WorldWideScience

Sample records for provocation story questions

  1. The Relationship between Knowledge of Story Structure and Question Comprehension in Young Hearing Impaired Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluwin, Thomas N.; Papalia, Julie

    Thirty hearing-impaired children at a residential school for the deaf, a day school for the deaf, and a day program for the deaf in a regular public elementary school were shown picture books, asked to tell the story, and asked to respond to specific questions. Results showed that the ability to process questions was related to the structure of…

  2. An examination of the association between interviewer question type and story-grammar detail in child witness interviews about abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltis, Brooke B; Powell, Martine B; Snow, Pamela C; Hughes-Scholes, Carolyn H

    2010-06-01

    This study compared the effects of open-ended versus specific questions, and various types of open-ended questions, in eliciting story-grammar detail in child abuse interviews. The sample included 34 police interviews with child witnesses aged 5-15 years (M age=9 years, 9 months). The interviewers' questions and their relative sub-types were classified according to definitions reported in the child interview training literature. The children's responses were classified according to the proportion of story grammar and the prevalence of individual story grammar elements as defined by Stein and Glenn (1979). Open-ended questions were more effective at eliciting story grammar than specific questions. This finding was revealed across three age groups, two interview phases and irrespective of how question effectiveness was measured. However, not all types of open-ended questions were equally effective. Open-ended questions that encouraged a broad response, or asked the child to elaborate on a part of their account, elicited more story-grammar detail compared to open-ended questions that requested clarification of concepts or descriptions of the next (or another) activity or detail within a sequence. This study demonstrates that children's ability to provide story-grammar detail is maximised when there is minimal prompting from the interviewer. Given the association between story grammar production and victim credibility, greater guidance is warranted in interviewer training programs in relation to the effects and administration of different types of open-ended questions. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callison, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the use of storytelling by teachers and librarians to promote reading. Topics include folktales; communication through story; oral traditions; learning through story; impact on reading, comprehension, and composition skills; telling/listening interaction; storytelling as a leadership skill; and story and inquiry or discovery learning.…

  4. Provocative Video Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caglio, Agnese

    This paper presents the use of ”provocative videos”, as a tool to support and deepen findings from ethnographic investigation on the theme of remote videocommunication. The videos acted as a resource to also investigate potential for novel technologies supporting continuous connection between...

  5. [Chronic urticaria. Provocation test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez Camarasa, J M

    1976-01-01

    Sixty patients of ages ranging from 11 to 64, with chronic urticaria from 2 months to 50 years duration, were studied with the provocation test. We found responses in 33.3% of patients. Tartrazine was the most common inducer, specially in those patients sensitive to aspirin with increased salicilate blood levels. As we did not use aspirin as inducer the results with tartrazine are more relevant and can be used to detect a positive response to aspirin. The relation between tartrazine and aspirin was not observed in patients with pressure or cholinergic urticaria. The provocation test is most useful in patients with chronic urticaria of unknown cause. 4 hydroxybenzoic acid and sodium acid and sodium benzoate were the more common inducers in the latter patients. We feel that the provocation test is a useful tool to study patients with chronic urticaria. Tartrazine, 4 hydroxybenzoic acid, sodium benzoate, tiramin and penicilin are included in the test. The responders should eliminate the offender from their diet.

  6. The Big Story: Ten Questions and Answers about the Booming Career Field of Journalism and Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigma Delta Chi, Chicago, IL.

    Ten questions about careers in journalism and communications are asked and answered in this booklet. The questions are: Is journalism mainly newspaper work? What opportunities are there today? How is the pay in journalism? Are there incentives besides pay? What about working conditions? What about opportunities for women? What about advancement in…

  7. On Provocation, Education and Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    This essay develops an affect-based theory of entrepreneurial entrepreneurship education, something we summarise in a model of provocation-based entrepreneurial entrepreneurship education (the E3 model). Taking its starting point in an anecdote that illustrates the importance of provocation...... in processes of learning entrepreneurship, this article responds to previous calls for less economised entrepreneurship education focusing on its creative-relational nature. An affect-based theory of E3 brings together provocation, deterritorialisation (uprooting) and decoding/imagination, which calls for both...... critique and creativity, and resonates with appreciations of paralogy as driver in learning processes. The implications of this conceptual model of learning entrepreneurship entrepreneurially are discussed, with particular focus on the role of the pedagogue and on the future of learning entrepreneurship....

  8. 'Being sick a lot, often on each other': students' alcohol-related provocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Lori F; Monrouxe, Lynn V

    2014-03-01

    Many medical students consume alcohol in excess, which can compromise their professionalism and increase their risk of future alcohol dependency. Just one study in Japan has examined the social influences of alcohol consumption among medical students. Eighty-six per cent (n = 821) of their respondents reported experiencing some form of alcohol-related harassment since the beginning of medical school. No similar research has been conducted in the UK. A cross-sectional online questionnaire of medical students at three British medical schools. In total, 216 students answered questions regarding their experiences of alcohol-related provocation (as targets and instigators), the rate of occurrence of events and their distress following acts of provocation. An open-ended question enabled respondents to report personal experiences of alcohol-related provocation. Seventy-five per cent (n = 162) of respondents reported experiencing alcohol-related provocation during the past year, with 49.1% (n = 106) reporting instigating acts of provocation. The most prevalent experience (both for targets and instigators) was coercion to drink an entire alcoholic beverage at once as part of a game. Most acts of alcohol-related provocation generated little or no distress. Males were significantly more likely to experience some events than females. Thirty-two personal narratives of alcohol-related provocation were reported (only three reported resisting provocation). Thematic analysis identified three themes with differing power relations: ongoing 'peer-peer provocation' as a commonplace social activity, hierarchical 'peer provocation' at initiation ceremonies and 'team-mate provocation' at sports socials as bonding exercises. The tone of the narratives depended on the context in which the events described occurred. Alcohol-related provocation occurs among some UK medical students and may present professionalism issues to medical students. Medical schools may wish to integrate more teaching

  9. North Korea's choice of the types of provocation against South Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hyun Haeng

    2013-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This research starts from the question of how North Korea decides upon the types of its provocations against the South. To find the answer, the author divides the major provocations into three periods, according to their characteristics, and examines how the major decisive factors of the Norths crisis policy making, such as military strength, relations with China and the Soviet Union (Russia), regime stability, and economic power, aff...

  10. Interpretation of growth hormone provocative tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, A M; Orskov, H; Ranke, M B

    1995-01-01

    To compare interpretations of growth hormone (GH) provocative tests in laboratories using six different GH immunoassays (one enzymeimmunometric assay (EIMA, assay 1), one immunoradiometric assay (IRMA, assay 5), one time-resolved fluorimmunometric assay (TRFIA, assay 3) and three radioimmunoassays...... (RIAs, assays 2, 4 and 6)), aliquots of peak samples from GH provocative tests were distributed between the four participating laboratories, quantified in the respective immunoassays and interpreted according to the cut-off values for provocative tests defined for each assay method. There was a high...

  11. Whose Story Is It Anyway?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korty, Carol

    1995-01-01

    Asks the question of what stories playwrights may use. States that dramatists have a deep commitment to explore the truth about life. Discusses questions regarding stories in the public domain, and issues of exclusive intellectual property. Concludes that the decision to use a story is a political one more than an ethical one. (PA)

  12. Aesthetic, Functional and Conceptual Provocation in Research Through Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raptis, Dimitrios; Jensen, Rikke Hagensby; Kjeldskov, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    how to use provocation in research through design. Towards this end, we report on a field study with four families that used an aesthetically, functionally and conceptually provocative future probe. The purpose of the probe was to challenge existing energy consuming practices through provocation...... and make its users reflect on them. The paper describes how all three provocative aspects were addressed, and our findings demonstrate how they were experienced in the real world, and how they impacted our research through design approach. We conclude by presenting reflections on how to design provocations......, and reflections on the impact of provocations for research through design in general....

  13. Reframing Practice through Provocative Co-design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lotte; Poulsen, Søren Bolvig; Morelli, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    changes in organisations, as it has the ability to force a shift in face (Goffman 1967) and the potential to motivate and enable stakeholders to reframe practice and initiate change initiatives. This is done by focusing on a service design project in which a provocative assignment in a co-design workshop...... triggered a key stakeholder to implement a change in an existing service in a public hospital. However, we will also argue that provocation should be supported with a dynamic attitude from the designer in the social interaction....

  14. The hyperventilation provocation test in panic disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spinhoven, P.; Onstein, E. J.; Sterk, P. J.; Le Haen-Versteijnen, D.

    1992-01-01

    Forty-eight patients with DSM-III-R Panic Disorder underwent a hyperventilation provocation Test (HVPT). Twenty-four patients rated the symptoms induced during the HVPT as similar to those occurring during panic attacks in daily life. Contrary to the classical hyperventilation model of panic, no

  15. Provocative behavior of a victim and its difference from the provocation of a crime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriy Anatolyevich Cherepakhin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective to define the main elements of provocative behavior of a victim and its difference from the provocation of a crime. Methods dialectic approach to the study of social phenomena and historical and comparativelegal methods for the study of legal reality. Results scientific grounding of theoreticallegal bases of the ldquoprovocationrdquo institution and formulating proposals for improving its legislative regulation and increasing the efficiency of its law enforcement. Scientific novelty the article presents the author39s classification of the types and forms of provocative activity in the norms of both the General and the Specific parts. Practical value summarizing and analysis of the modern empirical data on the practice of implementation of the norms containing the features of provocation and elaboration of organizational and methodological recommendations based on the authorrsquos research. nbsp

  16. Aesthetic, Functional and Conceptual Provocation in Research Through Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raptis, Dimitrios; Jensen, Rikke Hagensby; Kjeldskov, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    how to use provocation in research through design. Towards this end, we report on a field study with four families that used an aesthetically, functionally and conceptually provocative future probe. The purpose of the probe was to challenge existing energy consuming practices through provocation...... and make its users reflect on them. The paper describes how all three provocative aspects were addressed, and our findings demonstrate how they were experienced in the real world, and how they impacted our research through design approach. We conclude by presenting reflections on how to design provocations...

  17. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Educational Resources Glossary of Common Terms If You Have a Question In the News Researcher Story: Stuttering ... participation of research volunteers. If you stutter or have a family member who stutters, you could be ...

  18. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Have a Question In the News Researcher Story: Stuttering In a 2010 movie, The King’s Speech, many ... effects of the disorder. How Do Researchers Study Stuttering? Video of How Do Researchers Study Stuttering? A ...

  19. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Have a Question In the News Researcher Story: Stuttering In a 2010 movie, The King’s Speech, many ... effects of the disorder. How Do Researchers Study Stuttering? Video of How Do Researchers Study Stuttering? A ...

  20. [The processing unit and story structure in memory for story].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, E

    1988-04-01

    To investigate story memory, three experiments were conducted. In Experiment I, 60 professional school students were asked to sort the sentences of stories into groups. Hierarchical clustering analysis was used to generate perceived story structure. Results indicated generally a good agreement between perceived structure and the structure induced by story grammar. In Experiment II and III, 72 university students and 72 professional school students learned three stories and were tested in recognition task. In the course of presenting the sentences in story, pauses were inserted between story clusters (BP) or within them (WP) (Experiment II). In BP condition, recognition time (RT) was faster than in WP condition. In Experiment III questions were inserted at the same points as in Experiment II (BQ, WP). In BQ condition RT was faster than in BP condition. These results indicated that pause or question inserted at the boundary of story cluster facilitated story processing and that question was more effective than pause. Story was processed in unit corresponding to perceived story structure.

  1. Nasal provocation test using allergen extract versus cold dry air provocation test: which and when?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Hyo; Jang, Tae Young

    2013-01-01

    Nasal provocation tests (NPTs) are useful for evaluation of patients with allergic rhinitis. The cold dry air (CDA) provocation test is useful for evaluation of patients with nonspecific nasal hyperreactivity (NHR). This study aimed to determine whether the NPT or CDA provocation would be more useful for patients with different clinical pictures. We evaluated changes in nasal symptoms (visual analog scale [VAS]) and acoustic parameters after NPT or CDA provocation in healthy volunteers (group A, n = 27), patients with allergic rhinitis (group B, n = 20), and subjects with nonallergic rhinitis (group C, n = 26). According to their subjective cold hyperresponsiveness (SCH), we compared changes in VAS and acoustic parameters after each protocol. The correlation between results of the skin-prick test (SPT) and changes in VAS after each protocol was analyzed. Finally, we performed an analysis of correlation between NPT and CDA provocation. After NPT, group B showed a larger change in VAS for rhinorrhea, sneezing, and itching (p < 0.01). After CDA challenge, the change in VAS for nasal obstruction was larger in group C (p < 0.05). Changes in acoustic parameters were larger in groups B and C after NPT (p < 0.01). After CDA challenge, the SCH(+) group (n = 49) showed a larger decrease of acoustic parameters than the SCH(-) group (n = 24; p < 0.01). Significant correlation was observed between the size of SPT and degree of change in VAS after NPT. No significant correlation was observed between NPT and CDA. CDA could be an adjunct tool for evaluating NHR in patients with self-reported SCH.

  2. Philosophical Provocation: The Lifeblood of Clinical Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Laurence B

    2017-02-01

    The daily work of the clinical ethics teacher and clinical ethics consultant falls into the routine of classifying clinical cases by ethical type and proposing ethically justified alternatives for the professionally responsible management of a specific type of case. Settling too far into this routine creates the risk of philosophical inertia, which is not good either for the clinical ethicist or for the field of clinical ethics. The antidote to this philosophical inertia and resultant blinkered vision of clinical ethics is sustained, willing exposure to philosophical provocation. The papers in this clinical ethics issue of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy provide just such philosophical provocation related to core topics in clinical ethics: the distinction between clinical practice and clinical research; telemedicine, or medicine at a distance; illness narratives; the concept of the placebo effect; and sex reassignment. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy Inc. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Toy Story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cole, Anne Jodon; Petersson Brooks, Eva

    2016-01-01

    a mediating device between adults and children. The question then becomes, how does a display of static toys speak to a child’s culture of play? Through interviews with toy museum curators and personal observations it was found that the exhibition was designed to have adults share and reflect stories about......Toys are considered to be children’s cultural objects, yet when placed in a toy museum context they become a collection for adult viewing. This article uses Kress and van Leeuwens’ concept of ‘semiotic landscape’ wherein the exhibit provides a specific context of communication that becomes...... the toys with children. Such activity reflects a representation of toys as collections for adults (child’s perspective) rather than the playthings of children (children’s perspectives). Material culture of children was implicitly represented through playful, sensory, and affective engagement. Key words...

  4. Toy Story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cole, Anne Jodon; Petersson Brooks, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Toys are considered to be children’s cultural objects, yet when placed in a toy museum context they become a collection for adult viewing. This article uses Kress and van Leeuwens’ concept of ‘semiotic landscape’ wherein the exhibit provides a specific context of communication that becomes...... a mediating device between adults and children. The question then becomes, how does a display of static toys speak to a child’s culture of play? Through interviews with toy museum curators and personal observations it was found that the exhibition was designed to have adults share and reflect stories about...... the toys with children. Such activity reflects a representation of toys as collections for adults (child’s perspective) rather than the playthings of children (children’s perspectives). Material culture of children was implicitly represented through playful, sensory, and affective engagement. Key words...

  5. The Power of the Provocative: Exploring World History Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkettle, Bryan L.

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses how my freshman world history students come to understand controversial issues as provocative within the secondary social studies classroom, and in what ways does their engagement with provocative issues influence their understanding of the content and the world around them. In addition, this research study seeks to discover…

  6. Sweet Secrets: Stories of Menstruation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Kathleen; Wansbrough, Paula

    This book combines short stories with clear, factual health information for adolescent females about menstruation and their bodily changes they are experiencing. It focuses on young girls' concerns and questions about menstruation and educates through a combination of the front matter and the stories themselves. Coming from different generations…

  7. Odor provocation test for laryngeal hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner-Schmidt, Jackie L; Rosen, Clark A; Radhakrishnan, Nandhakumar; Ferguson, Berrylin J

    2008-05-01

    This study was to present an odor provocation/challenge test for laryngeal hypersensitivity in a suspected odor induced dysphonic patient. The second aim was to rule out secondary gain from organic laryngeal hypersensitivity. Two steps were taken for this purpose. First, because the evaluation of hypersensitivity may be affected by the perception of odor, the study investigated laryngeal hypersensitivity during nasal and oral breathing separately to disentangle possible cognitive reactions to odors. Second, a healthy control (HC) participant was used with the identical testing protocol for nasal breathing to minimize unbiased results. The HC's response to nasal breathing of the odors showed no response to all the stimuli. The participant with possible secondary gain issues responded differently to the odors when presented nasally versus orally. Oral breathing showed less severe and less frequent laryngeal hypersensitive reactions. This suggests that laryngeal hypersensitivity was either due to the odor, cognitive information, sensory changes in olfaction leading to psychological conditioning, or for any possible secondary gain. Hence, it is difficult to indicate the precise reason (cause and effect) for the participant's laryngeal hypersensitivity; however, this study describes the first structured, controlled, repeatable, and randomized design to investigate odor induced laryngeal hypersensitivity and decipher possible secondary gain from true laryngeal hypersensitivity.

  8. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... List of Registries Personal Stories For Parents and Children For Health Care Providers For Researchers and Trial ... and who have a family history of the disorder. — CROSS FADE — The foundation of our studies is the human ... (a fact sheet from NIDCD) Questions ...

  9. Karuk Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Ruth, Ed.; Davis, Shan

    Three illustrated stories from the Karuk Indians of northwestern California are told in free English translation and in Karuk with literal English translation. Stories tell of Bluejay who pretends to be sick to get higher pay for doctoring the person she is making sick, how the Karuk learned to kill the fattest deer, and the waterdog who kills the…

  10. Questioning the Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tienken, Christopher H.; Goldberg, Stephanie; DiRocco, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    Historical accounts of questioning used in the education process trace back to Socrates. One of the best examples of his use of questioning is found in Plato's "The Republic." Socrates used a series of strategic questions to help his student Glaucon come to understand the concept of justice. Socrates purposefully posed a series of…

  11. Can magnetic resonance imaging accurately predict concordant pain provocation during provocative disc injection?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Chang Ho; Kim, Yun Hwan; Kim, Jung Hyuk; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Sung, Deuk Jae [Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Sang-Heon [Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Seoul (Korea); Derby, Richard [Spinal Diagnostics and Treatment Center, Daly City, CA (United States); Stanford University Medical Center, Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2009-09-15

    To correlate magnetic resonance (MR) image findings with pain response by provocation discography in patients with discogenic low back pain, with an emphasis on the combination analysis of a high intensity zone (HIZ) and disc contour abnormalities. Sixty-two patients (aged 17-68 years) with axial low back pain that was likely to be disc related underwent lumbar discography (178 discs tested). The MR images were evaluated for disc degeneration, disc contour abnormalities, HIZ, and endplate abnormalities. Based on the combination of an HIZ and disc contour abnormalities, four classes were determined: (1) normal or bulging disc without HIZ; (2) normal or bulging disc with HIZ; (3) disc protrusion without HIZ; (4) disc protrusion with HIZ. These MR image findings and a new combined MR classification were analyzed in the base of concordant pain determined by discography. Disc protrusion with HIZ [sensitivity 45.5%; specificity 97.8%; positive predictive value (PPV), 87.0%] correlated significantly with concordant pain provocation (P < 0.01). A normal or bulging disc with HIZ was not associated with reproduction of pain. Disc degeneration (sensitivity 95.4%; specificity 38.8%; PPV 33.9%), disc protrusion (sensitivity 68.2%; specificity 80.6%; PPV 53.6%), and HIZ (sensitivity 56.8%; specificity 83.6%; PPV 53.2%) were not helpful in the identification of a disc with concordant pain. The proposed MR classification is useful to predict a disc with concordant pain. Disc protrusion with HIZ on MR imaging predicted positive discography in patients with discogenic low back pain. (orig.)

  12. Theoretical Stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Serisier

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of Clare Hemmings, Why Stories Matter: The Political Grammar of Feminist Theory (Duke 2011 and Janet Halley & Andrew Parker (eds. After Sex? On Writing Since Queer Theory (Duke 2011.

  13. Data Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watts, Laura; Nafus, Dawn

    2013-01-01

    ‘Big Data’ rises and accumulates today from so much of our activity, off and online, that our lives seem almost suffused by ‘The Cloud’. But perhaps data might be otherwise? In this collection, Laura Watts and Dawn Nafus, two ethnographers, bring together stories from different data sites: from...... the marine energy industry, and from the Quantified Self movement. These Data Stories speak, not of clouds, but of transformations: in things, in energy, and in experience....

  14. Provocation, Hostility, Aggression, and Victimization: Firefighters and Incarcerated Felons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, E. Carlene; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines self-reported histories of victimization among two groups of men. Violence, provocation, hostility, and aggression inventories were administered to a prosocial group of firefighters and an antisocial group of incarcerated felons. Fourteen of the 15 possible behavioral-abuse correlations were significant when both groups were considered…

  15. Provocative Pedagogies in e-Learning: Making the Invisible Visible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to explore the experiences of participants (practicing teachers) involved in an online course entitled: "Reflective Practice for Teachers." Using a provocative pedagogy in the course, the teachers were challenged to confront beliefs and assumptions about teaching and learning and become active participants in the…

  16. Specificity and sensitivity assessment of selected nasal provocation testing techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Krzych-Fałta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nasal provocation testing involves an allergen-specific local reaction of the nasal mucosa to the administered allergen. Aim: To determine the most objective nasal occlusion assessment technique that could be used in nasal provocation testing. Material and methods : A total of 60 subjects, including 30 patients diagnosed with allergy to common environmental allergens and 30 healthy subjects were enrolled into the study. The method used in the study was a nasal provocation test with an allergen, with a standard dose of a control solution and an allergen (5,000 SBU/ml administered using a calibrated atomizer into both nostrils at room temperature. Early-phase nasal mucosa response in the early phase of the allergic reaction was assessed via acoustic rhinometry, optical rhinometry, nitric oxide in nasal air, and tryptase levels in the nasal lavage fluid. Results : In estimating the homogeneity of the average values, the Levene’s test was used and receiver operating characteristic curves were plotted for all the methods used for assessing the nasal provocation test with an allergen. Statistically significant results were defined for p < 0.05. Of all the objective assessment techniques, the most sensitive and characteristic ones were the optical rhinometry techniques (specificity = 1, sensitivity = 1, AUC = 1, PPV = 1, NPV = 1. Conclusions : The techniques used showed significant differences between the group of patients with allergic rhinitis and the control group. Of all the objective assessment techniques, those most sensitive and characteristic were the optical rhinometry.

  17. Provocative design for unprovocative designers : Strategies for triggering personal dilemmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozkaramanli, D.; Desmet, P.M.A.; Lloyd, Peter; Bohemia, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Traditional design approaches stimulate the creation of products that make daily interactions more efficient, comfortable, and pleasant. In contrast, provocative design approaches, such as critical design, have a different focus: they aim to challenge the status quo through products that expose

  18. Discontinuation of tube feeding in young children by hunger provocation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kindermann, Angelika; Kneepkens, Corneille Marie Francois; Stok, Anita; van Dijk, Elisabeth Maria; Engels, Michelle; Douwes, Adriaan Cornelis

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Pathological food refusal (PFR) is not rare in young children with chronic conditions requiring prolonged tube feeding. We investigated whether these children could be weaned from tube feeding with a multidisciplinary hunger provocation program. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study included

  19. The Effects of a Provocation on Aggression for Three Types of Alcohol Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Joseph J.; Randoph, Daniel Lee

    1982-01-01

    Investigated the effects of a provocation on aggression for three types of alcohol users. The results indicated that the provocation elicited significantly more feelings of hostility and verbal aggression. However, there were no significant level effects, nor a significant interaction between level of drinking and presence of a provocation.…

  20. Story Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaleb, Joseph L.

    2003-01-01

    Argues that the prevalence of print literacy has diminished the interest in and teaching of oral culture. Describes a storytelling experiences and illustrates the importance of considering oral narrative in the English classroom. Discusses the healing truth of stories, the mental health of adolescents, and the oral tradition and relational values.…

  1. Migrant life stories and the Web

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marselis, Randi

    2013-01-01

    The life stories of migrants are increasingly being told, as part of the work of cultural organizations, and websites are well suited to making such life story projects accessible to the public. However, by using the lives of real people as raw material in a public forum, Web projects raise...... important questions about the terms on which participants are given a voice. This article focuses on a Danish website which depicts the life stories of migrant men through written texts, audio clips, and photographs. It presents a detailed analysis of the life story of one young man from a Muslim background...... who has openly declared himself an atheist. The article examines his experience of having this somewhat sensitive story made public. The religious aspect inevitably positioned his story in relation to broader political debates about Muslims in Denmark. Since migrants’ stories often touch on highly...

  2. New Responses to Enduring Questions in Religious and Theological Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siejk, Cate

    2011-01-01

    This article offers a response to two provocative questions about the relationship of theology to religious education posed by Norma Thompson in her Presidential address given at the annual meeting of APRRE in 1978. I offer contemporary answers to these questions from the perspective of a theological educator. First, I show how feminist theory and…

  3. Evangelization, media and marketing: provocation to debate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonso Tadeu Murad

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article develops a reflection on the relationship between evangelization, media and marketing, especially in Catholic circles. In the first part, we present the six dimensions of Christian religious experience that are part of evangelization: mystical, ritual, ethics, Cognitive (intellectual, communal and missionary. The article also shows that these dimensions come in different concentration on multiple agents acting in religious media. In the second part, serving up the contribution of science of media and marketing, the article outlines the basic concepts of Media, market and marketing, revealing the relationship of autonomy and interdependence between them. Finally, the text reflects on the possibilities and risks of evangelization in the mainstream media as well as social media. It denounces the misconceptions of "media Catholicism," the reduction of evangelization to the sale of a religious product and a brand. It justifies the use of the media to spread the gospel, founded on values and on dialogue with the great human questions.

  4. Policy stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Carina Bregnholm; Rasmussen, Rasmus Kjærgaard

    This article uses Arctic Winter 2016 as an exploration site of values and futures in Greenland. By taking a valuation approach where the creation and interpretation of event values are seen as an ongoing and taxing accomplishment, we firstly expand the understanding of events beyond their actual...... present three central policy stories from the field. The stories tell of how the event was first interested, then activated and finally evaluated. Besides adding a new understanding to policy-driven events as a locus of value creation, we also argue that the AWG 2016 offer speculative bets for new...... planning and execution and of event outcomes beyond the narrow confines of bed nights and legacies. Second, we introduce policies as an entry point to unlock discussions and manifestations of value and futures which connect to AWG. In order to exemplify the workings of the AWG event in these domains, we...

  5. Picture Stories for ESL Health Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Kate

    These picture stories help English as a Second Language teachers address topics affecting their students' health and wellbeing. They are useful for beginner and low-literacy students, offering a safe, impromptu way to discuss difficult topics, ask questions, and obtain information. As the stories are about cartoon characters, students are not…

  6. Multi story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Law, Ho; Stelter, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    The article discusses the use of narrative coaching as a powerful tool of co-creation and collaboration of the coach and client that emphasizes values and aspirations. Narrative coaches listen to the stories of lived experience and help clients identify values and skills. Narrative coaching has two...... central foundations which are societal/cultural and learning. The approach consists of the techniques of externalizing conversations and re-authoring and remembering....

  7. Indira's story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Eric Dawe

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Indira is an independent woman who does not live a traditional Nepali life. She rescues abandoned and abused young women from sexual exploitation and provides them with love, support, and education. Her story highlights the key role of the social determinants of health in caring for marginalized populations. Challenges and benefits of attempting to learn from another’s personal narrative are also considered.

  8. Reactivity to laboratory stress provocation predicts relapse to cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Sudie E; Hartwell, Karen; DeSantis, Stacia M; Saladin, Michael; McRae-Clark, Aimee L; Price, Kimber L; Moran-Santa Maria, Megan M; Baker, Nathaniel L; Spratt, Eve; Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Brady, Kathleen T

    2010-01-01

    Cocaine dependence is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by periods of abstinence and high rates of return to drug using behavior. Elevated levels of stress have been associated with relapse to cocaine; however, the nature of this association is not well understood. The relationship between reactivity to three human laboratory provocations and relapse to cocaine was investigated. Participants were 53 cocaine-dependent individuals who were admitted for a 2-day inpatient stay during which a psychosocial provocation (i.e., the Trier Social Stress Task), a pharmacological provocation (i.e., administration of 1 microg/kg corticotrophin releasing hormone; CRH), and a drug cue exposure paradigm were completed. Adrenocortico-trophic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, heart rate, and subjective cocaine craving and stress were assessed at baseline and at multiple time points post-task. Participants' cocaine use was monitored for approximately 1 month following testing. The majority (72.3%) of participants relapsed to cocaine during the follow-up period. In response to the CRH and drug cue exposure, elevated subjective craving and stress were significant predictors of cocaine use during follow-up. In response to the Trier, attenuated neuroendocrine responses were significant predictors of cocaine use. The findings provide further evidence of the ability of laboratory paradigms to predict relapse. The observed associations between stress reactivity and subsequent cocaine use highlight the clinical importance of the findings. Predictors of relapse may vary based on the type of provocation utilized. Interventions aimed at normalizing stress response, as measured using laboratory paradigms, may prove useful in relapse prevention. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Inhaled Mannitol as a Laryngeal and Bronchial Provocation Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Tunn Ren; Hoy, Ryan; Richards, Amanda L; Paddle, Paul; Hew, Mark

    2017-03-01

    Timely diagnosis of vocal cord dysfunction (VCD), more recently termed "inducible laryngeal obstruction," is important because VCD is often misdiagnosed as asthma, resulting in delayed diagnosis and inappropriate treatment. Visualization of paradoxical vocal cord movement on laryngoscopy is the gold standard for diagnosis, but is limited by poor test sensitivity. Provocation tests may improve the diagnosis of VCD, but the diagnostic performance of current tests is less than ideal. Alternative provocation tests are required. This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of using inhaled mannitol for concurrent investigation of laryngeal and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. Consecutive patients with suspected VCD seen at our institution's asthma clinic underwent flexible laryngoscopy at baseline and following mannitol challenge. VCD was diagnosed on laryngoscopy based on inspiratory adduction, or >50% expiratory adduction of the vocal cords. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness after mannitol challenge was also assessed. We evaluated the interrater agreement of postmannitol laryngoscopy between respiratory specialists and laryngologists. Fourteen patients with suspected VCD in the context of asthma evaluation were included in the study. Mannitol provocation demonstrated VCD in three of the seven patients with normal baseline laryngoscopy (42.9%). Only two patients had bronchial hyperresponsiveness. There was substantial interrater agreement between respiratory specialists and laryngologists, kappa = 0.696 (95% confidence interval: 0.324-1) (P = 0.006). Inhaled mannitol can be used to induce VCD. It is well tolerated and can evaluate laryngeal and bronchial hyperresponsiveness at the same setting. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Effect of Using the Story-Mapping Technique on Developing Tenth Grade Students' Short Story Writing Skills in EFL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibnian, Salem Saleh Khalaf

    2010-01-01

    The current study aimed at investigating the effect of using the story-mapping technique on developing tenth grade students' short story writing skills in EFL. The study attempted to answer the following questions: (1) What are the short story writing skills needed for tenth grade students in EFL?; and (2) What is the effect of the using the…

  11. Empathy Inhibits Aggression in Competition: The Role of Provocation, Emotion, and Gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanger, Nicholas; Kavussanu, Maria; McIntyre, David; Ring, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    Although the empathy-aggression relationship has been well documented, research has yet to establish whether emotions mediate and gender moderates this relationship in athletes, under conditions of low and high provocation. In this experiment, we assigned team-sport athletes to either a high (n = 40) or a low (n = 40) empathy group, and asked them to compete in a reaction-time task against a (fictitious) opponent, under conditions of low and high provocation. Empathy reduced aggression (i.e., intensity of electrical shock administered to the opponent) at low provocation in men, and at both low and high provocation in women. Guilt mediated the effect of empathy on aggression at low provocation in men; anger did not mediate any effects of empathy on aggression. Our findings indicate that the inhibitory effect of empathy on aggression and the mediating role of guilt are moderated by provocation and gender.

  12. Truth Without Reconciliation? The Question of Guilt and Forgiveness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Guilt and forgiveness, with their attendant philosophical and religious ramifications, permeate writing on the Holocaust and can also be related to South Africa\\'s recent history and present situation. Two controversial and provocative books (both possibly autobiographical) which tackle the question of guilt and forgiveness ...

  13. Popcorn Story Frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLella, Carol Ann

    This paper presents "popcorn story frames"--holistic outlines that facilitate comprehension when reading and writing stories, useful for outlining stories read and for creating outlines for original student stories--that are particularly useful for elementary and intermediate school students. "Popcorn" pops in a horizontal…

  14. Indirect bronchial provocation tests in childhood asthma : Monitoring short-term treatment changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, Elin

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, we used indirect bronchial provocation tests to monitor treatment changes in asthmatic children. Indirect bronchial provocation tests assess the response of the airways to stimuli that act on inflammatory cells present in the airways. The response to indirect stimuli is greater in

  15. Critiquing Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Lynn W.

    2015-01-01

    Question formation is a basic part of teaching and learning English. However, teachers often focus on the ability to form the question properly and not as much on the quality of the information the question is seeking. Whether teaching English language learners or students who want to be English teachers, teachers need to carefully consider the…

  16. Four Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hark-Weber, Amara G., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    The author is pleased to introduce a new section in "TAJ," Four Questions. The structure is simple: four questions are asked to teaching artists working in various media and locations. The questions are always the same, but because each teaching artist's approach is unique, their answers will provide an insight into particular methodologies that…

  17. A study of drug eruptions by provocative tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das J

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Sixty cases of drug eruptions were observed during the period of one year. The incidence of drug eruption was 0.47% amongst all Dermatology O.P.D. attendances. Male to female ratio was 7:3. The highest number of cases were seen in the age group of 21-30 years. Fixed drug eruptions were the most frequent (58.3%, followed by urticaria and angioedema (20%. The drug sulphonamides (including co-trimoxazole accounted for the highest number of eruptions (35%. The other drugs which were responsible for the eruptions, in order of frequency, were oxyphenbutazone, ampicillin, analgin, penicillin, tetracycline, ibuprofen, paracetamol, phenylbutazone, acetaminophen and phenobarbitone. The causative drug (s were confirmed by provocation tests in 42 (70% cases.

  18. Concussion Recovery Phase Affects Vestibular and Oculomotor Symptom Provocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheever, Kelly M; McDevitt, Jane; Tierney, Ryan; Wright, W Geoffrey

    2017-11-30

    Vestibular and oculomotor testing is emerging as a valuable assessment in sport-related concussion (SRC). However, their usefulness for tracking recovery and guiding return-to-play decisions remains unclear. Therefore the purpose of this study was to evaluate their clinical usefulness for tracking SRC recovery. Vestibular and oculomotor assessments were used to measure symptom provocation in an acute group (n=21) concussed≤10 days, prolonged symptoms group (n=10) concussed ≥16 days (median=84 days), healthy group (n=58) no concussions in >6 months. Known-groups approach was used with three groups at three time points (initial, 2-week and 6-week follow-up). Provoked symptoms for Gaze-Stabilization (GST), Rapid Eye Horizontal (REH), Optokinetic Stimulation (OKS), Smooth-Pursuit Slow (SPS) and Fast (SPF) tests, total combined symptoms scores and near point convergence (NPC) distance were significantly greater at initial assessment in both injury groups compared to controls. Injury groups improved on the King-Devick test and combined symptom provocation scores across time. The acute group improved over time on REH and SPF tests, while the prolonged symptoms group improved on OKS. A regression model (REH, OKS, GST) was 90% accurate discriminating concussed from healthy. Vestibular and ocular motor tests give valuable insight during recovery. They can prove beneficial in concussion evaluation given the modest equipment, training and time requirements. The current study demonstrates that when combined, vestibular and oculomotor clinical tests aid in the detection of deficits following a SRC. Additionally, tests such as NPC, GST, REH, SPS, SPF OKS and KD provide valuable information to clinicians throughout the recovery process and may aid in return to play decisions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Personal and Parents’ Life Stories in Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Majse; Thomsen, Dorthe Kirkegaard; Bøye, Rikke

    . Thirty patients with BPD and thirty matched control participants described and answered questions about their personal life stories and their parents’ life stories and completed measures of identity disturbance, alexithymia, empathy, and emotional intelligence. Compared to the control group, patients...

  20. Storie di genere, storie di partito

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Bellè

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Lo studio delle narrazioni di genere all'interno di questo tipo di organizzazione desta inoltre un particolare interesse anche in ragione della sottorappresentazione delle donne nella sfera della politica. Si tratta di un deficit democratico che coinvolge i sistemi politici moderni nel loro complesso, ma che interessa l'Italia con una particolare gravità ed evidenza. La questione della sottorappresentazione politica delle donne è stata sinora affrontata prevalentemente in termini tecnico-legali (politiche di pari opportunità ed azione positiva, o di teoria politica (la dicotomia pubblico-maschile e privato-femminile come fondamento del contratto sessuale della politica. Mancano invece contributi che guardino ai partiti come organizzazioni largamente responsabili dei processi di selezione e promozione delle carriere politiche, dunque come luoghi di quotidiana produzione di pratiche e culture di genere, più o meno egualitarie o, viceversa, discriminatorie. Sulla base di tale vuoto di ricerca e riflessione, il presente articolo si propone di mettere in luce le pratiche e le culture di genere che emergono dai racconti di uomini e donne all'interno di due organizzazioni partitiche, una di destra e una di sinistra, situate nel contesto territoriale della provincia di Trento. La ricerca è stata condotta attraverso lo strumento dell'intervista semi-strutturata, coinvolgendo quattro donne e quattro uomini, divisi per coppie di età (un uomo ed una donna giovani ed un uomo ed una donna da lungo presenti nel partito, accostabili per quanto concerne ruolo e posizione nelle organizzazioni partitiche considerate. L'attenzione analitica si è concentrata sulla costruzione del genere di uomini e donne intervistati/e, intesa sia come dimensione ed esperienza individuale (le storie di genere dei/lle singoli/e, sia come dimensione organizzativa più ampia (le storie di genere delle organizzazioni, narrate dalle diverse voci. Un'ulteriore dimensione analitica

  1. Telling the Human Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Miles

    1987-01-01

    Proposes that one of the fundamental human attributes is telling stories. Explores the debate on whether Neanderthals possessed language ability. Discusses the role of the "human story" in teaching anthropology. (DH)

  2. Story of Fluoridation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fluoride > The Story of Fluoridation The Story of Fluoridation Main Content It started as an observation, that ... fluoridate its drinking water.The Grand Rapids water fluoridation study was originally sponsored by the U.S. Surgeon ...

  3. When's a story not at story?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Eva

    . For example, as presented in this paper, a tourist guide tells the same story about a violent motorcycle gang, part of her ancetdotal reportoire, during two guided tours. The story is fixed in content and structure, but when brought into social interaction with tourists, it becomes part of a broader narrative...

  4. Story quality management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-12-15

    This book is written to explain quality management using stories, which have each story about quality management. The titles of stories are way to tell the meaning in mind, mom, house wife's meal costs a great deal, good bye digestive medicine, beans cooked in soy sauce, wedding and space rocket, each story is used to give descriptions of quality management like procedure and decision for division of labor, quality guaranteed and histogram.

  5. Question Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Josh

    2012-01-01

    After accepting the principal position at Farmersville (TX) Junior High, the author decided to increase instructional rigor through question mapping because of the success he saw using this instructional practice at his prior campus. Teachers are the number one influence on student achievement (Marzano, 2003), so question mapping provides a…

  6. Essential Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D.

    2012-01-01

    The secret to teaching may be as simple as asking students good questions--and then giving them the opportunity to find the answers. The author shares how he uses essential questions that set the class off on an inquiry. Rather than consuming information that he distributes and then repeating it on a test, students carry out their own…

  7. EMG and cardiovascular responses to emotionally provocative photographs and text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livesay, J R; Porter, T

    1994-08-01

    Previous studies on the psychophysiology of human emotion have repeatedly shown general and occasionally specific facial EMG (mu v) and covert cardiovascular response relationships to emotionally provocative photographs. Less clear are the relationships between psychophysiological response indices measured during the silent reading of emotionally charged versus emotionally neutral text. In this study, 12 adult subjects were presented two emotionally loaded color and black-and-white photographs and two brief newspaper articles, one emotionally charged and the other emotionally neutral in content. Each independent stimulus was presented for 1 min., preceded by a rest according to a multiple baseline-reversal design. Subjects evaluated each pictorial and textual stimulus condition according to adjective dimensions on 7-point rating scales. Mean values for corrugator supercilii EMG (mu v), upper trapezius EMG (mu v), surface temperature (degrees F), and heart rate (bpm) measured by finger photoplethysmography were measured during each rest and test period. Significant increases in the subjects' mean corrugator supercilii EMG (mu v) measures were observed during all color and black-and-white photograph presentations for both emotional and neutral content. As predicted, the subjects' mean corrugator supercilii EMG (mu v) measures increased significantly while silently reading text with an obvious unpleasant emotional tone. A significant positive relationship was observed between the subjects' mean ratings and mean corrugator EMG (mu v) difference values for the emotionally loaded color photographs.

  8. Psychobiological characteristics of dissociative identity disorder: a symptom provocation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinders, A A T Simone; Nijenhuis, Ellert R S; Quak, Jacqueline; Korf, Jakob; Haaksma, Jaap; Paans, Anne M J; Willemsen, Antoon T M; den Boer, Johan A

    2006-10-01

    Dissociative identity disorder (DID) patients function as two or more identities or dissociative identity states (DIS), categorized as 'neutral identity states' (NIS) and 'traumatic identity states' (TIS). NIS inhibit access to traumatic memories thereby enabling daily life functioning. TIS have access and responses to these memories. We tested whether these DIS show different psychobiological reactions to trauma-related memory. A symptom provocation paradigm with 11 DID patients was used in a two-by-two factorial design setting. Both NIS and TIS were exposed to a neutral and a trauma-related memory script. Three psychobiological parameters were tested: subjective ratings (emotional and sensori-motor), cardiovascular responses (heart rate, blood pressure, heart rate variability) and regional cerebral blood flow as determined with H(2)(15)O positron emission tomography. Psychobiological differences were found for the different DIS. Subjective and cardiovascular reactions revealed significant main and interactions effects. Regional cerebral blood flow data revealed different neural networks to be associated with different processing of the neutral and trauma-related memory script by NIS and TIS. Patients with DID encompass at least two different DIS. These identities involve different subjective reactions, cardiovascular responses and cerebral activation patterns to a trauma-related memory script.

  9. Constructing leadership identities through stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimann, Søren; Hersted, Lone

    2016-01-01

    This article analyzes the construction of leadership identities through stories found in four narrative interviews from a qualitative study and leadership development project based on social constructionism and action learning. We argue that leadership development and the construction of leadership...... identities in a postmodern paradigm are based on the negotiation and co-construction of meanings, relationships, and stories. The following questions are investigated: What happens when a group of leaders from different organizations construct, deconstruct, and reconstruct their identity as leaders through...... narrative interviews about their challenges as leaders? In addition, how do these discursive constructions restrict or enable new perspectives, other voices, and the possibilities for learning and change? Our analysis identified traces of both modern and postmodern leadership discourses. We suggest...

  10. Constructing leadership identities through stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimann, Søren; Hersted, Lone

    2016-01-01

    This article analyzes the construction of leadership identities through stories found in four narrative interviews from a qualitative study and leadership development project based on social constructionism and action learning. We argue that leadership development and the construction of leadership...... narrative interviews about their challenges as leaders? In addition, how do these discursive constructions restrict or enable new perspectives, other voices, and the possibilities for learning and change? Our analysis identified traces of both modern and postmodern leadership discourses. We suggest...... identities in a postmodern paradigm are based on the negotiation and co-construction of meanings, relationships, and stories. The following questions are investigated: What happens when a group of leaders from different organizations construct, deconstruct, and reconstruct their identity as leaders through...

  11. The Use and Effectiveness of User Stories in Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, Garm; Dalpiaz, Fabiano; Werf, Jan Martijn van der; Brinkkemper, Sjaak

    2016-01-01

    [Context and motivation] User stories are an increasingly popular textual notation to capture requirements in agile software development. [Question/Problem] To date there is no scientific evidence on the effectiveness of user stories. The goal of this paper is to explore how practicioners perceive

  12. Arguments as a new perspective on character motive in stories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bex, Floris; Atkinson, Katie; Bench-Capon, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    We often try to teach people through stories and narratives instead of giving them explicit facts and rules. But how do these stories influence us, how do they persuade us to change our attitudes? In this paper, we aim to answer these questions by providing a computational model that offers an

  13. Painful and provocative events scale and fearlessness about death among Veterans: Exploratory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindexter, Erin K; Nazem, Sarra; Forster, Jeri E

    2017-01-15

    The interpersonal theory of suicide suggests three proximal risk factors for suicide: perceived burdensomeness, thwarted belongingness, and acquired capability. Previous literature indicates that repetitive exposure to painful and provocative events is related to increased acquired capability for suicide. Despite this, research related to the assessment of painful and provocative events has been insufficient. Research has inconsistently administered the Painful and Provocative Events Scale (PPES; a painful and provocative events assessment), and no study has examined the factor structure of the English PPES. This study explored the factor structure of the PPES and the relation between factors and fearlessness about death. The sample was a cross-sectional, self-report study comprised of 119 Veterans (Mage = 46.5, SD = 13.5). Findings from an exploratory factor analysis indicated a four-factor solution for the PPES; however, no factor from the PPES significantly related to fearlessness about death (measured by the Acquired Capability for Suicide Scale - Fearlessness About Death Scale; all p >.21). Cross-sectional, small Veteran sample. Findings suggest that the PPES lacks the psychometric properties necessary to reliably investigate painful and provocative factors. Consequently, this measure may not reliably capture and explain how painful and provocative events relate to fearlessness about death, which is a barrier to improving suicide risk assessment and prediction. Recommendations for the construction of a new PPES are offered. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. The effects of a provocation on aggression for three types of alcohol users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, J J; Randolph, D L

    1982-04-01

    Investigated the effects of a provocation on aggression for three types of alcohol users. The Alcohol Use Inventory was used to select 30 light-moderate and 30 moderate drinkers. Thirty abstainers were selected as a control group. Half of each group was assigned randomly to one of two treatments, a provocation or a no-provocation. After treatment, each S completed the Adjective Rating Form (ARF) verbal aggression scales and the Multiple Affect Adjective Checklist (MAACL). The results of this study indicated that, for both instruments, the provocation elicited significantly more feelings of hostility and verbal aggression than the no-provocation. However, there were no significant level effects, nor was there a significant interaction between level of drinking and presence of a provocation. The failure to find significant level effects was attributed to the abstainers' scores. With the abstainer category excluded from the analysis, additional findings resulted in significant level effects for the MAACL hostility scales, but not for the ARF verbal aggression scales. It was recommended that future studies investigate risk factors of abstinence and eliminate the abstainer category as a control.

  15. Designing a story database for use in automatic story generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oinonen, K.M.; Theune, Mariet; Nijholt, Antinus; Uijlings, J.R.R.; Harper, R.; Rauterberg, M; Combetto, M.

    In this paper we propose a model for the representation of stories in a story database. The use of such a database will enable computational story generation systems to learn from previous stories and associated user feedback, in order to create believable stories with dramatic plots that invoke an

  16. Four Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hark-Weber, Amara G., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Teaching artists often find themselves working in schools and communities that are new to them, whether these are situations close to home or farther afield. This issue of Four Questions highlights teaching artists who travel extensively as part of their teaching and artistic practices and bring their expertise, energy, and creativity to…

  17. Thousand Questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    (perhaps as an expanded Turing test) on its listeners. These questions are extracted in real-time from Twitter with the keyword search of the ‘?’ symbol to create a spatio-temporal experience. The computerized voice the audience hears is a collective one, an entanglement of humans and non...

  18. Fragmented Work Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humle, Didde Maria; Reff Pedersen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    stories. We argue that meaning by story making is not always created by coherence and causality; meaning is created by different types of fragmentation: discontinuities, tensions and editing. The objective of this article is to develop and advance antenarrative practice analysis of work stories......Following a strand of narrative studies pointing to the living conditions of storytelling and the micro-level implications of working within fragmented narrative perspectives, this article contributes to narrative research on work stories by focusing on how meaning is created from fragmented...... by exploring how different types of fragmentation create meanings. This is done by studying the work stories of job and personnel consultants and by drawing on the results of a narrative, ethnographic study of a consultancy. The analysis demonstrates how work stories are social practices negotiated, retold...

  19. Does God Make It Real? Children's Belief in Religious Stories from the Judeo-Christian Tradition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaden, Victoria Cox; Woolley, Jacqueline D.

    2011-01-01

    Four- to 6-year-old children (N = 131) heard religious or nonreligious stories and were questioned about their belief in the reality of the story characters and events. Children had low to moderate levels of belief in the characters and events. Children in the religious story condition had higher levels of belief in the reality of the characters…

  20. The story of mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Mankiewicz, Richard

    2000-01-01

    Questioning how mathematics has evolved over the centuries and for what reasons; how human endeavour and changes in the way we live have been dependent on mathematics, this book tells the story of the impact this intellectual activity has had across cultures and civilizations. It shows how, far from being just the obsession of an elite group of philosophers, priests and scientists, mathematics has in some shape or other entered every area of human activity. The mysterious tally sticks of prehistoric peoples and the terrestial maps used for trade, exploration and warfare; the perennial fascination with the motions of heavenly bodies and changing perspectives on the art and science of vision; all are testament to a mathematics at the heart of history. The path of this changing discipline is marked by a wealth of images, from medieval manuscripts to the unsettling art of Dali or Duchamp, from the austere beauty of Babylonian clay tablets to the delicate complexity of computer-generated images. The text encompass...

  1. Evaluation of a provocative dyspnea severity score in acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbouEzzeddine, Omar F; Lala, Anuradha; Khazanie, Prateeti P; Shah, Ravi; Ho, Jennifer E; Chen, Horng H; Pang, Peter S; McNulty, Steven E; Anstrom, Kevin J; Hernandez, Adrian F; Redfield, Margaret M

    2016-02-01

    The acute heart failure (AHF) Syndromes International Working Group proposed that dyspnea be assessed under standardized, incrementally provocative maneuvers and called for studies to assess the feasibility of this approach. We sought to assess the feasibility and statistical characteristics of a novel provocative dyspnea severity score (pDS) versus the traditional dyspnea visual analog scale (DVAS) in an AHF trial. At enrollment, 24, 48 and 72hours, 230 ROSE-AHF patients completed a DVAS. Dyspnea was then assessed with 5-point Likert dyspnea scales administered during 4 stages (A: upright-with O2, B: upright-without O2, C: supine-without O2 and D: exercise-without O2). Patients with moderate or less dyspnea were eligible for the next stage. At enrollment, oxygen withdrawal and supine provocation were highly feasible (≥97%), provoking more severe dyspnea (≥1 Likert point) in 24% and 42% of eligible patients, respectively. Exercise provocation had low feasibility with 38% of eligible patients unable to exercise due to factors other than dyspnea. A pDS was constructed from Likert scales during the 3 feasible assessment conditions (A-C). Relative to DVAS, the distribution of the pDS was more skewed with a high "ceiling effect" at enrollment (23%) limiting sensitivity to change. Change in pDS was not related to decongestion or 60-day outcomes. Although oxygen withdrawal and supine provocation are feasible and elicit more severe dyspnea, exercise provocation had unacceptable feasibility in this AHF cohort. The statistical characteristics of a pDS based on feasible provocation measures do not support its potential as a robust dyspnea assessment tool in AHF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Provocation of symmetry/ordering symptoms in Anorexia nervosa: a functional neuroimaging study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Suda

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa (AN, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD, and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD are often co-morbid; however, the aetiology of such co-morbidity has not been well investigated. This study examined brain activation in women with AN and in healthy control (HC women during the provocation of symmetry/ordering-related anxiety. During provocation, patients with AN showed more anxiety compared to HCs, which was correlated with the severity of symmetry/ordering symptoms. Activation in the right parietal lobe and right prefrontal cortex (rPFC in response to provocation was reduced in the AN group compared with the HC group. The reduced right parietal activation observed in the AN group is consistent with parietal lobe involvement in visuospatial cognition and with studies of OCD reporting an association between structural abnormalities in this region and the severity of 'ordering' symptoms. Reduced rPFC activation in response to symmetry/ordering provocation has similarities with some, but not all, data collected from patients with AN who were exposed to images of food and bodies. Furthermore, the combination of data from the AN and HC groups showed that rPFC activation during symptom provocation was inversely correlated with the severity of symmetry/ordering symptoms. These data suggest that individuals with AN have a diminished ability to cognitively deal with illness-associated symptoms of provocation. Furthermore, our data also suggest that symptom provocation can progressively overload attempts by the rPFC to exert cognitive control. These findings are discussed in the context of the current neurobiological models of AN.

  3. Karuk Stories #2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Ruth, Ed.; And Others

    Three illustrated stories from the Karuk Indians of northwestern California are told in free English translation and in Karuk with literal English translation. English and Karuk Unifon alphabet charts are provided. Stories tell of seasonal migration of the mockingbird and the swamp robin, coyote's quest for the sun and how he determined the sun's…

  4. StoryTrek

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khaled, Rilla; Barr, Pippin; Greenspan, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Narrative is an important aspect of persuasion, but persua- sive technologies often use narrative in its most traditional, linear form. We present StoryTrek, a prototype system which creates narratives based on a reader’s location and movements in the real world. StoryTrek yields a number of unique...

  5. Constructing Digital Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajder, Sara; Bull, Glen; Albaugh, Susan

    2005-01-01

    A digital story consists of a series of still images combined with a narrated soundtrack to tell a story. This document contains a sequence of seven steps for digital storytelling based on a two-year project in Curry School's Center for Technology and Teacher Education at the University of Virginia. The strategies outlined offer a starting point…

  6. Everybody Has a Story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The book bears witness of Young peoples lived lives across Europe, Russia and Japan. It contains stories about love, loss of love and loss of loved ones, about dreams of future lives and wonders of lives as such. And it tells stories about bullying, mental illness and simple strives just to be able...

  7. Posterior pelvic pain provocation test is negative in patients with lumbar herniated discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutke, Annelie; Hansson, Eva Roos; Zetherström, Gunilla; Ostgaard, Hans Christian

    2009-07-01

    The classification of pelvic girdle pain can only be reached after lumbar causes have been excluded by a clinical examination. During clinical examination, the posterior pelvic pain provocation test is a well-established method for verifying pelvic girdle pain. However, a criticism of pelvic pain provocation tests is that they may have an effect on lumbar structures, thus yielding false-positive results. The posterior pelvic pain provocation test was performed with four groups of patients: patients with computed tomography-verified disc herniations (1) on the waiting list for surgery (14 women; 9 men); (2) 6 weeks after disc surgery (18 women, 12 men); (3) pregnant women seeking care for pelvic girdle pain (n = 25); and (4) women with persistent pelvic girdle pain after delivery (n = 32). The sensitivity of the posterior pelvic pain provocation test was 0.88 and the specificity was 0.89. The positive predictive value was 0.89 and the negative predictive value was 0.87. Analysis of only women showed similar results. In our study, the posterior pelvic pain provocation test was negative in patients with a well-defined lumbar diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation, both before and after disc surgery. Our results are an important step toward the more accurate classification of lumbopelvic pain.

  8. Systemic provocation in doxycycline induced fixed drug eruption: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anik Murwaningsih Rosmarini Estri Sih Hananti Niken Indrastuti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Fixed drug eruption (FDE is recurrent lesions that upon repeated uptake of causative drug, always appears at the same skin and mucosal site. Determination of causal relationship in drug allergy is very important. In this case report, cases of doxycycline-induced FDE was reported. The subject of the research was a 29-year-old male, referred by dermatologist, with history of reccurent FDE. Physical examination revealed an oval well demarcated patch hyperpigmentation. Patch test was perfomed on previous involved and uninvolved site. The result of the patch test was irrelevant. Retesting patch test gave similar result. Systemic provocation test or drug provocation test (DPT  with doxcycline were done with suspected drug under ambulatory survelance and gave positive result. In this case, the DPT succeeded to identify doxycycline as the causal agent of FDE. The work-up of a suspected drug hypersensitivity includes a detailed clinical history, physical examination, skin tests, and provocation tests. The DPT is recommended to confirm drug’s hypersensitivity reactions. Systemic provocation test is considered as the gold standard for diagnosing FDE. Keywords:   fixed drug eruption - doxycycline - causal relationship - patch test - systemic provocation test

  9. COMMUNICATIVE PROVOCATION AS A STRATEGY OF DESTRUCTIVE BEHAVIOUR IN EVERY-DAY CONFLICT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkova Olga Sergeevna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is concentrated on the issue of systematization and classification of strategies and tactics of individual's verbal behavior in a number of typical situations associated with disharmonious communication. Its scientific originality is defined by the necessity to present the provocation phenomenon as a category of communicative linguistics and linguistic pragmatics. The use of discourse analysis and descriptive pragmatic interpretation of real communication forms have enabled the revelation of various patterns of destructive verbal behavior that could provoke a communicative conflict. Communicative provocation is described as a strategy of destructive behavior aimed at dragging a communication partner into a conflict interaction or creating conditions for its occurrence. The provocation strategy is implemented in disharmonious interactions by means of individual or complex communication tactics including not only the aggressive ones: indignation, reproach, deliberate false informing, exaggerated demonstration of emotions, but also such tolerant tactics as praise, advice, apology, assurances, admiration, persuasion, etc. Two forms of communicative provocation are represented in the article. A direct provocation presupposes personal involvement of a provocateur in the conflict interaction while an indirect one allows its initiator stay aside from the open confrontation. In the latter case the provocateur stimulates and demonstrates the parties' conflict of interests, which leads to the communication harmony disruption.

  10. Peran Media Relations terhadap Keberhasilan Program Provocative Proactive di Pt Media Televisi Indonesia (Metro Tv

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Sanjaya

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to determine whether the Provocative Proactive (PP program on Metro TV proactive is known by Indonesian people, to explain how the media selection strategy for Provocative Proactive program is, and to explain the program on Metro TV can be written and known by the press or reporters (external PR. The method used was descriptive qualitative approach to analyze the existing problems by presentation of information from the data collected through the company's internal analysis of the results of in-depth interviews and field observations regarding activities in the company. The results showed that duties and functions of public relations are as a motor for better co-operation with external and internal parties relating to Provocative Proactive program. The PR and Promotion Departments were turned out to help the success of the PP program, in addition to various roles and hardworks of the Producer and the creative team. Based on the observations, the role of Metro TV’s PR and Promotion Departments in conducting media relations through cooperation with the media both print and electronic media in an effort to have Provocative Proactive widely known by the public is through cooperation with various mass media, implementation of mass media selection strategies, and introducing Provocative Proactive Program broadly.  

  11. Stories on the go

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karen Hvidtfeldt

    2014-01-01

    The article focuses on 1001 Stories of Denmark: an internet site and a mobile app that collects and displays stories and visual material connected to places all over Denmark. This site offers a “social media-like” communication frame with various levels of participation. But in reality, 1001...... stories of Denmark is mainly a one-to-many dissemination of expert knowledge, and actual user participation is limited. However, the site does host user-generated material, e.g. a number of amateurish videos and stories that often do not follow the guidelines, but in some cases construct willful...... and affective narratives. I argue that these videos and stories demonstrate the potential of mobile and digital cultural heritage sites; however, it requires strategic initiatives and long-term engagement from museums and cultural institutions to create and maintain the level of the dialogue and participation....

  12. Are You Insulting Me? Exposure to Alcohol Primes Increases Aggression Following Ambiguous Provocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, William C; Vasquez, Eduardo A; Bartholow, Bruce D; Grosvenor, Marianne; Truong, Ana

    2014-08-01

    Considerable research has shown that alcohol consumption can increase aggression and produce extremes in other social behaviors. Although most theories posit that such effects are caused by pharmacological impairment of cognitive processes, recent research indicates that exposure to alcohol-related constructs, in the absence of consumption, can produce similar effects. Here we tested the hypothesis that alcohol priming is most likely to affect aggression in the context of ambiguous provocation. Experiment 1 showed that exposure to alcohol primes increased aggressive retaliation but only when an initial provocation was ambiguous; unambiguous provocation elicited highly aggressive responses regardless of prime exposure. Experiment 2 showed that alcohol prime exposure effects are relatively short-lived and that perceptions of the provocateur's hostility mediated effects of prime exposure on aggression. These findings suggest modification and extension of existing models of alcohol-induced aggression. © 2014 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  13. Are You Insulting Me? Exposure to Alcohol Primes Increases Aggression Following Ambiguous Provocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, William C.; Vasquez, Eduardo A.; Bartholow, Bruce D.; Grosvenor, Marianne; Truong, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Considerable research has shown that alcohol consumption can increase aggression and produce extremes in other social behaviors. Although most theories posit that such effects are caused by pharmacological impairment of cognitive processes, recent research indicates that exposure to alcohol-related constructs, in the absence of consumption, can produce similar effects. Here we tested the hypothesis that alcohol priming is most likely to affect aggression in the context of ambiguous provocation. Experiment 1 showed that exposure to alcohol primes increased aggressive retaliation but only when an initial provocation was ambiguous; unambiguous provocation elicited highly aggressive responses regardless of prime exposure. Experiment 2 showed that alcohol prime exposure effects are relatively short-lived and that perceptions of the provocateur's hostility mediated effects of prime exposure on aggression. These findings suggest modification and extension of existing models of alcohol-induced aggression. PMID:24854477

  14. Men with high serotonin 1B receptor binding respond to provocations with heightened amygdala reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Cunha-Bang, Sofi; Fisher, Patrick M; Hjordt, Liv V

    2018-01-01

    Serotonin signalling influences amygdala reactivity to threat-related emotional facial expressions in healthy adults, but in vivo serotonin signalling has never been investigated in the context of provocative stimuli in aggressive individuals. The aim of this study was to evaluate associations...... (LV1B) modelling shared correlation between 5-HT1BR binding across multiple brain regions (neocortex, anterior and posterior cingulate cortex, raphe, amygdala, hippocampus and striatum). We tested whether the LV1B was associated with amygdala, striatal and prefrontal reactivity to provocations......, adjusting for age, injected mass and group. Across participants, LV1B was statistically significantly positively associated with amygdala (p = 0.01) but not with striatal (p = 0.2) or prefrontal reactivity to provocations (p = 0.3). These findings provide novel evidence that 5-HT1BR levels are linked...

  15. Dynamic Changes in Heart Rate Variability and Nasal Airflow Resistance during Nasal Allergen Provocation Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiina M. Seppänen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic rhinitis is a major chronic respiratory disease and an immunoneuronal disorder. We aimed at providing further knowledge on the function of the neural system in nasal allergic reaction. Here, a method to assess simultaneously the nasal airflow resistance and the underlying function of autonomic nervous system (ANS is presented and used during the nasal provocation of allergic and nonallergic subjects. Continuous nasal airflow resistance and spectral heart rate variability parameters show in detail the timing and intensity differences in subjects’ reactions. After the provocation, the nasal airflow resistance of allergic subjects showed a positive trend, whereas LF/HF (Low Frequency/High Frequency ratio and LF power showed a negative trend. This could imply a gradual sympathetic withdrawal in allergic subjects after the allergen provocation. The groups differed significantly by these physiological descriptors. The proposed method opens entirely new opportunities to research accurately concomitant changes in nasal breathing function and ANS.

  16. Peak nasal inspiratory flow as outcome for provocation studies in allergen exposure chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boelke, Georg; Berger, Uwe; Bergmann, Karl-Christian

    2017-01-01

    parameters are preferred. Despite its practicability, the objective parameter peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF) has been rarely used for allergy trials in the setting of allergen exposure chambers. This study aims to evaluate PNIF as an outcome parameter for provocation studies in AECs. METHODS...... during a challenge using a portable PNIF meter. RESULTS: 86 subjects participated in 203 challenges, altogether. House dust mite provocations caused the greatest reduction in PNIF values, followed by grass pollen and birch pollen. Provocations with every allergen or pollen concentration led...... to a significant decrease (p flow, height and weight, and inverse correlations between PNIF and total nasal symptom score, nasal congestion score and visual analog scale of overall subjective...

  17. Thematic irony in the story of Susanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dichk M. Kanonge

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is commonly held that irony features significantly in Susanna. This seemingly plausible hypothesis, however, has not yet been supported by compelling evidence resulting from a systematic analysis of Susanna. This study attempts to fill this gap by investigating the main ironic expressions, words and incidents featuring in Susanna. The approach followed consists of uncovering expressions of irony embedded in the story by paying attention to ironic use of metaphor, ironic use of wordplay, ironic use of rhetorical questions, ironic understatements (e.g. litotes, ironic exaggeration (e.g. hyperbole, ironic use of social conventions and traditions and ironic attribution. It is the contention of this study that Susanna is a thematically ironic story. The use of reversed social conventions is the most powerful and the most abundant expression of irony in the story. This dominant derisive technique is possibly aimed at addressing the irrelevance as well as the abuse of Jewish social conventions in the Second Temple period.

  18. When do Stories Work?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelman, Andrew; Basbøll, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Storytelling has long been recognized as central to human cognition and communication. Here we explore a more active role of stories in social science research, not merely to illustrate concepts but also to develop new ideas and evaluate hypotheses, for example, in deciding that a research method...... is effective. We see stories as central to engagement with the development and evaluation of theories, and we argue that for a story to be useful in this way, it should be anomalous (representing aspects of life that are not well explained by existing models) and immutable (with details that are well...

  19. The Disarming Seduction of Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Pat C., II

    2001-01-01

    Contends that essays are the proper rhetorical domain of stories, the place where stories most naturally belong when they are being used for the development and enlargement of ideas. Notes that stories are so powerful and distracting that when used together to make a familiar story, they can divert attention away from the essay's idea. Concludes…

  20. Measuring Goodness of Story Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Karen; Coelho, Carl; Mozeiko, Jennifer; Grafman, Jordan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article was to evaluate a new measure of story narrative performance: story completeness. It was hypothesized that by combining organizational (story grammar) and completeness measures, story "goodness" could be quantified. Method: Discourse samples from 46 typically developing adults were compared with those from 24…

  1. Telling My Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresser, Sylvia

    1998-01-01

    Experiential education provides a safe environment for the sharing of personal stories that promote understanding of diversity and commonalities. Describes the Play for Peace program to promote understanding by facilitating the play and sharing of children of conflicting cultures. (SAS)

  2. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... List of Registries Personal Stories For Parents and Children For Health Care Providers For Researchers and Trial ... with a speech therapist to overcome this communication disorder heard in speeches such as this one he ...

  3. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More » Search Health Topics Quick ... Clinical Research Trials and You The Basics Finding a Clinical Trial List of Registries Personal Stories For ...

  4. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the News Researcher Story: Stuttering In a 2010 movie, The King’s Speech, many learned for the first ... and Answers about NIDCD Stuttering Research The Long Road to Discovery: Stuttering Genes Turn Up in the ...

  5. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Personal Stories For Parents and Children For Health Care Providers For Researchers and Trial Sites Educational Resources ... can. The genetic methods for all sorts of medical genetic disorders have been refined over the past ...

  6. Digital story telling in social justice nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Raeann G

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore and evaluate how digital stories integrated into public health nursing education can teach social justice concepts essential for nurse leadership. Four digital stories were selected and incorporated into a public health nursing course. Students were asked to reflect on these stories. A retrospective qualitative analysis was completed on the student narrative reflections and analyzed for themes. A total of 108 narrative reflections of public health nursing students were included from 2015 to 2016. Themes were identified based on analysis and include-Encountering Vulnerability, Questioning Systems and Choosing Moral Courage. Digital stories offer an innovative medium to convey the importance of story, advance social justice as an essential practice of nursing, and create opportunities that addresses social justice in nursing and in developing nursing leaders. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. [Allergy diagnosis in patients with bronchial asthma (bronchial provocation test, skin test and RAST) (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, X; Fruhmann, G; von Liebe, V

    1978-12-15

    87 patients with bronchial asthma underwent skin test, RAST and measurment of airway resistance before and after inhalation of control solution as well as at least 10 times after each of one to four bronchial provocations (making up a total of 171 tests) with extracts of house dust, house dust mite, animal dander, mould spores and pollen in increasing concentrations. An actual clinical significance of the skin test reactions was found in 60% of all cases and of the RAST results in 66% of all cases. The overall agreement between skin test results and RAST results was 61%. The correlations between the different tests depended on the degree of hypersensitivity, on the tested allergen and on whether the results of skin test and RAST, respectively, were positive or negative. There existed a good correlation between the results of all three test methods and case history only for pollen allergens and animal dander. Noticeably often negative RAST results with house dust and mould spores, as well as positive skin tests with house dust mite and mould spores could not be confirmed by the provocation test. Important indications for a bronchial provocation test in asthmatics are doubtful case history, doubtful skin test or RAST results with the problem-allergens house dust, house dust mite and mould spores; the bronchial provocation test is especially commendable when drastic or cumbersome therapeutic measures (immunotherapy, change of home, change of job) are to follow or if late asthmatic reactions are expected.

  8. Measured Effects of Provocation and Emotional Mastery Techniques in Fostering Emotional Intelligence among Nigerian Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunyemi, Ajibola Olusoga

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: This study investigated the effects of provocation and emotional mastery programmes at fostering emotional intelligence of Nigerian adolescents. The study also aimed to establish whether gender will moderate the effects of the two techniques on emotional intelligence skills of adolescents. Method: The study employed a…

  9. Social provocation modulates decision making and feedback processing: Examining the trajectory of development in adolescent participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah L. Pincham

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, research is turning to the ways in which social context impacts decision making and feedback processing in adolescents. The current study recorded electroencephalography to examine the trajectory of development across adolescence, with a focus on how social context impacts cognition and behaviour. To that end, younger (10–12 years and older (14–16 years adolescents played a modified Taylor Aggression Paradigm against two virtual opponents: a low-provoker and a high-provoker. During the task's decision phase (where participants select punishment for their opponent, we examined two event-related potentials: the N2 and the late positive potential (LPP. During the outcome phase (where participants experience win or loss feedback, we measured the feedback related negativity (FRN. Although N2 amplitudes did not vary with provocation, LPP amplitudes were enhanced under high provocation for the younger group, suggesting that emotional reactivity during the decision phase was heightened for early adolescents. During the outcome phase, the FRN was reduced following win outcomes under high provocation for both groups, suggesting that a highly provocative social opponent may influence the reward response. Collectively, the data argue that social context is an important factor modulating neural responses in adolescent behavioural and brain development.

  10. Violent offenders respond to provocations with high amygdala and striatal reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Cunha-Bang, Sofi; Fisher, Patrick M.; Hjordt, Liv Vadskjær

    2017-01-01

    monetary rewards. The violent offenders behaved more aggressively than controls (aggression frequency 150 us 84, P = 0.03) and showed significantly higher brain reactivity to provocations within the amygdala and striatum, as well as reduced amygdala-prefrontal and striato-prefrontal connectivity. Amygdala...

  11. Laryngeal effects of nasal allergen provocation in singers with allergic rhinitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verguts, Monique M. L.; Eggermont, Anita; Decoster, Wivine; de Jong, Felix I. C. R. S.; Hellings, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    In spite of our recent insight into nasobronchial interaction mechanisms in allergic airway disease, the association between allergic rhinitis and voice complaints remains obscure. To evaluate the effects of nasal allergen provocation and seasonal grass pollen exposure on subjective and objective

  12. Violent offenders respond to provocations with high amygdala and striatal reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Cunha-Bang, Sofi; Fisher, Patrick M; Hjordt, Liv Vadskjær

    2017-01-01

    magnetic resonance imaging point-subtraction aggression paradigm in 44 men, of whom 18 were incarcerated violent offenders and 26 were control non-offenders. We measured brain activation following provocations (monetary subtractions), while the subjects had the possibility to behave aggressively or pursue...

  13. Clinical tube weaning supported by hunger provocation in fully-tube-fed children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartdorff, Caroline M; Kneepkens, C M Frank; Stok-Akerboom, Anita M; van Dijk-Lokkart, Elisabeth M; Engels, Michelle A H; Kindermann, Angelika

    2015-04-01

    Children with congenital malformations, mental retardation, and complex early medical history frequently have feeding problems. Although tube feeding is effective in providing the necessary energy and nutrients, it decreases the child's motivation to eat and may lead to oral aversion. In this study, we sought to confirm our previous results, showing that a multidisciplinary clinical hunger provocation program may lead to quick resumption of oral feeding. In a crossover study, 22 children of 9 to 24 months of age who were fully dependent on tube feeding were randomly assigned to one of two groups: group A, intervention group (2-week multidisciplinary clinical hunger provocation program); and group B, control group (4-week outpatient treatment by the same multidisciplinary team). Patients failing one treatment were reassigned to the other treatment group. Primary outcome measures were at least 75% orally fed at the conclusion of the intervention and fully orally fed and gaining weight 6 months after the intervention. In group A, 9/11 patients were successfully weaned from tube feeding (2 failures: 1 developed ulcerative colitis, 1 drop-out). In group B, only 1 patient was weaned successfully; 10/11 were reassigned to the clinical hunger provocation program, all being weaned successfully. Six months after the intervention, 1 patient had to resume tube feeding. In total, in the control group, 1/11 (9%) was weaned successfully as compared with 18/21 (86%) in the hunger provocation group (P hunger provocation is an effective short-term intervention for weaning young children from tube feeding.

  14. The Story Format and the Cycle of Meaning Construction for Physics Education in Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Cristina; Corni, Federico

    The story format may provide a stimulating environment, including tasks, questions or problems, giving space for scientific experimentation and group discussions guided by the teacher. In this contribution we present the main advantages of the story format for physics teaching and learning and the features that a story should have in order to implement what we call the "cycle of meaning construction", which constitutes an attempt to integrate the attributes already accredited to the story format in science teaching with pedagogical, methodological and didactic approaches. Lastly, a story will be presented in brief as a possible example for primary school physics education.

  15. Direct oral provocation tests in non-immediate mild cutaneous reactions related to beta-lactam antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezir, Emine; Dibek Misirlioglu, Emine; Civelek, Ersoy; Capanoglu, Murat; Guvenir, Hakan; Ginis, Tayfur; Toyran, Muge; Kocabas, Can N

    2016-02-01

    Skin testing has a limited role in the diagnosis of non-immediate beta-lactam hypersensitivity in children. The aim of this study was to report the results of oral provocation tests performed without skin tests in children with non-immediate mild cutaneous reactions without systemic symptoms caused by beta-lactam antibiotics. Oral provocation tests with suspected antibiotics were performed to patients with non-immediate mild cutaneous reactions without systemic symptoms caused by beta-lactam antibiotics. Skin tests were not performed before provocation tests. A total of five doses were administered with half-an-hour intervals in increasing doses. Provocation was continued for 5 days. A total of 119 patients with a median age of 4.3 (IQR: 2-7.5) years, of whom 58% were males, were included in the study. Amoxicillin-clavulanic acid was the most frequently responsible agent in 87 (73.1%) patients, and most common type of rash was maculopapular in 74 (62.2%) patients. Four patients (3.4%) had an urticarial reaction during the provocation test. We did not experience any severe reactions during oral provocation test without previous skin tests performed to children with non-immediate mild cutaneous reactions without systemic symptoms. Omitting skin tests before oral provocation test in this group of children can help decreasing the burden of allergy clinics and alleviating the discomfort of children. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Analyzing stories told by an elementary science teacher in a fifth-grade classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotman, Alicia M.

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to analyze and interpret the stories told by one teacher, Ms. M, in a fifth grade science classroom. In this study, stories are defined as teacher utterances that are used in first person or third person narrative view, and are related to an experience that occurred outside the classroom. This research answers questions concerning: (a) what types of stories Ms. M tells during science instruction; (b) when these stories occur in the classroom; and (c) what pedagogical functions do these stories serve in the classroom. Utilizing theories on the social construction of knowledge and narrative cognition, stories told may be formed through multiple paths that follow no logical expression to make sense of the context and to connect to its audience. Therefore, this study provides insight into how Ms. M made sense of science with her stories and the ways in which they worked with her students. The results illlustrated that the types of stories found with Ms. M were autobiographical, biographical, fictional, or based on current events. These stories occurred when the teacher initiated the discussion by bringing forth a definition, a question or reinforcing a concept. However, the stories were triggered by students to a greater degree with their questions, concerns, observations or their own stories or explanations. Finally, all pedagogical functions of stories were identified with Ms. M's stories: promotion of engagement or attention of students, building community, clarifying concepts or vocabulary, activation and building of background knowledge and disclosure of teacher role and voice. Ms. M stories exemplified her sense-making of science and connections to her own life that her students were eventually able to make for themselves.

  17. VQABQ: Visual Question Answering by Basic Questions

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jia-Hong

    2017-03-19

    Taking an image and question as the input of our method, it can output the text-based answer of the query question about the given image, so called Visual Question Answering (VQA). There are two main modules in our algorithm. Given a natural language question about an image, the first module takes the question as input and then outputs the basic questions of the main given question. The second module takes the main question, image and these basic questions as input and then outputs the text-based answer of the main question. We formulate the basic questions generation problem as a LASSO optimization problem, and also propose a criterion about how to exploit these basic questions to help answer main question. Our method is evaluated on the challenging VQA dataset and yields state-of-the-art accuracy, 60.34% in open-ended task.

  18. [The story of Appendix].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukáš, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is the most frequent acute abdominal emergency. Appendicitis may have been recorded by Aretaeus the Cappadocean in 30 AD. A description of the appendix was provided by the anatomist Berengario de Carpi in 1521. The first appendicectomy was performed by Claudius Amyand in 1735. Turning point in the story of appendix was public lecture of pathologist-physician Reginald Fitz in 1886. Fitz used the term "appendicitis". The area of maximal tenderness with appendicitis was immortalised by Charles McBurney. In the story of appendicitis many names figure, for example Niels Thorkild Rovsing, Jacob Moritz Blumberg, Otto Lanz, Frederic Treves and other. Kurt Semm introduced laparoscopic appendicectomy in 1988.

  19. Effect of a new selective H1 receptor antagonist (levocabastine) in a nasal and conjunctival provocation test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pécoud, A; Zuber, P; Kolly, M

    1987-01-01

    Levocabastine is a new selective H1 receptor antagonist. The effect of the drug administered locally was compared to placebo in a quantified nasal and conjunctival provocation test with allergens performed in patients allergic to grass pollen. In the nasal provocation test, levocabastine was able to increase the 'reaction threshold' (dose of allergen necessary to trigger allergic symptoms) in 9 out of 12 patients; the drug inhibited rhinorrhea and sneezing, but not nasal obstruction. In the conjunctival provocation test, the 'reaction threshold' clearly increased in 10 out of 11 patients. The local administration of levocabastine might be useful in allergic rhinitis and conjunctivitis.

  20. 'All stories bring hope because stories bring awareness': students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using narrative inquiry, and specifically Bamberg's (2006) 'small stories' approach, the research team analysed 30 stories students constructed in four focus group conversations at the end of the project. In these stories, most of Nussbaum's (2010) capabilities were evident. We found that, in the collective sharing of their ...

  1. Consapevolezza pragmatica e comprensione delle storie nei bambini di eta prescolare (Pragmatic Awareness and Story Comprehension in Preschool-age Children).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsolini, Margherita; Pontecorvo, Clotilde

    1989-01-01

    The results of a study are presented in which 40 preschool children were given 5 tasks including a test of story comprehension (listening and responding to questions) and a test of pragmatic awareness divided into 4 parts (listening to a story, retelling it, judging what was strange in it, and explaining the consequences of the "strange" event).…

  2. Question analysis for biomedical question answering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sable, Carl; Lee, Minsuk; Zhu, Hai Ran; Yu, Hong

    2005-01-01

    We are developing a biomedical question answering system. This paper describes our system's architecture and our question analysis component. Specifically, we have explored the use of various supervised machine learning approaches to filter out unanswerable questions based on physicians' annotations.

  3. Boron-Mediated Plant Somatic Embryogenesis: A Provocative Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay K. Pandey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A central question in plant regeneration biology concerns the primary driving forces invoking the acquisition of somatic embryogenesis. Recently, the role of micronutrient boron (B in the initiation and perpetuation of embryogenesis has drawn considerable attention within the scientific community. This interest may be due in part to the bewildering observation that the system-wide induction of embryogenic potential significantly varied in response to a minimal to optimal supply of B (minimal ≤ 0.1 mM, optimal = 0.1 mM. At the cellular level, certain channel proteins and cell wall-related proteins important for the induction of embryogenesis have been shown to be transcriptionally upregulated in response to minimal B supply suggesting the vital role of B in the induction of embryogenesis. At the molecular level, minimal to no B supply increased the endogenous level of auxin, which subsequently influenced the auxin-inducible somatic embryogenesis receptor kinases, suggesting the role of B in the induction of embryogenesis. Also, minimal B concentration may “turn on” other genetic and/or cellular transfactors reported earlier to be essential for cell-restructuring and induction of embryogenesis. In this paper, both the direct and indirect roles of B in the induction of somatic embryogenesis are highlighted and suggested for future validation.

  4. Resistance Stories of African-Brazilian Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stela Nazareth Meneghel

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study consists of an intervention using narrative workshops as a device to stimulate the empowerment of women. Ten women, victims of gender violence, took part in a workshop developed by non-governmental organization for African-Brazilian women Maria Mulher, which gives assistance to women living in Vila Cruzeiro do Sul, in the city of Porto Alegre. The main objective of the research was to debate questions related to gender and violence, making use of stories and histories related to the feminine, specifically African-Brazilian stories. Five meetings were held, where the women told and were told stories, took part in group discussions, experiences and rituals. The workshops gave those women a space where they could tell and hear stories, take part in the rituals of the orixás [African-Brazilian deities] of the black culture and tell their personal histories using those experiences. This intervention was an attempt at invoking different subjective experiences, and made it possible to empower the women who took part in the research, contributing for the rescue of the individual and collective memory of this group.

  5. Storytelling? Everyone Has a Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    School librarians can assume an important role in preserving and perpetuating the oral tradition. The same skills and techniques when telling a personal story can be transmitted to telling various kinds of stories from literature and history. For school librarians to be successful storytellers, they need to select stories that they like and enjoy…

  6. [The effects of media violence on aggression: focus on the role of anger evoked by provocation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukawa, S; Endo, K; Yoshida, F

    2001-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of anger evoked by earlier provocation on cognition, emotion, and aggressive behavior after being exposed to media violence. Sixty male undergraduates participated in the experiment. Before viewing one of three videos (either highly violent, violent with high entertainment, or nonviolent), half of the subjects were provoked by a confederate posing as another subject. Subjects' heart rates and eyeblink rates were recorded while viewing the video. After viewing the video, subjects described their thoughts that occurred while watching the video and rated their affective reactions toward the video. Finally, subjects' aggressive behavior toward the confederate was measured. Results of covariance structure analysis suggested that (a) anger evoked by provocation and high level of violence in videos additively elicited negative cognition and affect, which further facilitated aggressive behavior, and (b) high level of entertainment in videos elicited positive cognition and affect, which alleviated negative cognition and affect.

  7. Experimental panic provocation in healthy man—a translational role in anti-panic drug development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Experimental neurochemical provocation of panic attacks in susceptible human subjects has considerably expanded our knowledge of the pathophysiology and psychopharmacology of panic disorder. Some panicogens also elicit short-lived panic-like states in healthy man. This offers the opportunity to assess the anti-panic action of drugs in proof-of-concept studies. However, from current data it is still unclear whether experimental panic in healthy man is a valid translational model. Most such studies in healthy volunteers have been performed using a cholecystokinin tetrapeptide (CCK-4) challenge. While CCK-4 panic was blocked by alprazolam pretreatment, escitalopram showed negative results in healthy man. Preliminary findings on novel investigational drugs and a few problematic results will be reviewed. Small sample sizes in many panic provocation studies, lack of dose-response aspects, and still-insufficient knowledge about the biological underpinning of experimental and spontaneous panic limit the interpretation of existing findings and should inspire further research. PMID:22275853

  8. Hostile attribution biases for relationally provocative situations and event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godleski, Stephanie A; Ostrov, Jamie M; Houston, Rebecca J; Schlienz, Nicolas J

    2010-04-01

    This exploratory study investigates how hostile attribution biases for relationally provocative situations may be related to neurocognitive processing using the P300 event-related potential. Participants were 112 (45 women) emerging adults enrolled in a large, public university in upstate New York. Participants completed self-report measures on relational aggression and hostile attribution biases and performed an auditory perseveration task to elicit the P300. It was found that hostile attribution biases for relational provocation situations was associated with a larger P300 amplitude above and beyond the role of hostile attribution biases for instrumental situations, relational aggression, and gender. Larger P300 amplitude is interpreted to reflect greater allocation of cognitive resources or enhanced "attending" to salient stimuli. Implications for methodological approaches to studying aggression and hostile attribution biases and for theory are discussed, as well as implications for the fields of developmental psychology and psychopathology. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Bronchial provocation testing does not detect exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsted, Emil Schwarz; Hull, James H; Sverrild, Asger

    2017-01-01

    and possible asthma referred over 6 months. All subjects received comprehensive assessment including a detailed clinical evaluation; pulmonary function testing, indirect and direct bronchial provocation testing, and CLE testing. RESULTS: Out of 37 subjects, moderate or severe EILO was diagnosed in 8 subjects......INTRODUCTION: Exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO) is a key differential diagnosis for asthma in the presence of exertional respiratory symptoms. Continuous laryngoscopy during exercise (CLE), the current gold standard diagnostic test for EILO, has practical limitations. We aimed...... (22%, all female) while 5 (14%) had both asthma and EILO. There was no correlation between degree of EILO during CLE and mean decrease in forced inspiratory flow (%FIF50) obtained during neither the Methacholine (r = -0.15; p = 0.38) nor Mannitol (r = 0.04; p = 0.84) provocation tests. CONCLUSION...

  10. The Story of Iyal

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-08-24

    In this podcast, a mother tells her compelling story about a family living with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.  Created: 8/24/2009 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD).   Date Released: 8/24/2009.

  11. New Suburban Stories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dines, M.; Vermeulen, T.J.V.

    2013-01-01

    Exploring fiction, film and art from across the USA, South America, Asia, Europe and Australia, New Suburban Stories brings together new research from leading international scholars to examine cultural representations of the suburbs, home to a rapidly increasing proportion of the world's population.

  12. From Story to Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Stanley

    1986-01-01

    Presents a developmental taxonomy which promotes sequencing activities to enhance the potential of matching these activities with learner needs and readiness, suggesting that the order commonly found in the classroom needs to be inverted. The proposed taxonomy (story, skill, and algorithm) involves problem-solving emphasis in the classroom. (JN)

  13. Tell a Piecewise Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Nathalie; Armstrong, Alayne

    2011-01-01

    Piecewise linear functions and story graphs are concepts usually associated with algebra, but in the authors' classroom, they found success teaching this topic in a distinctly geometrical manner. The focus of the approach was less on learning geometric concepts and more on using spatial and kinetic reasoning. It not only supports the learning of…

  14. Intercultural Collaboration Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gertsen, Martine Cardel; Søderberg, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    to elucidate intercultural collaboration processes by analyzing how each member of a dyad of interacting managers narrates the same chain of events. We show how the narratological concepts of peripeteia and anagnorisis are well suited to identifying focal points in their stories: situations where change...... it clear how they overcome most of their differences and establish common ground through mutual learning....

  15. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Trials and You The Basics Finding a Clinical Trial List of Registries Personal Stories For Parents and ... recorded speech sample. For more information about this clinical trial, see Protocol NCT00001604 on ClinicalTrials.gov , or contact ...

  16. Story of Fission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 3. Story of Fission: Unlocking Power of the Nucleus. Amit Roy. General Article Volume 21 Issue 3 March 2016 pp 247-258. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/021/03/0247-0258 ...

  17. Putting Stories in Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, Mindi

    2012-01-01

    A very successful preschool project the author did at Ohio State University's Schoenbaum Family Center combined students' interest in storytelling, drama, and multiple literacies. For this particular project, a classic children's fairy tale was used, though the project is easily adaptable for other stories, texts, content, and age levels. In this…

  18. Why Story Circle Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, George Ella

    2016-01-01

    If adult attention is screen scrambled, what about kids, whose brains are still developing? In a world where we are over stimulated and hyperlinked-in we are deprived of the kind of time with a person or experience that deepens and sustains us. Here, poet laureate George Ella Lyon writes that the story circle can be such an experience. A school…

  19. Depressive Stories for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    While stories with a depressing message are now common for teenagers, resistance to them remains where smaller children are concerned. But is this more a case of the publishers and providers concerned protecting their own particular image of childhood? This article looks at the case for books that also convey a sense of sadness to infants,…

  20. Postcolonial Entanglements: Unruling Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini-Ketchabaw, Veronica

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I use Donna Haraway's philosophy to think about postcolonial encounters between different species. I follow entangled stories of the deer/settler-child figure to trouble colonialisms and untangle the histories and trajectories that we inhabit with other species through colonial histories. I shy away from generalizations and…

  1. Beyond the Single Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Yekaterina

    2016-01-01

    Teachers of world literature have the opportunity to help students explore the more complex reality behind the stereotypes that they often see in the media. If we don't encourage students to challenge one-dimensional "single stories" that characterize an entire people--whether Muslims, Russians, Mexicans, African Americans, Chinese,…

  2. Stories of change

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sonia Navia, Carlos Narváez, Philip Oxhorn, Leonor Perilla, Luz Patricia Restrepo, Ernesto Rodríguez and Helen Thai. Healthier and more nutritious potatoes for food security in Colombia. Stories of change. Key messages. • Innovative ... content, increased resistance to late blight disease ... understanding for enhanced.

  3. Children Writing Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael

    2006-01-01

    In this book, the author reveals the creative force of children's narrative imagination and shows how this develops through childhood. He provides a new and powerful understanding of the significance of narrative for children's intellectual growth and for learning and teaching. The book explores a series of real stories written by children between…

  4. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NIH Clinical Research Trials and You NIH Clinical Research Trials and You The Basics Finding a Clinical Trial List of Registries Personal Stories For Parents and Children For Health Care Providers For Researchers and Trial Sites Educational Resources Glossary of Common Terms If You Have ...

  5. Personal Digital Video Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Henningsen, Birgitte Sølbeck; Louw, Arnt Vestergaard

    2016-01-01

    agenda focusing on video productions in combination with digital storytelling, followed by a presentation of the digital storytelling features. The paper concludes with a suggestion to initiate research in what is identified as Personal Digital Video (PDV) Stories within longitudinal settings, while...

  6. Keepers of Our Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiuk, Glen

    2010-01-01

    Storytelling is an integral part of life for Indigenous Australians. Before the arrival of Europeans and continuing after; gathered around the campfire in the evening stories were and are still shared; passed from one generation to the next. In modern times, in addition to a continuing oral traditions, another method of storytelling has risen from…

  7. Stories Under Your Feet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riesto, Svava; Støvring, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Review of the new Købmagergade design by Karres et Brandts and Polyform. The article discusses the new design, its uses and story-telling, seen in relation to the "urban space boom" in Copenhagen of the early 2000nds....

  8. Teens With Heavy Prenatal Cocaine Exposure Respond to Experimental Social Provocation with Escape Not Aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Greenwald, M.K.; Chiodo, L.M.; Hannigan, J.H.; Sokol, R.J.; Janisse, J.; Delaney-Black, V.

    2010-01-01

    Preclinical data show that, compared to no exposure, prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) has age-dependent effects on social interaction and aggression. The aim of this clinical study was to determine how heavy/persistent PCE – after controlling for other prenatal drug exposures, sex and postnatal factors – predicts behavioral sensitivity to provocation (i.e., reactive aggression) using a well-validated human laboratory model of aggression. African American teens (mean = 14.2 yrs old) with histor...

  9. North Korea’s Provocation and Escalation Calculus: Dealing with the Kim Jong-un Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    rhetoric coming from Pyongyang during the Foal Eagle/Key Resolve exercises was in many respects unprecedented. Pyongyang moved up the escalatory ladder...2014 Foal Eagle/Key Resolve exercise, there were concerns in both South Korea and the United States that North Korea would respond with provocations...of the spokesman for the KPA General Staff in response to the annual Key Resolve/ Foal Eagle exercise. The wording of the statement seemed designed to

  10. Stratifying migraine patients based on dynamic pain provocation over the upper cervical spine

    OpenAIRE

    Luedtke, Kerstin; May, Arne

    2017-01-01

    Background Migraine patients usually report a high prevalence of neck pain preceding or during the migraine attack. A recent investigation of musculoskeletal dysfunctions in migraine patients concluded that neck pain is not simply a symptom of the migraine attack but corresponds to identifiable muscle and joint alterations. Particularly pain provocation using palpation of the joints in the upper cervical spine was significantly more prevalent in patients with migraine than in headache-free pa...

  11. Telling Your Stories: Why Stories Are Important for Your Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Johanna; Larsen, Diana

    We all tell stories. The stories we share are shared to some purpose; e.g. to communicate ideals, to share knowledge, to warn, to entertain, to educate or show status. The story we tell changes depending on the context - when we tell it and who we are telling it to - and how we choose to tell it is also revealing of our values and underlying beliefs. This workshop is designed to explore the way we tell our stories, and practice telling and retelling stories through a series of collaborative story-games. Attendees will help to explore the possibilities for designing a set of storycards to help teams construct and tell stories around software projects.

  12. Can migraine aura be provoked experimentally? A systematic review of potential methods for the provocation of migraine aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindblad, Marianne; Hougaard, Anders; Amin, Faisal Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Background The nature of the migraine aura and its role in migraine pathophysiology is incompletely understood. In particular, the mechanisms underlying aura initiation and the causal relation between aura and headache are unknown. The scientific investigation of aura in patients is only possible...... if aura can be triggered. This paper reviews potential methods for the experimental provocation of migraine aura. Methods We systematically searched PubMed for studies of experimental migraine provocation, including case reports of patients with aura and reports of the occurrence of aura following...... exposure to any kind of suspected trigger. Results We identified 21 provocation studies, using 13 different prospective provocation methods, and 34 case reports. In the prospective studies, aura were reported following the administration of intravenous and sublingual glyceryl trinitrate, visual stimulation...

  13. Symptoms suggestive of dumping syndrome after provocation in patients after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzovaras, George; Papamargaritis, Dimitris; Sioka, Eleni; Zachari, Eleni; Baloyiannis, Ioannis; Zacharoulis, Dimitris; Koukoulis, George

    2012-01-01

    Dumping syndrome is a well-known complication after upper gastrointestinal (GI) surgery. There are scarce data in the literature about the incidence of dumping after bariatric operations but, certainly no relation between this syndrome and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has been attempted. We conducted a prospective clinical study in order to evaluate the potential presence, incidence and severity of Dumping syndrome after LSG. Thirty one non-diabetic morbidly obese patients (eight male, 23 female) eligible for LSG were evaluated. Median age was 38 (22-58 years) and mean body mass index (BMI) was 45.55 (± 5.37). The diagnosis of dumping syndrome was based on clinical provocation of signs and symptoms using an oral glucose challenge before and 6 weeks after the operation. The Sigstad's dumping score was estimated in order to separate dumpers from non-dumpers, and the Arts questionnaire was completed to distinguish between early and late dumping. Moreover, blood glucose levels during the oral glucose challenge were measured. No patient had symptoms of dumping after provocation preoperatively, whereas after LSG 9 patients (29%) experienced definite dumping and other 5 patients (16%) symptoms suggestive of dumping syndrome. Arts' questionnaire demonstrated that dumping occurrence after LSG was associated with early symptoms. Late hypoglycaemia occurred in one patient. A significant proportion of patients after LSG experienced dumping syndrome upon provocation. It seems that LSG should no longer be considered as a pure restrictive procedure, and it might be an option for heavy sweeters by changing their food tolerance patterns.

  14. Habitual Starvation and Provocative Behaviors: Two Potential Routes to Extreme Suicidal Behavior in Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Edward A.; Smith, April R.; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Olmsted, Marion P.; Thornton, Laura; McFarlane, Traci L.; Berrettini, Wade H.; Brandt, Harry A.; Crawford, Steve; Fichter, Manfred M.; Halmi, Katherine A.; Jacoby, Georg E.; Johnson, Craig L.; Jones, Ian; Kaplan, Allan S.; Mitchell, James E.; Nutzinger, Detlev O.; Strober, Michael; Treasure, Janet; Woodside, D. Blake; Kaye, Walter H.; Joiner, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is perhaps the most lethal mental disorder, in part due to starvation-related health problems, but especially because of high suicide rates. One potential reason for high suicide rates in AN may be that those affected face pain and provocation on many fronts, which may in turn reduce their fear of pain and thereby increase risk for death by suicide. The purpose of the following studies was to explore whether repetitive exposure to painful and destructive behaviors such as vomiting, laxative use, and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) was a mechanism that linked AN-binge-purging (ANBP) subtype, as opposed to AN-restricting subtype (ANR), to extreme suicidal behavior. Study 1 utilized a sample of 787 individuals diagnosed with one or the other subtype of AN, and structural equation modeling results supported provocative behaviors as a mechanism linking ANBP to suicidal behavior. A second, unexpected mechanism emerged linking ANR to suicidal behavior via restricting. Study 2, which used a sample of 249 AN patients, replicated these findings, including the second mechanism linking ANR to suicide attempts. Two potential routes to suicidal behavior in AN appear to have been identified: one route through repetitive experience with provocative behaviors for ANBP, and a second for exposure to pain through the starvation of restricting in ANR. PMID:20398895

  15. Compatibility of Clinical Manifestation with Skin Prick Test Result and Food Provocation Test in Food Cross Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Lubis, Azwin; Barlianto, Wisnu; Endaryanto, Anang; Harsono, Ariyanto

    2017-01-01

    Background: Subjective diagnostic test of food allergy is hugely biased, resulting in irrational diet avoidance. Additional objective tools by skin prick test following food provocation test resulting more accurate cause and prevalence on population. Purpose: To evaluate the compatibility of clinical symptoms with skin prick test and provocation test for imunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated food allergy in Dr. Soetomo Hospital Surabaya. Methods: Cross sectional observational analytic study. Patient...

  16. Susceptibility to UV-A and UV-B provocation does not correlate with disease severity of polymorphic light eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Artiena Soe; Pavel, Stan; Ling, Tsui; Winhoven, Sandra Maria; Anastasopoulou, Nikoletta; Stratigos, Alexander; Antoniou, Christina; Diepgen, Thomas; de Gruijl, Frank; Rhodes, Lesley Elisabeth

    2007-05-01

    To examine whether the ease of disease provocation by UV-A and/or UV-B radiation correlates with clinical features of polymorphic light eruption (PLE), including those indicative of disease severity. Intervention study. One hundred forty-three patients with PLE. Provocation testing with broadband UV-A and UV-B lamps. Additionally, a range of clinical characteristics of the disorder, including a 5-item PLE severity score, was assessed by questionnaire. Percentage of PLE rash induction by UV-A and UV-B provocation, differences between the skin types, and correlation between the results of provocation and a range of clinical characteristics of the disorder, including a 5-item PLE severity score. Rash provocation was seen in 78.3% of patients after UV-A and in 46.7% after UV-B exposure. Neither UV-A nor UV-B provocation showed a significant association with the total 5-item severity score. The UV-B reactivity was associated with a high score on the severity item "number of months affected per year" (P = .04), whereas UV-A responsiveness showed a tendency for association with facial involvement (P = .06). The objective assessment of UV-A or UV-B susceptibility in this large group of patients showed no significant relationship with clinical disease severity.

  17. Defense Mechanism Card Pull in TAT Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Phebe

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the question of whether different Thematic Apperception Test (TAT; Murray, 1943 ) cards are likely to prompt stories that are characterized by different defense mechanisms. This condition is known as card pull and refers to the probability that different TAT cards elicit different personality scores for the same variable. If so, the assessment of defense use would be importantly influenced by the TAT cards used in an assessment. TAT stories from 3 different community samples were examined (Ns = 91, 98, 121), using a statistical method developed by Stein et al ( 2014 ). The results indicated that different TAT cards pull for different defenses, as assessed by the Defense Mechanism Manual (DMM: Cramer, 1991b ). However, the nature of card pull was not always consistent across samples. These dissimilarities could be due to group differences, or to the presence of different TAT cards used in the test battery, indicating that card pull is importantly determined by context.

  18. Recognizing Question Entailment for Medical Question Answering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abacha, Asma Ben; Dina, Demner-Fushman

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing heterogeneity and specialization of medical texts, automated question answering is becoming more and more challenging. In this context, answering a given medical question by retrieving similar questions that are already answered by human experts seems to be a promising solution. In this paper, we propose a new approach for the detection of similar questions based on Recognizing Question Entailment (RQE). In particular, we consider Frequently Asked Question (FAQs) as a valuable and widespread source of information. Our final goal is to automatically provide an existing answer if FAQ similar to a consumer health question exists. We evaluate our approach using consumer health questions received by the National Library of Medicine and FAQs collected from NIH websites. Our first results are promising and suggest the feasibility of our approach as a valuable complement to classic question answering approaches.

  19. Teddy Bear Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo; Caldas-Coulthardt, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a semiotic analysis of a key cultural artefact, the teddy bear. After introducing the iconography of the teddy bear, it analyses different kinds of stories to show how teddy bears are endowed with meaning in everyday life: stories from children's books, reminiscenses by adults...... about their childhood teddy bears, and children's accounts of what they do with teddy bears, both written for school and told 'out of school', The chapter sees teddy bears as artefacts that provide a cultural channeling for the child's need of a transitional object and argues that the meanings of teddy...... bears have traditionally centred on interpersonal relations within the nuclear family, but have recently been institutionalized and commercialized....

  20. An (Co)Autoethnography Story about Going against the Neoliberal Didactic Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szwabowski, Oskar; Wezniejewska, Paulina

    2017-01-01

    The article is an (co)autoethnography story about a project that conducted as a teacher at the University of Szczecin in Poland. Technically, the project consisted in creating a (co)autoethnography text. The story in this article attempts to raise the question of the relationship between (co)autoethography, emancipation and resistance to the…

  1. Building our stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    . Aligned with previous TEFI conference themes, Euro TEFI 2017 focuses on strategic, inspirational and compassionately disruptive storytelling, that seek to activate change and empower engaged scholarship. Drawing inspiration from fairytales to philosopher kings, Copenhagen, Denmark, offers a unique setting...... for our first TEFI regional conference. Storytelling is a powerful way of exploring, linking and crafting values, articulating them is such a way as to instil action. This conference proceedings assembles 31research stories of sustainable, caring and ethical worldmaking in tourism....

  2. What's your story?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Herminia; Lineback, Kent

    2005-01-01

    When you're in the midst of a major career change, telling stories about your professional self can inspire others' belief in your character and in your capacity to take a leap and land on your feet. It also can help you believe in yourself. A narrative thread will give meaning to your career history; it will assure you that, in moving on to something new, you are not discarding everything you've worked so hard to accomplish. Unfortunately, the authors explain in this article, most of us fail to use the power of storytelling in pursuit of our professional goals, or we do it badly. Tales of transition are especially challenging. Not knowing how to reconcile the built-in discontinuities in our work lives, we often relay just the facts. We present ourselves as safe--and dull and unremarkable. That's not a necessary compromise. A transition story has inherent dramatic appeal. The protagonist is you, of course, and what's at stake is your career. Perhaps you've come to an event or insight that represents a point of no return. It's this kind of break with the past that will force you to discover and reveal who you really are. Discontinuity and tension are part of the experience. If these elements are missing from your career story, the tale will fall flat. With all these twists and turns, how do you demonstrate stability and earn listeners' trust? By emphasizing continuity and causality--in other words, by showing that your past is related to the present and, from that trajectory, conveying that a solid future is in sight. If you can make your story of transition cohere, you will have gone far in convincing the listener--and reassuring yourself--that the change makes sense for you and is likely to bring success.

  3. Stories as case knowledge: case knowledge as stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, K

    2001-09-01

    Every case contains a human story of illness and a medical story of disease, which together cover person management, case management, health system management and self-management. Much of that management can be learned via a thorough set of stories of typical and atypical core cases compiled by clinical teachers. Stories provide a highly flexible framework for illustrating the lessons of experience, the tips and traps for young players, and the dilemmas requiring careful judgement in the trade-offs between benefits and risks. Listening to real stories unfold is much more fun than being lectured (and better remembered). Stories illustrate 'what can happen' in a case as a guide to 'what to do'. A story begins with a real world situation with some predicament and a (causal) sequence of events or plot in which things are resolved one way or another. Patients tell their illness story; their clinician translates that into a disease story. Stories sort out what is important in such a predicament, consider the strategy and tactics of what to do, and speak about the outcomes. Each local situation provides relevance, context and circumstantial detail. Stories about case management can encapsulate practical knowledge, logical deduction, judgement and decision making, sharing with the student all the ingredients that develop expertise. Sometimes it is the plot that is important, sometimes the detail, sometimes it is the underlying message, the parable that resonates with the listener's experiences and feelings.1 Stories can also accommodate the complexity of multiple variables and the influence of other stakeholders, the uncertainties and dilemmas within the trade-offs, and the niceties of 'informed judgement'. This paper makes four points. First, clinical stories recount pointed examples of 'what happened' that expand our expertise in handling 'a case like that'. Second, cases are the unit of clinical work. Case stories expand the dimensions and details of case knowledge

  4. Question Analysis for Biomedical Question Answering

    OpenAIRE

    Sable, Carl; Lee, Minsuk; Zhu, Hai Ran; Yu, Hong

    2005-01-01

    We are developing a biomedical question answering system. This paper describes our system’s architecture and our question analysis component. Specifically, we have explored the use of various supervised machine learning approaches to filter out unanswerable questions based on physicians’ annotations.

  5. Preoperative cellulose porous beads for therapeutic embolization of meningioma: provocation test and technical considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kai, Yutaka; Morioka, Motohiro; Yano, Shigetoshi; Nakamura, Hideo; Makino, Keishi; Mizuno, Takamasa; Takeshima, Hideo; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi [Kumamoto University, Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Hamada, Jun-ichiro [Kanazawa University, Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kanazawa (Japan)

    2007-05-15

    Cellulose porous beads (CPBs) are exceptionally uniform in size and nonabsorbable and they provide highly effective tumor devascularization. The risk of cranial nerve palsy must not be overlooked when embolization with CPBs is considered in meningioma patients. We attempted to identify patients at risk of cranial nerve palsy after meningioma embolization. Prior to preoperative superselective embolization with 200 {mu}m diameter CPBs, 141 patients with meningioma underwent provocation test with lidocaine and amytal. They were divided into two groups on the basis of whether they were or were not considered eligible for embolization. We evaluated the differences between the two groups with respect to tumor anatomy, angiographic findings, and clinical presentation and recorded complications associated with the embolization of the meningioma. Of the 141 patients, 128 underwent CPB embolization (group 2); 13 were not embolized because their provocation test results were positive (group 1, n = 11) or because they showed vasospasm (n = 2). Group 1 patients had meningioma in the cavernous sinus or petroclival region. Characteristically, the feeders were of middle meningeal artery origin and exhibited a posteromedial course toward the petrous apex or cavernous sinus. In group 2 patients the middle meningeal artery was the feeder, but it lacked branches coursing posteromedially. Three of these patients experienced complications which included intratumoral hemorrhage (n = 2) and post-embolization hearing disturbance (n = 1). Patients with meningioma whose tumor-feeding arteries run posteromedially toward the petrous apex or cavernous sinus are at increased risk of post-embolization cranial nerve palsy. Appropriate protocols, including lidocaine and amytal provocation tests, may reduce the risk of complications after CPB embolization of the external carotid territory in this group of patients. (orig.)

  6. Contextual representations of negative images modulate intrusion frequency in an intrusion provocation paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krans, J; Pearson, D G; Maier, B; Moulds, M L

    2016-12-01

    To understand how memories of negative events become highly accessible in the context of trauma, we tested the hypothesis that contextual information modulates how easily intrusions can be provoked by perceptual stimuli.. Healthy participants viewed pictures depicting trauma scenes either with or without accompanying moderate (i.e. survival, recovery) or severe (i.e. fatality, permanent injury) outcome information. All participants viewed the same depictions of trauma scenes. Involuntary memories for the pictures were assessed using self-report diaries and an adapted version of the Impact of Event Scales (IES). A blurred picture perceptual priming paradigm was adapted to be used as an intrusion provocation task. The severe outcome group experienced a significantly higher frequency of intrusions on the intrusion provocation task in comparison to both moderate outcome and control (no-context) conditions. The severe outcome condition did not increase intrusions on the self-report diaries or the adapted IES. There was no effect of condition on ratings for the emotionality, self-relevance, valence, or seriousness of the trauma scenes. The analogue method should not be generalized directly to incidences of real-life trauma. It was unclear why differences in intrusion frequency were found in the provocation task only. The relative amount of individual conceptual and data-driven processing adopted by the participants was not assessed. Manipulating contextual information that determines the meaning of sensory-perceptual features for a trauma scene can modulate subsequent intrusion frequency in response to visually similar cues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Traditions Told and Broken: Stories of Family and Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, Kathleen; Fales, Melanie

    2007-01-01

    C. Maxx Stevens, Katy Stone, and Hildur Bjarnadottir create monumental sculptural paintings, installations, and textiles to impart ideas regarding domesticity and nature as well as stories of evolving family or community traditions. Questioning and breaking traditional rules of art in unique ways, their innovative and graceful use of alternative…

  8. Three Reading Comprehension Strategies: TELLS, Story Mapping, and QARs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrell, Adrian L.

    1990-01-01

    Three reading comprehension strategies are presented to assist learning-disabled students: an advance organizer technique called "TELLS Fact or Fiction" used before reading a passage, a schema-based technique called "Story Mapping" used while reading, and a postreading method of categorizing questions called…

  9. North Korea’s Choice of the Types of Provocation Against South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    System En Coree Du Nord (Paris: L’HarmaHan, 1997), 86–135. Ibid., Bong-hwa Jeong, North Korean Policy toward South Korea, 110–111. 30 Bong-hwa Jeong...consequence of behaviors (one’s own or those of one’s opponent) that cause a crisis in a stable condition. This event threatens core values of...the core process required prior to all of these studies is to verify whether there have been noteworthy similarities in the provocations within

  10. Evaluation of Perfusion and Thermal Parameters of Skin Tissue Using Cold Provocation and Thermographic Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strąkowska Maria

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of the perfusion coefficient and thermal parameters of skin tissue using dynamic thermography is presented in this paper. A novel approach based on cold provocation and thermal modelling of skin tissue is presented. The measurement was performed on a person’s forearm using a special cooling device equipped with the Peltier module. The proposed method first cools the skin, and then measures the changes of its temperature matching the measurement results with a heat transfer model to estimate the skin perfusion and other thermal parameters. In order to assess correctness of the proposed approach, the uncertainty analysis was performed.

  11. Reflections on the journey: six short stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haynie Sharon L

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One of the goals of the 2011 International Year of Chemistry is to celebrate the contributions of women to science. A question that has been frequently asked in this regard is... Why is it necessary to highlight women in the "age of equality"? The reasons are varied but the facts are that many women scientists worked in obscurity throughout the 19th and even well into the 20th century, sometimes publishing anonymously to be heard. This celebration of Women in Science is one way to recognize both the resiliency and passion of these women. As part of this celebration, Chemistry Central Journal's Thematic Series of "Women in Chemistry" includes this article describing the path several women took as they pursued chemistry careers spanning the latter part of the 20th century and into the early 21st century. Sharon Haynie, Nancy Jones, Cheryl Martin, Paula Olsiewski, Mary Roberts and Amber Hinkle each have unique story of their personal journey from childhood to adulthood. As you read these stories, listen generously, and feel free to share your own stories, comments and thoughts.

  12. Personal and Parents’ Life Stories in Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Majse; Kirkegaard Thomsen, Dorthe; Bøye, Rikke

    . Thirty patients with BPD and thirty matched control participants described and answered questions about their personal life stories and their parents’ life stories and completed measures of identity disturbance, alexithymia, empathy, and emotional intelligence. Compared to the control group, patients...... with BPD described both their personal and their parents’ life stories more negatively and with fewer themes of agency and communion fulfillment. Patients and controls reasoned about their personal life stories in equally complex ways, but patients displayed less complexity, when reasoning about...... stories as less complex, more negative, with less agency and communion fulfillment themes. Patients differed from controls on identity disturbance, alexithymia, and empathy and overall these measures showed moderate relations with characteristics of personal and parents’ life stories, suggesting that life...

  13. Does God make it real? Children's belief in religious stories from the Judeo-Christian tradition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaden, Victoria Cox; Woolley, Jacqueline D

    2011-01-01

    Four- to 6-year-old children (N = 131) heard religious or nonreligious stories and were questioned about their belief in the reality of the story characters and events. Children had low to moderate levels of belief in the characters and events. Children in the religious story condition had higher levels of belief in the reality of the characters and events than did children in the nonreligious condition; this relation strengthened with age. Children who used God as an explanation for the events showed higher levels of belief in the factuality of those events. Story familiarity and family religiosity also affected children's responses. The authors conclude that God's involvement in a story influences children's belief in the reality of the characters and events in that story. © 2011 The Authors. Child Development © 2011 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  14. Stories in the Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gary

    2017-01-01

    To some degree, comics have always been used to convert data into stories, from ancient Egyptian heiroglyphics to crude biology diagrams in grade-school textbooks. By their very nature, comics communicate through a variety of visualization techniques. Benjamin Bach, who along with his coauthors Nathalie Henry Riche, Sheelagh Carpendale, and Hanspeter Pfister created this issue's Art on Graphics special contribution about the emerging genre of data comics, here talks about their attempts to leverage the massive untapped potential for data-driven comics to explain multiple threads of simultaneous data.

  15. Humidifier disinfectants, unfinished stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeyong Choi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Once released into the air, humidifier disinfectants became tiny nano-size particles, and resulted in chemical bronchoalveolitis. Families had lost their most beloved members, and even some of them became broken. Based on an estimate of two million potential victims who had experienced adverse effects from the use of humidifier disinfectants, we can say that what we have observed was only the tip of the iceberg. Problems of entire airways, as well as other systemic effects, should be examined, as we know these nano-size particles can irritate cell membranes and migrate into systemic circulation. The story of humidifier disinfectant is not finished yet.

  16. Can migraine aura be provoked experimentally? A systematic review of potential methods for the provocation of migraine aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblad, Marianne; Hougaard, Anders; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Ashina, Messoud

    2017-01-01

    Background The nature of the migraine aura and its role in migraine pathophysiology is incompletely understood. In particular, the mechanisms underlying aura initiation and the causal relation between aura and headache are unknown. The scientific investigation of aura in patients is only possible if aura can be triggered. This paper reviews potential methods for the experimental provocation of migraine aura. Methods We systematically searched PubMed for studies of experimental migraine provocation, including case reports of patients with aura and reports of the occurrence of aura following exposure to any kind of suspected trigger. Results We identified 21 provocation studies, using 13 different prospective provocation methods, and 34 case reports. In the prospective studies, aura were reported following the administration of intravenous and sublingual glyceryl trinitrate, visual stimulation, physical activity, calcitonin gene-related peptide infusion, chocolate ingestion, and the intravenous injection of insulin. In addition, carotid artery puncture has consistently been reported as a trigger of aura. Conclusions No safe and efficient method for aura provocation exists at present, but several approaches could prove useful for this purpose.

  17. Aggression in Children with Conduct Problems and Callous-Unemotional Traits: Social Information Processing and Response to Peer Provocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helseth, Sarah A; Waschbusch, Daniel A; King, Sara; Willoughby, Michael T

    2015-11-01

    Callous/unemotional traits (CU) moderate children's conduct problems (CP) in numerous domains, including social functioning. The present study examined whether CU traits also moderate the aggressiveness of children's social information processing (SIP) and responses to varying intensities of peer provocation. Sixty elementary school-age children (46 males) were grouped into those without CP or CU (controls, n = 32), those with CP but not CU (CP-only; n = 14), and those with both CP and CU (CPCU, n = 14). Participants completed a task that measured two aspects of SIP (response generation and hostile attribution bias) and a computerized reaction time task (CRTT) that measured behavior, affect, and communication before and after provocation under instrumental and hostile aggressive conditions. Children with CPCU generated more aggressive responses than controls on measures of SIP. On the CRTT, all children exhibited reactive aggression following high provocation, but only children with CPCU exhibited proactive aggression, and reactive aggression following low provocation; no differences in affect were found. In a series of exploratory analyses, CPCU children communicated antisocially, while CP-only communicated prosocially. Finally, children with CPCU did not seem to hold a grudge following the final instance of provocation, instead gradually returning to baseline like their non-CU peers. These distinct social cognitive and behavioral profiles hint at different etiologies of CP and CPCU, underscoring the variability of aggression in these populations.

  18. Telling better stories: strengthening the story in story and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp-Benedict, Eric

    2012-12-01

    information available at that time, based on statements that appear in the SRES itself. The CIB method is a technique for constructing internally consistent qualitative scenarios. Global-scale scenario exercises, in particular climate scenarios, typically include both qualitative (narrative) and quantitative (model) elements. As noted by Schweizer and Kriegler, the dominant method for such studies, which Alcamo (2001, 2008) formalized and named the 'story and simulation' (SAS) approach, relies at least in part on quantitative modeling to ensure consistency. Schweizer and Kriegler rightly criticize the idea that models alone can ensure consistency of a scenario narrative. By itself, this critique is not new. Indeed, if asked, both Alcamo and Raskin et al (Raskin et al 2005), whom Schweizer and Kriegler (2012) cite, would probably agree with them; both sources emphasize the need for qualitative storylines that go beyond what models can provide. However, Schweizer and Kriegler correctly point out that these sources provide little or no guidance to those responsible for the narratives beyond a dialog with the model outputs. The CIB method addresses this problem, and Schweizer and Kriegler's application of the method shows that even the best narrative-writing teams can benefit from this guidance. While the paper of Schweizer and Kriegler makes a compelling argument for using CIB in global scenarios, it should be used in combination with other methods. A scenario exercise has several aims, of which consistency is one. Another important goal is diversity: given a set of internally consistent scenarios, a diverse set covers the space of possibilities, and thereby helps users of the scenarios avoid underestimating or overestimating the potential for change in one or another key factor (e.g., see (Carlsen 2009)). From this point of view, the SRES authors could legitimately respond to Schweizer and Kriegler's finding that the SRES scenarios excluded interesting variants on coal

  19. Artifacts as Stories: Understanding Families, Digital Literacies, and Storied Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis Ellison, Tisha

    2016-01-01

    This column focuses on the interactions during family and group conversation circles that not only helped participants talk about personal, emotional, and social issues in their digital stories but also helped them make sense of artifacts and the meanings that stories carry in shared spaces and practices. This work adds to the bourgeoning…

  20. Mechanism of story elements in the Forud story of Shahname

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hojjatollah Hemmati

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Which by their nature narrative structure elements , motifs and narrative action takes place . Author In light of these characteristics and structural elements such as plot , point of view , conflict, crisis , climax and relief , follow the narrative structure down. In this study is to investigate the structure of the story landed in Shahnameh . For this purpose, the definition of story and structure delivers And a review of such issues to investigate this story. And to provide this evidence to conclude that the text of traditions and story And a coherent and systematic plan and that it regulates the relations of cause and effect . And shows the text with the help of fictional elements From a stable position starts And stable position and different ends.     Abstract Which by their nature narrative structure elements , motifs and narrative action takes place . Author In light of these characteristics and structural elements such as plot , point of view , conflict, crisis , climax and relief , follow the narrative structure down. In this study is to investigate the structure of the story landed in Shahnameh . For this purpose, the definition of story and structure delivers And a review of such issues to investigate this story. And to provide this evidence to conclude that the text of traditions and story And a coherent and systematic plan and that it regulates the relations of cause and effect . And shows the text with the help of fictional elements From a stable position starts And stable position and different ends.

  1. 'All stories bring hope because stories bring awareness': students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hennie

    2014-11-10

    Nov 10, 2014 ... Using narrative inquiry, and specifically Bamberg's. (2006) 'small stories' ... on the link between personal experience/narrative and larger social issues that affect students' practice in South. African schools, we hope to ..... ports on findings from a deductive analysis of 30 small stories told in the focus group ...

  2. An International Inquiry: Stories of Poverty--Poverty Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuffetelli Parker, Darlene; Craig, Cheryl J.

    2017-01-01

    This article features an international inquiry of two high-poverty urban schools, one Canadian and one American. The article examines poverty in terms of "small stories" that educators and students live and tell, often on the edges, unheard and unaccounted for in grand narratives. It also expands the story constellations approach to…

  3. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Stuttering Resources The Stuttering Foundation National Stuttering Association American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Stuttering (a fact sheet from NIDCD) Questions and ...

  4. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue Queue __count__/__total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe ... This vignette shares the story of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates ...

  5. Telling Feminist Stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Hemmings

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article identifies and analyses the dominant stories that academics tell about the development of Western second wave feminist theory. Through an examination of recent production of interdisciplinary feminist and cultural theory journals, I suggest that despite a rhetorical insistence on multiple feminisms, Western feminist trajectories emerge as startlingly singular. In particular, I am critical of an insistent narrative that sees the development of feminist thought as a relentless march of progress or loss. This dominant approach oversimplifies the complex history of Western feminisms, fixes writers and perspectives within a particular decade, and repeatedly (and erroneously positions poststructuralist feminists as ‘the first’ to challenge the category ‘woman’ as the subject and object of feminist knowledge. Rather than provide a corrective history of Western feminist theory, the article interrogates the techniques through which this dominant story is secured, despite the fact that we (feminist theorists know better. My focus, therefore, is on citation patterns, discursive framings and some of their textual, theoretical and political effects. As an alternative, I suggest a realignment of key theorists purported to provide a critical break in feminist theory with their feminist citational traces, to force a concomitant re-imagining of our historical legacy and our place within it.

  6. Assessment of heat provocation tests on the human gingiva: the effect of periodontal disease and smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, E; Lohinai, Z; Demeter, A; Mikecs, B; Tóth, Z; Vág, János

    2015-06-01

    Periodontal inflammation is associated with morphological changes in the blood vessels which may influence the regulation of gingival blood flow (GBF). Our aim was to adapt the heat provocation test to the human gingiva to assess vascular reactivity in periodontal inflammation. GBF was recorded by Laser Doppler Flowmetry before and after heat provocation in healthy volunteers (n = 50). Heat was generated either by warm saline or a halogen lamp. The latter method was also utilized for a heat test in non-smoking and smoking patients with periodontal inflammation. The circulatory parameters were correlated to the inflammatory marker, i.e. gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) production measured by Periotron. Local application of heat caused a rapid, significant and transient increase in GBF regardless of the method used. The increase in the speed and not in the concentration of moving blood cells was responsible for increased GBF. Higher GCF values were correlated with increased peak flow, flux pulse amplitude and faster restoration of GBF after the test in non-smokers, but not in smokers. The heat test could be a valuable tool to check the vascular reactivity of gingival vessels. Moderate periodontal inflammation may facilitate gingival vascular responsiveness which can be suppressed by smoking.

  7. Scopolamine provocation-based pharmacological MRI model for testing procognitive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedűs, Nikolett; Laszy, Judit; Gyertyán, István; Kocsis, Pál; Gajári, Dávid; Dávid, Szabolcs; Deli, Levente; Pozsgay, Zsófia; Tihanyi, Károly

    2015-04-01

    There is a huge unmet need to understand and treat pathological cognitive impairment. The development of disease modifying cognitive enhancers is hindered by the lack of correct pathomechanism and suitable animal models. Most animal models to study cognition and pathology do not fulfil either the predictive validity, face validity or construct validity criteria, and also outcome measures greatly differ from those of human trials. Fortunately, some pharmacological agents such as scopolamine evoke similar effects on cognition and cerebral circulation in rodents and humans and functional MRI enables us to compare cognitive agents directly in different species. In this paper we report the validation of a scopolamine based rodent pharmacological MRI provocation model. The effects of deemed procognitive agents (donepezil, vinpocetine, piracetam, alpha 7 selective cholinergic compounds EVP-6124, PNU-120596) were compared on the blood-oxygen-level dependent responses and also linked to rodent cognitive models. These drugs revealed significant effect on scopolamine induced blood-oxygen-level dependent change except for piracetam. In the water labyrinth test only PNU-120596 did not show a significant effect. This provocational model is suitable for testing procognitive compounds. These functional MR imaging experiments can be paralleled with human studies, which may help reduce the number of false cognitive clinical trials. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Experimental provocation of 'ice-cream headache' by ice cubes and ice water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mages, Stephan; Hensel, Ole; Zierz, Antonia Maria; Kraya, Torsten; Zierz, Stephan

    2017-04-01

    Background There are various studies on experimentally provoked 'ice-cream headache' or 'headache attributed to ingestion or inhalation of a cold stimulus' (HICS) using different provocation protocols. The aim of this study was to compare two provocation protocols. Methods Ice cubes pressed to the palate and fast ingestion of ice water were used to provoke HICS and clinical features were compared. Results The ice-water stimulus provoked HICS significantly more often than the ice-cube stimulus (9/77 vs. 39/77). Ice-water-provoked HICS had a significantly shorter latency (median 15 s, range 4-97 s vs. median 68 s, range 27-96 s). There was no difference in pain localisation. Character after ice-cube stimulation was predominantly described as pressing and after ice-water stimulation as stabbing. A second HICS followed in 10/39 (26%) of the headaches provoked by ice water. Lacrimation occurred significantly more often in volunteers with than in those without HICS. Discussion HICS provoked by ice water was more frequent, had a shorter latency, different pain character and higher pain intensity than HICS provoked by ice cubes. The finding of two subsequent HICS attacks in the same volunteers supports the notion that two types of HICS exist. Lacrimation during HICS indicates involvement of the trigeminal-autonomic reflex.

  9. The evaluation of drug provocation tests in pediatric allergy clinic: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezir, Emine; Erkocoglu, Mustafa; Civelek, Ersoy; Kaya, Aysenur; Azkur, Dilek; Akan, Aysegül; Ozcan, Celal; Toyran, Muge; Ginis, Tayfur; Misirlioglu, Emine Dibek; Kocabas, Can Naci

    2014-01-01

    Drug provocation tests (DPTs) are gold standard to diagnose drug allergy. Our goal was to evaluate the results and safety of diagnostic methods including DPTs during childhood. Between January 2010 and February 2013 DPTs were performed and evaluated, prospectively, in children who attended our pediatric allergy clinic with a suspected drug hypersensitivity reaction. One hundred ninety-eight suspected drug reactions in 175 patients (88 boys and 87 girls) were evaluated. The median age of the subjects at the time of the suspected drug-induced hypersensitivity reaction and at the time of the study was 56 (interquartile range [IQR] = 24-120 months) months and 76 (IQR = 35-149 months) months, respectively. Suspected drugs were beta-lactam antibiotics in 108 cases (54.5%), non-beta-lactam antibiotics in 22 cases (11.1%), and nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs in 52 cases (26.3%). The history was compatible with immediate-type reactions in 69 cases (34.8%). Skin-prick tests were not positive in any of the cases. Intradermal tests were positive in three cases (4%). DPTs were positive in 13 (6.8%) of 191 provocation cases, which were performed with culprit drugs. Our results suggest that a positive clinical history is not enough to make a diagnosis of drug allergy, which highlights the significance of undertaking further diagnostic evaluation especially for DPTs.

  10. Pacifists and Revenge-Seekers in Response to Unambiguous Peer Provocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kristina L; Asher, Steven R

    2018-01-19

    In order to better understand why some children retaliate when they feel provoked and others do not, the present study identified "pacifistically-oriented" children who made negative interpretations in response to unambiguous provocations, yet did not endorse revenge goals, and compared them to "revenge-seeking" children who also made negative interpretations but did endorse revenge goals. Groups were identified based on seventh graders' (N = 367; 54.77% male; 22.89% racial/ethnic minority) responses to hypothetical situations in which a peer excluded and insulted them. Comparing these groups revealed that Pacifists endorsed relationship-maintaining goals and emotion regulation goals more highly than Revenge-Seekers. Revenge-Seekers reported more anger and endorsed beliefs about negative reciprocity and aggression being legitimate more highly than Pacifists. Additionally, Revenge-Seekers were more disrespect sensitive than were Pacifists, based on a measure of vigilance for signs of disrespect and expectations that others would disrespect them. Together these findings point to social-cognitive and emotion-related processes that may inhibit revenge-seeking in unambiguous provocation situations, even when children interpret the peer's behavior quite negatively.

  11. Amygdala hyperactivation during symptom provocation in obsessive–compulsive disorder and its modulation by distraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Simon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders have been linked to a hyperactivated cortico-amygdalar circuitry. Recent findings highlight the amygdala's role in mediating elevated anxiety in obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD. However, modulation of amygdala hyperactivation by attentional distraction – an effective emotion regulation strategy in healthy individuals – has not yet been examined. While undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging twenty-one unmedicated OCD patients and 21 controls performed an evaluation and a distraction task during symptom provocation with individually tailored OCD-relevant pictures. To test the specificity of responses, additional aversive and neutral stimuli were included. Significant group-by-picture type interactions were observed within fronto–striato–limbic circuits including the amygdala. In these regions patients showed increased BOLD responses during processing of OCD triggers relative to healthy controls. Amygdala hyperactivation was present across OCD symptom dimensions indicating that it represents a common neural correlate. During distraction, we observed dampening of patients' amygdala hyperactivity to OCD-relevant stimuli. Augmented amygdala involvement in patients during symptom provocation, present across OCD symptom dimensions, might constitute a correlate of fear expression in OCD linking it to other anxiety disorders. Attentional distraction seemed to dampen emotional processing of disorder-relevant stimuli via amygdala downregulation. The clinical impact of this strategy to manage anxiety in OCD should be further elucidated.

  12. A questioning environment for scaffolding learners' questioning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Access to the textual world of academia requires that learners are familiar with the critical open-ended questioning stance demanded by textuality. Anecdotal evidence suggests that learners registered for the Bachelor of Education Honours degree are unable to generate appropriate questions to interrogate academic text, ...

  13. Ask Questions to Encourage Questions Asked

    Science.gov (United States)

    belcastro, sarah-marie

    2017-01-01

    We delineate some types of structured practice (modeling, requests, feedback, and space-making) that help students learn to pose appropriate questions and to initiate exploration of those questions. Developing skills requires practice, so we suggest ways to embed structured practice into existing class sessions. Including structured practice is…

  14. Social Studies and Effective Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Ian M.; McGuire, Margit E.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the use of storytelling and interactive story building as a technique for effective social studies teaching. Describes Storyline, a structured approach to teaching and learning, in which the students and teacher create a story together. Emphasizes the broad coverage of social studies content and skills that is achieved with the method.…

  15. Iconic Prosody in Story Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Marcus; Clark, Nathaniel; Falck, Marlene Johansson

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that people iconically modulate their prosody corresponding with the meaning of their utterance (e.g., Shintel et al., 2006). This article reports findings from a story reading task that expands the investigation of iconic prosody to abstract meanings in addition to concrete ones. Participants read stories that…

  16. Magical Landscapes: Two Love Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John Noell

    2002-01-01

    Introduces two books about magic, one a collection of essays "Ex Libris: Confessions of a Common Reader," which describes the author's inherited lifelong passion for books and reading; and the other a novel, "Mangos, Bananas and Coconuts: A Cuban Love Story," which tells a story of love and magic that seems both real and…

  17. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hearing Association Stuttering (a fact sheet from NIDCD) Questions and Answers about NIDCD Stuttering Research The Long Road to Discovery: Stuttering Genes Turn Up in the Most Unexpected Places This page last reviewed on March 23, ... Information Frequently Asked Questions Web Policies and Notices Freedom of Information Act ...

  18. Determining Citizens’ Opinions About Stories in the News Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Wandhöfer

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe a method whereby a governmental policy maker can discover citizens’ reaction to news stories. This is particularly relevant in the political world, where governments’ policy statements are reported by the news media and discussed by citizens. The work here addresses two main questions: whereabouts are citizens discussing a news story, and what are they saying? Our strategy to answer the first question is to find news articles pertaining to the policy statements, then perform internet searches for references to the news articles’ headlines and URLs. We have created a software tool that schedules repeating Google searches for the news articles and collects the results in a database, enabling the user to aggregate and analyse them to produce ranked tables of sites that reference the news articles. Using data mining techniques we can analyse data so that resultant ranking reflects an overall aggregate score, taking into account multiple datasets, and this shows the most relevant places on the internet where the story is discussed. To answer the second question, we introduce the WeGov toolbox as a tool for analysing citizens’ comments and behaviour pertaining to news stories.  We first use the tool for identifying social network discussions, using different strategies for Facebook and Twitter. We apply different analysis components to analyse the data to distil the essence of the social network users’ comments, to determine influential users and identify important comments.

  19. Question analysis for Indonesian comparative question

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saelan, A.; Purwarianti, A.; Widyantoro, D. H.

    2017-01-01

    Information seeking is one of human needs today. Comparing things using search engine surely take more times than search only one thing. In this paper, we analyzed comparative questions for comparative question answering system. Comparative question is a question that comparing two or more entities. We grouped comparative questions into 5 types: selection between mentioned entities, selection between unmentioned entities, selection between any entity, comparison, and yes or no question. Then we extracted 4 types of information from comparative questions: entity, aspect, comparison, and constraint. We built classifiers for classification task and information extraction task. Features used for classification task are bag of words, whether for information extraction, we used lexical, 2 previous and following words lexical, and previous label as features. We tried 2 scenarios: classification first and extraction first. For classification first, we used classification result as a feature for extraction. Otherwise, for extraction first, we used extraction result as features for classification. We found that the result would be better if we do extraction first before classification. For the extraction task, classification using SMO gave the best result (88.78%), while for classification, it is better to use naïve bayes (82.35%).

  20. A Little Solar Story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Bashir

    1997-01-01

    Experiences from use of solar cookers in India and many other places are different. But the story which is based on a field study in Gujarat state of India shows that during last twenty years there has been a tendency that many families do not continue to use their solar cookers. The study shows...... that the tendency is related with the lack of compatibility of this new technology (solar cooker) with the everyday real-life conditions of the families. In principle the findings are supported by an evaluation report on a solar cooker project in Burkina Faso. The conclusion is that the user should be involved...... in the solar cooker technological development process....

  1. Story and Real Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P. Waxler

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Why should we be concerned about the fate of literature as we move from a book culture to a screen culture in the digital age? Not primarily because we are losing our sense of story, but because we are losing our sense of the central importance of linguistic narrative. There is a difference. The technologies creating the digital revolution seem to devalue language and increasingly to do away with boundaries, celebrating instead speed and boundless exhilaration. The visual trumps the linguistic, the image and the screen trump the word and the book. As a result, we no longer seem to engage deeply with others or ourselves. We are beginning to move, in other words, from “a reading brain” to “a digital brain,” from a brain capable of deep reading and deep thinking to a brain increasingly addled by spectacle and surface sensation. We are losing our standing as “linguistic beings.”

  2. The Singapore research story

    CERN Document Server

    Teck Seng, Low; Thampuran, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Ever since Singapore became independent in 1965, its leaders have invested tremendous efforts and resources to develop its economy in order to create jobs for its people and to support national development. This book describes the challenging journey of Singapore in developing a knowledge-based economy driven by research and innovation and the roles played by research institutes, universities, research manpower and appropriate collaboration between research institutes and industry. The book traces the foundations of Singapore's research story from the time of its independence in 1965 to the present day. Through interviews with the key players and research into the records, the establishment of the key institutes and the roles of a global cast of researchers, scientists and engineers in setting up the R&D infrastructure are outlined. The impact that the concerted efforts of the last 25 years to build up a credible and world-class research capability in Singapore is discussed, as are the tremendous challeng...

  3. What stories unfold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Vorre

    2017-01-01

    of service-dominant logic and customer-dominant logic. Findings The research elucidated how value is both socially created and deconstructed through stories. Moreover, narrative analysis revealed how residents’ perceptions of services are deeply embedded in context and time. In this way, the study...... sector in Denmark, the research explored how residents perceive and co-create value in a long-term service relationship. The point of departure is an understanding of value co-creation as a phenomenological construct determined by the beneficiary, and the research is based primarily on the perspectives....... Originality/value Prevailing streams in service research on value co-creation argue for more studies and empirically grounded examples of value co-creation processes, especially those based in the customer sphere. This paper contributes to such an enhanced understanding of the process of value co...

  4. StoryTrek: Experiencing Stories in the Real World

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khaled, Rilla; Barr, Pippin James; Greenspan, Brian

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce StoryTrek, a locative hypernarrative system developed to generate stories based on a reader’s location and specific movements in the real world. This creates, for readers, an interplay between navigation, narrative, and agency, as well as between the fictional and real...... world experience. In early tests we observed the emergence of a number of recurrent themes in participants’ experiences which are characteristic of the StoryTrek system, but which also help us to understand locative media storytelling affordances more generally. In this paper we present the system...

  5. Stories of Power, Powerful Stories: The Drunken Priest in Donegal

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Lawrence J.

    1990-01-01

    This story is one of twenty-three “priest stories” collected in one notebook by folklorist Sean Ó’hEochaidh from his natal community of Teelin in Donegal, Ireland. The notebook containing these Gaelic tales is dated 1945, but there are also dozens of other priest stories scattered through the more than seventy volumes of oral lore recorded by Ó’hEochaidh in his nearly half century (beginning in the early 1930s) of folklore collecting in the area. The stories relate the exploits of local cur...

  6. Life Stories and Interculturality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toldi Éva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines two short stories: Teréz Müller’s Igaz történet [A True Story] and József Bálint senior’s Imádkozzál és dolgozzál [Pray and Work]. The argument explores the way the texts reflect on shifts in power in the Hungarian region of Vojvodina, and the way power structures define the relationship between majority and minority in a society that undergoes constant and radical changes. Contemporary historical events of the twentieth century, changes, faultlines, traumatic life events and identity shifts emerge as the contexts for these narratives of the daily experiences of a Jewish merchant family and a farmer family respectively. Thus, the two texts analysed are representative works rooted in two fundamentally different social backgrounds. The discourse about the I is always also about the other; the construction of identity is already in itself a dialogic, intercultural act, which makes it an ideal topic for the exploration of the changes and shifts in one’s own and the other’s cultural identity. Translational processes of transmission are also required for the narration of traumatic experiences. Teréz Müller was the grandmother of the Serbian writer Aleksandar Tišma. Her book is not primarily a document of their relationship; however, it does throw light on diverse background events of the writer’s life and oeuvre. Comparing the experiences of identity in the autobiographical novel of Aleksandar Tišma and the recollections of his grandmother reveals geocultural characteristics of their intercultural life experiences.

  7. Survei: Question Classification Untuk Question Answering System

    OpenAIRE

    Abdiansah, Abdiansah; Sari, Anny K

    2015-01-01

    Question Classification (QC) merupakan salahsatu dari tiga komponen utama yang ada dalam QuestionAnswering System (QAS). QC berfungsi untuk mereduksi ruangpencarian sehingga dapat meningkatkan kecepatan dan akurasiQAS. Secara umum kajian tentang QC dapat dibagi menjadi duabidang yaitu memperdalam analisis fitur yang meliputi analisisleksikal, sintaksis dan semantik serta improvisasi algoritmaklasifikasi. Artikel ini berisi laporan survei tentang algoritmaklasifikasi untuk QC berdasarkan tiga...

  8. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... stuttering is explained by genes and not by environment. So, the question is, can we use this ... that underlie really any clearly inherited disorder. The problem with stuttering is that it is not very ...

  9. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NIH Common Fund NIH and the American Recovery Act News & Events News Releases Digital Media Kits Media ... Questions Web Policies and Notices Freedom of Information Act No Fear Act Office of Inspector General USA. ...

  10. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library Resources Research ... Who We Are What We Do Jobs at NIH Visitor Information Frequently Asked Questions Contact ...

  11. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Library Resources Research Resources Clinical Research Resources Safety, Regulation and Guidance More » Quick Links PubMed Stem Cell ... the family clustering of stuttering is explained by genes and not by environment. So, the question is, ...

  12. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the family clustering of stuttering is explained by genes and not by environment. So, the question is, ... have given us the power to identify the genes that underlie really any clearly inherited disorder. The ...

  13. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About NIH Who We Are What We Do Jobs at NIH Visitor Information Frequently Asked Questions Contact ... 039;s Speech" In some ways the most important aspect of humans as a group is their ...

  14. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... stuttering is explained by genes and not by environment. So, the question is, can we use this ... variety of ways. We work closely with stuttering organizations. For example, each year I go to the ...

  15. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... And then, finally, we also work with speech therapy organizations in the United States that have provided ... Stuttering Foundation National Stuttering Association American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Stuttering (a fact sheet from NIDCD) Questions ...

  16. Power and Provocativeness: The Effects of Subtle Changes in Clothing on Perceptions of Working Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Regan A R; Punke, Elizabeth; Brickner, Michaella; Badalamenti, Vincenzio

    2017-05-19

    The current study investigates the effects of subtle changes in professional women's dress on women's perceptions of power and competence. We replicate and extend Howlett, Pine, Cahill, Orakcioglu, and Fletcher's (2015) research showing women in provocative clothing are rated as less competent. We used a larger sample, tested a second independent variable, and fine-tuned the design for higher face validity. Participants (N = 198, 170 women and 29 men) from a Midwestern university in the USA rated four photographs of professionally dressed women whose blouses varied in the number of buttons left undone and whether they wore a camisole. We found main effects of buttons (undone/done) and camisoles (on/off) for participants perceptions of intelligence, competence, powerfulness, and on a global rating score. Results also showed significant interaction effects between buttons and camisoles on ratings of powerfulness. The results have many implications for how women dress professionally.

  17. Validation of the Novaco Anger Scale-Provocation Inventory (Danish) With Nonclinical, Clinical, and Offender Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeller, Stine Bjerrum; Novaco, Raymond; Heinola-Nielsen, Vivian

    2015-01-01

    . Because the Novaco Anger Scale and Provocation Inventory (NAS-PI) has been extensively validated with different clinical populations and lends itself to clinical case formulation, it was selected for translation and evaluation in the present multistudy project. Psychometric properties of the NAS-PI were...... investigated with samples of 477 nonclinical, 250 clinical, 167 male prisoner, and 64 male forensic participants. Anger prevalence and its relationship with other anger measures, anxiety/depression, and aggression were examined. NAS-PI was found to have high reliability, concurrent validity, and discriminant...... aggressive behavior in hospital. Regression analyses showed that higher scores on NAS increase the risk of having acted aggressively in the past and of acting aggressively in the future....

  18. Posterior midline activation during symptom provocation in acute stress disorder: An fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Christopher Cwik

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Functional imaging studies of patients with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder showed wide-spread activation of mid-line cortical areas during symptom provocation i.e., exposure to trauma-related cues. The present study aimed at investigating neural activation during exposure to trauma-related pictures in patients with Acute Stress Disorder (ASD shortly after the traumatic event. Nineteen ASD patients and 19 healthy control participants were presented with individualized pictures of the traumatic event and emotionally neutral control pictures during the acquisition of whole-brain data with a 3-T fMRI scanner. Compared to the control group and to control pictures, ASD patients showed significant activation in mid-line cortical areas in response to trauma-related pictures including precuneus, cuneus, postcentral gyrus and pre-supplementary motor area. The results suggest that the trauma-related pictures evoke emotionally salient self-referential processing in ASD patients.

  19. Lorazepam provocation test in purported schizophrenia with lack of treatment response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Berg

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Some patients with severe mental disorders are refractory to psychotherapeutic or psychopharmacological interventions. We present a patient who at the age of 19 developed several schizophrenia - suspect symptoms. Soon inexplicable general seizures where observed. He was treated with antipsychotics, but had two bouts of malignant neuroleptic syndrome. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT gave some symptom relief and he continued on maintenance ECT for years with weekly intervals. Interruption of this treatment pattern rapidly increased symptom load. After seven years a lorazepam provocation test was performed as he had a new relapse after 3 weeks without ECT. In the ensuing hours his aggressiveness and nonsense speaking rapidly diminished. Kahlbaums observation of seizures as part of a catatonia was not understood in this case. The publication of the new DSM-V diagnosis of catatonia may hopefully reduce the probability of treating a patient for schizophrenia for years without access to a more targeted medication and ECT plan.

  20. Exercise as a provocative test in early renal disease in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Baker, L; Deckert, T

    1985-01-01

    The value of exercise as a provocative test for early renal disease in Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes was re-evaluated. Three carefully characterized groups of males were studied: 10 non-diabetic controls, 16 diabetic patients (group 1) with normal urinary albumin excretion (less than 15...... micrograms/min) and 14 Albustix-negative diabetics (group 2) with increased urinary albumin excretion (15-122 micrograms/min). Assignment to a study group was made on the basis of three 24-h urine collections, and the groups were well matched for age, weight, height, and serum creatinine concentration....... The two diabetic groups were similar with regard to duration of disease (13 +/- 6 versus 16 +/- 3 years), metabolic control (HbA1c: 8.4 +/- 1.4 versus 8.7 +/- 1.3%) and degree of diabetic complications (beat-to-beat variation and retinopathy). An exercise protocol of 450 and 600 kpm/min workloads...

  1. Introducing Interactive Technology--"Toy Story 3"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikirk, Martin

    2011-01-01

    "To infinity and beyond!" is the catchphrase of Buzz Lightyear, Universe Protection Unit space ranger, a character in the Disney/Pixar "Toy Story" franchise. The three films in the franchise--"Toy Story," 1993; "Toy Story 2," 1999; and "Toy Story 3," 2010--incorporate an innovative blend of many different genres, having spun off video games and…

  2. Neural and Behavioral Correlates of Alcohol-Induced Aggression Under Provocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Gabriela; Sterzer, Philipp; Marxen, Michael; Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Smolka, Michael N

    2015-12-01

    Although alcohol consumption is linked to increased aggression, its neural correlates have not directly been studied in humans so far. Based on a comprehensive neurobiological model of alcohol-induced aggression, we hypothesized that alcohol-induced aggression would go along with increased amygdala and ventral striatum reactivity and impaired functioning of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) under alcohol. We measured neural and behavioral correlates of alcohol-induced aggression in a provoking vs non-provoking condition with a variant of the Taylor aggression paradigm (TAP) allowing to differentiate between reactive (provoked) and proactive (unprovoked) aggression. In a placebo-controlled cross-over design with moderate alcohol intoxication (~0.6 g/kg), 35 young healthy adults performed the TAP during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Analyses revealed that provoking vs non-provoking conditions and alcohol vs placebo increased aggression and decreased brain responses in the anterior cingulate cortex/dorso-medial PFC (provokingalcoholalcohol specifically increased proactive (unprovoked) but not reactive (provoked) aggression (alcohol × provocation interaction). However, investigation of inter-individual differences revealed (1) that pronounced alcohol-induced proactive aggression was linked to higher levels of aggression under placebo, and (2) that pronounced alcohol-induced reactive aggression was related to increased amygdala and ventral striatum reactivity under alcohol, providing evidence for their role in human alcohol-induced reactive aggression. Our findings suggest that in healthy young adults a liability for alcohol-induced aggression in a non-provoking context might depend on overall high levels of aggression, but on alcohol-induced increased striatal and amygdala reactivity when triggered by provocation.

  3. Neural and Behavioral Correlates of Alcohol-Induced Aggression Under Provocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Gabriela; Sterzer, Philipp; Marxen, Michael; Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Smolka, Michael N

    2015-01-01

    Although alcohol consumption is linked to increased aggression, its neural correlates have not directly been studied in humans so far. Based on a comprehensive neurobiological model of alcohol-induced aggression, we hypothesized that alcohol-induced aggression would go along with increased amygdala and ventral striatum reactivity and impaired functioning of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) under alcohol. We measured neural and behavioral correlates of alcohol-induced aggression in a provoking vs non-provoking condition with a variant of the Taylor aggression paradigm (TAP) allowing to differentiate between reactive (provoked) and proactive (unprovoked) aggression. In a placebo-controlled cross-over design with moderate alcohol intoxication (~0.6 g/kg), 35 young healthy adults performed the TAP during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Analyses revealed that provoking vs non-provoking conditions and alcohol vs placebo increased aggression and decreased brain responses in the anterior cingulate cortex/dorso-medial PFC (provokingalcoholalcohol specifically increased proactive (unprovoked) but not reactive (provoked) aggression (alcohol × provocation interaction). However, investigation of inter-individual differences revealed (1) that pronounced alcohol-induced proactive aggression was linked to higher levels of aggression under placebo, and (2) that pronounced alcohol-induced reactive aggression was related to increased amygdala and ventral striatum reactivity under alcohol, providing evidence for their role in human alcohol-induced reactive aggression. Our findings suggest that in healthy young adults a liability for alcohol-induced aggression in a non-provoking context might depend on overall high levels of aggression, but on alcohol-induced increased striatal and amygdala reactivity when triggered by provocation. PMID:25971590

  4. Hypersensitivity to RF fields emitted from CDMA cellular phones: a provocation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ki Chang; Lee, Ju Hyung; Noh, Hyung Wook; Cha, Eun Jong; Kim, Nam Hyun; Kim, Deok Won

    2009-12-01

    With the number of cellular phone users rapidly increasing, there is a considerable amount of public concern regarding the effects that electromagnetic fields (EMFs) from cellular phones have on health. People with self-attributed electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) complain of subjective symptoms such as headaches, insomnia, and memory loss, and attribute these symptoms to radio frequency (RF) radiation from cellular phones and/or base stations. However, EHS is difficult to diagnose because it relies on a person's subjective judgment. Various provocation studies have been conducted on EHS caused by Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) phones in which heart rate and blood pressure or subjective symptoms were investigated. However, there have been few sham-controlled provocation studies on EHS with Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) phones where physiological parameters, subjective symptoms, and perception of RF radiation for EHS and non-EHS groups were simultaneously investigated. In this study, two volunteer groups of 18 self-reported EHS and 19 non-EHS persons were tested for both sham and real RF exposure from CDMA cellular phones with a 300 mW maximum exposure that lasted half an hour. We investigated not only the physiological parameters such as heart rate, respiration rate, and heart rate variability (HRV), but also various subjective symptoms and the perception of EMF. In conclusion, RF exposure did not have any effects on physiological parameters or subjective symptoms in either group. As for EMF perception, there was no evidence that the EHS group better perceived EMF than the non-EHS group.

  5. Individual Differences in Automatic Emotion Regulation Interact with Primed Emotion Regulation during an Anger Provocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Hu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The current study investigated the interactive effects of individual differences in automatic emotion regulation (AER and primed emotion regulation strategy on skin conductance level (SCL and heart rate during provoked anger. The study was a 2 × 2 [AER tendency (expression vs. control × priming (expression vs. control] between subject design. Participants were assigned to two groups according to their performance on an emotion regulation-IAT (differentiating automatic emotion control tendency and automatic emotion expression tendency. Then participants of the two groups were randomly assigned to two emotion regulation priming conditions (emotion control priming or emotion expression priming. Anger was provoked by blaming participants for slow performance during a subsequent backward subtraction task. In anger provocation, SCL of individuals with automatic emotion control tendencies in the control priming condition was lower than of those with automatic emotion control tendencies in the expression priming condition. However, SCL of individuals with automatic emotion expression tendencies did no differ in the automatic emotion control priming or the automatic emotion expression priming condition. Heart rate during anger provocation was higher in individuals with automatic emotion expression tendencies than in individuals with automatic emotion control tendencies regardless of priming condition. This pattern indicates an interactive effect of individual differences in AER and emotion regulation priming on SCL, which is an index of emotional arousal. Heart rate was only sensitive to the individual differences in AER, and did not reflect this interaction. This finding has implications for clinical studies of the use of emotion regulation strategy training suggesting that different practices are optimal for individuals who differ in AER tendencies.

  6. Methacholine bronchial provocation measured by spirometry versus wheeze detection in preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahav Yaacov

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Determination of PC20-FEV1 during Methacholine bronchial provocation test (MCT is considered to be impossible in preschool children, as it requires repetitive spirometry sets. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of determining PC20-FEV1 in preschool age children and compares the results to the wheeze detection (PCW method. Methods 55 preschool children (ages 2.8–6.4 years with recurrent respiratory symptoms were recruited. Baseline spirometry and MCT were performed according to ATS/ERS guidelines and the following parameters were determined at baseline and after each inhalation: spirometry-indices, lung auscultation at tidal breathing, oxygen saturation, respiratory and heart rate. Comparison between PCW and PC20-FEV1 and clinical parameters at these end-points was done by paired Student's t-tests. Results and discussion Thirty-six of 55 children (65.4% successfully performed spirometry-sets up to the point of PCW. PC20-FEV1 occurred at a mean concentration of 1.70+/-2.01 while PCW occurred at a mean concentration of 4.37+/-3.40 mg/ml (p 1 by 44.7+/-14.5%; PEFR by 40.5+/-14.5 and FEF25–75 by 54.7+/-14.4% (P Conclusion Determination of PC20-FEV1 by spirometry is feasible in many preschool children. PC20-FEV1 often appears at lower provocation dose than PCW. The lower dose may shorten the test and encourage participation. Significant decrease in spirometry indices at PCW suggests that PC20-FEV1 determination may be safer.

  7. Individual Differences in Automatic Emotion Regulation Interact with Primed Emotion Regulation during an Anger Provocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Lipp, Ottmar V.; Hu, Ping

    2017-01-01

    The current study investigated the interactive effects of individual differences in automatic emotion regulation (AER) and primed emotion regulation strategy on skin conductance level (SCL) and heart rate during provoked anger. The study was a 2 × 2 [AER tendency (expression vs. control) × priming (expression vs. control)] between subject design. Participants were assigned to two groups according to their performance on an emotion regulation-IAT (differentiating automatic emotion control tendency and automatic emotion expression tendency). Then participants of the two groups were randomly assigned to two emotion regulation priming conditions (emotion control priming or emotion expression priming). Anger was provoked by blaming participants for slow performance during a subsequent backward subtraction task. In anger provocation, SCL of individuals with automatic emotion control tendencies in the control priming condition was lower than of those with automatic emotion control tendencies in the expression priming condition. However, SCL of individuals with automatic emotion expression tendencies did no differ in the automatic emotion control priming or the automatic emotion expression priming condition. Heart rate during anger provocation was higher in individuals with automatic emotion expression tendencies than in individuals with automatic emotion control tendencies regardless of priming condition. This pattern indicates an interactive effect of individual differences in AER and emotion regulation priming on SCL, which is an index of emotional arousal. Heart rate was only sensitive to the individual differences in AER, and did not reflect this interaction. This finding has implications for clinical studies of the use of emotion regulation strategy training suggesting that different practices are optimal for individuals who differ in AER tendencies. PMID:28484412

  8. An Apparatus to Deliver Mannitol Powder for Bronchial Provocation in Children Under Six Years Old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Patricia; Leung, Sharon S Y; Hor, Eleanor; Ruzycki, Conor A; Carrigy, Nicholas B; Finlay, Warren H; Brannan, John D; Devadason, Sunalene; Anderson, Sandra D; Sly, Peter D; Samnick, Kevin; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2015-12-01

    Currently bronchial provocation testing (BPT) using mannitol powder cannot be performed in children under 6 years. A primary reason is it is challenging for children at this age to generate a consistent inspiratory effort to inhale mannitol efficiently from a dry powder inhaler. A prototype system, which does not require any inhalation training from the pediatric subject, is reported here. It uses an external source of compressed air to disperse mannitol powder into a commercial holding chamber. Then the subject uses tidal breathing to inhale the aerosol. The setup consists of a commercially available powder disperser and Volumatic™ holding chamber. Taguchi experimental design was used to identify the effect of dispersion parameters (flow rate of compressed air, time compressed air is applied, mass of powder, and the time between dispersion and inhalation) on the fine particle dose (FPD). The prototype was tested in vitro using a USP throat connected to a next generation impactor. The aerosols from the holding chamber were drawn at 10 L/min. A scaling factor for estimating the provoking dose to induce a 15% reduction in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) (PD15) was calculated using anatomical dimensions of the human respiratory tract at various ages combined with known dosing values from the adult BPT. Consistent and doubling FPDs were successfully generated based on the Taguchi experimental design. The FPD was reliable over a range of 0.8 (±0.09) mg to 14 (±0.94) mg. The calculated PD15 for children aged 1-6 years ranged from 7.1-30 mg. The FPDs generated from the proposed set up are lower than the calculated PD15 and therefore are not expected to cause sudden bronchoconstriction. A prototype aerosol delivery system has been developed that is consistently able to deliver doubling doses suitable for bronchial provocation testing in young children.

  9. Co-Story-ing: Collaborative Story Writing with Children Who Fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehrsson, Dale-Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This article offers a guide for using collaborative story writing (co-story-ing), an assessment technique as well as a therapeutic intervention for children who demonstrate fears, extreme shyness and difficulty in establishing relationships. Co-story-ing draws from Gardner's Mutual Story Telling Technique. Co-story-ing guides clients as they…

  10. Story Immersion in a Health Videogame for Childhood Obesity Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Debbe; Baranowski, Janice; Buday, Richard; Baranowski, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective Stories can serve as powerful tools for health interventions. Story immersion refers to the experience of being absorbed in a story. This is among the first studies to analyze story immersion's role in health videogames among children by addressing two main questions: Will children be more immersed when the main characters are similar to them? Do increased levels of immersion relate to more positive health outcomes? Subjects and Methods Eighty-seven 10–12-year-old African-American, Caucasian, and Hispanic children from Houston, TX, played a health videogame, “Escape from Diab” (Archimage, Houston, TX), featuring a protagonist with both African-American and Hispanic phenotypic features. Children's demographic information, immersion, and health outcomes (i.e., preference, motivation, and self-efficacy) were recorded and then correlated and analyzed. Results African-American and Hispanic participants reported higher immersion scores than Caucasian participants (P=0.01). Story immersion correlated positively (P valuesvideogame characters and players enhanced immersion and several health outcomes. Effectively embedding characters with similar phenotypic features to the target population in interactive health videogame narratives may be important when motivating children to adopt obesity prevention behaviors. PMID:24066276

  11. A Study of Plot in Siavash Story

    OpenAIRE

    Jafari, A.(Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium)

    2012-01-01

    Plot is the main element of a story based on a temporal chain and causality. Although Siavash story is an epic story, there are some structural elements on the basis of which we should call the first episode of this story âfrom Siavash birth till his emigrationâ a âDramatic storyâ and its second episode âfrom his emigration till being killedâ a âTragic storyâ. Analysing the plot of this story, we can summarize it in three sequences. Every sequence consists of three to five functions and ev...

  12. A true case story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanne Bjørg Walker

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Autism is not generally recognized as a condition which can be bio-medically influenced. As of today, there are no biomarkers for autism that are recognized by traditional medicine. Treating autism medically is a difficult and hopeless task according to official guidelines (even though it is seldom written in official documents. Parents of many children who have or had an ASD diagnosis have witnessed significant improvements in their children after dietary interventions as well as after interventions with vitamins, minerals and biogene substances which can be bought over the counter. The parents of individual children are their best observers. With a high degree of certainty, they are able to see which substances improve or weaken their children. Their observations are usually accurate, but their rationale for why is often wrong. Observations from parents can often be of greater importance for the child than advice from so called experts. This is a true story about a girl whose parents lost contact with her when she was only 6 months old. In her first 14 days she lost her ability to roll over, to babble and make sounds. She did not look at her parents any more – just stared up at the roof. At 9 months she did not respond to words such as, ‘look at mommy’. Through the parents own experiences with her older siblings and 4 months of frantic searching for a diet that would agree with the child, she made a remarkable journey from 10 months of age to 18 months. There is one thing worth mentioning – she refused to eat solid food throughout this time. The story does not end there. Today she is 12 years old and has had to be regulated with diet and biogene substances every day since she was 4 years old. During the last 5 months she has shown more stability and can even go a day or two without biogene substances as long as she keeps to her dietary plan. If you had just met her and spent a day with her, you would never know.

  13. Frequent Questions on Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a list of frequent questions on recycling, broken down into five categories. These are answers to common questions that EPA has received from press and web inquiries. This list is located on the Reduce, Reuse, Recycle website.

  14. Burning Questions about Calories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, J. David; Berry, Kimberly A.

    2001-01-01

    Uses questioning techniques to teach about caloric consumption and weight gain. Starts with defining questions about calories and includes the stages of measuring calories, analyzing data, and conducting inquiry research. Includes directions for the experiment. (YDS)

  15. Campylobacter Questions and Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Campylobacter Questions and Answers What is Campylobacter ? What harm can Campylobacter bacteria ... divisions/dfbmd/diseases/campylobacter/ [ Top of Page ] Campylobacter Questions and Answers Last Modified Aug 07, 2013 ').tablesorter({debug:false}). ...

  16. Pesticide Labeling Questions & Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticide manufacturers, applicators, state regulatory agencies, and other stakeholders raise questions or issues about pesticide labels. The questions on this page are those that apply to multiple products or address inconsistencies among product labels.

  17. Transmedia storytelling on travel stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Baltar Moreno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Travel stories form part of a great tradition inside Western Culture which has served historically to describe, to understand and to imagine other cul - tures and communities, far or near, being constituted into a real narra - tive genre. This type of story has been and is a reflection of the perception of the world based on the imaginary worlds created by the travelling narrators. How do modern authors of travel stories take advantage of the opportunities offered by transmedia storytelling? The present article explores the potential of these types of stories as a privileged object of study for transmedia storytelling studies, from the analysis of a sample of 80 narrative productions based on experiences of travel and presented in diverse editions of the Festival Le Grand Bivouac (France. It also shows the existence of a new contemporary trend inside this narrative form that transcends its literary nature.

  18. Telling stories through visual art

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    James Kochalka; Cara Bean

    2015-01-01

      Storytelling is at the core of visual art. Movies, photographs, comic books, advertisements, portraits, scrolls, and interdisciplinary arts communicate some kind of story, even if the meaning is unclear...

  19. Pragmatic Study of Directive Speech Acts in Stories in Alquran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rochmat Budi Santosa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at describing the directive speech acts in the verses that contain the stories in the Qur'an. Specifically, the objectives of this study are to assess the sub directive speech acts contained in the verses of the stories and the dominant directive speech acts. The research target is the verses (ayat containing stories in the Qur’an. This study emphasizes the problem of finding the meaning of verses pragmatically. The data in this study are all expressions of verses about the stories in the Qur'an that contain directive speech acts. In addition, the data in the form of contexts behind the emergence of the verses in the Qur’an story also included. Data collection technique used is the reading and record techniques. The data analysis was conducted using content analysis. Analysis of the data by classifying directive speech acts into 6 (six categories of Bach and Harnish theory namely; requestives, questions, requirements, prohibitive, permissives, and advisories. The result is that the requestives speech act consist only 1 (one paragraph, namely sub-directive asking for patience. In sub-directive questions, there are 4 (four questions that have meaning to ask about what, question tag, why, asking for permission, who, where, which, possibilities, and offering. For sub-requirements directive there are 60 (sixty types of command. Pray command is the most number (24 verses and command for giving attention is the second position with 21 verses. About sub-directive prohibitives, we found 19 kinds of restrictions. As for permissives, there is only one (1 verse that allows punishment. In advisories that there are 2 kinds of advises, they are 1 verse that counsel for fear of punishment of God, and advise to be humble (1 verse. Thus it can be said that the stories in the Alquran really contain messages, including a message to the people to carry out the commands of God and away from His prohibition. The purpose is to crystallize the basic

  20. Asking Questions in Academia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    2014-01-01

    Motivation for the activity In academia the most important skill is to ask academically relevant and sound questions. This is not easy and students need to practice asking questions orally and in writing before they write research papers.......Motivation for the activity In academia the most important skill is to ask academically relevant and sound questions. This is not easy and students need to practice asking questions orally and in writing before they write research papers....

  1. Cognitive Processes in Skimming Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-01

    timed recognition test to study the formation of macrostructure repre- sentations of narrative and newspaper stories while reading at rates ranging...increasing reading rate is achieved by readers who have greater flexibility (Thompson & Whitehill , 1970). Part of the ability to develop flexible reading...centered around the formation of a macrostructure as a memory representation of information explicitly presented in and inferred from a story. The

  2. Improving Student Question Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiner, Cecily; Zachary, Joseph L.

    2009-01-01

    Students in introductory programming classes often articulate their questions and information needs incompletely. Consequently, the automatic classification of student questions to provide automated tutorial responses is a challenging problem. This paper analyzes 411 questions from an introductory Java programming course by reducing the natural…

  3. Making Questions Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothstein, Dan; Santana, Luz; Minigan, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Getting students to ask questions can feel like pulling teeth. How can teachers transform that feeling and create classrooms that come alive with questions? The authors, developers of the question formulation technique, suggest two simple changes: First, teachers need to give students both a structure and the opportunity to practice generating…

  4. Questions for Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Nora Cate; Dykema, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    We begin with a look back at the field to identify themes of recent research that we expect to continue to occupy researchers in the future. As part of this overview, we characterize the themes and topics examined in research about measurement and survey questions published in Public Opinion Quarterly in the past decade. We then characterize the field more broadly by highlighting topics that we expect to continue or to grow in importance, including the relationship between survey questions and the total survey error perspective, cognitive versus interactional approaches, interviewing practices, mode and technology, visual aspects of question design, and culture. Considering avenues for future research, we advocate for a decision-oriented framework for thinking about survey questions and their characteristics. The approach we propose distinguishes among various aspects of question characteristics, including question topic, question type and response dimension, conceptualization and operationalization of the target object, question structure, question form, response categories, question implementation, and question wording. Thinking about question characteristics more systematically would allow study designs to take into account relationships among these characteristics and identify gaps in current knowledge. PMID:24970951

  5. Questions in Reference Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Marilyn Domas

    1998-01-01

    Characterizes the questioning behavior in reference interviews preceding delegated online searches of bibliographic databases and relates it to questioning behavior in other types of interviews/settings. Compares questions asked by the information specialist and those asked by the client; findings show the information specialist dominates the…

  6. Feasibility of omitting provocation test with 50 μg of acetylcholine in left coronary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yuichi; Kitahara, Hideki; Shoji, Toshihiro; Tokimasa, Satoshi; Nakayama, Takashi; Sugimoto, Kazumasa; Fujimoto, Yoshihide; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2017-06-01

    According to the Japanese Circulation Society guideline of vasospastic angina, incremental doses of acetylcholine (ACh) are prescribed for coronary spasm provocation: 20 and 50 μg for the right coronary artery (RCA), and 20, 50 and 100 μg for the left coronary artery (LCA). However, provocation by low doses of ACh in patients with low vasoreactivity may be less needed, and the requirement of 50 μg of ACh for the LCA in these patients has not been evaluated. In the present study, patients who underwent ACh provocation test for both the RCA and LCA were included. The positive diagnosis of intracoronary ACh provocation test was defined as total or subtotal coronary artery narrowing (i.e., angiographic coronary artery spasm) accompanied by chest pain and/or ischemic electrocardiographic changes. Coronary artery constriction was visually evaluated and defined as coronary artery diameter reduction LCA. There were 33 out of 249 patients (13%) with LCA spasm by 20 µg of ACh. In subjects without LCA spasm by 20 µg of ACh, patients with coronary constriction LCA rarely showed coronary artery spasm induced by 50 μg of ACh in the LCA, in comparison to those with coronary constriction 25-90% (n = 115) (2.6 vs. 32.7%, p LCA had cardiac complications associated with administration of ACh. In conclusion, omission of 50 µg of ACh in the LCA may be possible when there is little coronary artery constriction by 20 µg of ACh in the LCA during provocation test, leading to less contrast and shortens overall procedure time.

  7. Philoctetes and the Good Companion Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur W. Frank

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a companion story is developed through an analysis of Sophocles’ play Philoctetes, about living in chronic pain. That story is anchored by an ethnographic report of a boy living with pain, and his companion story. The good companion story is distinguished by three qualities: it consoles its companion, it complicates lives that it enters, and it promises a form of hope. The article thus seeks to demonstrate the therapeutic capacity of stories to effect healing.

  8. Prerana: a success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Prerana-Associate CEDPA, a women- and youth-focused community organization headquartered in New Delhi, has expanded its program activities with recent grants from two leading donors, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Rockefeller Foundation. CEDPA provides important support through grants from The Xerox Foundation, The Turner Foundation, World Bank, and the US Agency for International Development. Founded in 1976, Prerana--whose name means "Inspiration" in Hindi--has grown steadily as knowledge of its comprehensive community-based program has spread. The organization conducts the CEDPA Better Life Options health, education, and vocational skills programs for girls and young women, maternal and child health services, and integrated community-based family planning. A parallel Better Life Options program for boys and young men was recently started. With almost 20 years of experience in the private sector, Prerana provides training and assistance to other private organizations. Prerana's Better Life Options program received international recognition in UNFPA's "The State of World Population 1994." The publication featured an article by a young Indian woman who participated in the program and as a result was able to develop life skills, improve her self-esteem, and, with her husband, decide to delay parenthood. "This success story," said Prerana Executive Director Dr. Uma Agarwal (WIM 29), "is being repeated by many other girls who find support at Prerana." full text

  9. Personal and Parents’ Life Stories in Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Majse; Thomsen, Dorthe Kirkegaard; Bøye, Rikke

    Patients suffering from borderline personality disorder (BPD) display disturbances in understanding both their own and other people’s mind. We examined whether impaired self- and other understanding would also be evident when patients with BPD described their own and their parents’ life stories....... Thirty patients with BPD and thirty matched control participants described and answered questions about their personal life stories and their parents’ life stories and completed measures of identity disturbance, alexithymia, empathy, and emotional intelligence. Compared to the control group, patients...... with BPD described both their personal and their parents’ life stories more negatively and with fewer themes of agency and communion fulfillment. Patients and controls reasoned about their personal life stories in equally complex ways, but patients displayed less complexity, when reasoning about...

  10. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NIH Website NIH Employee Intranet Staff Directory En Español Site Menu Home Health Information Health Info Lines ... Social Media from NIH Footer NIH Home En Español Site Map Visitor Information Frequently Asked Questions Web ...

  11. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from NIDCD) Questions and Answers about NIDCD Stuttering Research The Long Road to Discovery: Stuttering Genes Turn Up in the Most Unexpected Places This page last reviewed on March 23, 2016 Connect with Us Contact Us Twitter Facebook Instagram YouTube Flickr More Social Media from ...

  12. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NIH Website NIH Employee Intranet Staff Directory En Español Site Menu Home Health Information Health Info Lines ... Outreach Twitter Facebook YouTube Footer NIH Home En Español Site Map Visitor Information Frequently Asked Questions Web ...

  13. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Flickr More Social Media from NIH Footer NIH Home En Español Site Map Visitor Information Frequently Asked Questions Web Policies and Notices Freedom of Information Act No Fear Act Office of Inspector General USA.gov – Government Made Easy ...

  14. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Social Media & Outreach Twitter Facebook YouTube Footer NIH Home En Español Site Map Visitor Information Frequently Asked Questions Web Policies and Notices Freedom of Information Act No Fear Act Office of Inspector General USA.gov – Government Made Easy ...

  15. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Guide Quick Links RePORT eRA Commons NIH Common Fund NIH and the American Recovery Act News & Events ... stuttering is explained by genes and not by environment. So, the question is, can we use this ...

  16. The Story of Azithromycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banić Tomišić, Z.

    2011-12-01

    the negotiations and signing of a contract between PLIVA, Croatian pharmaceutical company, the patent holder, and Pfizer, one of the world largest pharmaceutical companies in the field of proprietary research. The dihydrate form of azithromycin is also discussed. The azithromycin (i.e. Sumamed and Zithromax story, which dates from the second half of the last century, can be considered as the first and foremost example of successful knowledge and technology transfer in Croatia ever. On their web pages, the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO reports the PLIVA azithromycin story as a case study and excellent example of proactive licensing strategy. For the discovery of azithromycin, in addition to receiving numerous awards, in the year 2000, PLIVA's scientists D. Sc. S. Đokić and M. Sc. G. Kobrehel, together with the representatives from the US-based Pfizer, were granted the honorable titles of "Heroes of Chemistry 2000" by the American Chemical Society (ACS, a non-profit association of American chemists and chemical engineers, and the largest association of scientists in the world. This high award is rightly taken to be also recognition of the achievement of PLIVA's entire team working on azithromycin. The success of azithromycin has placed PLIVA among the few pharmaceutical companies in the world that have developed their own blockbuster drug, and has entitled Croatia to join a small group of nations that have developed a new antibiotic.

  17. Dancing Lights: Creating the Aurora Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, E. L.; Cobabe-Ammann, E. A.

    2009-12-01

    Science tells a story about our world, our existence, our history, and the larger environment our planet occupies. Bearing this in mind, we created a series of lessons for 3rd-5th grades using a cross-disciplinary approach to teaching about the aurora by incorporating stories, photos, movies, and geography into the science in order to paint a broad picture and answer the question, “why do we care?” The fundamental backbone of the program is literacy. Students write and illustrate fiction and non-fiction work, poetry, and brochures that solidify both language arts skills and science content. In a time when elementary teachers relegate science to less than one hour per week, we have developed a novel science program that can be easily integrated with other topics during the typical school day to increase the amount of science taught in a school year. We are inspiring students to take an interest in the natural world with this program, a stepping-stone for larger things.

  18. Dairi storytelling and stories in the Batak Reader of Herman Neubronner van der Tuuk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Brakel Papenhuyzen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article I first discuss how texts of Dairi stories collected in the nineteenth century by Herman Neubronner van der Tuuk relate to storytelling, and question whether the development of written versions of stories necessarily endangers the practice of storytelling. Then I investigate how written versions of Dairi stories in Van der Tuuk’s Batak Reader relate to each other and to the printed text, based on texts in manuscripts collected by Van der Tuuk. In conclusion I discuss the possible aim of Van der Tuuk’s Batak Reader, focussing on the Dairi section, which has not been dealt with in earlier publications.

  19. Gender stereotypes in story textbooks for primary school students in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Vu, Phuong Anh

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the gender stereotypes in story textbooks for primary school students in Vietnam before and after the textbook reform in 2002. The following research questions guided the research: How are females and males depicted in the story textbooks? Are their images stereotyped? Is there a significant change in the amount of gender stereotypes in the newly-renovated textbooks, compared to the previous ones? How stereotyped are the teachers? How do they react to the gender issues...

  20. Asking the Right Questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Line

    Based on fieldwork in Mali this paper discusses the role of anthropology (and the anthropologist) in a large public health research project on children's health. In the uncertainty and disquiet that comes with the battle to combat and avoid diseases in a setting where poverty and abysmal diseases......, is the ability to move beyond even the best hidden assumptions and question our own questions, thereby enabling us to ask the right questions....

  1. Origins the scientific story of creation

    CERN Document Server

    Baggott, Jim

    2015-01-01

    What is the nature of the material world? How does it work? What is the universe and how was it formed? What is life? Where do we come from and how did we evolve? How and why do we think? What does it mean to be human? How do we know? There are many different versions of our creation story. This book tells the version according to modern science. It is a unique account, starting at the Big Bang and travelling right up to the emergence of humans as conscious intelligent beings, 13.8 billion years later. Chapter by chapter, it sets out the current state of scientific knowledge: the origins of space and time; energy, mass, and light; galaxies, stars, and our sun; the habitable earth, and complex life itself. Drawing together the physical and biological sciences, Baggott recounts what we currently know of our history, highlighting the questions science has yet to answer.

  2. The novel as short story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk Schlueter

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent history, the novel has been thought of and defined primarily as a long prose narrative. However, this has not been the case historically, as the original meaning of "novel" was for "a piece of news" or "a short story or novella." Returning to this original definition, I propose a new way of viewing the work known contemporarily as the novel as a collection, or sequence, of united short stories rather than a single indivisible work, with the component short stories or novellas comprising the sequence renamed as "novels." A brief examination of several classic works traditionally considered novels serves to illustrate how this change in definition will affect reading.

  3. Mystery in Sepedi detective stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Mojalefa

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to illustrate the importance of the concept “mystery” in the classification of Sepedi detective stories. Mystery is therefore first defined, and then some rules governing how mystery is created and sustained in a narrative are reviewed. Examples are given of how the writers of Sepedi detective stories mislead their readers in order to create mystery. Mystery is then examined according to five of its constituent elements, namely the real character of the detective, the name of the criminal, the identity of the victim, the evidence that reveals the mystery in the end, and the investigation that reveals the mystery. Each category is explored by citing relevant examples from Sepedi detective stories.

  4. Legal Philosophy - Five Questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This collection gathers together a host of the most eminent contemporary legal philosophers, who writes about their take on legal philosophy, its fundamental questions and potential.......This collection gathers together a host of the most eminent contemporary legal philosophers, who writes about their take on legal philosophy, its fundamental questions and potential....

  5. Epistemology: 5 Questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epistemology: 5 Questions is a collection of short interviews based on 5 questions presented to some of the most influential and prominent scholars in epistemology. We hear their views on epistemology with particular emphasis on the intersection between mainstream and formal approaches to the field......; the aim, scope, the future direction of epistemology and how their work fits in these respects...

  6. Let's Switch Questioning Around

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovani, Cris

    2015-01-01

    English teacher Cris Tovani knows from her experiences teaching elementary school that students are naturally curious. But, too often, students are so trained to be question answerers that by the time they reach high school, they no longer form questions of their own and instead focus on trying to figure out what answer the teacher wants. Tovani…

  7. Questions in logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciardelli, I.A.

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation pursues two tightly interwoven goals: to bring out the relevance of questions for the field of logic, and to establish a solid theory of the logic of questions within a classical logical setting. These enterprises feed into each other: on the one hand, the development of our formal

  8. Pneumococcus: Questions and Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumococcus: Questions and Answers information about the disease and vaccines What causes pneumococcal disease? Pneumococcal disease is caused by the bacterium ... d/ p4213. pdf • Item #P4213 (3/16) Pneumococcus: Questions and Answers (continued) page 2 of 4 elderly and patients ...

  9. Conflicts in Africa and Major Powers: Proxy Wars, Zones of Influence or Provocative Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry Rowlings Tafotie

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the different nature of conflicts that have occurred in Africa since the end of Cold War. A special attention is given to the role of external factors in the process of conflict evolution and the escalation of violence on the African continent. In effect, this paper demonstrates through a critical examination of the meaning of proxy war as, zone of influence or provocation of instability as a strategy and an analysis of its employment by the United States and China, France etc. in Africa. The new potential confrontation between the United States and China as in Sudan, France in its former coloniesis not only based on a clash of world views about the structure and nature of international relations and security but largely over the control of strategically vital energy resources based in Africa. The authors conclude that this ultimately creates permanent tensions or bitter conflicts between the actors and African populations as a factor that have negative impact on the peace and stability of continent. According to the context of superpower conflict strategies, this paper critically examines, zone of influence, provoking of instability or proxy war as a viable national strategy of nuclear armed great powers in advancing and/or defending their global national interests in a bipolar/multipolar international system.

  10. Effects of gender and cigarette smoking on reactivity to psychological and pharmacological stress provocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Sudie E; Waldrop, Angela E; Saladin, Michael E; Yeatts, Sharon D; Simpson, Annie; McRae, Aimee L; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P; Contini Sisson, Regana; Spratt, Eve G; Allen, Julia; Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Brady, Kathleen T

    2008-06-01

    We examined the influence of gender and smoking status on reactivity in two human laboratory stress paradigms. Participants were 46 (21 men, 25 women) healthy individuals who completed the Trier Social Stress Task (i.e., performed speech and math calculations in front of an audience) and a pharmacological stress provocation (i.e., administration of corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH)) after an overnight hospital stay. Approximately half (53%) of the participants were smokers. Cortisol, adrenocorticotrophin hormone (ACTH), physiologic measures (heart rate, blood pressure), and subjective stress were assessed at baseline and at several time points post-task. Men demonstrated higher baseline ACTH and blood pressure as compared to women; however, ACTH and blood pressure responses were more pronounced in women. Women smokers evidenced a more blunted cortisol response as compared to non-smoking women, whereas smoking status did not affect the cortisol response in men. Finally, there was a more robust cardiovascular and subjective response to the Trier as compared to the CRH. Although preliminary, the findings suggest that women may be more sensitive than men to the impact of cigarette smoking on cortisol response. In addition, there is some evidence for a more robust neuroendocrine and physiologic response to acute laboratory stress in women as compared to men.

  11. Fear Processing in Dental Phobia during Crossmodal Symptom Provocation: An fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Hilbert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available While previous studies successfully identified the core neural substrates of the animal subtype of specific phobia, only few and inconsistent research is available for dental phobia. These findings might partly relate to the fact that, typically, visual stimuli were employed. The current study aimed to investigate the influence of stimulus modality on neural fear processing in dental phobia. Thirteen dental phobics (DP and thirteen healthy controls (HC attended a block-design functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI symptom provocation paradigm encompassing both visual and auditory stimuli. Drill sounds and matched neutral sinus tones served as auditory stimuli and dentist scenes and matched neutral videos as visual stimuli. Group comparisons showed increased activation in the insula, anterior cingulate cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and thalamus in DP compared to HC during auditory but not visual stimulation. On the contrary, no differential autonomic reactions were observed in DP. Present results are largely comparable to brain areas identified in animal phobia, but also point towards a potential downregulation of autonomic outflow by neural fear circuits in this disorder. Findings enlarge our knowledge about neural correlates of dental phobia and may help to understand the neural underpinnings of the clinical and physiological characteristics of the disorder.

  12. Exercice-induced bronchoconstriction among athletes: Assessment of bronchial provocation tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakali, S; Vogiatzis, I; Florou, A; Giavi, S; Zakynthinos, S; Papadopoulos, N G; Gratziou, Ch

    2017-01-01

    Diagnosis of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) requires the use of bronchial provocation tests (BPTs). We assessed exercise-induced respiratory symptoms (EIRS), EIB and asthma in athletes and evaluated the validity of BPTs in the diagnosis of EIB. Rhinitis and atopy were also assessed. Athletes with (n=55) and without previous asthma diagnosis (n=145) were tested by skin prick tests, lung function and eNO measurements. EIRS were recorded and EIB was assessed by methacholine (Mch), eucapnic voluntary hyperpnoea (EVH), mannitol and exercise test. EIRS were highly reported and history of asthma was common among athletes. A high prevalence of atopy (48.7%) and allergic rhinitis (30.5%) was found. Athletes with asthma had a higher response rate to Mch and to EVH, as compared with athletes without a previous asthma diagnosis (P=0.012 and P=0.017 respectively). Report of EIRS, rhinitis and atopy were not associated with a positive BPT response. Screening athletes for EIB using BPTs is suggested, irrespective of reported EIRS or a previous asthma diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. On recent advances in human engineering Provocative trends in embryology, genetics, and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Advances in embryology, genetics, and regenerative medicine regularly attract attention from scientists, scholars, journalists, and policymakers, yet implications of these advances may be broader than commonly supposed. Laboratories culturing human embryos, editing human genes, and creating human-animal chimeras have been working along lines that are now becoming intertwined. Embryogenic methods are weaving traditional in vivo and in vitro distinctions into a new "in vivitro" (in life in glass) fabric. These and other methods known to be in use or thought to be in development promise soon to bring society to startling choices and discomfiting predicaments, all in a global effort to supply reliably rejuvenating stem cells, to grow immunologically non-provocative replacement organs, and to prevent, treat, cure, or even someday eradicate diseases having genetic or epigenetic mechanisms. With humanity's human-engineering era now begun, procedural prohibitions, funding restrictions, institutional controls, and transparency rules are proving ineffective, and business incentives are migrating into the most basic life-sciences inquiries, wherein lie huge biomedical potentials and bioethical risks. Rights, health, and heritage are coming into play with bioethical presumptions and formal protections urgently needing reassessment.

  14. Mechanisms of cough provocation and cough resolution in neonates with bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadcherla, Sudarshan R; Hasenstab, Kathryn A; Shaker, Reza; Castile, Robert G

    2015-10-01

    Cough and deglutition are protective mechanisms that defend against aspiration. We identified mechanisms associated with cough provocation as well as those associated with cough resolution in infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Manometry signatures of cough were recognized in 16 premature infants with BPD undergoing concurrent esophageal manometry, respiratory inductance plethysmography, and nasal air flow measurements. Pretussive and post-tussive pharyngo-esophageal motility changes were analyzed. Mechanisms associated with cough and mechanisms that restored respiratory and esophageal normalcy were analyzed. We analyzed 312 cough events during 88 cough clusters; 97% were associated with recognizable manometric patterns. Initial mechanisms related with coughing included nonpropagating swallow (59%), upper esophageal sphincter (UES) reflex contraction (18%), and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation (14%). UES and LES dysfunction was present in 69% of nonpropagating swallow-associated cough clusters. Mechanisms restoring post-tussive normalcy included primary peristalsis (84%), secondary peristalsis (8%), and none recognized (8%). UES contraction reflex was associated with cough clusters more frequently in infants on nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) (OR = 9.13, 95% CI = 1.88-44.24). Cough clusters in infants with BPD had identifiable etiologies associated with esophageal events; common initial mechanisms were of upper aerodigestive origin, while common clearing mechanisms were peristaltic reflexes.

  15. Climate change communication: a provocative inquiry into motives, meanings, and means.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Branden B

    2012-06-01

    The deliberately provocative theme of this article is that perceived difficulties in climate change communication (CCC)--e.g., indifference about or denial of climate change's reality, negative consequences, anthropogenic causes, or need to mitigate or adapt to it-are partly the fault of climate change communicators. Fischhoff's model of risk communication development is used to demonstrate that CCC to date has tended to stress persuasion, rather than social movement mobilization or deliberation, and with a focus on the model's early stages. Later stages are not necessarily better, but a more diverse strategy seems superior to a focus perhaps narrowed by empathic, ideological, psychological, and resource constraints. Furthermore, even within persuasion, emphasizing a wider set of values, consequences, and audiences could be fruitful. Social movement mobilization has its own set of weaknesses, but usefully complements persuasion with a focus on developing power, subverting mainstream assumptions, and engaging people in collective action. Deliberation similarly has its drawbacks, but unlike the other two approaches does not define the solution-or even, necessarily, the problem-in advance, and thus offers the chance for people of contending viewpoints to jointly develop concepts and action agendas hitherto unimagined. Simultaneous pursuit of all three strategies can to some degree offset their respective flaws, at the potential cost of diffusion of energies and contradictory messages. Success in CCC is by no means guaranteed by a more diverse set of strategies and self-reflection by communicators, but their pursuit should better reveal CCC's limits. © 2011 Society for Risk Analysis.

  16. Usefulness of drug provocation tests in children with a history of adverse drug reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Ran Na

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : There are very few reports of adverse drug reactions (ADR and almost no study of drug provocation test (DPT in Korean children. We aimed to assess the role of DPT in children with unpredictable ADRs, and compare the causative drugs and clinical characteristics between detailed history of ADRs and result of DPTs. Methods : We included 16 children who were experienced ADRs referred to pediatric allergy clinic at Ajou University Hospital (January 2006 to December 2009. With various suspected drugs, 71 DPTs were done in 16 patients using our own protocol, and skin tests to antibiotics were combined in ADRs to antibiotics in medical history. Results : There were 17 (23.9% positive DPTs results out of 71 individual DPTs, and 11 patients (68.8% from 16 patients were positive to at least one drug. Drugs causing positive reactions were acetaminophen in 5 (31%, Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in 4 (25%, penicillin in 3 (19%, cephalosporin in 2 (13%, and cotrimoxazole, macrolide and lactose in 1 each. Conclusion : DPT seems a safe and useful procedure to confirm causative drug and identify safely administering alternative drugs in children with ADR.

  17. Hidden Stories, Toxic Stories, Healing Stories: The Power of Narrative in Peace and Reconciliation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Marks

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on narrative is more than simply listening to (more or less nice stories. There are stories that are hidden between the lines; these need to be noticed and retrieved. There are stories that can be toxic to be exposed to; these need to be coped with and conceived. But there may be stories that have a healing quality, too—stories that can contribute to peace and reconciliation. These three possible qualities of narratives are the focus of the following paper, which was delivered in October 2008, at the launch of the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research on Narrative at St. Thomas University in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. The lecture was based on his interdisciplinary research project "Geschichte und Erinnerung" [History and Memory, www.geschichte-erinnerung.de] in which interviews with Nazi followers, bystanders, and perpetrators were conducted and analysed. Marks presented one of the key findings of this research—shame—and its effect on what the interviewees recounted, as well as its relevance for National Socialism and present-day German society.

  18. Exaggerated Claims for Interactive Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thue, David; Bulitko, Vadim; Spetch, Marcia; Webb, Michael

    As advertising becomes more crucial to video games' success, developers risk promoting their products beyond the features that they can actually include. For features of interactive storytelling, the effects of making such exaggerations are not well known, as reports from industry have been anecdotal at best. In this paper, we explore the effects of making exaggerated claims for interactive stories, in the context of the theory of advertising. Results from a human user study show that female players find linear and branching stories to be significantly less enjoyable when they are advertised with exaggerated claims.

  19. Using Provocative Discography and Computed Tomography to Select Patients with Refractory Discogenic Low Back Pain for Lumbar Fusion Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Xi, Mengqiao Alan; Tong, Henry C; Fahim, Daniel K; Perez-Cruet, Mick

    2016-01-01

    Background Context Controversy remains over the use of provocative discography in conjunction with computed tomography (CT) to locate symptomatic intervertebral discs in patients with chronic, low back pain (LBP).?The current study explores the relationship between discogenic pain and disc morphology using discography and CT, respectively, and investigates the efficacy of this combined method in identifying surgical candidates for lumbar fusion by evaluating outcomes. Methods 43 consecutive p...

  20. Comparison of levocabastine, a new selective H1-receptor antagonist, and disodium cromoglycate, in a nasal provocation test with allergen.

    OpenAIRE

    Kolly, M; Pécoud, A

    1986-01-01

    The effect of intranasal administration of levocabastine, a new selective H1-receptor antagonist, was investigated in a nasal provocation test (NPT) performed with allergens. The NPT allowed a quantitative estimation of the nasal allergic threshold (concentration of allergen necessary to trigger the reaction). In addition, the intensity of the three major rhinitis symptoms (obstruction, rhinorrhea and sneezing) was determined. Twelve adult patients, allergic to grass pollen, underwent a first...

  1. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Try it free Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from ... patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's ...

  2. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? Cancel Unsubscribe ... The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category ...

  3. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Queue __count__/__total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? ... patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience ...

  4. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... count__/__total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? ... and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience ...

  5. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from ... patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's ...

  6. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... shares the story of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology ...

  7. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it free Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? ... and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience ...

  8. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Try it free Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? ... patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience ...

  9. What is a Question?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, Kevin H.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A given question can be defined in terms of the set of statements or assertions that answer it. Application of the logic of inference to this set of assertions allows one to derive the logic of inquiry among questions. There are interesting symmetries between the logics of inference and inquiry; where probability describes the degree to which a premise implies an assertion, there exists an analogous quantity that describes the bearing or relevance that a question has on an outstanding issue. These have been extended to suggest that the logic of inquiry results in functional relationships analogous to, although more general than, those found in information theory. Employing lattice theory, I examine in greater detail the structure of the space of assertions and questions demonstrating that the symmetries between the logical relations in each of the spaces derive directly from the lattice structure. Furthermore, I show that while symmetries between the spaces exist, the two lattices are not isomorphic. The lattice of assertions is described by a Boolean lattice 2(sup N) whereas the lattice of real questions is shown to be a sublattice of the free distributive lattice FD(N) = 2(sup 2(sup N)). Thus there does not exist a one-to-one mapping of assertions to questions, there is no reflection symmetry between the two spaces, and questions in general do not possess unique complements. Last, with these lattice structures in mind, I discuss the relationship between probability, relevance and entropy.

  10. Moderating role of trait hope in the relation between painful and provocative events and acquired capability for suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sean M; Cukrowicz, Kelly C; Van Allen, Jason; Seegan, Paige L

    2015-01-01

    The interpersonal theory of suicide has gained empirical support as a conceptualization of suicide risk; however, little research has examined the role of individual traits, such as trait hope, within the interpersonal theory of suicide. The purpose of this study was to further investigate the role of trait hope components (i.e., pathways and agency) in acquired capability for suicide. Participants were 711 college students who completed measures of acquired capability for suicide, painful and provocative events, and trait hope (i.e., pathways and agency). Linear regression was used to test the hypotheses. As hypothesized, there was a positive relation between pathways and acquired capability. Contrary to our hypotheses, after controlling for gender there was a significant relation between agency and acquired capability. In addition, after controlling for gender, pathways did not moderate the relation between painful and provocative events and acquired capability, whereas agency did moderate this relation. Painful and provocative events should be assessed as a risk factor for acquired capability for suicide, and this may be more salient for individuals higher in the agency component of trait hope. Future research should consider examining the role of other traits within the interpersonal theory of suicide.

  11. Generating ethnographic research questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, Torbjörn

    2015-01-01

    ? By drawing on the conceptual history of anthropology, the aim of this article is to generate ethnographic-oriented research questions concerned with higher education. The first part of the article provides an ethnographic background, while the second part focuses on Paul Willis's reasoning on ethnographic...... imagination, as a prerequisite for generating alternative research questions. The third part makes explicit anthropologist Maurice Godelier's theoretical imagination, carving out some specific theoretical parts which may be used in the generating process. The conclusion then suggests a number of questions...

  12. Interfacing with questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soon, Winnie

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses an artistic project entitled If I wrote you a love letter would you write back (and thousands of other questions): a piece of software that utilizes Twitter web API to query questions, drawing unpredictable questions in real-time from the distributed database of Twitter....... It undergoes the process of data query and manipulation: requesting data and receiving responses in a standardized format through mathematical operators. This article discusses the role of operators in which they constitute the unpredictability of queries. By understanding the operational and cultural logic...

  13. Worldviews in Isan-Thai Stories

    OpenAIRE

    Jaruwan Thammawat; Pathom Hongsuwan; Wajuppa Tossa

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: This study aimed to investigate two-fold: To present worldviews in Isan-Thai Stories and to explain the connections between the worldviews and their societal contexts. Approach: Following the methodology of folklore studies, both oral and written versions of Isan-Thai stories were analyzed in order to find out their structures, contents, motifs and contexts. The 76 stories which were chosen fall into five types: Legends, episodes of the Buddhas birth stories, chakchak wongw...

  14. Transgression médiatique et provocations décadentes: La décadence comme comportement médiatique.

    OpenAIRE

    Yoan Vérilhac

    2012-01-01

    The decadent and symbolist movements are deeply connected to the creation of media: newspapers, small reviews which make the promotion of the young poets and their original works. In the 1880’s, the decadent reviews use in a provocative way the codes and the media potentialities. However this provocative press is based on a double language (especially about the relationship with the public), and this contradiction generates a negative image in the popular press: the new generation of poets an...

  15. [Characteristics of pulmonary function in children with atypical asthma with chest tightness as chief complaint before and after bronchial provocation test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wen; Lv, Min; Zhang, Jian; Hua, Shan; Shang, Qi-Yun

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the characteristics of pulmonary function in children with atypical asthma with chest tightness as the chief complaint before and after a bronchial provocation test. This study included 34 children with atypical asthmas who underwent bronchial provocation test between January 2010 and December 2013. Thirty-four children with typical asthmas were selected as the control group. The pulmonary function of the atypical asthma group was examined before and after the bronchial provocation test and compared with that of the control group in the acute episode and remission stages. The forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), FEV1/FVC, peak expiratory flow, forced expiratory flow 25%, 50%, 75% (FEF25, FEF50, FEF75), and maximum mid-expiratory flow (MMEF75/25) in the atypical asthma group before the bronchial provocation test were (105±12)%, (104±12)%, (100±7)%, (88±13)%, (90±14)%, (81±17)%, (73±25)%, and (80±17)%, respectively; these functional indices were significantly higher than in the control group in the acute episode stage (P0.05). In addition, no significant difference in pulmonary indices was observed between the atypical asthma group after the bronchial provocation test and the control group in the acute episode stage (P>0.05), but functional indices above were significantly lower in the atypical asthma group after the bronchial provocation test than in the control group in the remission stage and the atypical asthma group before the bronchial provocation test (PBronchial provocation test is useful in the diagnosis of atypical asthma in children.

  16. Intersection of opposing pedagogical frameworks: Native Hawaiian ancestral stories and scientific inquiry in a high school science class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanahele-Mossman, Huihui

    Inquiry is defined as "an examination into facts and principles." In science education science inquiry is a process through which important discoveries are made by students through scientific methodology. The most important step in this process is forming the right question. The questions formed by students are usually the wrong questions which deem the remainder of the inquiry process impotent. This research will look at the pedagogy of ancestral stories for a solution. For the researcher, ancestral stories were a source of wonderment and learning not only from the lessons the stories revealed but mainly from the questions that still remained after the stories were told. Questions such as "why does the eel only swim near that part?", or "why does the story only talk about the uhu?" are examples of questions that remained after experiencing an ancestral narrative. The research questions were composed for the purpose of finding compatibility between the two pedagogies. The first research question which reads "how can Native Hawaiian ancestral stories encourage an increased level of student driven interactions at all levels of feedback from Native Hawaiian students in science classroom" focuses the research on the level of student feedback that initiate questions. Question two which reads "how can teachers of Native Hawaiian students facilitate the construction of science inquiry projects from ancestral stories" addresses the skill of the teacher and imbeds the concept of pedagogical knowledge into the literature. The last research question "how do analysis and discussion of the stories connect Native Hawaiian students to their ancestral intelligence" examines the role of identity and identity to ancestral intelligence. The method intended for this research was Grounded theory which allows the researcher to develop principles, concepts and theories based on the data presented. Another method utilized in this research is an undocumented but culturally imbedded method

  17. Archrtypal Analysis of Bijan and Manije Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayebeh Jafari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available  Abstract Manije and Bijan story, a poem by a great poet, Firdausi Tousi, like his other stories in Shahname is a story which can be analyzed by archetyoal approach. According to this approach, this story can be considered as the individuation of here of this story, Bijan, who voluntarily enters into the individuation and psychological growth by being called. In his perfection cycle which is started and in Iran, by the trickery of evil wise old (gorgin, Bijan meets his Anima of unconscious. Bijan, who lived in Ashkanian era as some researchers believe, is one of the prime characters in Shahnameh. From mythical point of view, Bijan story, which is known as one of ancient myths, is the indicator of feminine society in Iran. Bijan story, like Bahram Chobin, Rustam and Sohrab, Ardeshir Babakan, and Rustam and Esfandiar, is an independent story added to Shahnameh. The comparison of Bijan story with other stories of Shahnameh represents this issue that Ferdowsi composed Bijan story in his youth and just after Daghighi’s death. Because Bijan story, like most other stories of Shahnameh and other myths, has a quite symbolic structure and motifs, Jung archetypal point of view is helpful to discover a lot of mysteries. In the present article, Bijan story is analyzed from Jung’s archetypal point of view. According to this theory, there are a lot of symbols, motifs and archetypes in this story. There is a united structure in every story formed base on its plot thus, to discover the structure of a symbolic story is an important act.   The symbolic motif of Bijan story is reaching the perfection and the story structure is completely commensurate with this motif the move is started from Iran, which is the indicator of Bijan story’s consciousness, then the hero after getting individual experience in land of unconscious, Turan, comes back to Iran. Bijan voluntary goes on a dangerous and symbolic way as the hero. Actually he is the portrayal

  18. The content analysis of questioning level at p4c classroom | Kamali ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The gathered data with using questioning Fisher method (2005) which was based on storytelling and using Philip Cam (1998) thinking stories books. Data were analyzed with quantitative content analysis and the following were found: teaching philosophy for children was significantly effective on the questioning level in ...

  19. Popcorn Story Frames from a Multicultural Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLella, Carol Ann

    Popcorn story frames from a multicultural perspective are holistic outlines that in the reading/writing process facilitate comprehension for all cultures learning to read and write stories. Popcorn story frames are structured and modeled in a horizontal fashion just like popcorn pops in a horizontal fashion. The frames are designed for learners…

  20. Answering Essay Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBuvitz, William

    2008-03-01

    Most of the homework I have assigned in physics courses has been of the problem-solving type, although I do assign a few essay questions for most chapters. I have also taught qualitative science courses in which most of the homework and exams involved either multiple-choice or essay questions. What I find surprising is that all physics textbooks go into detail on how to solve physics problems (determining what is asked, choosing the proper formula, showing the work clearly, and checking the results) but never say anything about answering essay questions. Teachers and authors might answer my criticism by saying, "Isn't it obvious how to answer an essay question?" Based on my experiences, I do not think it is obvious to a good number of students.

  1. Revisiting Science in Culture: Science as Story Telling and Story Revising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Grobstein

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Both science itself, and the human culture of which it is a part, would benefit from a story of science that encourages wider engagement with and participation in the processes of scientific exploration. Such a story, based on a close analysis of scientific method, is presented here. It is the story of science as story telling and story revising. The story of science as story suggests that science can and should serve three distinctive functions for humanity: providing stories that may increase (but never guarantee human well-being, serving as a supportive nexus for human exploration and story telling in general, and exemplifying a commitment to skepticism and a resulting open-ended and continuing exploration of what might yet be. Some practical considerations that would further the development and acceptance of such a story of science as a widely shared nexus of human activity are described.

  2. The Story of Quantum Theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 7. The Story of Quantum Theory. Abhijit Saha. Book Review Volume 9 Issue 7 July ... Abhijit Saha1. IIA, Bangalore 560 034, India (till Dec. 28,2004), Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena, Chile (January-July 2005).

  3. Story Lab: Student Data Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Student data privacy is an increasingly high-profile--and controversial--issue that touches schools and families across the country. There are stories to tell in virtually every community. About three dozen states have passed legislation addressing student data privacy in the past two years, and eight different proposals were floating around…

  4. Teaching about Consumerism through Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Kay Parks

    2010-01-01

    One of the best methods in the English language arts classroom is to educate students through the world of stories. The beauty of storytelling is that it often has a more powerful impact on young adults than a didactic lecture or a textbook chapter. Many times students would say that they internalize a message much more willingly through reading a…

  5. Food Labels Tell the Story!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... My World From the Label to the Table! Food Labels Tell the Story! What is in food? Food provides your body with all of the ... your food choices. Nutrition Facts—the Labels on Food Products Beginning in 1994, the US government began ...

  6. Women Leaders Tell Their Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Marilyn L.; Curley, Virginia Russell; Lacost, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to identify examples of women education leaders at their best. There were two parts to the study procedures. First, the women were asked to write a case story about a time when they were involved in a successful leadership experience. Second, the women were divided into small groups of 5-8. In the small…

  7. Bibliography of Cinderella Stories & Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Price, Marisol

    This annotated bibliography considers diverse versions of Cinderella, including books for all ages and reading abilities and film versions. The bibliography is organized into four categories: picture books, books for youths, books for adults with a Cinderella theme, and Cinderella films. Noting that Cinderella is one of the few stories with many…

  8. Dramatic Presence in Improvised Stories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swartjes, I.M.T.; Theune, Mariet

    2009-01-01

    We investigate how to achieve a sense of dramatic presence (the perception of being “in” a story, playing the role of one of its characters), with the aim of building systems that can offer the same. Improvisational theatre might serve as a model for this experience, where there is no guiding plot;

  9. The Story of Nuclear Matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 10. The Story of Nuclear Matter. R Rajaraman. General Article Volume 10 Issue 10 October 2005 pp 8-32. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/010/10/0008-0032. Keywords. Nuclear ...

  10. Panspermia asks new questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyce, Brig

    2001-08-01

    There is a widespread sentiment that panspermia is uninteresting is because it does not answer fundamental questions about the origin of life. The strongest version of panspermia asks entirely new questions. While barriers to the acceptance of panspermia are falling and evidence supporting it is accumulating, the mere possibility of panspermia unhinges the Darwinian account of evolutionary progress. The new theory removes an issue dividing science and religion, but it requires an amendment to the big bang theory.

  11. Interesting Questions in Freakonomics

    OpenAIRE

    John DiNardo

    2007-01-01

    Freakonomics is more about "entertainment" than it is a serious attempt at popularization. Consequently, rather than conduct a comprehensive fact check, I use the book as a springboard for a broader inquiry into social science research and take issue with the book's surprising premise that "Economics is a science with excellent tools for gaining answers but a serious shortage of interesting questions." Using examples from Freakonomics , I argue that some of the questions the book addresses ar...

  12. Internal disc derangement in patients with low back pain: correlation of MR imaging and provocative discography and CT discography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hye Won [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Jung Eun; Hong, Sung Hwan; Kang, Heung Sik; Lee, Ji Ho; Oh, Joo Han [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Pyoung [National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the MR imaging abnormalities of the lumbar intervertebral discs, with emphasis being placed on the high intensity zone (HIZ) with the use of discography for pain provocation and disc morphologic evaluation of the disc. Consecutive patients with low back pain unresponsive to conservative treatment, and who were being considered for spinal fusion had MRI performed, and this was followed by lumbar discography. The MR imaging, discography and CT discography (CTD) were evaluated for all of the 19 patients. Forty-three lumbar discs in 19 patients were included in this study. The findings of MR and CTD images were evaluated retrospectively with the professional opinion and agreement of two radiologists. MR images were assessed for the presence or absence of decreased T2-wighted signal intensity, decreased disc height, annular bulging, HIZ on T2-weighted images and disc herniation. The results of pain provocation were graded as 0, nonconcordant pain; 1, definite pain, but only as part of the symptom complex; 2, concordant pain. The morphology of CTD was analyzed for presence or absence of disc degeneration, radial tearing and extravasation of the contrast agent. The presence of radial tearing was defined as contrast extension to the outer third of the annulus. The prevalence of all MR abnormalities was calculated, and the data were compared with disc morphologic characteristics and the pain response on provocative discography. We used the chi-square test to analyze the results. Grade 1 and 2 discogenic pain was observed in 8 (19%) and 12 disc levels (28%), respectively. All of the seven non-degenerated discs on MR had no pain response. The decreased SI on T2-weighted image, annular bulging and HIZ were significantly correlated with discogenic pain. Extravasation of contrast media had good correlation with annular bulging and disc herniation on MRI. Radial tearing on CT discography correlated significantly with HIZ. The HIZ was

  13. Stoats and the Irish question

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martínková, Natália; Searle, J. B.

    -, Spring (2008), s. 37 ISSN 1479-2605 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : stoats * Ireland Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour http://planetearth.nerc.ac.uk/features/story.aspx?id=77

  14. Opioid Hypersensitivity: Predictors of Allergy and Role of Drug Provocation Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Philip H; Ue, Kok Loong; Wagner, Annette; Rutkowski, Ryszard; Rutkowski, Krzysztof

    True IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to opioids is rare and many reactions are due to direct mast cell degranulation. Opioid drug provocation testing (DPT) is the gold standard for diagnosis but is underutilized. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics and predictors of opioid hypersensitivity, as well as outcomes of opioid DPT. Patients referred for opioid DPT over the past 9 years were studied. Patient characteristics, indications for opioid use, symptoms of index reaction, and outcomes of DPT were analyzed. Association analysis was performed to study variables associated with a diagnosis of opioid hypersensitivity. Of the total of 98 patients referred with suspected opioid hypersensitivity, 15 (15%) were diagnosed with opioid allergy. Angioedema (odds ratio [OR]: 5.66; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.49-21.47; P = .011) and hypotension (OR: 5.00; 95% CI: 1.15-21.70; P = .032) were significantly more frequent in opioid allergic patients than those with a negative DPT. Patients who received opioids during anesthesia were significantly more likely to be opioid allergic (OR: 6.74; 95% CI: 2.05-22.13; P = .001). In contrast, a negative association was identified with patients who received opioids for analgesia (OR: 0.27; 95% CI: 0.08-0.86; P = .008). Only 15% of our cohort were diagnosed with opioid allergy, emphasizing the importance of DPT in preventing erroneous overdiagnosis. Patients with a history of angioedema or hypotension as their index reaction were significantly more likely to be opioid allergic. DPT are safe when performed by experienced clinicians after risk stratification and using individualized protocols. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Amoxicillin allergy in children: five-day drug provocation test in the diagnosis of nonimmediate reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Francesca; Cianferoni, Antonella; Barni, Simona; Pucci, Neri; Rossi, Maria Elisabetta; Novembre, Elio

    2015-01-01

    The drug provocation test (DPT) is the gold standard to rule out drug hypersensitivity. There are standardized DPT protocols to diagnose immediate reactions to drugs, but not for nonimmediate reactions. The aim of this study was to show the sensitivity and specificity of an allergy work-up that included a 5-day DPT in children with histories of nonimmediate reactions to amoxicillin through focusing on a pediatric population with histories of immediate and nonimmediate reactions to amoxicillin. Two hundred consecutive patients with histories of amoxicillin reactions referred to the Allergy Unit of Anna Meyer Children's Hospital for suspected drug allergy from 2008 to 2011 underwent in vivo tests with the culprit drug according to European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology guidelines. Moreover, most of those children, regardless of the skin tests results, were challenged with amoxicillin for a total of 5 days. In 4 years, 200 patients were evaluated for a history of drug hypersensitivity to amoxicillin. The majority of patients (76%) had a history of mild nonimmediate reactions. All 200 patients underwent skin tests, and 9 of 200 tested positive. A total of 177 DPTs were performed with amoxicillin for 5 days in each child. Diagnosis of amoxicillin allergy was confirmed by a DPT in 17 patients (9.6%); 14/17 had history of nonimmediate reactions; 4/14 (26.6%) reacted on day 5. According to our results, a long-term DPT protocol increases the sensitivity of the allergy work-up, and it should be recommended for patients with a history of amoxicillin nonimmediate reaction. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The nasal provocation test combined with spirometry establishes paradoxical vocal fold motion in allergic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Celso Eduardo; Argentão, Daiana Guedes Pinto; Lima, Regiane Patussi dos Santos; da Silva, Mariana Dias; dos Santos, Raquel Acácia Pereira Gonçalves

    2013-01-01

    Vocal cord dysfunction (also called paradoxical vocal cord motion) or paradoxical vocal fold motion (PVFM) is an event elicited by specific and nonspecific triggers in which its diagnosis is limited by the restricted number of available functional tests. This study was designed to appreciate the contribution of the spirometric changes elicited by the allergen-specific nasal provocation test (NPT) performed with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus for the diagnosis of PVFM in subjects with known sensitization to this allergen. In total, 63 subjects with allergic rhinitis who had previously been shown to be sensitized to D. pteronyssinus and who had experienced one or more episodes of inspiratory shortness of breath underwent two spirometric tests, one before (pre-NPT) and another 15 minutes after the allergen-specific NPT (post-NPT). The forced inspiratory vital capacity (FIVC), forced inspiratory volume in 2 seconds (FIV2), and the ratio between the FIV in 1 second and FIVC (FIV1/FIVC) were measured by spirometry. The morphology of the post-NPT inspiratory loop was compared with the pre-NPT inspiratory loop. We found that 18 subjects (28.5%) showed alterations suggestive of PVFM on post-NPT spirometry (e.g., truncation and/or flattening of the inspiratory loop). The mean differences between the pre-NPT and post-NPT values for the whole group were significant using a two-tailed paired t-test for the FIVC (4.1; 95% confidence interval [CI95%], 1.4-6.8), FIV1/FIVC ratio (2.7; CI95%, 0.05-5.3), and FIV2 (7.2; CI95%, 3.4-11). Allergen-specific NPT combined with spirometry is useful to show allergen-specific laryngeal hyperresponsiveness in allergic subjects with PVFM. Brazilian clinical trial registry platform (Plataforma Brasil, CAAE 07971212.0.0000.5480).

  17. Clinical value of single versus composite provocative clinical tests in the assessment of painful shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaffi, Fausto; Ciapetti, Alessandro; Carotti, Marina; Gasparini, Stefania; Filippucci, Emilio; Grassi, Walter

    2010-04-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate the clinical value of the provocative clinical tests and propose a composite index for the assessment of painful shoulder, using ultrasonography (US) as reference method. Two hundred three patients with painful shoulder underwent both clinical and US evaluations. The physical examination was carried out performing the Hawkins, Jobe, Patte, Gerber, and Speed tests. Each test was included in a composite index namely, SNAPSHOT (Simple Numeric Assessment of Pain by SHOulder Tests). The US examination was performed by a rheumatologist experienced in US and blinded to clinical findings. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, positive and negative likelihood ratio of each clinical test were calculated. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to assess the performance of the composite SNAPSHOT index. Sensitivity was low for the clinical diagnosis of all shoulder abnormalities. The highest sensitivity and smallest negative likelihood ratio were found for the Hawkins (63.88% and 0.50%) and Patte (62.21% and 0.52%) tests. Specificity was good for Speed (76.33%), Gerber (75.42%), and Patte (74.20%) tests. Patte and Speed tests were the most accurate (71.12% and 66.41%, respectively). The calculated area under the ROC curve related to the SNAPSHOT composite index was 0.881 +/- 0.026. With an optimal cut-off point of 3, the sensitivity and specificity were 75.8% and 87.5%, respectively. The results of the present study showed that SNAPSHOT is a feasible, informative and quantitative composite index for the assessment of painful shoulder in the clinical setting.

  18. Evaluation of drug provocation test-related anxiety in patients with drug hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyyiğit, Şadan; Aydın, Ömür; Yılmaz, İnsu; Özdemir, Seçil Kepil; Cankorur, Vesile Şentürk; Atbaşoğlu, Cem; Çelik, Gülfem Elif

    2016-09-01

    Drug provocation tests (DPTs) are important in the treatment of patients with drug hypersensitivity (DH), but they carry certain hypersensitivity reaction risks, which lead to procedure-related concerns in patients. To investigate DPT-related anxiety and its effect on long-term use of tested drugs. The study included patients who underwent DPT from July 1, 2009, to July 1, 2012. After recording the patients' history and characteristics, a variety of psychiatric (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Panic and Agoraphobia Scale, and the Maudsley Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory) and quality-of-life (36-item Short Form Health Survey) tests were performed. DPT-related anxiety was also evaluated using a visual analog scale. The patients were requestioned about whether they had used the tested drug within 1 year. A total of 126 patients were included in the study. According to the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, 23.4% and 30.6% of the patients had depression and anxiety symptoms, respectively. The mean (SD) visual analog scale anxiety scores after a negative DPT result were lower than those before DPTs (2 [2.5] after vs 5.2 [3.4] before; P anxiety related to drug reactions, despite negative DPT results and symptoms indicated for use of the drug. Our findings suggest that DPTs in themselves cause significant anxiety in patients with DH. Importantly, anxiety levels decreased after a negative test result. However, our results also suggested that a negative DPT result is not convincing enough for some patients to use the tested drug when needed in the future. Therefore, supporting strategies appear to be the most effective way to eliminate DH-related anxiety of patients. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Provocation proven drug allergy in Thai children with adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indradat, Somying; Veskitkul, Jittima; Pacharn, Punchama; Jirapongsananuruk, Orathai; Visitsunthorn, Nualanong

    2016-03-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a common healthcare problem. The drug provocation test (DPT) is a gold standard for ADR diagnosis. To evaluate a correlation between history of ADRs, skin prick test (SPT), intradermal test (ID) and DPT in Thai children. This was a retrospective review of 211 children under 16 years of age who had a history of ADRs and underwent DPT from January 2006 to December 2012. Two hundred and thirty six (236) DPTs were performed in 211 children with a history of ADRs. The median age at which DPTs were performed was 4 years. Thirty-four children (14.4%) had positive DPT. The positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratio (LR) + and LR- of SPT were 50, 85.7, 6.9, 98.8%, 5.8 and 0.9, respectively. The PPV, NPV, sensitivity, specificity, LR+ and LR- of ID were 33.3, 84.6, 20, 91.7%, 2.4 and 0.9, respectively. Different presentation of symptoms (maculopapular rashes, urticaria, angioedema and anaphylaxis) did not predict SPT, ID and DPT results. Positive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but not atopy, was a risk in the present scope of evaluation for drug allergy (odds ratio 11.44, 95% confidence interval 2.60-50.41). Drug allergy, denoted by positive DPT, was present in 14.4% of Thai children with a history of ADRs. Antibiotics were the most common cause of ADRs. Both SPT and ID had high NPV and specificity but did not predict DPT results. HIV positivity is a risk factor of drug allergy in Thai children.

  20. Esophageal reflexes modulate frontoparietal response in neonates: Novel application of concurrent NIRS and provocative esophageal manometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakiraih, Joanna F.; Hasenstab, Kathryn A.; Dar, Irfaan; Gao, Xiaoyu; Bates, D. Gregory; Kashou, Nasser H.

    2014-01-01

    Central and peripheral neural regulation of swallowing and aerodigestive reflexes is unclear in human neonates. Functional near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a noninvasive method to measure changes in oxyhemoglobin (HbO) and deoxyhemoglobin (HbD). Pharyngoesophageal manometry permits evaluation of aerodigestive reflexes. Modalities were combined to investigate feasibility and to test neonatal frontoparietal cortical changes during pharyngoesophageal (visceral) stimulation and/or swallowing. Ten neonates (45.6 ± 3.0 wk postmenstrual age, 4.1 ± 0.5 kg) underwent novel pharyngoesophageal manometry concurrent with NIRS. To examine esophagus-brain interactions, we analyzed cortical hemodynamic response (HDR) latency and durations during aerodigestive provocation and esophageal reflexes. Data are presented as means ± SE or percent. HDR rates were 8.84 times more likely with basal spontaneous deglutition compared with sham stimuli (P = 0.004). Of 182 visceral stimuli, 95% were analyzable for esophageal responses, 38% for HDR, and 36% for both. Of analyzable HDR (n = 70): 1) HbO concentration (μmol/l) baseline 1.5 ± 0.7 vs. 3.7 ± 0.7 poststimulus was significant (P = 0.02), 2) HbD concentration (μmol/l) between baseline 0.1 ± 0.4 vs. poststimulus −0.5 ± 0.4 was not significant (P = 0.73), and 3) hemispheric lateralization was 21% left only, 29% right only, and 50% bilateral. During concurrent esophageal and NIRS responses (n = 66): 1) peristaltic reflexes were present in 74% and HDR in 61% and 2) HDR was 4.75 times more likely with deglutition reflex vs. secondary peristaltic reflex (P = 0.016). Concurrent NIRS with visceral stimulation is feasible in neonates, and frontoparietal cortical activation is recognized. Deglutition contrasting with secondary peristalsis is related to cortical activation, thus implicating higher hierarchical aerodigestive protective functional neural networks. PMID:24789204

  1. Alpha-9 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors mediate hypothermic responses elicited by provocative motion in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Longlong; Poppi, Lauren; Rudd, John; Cresswell, Ethan T; Smith, Doug W; Brichta, Alan; Nalivaiko, Eugene

    2017-05-15

    Hypothermic responses accompany motion sickness in humans and can be elicited by provocative motion in rats. We aimed to determine the potential role in these responses of the efferent cholinergic vestibular innervation. To this end, we used knockout (KO) mice lacking α9 cholinoreceptor subunit predominantly expressed in the vestibular hair cells and CBA strain as a wild-type (WT) control. In WT mice, circular horizontal motion (1Hz, 4cm radius, 20min) caused rapid and dramatic falls in core body temperature and surface head temperature associated with a transient rise in the tail temperature; these responses were substantially attenuated in KO mice; changes were (WT vs. KO): for the core body temperature-5.2±0.3 vs. -2.9±0.3°C; for the head skin temperature-3.3±0.2 vs. -1.7±0.2°C; for the tail skin temperature+3.9±1.1 vs+1.1±1.2°C. There was a close correlation in the time course of cooling the body and the surface of the head. KO mice also required 25% more time to complete a balance test. We conclude: i) that the integrity of cholinergic efferent vestibular system is essential for the full expression of motion-induced hypothermia in mice, and that the role of this system is likely facilitatory; ii) that the system is involvement in control of balance, but the involvement is not major; iii) that in mice, motion-induced body cooling is mediated via increased heat flow through vasodilated tail vasculature and (likely) via reduced thermogenesis. Our results support the idea that hypothermia is a biological correlate of a nausea-like state in animals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Provocation of coronary vasospastic angina using an isoproterenol head-up tilt test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ming-Jui; Wang, Chao-Hung; Cherng, Wen-Jin

    2004-01-01

    The goals of this study were to determine the value of the isoproterenol (ISO) head-up tilt (HUT) test in detecting coronary vasospastic angina and to investigate the possible mechanism responsible for coronary artery spasm. The ISO + HUT test was performed in 16 patients with coronary artery spasm documented by the intracoronary ergonovine provocation test. Patients' blood pressure and heart rate were measured at baseline, during the ISO + HUT (phase I), and during HUT after discontinuation of ISO (phase II). Patients were categorized as test-positive if they developed angina with ST-segment elevation during testing. Eight patients (50%) were test-positive (5 in phase I and 3 in phase II). Between the test-positive and test-negative groups, no significant differences were noted in the changes in blood pressure throughout the test. However, there were significant differences in the changes in heart rate from supine to 2 minutes after HUT under ISO infusion (-17 +/-22 vs 11 +/-25 beats/minute; p=0.035). In those patients with a positive result in the phase I stage, the heart rate decreased initially after tilt-up, and then significantly increased later (from 85 +/-16 to 110 +/-27 beats/minute; p=0.043), when coronary vasospasm occurred. In those patients with a positive result in the phase II stage, coronary vasospasm occurred immediately after HUT, when there was an insignificant transient increase in heart rate from the supine to the HUT position (from 85 +/-12 to 92 +/-11 beats/minute; p=0.109). The ISO + HUT test can provoke coronary vasospasm with ST-segment elevation in 50% of the patients with coronary artery spasm, when combined with an extensional protocol of HUT after discontinuation of ISO. This study suggests that the induction of coronary artery spasm during HUT testing is associated with a rapid elevation of sympathetic activity during augmented parasympathetic activity.

  3. Question answering for biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Mariana; Leser, Ulf

    2015-03-01

    Biologists often pose queries to search engines and biological databases to obtain answers related to ongoing experiments. This is known to be a time consuming, and sometimes frustrating, task in which more than one query is posed and many databases are consulted to come to possible answers for a single fact. Question answering comes as an alternative to this process by allowing queries to be posed as questions, by integrating various resources of different nature and by returning an exact answer to the user. We have surveyed the current solutions on question answering for Biology, present an overview on the methods which are usually employed and give insights on how to boost performance of systems in this domain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The social question revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenneth, Petersson; Olsson, Ulf; Krejsler, John B.

    2015-01-01

    the diversity of relevant populations “without obstacles related to their social and economic background”. In the 19th century the social question was raised in a context of industrialization of societies. It dealt with suggestions about disintegration of predominant social structures and the management......The focus of this chapter is the re-installation of the social question as a historical practice. The purpose is to investigate how historic figures return and are applied in contemporary political discourses, more precisely in the context of education, education policy and teacher education....... Contemporary as well as the 19th century debates about the social dimension and the social question deal with social integration. The recent London Communiqué of Ministers emphasizes the importance of the social dimension in higher education in terms of fostering social cohesion, reducing inequalities...

  5. The Question Concerning Thinking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Søren

    2008-01-01

    Martin Heidegger's thought-provoking essay "The Question Concerning Technology" (1977a) placed technology at the heart of philosophy. Heidegger tried to show that the essence of technology provokes humans to think about the world in a very dangerous way. Yet if we follow Heidegger's analysis...... of technology, what role does that ascribe to philosophy? To be able to understand the programmatic scope of Heidegger's question ‘concerning' technology, we need to see it as inseparable from his famous thesis about the end of philosophy (1977c) and what he considers to be the ideal kind of thinking. However......, by doing so, we will in the end realize two important things. First, that Heidegger's declaration of the end of philosophy in fact also means the end of anything we can meaningfully call thinking. Second, that Heidegger's own thinking is completely different from his own ideal of thinking. Our question...

  6. Creativity of students’ stories: Case study at primary school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksić Slavica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores a question relevant to educational practice: to what extent are teachers’ assessments of students’ creative story writing reliable and useful for gaining insight into students’ creative production in this domain, and for shaping and providing adequate support to creative potential of young people at school setting. Participants in this study were sixth and seventh grade primary school students who wrote stories (N=142, and teachers who assessed creativity of these stories (N=3. A statistically significant, but low agreement was found among teachers’ assessments of the stories’ creativity. The teachers identified two groups of creativity indicators: the first group refers to expression in the verbal domain (knowledge of language, playing with language, while the other group refers to creativity in general (originality, sentiment, ethic dimension. Case studies of four most creative story writers failed to find a typical profile with critical contribution of any indicator or precondition for their creative production. Narrative analysis of the most creative stories confirmed the existence of those indicators of creative potential which the teachers reported in their essays. It is concluded that an individual approach in interpreting data on the child’ talents is necessary even at the primary school level. It is recommended to combine qualitative and quantitative methods, which enables obtaining data that would not be accessible by using only one or the other approach. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 47008: Improving the quality and accessibility of education in modernization processes in Serbia i br. 179034: From encouraging initiative, cooperation and creativity in education to new roles and identities in society

  7. Card Stories on YouTube: A New Frame for Online Self-Disclosure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Misoch

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the phenomenon of so-called (note card stories on YouTube. Card stories can be described as self-disclosing videos or confessions, using a new frame for telling one’s own story audio-visually to the public by combining ‘old’ (hand-written messages and ‘new’ media (video, computer mediated communication. In 2012/13, a qualitative and exploratory study with a sample of 25 card story videos on YouTube was conducted. The content and visual analysis revealed (1 that these videos are bound to a very specific frame of presentation, (2 that they deal with specific topics, and (3 that the presenter does not remain (visually anonymous. These findings question previous research results that stressed a strong correlation between online self-disclosure and (visual anonymity; further, the findings show that this special frame of textual confessions via video supports deep self-disclosures.

  8. Teaching psychiatry through literature : the short story as case history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, W M

    1994-12-01

    The author proposes a simple systematic way to analyze short stories as if they were case histories. Class discussions are organized around five basic questions, stated in the article, and use Erikson's framework of life stages to translate life experiences into the language of psychic conflict. Fiction writers effectively dramatize psychological and developmental issues in a way that makes them real and memorable to psychiatric residents. Stories may be of particular value in illustrating the process of change and in exploring the topic of prognosis, which are often overlooked in more traditional teaching formats. The author has presented this approach at several recent meetings of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training and the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and workshop participants have reported success in its use, which depends on the teacher's clinical rather than literary skills.

  9. Istifham in the stories in Alquran from the perpective of Speech Act Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rochmat Budi Santosa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the most effective ways to attract an audience in order to influence him is through question. Many kinds of question. Questions in arabic terms known as istifham are also found in the stories. This study will make an attempt in affirmation of how istifhams, which is then simplified into the terms of questions, are clearly highlighted to enhance the connectivity of the components of the Quranic texts. Specifically how questions in the stories in Alquran found and understood using contextual frameworks. The content analysis is employed through speech act theory. It is found that            Istifham serves as question words, either to inquire about something of understanding, or not, the past and the future. Istifham are specifically used to ask about the place, time, circumstances, number, case dubious and uncertain. Sometimes question words come out of its original meaning to another meaning that can be seen through the sentence structure, so the function istifham here not as a question word again. Therefore, the sentence does not allow it to be interpreted as an interrogative sentence. Key words: istifham, stories, speech act.

  10. The life stories of motherhood among divorced women in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-Ling

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to delineate life stories of motherhood among divorced women, and to answer the following research questions: (1) How does their motherhood develop? (2) How does divorce impact on motherhood? (3) How do mothers cope with divorce? (4) What does motherhood mean for these mothers? Through in-depth interviews, inter-subjective interaction and story writing, a total of six women's stories were collected. The following titles were found for stories of motherhood among these divorced women: (1) Walking in balanced steps. (2) Becoming a single mom is not a surprise. (3) Seeking reunion for the sake of the kids. (4) Grieving for the loss of an integrated family. (5) I found myself. (6) A diamond becomes a stone. Motherhood was found not to be a set of stable role expectations, but to be transforming and shaping through reflective thoughts on motherhood, which were impacted by interactions between the mothers and their children, and by the social contexts they encountered. The impact of divorce on motherhood was found to be both positive and negative. Some families even enjoyed life more after discontinuing their chaotic marriage. Still, motherhood of divorced women was full of challenges and disadvantages due to a concrete double burden and invisible social persecution. Invisible social persecution of divorce was performed through the mechanism of stigma. Stigma was transmitted through the value myths of motherhood, which are passed from generation to generation through parent-child interactions. Stigmatized divorce made these mothers feel more guilt and powerlessness. Divorced motherhood was therefore found to be intertwined with processes of caring and grieving. In this research, however, community resources were found to be very helpful in supporting these families, and were able to empower them to overcome the myths. Life story research was found to be an effective support, inspiring deeper reflection, and empowering the storyteller. The

  11. Classroom Questioning for Georgraphy Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, Gary

    1973-01-01

    Questioning is an important teaching skill. Teaching should be able to ask thinking' questions as well as memory' questions and they should be able to ask questions about ideas as well as facts. Two dimensions of a question are reviewed; the dimensions are then combined into a matrix illustrating thirteen types of cognitive questions. (Author)

  12. A Question of Choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grabiner Gene

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Women's reproductive rights, reproductive health, and constitutional privacy rights in the United States are addressed in light of the contemporary onslaught of the Christian Right. The misuse of State power by fundamentalist social forces in America is critiqued. The article also briefly reviews the question of State control over women's bodies.

  13. My Favorite Exam Question

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styer, Dan

    2015-01-01

    My favorite exam question comes from the final exam in an introductory mechanics course: "A rolling 31 ton railroad boxcar collides with a stationary flatcar. The coupling mechanism activates so the cars latch together and roll down the track attached. Of the initial kinetic energy, 38% dissipates as heat, sound, vibrations, mechanical…

  14. Social Epistemology: 5 Questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Social Epistemology: 5 Questions is a collection of interviews with some of the world’s most influential scholars working on social epistemology from a range of disciplinary perspectives. We hear their views on social epistemology; its aim, scope, use, broader intellectual environment, future...

  15. Shaping Faster Question Answering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Lloyd O.

    To test a hypothesis that question answering speed and accuracy can be increased by an automated shaping procedure, a film, "The Analysis of Behavior," was presented individually by a teaching machine during twice-per-week sessions to one high school student and 12 junior college students. Six of the students were informed of monetary rewards for…

  16. Some Questions on Accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follett, Robert J. R.

    An educational publisher poses several questions that are related to accountability for the purpose of stimulating discussion on this topic at a national convention of social studies teachers. Is it appropriate to insist upon the verification or validation of instructional materials? Is it possible to make more money available for the purchase of…

  17. IC: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ICA staff and volunteers answer questions from patients, healthcare providers, researchers and the public. Below are some of the most commonly asked ... Exercise & IC Managing Stress Sleep & IC Quitting Smoking Public Restrooms ... IC & Healthcare Toolkit Health Insurance Finding the Right Doctor Pain ...

  18. Cyberterrorism: the story so far

    OpenAIRE

    Conway, Maura

    2003-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the origins and development of the concept of cyberterrorism. It seeks to excavate the story of the concept through an analysis of both popular/media renditions of the term and scholarly attempts to define the borders of same. The contention here is not that cyberterrorism cannot happen or will not happen, but that, contrary to popular perception, it has not happened yet.

  19. Creating robust vocabulary frequently asked questions and extended examples

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Isabel L

    2008-01-01

    Bringing Words to Life has enlivened the classrooms of hundreds of thousands of teachers. Responding to readers' success stories, practical questions, and requests for extended examples, this ideal volume builds on the groundbreaking work of Bringing Words to Life. The authors present additional tools, tips, and detailed explanations of such questions as which words to teach, when and how to teach them, and how to adapt instruction for English language learners. They provide specific instructional sequences, including assessments, for grades K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12, as well as interactive less

  20. Trapeziometacarpal Arthritis: A Prospective Clinical Evaluation of the Thumb Adduction and Extension Provocative Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelberman, Richard H; Boone, Sean; Osei, Daniel A; Cherney, Steven; Calfee, Ryan P

    2015-07-01

    To determine the diagnostic performance (ie, sensitivity, specificity, interrater reliability) of the thumb metacarpal adduction and extension tests against traditional examination maneuvers for trapeziometacarpal (TMC) arthritis. This cross-sectional study recruited 129 patients from 2 outpatient offices at a tertiary institution. All patients had radiographic wrist examinations and completed a standardized physical examination consisting of the thumb adduction and extension tests as well as standard examination maneuvers for radial wrist and thumb pain. The physical examinations were performed by 1 of 2 attending physicians and an independent examiner. Patients were recruited for 3 diagnostic groups: TMC arthritis, radial wrist or hand pain, and nonradial wrist pain controls. Statistical analysis calculated the sensitivity, specificity, and interrater reliability of each physical examination maneuver for detecting TMC arthritis. The thumb adduction maneuver was found to have a sensitivity of 0.94 (confidence interval [CI], 0.82-0.98) and a specificity of 0.93 (CI, 0.86-0.97). The thumb extension maneuver had a sensitivity of 0.94 (CI, 0.82-0.98) and a specificity of 0.95 (CI, 0.87-0.98). The interrater reliability was excellent for both the adduction (κ = 0.79) and the extension tests (κ = 0.84). The grind test had a sensitivity of 0.44 (CI, 0.30-0.59), a specificity of 0.92 (CI, 0.84-0.97), and poor interrater reliability (0.31). Point tenderness at the TMC joint had a sensitivity of 0.94 (CI, 0.82-0.98), a specificity of 0.81 (CI, 0.71-0.88) and fair interrater reliability (κ = 0.63). The adduction and extension tests each proved to be more sensitive than the grind test for the detection of TMC arthritis. Further, these provocative tests were more specific for basal joint arthrosis than was the elicitation of point tenderness at the joint. The metacarpal adduction and extension maneuvers demonstrated excellent utility as screening tests for the

  1. Five-year major clinical outcomes according to severity of coronary artery spasm as assessed by intracoronary acetylcholine provocation test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Hoon; Her, Ae-Young; Rha, Seung-Woon; Choi, Byoung Geol; Shim, Minsuk; Choi, Se Yeon; Byun, Jae Kyeong; Li, Hu; Kim, Woohyeun; Kang, Jun Hyuk; Choi, Jah Yeon; Park, Eun Jin; Park, Sung Hun; Lee, Sunki; Na, Jin Oh; Choi, Cheol Ung; Lim, Hong Euy; Kim, Eung Ju; Park, Chang Gyu; Seo, Hong Seog; Oh, Dong Joo

    2017-10-10

    Long-term clinical outcome data according to severity of coronary artery spasm (CAS) as assessed by an intracoronary acetylcholine provocation test are limited in series of Asian patients. To investigate 5-year clinical outcomes in patients with CAS according to CAS severity. In total, 5873 consecutive patients with insignificant coronary artery disease (<70% fixed stenosis) who underwent an acetylcholine provocation test were enrolled and divided into four groups according to CAS severity during the acetylcholine provocation test: negative, borderline positive, moderately positive and severely positive. CAS severity was assessed by quantitative coronary angiography. We investigated 5-year clinical outcomes according to CAS severity. Over a follow-up period of up to 5 years, before adjustment, the severely-positive CAS group showed a significantly higher incidence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE; composite of death, myocardial infarction and de novo revascularization) (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.834, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.047-3.211; P=0.033), total death (HR: 3.124, 95% CI: 1.047-9.322; P=0.041), myocardial infarction (HR: 3.190, 95% CI: 1.069-9.519; P=0.037) and recurrent angina (HR: 1.762, 95% CI: 1.363-2.278; P<0.001) compared with the negative group. However, after adjustment for baseline confounders, only the incidence of recurrent angina (HR: 1.323, 95% CI: 1.014-1.726; P=0.039) was significantly higher in the severely-positive CAS group compared with the negative group. The severity of CAS in the positive group was not associated with an increased incidence of MACE after adjustment for covariates compared with the negative group, but the severely-positive CAS group was associated with a higher incidence of recurrent angina compared with the negative group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of RF fields emitted from smart phones on cardio-respiratory parameters: a preliminary provocation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Min Kyung; Nam, Ki Chang; Lee, Da Som; Jang, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Deok Won

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental setup for evaluating the physiological effects of radiofrequency (RF) emitted from a Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (WCDMA) module with a 24 dBm at 1950 MHz for specific absorption rate (SAR(1g)) of 1.57 W/kg. This provocation study was executed in a double-blind study of two volunteer groups of 10 self-reported electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) and 10 non-EHS subjects under both sham and real exposures in a randomly assigned and counter-balanced order. In the preliminary results, WCDMA RF exposure of 30 min did not have any effects on physiological changes in either group.

  3. Living in the question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, J

    1999-01-01

    We live in a fast moving-world. Business has accelerated to breathtaking speeds in the 1990s--and in the last few years the afterburner has really kicked in. The speed of change is overwhelming. Especially in health care, who has time to "live in the question?" We need to decide things quickly, get the decision out of the way, and move on, right? Maybe. Biology shows us that you can't plan ahead very far. New things come along that you don't even have a category for, and therefore you don't even see them. Things are going to happen that you literally have no notion are even possible. The key to succeeding in this environment? Don't plan ahead. Stay curious. Make small bets. Build organizational hothouses. Feed the seedlings that grow. The challenge is to remain curious, to live in the question, both personally and organizationally.

  4. Questions about elastic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Engelbrecht, Jüri

    2015-01-01

    This book addresses the modelling of mechanical waves by asking the right questions about them and trying to find suitable answers. The questions follow the analytical sequence from elementary understandings to complicated cases, following a step-by-step path towards increased knowledge. The focus is on waves in elastic solids, although some examples also concern non-conservative cases for the sake of completeness. Special attention is paid to the understanding of the influence of microstructure, nonlinearity and internal variables in continua. With the help of many mathematical models for describing waves, physical phenomena concerning wave dispersion, nonlinear effects, emergence of solitary waves, scales and hierarchies of waves as well as the governing physical parameters are analysed. Also, the energy balance in waves and non-conservative models with energy influx are discussed. Finally, all answers are interwoven into the canvas of complexity.

  5. Quantum theory from questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhn, Philipp Andres; Wever, Christopher S. P.

    2017-01-01

    We reconstruct the explicit formalism of qubit quantum theory from elementary rules on an observer's information acquisition. Our approach is purely operational: we consider an observer O interrogating a system S with binary questions and define S 's state as O 's "catalog of knowledge" about S . From the rules we derive the state spaces for N elementary systems and show that (a) they coincide with the set of density matrices over an N -qubit Hilbert space C2N; (b) states evolve unitarily under the group PSU (2N) according to the von Neumann evolution equation; and (c) O 's binary questions correspond to projective Pauli operator measurements with outcome probabilities given by the Born rule. As a by-product, this results in a propositional formulation of quantum theory. Aside from offering an informational explanation for the theory's architecture, the reconstruction also unravels previously unnoticed structural insights. We show that, in a derived quadratic information measure, (d) qubits satisfy inequalities which bound the information content in any set of mutually complementary questions to 1 bit; and (e) maximal sets of mutually complementary questions for one and two qubits must carry precisely 1 bit of information in pure states. The latter relations constitute conserved informational charges which define the unitary groups and, together with their conservation conditions, the sets of pure quantum states. These results highlight information as a "charge of quantum theory" and the benefits of this informational approach. This work emphasizes the sufficiency of restricting to an observer's information to reconstruct the theory and completes the quantum reconstruction initiated in a companion paper (P. Höhn, arXiv:1412.8323).

  6. Questions of wisdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt Bunkers, Sandra

    2009-04-01

    In this column questions concerning wisdom are addressed, such as, what is wisdom? Can wisdom be taught in the academy? Several perspectives on wisdom from philosophy, education, business, and psychology are presented. Wisdom with creativity-creativity with wisdom is then explored through discussion of Parse's humanbecoming teaching-learning model and Laird Hamilton's life lessons learned from surfing, which he termed wisdom of the wave. The column concludes with consideration of the wise person.

  7. 501 reading comprehension questions

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This updated edition offers the most extensive and varied practice for all types of questions students might face on standardized and in-class tests. With this guide, students will learn to develop expert reading strategies, understand how to read faster and with greater comprehension, overcome reading anxiety, and increase appreciation of reading for pleasure. This book's step-by-step approach provides graduated coverage that moves from the basics to more advanced reading.

  8. Eight Questions about Corruption

    OpenAIRE

    Jakob Svensson

    2005-01-01

    This paper will discuss eight frequently asked questions about public corruption: (1) What is corruption? (2) Which countries are the most corrupt? (3) What are the common characteristics of countries with high corruption? (4) What is the magnitude of corruption? (5) Do higher wages for bureaucrats reduce corruption? (6) Can competition reduce corruption? (7) Why have there been so few (recent) successful attempts to fight corruption? (8) Does corruption adversely affect growth?

  9. Seeing the World through Mortal Kombat-Colored Glasses: Violent Video Games and the Development of a Short-Term Hostile Attribution Bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsh, Steven J.

    1998-01-01

    Investigated the effects of playing violent versus non-violent video games on the interpretation of ambiguous provocation situation. Found that children playing a violent video game responded more negatively to three of six ambiguous provocation story questions than children playing the non-violent video game. Data suggest that playing violent…

  10. Our Stories Matter: Storytelling and Social Justice in the Hollaback! Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wånggren, Lena

    2016-01-01

    As feminist and anti-racist scholars and activists have long known, which stories predominate and which are marginalised is always a question of power and authority--about who is entitled to speak, and who has the authority to decide the meanings of words and actions. Storytelling can be used as a tool for social justice, as exemplified by the…

  11. Whose Immigration Story?: Attending to Hidden Messages of Material in Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomidoy, Eleni; Williams, Gwendolyn

    2010-01-01

    Sometimes materials used in schools with good intentions can have effects opposite from those stated. Through the microscopic analysis of a parent-student immigration interview assignment on a social studies unit on immigration, this article aims to uncover the hidden story that underlies the questions asked. In so doing, it intends not only to…

  12. Intersections of life histories and science identities : the stories of three preservice elementary teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avraamidou, Lucy

    Grounded within Connelly and Clandinin's conceptualization of teachers' professional identity in terms of stories to live by' and through a life-history lens, this multiple case study aimed to respond to the following questions: (a) How do three preservice elementary teachers view themselves as

  13. The Stories We Need: Anthropology, Philosophy, Narrative and Higher Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scutt, Cecily; Hobson, Julia

    2013-01-01

    As higher education research is largely practised by those immersed within the university, the questions we ask, and the stories we tell, over time co-create the university itself. Using Bruner's concept of the "narrative mode," we argue for a revaluing of narrative and storytelling within higher education research. We ground our…

  14. Family stories : oral tradition, memories of the past, and contemporary conflicts over land in Mentawai - Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tulius, Juniator

    2012-01-01

    This is a study of oral tradition focusing on family stories that relate to historical events and social issues of contemporary Mentawai kin groups. I give descriptive answers for the central research question of how and to what extent oral narratives are involved in dealing with current issues

  15. Recycling Stories: Lessons from Community Arts-Based Process and Exhibition in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Jayme, Bruno; Monk, David; Tremblay, Crystal

    2016-01-01

    How can we create meaningful adult education and engagement opportunities for people who work in the recycling industry in Brazil and suffer marginalisation? This question guided the development of a series of community arts-based workshops and public exhibits in São Paulo. In this article, we share the stories of two workers from the recycling…

  16. RE-Powering Success Stories: Green Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    These success stories discuss sites on formerly contaminated lands, landfills, and mine sites that are manufacturing components for renewable energy, either solar panels, wind turbines, or other components.

  17. Automated Story Capture From Conversational Speech

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gordon, Andrew S; Ganesan, Kavita

    2005-01-01

    While storytelling has long been recognized as an important part of effective knowledge management in organizations, knowledge management technologies have generally not distinguished between stories...

  18. Shaping a Stories of Resilience Model from urban American Indian elders' narratives of historical trauma and resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinschmidt, Kerstin M; Attakai, Agnes; Kahn, Carmella B; Whitewater, Shannon; Teufel-Shone, Nicolette

    2016-01-01

    American Indians (AIs) have experienced traumatizing events but practice remarkable resilience to large-scale and long-term adversities. Qualitative, community-based participatory research served to collect urban AI elders' life narratives on historical trauma and resilience strategies. A consensus group of 15 elders helped finalize open-ended questions that guided 13 elders in telling their stories. Elders shared multifaceted personal stories that revealed the interconnectedness between historical trauma and resilience, and between traditional perceptions connecting past and present, and individuals, families, and communities. Based on the elders' narratives, and supported by the literature, an explanatory Stories of Resilience Model was developed.

  19. The Woman in the Mirror: Imaging the Filipino Woman in Short Stories in English by Filipino Woman Authors

    OpenAIRE

    Veronico Nogales Tarrayo

    2015-01-01

    This paper attempted to draw the image of the Filipino woman as depicted by female protagonists in selected short stories in English (1925-1986) written by Filipino woman authors. Specifically, the paper aimed to answer the following questions: (1) How are female protagonists depicted in the selected short stories written by Filipino woman authors? What are their virtues, vices, passions, and struggles?; and (2) What roles do these female protagonists play in the Philippine society? A vir...

  20. Questioning Danish Cartoon Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, Heidi

    2007-01-01

    The article discusses the language and satirical cartoons that describe African Danes in the Danish media. Starting with a brief historical overview of the social fonction of satirical cartoons in Denmark since the Reformation, it is discussed whether satire and satirical cartoons actually have s...... Danes today when it is considered demeaning and racist in most other countries. The conclusion does emphatically not plead in favour of law enforced limitations of the freedom of expression, but does question the prevalent "freedom of ignorance" concerning black identities which means...

  1. Immediate hypersensitivity to iodinated contrast media: diagnostic accuracy of skin tests and intravenous provocation test with low dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesé, L; Gaouar, H; Autegarden, J-E; Alari, A; Amsler, E; Vial-Dupuy, A; Pecquet, C; Francès, C; Soria, A

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of HSR to iodinated contrast media (ICM) is challenging based on clinical history and skin tests. This study evaluates the negative predictive value (NPV) of skin tests and intravenous provocation test (IPT) with low-dose ICM in patients with suspected immediate hypersensitivity reaction (HSR) to ICM. Thirty-seven patients with suspected immediate hypersensitivity reaction to ICM were included retrospectively. Skin tests and a single-blind placebo-controlled intravenous provocation test (IPT) with low-dose iodinated contrast media (ICM) were performed. Skin tests with ICM were positive in five cases (one skin prick test and five intradermal test). Thirty-six patients were challenged successfully by IPT, and only one patient had a positive challenge result, with a grade I reaction by the Ring and Messmer classification. Ten of 23 patients followed up by telephone were re-exposed to a negative tested ICM during radiologic examination; two experienced a grade I immediate reaction. For immediate hypersensitivity reaction to ICM, the NPV for skin tests and IPT with low dose was 80% (95% CI 44-97%). © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The Narrative Gap and Return to Story on Masnavi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Bamashki

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Masnavi’s narrations are not as Linear narration. In regards this aspect, the significant question is that what are the methods that applied by Molavi- narrator in order to make relationship between separated events and sepuences? In general, these methods can be divided into three groups: The use of these formulas represents the narrator’s awareness of delicate and detailed points of storytelling including spoken narrative and several narrative levels. He intentionally efforts to apply such techniques to preserve the Cohesion of Plats and recall the naratee to setting of interrupted story.

  3. The Narrative Gap and Return to Story on Masnavi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. S. Bamashki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Masnavi’s narrations are not as Linear narration. In regards this aspect, the significant question is that what are the methods that applied by Molavi- narrator in order to make relationship between separated events and sepuences? In general, these methods can be divided into three groups: The use of these formulas represents the narrator’s awareness of delicate and detailed points of storytelling including spoken narrative and several narrative levels. He intentionally efforts to apply such techniques to preserve the Cohesion of Plats and recall the naratee to setting of interrupted story.

  4. Getting the story right: making computer-generated stories more entertaining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oinonen, K.M.; Theune, Mariet; Nijholt, Antinus; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Maybury, Mark; Stock, Oliviero; Wahlster, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we describe our efforts to increase the entertainment value of the stories generated by our story generation system, the Virtual Storyteller, at the levels of plot creation, discourse generation and spoken language presentation. We also discuss the construction of a story database that

  5. The Stories They Tell: Story Production Difficulties of Children with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Benjamin D.; Hayden, Angela; Lorch, Elizabeth P.; Milich, Richard

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated differences in the structure of stories created by children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and their comparison peers. Children created one story without pictorial cues and one with pictorial cues available. Without cues, children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder told fewer stories based on a…

  6. The pied piper of Hamelin: Exploring the story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Mury Bergmann

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This article’s goal is to explore the story of The Pied Piper of Hamelin. In order to do so, social aspects of childhood in the (probable time when the story was created are presented, as well as some curiosities about the text. Furthermore, this paper brings a personal statement (by the authors of a storytelling activity in a public school nursery in Porto Alegre, based upon the version of the book The Pied Piper of Hamelin, by Tatiana Belinky. After some questions and informal conversation about the tale, the children’s verbal expositions were analyzed. The research brings, as a theoretical background, contributions of studies from authors connected, mainly, to the field of Children’s Literature and Education. It brought the conclusion that the piper’s story motivated representative interventions, since during the storytelling activity children used typical aspects of their culture and also showed their dominium of temporal arrangement of the text’s events, as well as their peculiar creativity – according to their age – of recreating in the situation of the so-called make-believe.

  7. Harsh discipline and readiness for interpersonal aggression in Poland and the USA: the mediating role of sensitivity to provocations and frustrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominiak-Kochanek Monika

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of history of harsh parenting on readiness for aggression in young adults testing the mediating effect of emotional reaction to frustration and provocation that is assumed to arise in the context of a history of physical punishment and psychological aggression. Data were collected from 402 participants including 187 Poles (Mage = 9.5; SD = 1.2 and 215 Americans (Mage = 19.16, SD = 1.15. Participants reported retrospectively on corporal punishment and psychological aggression experienced during childhood. Based on self-report instruments, sensitivity to provocation and frustration and three patterns of readiness for aggression in adulthood were assessed. Contrary to the US sample, sensitivity to provocation and frustration were mediators in the Polish sample alone. The important role of contextual factors that define harsh parenting circumstances, such as cultural context and sex of the parent, are discussed.

  8. Everybody Has a Story III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This is the third book in the series “Everybody Has a Story”. The story behind the idea for these books and their title goes back to The Freedom Writers Diary that came about as the result of the teachings of young teacher at a high school in a socially deprived area in Long Beach near Los Angeles...... the participating students as these products might be very personal. And personal it has to be, when you become aware of whom you actually are!...

  9. Trick questions: cosmopolitan hospitality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor Byrne

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Byrne’s paper consists of two parallel texts. The first explores the limits of cosmopolitanism in practice, taking as its subject the Life in the UK Citizenship Test, inaugurated under the Labour Government in 2005. It argues that the test exemplifies the predicament of all attempts at cosmopolitan hospitality as unconditional welcoming, through a discussion of the relation between questioning and welcoming the stranger. Establishing the relationship between cosmopolitanism and hospitality as envisaged in Derrida’s reading of Kant it asks what kind of cosmopolitan hospitality is either possible or desirable by exploring what Derrida calls the ‘perversions’ inherent in the structures of hospitality. It focuses on the concept of the ‘trick questions’ that the state asks the foreigner observed by Derrida in his reading of The Apology of Socrates; questions that seem to invite answers but foreclose the possibilities of a free response. The second text asks how this logic that Derrida identifies can be pushed or coaxed into new ways of addressing the perceived threats of ‘unconditional’ hospitality through a reading of ‘unconditional hospitality’ as queer in the work of Tove Jansson.

  10. Basophil histamine release in the diagnosis of house dust mite and dander allergy of asthmatic children. Comparison between prick test, RAST, basophil histamine release and bronchial provocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostergaard, P A; Ebbesen, F; Nolte, H; Skov, P S

    1990-04-01

    The aim of the study is to compare the glass fibre-based basophil histamine release test with skin test (Phazet), RAST (Phadebas) and bronchial provocation test in children with allergic asthma. The study comprised 68 selected children with a case history of extrinsic allergic asthma to danders (cat and dog) and house-dust mite. Skin prick test, RAST, and histamine release were performed in all children and the bronchial provocation test was used as a reference of "true allergic asthma". A total of 81 allergen bronchial challenges were performed and 44 children experienced 49 positive provocations. In 2.9% (2/68) of the children histamine release could not be performed due to technical difficulties (low histamine release with anti-IgE). Concordances in the range 76-87% were observed with no significant difference between the tests. The highest concordance (87%) was found between histamine release and bronchial provocation test followed by skin prick test vs bronchial provocation (84%) and RAST vs bronchial provocation (80%). The sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each test. All tests showed sensitivities in the range 90-94% and no significant difference between them was observed. The specificity of histamine release, skin prick test, and RAST was 0.78, 0.69, and 0.63, respectively. The specificity of histamine release was better than RAST demonstrated by 95% confidence intervals. In conclusion, it was found that the histamine release test is a convenient diagnostic method and the study indicates a diagnostic value comparable to the common diagnostic methods in clinical allergy.

  11. Simple Texts, Complex Questions: Helping Young Children Generate Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Molly

    2017-01-01

    As they are naturally curious about the world around them, young children ask lots and lots of questions. In classrooms today, however, there seems to be little space for these student-generated questions as teachers are more likely to pose the questions. Research indicates that question generation is an effective strategy to motivate young…

  12. The Korean Question--Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-01

    of the humiliation and explotation suffered in the thirty-six years under Japanese colonial rule. The ruling elites ensure the past is not forgotten...on fire . As he became engulfed with flames, he shouted, "Out with U.S. imperialists!" and jumped off a third -story ledge at Seoul National University

  13. NIMH Answers Questions about Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications How common is suicide in children and teens? What are some of the risks factors for suicide? What are the warning signs? What can I do for myself or someone else? What if someone seems suicidal on social media? What if I want to write a story ...

  14. Automatically classifying question types for consumer health questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Kirk; Kilicoglu, Halil; Fiszman, Marcelo; Demner-Fushman, Dina

    2014-01-01

    We present a method for automatically classifying consumer health questions. Our thirteen question types are designed to aid in the automatic retrieval of medical answers from consumer health resources. To our knowledge, this is the first machine learning-based method specifically for classifying consumer health questions. We demonstrate how previous approaches to medical question classification are insufficient to achieve high accuracy on this task. Additionally, we describe, manually annotate, and automatically classify three important question elements that improve question classification over previous techniques. Our results and analysis illustrate the difficulty of the task and the future directions that are necessary to achieve high-performing consumer health question classification.

  15. Automatically Classifying Question Types for Consumer Health Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Kirk; Kilicoglu, Halil; Fiszman, Marcelo; Demner-Fushman, Dina

    2014-01-01

    We present a method for automatically classifying consumer health questions. Our thirteen question types are designed to aid in the automatic retrieval of medical answers from consumer health resources. To our knowledge, this is the first machine learning-based method specifically for classifying consumer health questions. We demonstrate how previous approaches to medical question classification are insufficient to achieve high accuracy on this task. Additionally, we describe, manually annotate, and automatically classify three important question elements that improve question classification over previous techniques. Our results and analysis illustrate the difficulty of the task and the future directions that are necessary to achieve high-performing consumer health question classification. PMID:25954411

  16. The Gentle Art of Questioning: Writing Great Clicker Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasteen, Stephanie

    2012-02-01

    How does a teacher use questioning effectively? This workshop will focus on writing those questions that engage students, spark their curiosity, help recap material, give you insight into their thinking, or help them learn critical ideas in physics. We will focus on ``peer instruction'' -- a research-tested method of requiring students to discuss challenging questions with one another. We will investigate the surprising power of multiple-choice questions to achieve critical thinking skills. Finally, we will look at writing questions that align with our goals for students, discuss the elements of effective questions, and practice writing questions and work on improving them.

  17. "Robinson Crusoe" and the Story of the Novel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Quentin G.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses stories in general, stories in the novel, and "Robinson Crusoe," focusing on what happens in and to narrative--the transformation in the nature of story--that brings the novel into existence. (DD)

  18. [Effects and significance of methacholine bronchial provocation tests and salbutamol bronchial dilation test on measurements of fractional exhaled nitric oxide in patients with asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jielu; Yu, Huapeng; Tan, Xiaomei; Wu, Shuhan; Zhang, Pan; Fang, Zekui; Wang, Cuilan; He, Xi

    2016-03-01

    To study the effects and significance of methacholine (Mch) bronchial provocation tests and salbutamol bronchial dilation test on measurements of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) in patients with asthma. This was a prospective study conducted between November 2014 and August 2015. A total of 135 patients with asthma visiting the respiratory clinic of Zhujiang Hospital were enrolled. The patients received either Mch bronchial provocation test or salbutamol bronchial dilation test based on their FEV1/FVC values and cooperative degree. Mch bronchial provocation test was performed by using Astograph Jupiter-21 (Astograh group) or APS-Pro airway reaction testing apparatus (APS group), and salbutamol bronchial dilation test was performed by using Jaeger spirometer (Dilation group). We compared the differences between FeNO values measured before examinations (Pre-FeNO) and 5 min after completion of these examinations (Post-FeNO). The geometric mean of Pre-FeNO and Post-FeNO was 28.07 ppb and 24.08 ppb respectively in the Astograh group, with a significant decrease of the FeNO value after the examination (Z=-3.093, P=0.002). A significant difference between Pre-FeNO and Post-FeNO was found in patients who had positive provocation results in the Astograh group (Z=-2.787, P=0.005), but not in the patients with negative results (Z=-1.355, P=0.176). The geometric mean of FeNO in the APS group decreased significantly from 27.95 ppb to 23.15 ppb after the examination was completed (Z=-5.170, P=0.000); both in patients with positive saline or Mch provocation results and in patients with negative provocation results, the differences between Pre-FeNO and Post-FeNO in the APS group being significant (Z=-2.705, -3.709, -2.371, P=0.002, 0.000, 0.018). No difference of FeNO change(ΔFeNO) was observed between the 2 Mch bronchial provocation test groups (Ubronchial dilation test has minor effect on the measurement of FeNO, but Mch bronchial provocation tests can significantly

  19. Questions and Questioning Techniques: A View of Indonesian Students’ Preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Tri Ragawanti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated students’ preference on teacher’s questions and questionings techniques and more importantly on how they could facilitate or impede their learning. The results on teacher’s questioning techniques showed that random nomination was more preferred than pre-arranged format nomination. In addition, techniques of nominating volunteering students and of giving wait-time were disliked by most student-respondents. As for types of question, the yes/no question was favored by most of the respondents. Different from the yes/no question, the number of respondents leaning forward to the analysis question, questions about fact of life, and questions to state opinion did not show a significant difference from the number of those leaning against the same questions.

  20. From Questions to Queries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Drlík

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The extension of (Internet databases forceseveryone to become more familiar with techniques of datastorage and retrieval because users’ success often dependson their ability to pose right questions and to be able tointerpret their answers. University programs pay moreattention to developing database programming skills than todata exploitation skills. To educate our students to become“database users”, the authors intensively exploit supportivetools simplifying the production of database elements astables, queries, forms, reports, web pages, and macros.Videosequences demonstrating “standard operations” forcompleting them have been prepared to enhance out-ofclassroomlearning. The use of SQL and other professionaltools is reduced to the cases when the wizards are unable togenerate the intended construct.

  1. 1. Methodological Questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Arcari (a cura di

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The first part of this monographic section aims at analysing some methodological questions concerning identities, ethnicities, collectivities and religions, starting from the academic debate occurred between historians and anthropologists since the last decades of Twentieth Century, considering its reception especially for the study of ethnicity and collective and/or (so-called religious identities in the cultural context of ancient Greece. Another aspect of such a methodological section deals with the innovative approach inaugurated by the so-called “School of Wien” in the study of ethnic identity-constructions, especially analysing the relationships with Biblical texts as well as their multiform receptions between late-antiquity and early medieval period.

  2. The Deflection Question

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, A. H.; Nesvold, E.; van Heerden, E.; Erasmus, N.; Marchis, F.

    2016-12-01

    On 15 February, 2013, a 15 m diameter asteroid entered the Earth's atmosphere over Russia. The resulting shockwave injured nearly 1500 people, and incurred 33 million (USD) in infrastructure damages. The Chelyabinsk meteor served as a forceful demonstration of the threat posed to Earth by the hundreds of potentially hazardous objects (PHOs) that pass near the Earth every year. Although no objects have yet been discovered on an impact course for Earth, an impact is virtually statistically guaranteed at some point in the future. While many impactor deflection technologies have been proposed, humanity has yet to demonstrate the ability to divert an impactor when one is found. Developing and testing any single proposed technology will require significant research time and funding. This leaves open an obvious question - towards which technologies should funding and research be directed, in order to maximize our preparedness for when an impactor is eventually found? To help answer this question, we have created a detailed framework for analyzing various deflection technologies and their effectiveness. Using an n-body integrator (REBOUND), we have simulated the attempted deflections of a population of Earth-impacting objects with a variety of velocity perturbations (∂Vs), and measured the effects that these perturbations had on impact probability. We then mapped the ∂Vs applied in the orbital simulations to the technologies capable of achieving those perturbations, and analyzed which set of technologies would be most effective at preventing a PHO from impacting the earth. As a final step, we used the results of these simulations to train a machine learning algorithm. This algorithm, combined with a simulated PHO population, can predict which technologies are most likely to be needed. The algorithm can also reveal which impactor observables (mass, spin, orbit, etc.) have the greatest effect on the choice of deflection technology. These results can be used as a tool to

  3. Interactive Story Writing in the Classroom: Using Computer Games

    OpenAIRE

    Schaeffer, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    Computer games offer a new medium for creative writing – immersive stories where the "reader" is an active participant in the story. These stories are rich in visual and audio texture. Decisions made by the reader influence how the story unfolds (possibly even changing the outcome). In contrast to traditional pen-and-paper story writing, where the author is expected to specify everything textually, in interactive stories the "writer" uses computer tools to create visual representations of a v...

  4. AHP 10: Story: A Stolen Journey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blo bzang tshe ring བློ་བཟང་ཚེ་རིང་།

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BIo bzang tshe ring (b 1984 is from A mgon Village, A mchog Town, Bsang chu County, Kan Iho Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Kan su'u Province. He says, "I wrote this story based on what I was told by the three men who brought the main character of the story to Zi ling City in their car."

  5. Stories of Innovation: Roles, Perspectives, and Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine the roles of stories in the innovation process. Design/methodology/approach: An integrative literature review was used to identify and analyze studies that examined stories of innovation in various organizational settings. The conceptual framework of the review was based on three perspectives of organizational…

  6. Stories | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Young, locally-trained economists guide Francophone Africa towards a more prosperous future. Learn moreYoung, locally-trained economists guide Francophone Africa towards a more prosperous future. A man and a woman looking at a poster. Story. The untold story: IDRC supported researchers transform economic ...

  7. Children's stories: what knowledge constitutes indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The intention was to design a science module on a topic that learners identified as relevant. The method employed was to ask learners to write stories on the topic in an effort to determine what indigenous knowledge held with regard to the topic. While the stories contained examples of indigenous knowledge, the majority of ...

  8. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... One Couple's Story of Living While Dying - Duration: 2:20. HPCancer 9,964 views 2:20 Palliative Care & Me: Pat's story - Duration: 6:37. NYGHNews 2,079 views 6:37 Understanding Palliative Care - Duration: ...

  9. Coyote Stories of the Navaho People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessel, Robert A., Jr., Ed.; Platero, Dillon, Ed.

    Intended as a supplementary reading book for elementary level Navaho children, this book is one of a series being developed by the Navaho Curriculum Center in Rough Rock, Arizona. This volume contains a collection of 14 illustrated coyote stories collected from Navaho storytellers and translated into English. These stories have great significance…

  10. Campfire Stories of the Fort Belknap Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Minerva, Comp.

    This collection contains 21 brief stories told by members of the Fort Belknap (Montana) American Indian community. These tales of the Assiniboine, Sioux, and Gros Ventres include legends, ghost stories, and reminiscences of heroic deeds, traditional life, and unusual events. Recollections of the past contain descriptions of the daily life of the…

  11. Stories to Be Read Aloud (Booksearch).

    Science.gov (United States)

    English Journal, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Presents junior and senior high school teachers' suggestions for short stories to read aloud in a single class period, including "The Laughing Man" (J. D. Salinger), "A & P" (John Updike), "Epicac" (Kurt Vonnegut), "The Story of an Hour" (Kate Chopin), and "The Yellow Wallpaper" (Charlotte…

  12. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? ... patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience ...

  13. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This vignette shares the story of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology ... Up next The Keeney Family discuss pediatric palliative care - Duration: 12:07. Hospice of the ...

  14. Story Map: How to Improve Writing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidekli, Sabri

    2013-01-01

    The aim of written expression studies is to have students explain their knowledge, feelings, ideas and imaginations in a correct and effective manner. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of story map on story writing skills of first grade teacher candidates who study at the Department of Elementary Education. The…

  15. A Narrative Inquiry of International Adoption Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Christin; Pettinelli, J. Douglas

    2011-01-01

    The international adoption entrance story is an unexplored topic in the adoption literature. The stories that families tell of beginning life with their new children has important implications for the development of an autobiographical narrative of an adopted child. A coherent autobiographical narrative is vital for healthy childhood development.…

  16. The Virtual Storyteller: story generation by simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swartjes, I.M.T.; Theune, Mariet

    2008-01-01

    The Virtual Storyteller is a multi-agent framework that generates stories based on a concept called emergent narrative. In this paper, we describe the motivation and approach of the Virtual Storyteller, and give an overview of the computational processes involved in the story generation process. We

  17. Telling War Stories: The Things They Carry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Paige; Warren, Mike

    2010-01-01

    This webtext reveals two modern-day methods for soldiers to share their war stories: 1) soldiers sharing their stories with cadets from West Point through a project linking veterans from the Global War on Terror with composition students; and 2) soldiers learning in online composition classrooms designed specifically for them.

  18. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Care & Me: Pat's story - Duration: 6:37. NYGHNews 2,145 views 6:37 Last Days: HammondCare's Palliative ... One Couple's Story of Living While Dying - Duration: 2:20. HPCancer 10,360 views 2:20 Pediatric ...

  19. "Queer Provocations"! Exploring Queerly Informed Disruptive Pedagogies within Feminist Community-Higher-Education Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilty, Aideen

    2017-01-01

    Deborah Britzman, over 15 years ago in her insightful essay "Is There a Queer Pedagogy? Or Stop Thinking Straight", posed questions that continue to resonate (Britzman, Deborah P. 1998. "Curriculum: Toward New Identities", edited by William Pinar, 211. New York: Routledge). What if lesbian and gay theories were understood as…

  20. Automatic Chinese Factual Question Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Rus, Vasile; Liu, Li

    2017-01-01

    Question generation is an emerging research area of artificial intelligence in education. Question authoring tools are important in educational technologies, e.g., intelligent tutoring systems, as well as in dialogue systems. Approaches to generate factual questions, i.e., questions that have concrete answers, mainly make use of the syntactical…

  1. Assessing Question Quality Using NLP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Kristopher J.; Johnson, Amy M.; Crossley, Scott A.; McNamara, Danielle S.

    2017-01-01

    An NLP algorithm was developed to assess question quality to inform feedback on questions generated by students within iSTART (an intelligent tutoring system that teaches reading strategies). A corpus of 4575 questions was coded using a four-level taxonomy. NLP indices were calculated for each question and machine learning was used to predict…

  2. Beijing Bicycle - Stories from a Transformative Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger-Petersen, Mai Corlin

    2012-01-01

    Ideas, words, images and stories travel from west to east – and from east to west. Stories are chosen and retold in different settings and images are reproduced and appropriated into new contexts – and in new times. Cinema, in this case the mainland Chinese, becomes both a space of production...... and a production of space that reveals how transnational and translocal mechanisms affect the cinematic language, transforming the images and stories chosen for the cinematic representation. Wang Xiaoshuai’s Beijing Bicycle (Shiqi Sui de Danche) (2001) is a result of transnational currents weaving the carpet...... relevant in a new context – that of the Chinese mainland society in the 21st century. Doreen Massey (2005: 9) defines space as “a simultaneity of stories-so-far”, a space that is constantly exploding and imploding with the influx of new and old stories. Within this theoretical framework Wang Xiaoshuai...

  3. Dental stories for children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Ian W; Nelson, Travis M; Sheller, Barbara; McKinney, Christy M; Scott, JoAnna M

    2016-07-01

    To investigate caregivers' preference regarding dental stories to prepare children with autism for dental visits. Caregivers of children with autism were allowed use of dental stories available via different media (paper, tablet computer, computer) and image types (comics or drawings, photographs, video). Caregivers completed pre- and postintervention surveys. Fisher's exact tests were used to determine associations between predictive factors and preferences. Forty initial and 16 follow-up surveys were completed. Subjects were primarily male (85%). Mean child age was 6.7 years. Nine (64%) caregivers found the dental story useful for themselves and their child. Two (14%) caregivers found the aid only helpful for themselves. Preferred media type was associated with language understanding (p = .038) and home media preference (p = .002). Practitioners should consider using dental stories to help prepare families and children for dental visits. Individual preferences for dental stories vary; using prior history can aid in selection. © 2016 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Allergic asthmatics show divergent lipid mediator profiles from healthy controls both at baseline and following birch pollen provocation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna L Lundström

    Full Text Available Asthma is a respiratory tract disorder characterized by airway hyper-reactivity and chronic inflammation. Allergic asthma is associated with the production of allergen-specific IgE and expansion of allergen-specific T-cell populations. Progression of allergic inflammation is driven by T-helper type 2 (Th2 mediators and is associated with alterations in the levels of lipid mediators.Responses of the respiratory system to birch allergen provocation in allergic asthmatics were investigated. Eicosanoids and other oxylipins were quantified in the bronchoalveolar lumen to provide a measure of shifts in lipid mediators associated with allergen challenge in allergic asthmatics.Eighty-seven lipid mediators representing the cyclooxygenase (COX, lipoxygenase (LOX and cytochrome P450 (CYP metabolic pathways were screened via LC-MS/MS following off-line extraction of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF. Multivariate statistics using OPLS were employed to interrogate acquired oxylipin data in combination with immunological markers.Thirty-two oxylipins were quantified, with baseline asthmatics possessing a different oxylipin profile relative to healthy individuals that became more distinct following allergen provocation. The most prominent differences included 15-LOX-derived ω-3 and ω-6 oxylipins. Shared-and-Unique-Structures (SUS-plot modeling showed a correlation (R(2 = 0.7 between OPLS models for baseline asthmatics (R(2Y[cum] = 0.87, Q(2[cum] = 0.51 and allergen-provoked asthmatics (R(2Y[cum] = 0.95, Q(2[cum] = 0.73, with the majority of quantified lipid mediators and cytokines contributing equally to both groups. Unique structures for allergen provocation included leukotrienes (LTB(4 and 6-trans-LTB(4, CYP-derivatives of linoleic acid (epoxides/diols, and IL-10.Differences in asthmatic relative to healthy profiles suggest a role for 15-LOX products of both ω-6 and ω-3 origin in allergic inflammation. Prominent differences at baseline levels indicate

  5. Enhancing the Ability of Creative Expression and Intercultural Understanding through Visual Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widjajanto, Wahju Agung; Lund, Michael; Schelhowe, Heidi

    In our web-based platform “Wayang Authoring” children with different cultural backgrounds can create and share stories, and make experiences in culturally different storytelling. The idea of Wayang Authoring is based on the Indonesian ancient art form Wayang. The research question focuses on if and how the design of our system can support children to enhance understanding of story grammar, creative storytelling and self-expression as well as help to share cultural diversity. In this article the Wayang Authoring platform and its background is presented.

  6. Time Dilation: Flash Based Interactive Story For College, Pre-college, And Public Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eun-Young; Lollar, I.; Armitage, P.; Perreault, S.; Shitanishi, J.; Shvarts, E.; Wells, D.; Longson, T.; Mijic, M.; State LA SciVi Project, Cal

    2009-05-01

    Concepts of Einstein's Theory of Relativity are usually considered complicated enough that in the context of public science education they are often stated but seldom explained. In our game-like interactive animated story we explain the effect of Time Dilation in the Special Theory of Relativity by pushing to the limit a real life question: can Relativity help two students in love who want the same but in a different amount of time? The user is guided to the answer with the help of a familiar looking character. This interactive story can be used in variety of educational environments.

  7. Nanodesign: some basic questions

    CERN Document Server

    Schommers, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    There is no doubt that nanoscience will be the dominant direction for technology in this century, and that this science will influence our lives to a large extent as well as open completely new perspectives on all scientific and technological disciplines. To be able to produce optimal nanosystems with tailor-made properties, it is necessary to analyze and construct such systems in advance by adequate theoretical and computational methods. Since we work in nanoscience and nanotechnology at the ultimate level, we have to apply the basic laws of physics. What methods and tools are relevant here? The book gives an answer to this question. The background of the theoretical methods and tools is critically discussed, and also the world view on which these physical laws are based. Such a debate is not only of academic interest but is of highly general concern, and this is because we constantly move in nanoscience and nanotechnology between two extreme poles, between infinite life and total destruction . On the one ...

  8. Questioning Questions: Elementary Teachers' Adaptations of Investigation Questions across the Inquiry Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggers, Mandy

    2018-01-01

    Questioning is a central practice in science classrooms. However, not every question translates into a "good" science investigation. Questions that drive science investigations can be provided by many sources including the teacher, the curriculum, or the student. The variations in the source of investigation questions were explored in…

  9. Classical Cosmology Through Animation Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijic, Milan; Kang, E. Y. E.; Longson, T.; State LA SciVi Project, Cal

    2010-05-01

    Computer animations are a powerful tool for explanation and communication of ideas, especially to a younger generation. Our team completed a three part sequence of short, computer animated stories about the insight and discoveries that lead to the understanding of the overall structure of the universe. Our principal characters are Immanuel Kant, Henrietta Leavitt, and Edwin Hubble. We utilized animations to model and visualize the physical concepts behind each discovery and to recreate the characters, locations, and flavor of the time. The animations vary in length from 6 to 11 minutes. The instructors or presenters may wish to utilize them separately or together. The animations may be used for learning classical cosmology in a visual way in GE astronomy courses, in pre-college science classes, or in public science education setting.

  10. The story of Prosenjit Poddar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamonud Modak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of "Tarasoff duty" is familiar to mental health professionals. Entwined with the name of Tarasoff, is that of Prosenjit Poddar, the other important character in the story which led to the courts giving directions for mental health professionals with regard to their duty of warn. Prosenjit Poddar killed Tatiana Tarasoff when his advances toward her were rebuffed. However, the court ruled that the mental health professional who was treating Poddar and was in knowledge of his intentions to harm Tarasoff, did not take adequate measures to warn the potential victim. This led to courts laying statutes for warning the potential victims by mental health professionals when their clients disclose such threats. However, the ruling has been a matter of debate about when to take any threat seriously and how to tread cautiously given the therapist-client privilege. The case of Prosenjit Poddar throws light on complex issues related to balancing confidentiality and potential harm to others.

  11. The Story of the Universe

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS Outreach

    2003-01-01

    These pages were extracted from the 2003 CMS Experiment Brochure. These pages explain the story of our universe and how it was formed over time. All explanations are coupled with simple colorful illustrations, one per sheet. Each can be used as an individual teaching aid or together as a set. Topics covered: - Quantum Gravity Era- Grand Unification Era - Electro Weak Era - Protons and Neutrons Formation- Nuclei formation- Atoms and Light Era - Galaxy Formation - Today Humans wondering where this all came from- The Size of Things - Instruments and the observables- Particles (Leptons & Quarks) -Forces - Interactions: coupling of forces to matter - Short history and new frontiers - Unification of forces - Summary (includes timeline of theories/discoveries)

  12. The perfect shape spiral stories

    CERN Document Server

    Hammer, Øyvind

    2016-01-01

    This book uses the spiral shape as a key to a multitude of strange and seemingly disparate stories about art, nature, science, mathematics, and the human endeavour. In a way, the book is itself organized as a spiral, with almost disconnected chapters circling around and closing in on the common theme. A particular strength of the book is its extremely cross-disciplinary nature - everything is fun, and everything is connected! At the same time, the author puts great emphasis on mathematical and scientific correctness, in contrast, perhaps, with some earlier books on spirals. Subjects include the mathematical properties of spirals, sea shells, sun flowers, Greek architecture, air ships, the history of mathematics, spiral galaxies, the anatomy of the human hand, the art of prehistoric Europe, Alfred Hitchcock, and spider webs, to name a few.

  13. Historical short stories as nature of science instruction in secondary science classrooms: Science teachers' implementation and students' reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid-Smith, Jennifer Ann

    This study explores the use of historical short stories as nature of science (NOS) instruction in thirteen secondary science classes. The stories focus on the development of science ideas and include statements and questions to draw students' and teachers' attention to key NOS ideas and misconceptions. This study used mixed methods to examine how teachers implement the stories, factors influencing teachers' implementation, the impact on students' NOS understanding, students' interest in the stories and factors correlated with their interest. Teachers' implementation decisions were influenced by their NOS understanding, curricula, time constraints, perceptions of student ability and resistance, and student goals. Teachers implementing stories at a high-level of effectiveness were more likely to make instructional decisions to mitigate constraints from the school environment and students. High-level implementers frequently referred to their learning goals for students as a rationale for implementing the stories even when facing constraints. Teachers implementing at a low-level of effectiveness were more likely to express that constraints inhibited effective implementation. Teachers at all levels of implementation expressed concern regarding the length of the stories and time required to fully implement the stories. Additionally, teachers at all levels of implementation expressed a desire for additional resources regarding effective story implementation and reading strategies. Evidence exists that the stories can be used to improve students' NOS understanding. However, under what conditions the stories are effective is still unclear. Students reported finding the stories more interesting than textbook readings and many students enjoyed learning about scientists and the development of science idea. Students' interest in the stories is correlated with their attitudes towards reading, views of effective science learning, attributions of academic success, and interest in

  14. The diagnostic value of three sacroiliac joint pain provocation tests for sacroiliitis identified by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnbak, B; Jurik, A G; Jensen, R K

    2017-01-01

    was 33 (range 18-40) years and 241 (53%) were women. The prevalence of SI joints with sacroiliitis was 5%. In the whole study group, only the thigh trust test was associated with sacroiliitis, the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) was 0.58 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0......OBJECTIVES: The aim of the current study was to investigate the diagnostic value of three sacroiliac (SI) joint pain provocation tests for sacroiliitis identified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and stratified by gender. METHOD: Patients without clinical signs of nerve root compression were.......51-0.65], sensitivity 31% (95% CI 18-47), and specificity 85% (95% CI 82-87). In men, sacroiliitis was associated with all the SI joint tests assessed and multi-test regimens, with the greatest AUC found for at least one positive out of three tests [AUC 0.68 (95% CI 0.56-0.80), sensitivity 56% (95% CI 31...

  15. Behaviour on the nasal provocation test in patients affected by conjunctivitis and/or asthma of allergic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filiaci, F; Lucarelli, N

    1981-09-01

    In the Allergo-Immunological Centre of Rome University we selected 120 patients of both sexes, ranging from 5-65 years of age, affected by asthma and/or conjunctivitis without past or present history of nasal impairment (itching, sneezing, hydrorrhea). As a result of the allergometric tests carried out, the authors divided the samples into three groups: 1) positive reaction to Dermatophagoides Pteronissimus (66.6%); 2) positive reaction to the Graminacee (28.3%); 3) positive reaction to Parietaria officinalis (5.1%). After having undergone the rhinoreomanometric test of nasal provocation, 50% of the patients revealed a positive reaction to the specific allergen, more specifically at 50 PNU/ml 40% of the case were positive, and at 100 PNU/ml 50% were positive. These results are discussed in the light of modern biological knowledge on the mastocytes in normal subjects and in those suffering from allergy.

  16. A question of authority

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Earl W.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2003-10-15

    A Question of Authority. This article deals with a certain scenario and several reviewers are to give their opinion. This one is in regards to - Suspending an IACUC approved animal use activity is about the last thing a research institution wants to do. Consider the predicament that the Great Eastern University IACUC faced when Dr. Janet Jenkins, the Attending Veterinarian, suspended all animal use activity on an approved protocol of Dr. Roy Maslo. Jenkins had the IACUCs authority to temporarily suspend a protocol, subject to review by a quorum of the full committee. She alleged that Maslo used mice from his breeding colony, not purchased rats, to begin a new study. Jenkins saw Maslos technicians bringing mouse cages to a procedure room and setting up for a minor survival surgery. She asked them to wait until she clarified things as she felt confident that the protocol called for rats. She called Maslo and asked him if the study had been approved for mice, to which he responded affirmatively. Still not feeling quite assured, she went to her office, reviewed the protocol, and found only rat studies described. She also called the IACUC office to see if there were any approved amendments which she may not have received, and was told that there were none. By the time she returned, one procedure was completed. Understandably upset, she informed the technicians and Maslo that any further activity on the protocol was suspended until the issue was resolved. Jenkins informed the IACUC chairman who in turned called an emergency meeting of the committee.

  17. Ion-Smashing yields new knowledge, but some still question risk

    CERN Multimedia

    Weaver, Carolyn

    2006-01-01

    "Experimental results at Brookhaven National Laboratory's supercollider that replicate in miniature the "Big Bang", whn the universe expode into being, were names the top physics story of 2005 by the American Institute of Physis. But some observers say that the possible risks of the experiments, which smash together gold ions traveling near the speed of light, remain an open question"

  18. Automatically classifying question types for consumer health questions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roberts, Kirk; Kilicoglu, Halil; Fiszman, Marcelo; Demner-Fushman, Dina

    2014-01-01

    We present a method for automatically classifying consumer health questions. Our thirteen question types are designed to aid in the automatic retrieval of medical answers from consumer health resources...

  19. NSAID-exacerbated respiratory disease: a meta-analysis evaluating prevalence, mean provocative dose of aspirin and increased asthma morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, D R; Guthrie, B; Lipworth, B J; Jackson, C; Donnan, P T; Santiago, V H

    2015-07-01

    The prevalence and mean provocative dose of oral aspirin (MPDA) triggering respiratory reactions in people with asthma have been inconsistently reported, and the relationship between NSAID-exacerbated respiratory disease (NERD) and asthma morbidity was less well quantified. A systematic review was performed by identifying studies diagnosing NERD using blinded, placebo-controlled oral provocation challenge tests (OPCTs) or by self-reported history in people with asthma. Data were extracted, and effect estimates for changes in respiratory function, MPDA and asthma morbidity were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis. The prevalence of NERD in adults with asthma was 9.0% (95% CI 6-12%) using OPCTs and 9.9% (95% CI 9.4-10.5%) using self-reported history from questionnaires. The MPDA in adults with NERD was 85.8 mg (95% CI 73.9-97.6). In people with NERD, the risk of: uncontrolled asthma was increased twofold (RR 1.96 (95% CI 1.25-3.07)); severe asthma and asthma attacks was increased by 60% (RR 1.58 (95% CI 1.15-2.16) and RR 1.59 (95% CI 1.21-2.09), respectively); emergency room visits was increased by 80% (RR 1.79 (95% CI 1.29-2.49)); and asthma hospitalization was increased by 40% (RR 1.37 (95% CI 1.12-1.67)) compared to people with NSAID-tolerant asthma. Respiratory reactions triggered by oral aspirin in people with asthma are relatively common. At the population level, the prevalence of NERD was similar when measured using appropriately conducted OPCTs or by self-reported history. On average, respiratory reactions were triggered by clinically relevant doses of oral aspirin. Asthma morbidity was significantly increased in people with NERD who potentially require more intensive monitoring and follow-up. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Dumping symptoms and incidence of hypoglycaemia after provocation test at 6 and 12 months after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamargaritis, Dimitris; Koukoulis, George; Sioka, Eleni; Zachari, Eleni; Bargiota, Alexandra; Zacharoulis, Dimitris; Tzovaras, George

    2012-10-01

    A previous study has demonstrated that symptoms suggestive of dumping syndrome appear after a provocation test early after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) in 45 % of patients, and these are mainly related to early dumping. The aim of this study is to evaluate the evolution of dumping symptoms during the first postoperative year. Twenty-five non-diabetic morbidly obese patients (6 male, 19 female) were evaluated with an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) preoperatively, at 6 weeks and at 6 months postoperatively. In addition, 12 of them repeated the OGTT at 12 months after LSG. Sigstad score was used to separate dumpers from non-dumpers and Arts' questionnaire to differentiate between early and late dumping. Insulin and glucose levels were also measured. Sigstad score remained significantly elevated at 6 and 12 months postoperatively compared to preoperative values. Symptoms suggestive of dumping syndrome were recorded in 40 % of patients at 6 months and in 33 % at 12 months postoperatively. Arts' questionnaire demonstrated that early dumping score remained higher compared to baseline at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Late dumping scores increased gradually during the time and that difference was statistically significant at 12 months after LSG. Hypoglycaemia occurred at 33 % of patients both at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Symptoms suggestive of dumping syndrome after provocation still exist at 6 and 12 months in a significant proportion of patients after LSG and include both early and late dumping. These findings are consistent with the high incidence of hypoglycaemia after OGTT at 6 and 12 months after LSG.

  1. FCJ-161 Productive Provocations: Vitriolic Media, Spaces of Protest and Agonistic Outrage in the 2011 England Riots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony McCosker

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The intense social upheaval that spread through a number of UK cities in the riots and protests of August, 2011 signalled the terrifying speed with which passionate disaffection can turn to uncontained violence. At stake in the dense and volatile debate that ensued, and in the acts of violence themselves, were contests over spaces as well as competing models of democracy, publics and citizenship, including the appropriate use of social media. Within these debates, almost universally, rational deliberative discourse and action is assumed to be the only route to legitimate “civil” society. So what is to be made of the violent physical contest over city squares, streets and property, as well as contests over acts of participation and demonstration played out online through the hundreds of eyewitness videos posted to sites like YouTube and the endless flow of often vitriolic words in blogs, comments spaces and social network sites? This paper uses a video posted to YouTube titled ‘Clapham Junction Speaker (London Riots 2011’ to examine the passion and provocation that flowed beyond the city streets to enliven, intensify and sustain forms of protest and civic engagement. We argue that the aggressive and antagonistic tenor of the Speaker’s twenty minute monologue, the bitter vitriol that flowed through the comments space, and even the act of posting it constitute significant elements of a generative, ‘agonistic’ public, to use Chantal Mouffe’s term, that operates in multiple spaces and outside of the rationalising discourse demanded by mainstream media and government. This paper develops a richer understanding of these spaces of protest, and the concept of provocation central to these events.

  2. Avoidance of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs after negative provocation tests in urticaria/angioedema reactions: Real-world experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommarito, Luisa; Zisa, Giuliana; Riccobono, Francesca; Villa, Elisa; D'Antonio, Cristian; Calamari, Ambra M; Poppa, Mariangela; Moschella, Adele; Di Pietrantonj, Carlo; Galimberti, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Drug provocation tests (DPTs) are the gold standard in diagnosing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) hypersensitivity; however, only few data about follow-up of patients with negative DPTs are actually available. The aim of this study was to assess patients' behavior in taking NSAIDs again and to evaluate NSAID tolerability after negative allergological workup. This is a follow-up study involving patients evaluated for history of cutaneous reactions (urticaria and or angioedema) after NSAID intake and with negative DPTs with the suspected NSAID. Patients were asked during a phone interview about the intake of NSAIDs, tolerance, or reasons of avoidance. The negative predictive value (NPV) of NSAIDs DPTs was calculated. One hundred eleven of 142 patients were successfully contacted; 46/111 (41.44%) took the same NSAID previously tested with two adverse reactions reported (4.34%). Fifty-three of 111 (47.74%) patients did not take the same NSAID, but 34 of them took at least another strong cyclooxygenase (COX) 1 inhibitor, with 1 adverse reaction (2.94%) and 19 of them took only weak COX-1 inhibitors. Twelve of 111 patients (10.8%) did not take any NSAID. Reasons for drug avoidance were mainly fear of reactions (70.8%) and no need (29.2%). NPV, overall, was 96.97% (95% confidence interval, 91-99%). Although NSAID hypersensitivity diagnosis was ruled out by oral provocation test, the majority of patients with a history of urticaria/angioedema avoided the intake of the tested NSAIDs for fear of new reactions, particularly when strong COX-1 inhibitor NSAIDs were involved. The high NPV value of DPT resulting from this study should reassure NSAID intake.

  3. Individual differences in cognitive reappraisal usage modulate the time course of brain activation during symptom provocation in specific phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Extinction learning is proposed to be one key mechanism of action underlying exposure-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in specific phobia. Beyond that, cognitive reappraisal, one important strategy to regulate negative emotions, is a crucial component of CBT interventions, but has been disregarded in previous studies investigating neural change processes in specific phobia. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of individual differences in habitual/dispositional cognitive reappraisal usage and the time course of brain activation during phobic stimulation in specific phobia. Methods Dental phobic patients and healthy control subjects participated in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study whilst being confronted with phobic, disgust, fear and neutral pictures. Individual differences in cognitive reappraisal usage were assessed via a self-report questionnaire and correlated with activation decreases over the course of time. Results Phobic individuals with higher dispositional cognitive reappraisal scores showed a more pronounced activation decline in the right dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) which might be associated with a diminution of explicit cognitive emotion regulation over the course of time. Less decrease of activation in the right ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and the lateral orbitofrontal cortex (lOFC) over time in subjects with higher cognitive reappraisal scores might be related to a stronger automatic regulation of emotions or even emotional relearning. Additionally, phobic subjects compared with healthy controls showed a stronger habituation of the left dmPFC over the course of symptom provocation. Conclusions The results of this study show for the first time that individual differences in cognitive reappraisal usage are associated with the time course of brain activation during symptom provocation in specific phobia. Additionally, the present study gives first indications for the

  4. MAOA-uVNTR genotype predicts interindividual differences in experimental aggressiveness as a function of the degree of provocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuepper, Yvonne; Grant, Phillip; Wielpuetz, Catrin; Hennig, Juergen

    2013-06-15

    The MAOA-uVNTR has been suggested to play a role regarding aggression, however, results are inconsistent. We aimed at further elucidating potential effects of the MAOA-uVNTR on aggressiveness with respect to potential modulators: sex, experimental vs. trait aggressiveness and type of aggressiveness (proactive vs. reactive aggressiveness). We tested 239 healthy young adults (88 men/151 women). Participants were genotyped for the MAOA-uVNTR and performed a modified version of a competitive reaction time task - a commonly used and well established tool to elicit and measure aggressiveness. Furthermore, they completed a self-report scale measuring trait aggressiveness. We found a main effect of MAOA-uVNTR on a measure of reactive aggressiveness for both men and women, whereby the low-activity alleles of the MAOA-uVNTR were associated with substantially increased aggressive reactions (paggressiveness. Measures of proactive aggressiveness or self reports were not associated with the MAOA-uVNTR-genotype. Our data are in line with earlier studies and indicate the MAOA-uVNTR-genotype to be specifically associated with measures of reactive impulsive experimental aggressiveness in healthy men and women. Furthermore the association between the MAOA-uVNTR genotype and aggressive responses increases in a fashion linear to the degree of provocation. This indicates that the low-functional alleles of the MAOA-uVNTR are not associated with increased aggressive behavior per se, but rather with an increased aggressive reactivity to provocation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Hit or Run: Exploring Aggressive and Avoidant Reactions to Interpersonal Provocation Using a Novel Fight-or-Escape Paradigm (FOE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederike Beyer

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal provocation presents an approach-avoidance conflict to the provoked person: responding aggressively might yield the joy of retribution, whereas withdrawal can provide safety. Experimental aggression studies typically measure only retaliation intensity, neglecting whether individuals want to confront the provocateur at all. To overcome this shortcoming of previous measures, we developed and validated the Fight-or-Escape paradigm (FOE. The FOE is a competitive reaction time (RT task in which the winner can choose the volume of a sound blast to be directed at his/her opponent. Participants face two ostensible opponents who consistently select either high or low punishments. At the beginning of each trial, subjects are given the chance to avoid the encounter for a limited number of times. In a first experiment (n = 27, all women, we found that fear potentiation (FP of the startle response was related to lower scores in a composite measure of aggression and avoidance against the provoking opponent. In a second experiment (n = 34, 13 men, we altered the paradigm such that participants faced the opponents in alternating rather than in random order. Participants completed the FOE as well as the Dot-Probe Task (DPT and the Approach-Avoidance Task (AAT. Subjects with higher approach bias scores in the AAT avoided the provoking opponent less frequently. Hence, individuals with high threat reactivity and low approach motivation displayed more avoidant responses to provocation, whereas participants high in approach motivation were more likely to engage in aggressive interactions when provoked. The FOE is thus a promising laboratory measure of avoidance and aggression.

  6. Developing critical thinking through Socratic Questioning: An Action Research Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husniah Sahamid

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An action research study was conducted among 24 Form 4 level Malaysian students, aged 16. The duration of the study was five months and constituted 16 one-hour literature lessons (short stories from the secondary level Malaysian English Language Upper Secondary Level school syllabus. This paper describes my experience as a teacher-as-researcher to assist students to respond to teacher questions through Paul’s (1993 model of Socratic Questioning which claims to develop students’ critical thinking. Data was collected through researcher’s field notes, students’ writing tasks and student interviews which were analysed after each cycle of the action research study. Changes and adaptations were consequently made based on the data collected and upon teacher reflection to improve practice. The results of this study indicate that repeated practice of Socratic Questioning had a positive effect on student responses and writing tasks. Some of the factors affecting students’ performance included students’ language proficiency, weak reading ability and students’ anxiety towards the questioning method. These issues had to be addressed and dealt with, before Socratic Questioning could be properly implemented in the classroom. Keywords: Socratic questioning, teacher questioning, critical thinking, action research

  7. The Maudsley Obsessive-Compulsive Stimuli Set: validation of a standardized paradigm for symptom-specific provocation in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mataix-Cols, D.; Lawrence, N.S.; Wooderson, S.; Speckens, A.E.M.; Phillips, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes and further validates a standardized symptom-provocation procedure that combines symptom-specific audio instructions and pictures to reliably provoke different kinds of symptom-specific anxiety in obsessive-compulsive disorder, corresponding to its four major symptom

  8. Increase in IL-8, IL-10, IL-13, and RANTES mRNA levels (in situ hybridization) in the nasal mucosa after nasal allergen provocation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinjan, A.; Dijkstra, M. D.; Boks, S. S.; Severijnen, L. A.; Mulder, P. G.; Fokkens, W. J.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allergic inflammation is regulated by the local production and release of several cytokines. OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to assess the changes in mRNA cytokine-positive cells after allergen provocation and to compare these cytokines with tissue eosinophilia as a marker of

  9. Inferential processing and story recall in children with communication problems: a comparison of specific language impairment, pragmatic language impairment and high-functioning autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, Courtenay Frazier; Bishop, Dorothy V M

    2002-01-01

    An investigation is reported into the story comprehension abilities of four groups of children: those with typical specific language impairment (SLI-T), those with pragmatic language impairments who were not autistic (PLI), those with high-functioning autism (HFA) and typically developing controls. The story comprehension task required children to answer questions about the literal content of the story, as well as questions involving two types of inferences: text-connecting and gap-filling. The control children outscored the three clinical groups on story comprehension, but the group means of the clinical groups did not differ. However, categorical examination of the data revealed that children with pragmatic difficulties related to HFA were more likely to have specific inferencing deficits. Error analysis suggested that all children could make inferences, but these were not always relevant to the story context. This supports the notion of weak central coherence underlying deficits in inferencing. There were no group differences on story recall. However, there was a strong relationship between story comprehension and recall, in that those who had better comprehension tended to have better recall. It is concluded that comprehension aids recall by enabling the listener to build a more stable mental representation of the story. The pragmatic deficits seen in autism compromise this process.

  10. An early story of Kho Ping Hoo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CW Watson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Kho Ping Hoo (1926–1994 is the most well-known of all Indonesian writers of popular silat stories, largely set in China, which describe the adventures and romances of legendary heroes famed for their skill in martial arts. It is less well-known that he began his career writing critical stories about socio-economic conditions in the late 50s and early 60s. This paper discusses one of these stories. It places the story in the context of political developments of the time, in particular as they affected the Chinese Indonesian community. The paper argues that this story and one or two others like it come at the end of a tradition of Sino-Indonesian literature which had flourished from the end of the nineteenth century until the mid-1950s. After 1960, Chinese-Indonesian writers cease writing realist fiction of any kind and write either silat stories or romantic stories set in middle class urban environments.

  11. Question Quality in Community Question Answering Forums : A survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltadzhieva, Antoaneta; Chrupala, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Community Question Answering websites (CQA) offer a new opportunity for users to provide, search and share knowledge. Although the idea of receiving a direct, targeted response to a question sounds very attractive, the quality of the question itself can have an important effect on the likelihood of

  12. Question popularity analysis and prediction in community question answering services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Zhang, Wei-Nan; Cao, Liujuan; Zhang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    With the blooming of online social media applications, Community Question Answering (CQA) services have become one of the most important online resources for information and knowledge seekers. A large number of high quality question and answer pairs have been accumulated, which allow users to not only share their knowledge with others, but also interact with each other. Accordingly, volumes of efforts have been taken to explore the questions and answers retrieval in CQA services so as to help users to finding the similar questions or the right answers. However, to our knowledge, less attention has been paid so far to question popularity in CQA. Question popularity can reflect the attention and interest of users. Hence, predicting question popularity can better capture the users' interest so as to improve the users' experience. Meanwhile, it can also promote the development of the community. In this paper, we investigate the problem of predicting question popularity in CQA. We first explore the factors that have impact on question popularity by employing statistical analysis. We then propose a supervised machine learning approach to model these factors for question popularity prediction. The experimental results show that our proposed approach can effectively distinguish the popular questions from unpopular ones in the Yahoo! Answers question and answer repository.

  13. Question popularity analysis and prediction in community question answering services.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Liu

    Full Text Available With the blooming of online social media applications, Community Question Answering (CQA services have become one of the most important online resources for information and knowledge seekers. A large number of high quality question and answer pairs have been accumulated, which allow users to not only share their knowledge with others, but also interact with each other. Accordingly, volumes of efforts have been taken to explore the questions and answers retrieval in CQA services so as to help users to finding the similar questions or the right answers. However, to our knowledge, less attention has been paid so far to question popularity in CQA. Question popularity can reflect the attention and interest of users. Hence, predicting question popularity can better capture the users' interest so as to improve the users' experience. Meanwhile, it can also promote the development of the community. In this paper, we investigate the problem of predicting question popularity in CQA. We first explore the factors that have impact on question popularity by employing statistical analysis. We then propose a supervised machine learning approach to model these factors for question popularity prediction. The experimental results show that our proposed approach can effectively distinguish the popular questions from unpopular ones in the Yahoo! Answers question and answer repository.

  14. When Is a Question a Question for Children and Adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saindon, Mathieu R.; Trehub, Sandra E.; Schellenberg, E. Glenn; van Lieshout, Pascal H. H. M.

    2017-01-01

    Terminal changes in fundamental frequency provide the most salient acoustic cues to declarative questions, but adults sometimes identify such questions from pre-terminal cues. In the present study, adults and 7- to 10-year-old children judged a single speaker's adult- and child-directed utterances as questions or statements in a gating task with…

  15. [Oral contraception: users' questions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prolongeau, J F

    1993-02-01

    Answers are provided to common questions about the safety and use of oral contraceptives (OCs). Amenorrhea during OC use has no pathologic significance. It is related to endometrial atrophy resulting from insufficient estrogen after longterm pill use. A formulation with a higher estrogen content may be used for one or two cycles to regenerate the endometrium. If amenorrhea persists for more than a few months after discontinuation of pills, pituitary adenoma should be ruled out. Bromocriptine may be indicated in cases of moderate hyperprolactinemia if pregnancy is desired. All intermenstrual bleeding in pill users should be investigated for organic cause. Once endometrial polyps and other pathologies are ruled out, the cause may be assumed to be functional metrorrhagia due to endometrial atrophy identical to that causing amenorrhea in OC users. Intermenstrual bleeding may occasionally result from interactions with specific classes of drugs. Minor bleeding in the first cycles of pill use is common and usually temporary. Accidentally taking two pills in one day is without consequence. If the interval between pill cycles exceeds one week, there is risk of follicular maturation and a different contraceptive method should be used until the next cycle. Forgetting a combined pill is without consequence for delays of under twelve hours. Another method should be used until the next cycle if two pills are forgotten. Low-dose oral progestins rapidly lose efficacy if not taken at the same time every day. "Morning-after" pills may be used up to 72 hours after unprotected intercourse. The current generation of OCs entails no teratogenic risks. The cause of any pill failure should be sought. There is no increased risk of multiple pregnancy after discontinuation of pills, and fecundity does not decline after longterm pill use. OCs should be avoided by users of some antiepileptic drugs or of drugs that increase hepatic toxicity or act as enzyme inductors. All conditions accompanied

  16. Visualizing Nonlinear Narratives with Story Curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam Wook; Bach, Benjamin; Im, Hyejin; Schriber, Sasha; Gross, Markus; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we present story curves, a visualization technique for exploring and communicating nonlinear narratives in movies. A nonlinear narrative is a storytelling device that portrays events of a story out of chronological order, e.g., in reverse order or going back and forth between past and future events. Many acclaimed movies employ unique narrative patterns which in turn have inspired other movies and contributed to the broader analysis of narrative patterns in movies. However, understanding and communicating nonlinear narratives is a difficult task due to complex temporal disruptions in the order of events as well as no explicit records specifying the actual temporal order of the underlying story. Story curves visualize the nonlinear narrative of a movie by showing the order in which events are told in the movie and comparing them to their actual chronological order, resulting in possibly meandering visual patterns in the curve. We also present Story Explorer, an interactive tool that visualizes a story curve together with complementary information such as characters and settings. Story Explorer further provides a script curation interface that allows users to specify the chronological order of events in movies. We used Story Explorer to analyze 10 popular nonlinear movies and describe the spectrum of narrative patterns that we discovered, including some novel patterns not previously described in the literature. Feedback from experts highlights potential use cases in screenplay writing and analysis, education and film production. A controlled user study shows that users with no expertise are able to understand visual patterns of nonlinear narratives using story curves.

  17. Three stories about the conduct of science: Past, future, and present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neylon Cameron

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this piece I would like to tell a few stories; three stories to be precise. Firstly I want to explain where I am, where I've come from and what has led me to the views that I hold today. I find myself at an interesting point in my life and career at the same point as the research community is undergoing massive change. The second story is one of what the world might look like at some point in the future. What might we achieve? What might it look like? And what will be possible? Finally I want to ask the question of how we get there from here. What is the unifying idea or movement that actually has the potential to carry us forward in a positive way? At the end of this I'm going to ask you, the reader, to commit to something as part of the process of making that happen.

  18. Three stories about the conduct of science: Past, future, and present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neylon, Cameron

    2011-10-14

    In this piece I would like to tell a few stories; three stories to be precise. Firstly I want to explain where I am, where I've come from and what has led me to the views that I hold today. I find myself at an interesting point in my life and career at the same point as the research community is undergoing massive change. The second story is one of what the world might look like at some point in the future. What might we achieve? What might it look like? And what will be possible? Finally I want to ask the question of how we get there from here. What is the unifying idea or movement that actually has the potential to carry us forward in a positive way? At the end of this I'm going to ask you, the reader, to commit to something as part of the process of making that happen.

  19. Socratic Questioning-Guided Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hakan Türkçapar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available “Socratic Method” is a way of teaching philosophical thinking and knowledge by asking questions which was used by antique period greek philosopher Socrates. Socrates was teaching knowledge to his followers by asking questions and the conversation between them was named “Socratic Dialogues”. In this meaning, no novel knowledge is taught to the individual but only what is formerly known is reminded and rediscovered. The form of socratic questioning which is used during the process of cognitive behavioral therapy is known as Guided Discovery. In this method it is aimed to make the client notice the piece of knowledge which he could notice but is not aware with a series of questions. Socratic method or guided discovery consists of several steps which are: Identifying the problem by listening to the client and making reflections, finding alternatives by examining and evaluating, reidentification by using the newly found information and questioning the old distorted belief and reaching to a conclusion and applying it. Question types used during these procedures are, questions for gaining information, questions revealing the meanings, questions revealing the beliefs, questions about behaviours during the similar past experiences, analyse questions and analytic synthesis questions. In order to make the patient feel understood it is important to be empathetic and summarising the problem during the interview. In this text, steps of Socratic Questioning-Guided Discovery will be reviewed with sample dialogues after eachstep. [JCBPR 2012; 1(1.000: 15-20

  20. Teaching reading with stories vs. cognitive hierarchy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renee Fuller

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Suggestopedia emphasizes the use of interesting stories as vehicles for teaching classroom material such as reading or arithmetic. Independent support for this notion comes from the work of the author in teaching reading via stories in the Ball-Stick-Bird method. Suggestopedagogiek benadruk die gebruik van interessante stories as boustof by die onderrig van byvoorbeeld lees en wiskunde. Steun vir die sienswyse kom van die skrywer van hierdie artikel waarin die resultate bespreek word van die onderrig van lees met behulp van die "Ball-Stick-Bird"-metode.

  1. Robustness Analysis of Visual Question Answering Models by Basic Questions

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jia-Hong

    2017-11-01

    Visual Question Answering (VQA) models should have both high robustness and accuracy. Unfortunately, most of the current VQA research only focuses on accuracy because there is a lack of proper methods to measure the robustness of VQA models. There are two main modules in our algorithm. Given a natural language question about an image, the first module takes the question as input and then outputs the ranked basic questions, with similarity scores, of the main given question. The second module takes the main question, image and these basic questions as input and then outputs the text-based answer of the main question about the given image. We claim that a robust VQA model is one, whose performance is not changed much when related basic questions as also made available to it as input. We formulate the basic questions generation problem as a LASSO optimization, and also propose a large scale Basic Question Dataset (BQD) and Rscore (novel robustness measure), for analyzing the robustness of VQA models. We hope our BQD will be used as a benchmark for to evaluate the robustness of VQA models, so as to help the community build more robust and accurate VQA models.

  2. When is a research question not a research question?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Nancy E; Asano, Miho; Barbic, Skye Pamela

    2013-06-01

    Research is undertaken to answer important questions yet often the question is poorly expressed and lacks information on the population, the exposure or intervention, the comparison, and the outcome. An optimal research question sets out what the investigator wants to know, not what the investigator might do, nor what the results of the study might ultimately contribute. The purpose of this paper is to estimate the extent to which rehabilitation scientists optimally define their research questions. A cross-sectional survey of the rehabilitation research articles published during 2008. Two raters independently rated each question according to pre-specified criteria; a third rater adjudicated all discrepant ratings. The proportion of the 258 articles with a question formulated as methods or expected contribution and not as what knowledge was being sought was 65%; 30% of questions required reworking. The designs which most often had poorly formulated research questions were randomized trials, cross-sectional and measurement studies. Formulating the research question is not purely a semantic concern. When the question is poorly formulated, the design, analysis, sample size calculations, and presentation of results may not be optimal. The gap between research and clinical practice could be bridged by a clear, complete, and informative research question.

  3. Documenting Questions: A crash course

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Wendy; Johnson, Jon,; Duffes, Guillaume

    2017-01-01

    The most significant area of DDI adoption since 2008 has been around the development, management, and use of Questions. The creation of question banks, development of tools to organize and field questionnaires, and interest in new and specialized means of data capture has fueled development in the DDI. For those of you that have "Questions" and want to do something with them this half-day tutorial will address the following: Question structures in DDI: What have these structur...

  4. A solution to the single-question crowd wisdom problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prelec, Dražen; Seung, H Sebastian; McCoy, John

    2017-01-25

    Once considered provocative, the notion that the wisdom of the crowd is superior to any individual has become itself a piece of crowd wisdom, leading to speculation that online voting may soon put credentialed experts out of business. Recent applications include political and economic forecasting, evaluating nuclear safety, public policy, the quality of chemical probes, and possible responses to a restless volcano. Algorithms for extracting wisdom from the crowd are typically based on a democratic voting procedure. They are simple to apply and preserve the independence of personal judgment. However, democratic methods have serious limitations. They are biased for shallow, lowest common denominator information, at the expense of novel or specialized knowledge that is not widely shared. Adjustments based on measuring confidence do not solve this problem reliably. Here we propose the following alternative to a democratic vote: select the answer that is more popular than people predict. We show that this principle yields the best answer under reasonable assumptions about voter behaviour, while the standard 'most popular' or 'most confident' principles fail under exactly those same assumptions. Like traditional voting, the principle accepts unique problems, such as panel decisions about scientific or artistic merit, and legal or historical disputes. The potential application domain is thus broader than that covered by machine learning and psychometric methods, which require data across multiple questions.

  5. Utilizing verbally told stories for informal knowledge management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukosch, S.G.; Klebl, M.; Buttler, T.

    2011-01-01

    In knowledge management, the act of telling stories is utilized to capture and convey knowledge. Spoken language is the basis for telling stories. Collaborative audio-based storytelling uses the act of verbally telling stories in groups. In this paper, we explore how to utilize verbally told stories

  6. Social Stories[TM] and Young Children: Strategies for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Cori M.

    2012-01-01

    Social Stories are becoming a popular intervention used to improve the social skills of children with disabilities. This article examines the use of Social Stories with young children with disabilities. Social Stories are described, creation guidelines are recommended, and strategies for Social Story implementation in the classroom are discussed.…

  7. Questions for Music Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Estelle R.

    2008-01-01

    In addressing the question-set "What questions do music education researchers need to address?", an illustrative list of juxtaposed descriptive and normative questions is sketched as follows: What are and should be the dimensions of music education? What are and should be the institutional agencies of music education? What are and should be the…

  8. Does Anyone Have Any Questions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Judith M.; Ritter, Virginia F.

    The purpose of this study was to determine if answering a child's question with a question produces further analytical questioning by the child. A sample of 80 children in nursery-kindergarten, first, second and third grades (ages ranging from 4-9 years) were divided into two groups. An abstract painting by Kandinsky was shown individually to each…

  9. Student questioning : a componential analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meij, Hans

    1994-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on student questioning, organized through a modified version of Dillon's (1988a, 1990) componential model of questioning. Special attention is given to the properties of assumptions, questions, and answers. Each of these main elements are the result of certain

  10. The Hermeneutics of Educational Questioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Charles

    2005-01-01

    This article looks at the practice of educational questioning using the philosophical hermeneutics of Hans-Georg Gadamer. It first looks at questions and statements from a hermeneutic perspective, demonstrating some of the differences and similarities between the two. It then details Gadamer's notion of the "true question", asking whether it is…

  11. Provocation to Learn - A Study in the Use of Personal Response Systems in Information Literacy Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura Alicia Matesic

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The appearance of Personal Response Systems (PRS or “clickers” in universityclassrooms has opened an avenue for new forms of communication betweeninstructors and students in large-enrolment classes. Because it allows instructorsto pose questions and receive tabulated responses from students in real-time,proponents of this technology herald it as an innovative means for encouraginghigher levels of participation, fostering student engagement, and streamlining theassessment process. Having already been experimentally deployed acrossdisciplines ranging from business to the arts and sciences, it is also beginning tobe used in the context of information literacy instruction. In this project weemployed the technology not to transfer actual skills, but to advertise theexistence of online library guides, promote the use of the library within thecontext of the course itself, and “provoke” students to adopt a more activeapproach to research as a recursive process. Our findings suggest that studentsadapt easily to the use of this technology and feel democratically empowered torespond to their instructors in a variety of ways that include anonymous clickerresponses as well as more traditional means such as the raising of hands andposing questions verbally. The particular value of this study was to show thatthese broader findings seem equally applicable to pedagogical settings in whichlearning objectives are built around and integrated with the principles ofinformation literacy.

  12. SketchStory: telling more engaging stories with data through freeform sketching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bongshin; Kazi, Rubaiat Habib; Smith, Greg

    2013-12-01

    Presenting and communicating insights to an audience-telling a story-is one of the main goals of data exploration. Even though visualization as a storytelling medium has recently begun to gain attention, storytelling is still underexplored in information visualization and little research has been done to help people tell their stories with data. To create a new, more engaging form of storytelling with data, we leverage and extend the narrative storytelling attributes of whiteboard animation with pen and touch interactions. We present SketchStory, a data-enabled digital whiteboard that facilitates the creation of personalized and expressive data charts quickly and easily. SketchStory recognizes a small set of sketch gestures for chart invocation, and automatically completes charts by synthesizing the visuals from the presenter-provided example icon and binding them to the underlying data. Furthermore, SketchStory allows the presenter to move and resize the completed data charts with touch, and filter the underlying data to facilitate interactive exploration. We conducted a controlled experiment for both audiences and presenters to compare SketchStory with a traditional presentation system, Microsoft PowerPoint. Results show that the audience is more engaged by presentations done with SketchStory than PowerPoint. Eighteen out of 24 audience participants preferred SketchStory to PowerPoint. Four out of five presenter participants also favored SketchStory despite the extra effort required for presentation.

  13. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard ...

  14. Minimalism in the modern short story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Razi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Short story has recently become the focus of attention in the late decades in Iran. The expanding value of writing short story is actually a reasonable outcome of the dominance of minimalism- a movement which is based upon simplicity and shortness. Minimalist writers, leaving out redundant features of narration, mainly focus on essentialities through applying a variety of techniques such as cuttings from the interesting moments of real life, evading introduction, applying inter-referents, choice of words, short stanzas and sentences and so on. Looking upon critic’s opinion about such a tendency over the past and present, this article will come up with a brief explanation of the properties of such stories. Finally a sample story “candles will never go dead” will be analyzed and discussed in the lights of such techniques.

  15. Stories, Action and Ethics in Management Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kenneth Mølbjerg

    2018-01-01

    This chapter discusses ethics in management education from Hannah Arendt’s notion of action. Action for Arendt is disclosed in storytelling and other artful expression whereby people make their appearance in the world as distinct human beings with passions, feelings, intentions, and voices. Stories...... are collective, situated, embodied, and material. It is through stories that people disclose themselves as subjects in interaction with other people. The chapter suggests that stories have ethical consequences in three areas. Firstly, they emphasize the creative act and the new beginning. “True” action distorts...... for the world and our worldly becoming. These three areas serve as important signposts for reworking management students’ stories. They have consequences for the design of teaching practices for heightening students’ moral awareness. These concern both management students’ work of the self on the self...

  16. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... LIFE Before Death Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:27. LIFE Before Death 15,777 views 5:27 Little Stars – Paediatric Palliative Care – Charlie's Story - Duration: ...

  17. Enhancing children's health through digital story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Tami H; Hauenstein, Emily

    2008-01-01

    Stories in all of their many forms, including books, plays, skits, movies, poems, and songs, appeal to individuals of all ages but especially the young. Children are easily engaged in stories, and today's generation of children, the millennium generation, demands interactive, multimedia-rich environments. Story as a teaching and learning technique is pervasive in the classroom but is infrequently used to promote health. Because of advancing technology, it is possible to create interactive digital storytelling programs that teach children health topics. Using digital storytelling in an interactive environment to promote health has not been tested, but there is empirical support for using story in health education and interactive technology to promote health. This article briefly reviews the literature and discusses how technology and storytelling can be joined to promote positive health outcomes.

  18. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Search Loading... Close Yeah, keep it Undo Close This video is unavailable. Watch Queue Queue Watch Queue ... total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? Cancel ...

  19. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... free Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? Cancel ... later? Sign in to add this video to a playlist. Sign in Share More Report Need to ...

  20. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and ... 56:31 4 Cardiac arrests in 14 hours, How our son survived - Duration: 4:38. usrooks 38, ...

  1. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... story - Duration: 6:02. Consumers Health Forum of Australia 31,420 views 6:02 Palliative Care: One ... Language: English Location: United States Restricted Mode: Off History Help Loading... Loading... Loading... About Press Copyright Creators ...

  2. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society 4,209 views ... Riley's journey with Medulloblastoma...A survivor's story!! - Duration: 3:50. Melissa Saban 73,475 ...

  3. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... report inappropriate content. Sign in Transcript Add translations 4,327 views Like this video? Sign in to ... now. Please try again later. Published on Jan 8, 2014 This vignette shares the story of Rachel— ...

  4. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Search Loading... Close Yeah, keep it Undo Close This video is unavailable. Watch Queue Queue Watch Queue Queue Remove ... total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? Cancel ...

  5. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Close Yeah, keep it Undo Close This video is unavailable. Watch Queue Queue Watch Queue Queue Remove ... total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? Cancel ...

  6. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? Cancel ... Unsubscribe 405 Loading... Loading... Working... Add to Want to watch this again later? Sign in to add ...

  7. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category ... of Life and palliative care: Thinking about the words we use - Duration: 4:48. Social Care Institute ...

  8. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to a playlist. Sign in Share More Report Need to report the video? Sign in to report ... of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively ...

  9. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... now. Please try again later. Published on Jan 8, 2014 This vignette shares the story of Rachel— ... of Living While Dying - Duration: 2:20. HPCancer 8,199 views 2:20 Grief and nurses working ...

  10. Cultural Trauma and Life Stories / Ene Kõresaar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kõresaar, Ene

    2007-01-01

    Aili Aarelaid-Tarti 15-aastase uuringu tulemused raamatus "Cultural Trauma and Life Stories", Hesinki, Kikimora Publications, 2006. Uuritud on kolme suurt rahvusgruppi 1940-test tingitud trauma kontekstis: eestlased kodumaal, eestlased eksiilis ja venekeelne rahvusgrupp Eestis postsovetlikus diskursuses

  11. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? Cancel ... later? Sign in to add this video to a playlist. Sign in Share More Report Need to ...

  12. Exploring Culture : Exercises, Stories and Synthetic Cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstede, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    A unique training book containing over 100 culture awareness exercises, dialogues, stories incidents and simulations that bring to life Geert Hofstede's five dimensions of culture. These dimensions are: power distance, collectivism versus individualism, femininity versus masculinity, uncertainly

  13. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 Perinatal Palliative Care - The Zimmer Family Story - Duration: 13:34. UnityPoint Health - Meriter 193,342 views 13:34 LIFE Before Death Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:27. ...

  14. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:39. Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) 24,448 views 5:39 Little Stars – Paediatric Palliative Care – Charlie's Story - Duration: 10:35. Little Stars 12, ...

  15. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The Zimmer Family Story - Duration: 13:34. UnityPoint Health - Meriter 92,619 views 13:34 LIFE Before Death Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:27. LIFE Before Death 14,141 ...

  16. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... University (NEOMED) 24,012 views 5:39 Little Stars – Paediatric Palliative Care – Charlie's Story - Duration: 10:35. Little Stars 11,702 views 10:35 Last Days: HammondCare's ...

  17. How to create a UX story

    OpenAIRE

    Michailidou, Ioanna; von Saucken, Constantin; Kremer, Simon; Lindemann, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Narratives are a tool used in many disciplines. In the area of User Experience Design (UXD), in particular, a storytelling approach can be applied during the whole design process to improve the quality of developed concepts regarding user experience (UX). Furthermore stories support designers in ex-ploring and communicating their new concept ideas. However, the guidelines on how to create a story are either too abstract or do not focus on the experience elements of the interaction. This paper...

  18. Stories of Pasts and Futures in Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Aguiar Borges, Luciane

    2016-01-01

    Societies are constantly changing, facing new challenges and possibilities generated by innovative technologies, sociospatial re-structuring and mobilities. This research approaches these challenges by exploring the role that stories about pasts, presents and futures play in planning. It sees stories as interlinked spaces of struggle over meanings, legitimacies and powers through which “our” valuable pasts and “our” desirable futures become re-constructed, framed and projected. It argues that...

  19. Guided Discovery with Socratic Questioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hakan Türkçapar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available “The Socratic method” is a way of teaching philosophical thinking and knowledge by asking questions. It was first used by in ancient times by the Greek philosopher Socrates who taught his followers by asking questions; these conversations between them are known as “Socratic dialogues”. In this methodology, no new knowledge is taught to the individual; rather, the individual is guided to remember and rediscover what was formerly known through this process. The main method used in cognitive therapy is guided discovery. There are various methods of guided discovery in cognitive therapy. The form of verbal exchange between the therapist and client which is used during the process of cognitive behavioral therapy is known as “socratic questioning”. In this method the goal is to make the client rediscover, with a series of questions, a piece of knowledge which he could otherwise know but is not presently conscious of. The Socratic Questioning consists of several steps, including: identifying the problem by listening to the client and making reflections, finding alternatives by examining and evaluating, reidentification by using the newly rediscovered information and questioning the old distorted belief, and reaching a new conclusion and applying it. Question types used during these procedures are: questions for collecting information, questions revealing meanings, questions revealing beliefs, questions about behaviours during similar past experiences, analytic questions and analytic synthesis questions. In order to make the patient feel understood, it is important to be empathetic and summarize the problem during the interview. In this text, steps of Socratic Questioning-Guided Discovery will be reviewed with sample dialogues provided for each step. [JCBPR 2015; 4(1.000: 47-53

  20. [The story of oxygen (2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, F; Radin, S; Tenchini, P

    1985-04-01

    The authors, in this second part of the oxygen story, resolutely cross the borders of the biophysical field, and face the origins and becoming of life, the stages of which are synthesized in "casket" terms, unusual for surgeons: "protobionts", "procariots", "cyanobacteria", "chlorophyll", "caroteonides", "fermentation", "anaerobic glycolysis", "eucariots", "respiratory chain", "mitocondria". This is not an unconventional biological exercise, but the effort to give clinics a more legible ground, a sort of common denominator of the most different pathologies, and, among these ones, at the first place, just those of the specialistic branch, also less frequenter of biology, that is, surgery. This common denominator, the oxygen radicals represent the emerging apex of, like the peak of an iceberg, in fact, can be only investigated through an exasperated "philogenetic" recovering. Such process of "archaeology" seems to be the only suitable to supply us the cipher-key of the ambiguous, shifty character of oxygen, and entrust us with a cultural patrimony being unique as it is spendable in an immediate clinical future.

  1. Top medical news stories 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. Here is our list of the top seven medical news stories for 2015 with special emphasis on the Southwest. 7. Wearable health devices: A wave of wearable computing devices such as Fitbit and UP wristbands have people keeping track of how much they sit, stand, walk, climb stairs and calories they consume (1. These fitness-tracking devices herald a series of devices that will detect and monitor serious diseases. However, these so-called medical-grade wearables require approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, a regulatory hurdle avoided by the fitness-tracking devices which will likely slow their introduction. 6. Caitlyn Jenner: Caitlyn Jenner became the most famous transgender woman in the world following an interview published in Vanity Fair (2. The Vanity Fair website saw 11.6 million visits curious about the former Olympic athlete. Though Jenner publicly shared her gender identity, many transgender Americans do not-12% of gender non-conforming adults said they ...

  2. Framing a Story of Possibilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Marie Kofod

    2017-01-01

    The article investigates the dynamics of photographic production by refugee and immigrant youth in a participatory photography project in San Diego, United States (The AjA Project). Based on five months of fieldwork and the concepts of ‘the takeable photograph’ and ‘the subjunctive mood’, it exam......The article investigates the dynamics of photographic production by refugee and immigrant youth in a participatory photography project in San Diego, United States (The AjA Project). Based on five months of fieldwork and the concepts of ‘the takeable photograph’ and ‘the subjunctive mood......’, it examines under what ideals the photographic production takes place. I argue that there are particular ‘takeable’ photographs in AjA framed by the emic concept of story and defined in opposition to students’ private photographs. ‘Takeable’ photographs are produced in and aim for the subjunctive mood...... to instill the process with a potential for positive change....

  3. Pain provocation following sagittal plane repeated movements in people with chronic low back pain: Associations with pain sensitivity and psychological profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabey, Martin; Smith, Anne; Beales, Darren; Slater, Helen; O'Sullivan, Peter

    2017-07-01

    Provocative pain responses following standardised protocols of repeated sagittal plane spinal bending have not been reported in people with chronic low back pain (CLBP). Potential differing pain responses to movement likely reflect complex sensorimotor interactions influenced by physical, psychological and neurophysiological factors. To date, it is unknown whether provocative pain responses following repeated bending are associated with different pain sensitivity and psychological profiles. Therefore the first aim of this study was to determine whether data-driven subgroups with different, clinically-important pain responses following repeated movement exist in a large CLBP cohort, specifically using a standardised protocol of repeated sagittal plane spinal bending. The second aim was to determine if the resultant pain responses following repeated movement were associated with pain and disability, pain sensitivity and psychological factors. Clinically-important (≥2-points, 11-point numeric rating scale) changes in pain intensity following repeated forward/backward bending were examined. Participants with different provocative pain responses to forward and backward bending were profiled on age, sex, pain sensitivity, psychological variables, pain characteristics and disability. Three groups with differing provocative pain responses following repeated movements were derived: (i) no clinically-important increased pain in either direction (n=144, 49.0%), (ii) increased pain with repeated bending in one direction only (unidirectional, n=112, 38.1%), (iii) increased pain with repeated bending in both directions (bidirectional, n=38, 12.9%). After adjusting for psychological profile, age and sex, for the group with bidirectional pain provocation responses following repeated spinal bending, higher pressure and thermal pain sensitivity were demonstrated, while for the group with no increase in pain, better cognitive and affective psychological questionnaire scores were

  4. Anatomy of the story: Narratives of mortuary science learners and graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Jose Luis

    Using the anatomy of the story as a framework (Guajardo & Guajardo, 2010), this qualitative study reports the narratives of nine Mortuary Science learners and graduates from an accredited two-year Mortuary Science program in Texas. The research questions are: (1) What can we learn from the narratives of Mortuary Science learners and graduates? (2) What are the learning journeys of nine individuals currently enrolled or graduated from an accredited two-year Mortuary Science program? (3) What challenges and successes have they experienced during their residence in the program, their internship, and the process of obtaining a license? Data collected for the study include platicas (conversational interviews), artifacts, documents, and the researcher's analytic journal. Data analysis was multilayered and included several phases. First, MAXQDA software served to code the data using a priory codes (navel, heart, mind, hands, and legs) as the study framework. Next, the coded data were retrieved into a separate Word document to code it again for triangulation purposes. Narrative analysis techniques (story as data collection and data analysis) were at the center of reporting study findings to be faithful to storytelling and the anatomy of the story framework. This dissertation is divided into four main parts plus Appendix. Part I, Anatomy of the story, presents the research questions and the guidelines for the anatomy of the story to guide the reader on what to expect in this dissertation. Part II, Visualizing the main characters of the story, provides a rich description of the study participants---the navel. Part III, The main elements of the story, presents the heart, mind, hands, and legs of the story in separate sections. Part IV, Stories harvested for new beginnings, discusses the main learning product of analyzing the collective story of learners and graduates. The Appendix section of the dissertation includes important pieces explaining the elements that are expected

  5. Young children's difficulty with indirect speech acts: implications for questioning child witnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Angela D; Stolzenberg, Stacia N; Lee, Kang; Lyon, Thomas D

    2014-01-01

    Prior research suggests that infelicitous choice of questions can significantly underestimate children's actual abilities, independently of suggestiveness. One possibly difficult question type is indirect speech acts such as "Do you know..." questions (DYK, e.g., "Do you know where it happened?"). These questions directly ask if respondents know, while indirectly asking what respondents know. If respondents answer "yes," but fail to elaborate, they are either ignoring or failing to recognize the indirect question (known as pragmatic failure). Two studies examined the effect of indirect speech acts on maltreated and non-maltreated 2- to 7-year-olds' post-event interview responses. Children were read a story and later interviewed using DYK and Wh- questions. Additionally, children completed a series of executive functioning tasks. Both studies revealed that using DYK questions increased the chances of pragmatic failure, particularly for younger children and those with lower inhibitory control skills. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Provocation gratuite ? Commodification des logiques d’opposition et de différenciation du cinéma indépendant américain contemporain

    OpenAIRE

    Sauvage, Célia

    2015-01-01

    Cet essai se propose d’analyser le concept de provocation, selon un cas d’étude précis, celui du cinéma indépendant américain, comme stratégie de différenciation et outil de positionnement compétitif face à une industrie dominante hollywoodienne. La provocation se formalise tour à tour sous une forme discursive, promotionnelle et esthétique. Les auteurs cultivent une idéologie rebelle et un discours de la contreculture. Le marketing, lui, met en avant le caractère provocant, dérangeant des fi...

  7. Storytelling as a communication tool for health consumers: development of an intervention for parents of children with croup. Stories to communicate health information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Stories may be an effective tool to communicate with and influence patients because of their ability to engage the reader. The objective of this paper is to describe the development of a story-based intervention for delivery of health evidence to parents of children with croup for use in a randomized controlled trial. Methods A creative writer interviewed parents of children with croup presenting to the pediatric emergency department (ED) and drafted stories. We revised the stories based on written participant feedback and edited the stories to incorporate research evidence and health information. An illustrator and graphic designer developed story booklets which were evaluated through focus groups. Results Ten participants provided feedback on the five stories drafted by the creative writer. Participants liked the concept but found the writing overly sophisticated and wanted more character development and more medical/health information. Participants highlighted specific story content that they liked and disliked. The revised stories were evaluated through focus groups involving eight individuals. Feedback was generally positive; one participant questioned the associated costs. Participants liked the graphics and layout; felt that they could identify with the stories; and felt that it was easier to get information compared to a standard medical information sheet. Participants provided feedback on the story content, errors and inconsistencies, and preferences of writing style and booklet format. Feedback on how to package the stories was provided by attendees at a national meeting of pediatric emergency researchers. Conclusions Several challenges arose during the development of the stories including: staying true to the story versus being evidence based; addressing the use of the internet by consumers as a source of health information; balancing the need to be comprehensive and widely applicable while being succinct; considerations such as story length

  8. Storytelling as a communication tool for health consumers: development of an intervention for parents of children with croup. Stories to communicate health information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartling Lisa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stories may be an effective tool to communicate with and influence patients because of their ability to engage the reader. The objective of this paper is to describe the development of a story-based intervention for delivery of health evidence to parents of children with croup for use in a randomized controlled trial. Methods A creative writer interviewed parents of children with croup presenting to the pediatric emergency department (ED and drafted stories. We revised the stories based on written participant feedback and edited the stories to incorporate research evidence and health information. An illustrator and graphic designer developed story booklets which were evaluated through focus groups. Results Ten participants provided feedback on the five stories drafted by the creative writer. Participants liked the concept but found the writing overly sophisticated and wanted more character development and more medical/health information. Participants highlighted specific story content that they liked and disliked. The revised stories were evaluated through focus groups involving eight individuals. Feedback was generally positive; one participant questioned the associated costs. Participants liked the graphics and layout; felt that they could identify with the stories; and felt that it was easier to get information compared to a standard medical information sheet. Participants provided feedback on the story content, errors and inconsistencies, and preferences of writing style and booklet format. Feedback on how to package the stories was provided by attendees at a national meeting of pediatric emergency researchers. Conclusions Several challenges arose during the development of the stories including: staying true to the story versus being evidence based; addressing the use of the internet by consumers as a source of health information; balancing the need to be comprehensive and widely applicable while being succinct

  9. Student Moderators in Asynchronous Online Discussion: A Question of Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingaro, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Much current research exalts the benefits of having students facilitate weekly discussions in asynchronous online courses. This study seeks to add to what is known about student moderation through an analysis of the types of questions students use to spur each discussion. Prior experimental work has demonstrated that the types of questions posed…

  10. And the next question is powerful questions for sticky moments

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    A very practical and easy to use book of 3,000+ powerful questions, forming part of every coach''s / manager''s toolkit; it enables you to easily find key questions in some of the most distinctive areas of coaching, such as confidence, communications & leadership.

  11. Gesture Frequency Linked Primarily to Story Length in 4-10-Year Old Children's Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoladis, Elena; Marentette, Paula; Navarro, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that older children gesture more while telling a story than younger children. This increase in gesture use has been attributed to increased story complexity. In adults, both narrative complexity and imagery predict gesture frequency. In this study, we tested the strength of three predictors of children's gesture use in…

  12. Using Counter-Stories to Challenge Stock Stories about Traveller Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcy, Kate

    2017-01-01

    Critical Race Theory (CRT) is formed from a series of different methodological tools to expose and address racism and discrimination. Counter-stories are one of these tools. This article considers the potential of counter-stories as a methodological, theoretical and practical tool to analyse existing educational inequalities for Traveller…

  13. Children’s understanding of emotion causes: Question of future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirić Jovan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Question of development of children’s understanding of emotions causes has attracted a significant research attention. Child’s understanding of present wishes and beliefs, as well as understanding of past events as being the cause of emotions, has been researched. Research reported in this paper expands upon the issues of child’s understanding of emotions in relation to the future. It starts with the question of determining the age at which a child begins to understand that emotions might be caused by mental states related to the future - through imagining or expecting the future events. Three basic emotions (fear, happiness, and sadness has been selected and for each of them two simple stories have been created: one for immediate and other for the more distant future. Stories were illustrated and given to the group of 24 participants (12 boys and 12 girls ages of 5, 8 and 11 (total N = 72. Overall findings are in accord with previous research in the fild. It’s been determined that even preschool children can understand mental states related to the future. Such mental states more often occur as explanation of fear than of happiness or sadness, while the transitional age from situational to mental states explanations is between ages of five to eight.

  14. Questioning Questions: Elementary Teachers' Adaptations of Investigation Questions Across the Inquiry Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggers, Mandy

    2017-01-01

    Questioning is a central practice in science classrooms. However, not every question translates into a "good" science investigation. Questions that drive science investigations can be provided by many sources including the teacher, the curriculum, or the student. The variations in the source of investigation questions were explored in this study. A dataset of 120 elementary science classroom videos and associated lesson plans from 40 elementary teachers (K-5) across 21 elementary school campuses were scored on an instrument measuring the amount of teacher-direction or student-direction of the lessons' investigation questions. Results indicated that the investigation questions were overwhelmingly teacher directed in nature, with no opportunities for students to develop their own questions for investigation. This study has implications for researchers and practitioners alike, calling attention to the teacher-directed nature of investigation questions in existing science curriculum materials, and the need for teacher training in instructional strategies to adapt their existing curriculum materials across the continuum of teacher-directed and student-directed investigation questions. Teachers need strategies for adapting the teacher-directed questions provided in their existing curriculum materials in order to allow students the opportunity to engage in this essential scientific practice.

  15. Using circular questions as a tool in qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nicola; Whitcombe, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Circular questions are used within systematic family therapy as a tool to generate multiple explanations and stories from a family situation and as a means to stimulate the curiosity of the therapist while avoiding their temptation to seek a one definitive explanation. To consider the potential for using this approach in qualitative research, with researchers using carefully crafted questions to invite respondents to provide information about the meanings behind a phenomenon or consider how relationships between people contribute to it. Drawing on examples from a study into children's mental health services, this paper discusses the application of the technique of circular questioning from systemic family therapy to qualitative research. The use of circular questions is a technique that qualitative researchers could employ in the field when conducting interviews with individuals or groups, or when engaged in participant observation as a means to obtain rich sources of data. Circular questioning can help to promote curiosity in the researcher and invite responses that illuminate relational issues between participants in a study.

  16. Questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen Nepper

    2012-01-01

    Bidrag til festskrift til Jesper Hoffmeyer i anledning af hans 70 års dag i Don Favineau, Paul Cobley & Kalevi Kull (eds.): "A More Developed Sign. Interpreting the Work of Jesper Hoffmeyer". Antologien udg. som særnummer af Tartu Semiotics Library Nr. 10 og mit bidrag forefindes på p. 217-220....

  17. Transgression médiatique et provocations décadentes: La décadence comme comportement médiatique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoan Vérilhac

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The decadent and symbolist movements are deeply connected to the creation of media: newspapers, small reviews which make the promotion of the young poets and their original works. In the 1880’s, the decadent reviews use in a provocative way the codes and the media potentialities. However this provocative press is based on a double language (especially about the relationship with the public, and this contradiction generates a negative image in the popular press: the new generation of poets and writers appears to be a noisy group of « hoaxers ». Therefore, around 1890, when the new reviews grouped around the « symbolist » label define themselves a media identity, it is important for them to distance from decadent behaviours. The decadent moment of the mediatization of literature is thus indispensable to understand the history of connections between press and poetic avant-gardes.

  18. Modulation of neurotrophin and neurotrophin receptor expression in nasal mucosa after nasal allergen provocation in allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raap, U; Fokkens, W; Bruder, M; Hoogsteden, H; Kapp, A; Braunstahl, G-J

    2008-04-01

    Patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) feature both allergic airway inflammation and a hyperresponsiveness to nonspecific stimuli which is partly neuronally controlled. Still, it is unclear whether or not neurotrophins are involved in airway pathophysiology of AR and in nasobronchial interaction. Nine AR patients with mono-allergy to grass pollen and nine healthy controls underwent nasal allergen provocation (NP). Serum samples, nasal and bronchial biopsies were taken before (T(0)) and 24 h after (T(24)) NP. Pan-neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR), tyrosine kinase A (trkA), trkB, nerve growth factor (NGF), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were assessed with immunohistochemistry, and NGF and BDNF levels with ELISA. At T(24), BDNF and NGF were upregulated in nasal mucosa (P neurotrophins and receptors in bronchial mucosa. This study shows that neurotrophins and their receptors are expressed in human airways. Allergic rhinitis was characterized by a modulation of BDNF, NGF, and trkB in nasal mucosa after NP and a correlation of nasal BDNF with the maximal increase of total nasal symptom score. Therefore, our data suggest that neurotrophins participate in upper-airway pathophysiology in AR, whereas their role in nasobronchial interaction remains unclear.

  19. A pilot study on the validity of using pictures and videos for individualized symptom provocation in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Daniela; Kischkel, Eva; Spielberg, Rüdiger; Kathmann, Norbert

    2012-06-30

    Distressing symptom-related anxiety is difficult to study in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) due to the disorder's heterogeneity. Our aim was to develop and validate a set of pictures and films comprising a variety of prominent OCD triggers that can be used for individually tailored symptom provocation in experimental studies. In a two-staged production procedure a large pool of OCD triggers and neutral contents was produced and preselected by three psychotherapists specialized in OCD. A sample of 13 OCD patients and 13 controls rated their anxiety, aversiveness and arousal during exposure to OCD-relevant, aversive and neutral control stimuli. Our findings demonstrate differences between the responses of patients and controls to OCD triggers only. Symptom-related anxiety was stronger in response to dynamic compared with static OCD-relevant stimuli. Due to the small number of 13 patients included in the study, only tentative conclusions can be drawn and this study merely provides a first step of validation. These standardized sets constitute valuable tools that can be used in experimental studies on the brain correlates of OCD symptoms and for the study of therapeutic interventions in order to contribute to future developments in the field. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Design and dosimetric analysis of a 385 MHz TETRA head exposure system for use in human provocation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Gernot; Bolz, Thomas; Uberbacher, Richard; Escorihuela-Navarro, Ana; Bahr, Achim; Dorn, Hans; Sauter, Cornelia; Eggert, Torsten; Danker-Hopfe, Heidi

    2012-10-01

    A new head exposure system for double-blind provocation studies investigating possible effects of terrestrial trunked radio (TETRA)-like exposure (385 MHz) on central nervous processes was developed and dosimetrically analyzed. The exposure system allows localized exposure in the temporal brain, similar to the case of operating a TETRA handset at the ear. The system and antenna concept enables exposure during wake and sleep states while an electroencephalogram (EEG) is recorded. The dosimetric assessment and uncertainty analysis yield high efficiency of 14 W/kg per Watt of accepted antenna input power due to an optimized antenna directly worn on the subject's head. Beside sham exposure, high and low exposure at 6 and 1.5 W/kg (in terms of maxSAR10g in the head) were implemented. Double-blind control and monitoring of exposure is enabled by easy-to-use control software. Exposure uncertainty was rigorously evaluated using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD)-based computations, taking into account anatomical differences of the head, the physiological range of the dielectric tissue properties including effects of sweating on the antenna, possible influences of the EEG electrodes and cables, variations in antenna input reflection coefficients, and effects on the specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution due to unavoidable small variations in the antenna position. This analysis yielded a reasonable uncertainty of analysis. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.