe the mechanical consequence of ligand binding on proteins. Many recent experiments have revealed how ligand binding affects the mechanical stability and mechanical unfolding dynamics of proteins, and provided mechanistic understanding on these effects. The enhancement effect of mechanical stability by ligand binding has been used to help tune the mechanical stability of proteins in a rational manner and develop novel functional binding assays for protein-ligand interactions. Single molecule force spectroscopy studies have started to shed new lights on the structural and functional consequence of ligand binding on proteins that bear force under their biological settings. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor ligand interactions: structural cross talk between ligands and the extracellular domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham M West

    Full Text Available Activation of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R in pancreatic β-cells potentiates insulin production and is a current therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Like other class B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, the GLP-1R contains an N-terminal extracellular ligand binding domain. N-terminal truncations on the peptide agonist generate antagonists capable of binding to the extracellular domain, but not capable of activating full length receptor. The main objective of this study was to use Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX to identify how the amide hydrogen bonding network of peptide ligands and the extracellular domain of GLP-1R (nGLP-1R were altered by binding interactions and to then use this platform to validate direct binding events for putative GLP-1R small molecule ligands. The HDX studies presented here for two glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R peptide ligands indicates that the antagonist exendin-4[9-39] is significantly destabilized in the presence of nonionic detergents as compared to the agonist exendin-4. Furthermore, HDX can detect stabilization of exendin-4 and exendin-4[9-39] hydrogen bonding networks at the N-terminal helix [Val19 to Lys27] upon binding to the N-terminal extracellular domain of GLP-1R (nGLP-1R. In addition we show hydrogen bonding network stabilization on nGLP-1R in response to ligand binding, and validate direct binding events with the extracellular domain of the receptor for putative GLP-1R small molecule ligands.

  13. Ultrafast dynamics of ligand and substrate interaction in endothelial nitric oxide synthase under Soret excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chih-Chang; Yabushita, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Chen, Pei-Feng; Liang, Keng S

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy of endothelial NOS oxygenase domain (eNOS-oxy) was performed to study dynamics of ligand or substrate interaction under Soret band excitation. Photo-excitation dissociates imidazole ligand in 4ps. The eNOS-oxy without additive is partially bound with water molecule, thus its photoexcited dynamics also shows ligand dissociation in <800fs. Then it followed by vibrational cooling coupled with charge transfer in 4.8ps, and recombination of ligand to distal side of heme in 12ps. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Controlling Nanocrystal Superlattice Symmetry and Shape-Anisotropic Interactions through Variable Ligand Surface Coverage

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Joshua J.; Bealing, Clive R.; Bian, Kaifu; Hughes, Kevin J.; Zhang, Wenyu; Smilgies, Detlef-M.; Hennig, Richard G.; Engstrom, James R.; Hanrath, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    The assembly of colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) into superstructures with long-range translational and orientational order is sensitive to the molecular interactions between ligands bound to the NC surface. We illustrate how ligand coverage on colloidal PbS NCs can be exploited as a tunable parameter to direct the self-assembly of superlattices with predefined symmetry. We show that PbS NCs with dense ligand coverage assemble into face-centered cubic (fcc) superlattices whereas NCs with sparse ligand coverage assemble into body-centered cubic (bcc) superlattices which also exhibit orientational ordering of NCs in their lattice sites. Surface chemistry characterization combined with density functional theory calculations suggest that the loss of ligands occurs preferentially on {100} than on reconstructed {111} NC facets. The resulting anisotropic ligand distribution amplifies the role of NC shape in the assembly and leads to the formation of superlattices with translational and orientational order. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  15. Controlling Nanocrystal Superlattice Symmetry and Shape-Anisotropic Interactions through Variable Ligand Surface Coverage

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Joshua J.

    2011-03-09

    The assembly of colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) into superstructures with long-range translational and orientational order is sensitive to the molecular interactions between ligands bound to the NC surface. We illustrate how ligand coverage on colloidal PbS NCs can be exploited as a tunable parameter to direct the self-assembly of superlattices with predefined symmetry. We show that PbS NCs with dense ligand coverage assemble into face-centered cubic (fcc) superlattices whereas NCs with sparse ligand coverage assemble into body-centered cubic (bcc) superlattices which also exhibit orientational ordering of NCs in their lattice sites. Surface chemistry characterization combined with density functional theory calculations suggest that the loss of ligands occurs preferentially on {100} than on reconstructed {111} NC facets. The resulting anisotropic ligand distribution amplifies the role of NC shape in the assembly and leads to the formation of superlattices with translational and orientational order. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  16. Analytical developments for screening of lanthanides/ligands interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varenne, F.

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the potential of hyphenated capillary electrophoresis and inductively coupled mass spectrometry to classify different ligands according to their europium binding affinity in a hydro-organic medium. On the one hand, this method enables to evaluate the affinity of phosphorus-containing ligands in less than two hours and using less than 15 ng of ligand. On the other hand, complexation constants could be determined. The results are in excellent agreement with the values obtained by spectrophotometric titrations.Moreover, a library of copolymers for solid/liquid extraction of europium is investigated. The extraction protocol enables to classify copolymers according to their europium affinity in a hydro-organic medium. This screening requires 60 mg of copolymers. For the most promising recognition properties and selectivity La 3+ /Eu 3+ /Lu 3+ are evaluated. (author)

  17. Physics-based scoring of protein-ligand interactions: explicit polarizability, quantum mechanics and free energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Richard A

    2011-04-01

    The ability to accurately predict the interaction of a ligand with its receptor is a key limitation in computer-aided drug design approaches such as virtual screening and de novo design. In this article, we examine current strategies for a physics-based approach to scoring of protein-ligand affinity, as well as outlining recent developments in force fields and quantum chemical techniques. We also consider advances in the development and application of simulation-based free energy methods to study protein-ligand interactions. Fuelled by recent advances in computational algorithms and hardware, there is the opportunity for increased integration of physics-based scoring approaches at earlier stages in computationally guided drug discovery. Specifically, we envisage increased use of implicit solvent models and simulation-based scoring methods as tools for computing the affinities of large virtual ligand libraries. Approaches based on end point simulations and reference potentials allow the application of more advanced potential energy functions to prediction of protein-ligand binding affinities. Comprehensive evaluation of polarizable force fields and quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular mechanical and QM methods in scoring of protein-ligand interactions is required, particularly in their ability to address challenging targets such as metalloproteins and other proteins that make highly polar interactions. Finally, we anticipate increasingly quantitative free energy perturbation and thermodynamic integration methods that are practical for optimization of hits obtained from screened ligand libraries.

  18. Interactions between alkaline earth cations and oxo ligands. DFT study of the affinity of the Mg²+ cation for phosphoryl ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Leonardo Moreira; de Mesquita Carneiro, José Walkimar; Paes, Lilian Weitzel Coelho

    2011-08-01

    DFT (B3LYP/6-31+G(d)) calculations of Mg(2+) affinities for a set of phosphoryl ligands were performed. Two types of ligands were studied: a set of trivalent [O = P(R)] and a set of pentavalent phosphoryl ligands [O = P(R)(3)] (R = H, F, Cl, Br, OH, OCH(3), CH(3), CN, NH(2) and NO(2)), with R either bound directly to the phosphorus atom or to the para position of a phenyl ring. The affinity of the Mg(2+) cation for the ligands was quantified by means of the enthalpy for the substitution of one water molecule in the [Mg(H(2)O)(6)](2+) complex for a ligand. The enthalpy of substitution was correlated with electronic and geometric parameters. Electron-donor groups increase the interaction between the cation and the ligand, while electron-acceptor groups decrease the interaction enthalpy.

  19. Monitoring lysin motif-ligand interactions via tryptophan analog fluorescence spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrovic, Dejan M.; Leenhouts, Kees; van Roosmalen, Maarten L.; KleinJan, Fenneke; Broos, Jaap

    2012-01-01

    The lysin motif (LysM) is a peptidoglycan binding protein domain found in a wide range of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Various techniques have been used to study the LysM-ligand interaction, but a sensitive spectroscopic method to directly monitor this interaction has not been reported. Here a

  20. Intuitive Density Functional Theory-Based Energy Decomposition Analysis for Protein-Ligand Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, M J S; Fox, T; Tautermann, C S; Skylaris, C-K

    2017-04-11

    First-principles quantum mechanical calculations with methods such as density functional theory (DFT) allow the accurate calculation of interaction energies between molecules. These interaction energies can be dissected into chemically relevant components such as electrostatics, polarization, and charge transfer using energy decomposition analysis (EDA) approaches. Typically EDA has been used to study interactions between small molecules; however, it has great potential to be applied to large biomolecular assemblies such as protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions. We present an application of EDA calculations to the study of ligands that bind to the thrombin protein, using the ONETEP program for linear-scaling DFT calculations. Our approach goes beyond simply providing the components of the interaction energy; we are also able to provide visual representations of the changes in density that happen as a result of polarization and charge transfer, thus pinpointing the functional groups between the ligand and protein that participate in each kind of interaction. We also demonstrate with this approach that we can focus on studying parts (fragments) of ligands. The method is relatively insensitive to the protocol that is used to prepare the structures, and the results obtained are therefore robust. This is an application to a real protein drug target of a whole new capability where accurate DFT calculations can produce both energetic and visual descriptors of interactions. These descriptors can be used to provide insights for tailoring interactions, as needed for example in drug design.

  1. The proximate memory mechanism underlying the survival-processing effect: richness of encoding or interactive imagery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroneisen, Meike; Erdfelder, Edgar; Buchner, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Nairne and collaborators showed that assessing the relevance of words in the context of an imagined survival scenario boosts memory for these words. Although this survival-processing advantage has attracted a considerable amount of research, little is known about the proximate memory mechanism mediating this effect. Recently, Kroneisen and Erdfelder (2011) argued that it is not survival processing itself that facilitates recall but rather the richness and distinctiveness of encoding that is triggered by the survival-processing task. Alternatively, however, it is also conceivable that survival processing fosters interactive imagery, a process known to improve associative learning. To test these explanations we compared relevance-rating and interactive imagery tasks for survival and control scenarios. Results show that the survival advantage replicates in the relevance-rating condition but vanishes in the interactive imagery condition. This refutes the interactive imagery explanation and corroborates the richness-of-encoding hypothesis of the survival-processing effect.

  2. Accounting for Intraligand Interactions in Flexible Ligand Docking with a PMF-Based Scoring Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizunov, A Y; Gonchar, A L; Zaitseva, N I; Zosimov, V V

    2015-10-26

    We analyzed the frequency with which intraligand contacts occurred in a set of 1300 protein-ligand complexes [ Plewczynski et al. J. Comput. Chem. 2011 , 32 , 742 - 755 .]. Our analysis showed that flexible ligands often form intraligand hydrophobic contacts, while intraligand hydrogen bonds are rare. The test set was also thoroughly investigated and classified. We suggest a universal method for enhancement of a scoring function based on a potential of mean force (PMF-based score) by adding a term accounting for intraligand interactions. The method was implemented via in-house developed program, utilizing an Algo_score scoring function [ Ramensky et al. Proteins: Struct., Funct., Genet. 2007 , 69 , 349 - 357 .] based on the Tarasov-Muryshev PMF [ Muryshev et al. J. Comput.-Aided Mol. Des. 2003 , 17 , 597 - 605 .]. The enhancement of the scoring function was shown to significantly improve the docking and scoring quality for flexible ligands in the test set of 1300 protein-ligand complexes [ Plewczynski et al. J. Comput. Chem. 2011 , 32 , 742 - 755 .]. We then investigated the correlation of the docking results with two parameters of intraligand interactions estimation. These parameters are the weight of intraligand interactions and the minimum number of bonds between the ligand atoms required to take their interaction into account.

  3. Ligand-regulated peptides: a general approach for modulating protein-peptide interactions with small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkowski, Brock F; Miller, Russell A; Belshaw, Peter J

    2005-07-01

    We engineered a novel ligand-regulated peptide (LiRP) system where the binding activity of intracellular peptides is controlled by a cell-permeable small molecule. In the absence of ligand, peptides expressed as fusions in an FKBP-peptide-FRB-GST LiRP scaffold protein are free to interact with target proteins. In the presence of the ligand rapamycin, or the nonimmunosuppressive rapamycin derivative AP23102, the scaffold protein undergoes a conformational change that prevents the interaction of the peptide with the target protein. The modular design of the scaffold enables the creation of LiRPs through rational design or selection from combinatorial peptide libraries. Using these methods, we identified LiRPs that interact with three independent targets: retinoblastoma protein, c-Src, and the AMP-activated protein kinase. The LiRP system should provide a general method to temporally and spatially regulate protein function in cells and organisms.

  4. Simple Ligand-Receptor Interaction Descriptor (SILIRID) for alignment-free binding site comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chupakhin, Vladimir; Marcou, Gilles; Gaspar, Helena; Varnek, Alexandre

    2014-06-01

    We describe SILIRID (Simple Ligand-Receptor Interaction Descriptor), a novel fixed size descriptor characterizing protein-ligand interactions. SILIRID can be obtained from the binary interaction fingerprints (IFPs) by summing up the bits corresponding to identical amino acids. This results in a vector of 168 integer numbers corresponding to the product of the number of entries (20 amino acids and one cofactor) and 8 interaction types per amino acid (hydrophobic, aromatic face to face, aromatic edge to face, H-bond donated by the protein, H-bond donated by the ligand, ionic bond with protein cation and protein anion, and interaction with metal ion). Efficiency of SILIRID to distinguish different protein binding sites has been examined in similarity search in sc-PDB database, a druggable portion of the Protein Data Bank, using various protein-ligand complexes as queries. The performance of retrieval of structurally and evolutionary related classes of proteins was comparable to that of state-of-the-art approaches (ROC AUC ≈ 0.91). SILIRID can efficiently be used to visualize chemogenomic space covered by sc-PDB using Generative Topographic Mapping (GTM): sc-PDB SILIRID data form clusters corresponding to different protein types.

  5. Quantitation of species differences in albumin–ligand interactions for bovine, human and rat serum albumins using fluorescence spectroscopy: A test case with some Sudlow's site I ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poór, Miklós; Li, Yin; Matisz, Gergely; Kiss, László; Kunsági-Máté, Sándor; Kőszegi, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    Albumin, the most abundant plasma protein is an approximately 67 kDa sized water-soluble macromolecule. Since several drugs and xenobiotics circulate in the blood at least partially in albumin-bound form, albumin plays a key role in the pharmacokinetics/toxicokinetics of these chemicals. Most of the drugs and xenobiotics are Sudlow's site I ligands. In numerous studies, bovine serum albumin (BSA) is used for modeling albumin–ligand interactions and the results are extrapolated to human serum albumin (HSA). Furthermore, only limited information is available related to albumin–ligand interactions of different albumin species. Therefore, in our study, we have focused on the quantification of differences between bovine, human and rat serum albumin (RSA) using four Sudlow's site I ligands (luteolin, ochratoxin A, phenylbutazone and warfarin). Interactions were analyzed by fluorescence spectroscopy. Stability constants as well as competing capacities of the ligands were determined, and thermodynamic study was also performed. Our results highlight that there could be major differences between BSA, HSA and RSA in their ligand binding properties. Based on our observations we emphasize that in molecular aspects BSA behaves considerably differently from HSA or from albumins of other species therefore, it is strongly recommended to apply at least some confirmatory measurements when data obtained from other species are attempted to be extrapolated to HSA. -- Highlights: • Albumin–ligand interactions of human, bovine and rat albumins were studied. • Four Sudlow's site I ligands were tested by fluorescence spectroscopy. • Substantial differences were found in stability constants among albumin complexes. • Competing capacity of ligands showed major differences in the studied species. • Data obtained for BSA cannot be directly extrapolated to human albumin

  6. Longitudinal effects of contextual and proximal factors on mother-infant interactions among Brazilian adolescent mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Eva; DeSousa, Diogo; Koller, Silvia H; Volling, Brenda L

    2016-05-01

    Adolescent mothers often come from vulnerable backgrounds which might impact the quality of both maternal and infant behavior. Despite the negative impact of adolescent motherhood for maternal and infant behavior, social support may decrease the risks and promote maternal behavior toward the infant. The aim of this study was to investigate longitudinally the effects of proximal (maternal behavior) and distal (mother's perceived social support) variables on infant development in a sample of Brazilian adolescent mothers and their infants. Thirty-nine adolescent mothers (Mage=17.26years; SD=1.71) were observed interacting with their infants at 3 and 6 months postpartum and reported on social support. Results revealed that maternal and infant behavior were associated within and across times. Mothers' perceived social support at 3 months had an indirect effect on infant behavior at 6 months, totally mediated by maternal behavior at 6 months. Our findings revealed the mutual influence between maternal and infant behavior, revealing a proximal process. The results also underscored the importance of the passage of time in the interplay between mother-infant interactions and their developmental context. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Unnatural amino acids as probes of ligand-receptor interactions and their conformational consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Ahern, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    -edge synthetic and chemical biological approaches. Here we summarize recent advances in the use of site-directed incorporation of unnatural amino acids and chemical probes to study ligand-receptor interactions, determine the location of binding sites, and examine the downstream conformational consequences...

  8. Characterization of mRNA-cytoskeleton interactions in situ using FMTRIP and proximity ligation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeenah Jung

    Full Text Available Many studies have demonstrated an association between the cytoskeleton and mRNA, as well as the asymmetric distribution of mRNA granules within the cell in response to various signaling events. It is likely that the extensive cytoskeletal network directs mRNA transport and localization, with different cytoskeletal elements having their own specific roles. In order to understand the spatiotemporal changes in the interactions between the mRNA and the cytoskeleton as a response to a stimulus, a technique that can visualize and quantify these changes across a population of cells while capturing cell-to-cell variations is required. Here, we demonstrate a method for imaging and quantifying mRNA-cytoskeleton interactions on a per cell basis with single-interaction sensitivity. Using a proximity ligation assay with flag-tagged multiply-labeled tetravalent RNA imaging probes (FMTRIP, we quantified interactions between mRNAs and β-tubulin, vimentin, or filamentous actin (F-actin for two different mRNAs, poly(A + and β-actin mRNA, in two different cell types, A549 cells and human dermal fibroblasts (HDF. We found that the mRNAs interacted predominantly with F-actin (>50% in HDF, >20% in A549 cells, compared to β-tubulin (<5% and vimentin (11-13%. This likely reflects differences in mRNA management by the two cell types. We then quantified changes in these interactions in response to two perturbations, F-actin depolymerization and arsenite-induced oxidative stress, both of which alter either the cytoskeleton itself and mRNA localization. Both perturbations led to a decrease in poly(A + mRNA interactions with F-actin and an increase in the interactions with microtubules, in a time dependent manner.

  9. Fringe proteins modulate Notch-ligand cis and trans interactions to specify signaling states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBon, Lauren; Lee, Tom V; Sprinzak, David; Jafar-Nejad, Hamed; Elowitz, Michael B

    2014-09-25

    The Notch signaling pathway consists of multiple types of receptors and ligands, whose interactions can be tuned by Fringe glycosyltransferases. A major challenge is to determine how these components control the specificity and directionality of Notch signaling in developmental contexts. Here, we analyzed same-cell (cis) Notch-ligand interactions for Notch1, Dll1, and Jag1, and their dependence on Fringe protein expression in mammalian cells. We found that Dll1 and Jag1 can cis-inhibit Notch1, and Fringe proteins modulate these interactions in a way that parallels their effects on trans interactions. Fringe similarly modulated Notch-ligand cis interactions during Drosophila development. Based on these and previously identified interactions, we show how the design of the Notch signaling pathway leads to a restricted repertoire of signaling states that promote heterotypic signaling between distinct cell types, providing insight into the design principles of the Notch signaling system, and the specific developmental process of Drosophila dorsal-ventral boundary formation.

  10. iview: an interactive WebGL visualizer for protein-ligand complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongjian; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Nakane, Takanori; Wong, Man-Hon

    2014-02-25

    Visualization of protein-ligand complex plays an important role in elaborating protein-ligand interactions and aiding novel drug design. Most existing web visualizers either rely on slow software rendering, or lack virtual reality support. The vital feature of macromolecular surface construction is also unavailable. We have developed iview, an easy-to-use interactive WebGL visualizer of protein-ligand complex. It exploits hardware acceleration rather than software rendering. It features three special effects in virtual reality settings, namely anaglyph, parallax barrier and oculus rift, resulting in visually appealing identification of intermolecular interactions. It supports four surface representations including Van der Waals surface, solvent excluded surface, solvent accessible surface and molecular surface. Moreover, based on the feature-rich version of iview, we have also developed a neat and tailor-made version specifically for our istar web platform for protein-ligand docking purpose. This demonstrates the excellent portability of iview. Using innovative 3D techniques, we provide a user friendly visualizer that is not intended to compete with professional visualizers, but to enable easy accessibility and platform independence.

  11. Interaction between alkaline earth cations and oxo-ligands. DFT study of the affinity of the Ca2+ cation for carbonyl ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Leonardo Moreira; Carneiro, José Walkimar de Mesquita; Romeiro, Gilberto Alves; Paes, Lilian Weitzel Coelho

    2011-02-01

    The affinity of the Ca(2+) ion for a set of substituted carbonyl ligands was analyzed with both the DFT (B3LYP/6-31+G(d)) and semi-empirical (PM6) methods. Two types of ligands were studied: a set of monosubstituted [O=CH(R)] and a set of disubstituted ligands [O=C(R)(2)] (R=H, F, Cl, Br, OH, OCH(3), CH(3), CN, NH(2) and NO(2)), with R either directly bound to the carbonyl carbon atom or to the para position of a phenyl ring. The interaction energy was calculated to quantify the affinity of the Ca(2+) cation for the ligands. Geometric and electronic parameters were correlated with the intensity of the metal-ligand interaction. The electronic nature of the substituent is the main parameter that determines the interaction energy. Donor groups make the interaction energy more negative (stabilizing the complex formed), while acceptor groups make the interaction energy less negative (destabilizing the complex formed).

  12. PL-PatchSurfer: a novel molecular local surface-based method for exploring protein-ligand interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bingjie; Zhu, Xiaolei; Monroe, Lyman; Bures, Mark G; Kihara, Daisuke

    2014-08-27

    Structure-based computational methods have been widely used in exploring protein-ligand interactions, including predicting the binding ligands of a given protein based on their structural complementarity. Compared to other protein and ligand representations, the advantages of a surface representation include reduced sensitivity to subtle changes in the pocket and ligand conformation and fast search speed. Here we developed a novel method named PL-PatchSurfer (Protein-Ligand PatchSurfer). PL-PatchSurfer represents the protein binding pocket and the ligand molecular surface as a combination of segmented surface patches. Each patch is characterized by its geometrical shape and the electrostatic potential, which are represented using the 3D Zernike descriptor (3DZD). We first tested PL-PatchSurfer on binding ligand prediction and found it outperformed the pocket-similarity based ligand prediction program. We then optimized the search algorithm of PL-PatchSurfer using the PDBbind dataset. Finally, we explored the utility of applying PL-PatchSurfer to a larger and more diverse dataset and showed that PL-PatchSurfer was able to provide a high early enrichment for most of the targets. To the best of our knowledge, PL-PatchSurfer is the first surface patch-based method that treats ligand complementarity at protein binding sites. We believe that using a surface patch approach to better understand protein-ligand interactions has the potential to significantly enhance the design of new ligands for a wide array of drug-targets.

  13. Characterization of mRNA-Cytoskeleton Interactions In Situ Using FMTRIP and Proximity Ligation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jeenah; Lifland, Aaron W.; Alonas, Eric J.; Zurla, Chiara; Santangelo, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated an association between the cytoskeleton and mRNA, as well as the asymmetric distribution of mRNA granules within the cell in response to various signaling events. It is likely that the extensive cytoskeletal network directs mRNA transport and localization, with different cytoskeletal elements having their own specific roles. In order to understand the spatiotemporal changes in the interactions between the mRNA and the cytoskeleton as a response to a stimulus, a technique that can visualize and quantify these changes across a population of cells while capturing cell-to-cell variations is required. Here, we demonstrate a method for imaging and quantifying mRNA-cytoskeleton interactions on a per cell basis with single-interaction sensitivity. Using a proximity ligation assay with flag-tagged multiply-labeled tetravalent RNA imaging probes (FMTRIP), we quantified interactions between mRNAs and β-tubulin, vimentin, or filamentous actin (F-actin) for two different mRNAs, poly(A) + and β-actin mRNA, in two different cell types, A549 cells and human dermal fibroblasts (HDF). We found that the mRNAs interacted predominantly with F-actin (>50% in HDF, >20% in A549 cells), compared to β-tubulin (cytoskeleton itself and mRNA localization. Both perturbations led to a decrease in poly(A) + mRNA interactions with F-actin and an increase in the interactions with microtubules, in a time dependent manner. PMID:24040294

  14. Deciphering ligands' interaction with Cu and Cu2O nanocrystal surfaces by NMR solution tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaria, Arnaud; Cure, Jérémy; Piettre, Kilian; Coppel, Yannick; Turrin, Cédric-Olivier; Chaudret, Bruno; Fau, Pierre

    2015-01-12

    The hydrogenolysis of [Cu2{(iPrN)2(CCH3)}2] in the presence of hexadecylamine (HDA) or tetradecylphosphonic acid (TDPA) in toluene leads to 6-9 nm copper nanocrystals. Solution NMR spectroscopy has been used to describe the nanoparticle surface chemistry during the dynamic phenomenon of air oxidation. The ligands are organized as multilayered shells around the nanoparticles. The shell of ligands is controlled by both their intermolecular interactions and their bonding strength on the nanocrystals. Under ambient atmosphere, the oxidation rate of colloidal copper nanocrystals closely relies on the chemical nature of the employed ligands (base or acid). Primary amine molecules behave as soft ligands for Cu atoms, but are even more strongly coordinated on surface Cu(I) sites, thus allowing a very efficient corrosion protection of the copper core. On the contrary, the TDPA ligands lead to a rapid oxidation rate of Cu nanoparticles and eventually to the re-dissolution of Cu(II) species at the expense of the nanocrystals. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Titration ELISA as a Method to Determine the Dissociation Constant of Receptor Ligand Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eble, Johannes A

    2018-02-15

    The dissociation constant describes the interaction between two partners in the binding equilibrium and is a measure of their affinity. It is a crucial parameter to compare different ligands, e.g., competitive inhibitors, protein isoforms and mutants, for their binding strength to a binding partner. Dissociation constants are determined by plotting concentrations of bound versus free ligand as binding curves. In contrast, titration curves, in which a signal that is proportional to the concentration of bound ligand is plotted against the total concentration of added ligand, are much easier to record. The signal can be detected spectroscopically and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). This is exemplified in a protocol for a titration ELISA that measures the binding of the snake venom-derived rhodocetin to its immobilized target domain of α2β1 integrin. Titration ELISAs are versatile and widely used. Any pair of interacting proteins can be used as immobilized receptor and soluble ligand, provided that both proteins are pure, and their concentrations are known. The difficulty so far has been to determine the dissociation constant from a titration curve. In this study, a mathematical function underlying titration curves is introduced. Without any error-prone graphical estimation of a saturation yield, this algorithm allows processing of the raw data (signal intensities at different concentrations of added ligand) directly by mathematical evaluation via non-linear regression. Thus, several titration curves can be recorded simultaneously and transformed into a set of characteristic parameters, among them the dissociation constant and the concentration of binding-active receptor, and they can be evaluated statistically. When combined with this algorithm, titration ELISAs gain the advantage of directly presenting the dissociation constant. Therefore, they may be used more efficiently in the future.

  16. Combined modeling of cell aggregation and adhesion mediated by receptor–ligand interactions under shear flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Du

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Blood cell aggregation and adhesion to endothelial cells under shear flow are crucial to many biological processes such as thrombi formation, inflammatory cascade, and tumor metastasis, in which these cellular interactions are mainly mediated by the underlying receptor–ligand bindings. While theoretical modeling of aggregation dynamics and adhesion kinetics of interacting cells have been well studied separately, how to couple these two processes remains unclear. Here we develop a combined model that couples cellular aggregation dynamics and adhesion kinetics under shear flow. The impacts of shear rate (or shear stress and molecular binding affinity were elucidated. This study provides a unified model where the action of a fluid flow drives cell aggregation and adhesion under the modulations of the mechanical shear flow and receptor–ligand interaction kinetics. It offers an insight into understanding the relevant biological processes and functions.

  17. Structural analysis of protein-ligand interactions: the binding of endogenous compounds and of synthetic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallina, Anna M; Bork, Peer; Bordo, Domenico

    2014-02-01

    The large number of macromolecular structures deposited with the Protein Data Bank (PDB) describing complexes between proteins and either physiological compounds or synthetic drugs made it possible a systematic analysis of the interactions occurring between proteins and their ligands. In this work, the binding pockets of about 4000 PDB protein-ligand complexes were investigated and amino acid and interaction types were analyzed. The residues observed with lowest frequency in protein sequences, Trp, His, Met, Tyr, and Phe, turned out to be the most abundant in binding pockets. Significant differences between drug-like and physiological compounds were found. On average, physiological compounds establish with respect to drugs about twice as many hydrogen bonds with protein atoms, whereas drugs rely more on hydrophobic interactions to establish target selectivity. The large number of PDB structures describing homologous proteins in complex with the same ligand made it possible to analyze the conservation of binding pocket residues among homologous protein structures bound to the same ligand, showing that Gly, Glu, Arg, Asp, His, and Thr are more conserved than other amino acids. Also in the cases in which the same ligand is bound to unrelated proteins, the binding pockets showed significant conservation in the residue types. In this case, the probability of co-occurrence of the same amino acid type in the binding pockets could be up to thirteen times higher than that expected on a random basis. The trends identified in this study may provide an useful guideline in the process of drug design and lead optimization. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Interactions of human hemoglobin with charged ligand-functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles and effect of counterions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Goutam, E-mail: ghoshg@yahoo.com [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Mumbai Centre (India); Panicker, Lata [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Solid State Physics Division (India)

    2014-12-15

    Human hemoglobin is an important metalloprotein. It has tetrameric structure with each subunit containing a ‘heme’ group which carries oxygen and carbon dioxide in blood. In this work, we have investigated the interactions of human hemoglobin (Hb) with charged ligand-functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles and the effect of counterions, in aqueous medium. Several techniques like DLS and ζ-potential measurements, UV–vis, fluorescence, and CD spectroscopy have been used to characterize the interaction. The nanoparticle size was measured to be in the range of 20–30 nm. Our results indicated the binding of Hb with both positively as well as negatively charged ligand-functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles in neutral aqueous medium which was driven by the electrostatic and the hydrophobic interactions. The electrostatic binding interaction was not seen in phosphate buffer at pH 7.4. We have also observed that the ‘heme’ groups of Hb remained unaffected on binding with charged nanoparticles, suggesting the utility of the charged ligand-functionalized nanoparticles in biomedical applications.

  19. Simple knowledge-based descriptors to predict protein-ligand interactions. Methodology and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissink, J. Willem M.; Verdonk, Marcel L.; Klebe, Gerhard

    2000-11-01

    A new type of shape descriptor is proposed to describe the spatial orientation for non-covalent interactions. It is built from simple, anisotropic Gaussian contributions that are parameterised by 10 adjustable values. The descriptors have been used to fit propensity distributions derived from scatter data stored in the IsoStar database. This database holds composite pictures of possible interaction geometries between a common central group and various interacting moieties, as extracted from small-molecule crystal structures. These distributions can be related to probabilities for the occurrence of certain interaction geometries among different functional groups. A fitting procedure is described that generates the descriptors in a fully automated way. For this purpose, we apply a similarity index that is tailored to the problem, the Split Hodgkin Index. It accounts for the similarity in regions of either high or low propensity in a separate way. Although dependent on the division into these two subregions, the index is robust and performs better than the regular Hodgkin index. The reliability and coverage of the fitted descriptors was assessed using SuperStar. SuperStar usually operates on the raw IsoStar data to calculate propensity distributions, e.g., for a binding site in a protein. For our purpose we modified the code to have it operate on our descriptors instead. This resulted in a substantial reduction in calculation time (factor of five to eight) compared to the original implementation. A validation procedure was performed on a set of 130 protein-ligand complexes, using four representative interacting probes to map the properties of the various binding sites: ammonium nitrogen, alcohol oxygen, carbonyl oxygen, and methyl carbon. The predicted `hot spots' for the binding of these probes were compared to the actual arrangement of ligand atoms in experimentally determined protein-ligand complexes. Results indicate that the version of SuperStar that applies to

  20. The operator technique in the theory of the rare earth ion interaction with ligand nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikeenok, O.A.; Eremin, M.V.; Khutsishvili, O.G.

    1986-01-01

    The tensor structure of the operator of rare earth ion interaction with nuclei of close ligands conditioned by virtual processes of charge transport is established. It is taken into account that virtual processes of electron transport from the ligand can take place to the non-filled 4f-, void 5d- and 6s- and preliminarily excited 5p-shells of the rare earth ion. Effects of 4f- and 5d-state mixing by the odd crystal field are considered for the first time. In contrast to the usual multipole-dipole interaction the given one is characterized by anomalously greater significance of highest multipole momenta of the rare earth ion and in the common case it does not have axial symmetry. The theory is compared with data on double electron-nuclear resonance and radiofrequency discrete saturation, taking CaF 2 :Ce 3+ impurity centers as an example

  1. NNAlign: a platform to construct and evaluate artificial neural network models of receptor-ligand interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Andreatta, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Peptides are extensively used to characterize functional or (linear) structural aspects of receptor-ligand interactions in biological systems, e.g. SH2, SH3, PDZ peptide-recognition domains, the MHC membrane receptors and enzymes such as kinases and phosphatases. NNAlign is a method for the ident...... with insertions and deletions, encoding of receptor pseudo-sequences, and custom alphabets for the training sequences. The server is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NNAlign-2.0....

  2. The interactions between lipase and pyridinium ligands investigated by electrochemical and spectrophotometric methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Patriche

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between pyridinium ligands derived from 4,4’-bipyridine (N,N’-bis(p-bromophenacyl-4,4’-bipyridinium dibromide – Lr and (N,N’-bis(p-bromophenacyl-1,2-bis (4-pyridyl ethane dibromide – Lm with lipase enzyme was evaluated. The stability of the pyridinium ligands, having an essential role in biological systems, in 0.1 M KNO3 as supporting electrolyte is influenced by the lipase concentration added. The pH and conductometry measurements in aqueous solution suggest a rapid ionic exchange process. The behavior of pyridinium ligands in the presence of lipase is investigated by cyclic voltammetry and UV/Vis spectroscopy, which indicated bindings and changes from the interaction between them. The voltammograms recorded on the glassy carbon electrode showed a more intense electronic transfer for the Lr interaction with lipase compared to Lm, which is due to the absence of mobile ethylene groups from Lr structure.

  3. Spatio-temporal Characterization of Ligand-Receptor Interactions in Blood Stem-Cell Rolling

    KAUST Repository

    Al Alwan, Bader

    2017-08-16

    One of the most important issues in the research on hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) is to understand the mechanism of the homing process of these cells to the bone marrow after being transplanted into patients and establish the production of various blood cell types. The HSPCs first come in contact with the endothelial cells. This contact is known as adhesion and occurs through a multi-step paradigm ending with transmigration to the bone marrow niche. The initial step of the homing, tethering and rolling of HSPCs is mediated by P- and E-Selectins expressed on the endothelial cell surface through their interactions with the ligands expressed by HSPCs. Here we developed a novel experimental method to unravel the molecular mechanisms of the selectin-ligands interactions in vitro at the single molecule level by combining microfluidics and single-molecule fluorescence imaging. Our method enables direct visualization of the nanoscale spatiotemporal dynamics of the E-selectin-ligand (PSGL-1) interactions under conditions of shear stress acting on the cells at the molecular level in real time.

  4. Statistical Estimation of the Protein-Ligand Binding Free Energy Based On Direct Protein-Ligand Interaction Obtained by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruki Nakamura

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a method for estimating protein-ligand binding free energy (DG based on the direct protein-ligand interaction obtained by a molecular dynamics simulation. Using this method, we estimated the DG value statistically by the average values of the van der Waals and electrostatic interactions between each amino acid of the target protein and the ligand molecule. In addition, we introduced fluctuations in the accessible surface area (ASA and dihedral angles of the protein-ligand complex system as the entropy terms of the DG estimation. The present method included the fluctuation term of structural change of the protein and the effective dielectric constant. We applied this method to 34 protein-ligand complex structures. As a result, the correlation coefficient between the experimental and calculated DG values was 0.81, and the average error of DG was 1.2 kcal/mol with the use of the fixed parameters. These results were obtained from a 2 nsec molecular dynamics simulation.

  5. A meta-selective C-H borylation directed by a secondary interaction between ligand and substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuninobu, Yoichiro; Ida, Haruka; Nishi, Mitsumi; Kanai, Motomu

    2015-09-01

    Regioselective C-H bond transformations are potentially the most efficient method for the synthesis of organic molecules. However, the presence of many C-H bonds in organic molecules and the high activation barrier for these reactions make these transformations difficult. Directing groups in the reaction substrate are often used to control regioselectivity, which has been especially successful for the ortho-selective functionalization of aromatic substrates. Here, we describe an iridium-catalysed meta-selective C-H borylation of aromatic compounds using a newly designed catalytic system. The bipyridine-derived ligand that binds iridium contains a pendant urea moiety. A secondary interaction between this urea and a hydrogen-bond acceptor in the substrate places the iridium in close proximity to the meta-C-H bond and thus controls the regioselectivity. 1H NMR studies and control experiments support the participation of hydrogen bonds in inducing regioselectivity. Reversible direction of the catalyst through hydrogen bonds is a versatile concept for regioselective C-H transformations.

  6. Rapid, portable detection of endocrine disrupting chemicals through ligand-nuclear hormone receptor interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, J Porter; Schinn, Song-Min; Jones, Matthew D; Bundy, Bradley C

    2017-12-04

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) are structurally diverse compounds that can interact with nuclear hormone receptors, posing significant risk to human and ecological health. Unfortunately, many conventional biosensors have been too structure-specific, labor-intensive or laboratory-oriented to detect broad ranges of EDC effectively. Recently, several technological advances are providing more rapid, portable, and affordable detection of endocrine-disrupting activity through ligand-nuclear hormone receptor interactions. Here, we overview these recent advances applied to EDC biosensors - including cell lyophilization, cell immobilization, cell-free systems, smartphone-based signal detection, and improved competitive binding assays.

  7. "Precipitation on Nanoparticles": Attractive Intermolecular Interactions Stabilize Specific Ligand Ratios on the Surfaces of Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Zonglin; Han, Yanxiao; Kral, Petr; Klajn, Rafal

    2018-04-19

    Confining organic molecules to the surfaces of inorganic nanoparticles can induce intermolecular interactions between them, which can affect the composition of the mixed self-assembled monolayers obtained by co-adsorption from solution of two different molecules. Here, we study co-adsorption of two thiolated ligands-a dialkylviologen and a zwitterionic sulfobetaine-that can interact with each other electrostatically, onto gold nanoparticles. Consequently, the nanoparticles favor a narrow range of ratios of these two molecules that is largely independent of the molar ratio in solution. We show that changing the solution molar ratio of two ligands by a factor of ~5,000 affects the on-nanoparticle ratio of these ligands by only 3 times. This behavior is reminiscent of the formation of insoluble inorganic salts (e.g., AgCl), which similarly compensate positive and negative charges upon crystallizing. Our results pave the way towards developing well-defined hybrid organic-inorganic nanostructures. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Analysis of protein stability and ligand interactions by thermal shift assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Kathy; Partch, Carrie L

    2015-02-02

    Purification of recombinant proteins for biochemical assays and structural studies is time-consuming and presents inherent difficulties that depend on the optimization of protein stability. The use of dyes to monitor thermal denaturation of proteins with sensitive fluorescence detection enables rapid and inexpensive determination of protein stability using real-time PCR instruments. By screening a wide range of solution conditions and additives in a 96-well format, the thermal shift assay easily identifies conditions that significantly enhance the stability of recombinant proteins. The same approach can be used as an initial low-cost screen to discover new protein-ligand interactions by capitalizing on increases in protein stability that typically occur upon ligand binding. This unit presents a methodological workflow for small-scale, high-throughput thermal denaturation of recombinant proteins in the presence of SYPRO Orange dye. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. IChem: A Versatile Toolkit for Detecting, Comparing, and Predicting Protein-Ligand Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Franck; Desaphy, Jeremy; Rognan, Didier

    2018-03-20

    Structure-based ligand design requires an exact description of the topology of molecular entities under scrutiny. IChem is a software package that reflects the many contributions of our research group in this area over the last decade. It facilitates and automates many tasks (e.g., ligand/cofactor atom typing, identification of key water molecules) usually left to the modeler's choice. It therefore permits the detection of molecular interactions between two molecules in a very precise and flexible manner. Moreover, IChem enables the conversion of intricate three-dimensional (3D) molecular objects into simple representations (fingerprints, graphs) that facilitate knowledge acquisition at very high throughput. The toolkit is an ideal companion for setting up and performing many structure-based design computations. © 2018 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  10. Interaction Entropy: A New Paradigm for Highly Efficient and Reliable Computation of Protein-Ligand Binding Free Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lili; Liu, Xiao; Zhang, John Z H

    2016-05-04

    Efficient and reliable calculation of protein-ligand binding free energy is a grand challenge in computational biology and is of critical importance in drug design and many other molecular recognition problems. The main challenge lies in the calculation of entropic contribution to protein-ligand binding or interaction systems. In this report, we present a new interaction entropy method which is theoretically rigorous, computationally efficient, and numerically reliable for calculating entropic contribution to free energy in protein-ligand binding and other interaction processes. Drastically different from the widely employed but extremely expensive normal mode method for calculating entropy change in protein-ligand binding, the new method calculates the entropic component (interaction entropy or -TΔS) of the binding free energy directly from molecular dynamics simulation without any extra computational cost. Extensive study of over a dozen randomly selected protein-ligand binding systems demonstrated that this interaction entropy method is both computationally efficient and numerically reliable and is vastly superior to the standard normal mode approach. This interaction entropy paradigm introduces a novel and intuitive conceptual understanding of the entropic effect in protein-ligand binding and other general interaction systems as well as a practical method for highly efficient calculation of this effect.

  11. Proximal Sensing of Plant-Pathogen Interactions in Spring Barley with Three Fluorescence Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Leufen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last years fluorescence spectroscopy has come to be viewed as an essential approach in key research fields of applied plant sciences. However, the quantity and particularly the quality of information produced by different equipment might vary considerably. In this study we investigate the potential of three optical devices for the proximal sensing of plant-pathogen interactions in four genotypes of spring barley. For this purpose, the fluorescence lifetime, the image-resolved multispectral fluorescence and selected indices of a portable multiparametric fluorescence device were recorded at 3, 6, and 9 days after inoculation (dai from healthy leaves as well as from leaves inoculated with powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis or leaf rust (Puccinia hordei. Genotype-specific responses to pathogen infections were revealed already at 3 dai by higher fluorescence mean lifetimes in the spectral range from 410 to 560 nm in the less susceptible varieties. Noticeable pathogen-induced modifications were also revealed by the ‘Blue-to-Far-Red Fluorescence Ratio’ and the ‘Simple Fluorescence Ratio’. Particularly in the susceptible varieties the differences became more evident in the time-course of the experiment i.e., following the pathogen development. The relevance of the blue and green fluorescence to exploit the plant-pathogen interaction was demonstrated by the multispectral fluorescence imaging system. As shown, mildewed leaves were characterized by exceptionally high blue fluorescence, contrasting the values observed in rust inoculated leaves. Further, we confirm that the intensity of green fluorescence depends on the pathogen infection and the stage of disease development; this information might allow a differentiation of both diseases. Moreover, our results demonstrate that the detection area might influence the quality of the information, although it had a minor impact only in the current study. Finally, we highlight the relevance of

  12. Instrumented Compliant Wrist with Proximity and Contact Sensing for Close Robot Interaction Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Laferrière

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Compliance has been exploited in various forms in robotic systems to allow rigid mechanisms to come into contact with fragile objects, or with complex shapes that cannot be accurately modeled. Force feedback control has been the classical approach for providing compliance in robotic systems. However, by integrating other forms of instrumentation with compliance into a single device, it is possible to extend close monitoring of nearby objects before and after contact occurs. As a result, safer and smoother robot control can be achieved both while approaching and while touching surfaces. This paper presents the design and extensive experimental evaluation of a versatile, lightweight, and low-cost instrumented compliant wrist mechanism which can be mounted on any rigid robotic manipulator in order to introduce a layer of compliance while providing the controller with extra sensing signals during close interaction with an object’s surface. Arrays of embedded range sensors provide real-time measurements on the position and orientation of surfaces, either located in proximity or in contact with the robot’s end-effector, which permits close guidance of its operation. Calibration procedures are formulated to overcome inter-sensor variability and achieve the highest available resolution. A versatile solution is created by embedding all signal processing, while wireless transmission connects the device to any industrial robot’s controller to support path control. Experimental work demonstrates the device’s physical compliance as well as the stability and accuracy of the device outputs. Primary applications of the proposed instrumented compliant wrist include smooth surface following in manufacturing, inspection, and safe human-robot interaction.

  13. Descriptor Data Bank (DDB): A Cloud Platform for Multiperspective Modeling of Protein-Ligand Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtawy, Hossam M; Mahapatra, Nihar R

    2018-01-22

    Protein-ligand (PL) interactions play a key role in many life processes such as molecular recognition, molecular binding, signal transmission, and cell metabolism. Examples of interaction forces include hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic effects, steric clashes, electrostatic contacts, and van der Waals attractions. Currently, a large number of hypotheses and perspectives to model these interaction forces are scattered throughout the literature and largely forgotten. Instead, had they been assembled and utilized collectively, they would have substantially improved the accuracy of predicting binding affinity of protein-ligand complexes. In this work, we present Descriptor Data Bank (DDB), a data-driven platform on the cloud for facilitating multiperspective modeling of PL interactions. DDB is an open-access hub for depositing, hosting, executing, and sharing descriptor extraction tools and data for a large number of interaction modeling hypotheses. The platform also implements a machine-learning (ML) toolbox for automatic descriptor filtering and analysis and scoring function (SF) fitting and prediction. The descriptor filtering module is used to filter out irrelevant and/or noisy descriptors and to produce a compact subset from all available features. We seed DDB with 16 diverse descriptor extraction tools developed in-house and collected from the literature. The tools altogether generate over 2700 descriptors that characterize (i) proteins, (ii) ligands, and (iii) protein-ligand complexes. The in-house descriptors we extract are protein-specific which are based on pairwise primary and tertiary alignment of protein structures followed by clustering and trilateration. We built and used DDB's ML library to fit SFs to the in-house descriptors and those collected from the literature. We then evaluated them on several data sets that were constructed to reflect real-world drug screening scenarios. We found that multiperspective SFs that were constructed using a large number

  14. Accuracy and precision of protein-ligand interaction kinetics determined from chemical shift titrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markin, Craig J.; Spyracopoulos, Leo, E-mail: leo.spyracopoulos@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, Department of Biochemistry (Canada)

    2012-12-15

    NMR-monitored chemical shift titrations for the study of weak protein-ligand interactions represent a rich source of information regarding thermodynamic parameters such as dissociation constants (K{sub D}) in the micro- to millimolar range, populations for the free and ligand-bound states, and the kinetics of interconversion between states, which are typically within the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale. We recently developed two chemical shift titration methods wherein co-variation of the total protein and ligand concentrations gives increased precision for the K{sub D} value of a 1:1 protein-ligand interaction (Markin and Spyracopoulos in J Biomol NMR 53: 125-138, 2012). In this study, we demonstrate that classical line shape analysis applied to a single set of {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N 2D HSQC NMR spectra acquired using precise protein-ligand chemical shift titration methods we developed, produces accurate and precise kinetic parameters such as the off-rate (k{sub off}). For experimentally determined kinetics in the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale, k{sub off} {approx} 3,000 s{sup -1} in this work, the accuracy of classical line shape analysis was determined to be better than 5 % by conducting quantum mechanical NMR simulations of the chemical shift titration methods with the magnetic resonance toolkit GAMMA. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the experimental precision for k{sub off} from line shape analysis of NMR spectra was determined to be 13 %, in agreement with the theoretical precision of 12 % from line shape analysis of the GAMMA simulations in the presence of noise and protein concentration errors. In addition, GAMMA simulations were employed to demonstrate that line shape analysis has the potential to provide reasonably accurate and precise k{sub off} values over a wide range, from 100 to 15,000 s{sup -1}. The validity of line shape analysis for k{sub off} values approaching intermediate exchange ({approx}100 s{sup -1}), may be facilitated by

  15. Accuracy and precision of protein–ligand interaction kinetics determined from chemical shift titrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markin, Craig J.; Spyracopoulos, Leo

    2012-01-01

    NMR-monitored chemical shift titrations for the study of weak protein–ligand interactions represent a rich source of information regarding thermodynamic parameters such as dissociation constants (K D ) in the micro- to millimolar range, populations for the free and ligand-bound states, and the kinetics of interconversion between states, which are typically within the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale. We recently developed two chemical shift titration methods wherein co-variation of the total protein and ligand concentrations gives increased precision for the K D value of a 1:1 protein–ligand interaction (Markin and Spyracopoulos in J Biomol NMR 53: 125–138, 2012). In this study, we demonstrate that classical line shape analysis applied to a single set of 1 H– 15 N 2D HSQC NMR spectra acquired using precise protein–ligand chemical shift titration methods we developed, produces accurate and precise kinetic parameters such as the off-rate (k off ). For experimentally determined kinetics in the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale, k off ∼ 3,000 s −1 in this work, the accuracy of classical line shape analysis was determined to be better than 5 % by conducting quantum mechanical NMR simulations of the chemical shift titration methods with the magnetic resonance toolkit GAMMA. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the experimental precision for k off from line shape analysis of NMR spectra was determined to be 13 %, in agreement with the theoretical precision of 12 % from line shape analysis of the GAMMA simulations in the presence of noise and protein concentration errors. In addition, GAMMA simulations were employed to demonstrate that line shape analysis has the potential to provide reasonably accurate and precise k off values over a wide range, from 100 to 15,000 s −1 . The validity of line shape analysis for k off values approaching intermediate exchange (∼100 s −1 ), may be facilitated by more accurate K D measurements from NMR

  16. Accuracy and precision of protein-ligand interaction kinetics determined from chemical shift titrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markin, Craig J; Spyracopoulos, Leo

    2012-12-01

    NMR-monitored chemical shift titrations for the study of weak protein-ligand interactions represent a rich source of information regarding thermodynamic parameters such as dissociation constants (K ( D )) in the micro- to millimolar range, populations for the free and ligand-bound states, and the kinetics of interconversion between states, which are typically within the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale. We recently developed two chemical shift titration methods wherein co-variation of the total protein and ligand concentrations gives increased precision for the K ( D ) value of a 1:1 protein-ligand interaction (Markin and Spyracopoulos in J Biomol NMR 53: 125-138, 2012). In this study, we demonstrate that classical line shape analysis applied to a single set of (1)H-(15)N 2D HSQC NMR spectra acquired using precise protein-ligand chemical shift titration methods we developed, produces accurate and precise kinetic parameters such as the off-rate (k ( off )). For experimentally determined kinetics in the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale, k ( off ) ~ 3,000 s(-1) in this work, the accuracy of classical line shape analysis was determined to be better than 5 % by conducting quantum mechanical NMR simulations of the chemical shift titration methods with the magnetic resonance toolkit GAMMA. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the experimental precision for k ( off ) from line shape analysis of NMR spectra was determined to be 13 %, in agreement with the theoretical precision of 12 % from line shape analysis of the GAMMA simulations in the presence of noise and protein concentration errors. In addition, GAMMA simulations were employed to demonstrate that line shape analysis has the potential to provide reasonably accurate and precise k ( off ) values over a wide range, from 100 to 15,000 s(-1). The validity of line shape analysis for k ( off ) values approaching intermediate exchange (~100 s(-1)), may be facilitated by more accurate K ( D ) measurements

  17. PL-PatchSurfer: A Novel Molecular Local Surface-Based Method for Exploring Protein-Ligand Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingjie Hu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Structure-based computational methods have been widely used in exploring protein-ligand interactions, including predicting the binding ligands of a given protein based on their structural complementarity. Compared to other protein and ligand representations, the advantages of a surface representation include reduced sensitivity to subtle changes in the pocket and ligand conformation and fast search speed. Here we developed a novel method named PL-PatchSurfer (Protein-Ligand PatchSurfer. PL-PatchSurfer represents the protein binding pocket and the ligand molecular surface as a combination of segmented surface patches. Each patch is characterized by its geometrical shape and the electrostatic potential, which are represented using the 3D Zernike descriptor (3DZD. We first tested PL-PatchSurfer on binding ligand prediction and found it outperformed the pocket-similarity based ligand prediction program. We then optimized the search algorithm of PL-PatchSurfer using the PDBbind dataset. Finally, we explored the utility of applying PL-PatchSurfer to a larger and more diverse dataset and showed that PL-PatchSurfer was able to provide a high early enrichment for most of the targets. To the best of our knowledge, PL-PatchSurfer is the first surface patch-based method that treats ligand complementarity at protein binding sites. We believe that using a surface patch approach to better understand protein-ligand interactions has the potential to significantly enhance the design of new ligands for a wide array of drug-targets.

  18. Predicting Ligand Binding Sites on Protein Surfaces by 3-Dimensional Probability Density Distributions of Interacting Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Jhih-Wei; Elumalai, Pavadai; Pitti, Thejkiran; Wu, Chih Yuan; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Peng, Hung-Pin; Yang, An-Suei

    2016-01-01

    Predicting ligand binding sites (LBSs) on protein structures, which are obtained either from experimental or computational methods, is a useful first step in functional annotation or structure-based drug design for the protein structures. In this work, the structure-based machine learning algorithm ISMBLab-LIG was developed to predict LBSs on protein surfaces with input attributes derived from the three-dimensional probability density maps of interacting atoms, which were reconstructed on the query protein surfaces and were relatively insensitive to local conformational variations of the tentative ligand binding sites. The prediction accuracy of the ISMBLab-LIG predictors is comparable to that of the best LBS predictors benchmarked on several well-established testing datasets. More importantly, the ISMBLab-LIG algorithm has substantial tolerance to the prediction uncertainties of computationally derived protein structure models. As such, the method is particularly useful for predicting LBSs not only on experimental protein structures without known LBS templates in the database but also on computationally predicted model protein structures with structural uncertainties in the tentative ligand binding sites. PMID:27513851

  19. Ligand-Receptor Interaction-Mediated Transmembrane Transport of Dendrimer-like Soft Nanoparticles: Mechanisms and Complicated Diffusive Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Junshi; Chen, Pengyu; Dong, Bojun; Huang, Zihan; Zhao, Kongyin; Yan, Li-Tang

    2016-05-09

    Nearly all nanomedical applications of dendrimer-like soft nanoparticles rely on the functionality of attached ligands. Understanding how the ligands interact with the receptors in cell membrane and its further effect on the cellular uptake of dendrimer-like soft nanoparticles is thereby a key issue for their better application in nanomedicine. However, the essential mechanism and detailed kinetics for the ligand-receptor interaction-mediated transmembrane transport of such unconventional nanoparticles remain poorly elucidated. Here, using coarse-grained simulations, we present the very first study of molecular mechanism and kinetics behaviors for the transmembrane transport of dendrimer-like soft nanoparticles conjugated with ligands. A phase diagram of interaction states is constructed through examining ligand densities and membrane tensions that allows us to identify novel endocytosis mechanisms featured by the direct wrapping and the penetration-extraction vesiculation. The results provide an in-depth insight into the diffusivity of receptors and dendrimer in the membrane plane and demonstrate how the ligand density influences receptor diffusion and uptake kinetics. It is interesting to find that the ligand-conjugated dendrimers present superdiffusive behaviors on a membrane, which is revealed to be driven by the random fluctuation dynamics of the membrane. The findings facilitate our understanding of some recent experimental observations and could establish fundamental principles for the future development of such important nanomaterials for widespread nanomedical applications.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of S100B protein to explore ligand blockage of the interaction with p53 protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhigang; Li, Yumin

    2009-10-01

    As a tumor suppressor, p53 plays an important role in cancer suppression. The biological function of p53 as a tumor suppressor is disabled when it binds to S100B. Developing the ligands to block the S100B-p53 interaction has been proposed as one of the most important approaches to the development of anti-cancer agents. We screened a small compound library against the binding interface of S100B and p53 to identify potential compounds to interfere with the interaction. The ligand-binding effect on the S100B-p53 interaction was explored by molecular dynamics at the atomic level. The results show that the ligand bound between S100B and p53 propels the two proteins apart by about 2 Å compared to the unligated S100B-p53 complex. The binding affinity of S100B and p53 decreases by 8.5-14.6 kcal/mol after a ligand binds to the interface from the original unligated state of the S100B-p53 complex. Ligand-binding interferes with the interaction of S100B and p53. Such interference could impact the association of S100B and p53, which would free more p53 protein from the pairing with S100B and restore the biological function of p53 as a tumor suppressor. The analysis of the binding mode and ligand structural features would facilitate our effort to identify and design ligands to block S100B-p53 interaction effectively. The results from the work suggest that developing ligands targeting the interface of S100B and p53 could be a promising approach to recover the normal function of p53 as a tumor suppressor.

  1. Forging the Basis for Developing Protein-Ligand Interaction Scoring Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihai; Su, Minyi; Han, Li; Liu, Jie; Yang, Qifan; Li, Yan; Wang, Renxiao

    2017-02-21

    In structure-based drug design, scoring functions are widely used for fast evaluation of protein-ligand interactions. They are often applied in combination with molecular docking and de novo design methods. Since the early 1990s, a whole spectrum of protein-ligand interaction scoring functions have been developed. Regardless of their technical difference, scoring functions all need data sets combining protein-ligand complex structures and binding affinity data for parametrization and validation. However, data sets of this kind used to be rather limited in terms of size and quality. On the other hand, standard metrics for evaluating scoring function used to be ambiguous. Scoring functions are often tested in molecular docking or even virtual screening trials, which do not directly reflect the genuine quality of scoring functions. Collectively, these underlying obstacles have impeded the invention of more advanced scoring functions. In this Account, we describe our long-lasting efforts to overcome these obstacles, which involve two related projects. On the first project, we have created the PDBbind database. It is the first database that systematically annotates the protein-ligand complexes in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) with experimental binding data. This database has been updated annually since its first public release in 2004. The latest release (version 2016) provides binding data for 16 179 biomolecular complexes in PDB. Data sets provided by PDBbind have been applied to many computational and statistical studies on protein-ligand interaction and various subjects. In particular, it has become a major data resource for scoring function development. On the second project, we have established the Comparative Assessment of Scoring Functions (CASF) benchmark for scoring function evaluation. Our key idea is to decouple the "scoring" process from the "sampling" process, so scoring functions can be tested in a relatively pure context to reflect their quality. In our

  2. Mapping the Conformational Dynamics of E-selectin upon Interaction with its Ligands

    KAUST Repository

    Aleisa, Fajr A

    2013-05-15

    Selectins are key adhesion molecules responsible for initiating a multistep process that leads a cell out of the blood circulation and into a tissue or organ. The adhesion of cells (expressing ligands) to the endothelium (expressing the selectin i.e.,E-selectin) occurs through spatio-temporally regulated interactions that are mediated by multiple intra- and inter-cellular components. The mechanism of cell adhesion is investigated primarily using ensemble-based experiments, which provides indirect information about how individual molecules work in such a complex system. Recent developments in single-molecule (SM) fluorescence detection allow for the visualization of individual molecules with a good spatio-temporal resolution nanometer spatial resolution and millisecond time resolution). Furthermore, advanced SM fluorescence techniques such as Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) and super-resolution microscopy provide unique opportunities to obtain information about nanometer-scale conformational dynamics of proteins as well as nano-scale architectures of biological samples. Therefore, the state-of-the-art SM techniques are powerful tools for investigating complex biological system such as the mechanism of cell adhesion. In this project, several constructs of fluorescently labeled E-selectin will be used to study the conformational dynamics of E-selectin binding to its ligand(s) using SM-FRET and combination of SM-FRET and force microscopy. These studies will be beneficial to fully understand the mechanistic details of cell adhesion and migration of cells using the established model system of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) adhesion to the selectin expressing endothelial cells (such as the E-selectin expressing endothelial cells in the bone marrow).

  3. Recent Progress in Treating Protein–Ligand Interactions with Quantum-Mechanical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nusret Duygu Yilmazer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We review the first successes and failures of a “new wave” of quantum chemistry-based approaches to the treatment of protein/ligand interactions. These approaches share the use of “enhanced”, dispersion (D, and/or hydrogen-bond (H corrected density functional theory (DFT or semi-empirical quantum mechanical (SQM methods, in combination with ensemble weighting techniques of some form to capture entropic effects. Benchmark and model system calculations in comparison to high-level theoretical as well as experimental references have shown that both DFT-D (dispersion-corrected density functional theory and SQM-DH (dispersion and hydrogen bond-corrected semi-empirical quantum mechanical perform much more accurately than older DFT and SQM approaches and also standard docking methods. In addition, DFT-D might soon become and SQM-DH already is fast enough to compute a large number of binding modes of comparably large protein/ligand complexes, thus allowing for a more accurate assessment of entropic effects.

  4. Recent Progress in Treating Protein-Ligand Interactions with Quantum-Mechanical Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmazer, Nusret Duygu; Korth, Martin

    2016-05-16

    We review the first successes and failures of a "new wave" of quantum chemistry-based approaches to the treatment of protein/ligand interactions. These approaches share the use of "enhanced", dispersion (D), and/or hydrogen-bond (H) corrected density functional theory (DFT) or semi-empirical quantum mechanical (SQM) methods, in combination with ensemble weighting techniques of some form to capture entropic effects. Benchmark and model system calculations in comparison to high-level theoretical as well as experimental references have shown that both DFT-D (dispersion-corrected density functional theory) and SQM-DH (dispersion and hydrogen bond-corrected semi-empirical quantum mechanical) perform much more accurately than older DFT and SQM approaches and also standard docking methods. In addition, DFT-D might soon become and SQM-DH already is fast enough to compute a large number of binding modes of comparably large protein/ligand complexes, thus allowing for a more accurate assessment of entropic effects.

  5. Stereochemistry of charged nitrogen-aromatic interactions and its involvement in ligand-receptor binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonk, Marcel L.; Boks, Gertjan J.; Kooijman, Huub; Kanters, Jan A.; Kroon, Jan

    1993-04-01

    Recently, new evidence was found for the involvement of charged nitrogen-aromatic interactions in ligand-receptor binding. In this study we report two favourable orientations of a phenyl ring with respect to a R-N+(CH3)3 group, based on crystal structure statistics from the Cambridge Structural Database. In the first orientation, the phenyl ring is situated in between the substituents at about 4.5 Å from the nitrogen atom, and the ring is approximately oriented on the sphere around the nitrogen atom. In the second orientation, the phenyl ring is situated in the same direction as one of the N-C bonds at about 6.0 Å from the nitrogen atom, and the ring is tilted with respect to the sphere around the nitrogen atom. The same two orientations were also found in the crystal structures of three ligand-receptor complexes, which implies that these orientations probably play a major role in molecular recognition mechanisms.

  6. Generation of signaling specificity in Arabidopsis by spatially restricted buffering of ligand-receptor interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrash, Emily B; Davies, Kelli A; Bergmann, Dominique C

    2011-08-01

    Core signaling pathways function in multiple programs during multicellular development. The mechanisms that compartmentalize pathway function or confer process specificity, however, remain largely unknown. In Arabidopsis thaliana, ERECTA (ER) family receptors have major roles in many growth and cell fate decisions. The ER family acts with receptor TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM) and several ligands of the EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR LIKE (EPFL) family, which play distinct yet overlapping roles in patterning of epidermal stomata. Here, our examination of EPFL genes EPFL6/CHALLAH (CHAL), EPFL5/CHALLAH-LIKE1, and EPFL4/CHALLAH-LIKE2 (CLL2) reveals that this family may mediate additional ER-dependent processes. chal cll2 mutants display growth phenotypes characteristic of er mutants, and genetic interactions are consistent with CHAL family molecules acting as ER family ligands. We propose that different classes of EPFL genes regulate different aspects of ER family function and introduce a TMM-based discriminatory mechanism that permits simultaneous, yet compartmentalized and distinct, function of the ER family receptors in growth and epidermal patterning.

  7. Proximity effect in semiconductor films with spin-splitting and spin-orbit interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelsen, Jens; Grein, Roland [Institut fuer Theoretische Festkoerperphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Superconducting heterostructures with spin-active materials have emerged as promising platforms for engineering topological superconductors featuring Majorana bound states at surfaces, edges and vortices. Here we present a method for evaluating, from a microscopic model, the band structure of a semiconductor film of finite thickness deposited on top of a conventional superconductor. Analytical expressions for the proximity induced gap openings are presented in terms of microscopic parameters and the proximity effect in presence of spin-orbit and exchange splitting is visualized in terms of Andreev reflection processes. An expression for the topological invariant, associated with the existence of Majorana bound states, is shown to depend only on parameters of the semiconductor film. The finite thickness of the film leads to resonant states in the film giving rise to a complex band structure with the topological phase alternating between trivial and non-trivial as the parameters are tuned of the film are tuned.

  8. Comprehensive Characterization of Minichromosome Maintenance Complex (MCM) Protein Interactions Using Affinity and Proximity Purifications Coupled to Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Marie-Line; Bastin, Charlotte; Lévesque, Dominique; Boisvert, François-Michel

    2016-09-02

    The extensive identification of protein-protein interactions under different conditions is an important challenge to understand the cellular functions of proteins. Here we use and compare different approaches including affinity purification and purification by proximity coupled to mass spectrometry to identify protein complexes. We explore the complete interactome of the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex by using both approaches for all of the different MCM proteins. Overall, our analysis identified unique and shared interaction partners and proteins enriched for distinct biological processes including DNA replication, DNA repair, and cell cycle regulation. Furthermore, we mapped the changes in protein interactions of the MCM complex in response to DNA damage, identifying a new role for this complex in DNA repair. In summary, we demonstrate the complementarity of these approaches for the characterization of protein interactions within the MCM complex.

  9. Efficient computation of co-transcriptional RNA-ligand interaction dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfinger, Michael T; Flamm, Christoph; Hofacker, Ivo L

    2018-05-04

    Riboswitches form an abundant class of cis-regulatory RNA elements that mediate gene expression by binding a small metabolite. For synthetic biology applications, they are becoming cheap and accessible systems for selectively triggering transcription or translation of downstream genes. Many riboswitches are kinetically controlled, hence knowledge of their co-transcriptional mechanisms is essential. We present here an efficient implementation for analyzing co-transcriptional RNA-ligand interaction dynamics. This approach allows for the first time to model concentration-dependent metabolite binding/unbinding kinetics. We exemplify this novel approach by means of the recently studied I-A 2 ' -deoxyguanosine (2 ' dG)-sensing riboswitch from Mesoplasma florum. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Protein-ligand interactions investigated by thermal shift assays (TSA) and dual polarization interferometry (DPI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grøftehauge, Morten K; Hajizadeh, Nelly R; Swann, Marcus J; Pohl, Ehmke

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, a wide range of biophysical techniques investigating protein-ligand interactions have become indispensable tools to complement high-resolution crystal structure determinations. Current approaches in solution range from high-throughput-capable methods such as thermal shift assays (TSA) to highly accurate techniques including microscale thermophoresis (MST) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) that can provide a full thermodynamic description of binding events. Surface-based methods such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and dual polarization interferometry (DPI) allow real-time measurements and can provide kinetic parameters as well as binding constants. DPI provides additional spatial information about the binding event. Here, an account is presented of new developments and recent applications of TSA and DPI connected to crystallography.

  11. Effects of cypermethrin on the ligand-independent interaction between androgen receptor and steroid receptor coactivator-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Chen; Liu, Ya-Peng; Li, Yan-Fang; Hu, Jin-Xia; Zhang, Jin-Peng; Wang, Hong-Mei; Li, Jing; Xu, Li-Chun

    2012-01-01

    The pyrethroid insecticide, cypermethrin has been considered as an environmental anti-androgen by interfering with the androgen receptor (AR) transactivation. In order to clarify the effects of cypermethrin on the ligand-independent interaction between the AR and SRC-1, the mammalian two-hybrid assay has been developed in the study. The AR N-terminal domain 1–660 amino acid residues were subcloned into the plasmid pVP16 to construct the vector pVP16-ARNTD. The SRC-1 C-terminal domain 989–1240 amino acid residues were subcloned into the plasmid pM to construct the vector pM-SRC-1. The fusion vectors pVP16-ARNTD, pM-SRC-1 and the pG5CAT Reporter Vector were cotransfected into the CV-1 cells. The AR AF1 interacted with SRC-1 in the absence of exogenous ligand 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Furthermore, DHT did not enhance the interaction between AR AF-1 and SRC-1 at the concentrations from 10 −10 M to 10 −8 M. Cypermethrin inhibited the interaction between the AR AF1 and SRC-1, and the significant reduction was detected at the concentration of 10 −5 M. It is suggested that the interaction between the AR AF1 and SRC-1 is ligand-independent. Cypermethrin inhibits AR activity by disrupting the ligand-independent AR–SRC-1 interaction.

  12. Interaction of d(10) metal ions with thioether ligands: a thermodynamic and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, Andrea; Peralta, Elena; Valiente, Manuel; Tavagnacco, Claudio; Endrizzi, Francesco; Tolazzi, Marilena

    2013-05-07

    Thermodynamic parameters of complex formation between d(10) metal ions, such as Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+) and Ag(+), and the macrocyclic thioether 1,4,7-trithiacyclononane ([9]AneS3) or the monodentate diethylsulfide (Et(2)S), in acetonitrile (AN) at 298.15 K, were studied by a systematic methodology including potentiometry, calorimetry and polarography. [9]AneS3 is able to form complexes with all the target cations, Et(2)S only reacts with Hg(2+) and Ag(+). Mononuclear ML(j) (j = 1, 2) complexes are formed with all the metal ions investigated, where the affinity order is Hg(2+) > Ag(+) > Cd(2+) ≈ Zn(2+) when L = [9]AneS3 and Hg(2+) > Ag(+) when L = Et(2)S. Enthalpy and entropy values are generally negative, as a consequence of both metal ion interactions with neutral ligands, the reagents' loss of degrees of freedom and the release of solvating molecules. DFT calculations on the complexes formed with [9]AneS3 in vacuum and in AN are also carried out, to correlate experimental and theoretical thermodynamic values and to highlight the interplay between the direct metal-thioether interaction and the solvation effects. Trends obtained for the stability constants and enthalpies of the 1 : 1 and 1 : 2 complexes in solvent well reproduce the experimental ones for all the divalent metal ion complexes with [9]AneS3 and indicate the release of 3 AN molecules in the formation of each consecutive octahedral complex. In addition, calculated and experimental values for Ag(+) complex formation in solution suggest that in AgL(2) species [9]AneS3 ligands are not both tridentate.

  13. Revealing the sequence and resulting cellular morphology of receptor-ligand interactions during Plasmodium falciparum invasion of erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta E Weiss

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available During blood stage Plasmodium falciparum infection, merozoites invade uninfected erythrocytes via a complex, multistep process involving a series of distinct receptor-ligand binding events. Understanding each element in this process increases the potential to block the parasite's life cycle via drugs or vaccines. To investigate specific receptor-ligand interactions, they were systematically blocked using a combination of genetic deletion, enzymatic receptor cleavage and inhibition of binding via antibodies, peptides and small molecules, and the resulting temporal changes in invasion and morphological effects on erythrocytes were filmed using live cell imaging. Analysis of the videos have shown receptor-ligand interactions occur in the following sequence with the following cellular morphologies; 1 an early heparin-blockable interaction which weakly deforms the erythrocyte, 2 EBA and PfRh ligands which strongly deform the erythrocyte, a process dependant on the merozoite's actin-myosin motor, 3 a PfRh5-basigin binding step which results in a pore or opening between parasite and host through which it appears small molecules and possibly invasion components can flow and 4 an AMA1-RON2 interaction that mediates tight junction formation, which acts as an anchor point for internalization. In addition to enhancing general knowledge of apicomplexan biology, this work provides a rational basis to combine sequentially acting merozoite vaccine candidates in a single multi-receptor-blocking vaccine.

  14. Analysis of protein-protein docking decoys using interaction fingerprints: application to the reconstruction of CaM-ligand complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uchikoga Nobuyuki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein docking for proteins with large conformational changes was analyzed by using interaction fingerprints, one of the scales for measuring similarities among complex structures, utilized especially for searching near-native protein-ligand or protein-protein complex structures. Here, we have proposed a combined method for analyzing protein-protein docking by taking large conformational changes into consideration. This combined method consists of ensemble soft docking with multiple protein structures, refinement of complexes, and cluster analysis using interaction fingerprints and energy profiles. Results To test for the applicability of this combined method, various CaM-ligand complexes were reconstructed from the NMR structures of unbound CaM. For the purpose of reconstruction, we used three known CaM-ligands, namely, the CaM-binding peptides of cyclic nucleotide gateway (CNG, CaM kinase kinase (CaMKK and the plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase pump (PMCA, and thirty-one structurally diverse CaM conformations. For each ligand, 62000 CaM-ligand complexes were generated in the docking step and the relationship between their energy profiles and structural similarities to the native complex were analyzed using interaction fingerprint and RMSD. Near-native clusters were obtained in the case of CNG and CaMKK. Conclusions The interaction fingerprint method discriminated near-native structures better than the RMSD method in cluster analysis. We showed that a combined method that includes the interaction fingerprint is very useful for protein-protein docking analysis of certain cases.

  15. Post hoc support vector machine learning for impedimetric biosensors based on weak protein-ligand interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Y; Padron, A V; Hagerty, K J; Nelson, N; Chi, S; Keyhani, N O; Katz, J; Datta, S P A; Gomes, C; McLamore, E S

    2018-04-30

    Impedimetric biosensors for measuring small molecules based on weak/transient interactions between bioreceptors and target analytes are a challenge for detection electronics, particularly in field studies or in the analysis of complex matrices. Protein-ligand binding sensors have enormous potential for biosensing, but achieving accuracy in complex solutions is a major challenge. There is a need for simple post hoc analytical tools that are not computationally expensive, yet provide near real time feedback on data derived from impedance spectra. Here, we show the use of a simple, open source support vector machine learning algorithm for analyzing impedimetric data in lieu of using equivalent circuit analysis. We demonstrate two different protein-based biosensors to show that the tool can be used for various applications. We conclude with a mobile phone-based demonstration focused on the measurement of acetone, an important biomarker related to the onset of diabetic ketoacidosis. In all conditions tested, the open source classifier was capable of performing as well as, or better, than the equivalent circuit analysis for characterizing weak/transient interactions between a model ligand (acetone) and a small chemosensory protein derived from the tsetse fly. In addition, the tool has a low computational requirement, facilitating use for mobile acquisition systems such as mobile phones. The protocol is deployed through Jupyter notebook (an open source computing environment available for mobile phone, tablet or computer use) and the code was written in Python. For each of the applications, we provide step-by-step instructions in English, Spanish, Mandarin and Portuguese to facilitate widespread use. All codes were based on scikit-learn, an open source software machine learning library in the Python language, and were processed in Jupyter notebook, an open-source web application for Python. The tool can easily be integrated with the mobile biosensor equipment for rapid

  16. Evaluation of the effect of polymorphism on G-quadruplex-ligand interaction by means of spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, S.; Ferrer, A.; Benabou, S.; Aviñó, A.; Eritja, R.; Gargallo, R.

    2018-05-01

    Guanine-rich sequences may fold into highly ordered structures known as G-quadruplexes. Apart from the monomeric G-quadruplex, these sequences may form multimeric structures that are not usually considered when studying interaction with ligands. This work studies the interaction of a ligand, crystal violet, with three guanine-rich DNA sequences with the capacity to form multimeric structures. These sequences correspond to short stretches found near the promoter regions of c-kit and SMARCA4 genes. Instrumental techniques (circular dichroism, molecular fluorescence, size-exclusion chromatography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry) and multivariate data analysis were used for this purpose. The polymorphism of G-quadruplexes was characterized prior to the interaction studies. The ligand was shown to interact preferentially with the monomeric G-quadruplex; the binding stoichiometry was 1:1 and the binding constant was in the order of 105 M-1 for all three sequences. The results highlight the importance of DNA treatment prior to interaction studies.

  17. Interactive toxicity of inorganic mercury and trichloroethylene in rat and human proximal tubules: Effects on apoptosis, necrosis, and glutathione status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lash, Lawrence H.; Putt, David A.; Hueni, Sarah E.; Payton, Scott G.; Zwickl, Joshua

    2007-01-01

    Simultaneous or prior exposure to one chemical may alter the concurrent or subsequent response to another chemical, often in unexpected ways. This is particularly true when the two chemicals share common mechanisms of action. The present study uses the paradigm of prior exposure to study the interactive toxicity between inorganic mercury (Hg 2+ ) and trichloroethylene (TRI) or its metabolite S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC) in rat and human proximal tubule. Pretreatment of rats with a subtoxic dose of Hg 2+ increased expression of glutathione S-transferase-α1 (GSTα1) but decreased expression of GSTα2, increased activities of several GSH-dependent enzymes, and increased GSH conjugation of TRI. Primary cultures of rat proximal tubular (rPT) cells exhibited both necrosis and apoptosis after incubation with Hg 2+ . Pretreatment of human proximal tubular (hPT) cells with Hg 2+ caused little or no changes in GST expression or activities of GSH-dependent enzymes, decreased apoptosis induced by TRI or DCVC, but increased necrosis induced by DCVC. In contrast, pretreatment of hPT cells with TRI or DCVC protected from Hg 2+ by decreasing necrosis and increasing apoptosis. Thus, whereas pretreatment of hPT cells with Hg 2+ exacerbated cellular injury due to TRI or DCVC by shifting the response from apoptosis to necrosis, pretreatment of hPT cells with either TRI or DCVC protected from Hg 2+ -induced cytotoxicity by shifting the response from necrosis to apoptosis. These results demonstrate that by altering processes related to GSH status, susceptibilities of rPT and hPT cells to acute injury from Hg 2+ , TRI, or DCVC are markedly altered by prior exposures

  18. Structural insights, protein-ligand interactions and spectroscopic characterization of isoformononetin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anubha; Singh, Harshita; Mishra, Rashmi; Dev, Kapil; Tandon, Poonam; Maurya, Rakesh

    2017-04-01

    Isoformononetin, a methoxylated isoflavone present in medicinal plants, has non-estrogenic bone forming effect via differential mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Spectroscopic (FT-Raman, FT-IR, UV-vis and NMR spectra) and quantum chemical calculations using density functional theory (DFT) and 6-311++G(d,p) as a large basis set have been employed to study the structural and electronic properties of isoformononetin. A detailed conformational analysis is performed to determine the stability among conformers and the various possibilities of intramolecular hydrogen bonding formation. Molecular docking studies with different protein kinases were performed on isoformononetin and previously studied isoflavonoid, formononetin in order to understand their inhibitory nature and the effect of functional groups on osteogenic or osteoporosis associated proteins. It is found that the oxygen atoms of methoxy, hydroxyl groups attached to phenyl rings R1, R3 and carbonyl group attached to pyran ring R2, play a major role in binding with the protein kinases that is responsible for the osteoporosis; however, no hydrophobic interactions are observed between rings of ligand and protein. The electronic properties such as HOMO and LUMO energies were determined by time-dependent TD-DFT which predict that conformer II is a little bit more stable and chemically low reactive than conformer I of isoformononetin. To estimate the structure-activity relationship, the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) surface map, and reactivity descriptors are calculated from the optimized geometry of the molecule. From these results, it is also found that isoformononetin is kinetically more stable, less toxic, weak electrophile and chemically less reactive than formononetin. The atoms in molecules and natural bond orbital analysis are applied for the detailed analysis of intra and intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions.

  19. Interaction of Pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD) Ligands with Parallel Intermolecular G-Quadruplex Complex Using Spectroscopy and ESI-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Gajjela; Srinivas, Ragampeta; Santhosh Reddy, Vangala; Idris, Mohammed M.; Kamal, Ahmed; Nagesh, Narayana

    2012-01-01

    Studies on ligand interaction with quadruplex DNA, and their role in stabilizing the complex at concentration prevailing under physiological condition, has attained high interest. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and spectroscopic studies in solution were used to evaluate the interaction of PBD and TMPyP4 ligands, stoichiometry and selectivity to G-quadruplex DNA. Two synthetic ligands from PBD family, namely pyrene-linked pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine hybrid (PBD1), mixed imine-amide pyrrolobenzodiazepine dimer (PBD2) and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin (TMPyP4) were studied. G-rich single-stranded oligonucleotide d(5′GGGGTTGGGG3′) designated as d(T2G8), from the telomeric region of Tetrahymena Glaucoma, was considered for the interaction with ligands. ESI-MS and spectroscopic methods viz., circular dichroism (CD), UV-Visible, and fluorescence were employed to investigate the G-quadruplex structures formed by d(T2G8) sequence and its interaction with PBD and TMPyP4 ligands. From ESI-MS spectra, it is evident that the majority of quadruplexes exist as d(T2G8)2 and d(T2G8)4 forms possessing two to ten cations in the centre, thereby stabilizing the complex. CD band of PBD1 and PBD2 showed hypo and hyperchromicity, on interaction with quadruplex DNA, indicating unfolding and stabilization of quadruplex DNA complex, respectively. UV-Visible and fluorescence experiments suggest that PBD1 bind externally where as PBD2 intercalate moderately and bind externally to G-quadruplex DNA. Further, melting experiments using SYBR Green indicate that PBD1 unfolds and PBD2 stabilizes the G-quadruplex complex. ITC experiments using d(T2G8) quadruplex with PBD ligands reveal that PBD1 and PBD2 prefer external/loop binding and external/intercalative binding to quadruplex DNA, respectively. From experimental results it is clear that the interaction of PBD2 and TMPyP4 impart higher stability to the quadruplex complex. PMID:22558271

  20. Interaction of pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD ligands with parallel intermolecular G-quadruplex complex using spectroscopy and ESI-MS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajjela Raju

    Full Text Available Studies on ligand interaction with quadruplex DNA, and their role in stabilizing the complex at concentration prevailing under physiological condition, has attained high interest. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS and spectroscopic studies in solution were used to evaluate the interaction of PBD and TMPyP4 ligands, stoichiometry and selectivity to G-quadruplex DNA. Two synthetic ligands from PBD family, namely pyrene-linked pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine hybrid (PBD1, mixed imine-amide pyrrolobenzodiazepine dimer (PBD2 and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(N-methyl-4-pyridylporphyrin (TMPyP4 were studied. G-rich single-stranded oligonucleotide d(5'GGGGTTGGGG3' designated as d(T(2G(8, from the telomeric region of Tetrahymena Glaucoma, was considered for the interaction with ligands. ESI-MS and spectroscopic methods viz., circular dichroism (CD, UV-Visible, and fluorescence were employed to investigate the G-quadruplex structures formed by d(T(2G(8 sequence and its interaction with PBD and TMPyP4 ligands. From ESI-MS spectra, it is evident that the majority of quadruplexes exist as d(T(2G(8(2 and d(T(2G(8(4 forms possessing two to ten cations in the centre, thereby stabilizing the complex. CD band of PBD1 and PBD2 showed hypo and hyperchromicity, on interaction with quadruplex DNA, indicating unfolding and stabilization of quadruplex DNA complex, respectively. UV-Visible and fluorescence experiments suggest that PBD1 bind externally where as PBD2 intercalate moderately and bind externally to G-quadruplex DNA. Further, melting experiments using SYBR Green indicate that PBD1 unfolds and PBD2 stabilizes the G-quadruplex complex. ITC experiments using d(T(2G(8 quadruplex with PBD ligands reveal that PBD1 and PBD2 prefer external/loop binding and external/intercalative binding to quadruplex DNA, respectively. From experimental results it is clear that the interaction of PBD2 and TMPyP4 impart higher stability to the quadruplex complex.

  1. ICOS:ICOS-ligand interaction is required for type 2 innate lymphoid cell function, homeostasis, and induction of airway hyperreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maazi, Hadi; Patel, Nisheel; Sankaranarayanan, Ishwarya; Suzuki, Yuzo; Rigas, Diamanda; Soroosh, Pejman; Freeman, Gordon J; Sharpe, Arlene H; Akbari, Omid

    2015-03-17

    Allergic asthma is caused by Th2-cell-type cytokines in response to allergen exposure. Type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) are a newly identified subset of immune cells that, along with Th2 cells, contribute to the pathogenesis of asthma by producing copious amounts of IL-5 and IL-13, which cause eosinophilia and airway hyperreactivity (AHR), a cardinal feature of asthma. ILC2s express ICOS, a T cell costimulatory molecule with a currently unknown function. Here we showed that a lack of ICOS on murine ILC2s and blocking the ICOS:ICOS-ligand interaction in human ILC2s reduced AHR and lung inflammation. ILC2s expressed both ICOS and ICOS-ligand, and the ICOS:ICOS-ligand interaction promoted cytokine production and survival in ILC2s through STAT5 signaling. Thus, ICOS:ICOS-ligand signaling pathway is critically involved in ILC2 function and homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ligand-modulated interactions between charged monolayer-protected Au144 (SR)60 gold nanoparticles in physiological saline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Oscar; Chen, Liao; Whetten, Robert; Yacaman, Miguel

    2015-03-01

    We studied the interactions of functionalized Au144 nanoparticles (NPs) in a near-physiological environment through all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. The AuNPs were coated with a homogeneous selection of 60 thiolates: 11-mercapto-1-undecanesulfonate, 5-mercapto-1-pentanesulfonate, 5-mercapto-1-pentane-amine, 4-mercapto-benzoate or 4-mercapto-benzamide. These ligands were selected to elucidate how the aggregation behavior depends on the ligands' sign of charge, length, and flexibility. Simulating the dynamics of a pair of identical AuNPs in a cell of saline of 150 mM NaCl in addition to 120 Na+/Cl- counter-ions, we computed the aggregation affinities from the potential of mean force as a function of the pair separation. We found that NPs coated with negatively charged, short ligands have the strongest affinities mediated by multiple Na+ counter-ions residing on a plane in-between the pair and forming ``salt bridges'' to both NPs. Positively charged NPs have weaker affinities, as Cl counter-ions form fewer and weaker salt bridges. The longer ligands' large fluctuations disfavor the forming of salt bridges, enable hydrophobic contact between the exposed hydrocarbon chains and interact at greater separations due to the fact that the screening effect is rather incomplete. Supported by the CONACYT, NIH, NSF and TACC.

  3. Casimir interaction between a cylinder and a plate at finite temperature: Exact results and comparison to proximity force approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, L. P.

    2011-01-01

    We study the finite temperature Casimir interaction between a cylinder and a plate using the exact formula derived from the Matsubara representation and the functional determinant representation. We consider the scalar field with Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The asymptotic expansions of the Casimir free energy and the Casimir force when the separation a between the cylinder and the plate is small are derived. As in the zero temperature case, it is found that the leading terms of the Casimir free energy and the Casimir force agree with those derived from the proximity force approximation when rT>>1, where r is the radius of the cylinder. Specifically, when aT 5/2 whereas, for the Casimir force, it is of order T 7/2 . In this case, the leading terms are independent of the separation a. When 1 3/2 , whereas, for the force, it is inversely proportional to a 5/2 . The first order corrections to the proximity force approximations in different temperature regions are computed using the perturbation approach. In the zero temperature case, the results agree with those derived in [M. Bordag, Phys. Rev. D 73, 125018 (2006)].

  4. Quantitation of species differences in albumin–ligand interactions for bovine, human and rat serum albumins using fluorescence spectroscopy: A test case with some Sudlow's site I ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poór, Miklós [Institute of Laboratory Medicine, University of Pécs, Ifjúság u. 13, Pécs H-7624 (Hungary); Li, Yin; Matisz, Gergely [Department of General and Physical Chemistry, University of Pécs, Pécs H-7624 (Hungary); János Szentágothai Research Center, Pécs H-7624 (Hungary); Kiss, László [Department of General and Physical Chemistry, University of Pécs, Pécs H-7624 (Hungary); Kunsági-Máté, Sándor [Department of General and Physical Chemistry, University of Pécs, Pécs H-7624 (Hungary); János Szentágothai Research Center, Pécs H-7624 (Hungary); Kőszegi, Tamás, E-mail: koszegit@freemail.hu [Institute of Laboratory Medicine, University of Pécs, Ifjúság u. 13, Pécs H-7624 (Hungary)

    2014-01-15

    Albumin, the most abundant plasma protein is an approximately 67 kDa sized water-soluble macromolecule. Since several drugs and xenobiotics circulate in the blood at least partially in albumin-bound form, albumin plays a key role in the pharmacokinetics/toxicokinetics of these chemicals. Most of the drugs and xenobiotics are Sudlow's site I ligands. In numerous studies, bovine serum albumin (BSA) is used for modeling albumin–ligand interactions and the results are extrapolated to human serum albumin (HSA). Furthermore, only limited information is available related to albumin–ligand interactions of different albumin species. Therefore, in our study, we have focused on the quantification of differences between bovine, human and rat serum albumin (RSA) using four Sudlow's site I ligands (luteolin, ochratoxin A, phenylbutazone and warfarin). Interactions were analyzed by fluorescence spectroscopy. Stability constants as well as competing capacities of the ligands were determined, and thermodynamic study was also performed. Our results highlight that there could be major differences between BSA, HSA and RSA in their ligand binding properties. Based on our observations we emphasize that in molecular aspects BSA behaves considerably differently from HSA or from albumins of other species therefore, it is strongly recommended to apply at least some confirmatory measurements when data obtained from other species are attempted to be extrapolated to HSA. -- Highlights: • Albumin–ligand interactions of human, bovine and rat albumins were studied. • Four Sudlow's site I ligands were tested by fluorescence spectroscopy. • Substantial differences were found in stability constants among albumin complexes. • Competing capacity of ligands showed major differences in the studied species. • Data obtained for BSA cannot be directly extrapolated to human albumin.

  5. Mapping the Conformational Dynamics of E-selectin upon Interaction with its Ligands

    KAUST Repository

    Aleisa, Fajr A

    2013-01-01

    Selectins are key adhesion molecules responsible for initiating a multistep process that leads a cell out of the blood circulation and into a tissue or organ. The adhesion of cells (expressing ligands) to the endothelium (expressing the selectin i

  6. Polymorphism of Ag29(BDT)12(TPP)43- cluster: interactions of secondary ligands and their effect on solid state luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Abhijit; Chakraborty, Papri; Bodiuzzaman, Mohammad; Ahuja, Tripti; Antharjanam, Sudhadevi; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2018-05-31

    We present the first example of polymorphism (cubic & trigonal) in single crystals of an atomically precise monolayer protected cluster, Ag29(BDT)12(TPP)43-. We demonstrate that C-Hπ interactions of the secondary ligands (TPP) are dominant in a cubic lattice compared to a trigonal lattice, resulting in a greater rigidity of the structure, which in turn, results in a higher luminescence efficiency in it.

  7. Molecular Characterization of the Interactions between Vascular Selectins and Glycoprotein Ligands on Human Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Abusamra, Dina

    2016-12-01

    The human bone marrow vasculature constitutively expresses both E-selectin and P-selectin where they interact with the cell-surface glycan moiety, sialyl Lewis x, on circulating hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to mediate the essential tethering/rolling step. Although several E-selectin glycoprotein ligands (E-selLs) have been identified, the importance of each E-selL on human HSPCs is debatable and requires additional methodologies to advance their specific involvement. The first objective was to fill the knowledge gap in the in vitro characterization of the mechanisms used by selectins to mediate the initial step in the HSPCs homing by developing a real time immunoprecipitation-based assay on a surface plasmon resonance chip. This novel assay bypass the difficulties of purifying ligands, enables the use of natively glycosylated forms of selectin ligands from any model cell of interest and study its binding affinities under flow. We provide the first comprehensive quantitative binding kinetics of two well-documented ligands, CD44 and PSGL-1, with E-selectin. Both ligands bind monomeric E-selectin transiently with fast on- and off-rates while they bind dimeric E-selectin with remarkably slow on- and off-rates with the on-rate, but not the off-rate, is dependent on salt concentration. Thus, suggest a mechanism through which monomeric selectins mediate initial fast-on and -off binding to capture the circulating cells out of shear-flow; subsequently, tight binding by dimeric/oligomeric selectins is enabled to slow rolling significantly. The second objective is to fully identify and characterize E/P-selectin ligand candidates expressed on CD34+ HSPCs which cause enhanced migration after intravenous transplantation compared to their CD34- counterparts. CD34 is widely recognized marker of human HSPCs but its natural ligand and function on these cells remain elusive. Proteomics identified CD34 as an E-selL candidate on human HSPCs, whose binding to E

  8. Using novel descriptor accounting for ligand-receptor interactions to define and visually explore biologically relevant chemical space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabal, Obdulia; Oyarzabal, Julen

    2012-05-25

    The definition and pragmatic implementation of biologically relevant chemical space is critical in addressing navigation strategies in the overlapping regions where chemistry and therapeutically relevant targets reside and, therefore, also key to performing an efficient drug discovery project. Here, we describe the development and implementation of a simple and robust method for representing biologically relevant chemical space as a general reference according to current knowledge, independently of any reference space, and analyzing chemical structures accordingly. Underlying our method is the generation of a novel descriptor (LiRIf) that converts structural information into a one-dimensional string accounting for the plausible ligand-receptor interactions as well as for topological information. Capitalizing on ligand-receptor interactions as a descriptor enables the clustering, profiling, and comparison of libraries of compounds from a chemical biology and medicinal chemistry perspective. In addition, as a case study, R-groups analysis is performed to identify the most populated ligand-receptor interactions according to different target families (GPCR, kinases, etc.), as well as to evaluate the coverage of biologically relevant chemical space by structures annotated in different databases (ChEMBL, Glida, etc.).

  9. Automated identification of protein-ligand interaction features using Inductive Logic Programming: a hexose binding case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Santos Jose C

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a need for automated methods to learn general features of the interactions of a ligand class with its diverse set of protein receptors. An appropriate machine learning approach is Inductive Logic Programming (ILP, which automatically generates comprehensible rules in addition to prediction. The development of ILP systems which can learn rules of the complexity required for studies on protein structure remains a challenge. In this work we use a new ILP system, ProGolem, and demonstrate its performance on learning features of hexose-protein interactions. Results The rules induced by ProGolem detect interactions mediated by aromatics and by planar-polar residues, in addition to less common features such as the aromatic sandwich. The rules also reveal a previously unreported dependency for residues cys and leu. They also specify interactions involving aromatic and hydrogen bonding residues. This paper shows that Inductive Logic Programming implemented in ProGolem can derive rules giving structural features of protein/ligand interactions. Several of these rules are consistent with descriptions in the literature. Conclusions In addition to confirming literature results, ProGolem’s model has a 10-fold cross-validated predictive accuracy that is superior, at the 95% confidence level, to another ILP system previously used to study protein/hexose interactions and is comparable with state-of-the-art statistical learners.

  10. Automated identification of protein-ligand interaction features using Inductive Logic Programming: a hexose binding case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Santos, Jose C; Nassif, Houssam; Page, David; Muggleton, Stephen H; E Sternberg, Michael J

    2012-07-11

    There is a need for automated methods to learn general features of the interactions of a ligand class with its diverse set of protein receptors. An appropriate machine learning approach is Inductive Logic Programming (ILP), which automatically generates comprehensible rules in addition to prediction. The development of ILP systems which can learn rules of the complexity required for studies on protein structure remains a challenge. In this work we use a new ILP system, ProGolem, and demonstrate its performance on learning features of hexose-protein interactions. The rules induced by ProGolem detect interactions mediated by aromatics and by planar-polar residues, in addition to less common features such as the aromatic sandwich. The rules also reveal a previously unreported dependency for residues cys and leu. They also specify interactions involving aromatic and hydrogen bonding residues. This paper shows that Inductive Logic Programming implemented in ProGolem can derive rules giving structural features of protein/ligand interactions. Several of these rules are consistent with descriptions in the literature. In addition to confirming literature results, ProGolem's model has a 10-fold cross-validated predictive accuracy that is superior, at the 95% confidence level, to another ILP system previously used to study protein/hexose interactions and is comparable with state-of-the-art statistical learners.

  11. Differential TAM receptor-ligand-phospholipid interactions delimit differential TAM bioactivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Erin D; Oh, Jennifer; Burrola, Patrick G; Lax, Irit; Zagórska, Anna; Través, Paqui G; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lemke, Greg

    2014-09-29

    The TAM receptor tyrosine kinases Tyro3, Axl, and Mer regulate key features of cellular physiology, yet the differential activities of the TAM ligands Gas6 and Protein S are poorly understood. We have used biochemical and genetic analyses to delineate the rules for TAM receptor-ligand engagement and find that the TAMs segregate into two groups based on ligand specificity, regulation by phosphatidylserine, and function. Tyro3 and Mer are activated by both ligands but only Gas6 activates Axl. Optimal TAM signaling requires coincident TAM ligand engagement of both its receptor and the phospholipid phosphatidylserine (PtdSer): Gas6 lacking its PtdSer-binding 'Gla domain' is significantly weakened as a Tyro3/Mer agonist and is inert as an Axl agonist, even though it binds to Axl with wild-type affinity. In two settings of TAM-dependent homeostatic phagocytosis, Mer plays a predominant role while Axl is dispensable, and activation of Mer by Protein S is sufficient to drive phagocytosis.

  12. Cationic uremic toxins affect human renal proximal tubule cell functioning through interaction with the organic cation transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schophuizen, Carolien M S; Wilmer, Martijn J; Jansen, Jitske; Gustavsson, Lena; Hilgendorf, Constanze; Hoenderop, Joost G J; van den Heuvel, Lambert P; Masereeuw, Rosalinde

    2013-12-01

    Several organic cations, such as guanidino compounds and polyamines, have been found to accumulate in plasma of patients with kidney failure due to inadequate renal clearance. Here, we studied the interaction of cationic uremic toxins with renal organic cation transport in a conditionally immortalized human proximal tubule epithelial cell line (ciPTEC). Transporter activity was measured and validated in cell suspensions by studying uptake of the fluorescent substrate 4-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-methylpyridinium-iodide (ASP(+)). Subsequently, the inhibitory potencies of the cationic uremic toxins, cadaverine, putrescine, spermine and spermidine (polyamines), acrolein (polyamine breakdown product), guanidine, and methylguanidine (guanidino compounds) were determined. Concentration-dependent inhibition of ASP(+) uptake by TPA, cimetidine, quinidine, and metformin confirmed functional endogenous organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) expression in ciPTEC. All uremic toxins tested inhibited ASP(+) uptake, of which acrolein required the lowest concentration to provoke a half-maximal inhibition (IC50 = 44 ± 2 μM). A Dixon plot was constructed for acrolein using three independent inhibition curves with 10, 20, or 30 μM ASP(+), which demonstrated competitive or mixed type of interaction (K i = 93 ± 16 μM). Exposing the cells to a mixture of cationic uremic toxins resulted in a more potent and biphasic inhibitory response curve, indicating complex interactions between the toxins and ASP(+) uptake. In conclusion, ciPTEC proves a suitable model to study cationic xenobiotic interactions. Inhibition of cellular uptake transport was demonstrated for several uremic toxins, which might indicate a possible role in kidney disease progression during uremia.

  13. Investigation into kinetics of redox interaction in the system Ce(4) β-diketonate-additional ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anufrieva, S.I.; Snezhko, N.I.; Pechurova, N.I.; Martynenko, L.N.; Spitsyn, V.I.

    1981-01-01

    The rate of reduction of β-diketonate complexes of Ce(4) to Ce(3) β-diketonates in benzene solution in the presence and in the absence of additional ligands is studied using spectrophotometry. The rate of reduction of Ce(4) β-diketonates increases in the series Ce(TTFA) 4 4 4 4 4 (TTFA - thenoyltrifluoroacetone, DPM- --dipivaloylmethane, DBM - dibenzoylemethane, BA benzoylacetone, AA - acetylaceton). The studied phosphorus-containing additional ligands as to their effect on the rate of Ce (4) reduction can be arranged in the following order: trioctylphosphine oxide>triphenylphosphine oxide>tributyl phosphate [ru

  14. Protein-Ligand Informatics Force Field (PLIff): Toward a Fully Knowledge Driven "Force Field" for Biomolecular Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonk, Marcel L; Ludlow, R Frederick; Giangreco, Ilenia; Rathi, Prakash Chandra

    2016-07-28

    The Protein Data Bank (PDB) contains a wealth of data on nonbonded biomolecular interactions. If this information could be distilled down to nonbonded interaction potentials, these would have some key advantages over standard force fields. However, there are some important outstanding issues to address in order to do this successfully. This paper introduces the protein-ligand informatics "force field", PLIff, which begins to address these key challenges ( https://bitbucket.org/AstexUK/pli ). As a result of their knowledge-based nature, the next-generation nonbonded potentials that make up PLIff automatically capture a wide range of interaction types, including special interactions that are often poorly described by standard force fields. We illustrate how PLIff may be used in structure-based design applications, including interaction fields, fragment mapping, and protein-ligand docking. PLIff performs at least as well as state-of-the art scoring functions in terms of pose predictions and ranking compounds in a virtual screening context.

  15. Macromolecular competition titration method accessing thermodynamics of the unmodified macromolecule-ligand interactions through spectroscopic titrations of fluorescent analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujalowski, Wlodzimierz; Jezewska, Maria J

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of thermodynamically rigorous binding isotherms provides fundamental information about the energetics of the ligand-macromolecule interactions and often an invaluable insight about the structure of the formed complexes. The Macromolecular Competition Titration (MCT) method enables one to quantitatively obtain interaction parameters of protein-nucleic acid interactions, which may not be available by other methods, particularly for the unmodified long polymer lattices and specific nucleic acid substrates, if the binding is not accompanied by adequate spectroscopic signal changes. The method can be applied using different fluorescent nucleic acids or fluorophores, although the etheno-derivatives of nucleic acid are especially suitable as they are relatively easy to prepare, have significant blue fluorescence, their excitation band lies far from the protein absorption spectrum, and the modification eliminates the possibility of base pairing with other nucleic acids. The MCT method is not limited to the specific size of the reference nucleic acid. Particularly, a simple analysis of the competition titration experiments is described in which the fluorescent, short fragment of nucleic acid, spanning the exact site-size of the protein-nucleic acid complex, and binding with only a 1:1 stoichiometry to the protein, is used as a reference macromolecule. Although the MCT method is predominantly discussed as applied to studying protein-nucleic acid interactions, it can generally be applied to any ligand-macromolecule system by monitoring the association reaction using the spectroscopic signal originating from the reference macromolecule in the presence of the competing macromolecule, whose interaction parameters with the ligand are to be determined. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Electrostatic similarities between protein and small molecule ligands facilitate the design of protein-protein interaction inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnout Voet

    Full Text Available One of the underlying principles in drug discovery is that a biologically active compound is complimentary in shape and molecular recognition features to its receptor. This principle infers that molecules binding to the same receptor may share some common features. Here, we have investigated whether the electrostatic similarity can be used for the discovery of small molecule protein-protein interaction inhibitors (SMPPIIs. We have developed a method that can be used to evaluate the similarity of electrostatic potentials between small molecules and known protein ligands. This method was implemented in a software called EleKit. Analyses of all available (at the time of research SMPPII structures indicate that SMPPIIs bear some similarities of electrostatic potential with the ligand proteins of the same receptor. This is especially true for the more polar SMPPIIs. Retrospective analysis of several successful SMPPIIs has shown the applicability of EleKit in the design of new SMPPIIs.

  17. Exact and Effective Pair-Wise Potential for Protein-Ligand Interactions Obtained from a Semiempirical Energy Partition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Melo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the partition method introduced by Carvalho and Melo was used to study the complex between Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor (CMTI-I and glycerol at the AM1 level. An effective potential, combining non-bonding and polarization plus charge transfer (PLCT terms, was introduced to evaluate the magnitude of the interaction between each amino acid and the ligand. In this case study, the nonbonding–PLCT noncompensation characterizes the stabilization energy of the association process in study. The main residues (Gly29, Cys3 and Arg5 with net attractive effects and Arg1 (with a net repulsive effect, responsible by the stability of protein-ligand complex, are associated with large nonbonding energies non-compensated by PLCT effects. The results obtained enable us to conclude that the present decomposition scheme can be used for understanding the cohesive phenomena in proteins.

  18. The molecular basis of ligand interaction at free fatty acid receptor 4 (FFA4/GPR120)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hudson, Brian D; Shimpukade, Bharat; Milligan, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    The long-chain fatty acid receptor FFA4 (previously GPR120) is receiving substantial interest as a novel target for the treatment of metabolic and inflammatory disease. This study examines for the first time the detailed mode of binding of both long-chain fatty acid and synthetic agonist ligands ...

  19. NMR studies of DNA oligomers and their interactions with minor groove binding ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagan, Patricia A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-05-01

    The cationic peptide ligands distamycin and netropsin bind noncovalently to the minor groove of DNA. The binding site, orientation, stoichiometry, and qualitative affinity of distamycin binding to several short DNA oligomers were investigated by NMR spectroscopy. The oligomers studied contain A,T-rich or I,C-rich binding sites, where I = 2-desaminodeoxyguanosine. I•C base pairs are functional analogs of A•T base pairs in the minor groove. The different behaviors exhibited by distamycin and netropsin binding to various DNA sequences suggested that these ligands are sensitive probes of DNA structure. For sites of five or more base pairs, distamycin can form 1:1 or 2:1 ligand:DNA complexes. Cooperativity in distamycin binding is low in sites such as AAAAA which has narrow minor grooves, and is higher in sites with wider minor grooves such as ATATAT. The distamycin binding and base pair opening lifetimes of I,C-containing DNA oligomers suggest that the I,C minor groove is structurally different from the A,T minor groove. Molecules which direct chemistry to a specific DNA sequence could be used as antiviral compounds, diagnostic probes, or molecular biology tools. The author studied two ligands in which reactive groups were tethered to a distamycin to increase the sequence specificity of the reactive agent.

  20. Challenges predicting ligand-receptor interactions of promiscuous proteins: the nuclear receptor PXR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Ekins

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional regulation of some genes involved in xenobiotic detoxification and apoptosis is performed via the human pregnane X receptor (PXR which in turn is activated by structurally diverse agonists including steroid hormones. Activation of PXR has the potential to initiate adverse effects, altering drug pharmacokinetics or perturbing physiological processes. Reliable computational prediction of PXR agonists would be valuable for pharmaceutical and toxicological research. There has been limited success with structure-based modeling approaches to predict human PXR activators. Slightly better success has been achieved with ligand-based modeling methods including quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR analysis, pharmacophore modeling and machine learning. In this study, we present a comprehensive analysis focused on prediction of 115 steroids for ligand binding activity towards human PXR. Six crystal structures were used as templates for docking and ligand-based modeling approaches (two-, three-, four- and five-dimensional analyses. The best success at external prediction was achieved with 5D-QSAR. Bayesian models with FCFP_6 descriptors were validated after leaving a large percentage of the dataset out and using an external test set. Docking of ligands to the PXR structure co-crystallized with hyperforin had the best statistics for this method. Sulfated steroids (which are activators were consistently predicted as non-activators while, poorly predicted steroids were docked in a reverse mode compared to 5alpha-androstan-3beta-ol. Modeling of human PXR represents a complex challenge by virtue of the large, flexible ligand-binding cavity. This study emphasizes this aspect, illustrating modest success using the largest quantitative data set to date and multiple modeling approaches.

  1. Interaction of cadmium with atrial natriuretic factor receptors: Ligand binding and cellular processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giridhar, J.; Rathinavelu, A.; Isom, G.E.

    1990-01-01

    ANF is a peptide hormone secreted by the heart and produces potent diuresis and vascular smooth muscle relaxation. It is well known that Cd produces cardiovascular toxicity and is implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Hence the effects of Cd on ANF receptor dynamics and ligand binding were studied in PC12 cells. Receptor internalization using 125 I-ANF as the ligand at 37 degree C displayed a decrease in endocytic rate constants (ERC) when either preincubated with Cd (500 μM for 30 min, ERC = 0.183/min) or coincubated with Cd (500 μM, ERC = 0.196) when compared to control value (ERC = 0.259/min). Ligand binding ( 125 I-ANF) was changed by Cd as reflected by a decrease in the number of binding sites/cell in both Cd preincubated (Kd = 3.81 x 10 -10 M, B max = 1 x 10 -10 M, binding sites/cell = 9333) and coincubated cells (Kd = 1.76 x 10 -10 M, B max = 3.92 x 10 -11 M, binding sites/cell = 5960) from control (Kd = 3.87 x 10 -10 M, B max = 9.58 x 10 -11 M, binding sites/cell = 12141). Photoaffinity labelling with 125 I-ANF as the ligand was used to measure receptor subtype binding. Coincubation of cells with Cd (500 μM) and ligand decreased both high and low mol. wt. receptor binding, whereas preincubation with Cd (500μM) for 60 min produced a slight decrease in binding of both receptor subtypes. These results indicate that the cardiovascular toxicity of Cd may be partially mediated by altered ANF receptor function

  2. Interactions of ligands with active and inactive conformations of the dopamine D2 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmberg, A; Mohell, N; Backlund Höök, B; Johansson, A M; Hacksell, U; Nordvall, G

    1998-04-10

    The affinities of 19 pharmacologically diverse dopamine D2 receptor ligands were determined for the active and inactive conformations of cloned human dopamine D2 receptors expressed in Ltk cells. The agonist [3H]quinpirole was used to selectively label the guanine nucleotide-binding protein-coupled, active receptor conformation. The antagonist [3H]raclopride, in the presence of the non-hydrolysable GTP-analogue Gpp(NH)p and sodium ions and in the absence of magnesium ions, was used to label the free inactive receptor conformation. The intrinsic activities of the ligands were determined in a forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP assay using the same cells. An excellent correlation was shown between the affinity ratios (KR/KRG) of the ligands for the two receptor conformations and their intrinsic activity (r=0.96). The ligands included eight structurally related and enantiopure 2-aminotetralin derivatives; the enantiomers of 5-hydroxy-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin, 5-methoxy-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin, 5-fluoro-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin and 2-(dipropylamino)tetralin. The (S)-enantiomers behaved as full agonists in the cyclic AMP assay and displayed a large KR/KRG ratio. The (R)-enantiomers were classified as partial agonists and had lower ratios. The structure-affinity relationships of these compounds at the active and the inactive receptor conformations were analysed separately, and used in conjunction with a homology based receptor model of the dopamine D2 receptor. This led to proposed binding modes for agonists, antagonists and partial agonists in the 2-aminotetralin series. The concepts used in this study should be of value in the design of ligands with predetermined affinity and intrinsic activity.

  3. Evaluation of several two-step scoring functions based on linear interaction energy, effective ligand size, and empirical pair potentials for prediction of protein-ligand binding geometry and free energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Obaidur; Estrada, Trilce P; Doren, Douglas J; Taufer, Michela; Brooks, Charles L; Armen, Roger S

    2011-09-26

    The performances of several two-step scoring approaches for molecular docking were assessed for their ability to predict binding geometries and free energies. Two new scoring functions designed for "step 2 discrimination" were proposed and compared to our CHARMM implementation of the linear interaction energy (LIE) approach using the Generalized-Born with Molecular Volume (GBMV) implicit solvation model. A scoring function S1 was proposed by considering only "interacting" ligand atoms as the "effective size" of the ligand and extended to an empirical regression-based pair potential S2. The S1 and S2 scoring schemes were trained and 5-fold cross-validated on a diverse set of 259 protein-ligand complexes from the Ligand Protein Database (LPDB). The regression-based parameters for S1 and S2 also demonstrated reasonable transferability in the CSARdock 2010 benchmark using a new data set (NRC HiQ) of diverse protein-ligand complexes. The ability of the scoring functions to accurately predict ligand geometry was evaluated by calculating the discriminative power (DP) of the scoring functions to identify native poses. The parameters for the LIE scoring function with the optimal discriminative power (DP) for geometry (step 1 discrimination) were found to be very similar to the best-fit parameters for binding free energy over a large number of protein-ligand complexes (step 2 discrimination). Reasonable performance of the scoring functions in enrichment of active compounds in four different protein target classes established that the parameters for S1 and S2 provided reasonable accuracy and transferability. Additional analysis was performed to definitively separate scoring function performance from molecular weight effects. This analysis included the prediction of ligand binding efficiencies for a subset of the CSARdock NRC HiQ data set where the number of ligand heavy atoms ranged from 17 to 35. This range of ligand heavy atoms is where improved accuracy of predicted ligand

  4. Molecular modeling of ligand-receptor interactions in the OR5 olfactory receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, M S; Shepherd, G M

    1994-06-02

    Olfactory receptors belong to the superfamily of seven transmembrane domain, G protein-coupled receptors. In order to begin analysis of mechanisms of receptor activation, a computer model of the OR5 olfactory receptor has been constructed and compared with other members of this superfamily. We have tested docking of the odor molecule lyral, which is known to activate the OR5 receptor. The results point to specific ligand-binding residues on helices III through VII that form a binding pocket in the receptor. Some of these residues occupy sequence positions identical to ligand-binding residues conserved among other superfamily members. The results provide new insights into possible molecular mechanisms of odor recognition and suggest hypotheses to guide future experimental studies using site-directed mutagenesis.

  5. Investigation into kinetics of redox interaction in the system Ce(4). beta. -diketonate-additional ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anufrieva, S.I.; Snezhko, N.I.; Pechurova, N.I.; Martynenko, L.N.; Spitsyn, V.I. (Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR))

    1981-07-01

    The rate of reduction of ..beta..-diketonate complexes of Ce(4) to Ce(3) ..beta..-diketonates in benzene solution in the presence and in the absence of additional ligands is studied using spectrophotometry. The rate of reduction of Ce(4) ..beta..-diketonates increases in the series Ce(TTFA)/sub 4/ligands as to their effect on the rate of Ce (4) reduction can be arranged in the following order: trioctylphosphine oxide>triphenylphosphine oxide>tributyl phosphate.

  6. Investigation on biomolecular interactions of nickel(II) complexes with monoanionic bidentate ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayamani, Arumugam; Sethupathi, Murugan; Ojwach, Stephen O.; Sengottuvelan, Nallathambi

    2018-01-01

    Reactions of monoanionic bidentate ligands 5-methylsalicylaldehyde (5-msal), 5-bromosalicylaldehyde (5-brsal), 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-nsal) and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde (2-hnap) with nickel perchlorate hexahydrate produced nickel(II) complexes 1-4, respectively. Single crystal X-ray analyses of complexes 1 and 2 confirmed bidentate mode of the ligands with O˄O coordination to give square planar geometry around nickel atoms. Complexes 1-4 showed one quasi-reversible redox peak at cathodic region (-0.67 to -0.80 V) and one redox peak at anodic region (+1.08 to +1.44 V) assignable to the Ni(II)/Ni(I) and Ni(II)/Ni(III) redox couples, respectively. The complexes exhibited good bovine serum albumin (BSA) binding abilities with a maximum binding constant of 1.96 × 105 M-1. The binding of complexes with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) showed that the binding affinity is consistent with an increase in steric bulk of the ligands. The nuclease activity of the complexes showed efficient oxidative cleavage in the presence of hydrogen peroxide as an oxidizing agent. The complexes showed higher zone of inhibition when screened for antimicrobial activity against bacteria and human pathogenic fungi.

  7. Solution characterization of the extracellular region of CD147 and its interaction with its enzyme ligand cyclophilin-A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlegel, Jennifer; Redzic, Jasmina S.; Porter, Christopher; Yurchenko, Vyacheslav; Bukrinsky, Michael; Labeikovsky, Wladimir; Armstrong, Geoffrey S.; Zhang, Fengli; Isern, Nancy G.; Degregori, James; Hodges, Robert; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.

    2009-08-21

    The CD147 receptor plays an integral role in numerous diseases by stimulating the expression of several protein families and serving as the receptor for extracellular cyclophilins, however, neither CD147 nor its interactions with its cyclophilin ligands have been well characterized in solution. CD147 is a unique protein in that it can function both at the cell membrane and after being released from cells where it continues to retain activity. Thus, the CD147 receptor functions through at least two mechanisms that include both cyclophilin-independent and cyclophilin-dependent modes of action. In regard to CD147 cyclophilin-independent activity, CD147 homophilic interactions are thought to underlie its activity. In regard to CD147 cyclophilin-dependent activity, cyclophilin/CD147 interactions may represent a novel means of signaling since cyclophilins are also peptidyl-prolyl isomerases.

  8. Proximal Humerus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diercks, Ron L.; Bain, Gregory; Itoi, Eiji; Di Giacomo, Giovanni; Sugaya, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the bony structures of the proximal humerus. The proximal humerus is often regarded as consisting of four parts, which assists in understanding function and, more specially, describes the essential parts in reconstruction after fracture or in joint replacement. These are the

  9. Synthesis and characterization of 6,6'-bis(2-hydroxyphenyl)-2,2'-bipyridine ligand and its interaction with ct-DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selamat, Norhidayah; Heng, Lee Yook; Hassan, Nurul Izzaty; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd

    2015-09-01

    The tetradentate ligand with four donor atoms OONN was synthesized. Bis(phenoxy)bipyridine ligand was prepared by Suzuki coupling reaction between 6,6'-dibromo-2,2'-bipyridyl and 2-hydroxyphenylboronic acid with presence of palladium (II) acetate. Bis(phenoxy)bipyridine ligand was also synthesized by demethylating of 6,6'-bis(2-methoxyphenyl)-2,2'-bipyridyl ligand through solvent free reaction using pyridine hydrocloride. The formation of both phenoxy and methoxy ligands was confirmed by 1H, 2D cosy and 13C NMR spectroscopy, ESI-MS spectrometry, FTIR spectroscopy. The purity of the ligand was confirmed by melting point. Binding studies of small molecules with DNA are useful to understand the reaction mechanism and to provide guidance for the application and design of new and more efficient drugs targeted to DNA. In this study, the binding interaction between the synthesized ligand with calf thymus-DNA (ct-DNA) has been investigated by UV/Vis DNA titration study. From the UV/Vis DNA study, it shows that bis(phenoxy)bipyridine ligand bind with ct-DNA via outside binding with binding contant Kb = 1.19 × 103 ± 0.08 M-1.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of 6,6’-bis(2-hydroxyphenyl)-2,2’-bipyridine ligand and its interaction with ct-DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selamat, Norhidayah; Heng, Lee Yook; Hassan, Nurul Izzaty; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd

    2015-01-01

    The tetradentate ligand with four donor atoms OONN was synthesized. Bis(phenoxy)bipyridine ligand was prepared by Suzuki coupling reaction between 6,6’-dibromo-2,2’-bipyridyl and 2-hydroxyphenylboronic acid with presence of palladium (II) acetate. Bis(phenoxy)bipyridine ligand was also synthesized by demethylating of 6,6’-bis(2-methoxyphenyl)-2,2’-bipyridyl ligand through solvent free reaction using pyridine hydrocloride. The formation of both phenoxy and methoxy ligands was confirmed by 1 H, 2D cosy and 13 C NMR spectroscopy, ESI-MS spectrometry, FTIR spectroscopy. The purity of the ligand was confirmed by melting point. Binding studies of small molecules with DNA are useful to understand the reaction mechanism and to provide guidance for the application and design of new and more efficient drugs targeted to DNA. In this study, the binding interaction between the synthesized ligand with calf thymus-DNA (ct-DNA) has been investigated by UV/Vis DNA titration study. From the UV/Vis DNA study, it shows that bis(phenoxy)bipyridine ligand bind with ct-DNA via outside binding with binding contant K b = 1.19 × 10 3 ± 0.08 M −1

  11. Synthesis and characterization of 6,6’-bis(2-hydroxyphenyl)-2,2’-bipyridine ligand and its interaction with ct-DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selamat, Norhidayah; Heng, Lee Yook; Hassan, Nurul Izzaty; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43650 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    The tetradentate ligand with four donor atoms OONN was synthesized. Bis(phenoxy)bipyridine ligand was prepared by Suzuki coupling reaction between 6,6’-dibromo-2,2’-bipyridyl and 2-hydroxyphenylboronic acid with presence of palladium (II) acetate. Bis(phenoxy)bipyridine ligand was also synthesized by demethylating of 6,6’-bis(2-methoxyphenyl)-2,2’-bipyridyl ligand through solvent free reaction using pyridine hydrocloride. The formation of both phenoxy and methoxy ligands was confirmed by {sup 1}H, 2D cosy and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, ESI-MS spectrometry, FTIR spectroscopy. The purity of the ligand was confirmed by melting point. Binding studies of small molecules with DNA are useful to understand the reaction mechanism and to provide guidance for the application and design of new and more efficient drugs targeted to DNA. In this study, the binding interaction between the synthesized ligand with calf thymus-DNA (ct-DNA) has been investigated by UV/Vis DNA titration study. From the UV/Vis DNA study, it shows that bis(phenoxy)bipyridine ligand bind with ct-DNA via outside binding with binding contant K{sub b} = 1.19 × 10{sup 3} ± 0.08 M{sup −1}.

  12. A control on hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions between HEWL and metal Schiff-base complexes comprising of different metal ions and ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koley Seth, Banabithi; Ray, Aurkie; Basu, Samita, E-mail: samita.basu@saha.ac.in

    2015-05-15

    The structural effects of different copper(II) and nickel(II) Schiff base complexes on hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) have been investigated through steady state and time resolved absorption and fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The Schiff base ligands with N{sub 4} donor atoms show both hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions, however hydrophilic interaction prevails with ligands having N{sub 2}O{sub 2} donor atoms. Variation of metal ions from Cu{sup 2+} to Ni{sup 2+} with each type of Schiff base ligand increases the probability of hydrophilic over hydrophobic interactions, which supports their significance in regulating the binding affinity between HEWL and metal complexes. On photo-excitation the complexes comprising of Cu{sup 2+} ion instead of Ni{sup 2+} ion and ligands with N{sub 4} donor system rather than N{sub 2}O{sub 2} donor system, increases the probability of intersystem crossing to populate the corresponding triplet state as observed from laser flash photolysis study. The better binding affinity of nickel complexes with different selectivities compared to copper complexes towards HEWL emphasizes the potentiality of less explored nickel complexes in drug–protein interactions. - Highlights: • Ni{sup II} and Cu{sup II} -Schiff base complexes bind hen egg white lysozyme spontaneously. • Both hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions are effective for N{sub 4} ligands. • For N{sub 2}O{sub 2} ligands the hydrophilic is predominant over hydrophobic interaction. • Binding affinity and selectivity of Ni{sup II}-complexes are better than Cu{sup II}-complexes. • Replacement of Cu{sup 2+} by Ni{sup 2+} in a ligand enhances chance of hydrophilic interaction.

  13. Enzyme-ligand interactions that drive active site rearrangements in the Helicobacter pylori 5´-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronning, Donald R; Iacopelli, Natalie M; Mishra, Vidhi [Toledo

    2012-03-15

    The bacterial enzyme 5'-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase (MTAN) plays a central role in three essential metabolic pathways in bacteria: methionine salvage, purine salvage, and polyamine biosynthesis. Recently, its role in the pathway that leads to the production of autoinducer II, an important component in quorum-sensing, has garnered much interest. Because of this variety of roles, MTAN is an attractive target for developing new classes of inhibitors that influence bacterial virulence and biofilm formation. To gain insight toward the development of new classes of MTAN inhibitors, the interactions between the Helicobacter pylori-encoded MTAN and its substrates and substrate analogs were probed using X-ray crystallography. The structures of MTAN, an MTAN-Formycin A complex, and an adenine bound form were solved by molecular replacement and refined to 1.7, 1.8, and 1.6 Å, respectively. The ribose-binding site in the MTAN and MTAN-adenine cocrystal structures contain a tris[hydroxymethyl]aminomethane molecule that stabilizes the closed form of the enzyme and displaces a nucleophilic water molecule necessary for catalysis. This research gives insight to the interactions between MTAN and bound ligands that promote closing of the enzyme active site and highlights the potential for designing new classes of MTAN inhibitors using a link/grow or ligand assembly development strategy based on the described H. pylori MTAN crystal structures.

  14. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae Assay System to Investigate Ligand/AdipoR1 Interactions That Lead to Cellular Signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Aouida, Mustapha

    2013-06-07

    Adiponectin is a mammalian hormone that exerts anti-diabetic, anti-cancer and cardioprotective effects through interaction with its major ubiquitously expressed plasma membrane localized receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2. Here, we report a Saccharomyces cerevisiae based method for investigating agonist-AdipoR interactions that is amenable for high-throughput scale-up and can be used to study both AdipoRs separately. Agonist-AdipoR1 interactions are detected using a split firefly luciferase assay based on reconstitution of firefly luciferase (Luc) activity due to juxtaposition of its N- and C-terminal fragments, NLuc and CLuc, by ligand induced interaction of the chimeric proteins CLuc-AdipoR1 and APPL1-NLuc (adaptor protein containing pleckstrin homology domain, phosphotyrosine binding domain and leucine zipper motif 1-NLuc) in a S. cerevisiae strain lacking the yeast homolog of AdipoRs (Izh2p). The assay monitors the earliest known step in the adiponectin-AdipoR anti-diabetic signaling cascade. We demonstrate that reconstituted Luc activity can be detected in colonies or cells using a CCD camera and quantified in cell suspensions using a microplate reader. AdipoR1-APPL1 interaction occurs in absence of ligand but can be stimulated specifically by agonists such as adiponectin and the tobacco protein osmotin that was shown to have AdipoR-dependent adiponectin-like biological activity in mammalian cells. To further validate this assay, we have modeled the three dimensional structures of receptor-ligand complexes of membrane-embedded AdipoR1 with cyclic peptides derived from osmotin or osmotin-like plant proteins. We demonstrate that the calculated AdipoR1-peptide binding energies correlate with the peptides\\' ability to behave as AdipoR1 agonists in the split luciferase assay. Further, we demonstrate agonist-AdipoR dependent activation of protein kinase A (PKA) signaling and AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in S. cerevisiae, which are homologous to

  15. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae assay system to investigate ligand/AdipoR1 interactions that lead to cellular signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustapha Aouida

    Full Text Available Adiponectin is a mammalian hormone that exerts anti-diabetic, anti-cancer and cardioprotective effects through interaction with its major ubiquitously expressed plasma membrane localized receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2. Here, we report a Saccharomyces cerevisiae based method for investigating agonist-AdipoR interactions that is amenable for high-throughput scale-up and can be used to study both AdipoRs separately. Agonist-AdipoR1 interactions are detected using a split firefly luciferase assay based on reconstitution of firefly luciferase (Luc activity due to juxtaposition of its N- and C-terminal fragments, NLuc and CLuc, by ligand induced interaction of the chimeric proteins CLuc-AdipoR1 and APPL1-NLuc (adaptor protein containing pleckstrin homology domain, phosphotyrosine binding domain and leucine zipper motif 1-NLuc in a S. cerevisiae strain lacking the yeast homolog of AdipoRs (Izh2p. The assay monitors the earliest known step in the adiponectin-AdipoR anti-diabetic signaling cascade. We demonstrate that reconstituted Luc activity can be detected in colonies or cells using a CCD camera and quantified in cell suspensions using a microplate reader. AdipoR1-APPL1 interaction occurs in absence of ligand but can be stimulated specifically by agonists such as adiponectin and the tobacco protein osmotin that was shown to have AdipoR-dependent adiponectin-like biological activity in mammalian cells. To further validate this assay, we have modeled the three dimensional structures of receptor-ligand complexes of membrane-embedded AdipoR1 with cyclic peptides derived from osmotin or osmotin-like plant proteins. We demonstrate that the calculated AdipoR1-peptide binding energies correlate with the peptides' ability to behave as AdipoR1 agonists in the split luciferase assay. Further, we demonstrate agonist-AdipoR dependent activation of protein kinase A (PKA signaling and AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK phosphorylation in S. cerevisiae, which are

  16. Bond of donor-acceptor interaction in metal-ligand system with energies of Fermi electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasov, Yu.V.; Khentov, V.Ya.; Velikanova, L.N.; Semchenko, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Role of quantum nature of metal (W, Mo and others) in donor-acceptor interaction of metal salicylalaniline - aprotic solvent was discussed. The dependence of dissolution rate and activation energy of donor-acceptor interaction on electron energy was established

  17. Engineering bacterial surface displayed human norovirus capsid proteins: A novel system to explore interaction between norovirus and ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengya eNiu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human noroviruses (HuNoVs are major contributors to acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis outbreaks. Many aspects of HuNoVs are poorly understood due to both the current inability to culture HuNoVs, and the lack of efficient small animal models. Surrogates for HuNoVs, such as recombinant viral like particles (VLPs expressed in eukaryotic system or P particles expressed in prokaryotic system, have been used for studies in immunology and interaction between the virus and its receptors. However, it is difficult to use VLPs or P particles to collect or isolate potential ligands binding to these recombinant capsid proteins. In this study, a new strategy was used to collect HuNoVs binding ligands through the use of ice nucleation protein (INP to display recombinant capsid proteins of HuNoVs on bacterial surfaces. The viral protein-ligand complex could be easily separated by a low speed centrifugation step. This system was also used to explore interaction between recombinant capsid proteins of HuNoVs and their receptors. In this system, the VP1 capsid encoding gene (ORF2 and the protruding domain (P domain encoding gene (3’ terminal fragment of ORF2 of HuNoVs GI.1 and GII.4 were fused with 5’ terminal fragment of ice nucleation protein encoding gene (inaQn. The results demonstrated that the recombinant VP1 and P domains of HuNoVs were expressed and anchored on the surface of Escherichia coli BL21 cells after the bacteria were transformed with the corresponding plasmids. Both cell surface displayed VP1 and P domains could be recognized by HuNoVs specific antibodies and interact with the viral histo-blood group antigens receptors. In both cases, displayed P domains had better binding abilities than VP1. This new strategy of using displayed HuNoVs capsid proteins on the bacterial surface could be utilized to separate HuNoVs binding components from complex samples, to investigate interaction between the virus and its receptors, as well as to develop an

  18. Targeting P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1/P-selectin interactions as a novel therapy for metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Madhukar S; Miranda-Nieves, David; Chen, Jiaxuan; Haller, Carolyn A; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2017-05-01

    Obesity-induced insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome continue to pose an important public health challenge worldwide as they significantly increase the risk of type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Advances in the pathophysiologic understanding of this process has identified that chronic inflammation plays a pivotal role. In this regard, given that both animal models and human studies have demonstrated that the interaction of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) with P-selectin is not only critical for normal immune response but also is upregulated in the setting of metabolic syndrome, PSGL-1/P-selectin interactions provide a novel target for preventing and treating resultant disease. Current approaches of interfering with PSGL-1/P-selectin interactions include targeted antibodies, recombinant immunoglobulins that competitively bind P-selectin, and synthetic molecular therapies. Experimental models as well as clinical trials assessing the role of these modalities in a variety of diseases have continued to contribute to the understanding of PSGL-1/P-selectin interactions and have demonstrated the difficulty in creating clinically relevant therapeutics. Most recently, however, computational simulations have further enhanced our understanding of the structural features of PSGL-1 and related glycomimetics, which are responsible for high-affinity selectin interactions. Leveraging these insights for the design of next generation agents has thus led to development of a promising synthetic method for generating PSGL-1 glycosulfopeptide mimetics for the treatment of metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of interaction of ligands with Streptococcus faecium dihydrofolate reductase labeled with [#betta#-13C]tryptophan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    London, R.E.; Groff, J.P.; Cocco, L.; Blakley, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase from Streptococcus faecium has been labeled with [#betta#- 13 C]tryptophan. We have determined changes occurring in the chemical shifts and line widths of the four resonances of the 13 C NMR spectrum of the labeled enzyme, due to its interaction with various ligands. These include the coenzyme, NPDPH and related nucleotides, folate and its polyglutamate derivatives, and many inhibitors including methotrexate and trimethoprim. In addition, paramagnetic relaxation effects produced by a bound spin-labeled analogue of 2'-phosphoadenosine-5'-diphosphoribose on the tryptophan C/sup #betta#/ carbons have been measured. Distances calculated from the relaxation data have been compared with corresponding distances in the crystallographic model of the NADPH-methotrexate ternary complex of Lactobacillus casei reductase. The paramagnetic relaxation data indicate that the two downfield resonances (1 and 2) correspond to tryptophans (W/sub A/ and W/sub B/) that are more remote from the catalytic site, and from the crystallographic model these are seen to be Trp-115 and Trp-160. The upfield resonances (3 and 4) that show broadening due to chemical exchange correspond to closer residues (W/sub C/ and W/sub D/), and these are identified with Trp-6 and Trp-22. However, the relaxation data do not permit specific assignments within the nearer and farther pairs. Although resonance 3, which is split due to chemical exchange, was formerly assigned to Trp-6, data obtained for the enzyme in the presence of various ligands are better interpreted if resonance 3 is assigned to Trp-22, which is located on a loop that joins elements of secondary structure and forms one side of the ligand-binding cavity

  20. Enhance the performance of current scoring functions with the aid of 3D protein-ligand interaction fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Su, Minyi; Liu, Zhihai; Li, Jie; Li, Yan; Wang, Renxiao

    2017-07-18

    In structure-based drug design, binding affinity prediction remains as a challenging goal for current scoring functions. Development of target-biased scoring functions provides a new possibility for tackling this problem, but this approach is also associated with certain technical difficulties. We previously reported the Knowledge-Guided Scoring (KGS) method as an alternative approach (BMC Bioinformatics, 2010, 11, 193-208). The key idea is to compute the binding affinity of a given protein-ligand complex based on the known binding data of an appropriate reference complex, so the error in binding affinity prediction can be reduced effectively. In this study, we have developed an upgraded version, i.e. KGS2, by employing 3D protein-ligand interaction fingerprints in reference selection. KGS2 was evaluated in combination with four scoring functions (X-Score, ChemPLP, ASP, and GoldScore) on five drug targets (HIV-1 protease, carbonic anhydrase 2, beta-secretase 1, beta-trypsin, and checkpoint kinase 1). In the in situ scoring test, considerable improvements were observed in most cases after application of KGS2. Besides, the performance of KGS2 was always better than KGS in all cases. In the more challenging molecular docking test, application of KGS2 also led to improved structure-activity relationship in some cases. KGS2 can be applied as a convenient "add-on" to current scoring functions without the need to re-engineer them, and its application is not limited to certain target proteins as customized scoring functions. As an interpolation method, its accuracy in principle can be improved further with the increasing knowledge of protein-ligand complex structures and binding affinity data. We expect that KGS2 will become a practical tool for enhancing the performance of current scoring functions in binding affinity prediction. The KGS2 software is available upon contacting the authors.

  1. Functional expression of Squalus acanthias melanocortin-5 receptor in CHO cells: ligand selectivity and interaction with MRAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinick, Christina L; Liang, Liang; Angleson, Josepha K; Dores, Robert M

    2012-04-05

    The melanocortin-5 receptor (MC(5)) of the dogfish Squalus acanthias (SacMC(5) receptor) can be functionally expressed in CHO cells in the absence of the co-expression of an exogenous MRAP cDNA. Both human ACTH(1-24) and dogfish ACTH(1-25) were much better stimulators of the SacMC(5) receptor than any of the mammalian or dogfish MSH ligands that were tested. The order of ligand selectivity for the dogfish melanocortins was ACTH(1-25)>αMSH>γ-MSH=δ-MSH>β-MSH. Unlike mammalian MC(5) receptors, the functional expression of the SacMC(5) receptor was not negatively impacted when the receptor was co-expressed with a cartilaginous fish (Callorhinchus milii) MRAP2 cDNA. However, co-expression with either mouse mMRAP1 or zebrafish zfMRAP1 increased the sensitivity of SacMC(5) receptor for hACTH(1-24) by at least one order of magnitude. Hence, SacMC(5) receptor has the potential to interact with MRAP1 orthologs and in this regard behaved more like a melanocortin MC(2) receptor ortholog than a melanocortin MC(5) receptor ortholog. These observations are discussed in light of the evolution of the melanocortin receptor gene family in cartilaginous fish, and the physiological implications of these observations are considered. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Size versus polarizability in protein-ligand interactions: binding of noble gases within engineered cavities in phage T4 lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillin, M L; Breyer, W A; Griswold, I J; Matthews, B W

    2000-09-29

    To investigate the relative importance of size and polarizability in ligand binding within proteins, we have determined the crystal structures of pseudo wild-type and cavity-containing mutant phage T4 lysozymes in the presence of argon, krypton, and xenon. These proteins provide a representative sample of predominantly apolar cavities of varying size and shape. Even though the volumes of these cavities range up to the equivalent of five xenon atoms, the noble gases bind preferentially at highly localized sites that appear to be defined by constrictions in the walls of the cavities, coupled with the relatively large radii of the noble gases. The cavities within pseudo wild-type and L121A lysozymes each bind only a single atom of noble gas, while the cavities within mutants L133A and F153A have two independent binding sites, and the L99A cavity has three interacting sites. The binding of noble gases within two double mutants was studied to characterize the additivity of binding at such sites. In general, when a cavity in a protein is created by a "large-to-small" substitution, the surrounding residues relax somewhat to reduce the volume of the cavity. The binding of xenon and, to a lesser degree, krypton and argon, tend to expand the volume of the cavity and to return it closer to what it would have been had no relaxation occurred. In nearly all cases, the extent of binding of the noble gases follows the trend xenon>krypton>argon. Pressure titrations of the L99A mutant have confirmed that the crystallographic occupancies accurately reflect fractional saturation of the binding sites. The trend in noble gas affinity can be understood in terms of the effects of size and polarizability on the intermolecular potential. The plasticity of the protein matrix permits repulsion due to increased ligand size to be more than compensated for by attraction due to increased ligand polarizability. These results have implications for the mechanism of general anesthesia, the migration

  3. Roles of Bridging Ligand Topology and Conformation in Controlling Exchange Interactions between Paramagnetic Molybdenum Fragments in Dinuclear and Trinuclear Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung VÂ, V&acaron;n Ân; Cargill Thompson, Alexander M. W.; Bardwell, David A.; Gatteschi, Dante; Jeffery, John C.; McCleverty, Jon A.; Totti, Federico; Ward, Michael D.

    1997-07-30

    The magnetic properties of two series of dinuclear complexes, and one trinuclear complex, have been examined as a function of the bridging pathway between the metal centers. The first series of dinuclear complexes is [{Mo(V)(O)(Tp)Cl}(2)(&mgr;-OO)], where "OO" is [1,4-O(C(6)H(4))(n)O](2)(-) (n = 1, 1; n = 2, 3), [4,4'-O(C(6)H(3)-2-Me)(2)O](2)(-) (4), or [1,3-OC(6)H(4)O](2)(-) (2) [Tp = tris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)hydroborate]. The second series of dinuclear complexes is [{Mo(I)(NO)(Tp)Cl}(2)(&mgr;-NN)], where "NN" is 4,4'-bipyridyl (5), 3,3'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridine (6), 3,8-phenanthroline (7), or 2,7-diazapyrene (8). The trinuclear complex is [{Mo(V)(O)(Tp)Cl}(3)(1,3,5-C(6)H(3)O(3))] (9), whose crystal structure was determined [9.5CH(2)Cl(2): C(56)H(81)B(3)Cl(13)Mo(3)N(18)O(6); monoclinic, P2(1)/n; a = 13.443, b = 41.46(2), c = 14.314(6) Å; beta = 93.21(3) degrees; V = 7995(5) Å(3); Z = 4; R(1) = 0.106]. In these complexes, the sign and magnitude of the exchange coupling constant J is clearly related to both the topology and the conformation of the bridging ligand [where J is derived from H = -JS(1)().S(2)() for 1-8 and H = -J(S(1)().S(2)() + S(2)().S(3)() + S(1)().S(3)()) for 9]. The values are as follows: 1, -80 cm(-)(1); 2, +9.8 cm(-)(1); 3, -13.2 cm(-)(1); 4, -2.8 cm(-)(1); 5, -33 cm(-)(1); 6, -3.5 cm(-)(1); 7, -35.6 cm(-)(1); 8, -35.0 cm(-)(1); 9, +14.4 cm(-)(1). In particular the following holds: (1) J is negative (antiferromagnetic exchange) across the para-substituted bridges ligands of 1 and 3-8 but positive (ferromagnetic exchange) across the meta-substituted bridging ligands of 2 and 9. (2) J decreases in magnitude dramatically as the bridging ligand conformation changes from planar to twisted (compare 3 and 4, or 6 and 8). These observations are consistent with a spin-polarization mechanism for the exchange interaction, propagated across the pi-system of the bridging ligand by via overlap of bridging ligand p(pi) orbitals with the d(pi) magnetic

  4. Dynamic strength of the interaction between lung surfactant protein D (SP-D) and saccharide ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thormann, Esben; Dreyer, Jakob K; Simonsen, Adam C

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the dynamic strength of the interaction between lung surfactant protein D (SP-D) and different sugars, maltose, mannose, glucose, and galactose, we have used an atomic force microscope to monitor the interaction on a single molecule scale. The experiment is performed...

  5. Interacting effects of uniform flow, plane shear, and near-wall proximity on the heat and mass transfer of respiratory aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worth Longest, P. [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Kleinstreuer, C. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    2004-10-01

    Individual and interacting effects of uniform flow, plane shear, and near-wall proximity on spherical droplet heat and mass transfer have been assessed for low Reynolds number conditions beyond the creeping flow regime. Validated resolved volume simulations were used to compute heat and mass transfer surface gradients of two-dimensional axisymmetric droplets and three-dimensional spherical droplets near planar wall boundaries for conditions consistent with inhalable aerosols (5 {<=} d {<=} 300 {mu}m) in the upper respiratory tract. Results indicate that planar shear significantly impacts droplet heat and mass transfer for shear-based Reynolds numbers greater than 1, which occur for near-wall respiratory aerosols with diameters in excess of 50 {mu}m. Wall proximity is shown to significantly enhance heat and mass transfer due to conduction and diffusion at separation distances less than five particle diameters and for small Reynolds numbers. For the Reynolds number conditions of interest, significant non-linear effects arise due to the concurrent interaction of uniform flow and shear such that linear superposition of Sherwood or Nusselt number terms is not allowable. Based on the validated numeric simulations, multivariable Sherwood and Nusselt number correlations are provided to account for individual flow characteristics and concurrent non-linear interactions of uniform flow, planar shear, and near-wall proximity. These heat and mass transfer correlations can be applied to effectively compute condensation and evaporation rates of potentially toxic or therapeutic aerosols in the upper respiratory tract, where non-uniform flow and wall proximity are expected to significantly affect droplet transport, deposition, and vapor formation. (author)

  6. Structural Insights into Selective Ligand-Receptor Interactions Leading to Receptor Inactivation Utilizing Selective Melanocortin 3 Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Minying; Marelli, Udaya Kiran; Mertz, Blake; Beck, Johannes G; Opperer, Florian; Rechenmacher, Florian; Kessler, Horst; Hruby, Victor J

    2017-08-15

    Systematic N-methylated derivatives of the melanocortin receptor ligand, SHU9119, lead to multiple binding and functional selectivity toward melanocortin receptors. However, the relationship between N-methylation-induced conformational changes in the peptide backbone and side chains and melanocortin receptor selectivity is still unknown. We conducted comprehensive conformational studies in solution of two selective antagonists of the third isoform of the melanocortin receptor (hMC3R), namely, Ac-Nle-c[Asp-NMe-His 6 -d-Nal(2') 7 -NMe-Arg 8 -Trp 9 -Lys]-NH 2 (15) and Ac-Nle-c[Asp-His 6 -d-Nal(2') 7 -NMe-Arg 8 -NMe-Trp 9 -NMe-Lys]-NH 2 (17). It is known that the pharmacophore (His 6 -DNal 7 -Arg 8 -Trp 9 ) of the SHU-9119 peptides occupies a β II-turn-like region with the turn centered about DNal 7 -Arg 8 . The analogues with hMC3R selectivity showed distinct differences in the spatial arrangement of the Trp 9 side chains. In addition to our NMR studies, we also carried out molecular-level interaction studies of these two peptides at the homology model of hMC3R. Earlier chimeric human melanocortin 3 receptor studies revealed insights regarding the binding and functional sites of hMC3R selectivity. Upon docking of peptides 15 and 17 to the binding pocket of hMC3R, it was revealed that Arg 8 and Trp 9 side chains are involved in a majority of the interactions with the receptor. While Arg 8 forms polar contacts with D154 and D158 of hMC3R, Trp 9 utilizes π-π stacking interactions with F295 and F298, located on the transmembrane domain of hMC3R. It is hypothesized that as the frequency of Trp 9 -hMC3R interactions decrease, antagonistic activity increases. The absence of any interactions of the N-methyl groups with hMC3R suggests that their primary function is to modulate backbone conformations of the ligands.

  7. Specific interactions between DNA and regulatory protein controlled by ligand-binding: Ab initio molecular simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Y.; Murakawa, T.; Shimamura, K.; Oishi, M.; Ohyama, T.; Kurita, N.

    2015-01-01

    The catabolite activator protein (CAP) is one of the regulatory proteins controlling the transcription mechanism of gene. Biochemical experiments elucidated that the complex of CAP with cyclic AMP (cAMP) is indispensable for controlling the mechanism, while previous molecular simulations for the monomer of CAP+cAMP complex revealed the specific interactions between CAP and cAMP. However, the effect of cAMP-binding to CAP on the specific interactions between CAP and DNA is not elucidated at atomic and electronic levels. We here considered the ternary complex of CAP, cAMP and DNA in solvating water molecules and investigated the specific interactions between them at atomic and electronic levels using ab initio molecular simulations based on classical molecular dynamics and ab initio fragment molecular orbital methods. The results highlight the important amino acid residues of CAP for the interactions between CAP and cAMP and between CAP and DNA

  8. Specific interactions between DNA and regulatory protein controlled by ligand-binding: Ab initio molecular simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushita, Y., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp; Murakawa, T., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp; Shimamura, K., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp; Oishi, M., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp; Ohyama, T., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp; Kurita, N., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi, 441-8580 (Japan)

    2015-02-27

    The catabolite activator protein (CAP) is one of the regulatory proteins controlling the transcription mechanism of gene. Biochemical experiments elucidated that the complex of CAP with cyclic AMP (cAMP) is indispensable for controlling the mechanism, while previous molecular simulations for the monomer of CAP+cAMP complex revealed the specific interactions between CAP and cAMP. However, the effect of cAMP-binding to CAP on the specific interactions between CAP and DNA is not elucidated at atomic and electronic levels. We here considered the ternary complex of CAP, cAMP and DNA in solvating water molecules and investigated the specific interactions between them at atomic and electronic levels using ab initio molecular simulations based on classical molecular dynamics and ab initio fragment molecular orbital methods. The results highlight the important amino acid residues of CAP for the interactions between CAP and cAMP and between CAP and DNA.

  9. INTERACTION OF IRON(II MIXED-LIGAND COMPLEXES WITH DNA: BASE-PAIR SPECIFICITY AND THERMAL DENATURATION STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudasir Mudasir

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A research about base-pair specificity of the DNA binding of [Fe(phen3]2+, [Fe(phen2(dip]2+ and [Fe(phen(dip2]2+ complexes and the effect of calf-thymus DNA (ct-DNA binding of these metal complexes on thermal denaturation of ct-DNA has been carried out. This research is intended to evaluate the preferential binding of the complexes to the sequence of DNA (A-T or G-C sequence and to investigate the binding strength and mode upon their interaction with DNA. Base-pair specificity of the DNA binding of the complexes was determined by comparing the equilibrium binding constant (Kb of each complex to polysynthetic DNA that contain only A-T or G-C sequence. The Kb value of the interaction was determined by spectrophotometric titration and thermal denaturation temperature (Tm was determined by monitoring the absorbance of the mixture solution of each complex and ct-DNA at λ =260 nm as temperature was elevated in the range of 25 - 100 oC. Results of the study show that in general all iron(II complexes studied exhibit a base-pair specificity in their DNA binding to prefer the relatively facile A-T sequence as compared to the G-C one. The thermal denaturation experiments have demonstrated that Fe(phen3]2+ and [Fe(phen2(dip]2+ interact weakly with double helical DNA via electrostatic interaction as indicated by insignificant changes in melting temperature, whereas [Fe(phen2(dip]2+  most probably binds to DNA in mixed modes of interaction, i.e.: intercalation and electrostatic interaction. This conclusion is based on the fact that the binding of [Fe(phen2(dip]2+ to ct-DNA moderately increase the Tm value of ct- DNA   Keywords: DNA Binding, mixed-ligand complexes

  10. Sex, Temperament, and Family Context: How the Interaction of Early Factors Differentially Predict Adolescent Alcohol Use and Are Mediated by Proximal Adolescent Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Linnea R.; Armstrong, Jeffrey M.; Goldsmith, H. Hill; Klein, Marjorie H.; Strauman, Timothy J.; Costanzo, Phillip; Essex, Marilyn J.

    2011-01-01

    Adolescent alcohol use is common and has serious immediate and long-term ramifications. While concurrent individual and context factors are robustly associated with adolescent alcohol use, the influence of early childhood factors, particularly in interaction with child sex, are less clear. Using a prospective community sample of 362 (190 girls), this study investigated sex differences in the joint influence of distal childhood and proximal adolescent factors on Grade 10 alcohol use. All risk factors and 2-way early individual-by-context interactions, and interactions of each of these with child sex, were entered into the initial regression. Significant sex interactions prompted the use of separate models for girls and boys. In addition to the identification of early (family socioeconomic status, authoritative parenting style) and proximal adolescent (mental health symptoms, deviant friends) risk factors for both girls and boys, results highlighted important sex differences. In particular, girls with higher alcohol consumption at Grade 10 were distinguished by the interaction of early temperamental disinhibition and exposure to parental stress; boys with higher alcohol consumption at Grade 10 were distinguished primarily by early temperamental negative affect. Results have implications for the timing and type of interventions offered to adolescents. PMID:21443307

  11. Sex, temperament, and family context: how the interaction of early factors differentially predict adolescent alcohol use and are mediated by proximal adolescent factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Linnea R; Armstrong, Jeffrey M; Goldsmith, H Hill; Klein, Marjorie H; Strauman, Timothy J; Costanzo, Phillip; Essex, Marilyn J

    2011-03-01

    Adolescent alcohol use is common and has serious immediate and long-term ramifications. While concurrent individual and context factors are robustly associated with adolescent alcohol use, the influence of early childhood factors, particularly in interaction with child sex, are less clear. Using a prospective community sample of 362 (190 girls), this study investigated sex differences in the joint influence of distal childhood and proximal adolescent factors on Grade 10 alcohol use. All risk factors and two-way early individual-by-context interactions, and interactions of each of these with child sex, were entered into the initial regression. Significant sex interactions prompted the use of separate models for girls and boys. In addition to the identification of early (family socioeconomic status, authoritative parenting style) and proximal adolescent (mental health symptoms, deviant friends) risk factors for both girls and boys, results highlighted important sex differences. In particular, girls with higher alcohol consumption at Grade 10 were distinguished by the interaction of early temperamental disinhibition and exposure to parental stress; boys with higher alcohol consumption at Grade 10 were distinguished primarily by early temperamental negative affect. Results have implications for the timing and type of interventions offered to adolescents.

  12. Molecular Docking Explains Atomic Interaction between Plant-originated Ligands and Oncogenic E7 Protein of High Risk Human Papillomavirus Type 16

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer caused by Human papillomavirus (HPV is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality in women worldwide, particularly in the developing countries. In the last few decades, various compounds from plant origin such as Curcumin, Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, Jaceosidin, Resveratrol etc. have been used as anti cancer therapeutic agents. Different studies have shown these plant-originated compounds are able to suppress HPV infection. The E6 and E7 oncoproteins of high-risk HPV play a key role in HPV related cancers. In this study, we explored these ligands from plants origin against E7 oncoprotein of high risk HPV 16, which is known to inactivate tumor suppressor pRb protein. A robust homology model of HPV 16 E7 was built to foresee the interaction mechanism of E7 oncoprotein with these ligands using structure-based drug designing approach. Docking studies demonstrate the interaction of these ligands with pRb binding site of E7 protein by residues Tyr52, Asn53, Val55, Phe57, Cys59, Ser63, Thr64, Thr72, Arg77, Glu80 and Asp81 and help restoration of pRb functioning. This in silico based atomic interaction between these ligands and E7 protein may assist in validating the plant-originated ligands as effective drugs against HPV.

  13. A BRET assay for monitoring insulin receptor interactions and ligand pharmacology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahin, Nikolaj; Sanni, Samra J; Slaaby, Rita

    2012-01-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) belongs to the receptor tyrosine kinase super family and plays an important role in glucose homeostasis. The receptor interacts with several large docking proteins that mediate signaling from the receptor, including the insulin receptor substrate (IRS) family and Src...... for monitoring the interactions between the IR and its substrates. Furthermore, the insulin analogue X10 was characterized in the BRET2 assay and was found to be 10 times more potent with respect to IRS1, IRS4 and Shc recruitment compared to human insulin. This study demonstrates that the BRET2 technique can...

  14. Macromolecular Competition Titration Method: Accessing Thermodynamics of the Unmodified Macromolecule–Ligand Interactions Through Spectroscopic Titrations of Fluorescent Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujalowski, Wlodzimierz; Jezewska, Maria J.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of thermodynamically rigorous binding isotherms provides fundamental information about the energetics of the ligand–macromolecule interactions and often an invaluable insight about the structure of the formed complexes. The Macromolecular Competition Titration (MCT) method enables one to quantitatively obtain interaction parameters of protein–nucleic acid interactions, which may not be available by other methods, particularly for the unmodified long polymer lattices and specific nucleic acid substrates, if the binding is not accompanied by adequate spectroscopic signal changes. The method can be applied using different fluorescent nucleic acids or fluorophores, although the etheno-derivatives of nucleic acid are especially suitable as they are relatively easy to prepare, have significant blue fluorescence, their excitation band lies far from the protein absorption spectrum, and the modification eliminates the possibility of base pairing with other nucleic acids. The MCT method is not limited to the specific size of the reference nucleic acid. Particularly, a simple analysis of the competition titration experiments is described in which the fluorescent, short fragment of nucleic acid, spanning the exact site-size of the protein–nucleic acid complex, and binding with only a 1:1 stoichiometry to the protein, is used as a reference macromolecule. Although the MCT method is predominantly discussed as applied to studying protein–nucleic acid interactions, it can generally be applied to any ligand–macromolecule system by monitoring the association reaction using the spectroscopic signal originating from the reference macromolecule in the presence of the competing macromolecule, whose interaction parameters with the ligand are to be determined. PMID:21195223

  15. Long chain fatty acids alter the interactive binding of ligands to the two principal drug binding sites of human serum albumin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keishi Yamasaki

    Full Text Available A wide variety of drugs bind to human serum albumin (HSA at its two principal sites, namely site I and site II. A number of reports indicate that drug binding to these two binding sites are not completely independent, and that interactions between ligands of these two discrete sites can play a role. In this study, the effect of the binding of long-chain fatty acids on the interactive binding between dansyl-L-asparagine (DNSA; site I ligand and ibuprofen (site II ligand at pH6.5 was examined. Binding experiments showed that the binding of sodium oleate (Ole to HSA induces conformational changes in the molecule, which, in turn, changes the individual binding of DNSA and ibuprofen, as well as the mode of interaction between these two ligands from a 'competitive-like' allosteric interaction in the case of the defatted HSA conformer to a 'nearly independent' binding in the case of non-defatted HSA conformer. Circular dichroism measurements indicated that ibuprofen and Ole are likely to modify the spatial orientation of DNSA at its binding site. Docking simulations suggest that the long-distance electric repulsion between DNSA and ibuprofen on defatted HSA contributes to a 'competitive-like' allosteric interaction, whereas extending the distance between ligands and/or increasing the flexibility or size of the DNSA binding site in fatted HSA evokes a change in the interaction mode to 'nearly independent' binding. The present findings provide further insights into the structural dynamics of HSA upon the binding of fatty acids, and its effects on drug binding and drug-drug interactions that occur on HSA.

  16. Aromatic interactions impact ligand binding and function at serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptors: receptor homology modelling, ligand docking, and molecular dynamics results validated by experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova-Sintjago, Tania; Villa, Nancy; Fang, Lijuan; Booth, Raymond G.

    2014-02-01

    The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) 5-HT2 G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family consists of types 2A, 2B, and 2C that share ∼75% transmembrane (TM) sequence identity. Agonists for 5-HT2C receptors are under development for psychoses; whereas, at 5-HT2A receptors, antipsychotic effects are associated with antagonists - in fact, 5-HT2A agonists can cause hallucinations and 5-HT2B agonists cause cardiotoxicity. It is known that 5-HT2A TM6 residues W6.48, F6.51, and F6.52 impact ligand binding and function; however, ligand interactions with these residues at the 5-HT2C receptor have not been reported. To predict and validate molecular determinants for 5-HT2C-specific activation, results from receptor homology modelling, ligand docking, and molecular dynamics simulation studies were compared with experimental results for ligand binding and function at wild type and W6.48A, F6.51A, and F6.52A point-mutated 5-HT2C receptors.

  17. Specificity and affinity motifs for Grb2 SH2-ligand interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, Helmut W. H. G.; Ward, Alister C.; Schumacher, Ton N. M.

    2002-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are often mediated by the recognition of short continuous amino acid stretches on target proteins by specific binding domains. Affinity-based selection strategies have successfully been used to define recognition motifs for a large series of such protein domains.

  18. Structure of uracil-DNA glycosylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: insights into interactions with ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushal, Prem Singh; Talawar, Ramappa K.; Varshney, Umesh; Vijayan, M.

    2010-01-01

    The molecule of uracil-DNA glycosylase from M. tuberculosis exhibits domain motion on binding to DNA or a proteinaceous inhibitor. The highly conserved DNA-binding region interacts with a citrate ion in the structure. Uracil N-glycosylase (Ung) is the most thoroughly studied of the group of uracil DNA-glycosylase (UDG) enzymes that catalyse the first step in the uracil excision-repair pathway. The overall structure of the enzyme from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is essentially the same as that of the enzyme from other sources. However, differences exist in the N- and C-terminal stretches and some catalytic loops. Comparison with appropriate structures indicate that the two-domain enzyme closes slightly when binding to DNA, while it opens slightly when binding to the proteinaceous inhibitor Ugi. The structural changes in the catalytic loops on complexation reflect the special features of their structure in the mycobacterial protein. A comparative analysis of available sequences of the enzyme from different sources indicates high conservation of amino-acid residues in the catalytic loops. The uracil-binding pocket in the structure is occupied by a citrate ion. The interactions of the citrate ion with the protein mimic those of uracil, in addition to providing insights into other possible interactions that inhibitors could be involved in

  19. Positive Modulatory Interactions of NMDA Receptor GluN1/2B Ligand Binding Domains Attenuate Antagonists Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Bledsoe

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available N-methyl D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR play crucial role in normal brain function and pathogenesis of neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Functional tetra-heteromeric NMDAR contains two obligatory GluN1 subunits and two identical or different non-GluN1 subunits that include six different gene products; four GluN2 (A–D and two GluN3 (A–B subunits. The heterogeneity of subunit combination facilities the distinct function of NMDARs. All GluN subunits contain an extracellular N-terminal Domain (NTD and ligand binding domain (LBD, transmembrane domain (TMD and an intracellular C-terminal domain (CTD. Interaction between the GluN1 and co-assembling GluN2/3 subunits through the LBD has been proven crucial for defining receptor deactivation mechanisms that are unique for each combination of NMDAR. Modulating the LBD interactions has great therapeutic potential. In the present work, by amino acid point mutations and electrophysiology techniques, we have studied the role of LBD interactions in determining the effect of well-characterized pharmacological agents including agonists, competitive antagonists, and allosteric modulators. The results reveal that agonists (glycine and glutamate potency was altered based on mutant amino acid sidechain chemistry and/or mutation site. Most antagonists inhibited mutant receptors with higher potency; interestingly, clinically used NMDAR channel blocker memantine was about three-fold more potent on mutated receptors (N521A, N521D, and K531A than wild type receptors. These results provide novel insights on the clinical pharmacology of memantine, which is used for the treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. In addition, these findings demonstrate the central role of LBD interactions that can be exploited to develop novel NMDAR based therapeutics.

  20. A Statistical Thermodynamic Model for Ligands Interacting With Ion Channels: Theoretical Model and Experimental Validation of the KCNQ2 Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Bai

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels are important therapeutic targets, and their pharmacology is becoming increasingly important. However, knowledge of the mechanism of interaction of the activators and ion channels is still limited due to the complexity of the mechanisms. A statistical thermodynamic model has been developed in this study to characterize the cooperative binding of activators to ion channels. By fitting experimental concentration-response data, the model gives eight parameters for revealing the mechanism of an activator potentiating an ion channel, i.e., the binding affinity (KA, the binding cooperative coefficients for two to four activator molecules interacting with one channel (γ, μ, and ν, and the channel conductance coefficients for four activator binding configurations of the channel (a, b, c, and d. Values for the model parameters and the mechanism underlying the interaction of ztz240, a proven KCNQ2 activator, with the wild-type channel have been obtained and revealed by fitting the concentration-response data of this activator potentiating the outward current amplitudes of KCNQ2. With these parameters, our model predicted an unexpected bi-sigmoid concentration-response curve of ztz240 activation of the WT-F137A mutant heteromeric channel that was in good agreement with the experimental data determined in parallel in this study, lending credence to the assumptions on which the model is based and to the model itself. Our model can provide a better fit to the measured data than the Hill equation and estimates the binding affinity, as well as the cooperative coefficients for the binding of activators and conductance coefficients for binding states, which validates its use in studying ligand-channel interaction mechanisms.

  1. A ligand peptide motif selected from a cancer patient is a receptor-interacting site within human interleukin-11.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Cardó-Vila

    Full Text Available Interleukin-11 (IL-11 is a pleiotropic cytokine approved by the FDA against chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. From a combinatorial selection in a cancer patient, we isolated an IL-11-like peptide mapping to domain I of the IL-11 (sequence CGRRAGGSC. Although this motif has ligand attributes, it is not within the previously characterized interacting sites. Here we design and validate in-tandem binding assays, site-directed mutagenesis and NMR spectroscopy to show (i the peptide mimics a receptor-binding site within IL-11, (ii the binding of CGRRAGGSC to the IL-11R alpha is functionally relevant, (iii Arg4 and Ser8 are the key residues mediating the interaction, and (iv the IL-11-like motif induces cell proliferation through STAT3 activation. These structural and functional results uncover an as yet unrecognized receptor-binding site in human IL-11. Given that IL-11R alpha has been proposed as a target in human cancer, our results provide clues for the rational design of targeted drugs.

  2. 5f state interaction with inner coordination sphere ligands: einsteinium 3+ ion fluorescence in aqueous and organic phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitz, J.V.; Wester, D.W.; Williams, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    The interaction between 5f electron states of einsteinium 3+ ion and coordinated ligands in solution has been probed using laser-induced fluorescence. Aquo einsteinium 3+ ion was observed to fluoresce from its first excited J = 5 state in a broad-band peaking at 9260 wavenumbers. The observed fluorescence lifetimes were 1.05 microseconds and 2.78 microseconds in H 2 O and D 2 O (99+ % D atom), respectively. The non-radiative decay rates derived from the lifetime data are compared with previously reported data for Cm, Sm, Eu, Tb, and Dy aquo 3+ ions. The 5f actinide states exhibit substantially greater non-radiative decay rates than do lanthanide 4f states of similar energy gap. This provides evidence that actinide 5f electrons interact more strongly with their inner coordination sphere than do lanthanide ion 4f electrons. The fluorescence lifetime of einsteinium 3+ ion complexed with 1 formal di(2-ethylhexyl)orthophosphoric acid in h-heptane was 2.34 microseconds. 3 figures, 1 table

  3. Flt3 ligand-receptor interaction is important for maintenance of early thymic progenitor numbers in steady-state thymopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenins, Linda; Gill, Jason W; Holländer, Georg A; Wodnar-Filipowicz, Aleksandra

    2010-01-01

    T-cell production throughout life depends on efficient colonization and intrathymic expansion of BM-derived hematopoietic precursors. After irradiation-induced thymic damage, thymic recovery is facilitated by Flt3 ligand (FL), expressed by perivascular fibroblasts surrounding the thymic entry site of Flt3 receptor-positive progenitor cells. Whether intrathymic FL-Flt3 interactions play a role in steady-state replenishment of T cells remains unknown. Here, using competitive BM transplantation studies and fetal thymic organ cultures we demonstrated the continued numerical advantage of Flt3+ intrathymic T-cell precursors. Sub-kidney capsule thymic transplantation experiments, in which WT and FL-/- thymic lobes were grafted into FL-/- recipients, revealed that FL expression by the thymic microenvironment plays a role in steady-state thymopoiesis. The deficiency of the most immature thymic T-cell precursors correlated to upregulation of FL by thymic MTS15+ fibroblasts, suggesting that the number of Flt3+ progenitor cells may regulate the thymic expression of this cytokine. Together, these results show that FL expression by thymic stromal fibroblasts interacting with Flt3+ T-cell progenitors is important for the physiological maintenance of early T-cell development.

  4. Peptide–polymer ligands for a tandem WW-domain, an adaptive multivalent protein–protein interaction: lessons on the thermodynamic fitness of flexible ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Koschek

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Three polymers, poly(N-(2-hydroxypropylmethacrylamide (pHPMA, hyperbranched polyglycerol (hPG, and dextran were investigated as carriers for multivalent ligands targeting the adaptive tandem WW-domain of formin-binding protein (FBP21. Polymer carriers were conjugated with 3–9 copies of the proline-rich decapeptide GPPPRGPPPR-NH2 (P1. Binding of the obtained peptide–polymer conjugates to the tandem WW-domain was investigated employing isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC to determine the binding affinity, the enthalpic and entropic contributions to free binding energy, and the stoichiometry of binding for all peptide–polymer conjugates. Binding affinities of all multivalent ligands were in the µM range, strongly amplified compared to the monovalent ligand P1 with a KD > 1 mM. In addition, concise differences were observed, pHPMA and hPG carriers showed moderate affinity and bound 2.3–2.8 peptides per protein binding site resulting in the formation of aggregates. Dextran-based conjugates displayed affinities down to 1.2 µM, forming complexes with low stoichiometry, and no precipitation. Experimental results were compared with parameters obtained from molecular dynamics simulations in order to understand the observed differences between the three carrier materials. In summary, the more rigid and condensed peptide–polymer conjugates based on the dextran scaffold seem to be superior to induce multivalent binding and to increase affinity, while the more flexible and dendritic polymers, pHPMA and hPG are suitable to induce crosslinking upon binding.

  5. How to awaken your nanomachines: Site-specific activation of focal adhesion kinases through ligand interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Walkiewicz, Katarzyna Wiktoria

    2015-06-17

    The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the related protein-tyrosine kinase 2-beta (Pyk2) are highly versatile multidomain scaffolds central to cell adhesion, migration, and survival. Due to their key role in cancer metastasis, understanding and inhibiting their functions are important for the development of targeted therapy. Because FAK and Pyk2 are involved in many different cellular functions, designing drugs with partial and function-specific inhibitory effects would be desirable. Here, we summarise recent progress in understanding the structural mechanism of how the tug-of-war between intramolecular and intermolecular interactions allows these protein ‘nanomachines’ to become activated in a site-specific manner.

  6. Role of Carboxylate ligands in the Synthesis of AuNPs: Size Control, Molecular Interaction and Catalytic Activity

    KAUST Repository

    Aljohani, Hind Abdullah

    2016-05-22

    low temperature. The structure of the citrate layer on the AuNP surface may be a key factor in gaining a more detailed understanding of nanoparticle formation and stabilization. This can be affecting the catalytic activity. These thoughts invited us to systematically examine the role of sodium citrate as a stabilizer of gold nanoparticles, which is the main theme of this thesis. This research is focused on three main objectives, controlling the size of the gold nanoparticles based on citrate (and other carboxylate ligands Trisodium citrate dihydrate, Isocitric Acid, Citric acid, Trimesic acid, Succinic Acid, Phthalic acid, Disodium glutarate, Tartaric Acid, Sodium acetate, Acetic Acid and Formic Acid by varying the concentration of Gold/sodium citrate, investigating the interaction of the citrate layer on the AuNP surface, and testing the activity of the Au/TiO2 catalysts for the oxidation of carbon monoxide. This thesis will be divided into five chapters. In Chapter 1, a general literature study on the various applications and methods of synthesis of Au nanoparticles is described. Then we present the main synthetic pathways of Au nanoparticles we selected. A part of the bibliographic study was given to the use of Au nanoparticles in catalysis. In Chapter 2, we give a brief description of the different experimental procedures and characterization techniques utilized over the course of the present work. The study of the size control and the interaction between gold nanoparticles and the stabilizer (carboxylate groups) was achieved by using various characterization techniques such as UV-visible spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Nuclear Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). In Chapter 3, we discuss the synthesis and size control of Au nanoparticles by following the growth of these nanoparticles by UV-Visible spectroscopy and TEM. We

  7. Alignment of SWNTs by protein-ligand interaction of functionalized magnetic particles under low magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Tae Jung; Park, Jong Pil; Lee, Seok Jae; Jung, Dae-Hwan; Ko, Young Koan; Jung, Hee-Tae; Lee, Sang Yup

    2011-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted considerable attention for applications using their superior mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. A simple method to controllably align single-walled CNTs (SWNTs) by using magnetic particles embedded with superparamagnetic iron oxide as an accelerator under the magnetic field was developed. The functionalization of SWNTs using biotin, interacted with streptavidin-coupled magnetic particles (micro-to-nano in diameter), and layer-by-layer assembly were performed for the alignment of a particular direction onto the clean silicon and the gold substrate at very low magnetic forces (0.02-0.89 T) at room temperature. The successful alignment of the SWNTs with multi-layer film was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). By changing the orientation and location of the substrates, crossed-networks of SWNTs-magnetic particle complex could easily be fabricated. We suggest that this approach, which consists of a combination of biological interaction among streptavidin-biotin and magnetite particles, should be useful for lateral orientation of individual SWNTs with controllable direction.

  8. How to awaken your nanomachines: Site-specific activation of focal adhesion kinases through ligand interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkiewicz, Katarzyna W; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Arold, Stefan T

    2015-10-01

    The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the related protein-tyrosine kinase 2-beta (Pyk2) are highly versatile multidomain scaffolds central to cell adhesion, migration, and survival. Due to their key role in cancer metastasis, understanding and inhibiting their functions are important for the development of targeted therapy. Because FAK and Pyk2 are involved in many different cellular functions, designing drugs with partial and function-specific inhibitory effects would be desirable. Here, we summarise recent progress in understanding the structural mechanism of how the tug-of-war between intramolecular and intermolecular interactions allows these protein 'nanomachines' to become activated in a site-specific manner. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. High pressure as a tool for investigating protein-ligand interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchal, S; Lange, R; Tortora, P; Balny, C

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, the application of pressure on biological systems has gained increasing interest. Pressure-induced destabilization of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions is currently exploited to study conformational protein stability and macromolecular assemblies of proteins. Due to links between severe human pathologies and ordered protein oligomerization into aggregates, which have become apparent, a better knowledge of the molecular and structural determinants that ensure the packing efficiency and stability of such complexes has taken on special importance. Here, we report the effect of pressure on the property of human ataxin-3 of aggregation. The results indicate the importance of its polyglutamine chain length in the stability and the tendency of the protein to form spheroids. Partial unfolding of the protein leading to solvent exposure of hydrophobic domains appears to be a prerequisite in the aggregation process of ataxin-3

  10. Synthesis, characterization, DNA/protein interaction and cytotoxicity studies of Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes derived from dipyridyl triazole ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Yao, Di; Wei, Yi; Tang, Jie; Bian, He-Dong; Huang, Fu-Ping; Liang, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Four different transition metal complexes containing dipyridyl triazole ligands, namely [Cu(abpt)2Cl2]·2H2O (1), [Cu(abpt)2(ClO4)2] (2), [Co2(abpt)2(H2O)2Cl2]·Cl2·4H2O (3) and [Co2(Hbpt)2(CH3OH)2(NO3)2] (4) have been designed, synthesized and further structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography, ESI-MS, elemental analysis, IR and Raman spectroscopy. In these complexes, the both ligands act as bidentate ligands with N, N donors. DNA binding interactions with calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) of the ligand and its complexes 1 ~ 4 were investigated via electronic absorption, fluorescence quenching, circular dichroism and viscosity measurements as well as confocal Laser Raman spectroscopy. The results show these complexes are able to bind to DNA via the non-covalent mode i.e. intercalation and groove binding or electrostatic interactions. The interactions with bovine serum albumin (BSA) were also studied using UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopic methods which indicated that fluorescence quenching of BSA by these compounds was the presence of both static and dynamic quenching. Moreover, the in vitro cytotoxic effects of the complexes against four cell lines SK-OV-3, HL-7702, BEL7404 and NCI-H460 showed the necessity of the coordination action on the biological properties on the respective complex and that all four complexes exhibited substantial cytotoxic activity.

  11. A high pressure study of calmodulin-ligand interactions using small-angle X-ray and elastic incoherent neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinar, Süleyman; Al-Ayoubi, Samy; Sternemann, Christian; Peters, Judith; Winter, Roland; Czeslik, Claus

    2018-01-31

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a Ca 2+ sensor and mediates Ca 2+ signaling through binding of numerous target ligands. The binding of ligands by Ca 2+ -saturated CaM (holo-CaM) is governed by attractive hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions that are weakened under high pressure in aqueous solutions. Moreover, the potential formation of void volumes upon ligand binding creates a further source of pressure sensitivity. Hence, high pressure is a suitable thermodynamic variable to probe protein-ligand interactions. In this study, we compare the binding of two different ligands to holo-CaM as a function of pressure by using X-ray and neutron scattering techniques. The two ligands are the farnesylated hypervariable region (HVR) of the K-Ras4B protein, which is a natural binding partner of holo-CaM, and the antagonist trifluoperazine (TFP), which is known to inhibit holo-CaM activity. From small-angle X-ray scattering experiments performed up to 3000 bar, we observe a pressure-induced partial unfolding of the free holo-CaM in the absence of ligands, where the two lobes of the dumbbell-shaped protein are slightly swelled. In contrast, upon binding TFP, holo-CaM forms a closed globular conformation, which is pressure stable at least up to 3000 bar. The HVR of K-Ras4B shows a different binding behavior, and the data suggest the dissociation of the holo-CaM/HVR complex under high pressure, probably due to a less dense protein contact of the HVR as compared to TFP. The elastic incoherent neutron scattering experiments corroborate these findings. Below 2000 bar, pressure induces enhanced atomic fluctuations in both holo-CaM/ligand complexes, but those of the holo-CaM/HVR complex seem to be larger. Thus, the inhibition of holo-CaM by TFP is supported by a low-volume ligand binding, albeit this is not associated with a rigidification of the complex structure on the sub-ns Å-scale.

  12. Cancer exosomes and NKG2D receptor-ligand interactions: impairing NKG2D-mediated cytotoxicity and anti-tumour immune surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia; Baranov, Vladimir

    2014-10-01

    Human cancers constitutively produce and release endosome-derived nanometer-sized vesicles called exosomes that carry biologically active proteins, messenger and micro RNAs and serve as vehicles of intercellular communication. The tumour exosomes are present in the blood, urine and various malignant effusions such as peritoneal and pleural fluid of cancer patients and can modulate immune cells and responses thus deranging the immune system of cancer patients and giving advantage to the cancer to establish and spread itself. Here, the role of exosomes in the NKG2D receptor-ligand system's interactions is discussed. The activating NK cell receptor NKG2D and its multiple ligands, the MHC class I-related chain (MIC) A/B and the retinoic acid transcript-1/UL-16 binding proteins (RAET1/ULBP) 1-6 comprise a powerful stress-inducible danger detector system that targets infected, inflamed and malignantly transformed cells and plays a decisive role in anti-tumour immune surveillance. Mounting evidence reveals that the MIC- and RAET1/ULBP ligand family members are enriched in the endosomal compartment of various tumour cells and expressed and released into the intercellular space and bodily fluids on exosomes thus preserving their entire molecule, three-dimensional protein structure and biologic activity. The NKG2D ligand-expressing exosomes serve as decoys with a powerful ability to down regulate the cognate receptor and impair the cytotoxic function of NK-, NKT-, gamma/delta- and cytotoxic T cells. This review summarizes recent findings concerning the role of NKG2D receptor-ligand system in cancer with emphasis on regulation of NKG2D ligand expression and the immunosuppressive role of exosomally expressed NKG2D ligands. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Short Intramolecular N–H⋯C(carbonyl Interactions in Mixed-Ligand Molybdenum Hexacarbonyl Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew G. Budge

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The syntheses and single-crystal structures of Mo(CO3(phen(dipy (1, Mo(CO3(biquin(dipy (2 and Mo(CO3(dpme(dipy (3, (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, C12H8N2; dipy = 2,2'-dipyridylamine, C10H9N3; biquin = 2,2'-biquinoline, C18H12N2; dpme = 2,2'-dipyridylmethane, C11H10N2 are described. In each case, distorted fac-MoC3N3 octahedral coordination geometries arise for the metal atoms. Short intramolecular N–H…C interactions from the dipy N–H group to a carbonyl carbon atom occur in each structure. Crystal data: 1 (C25H17MoN5O3, Mr = 531.38, monoclinic, P21/n (No. 14, Z = 4, a = 11.0965 (5 Å, b = 13.0586 (6 Å, c = 16.6138 (8 Å, b = 108.324 (1°, V = 2285.31 (18 Å3, R(F = 0.035, wR(F2 = 0.070. 2 (C31H21MoN5O3, Mr = 607.47, monoclinic, P21/n (No. 14, Z = 4, a = 11.4788 (6 Å, b = 19.073 (1 Å, c = 11.9881 (6 Å, b = 95.179 (1°, V = 2613.9 (2 Å3, R(F = 0.030, wR(F2 = 0.076. 3 (C24H19MoN5O3, Mr = 521.38, monoclinic, P21/n (No. 14, Z = 4, a = 8.4222 (3 Å, b = 21.5966 (9 Å, c = 12.5011 (5 Å, b = 94.065 (1°, V = 2268.12 (15 Å3, R(F = 0.025, wR(F2 = 0.065.

  14. Photo-cross-linked small-molecule microarrays as chemical genomic tools for dissecting protein-ligand interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanoh, Naoki; Asami, Aya; Kawatani, Makoto; Honda, Kaori; Kumashiro, Saori; Takayama, Hiroshi; Simizu, Siro; Amemiya, Tomoyuki; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Hatakeyama, Satoru; Tsuganezawa, Keiko; Utata, Rei; Tanaka, Akiko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Tashiro, Hideo; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2006-12-18

    We have developed a unique photo-cross-linking approach for immobilizing a variety of small molecules in a functional-group-independent manner. Our approach depends on the reactivity of the carbene species generated from trifluoromethylaryldiazirine upon UV irradiation. It was demonstrated in model experiments that the photogenerated carbenes were able to react with every small molecule tested, and they produced multiple conjugates in most cases. It was also found in on-array immobilization experiments that various small molecules were immobilized, and the immobilized small molecules retained their ability to interact with their binding proteins. With this approach, photo-cross-linked microarrays of about 2000 natural products and drugs were constructed. This photo-cross-linked microarray format was found to be useful not merely for ligand screening but also to study the structure-activity relationship, that is, the relationship between the structural motif (or pharmacophore) found in small molecules and its binding affinity toward a protein, by taking advantage of the nonselective nature of the photo-cross-linking process.

  15. Ligand-independent interaction of the type I interferon receptor complex is necessary to observe its biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Christopher D; Digioia, Gina; Izotova, Lara S; Xie, Junxia; Kim, Youngsun; Schwartz, Barbara J; Mirochnitchenko, Olga V; Pestka, Sidney

    2013-10-01

    Ectopic coexpression of the two chains of the Type I and Type III interferon (IFN) receptor complexes (IFN-αR1 and IFN-αR2c, or IFN-λR1 and IL-10R2) yielded sensitivity to IFN-alpha or IFN-lambda in only some cells. We found that IFN-αR1 and IFN-αR2c exhibit FRET only when expressed at equivalent and low levels. Expanded clonal cell lines expressing both IFN-αR1 and IFN-αR2c were sensitive to IFN-alpha only when IFN-αR1 and IFN-αR2c exhibited FRET in the absence of human IFN-alpha. Coexpression of RACK-1 or Jak1 enhanced the affinity of the interaction between IFN-αR1 and IFN-αR2c. Both IFN-αR1 and IFN-αR2c exhibited FRET with Jak1 and Tyk2. Together with data showing that disruption of the preassociation between the IFN-gamma receptor chains inhibited its biological activity, we propose that biologically active IFN receptors require ligand-independent juxtaposition of IFN receptor chains assisted by their associated cytosolic proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. First-principles density functional theory (DFT) study of gold nanorod and its interaction with alkanethiol ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hang; Reven, Linda; Rey, Alejandro

    2013-10-17

    The structure and mechanical properties of gold nanorods and their interactions with alkenthiolate self-assembled monolayers have been determined using a novel first-principle density functional theory simulation approach. The multifaceted, 1-dimensional, octagonal nanorod has alternate Au100 and Au110 surfaces. The structural optimization of the gold nanorods was performed with a mixed basis: the outermost layer of gold atoms used double-ζ plus polarization (DZP), the layer below used double-ζ (DZ), and the inner layers used single-ζ (SZ). The final structure compares favorably with simulations using DZP for all atoms. Phonon dispersion calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) were used to establish the dynamic and thermal stability of the system. From the AIMD simulations it was found that the nanorod system will undergo significant surface reconstruction at 300 K. In addition, when subjected to mechanical stress in the axial direction, the nanorod responds as an orthotropic material, with uniform expansion along the radial direction. The Young's moduli are 207 kbar in the axial direction and 631 kbar in the radial direction. The binding of alkanethiolates, ranging from methanethiol to pentanethiol, caused formation of surface point defects on the Au110 surfaces. On the Au100 surfaces, the defects occurred in the inner layer, creating a small surface island. These defects make positive and negative concavities on the gold nanorod surface, which helps the ligand to achieve a more stable state. The simulation results narrowed significant knowledge gaps on the alkanethiolate adsorption process and on their mutual interactions on gold nanorods. The mechanical characterization offers a new dimension to understand the physical chemistry of these complex nanoparticles.

  17. Epistatic interaction between haplotypes of the ghrelin ligand and receptor genes influence susceptibility to myocardial infarction and coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baessler, Andrea; Fischer, Marcus; Mayer, Bjoern; Koehler, Martina; Wiedmann, Silke; Stark, Klaus; Doering, Angela; Erdmann, Jeanette; Riegger, Guenter; Schunkert, Heribert; Kwitek, Anne E; Hengstenberg, Christian

    2007-04-15

    Data from both experimental models and humans provide evidence that ghrelin and its receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (ghrelin receptor, GHSR), possess a variety of cardiovascular effects. Thus, we hypothesized that genetic variants within the ghrelin system (ligand ghrelin and its receptor GHSR) are associated with susceptibility to myocardial infarction (MI) and coronary artery disease (CAD). Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering the GHSR region as well as eight SNPs across the ghrelin gene (GHRL) region were genotyped in index MI patients (864 Caucasians, 'index MI cases') from the German MI family study and in matched controls without evidence of CAD (864 Caucasians, 'controls', MONICA Augsburg). In addition, siblings of these MI patients with documented severe CAD (826 'affected sibs') were matched likewise with controls (n = 826 Caucasian 'controls') and used for verification. The effect of interactions between genetic variants of both genes of the ghrelin system was explored by conditional classification tree models. We found association of several GHSR SNPs with MI [best SNP odds ratio (OR) 1.7 (1.2-2.5); P = 0.002] using a recessive model. Moreover, we identified a common GHSR haplotype which significantly increases the risk for MI [multivariate adjusted OR for homozygous carriers 1.6 (1.1-2.5) and CAD OR 1.6 (1.1-2.5)]. In contrast, no relationship between genetic variants and the disease could be revealed for GHRL. However, the increase in MI/CAD frequency related to the susceptible GHSR haplotype was abolished when it coincided with a common GHRL haplotype. Multivariate adjustments as well as permutation-based methods conveyed the same results. These data are the first to demonstrate an association of SNPs and haplotypes within important genes of the ghrelin system and the susceptibility to MI, whereas association with MI/CAD could be identified for genetic variants across GHSR, no relationship could be revealed for GHRL

  18. Optimization of proximity ligation assay (PLA) for detection of protein interactions and fusion proteins in non-adherent cells: application to pre-B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debaize, Lydie; Jakobczyk, Hélène; Rio, Anne-Gaëlle; Gandemer, Virginie; Troadec, Marie-Bérengère

    2017-01-01

    Genetic abnormalities, including chromosomal translocations, are described for many hematological malignancies. From the clinical perspective, detection of chromosomal abnormalities is relevant not only for diagnostic and treatment purposes but also for prognostic risk assessment. From the translational research perspective, the identification of fusion proteins and protein interactions has allowed crucial breakthroughs in understanding the pathogenesis of malignancies and consequently major achievements in targeted therapy. We describe the optimization of the Proximity Ligation Assay (PLA) to ascertain the presence of fusion proteins, and protein interactions in non-adherent pre-B cells. PLA is an innovative method of protein-protein colocalization detection by molecular biology that combines the advantages of microscopy with the advantages of molecular biology precision, enabling detection of protein proximity theoretically ranging from 0 to 40 nm. We propose an optimized PLA procedure. We overcome the issue of maintaining non-adherent hematological cells by traditional cytocentrifugation and optimized buffers, by changing incubation times, and modifying washing steps. Further, we provide convincing negative and positive controls, and demonstrate that optimized PLA procedure is sensitive to total protein level. The optimized PLA procedure allows the detection of fusion proteins and protein interactions on non-adherent cells. The optimized PLA procedure described here can be readily applied to various non-adherent hematological cells, from cell lines to patients' cells. The optimized PLA protocol enables detection of fusion proteins and their subcellular expression, and protein interactions in non-adherent cells. Therefore, the optimized PLA protocol provides a new tool that can be adopted in a wide range of applications in the biological field.

  19. Metal-metal bonds involving the f elements. 4. Molecular orbital studies of metal-metal and metal-ligand interactions in dinuclear uranium(V) systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cayton, R.H.; Novo-Gradac, K.J.; Bursten, B.E.

    1991-01-01

    The electronic structures of a series of dinuclear uranium(V) complexes have been investigated using Xα-SW molecular orbital calculations including quasirelativistic corrections. Complexes of the formula U 2 H 10 and U 2 (OH) 10 were used to model the metal-ligand σ and π interactions, respectively, in the known species U 2 (O-i-Pr) 10 . Two basic geometries were investigated: a vertex-sharing bioctahedron with only terminal ligands (D 4h symmetry) and an edge-sharing bioctahedron containing two bridging ligands (D 2h symmetry). The latter geometry, which is that of U 2 (O-i-Pr) 10 , was also examined at U-U bonding and nonbonding distances. The calculations indicate that the U-U interactions are significantly perturbed when H is replaced by OH, owing to strong donation from the OH pπ orbitals into selected U 5f orbitals. The result is a lack of any appreciable U-U interaction for U 2 (OH) 10 in either the D 4h or D 2h geometry. In addition, the overall OH π donation to the U 5f levels is enhanced in the D 2h geometry. The electronic structure of a hypothetical U(V) dimer, Cp 2 U 2 O 4 , was also examined in both bridged and unsupported geometries. The unbridged geometry, like that for U 2 (OH) 10 , suffered from a destabilization of the U-U σ orbital due to ligand π donation and revealed no net U-U bonding. However, the geometry exhibiting two bridging oxo ligands maintains the U-U σ-bonding MO as its lowest energy U 5f orbital. 21 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs

  20. Molecular interactions of agonist and inverse agonist ligands at serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptors: computational ligand docking and molecular dynamics studies validated by experimental mutagenesis results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova-Sintjago, Tania C.; Liu, Yue; Booth, Raymond G.

    2015-02-01

    To understand molecular determinants for ligand activation of the serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), a drug target for obesity and neuropsychiatric disorders, a 5-HT2C homology model was built according to an adrenergic β2 GPCR (β2AR) structure and validated using a 5-HT2B GPCR crystal structure. The models were equilibrated in a simulated phosphatidyl choline membrane for ligand docking and molecular dynamics studies. Ligands included (2S, 4R)-(-)-trans-4-(3'-bromo- and trifluoro-phenyl)-N,N-dimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene-2-amine (3'-Br-PAT and 3'-CF3-PAT), a 5-HT2C agonist and inverse agonist, respectively. Distinct interactions of 3'-Br-PAT and 3'-CF3-PAT at the wild-type (WT) 5-HT2C receptor model were observed and experimental 5-HT2C receptor mutagenesis studies were undertaken to validate the modelling results. For example, the inverse agonist 3'-CF3-PAT docked deeper in the WT 5-HT2C binding pocket and altered the orientation of transmembrane helices (TM) 6 in comparison to the agonist 3'-Br-PAT, suggesting that changes in TM orientation that result from ligand binding impact function. For both PATs, mutation of 5-HT2C residues S3.36, T3.37, and F5.47 to alanine resulted in significantly decreased affinity, as predicted from modelling results. It was concluded that upon PAT binding, 5-HT2C residues T3.37 and F5.47 in TMs 3 and 5, respectively, engage in inter-helical interactions with TMs 4 and 6, respectively. The movement of TMs 5 and 6 upon agonist and inverse agonist ligand binding observed in the 5-HT2C receptor modelling studies was similar to movements reported for the activation and deactivation of the β2AR, suggesting common mechanisms among aminergic neurotransmitter GPCRs.

  1. Synthesis, Characterization, DNA Interaction, and Antitumor Activities of La (III) Complex with Schiff Base Ligand Derived from Kaempferol and Diethylenetriamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Huang, Yu; Zhang, Jin-Sheng; Yang, Xin-Bin

    2014-01-01

    A novel La (III) complex, [LaL(H2O)3]NO3 ·3H2O, with Schiff base ligand L derived from kaempferol and diethylenetriamine, has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-visible, (1)H NMR, thermogravimetric analysis, and molar conductance measurements. The fluorescence spectra, circular dichroism spectra, and viscosity measurements and gel electrophoresis experiments indicated that the ligand L and La (III) complex could bind to CT-DNA presumably via intercalative mode and the La (III) complex showed a stronger ability to bind and cleave DNA than the ligand L alone. The binding constants (K b ) were evaluated from fluorescence data and the values ranged from 0.454 to 0.659 × 10(5) L mol(-1) and 1.71 to 17.3 × 10(5) L mol(-1) for the ligand L and La (III) complex, respectively, in the temperature range of 298-310 K. It was also found that the fluorescence quenching mechanism of EB-DNA by ligand L and La (III) complex was a static quenching process. In comparison to free ligand L, La (III) complex exhibited enhanced cytotoxic activities against tested tumor cell lines HL-60 and HepG-2, which may correlate with the enhanced DNA binding and cleaving abilities of the La (III) complex.

  2. Novel Interactive Data Visualization: Exploration of the ESCAPE Trial (Endovascular Treatment for Small Core and Anterior Circulation Proximal Occlusion With Emphasis on Minimizing CT to Recanalization Times) Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigdan, Matthew; Hill, Michael D; Jagdev, Abhijeet; Kamal, Noreen

    2018-01-01

    The ESCAPE (Endovascular Treatment for Small Core and Anterior Circulation Proximal Occlusion With Emphasis on Minimizing CT to Recanalization Times) randomized clinical trial collected a large diverse data set. However, it is difficult to fully understand the effects of the study on certain patient groups and disease progression. We developed and evaluated an interactive visualization of the ESCAPE trial data. We iteratively designed an interactive visualization using Python's Bokeh software library. The design was evaluated through a user study, which quantitatively evaluated its efficiency and accuracy against traditional modified Rankin Scalegraphic. Qualitative feedback was also evaluated. The novel interactive visualization of the ESCAPE data are publicly available at http://escapevisualization.herokuapp.com/. There was no difference in the efficiency and accuracy when comparing the use of the novel with the traditional visualization. However, users preferred the novel visualization because it allowed for greater exploration. Some insights obtained through exploration of the ESCAPE data are presented. Novel interactive visualizations can be applied to acute stroke trial data to allow for greater exploration of the results. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01778335. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. A PM7 dynamic residue-ligand interactions energy landscape of the BACE1 inhibitory pathway by hydroxyethylamine compounds. Part I: The flap closure process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueto-Tettay, Carlos; Martinez-Consuegra, Alejandro; Zuchniarz, Joshua; Gueto-Tettay, Luis Roberto; Drosos-Ramírez, Juan Carlos

    2017-09-01

    BACE1 is an enzyme of scientific interest because it participates in the progression of Alzheimer's disease. Hydroxyethylamines (HEAs) are a family of compounds which exhibit inhibitory activity toward BACE1 at a nanomolar level, favorable pharmacokinetic properties and oral bioavailability. The first step in the inhibition of BACE1 by HEAs consists of their entrance into the protease active site and the resultant conformational change in the protein, from Apo to closed form. These two conformations differ in the position of an antiparallel loop (called the flap) which covers the entrance to the catalytic site. For BACE1, closure of this flap is vital to its catalytic activity and to inhibition of the enzyme due to the new interactions thereby formed with the ligand. In the present study a dynamic energy landscape of residue-ligand interaction energies (ReLIE) measured for 112 amino acids in the BACE1 active site and its immediate vicinity during the closure of the flap induced by 8 HEAs of different inhibitory power is presented. A total of 6.272 million ReLIE calculations, based on the PM7 semiempirical method, provided a deep and quantitative view of the first step in the inhibition of the aspartyl protease. The information suggests that residues Asp93, Asp289, Thr292, Thr293, Asn294 and Arg296 are anchor points for the ligand, accounting for approximately 45% of the total protein-ligand interaction. Additionally, flap closure improved the BACE1-HEA interaction by around 25%. Furthermore, the inhibitory activity of HEAs could be related to the capacity of these ligands to form said anchor point interactions and maintain them over time: the lack of some of these anchor interactions delayed flap closure or impeded it completely, or even caused the flap to reopen. The methodology employed here could be used as a tool to evaluate future structural modifications which lead to improvements in the favorability and stability of BACE1-HEA ReLIEs, aiding in the design of

  4. PLASS: Protein-ligand affinity statistical score a knowledge-based force-field model of interaction derived from the PDB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozrin, V. D.; Subbotin, M. V.; Nikitin, S. M.

    2004-04-01

    We have developed PLASS (Protein-Ligand Affinity Statistical Score), a pair-wise potential of mean-force for rapid estimation of the binding affinity of a ligand molecule to a protein active site. This scoring function is derived from the frequency of occurrence of atom-type pairs in crystallographic complexes taken from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Statistical distributions are converted into distance-dependent contributions to the Gibbs free interaction energy for 10 atomic types using the Boltzmann hypothesis, with only one adjustable parameter. For a representative set of 72 protein-ligand structures, PLASS scores correlate well with the experimentally measured dissociation constants: a correlation coefficient R of 0.82 and RMS error of 2.0 kcal/mol. Such high accuracy results from our novel treatment of the volume correction term, which takes into account the inhomogeneous properties of the protein-ligand complexes. PLASS is able to rank reliably the affinity of complexes which have as much diversity as in the PDB.

  5. Synthesis, characterization, DNA interaction and antimicrobial screening of isatin-based polypyridyl mixed-ligand Cu(II and Zn(II complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NATARAJAN RAMAN

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Several mixed ligand Cu(II/Zn(II complexes using 3-(phenyl-imino-1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one (obtained by the condensation of isatin and aniline as the primary ligand and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen/2,2’-bipyridine (bpy as an additional ligand were synthesized and characterized analytically and spectroscopically by elemental analyses, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductance measurements, as well as by UV–Vis, IR, NMR and FAB mass spectroscopy. The interaction of the complexes with calf thymus (CT DNA was studied using absorption spectra, cyclic voltammetric and viscosity measurements. They exhibit absorption hypochromicity, and the specific viscosity increased during the binding of the complexes to calf thymus DNA. The shifts in the oxidation–reduction potential and changes in peak current on addition of DNA were shown by CV measurements. The Cu(II/Zn(II complexes were found to promote cleavage of pUC19 DNA from the supercoiled form I to the open circular form II and linear form III. The complexes show enhanced antifungal and antibacterial activities compared with the free ligand.

  6. Functional, non-clonal IgMa-restricted B cell receptor interactions with the HIV-1 envelope gp41 membrane proximal external region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Verkoczy

    Full Text Available The membrane proximal external region (MPER of HIV-1 gp41 has several features that make it an attractive antibody-based vaccine target, but eliciting an effective gp41 MPER-specific protective antibody response remains elusive. One fundamental issue is whether the failure to make gp41 MPER-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies like 2F5 and 4E10 is due to structural constraints with the gp41 MPER, or alternatively, if gp41 MPER epitope-specific B cells are lost to immunological tolerance. An equally important question is how B cells interact with, and respond to, the gp41 MPER epitope, including whether they engage this epitope in a non-canonical manner i.e., by non-paratopic recognition via B cell receptors (BCR. To begin understanding how B cells engage the gp41 MPER, we characterized B cell-gp41 MPER interactions in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Surprisingly, we found that a significant (approximately 7% fraction of splenic B cells from BALB/c, but not C57BL/6 mice, bound the gp41 MPER via their BCRs. This strain-specific binding was concentrated in IgM(hi subsets, including marginal zone and peritoneal B1 B cells, and correlated with enriched fractions (approximately 15% of gp41 MPER-specific IgM secreted by in vitro-activated splenic B cells. Analysis of Igh(a (BALB/c and Igh(b (C57BL/6 congenic mice demonstrated that gp41 MPER binding was controlled by determinants of the Igh(a locus. Mapping of MPER gp41 interactions with IgM(a identified MPER residues distinct from those to which mAb 2F5 binds and demonstrated the requirement of Fc C(H regions. Importantly, gp41 MPER ligation produced detectable BCR-proximal signaling events, suggesting that interactions between gp41 MPER and IgM(a determinants may elicit partial B cell activation. These data suggest that low avidity, non-paratopic interactions between the gp41 MPER and membrane Ig on naïve B cells may interfere with or divert bnAb responses.

  7. Proximity Ligation In situ Assay is a Powerful Tool to Monitor Specific ATG Protein Interactions following Autophagy Induction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Gauthier

    Full Text Available Macroautophagy is a highly regulated intracellular degradation process which has been extensively studied over the last decade. This pathway has been initially described as a non selective process inducing the degradation of parts of the cytoplasm as well as organelles at random. Nevertheless, over the last few years, new research highlighted the existence of a more selective autophagy pathway specifically recruiting some organelles or aggregates to the autophagosomes in order to induce their degradation. These selective autophagy pathways such as aggrephagy, mitophagy, pexophagy or xenophagy, involve the intervention of a cargo, the material to be degraded, cargo adapters, the molecules allowing the recruitment of the cargo to the autophagosome, and the proteins of the ATG8 family which link the cargo adapters to the autophagosome. One of the main questions which now remain is to develop new techniques and protocols able to discriminate between these different types of induced autophagy. In our work, we studied the possibility to use the P-LISA technique, which has been recently developed to study endogenous in vivo protein interactions, as a new technique to characterize the ATG proteins specifically involved in bulk or selective autophagy. In this manuscript, we indeed demonstrate that this technique allows the study of endogenous ATG protein interactions in cells following autophagy induction, but more interestingly that this technique might be used to characterize the ATG proteins involved in selective autophagy.

  8. Spin manipulation and spin-lattice interaction in magnetic colloidal quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Moro, F.; Turyanska, L.; Granwehr, J.; Patane, A.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the spin-lattice interaction and coherent manipulation of electron spins in Mn-doped colloidal PbS quantum dots (QDs) by electron spin resonance. We show that the phase memory time,TM, is limited by Mn-Mn dipolar interactions, hyperfine interactions of the protons (H1) on the QD capping ligands with Mn ions in their proximity (

  9. Self-assembling hydrogels crosslinked solely by receptor-ligand interactions: tunability, rationalization of physical properties, and 3D cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael S; Tsurkan, Mikhail V; Chwalek, Karolina; Bornhauser, Martin; Schlierf, Michael; Werner, Carsten; Zhang, Yixin

    2015-02-16

    We report a novel, noncovalent hydrogel system crosslinked solely by receptor-ligand interactions between biotin and avidin. The simple hydrogel synthesis and functionalization together with the widespread use of biotinylated ligands in biosciences make this versatile system suitable for many applications. The gels possess a range of tunable physical properties, including stiffness, lifetime, and swelling. The erosion rates, unexpectedly fast compared to the kinetic parameters for biotin-avidin, are explored in terms of stretching tensions on the polymers, a concept well-known on the single-molecule level, but largely unexplored in supramolecular systems. As proof of utility, the gels were functionalized with different peptide sequences to control human mesenchymal stromal cell morphology in 3D culture. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Target-specific NMR detection of protein–ligand interactions with antibody-relayed {sup 15}N-group selective STD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetényi, Anasztázia [University of Szeged, Department of Medical Chemistry (Hungary); Hegedűs, Zsófia [University of Szeged, SZTE-MTA Lendület Foldamer Research Group, Institute of Pharmaceutical Analysis Department (Hungary); Fajka-Boja, Roberta; Monostori, Éva [Biological Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Lymphocyte Signal Transduction Laboratory, Institute of Genetics (Hungary); Kövér, Katalin E. [University of Debrecen, Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry (Hungary); Martinek, Tamás A., E-mail: martinek@pharm.u-szeged.hu [University of Szeged, SZTE-MTA Lendület Foldamer Research Group, Institute of Pharmaceutical Analysis Department (Hungary)

    2016-12-15

    Fragment-based drug design has been successfully applied to challenging targets where the detection of the weak protein–ligand interactions is a key element. {sup 1}H saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy is a powerful technique for this work but it requires pure homogeneous proteins as targets. Monoclonal antibody (mAb)-relayed {sup 15}N-GS STD spectroscopy has been developed to resolve the problem of protein mixtures and impure proteins. A {sup 15}N-labelled target-specific mAb is selectively irradiated and the saturation is relayed through the target to the ligand. Tests on the anti-Gal-1 mAb/Gal-1/lactose system showed that the approach is experimentally feasible in a reasonable time frame. This method allows detection and identification of binding molecules directly from a protein mixture in a multicomponent system.

  11. Ion-solvent interactions and the complex behaviour of U(IV) and U(VI) with chloro-ligands in ethanol-water mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.; Duschner, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Born, H.J.

    1975-01-01

    The complex chemical behaviour of U(IV) and U(VI) in amphiprotic solutions, especially in mixtures of solvents, was investigated using ion exchange and solvent extraction methods. The experimental data was used, on the one hand, in order to obtain complexing constants in dependence of ligands and their concentration as well as of the agent and to classify these in a universal scale of ion activities with water as reference point, and on the other hand, to explain the interactions between central atom, ligand and solvating molecule. One aim of these investigations is to understand the basic mechanisms in adjusting the equilibrium between two different phases in the separation chemistry of these elements. (orig./LH) [de

  12. Molecular Characterization of the Interactions between Vascular Selectins and Glycoprotein Ligands on Human Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Abu Samra, Dina Bashir Kamil

    2016-01-01

    The first objective was to fill the knowledge gap in the in vitro characterization of the mechanisms used by selectins to mediate the initial step in the HSPCs homing by developing a real time immunoprecipitation-based assay on a surface plasmon resonance chip. This novel assay bypass the difficulties of purifying ligands, enables the use of natively glycosylated forms of selectin ligands from any model cell of interest and study its binding affinities under flow. We provide the first comprehensive quantitative binding kinetics of two well-documented ligands, CD44 and PSGL-1, with E-selectin. Both ligands bind monomeric E-selectin transiently with fast on- and off-rates while they bind dimeric E-selectin with remarkably slow on- and off-rates with the on-rate, but not the off-rate, is dependent on salt concentration. Thus, suggest a mechanism through which monomeric selectins mediate initial fast-on and -off binding to capture the circulating cells out of shear-flow; subsequently, tight binding by dimeric/oligomeric selectins is enabled to slow rolling significantly. The second objective is to fully identify and characterize E/P-selectin ligand candidates expressed on CD34+ HSPCs which cause enhanced migration after intravenous transplantation compared to their CD34- counterparts. CD34 is widely recognized marker of human HSPCs but its natural ligand and function on these cells remain elusive. Proteomics identified CD34 as an E-selL candidate on human HSPCs, whose binding to E-selectin was confirmed using some static and flow-based assays. E-selectin binds to CD34 with an affinity comparable to the well-described E-selLs CD44/HCELL and PSGL-1. CD34 knockdown resulted in faster-rolling velocities compared to control cells especially at and above three dyne/cm2. CD34 is the first selectin ligand since PSGL-1 reported to bind E-/P-/L-selectins and likely plays a key role in directing the migration of human HSPCs to the bone marrow.

  13. Sensitivity and specificity of in situ proximity ligation for protein interaction analysis in a model of steatohepatitis with Mallory-Denk bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Zatloukal

    Full Text Available The in situ proximity ligation assay (isPLA is an increasingly used technology for in situ detection of protein interactions, post-translational modifications, and spatial relationships of antigens in cells and tissues, in general. In order to test its performance we compared isPLA with immunofluorescence microscopy by analyzing protein interactions in cytoplasmic protein aggregates, so-called Mallory Denk bodies (MDBs. These structures represent protein inclusions in hepatocytes typically found in human steatohepatitis and they can be generated in mice by feeding of 3,5-diethoxy-carbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC. We investigated the colocalization of all three key MDB components, namely keratin 8 (K8, keratin 18 (K18, and p62 (sequestosome 1 by isPLA and immunofluorescence microscopy. Sensitivity and specificity of isPLA was assessed by using Krt8-/- and Krt18-/- mice as biological controls, along with a series of technical controls. isPLA signal visualization is a robust technology with excellent sensitivity and specificity. The biological relevance of signals generated critically depends on the performance of antibodies used, which requires careful testing of antibodies like in immunofluorescence microscopy. There is a clear advantage of isPLA in visualizing protein co-localization, particularly when antigens are present at markedly different concentrations. Furthermore, isPLA is superior to confocal microscopy with respect to spatial resolution of colocalizing antigens. Disadvantages compared to immunofluorescence are increased costs and longer duration of the laboratory protocol.

  14. Platinum(II Complexes with Tetradentate Schiff Bases as Ligands: Synthesis, Characterization and Detection of DNA Interaction by Differential Pulse Voltammetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Five sterically hindered platinum(II complexes with tetradentate schiff bases as ligands, [Pt(L] (L= N,N′-bisalicylidene-1,2-ethylenediamine (L1, N,N′-bisalicylidene-1,2-cyclohexanediamine (L2, N,N′-bis(5-hydroxyl-salicylidene-1,2-cyclohexanediamine (L3, N,N′-bisalicylidene-1,2-diphenyl-ethylenediamine (L4 and N,N′-bis(3-tert-butyl-5-methyl-salicylidene-1,2-diphenylethylenediamine (L5 have been synthesized and characterized by IR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The sterical hindrance of antitumor drug candidates potentially makes them less susceptible to deactivation by sulphur containing proteins and helping to overcome resistance mechanisms. The interaction of these metal complexes with fish sperm single-stranded DNA (ssDNA was studied electrochemically based on the oxidation signals of guanine and adenine. Differential pulse voltammetry was employed to monitor the DNA interaction in solution by using renewable pencil graphite electrode. The results indicate that ligands with different groups can strongly affect the interaction between [Pt(L] complexes and ssDNA due to sterical hindrances and complex [Pt(L1] has the best interaction with DNA among the five complexes.

  15. Study of new interactions of glitazone's stereoisomers and the endogenous ligand 15d-PGJ2 on six different PPAR gamma proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Almazán, Samuel; Bello, Martiniano; Tamay-Cach, Feliciano; Martínez-Archundia, Marlet; Alemán-González-Duhart, Diana; Correa-Basurto, José; Mendieta-Wejebe, Jessica Elena

    2017-10-15

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia. Glitazones or thiazolidinediones (TZD) are drugs that act as insulin-sensitizing agents whose molecular target is the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). The euglycemic action of TZD has been linked with the induction of type 4 glucose transporter. However, it has been shown that the effect of TZD depends on the specific stereoisomer that interacts with PPARγ. Therefore, this work is focused on exploring the interactions and geometry adopted by glitazone's stereoisomers and one endogenous ligand on different conformations of the six crystals of the PPARγ protein using molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations accompanied by the MMGBSA approach. Specifically, the 2,4-thiazolidinedione ring, pioglitazone (PIO), rosiglitazone (ROSI) and troglitazone (TRO) stereoisomers (exogenous ligands), as well as the endogenous ligand 15d-PGJ2, were evaluated. The six crystallographic structures of PPARγ are available at Protein Data Bank as the PDB entries 2PRG, 4PRG, 3T03, 1I7I, 1FM6, and 4EMA. According to the results, a boomerang shape and a particular location of ligands were found with low variations according to the protein conformations. The 15d-PGJ2, TZD, PIO, ROSI and (S,S)-TRO enantiomers were mostly stabilized by twenty hydrophobic residues: Phe226, Pro227, Leu228, Ile281, Phe282, Cys285, Ala292, Ile296, Ile326, Tyr327, Met329, Leu330, Leu333, Met334, Val339, Ile341, Met348, Leu353, Phe363 and Met364. Most hydrogen bond interactions were found between the polar groups of ligands with Arg288, Ser289, Lys367, Gln286, His323, Glu343 and His449 residues. An energetic analysis revealed binding free energy trends that supported known experimental findings of other authors describing better binding properties for PIO, ROSI and (S,S)-TRO than for 15d-PGJ2 and the TZD ring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A series of Cd(II) complexes with π-π stacking and hydrogen bonding interactions: Structural diversities by varying the ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiuli; Zhang Jinxia; Liu Guocheng; Lin Hongyan

    2011-01-01

    Seven new Cd(II) complexes consisting of different phenanthroline derivatives and organic acid ligands, formulated as [Cd(PIP) 2 (dnba) 2 ] (1), [Cd(PIP)(ox)].H 2 O (2), [Cd(PIP)(1,4-bdc)(H 2 O)].4H 2 O (3), [Cd(3-PIP) 2 (H 2 O) 2 ].4H 2 O (4), [Cd 2 (3-PIP) 4 (4,4'-bpdc)(H 2 O) 2 ].5H 2 O (5), [Cd(3-PIP)(nip)(H 2 O)].H 2 O (6), [Cd 2 (TIP) 4 (4,4'-bpdc)(H 2 O) 2 ].3H 2 O (7) (PIP=2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline, 3-PIP=2-(3-pyridyl)imidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline, TIP=2-(2-thienyl)imidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline, Hdnba=3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, H 2 ox=oxalic acid, 1,4-H 2 bdc=benzene-1,4-dicarboxylic acid, 4,4'-H 2 bpdc=biphenyl-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid, H 2 nip=5-nitroisophthalic acid) have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. Complexes 1 and 4 possess mononuclear structures; complexes 5 and 7 are isostructural and have dinuclear structures; complexes 2 and 3 feature 1D chain structures; complex 6 contains 1D double chain, which are further extended to a 3D supramolecular structure by π-π stacking and hydrogen bonding interactions. The N-donor ligands with extended π-system and organic acid ligands play a crucial role in the formation of the final supramolecular frameworks. Moreover, thermal properties and fluorescence of 1-7 are also investigated. -- Graphical abstract: Seven new supramolecular architectures have been successfully isolated under hydrothermal conditions by reactions of different phen derivatives and Cd(II) salts together with organic carboxylate anions auxiliary ligands. Display Omitted Research highlights: → Complexes 1-7 are 0D or 1D polymeric structure, the π-π stacking and H-bonding interactions extend the complexes into 3D supramolecular network. To our knowledge, systematic study on π-π stacking and H-bonding interactions in cadmium(II) complexes are still limited. → The structural differences among the title complexes indicate the importance of N-donor chelating ligands for the creation of molecular

  17. Ligand modeling and design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, B.P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop and implement a molecular design basis for selecting organic ligands that would be used in the cost-effective removal of specific radionuclides from nuclear waste streams. Organic ligands with metal ion specificity are critical components in the development of solvent extraction and ion exchange processes that are highly selective for targeted radionuclides. The traditional approach to the development of such ligands involves lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing, which in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, results in wasted research effort. The author`s approach breaks down and simplifies this costly process with the aid of computer-based molecular modeling techniques. Commercial software for organic molecular modeling is being configured to examine the interactions between organic ligands and metal ions, yielding an inexpensive, commercially or readily available computational tool that can be used to predict the structures and energies of ligand-metal complexes. Users will be able to correlate the large body of existing experimental data on structure, solution binding affinity, and metal ion selectivity to develop structural design criteria. These criteria will provide a basis for selecting ligands that can be implemented in separations technologies through collaboration with other DOE national laboratories and private industry. The initial focus will be to select ether-based ligands that can be applied to the recovery and concentration of the alkali and alkaline earth metal ions including cesium, strontium, and radium.

  18. Cyclophilin B interacts with sodium-potassium ATPase and is required for pump activity in proximal tubule cells of the kidney.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Suñé

    Full Text Available Cyclophilins (Cyps, the intracellular receptors for Cyclosporine A (CsA, are responsible for peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerisation and for chaperoning several membrane proteins. Those functions are inhibited upon CsA binding. Albeit its great benefits as immunosuppressant, the use of CsA has been limited by undesirable nephrotoxic effects, including sodium retention, hypertension, hyperkalemia, interstial fibrosis and progressive renal failure in transplant recipients. In this report, we focused on the identification of novel CypB-interacting proteins to understand the role of CypB in kidney function and, in turn, to gain further insight into the molecular mechanisms of CsA-induced toxicity. By means of yeast two-hybrid screens with human kidney cDNA, we discovered a novel interaction between CypB and the membrane Na/K-ATPase β1 subunit protein (Na/K-β1 that was confirmed by pull-down, co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy, in proximal tubule-derived HK-2 cells. The Na/K-ATPase pump, a key plasma membrane transporter, is responsible for maintenance of electrical Na+ and K+ gradients across the membrane. We showed that CypB silencing produced similar effects on Na/K-ATPase activity than CsA treatment in HK-2 cells. It was also observed an enrichment of both alpha and beta subunits in the ER, what suggested a possible failure on the maturation and routing of the pump from this compartment towards the plasma membrane. These data indicate that CypB through its interaction with Na/K-β1 might regulate maturation and trafficking of the pump through the secretory pathway, offering new insights into the relationship between cyclophilins and the nephrotoxic effects of CsA.

  19. Cyclophilin B interacts with sodium-potassium ATPase and is required for pump activity in proximal tubule cells of the kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suñé, Guillermo; Sarró, Eduard; Puigmulé, Marta; López-Hellín, Joan; Zufferey, Madeleine; Pertel, Thomas; Luban, Jeremy; Meseguer, Anna

    2010-11-10

    Cyclophilins (Cyps), the intracellular receptors for Cyclosporine A (CsA), are responsible for peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerisation and for chaperoning several membrane proteins. Those functions are inhibited upon CsA binding. Albeit its great benefits as immunosuppressant, the use of CsA has been limited by undesirable nephrotoxic effects, including sodium retention, hypertension, hyperkalemia, interstial fibrosis and progressive renal failure in transplant recipients. In this report, we focused on the identification of novel CypB-interacting proteins to understand the role of CypB in kidney function and, in turn, to gain further insight into the molecular mechanisms of CsA-induced toxicity. By means of yeast two-hybrid screens with human kidney cDNA, we discovered a novel interaction between CypB and the membrane Na/K-ATPase β1 subunit protein (Na/K-β1) that was confirmed by pull-down, co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy, in proximal tubule-derived HK-2 cells. The Na/K-ATPase pump, a key plasma membrane transporter, is responsible for maintenance of electrical Na+ and K+ gradients across the membrane. We showed that CypB silencing produced similar effects on Na/K-ATPase activity than CsA treatment in HK-2 cells. It was also observed an enrichment of both alpha and beta subunits in the ER, what suggested a possible failure on the maturation and routing of the pump from this compartment towards the plasma membrane. These data indicate that CypB through its interaction with Na/K-β1 might regulate maturation and trafficking of the pump through the secretory pathway, offering new insights into the relationship between cyclophilins and the nephrotoxic effects of CsA.

  20. Understanding the Selectivity Mechanism of the Human Asialoglycoprotein Receptor (ASGP-R toward Gal- and Man- type Ligands for Predicting Interactions with Exogenous Sugars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emo Chiellini

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A practical approach for addressing the computer simulation of protein-carbohydrate interactions is described here. An articulated computational protocol was setup and validated by checking its ability to predict experimental data, available in theliterature, and concerning the selectivity shown by the Carbohydrate Recognition Domain(CRD of the human asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R toward Gal-type ligands. Somerequired features responsible for the interactions were identified. Subsequently the sameprotocol was applied to monomer sugar molecules that constitute the building blocks foralginates and ulvans. Such sugar polymers may supply a low-cost source of rare sugars witha potential impact on several industrial applications, from pharmaceutical to fine chemicalindustry. An example of their applicative exploitation could be given by their use indeveloping biomaterial with adhesion properties toward hepatocytes, through interactionwith the ASGP-R. Such a receptor has been already proposed as a target for exogenousmolecules, specifically in the case of hepatocytes, for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.The DOCK5.2 program was used to search optimal locations of the above ligands of interestinto CRD binding site and to roughly estimate interaction energies. Finally, the binding ∆G oftheoretical protein-ligand complexes was estimated by using the DelPhi program in which thesolvation free energy is accounted for with a continuum solvent model, by solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The structure analysis of the obtained complexes and their ∆G values suggest that one of the sugar monomers of interest shows the desired characteristics.

  1. Functional glass slides for in vitro evaluation of interactions between osteosarcoma TE85 cells and mineral-binding ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jie; Chen, Julia; Klapperich, Catherine M.; Eng, Vincent; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2004-07-20

    Primary amine-functionalized glass slides obtained through a multi-step plasma treatment were conjugated with anionic amino acids that are frequently found as mineral binding elements in acidic extracellular matrix components of natural bone. The modified glass surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements. Human osteosarcoma TE85 cells were cultured on these functionalized slides and analyses on both protein and gene expression levels were performed to probe the ''biocompatibility'' of the surface ligands. Cell attachment and proliferation on anionic surfaces were either better than or comparable to those of cells cultured on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). The modified glass surfaces promoted the expression of osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase activity and ECM proteins such as fibronectin and vitronectin under differentiation culture conditions. Transcript analysis using gene chip microarrays confirmed that culturing TE85 cells on anionic surfaces did not activate apoptotic pathways. Collectively, these results suggest that the potential mineral-binding anionic ligands examined here do not exert significant adverse effects on the expression of important osteogenic markers of TE85 cells. This work paves the way for the incorporation of these ligands into 3-dimensional artificial bone-like scaffolds.

  2. The Role of Coulomb Interactions for Spin Crossover Behaviors and Crystal Structural Transformation in Novel Anionic Fe(III Complexes from a π-Extended ONO Ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suguru Murata

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the π-extension effect on an unusual negative-charged spin crossover (SCO FeIII complex with a weak N2O4 first coordination sphere, we designed and synthesized a series of anionic FeIII complexes from a π-extended naphthalene derivative ligand. Acetonitrile-solvate tetramethylammonium (TMA salt 1 exhibited an SCO conversion, while acetone-solvate TMA salt 2 was in a high-spin state. The crystal structural analysis for 2 revealed that two-leg ladder-like cation-anion arrays derived from π-stacking interactions between π-ligands of the FeIII complex anion and Coulomb interactions were found and the solvated acetone molecules were in one-dimensional channels between the cation-anion arrays. A desolvation-induced single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation to desolvate compound 2’ may be driven by Coulomb energy gain. Furthermore, the structural comparison between quasi-polymorphic compounds 1 and 2 revealed that the synergy between Coulomb and π-stacking interactions induces a significant distortion of coordination structure of 2.

  3. Two crystal structures of dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase from Cryptosporidium hominis reveal protein–ligand interactions including a structural basis for observed antifolate resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Amy C., E-mail: aca@dartmouth.edu [Dartmouth College, Department of Chemistry, Burke Laboratories, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

    2005-03-01

    An analysis of the protein–ligand interactions in two crystal structures of DHFR-TS from C. hominis reveals a possible structural basis for observed antifolate resistance in C. hominis DHFR. A comparison with the structure of human DHFR reveals residue substitutions that may be exploited for the design of species-selective inhibitors. Cryptosporidium hominis is a protozoan parasite that causes acute gastrointestinal illness. There are no effective therapies for cryptosporidiosis, highlighting the need for new drug-lead discovery. An analysis of the protein–ligand interactions in two crystal structures of dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) from C. hominis, determined at 2.8 and 2.87 Å resolution, reveals that the interactions of residues Ile29, Thr58 and Cys113 in the active site of C. hominis DHFR provide a possible structural basis for the observed antifolate resistance. A comparison with the structure of human DHFR reveals active-site differences that may be exploited for the design of species-selective inhibitors.

  4. Quantum chemical DFT study of the interaction between molecular oxygen and FeN₄ complexes, and effect of the macrocyclic ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Adilson Luís Pereira; de Almeida, Luciano Farias; Marques, Aldaléa Lopes Brandes; Costa, Hawbertt Rocha; Tanaka, Auro Atsushi; da Silva, Albérico Borges Ferreira; de Jesus Gomes Varela, Jaldyr

    2014-03-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) was used to examine the interaction between molecular oxygen (O₂) and macrocyclic iron complexes of the type FeN₄ during the formation of FeN₄--O₂ adducts. In order to understand how this interaction is affected by different macrocyclic ligands, O₂ was bonded to iron-tetraaza[14]annulene (FeTAA), iron-tetramethyl-tetraaza[14]annulene (FeTMTAA), iron-hexamethyl-tetraaza[14]annulene (FeHMTAA), iron dibenzotetraaza[14]annulene (FeDBTAA), and two iron-tetramethyl-dibenzotetraaza[14]annulene complexes (FeTMDBTAA1, FeTMDBTAA2). The ground state for FeN₄-O₂ adducts was the open-shell singlet. Analysis of the factors influencing the O₂ bonding process showed that different macrocyclic ligands yielded adducts with differences in O--O and Fe--O₂ bond lengths, total charge over the O₂ fragment, O--O vibrational frequency, and spin density in the O₂ fragment. A smaller energy gap between the α-HOMO of the FeN₄ complexes and the β-LUMO of O₂ increased the interaction between the complex and the O₂ molecule. The order of activity was FeDBTAA < FeTMDBTAA2 < FeTMDBTAA1 < FeTAA < FeTMTAA < FeHMTAA.

  5. Identification of putative agouti-related protein(87-132)-melanocortin-4 receptor interactions by homology molecular modeling and validation using chimeric peptide ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczynski, Andrzej; Wang, Xiang S; Joseph, Christine G; Xiang, Zhimin; Bauzo, Rayna M; Scott, Joseph W; Sorensen, Nicholas B; Shaw, Amanda M; Millard, William J; Richards, Nigel G; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie

    2004-04-22

    Agouti-related protein (AGRP) is one of only two naturally known antagonists of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) identified to date. Specifically, AGRP antagonizes the brain melanocortin-3 and -4 receptors involved in energy homeostasis. Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) is one of the known endogenous agonists for these melanocortin receptors. Insight into putative interactions between the antagonist AGRP amino acids with the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) may be important for the design of unique ligands for the treatment of obesity related diseases and is currently lacking in the literature. A three-dimensional homology molecular model of the mouse MC4 receptor complex with the hAGRP(87-132) ligand docked into the receptor has been developed to identify putative antagonist ligand-receptor interactions. Key putative AGRP-MC4R interactions include the Arg111 of hAGRP(87-132) interacting in a negatively charged pocket located in a cavity formed by transmembrane spanning (TM) helices 1, 2, 3, and 7, capped by the acidic first extracellular loop (EL1) and specifically with the conserved melanocortin receptor residues mMC4R Glu92 (TM2), mMC4R Asp114 (TM3), and mMC4R Asp118 (TM3). Additionally, Phe112 and Phe113 of hAGRP(87-132) putatively interact with an aromatic hydrophobic pocket formed by the mMC4 receptor residues Phe176 (TM4), Phe193 (TM5), Phe253 (TM6), and Phe254 (TM6). To validate the AGRP-mMC4R model complex presented herein from a ligand perspective, we generated nine chimeric peptide ligands based on a modified antagonist template of the hAGRP(109-118) (Tyr-c[Asp-Arg-Phe-Phe-Asn-Ala-Phe-Dpr]-Tyr-NH(2)). In these chimeric ligands, the antagonist AGRP Arg-Phe-Phe residues were replaced by the melanocortin agonist His/D-Phe-Arg-Trp amino acids. These peptides resulted in agonist activity at the mouse melanocortin receptors (mMC1R and mMC3-5Rs). The most notable results include the identification of a novel subnanomolar melanocortin peptide

  6. Ligand field and intermolecular interactions tuning the magnetic properties of spin-crossover Fe(II) polymer with 4,4′-bipyridine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yang-Hui; Liu, Qing-Ling; Yang, Li-Jing; Ling, Yang; Wang, Wei; Sun, Bai-Wang, E-mail: chmsunbw@seu.edu.cn

    2015-02-15

    A new spin crossover coordination polymer (SCO-CPs) of Fe(II)-4,4′-bipyridine (4,4′-bipy) family: (Fe(4,4′-bipy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2})·(4,4′-bipy)· 8(H{sub 2}O)·2(ClO{sub 4}) (3), which displays half spin transitions between 100 and 300 K, has been synthesized and structurally characterized. Compound 3 featured with two-dimensional (2-D) grids connected by hydrogen bonds and π…π packing between one-dimensional (1-D) chains, the 2-D grids expand to three-dimensional (3-D) architecture supported by a “S-shaped holder” involving lattice 4-4′-bipy, water molecules and perchlorate anion. We compared 3 with the other two analogous complexes: ((Fe(4,4′-bipy) (H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (NCS){sub 2})·4,4′-bipy, 1 and (Fe(4,4′-bipy){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2})·mSolv, 2) through Hirshfeld surfaces analysis, which revealed that the low ligand field strength (NCS{sup −}) and lone-pair…H contacts contribute to the stabilization of HS (high-spin) state of the Fe(II) ion, while the high ligand field strength (4,4′-bipy) and strong intermolecular contacts (hydrogen bonds and π…π packing interactions) make for the LS (low-spin) state. - Highlights: ●A new member of Fe(||)-4,4′-bipy family has been prepared. ●It displays half spin transitions tuned by ligand field and intermolecular interactions. ●We have made a detailed comparison of this new member with two other analogous complexes.

  7. Magnetic interactions in oxide-bridged dichromium(III) complexes. Computational determination of the importance of non-bridging ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsing, Thorbjørn Juul; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Weihe, Høgni

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of the dinuclear chromium(III) complex [(CH3CN)5CrOCr(NCCH3)5](BF4)4 · 2 CH3CN has been measured and analyzed. With a fitted value of the triplet energy J = 650 cm-1, the antiferromagnetic coupling is the strongest hitherto determined for an unsupported linear oxide-br...... relative errors typically of less than 10 % ranging from the strongest coupled systems to systems with moderately strong couplings. A significant influence (>20%) of the chemical nature of the peripheral, non-bridging ligands on the exchange coupling was found and rationalized....

  8. Ranking docking poses by graph matching of protein-ligand interactions: lessons learned from the D3R Grand Challenge 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Figueiredo Celestino Gomes, Priscila; Da Silva, Franck; Bret, Guillaume; Rognan, Didier

    2018-01-01

    A novel docking challenge has been set by the Drug Design Data Resource (D3R) in order to predict the pose and affinity ranking of a set of Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists, prior to the public release of their bound X-ray structures and potencies. In a first phase, 36 agonists were docked to 26 Protein Data Bank (PDB) structures of the FXR receptor, and next rescored using the in-house developed GRIM method. GRIM aligns protein-ligand interaction patterns of docked poses to those of available PDB templates for the target protein, and rescore poses by a graph matching method. In agreement with results obtained during the previous 2015 docking challenge, we clearly show that GRIM rescoring improves the overall quality of top-ranked poses by prioritizing interaction patterns already visited in the PDB. Importantly, this challenge enables us to refine the applicability domain of the method by better defining the conditions of its success. We notably show that rescoring apolar ligands in hydrophobic pockets leads to frequent GRIM failures. In the second phase, 102 FXR agonists were ranked by decreasing affinity according to the Gibbs free energy of the corresponding GRIM-selected poses, computed by the HYDE scoring function. Interestingly, this fast and simple rescoring scheme provided the third most accurate ranking method among 57 contributions. Although the obtained ranking is still unsuitable for hit to lead optimization, the GRIM-HYDE scoring scheme is accurate and fast enough to post-process virtual screening data.

  9. Chronic In Vivo Interaction of Dendritic Cells Expressing the Ligand Rae-1ε with NK Cells Impacts NKG2D Expression and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morvan, Maelig G; Champsaur, Marine; Reizis, Boris; Lanier, Lewis L

    2017-05-01

    To investigate how dendritic cells (DCs) interact with NK cells in vivo, we developed a novel mouse model in which Rae-1ε, a ligand of the NKG2D receptor, is expressed in cells with high levels of CD11c. In these CD11c-Rae1 mice, expression of Rae-1 was confirmed on all subsets of DCs and a small subset of B and T cells, but not on NK cells. DC numbers and activation status were unchanged, and NK cells in these CD11c-Rae1 mice presented the same Ly49 repertoire and maturation levels as their littermate wildtype controls. Early NK cell activation after mouse CMV infection was slightly lower than in wildtype mice, but NK cell expansion and viral control were comparable. Notably, we demonstrate that chronic interaction of NK cells with NKG2D ligand-expressing DCs leads to a reversible NKG2D down-modulation, as well as impaired NKG2D-dependent NK cell functions, including tumor rejection. In addition to generating a useful mouse model, our studies reveal in vivo the functional importance of the NK cell and DC cross-talk.

  10. Effect of pH and uranium concentration on interaction of uranium(VI) and uranium(IV) with organic ligands in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, W.C.; Victor, D.M.; Chakrabarti, C.L.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of pH and uranium concentration on the interactions of uranium(VI) and uranium(IV) with organic ligands was studied by employing dialysis and ultrafiltration techniques. The interactions of U(VI) and U(IV) with organic ligands in nitrate or chloride aqueous solution have been found to be pH-dependent. The stability constants of uranium-organic complexes decrease in the order: fulvic acid>humic acid>tannic acid for U(VI) and humic acid>tannic acid>fulvic acid for U(IV). Scatchard plots for the uranium-organic acid systems indicate two types of binding sites with a difference in stability constants of about 10 2 . Ultrafiltration of uranium-humic acid complexes indicates that U(VI) and U(IV) ions are concentrated in larger molecular size fractions (>5.1 nm) at pH less than or equal to 3 and in smaller molecular size fractions (in the range 5.1 to 3.1 nm and 2.4 to 1.9 nm) at pH greater than or equal to 5. 7 figures, 4 tables

  11. Quantifying the Sigma and Pi interactions between U(V) f orbitals and halide, alkyl, alkoxide, amide and ketimide ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    University of California, Berkeley; Lukens, Wayne W.; Edelstein, Norman M.; Magnani, Nicola; Hayton, Trevor W.; Fortier, Skye; Seaman, Lani A.

    2013-06-20

    f Orbital bonding in actinide and lanthanide complexes is critical to their behavior in a variety of areas from separations to magnetic properties. Octahedral f1 hexahalide complexes have been extensively used to study f orbital bonding due to their simple electronic structure and extensive spectroscopic characterization. The recent expansion of this family to include alkyl, alkoxide, amide, and ketimide ligands presents the opportunity to extend this study to a wider variety of ligands. To better understand f orbital bonding in these complexes, the existing molecular orbital (MO) model was refined to include the effect of covalency on spin orbit coupling in addition to its effect on orbital angular momentum (orbital reduction). The new MO model as well as the existing MO model and the crystal field (CF) model were applied to the octahedral f1 complexes to determine the covalency and strengths of the ? and ? bonds formed by the f orbitals. When covalency is significant, MO models more precisely determined the strengths of the bonds derived from the f orbitals; however, when covalency was small, the CF model was better than either MO model. The covalency determined using the new MO model is in better agreement with both experiment and theory than that predicted by the existing MO model. The results emphasize the role played by the orbital energy in determining the strength and covalency of bonds formed by the f orbitals.

  12. Natural bond orbital analysis of molecular interactions: Theoretical study of W(CO)5 complexes with E(PH3)2 and NHEMe ligands (E=C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Thi Ai Nhung; Huynh Thi Phuong Loan; Duong Tuan Quang; Pham Van Tat

    2014-01-01

    The complexes with ligands carbodiphosphorane-analogues (called tetrylones) [(CO) 5 W-{E(PH 3 ) 2 }] (W5-EP 2 ) and N-heterocyclic carbene-analogues (called tetrylenes) [(CO) 5 W-{NHE Me }] (W5-NHE Me ) when E=C-Pb have been studied using natural bond orbital (NBO) method. The NBO analysis provides a consistent picture of the chemical bonding is two entire families of transition metal complexes of tetrylone and tetrylene ligands in term of donor-acceptor interactions, showing the correlation of these interactions with Wiberg bond indies (WBI), natural partial charges, and the energetically highest lying occupied molecular orbitals for σ and π orbitals of free ligands E(PH 3 ) 2 and NHE Me . Analysis of the bonding situation reveals that in E(PH 3 ) 2 and NHE Me ligands, the energy level of the π orbital rises, whereas that of the σ orbital decreases as atom E becomes heavier. The complexes with head-on-bonded ligands have (CO) 5 W←E donation which comes from the σ-lone-pair orbital of E(PH 3 ) 2 and NHE Me where E=C for tetrylones and E=C, Si, Ge for tetrylenes, whereas the (CO) 5 W←E donation in the side-on bonded complexes when E becomes heavier arises from the π-lone-pair orbital of E(PH 3 ) 2 and NHE Me ligands which is the HOMO of the free ligands. This makes the heavier adducts of tetrylones and tetrylenes become stronger donors than the lighter systems. The NBO analysis suggests that the E(PH 3 ) 2 ligands are strong σ-donors and strong π-acceptors while the NHE Me ligands are strong σ-donors and weak π-acceptors. This is possible for tetrylones that have two lone-pair orbitals available for donation, whereas the tetrylenes have only one lone-pair orbital available for donation. (author)

  13. Room temperature synthesis of PbSe quantum dots in aqueous solution: Stabilization by interactions with ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primera-Pedrozo, Oliva M.; Arslan, Zikri; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2011-01-01

    An aqueous route of synthesis is described for rapid synthesis of lead selenide quantum dots (PbSe QDs) at room temperature in an attempt to produce water-soluble and stable nanocrystals. Several thiol-ligands, including thioglycolic acid (TGA), thioglycerol (TGC), 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA), 2-mercaptoethyleamine hydrochloride (MEA), 6-mercaptohexanoic acid (MHA), and L-cysteine (L-cys), were used for capping/stabilization of PbSe QDs. The effects of the ligands on the stability of PbSe QDs were evaluated for a period of two months at room temperature under normal light conditions and at 4 °C in dark. The TGA- and MEA-capped QDs exhibited the highest stability prior to purification, almost two months when kept in dark at 4 °C. However, the stability of TGA-capped QDs was reduced substantially after purification to about 5 days under same conditions, while MEA-capped QDs did not show any significant instability. The stabilization energies of Pb-thiolate complexes determined by theoretical DFT simulations supported the experimental results. The PbSe QDs capped with TGA, MPA and MEA were successfully purified and re-dispersed in water, while those stabilized with TGC, MHA and L-cys aggregated during purification attempts. The purified PbSe QDs possess very susceptible surface resulting in poor stability for about 30 – 45 min after re-dispersion in water. In the presence of an excess of free ligand, the stability increased up to 5 days for TGA-capped QDs at pH 7.19, 9 –12 days for MPA-capped QDs at pH 7.3–7.5 and 45–47 days for MEA-capped QDs at pH 7.35. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) results showed that the QDs possess a cubic rock salt structure with the most intense peaks located at 2θ = 25.3° (200) and 2θ = 29.2° (100). TEM images showed that the size of the QDs ranges between 5 and 10 nm. ICP-MS results revealed that Pb:Se ratio was 1.26, 1.28, 3.85, 1.18, and 1.31 for the QDs capped with TGA, MPA, MEA, L-Cys, and TGC, respectively. The proposed method

  14. Nifedipine inhibits advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction-mediated proximal tubular cell injury via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Takanori; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Ueda, Seiji; Fukami, Kei; Okuda, Seiya

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells, which was prevented by GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ. → GW9662 treatment alone increased RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells. → Nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced reactive oxygen species generation, NF-κB activation and increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and transforming growth factor-β gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were blocked by GW9662. -- Abstract: There is a growing body of evidence that advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction evokes oxidative stress generation and subsequently elicits inflammatory and fibrogenic reactions, thereby contributing to the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. We have previously found that nifedipine, a calcium-channel blocker (CCB), inhibits the AGE-induced mesangial cell damage in vitro. However, effects of nifedipine on proximal tubular cell injury remain unknown. We examined here whether and how nifedipine blocked the AGE-induced tubular cell damage. Nifedipine, but not amlodipine, a control CCB, inhibited the AGE-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells, which was prevented by the simultaneous treatment of GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ). GW9662 treatment alone was found to increase RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells. Further, nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced reactive oxygen species generation, NF-κB activation and increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and transforming growth factor-beta gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were blocked by GW9662. Our present study provides a unique beneficial aspect of nifedipine on diabetic nephropathy; it could work as an anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory agent against AGEs in tubular cells by suppressing RAGE expression via PPARγ activation.

  15. Nifedipine inhibits advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction-mediated proximal tubular cell injury via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, Takanori [Department of Pathophysiology and Therapeutics of Diabetic Vascular Complications, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Yamagishi, Sho-ichi, E-mail: shoichi@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Department of Pathophysiology and Therapeutics of Diabetic Vascular Complications, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Takeuchi, Masayoshi [Department of Pathophysiological Science, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science, Hokuriku University, Kanazawa (Japan); Ueda, Seiji; Fukami, Kei; Okuda, Seiya [Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan)

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} Nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells, which was prevented by GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}. {yields} GW9662 treatment alone increased RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells. {yields} Nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced reactive oxygen species generation, NF-{kappa}B activation and increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and transforming growth factor-{beta} gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were blocked by GW9662. -- Abstract: There is a growing body of evidence that advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction evokes oxidative stress generation and subsequently elicits inflammatory and fibrogenic reactions, thereby contributing to the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. We have previously found that nifedipine, a calcium-channel blocker (CCB), inhibits the AGE-induced mesangial cell damage in vitro. However, effects of nifedipine on proximal tubular cell injury remain unknown. We examined here whether and how nifedipine blocked the AGE-induced tubular cell damage. Nifedipine, but not amlodipine, a control CCB, inhibited the AGE-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells, which was prevented by the simultaneous treatment of GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}). GW9662 treatment alone was found to increase RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells. Further, nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced reactive oxygen species generation, NF-{kappa}B activation and increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and transforming growth factor-beta gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were blocked by GW9662. Our present study provides a unique beneficial aspect of nifedipine on diabetic nephropathy; it could work as an anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory agent against AGEs in tubular cells by suppressing RAGE expression

  16. NOD2 and TLR2 ligands trigger the activation of basophils and eosinophils by interacting with dermal fibroblasts in atopic dermatitis-like skin inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Delong; Wong, Chun-Kwok; Qiu, Huai-Na; Dong, Jie; Cai, Zhe; Chu, Man; Hon, Kam-Lun; Tsang, Miranda Sin-Man; Lam, Christopher Wai-Kei

    2016-01-01

    The skin of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) has a unique predisposition for colonization by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), which contributes to the inflammation and grim prognosis of AD. Although the mechanism underlying the S. aureus-induced exacerbation of AD remains unclear, recent studies have found a pivotal role for pattern recognition receptors in regulating the inflammatory responses in S. aureus infection. In the present study, we used a typical mouse model of AD-like skin inflammation and found that S. aureus-associated nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) and toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) ligands exacerbated AD-like symptoms, which were further deteriorated by the in vivo expansion of basophils and eosinophils. Subsequent histological analyses revealed that dermal fibroblasts were pervasive in the AD-like skin lesions. Co-culture of human dermal fibroblasts with basophils and eosinophils resulted in a vigorous cytokine/chemokine response to the NOD2/TLR2 ligands and the enhanced expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 on the dermal fibroblasts. Basophils and eosinophils were primarily responsible for the AD-related cytokine/chemokine expression in the co-cultures. Direct intercellular contact was necessary for the crosstalk between basophils and dermal fibroblasts, while soluble mediators were sufficient to mediate the eosinophil–fibroblast interactions. Moreover, the intracellular p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathways were essential for NOD2/TLR2 ligand-mediated activation of basophils, eosinophils, and dermal fibroblasts in AD-related inflammation. This study provides the evidence of NOD2/TLR2-mediated exacerbation of AD through activation of innate immune cells and therefore sheds light on a novel mechanistic pathway by which S. aureus contributes to the pathophysiology of AD. PMID:26388234

  17. Interaction of the phosphorylated DNA-binding domain in nuclear receptor CAR with its ligand-binding domain regulates CAR activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizu, Ryota; Min, Jungki; Sobhany, Mack; Pedersen, Lars C; Mutoh, Shingo; Negishi, Masahiko

    2018-01-05

    The nuclear protein constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR or NR1I3) regulates several liver functions such as drug and energy metabolism and cell growth or death, which are often involved in the development of diseases such as diabetes and hepatocellular carcinoma. CAR undergoes a conversion from inactive homodimers to active heterodimers with retinoid X receptor α (RXRα), and phosphorylation of the DNA-binding domain (DBD) at Thr-38 in CAR regulates this conversion. Here, we uncovered the molecular mechanism by which this phosphorylation regulates the intramolecular interaction between CAR's DBD and ligand-binding domain (LBD), enabling the homodimer-heterodimer conversion. Phosphomimetic substitution of Thr-38 with Asp increased co-immunoprecipitation of the CAR DBD with CAR LBD in Huh-7 cells. Isothermal titration calorimetry assays also revealed that recombinant CAR DBD-T38D, but not nonphosphorylated CAR DBD, bound the CAR LBD peptide. This DBD-LBD interaction masked CAR's dimer interface, preventing CAR homodimer formation. Of note, EGF signaling weakened the interaction of CAR DBD T38D with CAR LBD, converting CAR to the homodimer form. The DBD-T38D-LBD interaction also prevented CAR from forming a heterodimer with RXRα. However, this interaction opened up a CAR surface, allowing interaction with protein phosphatase 2A. Thr-38 dephosphorylation then dissociated the DBD-LBD interaction, allowing CAR heterodimer formation with RXRα. We conclude that the intramolecular interaction of phosphorylated DBD with the LBD enables CAR to adapt a transient monomer configuration that can be converted to either the inactive homodimer or the active heterodimer.

  18. The non-canonical NOTCH1 ligand Delta-like 1 homolog (DLK1) self interacts in mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traustadóttir, Gunnhildur Ásta; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Garcia Ramirez, Jose Javier

    2017-01-01

    the proposed DLK1-IGFBP1 interaction was not supported by MTH. Very little has previously been described on the DLK1 self-interaction. Herein, we showed by immunoprecipitation as well as Sulfo-SBED label transfer that the DLK1-DLK1 interaction likely is part of Dlk1's function in preadipocytes. Furthermore our......Delta-like 1 homolog (DLK1) is an imprinted gene, which is widely expressed during mammalian development and plays a pivotal role in differentiation of various tissue types. Most recently, we have shown that DLK1 interacts with NOTCH1, yet several Notch independent mechanisms have previously been...... suggested as well, but only poorly confirmed in a mammalian context. In the present study, we employed the mammalian two-hybrid (MTH) system, a genetic in vivo protein-protein interaction system, to show robust DLK1-DLK1, DLK1-FnI (Fibronectin) and DLK1-CFR (cysteine-rich FGF receptor) interactions, whereas...

  19. NetMHCpan-4.0: Improved Peptide-MHC Class I Interaction Predictions Integrating Eluted Ligand and Peptide Binding Affinity Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurtz, Vanessa; Paul, Sinu; Andreatta, Massimo; Marcatili, Paolo; Peters, Bjoern; Nielsen, Morten

    2017-11-01

    Cytotoxic T cells are of central importance in the immune system's response to disease. They recognize defective cells by binding to peptides presented on the cell surface by MHC class I molecules. Peptide binding to MHC molecules is the single most selective step in the Ag-presentation pathway. Therefore, in the quest for T cell epitopes, the prediction of peptide binding to MHC molecules has attracted widespread attention. In the past, predictors of peptide-MHC interactions have primarily been trained on binding affinity data. Recently, an increasing number of MHC-presented peptides identified by mass spectrometry have been reported containing information about peptide-processing steps in the presentation pathway and the length distribution of naturally presented peptides. In this article, we present NetMHCpan-4.0, a method trained on binding affinity and eluted ligand data leveraging the information from both data types. Large-scale benchmarking of the method demonstrates an increase in predictive performance compared with state-of-the-art methods when it comes to identification of naturally processed ligands, cancer neoantigens, and T cell epitopes. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. A viral, transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP)-independent, high affinity ligand with alternative interactions endogenously presented by the nonclassical human leukocyte antigen E class I molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Elena; Infantes, Susana; Abia, David; Barnea, Eilon; Beer, Ilan; García, Ruth; Lasala, Fátima; Jiménez, Mercedes; Mir, Carmen; Morreale, Antonio; Admon, Arie; López, Daniel

    2012-10-12

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) enables the flow of viral peptides generated in the cytosol by the proteasome and other proteases to the endoplasmic reticulum, where they complex with nascent human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I. Later, these peptide-HLA class I complexes can be recognized by CD8(+) lymphocytes. Cancerous cells and infected cells in which TAP is blocked, as well as individuals with unusable TAP complexes, are able to present peptides on HLA class I by generating them through TAP-independent processing pathways. Here, we identify a physiologically processed HLA-E ligand derived from the D8L protein in TAP-deficient vaccinia virus-infected cells. This natural high affinity HLA-E class I ligand uses alternative interactions to the anchor motifs previously described to be presented on nonclassical HLA class I molecules. This octameric peptide was also presented on HLA-Cw1 with similar binding affinity on both classical and nonclassical class I molecules. In addition, this viral peptide inhibits HLA-E-mediated cytolysis by natural killer cells. Comparison between the amino acid sequences of the presenting HLA-E and HLA-Cw1 alleles revealed a shared structural motif in both HLA class molecules, which could be related to their observed similar cross-reactivity affinities. This motif consists of several residues located on the floor of the peptide-binding site. These data expand the role of HLA-E as an antigen-presenting molecule.

  1. Molecular recognition in a diverse set of protein-ligand interactions studied with molecular dynamics simulations and end-point free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Li, Liwei; Hurley, Thomas D; Meroueh, Samy O

    2013-10-28

    End-point free energy calculations using MM-GBSA and MM-PBSA provide a detailed understanding of molecular recognition in protein-ligand interactions. The binding free energy can be used to rank-order protein-ligand structures in virtual screening for compound or target identification. Here, we carry out free energy calculations for a diverse set of 11 proteins bound to 14 small molecules using extensive explicit-solvent MD simulations. The structure of these complexes was previously solved by crystallography and their binding studied with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) data enabling direct comparison to the MM-GBSA and MM-PBSA calculations. Four MM-GBSA and three MM-PBSA calculations reproduced the ITC free energy within 1 kcal·mol(-1) highlighting the challenges in reproducing the absolute free energy from end-point free energy calculations. MM-GBSA exhibited better rank-ordering with a Spearman ρ of 0.68 compared to 0.40 for MM-PBSA with dielectric constant (ε = 1). An increase in ε resulted in significantly better rank-ordering for MM-PBSA (ρ = 0.91 for ε = 10), but larger ε significantly reduced the contributions of electrostatics, suggesting that the improvement is due to the nonpolar and entropy components, rather than a better representation of the electrostatics. The SVRKB scoring function applied to MD snapshots resulted in excellent rank-ordering (ρ = 0.81). Calculations of the configurational entropy using normal-mode analysis led to free energies that correlated significantly better to the ITC free energy than the MD-based quasi-harmonic approach, but the computed entropies showed no correlation with the ITC entropy. When the adaptation energy is taken into consideration by running separate simulations for complex, apo, and ligand (MM-PBSAADAPT), there is less agreement with the ITC data for the individual free energies, but remarkably good rank-ordering is observed (ρ = 0.89). Interestingly, filtering MD snapshots by prescoring

  2. Silica- and germania-based dual-ligand sol-gel organic-inorganic hybrid sorbents combining superhydrophobicity and π-π interaction. The role of inorganic substrate in sol-gel capillary microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyyal, Emre; Malik, Abdul

    2017-04-29

    Principles of sol-gel chemistry were utilized to create silica- and germania-based dual-ligand surface-bonded sol-gel coatings providing enhanced performance in capillary microextraction (CME) through a combination of ligand superhydrophobicity and π-π interaction. These organic-inorganic hybrid coatings were prepared using sol-gel precursors with bonded perfluorododecyl (PF-C 12 ) and phenethyl (PhE) ligands. Here, the ability of the PF-C 12 ligand to provide enhanced hydrophobic interaction was advantageously combined with π-π interaction capability of the PhE moiety to attain the desired sorbent performance in CME. The effect of the inorganic sorbent component on microextraction performance of was explored by comparing microextraction characteristics of silica- and germania-based sol-gel sorbents. The germania-based dual-ligand sol-gel sorbent demonstrated superior CME performance compared to its silica-based counterpart. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the created silica- and germania-based dual-ligand sol-gel sorbents suggested higher carbon loading on the germania-based sorbent. This might be indicative of more effective condensation of the organic ligand-bearing sol-gel-active chemical species to the germania-based sol-gel network (than to its silica-based counterpart) evolving in the sol solution. The type and concentration of the organic ligands were varied in the sol-gel sorbents to fine-tune extraction selectivity toward different classes of analytes. Specific extraction (SE) values were used for an objective comparison of the prepared sol-gel CME sorbents. The sorbents with higher content of PF-C 12 showed remarkable affinity for aliphatic hydrocarbons. Compared to their single-ligand sol-gel counterparts, the dual-ligand sol-gel coatings demonstrated significantly superior CME performance in the extraction of alkylbenzenes, providing up to ∼65.0% higher SE values. The prepared sol-gel CME coatings provided low ng L -1 limit of detections (LOD

  3. Rosetta Ligand docking with flexible XML protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmon, Gordon; Meiler, Jens

    2012-01-01

    RosettaLigand is premiere software for predicting how a protein and a small molecule interact. Benchmark studies demonstrate that 70% of the top scoring RosettaLigand predicted interfaces are within 2Å RMSD from the crystal structure [1]. The latest release of Rosetta ligand software includes many new features, such as (1) docking of multiple ligands simultaneously, (2) representing ligands as fragments for greater flexibility, (3) redesign of the interface during docking, and (4) an XML script based interface that gives the user full control of the ligand docking protocol.

  4. NetMHCpan-4.0: Improved Peptide-MHC Class I Interaction Predictions Integrating Eluted Ligand and Peptide Binding Affinity Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurtz, Vanessa Isabell; Paul, Sinu; Andreatta, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    by mass spectrometry have been reported containing information about peptide-processing steps in the presentation pathway and the length distribution of naturally presented peptides. In this article, we present NetMHCpan-4.0, a method trained on binding affinity and eluted ligand data leveraging......Cytotoxic T cells are of central importance in the immune system's response to disease. They recognize defective cells by binding to peptides presented on the cell surface by MHC class I molecules. Peptide binding to MHC molecules is the single most selective step in the Ag-presentation pathway....... Therefore, in the quest for T cell epitopes, the prediction of peptide binding to MHC molecules has attracted widespread attention. In the past, predictors of peptide-MHC interactions have primarily been trained on binding affinity data. Recently, an increasing number of MHC-presented peptides identified...

  5. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae Assay System to Investigate Ligand/AdipoR1 Interactions That Lead to Cellular Signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Aouida, Mustapha; Kim, Kangchang; Shaikh, Abdul Rajjak; Pardo, Jose M.; Eppinger, Jö rg; Yun, Dae-Jin; Bressan, Ray A.; Narasimhan, Meena L.

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin is a mammalian hormone that exerts anti-diabetic, anti-cancer and cardioprotective effects through interaction with its major ubiquitously expressed plasma membrane localized receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2. Here, we report a

  6. The estimation of H-bond and metal ion-ligand interaction energies in the G-Quadruplex ⋯ Mn+ complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafavi, Najmeh; Ebrahimi, Ali

    2018-06-01

    In order to characterize various interactions in the G-quadruplex ⋯ Mn+ (G-Q ⋯ Mn+) complexes, the individual H-bond (EHB) and metal ion-ligand interaction (EMO) energies have been estimated using the electron charge densities (ρs) calculated at the X ⋯ H (X = N and O) and Mn+ ⋯ O (Mn+ is an alkaline, alkaline earth and transition metal ion) bond critical points (BCPs) obtained from the atoms in molecules (AIM) analysis. The estimated values of EMO and EHB were evaluated using the structural parameters, results of natural bond orbital analysis (NBO), aromaticity indexes and atomic charges. The EMO value increase with the ratio of ionic charge to radius, e/r, where a linear correlation is observed between EMO and e/r (R = 0.97). Meaningful relationships are also observed between EMO and indexes used for aromaticity estimation. The ENH value is higher than EOH in the complexes; this is in complete agreement with the trend of N⋯Hsbnd N and O⋯Hsbnd N angles, the E (2) value of nN → σ*NH and nO → σ*NH interactions and the difference between the natural charges on the H-bonded atom and the hydrogen atom of guanine (Δq). In general, the O1MO2 angle becomes closer to 109.5° with the increase in EMO and decrease in EHB in the presence of metal ion.

  7. On the accuracy of DFT methods in reproducing ligand substitution energies for transition metal complexes in solution: The role of dispersive interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2011-12-23

    The performance of a series of density functionals when tested on the prediction of the phosphane substitution energy of transition metal complexes is evaluated. The complexes Fe-BDA and Ru-COD (BDA=benzylideneacetone, COD=cyclooctadiene) serve as reference systems, and calculated values are compared with the experimental values in THF as obtained from calorimetry. Results clearly indicate that functionals specifically developed to include dispersion interactions usually outperform other functionals when BDA or COD substitution is considered. However, when phosphanes of different sizes are compared, functionals including dispersion interactions, at odd with experimental evidence, predict that larger phosphanes bind more strongly than smaller phosphanes, while functionals not including dispersion interaction reproduce the experimental trends with reasonable accuracy. In case of the DFT-D functionals, inclusion of a cut-off distance on the dispersive term resolves this issue, and results in a rather robust behavior whatever ligand substitution reaction is considered. Ne quid nimis: Describing chemical reactions in solution by computational techniques developed for gas-phase scenarios might produce erroneous results (see histogram). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Preliminary study on leadership proximity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghinea Valentina Mihaela

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In general, it is agreed that effective leadership requires a certain degree of proximity, either physical or mental, which enables leaders to maintain control over their followers and communicate their vision. Although we agree with the leadership proximity principles which states that leaders are able to efficiently serve only those people with whom they interact frequently, in this article we focus instead on the disadvantages of being too close and the way in which close proximity can actually hurt the effectiveness of leadership. The main effects that we discuss regard the way in which proximity and familiarity allow followers to see the weaknesses and faults of the leader much more easily and thus diminish the leader’s heroic aura, and the emotional bias that results from a leader being too familiar with his followers which will impede the process of rational decision making. As a result, we argue that there exists a functional proximity which allows the leader the necessary space in which to perform effective identity work and to hide the backstage aspects of leadership, while also allowing him an emotional buffer zone which will enable him to maintain the ability to see clearly and make rational decisions.

  9. Importance of a Conserved Lys/Arg Residue for Ligand/PDZ Domain Interactions as Examined by Protein Semisynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren W; Moran, Griffin E; Sereikaité, Vita

    2016-01-01

    PDZ domains are ubiquitous small protein domains that are mediators of numerous protein-protein interactions, and play a pivotal role in protein trafficking, synaptic transmission, and the assembly of signaling-transduction complexes. In recent years, PDZ domains have emerged as novel and exciting...... drug targets for diseases (in the brain in particular), so understanding the molecular details of PDZ domain interactions is of fundamental importance. PDZ domains bind to a protein partner at either a C-terminal peptide or internal peptide motifs. Here, we examined the importance of a conserved Lys...

  10. Synthesis And Characterization Of 6,6'-Bis (2-Hydroxyphenyl)-2,2'-Bipyridyl Ligand And Its Platinum Complex for the Interaction with CT-DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norhidayah Selamat; Heng, L.Y.; Nurul Izzaty Hassan; Nurul Huda Abd Karim

    2016-01-01

    A tetradentate ligand with four donor atoms OONN and its platinum metal complex were synthesized. Bis(phenoxy)bipyridine ligand was prepared by Suzuki coupling reaction between 6,6 ' -dibromo-2,2 ' -bipyridyl and 2-hydroxy phenylboronic acid with the presence of palladium (II) acetate. The formation of platinum complex was done by introducing the ligand with platinum (II) chloride in benzonitrile. Both ligand and complex structures were confirmed by 1 H, 2D cosy and 13 C NMR spectroscopy, ESIMS spectrometry and FTIR spectroscopy. Binding studies of small molecules with DNA are useful to understand the reaction mechanism and to provide guidance for the application and design of new and more efficient drugs or sensors targeted on DNA. In this study, the binding interaction between the synthesized ligand and complex with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been investigated using UV-Visible and emission DNA titration. From the UV-Visible DNA study, it showed that platinum (II) bipyridine complex had higher affinity towards CT-DNA with binding constant K b =(3.1 ± 0.02 x 10 5 ) ± 0.02 M -1 compared to that of bis(phenoxy) bipyridine ligand with binding constant (K b ) = (1.19 ± 0.08) x 10 3 M -1 . These findings will be valuable for the potential use of platinum (II) bipyridine complex as a phosphorescent probe in optical sensor DNA. (author)

  11. [Changes in the secondary and tertiary structure of serum albumin in interactions with ligands of various structures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinus, F P; Braver-Chernobul'skaia, B S; Luĭk, A I; Boldeskul, A E; Velichko, A N

    1984-01-01

    High affinity interactions between blood serum albumin and five substances of various chemical structure, exhibiting distinct physiological activity, were accompanied by alterations in the protein tertiary structure, while the albumin secondary structure was involved in conformational transformation after less effective affinity binding.

  12. Antidepressant-like effects of the cannabinoid receptor ligands in the forced swimming test in mice: mechanism of action and possible interactions with cholinergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk-Slomka, Marta; Michalak, Agnieszka; Biala, Grazyna

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the experiments was to explore the role of the endocannabinoid system, through cannabinoid (CB) receptor ligands, nicotine and scopolamine, in the depression-related responses using the forced swimming test (FST) in mice. Our results revealed that acute injection of oleamide (10 and 20 mg/kg), a CB1 receptor agonist, caused antidepressant-like effect in the FST, while AM 251 (0.25-3 mg/kg), a CB1 receptor antagonist, did not provoke any effect in this test. Moreover, acute administration of both CB2 receptor agonist, JWH 133 (0.5 and 1 mg/kg) and CB2 receptor antagonist, AM 630 (0.5 mg/kg), exhibited antidepressant action. Antidepressant effects of oleamide and JWH 133 were attenuated by acute injection of both non-effective dose of AM 251, as well as AM 630. Among the all CB compounds used, only the combination of non-effective dose of oleamide (2.5 mg/kg) with non-effective dose of nicotine (0.5 mg/kg) caused an antidepressant effect. However, none of the CB receptor ligands, had influence on the antidepressant effects provoked by nicotine (0.2 mg/kg) injection. In turn, the combination of non-effective dose of oleamide (2.5 mg/kg); JWH (2 mg/kg) or AM 630 (2 mg/kg), but not of AM 251 (0.25 mg/kg), with non-effective dose of scopolamine (0.1 mg/kg), exhibited antidepressant properties. Indeed, all of the CB compounds used, intensified the antidepressant-like effects induced by an acute injection of scopolamine (0.3 mg/kg). Our results provide clear evidence that the endocannabinoid system participates in the depression-related behavior and through interactions with cholinergic system modulate these kind of responses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Size matters: influence of the size of nanoparticles on their interactions with ligands immobilized on the solid surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piletska, Elena V; Piletsky, Sergey A

    2010-03-16

    The correlation between the size of biotinylated nanoparticles and their affinity in relation to interactions with the solid surface was investigated. The silica particles with a diameter of 50-200 nm containing amino groups on the surface were labeled with different quantities of biotin. The affinity properties of biotinylated nanoparticles were studied using a Biacore 3000 instrument equipped with a streptavidin-coated sensor chip (SA chip). It was shown that the increase in the particle size from 50 to 200 nm reduced the affinity (K(D)) of biotin-streptavidin interactions from 1.2 x 10(-12) to 1.2 x 10(-10) M. It was found that the particles with higher concentrations of immobilized biotin on particle surfaces demonstrated stronger binding with streptavidin.

  14. Functional structural motifs for protein-ligand, protein-protein, and protein-nucleic acid interactions and their connection to supersecondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Akira R; Nakamura, Haruki

    2013-01-01

    Protein functions are mediated by interactions between proteins and other molecules. One useful approach to analyze protein functions is to compare and classify the structures of interaction interfaces of proteins. Here, we describe the procedures for compiling a database of interface structures and efficiently comparing the interface structures. To do so requires a good understanding of the data structures of the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Therefore, we also provide a detailed account of the PDB exchange dictionary necessary for extracting data that are relevant for analyzing interaction interfaces and secondary structures. We identify recurring structural motifs by classifying similar interface structures, and we define a coarse-grained representation of supersecondary structures (SSS) which represents a sequence of two or three secondary structure elements including their relative orientations as a string of four to seven letters. By examining the correspondence between structural motifs and SSS strings, we show that no SSS string has particularly high propensity to be found interaction interfaces in general, indicating any SSS can be used as a binding interface. When individual structural motifs are examined, there are some SSS strings that have high propensity for particular groups of structural motifs. In addition, it is shown that while the SSS strings found in particular structural motifs for nonpolymer and protein interfaces are as abundant as in other structural motifs that belong to the same subunit, structural motifs for nucleic acid interfaces exhibit somewhat stronger preference for SSS strings. In regard to protein folds, many motif-specific SSS strings were found across many folds, suggesting that SSS may be a useful description to investigate the universality of ligand binding modes.

  15. A novel interaction between calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand and Basigin regulates calcium signaling and matrix metalloproteinase activities in human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Tingting; Su, Juan; Tang, Wen; Luo, Zhongling; Liu, Shuang; Liu, Zhaoqian; Zhou, Honghao; Qi, Min; Zeng, Weiqi; Zhang, Jianglin; Chen, Xiang

    2013-10-01

    Intracellular free calcium is a ubiquitous second messenger regulating a multitude of normal and pathogenic cellular responses, including the development of melanoma. Upstream signaling pathways regulating the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) may therefore have a significant impact on melanoma growth and metastasis. In this study, we demonstrate that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand (CAML) is bound to Basigin, a widely expressed integral plasma membrane glycoprotein and extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN, or CD147) implicated in melanoma proliferation, invasiveness, and metastasis. This interaction between CAML and Basigin was first identified using yeast two-hybrid screening and further confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. In human A375 melanoma cells, CAML and Basigin were co-localized to the ER. Knockdown of Basigin in melanoma cells by siRNA significantly decreased resting [Ca2+]i and the [Ca2+]i increase induced by the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) inhibitor thapsigargin (TG), indicating that the interaction between CAML and Basigin regulates ER-dependent [Ca2+]i signaling. Meanwhile upregulating the [Ca2+]i either by TG or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) could stimulate the production of MMP-9 in A375 cells with the expression of Basigin. Our study has revealed a previously uncharacterized [Ca2+]i signaling pathway that may control melanoma invasion, and metastasis. Disruption of this pathway may be a novel therapeutic strategy for melanoma treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Netrin-related domain of Sfrp1 interacts with Wnt ligands and antagonizes their activity in the anterior neural plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteve Pilar

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secreted frizzled related proteins (SFRPs are multifunctional modulators of Wnt and BMP (Bone Morphogenetic Protein signalling necessary for the development of most organs and the homeostasis of different adult tissues. SFRPs fold in two independent domains: the cysteine rich domain (SfrpCRD related to the extracellular portion of Frizzled (Fz, Wnt receptors and the Netrin module (SfrpNTR defined by homologies with molecules such as Netrin-1, inhibitors of metalloproteinases and complement proteins. Due to its structural relationship with Fz, it is believed that SfrpCRD interferes with Wnt signalling by binding and sequestering the ligand. In contrast, the functional relevance of the SfrpNTR has been barely addressed. Results Here, we combine biochemical studies, mutational analysis and functional assays in cell culture and medaka-fish embryos to show that the Sfrp1NTR mimics the function of the entire molecule, binds to Wnt8 and antagonizes Wnt canonical signalling. This activity requires intact tertiary structure and is shared by the distantly related Netrin-1NTR. In contrast, the Sfrp1CRD cannot mirror the function of the entire molecule in vivo but interacts with Fz receptors and antagonizes Wnt8-mediated β-catenin transcriptional activity. Conclusion On the basis of these results, we propose that SFRP modulation of Wnt signalling may involve multiple and differential interactions among Wnt, Fz and SFRPs.

  17. Proximity credentials: A survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, L.J.

    1987-04-01

    Credentials as a means of identifying individuals have traditionally been a photo badge and more recently, the coded credential. Another type of badge, the proximity credential, is making inroads in the personnel identification field. This badge can be read from a distance instead of being veiewed by a guard or inserted into a reading device. This report reviews proximity credentials, identifies the companies marketing or developing proximity credentials, and describes their respective credentials. 3 tabs

  18. Proximal Probes Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the...

  19. High-resolution structure of AKR1a4 in the apo form and its interaction with ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faucher, Frédérick; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-01-01

    Despite its high affinity for NADPH, AKR1a4 crystallized in the apo form, which is very rare for aldo-keto reductase enzymes. Aldo-keto reductase 1a4 (AKR1a4; EC 1.1.1.2) is the mouse orthologue of human aldehyde reductase (AKR1a1), the founding member of the AKR family. As an NADPH-dependent enzyme, AKR1a4 catalyses the conversion of d-glucuronate to l-gulonate. AKR1a4 is involved in ascorbate biosynthesis in mice, but has also recently been found to interact with SMAR1, providing a novel mechanism of ROS regulation by ATM. Here, the crystal structure of AKR1a4 in its apo form at 1.64 Å resolution as well as the characterization of the binding of AKR1a4 to NADPH and P44, a peptide derived from SMAR1, is presented

  20. Intramolecular interaction influences binding of the Flax L5 and L6 resistance proteins to their AvrL567 ligands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ravensdale

    Full Text Available L locus resistance (R proteins are nucleotide binding (NB-ARC leucine-rich repeat (LRR proteins from flax (Linum usitatissimum that provide race-specific resistance to the causal agent of flax rust disease, Melampsora lini. L5 and L6 are two alleles of the L locus that directly recognize variants of the fungal effector AvrL567. In this study, we have investigated the molecular details of this recognition by site-directed mutagenesis of AvrL567 and construction of chimeric L proteins. Single, double and triple mutations of polymorphic residues in a variety of AvrL567 variants showed additive effects on recognition strength, suggesting that multiple contact points are involved in recognition. Domain-swap experiments between L5 and L6 show that specificity differences are determined by their corresponding LRR regions. Most positively selected amino acid sites occur in the N- and C-terminal LRR units, and polymorphisms in the first seven and last four LRR units contribute to recognition specificity of L5 and L6 respectively. This further confirms that multiple, additive contact points occur between AvrL567 variants and either L5 or L6. However, we also observed that recognition of AvrL567 is affected by co-operative polymorphisms between both adjacent and distant domains of the R protein, including the TIR, ARC and LRR domains, implying that these residues are involved in intramolecular interactions to optimize detection of the pathogen and defense signal activation. We suggest a model where Avr ligand interaction directly competes with intramolecular interactions to cause activation of the R protein.

  1. A rapid method for selecting suitable animal species for studying pathogen interactions with plasma protein ligands in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudin, Clément; Schumski, Ariane; Salo-Ahen, Outi M H; Herwald, Heiko; Smeds, Emanuel

    2017-05-01

    Species tropism constitutes a serious problem for developing relevant animal models of infection. Human pathogens can express virulence factors that show specific selectivity to human proteins, while their affinity for orthologs from other species can vary significantly. Suitable animal species must be used to analyse whether virulence factors are potential targets for drug development. We developed an assay that rapidly predicts applicable animal species for studying virulence factors binding plasma proteins. We used two well-characterized Staphylococcus aureus proteins, SSL7 and Efb, to develop an ELISA-based inhibition assay using plasma from different animal species. The interaction between SSL7 and human C5 and the binding of Efb to human fibrinogen and human C3 was studied. Affinity experiments and Western blot analyses were used to validate the assay. Human, monkey and cat plasma interfered with binding of SSL7 to human C5. Binding of Efb to human fibrinogen was blocked in human, monkey, gerbil and pig plasma, while human, monkey, gerbil, rabbit, cat and guinea pig plasma inhibited the binding of Efb to human C3. These results emphasize the importance of choosing correct animal models, and thus, our approach is a rapid and cost-effective method that can be used to prevent unnecessary animal experiments. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Interaction of In(I) and Tl(I) cations with 2,6-diaryl pyridine ligands: cation encapsulation within a very weakly interacting N/arene host environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansaray, Hassanatu B; Tang, Christina Y; Vidovic, Dragoslav; Thompson, Amber L; Aldridge, Simon

    2012-12-03

    The interaction of 2,6-dimesitylpyridine with Tl(I) and In(I) cations has been investigated with a view to developing tractable molecular M(I) compounds which are soluble in organic media. In stark contrast to isosteric and isoelectronic terphenyl systems, complexes featuring the [(2,6-Mes(2)py)M](+) fragment feature very weak metal-ligand interactions in the solid state, as revealed by M-N distances of the order of 2.45 Å (M = In) and 2.64 Å (M = Tl). While additional weak π interactions are observed with arene solvate molecules in these systems, the related 2:1 complex [(2,6-Mes(2)py)(2)In][BAr(f)(4)] features an In(I) center wholly encapsulated by the bulky Mes(2)py donors, and even longer In-N distances [2.586(6) and 2.662(5) Å]. These contacts are about 0.5 Å greater than the sum of the respective covalent radii (2.13 Å) and provide evidence for an effectively "naked" In(I) cation stabilized to a minor extent by orbital interactions.

  3. Quantitative Characterization of E-selectin Interaction with Native CD44 and P-selectin Glycoprotein Ligand-1 (PSGL-1) Using a Real Time Immunoprecipitation-based Binding Assay

    KAUST Repository

    Abu Samra, Dina Bashir Kamil; Al Kilani, Alia; Hamdan, Samir; Sakashita, Kosuke; Gadhoum, Samah Z.; Merzaban, Jasmeen

    2015-01-01

    Selectins (E-, P-, and L-selectins) interact with glycoprotein ligands to mediate the essential tethering/rolling step in cell transport and delivery that captures migrating cells from the circulating flow. In this work, we developed a real time immunoprecipitation assay on a surface plasmon resonance chip that captures native glycoforms of two well known E-selectin ligands (CD44/hematopoietic cell E-/L-selectin ligand and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1) from hematopoietic cell extracts. Here we present a comprehensive characterization of their binding to E-selectin. We show that both ligands bind recombinant monomeric E-selectin transiently with fast on- and fast off-rates, whereas they bind dimeric E-selectin with remarkably slow onand off-rates. This binding requires the sialyl Lewis x sugar moiety to be placed on both O- and N-glycans, and its association, but not dissociation, is sensitive to the salt concentration. Our results suggest a mechanism through which monomeric selectins mediate initial fast on and fast off kinetics to help capture cells out of the circulating shear flow; subsequently, tight binding by dimeric/oligomeric selectins is enabled to significantly slow rolling. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Quantitative Characterization of E-selectin Interaction with Native CD44 and P-selectin Glycoprotein Ligand-1 (PSGL-1) Using a Real Time Immunoprecipitation-based Binding Assay

    KAUST Repository

    Abu Samra, Dina Bashir Kamil

    2015-06-29

    Selectins (E-, P-, and L-selectins) interact with glycoprotein ligands to mediate the essential tethering/rolling step in cell transport and delivery that captures migrating cells from the circulating flow. In this work, we developed a real time immunoprecipitation assay on a surface plasmon resonance chip that captures native glycoforms of two well known E-selectin ligands (CD44/hematopoietic cell E-/L-selectin ligand and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1) from hematopoietic cell extracts. Here we present a comprehensive characterization of their binding to E-selectin. We show that both ligands bind recombinant monomeric E-selectin transiently with fast on- and fast off-rates, whereas they bind dimeric E-selectin with remarkably slow onand off-rates. This binding requires the sialyl Lewis x sugar moiety to be placed on both O- and N-glycans, and its association, but not dissociation, is sensitive to the salt concentration. Our results suggest a mechanism through which monomeric selectins mediate initial fast on and fast off kinetics to help capture cells out of the circulating shear flow; subsequently, tight binding by dimeric/oligomeric selectins is enabled to significantly slow rolling. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Interaction of chemokine receptor CXCR4 in monomeric and dimeric state with its endogenous ligand CXCL12: coarse-grained simulations identify differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, Pasquale; Basdevant, Nathalie; Bernadat, Guillaume; Bachelerie, Françoise; Ha-Duong, Tâp

    2017-02-01

    Despite the recent resolutions of the crystal structure of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in complex with small antagonists or viral chemokine, a description at the molecular level of the interactions between the full-length CXCR4 and its endogenous ligand, the chemokine CXCL12, in relationship with the receptor recognition and activation, is not yet completely elucidated. Moreover, since CXCR4 is able to form dimers, the question of whether the CXCR4-CXCL12 complex has a 1:1 or 2:1 preferential stoichiometry is still an open question. We present here results of coarse-grained protein-protein docking and molecular dynamics simulations of CXCL12 in association with CXCR4 in monomeric and dimeric states. Our proposed models for the 1:1 and 2:1 CXCR4-CXCL12 quaternary structures are consistent with recognition and activation motifs of both partners provided by the available site-directed mutagenesis data. Notably, we observed that in the 2:1 complex, the chemokine N-terminus makes more steady contacts with the receptor residues critical for binding and activation than in the 1:1 structure, suggesting that the 2:1 stoichiometry would favor the receptor signaling activity with respect to the 1:1 association.

  6. Knowledge-based modeling of a legume lectin and docking of the carbohydrate ligand: the Ulex europaeus lectin I and its interaction with fucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohier, A; Espinosa, J F; Jimenez-Barbero, J; Carrupt, P A; Pérez, S; Imberty, A

    1996-12-01

    Ulex europaeus isolectin I is specific for fucose-containing oligosaccharide such as H type 2 trisaccharide alpha-L-Fuc (1-->2) beta-D-Gal (1-->4) beta-D-GlcNAc. Several legume lectins have been crystallized and modeled, but no structural data are available concerning such fucose-binding lectin. The three-dimensional structure of Ulex europaeus isolectin I has been constructed using seven legume lectins for which high-resolution crystal structures were available. Some conserved water molecules, as well as the structural cations, were taken into account for building the model. In the predicted binding site, the most probable locations of the secondary hydroxyl groups were determined using the GRID method. Several possible orientations could be determined for a fucose residue. All of the four possible conformations compatible with energy calculations display several hydrogen bonds with Asp-87 and Ser-132 and a stacking interaction with Tyr-220 and Phe-136. In two orientations, the O-3 and O-4 hydroxyl groups of fucose are the most buried ones, whereas two other, the O-2 and O-3 hydroxyl groups are at the bottom of the site. Possible docking modes are also studied by analysis of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces for both the ligand and the protein. The SCORE method allows for a quantitative evaluation of the complementarity of these surfaces, on the basis of molecular lipophilicity calculations. The predictions presented here are compared with known biochemical data.

  7. Chemical Synthesis and Evaluation of a Disialic Acid-Containing Dextran Polymer as an Inhibitor for the Interaction between Siglec 7 and Its Ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Sho; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Yasuda, Yu; Mori, Airi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Takashi; Kitajima, Ken; Sato, Chihiro

    2017-07-04

    A new sialic acid (Sia)-containing glycopolymer-a fluorescent probe with high-density disialic acid (diSia) on the surface of polysaccharide dextran (diSia-Dex)-was synthesized as a key molecule to regulate the Sia recognition lectins, Siglecs, that are involved in the immune system. According to our original methods, diSia was synthesized by α-selective sialylation, and a dextran template possessing terminal acetylenes and amino groups was prepared. A diSia and a fluorescent molecule were subsequently introduced to surface-modified dextran by Hüisgen reaction and amidation, respectively. The modulatory activity of Siglec7 was evaluated by using synthetic probes. DiSia-Dex showed high binding avidity toward Siglec7, with a K D value of 5.87×10 -10  m, and a high inhibitory activity for the interaction between Siglec7 and a ligand (GD3), with a IC 50 value of 1.0 nm. Notably, diSia-Dex was able to release Siglec7 from the pre-existing Siglec7-GD3 complex, possibly due to its unique properties of a slow dissociation rate and a high association rate. Together, these data show that diSia-Dex can be widely applicable as a modulator of Siglec7 functions. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Crystal structure of mixed ligand compound [HgPhen{(C2H5)2NCS2}2] and character of intermolecular interaction in the structures of [MPhen{(C2H5)2NCS2}2] (M = Zn, Cd, Hg) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klevtsova, R.F.; Glinskaya, L.A.; Zemskova, S.M.; Larionov, S.V.

    2002-01-01

    Monocrystals of mixed ligand complex [HgPhen(Et 2 NCS 2 ) 2 ] (Phen = 1, 10-phenanthroline) have been prepared and by the method of X-ray diffraction its crystal structure has been determined. The structure of mercury complex has been compared with structures of previously studied cadmium and zinc complexes similar in composition. The character of interaction between molecules of cadmium, zinc, mercury mixed ligand complexes and ways of their packing have been considered. It is shown that the structure of the complexes presents a molecular group assembled from two monomeric compounds at the expense of interaction between heterocyclic ligands contained in the mixed ligand complexes [ru

  9. From guest to ligand - A study on the competing interactions of antitumor drug resveratrol with β-cyclodextrin and bovine serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xudong; Li, Hui; Liu, Min; Li, Guangqian; Li, Linwei; Sun, Dezhi

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Thermodynamic behavior of the interaction between bovine serum albumin and antitumor drug resveratrol delivered by β-cyclodextrin in buffer solutions (pH 7.40) have been investigated by ITC combined with UV, FS and circular dichroism at 298.15 K. The results indicated that the affinity of resveratrol with the host (β-cyclodextrin) was evidently weaker than that of the drug with the both classes of binding sites on the protein molecule. Highlights: → Supramolecular complex of a drug with BSA could form in aqueous medium. → A set of thermodynamic parameters were determined. → Affinity of the drug to β-CD is weaker than that of it to the protein. → The molecular conformation of BSA was (slightly) changed by the drug. - Abstract: Interaction between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and resveratrol (RES) included by β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) in Tris-HCl aqueous buffer solutions (pH 7.4) has been investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) combined with ultraviolet, fluorescence and circular dichroism spectra analyses. The results indicate that there are two classes of ligand binding sites. The first class of binding is mainly driven by enthalpy, while the second one is driven by both enthalpy and entropy. The secondary structure of BSA in the aqueous system was slightly changed with addition of the drug. Thermodynamic parameters, i.e., equilibrium constants, standard enthalpy changes and the entropy effects for the binding process of RES with BSA were calculated based on the calorimetric data. In fact, due to the poor solubility of RES in aqueous buffer medium, these parameters could not be determined by the employed experimental method without the existence of the CD.

  10. From guest to ligand - A study on the competing interactions of antitumor drug resveratrol with {beta}-cyclodextrin and bovine serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xudong [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng, Shandong Province 252059 (China); Department of Clinical Laboratory, Liaocheng People' s Hospital, Liaocheng, Shandong Province 252000 (China); Li, Hui [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng, Shandong Province 252059 (China); Liu, Min, E-mail: liumin_panpan@163.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng, Shandong Province 252059 (China); Li, Guangqian; Li, Linwei [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng, Shandong Province 252059 (China); Sun, Dezhi, E-mail: sundezhisdz@163.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng, Shandong Province 252059 (China)

    2011-07-10

    Graphical abstract: Thermodynamic behavior of the interaction between bovine serum albumin and antitumor drug resveratrol delivered by {beta}-cyclodextrin in buffer solutions (pH 7.40) have been investigated by ITC combined with UV, FS and circular dichroism at 298.15 K. The results indicated that the affinity of resveratrol with the host ({beta}-cyclodextrin) was evidently weaker than that of the drug with the both classes of binding sites on the protein molecule. Highlights: {yields} Supramolecular complex of a drug with BSA could form in aqueous medium. {yields} A set of thermodynamic parameters were determined. {yields} Affinity of the drug to {beta}-CD is weaker than that of it to the protein. {yields} The molecular conformation of BSA was (slightly) changed by the drug. - Abstract: Interaction between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and resveratrol (RES) included by {beta}-cyclodextrin ({beta}-CD) in Tris-HCl aqueous buffer solutions (pH 7.4) has been investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) combined with ultraviolet, fluorescence and circular dichroism spectra analyses. The results indicate that there are two classes of ligand binding sites. The first class of binding is mainly driven by enthalpy, while the second one is driven by both enthalpy and entropy. The secondary structure of BSA in the aqueous system was slightly changed with addition of the drug. Thermodynamic parameters, i.e., equilibrium constants, standard enthalpy changes and the entropy effects for the binding process of RES with BSA were calculated based on the calorimetric data. In fact, due to the poor solubility of RES in aqueous buffer medium, these parameters could not be determined by the employed experimental method without the existence of the CD.

  11. Heteroleptic and Homoleptic Iron(III Spin-Crossover Complexes; Effects of Ligand Substituents and Intermolecular Interactions between Co-Cation/Anion and the Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasinee Phonsri

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The structural and magnetic properties of a range of new iron(III bis-tridentate Schiff base complexes are described with emphasis on how intermolecular structural interactions influence spin states and spin crossover (SCO in these d5 materials. Three pairs of complexes were investigated. The first pair are the neutral, heteroleptic complexes [Fe(3-OMe-SalEen(thsa] 1 and [Fe(3-MeOSalEen(3-EtOthsa] 2, where 3-R-HSalEen = (E-2-(((2-(ethylaminoethyliminomethyl-6-R-phenol and 3-R-H2thsa = thiosemicarbazone-3-R-salicylaldimine. They display spin transitions above room temperature. However, 2 shows incomplete and gradual change, while SCO in 1 is complete and more abrupt. Lower cooperativity in 2 is ascribed to the lack of π–π interactions, compared to 1. The second pair, cationic species [Fe(3-EtOSalEen2]NO3 3 and [Fe(3-EtOSalEen2]Cl 4 differ only in the counter-anion. They show partial SCO above room temperature with 3 displaying a sharp transition at 343 K. Weak hydrogen bonds from cation to Cl− probably lead to weaker cooperativity in 4. The last pair, CsH2O[Fe(3-MeO-thsa2] 5 and Cs(H2O2[Fe(5-NO2-thsa2] 6, are anionic homoleptic chelates that have different substituents on the salicylaldiminate rings of thsa2−. The Cs cations bond to O atoms of water and the ligands, in unusual ways thus forming attractive 1D and 3D networks in 5 and 6, respectively, and 5 remains HS (high spin at all temperatures while 6 remains LS (low spin. Comparisons are made to other literature examples of Cs salts of [Fe(5-R-thsa2]− (R = H and Br.

  12. Cardiac contractility structure-activity relationship and ligand-receptor interactions; the discovery of unique and novel molecular switches in myosuppressin signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Leander

    Full Text Available Peptidergic signaling regulates cardiac contractility; thus, identifying molecular switches, ligand-receptor contacts, and antagonists aids in exploring the underlying mechanisms to influence health. Myosuppressin (MS, a decapeptide, diminishes cardiac contractility and gut motility. Myosuppressin binds to G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR proteins. Two Drosophila melanogaster myosuppressin receptors (DrmMS-Rs exist; however, no mechanism underlying MS-R activation is reported. We predicted DrmMS-Rs contained molecular switches that resembled those of Rhodopsin. Additionally, we believed DrmMS-DrmMS-R1 and DrmMS-DrmMS-R2 interactions would reflect our structure-activity relationship (SAR data. We hypothesized agonist- and antagonist-receptor contacts would differ from one another depending on activity. Lastly, we expected our study to apply to other species; we tested this hypothesis in Rhodnius prolixus, the Chagas disease vector. Searching DrmMS-Rs for molecular switches led to the discovery of a unique ionic lock and a novel 3-6 lock, as well as transmission and tyrosine toggle switches. The DrmMS-DrmMS-R1 and DrmMS-DrmMS-R2 contacts suggested tissue-specific signaling existed, which was in line with our SAR data. We identified R. prolixus (RhpMS-R and discovered it, too, contained the unique myosuppressin ionic lock and novel 3-6 lock found in DrmMS-Rs as well as transmission and tyrosine toggle switches. Further, these motifs were present in red flour beetle, common water flea, honey bee, domestic silkworm, and termite MS-Rs. RhpMS and DrmMS decreased R. prolixus cardiac contractility dose dependently with EC50 values of 140 nM and 50 nM. Based on ligand-receptor contacts, we designed RhpMS analogs believed to be an active core and antagonist; testing on heart confirmed these predictions. The active core docking mimicked RhpMS, however, the antagonist did not. Together, these data were consistent with the unique ionic lock, novel 3-6 lock

  13. Insights into an original pocket-ligand pair classification: a promising tool for ligand profile prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Pérot

    Full Text Available Pockets are today at the cornerstones of modern drug discovery projects and at the crossroad of several research fields, from structural biology to mathematical modeling. Being able to predict if a small molecule could bind to one or more protein targets or if a protein could bind to some given ligands is very useful for drug discovery endeavors, anticipation of binding to off- and anti-targets. To date, several studies explore such questions from chemogenomic approach to reverse docking methods. Most of these studies have been performed either from the viewpoint of ligands or targets. However it seems valuable to use information from both ligands and target binding pockets. Hence, we present a multivariate approach relating ligand properties with protein pocket properties from the analysis of known ligand-protein interactions. We explored and optimized the pocket-ligand pair space by combining pocket and ligand descriptors using Principal Component Analysis and developed a classification engine on this paired space, revealing five main clusters of pocket-ligand pairs sharing specific and similar structural or physico-chemical properties. These pocket-ligand pair clusters highlight correspondences between pocket and ligand topological and physico-chemical properties and capture relevant information with respect to protein-ligand interactions. Based on these pocket-ligand correspondences, a protocol of prediction of clusters sharing similarity in terms of recognition characteristics is developed for a given pocket-ligand complex and gives high performances. It is then extended to cluster prediction for a given pocket in order to acquire knowledge about its expected ligand profile or to cluster prediction for a given ligand in order to acquire knowledge about its expected pocket profile. This prediction approach shows promising results and could contribute to predict some ligand properties critical for binding to a given pocket, and conversely

  14. Insights into an original pocket-ligand pair classification: a promising tool for ligand profile prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérot, Stéphanie; Regad, Leslie; Reynès, Christelle; Spérandio, Olivier; Miteva, Maria A; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Pockets are today at the cornerstones of modern drug discovery projects and at the crossroad of several research fields, from structural biology to mathematical modeling. Being able to predict if a small molecule could bind to one or more protein targets or if a protein could bind to some given ligands is very useful for drug discovery endeavors, anticipation of binding to off- and anti-targets. To date, several studies explore such questions from chemogenomic approach to reverse docking methods. Most of these studies have been performed either from the viewpoint of ligands or targets. However it seems valuable to use information from both ligands and target binding pockets. Hence, we present a multivariate approach relating ligand properties with protein pocket properties from the analysis of known ligand-protein interactions. We explored and optimized the pocket-ligand pair space by combining pocket and ligand descriptors using Principal Component Analysis and developed a classification engine on this paired space, revealing five main clusters of pocket-ligand pairs sharing specific and similar structural or physico-chemical properties. These pocket-ligand pair clusters highlight correspondences between pocket and ligand topological and physico-chemical properties and capture relevant information with respect to protein-ligand interactions. Based on these pocket-ligand correspondences, a protocol of prediction of clusters sharing similarity in terms of recognition characteristics is developed for a given pocket-ligand complex and gives high performances. It is then extended to cluster prediction for a given pocket in order to acquire knowledge about its expected ligand profile or to cluster prediction for a given ligand in order to acquire knowledge about its expected pocket profile. This prediction approach shows promising results and could contribute to predict some ligand properties critical for binding to a given pocket, and conversely, some key pocket

  15. Performance of scintillation proximity assay (SPA) to measure the level of VEGFR 1 protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LEE, So-Young; LIM, Jae-Cheong; KIM, Jin-Joo

    2014-01-01

    Scintillation proximity assay is a one of radioimmunoassay and can be assayed without the washing or filtration procedures normally used to separate bound from free fractions. Due to its simplicity and high-throughput protocol, it is broadly applicable to immunology, receptor binding, monitoring receptor-ligand interactions and enzyme reactions. Briefly, an antibody or receptor is coated on SPA beads. When a radiolabeled antigen or ligand binds to the beads, the SPA beads stimulate to emit short range electrons. The 3 H and 125 I are commonly used for radiolabeling and the produced photons are detectable with a liquid scintillation counter (LSC). A binding affinity of unlabeled ligands can be determined by competitive reaction of the radiolabeled ligands. Bevacizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody, and can stop or delay growth of tumors by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Bevacizumab was approved by FDA for metastatic cancer such as colorectal cancers, ovarian cancers, breast cancers and glioblastoma multiform of the brain. Recently, Dan G. duda et al. was reported that the concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) in plasma may potentially be used as a negative selection biomarker. In this study, we describe a method using scintillation proximity assay to detect the amounts of VEGFR-1 protein. This method is successfully used to measure the concentration of VEGFR-1 protein in human cell extracts. In summary, a simple and sensitive assay is developed for measuring the amount of VEGFR 1 protein in cancer cell lysate using SPA beads. The antibody coating on the beads and antigen binding are achieved in one mixing step

  16. Performance of scintillation proximity assay (SPA) to measure the level of VEGFR 1 protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LEE, So-Young; LIM, Jae-Cheong; KIM, Jin-Joo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Scintillation proximity assay is a one of radioimmunoassay and can be assayed without the washing or filtration procedures normally used to separate bound from free fractions. Due to its simplicity and high-throughput protocol, it is broadly applicable to immunology, receptor binding, monitoring receptor-ligand interactions and enzyme reactions. Briefly, an antibody or receptor is coated on SPA beads. When a radiolabeled antigen or ligand binds to the beads, the SPA beads stimulate to emit short range electrons. The {sup 3}H and {sup 125}I are commonly used for radiolabeling and the produced photons are detectable with a liquid scintillation counter (LSC). A binding affinity of unlabeled ligands can be determined by competitive reaction of the radiolabeled ligands. Bevacizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody, and can stop or delay growth of tumors by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Bevacizumab was approved by FDA for metastatic cancer such as colorectal cancers, ovarian cancers, breast cancers and glioblastoma multiform of the brain. Recently, Dan G. duda et al. was reported that the concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) in plasma may potentially be used as a negative selection biomarker. In this study, we describe a method using scintillation proximity assay to detect the amounts of VEGFR-1 protein. This method is successfully used to measure the concentration of VEGFR-1 protein in human cell extracts. In summary, a simple and sensitive assay is developed for measuring the amount of VEGFR 1 protein in cancer cell lysate using SPA beads. The antibody coating on the beads and antigen binding are achieved in one mixing step.

  17. Synthesis, spectral characterization, theoretical, antimicrobial, DNA interaction and in vitro anticancer studies of Cu(II and Zn(II complexes with pyrimidine-morpholine based Schiff base ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sankarganesh

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Novel Cu(II (1 and Zn(II (2 complexes with 4-(1-(4-morpholinophenylethylideneaminopyrimidine-5-carbonitrile (L have been synthesized and characterized by various spectroscopic and analytical techniques. DFT (density functional theory studies result confirms that, LMCT mechanism have been done between L and M(II ions. The antimicrobial studies indicate that the ligand L and complexes 1 & 2 exhibit higher activity against the E. coli bacteria and C. albicans fungi. The groove binding mode of ligand L and complexes 1 & 2 with CT-DNA have been confirmed by electronic absorption, competitive binding, viscometric and cyclic voltammetric studies. The electronic absorption titration of ligand L and complexes 1 & 2 with DNA have been carried out in different buffer solutions (pH 4.0, 7.0 & 10.0. The Kb values of ligand L and complexes 1 & 2 are higher in acidic buffer at pH 4.0 (Kb = 2.42 × 105, L; 2.8 × 105, 1; 2.65 × 105, 2 and the results revealed that, the interaction of synthesized compounds with DNA were higher in the acidic medium than basic and neutral medium. Furthermore, CT-DNA cleavage studies of ligand L and complexes 1 & 2 have been studied. The in vitro anticancer activities results show that complexes 1 & 2 have moderate cytotoxicity against cancer cell lines and low toxicity on normal cell line than ligand L. Keywords: Pyrimidine, Morpholine, DFT, Antimicrobial, DNA binding, Anticancer studies

  18. A chimeric prokaryotic-eukaryotic pentameric ligand gated ion channel reveals interactions between the extracellular and transmembrane domains shape neurosteroid modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Borna; Tsao, Tzu-Wei; Czajkowski, Cynthia

    2017-10-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) are the targets of several clinical and endogenous allosteric modulators including anesthetics and neurosteroids. Molecular mechanisms underlying allosteric drug modulation are poorly understood. Here, we constructed a chimeric pLGIC by fusing the extracellular domain (ECD) of the proton-activated, cation-selective bacterial channel GLIC to the transmembrane domain (TMD) of the human ρ1 chloride-selective GABA A R, and tested the hypothesis that drug actions are regulated locally in the domain that houses its binding site. The chimeric channels were proton-gated and chloride-selective demonstrating the GLIC ECD was functionally coupled to the GABAρ TMD. Channels were blocked by picrotoxin and inhibited by pentobarbital, etomidate and propofol. The point mutation, ρ TMD W328M, conferred positive modulation and direct gating by pentobarbital. The data suggest that the structural machinery mediating general anesthetic modulation resides in the TMD. Proton-activation and neurosteroid modulation of the GLIC-ρ chimeric channels, however, did not simply mimic their respective actions on GLIC and GABAρ revealing that across domain interactions between the ECD and TMD play important roles in determining their actions. Proton-induced current responses were biphasic suggesting that the chimeric channels contain an additional proton sensor. Neurosteroid modulation of the GLIC-ρ chimeric channels by the stereoisomers, 5α-THDOC and 5β-THDOC, were swapped compared to their actions on GABAρ indicating that positive versus negative neurosteroid modulation is not encoded solely in the TMD nor by neurosteroid isomer structure but is dependent on specific interdomain connections between the ECD and TMD. Our data reveal a new mechanism for shaping neurosteroid modulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of 7TM receptor-ligand complex models using ligand-biased, semi-empirical helix-bundle repacking in torsion space: application to the agonist interaction of the human dopamine D2 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malo, Marcus; Persson, Ronnie; Svensson, Peder; Luthman, Kristina; Brive, Lars

    2013-03-01

    Prediction of 3D structures of membrane proteins, and of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) in particular, is motivated by their importance in biological systems and the difficulties associated with experimental structure determination. In the present study, a novel method for the prediction of 3D structures of the membrane-embedded region of helical membrane proteins is presented. A large pool of candidate models are produced by repacking of the helices of a homology model using Monte Carlo sampling in torsion space, followed by ranking based on their geometric and ligand-binding properties. The trajectory is directed by weak initial restraints to orient helices towards the original model to improve computation efficiency, and by a ligand to guide the receptor towards a chosen conformational state. The method was validated by construction of the β1 adrenergic receptor model in complex with (S)-cyanopindolol using bovine rhodopsin as template. In addition, models of the dopamine D2 receptor were produced with the selective and rigid agonist (R)-N-propylapomorphine ((R)-NPA) present. A second quality assessment was implemented by evaluating the results from docking of a library of 29 ligands with known activity, which further discriminated between receptor models. Agonist binding and recognition by the dopamine D2 receptor is interpreted using the 3D structure model resulting from the approach. This method has a potential for modeling of all types of helical transmembrane proteins for which a structural template with sequence homology sufficient for homology modeling is not available or is in an incorrect conformational state, but for which sufficient empirical information is accessible.

  20. Two novel mixed-ligand complexes containing organosulfonate ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingtian; Huang, Jun; Zhou, Xuan; Fang, Hua; Ding, Liyun

    2008-07-01

    The structures reported herein, viz. bis(4-aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonato-kappaO)bis(4,5-diazafluoren-9-one-kappa(2)N,N')copper(II), [Cu(C(10)H(8)NO(3)S)(2)(C(11)H(6)N(2)O)(2)], (I), and poly[[[diaquacadmium(II)]-bis(mu-4-aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonato)-kappa(2)O:N;kappa(2)N:O] dihydrate], {[Cd(C(10)H(8)NO(3)S)(2)(H(2)O)(2)].2H(2)O}(n), (II), are rare examples of sulfonate-containing complexes where the anion does not fulfill a passive charge-balancing role, but takes an active part in coordination as a monodentate and/or bridging ligand. Monomeric complex (I) possesses a crystallographic inversion center at the Cu(II) atom, and the asymmetric unit contains one-half of a Cu atom, one complete 4-aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonate (ans) ligand and one 4,5-diazafluoren-9-one (DAFO) ligand. The Cu(II) atom has an elongated distorted octahedral coordination geometry formed by two O atoms from two monodentate ans ligands and by four N atoms from two DAFO molecules. Complex (II) is polymeric and its crystal structure is built up by one-dimensional chains and solvent water molecules. Here also the cation (a Cd(II) atom) lies on a crystallographic inversion center and adopts a slightly distorted octahedral geometry. Each ans anion serves as a bridging ligand linking two Cd(II) atoms into one-dimensional infinite chains along the [010] direction, with each Cd(II) center coordinated by four ans ligands via O and N atoms and by two aqua ligands. In both structures, there are significant pi-pi stacking interactions between adjacent ligands and hydrogen bonds contribute to the formation of two- and three-dimensional networks.

  1. Neighborhoods and manageable proximity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavros Stavrides

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The theatricality of urban encounters is above all a theatricality of distances which allow for the encounter. The absolute “strangeness” of the crowd (Simmel 1997: 74 expressed, in its purest form, in the absolute proximity of a crowded subway train, does not generally allow for any movements of approach, but only for nervous hostile reactions and submissive hypnotic gestures. Neither forced intersections in the course of pedestrians or vehicles, nor the instantaneous crossing of distances by the technology of live broadcasting and remote control give birth to places of encounter. In the forced proximity of the metropolitan crowd which haunted the city of the 19th and 20th century, as well as in the forced proximity of the tele-presence which haunts the dystopic prospect of the future “omnipolis” (Virilio 1997: 74, the necessary distance, which is the stage of an encounter between different instances of otherness, is dissipated.

  2. Ligand-regulated peptide aptamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Russell A

    2009-01-01

    The peptide aptamer approach employs high-throughput selection to identify members of a randomized peptide library displayed from a scaffold protein by virtue of their interaction with a target molecule. Extending this approach, we have developed a peptide aptamer scaffold protein that can impart small-molecule control over the aptamer-target interaction. This ligand-regulated peptide (LiRP) scaffold, consisting of the protein domains FKBP12, FRB, and GST, binds to the cell-permeable small-molecule rapamycin and the binding of this molecule can prevent the interaction of the randomizable linker region connecting FKBP12 with FRB. Here we present a detailed protocol for the creation of a peptide aptamer plasmid library, selection of peptide aptamers using the LiRP scaffold in a yeast two-hybrid system, and the screening of those peptide aptamers for a ligand-regulated interaction.

  3. Proximal collagenous gastroenteritides:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Riis, Lene Buhl; Danese, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    AIM: While collagenous colitis represents the most common form of the collagenous gastroenteritides, the collagenous entities affecting the proximal part of the gastrointestinal tract are much less recognized and possibly overlooked. The aim was to summarize the latest information through a syste...

  4. Proximal femoral fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palm, Henrik; Teixidor, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    searched the homepages of the national heath authorities and national orthopedic societies in West Europe and found 11 national or regional (in case of no national) guidelines including any type of proximal femoral fracture surgery. RESULTS: Pathway consensus is outspread (internal fixation for un...

  5. Proximate Analysis of Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Craig J.; Rais, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    This lab experiment illustrates the use of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to perform proximate analysis on a series of coal samples of different rank. Peat and coke are also examined. A total of four exercises are described. These are dry exercises as students interpret previously recorded scans. The weight percent moisture, volatile matter,…

  6. Experimental and Computational Study of an Unexpected Iron-Catalyzed Carboetherification by Cooperative Metal and Ligand Substrate Interaction and Proton Shuttling

    KAUST Repository

    El-Sepelgy, Osama; Brzozowska, Aleksandra; Azofra, Luis Miguel; Jang, Yoon Kyung; Cavallo, Luigi; Rueping, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    An iron-catalyzed cycloisomerization of allenols to deoxygenated pyranose glycals has been developed. Combined experimental and computational studies show that the iron complex exhibits a dual catalytic role in that the non-innocent cyclopentadienone ligand acts as proton shuttle by initial hydrogen abstraction from the alcohol and by facilitating protonation and deprotonation events in the isomerization and demetalation steps. Molecular orbital analysis provides insight into the unexpected and selective formation of the 3,4-dihydro-2H-pyran.

  7. Experimental and Computational Study of an Unexpected Iron-Catalyzed Carboetherification by Cooperative Metal and Ligand Substrate Interaction and Proton Shuttling

    KAUST Repository

    El-Sepelgy, Osama

    2017-09-26

    An iron-catalyzed cycloisomerization of allenols to deoxygenated pyranose glycals has been developed. Combined experimental and computational studies show that the iron complex exhibits a dual catalytic role in that the non-innocent cyclopentadienone ligand acts as proton shuttle by initial hydrogen abstraction from the alcohol and by facilitating protonation and deprotonation events in the isomerization and demetalation steps. Molecular orbital analysis provides insight into the unexpected and selective formation of the 3,4-dihydro-2H-pyran.

  8. Highly specific detection of muscarinic M3 receptor, G protein interaction and intracellular trafficking in human detrusor using Proximity Ligation Assay (PLA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt-Paetz, Mandy; Herbst, Luise; Weimann, Annett; Gonsior, Andreas; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Neuhaus, Jochen

    2018-05-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) regulate a number of important physiological functions. Alteration of mAChR expression or function has been associated in the etiology of several pathologies including functional bladder disorders (e.g bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis - BPS/IC). In a previous study we found specific mAChR expression patterns associated with BPS/IC, while correlation between protein and gene expression was lacking. Posttranslational regulatory mechanisms, e.g. altered intracellular receptor trafficking, could explain those differences. In addition, alternative G protein (GP) coupling could add to the pathophysiology via modulation of muscarinic signaling. In our proof-of-principle study, we addressed these questions in situ. We established PLA in combination with confocal laserscanning microscopy (CLSM) and 3D object reconstruction for highly specific detection and analysis of muscarinic 3 receptors (M3), G protein (GP) coupling and intracellular trafficking in human detrusor samples. Paraffin sections of formalin-fixed bladder tissue (FFPE) of BPS/IC patients receiving transurethral biopsy were examined by Cy3-PLA for M3 expression, coupling of M3 to GPs (G αq/11 , G αs , G αi ) and interaction of M3 with endocytic regulator proteins. Membranes were labeled with wheat germ agglutinin-Alexa Fluor ® 488, nuclei were stained with DAPI. Object density and co-localization were analyzed in 3D-reconstruction of high resolution confocal z-stacks. Confocal image stack processing resulted in well demarcated objects. Calculated receptor densities correlated significantly with existing confocal expression data, while significantly improved specificity of M3 detection by PLA was verified using bladder tissue samples from transgenic mice. 50-60% of the M3 receptor complexes were plasma membrane associated in human bladder detrusor. Application of PLA for M3 and GPs allowed visualization of M3-GP interactions and revealed individual GP

  9. Quantum Proximity Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    It is well known that at long wavelengths λ an s-wave scatterer can have a scattering cross section σ on the order of λ 2 , much larger than its physical size, as measured by the range of its potential. Very interesting phenomena can arise when two or more identical scatterers are placed close together, well within one wavelength. We show that, for a pair of identical scatterers, an extremely narrow p-wave open-quote open-quote proximity close-quote close-quote resonance develops from a broader s-wave resonance of the individual scatterers. A new s-wave resonance of the pair also appears. The relation of these proximity resonances (so called because they appear when the scatterers are close together) to the Thomas and Efimov effects is discussed. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  10. An experimental and theoretical study on the interaction of DNA and BSA with novel Ni2 +, Cu2 + and VO2 + complexes derived from vanillin bidentate Schiff base ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostani, Morteza; Kianfar, Ali Hossein; Mahmood, Wan Ahmad Kamil; Dinari, Mohammad; Farrokhpour, Hossein; Sabzalian, Mohammad R.; Abyar, Fatemeh; Azarian, Mohammad Hossein

    2017-06-01

    In this investigation, the structure of bidentate N,N-Schiff base ligand of vanillin, (E)-4-(((2-amino-5-nitrophenyl)imino)methyl)-2-methoxyphenol (HL) was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The interaction of new [CuL2], [NiL2] and [VOL2] complexes with DNA and BSA was explored through UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The electronic spectra changes displayed an isosbestic point for the complexes upon titration with DNA. The Kb values for the complexes [CuL2], [NiL2] and [VOL2] were 2.4 × 105, 1.9 × 105 and 4.2 × 104, respectively. [CuL2] complex was bound more toughly than [NiL2] and [VOL2] complexes. These complexes had a significant interaction with Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and the results demonstrated that the quenching mechanism was a static procedure. Also, the complexes interacted with BSA by more than one binding site (n > 1). Finally, the theoretical studies were performed using the docking method to calculate the binding constants and recognize the binding site of the DNA and BSA with the complexes. The ligand and complexes including Ni2 +, Cu2 + and VO2 + ions were colonized by fungal growth.

  11. Application of oxime-diversification to optimize ligand interactions within a cryptic pocket of the polo-like kinase 1 polo-box domain | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    By a process involving initial screening of a set of 87 aldehydes using an oxime ligation-based strategy, we were able to achieve a several-fold affinity enhancement over one of the most potent previously known polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) polo-box domain (PBD) binding inhibitors. This improved binding may result by accessing a newly identified auxiliary region proximal to a key

  12. Reduction of dinitrogen ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Processes of dinitrogen ligand reduction in complexes of transition metals are considered. The basic character of the dinitrogen ligand is underlined. Data on X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy and intensities of bands ν (N 2 ) in IR-spectra of nitrogen complexes are given. The mechanism of protonation of an edge dinitrogen ligand is discussed. Model systems and mechanism of nitrogenogenase are compared

  13. Intra- and Interspecific Interactions as Proximate Determinants of Sexual Dimorphism and Allometric Trajectories in the Bottlenose Dolphin Tursiops truncatus (Cetacea, Odontoceti, Delphinidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carla de Francesco

    Full Text Available Feeding adaptation, social behaviour, and interspecific interactions related to sexual dimorphism and allometric growth are particularly challenging to be investigated in the high sexual monomorphic Delphinidae. We used geometric morphometrics to extensively explore sexual dimorphism and ontogenetic allometry of different projections of the skull and the mandible of the bottlenose dolphin Tursiops truncatus. Two-dimensional landmarks were recorded on the dorsal, ventral, lateral, and occipital views of the skull, and on the lateral view of the left and the right mandible of 104 specimens from the Mediterranean and the North Seas, differing environmental condition and degree of interspecific associations. Landmark configurations were transformed, standardized and superimposed through a Generalized Procrustes Analysis. Size and shape differences between adult males and females were respectively evaluated through ANOVA on centroid size, Procrustes ANOVA on Procrustes distances, and MANOVA on Procrustes coordinates. Ontogenetic allometry was investigated by multivariate regression of shape coordinates on centroid size in the largest homogenous sample from the North Sea. Results evidenced sexual dimorphic asymmetric traits only detected in the adults of the North Sea bottlenose dolphins living in monospecific associations, with females bearing a marked incision of the cavity hosting the left tympanic bulla. These differences were related to a more refined echolocalization system that likely enhances the exploitation of local resources by philopatric females. Distinct shape in immature versus mature stages and asymmetric changes in postnatal allometry of dorsal and occipital traits, suggest that differences between males and females are established early during growth. Allometric growth trajectories differed between males and females for the ventral view of the skull. Allometric trajectories differed among projections of skull and mandible, and were

  14. Constitutive expression of a costimulatory ligand on antigen-presenting cells in the nervous system drives demyelinating disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zehntner, Simone P; Brisebois, Marcel; Tran, Elise

    2003-01-01

    that transgenic mice constitutively expressing the costimulatory ligand B7.2/CD86 on microglia in the central nervous system (CNS) and on related cells in the proximal peripheral nervous tissue spontaneously develop autoimmune demyelinating disease. Disease-affected nervous tissue in transgenic mice showed...... recipients but not into non-transgenic recipients. These data provide evidence that B7/CD28 interactions within the nervous tissue are critical determinants of disease development. Our findings have important implications for understanding the etiology of nervous system autoimmune diseases such as multiple...

  15. Realities of proximity facility siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMott, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    Numerous commercial nuclear power plant sites have 2 to 3 reactors located together, and a group of Facilities with capabilities for fuel fabrication, a nuclear reactor, a storage area for spent fuel, and a maintenance area for contaminated equipment and radioactive waste storage are being designed and constructed in the US. The proximity of these facilities to each other provides that the ordinary flow of materials remain within a limited area. Interactions between the various facilities include shared resources such as communication, fire protection, security, medical services, transportation, water, electrical, personnel, emergency planning, transport of hazardous material between facilities, and common safety and radiological requirements between facilities. This paper will explore the advantages and disadvantages of multiple facilities at one site. Problem areas are identified, and recommendations for planning and coordination are discussed

  16. Ligands in PSI structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Abhinav; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Morse, Andrew; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Deacon, Ashley

    2010-01-01

    A survey of the types and frequency of ligands that are bound to PSI structures is analyzed as well as their utility in functional annotation of previously uncharacterized proteins. Approximately 65% of PSI structures report some type of ligand(s) that is bound in the crystal structure. Here, a description is given of how such ligands are handled and analyzed at the JCSG and a survey of the types, variety and frequency of ligands that are observed in the PSI structures is also compiled and analyzed, including illustrations of how these bound ligands have provided functional clues for annotation of proteins with little or no previous experimental characterization. Furthermore, a web server was developed as a tool to mine and analyze the PSI structures for bound ligands and other identifying features

  17. Interaction between metals and nucleic acids. Part 3. Synthesis and structural studies of copper(II) complexes with Schiff base ligands derived from barbituric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, I.; Gaudemer, A.; Chiaroni, A.; Riche, C.

    1986-02-17

    Schiff bases have been prepared from 5-formylbarbituric acid and 5-formyl-1,3-dimethyl-barbituric acid and various di- or tri-amines. The structure of the corresponding copper(II) complexes have been established by elemental analysis and spectroscopic methods. The molecular structure of one of the complexes, Cu(DiMeBardpt), was determined by X-ray diffraction. Electrochemical study shows that these complexes are reduced at slightly more negative potentials than the corresponding complexes obtained from uracil, which suggests that these new ligands are better electron-donors.

  18. Proximity friction reexamined

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krappe, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    The contribution of inelastic excitations to radial and tangential friction form-factors in heavy-ion collisions is investigated in the frame-work of perturbation theory. The dependence of the form factors on the essential geometrical and level-density parameters of the scattering system is exhibited in a rather closed form. The conditions for the existence of time-local friction coefficients are discussed. Results are compared to form factors from other models, in particular the transfer-related proximity friction. For the radial friction coefficient the inelastic excitation mechanism seems to be the dominant contribution in peripheral collisions. (orig.)

  19. Proximal femoral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Lawrence X

    2002-01-01

    Fractures of the proximal femur include fractures of the head, neck, intertrochanteric, and subtrochanteric regions. Head fractures commonly accompany dislocations. Neck fractures and intertrochanteric fractures occur with greatest frequency in elderly patients with a low bone mineral density and are produced by low-energy mechanisms. Subtrochanteric fractures occur in a predominantly strong cortical osseous region which is exposed to large compressive stresses. Implants used to address these fractures must be able to accommodate significant loads while the fractures consolidate. Complications secondary to these injuries produce significant morbidity and include infection, nonunion, malunion, decubitus ulcers, fat emboli, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, pneumonia, myocardial infarction, stroke, and death.

  20. Application of oxime-diversification to optimize ligand interactions within a cryptic pocket of the polo-like kinase 1 polo-box domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xue Zhi; Hymel, David; Burke, Terrence R

    2016-10-15

    By a process involving initial screening of a set of 87 aldehydes using an oxime ligation-based strategy, we were able to achieve a several-fold affinity enhancement over one of the most potent previously known polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) polo-box domain (PBD) binding inhibitors. This improved binding may result by accessing a newly identified auxiliary region proximal to a key hydrophobic cryptic pocket on the surface of the protein. Our findings could have general applicability to the design of PBD-binding antagonists. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Autocrine signal transmission with extracellular ligand degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratov, C B; Posta, F; Shvartsman, S Y

    2009-03-01

    Traveling waves of cell signaling in epithelial layers orchestrate a number of important processes in developing and adult tissues. These waves can be mediated by positive feedback autocrine loops, a mode of cell signaling where binding of a diffusible extracellular ligand to a cell surface receptor can lead to further ligand release. We formulate and analyze a biophysical model that accounts for ligand-induced ligand release, extracellular ligand diffusion and ligand-receptor interaction. We focus on the case when the main mode for ligand degradation is extracellular and analyze the problem with the sharp threshold positive feedback nonlinearity. We derive expressions that link the speed of propagation and other characteristics of traveling waves to the parameters of the biophysical processes, such as diffusion rates, receptor expression level, etc. Analyzing the derived expressions we found that traveling waves in such systems can exhibit a number of unusual properties, e.g. non-monotonic dependence of the speed of propagation on ligand diffusivity. Our results for the fully developed traveling fronts can be used to analyze wave initiation from localized perturbations, a scenario that frequently arises in the in vitro models of epithelial wound healing, and guide future modeling studies of cell communication in epithelial layers.

  2. Impact of protein and ligand impurities on ITC-derived protein-ligand thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüner, Stefan; Neeb, Manuel; Barandun, Luzi Jakob; Sielaff, Frank; Hohn, Christoph; Kojima, Shun; Steinmetzer, Torsten; Diederich, François; Klebe, Gerhard

    2014-09-01

    The thermodynamic characterization of protein-ligand interactions by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a powerful tool in drug design, giving valuable insight into the interaction driving forces. ITC is thought to require protein and ligand solutions of high quality, meaning both the absence of contaminants as well as accurately determined concentrations. Ligands synthesized to deviating purity and protein of different pureness were titrated by ITC. Data curation was attempted also considering information from analytical techniques to correct stoichiometry. We used trypsin and tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (TGT), together with high affinity ligands to investigate the effect of errors in protein concentration as well as the impact of ligand impurities on the apparent thermodynamics. We found that errors in protein concentration did not change the thermodynamic properties obtained significantly. However, most ligand impurities led to pronounced changes in binding enthalpy. If protein binding of the respective impurity is not expected, the actual ligand concentration was corrected for and the thus revised data compared to thermodynamic properties obtained with the respective pure ligand. Even in these cases, we observed differences in binding enthalpy of about 4kJ⋅mol(-1), which is considered significant. Our results indicate that ligand purity is the critical parameter to monitor if accurate thermodynamic data of a protein-ligand complex are to be recorded. Furthermore, artificially changing fitting parameters to obtain a sound interaction stoichiometry in the presence of uncharacterized ligand impurities may lead to thermodynamic parameters significantly deviating from the accurate thermodynamic signature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation of hyperfine interactions in hafnium compounds with F1-, OH1-, and EDTA ligands by perturbed γ-γ angular correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, Antonio A.; Silva, Andreia dos S.; Lapolli, Andre L.; Carbonari, Artur W.; Saxena, Rajendra N.

    2011-01-01

    In this study the hyperfine parameters, including the dynamical nature, Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) spectroscopy was used to measure the hyperfine parameters in molecules of ligand compounds in solutions. The measurements were carried out at 295 K and 77 K using 181 Hf → 181 Ta, as probe nuclei. Samples were prepared by adding a small volume of radioactive solution containing the probe nuclei in aqueous solution, buffer solution and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) used as a ligand with pH between 4 and 5 which correspond to the pH of the saturated EDTA solution and in buffer solution with pH between 9 and 10. The results made possible to understand the impact of each method for PAC measurements. Finally a comparative analysis for the several methods of inserting of the probe nuclei in the sample was made, considering chemical and nuclear aspects. The lack of measurements in this kind of samples justifies the importance of the obtained results. (author)

  4. Application of the perturbed angular correlation in the investigation of hyperfine interactions in compounds of hafnium, indium and cadmium with F1-, OH1- and EDTA ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, Antonio Acleto

    2011-01-01

    In this study the hyperfine parameters, including the dynamical nature, Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) spectroscopy was used to measure the hyperfine parameters in molecules of ligand compounds in solutions. The measurements were carried out at 295 K and 77 K using 111 In → 111 Cd, 181 Hf → 181 Ta and 111m Cd → 111 Cd, as probe nuclei. Samples were prepared by adding a small volume of radioactive solution containing the probe nuclei in aqueous solution, buffer solution and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) used as a ligand with pH 4.3 which correspond to the pH of the saturated EDTA solution and in buffer solution with pH between 9 and 10. The results made possible to understand the impact of each method for PAC measurements. Finally a comparative analysis for the several methods of inserting of the probe nuclei in the sample was made, considering chemical and nuclear aspects. The lack of measurements in this kind of samples justifies the importance of the obtained results. (author)

  5. Investigation of hyperfine interactions in hafnium compounds with F{sup 1-}, OH{sup 1-}, and EDTA ligands by perturbed {gamma}-{gamma} angular correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaral, Antonio A.; Silva, Andreia dos S.; Lapolli, Andre L.; Carbonari, Artur W.; Saxena, Rajendra N., E-mail: alapolli@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In this study the hyperfine parameters, including the dynamical nature, Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) spectroscopy was used to measure the hyperfine parameters in molecules of ligand compounds in solutions. The measurements were carried out at 295 K and 77 K using {sup 181}Hf {yields}{sup 181}Ta, as probe nuclei. Samples were prepared by adding a small volume of radioactive solution containing the probe nuclei in aqueous solution, buffer solution and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) used as a ligand with pH between 4 and 5 which correspond to the pH of the saturated EDTA solution and in buffer solution with pH between 9 and 10. The results made possible to understand the impact of each method for PAC measurements. Finally a comparative analysis for the several methods of inserting of the probe nuclei in the sample was made, considering chemical and nuclear aspects. The lack of measurements in this kind of samples justifies the importance of the obtained results. (author)

  6. Echosonography with proximity sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thaisiam, W; Laithong, T; Meekhun, S; Chaiwathyothin, N; Thanlarp, P; Danworaphong, S

    2013-01-01

    We propose the use of a commercial ultrasonic proximity sensor kit for profiling an altitude-varying surface by employing echosonography. The proximity sensor kit, two identical transducers together with its dedicated operating circuit, is used as a profiler for the construction of an image. Ultrasonic pulses are emitted from one of the transducers and received by the other. The time duration between the pulses allows us to determine the traveling distance of each pulse. In the experiment, the circuit is used with the addition of two copper wires for directing the outgoing and incoming signals to an oscilloscope. The time of flight of ultrasonic pulses can thus be determined. Square grids of 5 × 5 cm 2 are made from fishing lines, forming pixels in the image. The grids are designed to hold the detection unit in place, about 30 cm above a flat surface. The surface to be imaged is constructed to be height varying and placed on the flat surface underneath the grids. Our result shows that an image of the profiled surface can be created by varying the location of the detection unit along the grid. We also investigate the deviation in relation to the time of flight of the ultrasonic pulse. Such an experiment should be valuable for conveying the concept of ultrasonic imaging to physical and medical science undergraduate students. Due to its simplicity, the setup could be made in any undergraduate laboratory relatively inexpensively and it requires no complex parts. The results illustrate the concept of echosonography. (paper)

  7. Effects of Fermentation and Extrusion on the Proximate Composition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    protein malnutrition persists as a principal health problem among children .... Proximate analysis: Moisture content ... nitrogen by a factor of 6.25. Crude fat ... Statistical analysis: The data were ..... interaction of amino acid in maillard reactions.

  8. Ultimate and proximate explanations of strong reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vromen, Jack

    2017-08-23

    Strong reciprocity (SR) has recently been subject to heated debate. In this debate, the "West camp" (West et al. in Evol Hum Behav 32(4):231-262, 2011), which is critical of the case for SR, and the "Laland camp" (Laland et al. in Science, 334(6062):1512-1516, 2011, Biol Philos 28(5):719-745, 2013), which is sympathetic to the case of SR, seem to take diametrically opposed positions. The West camp criticizes advocates of SR for conflating proximate and ultimate causation. SR is said to be a proximate mechanism that is put forward by its advocates as an ultimate explanation of human cooperation. The West camp thus accuses advocates of SR for not heeding Mayr's original distinction between ultimate and proximate causation. The Laland camp praises advocates of SR for revising Mayr's distinction. Advocates of SR are said to replace Mayr's uni-directional view on the relation between ultimate and proximate causes by the bi-directional one of reciprocal causation. The paper argues that both the West camp and the Laland camp misrepresent what advocates of SR are up to. The West camp is right that SR is a proximate cause of human cooperation. But rather than putting forward SR as an ultimate explanation, as the West camp argues, advocates of SR believe that SR itself is in need of ultimate explanation. Advocates of SR tend to take gene-culture co-evolutionary theory as the correct meta-theoretical framework for advancing ultimate explanations of SR. Appearances notwithstanding, gene-culture coevolutionary theory does not imply Laland et al.'s notion of reciprocal causation. "Reciprocal causation" suggests that proximate and ultimate causes interact simultaneously, while advocates of SR assume that they interact sequentially. I end by arguing that the best way to understand the debate is by disambiguating Mayr's ultimate-proximate distinction. I propose to reserve "ultimate" and "proximate" for different sorts of explanations, and to use other terms for distinguishing

  9. Keldysh proximity action for disordered superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feigel'man, M.V.; Larkin, A.I.; Skvortsov, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    We review a novel approach to the superconductive proximity effect in disordered normal-superconducting (N-S) structures. The method is based on the multicharge Keldysh action and is suitable for the treatment of interaction and fluctuation effects. As an application of the formalism, we study the subgap conductance and noise in two-dimensional N-S system in the presence of the electron-electron interaction in the Cooper channel. It is shown that singular nature of the interaction correction at large scales leads to a nonmonotonous temperature, voltage and magnetic field dependence of the Andreev conductance. (author)

  10. Ligand and proton exchange dynamics in recombinant human myoglobin mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambright, D G; Balasubramanian, S; Boxer, S G

    1989-05-05

    Site-specific mutants of human myoglobin have been prepared in which lysine 45 is replaced by arginine (K45R) and aspartate 60 by glutamate (D60E), in order to examine the influence of these residues and their interaction on the dynamics of the protein. These proteins were studied by a variety of methods, including one and two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, exchange kinetics for the distal and proximal histidine NH protons as a function of pH in the met cyano forms, flash photolysis of the CO forms, and ligand replacement kinetics. The electronic absorption and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the CO forms of these proteins are virtually identical, indicating that the structure of the heme pocket is unaltered by these mutations. There are, however, substantial changes in the dynamics of both CO binding and proton exchange for the mutant K45R, whereas the mutant D60E exhibits behavior indistinguishable from the reference human myoglobin. K45R has a faster CO bimolecular recombination rate and slower CO off-rate relative to the reference. The kinetics for CO binding are independent of pH (6.5 to 10) as well as ionic strength (0 to 1 M-NaCl). The exchange rate for the distal histidine NH is substantially lower for K45R than the reference, whereas the proximal histidine NH exchange rate is unaltered. The exchange behavior of the human proteins is similar to that reported for a comparison of the exchange rates for myoglobins having lysine at position 45 with sperm whale myoglobin, which has arginine at this position. This indicates that the differences in exchange rates reflects largely the Lys----Arg substitution. The lack of a simple correlation for the CO kinetics with this substitution means that these are sensitive to other factors as well. Specific kinetic models, whereby substitution of arginine for lysine at position 45 can affect ligand binding dynamics, are outlined. These experiments demonstrate that a relatively

  11. Analogies and surprising differences between recombinant nitric oxide synthase-like proteins from Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus anthracis in their interactions with l-arginine analogs and iron ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salard, Isabelle; Mercey, Emilie; Rekka, Eleni; Boucher, Jean-Luc; Nioche, Pierre; Mikula, Ivan; Martasek, Pavel; Raman, C S; Mansuy, Daniel

    2006-12-01

    Genome sequencing has recently shown the presence of genes coding for NO-synthase (NOS)-like proteins in bacteria. The roles of these proteins remain unclear. The interactions of a series of l-arginine (l-arg) analogs and iron ligands with two recombinant NOS-like proteins from Staphylococcus aureus (saNOS) and Bacillus anthracis (baNOS) have been studied by UV-visible spectroscopy. SaNOS and baNOS in their ferric native state, as well as their complexes with l-arg analogs and with various ligands, exhibit spectral characteristics highly similar to the corresponding complexes of heme-thiolate proteins such as cytochromes P450 and NOSs. However, saNOS greatly differs from baNOS at the level of three main properties: (i) native saNOS mainly exists under an hexacoordinated low-spin ferric state whereas native baNOS is mainly high-spin, (ii) the addition of tetrahydrobiopterin (H4B) or H4B analogs leads to an increase of the affinity of l-arg for saNOS but not for baNOS, and (iii) saNOS Fe(II), contrary to baNOS, binds relatively bulky ligands such as nitrosoalkanes and tert-butylisocyanide. Thus, saNOS exhibits properties very similar to those of the oxygenase domain of inducible NOS (iNOS(oxy)) not containing H4B, as expected for a NOSoxy-like protein that does not contain H4B. By contrast, the properties of baNOS which look like those of H4B-containing iNOS(oxy) are unexpected for a NOS-like protein not containing H4B. The origin of these surprising properties of baNOS remains to be determined.

  12. New pyrimidine based ligand capped gold and platinum nano particles: Synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial, antioxidant, DNA interaction and in vitro anticancer activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankarganesh, M; Adwin Jose, P; Dhaveethu Raja, J; Kesavan, M P; Vadivel, M; Rajesh, J; Jeyamurugan, R; Senthil Kumar, R; Karthikeyan, S

    2017-11-01

    In this research work, we have synthesized new pyrimidine based Schiff base ligand, 2-((4,6-dimethoxypyrimidine-2-yl)methyleneenamino)-6-methoxyphenol (DPMM) capped gold (Au) and platinum (Pt) nanoparticles (NPs) by modified Brust-Schiffrin method. The characteristics of DPMM-Au NPs and DPMM-Pt NPs have been examined by UV-Visible, FTIR, SEM, TEM and powder XRD analysis. SEM analysis result shows that surface morphology of the DPMM-Au NPs and DPMM-Pt NPs are in granular and spherical shape, correspondingly. The size of the DPMM-Au NPs and DPMM-Pt NPs are approximately 38.14±4.5 and 58.64±3.0nm respectively, which confirmed by TEM analysis. The DPMM-Au NPs and DPMM-Pt NPs have potent antimicrobial against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Shigella sonnei, Staphylococcus aureus and Aspergillus niger, Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Mucor indicus, Rhizopus strains. The DPMM-Au NPs and DPMM-Pt NPs have good antioxidant activities than the free ligand (DPMM). The spectroscopic and viscometric measurement confirms the hydrophobic DNA binding abilities of the newly prepared DPMM capped metal NPs. Moreover, the in vitro anticancer activity of DPMM, DPMM-Au NPs and DPMM-Pt NPs against cancer (MCF-7, HeLa & HEp2) and normal (NHDF) cell lines have performed using MTT assay. These results reveals that, DPMM-Au NPs and DPMM-Pt NPs having significant cytotoxic activity against the cancer cell lines and least toxic effect on normal cell line as compared to standard drug cisplatin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Children's proximal societal conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanek, Anja Hvidtfeldt

    2018-01-01

    that is above or outside the institutional setting or the children’s everyday life, but something that is represented through societal structures and actual persons participating (in political ways) within the institutional settings, in ways that has meaning to children’s possibilities to participate, learn...... and develop. Understanding school or kindergarten as (part of) the children’s proximal societal conditions for development and learning, means for instance that considerations about an inclusive agenda are no longer simply thoughts about the school – for economic reasons – having space for as many pupils...... as possible (schools for all). Such thoughts can be supplemented by reflections about which version of ‘the societal’ we wish to present our children with, and which version of ‘the societal’ we wish to set up as the condition for children’s participation and development. The point is to clarify or sharpen...

  14. Proximity detection system underground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denis Kent [Mine Site Technologies (Australia)

    2008-04-15

    Mine Site Technologies (MST) with the support ACARP and Xstrata Coal NSW, as well as assistance from Centennial Coal, has developed a Proximity Detection System to proof of concept stage as per plan. The basic aim of the project was to develop a system to reduce the risk of the people coming into contact with vehicles in an uncontrolled manner (i.e. being 'run over'). The potential to extend the developed technology into other areas, such as controls for vehicle-vehicle collisions and restricting access of vehicle or people into certain zones (e.g. non FLP vehicles into Hazardous Zones/ERZ) was also assessed. The project leveraged off MST's existing Intellectual Property and experience gained with our ImPact TRACKER tagging technology, allowing the development to be fast tracked. The basic concept developed uses active RFID Tags worn by miners underground to be detected by vehicle mounted Readers. These Readers in turn provide outputs that can be used to alert a driver (e.g. by light and/or audible alarm) that a person (Tag) approaching within their vicinity. The prototype/test kit developed proved the concept and technology, the four main components being: Active RFID Tags to send out signals for detection by vehicle mounted receivers; Receiver electronics to detect RFID Tags approaching within the vicinity of the unit to create a long range detection system (60 m to 120 m); A transmitting/exciter device to enable inner detection zone (within 5 m to 20 m); and A software/hardware device to process & log incoming Tags reads and create certain outputs. Tests undertaken in the laboratory and at a number of mine sites, confirmed the technology path taken could form the basis of a reliable Proximity Detection/Alert System.

  15. 3D coordination polymers with nitrilotriacetic and 4,4'-bipyridyl mixed ligands: structural variation based on dinuclear or tetranuclear subunits assisted by Na-O and/or O-H...O interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Xing-Qiang; Jiang, Ji-Jun; Chen, Chun-Long; Kang, Bei-Sheng; Su, Cheng-Yong

    2005-06-27

    The reactions of Cu(II) with the mixed nitrilotriacetic acid (H3NTA) and 4,4'-bipyridyl (4,4'-bpy) ligands in different metal-to-ligand ratios in the presence of NaOH and NaClO4 afforded two complexes, Na3[Cu2(NTA)2(4,4'-bpy)]ClO4 x 5H2O (1) and [Cu2(NTA) (4,4'-bpy)2]ClO4 x 4H2O (2). The two complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, IR, XRD, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. 1 contains a basic doubly negatively charged [Cu2(NTA)2(4,4'-bpy)]2- dinuclear unit which was further assembled via multiple Na-O and O-H...O interactions into a three-dimensional (3D) pillared-layer structure. 2 features a two-dimensional (2D) undulated brick-wall architecture containing a basic doubly positively charged [Cu4(NTA)2(4,4'-bpy)2]2+ tetranuclear unit. The 2D network possesses large cavities hosting guest molecules and was further assembled via O-H...O hydrogen bonds into a 3D structure with several channels running in different directions.

  16. PROXIMITY MANAGEMENT IN CRISIS CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Dorin BUMBENECI

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate the level of assimilation for the terms "Proximity Management" and "Proximity Manager", both in the specialized literature and in practice. The study has two parts: the theoretical research of the two terms, and an evaluation of the use of Proximity management in 32 companies in Gorj, Romania. The object of the evaluation resides in 27 companies with less than 50 employees and 5 companies with more than 50 employees.

  17. PuF, an antimetastatic and developmental signaling protein, interacts with the Alzheimer’s amyloid-β precursor protein via a tissue-specific proximal regulatory element (PRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahiri Debomoy K

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD is intimately tied to amyloid-β (Aβ peptide. Extraneuronal brain plaques consisting primarily of Aβ aggregates are a hallmark of AD. Intraneuronal Aβ subunits are strongly implicated in disease progression. Protein sequence mutations of the Aβ precursor protein (APP account for a small proportion of AD cases, suggesting that regulation of the associated gene (APP may play a more important role in AD etiology. The APP promoter possesses a novel 30 nucleotide sequence, or “proximal regulatory element” (PRE, at −76/−47, from the +1 transcription start site that confers cell type specificity. This PRE contains sequences that make it vulnerable to epigenetic modification and may present a viable target for drug studies. We examined PRE-nuclear protein interaction by gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA and PRE mutant EMSA. This was followed by functional studies of PRE mutant/reporter gene fusion clones. Results EMSA probed with the PRE showed DNA-protein interaction in multiple nuclear extracts and in human brain tissue nuclear extract in a tissue-type specific manner. We identified transcription factors that are likely to bind the PRE, using competition gel shift and gel supershift: Activator protein 2 (AP2, nm23 nucleoside diphosphate kinase/metastatic inhibitory protein (PuF, and specificity protein 1 (SP1. These sites crossed a known single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP. EMSA with PRE mutants and promoter/reporter clone transfection analysis further implicated PuF in cells and extracts. Functional assays of mutant/reporter clone transfections were evaluated by ELISA of reporter protein levels. EMSA and ELISA results correlated by meta-analysis. Conclusions We propose that PuF may regulate the APP gene promoter and that AD risk may be increased by interference with PuF regulation at the PRE. PuF is targeted by calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor 1, which also

  18. AutoSite: an automated approach for pseudo-ligands prediction—from ligand-binding sites identification to predicting key ligand atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindranath, Pradeep Anand; Sanner, Michel F.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The identification of ligand-binding sites from a protein structure facilitates computational drug design and optimization, and protein function assignment. We introduce AutoSite: an efficient software tool for identifying ligand-binding sites and predicting pseudo ligand corresponding to each binding site identified. Binding sites are reported as clusters of 3D points called fills in which every point is labelled as hydrophobic or as hydrogen bond donor or acceptor. From these fills AutoSite derives feature points: a set of putative positions of hydrophobic-, and hydrogen-bond forming ligand atoms. Results: We show that AutoSite identifies ligand-binding sites with higher accuracy than other leading methods, and produces fills that better matches the ligand shape and properties, than the fills obtained with a software program with similar capabilities, AutoLigand. In addition, we demonstrate that for the Astex Diverse Set, the feature points identify 79% of hydrophobic ligand atoms, and 81% and 62% of the hydrogen acceptor and donor hydrogen ligand atoms interacting with the receptor, and predict 81.2% of water molecules mediating interactions between ligand and receptor. Finally, we illustrate potential uses of the predicted feature points in the context of lead optimization in drug discovery projects. Availability and Implementation: http://adfr.scripps.edu/AutoDockFR/autosite.html Contact: sanner@scripps.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27354702

  19. Cholinesterases: structure of the active site and mechanism of the effect of cholinergic receptor blockers on the rate of interaction with ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antokhin, A M; Gainullina, E T; Taranchenko, V F; Ryzhikov, S B; Yavaeva, D K

    2010-01-01

    Modern views on the structure of cholinesterase active sites and the mechanism of their interaction with organophosphorus inhibitors are considered. The attention is focused on the mechanism of the effect of cholinergic receptor blockers, acetylcholine antagonists, on the rate of interaction of acetylcholine esterase with organophosphorus inhibitors.

  20. Cholinesterases: structure of the active site and mechanism of the effect of cholinergic receptor blockers on the rate of interaction with ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antokhin, A M; Gainullina, E T; Taranchenko, V F [Federal State Agency ' 27 Scientific Centre of Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation' (Russian Federation); Ryzhikov, S B; Yavaeva, D K [Department of Physics, M.V.Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2010-10-19

    Modern views on the structure of cholinesterase active sites and the mechanism of their interaction with organophosphorus inhibitors are considered. The attention is focused on the mechanism of the effect of cholinergic receptor blockers, acetylcholine antagonists, on the rate of interaction of acetylcholine esterase with organophosphorus inhibitors.

  1. Autocrine signal transmission with extracellular ligand degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muratov, C B; Posta, F; Shvartsman, S Y

    2009-01-01

    Traveling waves of cell signaling in epithelial layers orchestrate a number of important processes in developing and adult tissues. These waves can be mediated by positive feedback autocrine loops, a mode of cell signaling where binding of a diffusible extracellular ligand to a cell surface receptor can lead to further ligand release. We formulate and analyze a biophysical model that accounts for ligand-induced ligand release, extracellular ligand diffusion and ligand–receptor interaction. We focus on the case when the main mode for ligand degradation is extracellular and analyze the problem with the sharp threshold positive feedback nonlinearity. We derive expressions that link the speed of propagation and other characteristics of traveling waves to the parameters of the biophysical processes, such as diffusion rates, receptor expression level, etc. Analyzing the derived expressions we found that traveling waves in such systems can exhibit a number of unusual properties, e.g. non-monotonic dependence of the speed of propagation on ligand diffusivity. Our results for the fully developed traveling fronts can be used to analyze wave initiation from localized perturbations, a scenario that frequently arises in the in vitro models of epithelial wound healing, and guide future modeling studies of cell communication in epithelial layers

  2. Schiff base ligand

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Low-temperature stoichiometric Schiff base reaction in air in 3 : 1 mole ratio between benz- aldehyde and triethylenetetramine (trien) in methanol yields a novel tetraaza µ-bis(bidentate) acyclic ligand L. It was .... electrochemical work was performed as reported in ..... change in ligand shape through change in oxidation.

  3. Interaction of amatoxins with plant cells and RNA polymerases II: selection of amanitin-resistant cell lines and synthesis of amanitin-based affinity ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    A series of experiments directed toward deriving basic information regarding plant RNA polymerase II is presented. The experiments described relate to the potential of isolating RNA polymerase II mutants in plants, using carrot cell cultures as models. Additionally, the synthesis of amanitin-based affinity ligands to immobilize isolated plant RNA polymerase II and associated transcriptional complexes is described. RNA polymerase II activities have been isolated from suspension cultures of carrot and compared to other plant RNA polymerases II with respect to subunit analysis and inhibition with α-amanitin. RNA polymerase II purified by polymin P absorption, DE52, phosphocellulose, and RNA-agarose chromatography is shown to copurify with proteins of 175 (and 200), 135, 70, 43, 28, 22, and 17 kdaltons apparent molecular weights. Conditions for accurate determination of amanitin inhibition of the enzyme are established using 3 H-amanitin and are presented for the first time for plant RNA polymerase II; RNA polymerase II from these cultures is shown to be inhibited by 50% at 3-5 nM by α-amanitin, a value 10-50 times lower than previously reported

  4. Correlation between DNA interactions and cytotoxic activity of four new ternary compounds of copper(II) with N-donor heterocyclic ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Priscila P; Guerra, Wendell; Dos Santos, Geandson Coelho; Fernandes, Nelson G; Silveira, Josiane N; da Costa Ferreira, Ana M; Bortolotto, Tiago; Terenzi, Hernán; Bortoluzzi, Adailton João; Neves, Ademir; Pereira-Maia, Elene C

    2014-03-01

    Four new ternary complexes of copper(II) were synthesized and characterized: [Cu(hyd)(bpy)(acn)(ClO4)](ClO4)] (1), [Cu(hyd)(phen)(acn)(ClO4)](ClO4)] (2), [Cu(Shyd)(bpy)(acn)(ClO4)](ClO4)] (3) and [Cu(Shyd)(phen)(acn)(ClO4)](ClO4)] (4), in which acn=acetonitrile; hyd=2-furoic acid hydrazide, bpy=2,2-bipyridine; phen=1,10-phenanthroline and Shyd=2-thiophenecarboxylic acid hydrazide. The cytotoxic activity of the complexes in a chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line was investigated. All complexes are able to enter cells and inhibit cellular growth in a concentration-dependent manner, with an activity higher than that of the corresponding free ligands. The substitution of Shyd for hyd increases the activity, while the substitution of bpy for phen renders the complex less active. Therefore, the most potent complex is 4 with an IC50 value of 1.5±0.2μM. The intracellular copper concentration needed to inhibit 50% of cell growth is approximately 7×10(-15)mol/cell. It is worth notifying that a correlation between cytotoxic activity, DNA binding affinity and DNA cleavage was found: 1<3<2<4. © 2013.

  5. Characterization of protein/ligand interactions by 1H/3H exchange: application to the hAsf1/ histone H3 complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousseau, G.

    2007-05-01

    In the first chapter will be exposed the main current methods of identification to high debit of the interactions protein-protein. Then the methods allowing to characterize the surfaces of interaction or to determine the structures of the complexes will be listed by discussing the main advantages and the inconveniences. Our approach of characterization of the zones of interaction protein-protein is a method of 'foot-printing' 1, based on the identification and radicals' quantification formed on the residues of proteins accessible to the water. The second chapter will so discuss the development of this method of radical identification using the atom of tritium as radioactive label. Our approach will finally be validated in the third chapter by applying it to the characterization of amino acids involved in the interaction enter the human protein anti silencing factor 1 (hAsf11-156) and a fragment of the histone H 3 . (N.C.)

  6. On the accuracy of DFT methods in reproducing ligand substitution energies for transition metal complexes in solution: The role of dispersive interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Jacobsen, Heiko; Cavallo, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    phosphanes, while functionals not including dispersion interaction reproduce the experimental trends with reasonable accuracy. In case of the DFT-D functionals, inclusion of a cut-off distance on the dispersive term resolves this issue, and results in a

  7. Study of the interactions between a proline-rich protein and a flavan-3-ol by NMR: residual structures in the natively unfolded protein provides anchorage points for the ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Christine; Paté, Franck; Cheynier, Véronique; Delsuc, Marc-André

    2009-09-01

    Astringency is one of the major organoleptic properties of food and beverages that are made from plants, such as tea, chocolate, beer, or red wine. This sensation is thought to be due to interactions between tannins and salivary proline-rich proteins, which are natively unfolded proteins. A human salivary proline-rich protein, namely IB-5, was produced by the recombinant method. Its interactions with a model tannin, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the major flavan-3-ol in green tea, were studied here. Circular dichroism experiments showed that IB-5 presents residual structures (PPII helices) when the ionic strength is close to that in saliva. In the presence of these residual structures, IB-5 undergoes an increase in structural content upon binding to EGCG. NMR data corroborated the presence of preformed structural elements within the protein prior to binding and a partial assignment was proposed, showing partial structuration. TOCSY experiments showed that amino acids that are involved in PPII helices are more likely to interact with EGCG than those in random coil regions, as if they were anchorage points for the ligand. The signal from IB-5 in the DOSY NMR spectrum revealed an increase in polydispersity upon addition of EGCG while the mean hydrodynamic radius remained unchanged. This strongly suggests the formation of IB-5/EGCG aggregates.

  8. Dockomatic - automated ligand creation and docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Casey W; Jacob, Reed B; McDougal, Owen M; Hampikian, Greg; Andersen, Tim

    2010-11-08

    The application of computational modeling to rationally design drugs and characterize macro biomolecular receptors has proven increasingly useful due to the accessibility of computing clusters and clouds. AutoDock is a well-known and powerful software program used to model ligand to receptor binding interactions. In its current version, AutoDock requires significant amounts of user time to setup and run jobs, and collect results. This paper presents DockoMatic, a user friendly Graphical User Interface (GUI) application that eases and automates the creation and management of AutoDock jobs for high throughput screening of ligand to receptor interactions. DockoMatic allows the user to invoke and manage AutoDock jobs on a single computer or cluster, including jobs for evaluating secondary ligand interactions. It also automates the process of collecting, summarizing, and viewing results. In addition, DockoMatic automates creation of peptide ligand .pdb files from strings of single-letter amino acid abbreviations. DockoMatic significantly reduces the complexity of managing multiple AutoDock jobs by facilitating ligand and AutoDock job creation and management.

  9. Dockomatic - automated ligand creation and docking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hampikian Greg

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of computational modeling to rationally design drugs and characterize macro biomolecular receptors has proven increasingly useful due to the accessibility of computing clusters and clouds. AutoDock is a well-known and powerful software program used to model ligand to receptor binding interactions. In its current version, AutoDock requires significant amounts of user time to setup and run jobs, and collect results. This paper presents DockoMatic, a user friendly Graphical User Interface (GUI application that eases and automates the creation and management of AutoDock jobs for high throughput screening of ligand to receptor interactions. Results DockoMatic allows the user to invoke and manage AutoDock jobs on a single computer or cluster, including jobs for evaluating secondary ligand interactions. It also automates the process of collecting, summarizing, and viewing results. In addition, DockoMatic automates creation of peptide ligand .pdb files from strings of single-letter amino acid abbreviations. Conclusions DockoMatic significantly reduces the complexity of managing multiple AutoDock jobs by facilitating ligand and AutoDock job creation and management.

  10. The utilization of BSA-modified chip on the investigation of ligand ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... investigation of ligand/protein interaction with surface plasma resonance ... for immobilizing proteins or low-molecular-weight ligands to dextran ..... contamination in dynamic aqueous environments using optical sensors. Anal.

  11. Structure-Based Design of Peptidic Inhibitors of the Interaction between CC Chemokine Ligand 5 (CCL5) and Human Neutrophil Peptides 1 (HNP1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wichapong, Kanin; Alard, Jean-Eric; Ortega-Gomez, Almudena; Weber, Christian; Hackeng, Tilman M.; Soehnlein, Oliver; Nicolaes, Gerry A. F.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are receiving increasing interest, much sparked by the realization that they represent druggable targets. Recently, we successfully developed a peptidic inhibitor, RRYGTSKYQ ("SKY" peptide), that shows high potential in vitro and in vivo to interrupt a PPI between

  12. ProxImaL: efficient image optimization using proximal algorithms

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix; Diamond, Steven; Nieß ner, Matthias; Ragan-Kelley, Jonathan; Heidrich, Wolfgang; Wetzstein, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    domain-specific language and compiler for image optimization problems that makes it easy to experiment with different problem formulations and algorithm choices. The language uses proximal operators as the fundamental building blocks of a variety

  13. A proximal point algorithm with generalized proximal distances to BEPs

    OpenAIRE

    Bento, G. C.; Neto, J. X. Cruz; Lopes, J. O.; Soares Jr, P. A.; Soubeyran, A.

    2014-01-01

    We consider a bilevel problem involving two monotone equilibrium bifunctions and we show that this problem can be solved by a proximal point method with generalized proximal distances. We propose a framework for the convergence analysis of the sequences generated by the algorithm. This class of problems is very interesting because it covers mathematical programs and optimization problems under equilibrium constraints. As an application, we consider the problem of the stability and change dyna...

  14. Fractures of the proximal humerus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorson, Stig

    2013-01-01

    Fractures of the proximal humerus have been diagnosed and managed since the earliest known surgical texts. For more than four millennia the preferred treatment was forceful traction, closed reduction, and immobilization with linen soaked in combinations of oil, honey, alum, wine, or cerate......, classification of proximal humeral fractures remains a challenge for the conduct, reporting, and interpretation of clinical trials. The evidence for the benefits of surgery in complex fractures of the proximal humerus is weak. In three systematic reviews I studied the outcome after locking plate osteosynthesis...

  15. Type 2 innate lymphoid cell suppression by regulatory T cells attenuates airway hyperreactivity and requires inducible T-cell costimulator-inducible T-cell costimulator ligand interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigas, Diamanda; Lewis, Gavin; Aron, Jennifer L; Wang, Bowen; Banie, Homayon; Sankaranarayanan, Ishwarya; Galle-Treger, Lauriane; Maazi, Hadi; Lo, Richard; Freeman, Gordon J; Sharpe, Arlene H; Soroosh, Pejman; Akbari, Omid

    2017-05-01

    Atopic diseases, including asthma, exacerbate type 2 immune responses and involve a number of immune cell types, including regulatory T (Treg) cells and the emerging type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s). Although ILC2s are potent producers of type 2 cytokines, the regulation of ILC2 activation and function is not well understood. In the present study, for the first time, we evaluate how Treg cells interact with pulmonary ILC2s and control their function. ILC2s and Treg cells were evaluated by using in vitro suppression assays, cell-contact assays, and gene expression panels. Also, human ILC2s and Treg cells were adoptively transferred into NOD SCID γC-deficient mice, which were given isotype or anti-inducible T-cell costimulator ligand (ICOSL) antibodies and then challenged with IL-33 and assessed for airway hyperreactivity. We show that induced Treg cells, but not natural Treg cells, effectively suppress the production of the ILC2-driven proinflammatory cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, our data reveal the necessity of inducible T-cell costimulator (ICOS)-ICOS ligand cell contact for Treg cell-mediated ILC2 suppression alongside the suppressive cytokines TGF-β and IL-10. Using a translational approach, we then demonstrate that human induced Treg cells suppress syngeneic human ILC2s through ICOSL to control airway inflammation in a humanized ILC2 mouse model. These findings suggest that peripheral expansion of induced Treg cells can serve as a promising therapeutic target against ILC2-dependent asthma. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A molecular dynamics study on the transport of a charged biomolecule in a polymeric adsorbent medium and its adsorption onto a charged ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccardi, E; Wang, J-C; Liapis, A I

    2010-08-28

    The transport of a charged adsorbate biomolecule in a porous polymeric adsorbent medium and its adsorption onto the covalently immobilized ligands have been modeled and investigated using molecular dynamics modeling and simulations as the third part of a novel fundamental methodology developed for studying ion-exchange chromatography based bioseparations. To overcome computational challenges, a novel simulation approach is devised where appropriate atomistic and coarse grain models are employed simultaneously and the transport of the adsorbate is characterized through a number of locations representative of the progress of the transport process. The adsorbate biomolecule for the system studied in this work changes shape, orientation, and lateral position in order to proceed toward the site where adsorption occurs and exhibits decreased mass transport coefficients as it approaches closer to the immobilized ligand. Furthermore, because the ligands are surrounded by counterions carrying the same type of charge as the adsorbate biomolecule, it takes the biomolecule repeated attempts to approach toward a ligand in order to displace the counterions in the proximity of the ligand and to finally become adsorbed. The formed adsorbate-ligand complex interacts with the counterions and polymeric molecules and is found to evolve slowly and continuously from one-site (monovalent) interaction to multisite (multivalent) interactions. Such a transition of the nature of adsorption reduces the overall adsorption capacity of the ligands in the adsorbent medium and results in a type of surface exclusion effect. Also, the adsorption of the biomolecule also presents certain volume exclusion effects by not only directly reducing the pore volume and the availability of the ligands in the adjacent regions, but also causing the polymeric molecules to change to more compact structures that could further shield certain ligands from being accessible to subsequent adsorbate molecules. These

  17. Human - Robot Proximity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickelsen, Niels Christian Mossfeldt

    The media and political/managerial levels focus on the opportunities to re-perform Denmark through digitization. Feeding assistive robotics is a welfare technology, relevant to citizens with low or no function in their arms. Despite national dissemination strategies, it proves difficult to recruit...... the study that took place as multi-sited ethnography at different locations in Denmark and Sweden. Based on desk research, observation of meals and interviews I examine socio-technological imaginaries and their practical implications. Human - robotics interaction demands engagement and understanding...

  18. Scintillation proximity assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, H.

    1980-01-01

    In a method of immunological assay two different classes of particles which interact at short distances to produce characteristic detectable signals are employed in a modification of the usual latex fixation test. In one embodiment an aqueous suspension of antigen coated tritiated latex particles (LH) and antigen coated polystyrene scintillant particles (L*) is employed to assay antibody in the aqueous medium. The amount of (LH) (L*) dimer formation and higher order aggregation induced and therefore the concentration of antibody (or antigen) present which caused the aggregation can be determined by using standard liquid scintillation counting equipment. (author)

  19. Study of the interactions between the transuranic elements and some environmental ligands by the hyphenated technique capillary electrophoresis: inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topin, S.

    2009-09-01

    In this work, the capabilities of the hyphenated Capillary Electrophoresis-ICP-MS technique are used to improve the knowledge on the transuranic element speciation in the environment (nuclear waste management) and in the framework of spent fuel reprocessing. Essential thermodynamical data have been determined for the first time for the interactions of the plutonium at the (5+) oxidation state (main soluble species of Pu of the surface water) in inorganic media (chloride, nitrate, sulfate, carbonate). This study enables to correct the existing model, based on the thermodynamical data of the neptunium at the (5+) oxidation state (analogue of the pentavalent plutonium). Furthermore, the hyphenated CE-ICP-MS technique has also been applied to study the interactions between DTPA, widely used in the nuclear industry, and the elements at the (3+) oxidation state (Pu, Am, Cm, Cf) and at the (4+) oxidation state (Pu, Np, Th). The results show for the first time the formation of mixed An(IV)/DTPA/OH complexes likely to play a key role on the actinide behavior in the field of the waste management. The study on the trivalent elements confirms the selectivity of DTPA versus the actinide in the framework of the actinide/lanthanide separation but proves that the covalency, responsible of the selectivity, are less important than the ionicity in the binding. (author)

  20. Towards ligand docking including explicit interface water molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Lemmon

    Full Text Available Small molecule docking predicts the interaction of a small molecule ligand with a protein at atomic-detail accuracy including position and conformation the ligand but also conformational changes of the protein upon ligand binding. While successful in the majority of cases, docking algorithms including RosettaLigand fail in some cases to predict the correct protein/ligand complex structure. In this study we show that simultaneous docking of explicit interface water molecules greatly improves Rosetta's ability to distinguish correct from incorrect ligand poses. This result holds true for both protein-centric water docking wherein waters are located relative to the protein binding site and ligand-centric water docking wherein waters move with the ligand during docking. Protein-centric docking is used to model 99 HIV-1 protease/protease inhibitor structures. We find protease inhibitor placement improving at a ratio of 9:1 when one critical interface water molecule is included in the docking simulation. Ligand-centric docking is applied to 341 structures from the CSAR benchmark of diverse protein/ligand complexes [1]. Across this diverse dataset we see up to 56% recovery of failed docking studies, when waters are included in the docking simulation.

  1. Plasmodium falciparum Hop (PfHop Interacts with the Hsp70 Chaperone in a Nucleotide-Dependent Fashion and Exhibits Ligand Selectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawanda Zininga

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (Hsps play an important role in the development and pathogenicity of malaria parasites. One of the most prominent functions of Hsps is to facilitate the folding of other proteins. Hsps are thought to play a crucial role when malaria parasites invade their host cells and during their subsequent development in hepatocytes and red blood cells. It is thought that Hsps maintain proteostasis under the unfavourable conditions that malaria parasites encounter in the host environment. Although heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 is capable of independent folding of some proteins, its functional cooperation with heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 facilitates folding of some proteins such as kinases and steroid hormone receptors into their fully functional forms. The cooperation of Hsp70 and Hsp90 occurs through an adaptor protein called Hsp70-Hsp90 organising protein (Hop. We previously characterised the Hop protein from Plasmodium falciparum (PfHop. We observed that the protein co-localised with the cytosol-localised chaperones, PfHsp70-1 and PfHsp90 at the blood stages of the malaria parasite. In the current study, we demonstrated that PfHop is a stress-inducible protein. We further explored the direct interaction between PfHop and PfHsp70-1 using far Western and surface plasmon resonance (SPR analyses. The interaction of the two proteins was further validated by co-immunoprecipitation studies. We observed that PfHop and PfHsp70-1 associate in the absence and presence of either ATP or ADP. However, ADP appears to promote the association of the two proteins better than ATP. In addition, we investigated the specific interaction between PfHop TPR subdomains and PfHsp70-1/ PfHsp90, using a split-GFP approach. This method allowed us to observe that TPR1 and TPR2B subdomains of PfHop bind preferentially to the C-terminus of PfHsp70-1 compared to PfHsp90. Conversely, the TPR2A motif preferentially interacted with the C-terminus of PfHsp90. Finally, we

  2. Superconducting proximity effect in topological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeg, Christopher R.

    In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in the proximity effect due to its role in the realization of topological superconductivity. In this dissertation, we discuss several results that have been obtained in the field of proximity-induced superconductivity and relate the results to the search for Majorana fermions. First, we show that repulsive electron-electron interactions can induce a non-Majorana zero-energy bound state at the interface between a conventional superconductor and a normal metal. We show that this state is very sensitive to disorder, owing to its lack of topological protection. Second, we show that Rashba spin-orbit coupling, which is one of the key ingredients in engineering a topological superconductor, induces triplet pairing in the proximity effect. When the spin-orbit coupling is strong (i.e., when the characteristic energy scale for spin-orbit coupling is comparable to the Fermi energy), the induced singlet and triplet pairing amplitudes can be comparable in magnitude. Finally, we discuss how the size of the proximity-induced gap, which appears in a low-dimensional material coupled to a superconductor, evolves as the thickness of the (quasi-)low-dimensional material is increased. We show that the induced gap can be comparable to the bulk energy gap of the underlying superconductor in materials that are much thicker than the Fermi wavelength, even in the presence of an interfacial barrier and strong Fermi surface mismatch. This result has important experimental consequences for topological superconductivity, as a sizable gap is required to isolate and detect the Majorana modes.

  3. Phonon structure in proximity tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarate, H.G.; Carbotte, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    We have iterated to convergence, for the first time, a set of four coupled real axis Eliashberg equations for the superconducting gap and renormalization functions on each side of a proximity sandwich. We find that the phenomenological procedures developed to extract the size of the normal side electron-phonon interaction from tunneling data are often reasonable but may in some cases need modifications. In all the cases considered the superconducting phonon structure reflected on the normal side, as well as other structures, shows considerable agreement with experiment as to size, shape, and variation with barrier transmission coefficient. Finally, we study the effects of depairing on these structures

  4. A Fluorescent Oligothiophene-Bis-Triazine ligand interacts with PrP fibrils and detects SDS-resistant oligomers in human prion diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imberdis, Thibaut; Ayrolles-Torro, Adeline; Duarte Rodrigues, Alysson; Torrent, Joan; Alvarez-Martinez, Maria Teresa; Kovacs, Gabor G; Verdier, Jean-Michel; Robitzer, Mike; Perrier, Véronique

    2016-01-26

    Prion diseases are characterized by the accumulation in the central nervous system of an abnormally folded isoform of the prion protein, named PrP(Sc). Aggregation of PrP(Sc) into oligomers and fibrils is critically involved in the pathogenesis of prion diseases. Oligomers are supposed to be the key neurotoxic agents in prion disease, so modulation of prion aggregation pathways with small molecules can be a valuable strategy for studying prion pathogenicity and for developing new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. We previously identified thienyl pyrimidine compounds that induce SDS-resistant PrP(Sc) (rSDS-PrP(Sc)) oligomers in prion-infected samples. Due to the low effective doses of the thienyl pyrimidine hits, we synthesized a quaterthiophene-bis-triazine compound, called MR100 to better evaluate their diagnostic and therapeutic potentials. This molecule exhibits a powerful activity inducing rSDS-PrP(Sc) oligomers at nanomolar concentrations in prion-infected cells. Fluorescence interaction studies of MR100 with mouse PrP fibrils showed substantial modification of the spectrum, and the interaction was confirmed in vitro by production of rSDS-oligomer species upon incubation of MR100 with fibrils in SDS-PAGE gel. We further explored whether MR100 compound has a potential to be used in the diagnosis of prion diseases. Our results showed that: (i) MR100 can detect rSDS-oligomers in prion-infected brain homogenates of various species, including human samples from CJD patients; (ii) A protocol, called "Rapid Centrifugation Assay" (RCA), was developed based on MR100 property of inducing rSDS-PrP(Sc) oligomers only in prion-infected samples, and avoiding the protease digestion step. RCA allows the detection of both PK-sensitive and PK-resistant PrP(Sc) species in rodents samples but also from patients with different CJD forms (sporadic and new variant); (iii) A correlation could be established between the amount of rSDS-PrP(Sc) oligomers revealed by MR100 and the

  5. Binding of hydrocarbons and other extremely weak ligands to transition metal complexes that coordinate hydrogen: Investigation of cis-interactions and delocalized bonding involving sigma bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubas, G.J.; Eckert, J.; Luo, X.L.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). At the forefront of chemistry are efforts to catalytically transform the inert C-H bonds in alkanes to more useful products using metal compounds. The goal is to observe binding and cleavage of alkane C-H bonds on metals or to use related silane Si-H bonding as models, analogous to the discovery of hydrogen (H 2 ) binding to metals. Studies of these unique sigma complexes (M hor-ellipsis H-Y; Y double-bond H, Si, C) will aid in developing new catalysts or technologies relevant to DOE interest, e.g., new methods for tritium isotope separation. Several transition metals (Mo, W, Mn, and Pt) were found to reversibly bind and cleave H 2 , silanes, and halocarbons. The first metal-SiH 4 complexes, thus serving as a model for methane reactions. A second goal is to study the dynamics and energetics of H-Y bonds on metals by neutron scattering, and evidence for interactions between bound H-Y and nearby H atoms on metal complexes has been found

  6. A web server for analysis, comparison and prediction of protein ligand binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harinder; Srivastava, Hemant Kumar; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2016-03-25

    One of the major challenges in the field of system biology is to understand the interaction between a wide range of proteins and ligands. In the past, methods have been developed for predicting binding sites in a protein for a limited number of ligands. In order to address this problem, we developed a web server named 'LPIcom' to facilitate users in understanding protein-ligand interaction. Analysis, comparison and prediction modules are available in the "LPIcom' server to predict protein-ligand interacting residues for 824 ligands. Each ligand must have at least 30 protein binding sites in PDB. Analysis module of the server can identify residues preferred in interaction and binding motif for a given ligand; for example residues glycine, lysine and arginine are preferred in ATP binding sites. Comparison module of the server allows comparing protein-binding sites of multiple ligands to understand the similarity between ligands based on their binding site. This module indicates that ATP, ADP and GTP ligands are in the same cluster and thus their binding sites or interacting residues exhibit a high level of similarity. Propensity-based prediction module has been developed for predicting ligand-interacting residues in a protein for more than 800 ligands. In addition, a number of web-based tools have been integrated to facilitate users in creating web logo and two-sample between ligand interacting and non-interacting residues. In summary, this manuscript presents a web-server for analysis of ligand interacting residue. This server is available for public use from URL http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/lpicom .

  7. Soluble CD40 ligand stimulates CD40-dependent activation of the β2 integrin Mac-1 and protein kinase C zeda (PKCζ in neutrophils: implications for neutrophil-platelet interactions and neutrophil oxidative burst.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Jin

    Full Text Available Recent work has revealed an essential involvement of soluble CD40L (sCD40L in inflammation and vascular disease. Activated platelets are the major source of sCD40L, which has been implicated in platelet and leukocyte activation, although its exact functional impact on leukocyte-platelet interactions and the underlying mechanisms remain undefined. We aimed to determine the impact and the mechanisms of sCD40L on neutrophils. We studied neutrophil interactions with activated, surface-adherent platelets as a model for leukocyte recruitment to the sites of injury. Our data show that CD40L contributes to neutrophil firm adhesion to and transmigration across activated surface-adherent platelets, possibly through two potential mechanisms. One involves the direct interaction of ligand-receptor (CD40L-CD40, i.e., platelet surface CD40L interaction with neutrophil CD40; another involves an indirect mechanism, i.e. soluble CD40L stimulates activation of the leukocyte-specific β2 integrin Mac-1 in neutrophils and thereby further promotes neutrophil adhesion and migration. Activation of the integrin Mac-1 is known to be critical for mediating neutrophil adhesion and migration. sCD40L activated Mac-1 in neutrophils and enhanced neutrophil-platelet interactions in wild-type neutrophils, but failed to elicit such responses in CD40-deficient neutrophils. Furthermore, our data show that the protein kinase C zeta (PKCζ is critically required for sCD40L-induced Mac-1 activation and neutrophil adhesive function. sCD40L strongly stimulated the focal clustering of Mac-1 (CD11b and the colocalization of Mac-1 with PKCζ in wild-type neutrophils, but had minimal effect in CD40-deficient neutrophils. Blocking PKCζ completely inhibited sCD40L-induced neutrophil firm adhesion. Moreover, sCD40L strongly stimulates neutrophil oxidative burst via CD40-dependent activation of PI3K/NF-KB, but independent of Mac-1 and PKCζ. These findings may contribute to a better

  8. Physical Proximity and Spreading in Dynamic Social Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Pentland, Alex Sandy; Lehmann, Sune

    2015-01-01

    Most infectious diseases spread on a dynamic network of human interactions. Recent studies of social dynamics have provided evidence that spreading patterns may depend strongly on detailed micro-dynamics of the social system. We have recorded every single interaction within a large population, mapping out---for the first time at scale---the complete proximity network for a densely-connected system. Here we show the striking impact of interaction-distance on the network structure and dynamics ...

  9. Flow Cytometry-Based Bead-Binding Assay for Measuring Receptor Ligand Specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprokholt, Joris K.; Hertoghs, Nina; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter we describe a fluorescent bead-binding assay, which is an efficient and feasible method to measure interaction between ligands and receptors on cells. In principle, any ligand can be coated on fluorescent beads either directly or via antibodies. Binding between ligand-coated beads

  10. Glutamate receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldbrandt, Mette; Johansen, Tommy N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Homologation and substitution on the carbon backbone of (S)-glutamic acid [(S)-Glu, 1], as well as absolute stereochemistry, are structural parameters of key importance for the pharmacological profile of (S)-Glu receptor ligands. We describe a series of methyl-substituted 2-aminoadipic acid (AA...

  11. A Protein Data Bank survey reveals shortening of intermolecular hydrogen bonds in ligand-protein complexes when a halogenated ligand is an H-bond donor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Poznański

    Full Text Available Halogen bonding in ligand-protein complexes is currently widely exploited, e.g. in drug design or supramolecular chemistry. But little attention has been directed to other effects that may result from replacement of a hydrogen by a strongly electronegative halogen. Analysis of almost 30000 hydrogen bonds between protein and ligand demonstrates that the length of a hydrogen bond depends on the type of donor-acceptor pair. Interestingly, lengths of hydrogen bonds between a protein and a halogenated ligand are visibly shorter than those estimated for the same family of proteins in complexes with non-halogenated ligands. Taking into account the effect of halogenation on hydrogen bonding is thus important when evaluating structural and/or energetic parameters of ligand-protein complexes. All these observations are consistent with the concept that halogenation increases the acidity of the proximal amino/imino/hydroxyl groups and thus makes them better, i.e. stronger, H-bond donors.

  12. A Protein Data Bank survey reveals shortening of intermolecular hydrogen bonds in ligand-protein complexes when a halogenated ligand is an H-bond donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poznański, Jarosław; Poznańska, Anna; Shugar, David

    2014-01-01

    Halogen bonding in ligand-protein complexes is currently widely exploited, e.g. in drug design or supramolecular chemistry. But little attention has been directed to other effects that may result from replacement of a hydrogen by a strongly electronegative halogen. Analysis of almost 30000 hydrogen bonds between protein and ligand demonstrates that the length of a hydrogen bond depends on the type of donor-acceptor pair. Interestingly, lengths of hydrogen bonds between a protein and a halogenated ligand are visibly shorter than those estimated for the same family of proteins in complexes with non-halogenated ligands. Taking into account the effect of halogenation on hydrogen bonding is thus important when evaluating structural and/or energetic parameters of ligand-protein complexes. All these observations are consistent with the concept that halogenation increases the acidity of the proximal amino/imino/hydroxyl groups and thus makes them better, i.e. stronger, H-bond donors.

  13. Crystallization of bi-functional ligand protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Claudia; Vera, Laura; Devel, Laurent; Catalani, Maria Pia; Czarny, Bertrand; Cassar-Lajeunesse, Evelyn; Nuti, Elisa; Rossello, Armando; Dive, Vincent; Stura, Enrico Adriano

    2013-06-01

    Homodimerization is important in signal transduction and can play a crucial role in many other biological systems. To obtaining structural information for the design of molecules able to control the signalization pathways, the proteins involved will have to be crystallized in complex with ligands that induce dimerization. Bi-functional drugs have been generated by linking two ligands together chemically and the relative crystallizability of complexes with mono-functional and bi-functional ligands has been evaluated. There are problems associated with crystallization with such ligands, but overall, the advantages appear to be greater than the drawbacks. The study involves two matrix metalloproteinases, MMP-12 and MMP-9. Using flexible and rigid linkers we show that it is possible to control the crystal packing and that by changing the ligand-enzyme stoichiometric ratio, one can toggle between having one bi-functional ligand binding to two enzymes and having the same ligand bound to each enzyme. The nature of linker and its point of attachment on the ligand can be varied to aid crystallization, and such variations can also provide valuable structural information about the interactions made by the linker with the protein. We report here the crystallization and structure determination of seven ligand-dimerized complexes. These results suggest that the use of bi-functional drugs can be extended beyond the realm of protein dimerization to include all drug design projects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. AMPA receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, Kristian; Mellor, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPAR), subtype of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (IGRs), mediate fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS), and are involved in many neurological disorders, as well as being a key player in the f......Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPAR), subtype of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (IGRs), mediate fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS), and are involved in many neurological disorders, as well as being a key player...... in the formation of memory. Hence, ligands affecting AMPARs are highly important for the study of the structure and function of this receptor, and in this regard polyamine-based ligands, particularly polyamine toxins, are unique as they selectively block Ca2+ -permeable AMPARs. Indeed, endogenous intracellular...

  15. Leukocyte integrins and their ligand interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Young-Min; Lefort, Craig T.; Kim, Minsoo

    2010-01-01

    Although critical for cell adhesion and migration during normal immune-mediated reactions, leukocyte integrins are also involved in the pathogenesis of diverse clinical conditions including autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammation. Leukocyte integrins therefore have been targets for anti-adhesive therapies to treat the inflammatory disorders. Recently, the therapeutic potential of integrin antagonists has been demonstrated in psoriasis and multiple sclerosis. However, current therapeutics broadly affect integrin functions and, thus, yield unfavorable side effects. This review discusses the major leukocyte integrins and the anti-adhesion strategies for treating immune diseases. PMID:19184539

  16. Carbohydrates/nucleosides/RNA-DNA-ligand interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaptein, R.; McConnell, B.; Serianni, A.S.; Silks, L.A. III.

    1994-01-01

    Carbohydrate and nucleotide structural determination using modern spectroscopic techniques is dependent on our ability to label oligonucleotides and oligosaccharides with stable isotopes. Uniform Carbon 13 and Nitrogen 15 labeling of oligonucleotides is important to present-day efforts, which are focused on determining the structure of relatively small oligosaccharides and oligonucleotides, which form the elements of larger structures. Because of the relatively recent interest in three-dimensional structure, the development of techniques used to label them has lagged behind parallel techniques used to label peptides and proteins. Therefore, this group's discussion focused primarily on problems faced today in obtaining oligonucleotides labeled uniformly with carbon 13 and nitrogen 15

  17. Carbohydrates/nucleosides/RNA-DNA-ligand interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaptein, R.; McConnell, B.; Serianni, A.S.; Silks, L.A. III

    1994-12-01

    Carbohydrate and nucleotide structural determination using modern spectroscopic techniques is dependent on our ability to label oligonucleotides and oligosaccharides with stable isotopes. Uniform Carbon 13 and Nitrogen 15 labeling of oligonucleotides is important to present-day efforts, which are focused on determining the structure of relatively small oligosaccharides and oligonucleotides, which form the elements of larger structures. Because of the relatively recent interest in three-dimensional structure, the development of techniques used to label them has lagged behind parallel techniques used to label peptides and proteins. Therefore, this group`s discussion focused primarily on problems faced today in obtaining oligonucleotides labeled uniformly with carbon 13 and nitrogen 15.

  18. ProxImaL: efficient image optimization using proximal algorithms

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2016-07-11

    Computational photography systems are becoming increasingly diverse, while computational resources-for example on mobile platforms-are rapidly increasing. As diverse as these camera systems may be, slightly different variants of the underlying image processing tasks, such as demosaicking, deconvolution, denoising, inpainting, image fusion, and alignment, are shared between all of these systems. Formal optimization methods have recently been demonstrated to achieve state-of-the-art quality for many of these applications. Unfortunately, different combinations of natural image priors and optimization algorithms may be optimal for different problems, and implementing and testing each combination is currently a time-consuming and error-prone process. ProxImaL is a domain-specific language and compiler for image optimization problems that makes it easy to experiment with different problem formulations and algorithm choices. The language uses proximal operators as the fundamental building blocks of a variety of linear and nonlinear image formation models and cost functions, advanced image priors, and noise models. The compiler intelligently chooses the best way to translate a problem formulation and choice of optimization algorithm into an efficient solver implementation. In applications to the image processing pipeline, deconvolution in the presence of Poisson-distributed shot noise, and burst denoising, we show that a few lines of ProxImaL code can generate highly efficient solvers that achieve state-of-the-art results. We also show applications to the nonlinear and nonconvex problem of phase retrieval.

  19. Radiobiology with DNA ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinreich, R.; Argentini, M.; Guenther, I.; Koziorowski, J.; Larsson, B.; Nievergelt-Egido, M.C.; Salt, C.; Wyer, L.; Dos Santos, D.F.; Hansen, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    The paper deals with the following topics: labelling of DNA ligands and other tumour-affinic compounds with 4.15-d 124 I, radiotoxicity of Hoechst 33258 and 33342 and of iodinated Hoechst 33258 in cell cultures, preparation of 76 Br-, 123 I-, and 221 At-labelled 5-halo-2'-deoxyuridine, chemical syntheses of boron derivatives of Hoechst 33258.III., Gadolinium neutron capture therapy

  20. Residue preference mapping of ligand fragments in the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lirong; Xie, Zhaojun; Wipf, Peter; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2011-04-25

    The interaction between small molecules and proteins is one of the major concerns for structure-based drug design because the principles of protein-ligand interactions and molecular recognition are not thoroughly understood. Fortunately, the analysis of protein-ligand complexes in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) enables unprecedented possibilities for new insights. Herein, we applied molecule-fragmentation algorithms to split the ligands extracted from PDB crystal structures into small fragments. Subsequently, we have developed a ligand fragment and residue preference mapping (LigFrag-RPM) algorithm to map the profiles of the interactions between these fragments and the 20 proteinogenic amino acid residues. A total of 4032 fragments were generated from 71 798 PDB ligands by a ring cleavage (RC) algorithm. Among these ligand fragments, 315 unique fragments were characterized with the corresponding fragment-residue interaction profiles by counting residues close to these fragments. The interaction profiles revealed that these fragments have specific preferences for certain types of residues. The applications of these interaction profiles were also explored and evaluated in case studies, showing great potential for the study of protein-ligand interactions and drug design. Our studies demonstrated that the fragment-residue interaction profiles generated from the PDB ligand fragments can be used to detect whether these fragments are in their favorable or unfavorable environments. The algorithm for a ligand fragment and residue preference mapping (LigFrag-RPM) developed here also has the potential to guide lead chemistry modifications as well as binding residues predictions.

  1. Beyond proximities : The socio-spatial dynamics of knowledge creation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.P.J.H.

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge creation is recognized as interaction between individuals in a social context, but geography-of-knowledge-creation research inadequately connects social context to physical place. The proximities approach reduces physical place to near-far dichotomies and territorial innovation models

  2. Identification and characterization of PPARα ligands in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Avik; Kundu, Madhuchhanda; Jana, Malabendu; Mishra, Rama K; Yung, Yeni; Luan, Chi-Hao; Gonzalez, Frank J; Pahan, Kalipada

    2016-12-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) regulates hepatic fatty acid catabolism and mediates the metabolic response to starvation. Recently we found that PPARα is constitutively activated in nuclei of hippocampal neurons and controls plasticity via direct transcriptional activation of CREB. Here we report the discovery of three endogenous PPARα ligands-3-hydroxy-(2,2)-dimethyl butyrate, hexadecanamide, and 9-octadecenamide-in mouse brain hippocampus. Mass spectrometric detection of these compounds in mouse hippocampal nuclear extracts, in silico interaction studies, time-resolved FRET analyses, and thermal shift assay results clearly indicated that these three compounds served as ligands of PPARα. Site-directed mutagenesis studies further revealed that PPARα Y464 and Y314 are involved in binding these hippocampal ligands. Moreover, these ligands activated PPARα and upregulated the synaptic function of hippocampal neurons. These results highlight the discovery of hippocampal ligands of PPARα capable of modulating synaptic functions.

  3. Quantifying social contacts in a household setting of rural Kenya using wearable proximity sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Kiti, Moses C.; Tizzoni, Michele; Kinyanjui, Timothy M.; Koech, Dorothy C.; Munywoki, Patrick K.; Meriac, Milosch; Cappa, Luca; Panisson, André; Barrat, Alain; Cattuto, Ciro; Nokes, D. James

    2016-01-01

    Close proximity interactions between individuals influence how infections spread. Quantifying close contacts in developing world settings, where such data is sparse yet disease burden is high, can provide insights into the design of intervention strategies such as vaccination. Recent technological advances have enabled collection of time-resolved face-to-face human contact data using radio frequency proximity sensors. The acceptability and practicalities of using proximity devices within the ...

  4. Characterization of protein/ligand interactions by {sup 1}H/{sup 3}H exchange: application to the hAsf{sup 1}/ histone H{sup 3} complex; Caracterisation des interactions proteine / ligand par echange {sup 1}H/{sup 3}H: application au complexe entre la proteine hAsf{sup 1} et l'histone H{sup 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousseau, G

    2007-05-15

    In the first chapter will be exposed the main current methods of identification to high debit of the interactions protein-protein. Then the methods allowing to characterize the surfaces of interaction or to determine the structures of the complexes will be listed by discussing the main advantages and the inconveniences. Our approach of characterization of the zones of interaction protein-protein is a method of 'foot-printing' 1, based on the identification and radicals' quantification formed on the residues of proteins accessible to the water. The second chapter will so discuss the development of this method of radical identification using the atom of tritium as radioactive label. Our approach will finally be validated in the third chapter by applying it to the characterization of amino acids involved in the interaction enter the human protein anti silencing factor 1 (hAsf11-156) and a fragment of the histone H{sup 3}. (N.C.)

  5. Electromagnetic properties of proximity systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresin, Vladimir Z.

    1985-07-01

    Magnetic screening in the proximity system Sα-Mβ, where Mβ is a normal metal N, semiconductor (semimetal), or a superconductor, is studied. Main attention is paid to the low-temperature region where nonlocality plays an important role. The thermodynamic Green's-function method is employed in order to describe the behavior of the proximity system in an external field. The temperature and thickness dependences of the penetration depth λ are obtained. The dependence λ(T) differs in a striking way from the dependence in usual superconductors. The strong-coupling effect is taken into account. A special case of screening in a superconducting film backed by a size-quantizing semimetal film is considered. The results obtained are in good agreement with experimental data.

  6. Electromagnetic properties of proximity systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kresin, V.Z.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic screening in the proximity system S/sub α/-M/sub β/, where M/sub β/ is a normal metal N, semiconductor (semimetal), or a superconductor, is studied. Main attention is paid to the low-temperature region where nonlocality plays an important role. The thermodynamic Green's-function method is employed in order to describe the behavior of the proximity system in an external field. The temperature and thickness dependences of the penetration depth lambda are obtained. The dependence lambda(T) differs in a striking way from the dependence in usual superconductors. The strong-coupling effect is taken into account. A special case of screening in a superconducting film backed by a size-quantizing semimetal film is considered. The results obtained are in good agreement with experimental data

  7. 2D MI-DRAGON: a new predictor for protein-ligands interactions and theoretic-experimental studies of US FDA drug-target network, oxoisoaporphine inhibitors for MAO-A and human parasite proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado-Prado, Francisco; García-Mera, Xerardo; Escobar, Manuel; Sobarzo-Sánchez, Eduardo; Yañez, Matilde; Riera-Fernandez, Pablo; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2011-12-01

    There are many pairs of possible Drug-Proteins Interactions that may take place or not (DPIs/nDPIs) between drugs with high affinity/non-affinity for different proteins. This fact makes expensive in terms of time and resources, for instance, the determination of all possible ligands-protein interactions for a single drug. In this sense, we can use Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) models to carry out rational DPIs prediction. Unfortunately, almost all QSAR models predict activity against only one target. To solve this problem we can develop multi-target QSAR (mt-QSAR) models. In this work, we introduce the technique 2D MI-DRAGON a new predictor for DPIs based on two different well-known software. We use the software MARCH-INSIDE (MI) to calculate 3D structural parameters for targets and the software DRAGON was used to calculated 2D molecular descriptors all drugs showing known DPIs present in the Drug Bank (US FDA benchmark dataset). Both classes of parameters were used as input of different Artificial Neural Network (ANN) algorithms to seek an accurate non-linear mt-QSAR predictor. The best ANN model found is a Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) with profile MLP 21:21-31-1:1. This MLP classifies correctly 303 out of 339 DPIs (Sensitivity = 89.38%) and 480 out of 510 nDPIs (Specificity = 94.12%), corresponding to training Accuracy = 92.23%. The validation of the model was carried out by means of external predicting series with Sensitivity = 92.18% (625/678 DPIs; Specificity = 90.12% (730/780 nDPIs) and Accuracy = 91.06%. 2D MI-DRAGON offers a good opportunity for fast-track calculation of all possible DPIs of one drug enabling us to re-construct large drug-target or DPIs Complex Networks (CNs). For instance, we reconstructed the CN of the US FDA benchmark dataset with 855 nodes 519 drugs+336 targets). We predicted CN with similar topology (observed and predicted values of average distance are equal to 6.7 vs. 6.6). These CNs can be used to explore

  8. Proximity effect at Millikelvin temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota, A.C.

    1986-01-01

    Proximity effects have been studied extensively for the past 25 years. Typically, they are in films several thousand angstroms thick at temperatures not so far below T/sub CNS/, the transition temperature of the NS system. Interesting is, however, the proximity effect at temperatures much lower than T/sub CNS/. In this case, the Cooper-pair amplitudes are not small and very long pair penetration lengths into the normal metal can be expected. Thus, we have observed pair penetration lengths. For these investigations very suitable specimens are commercial wires of one filament of NbTi or Nb embedded in a copper matrix. The reasons are the high transmission coefficient at the interface between the copper and the superconductor and the fact that the copper in these commercial wires is rather clean with electron free paths between 5 to 10 μm long. In this paper, the magnetic properties of thick proximity systems in the range of temperatures between T/sub CNS/ and 5 x 10/sup -4/ T/sub CNS/ in both low and high magnetic fields are discussed

  9. Ligand Exchange Kinetics of Environmentally Relevant Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panasci, Adele Frances [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    The interactions of ground water with minerals and contaminants are of broad interest for geochemists but are not well understood. Experiments on the molecular scale can determine reaction parameters (i.e. rates of ligand exchange, activation entropy, activation entropy, and activation volume) that can be used in computations to gain insight into reactions that occur in natural groundwaters. Experiments to determine the rate of isotopic ligand exchange for three environmentally relevant metals, rhodium (Rh), iron (Fe), and neptunium (Np), are described. Many environmental transformations of metals (e.g. reduction) in soil occur at trivalent centers, Fe(III) in particular. Contaminant ions absorb to mineral surfaces via ligand exchange, and the reversal of this reaction can be dangerous, releasing contaminants into the environment. Ferric iron is difficult to study spectroscopically because most of its complexes are paramagnetic and are generally reactive toward ligand exchange; therefore, Rh(III), which is diamagnetic and less reactive, was used to study substitution reactions that are analogous to those that occur on mineral oxide surfaces. Studies on both Np(V) and Np(VI) are important in their own right, as 237Np is a radioactive transuranic element with a half-life of 2 million years.

  10. Bexarotene ligand pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, R E

    2000-12-01

    Bexarotene (LGD-1069), from Ligand, was the first retinoid X receptor (RXR)-selective, antitumor retinoid to enter clinical trials. The company launched the drug for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), as Targretin capsules, in the US in January 2000 [359023]. The company filed an NDA for Targretin capsules in June 1999, and for topical gel in December 1999 [329011], [349982] specifically for once-daily oral administration for the treatment of patients with early-stage CTCL who have not tolerated other therapies, patients with refractory or persistent early stage CTCL and patients with refractory advanced stage CTCL. The FDA approved Targretin capsules at the end of December 1999 for once-daily oral treatment of all stages of CTCL in patients refractory to at least one prior systemic therapy, at an initial dose of 300 mg/m2/day. After an NDA was submitted in December 1999 for Targretin gel, the drug received Priority Review status for use as a treatment of cutaneous lesions in patients with stage IA, IB or IIA CTCL [354836]. The FDA issued an approvable letter in June 2000, and granted marketing clearance for CTCL in the same month [370687], [372768], [372769], [373279]. Ligand had received Orphan Drug designation for this indication [329011]. At the request of the FDA, Ligand agreed to carry out certain post-approval phase IV and pharmacokinetic studies [351604]. The company filed an MAA with the EMEA for Targretin Capsules to treat lymphoma in November 1999 [348944]. The NDA for Targretin gel is based on a multicenter phase III trial that was conducted in the US, Canada, Europe and Australia involving 50 patients and a multicenter phase I/II clinical program involving 67 patients. Targretin gel was evaluated for the treatment of patients with early stage CTCL (IA-IIA) who were refractory to, intolerant to, or reached a response plateau for at least 6 months on at least two prior therapies. Efficacy results exceeded the protocol-defined response

  11. Identification of VDR Antagonists among Nuclear Receptor Ligands Using Virtual Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Teske

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we described the development of two virtual screens to identify new vitamin D receptor (VDR antagonists among nuclear receptor (NR ligands. Therefore, a database of 14330 nuclear receptor ligands and their NR affinities was assembled using the online available “Binding Database.” Two different virtual screens were carried out in conjunction with a reported VDR crystal structure applying a stringent and less stringent pharmacophore model to filter docked NR ligand conformations. The pharmacophore models were based on the spatial orientation of the hydroxyl functionalities of VDR's natural ligands 1,25(OH2D3 and 25(OH2D3. The first virtual screen identified 32 NR ligands with a calculated free energy of VDR binding of more than -6.0 kJ/mol. All but nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA are VDR ligands, which inhibited the interaction between VDR and coactivator peptide SRC2-3 with an IC50 value of 15.8 μM. The second screen identified 162 NR ligands with a calculated free energy of VDR binding of more than -6.0 kJ/mol. More than half of these ligands were developed to bind VDR followed by ERα/β ligands (26%, TRα/β ligands (7%, and LxRα/β ligands (7%. The binding between VDR and ERα ligand H6036 as well as TRα/β ligand triiodothyronine and a homoserine analog thereof was confirmed by fluorescence polarization.

  12. High-throughput determination of RNA structure by proximity ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, Vijay; Qiu, Ruolan; Shendure, Jay

    2015-09-01

    We present an unbiased method to globally resolve RNA structures through pairwise contact measurements between interacting regions. RNA proximity ligation (RPL) uses proximity ligation of native RNA followed by deep sequencing to yield chimeric reads with ligation junctions in the vicinity of structurally proximate bases. We apply RPL in both baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and human cells and generate contact probability maps for ribosomal and other abundant RNAs, including yeast snoRNAs, the RNA subunit of the signal recognition particle and the yeast U2 spliceosomal RNA homolog. RPL measurements correlate with established secondary structures for these RNA molecules, including stem-loop structures and long-range pseudoknots. We anticipate that RPL will complement the current repertoire of computational and experimental approaches in enabling the high-throughput determination of secondary and tertiary RNA structures.

  13. Symmetry-based reciprocity: evolutionary constraints on a proximate mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campennì, Marco; Schino, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Background. While the evolution of reciprocal cooperation has attracted an enormous attention, the proximate mechanisms underlying the ability of animals to cooperate reciprocally are comparatively neglected. Symmetry-based reciprocity is a hypothetical proximate mechanism that has been suggested to be widespread among cognitively unsophisticated animals. Methods. We developed two agent-based models of symmetry-based reciprocity (one relying on an arbitrary tag and the other on interindividual proximity) and tested their ability both to reproduce significant emergent features of cooperation in group living animals and to promote the evolution of cooperation. Results. Populations formed by agents adopting symmetry-based reciprocity showed differentiated "social relationships" and a positive correlation between cooperation given and received: two common aspects of animal cooperation. However, when reproduction and selection across multiple generations were added to the models, agents adopting symmetry-based reciprocity were outcompeted by selfish agents that never cooperated. Discussion. In order to evolve, hypothetical proximate mechanisms must be able to stand competition from alternative strategies. While the results of our simulations require confirmation using analytical methods, we provisionally suggest symmetry-based reciprocity is to be abandoned as a possible proximate mechanism underlying the ability of animals to reciprocate cooperative interactions.

  14. Equilibrium properties of proximity effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteve, D.; Pothier, H.; Gueron, S.; Birge, N.O.; Devoret, M.

    1996-01-01

    The proximity effect in diffusive normal-superconducting (NS) nano-structures is described by the Usadel equations for the electron pair correlations. We show that these equations obey a variational principle with a potential which generalizes the Ginzburg-Landau energy functional. We discuss simple examples of NS circuits using this formalism. In order to test the theoretical predictions of the Usadel equations, we have measured the density of states as a function of energy on a long N wire in contact with a S wire at one end, at different distances from the NS interface. (authors)

  15. Equilibrium properties of proximity effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteve, D.; Pothier, H.; Gueron, S.; Birge, N.O.; Devoret, M.

    1996-12-31

    The proximity effect in diffusive normal-superconducting (NS) nano-structures is described by the Usadel equations for the electron pair correlations. We show that these equations obey a variational principle with a potential which generalizes the Ginzburg-Landau energy functional. We discuss simple examples of NS circuits using this formalism. In order to test the theoretical predictions of the Usadel equations, we have measured the density of states as a function of energy on a long N wire in contact with a S wire at one end, at different distances from the NS interface. (authors). 12 refs.

  16. Database of ligand-induced domain movements in enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayward Steven

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conformational change induced by the binding of a substrate or coenzyme is a poorly understood stage in the process of enzyme catalysed reactions. For enzymes that exhibit a domain movement, the conformational change can be clearly characterized and therefore the opportunity exists to gain an understanding of the mechanisms involved. The development of the non-redundant database of protein domain movements contains examples of ligand-induced domain movements in enzymes, but this valuable data has remained unexploited. Description The domain movements in the non-redundant database of protein domain movements are those found by applying the DynDom program to pairs of crystallographic structures contained in Protein Data Bank files. For each pair of structures cross-checking ligands in their Protein Data Bank files with the KEGG-LIGAND database and using methods that search for ligands that contact the enzyme in one conformation but not the other, the non-redundant database of protein domain movements was refined down to a set of 203 enzymes where a domain movement is apparently triggered by the binding of a functional ligand. For these cases, ligand binding information, including hydrogen bonds and salt-bridges between the ligand and specific residues on the enzyme is presented in the context of dynamical information such as the regions that form the dynamic domains, the hinge bending residues, and the hinge axes. Conclusion The presentation at a single website of data on interactions between a ligand and specific residues on the enzyme alongside data on the movement that these interactions induce, should lead to new insights into the mechanisms of these enzymes in particular, and help in trying to understand the general process of ligand-induced domain closure in enzymes. The website can be found at: http://www.cmp.uea.ac.uk/dyndom/enzymeList.do

  17. Untangling the relationships between proximity dimensions – an in-depth study of collaboration in the Danish cleantech industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Teis

    The increasingly interactive nature of innovation processes has been widely studied in economic geography lately, especially the effect of geographical proximity on innovation. While some authors stress that localised learning is central to innovative activity, others argue that this particular......, organisational, social and institutional proximity. He emphasises that some cognitive proximity is a prerequisite for interactive learning contrary to the other dimensions, where one form of proximity can substitute another. However, geographical proximity is different from the other dimensions, as it does....... The analysis will in this way reveal to what extent the other proximity dimensions are consequences of geographical proximity. Additionally, the paper will provide a detailed picture of the use of knowledge networks in the cleantech industry. This is in itself a novel contribution, as the industry is rarely...

  18. Anion–π, lone pair–π and π–π interactions in VO(O2)+ complexes with one dipicolinato(2-)-N,O,O ligand and bearing picolinamidium, nicotinamidium or phenanthrolinium as counterions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gyepes, Robert; Pacigová, S.; Tatiersky, J.; Sivák, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 1041, JUN 2013 (2013), s. 113-121 ISSN 0022-2860 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN100400701 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Monoperoxidovanadium (V) * Dipicolinato(2-) ligand * Anion–π Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.599, year: 2013

  19. Ligand Depot: a data warehouse for ligands bound to macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zukang; Chen, Li; Maddula, Himabindu; Akcan, Ozgur; Oughtred, Rose; Berman, Helen M; Westbrook, John

    2004-09-01

    Ligand Depot is an integrated data resource for finding information about small molecules bound to proteins and nucleic acids. The initial release (version 1.0, November, 2003) focuses on providing chemical and structural information for small molecules found as part of the structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank. Ligand Depot accepts keyword-based queries and also provides a graphical interface for performing chemical substructure searches. A wide variety of web resources that contain information on small molecules may also be accessed through Ligand Depot. Ligand Depot is available at http://ligand-depot.rutgers.edu/. Version 1.0 supports multiple operating systems including Windows, Unix, Linux and the Macintosh operating system. The current drawing tool works in Internet Explorer, Netscape and Mozilla on Windows, Unix and Linux.

  20. Ligand cluster-based protein network and ePlatton, a multi-target ligand finder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yu; Shi, Tieliu

    2016-01-01

    Small molecules are information carriers that make cells aware of external changes and couple internal metabolic and signalling pathway systems with each other. In some specific physiological status, natural or artificial molecules are used to interact with selective biological targets to activate or inhibit their functions to achieve expected biological and physiological output. Millions of years of evolution have optimized biological processes and pathways and now the endocrine and immune system cannot work properly without some key small molecules. In the past thousands of years, the human race has managed to find many medicines against diseases by trail-and-error experience. In the recent decades, with the deepening understanding of life and the progress of molecular biology, researchers spare no effort to design molecules targeting one or two key enzymes and receptors related to corresponding diseases. But recent studies in pharmacogenomics have shown that polypharmacology may be necessary for the effects of drugs, which challenge the paradigm, 'one drug, one target, one disease'. Nowadays, cheminformatics and structural biology can help us reasonably take advantage of the polypharmacology to design next-generation promiscuous drugs and drug combination therapies. 234,591 protein-ligand interactions were extracted from ChEMBL. By the 2D structure similarity, 13,769 ligand emerged from 156,151 distinct ligands which were recognized by 1477 proteins. Ligand cluster- and sequence-based protein networks (LCBN, SBN) were constructed, compared and analysed. For assisting compound designing, exploring polypharmacology and finding possible drug combination, we integrated the pathway, disease, drug adverse reaction and the relationship of targets and ligand clusters into the web platform, ePlatton, which is available at http://www.megabionet.org/eplatton. Although there were some disagreements between the LCBN and SBN, communities in both networks were largely the same

  1. Melatonin: functions and ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mahaveer; Jadhav, Hemant R

    2014-09-01

    Melatonin is a chronobiotic substance that acts as synchronizer by stabilizing bodily rhythms. Its synthesis occurs in various locations throughout the body, including the pineal gland, skin, lymphocytes and gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Its synthesis and secretion is controlled by light and dark conditions, whereby light decreases and darkness increases its production. Thus, melatonin is also known as the 'hormone of darkness'. Melatonin and analogs that bind to the melatonin receptors are important because of their role in the management of depression, insomnia, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease (AD), diabetes, obesity, alopecia, migraine, cancer, and immune and cardiac disorders. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of action of melatonin in these disorders, which could aid in the design of novel melatonin receptor ligands. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Macrocyclic G-quadruplex ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M C; Ulven, Trond

    2010-01-01

    are macrocyclic structures which have been modeled after the natural product telomestatin or from porphyrin-based ligands discovered in the late 1990s. These two structural classes of G-quadruplex ligands are reviewed here with special attention to selectivity and structure-activity relationships, and with focus...

  3. Spectrophotometric method for determination of bifunctional macrocyclic ligands in macrocyclic ligand-protein conjugates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadachova, E.; Chappell, L.L.; Brechbiel, M.W.

    1999-01-01

    A simple spectrophotometric assay for determination of bifunctional polyazacarboxylate-macrocyclic ligands of different sizes that are conjugated to proteins has been developed for: 12-membered macrocycle DOTA (2-[4-nitrobenzyl]-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid) and analogs, the 15-membered PEPA macrocycle (2-[4-nitrobenzyl]-1,4,7,10,13-pentaazacyclopentadecane-N,N',N'',N''',N'''' -pentaacetic acid), and the large 18-membered macrocycle HEHA (1,4,7,10,13,16-hexaazacyclooctadecane-N,N',N'',N''',N''''-hexaacetic acid). The method is based on titration of the blue-colored 1:1 Pb(II)-Arsenazo III (AAIII) complex with the polyazacarboxylate macrocyclic ligand in the concentration range of 0-2.5 μM, wherein color change occurring upon transchelation of the Pb(II) from the AAIII to the polyazamacrocyclic ligand is monitored at 656 nm. The assay is performed at ambient temperature within 20 min without any interfering interaction between the protein and Pb(II)-AA(III) complex. Thus, this method also provides a ligand-to-protein ratio (L/P ratio) that reflects the effective number of ligands per protein molecule available to radiolabeling. The method is not suitable for 14-membered TETA macrocycle (2-[4-nitrobenzyl]-1, 4, 8, 11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid) because of low stability constant of Pb(II)-TETA complex. The method is rapid, simple and may be customized for other polyazacarboxylate macrocyclic ligands

  4. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions ...

  5. Ligand recognition by RAR and RXR receptors: binding and selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Fredy; de Lera, Angel R

    2005-10-06

    Fundamental biological functions, most notably embriogenesis, cell growth, cell differentiation, and cell apoptosis, are in part regulated by a complex genomic network that starts with the binding (and activation) of retinoids to their cognate receptors, members of the superfamily of nuclear receptors. We have studied ligand recognition of retinoic receptors (RXRalpha and RARgamma) using a molecular-mechanics-based docking method. The protocol used in this work is able to rank the affinity of pairs of ligands for a single retinoid receptor, the highest values corresponding to those that adapt better to the shape of the binding site and generate the optimal set of electrostatic and apolar interactions with the receptor. Moreover, our studies shed light onto some of the energetic contributions to retinoid receptor ligand selectivity. In this regard we show that there is a difference in polarity between the binding site regions that anchor the carboxylate in RAR and RXR, which translates itself into large differences in the energy of interaction of both receptors with the same ligand. We observe that the latter energy change is canceled off by the solvation energy penalty upon binding. This energy compensation is borne out as well by experiments that address the effect of site-directed mutagenesis on ligand binding to RARgamma. The hypothesis that the difference in binding site polarity might be exploited to build RXR-selective ligands is tested with some compounds having a thiazolidinedione anchoring group.

  6. AFAL: a web service for profiling amino acids surrounding ligands in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas-Salinas, Mauricio; Ortega-Salazar, Samuel; Gonzales-Nilo, Fernando; Pohl, Ehmke; Holmes, David S.; Quatrini, Raquel

    2014-11-01

    With advancements in crystallographic technology and the increasing wealth of information populating structural databases, there is an increasing need for prediction tools based on spatial information that will support the characterization of proteins and protein-ligand interactions. Herein, a new web service is presented termed amino acid frequency around ligand (AFAL) for determining amino acids type and frequencies surrounding ligands within proteins deposited in the Protein Data Bank and for assessing the atoms and atom-ligand distances involved in each interaction (availability: http://structuralbio.utalca.cl/AFAL/index.html). AFAL allows the user to define a wide variety of filtering criteria (protein family, source organism, resolution, sequence redundancy and distance) in order to uncover trends and evolutionary differences in amino acid preferences that define interactions with particular ligands. Results obtained from AFAL provide valuable statistical information about amino acids that may be responsible for establishing particular ligand-protein interactions. The analysis will enable investigators to compare ligand-binding sites of different proteins and to uncover general as well as specific interaction patterns from existing data. Such patterns can be used subsequently to predict ligand binding in proteins that currently have no structural information and to refine the interpretation of existing protein models. The application of AFAL is illustrated by the analysis of proteins interacting with adenosine-5'-triphosphate.

  7. Influence of bidentate structure of an aryl phosphine oxide ligand on photophysical properties of its Eu~Ⅲ complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许辉; 魏莹; 赵保敏; 黄维

    2010-01-01

    The bidentate phosphine oxide ligand 1,8-bis(diphenylphosphino) naphthalene oxide (NAPO) and its EuⅢ complex 1 Eu(TTA)3(NAPO) (TTA=2-thenoyltrifluoroacetonate) were chosen to study the effect of bidentate phosphine oxide ligand on the photophysical properties of the corresponding complex. The intramolecular energy transfer processes of 1 were studied. The investigation showed that with bidentate structure NAPO could suppress solvent-induced quenching by enforcing the ligand-ligand interaction and the rigidi...

  8. Interactions of AsCy3 with cysteine-rich peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Seth C; Schepartz, Alanna

    2014-07-18

    There is great interest in fluorogenic compounds that tag biomolecules within cells. Biarsenicals are fluorogenic compounds that become fluorescent upon binding four proximal Cys thiols, a tetracysteine (Cys(4)) motif. This work details interactions between the biarsenical AsCy3 and Cys(4) peptides. Maximal affinity was observed when two Cys-Cys pairs were separated by at least 8 amino acids; the highest affinity ligand bound in the nanomolar concentration range (K(app) = 43 nM) and with a significant (3.2-fold) fluorescence enhancement.

  9. comparative proximate composition and antioxidant vitamins

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Keywords: Comparative, proximate composition, antioxidant vitamins, honey. INTRODUCTION ... solution of inverted sugars and complex mixture of other saccharides ... enzymatic browning in apple slices and grape juice. (Khan, 1985).

  10. Proximate, Mineral and Phytochemical Composition of Dioscorea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Keywords: Dioscorea dumetorum, proximate composition, mineral analysis, phytochemical screening ... were analyzed using atomic absorption ... determined using a Hack Dr/200 Spectrophotometer. ... Lead Acetate. +. +. + .... cosmetics.

  11. Proximate composition and antinutrient content of pumpkin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proximate composition and antinutrient content of pumpkin ( Cucurbita pepo ) and sorghum ( Sorghum bicolor ) flour blends fermented with Lactobacillus plantarum , Aspergillus niger and Bacillus subtilis.

  12. A dual-mode proximity sensor with integrated capacitive and temperature sensing units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, Shihua; Huang, Ying; He, Xiaoyue; Sun, Zhiguang; Liu, Ping; Liu, Caixia

    2015-01-01

    The proximity sensor is one of the most important devices in the field of robot application. It can accurately provide the proximity information to assistant robots to interact with human beings and the external environment safely. In this paper, we have proposed and demonstrated a dual-mode proximity sensor composed of capacitive and resistive sensing units. We defined the capacitive type proximity sensor perceiving the proximity information as C-mode and the resistive type proximity sensor detecting as R-mode. Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) were chosen as the R-mode sensing material because of its high performance. The dual-mode proximity sensor presents the following features: (1) the sensing distance of the dual-mode proximity sensor has been enlarged compared with the single capacitive proximity sensor in the same geometrical pattern; (2) experiments have verified that the proposed sensor can sense the proximity information of different materials; (3) the proximity sensing capability of the sensor has been improved by two modes perceive collaboratively, for a plastic block at a temperature of 60 °C: the R-mode will perceive the proximity information when the distance d between the sensor and object is 6.0–17.0 mm and the C-mode will do that when their interval is 0–2.0 mm; additionally two modes will work together when the distance is 2.0–6.0 mm. These features indicate our transducer is very valuable in skin-like sensing applications. (paper)

  13. LASSO-ligand activity by surface similarity order: a new tool for ligand based virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Darryl; Sadjad, Bashir S; Zsoldos, Zsolt; Simon, Aniko

    2008-01-01

    Virtual Ligand Screening (VLS) has become an integral part of the drug discovery process for many pharmaceutical companies. Ligand similarity searches provide a very powerful method of screening large databases of ligands to identify possible hits. If these hits belong to new chemotypes the method is deemed even more successful. eHiTS LASSO uses a new interacting surface point types (ISPT) molecular descriptor that is generated from the 3D structure of the ligand, but unlike most 3D descriptors it is conformation independent. Combined with a neural network machine learning technique, LASSO screens molecular databases at an ultra fast speed of 1 million structures in under 1 min on a standard PC. The results obtained from eHiTS LASSO trained on relatively small training sets of just 2, 4 or 8 actives are presented using the diverse directory of useful decoys (DUD) dataset. It is shown that over a wide range of receptor families, eHiTS LASSO is consistently able to enrich screened databases and provides scaffold hopping ability.

  14. LASSO—ligand activity by surface similarity order: a new tool for ligand based virtual screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Darryl; Sadjad, Bashir S.; Zsoldos, Zsolt; Simon, Aniko

    2008-06-01

    Virtual Ligand Screening (VLS) has become an integral part of the drug discovery process for many pharmaceutical companies. Ligand similarity searches provide a very powerful method of screening large databases of ligands to identify possible hits. If these hits belong to new chemotypes the method is deemed even more successful. eHiTS LASSO uses a new interacting surface point types (ISPT) molecular descriptor that is generated from the 3D structure of the ligand, but unlike most 3D descriptors it is conformation independent. Combined with a neural network machine learning technique, LASSO screens molecular databases at an ultra fast speed of 1 million structures in under 1 min on a standard PC. The results obtained from eHiTS LASSO trained on relatively small training sets of just 2, 4 or 8 actives are presented using the diverse directory of useful decoys (DUD) dataset. It is shown that over a wide range of receptor families, eHiTS LASSO is consistently able to enrich screened databases and provides scaffold hopping ability.

  15. Transverse and Longitudinal proximity effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalan, Pryianka; Chand, Hum; Srianand, Raghunathan

    2018-04-01

    With close pairs (˜1.5arcmin) of quasars (QSOs), absorption in the spectra of a background quasar in the vicinity of a foreground quasar can be used to study the environment of the latter quasar at kpc-Mpc scales. For this we used a sample of 205 quasar pairs from the Sloan Digital Sky-Survey Data Release 12 (SDSS DR12) in the redshift range of 2.5 to 3.5 by studying their H I Ly-α absorption. We study the environment of QSOs both in the longitudinal as well as in the transverse direction by carrying out a statistical comparison of the Ly-α absorption lines in the quasar vicinity to that of the absorption lines caused by the inter-galactic medium (IGM). This comparison was done with IGM, matched in absorption redshift and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to that of the proximity region. In contrast to the measurements along the line-of-sight, the regions transverse to the quasars exhibit enhanced H I Ly-α absorption. This discrepancy can either be interpreted as due to an anisotropic emission from the quasars or as a consequence of their finite lifetime.

  16. Correcting ligands, metabolites, and pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ott, M.A.; Vriend, G.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A wide range of research areas in bioinformatics, molecular biology and medicinal chemistry require precise chemical structure information about molecules and reactions, e.g. drug design, ligand docking, metabolic network reconstruction, and systems biology. Most available databases,

  17. Proximal Participation: A Pathway into Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Selena

    2013-01-01

    In a longitudinal case study of apprentices, the term proximal participation was coined to describe the entry process of young people, with unclear career destinations, into the trade of baking. This article unravels the significance of proximal participation in the decision-making processes of young people who enter a trade through initial…

  18. Bimalleolar ankle fracture with proximal fibular fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colenbrander, R. J.; Struijs, P. A. A.; Ultee, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    A 56-year-old female patient suffered a bimalleolar ankle fracture with an additional proximal fibular fracture. This is an unusual fracture type, seldom reported in literature. It was operatively treated by open reduction and internal fixation of the lateral malleolar fracture. The proximal fibular

  19. Vigostsky's formulations on ZDP - Zone of Proximal Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Moysés Alves

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The zone of proximal development (ZPD is, probably, the most known concept from Vygotsky's theory. And has been much discussed recently. Hoping to contribute for the understanding of this contemporary debate, we focus on recurrent themes in Vygotsky's writings. We read ten texts of his where he constructed the concept of ZPD. We have through the reading summarized his formulations about the following topics: criticism to the traditional diagnostic; explicit definitions of ZPD's concept; redefinition of imitation's concept; ZPD and pretend play; ZPD and the interaction between development and learning; ZPD and the interaction among daily and scientific concepts; practical value and theoretical value of ZPD's concept

  20. Semiconductor detectors with proximity signal readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asztalos, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Semiconductor-based radiation detectors are routinely used for the detection, imaging, and spectroscopy of x-rays, gamma rays, and charged particles for applications in the areas of nuclear and medical physics, astrophysics, environmental remediation, nuclear nonproliferation, and homeland security. Detectors used for imaging and particle tracking are more complex in that they typically must also measure the location of the radiation interaction in addition to the deposited energy. In such detectors, the position measurement is often achieved by dividing or segmenting the electrodes into many strips or pixels and then reading out the signals from all of the electrode segments. Fine electrode segmentation is problematic for many of the standard semiconductor detector technologies. Clearly there is a need for a semiconductor-based radiation detector technology that can achieve fine position resolution while maintaining the excellent energy resolution intrinsic to semiconductor detectors, can be fabricated through simple processes, does not require complex electrical interconnections to the detector, and can reduce the number of required channels of readout electronics. Proximity electrode signal readout (PESR), in which the electrodes are not in physical contact with the detector surface, satisfies this need

  1. Dissecting Orthosteric Contacts for a Reverse-Fragment-Based Ligand Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandramohan, Arun; Tulsian, Nikhil K; Anand, Ganesh S

    2017-08-01

    Orthosteric sites on proteins are formed typically from noncontiguous interacting sites in three-dimensional space where the composite binding interaction of a biological ligand is mediated by multiple synergistic interactions of its constituent functional groups. Through these multiple interactions, ligands stabilize both the ligand binding site and the local secondary structure. However, relative energetic contributions of the individual contacts in these protein-ligand interactions are difficult to resolve. Deconvolution of the contributions of these various functional groups in natural inhibitors/ligand would greatly aid in iterative fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD). In this study, we describe an approach of progressive unfolding of a target protein using a gradient of denaturant urea to reveal the individual energetic contributions of various ligand-functional groups to the affinity of the entire ligand. Through calibrated unfolding of two protein-ligand systems: cAMP-bound regulatory subunit of Protein Kinase A (RIα) and IBMX-bound phosphodiesterase8 (PDE8), monitored by amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, we show progressive disruption of individual orthosteric contacts in the ligand binding sites, allowing us to rank the energetic contributions of these individual interactions. In the two cAMP-binding sites of RIα, exocyclic phosphate oxygens of cAMP were identified to mediate stronger interactions than ribose 2'-OH in both the RIα-cAMP binding interfaces. Further, we have also ranked the relative contributions of the different functional groups of IBMX based on their interactions with the orthosteric residues of PDE8. This strategy for deconstruction of individual binding sites and identification of the strongest functional group interaction in enzyme orthosteric sites offers a rational starting point for FBDD.

  2. Neuropilin-1 and neuropilin-2 are differentially expressed in human proteinuric nephropathies and cytokine-stimulated proximal tubular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramek, Herbert; Sarközi, Rita; Lauterberg, Christina; Kronbichler, Andreas; Pirklbauer, Markus; Albrecht, Rudolf; Noppert, Susie-Jane; Perco, Paul; Rudnicki, Michael; Strutz, Frank M; Mayer, Gert

    2009-11-01

    Neuropilin-1 (NRP1) and neuropilin-2 (NRP2) are transmembrane glycoproteins with large extracellular domains that interact with class 3 semaphorins, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family members, and ligands, such as hepatocyte growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor BB, transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), and fibroblast growth factor2 (FGF2). Neuropilins (NRPs) have been implicated in tumor growth and vascularization, as novel mediators of the primary immune response and in regeneration and repair; however, their role in renal pathophysiology is largely unknown. Here, we report upregulation of tubular and interstitial NRP2 protein expression in patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). In an additional cohort of patients with minimal change disease (MCD), membranous nephropathy (MN), and FSGS, elevated NRP2 mRNA expression in kidney biopsies inversely correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at the time of biopsy. Furthermore, upregulation of NRP2 mRNA correlated with post-bioptic decline of kidney function. Expression of NRP1 and NRP2 in human proximal tubular cells (PTCs) was differentially affected after stimulation with TGF-beta1, interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), and oncostatin M (OSM). Although the pro-fibrotic mediators, TGF-beta1 and IL-1beta, induced upregulation of NRP2 expression but downregulation of NRP1 expression, OSM stimulated the expression of both NRP1 and NRP2. Basal and OSM-induced NRP1 mRNA expression, as well as TGF-beta1-induced NRP2 mRNA and protein expression were partially mediated by MEK1/2-ERK1/2 signaling. This is the first report suggesting a differential role of NRP1 and NRP2 in renal fibrogenesis, and TGF-beta1, IL-1beta, and OSM represent the first ligands known to stimulate NRP2 expression in mammalian cells.

  3. Functionalization of Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots with Poly(ethylene glycol): Ligand Exchange, Surface Coverage, and Dispersion Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Whitney Nowak; Bates, Frank S; Aydil, Eray S

    2017-08-22

    Semiconductor quantum dots synthesized using rapid mixing of precursors by injection into a hot solution of solvents and surfactants have surface ligands that sterically stabilize the dispersions in nonpolar solvents. Often, these ligands are exchanged to disperse the quantum dots in polar solvents, but quantitative studies of quantum dot surfaces before and after ligand exchange are scarce. We studied exchanging trioctylphosphine (TOP) and trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) ligands on as-synthesized CdSe quantum dots dispersed in hexane with a 2000 g/mol thiolated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) polymer. Using infrared spectroscopy we quantify the absolute surface concentration of TOP/TOPO and PEG ligands per unit area before and after ligand exchange. While 50-85% of the TOP/TOPO ligands are removed upon ligand exchange, only a few are replaced with PEG. Surprisingly, the remaining TOP/TOPO ligands outnumber the PEG ligands, but these few PEG ligands are sufficient to disperse the quantum dots in polar solvents such as chloroform, tetrahydrofuran, and water. Moreover, as-synthesized quantum dots once easily dispersed in hexane are no longer dispersible in nonpolar solvents after ligand exchange. A subtle coverage-dependent balance between attractive PEG-solvent interactions and repulsive TOP/TOPO-solvent interactions determines the dispersion stability.

  4. Selenolate complexes of CYP101 and the heme-bound hHO-1/H25A proximal cavity mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yongying; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2008-05-05

    Thiolate and selenolate complexes of CYP101 (P450cam) and the H25A proximal cavity mutant of heme-bound human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) have been examined by UV-vis spectroscopy. Both thiolate and selenolate ligands bound to the heme distal side in CYP101 and gave rise to characteristic hyperporphyrin spectra. Thiolate ligands also bound to the proximal side of the heme in the cavity created by the H25A mutation in hHO-1, giving a Soret absorption similar to that of the H25C hHO-1 mutant. Selenolate ligands also bound to this cavity mutant under anaerobic conditions but reduced the heme iron to the ferrous state, as shown by the formation of a ferrous CO complex. Under aerobic conditions, the selenolate ligand but not the thiolate ligand was rapidly oxidized. These results indicate that selenocysteine-coordinated heme proteins will not be stable species in the absence of a redox potential stabilizing effect.

  5. Reactivity of olefin and allyl ligands in π-complexes of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukushkin, Yu.N.

    1987-01-01

    The data on reactivity of olefin and allyl ligands in transition metal (Ru, W) π-complexes, published up to 1984 are presented. Metal ion coordination of olefins causes their appreciable reactivity change. Transformations of π-olefin ligands into σ-alkyl ones, interaction of π-complexes with oxygen nucleophilic reagents, amines, halogenides and pseudohalogenides are considered

  6. Receptor-ligand binding sites and virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattotuwagama, Channa K; Davies, Matthew N; Flower, Darren R

    2006-01-01

    Within the pharmaceutical industry, the ultimate source of continuing profitability is the unremitting process of drug discovery. To be profitable, drugs must be marketable: legally novel, safe and relatively free of side effects, efficacious, and ideally inexpensive to produce. While drug discovery was once typified by a haphazard and empirical process, it is now increasingly driven by both knowledge of the receptor-mediated basis of disease and how drug molecules interact with receptors and the wider physiome. Medicinal chemistry postulates that to understand a congeneric ligand series, or set thereof, is to understand the nature and requirements of a ligand binding site. Likewise, structural molecular biology posits that to understand a binding site is to understand the nature of ligands bound therein. Reality sits somewhere between these extremes, yet subsumes them both. Complementary to rules of ligand design, arising through decades of medicinal chemistry, structural biology and computational chemistry are able to elucidate the nature of binding site-ligand interactions, facilitating, at both pragmatic and conceptual levels, the drug discovery process.

  7. Tuning Confinement in Colloidal Silicon Nanocrystals with Saturated Surface Ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neale, Nathan R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Carroll, Gerard [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Limpens, Rens [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-04-16

    The optical properties of silicon nanocrystals (Si NCs) are a subject of intense study and continued debate. In particular, Si NC photoluminescence (PL) properties are known to depend strongly on the surface chemistry, resulting in electron-hole recombination pathways derived from the Si NC band-edge, surface-state defects, or combined NC-conjugated ligand hybrid states. In this Letter, we perform a comparison of three different saturated surface functional groups - alkyls, amides, and alkoxides - on nonthermal plasma-synthesized Si NCs. We find a systematic and size-dependent high-energy (blue) shift in the PL spectrum of Si NCs with amide and alkoxy functionalization relative to alkyl. Time-resolved photoluminescence and transient absorption spectroscopies reveal no change in the excited-state dynamics between Si NCs functionalized with alkyl, amide, or alkoxide ligands, showing for the first time that saturated ligands - not only surface-derived charge-transfer states or hybridization between NC and low-lying ligand orbitals - are responsible for tuning the Si NC optical properties. To explain these PL shifts we propose that the atom bound to the Si NC surface strongly interacts with the Si NC electronic wave function and modulates the Si NC quantum confinement. These results reveal a potentially broadly applicable correlation between the optoelectronic properties of Si NCs and related quantum-confined structures based on the interaction between NC surfaces and the ligand binding group.

  8. Tuning Confinement in Colloidal Silicon Nanocrystals with Saturated Surface Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Gerard M; Limpens, Rens; Neale, Nathan R

    2018-05-09

    The optical properties of silicon nanocrystals (Si NCs) are a subject of intense study and continued debate. In particular, Si NC photoluminescence (PL) properties are known to depend strongly on the surface chemistry, resulting in electron-hole recombination pathways derived from the Si NC band-edge, surface-state defects, or combined NC-conjugated ligand hybrid states. In this Letter, we perform a comparison of three different saturated surface functional groups-alkyls, amides, and alkoxides-on nonthermal plasma-synthesized Si NCs. We find a systematic and size-dependent high-energy (blue) shift in the PL spectrum of Si NCs with amide and alkoxy functionalization relative to alkyl. Time-resolved photoluminescence and transient absorption spectroscopies reveal no change in the excited-state dynamics between Si NCs functionalized with alkyl, amide, or alkoxide ligands, showing for the first time that saturated ligands-not only surface-derived charge-transfer states or hybridization between NC and low-lying ligand orbitals-are responsible for tuning the Si NC optical properties. To explain these PL shifts we propose that the atom bound to the Si NC surface strongly interacts with the Si NC electronic wave function and modulates the Si NC quantum confinement. These results reveal a potentially broadly applicable correlation between the optoelectronic properties of Si NCs and related quantum-confined structures based on the interaction between NC surfaces and the ligand binding group.

  9. Proximal Alternating Direction Method with Relaxed Proximal Parameters for the Least Squares Covariance Adjustment Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghua Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of seeking a symmetric positive semidefinite matrix in a closed convex set to approximate a given matrix. This problem may arise in several areas of numerical linear algebra or come from finance industry or statistics and thus has many applications. For solving this class of matrix optimization problems, many methods have been proposed in the literature. The proximal alternating direction method is one of those methods which can be easily applied to solve these matrix optimization problems. Generally, the proximal parameters of the proximal alternating direction method are greater than zero. In this paper, we conclude that the restriction on the proximal parameters can be relaxed for solving this kind of matrix optimization problems. Numerical experiments also show that the proximal alternating direction method with the relaxed proximal parameters is convergent and generally has a better performance than the classical proximal alternating direction method.

  10. GluR2 ligand-binding core complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasper, C; Lunn, M-L; Liljefors, T

    2002-01-01

    X-ray structures of the GluR2 ligand-binding core in complex with (S)-Des-Me-AMPA and in the presence and absence of zinc ions have been determined. (S)-Des-Me-AMPA, which is devoid of a substituent in the 5-position of the isoxazolol ring, only has limited interactions with the partly hydrophobic...

  11. Speciation of Zinc Mixed Ligand Complexes in Salt Water Systems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Speciation of Zinc Mixed Ligand Complexes in Salt Water Systems. ... method has been used to study heavy metal interaction in model lake water in KNO3 ... is of no consequential effect because in its normal state, the [OH-] of the lake water is ...

  12. Secondary ligand-directed assembly of Co(II) coordination polymers based on a pyridine carboxylate ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Ke-Li; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Cai, Yi-Ni; Xu, Xiao-Wei; Feng, Yun-Long

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the influence of hydrogen bonds and secondary ligands on the structures and properties of the resulting frameworks, five new Co(II) compounds have been synthesized by the reactions of Co(II) salts and 3,5-bis(pyridin-4-ylmethoxy)benzoic acid (HL) with four rationally selected dicarboxylic acid ligands. Without secondary ligand, we got one compound [CoL 2 (H 2 O) 2 ] n ·2nH 2 O (1), which possesses a 1D chain structure. In the presence of ancillary ligands, namely, 1,3-adamantanedicarboxylic acid (H 2 adbc), terephthalic acid (H 2 tpa), thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid (H 2 tdc) and 1,4-benzenedithioacetic acid (H 2 bdtc), four 3D structures [Co 2 L 2 (adbc)] n ·nH 2 O (2), [Co 2 L 2 (tpa)] n (3), [Co 2 L 2 (tdc)] n (4), [Co 2 L 2 (bdtc)(H 2 O)] n (5) were obtained, respectively. It can be observed from the architectures of 1–5 that hydrogen bonds and secondary ligands both have great effects on the spatial connective fashions, resulting in the formation of various dimensional compounds. The XRPD, TGA data of title polymers and the magnetic properties for 2 and 5 have also been investigated. - Graphical abstract: The structural differences show that the ancillary ligands have great effects on the spatial connective fashions, resulting in the formation of various dimensional compounds. - Highlights: • Five new Co(II) coordination polymers have been synthesized by solvothermal reactions based on 3,5-bis(pyridin-4-ylmethoxy)benzoic acid (HL). • The long-flexible ligand (HL) is a good candidate to produce interpenetrating architectures. • The secondary dicarboxylic acid ligands play important roles in the spatial connective fashions and the formation of various dimensional compounds. • The magnetism studies show that both 2 and 5 exhibit antiferromagnetic interactions

  13. Free-energy relationships in ion channels activated by voltage and ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Sandipan

    2013-01-01

    Many ion channels are modulated by multiple stimuli, which allow them to integrate a variety of cellular signals and precisely respond to physiological needs. Understanding how these different signaling pathways interact has been a challenge in part because of the complexity of underlying models. In this study, we analyzed the energetic relationships in polymodal ion channels using linkage principles. We first show that in proteins dually modulated by voltage and ligand, the net free-energy change can be obtained by measuring the charge-voltage (Q-V) relationship in zero ligand condition and the ligand binding curve at highly depolarizing membrane voltages. Next, we show that the voltage-dependent changes in ligand occupancy of the protein can be directly obtained by measuring the Q-V curves at multiple ligand concentrations. When a single reference ligand binding curve is available, this relationship allows us to reconstruct ligand binding curves at different voltages. More significantly, we establish that the shift of the Q-V curve between zero and saturating ligand concentration is a direct estimate of the interaction energy between the ligand- and voltage-dependent pathway. These free-energy relationships were tested by numerical simulations of a detailed gating model of the BK channel. Furthermore, as a proof of principle, we estimate the interaction energy between the ligand binding and voltage-dependent pathways for HCN2 channels whose ligand binding curves at various voltages are available. These emerging principles will be useful for high-throughput mutagenesis studies aimed at identifying interaction pathways between various regulatory domains in a polymodal ion channel. PMID:23250866

  14. Proximal Hamstring Tendinosis and Partial Ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Startzman, Ashley N; Fowler, Oliver; Carreira, Dominic

    2017-07-01

    Proximal hamstring tendinosis and partial hamstring origin ruptures are painful conditions of the proximal thigh and hip that may occur in the acute, chronic, or acute on chronic setting. Few publications exist related to their diagnosis and management. This systematic review discusses the incidence, treatment, and prognosis of proximal hamstring tendinosis and partial hamstring ruptures. Conservative treatment measures include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, rest, and ice. If these measures fail, platelet-rich plasma or shockwave therapy may be considered. When refractory to conservative management, these injuries may be treated with surgical debridement and hamstring reattachment. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(4):e574-e582.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Ligand deconstruction: Why some fragment binding positions are conserved and others are not

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozakov, Dima; Hall, David R.; Jehle, Stefan; Luo, Lingqi; Ochiana, Stefan O.; Jones, Elizabeth V.; Pollastri, Michael; Allen, Karen N.; Whitty, Adrian; Vajda, Sandor

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) relies on the premise that the fragment binding mode will be conserved on subsequent expansion to a larger ligand. However, no general condition has been established to explain when fragment binding modes will be conserved. We show that a remarkably simple condition can be developed in terms of how fragments coincide with binding energy hot spots—regions of the protein where interactions with a ligand contribute substantial binding free energy—the locations of which can easily be determined computationally. Because a substantial fraction of the free energy of ligand binding comes from interacting with the residues in the energetically most important hot spot, a ligand moiety that sufficiently overlaps with this region will retain its location even when other parts of the ligand are removed. This hypothesis is supported by eight case studies. The condition helps identify whether a protein is suitable for FBDD, predicts the size of fragments required for screening, and determines whether a fragment hit can be extended into a higher affinity ligand. Our results show that ligand binding sites can usefully be thought of in terms of an anchor site, which is the top-ranked hot spot and dominates the free energy of binding, surrounded by a number of weaker satellite sites that confer improved affinity and selectivity for a particular ligand and that it is the intrinsic binding potential of the protein surface that determines whether it can serve as a robust binding site for a suitably optimized ligand. PMID:25918377

  16. Ligand deconstruction: Why some fragment binding positions are conserved and others are not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozakov, Dima; Hall, David R; Jehle, Stefan; Jehle, Sefan; Luo, Lingqi; Ochiana, Stefan O; Jones, Elizabeth V; Pollastri, Michael; Allen, Karen N; Whitty, Adrian; Vajda, Sandor

    2015-05-19

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) relies on the premise that the fragment binding mode will be conserved on subsequent expansion to a larger ligand. However, no general condition has been established to explain when fragment binding modes will be conserved. We show that a remarkably simple condition can be developed in terms of how fragments coincide with binding energy hot spots--regions of the protein where interactions with a ligand contribute substantial binding free energy--the locations of which can easily be determined computationally. Because a substantial fraction of the free energy of ligand binding comes from interacting with the residues in the energetically most important hot spot, a ligand moiety that sufficiently overlaps with this region will retain its location even when other parts of the ligand are removed. This hypothesis is supported by eight case studies. The condition helps identify whether a protein is suitable for FBDD, predicts the size of fragments required for screening, and determines whether a fragment hit can be extended into a higher affinity ligand. Our results show that ligand binding sites can usefully be thought of in terms of an anchor site, which is the top-ranked hot spot and dominates the free energy of binding, surrounded by a number of weaker satellite sites that confer improved affinity and selectivity for a particular ligand and that it is the intrinsic binding potential of the protein surface that determines whether it can serve as a robust binding site for a suitably optimized ligand.

  17. Acute inhibition of selected membrane-proximal mouse T cell receptor signaling by mitochondrial antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwangmi Kim

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available T cells absorb nanometric membrane vesicles, prepared from plasma membrane of antigen presenting cells, via dual receptor/ligand interactions of T cell receptor (TCR with cognate peptide/major histocompatibility complex (MHC plus lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1 with intercellular adhesion molecule 1. TCR-mediated signaling for LFA-1 activation is also required for the vesicle absorption. Exploiting those findings, we had established a high throughput screening (HTS platform and screened a library for isolation of small molecules inhibiting the vesicle absorption. Follow-up studies confirmed that treatments (1 hour with various mitochondrial antagonists, including a class of anti-diabetic drugs (i.e., Metformin and Phenformin, resulted in ubiquitous inhibition of the vesicle absorption without compromising viability of T cells. Further studies revealed that the mitochondrial drug treatments caused impairment of specific membrane-proximal TCR signaling event(s. Thus, activation of Akt and PLC-gamma1 and entry of extracellular Ca(2+ following TCR stimulation were attenuated while polymerization of monomeric actins upon TCR triggering progressed normally after the treatments. Dynamic F-actin rearrangement concurring with the vesicle absorption was also found to be impaired by the drug treatments, implying that the inhibition by the drug treatments of downstream signaling events (and the vesicle absorption could result from lack of directional relocation of signaling and cell surface molecules. We also assessed the potential application of mitochondrial antagonists as immune modulators by probing effects of the long-term drug treatments (24 hours on viability of resting primary T cells and cell cycle progression of antigen-stimulated T cells. This study unveils a novel regulatory mechanism for T cell immunity in response to environmental factors having effects on mitochondrial function.

  18. In vitro evaluation of biodegradable microspheres with surface-bound ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Mark E; Royce, Sara M; Fahmy, Tarek; Saltzman, W Mark

    2006-02-21

    Protein ligands were conjugated to the surface of biodegradable microspheres. These microsphere-ligand conjugates were then used in two in vitro model systems to evaluate the effect of conjugated ligands on microsphere behavior. Microsphere retention in agarose columns was increased by ligands on the microsphere surface specific for receptors on the agarose matrix. In another experiment, conjugating the lectin Ulex europaeus agglutinin 1 to the microsphere surface increased microsphere adhesion to Caco-2 monolayers compared to control microspheres. This increase in microsphere adhesion was negated by co-administration of l-fucose, indicating that the increase in adhesion is due to specific interaction of the ligand with carbohydrate receptors on the cell surface. These results demonstrate that the ligands conjugated to the microspheres maintain their receptor binding activity and are present on the microsphere surface at a density sufficient to target the microspheres to both monolayers and three-dimensional matrices bearing complementary receptors.

  19. U(SMes*)n, (n=3, 4) and Ln(SMes*)3 (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd): Lanthanide(III)/actinide(III) differentiation in agostic interactions and an unprecedented eta(3) Ligation mode of the aryl-thiolate ligand, from X-ray diffraction and DFT analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roger, Mathieu; Barros, Noemi; Arliguie, Therese; Thuery, Pierre; Maron, Laurent; Ephritikhine, Michel

    2006-01-01

    Reaction of U(NEt 2 ) 4 with HS-2,4,6- t Bu 3 C 6 H 2 (HSMes*) gave U(SMes*) 3 (NEt 2 )(py) (1), whereas similar treatment of U[N(SiMe 3 )SiMe 2 CH 2 ][N(SiMe 3 ) 2 ] 2 afforded U(SMes*)[N(SiMe 3 ) 2 ] 3 (2) and U(SMes*) 3 [N(SiMe 3 ) 2 ]. The first neutral homoleptic uranium(IV) thiolate to have been crystallographically characterized, U(SMes*) 4 (4), was isolated from the reaction of U(BH 4 ) 4 and KSMes*. The first homoleptic thiolate complex of uranium(III), U(SMes*) 3 (5), was synthesized by proton-lysis of U[N(SiMe 3 ) 2 ] 3 with HSMes* in cyclohexane. The crystal structure of 5 exhibits the novel η 3 ligation mode for the aryl-thiolate ligand. Comparison of the crystal structure of 5 with those of the isomorphous lanthanide congeners Ln(SMes*) 3 (Ln) La, Ce, Pr, and Nd) indicates that the U-S, U-C ipso , and U-C ortho bond lengths are shorter than the corresponding ones in the 4f-element analogues, when taking into account the variation in the ionic radii of the metals. The distance between the uranium and the carbon atoms involved in the U center dot center dot center dot H-C ε agostic interaction of each thiolate ligand is shorter, by ∼ 0.05 angstrom, than that expected from a purely ionic bonding model. The lanthanide( III)/actinide(III) differentiation was analyzed by density functional theory (DFT). The nature of the M-S bond is shown to be ionic strongly polarized at the sulfur for M) U and ion-covalent (i.e. strongly ionic with low orbital interaction), for M) Ln. The strength of the U center dot center dot center dot H-C ε agostic interaction is proposed to be controlled by the maximization of the interaction between U + and S - under steric constraints. The η 3 ligation mode of the aryl-thiolate ligand is also obtained from DFT. (authors)

  20. U(SMes*)n, (n = 3, 4) and Ln(SMes*)3 (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd): lanthanide(III)/actinide(III) differentiation in agostic interactions and an unprecedented eta3 ligation mode of the arylthiolate ligand, from X-ray diffraction and DFT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Mathieu; Barros, Noémi; Arliguie, Thérèse; Thuéry, Pierre; Maron, Laurent; Ephritikhine, Michel

    2006-07-12

    Reaction of U(NEt(2))(4) with HS-2,4,6-(t)Bu(3)C(6)H(2) (HSMes) gave U(SMes)(3)(NEt(2))(py) (1), whereas similar treatment of U[N(SiMe(3))SiMe(2)CH(2)][N(SiMe(3))(2)](2) afforded U(SMes)[N(SiMe(3))(2)](3) (2) and U(SMes)(3)[N(SiMe(3))(2)]. The first neutral homoleptic uranium(IV) thiolate to have been crystallographically characterized, U(SMes)(4) (4), was isolated from the reaction of U(BH(4))(4) and KSMes. The first homoleptic thiolate complex of uranium(III), U(SMes)(3) (5), was synthesized by protonolysis of U[N(SiMe(3))(2)](3) with HSMes in cyclohexane. The crystal structure of 5 exhibits the novel eta(3) ligation mode for the arylthiolate ligand. Comparison of the crystal structure of 5 with those of the isomorphous lanthanide congeners Ln(SMes)(3) (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, and Nd) indicates that the U-S, U-C(ipso)(), and U-C(ortho)() bond lengths are shorter than the corresponding ones in the 4f-element analogues, when taking into account the variation in the ionic radii of the metals. The distance between the uranium and the carbon atoms involved in the U...H-C epsilon agostic interaction of each thiolate ligand is shorter, by approximately 0.05 A, than that expected from a purely ionic bonding model. The lanthanide(III)/actinide(III) differentiation was analyzed by density functional theory (DFT). The nature of the M-S bond is shown to be ionic strongly polarized at the sulfur for M = U and iono-covalent (i.e. strongly ionic with low orbital interaction), for M = Ln. The strength of the U...H-C epsilon agostic interaction is proposed to be controlled by the maximization of the interaction between U(+) and S(-) under steric constraints. The eta(3) ligation mode of the arylthiolate ligand is also obtained from DFT.

  1. Group Problem Solving as a Zone of Proximal Development activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewe, Eric

    2006-12-01

    Vygotsky described learning as a process, intertwined with development, which is strongly influenced by social interactions with others that are at differing developmental stages.i These interactions create a Zone of Proximal Development for each member of the interaction. Vygotsky’s notion of social constructivism is not only a theory of learning, but also of development. While teaching introductory physics in an interactive format, I have found manifestations of Vygotsky’s theory in my classroom. The source of evidence is a paired problem solution. A standard mechanics problem was solved by students in two classes as a homework assignment. Students handed in the homework and then solved the same problem in small groups. The solutions to both the group and individual problem were assessed by multiple reviewers. In many cases the group score was the same as the highest individual score in the group, but in some cases, the group score was higher than any individual score. For this poster, I will analyze the individual and group scores and focus on three groups solutions and video that provide evidence of learning through membership in a Zone of Proximal Development. Endnotes i L. Vygotsky -Mind and society: The development of higher mental processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (1978).

  2. LigandRFs: random forest ensemble to identify ligand-binding residues from sequence information alone

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng; Huang, Jianhua Z; Gao, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Protein-ligand binding is important for some proteins to perform their functions. Protein-ligand binding sites are the residues of proteins that physically bind to ligands. Despite of the recent advances in computational prediction

  3. Promoting proximal formative assessment with relational discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Close, Hunter G.; McKagan, Sarah B.

    2012-02-01

    The practice of proximal formative assessment - the continual, responsive attention to students' developing understanding as it is expressed in real time - depends on students' sharing their ideas with instructors and on teachers' attending to them. Rogerian psychology presents an account of the conditions under which proximal formative assessment may be promoted or inhibited: (1) Normal classroom conditions, characterized by evaluation and attention to learning targets, may present threats to students' sense of their own competence and value, causing them to conceal their ideas and reducing the potential for proximal formative assessment. (2) In contrast, discourse patterns characterized by positive anticipation and attention to learner ideas increase the potential for proximal formative assessment and promote self-directed learning. We present an analysis methodology based on these principles and demonstrate its utility for understanding episodes of university physics instruction.

  4. THE PROXIMATE COMPOSITION OF AFRICAN BUSH MANGO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BIG TIMMY

    Information regarding previous studies on these physico-chemical ... This behaviour may be attributed to its high myristic acid ... The authors express deep appreciation to the. Heads of ... of a typical rural processing method on the proximate ...

  5. Proximate composition and nutritional characterization of Chia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... dairy product associated with several beneficial nutritional and health effects. ... The results for amino acids showed that the essential and non-essential amino ... proximate composition and nutritional (amino acids, fatty acids, and minerals ...

  6. Proximal focal femoral deficiency: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Proximal focal femoral deficiency (PFFD is a rare congenital anomaly resulting in limb shortening and disability in young. The exact cause of the disease is not known and it may present as varying grades of affection involving the proximal femur and the acetabulum. Recognition of this rare abnormality on radiographs can help manage these cases better since early institution of therapy may help in achieving adequate growth of the femur.

  7. Proximity sensor system development. CRADA final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haley, D.C.; Pigoski, T.M.

    1998-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (LMERC) and Merritt Systems, Inc. (MSI) entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) for the development and demonstration of a compact, modular proximity sensing system suitable for application to a wide class of manipulator systems operated in support of environmental restoration and waste management activities. In teleoperated modes, proximity sensing provides the manipulator operator continuous information regarding the proximity of the manipulator to objects in the workspace. In teleoperated and robotic modes, proximity sensing provides added safety through the implementation of active whole arm collision avoidance capabilities. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), managed by LMERC for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), has developed an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) design for the electronics required to support a modular whole arm proximity sensing system based on the use of capacitive sensors developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The use of ASIC technology greatly reduces the size of the electronics required to support the selected sensor types allowing deployment of many small sensor nodes over a large area of the manipulator surface to provide maximum sensor coverage. The ASIC design also provides a communication interface to support sensor commands from and sensor data transmission to a distributed processing system which allows modular implementation and operation of the sensor system. MSI is a commercial small business specializing in proximity sensing systems based upon infrared and acoustic sensors

  8. Proximity sensor system development. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haley, D.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Pigoski, T.M. [Merrit Systems, Inc. (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (LMERC) and Merritt Systems, Inc. (MSI) entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) for the development and demonstration of a compact, modular proximity sensing system suitable for application to a wide class of manipulator systems operated in support of environmental restoration and waste management activities. In teleoperated modes, proximity sensing provides the manipulator operator continuous information regarding the proximity of the manipulator to objects in the workspace. In teleoperated and robotic modes, proximity sensing provides added safety through the implementation of active whole arm collision avoidance capabilities. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), managed by LMERC for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), has developed an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) design for the electronics required to support a modular whole arm proximity sensing system based on the use of capacitive sensors developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The use of ASIC technology greatly reduces the size of the electronics required to support the selected sensor types allowing deployment of many small sensor nodes over a large area of the manipulator surface to provide maximum sensor coverage. The ASIC design also provides a communication interface to support sensor commands from and sensor data transmission to a distributed processing system which allows modular implementation and operation of the sensor system. MSI is a commercial small business specializing in proximity sensing systems based upon infrared and acoustic sensors.

  9. Using chemical shift perturbation to characterise ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Mike P

    2013-08-01

    Chemical shift perturbation (CSP, chemical shift mapping or complexation-induced changes in chemical shift, CIS) follows changes in the chemical shifts of a protein when a ligand is added, and uses these to determine the location of the binding site, the affinity of the ligand, and/or possibly the structure of the complex. A key factor in determining the appearance of spectra during a titration is the exchange rate between free and bound, or more specifically the off-rate koff. When koff is greater than the chemical shift difference between free and bound, which typically equates to an affinity Kd weaker than about 3μM, then exchange is fast on the chemical shift timescale. Under these circumstances, the observed shift is the population-weighted average of free and bound, which allows Kd to be determined from measurement of peak positions, provided the measurements are made appropriately. (1)H shifts are influenced to a large extent by through-space interactions, whereas (13)Cα and (13)Cβ shifts are influenced more by through-bond effects. (15)N and (13)C' shifts are influenced both by through-bond and by through-space (hydrogen bonding) interactions. For determining the location of a bound ligand on the basis of shift change, the most appropriate method is therefore usually to measure (15)N HSQC spectra, calculate the geometrical distance moved by the peak, weighting (15)N shifts by a factor of about 0.14 compared to (1)H shifts, and select those residues for which the weighted shift change is larger than the standard deviation of the shift for all residues. Other methods are discussed, in particular the measurement of (13)CH3 signals. Slow to intermediate exchange rates lead to line broadening, and make Kd values very difficult to obtain. There is no good way to distinguish changes in chemical shift due to direct binding of the ligand from changes in chemical shift due to allosteric change. Ligand binding at multiple sites can often be characterised, by

  10. Ligand screening by saturation-transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, V V

    2005-04-26

    NMR based methods to screen for high-affinity ligands have become an indispensable tool for designing rationalized drugs, as these offer a combination of good experimental design of the screening process and data interpretation methods, which together provide unprecedented information on the complex nature of protein-ligand interactions. These methods rely on measuring direct changes in the spectral parameters, that are often simpler than the complex experimental procedures used to study structure and dynamics of proteins. The goal of this review article is to provide the basic details of NMR based ligand-screening methods, with particular focus on the saturation transfer difference (STD) experiment. In addition, we provide an overview of other NMR experimental methods and a practical guide on how to go about designing and implementing them.

  11. Heterobifunctional crosslinkers for tethering single ligand molecules to scanning probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riener, Christian K.; Kienberger, Ferry; Hahn, Christoph D.; Buchinger, Gerhard M.; Egwim, Innocent O.C.; Haselgruebler, Thomas; Ebner, Andreas; Romanin, Christoph; Klampfl, Christian; Lackner, Bernd; Prinz, Heino; Blaas, Dieter; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Gruber, Hermann J.

    2003-01-01

    Single molecule recognition force microscopy (SMRFM) is a versatile atomic force microscopy (AFM) method to probe specific interactions of cognitive molecules on the single molecule level. It allows insights to be gained into interaction potentials and kinetic barriers and is capable of mapping interaction sites with nm positional accuracy. These applications require a ligand to be attached to the AFM tip, preferably by a distensible poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chain between the measuring tip and the ligand molecule. The PEG chain greatly facilitates specific binding of the ligand to immobile receptor sites on the sample surface. The present study contributes to tip-PEG-ligand tethering in three ways: (i) a convenient synthetic route was found to prepare NH 2 -PEG-COOH which is the key intermediate for long heterobifunctional crosslinkers; (ii) a variety of heterobifunctional PEG derivatives for tip-PEG-ligand linking were prepared from NH 2 -PEG-COOH; (iii) in particular, a new PEG crosslinker with one thiol-reactive end and one terminal nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) group was synthesized and successfully used to tether His 6 -tagged protein molecules to AFM tips via noncovalent NTA-Ni 2+ -His 6 bridges. The new crosslinker was applied to link a recombinant His 6 -tagged fragment of the very-low density lipoprotein receptor to the AFM tip whereupon specific docking to the capsid of human rhinovirus particles was observed by force microscopy. In a parallel study, the specific interaction of the small GTPase Ran with the nuclear import receptor importin β1 was studied in detail by SMRFM, using the new crosslinker to link His 6 -tagged Ran to the measuring tip [Nat. Struct. Biol. (2003), 10, 553-557

  12. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery.

  13. Tetrapyrroles as Endogenous TSPO Ligands in Eukaryotes and Prokaryotes: Comparisons with Synthetic Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Veenman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO is highly 0conserved in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Since its discovery in 1977, numerous studies established the TSPO’s importance for life essential functions. For these studies, synthetic TSPO ligands typically are applied. Tetrapyrroles present endogenous ligands for the TSPO. Tetrapyrroles are also evolutionarily conserved and regulate multiple functions. TSPO and tetrapyrroles regulate each other. In animals TSPO-tetrapyrrole interactions range from effects on embryonic development to metabolism, programmed cell death, response to stress, injury and disease, and even to life span extension. In animals TSPOs are primarily located in mitochondria. In plants TSPOs are also present in plastids, the nuclear fraction, the endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi stacks. This may contribute to translocation of tetrapyrrole intermediates across organelles’ membranes. As in animals, plant TSPO binds heme and protoporphyrin IX. TSPO-tetrapyrrole interactions in plants appear to relate to development as well as stress conditions, including salt tolerance, abscisic acid-induced stress, reactive oxygen species homeostasis, and finally cell death regulation. In bacteria, TSPO is important for switching from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism, including the regulation of photosynthesis. As in mitochondria, in bacteria TSPO is located in the outer membrane. TSPO-tetrapyrrole interactions may be part of the establishment of the bacterial-eukaryote relationships, i.e., mitochondrial-eukaryote and plastid-plant endosymbiotic relationships.

  14. Singular Value Decomposition and Ligand Binding Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Galo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Singular values decomposition (SVD is one of the most important computations in linear algebra because of its vast application for data analysis. It is particularly useful for resolving problems involving least-squares minimization, the determination of matrix rank, and the solution of certain problems involving Euclidean norms. Such problems arise in the spectral analysis of ligand binding to macromolecule. Here, we present a spectral data analysis method using SVD (SVD analysis and nonlinear fitting to determine the binding characteristics of intercalating drugs to DNA. This methodology reduces noise and identifies distinct spectral species similar to traditional principal component analysis as well as fitting nonlinear binding parameters. We applied SVD analysis to investigate the interaction of actinomycin D and daunomycin with native DNA. This methodology does not require prior knowledge of ligand molar extinction coefficients (free and bound, which potentially limits binding analysis. Data are acquired simply by reconstructing the experimental data and by adjusting the product of deconvoluted matrices and the matrix of model coefficients determined by the Scatchard and McGee and von Hippel equation.

  15. Cyclophilin B expression in renal proximal tubules of hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainer, D B; Doris, P A

    2000-04-01

    Rat cyclophilin-like protein (Cy-LP) is a candidate hypertension gene initially identified by differential hybridization and implicated in renal mechanisms of salt retention and high blood pressure. We report the molecular characterization of rat cyclophilin B (CypB) and demonstrate, through sequence analysis and an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction primer assay, that CypB but not Cy-LP is expressed in rat kidney. CypB is an endoplasmic reticulum-localized prolyl-isomerase that interacts with elongation initiation factor 2-beta, an important regulator of protein translation and a central component of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response to hypoxia or ATP depletion. Active renal transport of sodium is increased in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR), and there is evidence that this coincides with hypoxia and ATP depletion in the renal cortex. In the present studies we have examined expression of CypB in rat proximal tubules, which contributes to the increased renal sodium reabsorption in this model of hypertension. We report that CypB transcript abundance is significantly elevated in proximal convoluted tubules from SHR compared with the control Wistar-Kyoto strain. This upregulation occurs in weanling animals and precedes the development of hypertension, indicating that it is not a simple response to hypertension in SHR. Further, CypB expression is also higher in a proximal tubule cell line derived from SHR compared with a similar line derived from Wistar-Kyoto rats, indicating that this difference is genetically determined. No sequence differences were observed in the CypB cDNA from these 2 strains. These observations suggest that a genetically determined alteration in proximal tubules from SHR occurs that leads to increased expression of CypB. In view of evidence linking CypB to the regulation of elongation initiation factor-2, the upregulation of CypB may result from metabolic stress.

  16. Spin manipulation and spin-lattice interaction in magnetic colloidal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Fabrizio; Turyanska, Lyudmila; Granwehr, Josef; Patanè, Amalia

    2014-11-01

    We report on the spin-lattice interaction and coherent manipulation of electron spins in Mn-doped colloidal PbS quantum dots (QDs) by electron spin resonance. We show that the phase memory time,TM , is limited by Mn-Mn dipolar interactions, hyperfine interactions of the protons (1H) on the QD capping ligands with Mn ions in their proximity (limit and at low temperature, we achieve a long phase memory time constant TM˜0.9 μ s , thus enabling the observation of Rabi oscillations. Our findings suggest routes to the rational design of magnetic colloidal QDs with phase memory times exceeding the current limits of relevance for the implementation of QDs as qubits in quantum information processing.

  17. Modeling the interactions of a peptide-major histocompatibility class I ligand with its receptors. II. Cross-reaction between a monoclonal antibody and two alpha beta T cell receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rognan, D; Engberg, J; Stryhn, A

    2000-01-01

    -peptide pair into the Fab combining site. Interestingly, the most energetically favored binding mode shows numerous analogies to the recently determined recognition of class I MHC-peptide complexes by alpha beta T cell receptors (TCRs). The pSAN13.4.1 also binds diagonally across the MHC binding groove......The recombinant antibody, pSAN13.4.1, has a unique T cell like specificity; it binds an Influenza Hemagglutinin octapeptide (Ha255-262) in an MHC (H-2Kk)-restricted manner, and a detailed comparison of the fine specificity of pSAN13.4.1 with the fine specificity of two Ha255-262-specific, H-2Kk......-restricted T cell hybridomas has supported this contention. A three-dimensional model of pSAN13.4.1 has been derived by homology modeling techniques. Subsequently, the structure of the pSAN13.4.1 antibody in complex with the antigenic Ha-Kk ligand was derived after a flexible and automated docking of the MHC...

  18. Dynamical Binding Modes Determine Agonistic and Antagonistic Ligand Effects in the Prostate-Specific G-Protein Coupled Receptor (PSGR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Steffen; Jovancevic, Nikolina; Gelis, Lian; Pietsch, Sebastian; Hatt, Hanns; Gerwert, Klaus

    2017-11-22

    We analysed the ligand-based activation mechanism of the prostate-specific G-protein coupled receptor (PSGR), which is an olfactory receptor that mediates cellular growth in prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, it is an olfactory receptor with a known chemically near identic antagonist/agonist pair, α- and β-ionone. Using a combined theoretical and experimental approach, we propose that this receptor is activated by a ligand-induced rearrangement of a protein-internal hydrogen bond network. Surprisingly, this rearrangement is not induced by interaction of the ligand with the network, but by dynamic van der Waals contacts of the ligand with the involved amino acid side chains, altering their conformations and intraprotein connectivity. Ligand recognition in this GPCR is therefore highly stereo selective, but seemingly lacks any ligand recognition via polar contacts. A putative olfactory receptor-based drug design scheme will have to take this unique mode of protein/ligand action into account.

  19. Crystallization of protein–ligand complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassell, Anne M.; An, Gang; Bledsoe, Randy K.; Bynum, Jane M.; Carter, H. Luke III; Deng, Su-Jun J.; Gampe, Robert T.; Grisard, Tamara E.; Madauss, Kevin P.; Nolte, Robert T.; Rocque, Warren J.; Wang, Liping; Weaver, Kurt L.; Williams, Shawn P.; Wisely, G. Bruce; Xu, Robert; Shewchuk, Lisa M.

    2007-01-01

    Methods presented for growing protein–ligand complexes fall into the categories of co-expression of the protein with the ligands of interest, use of the ligands during protein purification, cocrystallization and soaking the ligands into existing crystals. Obtaining diffraction-quality crystals has long been a bottleneck in solving the three-dimensional structures of proteins. Often proteins may be stabilized when they are complexed with a substrate, nucleic acid, cofactor or small molecule. These ligands, on the other hand, have the potential to induce significant conformational changes to the protein and ab initio screening may be required to find a new crystal form. This paper presents an overview of strategies in the following areas for obtaining crystals of protein–ligand complexes: (i) co-expression of the protein with the ligands of interest, (ii) use of the ligands during protein purification, (iii) cocrystallization and (iv) soaks

  20. Proximity to sports facilities and sports participation for adolescents in Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne K Reimers

    Full Text Available To assess the relationship between proximity to specific sports facilities and participation in the corresponding sports activities for adolescents in Germany.A sample of 1,768 adolescents aged 11-17 years old and living in 161 German communities was examined. Distances to the nearest sports facilities were calculated as an indicator of proximity to sports facilities using Geographic Information Systems (GIS. Participation in specific leisure-time sports activities in sports clubs was assessed using a self-report questionnaire and individual-level socio-demographic variables were derived from a parent questionnaire. Community-level socio-demographics as covariates were selected from the INKAR database, in particular from indicators and maps on land development. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine associations between proximity to the nearest sports facilities and participation in the corresponding sports activities.The logistic regression analyses showed that girls residing longer distances from the nearest gym were less likely to engage in indoor sports activities; a significant interaction between distances to gyms and level of urbanization was identified. Decomposition of the interaction term showed that for adolescent girls living in rural areas participation in indoor sports activities was positively associated with gym proximity. Proximity to tennis courts and indoor pools was not associated with participation in tennis or water sports, respectively.Improved proximity to gyms is likely to be more important for female adolescents living in rural areas.

  1. Proximity to Sports Facilities and Sports Participation for Adolescents in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Anne K.; Wagner, Matthias; Alvanides, Seraphim; Steinmayr, Andreas; Reiner, Miriam; Schmidt, Steffen; Woll, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the relationship between proximity to specific sports facilities and participation in the corresponding sports activities for adolescents in Germany. Methods A sample of 1,768 adolescents aged 11–17 years old and living in 161 German communities was examined. Distances to the nearest sports facilities were calculated as an indicator of proximity to sports facilities using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Participation in specific leisure-time sports activities in sports clubs was assessed using a self-report questionnaire and individual-level socio-demographic variables were derived from a parent questionnaire. Community-level socio-demographics as covariates were selected from the INKAR database, in particular from indicators and maps on land development. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine associations between proximity to the nearest sports facilities and participation in the corresponding sports activities. Results The logisitic regression analyses showed that girls residing longer distances from the nearest gym were less likely to engage in indoor sports activities; a significant interaction between distances to gyms and level of urbanization was identified. Decomposition of the interaction term showed that for adolescent girls living in rural areas participation in indoor sports activities was positively associated with gym proximity. Proximity to tennis courts and indoor pools was not associated with participation in tennis or water sports, respectively. Conclusions Improved proximity to gyms is likely to be more important for female adolescents living in rural areas. PMID:24675689

  2. Locking plate fixation for proximal humerus fractures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, Neil G

    2012-02-01

    Locking plates are increasingly used to surgically treat proximal humerus fractures. Knowledge of the bone quality of the proximal humerus is important. Studies have shown the medial and dorsal aspects of the proximal humeral head to have the highest bone strength, and this should be exploited by fixation techniques, particularly in elderly patients with osteoporosis. The goals of surgery for proximal humeral fractures should involve minimal soft tissue dissection and achieve anatomic reduction of the head complex with sufficient stability to allow for early shoulder mobilization. This article reviews various treatment options, in particular locking plate fixation. Locking plate fixation is associated with a high complication rate, such as avascular necrosis (7.9%), screw cutout (11.6%), and revision surgery (13.7%). These complications are frequently due to the varus deformation of the humeral head. Strategic screw placement in the humeral head would minimize the possibility of loss of fracture reduction and potential hardware complications. Locking plate fixation is a good surgical option for the management of proximal humerus fractures. Complications can be avoided by using better bone stock and by careful screw placement in the humeral head.

  3. Giant proximity effect in ferromagnetic bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Silvia; Charlton, Tim; Quintanilla, Jorge; Suter, Andreas; Moodera, Jagadeesh; Prokscha, Thomas; Salman, Zaher; Forgan, Ted

    2013-03-01

    The proximity effect is a phenomenon where an ordered state leaks from a material into an adjacent one over some finite distance, ξ. For superconductors, this distance is ~ the coherence length. Nevertheless much longer-range, ``giant'' proximity effects have been observed in cuprate junctions. This surprising effect can be understood as a consequence of critical opalescence. Since this occurs near all second order phase transitions, giant proximity effects should be very general and, in particular, they should be present in magnetic systems. The ferromagnetic proximity effect has the advantage that its order parameter (magnetization) can be observed directly. We investigate the above phenomenon in Co/EuS bilayer films, where both materials undergo ferromagnetic transitions but at rather different temperatures (bulk TC of 1400K for Co and 16.6K for EuS). A dramatic increase in the range of the proximity effect is expected near the TC of EuS. We present the results of our measurements of the magnetization profiles as a function of temperature, carried out using the complementary techniques of low energy muon rotation and polarized neutron reflectivity. Work supported by EPSRC, STFC and ONR grant N00014-09-1-0177 and NSF grant DMR 0504158.

  4. Synthesis and binding properties of new selective ligands for the nucleobase opposite the AP site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yukiko; Nakagawa, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Rie; Sasaki, Shigeki

    2012-06-01

    DNA is continuously damaged by endogenous and exogenous factors such as oxidative stress or DNA alkylating agents. These damaged nucleobases are removed by DNA N-glycosylase and form apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (AP sites) as intermediates in the base excision repair (BER) pathway. AP sites are also representative DNA damages formed by spontaneous hydrolysis. The AP sites block DNA polymerase and a mismatch nucleobase is inserted opposite the AP sites by polymerization to cause acute toxicities and mutations. Thus, AP site specific compounds have attracted much attention for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. In this study, we have developed nucleobase-polyamine conjugates as the AP site binding ligand by expecting that the nucleobase part would play a role in the specific recognition of the nucleobase opposite the AP site by the Watson-Crick base pair formation and that the polyamine part should contribute to the access of the ligand to the AP site by a non-specific interaction to the DNA phosphate backbone. The nucleobase conjugated with 3,3'-diaminodipropylamine (A-ligand, G-ligand, C-ligand, T-ligand and U-ligand) showed a specific stabilization of the duplex containing the AP site depending on the complementary combination with the nucleobase opposite the AP site; that is A-ligand to T, G-ligand to C, C-ligand to G, T- and U-ligand to A. The thermodynamic binding parameters clearly indicated that the specific stabilization is due to specific binding of the ligands to the complementary AP site. These results have suggested that the complementary base pairs of the Watson-Crick type are formed at the AP site. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular Basis of Meiotic Maturation and Apoptosis of Oocytes, Sperm-Oocyte Interactions and Early Cleavage of Embryos in Mice, Role of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase, Mos, Fas-Fas Ligand, Integrinα6 and MAP Kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Yumi Hoshino; Ken-ichi Yamanaka; Ikuo Tomioka; Noritaka Fukunaga; Mehdi Abbasi; Eimei Sato

    2005-01-01

    The interaction between molecular biology and embryology made an extensive progress in the research on gametogenesis, fertilization and early embryogenesis in mice. In this article, molecules involving in meiotic maturation and apoptosis of oocytes, sperm-oocyte interactions and early cleavage of fertilized embryos in mice are described including our recent following experiments. 1) Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and Akt participate in the follicle stimulating hormone-induced meiotic maturatio...

  6. -Pincer Ligand Family through Ligand Post-Modification

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Mei-Hui; Hu, Jinsong; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2017-01-01

    A series of air-stable nickel complexes containing triazine-based PN3P-pincer ligands were synthesized and fully characterized. Complex 3 contains a de-aromatized central triazine ring from the deprotonation of one of the N–H arms. With a post-modification strategy, the Me-PN3P*NiCl complex (3) could be converted into a new class of diimine–traizine PN3P-pincer nickel complexes.

  7. -Pincer Ligand Family through Ligand Post-Modification

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Mei-Hui

    2017-10-02

    A series of air-stable nickel complexes containing triazine-based PN3P-pincer ligands were synthesized and fully characterized. Complex 3 contains a de-aromatized central triazine ring from the deprotonation of one of the N–H arms. With a post-modification strategy, the Me-PN3P*NiCl complex (3) could be converted into a new class of diimine–traizine PN3P-pincer nickel complexes.

  8. Reactivity of halide and pseudohalide ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukushkin, Yu.N.

    1987-01-01

    Reactivity of halide and pseudohalide (cyanide, azide, thiocyanate, cyanate) ligands tending to form bridge bonds in transition metal (Re, Mo, W) complexes is considered. Complexes where transition metal salts are ligands of other, complex-forming ion, are described. Transformation of innerspheric pseudohalide ligands is an important way of directed synthesis of these metal coordination compounds

  9. Proximity operations concept design study, task 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A. N.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of using optical technology to perform the mission of the proximity operations communications subsystem on Space Station Freedom was determined. Proximity operations mission requirements are determined and the relationship to the overall operational environment of the space station is defined. From this information, the design requirements of the communication subsystem are derived. Based on these requirements, a preliminary design is developed and the feasibility of implementation determined. To support the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle and National Space Transportation System, the optical system development is straightforward. The requirements on extra-vehicular activity are such as to allow large fields of uncertainty, thus exacerbating the acquisition problem; however, an approach is given that could mitigate this problem. In general, it is found that such a system could indeed perform the proximity operations mission requirement, with some development required to support extra-vehicular activity.

  10. Endomedullar nail of metacarpal and proximal phalanges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez Olaya, Francisco Javier; Sanchez Mesa, Pedro Antonio

    2002-01-01

    Prospective study, series of cases; it included patients with diaphysis fractures and union diaphysis-neck or union diaphysis-base of metacarpal and proximal phalanges, in whom was practiced anterograde intramedullary nailing previous closed reduction of the fracture, using prevent intramedullary nail of 1.6 mm. (cem 16) for the metacarpal fractures, and two nail prevent of 1.0 mm. (cem 10) for the proximal phalangeal fractures. Indications: transverse and oblique short fractures, spiral and with comminuting bicortical. Pursuit average is 5.7 months. Frequency surgical intervened patient: 2.2 each month, using this surgical technique a total of 20 (twenty) patients have been operated, 21 (twenty one) fractures; 16 (sixteen) metacarcal fractures and 5 (five) proximal phalangeal fractures, all of them tested using clinical and radiological parameters. Results: good 82%, regular 18%, and bad 0% obtaining bony consolidation and early rehabilitation with incorporation to their habitual works

  11. Correlation between social proximity and mobility similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chao; Liu, Yiding; Huang, Junming; Rong, Zhihai; Zhou, Tao

    2017-09-20

    Human behaviors exhibit ubiquitous correlations in many aspects, such as individual and collective levels, temporal and spatial dimensions, content, social and geographical layers. With rich Internet data of online behaviors becoming available, it attracts academic interests to explore human mobility similarity from the perspective of social network proximity. Existent analysis shows a strong correlation between online social proximity and offline mobility similarity, namely, mobile records between friends are significantly more similar than between strangers, and those between friends with common neighbors are even more similar. We argue the importance of the number and diversity of common friends, with a counter intuitive finding that the number of common friends has no positive impact on mobility similarity while the diversity plays a key role, disagreeing with previous studies. Our analysis provides a novel view for better understanding the coupling between human online and offline behaviors, and will help model and predict human behaviors based on social proximity.

  12. Evaluation and Management of Proximal Humerus Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Khmelnitskaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Proximal humerus fractures are common injuries, especially among older osteoporotic women. Restoration of function requires a thorough understanding of the neurovascular, musculotendinous, and bony anatomy. This paper addresses the relevant anatomy and highlights various management options, including indication for arthroplasty. In the vast majority of cases, proximal humerus fractures may be treated nonoperatively. In the case of displaced fractures, when surgical intervention may be pursued, numerous constructs have been investigated. Of these, the proximal humerus locking plate is the most widely used. Arthroplasty is generally reserved for comminuted 4-part fractures, head-split fractures, or fractures with significant underlying arthritic changes. Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is reserved for patients with a deficient rotator cuff, or highly comminuted tuberosities.

  13. The Life Saving Effects of Hospital Proximity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertoli, Paola; Grembi, Veronica

    We assess the lifesaving effect of hospital proximity using data on fatality rates of road-traffic accidents. While most of the literature on this topic is based on changes in distance to the nearest hospital triggered by hospital closures and use OLS estimates, our identification comes from......) increases the fatality rate by 13.84% on the sample average. This is equal to a 0.92 additional death per every 100 accidents. We show that OLS estimates provide a downward biased measure of the real effect of hospital proximity because they do not fully solve spatial sorting problems. Proximity matters...... more when the road safety is low; the emergency service is not properly organized, and the nearest hospital has lower quality standards....

  14. Proximity functions for general right cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellerer, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    Distributions of distances between pairs of points within geometrical objects, or the closely related proximity functions and geometric reduction factors, have applications to dosimetric and microdosimetric calculations. For convex bodies these functions are linked to the chord-length distributions that result from random intersections by straight lines. A synopsis of the most important relations is given. The proximity functions and related functions are derived for right cylinders with arbitrary cross sections. The solution utilizes the fact that the squares of the distances between two random points are sums of independently distributed squares of distances parallel and perpendicular to the axis of the cylinder. Analogous formulas are derived for the proximity functions or geometric reduction factors for a cylinder relative to a point. This requires only a minor modification of the solution

  15. Industrial Computed Tomography using Proximal Algorithm

    KAUST Repository

    Zang, Guangming

    2016-04-14

    In this thesis, we present ProxiSART, a flexible proximal framework for robust 3D cone beam tomographic reconstruction based on the Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (SART). We derive the proximal operator for the SART algorithm and use it for minimizing the data term in a proximal algorithm. We show the flexibility of the framework by plugging in different powerful regularizers, and show its robustness in achieving better reconstruction results in the presence of noise and using fewer projections. We compare our framework to state-of-the-art methods and existing popular software tomography reconstruction packages, on both synthetic and real datasets, and show superior reconstruction quality, especially from noisy data and a small number of projections.

  16. [Partial replantation following proximal limb injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubert, T; Malikov, S A; Dinh, A; Kupatadze, D D; Oberlin, C; Alnot, J Y; Nabokov, B B

    2000-11-01

    Proximal replantation is a technically feasible but life-threatening procedure. Indications must be restricted to patients in good condition with a good functional prognosis. The goal of replantation must be focused not only on reimplanting the amputated limb but also on achieving a good functional outcome. For the lower limb, simple terminalization remains the best choice in many cases. When a proximal amputation is not suitable for replantation, the main aim of the surgical procedure must be to reconstruct a stump long enough to permit fitting a prosthesis preserving the function of the adjacent joint. If the proximal stump beyond the last joint is very short, it may be possible to restore some length by partial replantation of spared tissues from the amputated part. We present here the results we obtained following this policy. This series included 16 cases of partial replantations, 14 involving the lower limb and 2 the upper limb. All were osteocutaneous microsurgical transfers. For the lower limb, all transfers recovered protective sensitivity following tibial nerve repair. The functional calcaeoplantar unit was used in 13 cases. The transfer of this specialized weight bearing tissue provided a stable distal surface making higher support unnecessary. In one case, we raised a 13-cm vascularized tibial segment covered with foot skin for additional length. For the upper limb, the osteocutaneous transfer, based on the radial artery, was not reinnervated, but this lack of sensitivity did not impair prosthesis fitting. One vascular failure was finally amputated. This was the only unsuccessful result. For all other patients, the surgical procedure facilitated prosthesis fitting and preserved the proximal joint function despite an initially very proximal amputation. The advantages of partial replantation are obvious compared with simple terminalization or secondary reconstruction. There is no secondary donor site and, because there is no major muscle mass in the

  17. The developmental spectrum of proximal radioulnar synostosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Alison M. [University of Manitoba, Winnipeg Regional Health Association Program of Genetics and Metabolism, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); University of Manitoba, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); University of Manitoba, Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); University of Manitoba, WRHA Program of Genetics and Metabolism, Departments of Paediatrics and Child Health, Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Kibria, Lisa [University of Manitoba, Department of School of Medical Rehabilitation, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Reed, Martin H. [University of Manitoba, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); University of Manitoba, Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); University of Manitoba, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Winnipeg, MB (Canada)

    2010-01-15

    Proximal radioulnar synostosis is a rare upper limb malformation. The elbow is first identifiable at 35 days (after conception), at which stage the cartilaginous anlagen of the humerus, radius and ulna are continuous. Subsequently, longitudinal segmentation produces separation of the distal radius and ulna. However, temporarily, the proximal ends are united and continue to share a common perichondrium. We investigated the hypothesis that posterior congenital dislocation of the radial head and proximal radioulnar fusion are different clinical manifestations of the same primary developmental abnormality. Records were searched for ''proximal radioulnar fusion/posterior radial head dislocation'' in patients followed at the local Children's Hospital and Rehabilitation Centre for Children. Relevant radiographic, demographic and clinical data were recorded. Ethics approval was obtained through the University Research Ethics Board. In total, 28 patients met the inclusion criteria. The majority of patients (16) had bilateral involvement; eight with posterior dislocation of the radial head only; five had posterior radial head dislocation with radioulnar fusion and two had radioulnar fusion without dislocation. One patient had bilateral proximal radioulnar fusion and posterior dislocation of the left radial head. Nine patients had only left-sided involvement, and three had only right-sided involvement.The degree of proximal fusion varied, with some patients showing 'complete' proximal fusion and others showing fusion that occurred slightly distal to the radial head: 'partially separated.' Associated disorders in our cohort included Poland syndrome (two patients), Cornelia de Lange syndrome, chromosome anomalies (including tetrasomy X) and Cenani Lenz syndactyly. The suggestion of a developmental relationship between posterior dislocation of the radial head and proximal radioulnar fusion is supported by the fact that both anomalies

  18. Proximity effects in ferromagnet/superconductor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, H.L.; Sun, G.Y.; Yang, L.Y.; Xing, D.Y.

    2004-01-01

    The Nambu spinor Green's function approach is applied to study proximity effects in ferromagnet/superconductor (FM/SC) structures. They include the induced superconducting order parameter and density of states (DOS) with superconducting feature on the FM side, and spin-dependent DOS within the energy gap on the SC side. The latter indicates an appearance of gapless superconductivity and a coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity in a small regime near the interface. The influence of exchange energy in FM and barrier strength at interface on the proximity effects is discussed

  19. Infiltrating/sealing proximal caries lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martignon, S; Ekstrand, K R; Gomez, J

    2012-01-01

    This randomized split-mouth controlled clinical trial aimed at assessing the therapeutic effects of infiltration vs. sealing for controlling caries progression on proximal surfaces. Out of 90 adult students/patients assessed at university clinics and agreeing to participate, 39, each with 3...... differences in lesion progression between infiltration and placebo (P = 0.0012) and between sealing and placebo (P = 0.0269). The study showed that infiltration and sealing are significantly better than placebo treatment for controlling caries progression on proximal lesions. No significant difference...

  20. AMMOS2: a web server for protein-ligand-water complexes refinement via molecular mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, Céline M; Pencheva, Tania; Jereva, Dessislava; Desvillechabrol, Dimitri; Becot, Jérôme; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Pajeva, Ilza; Miteva, Maria A

    2017-07-03

    AMMOS2 is an interactive web server for efficient computational refinement of protein-small organic molecule complexes. The AMMOS2 protocol employs atomic-level energy minimization of a large number of experimental or modeled protein-ligand complexes. The web server is based on the previously developed standalone software AMMOS (Automatic Molecular Mechanics Optimization for in silico Screening). AMMOS utilizes the physics-based force field AMMP sp4 and performs optimization of protein-ligand interactions at five levels of flexibility of the protein receptor. The new version 2 of AMMOS implemented in the AMMOS2 web server allows the users to include explicit water molecules and individual metal ions in the protein-ligand complexes during minimization. The web server provides comprehensive analysis of computed energies and interactive visualization of refined protein-ligand complexes. The ligands are ranked by the minimized binding energies allowing the users to perform additional analysis for drug discovery or chemical biology projects. The web server has been extensively tested on 21 diverse protein-ligand complexes. AMMOS2 minimization shows consistent improvement over the initial complex structures in terms of minimized protein-ligand binding energies and water positions optimization. The AMMOS2 web server is freely available without any registration requirement at the URL: http://drugmod.rpbs.univ-paris-diderot.fr/ammosHome.php. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Gene Duplication of the zebrafish kit ligand and partitioning of melanocyte development functions to kit ligand a.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith A Hultman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The retention of particular genes after the whole genome duplication in zebrafish has given insights into how genes may evolve through partitioning of ancestral functions. We examine the partitioning of expression patterns and functions of two zebrafish kit ligands, kit ligand a (kitla and kit ligand b (kitlb, and discuss their possible coevolution with the duplicated zebrafish kit receptors (kita and kitb. In situ hybridizations show that kitla mRNA is expressed in the trunk adjacent to the notochord in the middle of each somite during stages of melanocyte migration and later expressed in the skin, when the receptor is required for melanocyte survival. kitla is also expressed in other regions complementary to kita receptor expression, including the pineal gland, tail bud, and ear. In contrast, kitlb mRNA is expressed in brain ventricles, ear, and cardinal vein plexus, in regions generally not complementary to either zebrafish kit receptor ortholog. However, like kitla, kitlb is expressed in the skin during stages consistent with melanocyte survival. Thus, it appears that kita and kitla have maintained congruent expression patterns, while kitb and kitlb have evolved divergent expression patterns. We demonstrate the interaction of kita and kitla by morpholino knockdown analysis. kitla morphants, but not kitlb morphants, phenocopy the null allele of kita, with defects for both melanocyte migration and survival. Furthermore, kitla morpholino, but not kitlb morpholino, interacts genetically with a sensitized allele of kita, confirming that kitla is the functional ligand to kita. Last, we examine kitla overexpression in embryos, which results in hyperpigmentation caused by an increase in the number and size of melanocytes. This hyperpigmentation is dependent on kita function. We conclude that following genome duplication, kita and kitla have maintained their receptor-ligand relationship, coevolved complementary expression patterns, and that

  2. Heterogeneity and dynamics of the ligand recognition mode in purine-sensing riboswitches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Niyati; Zhao, Liang; Liu, John D; Xia, Tianbing

    2010-05-04

    High-resolution crystal structures and biophysical analyses of purine-sensing riboswitches have revealed that a network of hydrogen bonding interactions appear to be largey responsible for discrimination of cognate ligands against structurally related compounds. Here we report that by using femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy to capture the ultrafast decay dynamics of the 2-aminopurine base as the ligand, we have detected the presence of multiple conformations of the ligand within the binding pockets of one guanine-sensing and two adenine-sensing riboswitches. All three riboswitches have similar conformational distributions of the ligand-bound state. The known crystal structures represent the global minimum that accounts for 50-60% of the population, where there is no significant stacking interaction between the ligand and bases of the binding pocket, but the hydrogen-bonding cage collectively provides an electronic environment that promotes an ultrafast ( approximately 1 ps) charge transfer pathway. The ligand also samples multiple conformations in which it significantly stacks with either the adenine or the uracil bases of the A21-U75 and A52-U22 base pairs that form the ceiling and floor of the binding pocket, respectively, but favors the larger adenine bases. These alternative conformations with well-defined base stacking interactions are approximately 1-1.5 kcal/mol higher in DeltaG degrees than the global minimum and have distinct charge transfer dynamics within the picosecond to nanosecond time regime. Inside the pocket, the purine ligand undergoes dynamic motion on the low nanosecond time scale, sampling the multiple conformations based on time-resolved anisotropy decay dynamics. These results allowed a description of the energy landscape of the bound ligand with intricate details and demonstrated the elastic nature of the ligand recognition mode by the purine-sensing riboswitches, where there is a dynamic balance between hydrogen bonding

  3. Ligand binding by PDZ domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Celestine N.; Bach, Anders; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    , for example, are particularly rich in these domains. The general function of PDZ domains is to bring proteins together within the appropriate cellular compartment, thereby facilitating scaffolding, signaling, and trafficking events. The many functions of PDZ domains under normal physiological as well...... as pathological conditions have been reviewed recently. In this review, we focus on the molecular details of how PDZ domains bind their protein ligands and their potential as drug targets in this context....

  4. Bitopic Ligands and Metastable Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fronik, Philipp; Gaiser, Birgit I; Sejer Pedersen, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    of orthosteric binding sites. Bitopic ligands have been employed to address the selectivity problem by combining (linking) an orthosteric ligand with an allosteric modulator, theoretically leading to high-affinity subtype selective ligands. However, it remains a challenge to identify suitable allosteric binding...... that have been reported to date, this type of bitopic ligands would be composed of two identical pharmacophores. Herein, we outline the concept of bitopic ligands, review metastable binding sites, and discuss their potential as a new source of allosteric binding sites....

  5. Radioiodinated ligands for dopamine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kung, H.F.

    1994-01-01

    The dopamine receptor system is important for normal brain function; it is also the apparent action site for various neuroleptic drugs for the treatment of schizophrenia and other metal disorders. In the past few years radioiodinated ligands for single photon emission tomography (SPECT) have been successfully developed and tested in humans: [ 123 I]TISCH for D1 dopamine receptors; [ 123 I]IBZM, epidepride, IBF and FIDA2, four iodobenzamide derivatives, for D2/D3 dopamine receptors. In addition, [ 123 I]β-CIT (RTI-55) and IPT, cocaine derivatives, for the dopamine reuptake site are potentially useful for diagnosis of loss of dopamine neurons. The first iodinated ligand, (R)trans-7-OH-PIPAT, for D3 dopamine receptors, was synthesized and characterized with cloned cell lines (Spodoptera frugiperda, Sf9) expressing the D2 and D3 dopamine receptors and with rat basal forebrain membrane preparations. Most of the known iodobenzamides displayed similar potency in binding to both D2 and D3 dopamine receptors expressed in the cell lines. Initial studies appear to suggest that by fine tuning the structures it may be possible to develop agents specific for D2 and D3 dopamine receptors. It is important to investigate D2/D3 selectivity for this series of potent ligands

  6. Equilibrium studies on mixed ligand complexes of some tripositive rare earth ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vimal, Rashmi; Singh, Mamta; Ram Nayan

    1996-01-01

    Interaction of the rare earth ions, La 3+ , Ce 3+ , Pr 3+ , Nd 3+ , Sm 3+ and Eu 3+ with the pair of ligands 1-amino-2-naphthol-4-sulphonic acid (an, H 2 A) and o-aminophenol (ap, HB) have been studied in aqueous solution at 25 degC (μ=0.1 M KNO 3 /NaCl). Equilibrium constants of the reactions involving the formations of the mixed ligand species MAB, MA 2 B 2- , MB 2 A - (M = metal ion) and the binary complexes containing up to three ligand molecules have been evaluated from the pH-metric data, and coordinating behaviour of the ligands in the formation of the mixed ligand complexes has been discussed. (author). 10 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  7. Role of the T cell receptor ligand affinity in T cell activation by bacterial superantigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P S; Geisler, C; Buus, S

    2001-01-01

    Similar to native peptide/MHC ligands, bacterial superantigens have been found to bind with low affinity to the T cell receptor (TCR). It has been hypothesized that low ligand affinity is required to allow optimal TCR signaling. To test this, we generated variants of Staphylococcus enterotoxin C3...... (SEC3) with up to a 150-fold increase in TCR affinity. By stimulating T cells with SEC3 molecules immobilized onto plastic surfaces, we demonstrate that increasing the affinity of the SEC3/TCR interaction caused a proportional increase in the ability of SEC3 to activate T cells. Thus, the potency...... correlation between ligand affinity and ligand potency indicating that it is the density of receptor-ligand complexes in the T cell contact area that determines TCR signaling strength....

  8. Estimation of kinetic and thermodynamic ligand-binding parameters using computational strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deganutti, Giuseppe; Moro, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    Kinetic and thermodynamic ligand-protein binding parameters are gaining growing importance as key information to consider in drug discovery. The determination of the molecular structures, using particularly x-ray and NMR techniques, is crucial for understanding how a ligand recognizes its target in the final binding complex. However, for a better understanding of the recognition processes, experimental studies of ligand-protein interactions are needed. Even though several techniques can be used to investigate both thermodynamic and kinetic profiles for a ligand-protein complex, these procedures are very often laborious, time consuming and expensive. In the last 10 years, computational approaches have enormous potential in providing insights into each of the above effects and in parsing their contributions to the changes in both kinetic and thermodynamic binding parameters. The main purpose of this review is to summarize the state of the art of computational strategies for estimating the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of a ligand-protein binding.

  9. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  10. Phytochemical screening, proximate analysis and acute toxicity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phytochemical screening results indicate the presence of saponins, flavonoids, phytosterols and phenols. Acute toxicity study showed there was no mortality at 8000 mg/kg of the extract. The results indicate that the plant is rich in phytochemicals and is relatively safe. Key words: Phytochemicals, acute toxicity, proximate ...

  11. PROXIMATE AND ELEMENTAL COMPOSITION OF WHITE GRUBS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    This study determined the proximate and mineral element composition of whole white grubs using standard methods of analysis. ... and 12.75 ± 3.65% respectively. Mineral contents of white grub in terms of relative concentration .... of intracellular Ca, bone mineralization, blood coagulation, and plasma membrane potential ...

  12. Phytochemical Screening and Proximate Analysis of Newbouldia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted to assess the phytochemical and proximate composition of Newboudia laevis leaves and Allium sativum bulb extracts. The leaves and bulbs extracts were analyzed for their chemical composition and antinutritional factors (ANFs) which include moisture, crude protein, crude fat, crude fiber, total ash ...

  13. Phytochemical Screening, Proximate and Mineral Composition of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leaves of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) grown in Tepi area was studied for their class of phytochemicals, mineral and proximate composition using standard analytical methods. The phytochemical screening revealed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoid, terpenoids, saponins, quinones, phenol, tannins, amino acid and ...

  14. Phytochemical screening, proximate and elemental analysis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Citrus sinensis was screened for its phytochemical composition and was evaluated for the proximate and elemental analysis. The phytochemical analysis indicated the presence of reducing sugar, saponins, cardiac glycosides, tannins and flavonoids. The elemental analysis indicated the presence of the following mineral ...

  15. Modified Koyanagi Technique in Management of Proximal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    xp

    Modified Koyanagi Technique in Management of Proximal Hypospadias. Adham Elsaied, Basem Saied, and Mohammed El- ... All operations were performed by the authors,using fine instruments and under 3.5X loupe ... the other needed an operation to close the fistula six months later. The case with meatal recession had ...

  16. Proximity focusing RICH with TOF capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korpar, S.; Adachi, I.; Fujita, K.; Fukushima, T.; Gorisek, A.; Hayashi, D.; Iijima, T.; Ikado, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Kawai, H.; Kozakai, Y.; Krizan, P.; Kuratani, A.; Mazuka, Y.; Nakagawa, T.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Pestotnik, R.; Seki, T.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tabata, M.; Unno, Y.

    2007-01-01

    A proximity focusing RICH counter with a multi-channel micro-channel plate (MCP) PMT was tested as a time-of-flight counter. Cherenkov photons emitted in the radiator medium as well as in the entrance window of the PMT were used for the time-of-flight measurement, and an excellent performance of the counter could be demonstrated

  17. Proximate composition and mycological characterization of peanut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2013-12-30

    Dec 30, 2013 ... ABSTRACT. Objective: The aim of this work was to contribute to the food safety of Ivorian consumers by investigating the proximate composition and the toxic fungal contamination of peanut butters offered for retail sale on the different markets of Abidjan. Methodology and results: Peanut butter samples (45) ...

  18. Prosthetic replacement for proximal humeral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontakis, George; Tosounidis, Theodoros; Galanakis, Ioannis; Megas, Panagiotis

    2008-12-01

    The ideal management of complex proximal humeral fractures continues to be debatable. Evolution of proximal humeral fracture management, during the past decade, led to the implementation of many innovations in surgical treatment. Even though the pendulum of treatment seems to swing towards new trends such as locked plating, hemiarthroplasty remains a valid and reliable option that serves the patient's needs well. Hemiarthroplasty is indicated for complex proximal humeral fractures in elderly patients with poor bone stock and when internal fixation is difficult or unreliable. Hemiarthroplasty provides a better result when it is performed early post-injury. Stem height, retroversion and tuberosity positioning are technical aspects of utmost importance. Additionally reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is an alternative new modality that can be used as a primary solution in selected patients with proximal humeral fracture treatment. Failed hemiarthroplasty and fracture sequelae can be successfully managed with reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Individual decision-making and tailored treatment that takes into consideration the personality of the fracture and the patient's characteristics should be used.

  19. Phytochemistry and proximate composition of ginger ( Zingiber ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results of the phytochemical screening showed that alkaloids, carbohydrates, glycosides, proteins, saponins, steroids, flavonoids and terpenoids were present, while reducing sugars, tannins, oils and acid compounds were absent. Similarly, the results of the proximate analysis of the rhizome showed that ginger ...

  20. Disability occurrence and proximity to death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijs, Bart; Mackenbach, Johan P.; Kunst, Anton E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. This paper aims to assess whether disability occurrence is related more strongly to proximity to death than to age. Method. Self reported disability and vital status were available from six annual waves and a subsequent 12-year mortality follow-up of the Dutch GLOBE longitudinal study.

  1. Proximate composition, bread characteristics and sensory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to investigate proximate composition, bread characteristics and sensory evaluation of cocoyam-wheat composite breads at different levels of cocoyam flour substitution for human consumption.A whole wheat bread (WWB) and cocoyam-composite breads (CCB1,CCB 2 and CCB 3) were prepared ...

  2. Do nonbonded H--H interactions in phenanthrene stabilize it relative to anthracene? A possible resolution to this question and its implications for ligands such as 2,2'-bipyridyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Robert D; Nikolayenko, Igor V

    2012-08-23

    The problem of whether interactions between the hydrogen atoms at the 1,10-positions in the "cleft" of the "bent" phenanthrene stabilize the latter molecule thermodynamically relative to "linear" anthracene, or whether the higher stability of phenanthrene is due to a more energetically favorable π-system, is considered. DFT calculations at the X3LYP/cc-pVTZ(-f)++ level of the ground state energies (E) of anthracene, phenanthrene, and the set of five benzoquinolines are reported. In the gas phase, "bent" phenanthrene was computed to be thermodynamically more stable than "linear" anthracene by -28.5 kJ mol(-1). This fact was attributed predominantly to the phenomenon of higher aromatic stabilization of the π-system of phenanthrene relative to anthracene, and not to the stabilizing influence of the nonbonding H--H interactions in its cleft. In fact, these interactions in phenanthrene were shown to be destabilizing. Similar calculations for five benzoquinolines (bzq) indicate that ΔE values vary as: 6,7-bzq (linear) ≤ 2,3-bzq (linear) < 5,6-bzq (bent) ≤ 3,4-bzq (bent) < 7,8-bzq (bent, no H--H nonbonding interactions in cleft), supporting the idea that it is a more stable π-system that favors 7,8-bzq over 2,3-bzq and 6,7-bzq, and that the H--H interactions in the clefts of 3,4-bzq and 5,6-bzq are destabilizing. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding in the cleft of 7,8-bzq plays a secondary role in its stabilization relative 6,7-bzq. The question of whether H--H nonbonded interactions between H atoms at the 3 and 3' positions of 2,2'-bipyridyl (bpy) coordinated to metal ions are stabilizing or destabilizing is then considered. The energy of bpy is scanned as a function of N-C-C-N torsion angle (χ) in the gas-phase, and it is found that the trans form is 32.8 kJ mol(-1) more stable than the cis conformer. A relaxed coordinate scan of energy of bpy in aqueous solution as a function of χ is modeled using the PBF approach, and it is found that the trans conformer is

  3. Outcome of the first wwPDB/CCDC/D3R Ligand Validation Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Paul D.; Aertgeerts, Kathleen; Bauer, Cary; Bell, Jeffrey A.; Berman, Helen M.; Bhat, Talapady N.; Blaney, Jeff; Bolton, Evan; Bricogne, Gerard; Brown, David; Burley, Stephen K.; Case, David A.; Clark, Kirk L.; Darden, Tom; Emsley, Paul; Feher, Victoria A.; Feng, Zukang; Groom, Colin R.; Harris, Seth F.; Hendle, Jorg; Holder, Thomas; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Kleywegt, Gerard J.; Krojer, Tobias; Marcotrigiano, Joseph; Mark, Alan E.; Markley, John L.; Miller, Matthew; Minor, Wladek; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Murshudov, Garib; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Nakamura, Haruki; Nicholls, Anthony; Nicklaus, Marc; Nolte, Robert T.; Padyana, Anil K.; Peishoff, Catherine E.; Pieniazek, Susan; Read, Randy J.; Shao, Chenghua; Sheriff, Steven; Smart, Oliver; Soisson, Stephen; Spurlino, John; Stouch, Terry; Svobodova, Radka; Tempel, Wolfram; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Tronrud, Dale; Velankar, Sameer; Ward, Suzanna; Warren, Gregory L.; Westbrook, John D.; Williams, Pamela; Yang, Huanwang; Young, Jasmine

    2016-01-01

    Summary Crystallographic studies of ligands bound to biological macromolecules (proteins and nucleic acids) represent an important source of information concerning drug-target interactions, providing atomic level insights into the physical chemistry of complex formation between macromolecules and ligands. Of the more than 115,000 entries extant in the Protein Data Bank archive, ~75% include at least one non-polymeric ligand. Ligand geometrical and stereochemical quality, the suitability of ligand models for in silico drug discovery/design, and the goodness-of-fit of ligand models to electron density maps vary widely across the archive. We describe the proceedings and conclusions from the first Worldwide Protein Data Bank/Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre/Drug Design Data Resource (wwPDB/CCDC/D3R) Ligand Validation Workshop held at the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics at Rutgers University on July 30–31, 2015. Experts in protein crystallography from academe and industry came together with non-profit and for-profit software providers for crystallography and with experts in computational chemistry and data archiving to discuss and make recommendations on best practices, as framed by a series of questions central to structural studies of macromolecule-ligand complexes. What data concerning bound ligands should be archived in the Protein Data Bank? How should the ligands be best represented? How should structural models of macromolecule-ligand complexes be validated? What supplementary information should accompany publications of structural studies of biological macromolecules? Consensus recommendations on best practices developed in response to each of these questions are provided, together with some details regarding implementation. Important issues addressed but not resolved at the workshop are also enumerated. PMID:27050687

  4. Nanoparticle-based receptors mimic protein-ligand recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Riccardi, Laura; Gabrielli, Luca; Sun, Xiaohuan; Biasi, Federico De; Rastrelli, Federico; Mancin, Fabrizio; De Vivo, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Summary The self-assembly of a monolayer of ligands on the surface of noble-metal nanoparticles dictates the fundamental nanoparticle's behavior and its functionality. In this combined computational-experimental study, we analyze the structure, organization, and dynamics of functionalized coating thiols in monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). We explain how functionalized coating thiols self-organize through a delicate and somehow counterintuitive balance of interactions within the...

  5. Exploiting Proximity-Based Mobile Apps for Large-Scale Location Privacy Probing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Zhao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Proximity-based apps have been changing the way people interact with each other in the physical world. To help people extend their social networks, proximity-based nearby-stranger (NS apps that encourage people to make friends with nearby strangers have gained popularity recently. As another typical type of proximity-based apps, some ridesharing (RS apps allowing drivers to search nearby passengers and get their ridesharing requests also become popular due to their contribution to economy and emission reduction. In this paper, we concentrate on the location privacy of proximity-based mobile apps. By analyzing the communication mechanism, we find that many apps of this type are vulnerable to large-scale location spoofing attack (LLSA. We accordingly propose three approaches to performing LLSA. To evaluate the threat of LLSA posed to proximity-based mobile apps, we perform real-world case studies against an NS app named Weibo and an RS app called Didi. The results show that our approaches can effectively and automatically collect a huge volume of users’ locations or travel records, thereby demonstrating the severity of LLSA. We apply the LLSA approaches against nine popular proximity-based apps with millions of installations to evaluate the defense strength. We finally suggest possible countermeasures for the proposed attacks.

  6. Contrasting roles for TLR ligands in HIV-1 pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beda Brichacek

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The first line of a host's response to various pathogens is triggered by their engagement of cellular pattern recognition receptors (PRRs. Binding of microbial ligands to these receptors leads to the induction of a variety of cellular factors that alter intracellular and extracellular environment and interfere directly or indirectly with the life cycle of the triggering pathogen. Such changes may also affect any coinfecting microbe. Using ligands to Toll-like receptors (TLRs 5 and 9, we examined their effect on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 replication in lymphoid tissue ex vivo. We found marked differences in the outcomes of such treatment. While flagellin (TLR5 agonist treatment enhanced replication of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR 5-tropic and CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4-tropic HIV-1, treatment with oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN M362 (TLR9 agonist suppressed both viral variants. The differential effects of these TLR ligands on HIV-1 replication correlated with changes in production of CC chemokines CCL3, CCL4, CCL5, and of CXC chemokines CXCL10, and CXCL12 in the ligand-treated HIV-1-infected tissues. The nature and/or magnitude of these changes were dependent on the ligand as well as on the HIV-1 viral strain. Moreover, the tested ligands differed in their ability to induce cellular activation as evaluated by the expression of the cluster of differentiation markers (CD 25, CD38, CD39, CD69, CD154, and human leukocyte antigen D related (HLA-DR as well as of a cell proliferation marker, Ki67, and of CCR5. No significant effect of the ligand treatment was observed on apoptosis and cell death/loss in the treated lymphoid tissue ex vivo. Our results suggest that binding of microbial ligands to TLRs is one of the mechanisms that mediate interactions between coinfected microbes and HIV-1 in human tissues. Thus, the engagement of appropriate TLRs by microbial molecules or their mimetic might become a new strategy for HIV therapy or prevention.

  7. Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szigethy, Geza

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear power is an attractive alternative to hydrocarbon-based energy production at a time when moving away from carbon-producing processes is widely accepted as a significant developmental need. Hence, the radioactive actinide power sources for this industry are necessarily becoming more widespread, which is accompanied by the increased risk of exposure to both biological and environmental systems. This, in turn, requires the development of technology designed to remove such radioactive threats efficiently and selectively from contaminated material, whether that be contained nuclear waste streams or the human body. Raymond and coworkers (University of California, Berkeley) have for decades investigated the interaction of biologically-inspired, hard Lewis-base ligands with high-valent, early-actinide cations. It has been established that such ligands bind strongly to the hard Lewis-acidic early actinides, and many poly-bidentate ligands have been developed and shown to be effective chelators of actinide contaminants in vivo. Work reported herein explores the effect of ligand geometry on the linear U(IV) dioxo dication (uranyl, UO 2 2+ ). The goal is to utilize rational ligand design to develop ligands that exhibit shape selectivity towards linear dioxo cations and provides thermodynamically favorable binding interactions. The uranyl complexes with a series of tetradentate 3-hydroxy-pyridin-2-one (3,2-HOPO) ligands were studied in both the crystalline state as well as in solution. Despite significant geometric differences, the uranyl affinities of these ligands vary only slightly but are better than DTPA, the only FDA-approved chelation therapy for actinide contamination. The terepthalamide (TAM) moiety was combined into tris-beidentate ligands with 1,2- and 3,2-HOPO moieties were combined into hexadentate ligands whose structural preferences and solution thermodynamics were measured with the uranyl cation. In addition to achieving coordinative saturation, these

  8. Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szigethy, Geza [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2009-08-12

    Nuclear power is an attractive alternative to hydrocarbon-based energy production at a time when moving away from carbon-producing processes is widely accepted as a significant developmental need. Hence, the radioactive actinide power sources for this industry are necessarily becoming more widespread, which is accompanied by the increased risk of exposure to both biological and environmental systems. This, in turn, requires the development of technology designed to remove such radioactive threats efficiently and selectively from contaminated material, whether that be contained nuclear waste streams or the human body. Raymond and coworkers (University of California, Berkeley) have for decades investigated the interaction of biologically-inspired, hard Lewis-base ligands with high-valent, early-actinide cations. It has been established that such ligands bind strongly to the hard Lewis-acidic early actinides, and many poly-bidentate ligands have been developed and shown to be effective chelators of actinide contaminants in vivo. Work reported herein explores the effect of ligand geometry on the linear U(IV) dioxo dication (uranyl, UO2 2+). The goal is to utilize rational ligand design to develop ligands that exhibit shape selectivity towards linear dioxo cations and provides thermodynamically favorable binding interactions. The uranyl complexes with a series of tetradentate 3-hydroxy-pyridin-2-one (3,2-HOPO) ligands were studied in both the crystalline state as well as in solution. Despite significant geometric differences, the uranyl affinities of these ligands vary only slightly but are better than DTPA, the only FDA-approved chelation therapy for actinide contamination. The terepthalamide (TAM) moiety was combined into tris-beidentate ligands with 1,2- and 3,2-HOPO moieties were combined into hexadentate ligands whose structural preferences and solution thermodynamics were measured with the uranyl cation. In addition to achieving coordinative

  9. The role of ligands in the optical and electronic spectra of CdSe nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilina, Svletana [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sergei, Ivanov A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Victor, Klimov I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sergei, Tretiak [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the impact of ligands on morphology, electronic structure, and optical response of the Cd33Se33 cluster, which already overlapps in size with the smallest synthesized CdSe quantum dots (QDs). Our Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations demonstrate significant surface reorganization both for the bare cluster and for the cluster capped by amine and phosphine oxide ligand models. We observe strong surface-ligand interactions leading to substantial charge redistribution and polarization effects on the surface. This effect results in the appearance of hybridized states, where the electronic density is spread over the cluster and the ligands. Neither the ligand's nor hybridized molecular orbitals appear as trap states inside or near the band gap of the QD. Instead, being optically dark, dense hybridized states from the edges of the valence and the conduction bands could open new relaxation channels for high energy photoexcitations. Comparing quantum dots passivated by different ligands, we found that hybridized states are denser in at the edge of the conduction band of the cluster ligated with phosphine oxide molecules than that with primary amines. Such a different manifestation of ligand binding may potentially lead to the faster electron relaxation in dots passivated by phosphine oxide than by amine ligands, which is in agreement with experimental data.

  10. Increased precision for analysis of protein-ligand dissociation constants determined from chemical shift titrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markin, Craig J.; Spyracopoulos, Leo, E-mail: leo.spyracopoulos@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, Department of Biochemistry (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    NMR is ideally suited for the analysis of protein-protein and protein ligand interactions with dissociation constants ranging from {approx}2 {mu}M to {approx}1 mM, and with kinetics in the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale. For the determination of dissociation constants (K{sub D}) of 1:1 protein-protein or protein-ligand interactions using NMR, the protein and ligand concentrations must necessarily be similar in magnitude to the K{sub D}, and nonlinear least squares analysis of chemical shift changes as a function of ligand concentration is employed to determine estimates for the parameters K{sub D} and the maximum chemical shift change ({Delta}{delta}{sub max}). During a typical NMR titration, the initial protein concentration, [P{sub 0}], is held nearly constant. For this condition, to determine the most accurate parameters for K{sub D} and {Delta}{delta}{sub max} from nonlinear least squares analyses requires initial protein concentrations that are {approx}0.5 Multiplication-Sign K{sub D}, and a maximum concentration for the ligand, or titrant, of {approx}10 Multiplication-Sign [P{sub 0}]. From a practical standpoint, these requirements are often difficult to achieve. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that co-variation of the ligand and protein concentrations during a titration leads to an increase in the precision of the fitted K{sub D} and {Delta}{delta}{sub max} values when [P{sub 0}] > K{sub D}. Importantly, judicious choice of protein and ligand concentrations for a given NMR titration, combined with nonlinear least squares analyses using two independent variables (ligand and protein concentrations) and two parameters (K{sub D} and {Delta}{delta}{sub max}) is a straightforward approach to increasing the accuracy of measured dissociation constants for 1:1 protein-ligand interactions.

  11. INFLUENCE OF NATURAL AND SYNTHETIC ORGANIC LIGANDS ON THE STABILITY AND MOBILITY OF REDUCED TC(IV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathalie A. Wall; Baohua Gu

    2012-12-20

    The primary objectives were (1) to quantify the interactions of organic ligands with Tc(IV) through the generation of thermodynamic (complexation) and kinetic parameters needed to assess and predict the mobility of reduced Tc(IV) at DOE contaminated sites; and (2) to determine the impact of organic ligands on the mobility and fate of reduced Tc(IV) under field geochemical conditions.

  12. Ligand recognition and domain structure of Vps10p, a vacuolar protein sorting receptor in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, M U; Emr, S D; Winther, Jakob R.

    1999-01-01

    Vp10p is a receptor that sorts several different vacuolar proteins by cycling between a late Golgi compartment and the endosome. The cytoplasmic tail of Vps10p is necessary for the recycling, whereas the lumenal domain is predicted to interact with the soluble ligands. We have studied ligand bind...

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest ligand's binding to nicotinamidase/pyrazinamidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji-Long; Zheng, Qing-Chuan; Li, Zheng-Qiang; Zhang, Hong-Xing

    2012-01-01

    The research on the binding process of ligand to pyrazinamidase (PncA) is crucial for elucidating the inherent relationship between resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and PncA's activity. In the present study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods were performed to investigate the unbinding process of nicotinamide (NAM) from two PncA enzymes, which is the reverse of the corresponding binding process. The calculated potential of mean force (PMF) based on the steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations sheds light on an optimal binding/unbinding pathway of the ligand. The comparative analyses between two PncAs clearly exhibit the consistency of the binding/unbinding pathway in the two enzymes, implying the universality of the pathway in all kinds of PncAs. Several important residues dominating the pathway were also determined by the calculation of interaction energies. The structural change of the proteins induced by NAM's unbinding or binding shows the great extent interior motion in some homologous region adjacent to the active sites of the two PncAs. The structure comparison substantiates that this region should be very important for the ligand's binding in all PncAs. Additionally, MD simulations also show that the coordination position of the ligand is displaced by one water molecule in the unliganded enzymes. These results could provide the more penetrating understanding of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis and be helpful for the development of new antituberculosis drugs.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest ligand's binding to nicotinamidase/pyrazinamidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Long Zhang

    Full Text Available The research on the binding process of ligand to pyrazinamidase (PncA is crucial for elucidating the inherent relationship between resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and PncA's activity. In the present study, molecular dynamics (MD simulation methods were performed to investigate the unbinding process of nicotinamide (NAM from two PncA enzymes, which is the reverse of the corresponding binding process. The calculated potential of mean force (PMF based on the steered molecular dynamics (SMD simulations sheds light on an optimal binding/unbinding pathway of the ligand. The comparative analyses between two PncAs clearly exhibit the consistency of the binding/unbinding pathway in the two enzymes, implying the universality of the pathway in all kinds of PncAs. Several important residues dominating the pathway were also determined by the calculation of interaction energies. The structural change of the proteins induced by NAM's unbinding or binding shows the great extent interior motion in some homologous region adjacent to the active sites of the two PncAs. The structure comparison substantiates that this region should be very important for the ligand's binding in all PncAs. Additionally, MD simulations also show that the coordination position of the ligand is displaced by one water molecule in the unliganded enzymes. These results could provide the more penetrating understanding of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis and be helpful for the development of new antituberculosis drugs.

  15. Ligand-mediated adhesive mechanics of two static, deformed spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircar, Sarthok; Nguyen, Giang; Kotousov, Andrei; Roberts, Anthony J

    2016-10-01

    A self-consistent model is developed to investigate attachment/detachment kinetics of two static, deformable microspheres with irregular surface and coated with flexible binding ligands. The model highlights how the microscale binding kinetics of these ligands as well as the attractive/repulsive potential of the charged surface affects the macroscale static deformed configuration of the spheres. It is shown that in the limit of smooth, neutrally charged surface (i.e., the dimensionless inverse Debye length, [Formula: see text]), interacting via elastic binders (i.e., the dimensionless stiffness coefficient, [Formula: see text]) the adhesion mechanics approaches the regime of application of the JKR theory, and in this particular limit, the contact radius, R c , scales with the particle radius, R, according to the scaling law, [Formula: see text]. We show that static, deformed, highly charged, ligand-coated surface of micro-spheres exhibit strong adhesion. Normal stress distribution within the contact area adjusts with the binder stiffness coefficient, from a maximum at the center to a maximum at the periphery of the region. Although reported in some in vitro experiments involving particle adhesion, until now a physical interpretation for this variation of the stress distribution for deformable, charged, ligand-coated microspheres is missing. Surface roughness results in a diminished adhesion with a distinct reduction in the pull-off force, larger separation gap, weaker normal stress and limited area of adhesion. These results are in agreement with the published experimental findings.

  16. Selective Electrocatalytic Activity of Ligand Stabilized Copper Oxide Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauffman, Douglas R; Ohodnicki, Paul R; Kail, Brian W; Matranga, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Ligand stabilization can influence the surface chemistry of Cu oxide nanoparticles (NPs) and provide unique product distributions for electrocatalytic methanol (MeOH) oxidation and CO{sub 2} reduction reactions. Oleic acid (OA) stabilized Cu{sub 2}O and CuO NPs promote the MeOH oxidation reaction with 88% and 99.97% selective HCOH formation, respectively. Alternatively, CO{sub 2} is the only reaction product detected for bulk Cu oxides and Cu oxide NPs with no ligands or weakly interacting ligands. We also demonstrate that OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs can reduce CO{sub 2} into CO with a {approx}1.7-fold increase in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to bulk Cu oxides. The OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs also show 7.6 and 9.1-fold increases in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to weakly stabilized and non-stabilized Cu oxide NPs, respectively. Our data illustrates that the presence and type of surface ligand can substantially influence the catalytic product selectivity of Cu oxide NPs.

  17. A sequence-based dynamic ensemble learning system for protein ligand-binding site prediction

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng

    2015-12-03

    Background: Proteins have the fundamental ability to selectively bind to other molecules and perform specific functions through such interactions, such as protein-ligand binding. Accurate prediction of protein residues that physically bind to ligands is important for drug design and protein docking studies. Most of the successful protein-ligand binding predictions were based on known structures. However, structural information is not largely available in practice due to the huge gap between the number of known protein sequences and that of experimentally solved structures

  18. A sequence-based dynamic ensemble learning system for protein ligand-binding site prediction

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng; Hu, ShanShan; Zhang, Jun; Gao, Xin; Li, Jinyan; Xia, Junfeng; Wang, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proteins have the fundamental ability to selectively bind to other molecules and perform specific functions through such interactions, such as protein-ligand binding. Accurate prediction of protein residues that physically bind to ligands is important for drug design and protein docking studies. Most of the successful protein-ligand binding predictions were based on known structures. However, structural information is not largely available in practice due to the huge gap between the number of known protein sequences and that of experimentally solved structures

  19. SH2-PLA: a sensitive in-solution approach for quantification of modular domain binding by proximity ligation and real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Christopher M; Bloom, Lee R; Ogiue-Ikeda, Mari; Machida, Kazuya

    2015-06-26

    There is a great interest in studying phosphotyrosine dependent protein-protein interactions in tyrosine kinase pathways that play a critical role in many aspects of cellular function. We previously established SH2 profiling, a phosphoproteomic approach based on membrane binding assays that utilizes purified Src Homology 2 (SH2) domains as a molecular tool to profile the global tyrosine phosphorylation state of cells. However, in order to use this method to investigate SH2 binding sites on a specific target in cell lysate, additional procedures such as pull-down or immunoprecipitation which consume large amounts of sample are required. We have developed PLA-SH2, an alternative in-solution modular domain binding assay that takes advantage of Proximity Ligation Assay and real-time PCR. The SH2-PLA assay utilizes oligonucleotide-conjugated anti-GST and anti-EGFR antibodies recognizing a GST-SH2 probe and cellular EGFR, respectively. If the GST-SH2 and EGFR are in close proximity as a result of SH2-phosphotyrosine interactions, the two oligonucleotides are brought within a suitable distance for ligation to occur, allowing for efficient complex amplification via real-time PCR. The assay detected signal across at least 3 orders of magnitude of lysate input with a linear range spanning 1-2 orders and a low femtomole limit of detection for EGFR phosphotyrosine. SH2 binding kinetics determined by PLA-SH2 showed good agreement with established far-Western analyses for A431 and Cos1 cells stimulated with EGF at various times and doses. Further, we showed that PLA-SH2 can survey lung cancer tissues using 1 μl lysate without requiring phospho-enrichment. We showed for the first time that interactions between SH2 domain probes and EGFR in cell lysate can be determined in a microliter-scale assay using SH2-PLA. The obvious benefit of this method is that the low sample requirement allows detection of SH2 binding in samples which are difficult to analyze using traditional protein

  20. Proximal tubular hypertrophy and enlarged glomerular and proximal tubular urinary space in obese subjects with proteinuria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Tobar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is associated with glomerular hyperfiltration, increased proximal tubular sodium reabsorption, glomerular enlargement and renal hypertrophy. A single experimental study reported an increased glomerular urinary space in obese dogs. Whether proximal tubular volume is increased in obese subjects and whether their glomerular and tubular urinary spaces are enlarged is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether proximal tubules and glomerular and tubular urinary space are enlarged in obese subjects with proteinuria and glomerular hyperfiltration. METHODS: Kidney biopsies from 11 non-diabetic obese with proteinuria and 14 non-diabetic lean patients with a creatinine clearance above 50 ml/min and with mild or no interstitial fibrosis were retrospectively analyzed using morphometric methods. The cross-sectional area of the proximal tubular epithelium and lumen, the volume of the glomerular tuft and of Bowman's space and the nuclei number per tubular profile were estimated. RESULTS: Creatinine clearance was higher in the obese than in the lean group (P=0.03. Proteinuria was similarly increased in both groups. Compared to the lean group, the obese group displayed a 104% higher glomerular tuft volume (P=0.001, a 94% higher Bowman's space volume (P=0.003, a 33% higher cross-sectional area of the proximal tubular epithelium (P=0.02 and a 54% higher cross-sectional area of the proximal tubular lumen (P=0.01. The nuclei number per proximal tubular profile was similar in both groups, suggesting that the increase in tubular volume is due to hypertrophy and not to hyperplasia. CONCLUSIONS: Obesity-related glomerular hyperfiltration is associated with proximal tubular epithelial hypertrophy and increased glomerular and tubular urinary space volume in subjects with proteinuria. The expanded glomerular and urinary space is probably a direct consequence of glomerular hyperfiltration. These effects may be involved in the pathogenesis of obesity

  1. ClassBeacons: designing distributed visualization of teachers’ physical proximity in the classroom.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    An, P.; Bakker, S.; Ordanovski, S.; Taconis, R.; Eggen, J.H.

    2018-01-01

    Pengcheng An, Saskia Bakker, Sara Ordanovski, Ruurd Taconis, Berry Eggen. 2018 (accepted at Oct 2017). ClassBeacons: designing distributed visualization of teachers’ physical proximity in the classroom. In Proceedings of Tangible and Embodied Interaction, TEI 2018, Mar 18-21, 2018,

  2. Simultaneous Binding of Hybrid Molecules Constructed with Dual DNA-Binding Components to a G-Quadruplex and Its Proximal Duplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asamitsu, Sefan; Obata, Shunsuke; Phan, Anh Tuân; Hashiya, Kaori; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2018-03-20

    A G-quadruplex (quadruplex) is a nucleic acid secondary structure adopted by guanine-rich sequences and is considered to be relevant to various pharmacological and biological contexts. Although a number of researchers have endeavored to discover and develop quadruplex-interactive molecules, poor ligand designability originating from topological similarity of the skeleton of diverse quadruplexes has remained a bottleneck for gaining specificity for individual quadruplexes. This work reports on hybrid molecules that were constructed with dual DNA-binding components, a cyclic imidazole/lysine polyamide (cIKP), and a hairpin pyrrole/imidazole polyamide (hPIP), with the aim toward specific quadruplex targeting by reading out the local duplex DNA sequence adjacent to designated quadruplexes in the genome. By means of circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and NMR techniques, we showed the dual and simultaneous recognition of the respective segment via hybrid molecules, and the synergistic and mutual effect of each binding component that was appropriately linked on higher binding affinity and modest sequence specificity. Monitoring quadruplex and duplex imino protons of the quadruplex/duplex motif titrated with hybrid molecules clearly revealed distinct features of the binding of hybrid molecules to the respective segments upon their simultaneous recognition. A series of the systematic and detailed binding assays described here showed that the concept of simultaneous recognition of quadruplex and its proximal duplex by hybrid molecules constructed with the dual DNA-binding components may provide a new strategy for ligand design, enabling targeting of a large variety of designated quadruplexes at specific genome locations. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Progress on the application of ligand receptor binding assays in radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xue; Qian Jinping; Kong Aiying; Zhu Lin

    2010-01-01

    Receptor binding assay is an important drug screening method, which can quickly and inexpensively study the interactions between the targeted receptor and the potential ligands in vitro and provide the information of the relative binding affinity of ligand-receptor. The imaging of many radiopharmaceuticals is based on highly selective radioligand-receptor binding. The technique plays an important role in the design and screening of receptor-targeting radiopharmaceuticals. (authors)

  4. SINA: A test system for proximity fuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruizenaar, M. G. A.

    1989-04-01

    SINA, a signal generator that can be used for testing proximity fuses, is described. The circuitry of proximity fuses is presented; the output signal of the RF circuit results from a mixing of the emitted signal and received signal that is Doppler shifted in frequency by the relative motion of the fuse with respect to the reflecting target of surface. With SINA, digitized and stored target and clutter signals (previously measured) can be transformed to Doppler signals, for example during a real flight. SINA can be used for testing fuse circuitry, for example in the verification of results of computer simulations of the low frequency Doppler signal processing. The software of SINA and its use are explained.

  5. Ligand photo-isomerization triggers conformational changes in iGluR2 ligand binding domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tino Wolter

    Full Text Available Neurological glutamate receptors bind a variety of artificial ligands, both agonistic and antagonistic, in addition to glutamate. Studying their small molecule binding properties increases our understanding of the central nervous system and a variety of associated pathologies. The large, oligomeric multidomain membrane protein contains a large and flexible ligand binding domains which undergoes large conformational changes upon binding different ligands. A recent application of glutamate receptors is their activation or inhibition via photo-switchable ligands, making them key systems in the emerging field of optochemical genetics. In this work, we present a theoretical study on the binding mode and complex stability of a novel photo-switchable ligand, ATA-3, which reversibly binds to glutamate receptors ligand binding domains (LBDs. We propose two possible binding modes for this ligand based on flexible ligand docking calculations and show one of them to be analogues to the binding mode of a similar ligand, 2-BnTetAMPA. In long MD simulations, it was observed that transitions between both binding poses involve breaking and reforming the T686-E402 protein hydrogen bond. Simulating the ligand photo-isomerization process shows that the two possible configurations of the ligand azo-group have markedly different complex stabilities and equilibrium binding modes. A strong but slow protein response is observed after ligand configuration changes. This provides a microscopic foundation for the observed difference in ligand activity upon light-switching.

  6. Isolated Proximal Tibiofibular Dislocation during Soccer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey Chiu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Proximal tibiofibular dislocations are rarely encountered in the Emergency Department (ED. We present a case involving a man presenting to the ED with left knee pain after making a sharp left turn on the soccer field. His physical exam was only remarkable for tenderness over the lateral fibular head. His X-rays showed subtle abnormalities of the tibiofibular joint. The dislocation was reduced and the patient was discharged from the ED with orthopedic follow-up.

  7. [Proximity and breastfeeding at the maternity hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradin-Charrier, Anne-Claire

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of breastfeeding, as well as its duration, are facilitated through the proximity of the mother with her new baby. However, in maternity hospitals, breastfeeding mothers very often leave their baby in the nursery at night time. A study carried out in 2014 in several maternity hospitals put forward suggestions and highlighted areas to improve in everyday practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Novel Biosensor of Membrane Protein Proximity Based on Fluorogen Activated Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilev, Kalin V; Gallo, Eugenio; Shank, Nathaniel; Jarvik, Jonathan W

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel biosensor system for reporting proximity between cell surface proteins in live cultured cells. The biosensor takes advantage of recently developed fluorogen-activating proteins (FAPs) that display fluorescence only when bound to otherwise-nonfluorescent fluorogen molecules. To demonstrate feasibility for the approach, two recombinant rapamycin-binding proteins were expressed as single-pass plasma membrane proteins in HeLa cells; one of the proteins (scAvd- FRB) carried an extracellular avidin tag; the other (HL1-TO1-FKBP) carried an extracellular FAP. Cells were incubated with a membrane-impermeable bivalent ligand (biotin-PEG2000-DIR) consisting of biotin joined to a dimethyl-indole red (DIR) fluorogen by a polyethylene glycol linker, thus tethering the fluorogen to the scAvd-FRB fusion protein. Addition of rapamycin, which promotes FKBP-FRB dimerization and thereby brings the FAP in close proximity to the tethered fluorogen, led to a significant increase in DIR fluorescence. We call the new proximity assay TEFLA, for tethered fluorogen assay.

  9. Residential proximity to abandoned uranium mines and serum inflammatory potential in chronically exposed Navajo communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Molly E; Lewis, Johnnye; Miller, Curtis; Hoover, Joseph; Ali, Abdul-Mehdi S; Shuey, Chris; Cajero, Miranda; Lucas, Selita; Zychowski, Katherine; Pacheco, Bernadette; Erdei, Esther; Ramone, Sandy; Nez, Teddy; Gonzales, Melissa; Campen, Matthew J

    2017-07-01

    Members of the Navajo Nation, who possess a high prevalence of cardiometabolic disease, reside near hundreds of local abandoned uranium mines (AUM), which contribute uranium, arsenic and other metals to the soil, water and air. We recently reported that hypertension is associated with mine waste exposures in this population. Inflammation is a major player in the development of numerous vascular ailments. Our previous work establishing that specific transcriptional responses of cultured endothelial cells treated with human serum can reveal relative circulating inflammatory potential in a manner responsive to pollutant exposures, providing a model to assess responses associated with exposure to these waste materials in this population. To investigate a potential link between exposures to AUM and serum inflammatory potential in affected communities, primary human coronary artery endothelial cells were treated for 4 h with serum provided by Navajo study participants (n=145). Endothelial transcriptional responses of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) were measured. These transcriptional responses were then linked to AUM exposure metrics, including surface area-weighted AUM proximity and estimated oral intake of metals. AUM proximity strongly predicted endothelial transcriptional responses to serum including CCL2, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 (Puranium did not, even after controlling for all major effect modifiers. Inflammatory potential associated with proximity to AUMs, but not oral intake of specific metals, additionally suggests a role for inhalation exposure as a contributor to cardiovascular disease.

  10. Method to Measure Tone of Axial and Proximal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurfinkel, Victor S.; Cacciatore, Timothy W.; Cordo, Paul J.; Horak, Fay B.

    2011-01-01

    The control of tonic muscular activity remains poorly understood. While abnormal tone is commonly assessed clinically by measuring the passive resistance of relaxed limbs1, no systems are available to study tonic muscle control in a natural, active state of antigravity support. We have developed a device (Twister) to study tonic regulation of axial and proximal muscles during active postural maintenance (i.e. postural tone). Twister rotates axial body regions relative to each other about the vertical axis during stance, so as to twist the neck, trunk or hip regions. This twisting imposes length changes on axial muscles without changing the body's relationship to gravity. Because Twister does not provide postural support, tone must be regulated to counteract gravitational torques. We quantify this tonic regulation by the restive torque to twisting, which reflects the state of all muscles undergoing length changes, as well as by electromyography of relevant muscles. Because tone is characterized by long-lasting low-level muscle activity, tonic control is studied with slow movements that produce "tonic" changes in muscle length, without evoking fast "phasic" responses. Twister can be reconfigured to study various aspects of muscle tone, such as co-contraction, tonic modulation to postural changes, tonic interactions across body segments, as well as perceptual thresholds to slow axial rotation. Twister can also be used to provide a quantitative measurement of the effects of disease on axial and proximal postural tone and assess the efficacy of intervention. PMID:22214974

  11. Temperature as a proximate factor in orientation behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, W.W.

    1977-05-01

    Temperature serves as a proximate factor (cue, guidepost, sign stimulus, or directive factor) affecting locomotor responses of fishes. Although temperature can also serve as an ultimate ecological factor, as in behavioral thermoregulation, nonthermal factors may in some cases provide the ultimate adaptive or ecological value of a temperature response; some examples are habitat selection, intraspecific size segregation, interspecific niche differentiation, isolating mechanisms, predator avoidance, prey location, escape reactions, and migrations (thermoperiodic, diel, seasonal, spawning). Conversely, nonthermal variables such as light intensity or water depth may act as accessory proximate factors in thermoregulation. In spawning migrations, thermal requirements of eggs and larvae may take precedence over the (often different) preferenda or optima of adults. Although thermal responses of fishes are largely innate and species specific, ontogenetic and other changes can occur. Since temperature can serve as an unconditioned reinforcer in operant conditioning, thermal responses are not limited to simple kineses or taxes. Nonthermal factors such as photoperiod, circadian rhythms, currents, social and biotic interactions, stresses, infections, or chemicals can affect thermal responses, and may account for some lack of conformity between laboratory preferenda and field distributions and behaviors.

  12. Proximity effects in topological insulator heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiao-Guang; Wu Guang-Fen; Zhang G