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Sample records for province central california

  1. The Basin and Range Province in Utah, Nevada, and California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Thomas B.

    1943-01-01

    In this report an attempt has been made to summarize and in places to interpret the published information that was available through 1938 on the geology of those parts of Nevada, California, and Utah that are included in the geologic province known as the Basin and Range province. This region includes most of the Great Basin, from which no water flows to the sea, as well as part of the drainage basin of the lower Colorado River. It is characterized by numerous parallel, linear mountain ranges that are separated from one another by wide valleys or topographic basins. All the major divisions of geologic time are represented by the rocks exposed in this region. The oldest are of pre-Cambrian age and crop out chiefly along the eastern and southern borders. They have been carefully studied at only a few localities, and the correlation and extent of the subdivision so far recognized is uncertain. There appear to be at least three series of pre-Cambrian rocks which are probably separated from one another by profound unconformities. Large masses of intrusive igneous rocks have been recognized only in the oldest series. During the Paleozoic era the region was a part of the Cordilleran geosyncline, and sediments were deposited during all of the major and most of the minor subdivisions of the era. There are thick and widespread accumulations of Cambrian and Ordovician strata, the maximum aggregate thickness possibly exceeding 23,000 feet. The eastern and western boundaries of the province were approximately those of the area of rapid subsidence within the geosyncline, though the axes of maximum subsidence oscillated back and forth during the two periods. The Silurian and Devonian seas, on the other hand, extended beyond the province and, possibly as a consequence, are represented by much thinner sections - of the order of 6,000 feet. At the end of the Devonian period the geosyncline was split by the emergence of a geanticline in western Nevada, and Mississippian and

  2. Alluvial Boundary of California's Central Valley

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the extent of the alluvial deposits in the Central Valley of California and encompasses the contiguous Sacramento, San Joaquin, and...

  3. California Black Rail - Central Delta [ds17

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Results of taped-call black rail surveys of in-stream habitat within certain waterways in the central Sacramento / San Joaquin Delta during 1992 and 1993. TIME...

  4. Earthquakes in Central California, 1980-1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — There have been many earthquake occurrences in central California. This set of slides shows earthquake damage from the following events: Livermore, 1980, Coalinga,...

  5. Groundwater quality in the San Diego Drainages Hydrogeologic Province, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    More than 40 percent of California's drinking water is from groundwater. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State's groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The San Diego Drainages Hydrogeologic Province (hereinafter referred to as San Diego) is one of the study units being evaluated. The San Diego study unit is approximately 3,900 square miles and consists of the Temecula Valley, Warner Valley, and 12 other alluvial basins (California Department of Water Resources, 2003). The study unit also consists of all areas outside defined groundwater basins that are within 3 kilometers of a public-supply well. The study unit was separated, based primarily on hydrogeologic settings, into four study areas: Temecula Valley, Warner Valley, Alluvial Basins, and Hard Rock (Wright and others, 2005). The sampling density for the Hard Rock study area, which consists of areas outside of groundwater basins, was much lower than for the other study areas. Consequently, aquifer proportions for the Hard Rock study area are not used to calculate the aquifer proportions shown by the pie charts. An assessment of groundwater quality for the Hard Rock study area can be found in Wright and Belitz, 2011. The temperatures in the coastal part of the study unit are mild with dry summers, moist winters, and an average annual rainfall of about 10 inches. The temperatures in the mountainous eastern part of the study unit are cooler than in the coastal part, with an annual precipitation of about 45 inches that occurs mostly in the winter. The primary aquifers consist of Quaternary-age alluvium and weathered bedrock in the Temecula Valley, Warner Valley, and Alluvial Basins study areas, whereas in the Hard Rock study area the primary aquifers consist mainly of fractured and

  6. Bats in Agroecosytems around California's Central Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, A.

    2014-12-01

    Bats in agroecosystems around California's Central Coast: A full quarter of California's land area is farmland. Crops account for 32.5 billion of California's GDP. Insect control is a big problem for farmers, and California bats eat only insects, saving farmers an estimated 3 to $53 billion a year. As farmers maximize crop yield, they use more pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers, which contaminate runoff streams that bats drink from. Also, pesticide use kills bats' sole food source: insects. My research objective was to find out how farm management practices and landscape complexity affect bat diversity and activity, and to see which one affects bat activity more. We monitored 18 sites, including conventional, organic, and low and high-complexity landscapes. We noted more bat activity at sites with high complexity landscapes and organic practices than at sites with either low-complexity landscapes or conventional farming practices. I captured and processed bats and recorded data. I also classified insects collected from light traps. I learned how to handle bats and measure forearm length and weight, as well as how to indentify their gender. I took hair clippings and fecal samples, which yield data about the bats' diet. Their diet, in turn, gives us data about which pests they eat and therefore help control. I also learned about bats' echolocation: they have a special muscle over their ears that closes when they echolocate so that they don't burst their own eardrum. Also, some insects have evolved a special call that will disrupt bats echolocation so bats can't track it.

  7. Characterization of the Hosgri Fault Zone and adjacent structures in the offshore Santa Maria Basin, south-central California: Chapter CC of Evolution of sedimentary basins/onshore oil and gas investigations - Santa Maria province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willingham, C. Richard; Rietman, Jan D.; Heck, Ronald G.; Lettis, William R.

    2013-01-01

    The Hosgri Fault Zone trends subparallel to the south-central California coast for 110 km from north of Point Estero to south of Purisima Point and forms the eastern margin of the present offshore Santa Maria Basin. Knowledge of the attributes of the Hosgri Fault Zone is important for petroleum development, seismic engineering, and environmental planning in the region. Because it lies offshore along its entire reach, our characterizations of the Hosgri Fault Zone and adjacent structures are primarily based on the analysis of over 10,000 km of common-depth-point marine seismic reflection data collected from a 5,000-km2 area of the central and eastern parts of the offshore Santa Maria Basin. We describe and illustrate the along-strike and downdip geometry of the Hosgri Fault Zone over its entire length and provide examples of interpreted seismic reflection records and a map of the structural trends of the fault zone and adjacent structures in the eastern offshore Santa Maria Basin. The seismic data are integrated with offshore well and seafloor geologic data to describe the age and seismic appearance of offshore geologic units and marker horizons. We develop a basin-wide seismic velocity model for depth conversions and map three major unconformities along the eastern offshore Santa Maria Basin. Accompanying plates include maps that are also presented as figures in the report. Appendix A provides microfossil data from selected wells and appendix B includes uninterpreted copies of the annotated seismic record sections illustrated in the chapter. Features of the Hosgri Fault Zone documented in this investigation are suggestive of both lateral and reverse slip. Characteristics indicative of lateral slip include (1) the linear to curvilinear character of the mapped trace of the fault zone, (2) changes in structural trend along and across the fault zone that diminish in magnitude toward the ends of the fault zone, (3) localized compressional and extensional structures

  8. Multilocus phylogeographic assessment of the California Mountain Kingsnake (Lampropeltis zonata) suggests alternative patterns of diversification for the California Floristic Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, E A; Rodríguez-Robles, J A; Denardo, D F; Staub, R E; Stropoli, A; Ruane, S; Burbrink, F T

    2013-11-01

    Phylogeographic inference can determine the timing of population divergence, historical demographic processes, patterns of migration, and when extended to multiple species, the history of communities. Single-locus analyses can mislead interpretations of the evolutionary history of taxa and comparative analyses. It is therefore important to revisit previous single-locus phylogeographic studies, particularly those that have been used to propose general patterns for regional biotas and the processes responsible for generating inferred patterns. Here, we employ a multilocus statistical approach to re-examine the phylogeography of Lampropeltis zonata. Using nonparametic and Bayesian species delimitation, we determined that there are two well-supported species within L. zonata. Ecological niche modelling supports the delimitation of these taxa, suggesting that the two species inhabit distinct climatic environments. Gene flow between the two taxa is low and appears to occur unidirectionally. Further, our data suggest that gene flow was mediated by females, a rare pattern in snakes. In contrast to previous analyses, we determined that the divergence between the two lineages occurred in the late Pliocene (c. 2.07 Ma). Spatially and temporally, the divergence of these lineages is associated with the inundation of central California by the Monterey Bay. The effective population sizes of the two species appear to have been unaffected by Pleistocene glaciation. Our increased sampling of loci for L. zonata, combined with previously published multilocus analyses of other sympatric species, suggests that previous conclusions reached by comparative phylogeographic studies conducted within the California Floristic Province should be reassessed. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Malaria Situation and Anopheline Mosquitoes in Qom Province, Central Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Farzinnia

    2010-12-01

    Methods: This study was carried out in two parts. First stage was data collection about malaria cases using recorded documents of patients in the Province health center, during 2001–2008. The second stage was entomological survey conducted by mosquito larval collection method in 4 villages with different geographical positions in 2008. Data were analyzed using Excel software. Results: Of 4456 blood slides, 10.9% out were positive. Most of cases were imported from other countries (90.4%, mainly from Afghanistan (56.5% and Pakistan (16.3%. Slide positive rate showed a maximum of 16.9% and a minimum of 2.9% in 2008 and 2007, respectively. Plasmodium vivax was causative agent of 93.75% of cases, fol­lowed by P. falciparum (6.25%. More than 15 years old age group contained the most malaria reported cases (66.7%. Two Anopheles species, An. superpictus and An. claviger were collected and identified. This is the first report of Anopheles claviger in Qom Province. Conclusion: Malaria is in the control stage in Qom Province. The rate of local transmission is very low (only 1 case, shows Anopheles superpictus, as the main malaria vector of central part of Iran, can play its role in malaria transmission in the area.

  10. Seasonal variations in N2O emissions from central California

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jeong, Seongeun; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Andrews, Arlyn E; Dlugokencky, Edward J; Sweeney, Colm; Bianco, Laura; Wilczak, James M; Fischer, Marc L

    2012-01-01

    We estimate nitrous oxide (N 2 O) emissions from Central California for the period of December 2007 through November 2009 by comparing N 2 O mixing ratios measured at a tall tower (Walnut Grove, WGC...

  11. Heavy mineral provinces of the Palos Verdes margin, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Florence L.

    2002-04-01

    Natural sources of sediment for the Palos Verdes margin, southern California, have been augmented by effluent discharged from Los Angeles County Sanitation District's sewage-treatment facility and by the reactivation of the Portuguese Bend landslide. Heavy minerals in very fine and fine sand (63-250 μm) from beach and shelf sites off the Palos Verdes Peninsula distinguish effluent-affected sediment from unaffected deposits, and track the sediment contributed by the Portuguese Bend landslide. Heavy minerals also identify heterogeneous sediment sources for the nearshore zone and relate outer-shelf sediment to depositional cells north and south of the area.

  12. Thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies in Thua Thien Hue Province, Central Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoa Van; Sanchaisuriya, Kanokwan; Nguyen, Dung; Phan, Hoa Thi Thuy; Siridamrongvattana, Sirivara; Sanchaisuriya, Pattara; Fucharoen, Supan; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Schelp, Frank P

    2013-01-01

    A community-based assessment of thalassemias and hemoglobinopathies was conducted at the Thua Thien Hue Province, Central Vietnam. By cluster sampling, a total of 410 pregnant women attending the antenatal care service at 30 commune health centers were recruited consecutively from September 2011 to June 2012. Hemoglobin (Hb) analysis was performed using an automated Hb analyzer. α-Thalassemia (α-thal) genes were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based techniques. Out of the 410 pregnant women, 2.7% carried α(0)-thal and 1.2% were β-thal carriers. One woman with the - -(THAI) deletion was also found. Among the females under survey, structural Hb variants with 3.2% Hb E [β26(B8)Glu→Lys, GAG>AAG; HBB: c.78G>C] and 3.7% Hb Constant Spring [Hb CS; α142, Term→Gln, TAA>CAA (α2); HBA2: c.427T>C] were found. Assessing the frequency of thalassemias and hemoglobinopathies by ethnicity, Kinh (Vietnamese) and ethnic minority groups, Hb CS with a high frequency of 24.0% was observed in the ethnic minority groups. These results provide basic population-based information, are useful not only for implementing measures for prevention and control of thalassemias in the region but also for studying the importance of thalassemias and hemoglobinopathies in ethnic minorities within Southeast Asia.

  13. MOHO ORIENTATION BENEATH CENTRAL CALIFORNIA FROM REGIONAL EARTHQUAKE TRAVEL TIMES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, David H.; Eaton, Jerry P.

    1984-01-01

    This paper examines relative Pn arrival times, recorded by the U. S. Geological Survey seismic network in central and northern California from an azimuthally distributed set of regional earthquakes. Improved estimates are presented of upper mantle velocities in the Coast Ranges, Great Valley, and Sierra Nevada foothills and estimates of the orientation of the Moho throughout this region. Finally, the azimuthal distribution of apparent velocities, corrected for dip and individual station travel time effects, is then studied for evidence of upper mantle velocity anisotropy and for indications of lower crustal structure in central California.

  14. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the North-Central Montana Province, 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Christopher J.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Woodall, Cheryl A.; Le, Phuong A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Finn, Thomas M.; Pitman, Janet K.; Marra, Kristen R.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.

    2018-02-12

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean undiscovered, technically recoverable resources of 55 million barrels of oil and 846 billion cubic feet of gas in the North-Central Montana Province.

  15. Assessment of coalbed gas resources of the Central and South Sumatra Basin Provinces, Indonesia, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Christopher J.; Klett, Timothy R.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Pitman, Janet K.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Finn, Thomas M.

    2016-12-09

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated a mean of 20 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered, technically recoverable coalbed gas resource in the Central and South Sumatra Basin Provinces of Indonesia.

  16. Experimental waterfowl breeding population survey Maine, the Maritime provinces, and Central Quebec: 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the Waterfowl Breeding Population and Habitat Survey for Maine, the Maritime provinces, and Central Quebec during 1997. The primary purpose of...

  17. California GAMA Program: Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Results for the Sacramento Valley and Volcanic Provinces of Northern California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, J E; Hudson, G B; Eaton, G F; Leif, R

    2005-01-20

    In response to concerns expressed by the California Legislature and the citizenry of the State of California, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), implemented a program to assess groundwater quality, and provide a predictive capability for identifying areas that are vulnerable to contamination. The program was initiated in response to concern over public supply well closures due to contamination by chemicals such as methyl tert butyl ether (MTBE) from gasoline, and solvents from industrial operations. As a result of this increased awareness regarding groundwater quality, the Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act mandated the SWRCB to develop a comprehensive ambient groundwater monitoring plan, and led to the initiation of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The primary objective of the California Aquifer Susceptibility (CAS) project (under the GAMA Program) is to assess water quality and to predict the relative susceptibility to contamination of groundwater resources throughout the state of California. Under the GAMA program, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) collaborate with the SWRCB, the U.S. Geological Survey, the California Department of Health Services (DHS), and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to implement this groundwater assessment program. In 2003, LLNL carried out this vulnerability study in the Sacramento Valley and Volcanic Provinces. The goal of the study is to provide a probabilistic assessment of the relative vulnerability of groundwater used for the public water supply to contamination from surface sources. This assessment of relative contamination vulnerability is made based on the results of two types of analyses that are not routinely carried out at public water supply wells: ultra low-level measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and groundwater age dating (using the tritium-helium-3 method). In addition, stable oxygen isotope measurements

  18. California's Central Valley Groundwater Study: A Powerful New Tool to Assess Water Resources in California's Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunt, Claudia C.; Hanson, Randall T.; Belitz, Kenneth; Rogers, Laurel

    2009-01-01

    Competition for water resources is growing throughout California, particularly in the Central Valley. Since 1980, the Central Valley's population has nearly doubled to 3.8 million people. It is expected to increase to 6 million by 2020. Statewide population growth, anticipated reductions in Colorado River water deliveries, drought, and the ecological crisis in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta have created an intense demand for water. Tools and information can be used to help manage the Central Valley aquifer system, an important State and national resource.

  19. Groundwater availability of the Central Valley Aquifer, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunt, Claudia C.

    2009-01-01

    California's Central Valley covers about 20,000 square miles and is one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world. More than 250 different crops are grown in the Central Valley with an estimated value of $17 billion per year. This irrigated agriculture relies heavily on surface-water diversions and groundwater pumpage. Approximately one-sixth of the Nation's irrigated land is in the Central Valley, and about one-fifth of the Nation's groundwater demand is supplied from its aquifers. The Central Valley also is rapidly becoming an important area for California's expanding urban population. Since 1980, the population of the Central Valley has nearly doubled from 2 million to 3.8 million people. The Census Bureau projects that the Central Valley's population will increase to 6 million people by 2020. This surge in population has increased the competition for water resources within the Central Valley and statewide, which likely will be exacerbated by anticipated reductions in deliveries of Colorado River water to southern California. In response to this competition for water, a number of water-related issues have gained prominence: conservation of agricultural land, conjunctive use, artificial recharge, hydrologic implications of land-use change, and effects of climate variability. To provide information to stakeholders addressing these issues, the USGS Groundwater Resources Program made a detailed assessment of groundwater availability of the Central Valley aquifer system, that includes: (1) the present status of groundwater resources; (2) how these resources have changed over time; and (3) tools to assess system responses to stresses from future human uses and climate variability and change. This effort builds on previous investigations, such as the USGS Central Valley Regional Aquifer System and Analysis (CV-RASA) project and several other groundwater studies in the Valley completed by Federal, State and local agencies at differing scales. The

  20. Almost stochastic dominance for poverty level in Central Java Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slamet, Isnandar; Agus Wibowo, Aryanto; Roswitha, Mania

    2017-12-01

    The criteria for the domination of the distribution function has been used in the investment issues, momentum, agricultural production, and so on. One criteria of domination is stochastic dominance (SD). When this criteria is applied to the dominating area that has smaller value than the dominated area, then almost stochastic dominance (ASD) can be used. It this research, we apply the ASD criteria on data of expenditure per capita based on districts/cities in Central Java. Furthermore, we determine which year the expenditure per capita in the period 2009-2013 is the most dominating to know the level of poverty in Central Java. From the discussion, it can be concluded that the expenditure per capita in Central Java in 2013 dominates expenditure per capita in Central Java in 2009-2012. In other words, the level of poverty in Central Java in 2013 is lower than in 2009-2012.

  1. Late Neogene Volcanic Stratigraphy in the Southern Puertecitos Volcanic Province of Baja California: Time Constraints and Vent Source Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Carrillo, P.; Martin, A.; Lopez-Martinez, M.; Cañon, E.

    2007-05-01

    Late Neogene syn-rift explosive volcanism occurred in the Puertecitos Volcanic Province along the western margin of the Gulf of California. This volcanic episode is possibly related to extension during opening of the lower Delfin basin in mid-late Pliocene time. The volcanic stratigraphy in the southern Puertecitos Volcanic Province comprises three main groups: group 1 is a mid-Miocene, arc-related volcanic and sedimentary apron. Groups 2 and 3 are syn-rift volcanic units interstratified within alluvial conglomerate. Group 2 includes a non-welded, crystal-rich pyroclastic flow deposit, and a dark glassy dacite lava flow. Distinctive mineralogy of the crystal tuff is augite, sanidine-microcline and quartz. Two 39Ar/40Ar laser step-heating experiments on sanidine grains yielded an 6.18 ± 0.03 Ma isochron age, consistent with a 6.1 ± 0.4 Ma plateau age obtained in the dacite lava. Thickness of the crystal tuff varies from 35 m in the northeast to 10 m in the southwest along 5 km of distance. Group 3 is characterized by the lack of quartz and potassic feldspar phenocrysts. Three laser step heating experiments on groundmass samples constrain this pulse of explosive volcanism between 2.9 ± 0.1 and 2.3 ± 0.03 Ma. Thicknesses of individual units increase to the northeast and collectively reach up to 150 m. Isopath maps for distinctive flow-units indicate consistent dispersion direction to the SW (average azimuth 210° ± 15°). This inferred flow direction is similar to the orientation of magnetic susceptibility axes measured in 20 oriented samples that yield a mean azimuth of 214°± 24°. In group 3 flow-units eutaxitic foliation is concordant and dips 8-20° to the ENE. Tilting of the volcanic sequence is produced by a series of NNW-trending, west-dipping, high-angle normal faults with less than 40 m of throw. Balanced cross- sections in the southern Puertecitos Volcanic Province indicates that post-2.8 Ma extension is less than 15% suggesting that major deformation

  2. Mammalia, Didelphimorphia and Rodentia, central Santa Fe Province, Argentine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teta, P.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Three owl pellets samples collected in the localities of Pedro Gómez Cello (= Estación Km. 197;30°02’14” S, 60°18’56” W, Colonia Silva (= Estación Abipones; 30°26’59” S, 60°25’58” W and Jacinto L. Arauz(30°44’01” S, 60°58’31” W, Province of Santa Fe, Argentina, were studied. We registered 11 genera of smallmammals, including Didelphidae marsupials (1 species, and Caviidae (1, Cricetidae (10, and Muridae (1rodents. We documented the southernmost record for Pseudoryzomys simplex and the first and second recordinglocalities for Santa Fe of Oligoryzomys nigripes and Graomys chacoensis, respectively.

  3. Analysis on the forms and regional characteristics of the traditional dwellings in mountainous central Shandong Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haiyong; Hu, Haiyan; Miao, Lei; Zhou, Bo

    2017-08-01

    The traditional dwellings in mountainous central Shandong Province show rich historic cultural deposits and distinctive regional characteristics under the influence of the geographic environment, resource endowment and historic culture. Research was done on the main construction patterns of the traditional dwellings in mountainous central Shandong Province, as well as relevant data and techniques, revealing the symbiotic interdependence between the traditional dwellings and nature in different natural and humanistic environments, providing a certain theoretical reference for the diversified conservation and heritage of the traditional dwellings.

  4. Mapping Evapotranspiration over Agricultural Land in the California Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, F. S.; Huntington, J. L.; Guzman, A.; Johnson, L.; Morton, C.; Nemani, R. R.; Post, K. M.; Rosevelt, C.; Shupe, J. W.; Spellenberg, R.; Vitale, A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances in satellite mapping of evapotranspiration (ET) have made it possible to largely automate the process of mapping ET over large areas at the field-scale. This development coincides with recent drought events across the western U.S. which have intensified interest in mapping of ET and consumptive use to address a range of water management challenges, including resolving disputes over water rights, improving irrigation management, and developing sustainable management plans for groundwater resources. We present a case study for California that leverages two automated ET mapping capabilities to estimate ET at the field scale over agricultural areas in the California Central Valley. We utilized the NASA Earth Exchange and applied a python-based implementation of the METRIC surface energy balance model and the Satellite Irrigation Management Support (SIMS) system, which uses a surface reflectance-based approach, to map ET over agricultural areas in the Central Valley. We present estimates from 2014 from both approaches and results from a comparison of the estimates. Though theoretically and computationally quite different from each other, initial results from both approaches show good agreement overall on seasonal ET totals for 2014. We also present results from comparisons against ET measurements collected on commercial farms in the Central Valley and discuss implications for accuracy of the two different approaches. The objective of this analysis is to provide data that can inform planning for the development of sustainable groundwater management plans, and assist water managers and growers in evaluating irrigation demand during drought events.

  5. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the Ventura Basin Province, California, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Pitman, Janet K.; Lillis, Paul G.; Klett, Timothy R.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Finn, Thomas M.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Hawkins, Sarah J.; Marra, Kristen R.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Le, Phuong A.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.

    2017-10-02

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed a geology-based assessment of undiscovered, technically recoverable conventional and continuous oil and gas resources in the part of the Ventura Basin Province that lies onshore or within State waters (within 3 miles of the shoreline) of California (fig. 1). Conventional oil and gas resources are those that have migrated upward into structural or stratigraphic traps from deep zones where the oil and gas is generated; water is present below the oil or gas. Continuous accumulations, in contrast, are those in which oil or gas is pervasively present in essentially all wells that penetrate them, that may not be structurally or stratigraphically trapped, and that typically lack oil-water or gas-water contacts. They are commonly produced with well-stimulation technology, such as hydraulic fracturing, referred to as “unconventional.” The same stimulation technology, however, is also used in many conventionally trapped accumulations. We estimated both the likely range of oil and gas volumes remaining to be discovered in accumulations similar to existing conventional oil and gas fields in the Ventura Basin Province (previously assessed by Keller [1995] as 1,060 million barrels of oil [MMBO], 1,900 billion cubic feet of gas [BCFG], and 60 million barrels of natural gas liquids [MMBNGL]), and the potential for oil and gas that might be present in a continuous accumulation at extreme depth in the floor of the basin.

  6. Groundwater Quality in the Central Eastside San Joaquin Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belitz, Kenneth; Landon, Matthew K.

    2010-01-01

    The Central Eastside study unit is located in California's San Joaquin Valley. The 1,695 square mile study unit includes three groundwater subbasins: Modesto, Turlock, and Merced (California Department of Water Resources, 2003). The primary water-bearing units consist of discontinuous lenses of gravel, sand, silt, and clay, which are derived largely from the Sierra Nevada Mountains to the east. Public-supply wells provide most of the drinking water supply in the Central Eastside. Consequently, the primary aquifer in the Central Eastside study unit is defined as that part of the aquifer corresponding to the perforated interval of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health database. Public-supply wells are typically drilled to depths of 200 to 350 feet, consist of solid casing from the land surface to a depth of about 100 to 200 feet, and they are perforated below the solid casing. Water quality in the shallower and deeper parts of the aquifer system may differ from that in the primary aquifer. The Central Eastside study unit has hot and dry summers and cool, moist, winters. Average annual rainfall ranges from 11 to 15 inches. The Stanislaus, Tuolumne, and Merced Rivers, with headwaters in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, are the primary streams traversing the study unit. Land use in the study unit is approximately 59 percent (%) agricultural, 34% natural (primarily grassland), and 7% urban. The primary crops are almonds, walnuts, peaches, grapes, grain, corn, and alfalfa. The largest urban areas (2003 population in parentheses) are the cities of Modesto (206,872), Turlock (63,467), and Merced (69,512). Municipal water use accounts for about 5% of the total water use in the Central Eastside study unit, with the remainder used for irrigated agriculture. Groundwater accounts for about 75% of the municipal supply, and surface water accounts for about 25%. Recharge to the groundwater flow system is primarily from percolation of irrigation return

  7. Atmospheric Inverse Estimates of Methane Emissions from Central California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Chuanfeng; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Bianco, Laura; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Hirsch, Adam; MacDonald, Clinton; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Fischer, Marc L.

    2008-11-21

    Methane mixing ratios measured at a tall-tower are compared to model predictions to estimate surface emissions of CH{sub 4} in Central California for October-December 2007 using an inverse technique. Predicted CH{sub 4} mixing ratios are calculated based on spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and simulated atmospheric trajectories. The atmospheric trajectories, along with surface footprints, are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. An uncertainty analysis is performed to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated CH{sub 4} emissions. Three inverse model estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions are reported. First, linear regressions of modeled and measured CH{sub 4} mixing ratios obtain slopes of 0.73 {+-} 0.11 and 1.09 {+-} 0.14 using California specific and Edgar 3.2 emission maps respectively, suggesting that actual CH{sub 4} emissions were about 37 {+-} 21% higher than California specific inventory estimates. Second, a Bayesian 'source' analysis suggests that livestock emissions are 63 {+-} 22% higher than the a priori estimates. Third, a Bayesian 'region' analysis is carried out for CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions, which shows that inventory CH{sub 4} emissions from the Central Valley are underestimated and uncertainties in CH{sub 4} emissions are reduced for sub-regions near the tower site, yielding best estimates of flux from those regions consistent with 'source' analysis results. The uncertainty reductions for regions near the tower indicate that a regional network of measurements will be necessary to provide accurate estimates of surface CH{sub 4} emissions for multiple regions.

  8. The Central European, Tarim and Siberian Large Igneous Provinces, Late Palaeozoic orogeny and coeval metallogeny

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boorder, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/098199056

    2014-01-01

    The formation of the Central European and Tarim Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) in the Early Permian coincided with the demise of the Variscan and the Southern Tianshan orogens, respectively. The Early Triassic Siberian LIP was formed in the wake of the Western Altaid orogeny in the Late Permian.

  9. The impact of nutrition education at three health centres in Central Province, Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorweg, J.C.; Niemeijer, R.

    1980-01-01

    This report contains an account of a study of the effects of nutrition education as given at three health centres in different ecological zones in Central Province, Kenya. Two groups of mothers in similar social and economic situations were selected for interviewing: frequent and infrequent

  10. GIVETIAN–FRASNIAN BOUNDARY CONODONTS FROM KERMAN PROVINCE, CENTRAL IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HOSSEIN GHOLAMALIAN

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Middle - Late Devonian boundary is investigated based on twenty-two conodont species and subspecies from three sections in the north and west of Kerman, southeastern central Iran. Upper Givetian - lower Frasnian carbonates of the basal part of the Bahram Formation transgressively overlie the sandstone beds of the top of (? Early - Middle Devonian Padeha Formation. These massive skeletal limestones encompass the G-F boundary. The base of Frasnian is identified by the appearance of early forms of Ancyrodella rotundiloba . It helps to compare our biozones to those of global stratotype in southern France. A new species, Polygnathus hojedki n. sp. is described here. New range is suggested for P. praepolitus .

  11. Holocene Evolution of two Upwelling Systems - Offshore Northern California and the Central Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, J. A.; Bischoff, J. L.; Bukry, D.; Heusser, L.; Herbert, T. D.; Lyle, M.

    2002-12-01

    High resolution records from offshore northern California \\(ODP 1019\\) and the central Gulf of California \\(DSDP 480 and BAM80 E17\\) reveal both similarities and differences in the Holocene evolution of these upwelling systems. Common themes include: 1\\ ) an earlier Holocene period \\(11.6-8.2 ka\\) with relatively high calcium carbonate deposition, probably reflecting a maximum in summer insolation; 2\\ ) increasing diatom deposition during the middle and late Holocene, likely signaling an intensification of seasonal northwest winds; and 3\\ ) the onset of modern oceanic conditions between 3.5 and 3.2 ka, possibly associated with the expression of increasing ENSO variability. At ODP 1019 off northern California, cooler alkenone-based SST's and the rarity of the subtropical-diatom Pseudoeunotia doliolus suggest that the California Current was rather broad during the middle part of the Holocene \\(ca. 8.2-3.2 ka\\), perhaps similar to the conditions that exist during a modern La Niña. Decreasing wt. % CaCO3 relatively low, but increasing wt. % organic C, and low to moderate estimated opal content typify this middle Holocene interval. Beginning at 5.2 ka, increasing coastal redwood pollen is evidence that coastal fog and coastal upwelling were becoming more important. Subsequently, at ca. 3.5 ka, a doubling of estimated opal coupled with increased coastal redwood pollen suggests a further enhancement of seasonal coastal upwelling. At about the same time \\(ca. 3.2 ka\\), a sustained ca. 1 deg. C increase in alkenone SST and 3-fold increase in P. doliolus imply warming of fall and winter SST's. An enhancement of the interannual variability of surface water conditions at this time is probably associated with an increasing expression of ENSO variability. In the central Gulf of California between ca. 11.0 and 8.2 ka, biosilica production was generally low compared to that of the latest Holocene, suggesting that wintertime NW winds were relatively weak. Stepwise

  12. Accessibility benchmarks: interpretive programs and services in north central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura J. McLachlin; Emilyn A. Sheffield; Donald A. Penland; Charles W. Nelson

    1995-01-01

    The Heritage Corridors Project was a unique partnership between the California Department of Parks and Recreation, the California State University, and the Across California Conservancy. The purpose of the project was to develop a map of selected northern California outdoor recreation and heritage sites. Data about facility accessibility improvements (restrooms, clear...

  13. Winter habitat associations of diurnal raptors in Californias Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandolrno, E.R.; Herzog, M.P.; Hooper, S.L.; Smith, Z.

    2011-01-01

    The wintering raptors of California's Central Valley are abundant and diverse. Despite this, little information exists on the habitats used by these birds in winter. We recorded diurnal raptors along 19 roadside survey routes throughout the Central Valley for three consecutive winters between 2007 and 2010. We obtained data sufficient to determine significant positive and negative habitat associations for the White-tailed Kite (Elanus leucurus), Bald Eagle {Haliaeetus leucocephalus), Northern Harrier (Circus cyaneus), Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), Ferruginous Hawk (Buteo regalis), Rough-legged Hawk (Buteo lagopus), American Kestrel (Falco sparverius), and Prairie Falcon (Falco mexicanus). The Prairie Falcon and Ferruginous and Rough-legged hawks showed expected strong positive associations with grasslands. The Bald Eagle and Northern Harrier were positively associated not only with wetlands but also with rice. The strongest positive association for the White-tailed Kite was with wetlands. The Red-tailed Hawk was positively associated with a variety of habitat types but most strongly with wetlands and rice. The American Kestrel, Northern Harrier, and White-tailed Kite were positively associated with alfalfa. Nearly all species were negatively associated with urbanized landscapes, orchards, and other intensive forms of agriculture. The White-tailed Kite, Northern Harrier, Redtailed Hawk, Ferruginous Hawk, and American Kestrel showed significant negative associations with oak savanna. Given the rapid conversion of the Central Valley to urban and intensive agricultural uses over the past few decades, these results have important implications for conservation of these wintering raptors in this region.

  14. Wind speed forecasting in the central California wind resource area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, E.F. [Wind Economics & Technology, Inc., Martinez, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A wind speed forecasting program was implemented in the summer seasons of 1985 - 87 in the Central California Wind Resource Area (WRA). The forecasting program is designed to use either meteorological observations from the WRA and local upper air observations or upper air observations alone to predict the daily average windspeed at two locations. Forecasts are made each morning at 6 AM and are valid for a 24 hour period. Ease of use is a hallmark of the program as the daily forecast can be made using data entered into a programmable HP calculator. The forecasting program was the first step in a process to examine whether the electrical energy output of an entire wind power generation facility or defined subsections of the same facility could be predicted up to 24 hours in advance. Analysis of the results of the summer season program using standard forecast verification techniques show the program has skill over persistence and climatology.

  15. Interrogating the Isabella Anomaly with the Central California Seismic Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, S. M.; Schmandt, B.; Dougherty, S. L.; Clayton, R. W.

    2016-12-01

    The Isabella positive velocity anomaly is located in the uppermost mantle beneath the Great Valley of Central California ( 36°N) and was first recognized by seismic tomography efforts in 1980. The geologic interpretation of this feature remains contentious however. The conventional interpretation is that the anomaly is related to the delamination of a dense mafic root associated with the formation of the Sierra Nevada batholith which lies to the east. Alternatively, the anomaly has been interpreted as a fossil slab fragment associated with the stalled subduction of the Monterey microplate which lies offshore. One of the challenges in interpreting the Isabella anomaly is the relatively poor resolution due to a lack of seismic data in and around the Great Valley. To help further constrain the subsurface structure in this region, we deployed a dense line of 40 broadband seismometers in Central California stretching from the Sierra foothills to the coast that recorded data during 2013-2015. Here we report on our on-going research efforts which include body and surface wave tomography as well as scattered wave imaging derived from P and S wave receiver functions. The most prominent feature observed in the receiver function imaging is a high amplitude crustal discontinuity which is observed over 80 km distance. This westward dipping feature begins near the surface beneath the Sierra foothills and reaches 25 km depth beneath the Great Valley. We speculate that this feature represents the top of a high velocity ophiolite body that underlies most of the Great Valley. Receiver functions also suggest the presence of eastward dipping velocity discontinuities in the uppermost mantle (40-80 km) below the western Great Valley. Body wave travel-time measurements indicate that the Isabella anomaly extends west to beneath the coastal range. These observations support the hypothesis that the Isabella anomaly is a slab fragment rather than a piece of delaminating lithosphere.

  16. Fourteen years of forage monitoring on the California Central Coast shows tremendous variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royce Larsen; Karl Striby; Marc Horney

    2015-01-01

    To better understand forage production (above ground biomass) and precipitation patterns in the Central Coast region of California, the first in a growing network of primary production monitoring sites were established in 2001. The California Central Coast has a Mediterranean climate with cool, moist winters and hot, dry summers, and is dominated by annual grasslands...

  17. Quaternary stratigraphy and developmental history of the Central Russian Periglacial-Loessal Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agadjanian, A. K.; Glushankova, N. I.

    2017-07-01

    As a result of complex investigation in the Central Russian Loessal Province, detailed lithologic, geochemical, paleopedological, and paleontological characteristics of the young deposits of the stratotype section Mikhailovka are obtained. They provide the basis for facies genetic differentiation, stratification, and correlation of particular horizons chronologically coordinated by paleopedological and paleontological data with the geological scale of the Neopleistocene. The loess-soil sequences corresponding to climatolites of the Lower, Middle, and Upper Neopleistocene are established and characterized. In dynamical history of the Central Russian Periglacial Loessal Province, thirteen paleogeographical stages of natural-climatic changes (seven warm interglacial and interstadial epochs, six cold epochs alternating with them) are revealed. A rhythmic climatic substantiation for the stratigraphical division of recent sediments in the investigated region is provided.

  18. Prevalence of Dirofilaria immitis infection in dogs in Henan province, central China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shuai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The heartworm Dirofilaria immitis is the causative agent of cardiopulmonary dirofilariosis in dogs and cats, and also infects humans. However, there has been no study on dirofilariasis in dogs in central China. From March 2015 to February 2016, sera from 1176 randomly selected household dogs from Henan province, central China were examined for D. immitis antigen using the Canine Heartworm Antigen Test Kit. The overall seroprevalence of D. immitis in dogs in Henan province was 13% (155/1176. The prevalence was significantly higher in older dogs and dogs kept outdoors, compared to the younger ones and those sheltered indoors. No significant difference of prevalence was observed between sexes. The results suggest that the risk of exposure to D. immitis in dogs is high in Henan, and prophylaxis against the parasite is advisable to decrease the incidence of canine dirofilariosis in this region.

  19. Prevalence of Dirofilaria immitis infection in dogs in Henan province, central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Nian; Zhang, Zhenchao; Wang, Dong; Yao, Zhijun; Zhang, Haizhu; Ma, Jingbo; Zheng, Bin; Ren, Hongbin; Liu, Shiguo

    2016-01-01

    The heartworm Dirofilaria immitis is the causative agent of cardiopulmonary dirofilariosis in dogs and cats, and also infects humans. However, there has been no study on dirofilariasis in dogs in central China. From March 2015 to February 2016, sera from 1176 randomly selected household dogs from Henan province, central China were examined for D. immitis antigen using the Canine Heartworm Antigen Test Kit. The overall seroprevalence of D. immitis in dogs in Henan province was 13% (155/1176). The prevalence was significantly higher in older dogs and dogs kept outdoors, compared to the younger ones and those sheltered indoors. No significant difference of prevalence was observed between sexes. The results suggest that the risk of exposure to D. immitis in dogs is high in Henan, and prophylaxis against the parasite is advisable to decrease the incidence of canine dirofilariosis in this region. © S. Wang et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2016.

  20. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection and risk factors in domestic sheep in Henan province, central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nian; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Dong; Li, Chaoying; Zhang, Zhenchao; Yao, Zhijun; Li, Tingting; Xie, Qing; Liu, Shiguo; Zhang, Haizhu

    2016-01-01

    Sheep are highly susceptible to infections with Toxoplasma gondii and play a major role in the transmission of toxoplasmosis to humans. In the present study, 779 serum samples from sheep were collected from Henan province, central China from March 2015 to May 2016, and antibodies to T. gondii were detected by modified agglutination test (MAT). The overall seroprevalence of T. gondii in sheep was 12.71% (99/779). The risk factors significantly associated with T. gondii seroprevalence were the geographical origin, age, presence of cats, and the rearing system. This is the first report of T. gondii infection in sheep in Henan province, central China, and of an association of seropositivity to T. gondii with risk factors. © N. Zhang et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2016.

  1. Annual risks of tuberculous infection in East Nusa Tenggara and Central Java Provinces, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachtiar, A; Miko, T Y; Machmud, R; Besral, B; Yudarini, P; Mehta, F; Chadha, V K; Basri, C; Loprang, F; Jitendra, R

    2009-01-01

    East Nusa Tenggara (NTT) and Central Java Provinces, Indonesia. To estimate the average annual risk of tuberculous infection (ARTI) among school children aged 6-9 years in each province. Children attending Classes 1-4 in 65 schools in NTT and 79 in Central Java, selected by two-stage sampling, were intradermally administered 2 tuberculin units of purified protein derivative RT23 with Tween 80 on the mid-volar aspect of the left forearm. The maximum transverse diameter of induration was measured 72 h later. The analysis was carried out among 5479 satisfactorily test-read children in NTT and 6943 in Central Java. One hundred and fifty-five new sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) cases (78 in NTT and 77 in Central Java) were also tuberculin tested. Based on the frequency distribution of reaction sizes among the children and PTB cases, the prevalence of infection was estimated by the mirror-image method using the modes of tuberculous reactions at 15 and 17 mm. Using the 15 mm mode, ARTI was estimated at 1% in NTT and 0.9% in Central Java. Using the 17 mm mode, ARTI was estimated at 0.5% in NTT and 0.4% in Central Java. Transmission of tuberculous infection may be further reduced by intensification of tuberculosis control efforts.

  2. Evapotranspiration of applied water, Central Valley, California, 1957-78

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Alex K.

    1982-01-01

    In the Central Valley, Calif., where 57% of the 20,000 square miles of land is irrigated, ground-water recharge from agricultural lands is an important input to digital simulation models of ground-water flow. Several methods of calculating recharge were explored for the Central Valley Aquifer Project and a simplified water budget was designed where net recharge (recharge minus pumpage) equals net surface water diverted minus evapotranspiration of applied water (ETAW). This equation eliminates the need to determine pumpage from the water-table aquifer, assuming that the time lag for infiltration is not longer than the time intervals of interest for modeling. This study evaluates only the evapotranspiration of applied water. Future reports will describe the other components of the water budget. ETAW was calculated by summing the products of ETAW coefficients and respective crop areas for each 7 1/2-minute quadrangle area in the valley, for each of three land-use surveys between 1957 and 1978. In 1975 total ETAW was 15.2 million acre-feet, a 43% increase since 1959. The largest increases were in the south, especially Kern County, which had a sixfold increase, which was caused by the import of surface water in the California Aqueduct. (USGS)

  3. Volcanostratigraphic Sequences of Kebo-Butak Formation at Bayat Geological Field Complex, Central Java Province and Yogyakarta Special Province, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Mulyaningsih

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available DOI:10.17014/ijog.3.2.77-94Bayat Complex is usually used as a work field for students of geology and other geosciences. The study area is located in the southern part of the Bayat Complex. Administratively, it belongs to Central Java Province and Yogyakarta Special Province. The lithology of Bayat is very complex, composed of various kinds of igneous, sedimentary, metamorphic, and volcanic rocks. Most of previous researchers interpreted Bayat as a melange complex constructed within a subduction zone. Kebo-Butak is one of formations that forms the Bayat field complex. The formation is composed of basalt, layers of pumice, tuff, shale, and carbonaceous tuff. Most of them are known as volcanic rocks. These imply that volcanic activities are more probable to construct the geology of Bayat rather than the subducted melange complex. The geological mapping, supported by geomorphology, petrology, stratigraphy, and geological structures, had been conducted in a comprehensive manner using the deduction-induction method. The research encounters basalt, black pumice, tuff with basaltic glasses fragments, zeolite, argilic clay, as well as feldspathic- and pumice tuff. Petrographically, the basalt is composed of labradorite, olivine, clinopyroxene, and volcanic glass. Black pumice and tuff contain prismatic clinopyroxene, granular olivine, and volcanic glasses. Feldspathic tuff and pumice tuff are crystal vitric tuff due to more abundant feldspar, quartz, and amphibole than volcanic glass. Zeolite comprises chlorite and altered glasses as deep sea altered volcanic rocks. The geologic structure is very complex, the major structures are normal faults with pyrite in it. There were two deep submarine paleovolcanoes namely Tegalrejo and Baturagung. The first paleovolcano erupted effusively producing basaltic sequence, while the second one erupted explosively ejecting feldspathic-rich pyroclastic material. The two paleovolcanoes erupted simultaneously and

  4. Relationship Between Sanitation Access and Poverty Rate: a Case Study in Central Java Province

    OpenAIRE

    Saleh, Samsubar; Rizki, Bhimo

    2007-01-01

    The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) shows the inter¬dependent relationship between sanitation and poverty rate. In addition, the development and improvement of sanitation aspect will indirectly reduce poverty. This study is aimed to investigate the relationship between sanitation and poverty in several cases occurring in all regencies/municipalities in the central Java Province.The results show that the factors affecting sanitation are the per capita gross regional domestic product (PGRDP...

  5. DOCUMENTARY RESCUE OF POPULAR TRADITIONS OF THE CENTRAL AREA CANTONS HEREDIA PROVINCE

    OpenAIRE

    Esquivel Alfaro, Elbethia; Masís Esquivel, Luis Paulino

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of documentary rescue demonstrations performed in different counties present in the central area of the province of Heredia.This idea was enhanced thanks to the Organization of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has provided the rescue and preservation of folk traditions, both tangible and intangible, throughout the world.Coupled with this, the Ministry of Education under the direction of Professor Manuel Antonio Bolañ...

  6. Yellow Fever Outbreak - Kongo Central Province, Democratic Republic of the Congo, August 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otshudiema, John O; Ndakala, Nestor G; Mawanda, Elande-Taty K; Tshapenda, Gaston P; Kimfuta, Jacques M; Nsibu, Loupy-Régence N; Gueye, Abdou S; Dee, Jacob; Philen, Rossanne M; Giese, Coralie; Murrill, Christopher S; Arthur, Ray R; Kebela, Benoit I

    2017-03-31

    On April 23, 2016, the Democratic Republic of the Congo's (DRC's) Ministry of Health declared a yellow fever outbreak. As of May 24, 2016, approximately 90% of suspected yellow fever cases (n = 459) and deaths (45) were reported in a single province, Kongo Central Province, that borders Angola, where a large yellow fever outbreak had begun in December 2015. Two yellow fever mass vaccination campaigns were conducted in Kongo Central Province during May 25-June 7, 2016 and August 17-28, 2016. In June 2016, the DRC Ministry of Health requested assistance from CDC to control the outbreak. As of August 18, 2016, a total of 410 suspected yellow fever cases and 42 deaths were reported in Kongo Central Province. Thirty seven of the 393 specimens tested in the laboratory were confirmed as positive for yellow fever virus (local outbreak threshold is one laboratory-confirmed case of yellow fever). Although not well-documented for this outbreak, malaria, viral hepatitis, and typhoid fever are common differential diagnoses among suspected yellow fever cases in this region. Other possible diagnoses include Zika, West Nile, or dengue viruses; however, no laboratory-confirmed cases of these viruses were reported. Thirty five of the 37 cases of yellow fever were imported from Angola. Two-thirds of confirmed cases occurred in persons who crossed the DRC-Angola border at one market city on the DRC side, where ≤40,000 travelers cross the border each week on market day. Strategies to improve coordination between health surveillance and cross-border trade activities at land borders and to enhance laboratory and case-based surveillance and health border screening capacity are needed to prevent and control future yellow fever outbreaks.

  7. A Strategy to Increase the Competitiveness of Leading Industries in Central Java Province to Face AEC 2015

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fafurida Fafurida; Avi Budi Setiawan; Setyani Irmawati

    2016-01-01

    ... competitiveness to face AEC 2015. Results of this research shows that leading industry in Central Java Province are beverage, tobacco processing, textile, apparel, wood, printing, furniture and other processing industry...

  8. Residential Pesticide Usage in Older Adults Residing in Central California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beate Ritz

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Information on residential pesticide usage and behaviors that may influence pesticide exposure was collected in three population-based studies of older adults residing in the three Central California counties of Fresno, Kern, and Tulare. We present data from participants in the Study of Use of Products and Exposure Related Behaviors (SUPERB study (N = 153 and from community controls ascertained in two Parkinson’s disease studies, the Parkinson’s Environment and Gene (PEG study (N = 359 and The Center for Gene-Environment Studies in Parkinson’s Disease (CGEP; N = 297. All participants were interviewed by telephone to obtain information on recent and lifetime indoor and outdoor residential pesticide use. Interviews ascertained type of product used, frequency of use, and behaviors that may influence exposure to pesticides during and after application. Well over half of all participants reported ever using indoor and outdoor pesticides; yet frequency of pesticide use was relatively low, and appeared to increase slightly with age. Few participants engaged in behaviors to protect themselves or family members and limit exposure to pesticides during and after treatment, such as ventilating and cleaning treated areas, or using protective equipment during application. Our findings on frequency of use over lifetime and exposure related behaviors will inform future efforts to develop population pesticide exposure models and risk assessment.

  9. [Relationship between central obesity and clustering of cardiovascular risk factors in adults of Jiangsu province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jian; Xiang, Quanyong; Lyu, Shurong; Pan, Xiaoqun; Qin, Yu; Yang, Jie; Zhou, Jinyi; Zhang, Yongqing; Wu, Ming; Tao, Ran

    2015-06-01

    To explore the relationship between central obesity and cardiovascular risk factors and their clustering in adults of Jiangsu province. Multi-stratified clustering sampling method was used to sample 8 400 residents aged 18 years and over from 14 diseases surveillance units in Jiangsu province from October to December 2010. Information was obtained with face-to-face interview, physical examination and laboratory testing. A total of 8 380 residents finished the study protocol and their data were analyzed. Central obesity was defined as waist circumference ≥ 85 cm in males or ≥ 80 cm in females. Following complex weighting of the samples, level and proportion of cardiovascular risk factors in group with different waist circumference were analyzed. The prevalence of central obesity among adults in Jiangsu province was 46.2%, the proportion of males and females was 46.4% and 46.1%, respectively (P > 0.05). The prevalence of center obesity varied significantly in residents with different age, area, education and occupation (all P cardiovascular risk factors increased in proportion to increasing waist circumference (all P risk of hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia and clustering of cardiovascular risk factors was 2.2 (OR = 2.2, 95% CI: 2.0-2.4) and 4.7 (OR = 4.7, 95% CI: 3.9-5.7); 2.1 (OR = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.7-2.5) and 3.8 (OR = 3.8, 95% CI: 3.2-4.5); 2.3 (OR = 2.3, 95% CI: 1.8-2.9) and 4.1 (OR = 4.1, 95% CI: 3.2-5.3); 3.4 (OR = 3.4, 95% CI: 2.9-3.9) and 8.0 (OR = 8.0, 95% CI: 6.2-10.2) fold higher in residents with mild and severe central obesity than residents without central obesity. The extent of central obesity positively correlates with the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and their clustering in adults of Jiangsu province. Comprehensive interventions on obesity serve as an important tool to reduce the cardiovascular risk in adult Jiangshu residents.

  10. Atmospheric PCO2 Perturbations Associated with the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Morgan F.; Wright, James D.; Kent, Dennis V.

    2011-03-01

    The effects of a large igneous province on the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide (PCO2) are mostly unknown. In this study, we estimate PCO2 from stable isotopic values of pedogenic carbonates interbedded with volcanics of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) in the Newark Basin, eastern North America. We find pre-CAMP PCO2 values of ~2000 parts per million (ppm), increasing to ~4400 ppm immediately after the first volcanic unit, followed by a steady decrease toward pre-eruptive levels over the subsequent 300 thousand years, a pattern that is repeated after the second and third flow units. We interpret each PCO2 increase as a direct response to magmatic activity (primary outgassing or contact metamorphism). The systematic decreases in PCO2 after each magmatic episode probably reflect consumption of atmospheric CO2 by weathering of silicates, stimulated by fresh CAMP volcanics.

  11. 78 FR 75332 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; California Central Valley Angler Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-11

    ... California Department of Fish and Wildlife, with information useful for understanding the economic importance..., and ] expenditures of anglers who fish in the rivers of California's Central Valley. NMFS has engaged... recreational benefits associated with habitat restoration such as improved fish passage. Information to be...

  12. 77 FR 10598 - BIOTECH Holdings Ltd., California Oil & Gas Corp., Central Minera Corp., Chemokine Therapeutics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION BIOTECH Holdings Ltd., California Oil & Gas Corp., Central Minera Corp., Chemokine Therapeutics... current and accurate information concerning the securities of California Oil & Gas Corp. because it has...

  13. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Central California: REPTILES (Reptile and Amphibian Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for amphibians and reptiles in Central California. Vector polygons in this data set represent sea turtle...

  14. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Central California: NESTS (Nest Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for alcids, diving birds, gulls, terns, pelagic birds, and shorebirds in Central California. Vector points...

  15. Satellites measure recent rates of groundwater depletion in California's Central Valley

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Famiglietti, J. S; Lo, M; Ho, S. L; Bethune, J; Anderson, K. J; Syed, T. H; Swenson, S. C; de Linage, C. R; Rodell, M

    2011-01-01

    In highly‐productive agricultural areas such as California's Central Valley, where groundwater often supplies the bulk of the water required for irrigation, quantifying rates of groundwater depletion remains...

  16. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Central California: HABITATS (Habitat Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for benthic habitats in Central California. Vector polygons in this data set represent kelp and eelgrass...

  17. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Central California: FISHL (Fish Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for anadromous fish and rare fish species occurrences in Central California. Vector lines in this data set...

  18. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Central California: ALERTS (Vulnerable Resource Location Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector points representing locations in Central California that should be highlighted for protection due to the presence of certain highly...

  19. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Central California: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, and anadromous fish species in Central California. Vector polygons in this data set...

  20. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Central California: SOCECON (Socioeconomic Resource Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains socioeconomic resource data for the following types of locations in Central California: access, airport, aquaculture, beach, boat ramp, USCG...

  1. Spring 1961 water table of California's Central Valley (from Williamson and others, 1989)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the spring 1961 water-table altitude for the California's Central Valley. It was used to initiate the water-level altitudes for the...

  2. Physical, Nutrient, and Biological Measurements of Coastal Waters off Central California in November 2007

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rago, Thomas A; Michisaki, Reiko; Marinovic, Baldo; Blum, Marguerite; Whitaker, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    The results of analyses of hydrographic, nutrient, and biological data collected in coastal ocean waters off Central California in November 2007 aboard the NOAA Ship David Starr Jordan are presented...

  3. Age, distribution, and stratigraphic relationship of rock units in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California: Chapter 5 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosford Scheirer, Allegra; Magoon, Leslie B.

    2008-01-01

    The San Joaquin Basin is a major petroleum province that forms the southern half of California’s Great Valley, a 700-km-long, asymmetrical basin that originated between a subduction zone to the west and the Sierra Nevada to the east. Sedimentary fill and tectonic structures of the San Joaquin Basin record the Mesozoic through Cenozoic geologic history of North America’s western margin. More than 25,000 feet (>7,500 meters) of sedimentary rocks overlie the basement surface and provide a nearly continuous record of sedimentation over the past ~100 m.y. Further, depositional geometries and fault structures document the tectonic evolution of the region from forearc setting to strike-slip basin to transpressional margin. Sedimentary architecture in the San Joaquin Basin is complicated because of these tectonic regimes and because of lateral changes in depositional environment and temporal changes in relative sea level. Few formations are widespread across the basin. Consequently, a careful analysis of sedimentary facies is required to unravel the basin’s depositional history on a regional scale. At least three high-quality organic source rocks formed in the San Joaquin Basin during periods of sea level transgression and anoxia. Generated on the basin’s west side, hydrocarbons migrated into nearly every facies type in the basin, from shelf and submarine fan sands to diatomite and shale to nonmarine coarse-grained rocks to schist. In 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed a geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources and future additions to reserves in the San Joaquin Valley of California (USGS San Joaquin Basin Province Assessment Team, this volume, chapter 1). Several research aims supported this assessment: identifying and mapping the petroleum systems, modeling the generation, migration, and accumulation of hydrocarbons, and defining the volumes of rock to be analyzed for additional resources. To better understand the three dimensional

  4. California GAMA program: ground-water quality data in the San Diego drainages hydrogeologic province, California, 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth; Burton, Carmen A.

    2005-01-01

    Because of concerns over ground-water quality, the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, has implemented the Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. A primary objective of the program is to provide a current assessment of ground-water quality in areas where public supply wells are an important source of drinking water. The San Diego GAMA study unit was the first region of the state where an assessment of ground-water quality was implemented under the GAMA program. The San Diego GAMA study unit covers the entire San Diego Drainages hydrogeologic province, and is broken down into four distinct hydrogeologic study areas: the Temecula Valley study area, the Warner Valley study area, the Alluvial Basins study area, and the Hard Rock study area. A total of 58 ground-water samples were collected from public supply wells in the San Diego GAMA study unit: 19 wells were sampled in the Temecula Valley study area, 9 in the Warner Valley study area, 17 in the Alluvial Basins study area, and 13 in the Hard Rock study area. Over 350 chemical and microbial constituents and water-quality indicators were analyzed for in this study. However, only select wells were measured for all constituents and water-quality indicators. Results of analyses were calculated as detection frequencies by constituent classification and by individual constituents for the entire San Diego GAMA study unit and for the individual study areas. Additionally, concentrations of constituents that are routinely monitored were compared to maximum contaminant levels (MCL) and secondary maximum contaminant levels (SMCL). Concentrations of constituents classified as 'unregulated chemicals for which monitoring is required' (UCMR) were compared to the 'detection level for the purposes of reporting' (DLR). Eighteen of the 88 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and gasoline oxygenates

  5. CULTURAL TOURISM POTENTIAL IN THE NORTH CENTRAL PROVINCE OF SRI LANKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wijitapure Wimalaratana

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available International tourism has recorded a tremendous growth in the past and this trend will continue further uninterruptedly. Sri Lanka has been one of the major tourist attractions since antiquity. The end of a protracted civil war has been a blessing for the tourist industry and the consequent rapid expansion of tourist infrastructure in the island. Although the island is a small one, it is rich in religious and cultural diversity. Buddhism is the main religion of the majority of people, while Hinduism, Christianity and Islam are also practiced by portions of the population. The resultant rich cultural heritage of the island has been constructed around religious practices, historical monuments and ancient cities, meditation, yoga, folk music and dances, festivities, ceremonies and rituals. Special sites with multi religious attractions reflect the diversity and uniqueness of a rich culture. The North Central Province of Sri Lanka is especially rich in cultural resources owing largely to it housing two cities that served as the island’s capital for more than 1000 years in ancient times. Only a small fraction of this vast amount of resources has been utilized by the tourism industry so far. The paper argues that the promotion of religious and cultural tourism products in the North Central Province of Sri Lanka will open up new avenues of engagement for tourists and income generation for the island. Ancient monuments and religious sites, segments of culture tourism, would be magnates to overseas archeologists and Buddhist communities.

  6. Physical measurements including temperature profiles of coastal Waters off Central California in October 2006 (NODC Accession 0019214)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical measurements of Coastal Waters off Central California in October 2006. Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California, Technical Report NPS-OC-07-002. This...

  7. 75 FR 6696 - Draft Recovery Plan for Tidal Marsh Ecosystems of Northern and Central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Draft Recovery Plan for Tidal Marsh Ecosystems of Northern and Central... draft recovery plan for Tidal Marsh Ecosystems of Northern and Central California for public review and... Salt Marsh Harvest Mouse Recovery Plan. The plan also addresses several federally endangered plant...

  8. Detection and Classification of Volcanic Earthquakes/Tremors in Central Anatolian Volcanic Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Metin; Arda Özacar, A.; Bülent Tank, S.; Uslular, Göksu; Kuşcu, Gonca; Türkelli, Niyazi

    2017-04-01

    Central Anatolia has been characterized by active volcanism since 10 Ma which created the so called Central Anatolia Volcanic Province (CAVP) where a series of volcanoes are located along the NE-SW trend. The petrological investigations reveal that the magma source in the CAVP has both subduction and asthenospheric signature possibly due to tearing of ongoing northward subduction of African plate along Aegean and Cyprus arcs. Recently, a temporary seismic array was deployed within the scope of Continental Dynamics: Central Anatolian Tectonics (CD-CAT) project and provided a unique opportunity to study the deep seismic signature of the CAVP. Passive seismic imaging efforts and magnetotellurics (MT) observations revealed low velocity and high conductivity zones supporting the presence of localized partial melt bodies beneath the CAVP at varying depths, especially around Mt. Hasan which exhibits both geological and archeological evidences for its eruption around 7500 B.C. In Central Anatolia, local seismicity detected by the CD-CAT array coincides well with the active faults zones. However, active or potentially active volcanoes within CAVP are characterized by the lack of seismic activity. In this study, seismic data recorded by permanent stations of Regional Earthquake-Tsunami Monitoring Center were combined with temporary seismic data collected by the CD-CAT array to improve sampling density across the CAVP. Later, the continuous seismic waveforms of randomly selected time intervals were manually analyzed to identify initially undetected seismic sources which have signal characters matching to volcanic earthquakes/tremors. For candidate events, frequency spectrums are constructed to classify the sources according to their physical mechanisms. Preliminary results support the presence of both volcano-tectonic (VT) and low-period (LT) events within the CAVP. In the next stage, the spectral and polarization analyses techniques will be utilized to the entire seismic

  9. Mapping of Marine Area Boundary of Central Java Province using Differential GPS Survey Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Khakhim

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of GPS (Global Positioning System technology which is measuring position by satellite, has taken a great metodology aspect of position on surface of earth. The standard GPS measurement takes an absolute positioning. To develop the accurate abd precision, it is used the differential method. Differential GPS measurement can be much more accurate than standard GPs measurement, wherever the method uses one receiver as base station/ reference and the other receiver as field station in a same time. That could reduce and eliminate drifts and errors. The aim of research is use the differential method of GPS survey to map the ocean boundary of Central Java Province. Physical data which neede are base line and base point. Base line were taken from obsrvation of longtime Landsat TM image band 5th based o opinion that shore line are clear seems and easy to interpreted at 10.00 am according to Landsat satellite reording time and the lowest tide time as base line. Location of lowest tide were selected at conspicuous place, such as cape, dry shore, etc and measured base on the BPN (Badan Pertahanan Nasional base/ reference point (orde 2 and 3 on the district, with GPS differential metod. Twelve miles distance from base line of ocean bounddary is belong to province and 1/3 of is belong to district. Characteristic of marine landform as cape, bay, estuaria, attended to international rules. Final report of the research were 1 oean boundary map of Center Java Province, 2 the location and base/ reference points (orde 2 and 3 that could be reference as a base point differential method.

  10. A quantitative risk assessment of bovine theileriosis entering Luapula Province from Central Province in Zambia via live cattle imports from traditional and commercial production sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makungu, C; Mwacalimba, K K

    2014-09-01

    Theileriosis or East Coast Fever (ECF) is an important livestock disease widespread in Zambia except for some provinces such as Luapula. This freedom status has been achieved due to strict livestock movement regulations that only authorise cattle imports from commercial farms implementing strict ECF control regimens. Recent increases in both the demand and price of beef in Zambia are stimulating a policy change towards a more inclusive inter-provincial trade in live cattle. This may also encourage the introduction of breeding cattle from high production pastoral sectors such as Central Province to stimulate the beef industry in disease free low production areas such as the Luapula Province. To estimate and compare the risks linked with those potential introductions of cattle from the traditional or commercial production sectors of the Central Province, a quantitative risk assessment model was developed. This risk comparison was necessary because the traditional livestock production sector accounts for over 79% of breeding cattle trade in Central Province but is characterised by minimalistic tick-borne disease control and a higher prevalence of ECF. We estimate that should the importation of breeding cattle from Central into Luapula Province be permitted, we could expect to import ECF by the introduction of infected animals at a median rate (5th and 95th percentiles) of every 0.44 years (0.12, 2.60), from the traditional sector compared to every 3.57 years (0.37, 103.6) from the commercial sector. Infected ticks would be expected to enter every 3.46 (0.66, 43.8) years via traditional cattle imports. These risks are strongly influenced by the prevalence of infection, performance of pre-transport screening tests, and the effectiveness of pre-transport tick cleansing. This assessment is expected to provide a model for tick borne disease risk assessments in similar settings, as well as inform ECF control, cattle trade, and stock movement policies in Zambia. Copyright

  11. Genetic diversity of Trichomonas vaginalis clinical isolates from Henan province in central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Meng; Liu, Hui Li

    2015-07-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a flagellated protozoan parasite that infects the human urogenital tract, causing the most common non-viral, sexually transmitted disease worldwide. In this study, genetic variants of T. vaginalis were identified in Henan Province, China. Fragments of the small subunit of nuclear ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) were amplified from 32 T. vaginalis isolates obtained from seven regions of Henan Province. Overall, 18 haplotypes were determined from the 18S rRNA sequences. Each sampled population and the total population displayed high haplotype diversity (Hd), accompanied by very low nucleotide diversity (Pi). In these molecular genetic variants, 91.58% genetic variation was derived from intra-regions. Phylogenetic analysis revealed no correlation between phylogeny and geographic distribution. Demographic analysis supported population expansion of T. vaginalis isolates from central China. Our findings showing moderate-to-high genetic variations in the 32 isolates of T. vaginalis provide useful knowledge for monitoring changes in parasite populations for the development of future control strategies.

  12. Post-Delamination Magmatism at the Hasandag Cinder Cone Province, Central Anatolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, H. D.; Pickard, M.; Sayit, K.; Hanan, B. B.; Kürkçüoğlu, B.; Furman, T.

    2016-12-01

    Central Anatolian mafic lavas record both closure of the Tethyan Ocean and post-Miocene extension. Regional-scale delamination of the horizontally-subducted Neotethyan slab beneath Central Anatolia 9-14 Ma is inferred on the basis of >1 km of uplift of the Central Anatolian Plateau and the onset of widespread volcanism induced by melting of ascending asthenosphere (Bartol and Govers, 2014). Geochemical data from the Quaternary Hasandağ Cinder Cone Province suggest a more complicated story and require melting of both asthenosphere and lithosphere. Hasandağ cinder cones produce basalt, trachybasalt and basaltic trachyandesite (7.2-10.3 wt. % MgO; 48.9-51.8 wt. % SiO2). Systematic trends in key element ratios indicate a significant contribution from the lithosphere with metasomatic phases including rutile and sodic amphibole. Tb/YbN (1.2-1.7) values restrict depth of melting to the spinel stability field, 30-90 km. Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic values fall within published ranges of post-Miocene Central Anatolian mafic lavas and suggest binary mixing between geographically-constrained enriched and depleted endmembers. In contrast, ternary Pb isotopic abundances are nearly uniform and lack psuedobinary trends indicative of ordered mixing observed elsewhere in Anatolia and in other young extensional provinces. This difference suggests that Hasandağ lavas do not undergo progressive crustal contamination in an evolving extensional environment. Rather, Hasandağ primitive lavas document an increase in degree of melting with depth, a signature associated with drip magmatism (Elkins-Tanton, 2007; Holbig and Grove, 2008).Together, these data argue for a two-part lithospheric foundering process: Miocene microplate-scale delamination of the subducted African slab and the subsequent influx of warm asthenosphere stimulated localized Quaternary drip melting of the remaining Anatolian lithosphere. These distinct mechanisms and scales of lithospheric removal provide a consistent explanation

  13. Energy Study on the UEB Central Paquito Rosales of Santiago de Cuba Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ing. José A. Motito-Legrá

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available An integral evaluation of energy behavior in UEB Central Paquito Rosales of Santiago de Cuba province is presented, applying in detail the methodology based on performing mass and energy balances in all sections of the industry, from the mills to the cans, including the steam generators. To carry out these balance data must be known in most of the cases or if they are not available, can be estimated with high reliability. The calculation equations are fully informed raised in the relevant theoretical foundations and only in essential cases are approximations or considerations entirely justified and validated by practical experience. Be obtained the necessary informationwhich allowed to know the behavior of the parameters that are necessary to take into account in the overall assessment of the energy efficiency of the process and therefore take appropriatetechnical decisions to solve problems.

  14. A research on bread consumption of families living in the central district of Tokat province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep EKMEKCİ BAL

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, bread consumption statuses of families living in the central district of Tokat province were identified. Data were obtained from 272 consumers in November 2012. According to the findings, the amount of per capita bread consumption is 291.95 g which is lower than the national average consumption. The most frequently consumed bread type of families was loaf bread with 70.59%. Consumers were mainly purchased bread from supermarkets (80.51% and oven (25.37%. More than half of consumers think that the quality of bread sold in the market is insufficient. Several families cannot consume a significant portion of bread purchased during the day; they re-used some of the staled bread and wasted the rest of staled bread. Measures should be taken to prevent the waste of bread. The quality of the bread produced should be increased and a necessary care for hygiene should be taken during production and sales stages.

  15. Bathing water profile in the coastal belt of the province of Pescara (Italy, Central Adriatic Sea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberatore, Lolita; Murmura, Federica; Scarano, Antonio

    2015-06-15

    The quality of bathing water is fundamental, not only from an environmental point of view but also due to the economic importance of tourism. This paper examines the water profile in the coastal belt of the province of Pescara (Italy, Central Adriatic Sea) with reference to the microbiological parameters Escherichia coli and intestinal enterococci required by Directive 2006/07 of European Commission. The water quality of 15 coastal beaches was surveyed; data were produced from monitoring and controls made available by the Abruzzo Regional Environmental Prevention and Protection Agency (ARTA) and extracted and elaborated for the period of interest (2010-2013). Statistical analysis was used to confirm the aspects deduced from mean values of monitoring and control data for each stretch. The data highlight critical situations in various parts of the coast; these problems can be attributed to river pollution, mainly due to the malfunctioning of the treatment plants for urban wastewater. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in atmospheric dustfall from the industrial corridor in Hubei Province, Central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaquan; Qu, Chengkai; Qi, Shihua; Cao, Junji; Zhan, Changlin; Xing, Xinli; Xiao, Yulun; Zheng, Jingru; Xiao, Wensheng

    2015-10-01

    Thirty atmospheric dustfall samples collected from an industrial corridor in Hubei Province, central China, were analyzed for 16 USEPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to investigate their concentrations, spatial distributions, sources, and health risks. Total PAH concentrations (ΣPAHs) ranged from 1.72 to 13.17 µg/g and averaged 4.91 µg/g. High molecular weight (4-5 rings) PAHs averaged 59.67% of the ΣPAHs. Individual PAH concentrations were not significantly correlated with total organic carbon, possibly due to the semi-continuous inputs from anthropogenic sources. Source identification studies suggest that the PAHs were mainly from motor vehicles and biomass/coal combustion. The incremental lifetime cancer risks associated with exposure to PAHs in the dustfall ranged from 10(-4) to 10(-6); these indicate potentially serious carcinogenic risks for exposed populations in the industrial corridor.

  17. Hazelnut oil consumption of families in the central town of Ordu province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat SAYILI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a comparative analysis of consumption of edible oil of families in Central Town of OrduProvince. In addition, factor analysis was conducted on factors which affect the consumption of hazelnut oil. The data used in the study in January 2013 was a result of a survey conducted with 272 people. According to the survey, the most consumed oils, butter (71.32% and hazelnut oil (61.76%, which is the amount of total fatconsumption of 6.71 kg/month per family and 1.89 kg/month per person. Families with more than 5 littercontainers prefer buying oil. Hazelnut oil is thought to be healthy and of good quality too much is consumed by local people. As a result of factor analysis, three factors (image and highly attractive, odour and low weight, quality and health affecting hazelnut oil consumption has been collected under the title.

  18. The Central Atlantic Magmatic Province: Age Comparison Between the South Carolina Dykes and Morocco Lava Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youbi, N.; Nomade, S.; Breutel, E.; Knight, K.

    2003-12-01

    Believed to be the largest volcanic province on Earth at more than 6000 km long and 2000 km wide, the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) stretches from Eastern Canada to Brazil and from Western Spain to the Ivory Coast. Due to the massive erosion and subsequent in filling of these areas since the 200 Ma rifting event, dikes and sills constitute the majority of the exposed CAMP volcanics. However, well preserved lava flows have been found in the Triassic basins of the Northeastern United States and Morocco. Despite numerous 40Ar/39Ar dating attempts, very few of the exposed CAMP volcanics have been successfully dated due to a variety of factors including; excess argon and alteration. Especially no age is available in the well-mapped but structurally complex South and North Carolina dykes swarm as well as only few scattered ages in the Moroccan Trias-Liassic basins. Our goal is to better constrain the emplacement timing of the dykes swarm but also to compare age of both intrusive and effusive rocks from the same magmatic event but separated from more than 1000 km, 200 Mys ago. Several questions continue to surround the CAMP volcanic province including its cause and emplacement mechanism. Toward that end we have collected and dated dyke samples from the Carolinas and flows in Morocco, 1000 km away and across the rift. We anticipate that a comparison of these dates will enable us to understand more about the timing between the emplacement of the flows and dykes. We have collected in South Carolina and High Atlas in Morocco 7 and 9 hand samples respectively. Specimens from South Carolina correspond to the three distinct dykes' direction NE-SW, NW-SE and NS. In Morocco, samples were collected in four sections (100 to 300 m thick) located in the High Atlas between Marrakech and Ouarzazate. From each hand sample two different transparent plagioclase fractions, 250-180 and 180 to 100 microns, were separated. We have performed step heating experiments at the Berkeley

  19. BURNOUT SYNDROME, JOB SATISFACTION LEVELS AND RELATED FACTORS IN CENTRAL TRABZON PROVINCE PRIMARY HEALTH CENTER WORKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asuman YAVUZYILMAZ

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Burnout manifests itself in individuals working in professions involving face-to-face contact with the public in depersonalization towards others, feelings of emotional exhaustion, and reduced feelings of personal achievement and adequacy. The objective in this study was to determine burnout and job satisfaction levels and related factors in primary health center personnel in the central part of the Turkish province of Trabzon. A total of 227 people working in central Trabzon province primary health centers participated in this cross-sectional study, a level of 90.4%. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used to determine burnout level and the Job Satisfaction Inventory for job satisfaction. Burnout levels in health personnel were high among women (15.06±5.57, married individuals (14.80±5.65 and those dissatisfied with their working conditions (16.80±5.81; physicians (5.00±2.79, those without children (5.19±2.54, those whose spouses were not working (4.69±2.70 and smokers (4.71±3.29 had a high level of depersonalization; and married individuals were determined to have a low personal achievement level (10.24±4.14 (p=0.020, p=0.028, p=0.011, p=0.038, p=0.028, p=0.012 and p=0.010, respectively. In conclusion, gender, marital status, age, satisfaction with working conditions and income level were determined to be related to burnout and job satisfaction. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(1.000: 41-50

  20. BURNOUT SYNDROME, JOB SATISFACTION LEVELS AND RELATED FACTORS IN CENTRAL TRABZON PROVINCE PRIMARY HEALTH CENTER WORKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat TOPBAS

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Burnout manifests itself in individuals working in professions involving face-to-face contact with the public in depersonalization towards others, feelings of emotional exhaustion, and reduced feelings of personal achievement and adequacy. The objective in this study was to determine burnout and job satisfaction levels and related factors in primary health center personnel in the central part of the Turkish province of Trabzon. A total of 227 people working in central Trabzon province primary health centers participated in this cross-sectional study, a level of 90.4%. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used to determine burnout level and the Job Satisfaction Inventory for job satisfaction. Burnout levels in health personnel were high among women (15.06±5.57, married individuals (14.80±5.65 and those dissatisfied with their working conditions (16.80±5.81; physicians (5.00±2.79, those without children (5.19±2.54, those whose spouses were not working (4.69±2.70 and smokers (4.71±3.29 had a high level of depersonalization; and married individuals were determined to have a low personal achievement level (10.24±4.14 (p=0.020, p=0.028, p=0.011, p=0.038, p=0.028, p=0.012 and p=0.010, respectively. In conclusion, gender, marital status, age, satisfaction with working conditions and income level were determined to be related to burnout and job satisfaction. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2007; 6(1: 41-50

  1. Stalking the next Parkfield earthquake in Central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Looking southeast from Middle Mountain toward Gold Hill, it is a subtle furrow in the grassy knolls of the Cholame Valley of California's Coast Range. To geophysicists, this 19-mile section of the San Andreas fault midway between San Francisco and Los Angeles is the most well understood, most intensely monitored fault in the world. As such, it is also the most likely place for American earthquake researchers to become earthquake predictors. 

  2. The nutritional impact of the Pre-School Health Programme at three clinics in Central Province, Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorweg, J.C.; Niemeijer, R.

    1980-01-01

    Abr. sum.: Contains an account of a study of the effects of the Pre-School Health Programme at three clinics in different ecological zones in Central Province, Kenya. Two groups of mothers were selected for interviewing: recent entrants and longtime participants. The study concentrates on the

  3. Wives' Attitudes toward Gender Roles and Their Experience of Intimate Partner Violence by Husbands in Central Province, Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayatilleke, Achini; Poudel, Krishna C.; Sakisaka, Kayako; Yasuoka, Junko; Jayatilleke, Achala Upendra; Jimba, Masamine

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a community based, cross-sectional study to describe the prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) by husbands and the association between wives' attitudes toward gender roles and their experience of IPV in Central Province, Sri Lanka. This article included a representative sample of 624 wives between 15 and 49 years of…

  4. Physics Laboratory Investigation of Vocational High School Field Stone and Concrete Construction Techniques in the Central Java Province (Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwandari, Ristiana Dyah

    2015-01-01

    The investigation aims in this study were to uncover the observations of infrastructures and physics laboratory in vocational high school for Stone and Concrete Construction Techniques Expertise Field or Teknik Konstruksi Batu dan Beton (TKBB)'s in Purwokerto Central Java Province, mapping the Vocational High School or Sekolah Menengah Kejuruan…

  5. ANALYSIS OF DEVELOPING BATIK INDUSTRY CLUSTER IN BAKARAN VILLAGE CENTRAL JAVA PROVINCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermanto Hermanto

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available SMEs grow in a cluster in a certain geographical area. The entrepreneurs grow and thrive through the business cluster. Central Java Province has a lot of business clusters in improving the regional economy, one of which is batik industry cluster. Pati Regency is one of regencies / city in Central Java that has the lowest turnover. Batik industy cluster in Pati develops quite well, which can be seen from the increasing number of batik industry incorporated in the cluster. This research examines the strategy of developing the batik industry cluster in Pati Regency. The purpose of this research is to determine the proper strategy for developing the batik industry clusters in Pati. The method of research is quantitative. The analysis tool of this research is the Strengths, Weakness, Opportunity, Threats (SWOT analysis. The result of SWOT analysis in this research shows that the proper strategy for developing the batik industry cluster in Pati is optimizing the management of batik business cluster in Bakaran Village; the local government provides information of the facility of business capital loans; the utilization of labors from Bakaran Village while improving the quality of labors by training, and marketing the Bakaran batik to the broader markets while maintaining the quality of batik. Advice that can be given from this research is that the parties who have a role in batik industry cluster development in Bakaran Village, Pati Regency, such as the Local Government.

  6. Epidemiological Study on Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in an Endemic Area, of Qom Province, Central Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abedin Saghafipour

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL is one of the most important health problems in many areas of Iran. There are two forms of the disease in Iran, anthroponotic and zoonotic CL. This study conducted to assess the epi­demiological situation of CL in an endemic area of Qom Province, central Iran from Apr to Nov 2015.Methods: The sticky paper traps and aspirating tubes were used for collecting adult sand flies. Sherman traps and small insect nets were used to capture rodents and small mammals. Giemsa staining was used for preparing the ex­panded smear and followed by PCR for identifying the causative agent in human, vectors, and reservoirs. In this study, relative frequency of CL was also calculated.Results: Fourteen species of Phlebotomine sand flies were collected. Phlebotomus papatasi (61.74% was the pre­dominant species through the period of activity. Overall, 62 Meriones libycus, 8 Nesokia indica, 4 Mus musculus, 16 Allactaga elater and 2 Hemiechinus auritis were caught. PCR technique showed 6 out of 150 P. papatasi (2%, two out of 62 M. libycus (3.23% and all of suspected human's skin tissue samples (100% were infected with Leishmania major. The relative frequency of CL was 0.30%. Conclusion: This is the first detection of L. major within P. papatasi, M. libycus and human in Kahak District in Qom Province of Iran. Zoonotic cycle of CL exists in this area, L. major is the causative agent, P. papatasi is the main vector and M. libycus is the main reservoir of the disease. 

  7. Genetic affinities among the historical provinces of Romania and Central Europe as revealed by an mtDNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocoş, Relu; Schipor, Sorina; Hervella, Montserrat; Cianga, Petru; Popescu, Roxana; Bănescu, Claudia; Constantinescu, Mihai; Martinescu, Alina; Raicu, Florina

    2017-03-07

    As a major crossroads between Asia and Europe, Romania has experienced continuous migration and invasion episodes. The precise routes may have been shaped by the topology of the territory and had diverse impacts on the genetic structure of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in historical Romanian provinces. We studied 714 Romanians from all historical provinces, Wallachia, Dobrudja, Moldavia, and Transylvania, by analyzing the mtDNA control region and coding markers to encompass the complete landscape of mtDNA haplogroups. We observed a homogenous distribution of the majority of haplogroups among the Romanian provinces and a clear association with the European populations. A principal component analysis and multidimensional scaling analysis supported the genetic similarity of the Wallachia, Moldavia, and Dobrudja groups with the Balkans, while the Transylvania population was closely related to Central European groups. These findings could be explained by the topology of the Romanian territory, where the Carpathian Arch played an important role in migration patterns. Signals of Asian maternal lineages were observed in all Romanian historical provinces, indicating gene flow along the migration routes through East Asia and Europe. Our current findings based on the mtDNA analysis of populations in historical provinces of Romania suggest similarity between populations in Transylvania and Central Europe, supported both by the observed clines in haplogroup frequencies for several European and Asian maternal lineages and MDS analyses.

  8. Revisiting the magnetostratigraphy of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) in Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font, E.; Youbi, N.; Fernandes, S.; El Hachimi, H.; Kratinová, Z.; Hamim, Y.

    2011-09-01

    The origin of the Triassic-Jurassic (Tr-J) mass extinction is still a matter of debate: proponents of the idea that continental flood basalts of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) are responsible for the crisis are opposed by those who favor an extraterrestrial origin linked to the impact of meteorite. Principal limitations reside in the difficulty to date and correlate CAMP lavas with the marine realm turnover. One argument widely used to suggest that CAMP lavas pre-dated the Tr-J boundary in Morocco is based on the presence of two brief magnetic reversals in the intermediate units of the Tiourjdal and Oued Lahr sections (Morocco) that were correlated to the E23r chron from the Newark basin and to the SA5n.2r/3r and SA5r chrons of the Saint Audrie Bay [Knight, K.B., Nomade, S., Renne, P.R., Marzoli, A., Betrand, H., Youbi, N., 2004. The Central Atlantic Magmatic Province at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary: paleomagnetic and 40Ar/ 30Ar evidence from Morocco for brief, episodic volcanism. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 228, 143-160]. However the primary origin for these negative (reverse) magnetic components is questionable since no field or reversal test was provided to constrain the primary character of the remanence as well as because the small number of samples. Here we have conducted a detailed paleomagnetic and magnetic mineralogy study of the interbedded limestones of the Tiourjdal section and of other CAMP lavas sections where the intermediate unit is complete, namely the Tizi El Hajaj, Jbel Imzar and Aït Ourir sections, to better constrain the origin and stratigraphic location of these negative magnetic components. We show that the interbedded limestones of the Tiourjdal section were entirely remagnetized by chemical processes via acid and oxidizing hydrothermal fluids generated by eruptions of CAMP lavas. In addition, magnetostratigraphic data of the Tizi El Hajaj, Jbel Imzar and Aït Ourir sections show that the entire intermediate unit

  9. Disposal of household burned garbage and risk of low birth weight in Central Sulawesi Province, Indonesia

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    Puti Sari Hidayangsih

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Pembakaran sampah di dalam rumah tanggadapat mempengaruhi berat badan bayi lahir rendah (BBLR. Pada tulisan ini disajikan pembakaran sampah di rumah tangga terhadap risiko BBLR.Metode: Analisis data menggunakan sebagian data studi potong lintang Riskesdas 2013 di Provinsi Sulawesi Tengah. Data yang dianalisis ialah data bayi berusia 0-11 bulan. Berat badan bayi waktu lahir berdasarkan catatan berat bayi saat lahir yang tercatat dalam kuesioner Riskesdas. Bayi dikategorikan BBLR jika berat badan waktu lahir kurang dari 2500 gram. Hasil: Di antara 281 bayi yang mempunyai catatan berat badan lahir terdapat 10,6% (23 bayi yang BBLR. Bayi yang tinggal di rumah tangga dengan perilaku pengelolaan sampah dengan cara dibakar dibandingkan dengan selain dibakar mempunyai risiko 2,3 kali lipat mengalami BBLR (RRa=2,28; 95% CI=1,18-8,61. Kesimpulan: Bayi yang tinggal di rumah tangga dengan sampah dibakar dibandingkan dengan tanpa sampah dibakar mempunyai risiko lebih tinggi BBLR di Provinsi Sulawesi Tengah, Indonesia. (Health Science Indones 2014;2:89-93Kata kunci: berat badan lahir rendah, pembakaran sampahAbstractBackground: The management of household waste by burning can affect the incidence of low birth weight (LBW. This paper aims to identify the burning of garbage at home and risk of low birth weight. Methods: This analysis used a part of Riskesdas 2013 data in the Central Sulawesi Province. Subjects analyzed were infants aged 0-11 months. Baby’s weight was based on the baby’s birth weightwhich was recorded in the questionnaire of Riskesdas. The infants were categorized as LBW, if the recorded birth weight was less than 2500 grams. Results: Out of 392 babies,  281 babies had recorded birth weightswhich could be proved by documentary evidence. The majority of babies were boys (50.9% and lived in rural areas (58.7%. The proportion of babies who had LBW was 10.6% (23 infants. The babies who were living in households with

  10. Variability of surface temperature in agricultural fields of central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, J. L.; Millard, J. P.; Goettelman, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    In an attempt to evaluate the relationship between hand-held infrared thermometers and aircraft thermal scanners in near-level terrain and to quantify the variability of surface temperatures within individual fields, ground-based and aircraft thermal sensor measurements were made along a 50-km transect on 3 May 1979 and a 20-km transect on 7 August 1980. These comparisons were made on fields near Davis, California. Agreement was within 1 C for fields covered with vegetation and 3.6 C for bare, dry fields. The variability within fields was larger for bare, dry fields than for vegetatively covered fields. In 1980, with improvements in the collection of ground truth data, the agreement was within 1 C for a variety of fields.

  11. Constrained Inclusion: Access and Persistence Among Undocumented Community College Students in California's Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrón-Gonzales, Genevieve

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the ways in which citizenship status uniquely shapes both the access and persistence of undocumented community college students in the Central Valley of California. Drawing on more than 2 years of qualitative fieldwork, it is argued that undocumented community college students navigate an institutional landscape of…

  12. Timber resource statistics for the central coast resource area of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karen L. Waddell; Patricia M. Bassett

    1996-01-01

    This report is a summary of timber resource statistics for the Central Coast Resource Area of California, which includes Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Monterey, San Benito, San Francisco, San Luis Obispo, San Mateo, Santa Barbara, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Solano, and Ventura Counties. Data were collected as part of a statewide multi-resource inventory. The inventory...

  13. Chapter 34: Offshore Occurrence Patterns of Marbled Murrelets in Central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    David G. Ainley; Sarah G. Allen; Larry B. Spear

    1995-01-01

    We assessed the occurrence patterns of Marbled Murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) offshore of Waddell Creek, in central California. Data were derived primarily from cruises during the height of the murrelet breeding season, in June, between 1986 and 1994, as well as some cruises during the prebreeding period, February to early April. The large...

  14. Human population structure of the Costa Rican Central Provinces. An evaluation through isonymic methods

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    Andrés E Sáenz

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Se analiza la estructura de varias poblaciones humanas de las provincias centrales de Costa Rica mediante métodos isonímicos y utilizando los Padrones Electorales (1990 y 2006. Se estimaron cuatro parámetros que definen, en un contexto genético y evolutivo, esta estructura: la consanguinidad por cruces aleatorios (a-priori Kinship de Morton ii, el aislamiento genético (Fisher, la migración (Karlin-McGregor y el grado de subdivisión o diferenciación de las poblaciones (Fst. La posible distribución geográfica de estas variables se muestra utilizando un análisis de componentes principales. Existe una coincidencia entre grupos de cantones obtenidos por similitud en diversidad de apellidos y la localización geográfica de los mismos en el territorio. Se encontraron diferencias estadísticamente significativas en los valores obtenidos para los componentes de consanguinidad (F=15.6; pThe human population structure of the Central Provinces of Costa Rica was analyzed through isonymic methods and the use of Electoral Registers (1990 and 2006. Four parameters that define, in a genetic and evolutionary context, this structure were estimated: the consanguinity due to random mating (Morton’s a-priori kinship Fii, the genetic isolation (Fisher’s α, the migration (Karlin-McGregor’s υ, and the degree of subdivision or population differentiation (Fst. The possible geographical distribution of these variables is shown by the use of a Principal Components Analysis (PCA. There is a coincidence between groups of counties obtained by similarity in surname diversity and their geographic location in the territory. Differences were found for the values of the components of consanguinity (F=15.6; p<0.05 and genetic isolation (F=14.38; p<0.05 between different sectors of the Central Provinces. There is an association between population density and the breaking up of genetic isolates and another possible association between the geography

  15. Hydro-economic analysis of groundwater pumping for irrigated agriculture in California's Central Valley, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medellín-Azuara, Josué; MacEwan, Duncan; Howitt, Richard E.; Koruakos, George; Dogrul, Emin C.; Brush, Charles F.; Kadir, Tariq N.; Harter, Thomas; Melton, Forrest; Lund, Jay R.

    2015-09-01

    As in many places, groundwater in California (USA) is the major alternative water source for agriculture during drought, so groundwater's availability will drive some inevitable changes in the state's water management. Currently, agricultural, environmental, and urban uses compete for groundwater, resulting in substantial overdraft in dry years with lowering of water tables, which in turn increases pumping costs and reduces groundwater pumping capacity. In this study, SWAP (an economic model of agricultural production and water use in California) and C2VISim (the California Department of Water Resources groundwater model for California's Central Valley) are connected. This paper examines the economic costs of pumping replacement groundwater during drought and the potential loss of pumping capacity as groundwater levels drop. A scenario of three additional drought years continuing from 2014 show lower water tables in California's Central Valley and loss of pumping capacity. Places without access to groundwater and with uncertain surface-water deliveries during drought are the most economically vulnerable in terms of crop revenues, employment and household income. This is particularly true for Tulare Lake Basin, which relies heavily on water imported from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Remote-sensing estimates of idle agricultural land between 2012 and 2014 confirm this finding. Results also point to the potential of a portfolio approach for agriculture, in which crop mixing and conservation practices have substantial roles.

  16. FACTORS INFLUENCING FARMERS’ DECISION TO INCREASE BEEF CATTLE BUSINESS SCALE IN CENTRAL JAVA PROVINCE

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    W. Roessali

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to analyze factors influencing farmers' decision to increasebeef cattle business scale through improved technology. The research was conducted by using a surveymethod. Five districts were purposively selected in three base areas and two non-base areas of beefcattle in Central Java Province, Indonesia. Twenty beef cattle groups were selected based on the largestcattle population managed and their performance, while 196 respondents were randomly selected.Farmers’ decision to increase beef cattle business scale was determined using a probit model. Result ofthe research indicated that the number of family labor and expectation to increase income had asignificantly positive influence on the farmers’ decision to increase beef cattle business scale. It meantthat if the total number of family labor increased, so did the farmers’ decision to increase the beef cattlebusiness scale. Also, if the expectation to revenue increased, so did the farmers’ decision to increase thebeef cattle business scale. On the contrary, education level and business risk had negative significantinfluence on the farmers’ decision to increase the beef cattle business scale with the significance levelsof 1.1 and 0.84, respectively.

  17. FACTORS INFLUENCING FARMERS’ DECISION TO INCREASE BEEF CATTLE BUSINESS SCALE IN CENTRAL JAVA PROVINCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Roessali

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to analyze factors influencing farmers decision to increase beef cattle business scale through improved technology. The research was conducted by using a survey method. Five districts were purposively selected in three base areas and two non-base areas of beef cattle in Central Java Province, Indonesia. Twenty beef cattle groups were selected based on the largest cattle population managed and their performance, while 196 respondents were randomly selected. Farmers decision to increase beef cattle business scale was determined using a probit model. Result of the research indicated that the number of family labor and expectation to increase income had a significantly positive influence on the farmers’ decision to increase beef cattle business scale. It meant that if the total number of family labor increased, so did the farmers’ decision to increase the beef cattle business scale. Also, if the expectation to revenue increased, so did the farmers’ decision to increase the beef cattle business scale. On the contrary, education level and business risk had negative significant influence on the farmers decision to increase the beef cattle business scale with the significance levels of 1.1 and 0.84, respectively.

  18. Macrozoobenthos Community Structure In The Estuary of Donan River, Cilacap, Central Java Province, Indonesia

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    Taufik Fakih Hakiki

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Estuary of Donan Riverwhich is adjacent to Segara Anakan Lagoon in Cilacap, Central Java Province (Indonesia has been used for a number of activities such asfishieries, agriculture, industry, harbor, and tourism activities.  The aim of this study is to analyze the ecosystem condition based on mazcrozoobenthos community structure. This study was conducted from Augustus 2015 to January 2016. Samples were collected monthly at five stations from the river close area to the ocean close area. The study was conducted to identify kinds of generaand densityof themacrozoobenthos, and analyze substrates and water quality.Data analysis was performed onabundance, diversity, evenness and dominance indexes.Based on the study, macrozoobenthos at the estuary of Donan River consists of three classes i.e Gastropod (12 genera, Bivalvia(9 genera, and Polychaeta (6 genera. Based on the sampling location, Gastropod and Bivalvia are the largest composition found at five stations. Based on the sampling location, the macrozoobenthos density, diversity index, evennes index,and dominance index can be inferred that the estuary of Donan River is classified to be moderately ecological polluted.

  19. Imaging of karsts on buried carbonate platform in Central Luconia Province, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur Fathiyah Jamaludin, Siti; Mubin, Mukhriz; Latiff, Abdul Halim Abdul

    2017-10-01

    Imaging of carbonate rocks in the subsurface through seismic method is always challenging due to its heterogeneity and fast velocity compared to the other rock types. Existence of karsts features on the carbonate rocks make it more complicated to interpret the reflectors. Utilization of modern interpretation software such as PETREL and GeoTeric® to image the karsts morphology make it possible to model the karst network within the buried carbonate platform used in this study. Using combination of different seismic attributes such as Variance, Conformance, Continuity, Amplitude, Frequency and Edge attributes, we are able to image the karsts features that are available in the proven gas-field in Central Luconia Province, Malaysia. The mentioned attributes are excellent in visualize and image the stratigraphic features based on the difference in their acoustic impedance as well as structural features, which include karst. 2D & 3D Karst Models were developed to give a better understanding on the characteristics of the identified karsts. From the models, it is found that the karsts are concentrated in the top part of the carbonate reservoir (epikarst) and the middle layer with some of them becomes extensive and create karst networks, either laterally or vertically. Most of the vertical network karst are related to the existence of faults that displaced all the horizons in the carbonate platform.

  20. Prevalence of intestinal protozoan infections among schoolchi ldren in Bang Khla District, Chachoengsao Province, Central Thailand

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    Pisit Suntaravitun

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among primary schoolchildren in rural areas from Bang Khla District, Chachoengsao Province, Central Thailand. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out between January and March 2017 among 203 schoolchildren in four rural schools using purposive sampling. All stool samples were examined using simple direct smear method and formalin ethyl acetate concentration technique. Results: The overall prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections was 14.8% (30/203. Seven intestinal parasite species (two helminths and five protozoa were identified in the stool samples. The most common intestinal protozoa in schoolchildren was Giardia intestinalis (n = 11, 5.4% followed by Blastocystis hominis (n = 9, 4.4%, Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar (n = 5, 2.5%, Entamoeba coli (n = 2, 1.0% and Endolimax nana (n = 1, 0.5%. Hookworm (n = 1, 0.5% and Strongyloides stercoralis (n = 1, 0.5% were the most frequent helminths. No significant statistical differences in the prevalence rates of infections were observed by gender, age and school location (P > 0.05. Conclusions: Intestinal parasitic infection is a significant public health problem among schoolchildren in rural areas of Thailand. Therefore, health education and environmental sanitation improvement are recommended as preventive control measures.

  1. Supracrustal suite of the Precambrian crystalline crust in the Ghor Province of Central Afghanistan

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    Gediminas Motuza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Proterozoic pre-Ediacaran metamorphic basement of the southern Tajik (North Afghanistan continental block and the adjacent Band-e-Bayan zone is exposed in the Ghor Province of Central Afghanistan. It is predominantly composed of the EW-striking supracrustal succession consisting of interbedded felsic schists and gneisses (metapsammites, amphibolites (metabasalts, calcite and dolomite marbles. The metamorphic facies changes from greenschist in the Band-e-Bayan zone to amphibolite facies in the Tajik block. The supracrustal rocks of the Band-e-Bayan zone and Tajik block possess common features suggesting that the former represents a tectonized part of the latter. The geochemical characteristics of metapsammites indicate derivation of the clastic material from a continental arc and, partly from a passive continental margin, whereas the composition of metabasalts suggests their possible formation in a continental rift basin. The tectonic setting of supracrustal unit could be interpreted as a back-arc type basin. We presume that the Tajik microcontinent split off the Gondwana supercontinent along an ancient rift zone during the late Paleozoic.

  2. Spatial Distribution of Phlebotomine Sand Fly Species (Diptera: Psychodidae) in Qom Province, Central Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghafipour, Abedin; Vatandoost, Hassan; Zahraei-Ramazani, Ali Reza; Yaghoobi-Ershadi, Mohammad Reza; Rassi, Yavar; Shirzadi, Mohammad Reza; Akhavan, Amir Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) is transmitted to humans by phlebotomine sand fly bites. ZCL is a major health problem in Iran, where basic knowledge gaps about sand fly species diversity persist in some ZCL-endemic areas. This paper describes the richness and spatial distribution of sand fly species, collected with sticky traps, in Qom province, a ZCL-endemic area in central Iran, where sand fly fauna has been poorly studied. Collected species were mapped on urban and rural digital maps based on a scale of 1/50,000. All analyses were undertaken with rural- and urban-level precision, i.e., rural and urban levels were our basic units of analysis. After identifying the sand flies, high-risk foci were determined. For spatial analysis of vector species population, the entomological sampling sites were geo-referenced using GPS. Arc GIS 9.3 software was used to determine the foci with leishmaniasis vector species. Following the analyses, two genera (Phlebotomus and Sergentomyia) and 14 species were identified. Based on the mapping and sand fly dispersion analysis, the rural districts were categorized into three groups-infection reported, without infection, and no report. Based on Geographical Information System analyses, Kahak and Markazi districts were identified as high-risk foci with leishmaniasis vector species. These findings can act as a help guide to direct active control measures to the identified high-risk foci and, eventually, lead to reduction in incidence of the disease. © Crown copyright 2016.

  3. Physicochemical Characteristics of Larval Habitat Waters of Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in Qom Province, Central Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abai, Mohammad Reza; Saghafipour, Abedin; Ladonni, Hossein; Jesri, Nahid; Omidi, Saeed; Azari-Hamidian, Shahyad

    2016-03-01

    Mosquitoes lay eggs in a wide range of habitats with different physicochemical parameters. Ecological data, including physicochemical factors of oviposition sites, play an important role in integrated vector management. Those data help the managers to make the best decision in controlling the aquatic stages of vectors especially using source reduction. To study some physicochemical characteristics of larval habitat waters, an investigation was carried out in Qom Province, central Iran, during spring and summer 2008 and 2009. Water samples were collected during larval collection from ten localities. The chemical parameters of water samples were analyzed based on mg/l using standard methods. Water temperature (°C), turbidity (NTU), total dissolved solids (ppm), electrical conductivity (μS/cm), and acidity (pH) were measured using digital testers. Thermotolerant coliforms of water samples were analyzed based on MPN/100ml. Data were assessed by Kruskal-Wallis test and Spearman Correlation analysis. In total, 371 mosquito larvae were collected including 14 species representing four genera. Some physicochemical parameters of water in Emamzadeh Esmail, Qomrood, Qom City, and Rahjerd showed significant differences among localities (Pphysicochemical and microbial parameters did not show any significant differences among different species (P> 0.05). There was no significant correlation between the abundance of larvae and the different physicochemical and microbial parameters (P> 0.05). The means of EC, TDS, and phosphate of localities and species were remarkably higher than those of the previous studies. Other parameters seem to be in the range of other investigations.

  4. Helminth Infections of Stray Dogs from Garmsar, Semnan Province, Central Iran

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    A Eslami

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim was to study the gastro-intestinal helminths of stray dogs of Garmsar, Sem­nan Province, Central Iran, and its impacts on human health and animal production.Methods: During 2006, the alimentary tracts of 50 stray dogs at necropsy, selected from villages around Garmsar, were removed, and examined for helminth infections. Subsequently helminths were collected from the contents of each part and scraped sample of small intestines of washed materials in a 100-mesh sieve. To identify the species of helminths, the nematodes were cleared in lactophenol and cestodes were stained using carmine acid.Results: Mixed infection was the rule and 40 dogs (80% harbored more than one species of helminth. Taenia hydatigena was the most prevalent species (80% followed by Echinococcus granulosus (64%, Toxocara canis (22%, Mesocestoides lineatus (12%, Taenia multiceps (10% and Dipylidium caninum (4%. The mean intensity of worm infection was low (1-3 ex­cept for that of E. granulosus (645. No significant difference was noticed between sex, age and most helminth infections except for that of sex and T. hydatigena (P=0.001 as well as age and T. canis (P=0.001.Conclusion: Although human infection with T. hydatigena is unlikely, but other helminths re­ported in this study are of zoonotic importance, and may pose a threat to community health, and reduce the productions of ruminants harboring taeniid metacestodes.

  5. A seamless, high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of the north-central California coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxgrover, Amy C.; Barnard, Patrick L.

    2012-01-01

    A seamless, 2-meter resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of the north-central California coast has been created from the most recent high-resolution bathymetric and topographic datasets available. The DEM extends approximately 150 kilometers along the California coastline, from Half Moon Bay north to Bodega Head. Coverage extends inland to an elevation of +20 meters and offshore to at least the 3 nautical mile limit of state waters. This report describes the procedures of DEM construction, details the input data sources, and provides the DEM for download in both ESRI Arc ASCII and GeoTIFF file formats with accompanying metadata.

  6. Determinants of Tax Compliance Behaviour of Small and Medium Size Businesses in Cameroon's Littoral and Central Provinces

    OpenAIRE

    AKİNBOADE, Oludele Akinloye

    2014-01-01

    The paper reports the results of a survey of 575 small and medium size businesses operating in the manufacturing and wholesale sectors, that seeks to examine tax compliance behaviour in Cameroon's Littoral and Central Provinces. The study suggests that high registration cost and time consuming processes promote non-compliance of SME operators. The perception of a complex tax system results in registration non-compliance. A tedious compliance process results in filing non-compliance of SME own...

  7. Determinants of Tax Compliance Behaviour of Small and Medium Size Businesses in Cameroon's Littoral and Central Provinces

    OpenAIRE

    AKİNBOADE, Oludele Akinloye

    2014-01-01

    The paper reports the results of a survey of 575 small and medium size businesses operating in the manufacturing and wholesale sectors, that seeks to examine tax compliance behaviour in Cameroon's Littoral and Central Provinces. The study suggests that high registration cost and time consuming processes promote non-compliance of SME operators. The perception of a complex tax system results in registration non-compliance. A tedious compliance process results in filing non-compliance of SM...

  8. Seroepidemiological prevalence of brucellosis in livestock breeders of the central rural area of Bushehr province 2003-4

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    Katayoon Vahdat

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brucellosis is the most important zoonotic disease. As Brucellosis is endemic in Iran, this study was designed to evaluate seroepidemiological prevalence of brucellosis in livestock breeders of the central rural area of Bushehr province in 2003-2004. Methods: Sera of 397 livestock breeders from the central rural area of Bushehr province were collected and tested for anti-brucella IgG antibody using ELISA method. Results: The prevalence of brucellosis in livestock breeders was 10.8%. Brucella seropositively was found to have a significant association with sheep contact and abortion in domestic animals (p<0.05 but anti-brucella Ig antibody positivity had not a significant association with sex, age, contact with cattle, goats and camel, keeping livestock at home, consumption of milk products and raw milk, history of brucellosis in person and/or family and nonspecific signs such as fever, myalgia, low back pain and artheralgia. Conclusion: The prevalence of brucellosis is high in the central rural area of Bushehr province. The prevalence was much higher among livestock breeders in contact with sheep and also in those who had abortion in their domestic animals.

  9. Survey and Detection of Pectobacterium atrosepticum in Major Potato-Growing Areas in Central Java Province, Indonesia

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    Ismiyatuningsih Ismiyatuningsih

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Potato (Solanum tuberosum is a seasonal shrub-tuber crop originated from sub-tropical area. Soft-rot is one of the most important diseases of potato. It can be caused by Pectobactorium atrosepticum, a pathogen within a status of quarantine plant pest A1 type I in Indonesia. The objective of this study was to know the incidence of potato soft rot disease and to detect P. atrosepticum in major potato-growing areas in Central Java Province by applying the serology method using DAS-ELISA technique. Survey of soft rot disease was carried out in some regencies in Central Java Province, i.e. Magelang, Banjarnegara, Wonosobo and Karanganyar. The field survey of potato plant in all the regencies indicated symptoms of stem rot which was black in color (blackleg and foul-smelling, with disease incidence of about 10–90%. The laboratory testing showed that by applying DAS-ELISA method, P. atrosepticum was detected in samples collected from Pandean and Bagongan villages, district of Ngablak,Regency of Magelang, Central Java Province.

  10. Community response to construction noise in three central cities of Zhejiang province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Xia, Bo; Cui, Caiyun; Skitmore, Martin

    2017-11-01

    As a common source of environmental noise in China and many developing countries worldwide, construction work provokes many complaints and deterioration in acoustic climate quality. This paper describes research to obtain an improved understanding of people's community response to, and evaluation of, construction noise in three central cities of Zhejiang province, China. This involved carrying out a social survey using standard questionnaires developed by the International Commission on Biological Effects of Noise (ICBEN). A dose-response relationship model is established using a quadratic polynomial regression analysis based on construction noise exposure measurements from 40 construction sites in Hangzhou, Ningbo and Wenzhou. The results of the study indicate that the majority of people have a negative attitude to construction noise; the noise ranges between 60 dB and 80 dB (compared with 50 dB-70 dB traffic noise in Tianjin), with the percentage of highly annoyed people affected increasing from 15%-20% to 30%-40% over the range. There also different levels of annoyance depending on the time of day, and the location and activities of those affected. Other cultural differences are also apparent both between Ningbo/Wenzhou and the more urbane citizens of Hangzhou, and the Chinese people and their more noise-tolerant EU and Vietnam counterparts. The findings of this study provide a new perspective for the study of construction noise that can help local governments have an improved understanding of how residents react to construction noise for the purpose of selecting construction noise-mitigation projects and introducing construction noise-control regulations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Incidence of first primary central nervous system tumors in California, 2001-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Monica; Schrot, Rudolph; Bauer, Katrina; Letendre, Deanna

    2009-09-01

    We examined the incidence of first primary central nervous system tumors (PCNST) in California from 2001-2005. This study period represents the first five years of data collection of benign PCNST by the California Cancer Registry. California's age-adjusted incidence rates (AAIR) for malignant and benign PCNST (5.5 and 8.5 per 100,000, respectively). Malignant PCNST were highest among non-Hispanic white males (7.8 per 100,000). Benign PCNST were highest among African American females (10.5 per 100,000). Hispanics, those with the lowest socioeconomic status, and those who lived in rural California were found to be significantly younger at diagnosis. Glioblastoma was the most frequent malignant histology, while meningioma had the highest incidence among benign histologies (2.6 and 4.5 per 100,000, respectively). This study is the first in the US to compare malignant to benign PCNST using a population-based data source. It illustrates the importance of PCNST surveillance in California and in diverse communities.

  12. Barriers to utilization of postnatal care at village level in Klaten district, central Java Province, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probandari, Ari; Arcita, Akhda; Kothijah, Kothijah; Pamungkasari, Eti Poncorini

    2017-08-07

    Maternal health remains a persisting public health challenge in Indonesia. Postnatal complications, in particular, are considered as maternal health problems priority that should be addressed. Conducting adequate care for postnatal complications will improve the quality of life of mothers and babies. With the universal health coverage implementation, the Indonesian government provides free maternal and child health services close to clients at the village level, which include postnatal care. Our study aimed to explore barriers to utilization of postnatal care at the village level in Klaten district, Central Java Province, Indonesia. A qualitative study was conducted in March 2015 - June 2016 in Klaten district, Central Java, Indonesia. We selected a total of 19 study participants, including eight mothers with postnatal complications, six family members, and five village midwives for in-depth interviews. We conducted a content analysis technique on verbatim transcripts of the interviews using open code software. This study found three categories of barriers to postnatal care utilization in villages: mother and family members' health literacy on postnatal care, sociocultural beliefs and practices, and health service responses. Most mothers did not have adequate knowledge and skills regarding postnatal care that reflected how they lacked awareness and practice of postnatal care. Inter-generational norms and myths hindered mothers from utilizing postnatal care and from having adequate nutritional intake during the postnatal period. Mothers and family members conducted unsafe self-treatment to address perceived minor postnatal complication. Furthermore, social power from extended family influenced the postnatal care health literacy for mother and family members. Postnatal care in the village lacked patient-centered care practices. Additionally, midwives' workloads and capacities to conduct postnatal information, education and counseling were also issues. Despite the

  13. Irrigation in California's Central Valley strengthens the southwestern U.S. water cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S.

    2013-01-01

    Characterizing climatological and hydrological responses to agricultural irrigation continues to be an important challenge to understanding the full impact of water management on the Earth's environment and hydrological cycle. In this study, we use a global climate model, combined with realistic estimates of regional agricultural water use, to simulate the local and remote impacts of irrigation in California's Central Valley. We demonstrate a clear mechanism that the resulting increase in evapotranspiration and water vapor export significantly impacts the atmospheric circulation in the southwestern United States, including strengthening the regional hydrological cycle. We also identify that irrigation in the Central Valley initiates a previously unknown, anthropogenic loop in the regional hydrological cycle, in which summer precipitation is increased by 15%, causing a corresponding increase in Colorado River streamflow of ~30%. Ultimately, some of this additional streamflow is returned to California via managed diversions through the Colorado River aqueduct and the All-American Canal.

  14. Maritime climate influence on chaparral composition and diversity in the coast range of central California

    OpenAIRE

    Vasey, Michael C; Parker, V Thomas; Holl, Karen D; Loik, Michael E; Hiatt, Seth

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 The Authors. We investigated the hypothesis that maritime climatic factors associated with summer fog and low cloud stratus (summer marine layer) help explain the compositional diversity of chaparral in the coast range of central California. We randomly sampled chaparral species composition in 0.1-hectare plots along a coast-to-interior gradient. For each plot, climatic variables were estimated and soil samples were analyzed. We used Cluster Analysis and Principle Components Analysis t...

  15. Kelp forest fish populations in marine reserves and adjacent exploited areas of central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddack, M.J.; Estes, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    Population structure (density and size distribution) of 10 species of epibenthic kelp forest fishes was compared between three marine reserves and adjacent exploited areas in central California. We also contrasted substrate relief, algal turf cover, and kelp population density among these areas. Densities of fishes were 12-35% greater within the reserves, but this difference was not statistically) significant. Habitat features explained only 4% of the variation in fish density and did not vary consistently between reserves and nonreserves. The average length of rockfish (genus Sebastes) was significantly greater in two of the three reserve sites, as was the proportion of larger fish. Population density and size differences combined to produce substantially greater biomass and, therefore, greater reproductive potential per unit of area within the reserves. The magnitude of these effects seems to be influenced by the reserve's age. Our findings demonstrate that current levels of fishing pressure influence kelp forest rockfish populations and suggest that this effect is widespread in central California. Existing marine reserves in central California kelp forests may help sustain exploited populations both through adult emigration and larval pool augmentation. The magnitude of these effects remains uncertain, however, because the spatial scale of both larval and adult dispersal relative to the size of existing reserves is unknown.

  16. Identifying krill eggs in the central California current using novel multiplex PCR primers: Applications and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, C. N.; Slesinger, E.; Marinovic, B.

    2016-02-01

    Euphausiids, otherwise known as krill, are an important link between primary producers and higher trophic levels within the central California current upwelling system. Euphausia pacifica and Thysanoessa spinifera, two of the most common euphausiid species along the central California coast, are both broadcast spawners and have some overlap in habitat, e.g. near marine life hotspots like the Monterey Bay and Gulf of Farallones. Species composition of euphausiid egg population within these regions is currently unknown. Distinct morphological differences between their eggs are lost once the egg dies or is preserved via formalin, alcohol, or freezing. In this project we designed genus specific DNA primers (mtCOI) for use in a multiplex PCR to distinguish among spawned euphausiid eggs of Euphausia spp. and Thysanoessa spp. in central California current surface waters. Effective and ineffective application of primers in a multiplex versus single-plex PCR is discussed, with an emphasis on primer design limitations in reference to the available barcoded regions of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) for each species in GenBank. This new protocol expands current monitoring efforts into sampling a non-swimming portion of the population which has the potential to improve euphausiid biomass estimates.

  17. Subsidence in the Central Valley, California 2007 - present measured by InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, T. G.; Liu, Z.; Jones, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Subsidence caused by groundwater pumping in the rich agricultural area of California's Central Valley has been a problem for decades. Over the last few years, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) observations from satellite and aircraft platforms have been used to produce maps of subsidence with ~cm accuracy. For this study, we have obtained and analyzed Japanese PALSAR data for 2006 - 2011, Canadian Radarsat-1 data for 2011 - 2013, Radarsat-2 data for 2012 - 2015, and ESA's Sentinel-1A for 2015 and produced maps of subsidence for those periods. High resolution InSAR data were also acquired along the California Aqueduct by the NASA UAVSAR from 2013 - 2015. Using multiple scenes acquired by these systems, we were able to produce the time histories of subsidence at selected locations and transects showing how subsidence varies both spatially and temporally. The maps show that subsidence is continuing in areas with a history of subsidence and that the rates and areas affected have increased due to increased groundwater extraction during the extended western US drought. The high resolution maps from UAVSAR were used to identify and quantify new, highly localized areas of accelerated subsidence along the California Aqueduct that occurred in 2014. The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) funded this work to provide the background and an update on subsidence in the Central Valley to support future policy. Geographic Information System (GIS) files are being furnished to DWR for further analysis of the 4 dimensional subsidence time-series maps. Part of this work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA.

  18. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Central California: ESI (Environmental Sensitivity Index Shoreline Types - Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing the shoreline and coastal habitats of Central California classified according to the Environmental...

  19. Geodatabase of the datasets used to represent the two subunits of the Central Valley aquifer system, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This geodatabase includes spatial datasets that represent the Central Valley aquifer system in the State of California. Included are: (1) polygon extents; datasets...

  20. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Central California: M_MAMMAL (Marine Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for dolphins, porpoises, whales, seals, sea lions, and sea otters in Central California. Vector polygons in...

  1. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Central California (Including Monterey Bay Sanctuary), maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0013176)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) maps have been developed for the coastal areas of Central California from Point Conception to Point Reyes National Seashore....

  2. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Central California: T_MAMMAL (Terrestrial Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for rare/sensitive species occurrences of terrestrial mammals in Central California. Vector polygons in...

  3. MODFLOW2000_FMP1_1 model used to simulate the groundwater flow of the Central Valley Aquifer, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A three-dimensional groundwater flow model (MODFLOW200-FMP1_1) of the Central Valley in California was developed to aid water managers in understanding how water...

  4. Spring 1961 hydraulic head in the lower pumped zone of California's Central Valley (from Williamson and others, 1989)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the spring 1961 hydraulic head in the lower pumped zone of California's Central Valley. It was used to initiate the water-level...

  5. Mapping Fault Slip in Central California Using Satellite, Airborne InSAR and GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Lundgren, Paul; Hensley, Scott

    2015-05-01

    The central San Andreas fault is accommodating relative motion between the Sierra Nevada-Great Valley block and the Pacific plate in central California. It is creeping along the ~60 km long central segment while changing to locking towards the northwest and southeast. Characterizing its creeping nature and on and off-fault deformation are crucial for improved earthquake hazard assessment in the region. We use L-band ALOS PALSAR, NASA airborne UAVSAR data and geodetic measurements to map the fault slip variation. Our results show a distinct change in shallow fault creep and fault slip at depth from the central creeping to the transitional segment. Our work demonstrates that airborne UAVSAR provides useful constraints on shallow creep and near fault deformation. Continuing observations would be essential in capturing time-varying faulting behaviours and their implication towards present and future earthquake activities.

  6. Physical and microbiological properties of alluvial calcareous Çumra province soils (Central Anatolia, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Sami Erol

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Alluvial calcareous soils in Central Anatolia (Konya province, Çumra district has a heavy granulometric composition (average clay, low organic carbon content (less than 1%, but stable pore space structure and favorable agrophysical properties. Studies of the water regime in drip irrigation confirm favorable hydrological properties of these soils. It is assumed that the favorable structure of the pore space due to vigorous activity a large and diverse soil biota. Four phyla dominate in soil biota, among which predominate Actinobacteria. The higher (Streptomyces, and lower (three species Rhodococcus actinobacteria are predominant in large amounts as a part of this phyla. Large biodiversity at a sufficiently high bacteria richness formed the structure of the microbial community that contribute to the balanced production of specific metabolites, including gases (CO2, N2, which allows the soil to function actively, preventing compaction of the pore space and maintaining optimal density, porosity, hydrologic properties of the studied silty clay soils. m the uppermost soil horizons. Analyses of heavy mineral fraction show presence of metamorphic and igneous minerals which indicate participation of weathering products from other rock types in the nearby area. The types of heavy minerals in soils depend more on composition of parent rocks and geomorphic position than on climate type. Soils from Nova Lovcha show similar composition, but the quantity of goethite and hematite significantly increase in soil from plain. Typical high-metamorphic minerals as andalusite, kyanite and sillimanite present only in Nova Lovcha, while garnet dominates in Petrovo and opaque minerals - in Dobrostan. Red soils, formed on slopes, where erosion prevails over accumulation, contain more illite, smectite and vermiculite-smectite, and very few or no kaolinite, whereas the kaolinite is dominant in soils formed on plain. The mineralogical composition of clays in different

  7. Sedimentation Rates in the Central North Pacific Pelagic Clay Province Using Strontium Isotope Stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T. M.; Gleason, J. D.; Rea, D. K.; Owen, R. M.; Moore, T. C.; Blum, J. D.; Hovan, S. A.; Jones, C. E.

    2002-12-01

    In this study, we present an age-depth profile for a large diameter piston core collected by the R/V Ewing in 1997 sampled at 8.8 ° N, 135.4 ° W in the central North Pacific Ocean. Most of this core (EW9709-PC07) is not datable by conventional biostratigraphic methods. Fish teeth ichthyoliths are abundant throughout the core, while radiolarians are present in the bottom portion. Downcore evaluation of sedimentation rates and sources for the pelagic clay component is hindered by inability to obtain accurate stratigraphic ages. To generate an age-depth profile, strontium isotopic compositions were determined on ichthyoliths previously cleaned of contaminants using a newly improved reductive cleaning procedure. Ages were determined by reference to the recently refined Sr isotope curve for Neogene seawater. Red clays dominate the uppermost portion (top 350 cm) of this 16 m core. Lower in the core, silicious clays and carbonate-rich intervals occur. This lower section includes datable radiolarians, allowing some cross-calibration with the Sr isotope method. Our data suggests a very good correlation between the radiolarian biostratigraphy and the Sr isotope technique employed here. Most of the scatter in the data can be attributed to either analytical error or diagenesis. ICP analysis of selected intervals showed high Ca/P ratios indicating some ichthyoliths have undergone diagenetic alteration. The age-depth curve for PC-07 indicates two distinct sedimentation rates for this site with a transition period in between due to a change in lithology. From 1500 cm to approximately 650 cm (early to mid-Miocene) there is a high sedimentation rate of 1.35 mm/ky. The rate appears to decrease abruptly around 650 cm (15 Ma), increase around 550 cm (11 Ma) and decrease again during the uppermost 350 cm pelagic clay interval (10 Ma). The average sedimentation rate for the red clay interval (mid-Miocene to present) is an order of magnitude lower (0.25 mm/ky), reflecting northward

  8. Drought Impacts on Agricultural Production and Land Fallowing in California's Central Valley in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosevelt, Carolyn; Melton, Forrest S.; Johnson, Lee; Guzman, Alberto; Verdin, James P.; Thenkabail, Prasad S.; Mueller, Rick; Jones, Jeanine; Willis, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing drought in California substantially reduced surface water supplies for millions of acres of irrigated farmland in California's Central Valley. Rapid assessment of drought impacts on agricultural production can aid water managers in assessing mitigation options, and guide decision making with respect to mitigation of drought impacts. Satellite remote sensing offers an efficient way to provide quantitative assessments of drought impacts on agricultural production and increases in fallow acreage associated with reductions in water supply. A key advantage of satellite-based assessments is that they can provide a measure of land fallowing that is consistent across both space and time. We describe an approach for monthly and seasonal mapping of uncultivated agricultural acreage developed as part of a joint effort by USGS, USDA, NASA, and the California Department of Water Resources to provide timely assessments of land fallowing during drought events. This effort has used the Central Valley of California as a pilot region for development and testing of an operational approach. To provide quantitative measures of uncultivated agricultural acreage from satellite data early in the season, we developed a decision tree algorithm and applied it to time-series data from Landsat TM (Thematic Mapper), ETM+ (Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus), OLI (Operational Land Imager), and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer). Our effort has been focused on development of indicators of drought impacts in the March-August timeframe based on measures of crop development patterns relative to a reference period with average or above average rainfall. To assess the accuracy of the algorithms, monthly ground validation surveys were conducted across 650 fields from March-September in 2014 and 2015. We present the algorithm along with updated results from the accuracy assessment, and data and maps of land fallowing in the Central Valley in 2015.

  9. Cyrtodactylus rufford, a new cave-dwelling bent-toed gecko (Squamata: Gekkonidae) from Khammouane Province, central Laos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Vinh Quang; Calame, Thomas; Nguyen, Truong Quang; Le, Minh Duc; Bonkowski, Michael; Ziegler, Thomas

    2016-01-21

    We describe a new species of the gekkonid genus Cyrtodactylus from Khammouane Province, central Laos based on morphological and molecular data. Morphologically, Cyrtodactylus rufford sp. nov. differs from its congeners by a unique combination of the following characters: medium size, SVL reaching 72.5 mm; dorsal pattern with three or four light transverse bands between limb insertions; one intersupranasal; 14-16 irregular dorsal tubercle rows at midbody, weakly developed in the paravertebral region; 27-29 ventral scale rows between ventrolateral folds; 42-43 precloacal and femoral pores in a continuous row in males, enlarged femoral and precloacal scales present; 4 or 5 postcloacal tubercles on each side; dorsal tubercles present at base of tail; medial subcaudal scales enlarged. Molecular analyses show that the new species is closely related to C. khammouanensis, which was originally described from Khammouane Province.

  10. A new species of karst-dwelling bent-toed gecko (Squamata: Gekkonidae) from Khammouane Province, central Laos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Vinh Quang; Nguyen, Truong Quang; Le, Minh Duc; Bonkowski, Michael; Ziegler, Thomas

    2016-02-10

    We describe a new species of the genus Cyrtodactylus from Khammouane Province, central Laos based on morphological features and molecular data. Morphologically, Cyrtodactylus bansocensis sp. nov. is differentiated from other congeners by a unique combination of the following characters: medium size, SVL reaching 74.0 mm; dorsal pattern consisting of four light transverse bands between limb insertions; supranasals in contact with each other; dorsal tubercles at midbody in 14-15 irregular rows; lateral folds present without interspersed tubercles; ventral scales between ventrolateral folds 34-35; precloacal and femoral pores in males 34, separated by four poreless scales in the male holotype and in a continuous row in the male paratype; enlarged femoral and precloacal scales present; postcloacal tubercles 5-7 on each side; dorsal tubercles present at tail base; and subcaudal scales transversely enlarged. Molecular analyses revealed the new species to be closely related to Cyrtodactylus rufford, which is also found in Khammouane Province.

  11. Can We Mitigate Climate Extremes using Managed Aquifer Recharge: Case Studies California Central Valley and South-Central Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, B. R.; Reedy, R. C.; Faunt, C. C.; Pool, D. R.; Uhlman, K.

    2015-12-01

    Frequent long-term droughts interspersed with intense floods in the southwestern U.S. underscore the need to store more water to manage these climate extremes. Here we show how managed aquifer recharge can enhance drought resilience in the southwestern U.S. with ~ 70% of California under extreme drought and 75% of Arizona under moderate drought. Data on water sources, transportation, and users were compiled for managed aquifer recharge systems in the Central Valley and south-central Arizona. Groundwater depletion of 115 to 145 km3 in the 1900s created large subsurface reservoirs in thick alluvial basins in these regions. Large canals and aqueducts up to several 100 km long allow water to be imported from reservoirs, mostly in more humid regions. Imported water is either used instead of groundwater or is applied in surface spreading basins primarily during wet periods (≤1.3 km3/yr Central Valley, ≤0.7 km3/yr Arizona) and is extracted during droughts. The dominant water users include irrigators and municipalities both within and outside the managed aquifer recharge systems. Groundwater modeling indicates that recharge basins significantly increase groundwater storage in the Central Valley. Managed aquifer recharge systems significantly enhance drought resilience and increase sustainability of water resources in semiarid regions, complementing surface water reservoirs and conjunctive surface water/groundwater use by providing longer term storage.

  12. Black carbon in Central California: soil carbon and air quality implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, G.; Traina, S. J.

    2008-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) plays a significant role in the carbon cycle, simultaneously influencing the quality of air from local to regional scales from its point of origin. We are investigating these influences with respect to BC recently produced in the Central Valley and Sierra Nevada Forest area of California. Surface biomass, charred matter and soil (0-5 cm) were collected after prescribed fires in Yosemite National Park (YNP) locations along an elevational gradient ranging from 1148 m to 1992 m. Surface soils and aerosols from a protected (non-burnt) grassland in Merced (central valley) were also collected. Soil organic carbon (SOC) concentrations in burnt sites were analyzed and compared with concentrations in adjacent unburnt soils (controls). The SOC concentrations ranged from 3 to 15% in the control soils and 2 to 12% in post-burn soils. Initial results show a lack of significant change in surface SOC concentration from prescribed fires in the YNP forest sites. The relative contribution of fossil fuel combustion versus biomass combustion on soil deposited aerosol BC (soot) was determined using radiocarbon analysis with accelerator mass spectrometry. Initial findings show an increase in the contribution of fossil fuel combustion to soot BC with decreasing elevation in YNP, with little difference between burnt and recently unburnt sites. The BET surface area of BC from the field samples will also be analyzed and compared with BC produced in the lab from field-collected biomass. Bulk carbon composition and an assessment of the relative percentage BC present in the samples will be conducted with 13-C NMR analysis. This will help in the establishment of a relationship between black carbon and total carbon in central California. In this poster, will be presenting some of our initial findings and their implications for air quality and carbon budget balance in central California. The effects of prescribed fires on soil carbon and black carbon properties will also be

  13. Paleomagnetic stratigraphy and geochronology of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) from the Middle Atlas and Western Meseta, Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlee, S. J.; Renne, P. R.; Marzoli, A.; Callegaro, S.; Cuppone, T.; Mahmoudi, A.; Youbi, N.; Bertrand, H.

    2008-12-01

    The Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) is one of the largest igneous provinces (LIPs) on earth, and was emplaced as part of the pre-rift stage of the Central Atlantic Ocean at ~200 Ma. Like other LIPs, CAMP coincided closely with a mass extinction event. In order to further test the temporal correlation between the CAMP and the Triassic-Jurassic (T-J) boundary, four new sections of CAMP lavas in central and northern Morocco, each 110-140m thick with 14-16 flows, were sampled for paleomagnetic stratigraphy and geochronology. Preliminary paleomagnetic data are consistent with previous results (Knight et al. 2004) and record dominantly if not exclusively normal polarity, and also appear to record distinct pulses of magmatism with at least 4 directional groupings with discrete declinations and inclinations. 40Ar/39Ar analyses of plagioclase from 2 sections near Maaziz and Agourai yield plateau ages that are mutually indistinguishable and consistent with previous results. Collectively, these new paleomagnetic and geochronologic data provide further evidence of the brevity and synchrony of CAMP magmatism at the T-J boundary throughout Morocco.

  14. Food limitation of sea lion pups and the decline of forage off central and southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClatchie, Sam; Field, John; Thompson, Andrew R; Gerrodette, Tim; Lowry, Mark; Fiedler, Paul C; Watson, William; Nieto, Karen M; Vetter, Russell D

    2016-03-01

    California sea lions increased from approximately 50 000 to 340 000 animals in the last 40 years, and their pups are starving and stranding on beaches in southern California, raising questions about the adequacy of their food supply. We investigated whether the declining sea lion pup weight at San Miguel rookery was associated with changes in abundance and quality of sardine, anchovy, rockfish and market squid forage. In the last decade off central California, where breeding female sea lions from San Miguel rookery feed, sardine and anchovy greatly decreased in biomass, whereas market squid and rockfish abundance increased. Pup weights fell as forage food quality declined associated with changes in the relative abundances of forage species. A model explained 67% of the variance in pup weights using forage from central and southern California and 81% of the variance in pup weights using forage from the female sea lion foraging range. A shift from high to poor quality forage for breeding females results in food limitation of the pups, ultimately flooding animal rescue centres with starving sea lion pups. Our study is unusual in using a long-term, fishery-independent dataset to directly address an important consequence of forage decline on the productivity of a large marine predator. Whether forage declines are environmentally driven, are due to a combination of environmental drivers and fishing removals, or are due to density-dependent interactions between forage and sea lions is uncertain. However, declining forage abundance and quality was coherent over a large area (32.5-38° N) for a decade, suggesting that trends in forage are environmentally driven.

  15. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the San Diego Drainages Hydrogeologic Province, 2004: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 3,900-square-mile (mi2) San Diego Drainages Hydrogeologic Province (hereinafter San Diego) study unit was investigated from May through July 2004 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is located in southwestern California in the counties of San Diego, Riverside, and Orange. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA San Diego study was designed to provide a statistically robust assessment of untreated-groundwater quality within the primary aquifer systems. The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected by the USGS from 58 wells in 2004 and water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter referred to as the primary aquifers) were defined by the depth interval of the wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the San Diego study unit. The San Diego study unit consisted of four study areas: Temecula Valley (140 mi2), Warner Valley (34 mi2), Alluvial Basins (166 mi2), and Hard Rock (850 mi2). The quality of groundwater in shallow or deep water-bearing zones may differ from that in the primary aquifers. For example, shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination than groundwater in deep water-bearing zones. This study had two components: the status assessment and the understanding assessment. The first component of this study-the status assessment of the current quality of the groundwater resource-was assessed by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOC), pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. The status assessment is intended to

  16. Quality control of climatological time series in the province of macerata (adriatic side of central italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentilucci, Matteo; Bisci, Carlo; Fazzini, Massimiliano; Tognetti, Danilo

    2016-04-01

    The analysis is focused on more than 100 meteorological recording stations located in the Province of Macerata (Marche region, Adriatic side of Central Italy) and in its neighbours; it aims to check the time series of their climatological data (temperatures and precipitations), covering about one century of observations, in order to remove or rectify any errors. This small area (about 2.800Km2) features many different climate types, because of its varied topography ranging, moving westward, from the Adriatic coast to the Appennines (over 2.100m of altitude). In this irregular context, it is difficult to establish a common procedure for each sector; therefore, it has been followed the general guidelines of the WMO, with some important difference (mostly in the method). Data are classified on the basis of validation codes (VC): missing datum (VC=-1), correct or verified datum (VC=0), datum under investigation (VC=1), datum removed after the analysis (VC=2), datum reconstructed through interpolation or by estimating the errors of digitization (VC=3). The first step was the "Logical Control", consisting in the investigation of gross errors of digitization: the data found in this phase of the analysis has been removed without any other control (VC=2). The second step, represented by the "Internal Consistency Check", leads to the elimination (VC=2) of all the data out of range, estimated on the basis of the climate zone for each investigated variable. The third one is the "Tolerance Test", carried out comparing each datum with the historical record it belongs to, in order to apply this test, the normal distribution of data has been evaluated. The "Tolerance Test" usually defines only suspect data (VC=1) to be verified with further tests, such as the "Temporal Consistency" and the "Spatial Consistency". The "Temporal Consistency" allows an evaluation of the time sequence of data, setting a specified range for each station basing upon its historical records. Data out of

  17. Recurrence of seismic migrations along the central California segment of the San Andreas fault system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, M.D.; Allen, S.S.

    1973-01-01

    VERIFICATIONS of tectonic concepts1 concerning seafloor spreading are emerging in a manner that has direct bearing on earthquake prediction. Although the gross pattern of worldwide seismicity contributed to the formulation of the plate tectonic hypothesis, it is the space-time characteristics of this seismicity that may contribute more toward understanding the kinematics and dynamics of the driving mechanism long speculated to originate in the mantle. If the lithosphere is composed of plates that move essentially as rigid bodies, then there should be seismic edge effects associated with this movement. It is these interplate effects, especially seismic migration patterns, that we discuss here. The unidirectional propagation at constant velocity (80 km yr-1 east to west) for earthquakes (M???7.2) on the Antblian fault for the period 1939 to 1956 (ref. 2) is one of the earliest observations of such a phenomenon. Similar studies3,4 of the Alaska Aleutian seismic zone and certain regions of the west coast of South America suggest unidirectional and recurring migrations of earthquakes (M???7.7) occur in these areas. Between these two regions along the great transform faults of the west coast of North America, there is some evidence 5 for unidirectional, constant velocity and recurrent migration of great earthquakes. The small population of earthquakes (M>7.2) in Savage's investigation5 indicates a large spatial gap along the San Andreas system in central California from 1830 to 1970. Previous work on the seismicity of this gap in central California indicates that the recurrence curves remain relatively constant, independent of large earthquakes, for periods up to a century6. Recurrence intervals for earthquakes along the San Andreas Fault have been calculated empirically by Wallace7 on the basis of geological evidence, surface measurements and assumptions restricted to the surficial seismic layer. Here we examine the evidence for recurrence of seismic migrations along

  18. Drought Impacts to Water Footprints and Virtual Water Transfers of the Central Valley of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, L.; Konar, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Central Valley of California is one of the most productive agricultural locations in the world, which is made possible by a complex and vast irrigation system. Beginning in 2012, California endured one of the worst droughts in its history. Local impacts of the drought have been evaluated, but it is not yet well understood how the drought reverberated through the global food system. Here, we quantify drought impacts to the water footprint (WF) of agricultural production and virtual water transfers (VWT) of the Central Valley of California. To do this, we utilize high spatial, temporal, and water source resolution datasets and a crop model from pre-drought conditions (2011) through three years of exceptional drought (2012-2014). Over the course of the drought, there was a 0.6% increase (0.128 x 109 m3) in total WF. In particular, the groundwater WF increased from 6.00 x 109 m3 in 2011 to 11.61 x 109 m3 in 2014, predominantly in the Tulare Basin. However, production and food transfer declines led total VWT to decrease by 0.7% (0.097 x 109 m3). From 2011 to 2014, groundwater VWT increased by 3.19 x 109 m3, partially offsetting the 0.71 x 109 m3 reduction in green VWT and the 2.58 x 109 m3 decrease in surface VWT. During the drought, global consumers increased their reliance on the already over-exploited Central Valley Aquifer by 93.4% (5.61 x 109 m3). These results indicate that drought shocks may strengthen the telecoupling between unsustainable groundwater withdrawals and distant consumers of groundwater-intensive agricultural commodities.

  19. Indications for Protacted Groundwater Depletion after Drought over the Central Valley of California

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, S.-Y. Simon; Lin, Yen-Heng; Gillies, Robert R.; Hakala, Kirsti

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing (2014-2015) drought in the state of California has played a major 10 role in the depletion of groundwater. Within California’s Central Valley, home to one 11 of the world’s most productive agricultural regions, drought and increased 12 groundwater depletion occurs almost hand-in-hand but this relationship appears to 13 have changed over the last decade. Data derived from 497 wells have revealed a 14 continued depletion of groundwater lasting a full year after drought, a phenomenon 15 ...

  20. Economic and Water Supply Effects of Ending Groundwater Overdraft in California's Central Valley

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Timothy; Chou, Heidi; Zikalala, Prudentia; Lund, Jay; Hui, Rui; Medellín–Azuara, Josué

    2016-01-01

    doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.15447/sfews.2016v14iss1art7 Surface water and groundwater management are often tightly linked, even when linkage is not intended or expected. This link is especially common in semi-arid regions, such as California. This paper summarizes a modeling study on the effects of ending long-term overdraft in California’s Central Valley, the state’s largest aquifer system. The study focuses on economic and operational aspects, such as surface water pumping ...

  1. Effects of kelp forest removal on associated fish assemblages in central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodkin, James L.

    1988-01-01

    Visual surveys along subtidal belt transects were used to compare fish assemblages on an experimental and a control site before and after the removal of a canopy-forming kelp forest. The giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera (L.) C.A. Agardh was removed at the holdfast from approximately equals 1 ha of high relief structurally complex rock substratum. The abundance of seven species of fish, of which five were considered midwater species, significantly declined after the kelp was removed. Results indicate that the presence of a giant kelp forest may increase the abundance and species diversity of the fish assemblages over a high relief rocky reef in central California, U.S.A.

  2. The Space-Time Scales of Variability in Oceanic Thermal Structure Off the Central California Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    Km off the coast of Central California during February 1983 ( Linder and Breaker, 1983). The effects of the present warm anomaly are clearly evident in...1969b: Unsteady wind-driven ocean currents. Quart. J. Roy. Met. Soc., 95, 675-688. - 10 0 Linder , D., and L.C. Breaker, 1983: Warm sea-surface...Verlag, 3-11. Traganza, E.D., J.C. Conrad, and L.C. Breaker, 1981: Satellite observations of a cyclonic upwelling system and giant plume in the

  3. Space geodetic measurement of crustal deformation in central and southern California, 1984-1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigl, Kurt L.; Agnew, Duncan C.; Bock, Yehuda; Dong, Danan; Donnellan, Andrea; Hager, Bradford H.; Herring, Thomas A.; Jackson, David D.; Jordan, Thomas H.; King, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    We estimate the velocity field in central and southern California using Global Positioning System (GPS) observations from 1986 to 1992 and very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations from 1984 to 1991. Our core network includes 12 GPS sites spaced approximately 50 km apart, mostly in the western Transverse Ranges and the coastal Borderlands. The precision and accuracy of the relative horizontal velocities estimated for these core stations are adequately described by a 95% confidence ellipse with a semiminor axis of approximately 2 mm/yr oriented roughly north-south, and a semimajor axis of approximately 3 mm/yr oriented east-west.

  4. Geochemistry of Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) sills from deep boreholes in the Amazonas and Solimões basins, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatlen Heimdal, Thea; Svensen, Henrik H.; Pereira, Egberto; Planke, Sverre

    2016-04-01

    The Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) is one of the most extensive Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs), and is associated with the breakup of Pangea and the subsequent opening of the central Atlantic Ocean. A large part of the province, including > 1 M km2 basins containing sill intrusions, is located in Brazil but has received limited attention due to the lack of outcrops. We have studied CAMP sills from seven deep boreholes (up to 3100 m deep) in the Amazonas and Solimões basins, northern Brazil. The boreholes contain up to ~ 482 m of sills (18 % of the stratigraphy), with a maximum individual sill thickness of 140 m. The sills were partly emplaced into thick Carboniferous evaporites. The main mineral phases of the sills include plagioclase and pyroxene, with accessory apatite, biotite, ilmenite and quartz. The majority of the sills are low-Ti dolerites (TiO2 < 2 wt.%), with the exception of four samples (with 2.2 - 3.3 wt.% TiO2). The low-Ti rocks range from basalt to basaltic andesite and plot in the tholeiitic field defined within the total alkali versus silica (TAS) classification. C1 chondrite normalized Rare Earth Element (REE) patterns for both Ti-groups show increasing LREE compared to HREE (La/Lu = 2.2 - 4.1) with no major anomalies, and attest to a relatively evolved nature (La = 17-65 ppm). Primitive mantle normalized patterns for low-Ti rocks show negative anomalies for Nb, Ta, P and Ti and positive for K, whereas the high-Ti rocks show generally opposite anomalies. Late stage patches in the dolerites contain apatite, quartz and Cl-bearing biotite, suggesting the presence of halogens that may partly derive from the host sedimentary rocks.

  5. Evaluation of biochemical urinary stone composition and its relationship to tap water hardness in Qom province, central Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslemi, Mohammad Kazem; Saghafi, Hossein; Joorabchin, Seyed Mohammad Amin

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biochemical stone composition in general population of Qom province, central Iran, and its relationship with high tap water hardness. In a prospective study, from March 2008 to July 2011, biochemical analysis of urinary stones in patients living in Qom province for at least 5 years was performed. Stones were retrieved by spontaneous passage, endoscopic or open surgery, and after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. Demographic findings and the drinking water supply of patients were evaluated and compared with biochemical stone analysis. Stone analysis was performed in 255 patients. The most dominant composition of urinary stones was calcium oxalate (73%), followed by uric acid (24%), ammonium urate (2%), and cystine (1%). The peak incidence of urinary stone was in patients in their forties. Overall male to female ratio was 4.93:1. The dominant stone composition in inhabitants of central Iran, where tap water hardness is high, was calcium oxalate stones. On the basis of this study, biochemical urinary stone composition of Qom does not differ from other regions of Iran with lower water hardness.

  6. Downscaling GRACE satellite data for sub-region groundwater storage estimates in California's Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuss, A. M.; Newcomer, M. E.; Hsu, W.; Bourai, A.; Puranam, A.; Landerer, F. W.; Schmidt, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Central Valley aquifer (CVA) is a vital economic and environmental resource for California and the United States, and supplies water for one of the most agriculturally productive regions in the world. Recent estimates of groundwater (GW) availability in California have indicated declines in GW levels that may pose a threat to sustainable groundwater use in this region. The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) can be used to estimate variations in total water storage (TWS) and are therefore used to estimate GW storage changes within the CVA. However, using GRACE data in the CVA is challenging due to the coarse spatial resolution and increased error. To compensate for this, we used a statistical downscaling approach applied to GRACE data at the sub-region level using GW storage estimates from the California Department of Water Resources' (DWR) C2VSim hydrological model. This method produced a spatially and temporally variable GW anomaly dataset for sub-region GW management and for analysis of GW changes influenced by spatial and temporal variability. An additional challenge for this region is the influence of natural climate variability, altering GW recharge and influencing pumping practices. Understanding the effects of climate variability on GW storage changes, may improve GRACE TWS and GW estimates during periods of increased rain or droughts. Thus, the GRACE TWS and GW storage estimates were compared to the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) using singular spectral analysis (SSA). Results from SSA indicate that variations in GRACE TWS are moderately correlated to PDO (10-25 year cycle), although low correlations were observed when compared to ENSO (2-7 year cycle). The incorporation of these new methods for estimating variations in groundwater storage in highly productive aquifers may improve water management techniques in California.

  7. Marine debris in central California: quantifying type and abundance of beach litter in Monterey Bay, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosevelt, C; Los Huertos, M; Garza, C; Nevins, H M

    2013-06-15

    Monitoring beach litter is essential for reducing ecological threats towards humans and wildlife. In Monterey Bay, CA information on seasonal and spatial patterns is understudied. Central California's coastal managers require reliable information on debris abundance, distribution, and type, to support policy aimed at reducing litter. We developed a survey method that allowed for trained citizen scientists to quantify the types and abundance of beach litter. Sampling occurred from July 2009-June 2010. Litter abundance ranged from 0.03 to 17.1 items m(-2). Using a mixed model approach, we found season and location have the greatest effect on litter abundance. Styrofoam, the most numerically abundant item, made up 41% of the total amount of litter. Unexpected items included fertilizer pellets. The results of this study provide a baseline on the types and abundance of litter on the central coast and have directly supported policy banning Styrofoam take out containers from local municipalities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Modeling Nonresident Seabird Foraging Distributions to Inform Ocean Zoning in Central California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studwell, Anna J; Hines, Ellen; Elliott, Meredith L; Howar, Julie; Holzman, Barbara; Nur, Nadav; Jahncke, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    Seabird aggregations at sea have been shown to be associated with concentrations of prey. Previous research identified Central California as a highly used foraging area for seabirds, with locally breeding seabirds foraging close to their colonies on Southeast Farallon Island. Herein, we focus on nonresident (i.e. non-locally breeding) seabird species off of Central California. We hypothesized that high-use foraging areas for nonresident seabirds would be influenced by oceanographic and bathymetric factors and that spatial and temporal distributions would be similar within planktivorous and generalist foraging guilds but would differ between them. With data collected by the Applied California Current Ecosystem Studies (ACCESS) partnership during cruises between April and October from 2004-2013, we developed generalized linear models to identify high-use foraging areas for each of six nonresident seabird species. The four generalist species are Phoebastria nigripes (black-footed albatross), Ardenna griseus (sooty shearwater), Ardenna creatopus (pink-footed shearwater), and Fulmarus glacialis (northern fulmar). The two planktivorous species are Phalaropus lobatus (red-necked phalarope) and Phalaropus fulicarius (red phalarope). Sea surface temperature was significant for generalist species and sea surface salinity was important for planktivorous species. The distance to the 200-m isobath was significant in five of six models, Pacific Decadal Oscillation with a 3-month lag in four models, and sea surface fluorescence, the distance to Cordell Bank, and depth in three models. We did not find statistically significant differences between distributions of individual seabird species within a foraging guild or between guilds, with the exception of the sooty shearwater. Model results for a multi-use seabird foraging area highlighted the continental shelf break, particularly within the vicinity of Cordell Bank, as the highest use areas as did Marxan prioritization. Our

  9. Modeling Nonresident Seabird Foraging Distributions to Inform Ocean Zoning in Central California.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna J Studwell

    Full Text Available Seabird aggregations at sea have been shown to be associated with concentrations of prey. Previous research identified Central California as a highly used foraging area for seabirds, with locally breeding seabirds foraging close to their colonies on Southeast Farallon Island. Herein, we focus on nonresident (i.e. non-locally breeding seabird species off of Central California. We hypothesized that high-use foraging areas for nonresident seabirds would be influenced by oceanographic and bathymetric factors and that spatial and temporal distributions would be similar within planktivorous and generalist foraging guilds but would differ between them. With data collected by the Applied California Current Ecosystem Studies (ACCESS partnership during cruises between April and October from 2004-2013, we developed generalized linear models to identify high-use foraging areas for each of six nonresident seabird species. The four generalist species are Phoebastria nigripes (black-footed albatross, Ardenna griseus (sooty shearwater, Ardenna creatopus (pink-footed shearwater, and Fulmarus glacialis (northern fulmar. The two planktivorous species are Phalaropus lobatus (red-necked phalarope and Phalaropus fulicarius (red phalarope. Sea surface temperature was significant for generalist species and sea surface salinity was important for planktivorous species. The distance to the 200-m isobath was significant in five of six models, Pacific Decadal Oscillation with a 3-month lag in four models, and sea surface fluorescence, the distance to Cordell Bank, and depth in three models. We did not find statistically significant differences between distributions of individual seabird species within a foraging guild or between guilds, with the exception of the sooty shearwater. Model results for a multi-use seabird foraging area highlighted the continental shelf break, particularly within the vicinity of Cordell Bank, as the highest use areas as did Marxan prioritization

  10. Decadal Changes in Ozone and Emissions in Central California and Current Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanrikulu, S.; Beaver, S.; Soong, S.; Tran, C.; Cordova, J.; Palazoglu, A.

    2011-12-01

    The relationships among ozone, emissions, and meteorology are very complex in central California, and must be well studied and understood in order to facilitate better air quality planning. Factors significantly impacting changes in emissions such as economic and population growth, and adopted emission controls make the matter even more complex. Here we review the history of ozone pollution in central California since the 1970s to plan for the future. Since the 1970s, changes in emissions have been accompanied by likewise dramatic changes in region-to-region differences in air quality. We focus on the coastal San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) and the inland San Joaquin Valley (SJV). In the 1970s, the SFBA population was approaching 5 million people while the considerably larger and more rural SJV population remained below 2 million. The SFBA population was mostly confined to coastal locations. Peak ozone levels occurred mostly around the population centers and especially over the Bay itself. Hourly average ozone levels routinely approached 160 ppb. These high ozone levels promoted regulations under which SFBA emissions were continuously reduced through the present. By the 1990s, SFBA emissions had been reduced considerably despite the region's population growing to around 6 million. Relative to the 1970s, in 1990s the SFBA had lower peak ozone levels that were shifted to inland locations where much of the population growth was occurring. The SFBA still exceeded the federal 1-hour standard. A rapidly changing economic landscape in the 1970s promoted vast changes in the central California population distribution. In the SJV, the OPEC oil crisis promoted significant development of petroleum resources. Meanwhile, family farms were quickly being replaced with commercial-scale farming operations. The SJV population rapidly expanded to around 3 million people by the early 1990s. During this time, SJV emissions increased considerably, largely from increases in mobile source

  11. Extensive Genetic Diversity among Clinical Isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Central Province of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saman Soleimanpour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb remains a significant disease in many countries. According to Iran’s borders with Afghanistan and Pakistan, which are among the 22 high burden countries around the world, this study was conducted to analyze the current molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis and survey genetic diversity of Mtb strains in Markazi Province in center of Iran. In this experimental study, 75 sputum specimens and one gastric lavage from all smear-positive TB patients admitted to the public hospitals across the Markazi Province were cultured on specific mycobacterial culture media. Genomic DNA was digested by PvuII and transferred to positively charged nylon membrane by southern blotting method and hybridization by PGRS and DR probes. Genotyping of the isolates by PGRS-RFLP and DR-RFLP displayed a wide range of genetic diversity as 25 and 26 genotypes were identified, respectively. Generally speaking, despite the relatively limited number of isolates in the study, high age of patients and also large heterogeneity found in the setting are both in opposition to active circulation of Mtb strains between patients under study either Iranian or Afghan nationals. Thus, it seems that reactivation of latent infection has had the main role in the spread of tuberculosis.

  12. A comparative analysis of centralized waiting lists for patients without a primary care provider implemented in six Canadian provinces: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Mylaine; Green, Michael; Kreindler, Sara; Sutherland, Jason; Jbilou, Jalila; Wong, Sabrina T; Shaw, Jay; Crooks, Valorie A; Contandriopoulos, Damien; Smithman, Mélanie Ann; Brousselle, Astrid

    2017-01-21

    Having a regular primary care provider (i.e., family physician or nurse practitioner) is widely considered to be a prerequisite for obtaining healthcare that is timely, accessible, continuous, comprehensive, and well-coordinated with other parts of the healthcare system. Yet, 4.6 million Canadians, approximately 15% of Canada's population, are unattached; that is, they do not have a regular primary care provider. To address the critical need for attachment, especially for more vulnerable patients, six Canadian provinces have implemented centralized waiting lists for unattached patients. These waiting lists centralize unattached patients' requests for a primary care provider in a given territory and match patients with providers. From the little information we have on each province's centralized waiting list, we know the way they work varies significantly from province to province. The main objective of this study is to compare the different models of centralized waiting lists for unattached patients implemented in six provinces of Canada to each other and to available scientific knowledge to make recommendations on ways to improve their design in an effort to increase attachment of patients to a primary care provider. A logic analysis approach developed in three steps will be used. Step 1: build logic models that describe each province's centralized waiting list through interviews with key stakeholders in each province; step 2: develop a conceptual framework, separate from the provincially informed logic models, that identifies key characteristics of centralized waiting lists for unattached patients and factors influencing their implementation through a literature review and interviews with experts; step 3: compare the logic models to the conceptual framework to make recommendations to improve centralized waiting lists in different provinces during a pan Canadian face-to-face exchange with decision-makers, clinicians and researchers. This study is based on an inter

  13. Predicted pH at the domestic and public supply drinking water depths, Central Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosecrans, Celia Z.; Nolan, Bernard T.; Gronberg, Jo Ann M.

    2017-03-08

    This scientific investigations map is a product of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) project modeling and mapping team. The prediction grids depicted in this map are of continuous pH and are intended to provide an understanding of groundwater-quality conditions at the domestic and public supply drinking water zones in the groundwater of the Central Valley of California. The chemical quality of groundwater and the fate of many contaminants is often influenced by pH in all aquifers. These grids are of interest to water-resource managers, water-quality researchers, and groundwater modelers concerned with the occurrence of natural and anthropogenic contaminants related to pH. In this work, the median well depth categorized as domestic supply was 30 meters below land surface, and the median well depth categorized as public supply is 100 meters below land surface. Prediction grids were created using prediction modeling methods, specifically boosted regression trees (BRT) with a Gaussian error distribution within a statistical learning framework within the computing framework of R (http://www.r-project.org/). The statistical learning framework seeks to maximize the predictive performance of machine learning methods through model tuning by cross validation. The response variable was measured pH from 1,337 wells and was compiled from two sources: USGS National Water Information System (NWIS) database (all data are publicly available from the USGS: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ca/nwis/nwis) and the California State Water Resources Control Board Division of Drinking Water (SWRCB-DDW) database (water quality data are publicly available from the SWRCB: http://www.waterboards.ca.gov/gama/geotracker_gama.shtml). Only wells with measured pH and well depth data were selected, and for wells with multiple records, only the most recent sample in the period 1993–2014 was used. A total of 1,003 wells (training dataset) were used to train the BRT

  14. Influence of the summer marine layer on patterns of chaparral diversity in west central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasey, M. C.; Parker, V.; Loik, M. E.; Holl, K. D.; Hiatt, S.

    2012-12-01

    The central coast of California is renowned for its high concentration of narrow endemic shrub species, particularly in maritime chaparral. We investigated the possible influence of the summer marine layer on patterns of chaparral diversity in this region. Using field meteorological stations, water potential measurements, and stable isotopes of carbon for Arctostaphylos species, we tested the hypothesis that there is a pronounced late dry season coast-to-interior moisture gradient at a regional scale which impacts the water relations of these evergreen shrubs. Concurrently, we sampled species composition in 87 0.1-ha chaparral stands throughout the region so that we could evaluate the relationship between species diversity patterns and environmental variables. We found a pronounced late dry season coast-to-interior moisture gradient in west central California. Coastal chaparral sites had significantly higher mean percent leaf wetness, lower vapor pressure deficit, and less negative atmospheric water potential than chaparral sites in the interior. Likewise, Arctostaphylos shrubs along the coast had significantly less negative stem water potential than congeners in the interior, and stable carbon isotopes demonstrated that interior shrubs have greater water use efficiency. Chaparral composition plots clustered into three groups which we characterized as maritime, transition, and interior. A principle components analysis demonstrated that these plots were most strongly associated with estimated dry season climate variables. Non-metric multi-dimensional scaling revealed that interior plots were least dissimilar whereas transition and maritime plots here highly dissimilar, suggesting that maritime and transition plots had greater beta diversity than interior plots. A multivariate analysis of dispersion confirmed that maritime and transition plots differed significantly from interior plots but not from each other. Using one-way ANOVA, we found that mean alpha diversity

  15. Assessment of Climate Change Impacts on Agricultural Water Demands and Crop Yields in California's Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, M. K.; Flores-Lopez, F.; Young, C. A.; Huntington, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    Long term planning for the management of California's water resources requires assessment of the effects of future climate changes on both water supply and demand. Considerable progress has been made on the evaluation of the effects of future climate changes on water supplies but less information is available with regard to water demands. Uncertainty in future climate projections increases the difficulty of assessing climate impacts and evaluating long range adaptation strategies. Compounding the uncertainty in the future climate projections is the fact that most readily available downscaled climate projections lack sufficient meteorological information to compute evapotranspiration (ET) by the widely accepted ASCE Penman-Monteith (PM) method. This study addresses potential changes in future Central Valley water demands and crop yields by examining the effects of climate change on soil evaporation, plant transpiration, growth and yield for major types of crops grown in the Central Valley of California. Five representative climate scenarios based on 112 bias corrected spatially downscaled CMIP 3 GCM climate simulations were developed using the hybrid delta ensemble method to span a wide range future climate uncertainty. Analysis of historical California Irrigation Management Information System meteorological data was combined with several meteorological estimation methods to compute future solar radiation, wind speed and dew point temperatures corresponding to the GCM projected temperatures and precipitation. Future atmospheric CO2 concentrations corresponding to the 5 representative climate projections were developed based on weighting IPCC SRES emissions scenarios. The Land, Atmosphere, and Water Simulator (LAWS) model was used to compute ET and yield changes in the early, middle and late 21st century for 24 representative agricultural crops grown in the Sacramento, San Joaquin and Tulare Lake basins. Study results indicate that changes in ET and yield vary

  16. The ecological associations of surface-dwelling lizards in Qom Province in the Northwest of Central Plateau of Iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehregan Ebrahimi

    Full Text Available We used pitfall trapping to investigate the effects of elevation, plant density and soil structure on species diversity and the impact of these habitat factors on lizard habitat selectivity in the Qom Province in the Central Plateau of Iran. From a total of 12 1-ha plots, we captured 363 individuals of 15 species of lizards (six species of Lacertidae, five species of Agamidae, two species of Gekkonidae, one species of Varanidae and one species of Scincidae. A generalized linear model (GLM determined that elevation was the most important factor impacting species diversity. The highest species diversity was at the intermediate elevation (1289 m. Abundance of 6 out of 15 species showed strong relationships with some habitat factors. These relationships were demonstrated by habitat selectivity index (Ivlev's index. Our result supports other surveys that showed that elevation plays an important role in determining lizard species diversity.

  17. A Comparison of Groundwater Storage Using GRACE Data, Groundwater Levels, and a Hydrological Model in Californias Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuss, Amber; Brandt, William; Randall, Joshua; Floyd, Bridget; Bourai, Abdelwahab; Newcomer, Michelle; Skiles, Joseph; Schmidt, Cindy

    2011-01-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) measures changes in total water storage (TWS) remotely, and may provide additional insight to the use of well-based data in California's agriculturally productive Central Valley region. Under current California law, well owners are not required to report groundwater extraction rates, making estimation of total groundwater extraction difficult. As a result, other groundwater change detection techniques may prove useful. From October 2002 to September 2009, GRACE was used to map changes in TWS for the three hydrological regions (the Sacramento River Basin, the San Joaquin River Basin, and the Tulare Lake Basin) encompassing the Central Valley aquifer. Net groundwater storage changes were calculated from the changes in TWS for each of the three hydrological regions and by incorporating estimates for additional components of the hydrological budget including precipitation, evapotranspiration, soil moisture, snow pack, and surface water storage. The calculated changes in groundwater storage were then compared to simulated values from the California Department of Water Resource's Central Valley Groundwater- Surface Water Simulation Model (C2VSIM) and their Water Data Library (WDL) Geographic Information System (GIS) change in storage tool. The results from the three methods were compared. Downscaling GRACE data into the 21 smaller Central Valley sub-regions included in C2VSIM was also evaluated. This work has the potential to improve California's groundwater resource management and use of existing hydrological models for the Central Valley.

  18. THE IMPORTANCE OF BUREAUCRACY STRUCTURE FACTOR IN THE IMPLEMENTATION OF MINIMUM STANDARD OF HEALTH SERVICE IN CENTRAL JAVA PROVINCE, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardianti N.I.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the phenomenon of incompatibility of the institutional structure of Regional Public Hospital which causes the disruption of the achievement of Minimum Service Standards (MSS indicator in the health sector, especially maternal health in the Provincial Government of Central Java. In Central Java, the largest number of maternal mortality rate was in the hospital in 2015 amounted to 85.71%. Meanwhile, the coverage rate of delivery assisted by health personnel in accordance with the indicator of MSS is 98.09%. In 2015, Central Java is the province with the second highest national of maternal mortality rate case amounted to 619 cases. The Provincial Government as the coordinator of MSS implementation in the region through the Bureau of Pemotda and the Cooperation of Regional Secretariat of Central Java has a significant role in the successful implementation of the Regulation of Minister of Health 43/2016 on MSS in Health Sector. In which MSS has a function to observe the implementation of health program in the region. This research uses a qualitative approach, the type of research is a case study and interactive model analysis from Miles, Huberman, and Saldana. The results of the analysis show that the implementation process of the policy in Bureau of Pemotda and the Cooperation of Regional Secretariat of Central Java has not run well obstructed by bureaucratic structure factor. It can be seen from the unfulfilled policy objective which is to provide convenience to local government in the preparation of planning document on the achievement of health MSS indicator. Although health MSS is achieved, it will not be able to reduce the maternal mortality rate.

  19. Petrological and geochemical evolution of the Central Gneissic Belt, Rengali Province, eastern India: Implications for the Neoarchean growth and orogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Arnab; Bose, Sankar; Das, Kaushik; Ghosh, Gautam

    2017-09-01

    This study focuses on the evolution of the Central Gneissic Belt of the Archean Rengali Province which evolved as a craton-margin orogenic belt. The Central Gneissic Belt is constituted of charnockite gneiss, migmatitic hornblende gneiss and granite gneiss often showing gradational contacts. While mafic granulite occurs as enclave within the charnockite gneiss, amphibolite and calc-silicate granofels enclaves are present within the granite gneiss. Mafic granulite shows peak metamorphic assemblage of garnet + clinopyroxene + plagioclase + quartz ± orthopyroxene which was stabilized at 10.6 ± 0.5 kbar and 860 ± 20 °C. Charnockite gneiss with the peak assemblage of orthopyroxene + quartz + plagioclase + K-feldspar was metamorphosed at 792 ± 48 °C and 7.6 ± 0.4 kbar. Amphibolite and migmatitic hornblende gneiss contain hornblende along with plagioclase and garnet and these rocks were metamorphosed at 800 ± 20 °C, 8.5 ± 0.2 kbar and 695 °C, 8 kbar respectively. Later meta-dolerite dikes exhibit relic igneous textures which are slightly modified by greenschist-facies metamorphism. Charnockite gneiss, migmatitic hornblende gneiss and granite gneiss show similar trace and REE characteristics (moderate fractionation in terms of La and Yb, LREE enrichment and flat HREE pattern) implying the same protolith composition for these rock groups. Based on the field, petrographic and geochemical data, we propose that the protoliths for the charnockite gneiss, the migmatitic hornblende gneiss and the granite gneiss crystallized as fractionated magma in within-plate syncollisional setting during the ca. 2860-2780 Ma orogeny at the Rengali Province.

  20. Historical reconstruction of atmospheric lead pollution in central Yunnan province, southwest China: an analysis based on lacustrine sedimentary records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Enfeng; Zhang, Enlou; Li, Kai; Nath, Bibhash; Li, Yanling; Shen, Ji

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric lead (Pb) pollution during the last century in central Yunnan province, one of the largest non-ferrous metal production centers in China, was reconstructed using sediment cores collected from Fuxian and Qingshui Lakes. Lead concentrations and isotopic ratios ((207)Pb/(206)Pb and (208)Pb/(206)Pb) were measured in sediment cores from both lakes. The operationally defined chemical fractions of Pb in sediment core from Fuxian Lake were determined by the optimized BCR procedure. The chronology of the cores was reconstructed using (210)Pb and (137)Cs dating methods. Similar three-phase variations in isotopic ratios and enrichment factors of Pb were observed in the sediment cores from both lakes. Before the 1950s, the sediment data showed low (207)Pb/(206)Pb and (208)Pb/(206)Pb ratios and enrichment factors (EFs=~1), indicating that the sedimentary Pb was predominantly of lithogenic origin. However, these indices were increased gradually between the 1950s and the mid-1980s, implying an atmospheric Pb deposition. The EFs and isotopic ratios of Pb reached their peak during recent years, indicating aggravating atmospheric Pb pollution. The average anthropogenic Pb fluxes since the mid-1980s were estimated to be 0.032 and 0.053 g m(-2) year(-1) recorded in Fuxian and Qingshui cores, respectively. The anthropogenic Pb was primarily concentrated in the reducible fraction. Combining the results of Pb isotopic compositions and chemical speciations in the sediment cores and in potential sources, we deduced that recent aggravating atmospheric Pb pollution in central Yunnan province should primarily be attributed to regional emissions from non-ferrous metal production industries.

  1. Land Use and Stream Nitrogen Concentrations in Agricultural Watersheds Along the Central Coast of California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Los Huertos

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In coastal California nitrogen (N in runoff from urban and agricultural land is suspected to impair surface water quality of creeks and rivers that discharge into the Monterey Bay Sanctuary. However, quantitative data on the impacts of land use activities on water quality are largely limited to unpublished reports and do not estimate N loading. We report on spatial and temporal patterns of N concentrations for several coastal creeks and rivers in central California. During the 2001 water year, we estimated that the Pajaro River at Chittenden exported 302.4 Mg of total N. Nitrate-N concentrations were typically <1 mg N l–1 in grazing lands, oak woodlands, and forests, but increased to a range of 1 to 20 mg N l–1 as surface waters passed through agricultural lands. Very high concentrations of nitrate (in excess of 80 mg N l–1 were found in selected agricultural ditches that received drainage from tiles (buried perforated pipes. Nitrate concentrations in these ditches remained high throughout the winter and spring, indicating nitrate was not being flushed out of the soil profile. We believe unused N fertilizer has accumulated in the shallow groundwater through many cropping cycles. Results are being used to organize landowners, resource managers, and growers to develop voluntary monitoring and water quality protection plans.

  2. The ecology of western equine encephalomyelitis virus in the Central Valley of California, 1945-1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, J L

    1987-11-01

    Reeves' concept of the summer transmission cycle of western equine encephalomyelitis virus in 1945 was that the virus was amplified in a silent transmission cycle involving mosquitoes, domestic chickens, and possibly wild birds, from which it could be transmitted tangentially to and cause disease in human and equine populations. Extensive field and laboratory studies done since 1945 in the Central Valley of California have more clearly defined the specific invertebrate and vertebrate hosts involved in the basic virus transmission cycle, but the overall concept remains unchanged. The basic transmission cycle involves Culex tarsalis as the primary vector mosquito species and house finches and house sparrows as the primary amplifying hosts. Secondary amplifying hosts, upon which Cx. tarsalis frequently feeds, include other passerine species, chickens, and possibly pheasants in areas where they are abundant. Another transmission cycle that most likely is initiated from the Cx. tarsalis-wild bird cycle involves Aedes melanimon and the blacktail jackrabbit. Like humans and horses, California ground squirrels, western tree squirrels, and a few other wild mammal species become infected tangentially with the virus but do not contribute significantly to virus amplification.

  3. Patterns of seabird and marine mammal carcass deposition along the central California coast, 1980-1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodkin, James L.; Jameson, Ronald J.

    1991-01-01

    At monthly intervals from February 1980 through December 1986, a 14.5-km section of central California coastline was systematically surveyed for beach-cast carcasses of marine birds and mammals. Five hundred and fifty-four bird carcasses and 194 marine mammal carcasses were found. Common murres, western grebes, and Brandt's cormorants composed 45% of the bird total. California sea lions, sea otters, and harbor seals composed 90% of the mammal total. Several factors appeared to affect patterns of carcass deposition. The El Niño – Southern Oscillation (ENSO) of 1982–1983 was the dominant influence in terms of interannual variation in carcass deposition. During this ENSO, 56% of the seabirds and 48% of the marine mammals washed ashore. Patterns of intra-annual variation were species specific and were related to animal migration patterns, reproduction, and seasonal changes in weather. Nearshore currents and winds influenced the general area of carcass deposition, while beach substrate type and local patterns of sand deposition influenced the location of carcass deposition on a smaller spatial scale. Weekly surveys along a 1.1-km section of coastline indicated that 62% of bird carcasses and 41% of mammal carcasses remained on the beach less than 9 days. Cause of death was determined for only 8% of the carcasses. Oiling was the most common indication of cause of death in birds (6%). Neonates composed 8% of all mammal carcasses.

  4. An Outcome-Driven Approach to Flood Management in California's Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lienden, B.; Jimenez, M.; Mierzwa, M.; Grimm, R.

    2016-12-01

    The Central Valley Flood Protection Plan (CVFPP) is a long-range plan originally adopted in 2012 that guides California's participation in managing flood risk iin areas protected by the State-federal flood management system in the Central Valley. The 2017 Update to the CVFPP incorporates an outcome-driven approach that will help the State move towards sustainable flood management while delivering the best value for public investment. Application of this outcome-driven approach includes identification of flood-specific outcomes that help to accomplish societal goals (including public safety, economic stability, ecosystem vitality, and enriching experiences). To help build efficiency into the flood management system, the CVFPP identifies and supports implementation of a comprehensive set of individual but interrelated management actions that - when implemented together - work in concert to contribute to these flood-specific outcomes and societal goals to improve performance of the State-federal flood management system. To accomplish multiple intended outcomes and contribute in a resilient way towards all societal goals, it is necessary to invest in a diversity of actions (including both large-scale multi-benefit projects and smaller scale local projects) with varying strengths that complement and balance one another. The 2017 CVFPP Update describes what effective and resilient management action portfolios would look like on a systemwide scale and for urban, rural and small community regions in order to reconcile public safety, economic and environmental goals across the Central Valley flood management system.

  5. Soil cover characterization at large scale: the example of Perugia Province in central Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Giulia; Salciarini, Diana; Tamagnini, Claudio

    2015-04-01

    In the last years, physically-based models aimed at predicting the occurrence of landslides have had a large diffusion because the opportunity of having landslide susceptibility maps can be essential to reduce damages and human losses. On one hand physically-based models rationally analyse problems, because mathematically describe the physical processes that actually happen, on the other hand their diffusion is limited by the difficulty of having and managing accurate data over large areas. For this reason, and also because in the Perugia province geotechnical data are partial and not regularly distributed, a data collection campaign has been started in order to have a wide physical-mechanical data set that can be used to apply any physically-based model. The collected data have been derived from mechanical tests and investigations performed to characterize the soil. The data set includes about 3000 points and each record is characterized by the following quantitative information: coordinates, geological description, cohesion, friction angle. Besides, the records contain the results of seismic tests that allow knowing the shear waves velocity in the first 30 meters of soil. The database covers the whole Perugia province territory and it can be used to evaluate the effects of both rainfall-induced and earthquake-induced landslides. The database has been analysed in order to exclude possible outliers; starting from the all data set, 16 lithological units have been isolated, each one with homogeneous geological features and the same mechanical behaviour. It is important to investigate the quality of the data and know how much they are reliable; therefore statistical analyses have been performed to quantify the dispersion of the data - i.e. relative and cumulative frequency - and also geostatistical analyses to know the spatial correlation - i.e. the variogram. The empirical variogram is a common and useful tool in geostatistics because it quantifies the spatial

  6. Timber resource statistics for the central coast resource area of California. Forest Service resource bulletin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waddell, K.L.; Bassett, P.M.

    1997-03-01

    This report is a summary of timber resource statistics for the Central Coast Resource Area of California, which includes Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Monterey, San Benito, San Francisco, San Luis Obispo, San Mateo, Santa Barbara, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Solano, and Ventura Counties. Data were collected as part of a state-wide multiresource inventory. The inventory sampled private and public lands except reserved areas and National Forests. The national Forest System provided data from regional inventories of the Los Padres National Forest. Area information for parks and other reserves was obtained directly from the organizations managing these areas. Statistical tables summarize all ownerships and provide estimates of land area, timber volume, growth, mortality, and harvest. Estimates of period change of timberland area and timber volume are presented for all ownerships outside National Forests.

  7. Environmental fate of fungicides and other current-use pesticides in a central California estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalling, Kelly L.; Kuivila, Kathryn; Orlando, James L.; Phillips, Bryn M.; Anderson, Brian S.; Siegler, Katie; Hunt, John W.; Hamilton, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The current study documents the fate of current-use pesticides in an agriculturally-dominated central California coastal estuary by focusing on the occurrence in water, sediment and tissue of resident aquatic organisms. Three fungicides (azoxystrobin, boscalid, and pyraclostrobin), one herbicide (propyzamide) and two organophosphate insecticides (chlorpyrifos and diazinon) were detected frequently. Dissolved pesticide concentrations in the estuary corresponded to the timing of application while bed sediment pesticide concentrations correlated with the distance from potential sources. Fungicides and insecticides were detected frequently in fish and invertebrates collected near the mouth of the estuary and the contaminant profiles differed from the sediment and water collected. This is the first study to document the occurrence of many current-use pesticides, including fungicides, in tissue. Limited information is available on the uptake, accumulation and effects of current-use pesticides on non-target organisms. Additional data are needed to understand the impacts of pesticides, especially in small agriculturally-dominated estuaries.

  8. Maritime climate influence on chaparral composition and diversity in the coast range of central California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasey, Michael C; Parker, V Thomas; Holl, Karen D; Loik, Michael E; Hiatt, Seth

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that maritime climatic factors associated with summer fog and low cloud stratus (summer marine layer) help explain the compositional diversity of chaparral in the coast range of central California. We randomly sampled chaparral species composition in 0.1-hectare plots along a coast-to-interior gradient. For each plot, climatic variables were estimated and soil samples were analyzed. We used Cluster Analysis and Principle Components Analysis to objectively categorize plots into climate zone groups. Climate variables, vegetation composition and various diversity measures were compared across climate zone groups using ANOVA and nonmetric multidimensional scaling. Differences in climatic variables that relate to summer moisture availability and winter freeze events explained the majority of variance in measured conditions and coincided with three chaparral assemblages: maritime (lowland coast where the summer marine layer was strongest), transition (upland coast with mild summer marine layer influence and greater winter precipitation), and interior sites that generally lacked late summer water availability from either source. Species turnover (β-diversity) was higher among maritime and transition sites than interior sites. Coastal chaparral differs from interior chaparral in having a higher obligate seeder to facultative seeder (resprouter) ratio and by being dominated by various Arctostaphylos species as opposed to the interior dominant, Adenostoma fasciculatum. The maritime climate influence along the California central coast is associated with patterns of woody plant composition and β-diversity among sites. Summer fog in coastal lowlands and higher winter precipitation in coastal uplands combine to lower late dry season water deficit in coastal chaparral and contribute to longer fire return intervals that are associated with obligate seeders and more local endemism. Soil nutrients are comparatively less important in explaining plant

  9. Wave Observations from Central California: SeaSonde Systems and In Situ Wave Buoys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regan M. Long

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wave data from five 12-13 MHz SeaSondes radars along the central California coast were analyzed to evaluate the utility of operational wave parameters, including significant wave height, period, and direction. Data from four in situ wave buoys served to verify SeaSonde data and independently corroborate wave variability. Hourly averaged measurements spanned distance is 150 km alongshore × 45 km offshore. Individual SeaSondes showed statistically insignificant variation over 27 km in range. Wave height inter-comparisons between regional buoys exhibit strong correlations, approximately 0.93, and RMS differences less than 50 cm over the region. SeaSonde-derived wave data were compared to nearby buoys over timescales from 15 to 26 months, and revealed wave height correlations =0.85−0.91 and mean RMS difference of 53 cm. Results showed that height RMS differences are a percentage of significant wave height, rather than being constant independent of sea state. Period and directions compared favorably among radars, buoys, and the CDIP model. Results presented here suggest that SeaSondes are a reliable source of wave information. Supported by buoy data, they also reveal minimal spatial variation in significant wave height, period, and direction in coastal waters from ~45 km × ~150 km in this region of the central California coast. Small differences are explained by sheltering from coastal promontories, and cutoff boundaries in the case of the radars.

  10. Leishmaniasis in Central Morocco: Seasonal Fluctuations of Phlebotomine Sand Fly in Aichoun Locality, from Sefrou Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Zahra Talbi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous leishmaniases (CL are endemic in Morocco. They are common in the human population in different localities such as Aichoun in Sefrou province, Morocco. This study was carried out in Aichoun locality from April to October 2012 in order to study the spatiotemporal trends of the main Leishmania phlebotomine vectors in this focus. Overall, 1171 sand flies, belonging to four species, were collected by sticky traps. Phlebotomus sergenti was the predominant species (78.4% followed by Ph. perniciosus (10.5%, Ph. papatasi (7.94%, and Ph. longicuspis (3.16%. Sandflies were active during 6 months (May–October. Ph. sergenti, Ph. perniciosus, and Ph. papatasi displayed a bimodal distribution with a first peak in July and a second peak in September, while Ph. longicuspis showed a monophasic trend with a peak in August. The high abundance and the lengthy period of activity of Ph. sergenti and Ph. perniciosus, vectors of L. tropica and L. infantum, respectively, are a cause for concern as they indicate the high potential risk of Leishmania transmission in the studied areas.

  11. A new species of Cyrtodactylus (Squamata: Gekkonidae) from the limestone forest of Khammouane Province, central Laos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Vinh Quang; Calame, Thomas; Nguyen, Truong Quang; Bonkowski, Michael; Ziegler, Thomas

    2015-12-17

    We describe a new species of the genus Cyrtodactylus on the basis of three specimens from Khammouane Province, Laos. Cyrtodactylus soudthichaki sp. nov. is distinguished from the remaining congeners by the combination of the following characters: adult SVL 69.2-70.0 mm; dorsal head and neck with dark blotches; nuchal loop present; dorsum with five brown bands between limb insertions; 19 or 20 irregular rows of dorsal tubercles; 32 or 33 ventral scale rows; ventrolateral folds present, with distinct tubercles; dorsal surface of hind limbs with tubercles; 29 precloacal and femoral pores in a continuous row in males, precloacal pores absent in the female; enlarged femoral and precloacal scales present; 4 or 5 postcloacal tubercles; and subcaudals transversely enlarged. The new species most closely resembles Cyrtodactylus jaegeri and Cyrtodactylus roesleri in overall coloration and pattern. However, they can be clearly distinguished from each other in the number of dorsal tubercle rows, ventral scales, and femoral and precloacal pores. Cyrtodactylus soudthichaki is the 16th species of Cyrtodactylus known from Laos.

  12. Paleoceanographic changes on the Farallon Escarpment off central California during the last 16,000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGann, M.

    2011-01-01

    New benthic and planktic foraminiferal assemblage census data and Benthic Foraminiferal Oxygen Index (BFOI) values, previously published marine climate proxy data (stable isotopes and Ca/Cd), and unpublished results of total carbon, organic carbon, and calcium carbonate analyses of sediments recovered off central California on the Farallon Escarpment (1605m water depth; 37??13.4???N, 123??14.6???W; core F-8-90-G21) document paleoceanographic changes during the latest Quaternary which reflect the intensity and source of North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW) and surface productivity. Accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dates of both benthic and planktic species provide an excellent age-depth model for the last 16,000 years, covering the latest glacial, B??lling-Aller??d, Younger Dryas, and early, middle, and late Holocene intervals. A Q-mode cluster analysis separated the benthic fauna into three clusters, one Pleistocene and two Holocene, whereas the planktic fauna was divided only into Pleistocene and Holocene clusters. Stable oxygen isotope values show an increase in water temperature of ~1??C from the late glacial to late Holocene and a change in faunal composition of the planktic assemblage implies surface waters warmed as well. A general trend of decreasing dissolved oxygen concentration from the Pleistocene (high oxic; 3.0-6.0+ ml/l O2) to the Holocene (low oxic; 1.5-3.0ml/l O2) suggested by the BFOI and Cd/Ca data reflect decreased ventilation as the source of the NPIW shifted from the Sea of Okhotsk to the tropical east Pacific at ~11,000 cal BP. The middle Holocene cooling reported in other central and northern California margin studies is not apparent in F-8-90-G21, which compares more favorably with studies from southern California and British Columbia. Total carbon and organic carbon values are highest in the B??lling-Aller??d, early Holocene, and late Holocene. Similarly, calcium carbonate values are high in the B??lling-Aller??d and peak in the

  13. Study of the Reed Dolomite Aided by Remotely Sensed Imagery, Central White-Inyo Range, Easternmost California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, W. G.; Paylor, Earnest D., II

    1996-01-01

    Remote-sensing methods are of great value in assessing the stratigraphy and geologic structure of inaccessible terrains, especially where lithologic contrasts are marked. In this report, we show that such techniques can be successfully applied to a massive carbonate unit, the Reed Dolomite, exposed in the Wacuoba Mountain, Blanco Mountain, and Mount Barcroft quadrangles of east-central California.

  14. Ecology and manipulation of bearclover (Chamaebatia foliolosa) in northern and central California: The status of our knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip M. McDonald; Gary O. Fiddler; Donald A. Potter

    2004-01-01

    Long the bane of foresters, but of interest to ecologists, bearclover inhabits thousands of acres of forest land in northern and central California. Little quantification of its recovery after disturbance is available because knowledge on the morphology of flowers, seeds, and rhizomes is fragmented, and physiological processes, especially plant moisture and...

  15. Reuse/disposal of agricultural drainage water with high levels of salinity and toxic trace elements in central California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural drainage waters in the western San Joaquin Valley of Central California contain high levels of salts, boron (B) and selenium (Se). Discharge of the drainage water directly into the Kesterson Reservoir in 1980's was hazardous to plants and wildlife. To investigate the plausibility of usi...

  16. Spatial Collaboration Model among Local Governments in Ratubangnegoro Region in the Boundary Area of Central Java and East Java Provinces, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyono, H.; Wahdah, L.

    2018-02-01

    In Indonesia, according to Law No. 23/2014 on Local Government, a local government can conduct cooperation with other local governments that are based on considerations of efficiency and effectiveness of public services and mutual benefit, in order to improve people's welfare. Such cooperation can be categorized into mandatory and voluntary cooperation. Cooperation shall be developed jointly between the adjacent areas for the implementation of government affairs which have cross-local government externalities; and the provision of public services more efficient if managed together. One of the parts of the area that is directly related to the implementation of the policy liabilities of inter-local government cooperation which is mandated is the he province boundary areas. The public management of the provincial boundary areas is different from the central province area. While the central province area considers only their own interests, the management of boundary development must consider the neighboring regions. On one hand, the area is influenced only by its own province policy, while on the other influenced by neighboring regions. Meanwhile, a local government tends to resist the influence and intervention of neighboring regions. Likewise, neighboring local governments also tend to resist the influence and intervention of other local governments. Therefore, when interacting on the boundary, inter-local government interaction is not only the potential for cooperation, but also conflict-prone regions. One of the boundary area provinces attempt to implement the collaborative planning approach is the boundary area of Central Java Province and East Java Province, which is known as Ratubangnegoro Region. Ratubangnegoro region is one of the strategic areas of both provinces. In order to the interaction between the region could take place, there are regencies in the region have formed and joined the Inter-Local Government Cooperation Agency (BKAD-Badan Kerjasama Antar

  17. Tick control by small-scale cattle farmers in the central Eastern Cape Province, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    P.J. Masika; A. Sonandi; W. Van Averbeke

    1997-01-01

    A survey conducted in 5 magisterial districts involving rapid rural appraisal and a questionnaire showed participation in state-managed and funded dipping programmes by cattle owners in communal areas of the central Eastern Cape to be nearly complete, with 98 % of livestock owners interviewed participating in all dipping events. Disease control was the main reason for participation, but farmers perceive dipping to have a much broader disease-preventing activity than is really the case. Other ...

  18. Effect of an Educational Intervention Related to Health and Nutrition on Pregnant Women in the Villages of Central Java Province, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijaya-Erhardt, Maria; Muslimatun, Siti; Erhardt, Juergen G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effects of a health and nutrition educational intervention on maternal knowledge, attitudes and practices. Design: Pre- and post-test design using structured interviews of pregnant women. Setting: Thirty-nine villages in Central Java Province, Indonesia. Method: Pregnant women (N = 252) at 12-20 weeks of gestation were…

  19. A 150-ka-long record for the volcano-tectonic deformation of Central Anatolian Volcanic Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabacak, Volkan; Tonguç Uysal, I.; Ünal-İmer, Ezgi; Mutlu, Halim; Zhao, Jian-xin

    2017-04-01

    The Anatolian Block represents one of the most outstanding examples of intra-plate deformation related to continental collision. Deformation related to the convergence of the Afro-Arabian continent toward north gives rise to widespread and intense arc volcanism in the Central Anatolia. All the usual studies on dating the volcano-tectonic deformation of the region are performed entirely on volcanic events of the geological record resulted in eruptions. However, without volcanic eruption, magma migration and related fluid pressurization also generate crustal deformation. In the current study has been funded by the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey with the project no. 115Y497, we focused on fracture systems and their carbonate veins around the Ihlara Valley (Cappadocia) surrounded by well-known volcanic centers with latest activities of the southern Central Anatolian Volcanic Province. We dated 37 samples using the Uranium-series technique and analyzed their isotope systematics from fissure veins, which are thought to be controlled by the young volcanism in the region. Our detailed fracture analyses in the field show that there is a regional dilatation as a result of a NW-SE striking extension which is consistent with the results of recent GPS studies. The Uranium-series results indicate that fracture development and associated carbonate vein deposition occurred in the last 150 ka. Carbon and oxygen isotope systematics have almost remained unchanged in the studied time interval. Although veins in the region were precipitated from fluids primarily of meteoric origin, fluids originating from water-rock interaction also contribute for the deposition of carbonate veins. The age distribution indicates that the crustal deformation intensified during 7 different period at about 4.7, 34, 44, 52, 83, 91, 149 ka BP. Four of these periods (4.7, 34, 91, 149 ka BP) correspond to the volcanic activities suggested in the previous studies. The three crustal

  20. [Spatiotemporal pattern of urban growth and its driving forces in urban agglomeration of central Liaoning Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Feng-Ming; He, Hong-Shi; Hu, Yuan-Man; Wu, Xiao-Qing; Chang, Yu; Liu, Miao; Shi, Tie-Mao; Wang, Jin-Nian

    2010-03-01

    Based on the five temporal Landsat TM remote sensing data of 1988, 1992, 1997, 2000, and 2004, and by using GIS spatial analysis and landscape pattern analysis, this paper analyzed the spatiotemporal pattern of urban growth and its driving forces in the urban agglomeration of central Liaoning Province (UACLP). From 1988 to 2004, the urban area in the UACLP had being increased from 812.55 km2 to 1345.86 km2, with an average growth rate of 32.96 km2 per year. The urban growth rate increased rapidly after 1997, and the urban growth intensity was up to the peak in 1997-2000. The urban growth was mainly concentrated in the central dense belt of the UACLP. From 1988 to 1997, the urban growth was relatively slow, its spatial pattern was compact, and edge growth and filling were the main urban growth types. From 1997 to 2004, the urban growth became faster with diffused spatial pattern and complex patch shape, and "frog leap" and diffusion were the main urban growth types. Non-agricultural population growth, economic growth, urban spatial mutual attraction, industrial development, and development zones construction policies were the main driving forces of urban growth in the UACLP.

  1. Ground referencing GRACE satellite estimates of groundwater storage changes in the California Central Valley, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, B. R.; Longuevergne, L.; Long, D.

    2012-04-01

    There is increasing interest in using Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite data to remotely monitor groundwater storage variations; however, comparisons with ground-based well data are limited but necessary to validate satellite data processing, especially when the study area is close to or below the GRACE footprint. The Central Valley is a heavily irrigated region with large-scale groundwater depletion during droughts. Here we compare updated estimates of groundwater storage changes in the California Central Valley using GRACE satellites with storage changes from groundwater level data. A new processing approach was applied that optimally uses available GRACE and water balance component data to extract changes in groundwater storage. GRACE satellites show that groundwater depletion totaled ˜31.0 ± 3.0 km3 for Groupe de Recherche de Geodesie Spatiale (GRGS) satellite data during the drought from October 2006 through March 2010. Groundwater storage changes from GRACE agreed with those from well data for the overlap period (April 2006 through September 2009) (27 km3 for both). General correspondence between GRACE and groundwater level data validates the methodology and increases confidence in use of GRACE satellites to monitor groundwater storage changes.

  2. Spatially distributed pesticide exposure assessment in the Central Valley, California, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Yuzhou [Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Zhang Minghua, E-mail: mhzhang@ucdavis.ed [Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Field runoff is an important transport mechanism by which pesticides move into the hydrologic environment of intensive agricultural regions such as California's Central Valley. This study presents a spatially explicit modeling approach to extend Pesticide Root Zone Model (PRZM), a field-scale pesticide transport model, into basin level. The approach was applied to simulate chlorpyrifos use in the Central Valley during 2003-2007. The average value of loading as percent of use (LAPU) is 0.031%. Results of this study provide strong evidence that surface runoff generation and pesticide application timing are the two influencing factors on the spatial and temporal variability of chlorpyrifos sources from agricultural fields. This is one of the first studies in coupling GIS and field-scale models and providing simulations for the dynamics of pesticides over an agriculturally dominated landscape. The demonstrated modeling approach may be useful for implementations of best management practice (BMP) and total maximum daily load (TMDL). - Runoff generation and application timing are governing factors on spatiotemporal variability of pesticide sources.

  3. Deformation rates across the San Andreas Fault system, central California determined by geology and geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, Sarah J.

    The San Andreas fault system is a transpressional plate boundary characterized by sub-parallel dextral strike-slip faults separating internally deformed crustal blocks in central California. Both geodetic and geologic tools were used to understand the short- and long-term partitioning of deformation in both the crust and the lithospheric mantle across the plate boundary system. GPS data indicate that the short-term discrete deformation rate is ˜28 mm/yr for the central creeping segment of the San Andreas fault and increases to 33 mm/yr at +/-35 km from the fault. This gradient in deformation rates is interpreted to reflect elastic locking of the creeping segment at depth, distributed off-fault deformation, or some combination of these two mechanisms. These short-term fault-parallel deformation rates are slower than the expected geologic slip rate and the relative plate motion rate. Structural analysis of folds and transpressional kinematic modeling were used to quantify long-term distributed deformation adjacent to the Rinconada fault. Folding accommodates approximately 5 km of wrench deformation, which translates to a deformation rate of ˜1 mm/yr since the start of the Pliocene. Integration with discrete offset on the Rinconada fault indicates that this portion of the San Andreas fault system is approximately 80% strike-slip partitioned. This kinematic fold model can be applied to the entire San Andreas fault system and may explain some of the across-fault gradient in deformation rates recorded by the geodetic data. Petrologic examination of mantle xenoliths from the Coyote Lake basalt near the Calaveras fault was used to link crustal plate boundary deformation at the surface with models for the accommodation of deformation in the lithospheric mantle. Seismic anisotropy calculations based on xenolith petrofabrics suggest that an anisotropic mantle layer thickness of 35-85 km is required to explain the observed shear wave splitting delay times in central

  4. Petrology and deformation style of lithospheric mantle beneath the Heldburg Dike swarm (Central Germany) subset of Central European Volcanic Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukuła, Anna; Puziewicz, Jacek; Hidas, Károly; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Matusiak-Małek, Magdalena; Milke, Ralf

    2017-04-01

    The Heldburg Dike swarm is a set of Cenozoic alkali basalt dikes occurring in the central part of Germany at the border between Thuringia and Bavaria. We studied xenoliths from Strauf, Feldstein, Bramberg and from the active quarry in Zeilberg. The peridotites from Strauf, Feldstein and Bramberg have the composition of spinel lherzolite (15), spinel harzburgite (9) and dunite (3). They vary in size from 1.5 cm (Strauf) up to 20 cm (Zeilberg). We distinguish groups (A, A- and B) of peridotites based on different forsterite content in olivine. Group A consists of olivine (89.6 - 91.8 Fo), orthopyroxene (Mg# 0.90-0.93, Al 0.05-0.18 a pfu), clinopyroxene (Mg# 0.87-0.95, Al 0.06-0.26 a pfu) and spinel (Cr# 0.13-0.65, Mg# 0.54-0.78). Clinopyroxene rare earth elements (REE) patterns are S-shaped (Feldstein, Bramberg) or U-shaped (Strauf); spoon-shaped patterns occur occasionally. Trace element (TE) patterns show negative Nb, Ta, Zr, Hf, Ti and positive Th, U anomalies. The most magnesian clinopyroxene (xenolith 3140, Feldstein) is strongly aluminous and LREE depletedwith weak anomalies in TE patterns. Group A- is contains olivine (88.9-89.5 Fo), orthopyroxene (Mg# 0.89-0.90, Al 0.10-0.13 a pfu) and clinopyroxene (Mg# 0.90-0.92, Al 0.10-0.17 a pfu). Clinopyroxene is increasingly enriched in REEs from Lu to La. TE patterns are similar to those of group A but with less pronounced anomalies. Group B (3 xenoliths only) consists of olivine Fo 86.7-88.9, orthopyroxene (Mg# 0.88-0.89, Al 0.07-0.19 a pfu), clinopyroxene (Mg# 0.88-0.90, Al 0.10-0.26 a pfu). Clinopyroxene is enriched in LREE, concave upward in Pr. TE patterns are similar to those in group A. One of group B harzburgites contains grains (up to 0.5 mm) of Ca-Mg carbonate located in interstices. The clinopyroxene chemical composition plots away from the melting trend in the MgO-Al2O3 diagram of Upton et al. (2011), suggesting a later addition of the clinopyroxene. The composition of orthopyroxene corresponds to ca. 15

  5. Slab Contributions to Cascades Magmas: Constraints from Central Oregon and Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscitto, D. M.; Wallace, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    The Cascades arc is the global end member, warm-slab subduction zone (slab thermal parameter ~200 km) resulting from the slow subduction of young oceanic crust beneath North America. Significant slab dehydration is predicted to occur beneath the forearc (e., H2O, S, Cl) beneath the forearc should result in reduced slab contributions to the mantle wedge, consistent with muted subduction-related signatures in calc-alkaline magmas and low magmatic volatile flux estimates from Oregon and Washington compared to other arcs (e.g., Marianas, Kamchatka, Central America). Despite reduced slab-derived inputs, olivine-hosted melt inclusions in the Central Oregon Cascades display elevated volatile contents in melts erupted along the volcanic front compared to those erupted towards the back-arc. In contrast to Oregon and Southern Washington, primitive magmas from the southern part of the arc (e.g., Mt. Shasta) contain some of the highest H2O contents reported. We used olivine-hosted melt inclusion data from Central Oregon and Northern California to estimate the input of volatiles and trace elements from the slab to the mantle wedge beneath the Cascades. Inclusions from near Mt. Shasta in Northern California represent two types of hydrous primitive melts that have equilibrated with a refractory mantle: high-Mg andesite (HMA) and primitive basaltic andesite (PBA) with 3.3 and 5.6 wt.% H2Omax, respectively. Three distinct primitive melt compositions were calculated using inclusions from Central Oregon: calc-alkaline basalt, Sr-rich basalt, and depleted basaltic andesite (1.6, 2.3, and 3.0 wt.% H2Omax, respectively). We calculated extents of mantle melting for each primitive magma composition using Ti, Y, Gd, Dy, Er, and Yb contents (i.e., assuming negligible contributions from the slab). Based on these calculations, we infer Central Oregon and Shasta magmas to represent 8-15% and 14-20% partial melts (respectively) of variably depleted sources. Major elements in preliminary slab

  6. Human population structure of the Costa Rican Central Provinces. An evaluation through isonymic methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés E Sáenz

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Se analiza la estructura de varias poblaciones humanas de las provincias centrales de Costa Rica mediante métodos isonímicos y utilizando los Padrones Electorales (1990 y 2006. Se estimaron cuatro parámetros que definen, en un contexto genético y evolutivo, esta estructura: la consanguinidad por cruces aleatorios (a-priori Kinship de Morton ii, el aislamiento genético (Fisher, la migración (Karlin-McGregor y el grado de subdivisión o diferenciación de las poblaciones (Fst. La posible distribución geográfica de estas variables se muestra utilizando un análisis de componentes principales. Existe una coincidencia entre grupos de cantones obtenidos por similitud en diversidad de apellidos y la localización geográfica de los mismos en el territorio. Se encontraron diferencias estadísticamente significativas en los valores obtenidos para los componentes de consanguinidad (F=15.6; p<0.05 y aislamiento genético (F=14.38; p<0.05 entre diferentes sectores de las provincias centrales. Existe una asociación entre la densidad poblacional y la quiebra de aislados genéticos y otra posible asociación entre la geografía de la región y los patrones de migración de individuos y los consecuentes niveles de endocruzamiento y aislamiento genético. Las diferencias en los valores de los componentes de consanguinidad y aislamiento entre diferentes zonas del territorio central permiten suponer la existencia de diferencias en frecuencias génicas. La migración de bloques de genes del centro a la periferia también es posible y la variación en este sentido podría atribuirse principalmente a cambios en los componentes de la estructura poblacional: patrones de cruces, migración y la consecuencia del tamaño efectivo de población en procesos de deriva genética.

  7. Exploring multi-scale relationships between geology and ecology in Northern and Central California's intertidal habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, I. W.; Wheeler, A.; Raimondi, P.

    2016-02-01

    We present a multidisciplinary, geological and ecological study that tests whether rock's geologic characteristics and their spatial variations in the intertidal habitat is a significant determinant of the types and abundance of organisms that can settle, grow, and survive in a given intertidal location. To investigate these relationships we (1) produced high-resolution ( 2cm to 5cm) digital elevation models (DEMs) of rock surfaces exposed in the intertidal zone using state-of-the-art terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). The geological surveys were conducted on outcrops representative of the most common rock types (igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic/mélange units) along the Central and Northern California and at the same locations as the long-running biodiversity program PISCO and the newly established Northern California marine protected areas (MPAs). (2) Conducted biodiversity surveys at the same sites using methods developed in the pacificrockyinterdal.org program. (3) Linked the geomorphological and community composition attributes for each site to determine the characteristic spatial coupling signature. To parameterize the geomorphology of the rock surface we analyzed the DEMs with a Matlab code that produces a triangular irregular network (TIN) model of the surface and calculates the ratio between the area of the Delaunay triangles and their interpolated surface within a moving window of variable size (ranging from cm to tens of meters). The value of the ratio expresses the rugosity of the rock surface at any given scale. Bivariate plots of rugosity vs. window size offer, for the first time, the opportunity to quantitatively determine the spectral distribution of rock surface complexity over multiple scales, correlate rugosity with specific geologic features (e.g. fracture spacing, bedding) and allow statistical testing of the spatial relationships between community composition and geology (e.g. spectral coherence tests).

  8. Lithospheric Structure in Central California: Towards Identifying the Tectonic Origin of the Isabella Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, S. L.; Clayton, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    The tectonic origin of the Isabella high-velocity anomaly in the upper mantle beneath California's southern Great Valley is unclear. Previous low-resolution seismic imaging studies of the region have been unable to identify the structural connection between this upper mantle anomaly and the overlying lithosphere. The two dominant hypotheses attribute the Isabella anomaly to a fossil slab or the foundered lithospheric root of the Sierra Nevada batholith. The Central California Seismic Experiment (CCSE) is designed to distinguish between these hypotheses. We present results from the CCSE, which consists of 44 broadband seismometers currently deployed in a quasi-linear array spanning from the Pacific coast, across the Great Valley, to the Sierra Nevada foothills, at an approximate latitude of 36°N. Forward modeling of the 2D structure of the crust is performed using local earthquakes recorded by the CCSE and a finite-difference algorithm to provide constraints on the geometry and velocity of the seismic structure of the Great Valley. This sedimentary basin is suggested to be filled with very low velocity material at shallow depths and partially underlain by a high-velocity ophiolite body. Hence, a well-constrained basin structure will be important in correcting surface wave tomography and receiver function images. The impact of the Great Valley basin structure on body waves is evident by an observed delay in P-wave arrival times on the radial component relative to the vertical component for stations located within the basin. Surface waves along the CCSE array also show a distinct slowing by the valley at periods <10 sec. Data from teleseismic events recorded by the CCSE reveal scattered waves arriving tens of seconds after the S-wave, which we will interpret in terms of the lithospheric structure of the region by identifying the source location(s) of the scatterer(s). We may also gain insights into the structural connection between the Isabella anomaly and the

  9. Waterbird habitat in California's Central Valley basins under climate, urbanization, and water management scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matchett, Elliott L.; Fleskes, Joseph

    2018-01-01

    California's Central Valley provides critical, but threatened habitat and food resources for migrating and wintering waterfowl, shorebirds, and other waterbirds. The Central Valley is comprised of nine basins that were defined by the Central Valley Joint Venture (CVJV) to assist in conservation planning. Basins vary in composition and extent of habitats, which primarily include croplands and wetlands that rely on water supplies shared with other competing human and environmental uses. Changes in climate, urban development, and water supply management are uncertain and could reduce future availability of water supplies supporting waterbird habitats and limit effectiveness of wetland restoration planned by the CVJV to support wintering waterbirds. We modeled 17 plausible scenarios including combinations of three climate projections, three urbanization rates, and five water supply management options to promote agricultural and urban water uses, with and without wetland restoration. Our research examines the reduction in quantity and quality of habitats during the fall migration-wintering period by basin under each scenario, and the efficacy of planned wetland restoration to compensate reductions in flooded areas of wetland habitats. Scenario combinations of projected climate, urbanization, and water supply management options reduced availability of flooded cropland and wetland habitats during fall-winter and degraded the quality of seasonal wetlands (i.e., summer-irrigation for improved forage production), though the extent and frequency of impacts varied by basin. Planned wetland restoration may substantially compensate for scenario-related effects on wetland habitats in each basin. However, results indicate that Colusa, Butte, Sutter, San Joaquin, and Tulare Basins may require additional conservation to support summer-irrigation of seasonal wetlands and winter-flooding of cropland habitats. Still further conservation may be required to provide sufficient areas of

  10. Water and gas geochemistry of the Calatrava Volcanic Province (CVP) hydrothermal system (Ciudad Real, central Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaselli, Orlando; Nisi, Barbara; Tassi, Franco; Giannini, Luciano; Grandia, Fidel; Darrah, Tom; Capecchiacci, Francesco; del Villar, Pèrez

    2013-04-01

    An extensive geochemical and isotopic investigation was carried out in the water and gas discharges of the Late Miocene-Quaternary Calatrava Volcanic Province (CVP) (Ciudad Real, Spain) with the aim reconstruct the fluid circulation in the area. CVP consists of a series of scattered (monogenetic) vents from where alkaline lava flows and pyroclastic deposits formed in two different periods. The first stage (8.7-6.4 Ma) mainly included ultra-potassic mafic extrusives, whilst the second stage (4.7-1.75 Ma) prevalently originated alkaline and ultra-alkaline volcanics. Both stages were followed by a volcanic activity that extended up to 1.3 and 0.7 Ma, respectively. This area can likely be regarded as one of the most important emitting zones of CO2 in the whole Peninsular Spain along with that of Selva-Emporda in northeastern Spain (Cataluña) and it can be assumed as one of the best examples of natural analogues of CO2 leakages in Spain. This latter aspect is further evidenced by the relatively common water-gas blast events that characterize the CCVF. In the last few years the presence of a CO2-pressurized reservoir at a relatively shallow level as indeed caused several small-sized explosion particularly during the drilling of domestic wells. The fluid discharging sites are apparently aligned along well-defined directions: NW-SE and NNW-SSE and subordinately, ENE-WSW, indicating a clear relationship between the thermal discharges and the volcanic centers that also distribute along these lineaments. The CVP waters are mostly hypothermal (up to 33 °C) and are generally Mg(Ca)-HCO3 in composition and occasionally show relatively high concentrations of Fe and Mn, with pH and electrical conductivity down to 5.5 and up to 6.5 mS/cm, respectively. The oxygen and hydrogen isotopes suggest a meteoric origin for these waters. The mantle source of these volcanic products is apparently preserved in the many CO2-rich (up to 990,000 mmol/mol) gas discharges that characterize CVP

  11. Tick control by small-scale cattle farmers in the central Eastern Cape Province, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.J. Masika

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available A survey conducted in 5 magisterial districts involving rapid rural appraisal and a questionnaire showed participation in state-managed and funded dipping programmes by cattle owners in communal areas of the central Eastern Cape to be nearly complete, with 98 % of livestock owners interviewed participating in all dipping events. Disease control was the main reason for participation, but farmers perceive dipping to have a much broader disease-preventing activity than is really the case. Other reasons for participation in dipping programmes were to prevent ticks from sucking blood, provide animals with a clean appearance, and prevent damage to teats of cows. Many livestock owners complement dipping with other tick control measures, including old motor oil, household disinfectant, pour-on acaricide and manual removal of ticks. Recently local farming communities were given the responsibility of buying dipping acaricide. This has presented them with the challenge of developing farmer-managed, cost-effective tick control programmes. At present, this process is constrained by lack of information and farmer training.

  12. Geothermal prospecting by geochemical methods in the Quaternary volcanic province of Dhamar (central Yemen)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minissale, Angelo; Vaselli, Orlando; Mattash, Mohamed; Montegrossi, Giordano; Tassi, Franco; Ad-Dukhain, Abdulsalam; Kalberkamp, Ulrich; Al-Sabri, Ali; Al-Kohlani, Taha

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with geothermal prospecting carried out in the Quaternary volcanic field of Dhamar, which is located almost in the centre of the main Oligo-Miocene basaltic trap plateau of Yemen. By applying geochemical and thermometric techniques in domestic wells producing water from the shallow unconfined aquifer in the area, which is prevalently hosted inside the Quaternary volcano-clastic material, a closed thermal anomaly associated with the Quaternary volcanic activity was well delineated. Although the aquifer(s) has a Ca-Na-HCO3 composition, that is typical of shallow groundwater, there are several chemical anomalies in the hotter central area compared to typical aquifers: i) the pH is lower and, consequently, the calculated partial pressure of CO2 in solution is higher, ii) the electrical conductivity is higher, iii) the total salinity is higher and iv) the fluoride ion concentration is higher. Such chemical anomalies in the hotter part of the aquifer do not seem to be generated by the rising and/or mixing of deep hydrothermal components rising into the shallow aquifer, but rather produced by enhanced water-rock interaction processes resulting from the higher temperature of the aquifer and its greater acidity. By applying some speculative calculations, based on the likely temperature of rainfall in the area and the depth and temperature of individual wells, the local thermal gradients in the area have been calculated. The thermal gradient varies from less than the average Earth gradient at the periphery of the delimitated thermal anomaly, to more than 250 °C/km, within an extensive area (exceeding 200 km2) where the gradient is greater than 100/120 °C/km.

  13. Dependable Flow and Flood Control Performance of Logung Dam, Central Java Province, Indonesia

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    Faza Ramadhani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The change of land use in Mt. Muria area Central Java has been resulting in the significant sheet erosion of upstream watershed around Mt. Muria, followed by considerably high sedimentation on rivers downstream that lead to the reduction of cross sections of the rivers including Logung River. Such situation has been contributing the condition that downstream of Logung River is very potential to experience over flow and inundation to its surrounding area. An idea of constructing the Logung Dam was introduced in 1986 that aimed at reducing the aforementioned inundation. Besides, the development of Logung Dam was also aimed at fulfilling both irrigation and non-irrigation water demand. This paper presents the results of the analysis of the water availability and flood control performance of the Logung Dam. The dependable flow was analyzed by applying the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA method in order to determine the low flow characteristics, whereas the identification of the high flow characteristics was carried out by using the Synthetic Unit Hydrograph (SUH methods, i.e., the GAMA I and Nakayasu modeling approach. At a certain reservoir characteristic and a defined geometry of spillway, several reservoir routing simulations were carried out on both dependable flows and high flows. Results of the reservoir routing showed the promising water availability of the Logung Dam to fulfill water demand for both irrigation and non-irrigation, whereas the reservoir routing could reduce the probable maximum flood from QPMF from 1,031 m3/s to approximately 950 m3/s or damping efficiency at 7.86%. Further analysis suggests necessary operation and maintenance of Logung Dam to sustain its function and to mitigate possible problems related to reservoir sedimentation.

  14. Survey of Trichinella infection from domestic pigs in the historical endemic areas of Henan province, central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Peng; Zhang, Xi; Wang, Li Ang; Han, Lu Hong; Yang, Mei; Duan, Jiang Yang; Sun, Ge Ge; Qi, Xin; Liu, Ruo Dan; Wang, Zhong Quan; Cui, Jing

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the current situation of Trichinella infection from domestic pigs in the historical endemic areas of Henan province, central China. A total of 823 diaphragm samples from the indoor-raised pigs were collected in five cities of Henan during 2014-2015 and examined by artificial digestion method. The overall prevalence of Trichinella infection in pigs was 0.61 % (5/823). Trichinella larvae were detected in 0.91 % (5/550) of pigs from Nanyang city of Henan. The larval burden in infected animals was 0.03 larvae per gram (lpg) of muscles with a range from 0.02 to 0.05 lpg. The larvae were identified as Trichinella spiralis by multiple PCR. Our study confirms the existence of swine trichinellosis in Henan, but the infection level was under the minimum level for defining infectious sources for humans. However, the prevalence of swine Trichinella infection in Henan need to be further evaluated with a large scale of pork samples for ensuring meat food safety.

  15. Effects of the floods on dysentery in north central region of Henan Province, China from 2004 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Wei; Ding, Guoyong; Li, Yifei; Li, Hongkai; Liu, Qiyong; Jiang, Baofa

    2014-11-01

    Zhengzhou, Kaifeng and Xinxiang, the cities in the north central region of Henan Province, suffered from many times floods from 2004 to 2009. We focused on dysentery disease consequences of floods and examined the association between floods and the morbidity of dysentery, based on a longitudinal data. A generalized additive mixed model was conducted to examine the relationship between the monthly morbidity of dysentery and floods from 2004 to 2009 in the study areas. The relative risks (RRs) of the floods risk on the morbidity of dysentery were estimated in each city and the whole region. The RRs on dysentery were 11.47 (95% CI: 8.67-15.33), 1.35 (95% CI: 1.23-3.90) and 2.75 (95% CI: 1.36-4.85) in Kaifeng, Xinxiang and Zhengzhou, respectively. The RR on dysentery in the whole region was 1.66 (95% CI: 1.52-1.82). Our study confirms that flooding has significantly increased the risk of dysentery in the study areas. Additionally, we observed that a sudden and severe flooding can contribute more risk to the morbidity of dysentery than a persistent and moderate flooding. Our findings have significant implications for developing strategies to prevent and reduce health impact of floods. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. THE DIMENSION OF COOPERATIVISM AND DAIRY CATTLE FARMING IN GETASAN VILLAGE, SEMARANG REGENCY, CENTRAL JAVA PROVINCE, INDONESIA

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    S. Gayatri

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed to explore the role of cooperativism in dairy cattle farming in Getasan village,Semarang Regency, Central Java Province. Spearman Rank Correlation test was used to determine therelationship between cooperativism and the performance of dairy cattle farming. Based on the results ofthe Spearman Rank correlation test, feeds and feeding practices were significantly correlated withsharing of knowledge and information and sharing of resources. However, no significant relationshipwas found between participation in decision making and feeds and feeding practices. Meanwhile, therewere significant relationships amog sharing of knowledge and information, sharing of resources, andparticipation in decision making and milk production in Getasan Village. The dairy health asperformance indicator of dairy cattle farming, sharing of knowledge and information was the onlysignificant factor. Sharing of resources and participation in decision making had no significantrelationship with dairy health. As regards marketing, the test showed that sharing of knowledge andinformation, sharing of resources, and participation in decision making were significantly relatedfactors. This study indicated that cooperativism may provide opportunities for farmers to accessservices, information and resources that will allow them to improve their capacities in these areas. Thisstudy also proposed some recommendations that the cooperatives should promote activities encouraginggreater cooperation and mutual understanding among the members. Skills trainings and education forempowerment should be conducted to encourage participation in decision making.

  17. A new species of the Cyrtodactylus irregularis complex (Squamata: Gekkonidae) from Gia Lai Province, Central Highlands of Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Vinh Quang; Dung, Tran VAN; Nguyen, Truong Quang; LE, Minh Duc; Ziegler, Thomas

    2017-12-05

    We describe a new species of the genus Cyrtodactylus from Gia Lai Province, Central Highlands of Vietnam based on morphological and molecular differences. Cyrtodactylus gialaiensis sp. nov. is differentiated from other congeners by a unique combination of the following characters: Size small, maximum known SVL reaching 62.8 mm; dorsal pattern consisting of six or seven dark transverse bands between limb insertions; intersupranasals two or three; dorsal tubercles at midbody in 16-21 irregular rows, strongly developed on flanks; lateral folds poorly defined with interspersed tubercles; ventral scales between ventrolateral folds 38-45; precloacal pores nine or 10 in males, eight pitted scales in the adult female, in a continuous row; femoral pores absent; enlarged femoral scales present; postcloacal tubercles two or three; dorsal tubercles present to half of tail; subcaudal scales not enlarged. In molecular analyses, the new species is weakly supported as a member of the Cyrtodactylus irregularis species group with a minimum pairwise genetic distance of 13.7% from others within the group.

  18. Relating vegetation condition to grazing management systems in the central Keiskamma catchment, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakembo, Vincent; Ndou, Naledzani

    2017-04-01

    An investigation of the temporal changes in vegetation condition across the communal villages of the central Keiskamma catchment, Eastern Cape Province, in relation to local grazing management systems was conducted. Landsat TM images of 1984 and 1999, in conjunction with SPOT imagery of 2011 were used to assess the spatial trends in vegetation. Information regarding the functionality of local grazing management structures was obtained through structured interviews. Vegetation condition was related to grazing management systems using the logistic regression in Idrisi Selva remote sensing software. Analysis of vegetation condition trends revealed a consistent deterioration of vegetation condition in villages with weak grazing management systems. A statistically significant correlation between vegetation condition and grazing management systems was identified. High levels of vegetation degradation were associated with villages that did not adhere to sound grazing management practices. The introduction of another layer governance in the form of elected municipal committees weakened traditional village management structures. Strengthening traditional management committees should be the point of departure for vegetation restoration.

  19. Impact of Implementation of Direct Cash Transfer Program 2008/2009 on Household Consumption in Central Java Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subanti, S.; Hakim, A. R.; Hakim, I. M.

    2017-04-01

    This study aims to see the impact of direct cash transfer program for 2008/2009 on household consumption of food, nonfood, education, and health in Central Java Province. The study is expected to provide important findings for the improvement of a similar program in the future. This study findings that (1) the increasing in food and non-food consumption for direct cash transfer recipients than non direct cash transfer recipients; (2) the impact of households expenditure on education for direct cash transfer recipients is higher than non direct cash transfer recipients; (3) the impact of households expenditure on health for direct cash transfer recipients is lower than non direct cash transfer recipients. This study recommended that (1) implementation of direct cash transfer program 2008/2009 must be managed to be better because this program can defend household welfare. It shows from several indicators of well-being such as consumption spending, education, and health; (2) data targets for poor households (very poor, poor, nearly poor) must be updated.

  20. U-Th age evidence from carbonate veins for episodic crustal deformation of Central Anatolian Volcanic Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabacak, Volkan; Uysal, I. Tonguç; Ünal-İmer, Ezgi; Mutlu, Halim; Zhao, Jian-xin

    2017-12-01

    Central Anatolia represents one of the most outstanding examples of intraplate deformation related to both continental collision and back-arc extension generating non-uniformly distributed stress fields. In this study, we provide direct field evidence of various stress directions and investigate carbonate-filled fracture systems in the Central Anatolian Volcanic Province using U/Th geochronology and isotope geochemistry for evaluating the episodes of latest volcanic activity under regional stress. Field data reveal two independent fracture systems in the region. Successive fracture development has been controlled by two different volcanic eruption centers (Hasandağ Composite Volcano and Acıgöl Caldera). Trace element, and stable (C and O) and radiogenic (Sr) isotope compositions of carbonate veins indicate different fluid migration pathways for two different fracture systems. The U/Th age data for carbonate veins of two independent fracture systems indicate that the crustal deformation intensified during 7 episodic periods in the last 150 ka. The NNE-trending first fracture system was formed as a result of strain cycles in a period from 149 ± 2.5, through 91 ± 1.5 to 83 ± 2.5 ka BP. Subsequent deformation events represented by the ENE-trending second fracture zone have been triggered during the period of 53 ± 3.5, 44 ± 0.6 and 34 ± 1 ka BP before the first fracture zone resumed the activity at about 4.7 ± 0.15 ka BP. Although further studies are needed to evaluate statistical significance of age correlations, the periods of carbonate precipitation inferred from U-Th age distributions in this study are comparable with the previous dating results of surrounding volcanic eruption events.

  1. Mapping Aquifer Systems with Airborne Electromagnetics in the Central Valley of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, R. J.; Smith, R.; Asch, T. H.; Abraham, J.; Cannia, J.; Fogg, G. E.; Viezzoli, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Central Valley of California is an important agricultural region struggling to meet the need for irrigation water. Recent periods of drought have significantly reduced the delivery of surface water, resulting in extensive pumping of groundwater. This has exacerbated an already serious problem in the Central Valley, where a number of areas have experienced declining water levels for several decades leading to ongoing concerns about depletion of aquifers and impacts on ecosystems, as well as subsidence of the ground surface. The overdraft has been so significant, that there are now approximately140 million acre-feet (MAF) of unused groundwater storage in the Central Valley, storage that could be used to complement the 42 MAF of surface storage. The alluvial sedimentary geology of the Central Valley is typically composed of more than 50 to 70 percent fine-grained deposits dominated by silt and clay beds. These fine grained deposits can block potential recharge, and are associated with the large amount of observed subsidence. Fortunately, the geologic processes that formed the region created networks of sand and gravel which provide both a supply of water and pathways for recharge from the surface to the aquifers. The challenge is to find these sand and gravel deposits and thus identify optimal locations for surface spreading techniques so that recharge could be dramatically increased, and re-pressurization of the confined aquifer networks could be accomplished. We have acquired 100 line kilometers of airborne electromagnetic data over an area in the San Joaquin Valley, imaging the subsurface hydrostratigraphy to a depth of 500 m with spatial resolution on the order of meters to tens of meters. Following inversion of the data to obtain resistivity models along the flight lines, we used lithology logs in the area to transform the models to images displaying the distribution of sand and gravel, clay, and mixed fine and coarse materials. The quality of the data and

  2. Groundwater Age in Multi-Level Water Quality Monitor Wells on California Central Valley Dairies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, B. K.; Visser, A.; Hillegonds, D. J.; Singleton, M. J.; Moran, J. E.; Harter, T.

    2011-12-01

    Dairy farming in California's Central Valley is a significant source of nitrate to underlying aquifers. One approach to mitigation is to implement farm-scale management plans that reduce nutrient loading to groundwater while sustaining crop yield. While the effect of different management practices on crop yield is easily measured, their effect on groundwater quality has only infrequently been evaluated. Documenting and predicting the impact of management on water quality requires a quantitative assessment of transport (including timescale and mixing) through the vadose and saturated zones. In this study, we measured tritium, helium isotopic composition, and noble gas concentrations in groundwater drawn from monitor wells on several dairies in the Lower San Joaquin Valley and Tulare Lake Basin of California's Central Valley in order to predict the timescales on which changes in management may produce observable changes in groundwater quality. These dairies differ in age (from 100 years old), thickness of the vadose zone (from irrigation water (surface or groundwater). All of the dairies use manure wastewater for irrigation and fertilization. Three of the dairies have implemented management changes designed to reduce nutrient loading and/or water usage. Monitor wells in the southern Tulare Lake Basin dairies were installed by UC-Davis as multi-level nested wells allowing depth profiling of tritium and noble gases at these sites. Tritium/helium-3 groundwater ages, calculated using a simple piston-flow model, range from 50 years. Initial tritium (the sum of measured tritium and tritiogenic helium-3) is close to or slightly above precipitation in the calculated recharge year for young samples; and significantly above the precipitation curve for older samples. This pattern is consistent with the use of 20-30 year old groundwater recharged before 1980 for irrigation, and illustrates how irrigation with groundwater can complicate the use of tritium alone for age dating

  3. Building America Case Study: Multifamily Central Heat Pump Water Heaters, Davis, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Hoeschele, E. Weitzel

    2017-03-01

    Although heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have gained significant attention in recent years as a high efficiency electric water heating solution for single family homes, central HPWHs for commercial or multi-family applications are not as well documented in terms of measured performance and cost effectiveness. To evaluate this technology, the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation team monitored the performance of a 10.5 ton central HPWH installed on a student apartment building at the West Village Zero Net Energy Community in Davis, California. Monitoring data collected over a 16-month period were then used to validate a TRNSYS simulation model. The TRNSYS model was then used to project performance in different climates using local electric rates. Results of the study indicate that after some initial commissioning issues, the HPWH operated reliably with an annual average efficiency of 2.12 (Coefficient of Performance). The observed efficiency was lower than the unit's rated efficiency, primarily due to the fact that the system rarely operated under steady-state conditions. Changes in the system configuration, storage tank sizing, and control settings would likely improve the observed field efficiency. Modeling results suggest significant energy savings relative to electric storage water heating systems (typical annual efficiencies around 0.90) providing for typical simple paybacks of six to ten years without any incentives. The economics versus gas water heating are currently much more challenging given the current low natural gas prices in much of the country. Increased market size for this technology would benefit cost effectiveness and spur greater technology innovation.

  4. Building America Case Study: Multifamily Central Heat Pump Water Heaters, Davis, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-03-08

    Although heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have gained significant attention in recent years as a high efficiency electric water heating solution for single family homes, central HPWHs for commercial or multi-family applications are not as well documented in terms of measured performance and cost effectiveness. To evaluate this technology, the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation team monitored the performance of a 10.5 ton central HPWH installed on a student apartment building at the West Village Zero Net Energy Community in Davis, California. Monitoring data collected over a 16-month period were then used to validate a TRNSYS simulation model. The TRNSYS model was then used to project performance in different climates using local electric rates. Results of the study indicate that after some initial commissioning issues, the HPWH operated reliably with an annual average efficiency of 2.12 (Coefficient of Performance). The observed efficiency was lower than the unit's rated efficiency, primarily due to the fact that the system rarely operated under steady-state conditions. Changes in the system configuration, storage tank sizing, and control settings would likely improve the observed field efficiency. Modeling results suggest significant energy savings relative to electric storage water heating systems (typical annual efficiencies around 0.90) providing for typical simple paybacks of six to ten years without any incentives. The economics versus gas water heating are currently much more challenging given the current low natural gas prices in much of the country. Increased market size for this technology would benefit cost effectiveness and spur greater technology innovation.

  5. Water availability and land subsidence in the Central Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunt, Claudia C.; Sneed, Michelle; Traum, Jon; Brandt, Justin T.

    2016-05-01

    The Central Valley in California (USA) covers about 52,000 km2 and is one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world. This agriculture relies heavily on surface-water diversions and groundwater pumpage to meet irrigation water demand. Because the valley is semi-arid and surface-water availability varies substantially, agriculture relies heavily on local groundwater. In the southern two thirds of the valley, the San Joaquin Valley, historic and recent groundwater pumpage has caused significant and extensive drawdowns, aquifer-system compaction and subsidence. During recent drought periods (2007-2009 and 2012-present), groundwater pumping has increased owing to a combination of decreased surface-water availability and land-use changes. Declining groundwater levels, approaching or surpassing historical low levels, have caused accelerated and renewed compaction and subsidence that likely is mostly permanent. The subsidence has caused operational, maintenance, and construction-design problems for water-delivery and flood-control canals in the San Joaquin Valley. Planning for the effects of continued subsidence in the area is important for water agencies. As land use, managed aquifer recharge, and surface-water availability continue to vary, long-term groundwater-level and subsidence monitoring and modelling are critical to understanding the dynamics of historical and continued groundwater use resulting in additional water-level and groundwater storage declines, and associated subsidence. Modeling tools such as the Central Valley Hydrologic Model, can be used in the evaluation of management strategies to mitigate adverse impacts due to subsidence while also optimizing water availability. This knowledge will be critical for successful implementation of recent legislation aimed toward sustainable groundwater use.

  6. Water availability and land subsidence in the Central Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunt, Claudia; Sneed, Michelle; Traum, Jonathan A.; Brandt, Justin

    2016-01-01

    The Central Valley in California (USA) covers about 52,000 km2 and is one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world. This agriculture relies heavily on surface-water diversions and groundwater pumpage to meet irrigation water demand. Because the valley is semi-arid and surface-water availability varies substantially, agriculture relies heavily on local groundwater. In the southern two thirds of the valley, the San Joaquin Valley, historic and recent groundwater pumpage has caused significant and extensive drawdowns, aquifer-system compaction and subsidence. During recent drought periods (2007–2009 and 2012-present), groundwater pumping has increased owing to a combination of decreased surface-water availability and land-use changes. Declining groundwater levels, approaching or surpassing historical low levels, have caused accelerated and renewed compaction and subsidence that likely is mostly permanent. The subsidence has caused operational, maintenance, and construction-design problems for water-delivery and flood-control canals in the San Joaquin Valley. Planning for the effects of continued subsidence in the area is important for water agencies. As land use, managed aquifer recharge, and surface-water availability continue to vary, long-term groundwater-level and subsidence monitoring and modelling are critical to understanding the dynamics of historical and continued groundwater use resulting in additional water-level and groundwater storage declines, and associated subsidence. Modeling tools such as the Central Valley Hydrologic Model, can be used in the evaluation of management strategies to mitigate adverse impacts due to subsidence while also optimizing water availability. This knowledge will be critical for successful implementation of recent legislation aimed toward sustainable groundwater use.

  7. Magnetic and gravity studies of Mono Lake, east-central, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athens, Noah D.; Ponce, David A.; Jayko, Angela S.; Miller, Matt; McEvoy, Bobby; Marcaida, Mae; Mangan, Margaret T.; Wilkinson, Stuart K.; McClain, James S.; Chuchel, Bruce A.; Denton, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    From August 26 to September 5, 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected more than 600 line-kilometers of shipborne magnetic data on Mono Lake, 20 line-kilometers of ground magnetic data on Paoha Island, 50 gravity stations on Paoha and Negit Islands, and 28 rock samples on Paoha and Negit Islands, in east-central California. Magnetic and gravity investigations were undertaken in Mono Lake to study regional crustal structures and to aid in understanding the geologic framework, in particular regarding potential geothermal resources and volcanic hazards throughout Mono Basin. Furthermore, shipborne magnetic data illuminate local structures in the upper crust beneath Mono Lake where geologic exposure is absent. Magnetic and gravity methods, which sense contrasting physical properties of the subsurface, are ideal for studying Mono Lake. Exposed rock units surrounding Mono Lake consist mainly of Quaternary alluvium, lacustrine sediment, aeolian deposits, basalt, and Paleozoic granitic and metasedimentary rocks (Bailey, 1989). At Black Point, on the northwest shore of Mono Lake, there is a mafic cinder cone that was produced by a subaqueous eruption around 13.3 ka. Within Mono Lake there are several small dacite cinder cones and flows, forming Negit Island and part of Paoha Island, which also host deposits of Quaternary lacustrine sediments. The typical density and magnetic properties of young volcanic rocks contrast with those of the lacustrine sediment, enabling us to map their subsurface extent.

  8. Modeling nitrate at domestic and public-supply well depths in the Central Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Bernard T.; Gronberg, JoAnn M.; Faunt, Claudia C.; Eberts, Sandra M.; Belitz, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Aquifer vulnerability models were developed to map groundwater nitrate concentration at domestic and public-supply well depths in the Central Valley, California. We compared three modeling methods for ability to predict nitrate concentration >4 mg/L: logistic regression (LR), random forest classification (RFC), and random forest regression (RFR). All three models indicated processes of nitrogen fertilizer input at the land surface, transmission through coarse-textured, well-drained soils, and transport in the aquifer to the well screen. The total percent correct predictions were similar among the three models (69–82%), but RFR had greater sensitivity (84% for shallow wells and 51% for deep wells). The results suggest that RFR can better identify areas with high nitrate concentration but that LR and RFC may better describe bulk conditions in the aquifer. A unique aspect of the modeling approach was inclusion of outputs from previous, physically based hydrologic and textural models as predictor variables, which were important to the models. Vertical water fluxes in the aquifer and percent coarse material above the well screen were ranked moderately high-to-high in the RFR models, and the average vertical water flux during the irrigation season was highly significant (p < 0.0001) in logistic regression.

  9. Data for ground-water test hole near Zamora, Central Valley Aquifer Project, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, J.J.; Page, R.W.; Bertoldi, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary data are presented for the first of seven test holes drilled as a part of the Central Valley Aquifer Project which is part of the National Regional Aquifer Systems Analysis Program. The test hole was drilled in the SW 1/4 SE 1/4 sec. 34, T. 12 N. , R. 1 E., Yolo County, California, about 3 miles northeast of the town of Zamora. Drilled to a depth of 2,500 feet below land surface, the hole is cased to a depth of 190 feet and equipped with three piezometer tubes to depths of 947, 1,401, and 2,125 feet. A 5-foot well screen is at the bottom of each piezometer. Eighteen cores and 68 sidewall cores were recovered. Laboratory tests were made for mineralogy, hydraulic conductivity, porosity , consolidation, grain-size distribution, Atterberg limits, X-ray diffraction, diatom identification, thermal conductivity, and chemical analysis of water. Geophysical and thermal gradient logs were made. The hole is sampled periodically for chemical analysis and measured for water level in the three tapped zones. This report presents methods used to obtain field samples, laboratory procedures, and the data obtained. (USGS)

  10. Neogene folding and faulting in southern Monterey Bay, Central California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner-Taggart, J. M.; Greene, H. Gary; Ledbetter, M.T.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the Neogene structural history of southern Monterey Bay by mapping and correlating the shallow tectonic structures with previously identified deeper occurring structures. Side scan sonographs and Uniboom seismic reflection profiles collected in the region suggest that deformation associated with both compressional and transcurrent movement is occurring. Strike-slip movement between the North American and Pacific plates started as subduction ceased 21 Ma, creating the San Andreas fault system. Clockwise rotation of the Pacific plate occurred between 3.4 and 3.9 Ma causing orthogonal convergence between the two plates. This plate rotation is responsible for compressional Neogene structures along the central California coast. Structures exhibit transpressional tectonic characteristics such as thrust faulting, reverse faulting and asymmetrical folding. Folding and faulting are confined to middle Miocene and younger strata. Shallow Mesozoic granitic basement rocks either crop out or lie near the surface in most of the region and form a possible de??collement along which the Miocene Monterey Formation has decoupled and been folded. Over 50% of the shallow faults strike normal (NE-SW) to the previously identified faults. Wrench fault tectonics complicated by compression, gradual uplift of the basement rocks, and a change in plate convergence direction are responsible for the observed structures in southern Monterey Bay. ?? 1993.

  11. Air Pollution and Watershed Research in the Central Sierra Nevada of California: Nitrogen and Ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Hunsaker

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining healthy forests is the major objective for the Forest Service scientists and managers working for the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Air pollution, specifically ozone (O3 and nitrogenous (N air pollutants, may severely affect the health of forest ecosystems in the western U.S. Thus, the monitoring of air pollution concentration and deposition levels, as well as studies focused on understanding effects mechanisms, are essential for evaluation of risks associated with their presence. Such information is essential for development of proper management strategies for maintaining clean air, clean water, and healthy ecosystems on land managed by the Forest Service. We report on two years of research in the central Sierra Nevada of California, a semi-arid forest at elevations of 1100–2700 m. Information on O3 and N air pollutants is obtained from a network of 18 passive samplers. We relate the atmospheric N concentration to N concentrations in streams, shallow soil water, and bulk deposition collectors within the Kings River Experimental Watershed. This watershed also contains an intensive site that is part of a recent Forest Service effort to calculate critical loads for N, sulfur, and acidity to forest ecosystems. The passive sampler design allows for extensive spatial measurements while the watershed experiment provides intensive spatial data for future analysis of ecosystem processes.

  12. Surveillance for zoonotic and selected pathogens in harbor seals Phoca vitulina from central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, Denise J.; Ip, Hon S.; Gulland, Frances M. D.; Miller, Woutrina A.; Conrad, Patricia A.; Field, Cara L.; Fleetwood, Michelle; Harvey, James T.; Jang, Spencer; Packham, Andrea; Wheeler, Elizabeth; Hall, Ailsa J.

    2014-01-01

    The infection status of harbor seals Phoca vitulina in central California, USA, was evaluated through broad surveillance for pathogens in stranded and wild-caught animals from 2001 to 2008, with most samples collected in 2007 and 2008. Stranded animals from Mendocino County to San Luis Obispo County were sampled at a rehabilitation facility: The Marine Mammal Center (TMMC, n = 175); wild-caught animals were sampled at 2 locations: San Francisco Bay (SF, n = 78) and Tomales Bay (TB, n = 97), that differed in degree of urbanization. Low prevalences of Salmonella, Campylobacter, Giardia, and Cryptosporidium were detected in the feces of stranded and wild-caught seals. Clostridium perfringens and Escherichia coli were more prevalent in the feces of stranded (58% [78 out of 135] and 76% [102 out of 135]) than wild-caught (42% [45 out of 106] and 66% [68 out of 106]) seals, whereas Vibrio spp. were 16 times more likely to be cultured from the feces of seals from SF than TB or TMMC (p virus, although a single low titer to canine distemper virus was detected. These results highlight the role of harbor seals as sentinel species for zoonotic and terrestrial pathogens in the marine environment.

  13. Comparison of Two Parametric Methods to Estimate Pesticide Mass Loads in California's Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, D.K.; Lorenz, D.L.; Domagalski, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    Mass loadings were calculated for four pesticides in two watersheds with different land uses in the Central Valley, California, by using two parametric models: (1) the Seasonal Wave model (SeaWave), in which a pulse signal is used to describe the annual cycle of pesticide occurrence in a stream, and (2) the Sine Wave model, in which first-order Fourier series sine and cosine terms are used to simulate seasonal mass loading patterns. The models were applied to data collected during water years 1997 through 2005. The pesticides modeled were carbaryl, diazinon, metolachlor, and molinate. Results from the two models show that the ability to capture seasonal variations in pesticide concentrations was affected by pesticide use patterns and the methods by which pesticides are transported to streams. Estimated seasonal loads compared well with results from previous studies for both models. Loads estimated by the two models did not differ significantly from each other, with the exceptions of carbaryl and molinate during the precipitation season, where loads were affected by application patterns and rainfall. However, in watersheds with variable and intermittent pesticide applications, the SeaWave model is more suitable for use on the basis of its robust capability of describing seasonal variation of pesticide concentrations. ?? 2010 American Water Resources Association. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  14. Zeolites in the Miocene Briones Sandstone and related formations of the central Coast Ranges, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, K.J.; Whiteley, Karen R.

    1973-01-01

    Authigenic zeolites present in the generally tuffaceous Miocene Briones Sandstone and related formations of the central Coast Ranges of California indicate three stages of diagenetic history: (1) Initial alteration of pyroclastic materials to clinoptilolite (and montmorillonite) that is widely distributed in small amounts throughout the region. (2) Subsequent crystallization of heulandite followed by stilbite in fractures at a few places. (3) Widespread development of laumontite in only the southern part of the region, where the sandstone appears to have been downfolded and faulted to greater depths than elsewhere. Laumontite occurs both as pervasive cement of sandstone and as filling of fractures, and was produced through the reaction of interstitial solutions with other zeolites and with such major constituents of the sandstone as plagioclase, montmorillonite, and calcite at temperatures of 100° C or higher. Mordenite was found at only one locality, closely associated with clinoptilolite and opal. Analcite occurs in diverse settings, and its relation to the other zeolites is obscure.  Sparry calcite and coexisting stilbite, laumontite, or analcite in veins seem to make up nonequilibrium assemblages.

  15. Resource scarcity drives lethal aggression among prehistoric hunter-gatherers in central California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Mark W; Bettinger, Robert Lawrence; Codding, Brian F; Jones, Terry L; Schwitalla, Al W

    2016-10-25

    The origin of human violence and warfare is controversial, and some scholars contend that intergroup conflict was rare until the emergence of sedentary foraging and complex sociopolitical organization, whereas others assert that violence was common and of considerable antiquity among small-scale societies. Here we consider two alternative explanations for the evolution of human violence: (i) individuals resort to violence when benefits outweigh potential costs, which is likely in resource poor environments, or (ii) participation in violence increases when there is coercion from leaders in complex societies leading to group level benefits. To test these hypotheses, we evaluate the relative importance of resource scarcity vs. sociopolitical complexity by evaluating spatial variation in three macro datasets from central California: (i) an extensive bioarchaeological record dating from 1,530 to 230 cal BP recording rates of blunt and sharp force skeletal trauma on thousands of burials, (ii) quantitative scores of sociopolitical complexity recorded ethnographically, and (iii) mean net primary productivity (NPP) from a remotely sensed global dataset. Results reveal that sharp force trauma, the most common form of violence in the record, is better predicted by resource scarcity than relative sociopolitical complexity. Blunt force cranial trauma shows no correlation with NPP or political complexity and may reflect a different form of close contact violence. This study provides no support for the position that violence originated with the development of more complex hunter-gatherer adaptations in the fairly recent past. Instead, findings show that individuals are prone to violence in times and places of resource scarcity.

  16. A long-lived Late Cretaceous-early Eocene extensional province in Anatolia? Structural evidence from the Ivriz Detachment, southern central Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürer, Derya; Plunder, Alexis; Kirst, Frederik; Corfu, Fernando; Schmid, Stefan M.; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.

    2018-01-01

    Central Anatolia exposes previously buried and metamorphosed, continent-derived rocks - the Kırşehir and Afyon zones - now covering an area of ∼300 × 400 km. So far, the exhumation history of these rocks has been poorly constrained. We show for the first time that the major, >120 km long, top-NE 'Ivriz' Detachment controlled the exhumation of the HP/LT metamorphic Afyon Zone in southern Central Anatolia. We date its activity at between the latest Cretaceous and early Eocene times. Combined with previously documented isolated extensional detachments found in the Kırşehir Block, our results suggest that a major province governed by extensional exhumation was active throughout Central Anatolia between ∼80 and ∼48 Ma. Although similar in dimension to the Aegean extensional province to the east, the Central Anatolian extensional province is considerably older and was controlled by a different extension direction. From this, we infer that the African slab(s) that subducted below Anatolia must have rolled back relative to the Aegean slab since at least the latest Cretaceous, suggesting that these regions were underlain by a segmented slab. Whether or not these early segments already corresponded to the modern Aegean, Antalya, and Cyprus slab segments remains open for debate, but slab segmentation must have occurred much earlier than previously thought.

  17. Miocene to present deformation rates in the Yakima Fold Province and implications for earthquake hazards in central Washington State, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staisch, Lydia; Sherrod, Brian; Kelsey, Harvey; Blakely, Richard; Möller, Andreas; Styron, Richard

    2017-04-01

    The Yakima fold province (YFP), located in the Cascadia backarc of central Washington, is a region of active distributed deformation that accommodates NNE-SSW shortening. Geodetic data show modern strain accumulation of 2 mm/yr across this large-scale fold province. Deformation rates on individual structures, however, are difficult to assess from GPS data given low strain rates and the relatively short time period of geodetic observation. Geomorphic and geologic records, on the other hand, span sufficient time to investigate deformation rates on the folds. Resolving fault geometries and slip rates of the YFP is imperative to seismic hazard assessment for nearby infrastructure, including a large nuclear waste facility and hydroelectric dams along the Columbia and Yakima Rivers. We present new results on the timing and magnitude of deformation across several Yakima folds, including the Manastash Ridge, Umtanum Ridge, and Saddle Mountains anticlines. We constructed several line-balanced cross sections across the folds to calculated the magnitude of total shortening since Miocene time. To further constrain our structural models, we include forward-modeling of magnetic and gravity anomaly data. We estimate total shortening between 1.0 and 2.4 km across individual folds, decreasing eastward, consistent with geodetically and geologically measured clockwise rotation. Importantly, we find that thrust faults reactivate and invert normal faults in the basement, and do not appear to sole into a common décollement at shallow to mid-crustal depth. We constrain spatial and temporal variability in deformation rates along the Saddle Mountains, Manastash Ridge and Umtanum Ridge anticlines using geomorphic and stratigraphic markers of topographic evolution. From stratigraphy and geochronology of growth strata along the Saddle Mountains we find that the rate of deformation has increased up to six-fold since late Miocene time. To constrain deformation rates along other Yakima folds

  18. Timing and duration of the Central Atlantic magmatic province in the Newark and Culpeper basins, eastern U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzoli, Andrea; Jourdan, Fred; Puffer, John H.; Cuppone, Tiberio; Tanner, Lawrence H.; Weems, Robert E.; Bertrand, Hervé; Cirilli, Simonetta; Bellieni, Giuliano; De Min, Angelo

    2011-03-01

    New major and trace element data and 40Ar/ 39Ar plateau ages constrain the timing, duration and time-related geochemical evolution of the Central Atlantic magmatic province in the U.S.A. (Newark and Culpeper basins) and refine correlations with basaltic lava flows from other Late Triassic-Early Jurassic circum-Atlantic basins. The precise, statistically robust 40Ar/ 39Ar plateau ages were obtained on biotite and on fresh plagioclase and calculated using the latest 40K decay constants. These ages are supported by a general consistency of the Ca/K calculated from 37Ar/ 39Ar of the plateau steps and the Ca/K obtained by detailed electron microprobe analyses on plagioclase phenocrysts. The ages of five analyzed basalt lava flows, from all three lava flow units in the Newark basins, and the ages of two sill samples are indistinguishable, indicating a brief magmatic peak phase at 201.8 ± 0.7 Ma. Recalibrated 40Ar/ 39Ar plateau ages from the entire province indicate a near-synchronous onset and peak volcanic activity at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary within the circum-Atlantic basins from the U.S.A., Canada and Morocco. The early erupted magmas (Moroccan Lower to Upper basalts, the Fundy basin North Mountain Basalt, and Orange Mountain and equivalent U.S.A. flows) yield an enriched geochemical signature (e.g., with relatively high La/Yb), whereas late magmas in the U.S.A. (Hook Mountain and Hampden basalts) and Morocco (Recurrent basalt) yield relatively depleted geochemical compositions (low La/Yb). A slight, but significant age difference for eruption of Hook Mountain and Hampden basalts (200.3 ± 0.9 Ma) and Recurrent basalts (198.2 ± 1.1 Ma) is interpreted as evidence of a diachronous northward rift-drift transition during break-up of Pangea. Our data indicate also a prolonged intrusive sequence that continued until about 195 Ma at the Palisades sill and is consistent with sporadic late CAMP magmatism for dykes from the south-eastern U.S.A. and for intrusions from

  19. 76 FR 56905 - The Central Valley Project, the California-Oregon Transmission Project, the Pacific Alternating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Thomas R. Boyko, Regional Manager, Sierra Nevada Customer Service Region, Western... Cooperative, California; Power and Water Resources Pooling Authority (representing the Arvin-Edison Water...

  20. Groundwater resources of the aquifers of the northern Central African Republic (Ouham Province). First hydrogeological investigations in a changing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djebebe-Ndjiguim, Chantal; Foto, Eric; Backo, Salé; Nguerekossi, Bruno; Zoudamba, Narcisse; Basse-Keke, Eric; Allahdin, Oscar; Huneau, Frédéric; Garel, Emilie; Celle-Jeanton, Hélène; Mabingui, Joseph

    2017-04-01

    Groundwater is a key factor in the socio-economic development of African societies. This is particularly true for the Lake Chad Basin countries for which groundwater is the main water resource for both drinking water supply for population and agriculture, whether small or large scale. The Central African Republic (CAR) occupies a strategic place in the Lake Chad Basin since most waters feeding the different tributaries of the Chari River, which is the main water source of the Lake Chad, are originating from its territory. Indeed, the Northern CAR and particularly the Ouham Province, at the head of the whole Chad endoreic watershed, benefits from favourable rainfall conditions. Unfortunately, very little hydrological and hydrogeological information is available for this area which has never been investigated in terms of geochemical and isotope characterisation. The only available spares technical and scientific investigations over the area are dating from the 1960's. Unfortunately the Lake Chad basin has undergone strong climatological evolutions since the 1970's and hydrological information needs to be updated. The objectives of this study are to characterise groundwater from the Ouham Province in order to better appreciate the hydrogeological processes taking place in the recharge area of the Southern Lake Chad Basin. Isotope hydrology combined with geochemistry of groundwater has now proven being the best approach in under-documented territories to have a first diagnostic on the dynamics and quality of available resources. In this purpose combined hydrogeochemical and isotopic investigations (18O, 2H and 3H of the water molecule) have been launched to constrain groundwater origin, recharge processes, quality, residence time and anthropogenic fingerprint on aquifers. After two sampling campaigns it was possible to draw a general pattern of the hydrogeological and hydrochemical conditions in the region. The Ouham province is mostly composed of Precambrian

  1. Prediction and visualization of redox conditions in the groundwater of Central Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosecrans, Celia Z.; Nolan, Bernard T.; Gronberg, JoAnn M.

    2017-03-01

    Regional-scale, three-dimensional continuous probability models, were constructed for aspects of redox conditions in the groundwater system of the Central Valley, California. These models yield grids depicting the probability that groundwater in a particular location will have dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations less than selected threshold values representing anoxic groundwater conditions, or will have dissolved manganese (Mn) concentrations greater than selected threshold values representing secondary drinking water-quality contaminant levels (SMCL) and health-based screening levels (HBSL). The probability models were constrained by the alluvial boundary of the Central Valley to a depth of approximately 300 m. Probability distribution grids can be extracted from the 3-D models at any desired depth, and are of interest to water-resource managers, water-quality researchers, and groundwater modelers concerned with the occurrence of natural and anthropogenic contaminants related to anoxic conditions. Models were constructed using a Boosted Regression Trees (BRT) machine learning technique that produces many trees as part of an additive model and has the ability to handle many variables, automatically incorporate interactions, and is resistant to collinearity. Machine learning methods for statistical prediction are becoming increasing popular in that they do not require assumptions associated with traditional hypothesis testing. Models were constructed using measured dissolved oxygen and manganese concentrations sampled from 2767 wells within the alluvial boundary of the Central Valley, and over 60 explanatory variables representing regional-scale soil properties, soil chemistry, land use, aquifer textures, and aquifer hydrologic properties. Models were trained on a USGS dataset of 932 wells, and evaluated on an independent hold-out dataset of 1835 wells from the California Division of Drinking Water. We used cross-validation to assess the predictive performance of

  2. Prediction and visualization of redox conditions in the groundwater of Central Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosecrans, Celia Z.; Nolan, Bernard T.; Gronberg, JoAnn M.

    2017-01-01

    Regional-scale, three-dimensional continuous probability models, were constructed for aspects of redox conditions in the groundwater system of the Central Valley, California. These models yield grids depicting the probability that groundwater in a particular location will have dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations less than selected threshold values representing anoxic groundwater conditions, or will have dissolved manganese (Mn) concentrations greater than selected threshold values representing secondary drinking water-quality contaminant levels (SMCL) and health-based screening levels (HBSL). The probability models were constrained by the alluvial boundary of the Central Valley to a depth of approximately 300 m. Probability distribution grids can be extracted from the 3-D models at any desired depth, and are of interest to water-resource managers, water-quality researchers, and groundwater modelers concerned with the occurrence of natural and anthropogenic contaminants related to anoxic conditions.Models were constructed using a Boosted Regression Trees (BRT) machine learning technique that produces many trees as part of an additive model and has the ability to handle many variables, automatically incorporate interactions, and is resistant to collinearity. Machine learning methods for statistical prediction are becoming increasing popular in that they do not require assumptions associated with traditional hypothesis testing. Models were constructed using measured dissolved oxygen and manganese concentrations sampled from 2767 wells within the alluvial boundary of the Central Valley, and over 60 explanatory variables representing regional-scale soil properties, soil chemistry, land use, aquifer textures, and aquifer hydrologic properties. Models were trained on a USGS dataset of 932 wells, and evaluated on an independent hold-out dataset of 1835 wells from the California Division of Drinking Water. We used cross-validation to assess the predictive performance of

  3. Spectro-microscopic measurements of carbonaceous aerosol aging in Central California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Moffet

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbonaceous aerosols are responsible for large uncertainties in climate models, degraded visibility, and adverse health effects. The Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES was designed to study carbonaceous aerosols in the natural environment of the Central Valley, California, and learn more about their atmospheric formation and aging. This paper presents results from spectro-microscopic measurements of carbonaceous particles collected during CARES at the time of a pollution accumulation event (27–29 June 2010, when in situ measurements indicated an increase in the organic carbon content of aerosols as the Sacramento urban plume aged. Computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive X-ray detector (CCSEM/EDX and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled with near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS were used to probe the chemical composition and morphology of individual particles. It was found that the mass of organic carbon on individual particles increased through condensation of secondary organic aerosol. STXM/NEXAFS indicated that the number fraction of homogenous organic particles lacking inorganic inclusions (greater than ~50 nm equivalent circular diameter increased with plume age, as did the organic mass per particle. Comparison of the CARES spectro-microscopic dataset with a similar dataset obtained in Mexico City during the MILAGRO campaign showed that fresh particles in Mexico City contained three times as much carbon as those sampled during CARES. The number fraction of soot particles at the Mexico City urban site (ranging from 16.6 to 47.3% was larger than at the CARES urban site (13.4–15.7%, and the most aged samples from CARES contained fewer carbon–carbon double bonds. Differences between carbonaceous particles in Mexico City and California result from different sources, photochemical conditions, gas phase reactants, and secondary organic aerosol

  4. Mortalities of kelp-forest fishes associated with large oceanic waves off central California, 1982-1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodkin, James L.; VanBlaricom, Glenn R.; Jameson, Ronald J.

    1987-01-01

    Observations of three incidents of the mass mortality of nearshore fishes are reported; each corresponded to periods of high-amplitude, long-period swells during the 1982-1983 El Niño event along the coast of central California. Members of the nearshore kelp forest fish assemblage, primarily of the genus Sebastes, accounted for 96% of the observed mortalities and S. mystinus (blue rockfish) alone accounted for 72%.

  5. Deep-seated landslides and seismic triggering along major transcurrent faults in central Asia and California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, Derek; Korjenkov, Andrey; Bobrovskii, Alexander; Mamyrov, Ernes

    2010-05-01

    The Tien Shan mountains of central Asia, the northernmost expression of India-Eurasia collision, are characterised by active deformation (GPS measured contraction rates of ~20 mm a-1), rapid uplift and steep slopes prone to landsliding. In addition to seismogenic structures associated with contraction, the mountain belt is bisected by the Talas-Fergana fault, a poorly-known, historically aseismic, 700-km-long dextral strike-slip structure displaying active faulting and landslide features similar to those along the San Andreas fault in the Transverse Ranges of southern California. In both cases uplift along fault traces making up the fault zones has produced a deep central trough occupied by landslide and reworked landslide deposits, bordered by mountain ridges dominated by high to medium grade metamorphic bedrock and acting as landslide source areas. Moreover, palaeoseismic evidence suggests both fault zones may be regarded as seismic gaps characterised by relatively infrequent large-magnitude earthquakes. The numerous deep-seated landslides along both fault zones record a long history of landsliding based on: 1) radiocarbon dating; 2) sequences of lacustrine deposits containing apparent seismites and formed in landslide-dammed lakes now breached and drained; 3) recorded offsets and entrenchment of drainage features and deposits, associated with a characteristic cycle of fluvial reworking of landslide masses; 4) perched gravels preserved high on central trough walls and interpreted as related to reworking of landslide deposits; 5) degree of erosional and depositional degradation, including a time-series of landslide mass - lacustrine deposit assemblages. Together, these features suggest a landslide history characterised by large-volume failures, a pattern thought to mirror that of seismic strain release along these apparently locked fault systems. It seems likely that deep-seated landslides are effectively only triggered by major faulting events in these settings

  6. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) pollination in California's Central Valley is limited by native bee nest site location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardiñas, Hillary S; Tom, Kathleen; Ponisio, Lauren Catherine; Rominger, Andrew; Kremen, Claire

    2016-03-01

    The delivery of ecosystem services by mobile organisms depends on the distribution of those organisms, which is, in turn, affected by resources at local and landscape scales. Pollinator-dependent crops rely on mobile animals like bees for crop production, and the spatial relationship between floral resources and nest location for these central-place foragers influences the delivery of pollination services. Current models that map pollination coverage in agricultural regions utilize landscape-level estimates of floral availability and nesting incidence inferred from expert opinion, rather than direct assessments. Foraging distance is often derived from proxies of bee body size, rather than direct measurements of foraging that account for behavioral responses to floral resource type and distribution. The lack of direct measurements of nesting incidence and foraging distances may lead to inaccurate mapping of pollination services. We examined the role of local-scale floral resource presence from hedgerow plantings on nest incidence of ground-nesting bees in field margins and within monoculture, conventionally managed sunflower fields in California's Central Valley. We tracked bee movement into fields using fluorescent powder. We then used these data to simulate the distribution of pollination services within a crop field. Contrary to expert opinion, we found that ground-nesting native bees nested both in fields and edges, though nesting rates declined with distance into field. Further, we detected no effect of field-margin floral enhancements on nesting. We found evidence of an exponential decay rate of bee movement into fields, indicating that foraging predominantly occurred in less than 1% of medium-sized bees' predicted typical foraging range. Although we found native bees nesting within agricultural fields, their restricted foraging movements likely centralize pollination near nest sites. Our data thus predict a heterogeneous distribution of pollination services

  7. Geochemical conditions and the occurrence of selected trace elements in groundwater basins used for public drinking-water supply, Desert and Basin and Range hydrogeologic provinces, 2006-11: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michael T.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    The geochemical conditions, occurrence of selected trace elements, and processes controlling the occurrence of selected trace elements in groundwater were investigated in groundwater basins of the Desert and Basin and Range (DBR) hydrogeologic provinces in southeastern California as part of the Priority Basin Project (PBP) of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA PBP is designed to provide an assessment of the quality of untreated (raw) groundwater in the aquifer systems that are used for public drinking-water supply. The GAMA PBP is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  8. Fish communities of the Sacramento River Basin: Implications for conservation of native fishes in the Central Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, J.T.; Brown, L.R.

    2002-01-01

    The associations of resident fish communities with environmental variables and stream condition were evaluated at representative sites within the Sacramento River Basin, California between 1996 and 1998 using multivariate ordination techniques and by calculating six fish community metrics. In addition, the results of the current study were compared with recent studies in the San Joaquin River drainage to provide a wider perspective of the condition of resident fish communities in the Central Valley of California as a whole. Within the Sacramento drainage, species distributions were correlated with elevational and substrate size gradients; however, the elevation of a sampling site was correlated with a suite of water-quality and habitat variables that are indicative of land use effects on physiochemical stream parameters. Four fish community metrics - percentage of native fish, percentage of intolerant fish, number of tolerant species, and percentage of fish with external anomalies - were responsive to environmental quality. Comparisons between the current study and recent studies in the San Joaquin River drainage suggested that differences in water-management practices may have significant effects on native species fish community structure. Additionally, the results of the current study suggest that index of biotic integrity-type indices can be developed for the Sacramento River Basin and possibly the entire Central Valley, California. The protection of native fish communities in the Central Valley and other arid environments continues to be a conflict between human needs for water resources and the requirements of aquatic ecosystems; preservation of these ecosystems will require innovative management strategies.

  9. Fluoride in drinking water and diet: the causative factor of chronic kidney diseases in the North Central Province of Sri Lanka

    OpenAIRE

    Dharmaratne, Ranjith W.

    2015-01-01

    A significant number of people in the North Central Province of Sri Lanka suffer from chronic kidney diseases (CKD), and the author revisits existing literature related to CKD to find its causative factor. There is a direct connection between high fluoride levels in drinking water and kidney disease, and there are unhealthy levels of fluoride in the groundwater in Sri Lanka’s CKD-affected areas. Based on the following observations, the author believes with confidence that excess fluoride in d...

  10. Establishing a Eucalyptus energy plantation on the central coast of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman H. Pillsbury; Nelson L. Ayers

    1983-01-01

    A 17.5-acre non-irrigated biomass energy plantation has been established near San Luis Obispo. This joint California Polytechnic State University - California Department of Forestry project is measuring plot growth response of seven eucalyptus species for three spacing trials and for the effect of fertilization. All study plots are replicated. Site preparation strategy...

  11. The effect of marketing innovation, market orientation, and social capital on competitive advantage and marketing performance: A study in MSMEs of embroidery Central Java Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ag. Sunarno Handoyo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with marketing innovation, market orientation, and social capital in affecting the competitive advantage and marketing performance in Micro, Small, and Medium Enterprises (MSMEs of embroidery in Central Java Province. In this respect, this study tried to test and analyze the effect of marketing innovation, market orienta-tion, and social capital on competitive advantage and marketing performance in Micro, Small, and Medium Enterprises (MSMEs of embroidery in Central Java Province. The samples are 150 respondents as the owners of the embroidery business in Central Java Province. The technical analysis used is Structure Equations Modeling with AMOS Software version 22. The results show that: (1 marketing innovation has significant effect on competitive advantage; (2 market orientation has significant effect on competi-tive advantage; (3 social capital has significant effect on competitive advantage; (4 competitive advantage has significant effect on marketing performance; (5 marketing innovation has significant effect on marketing performance; (6 market orientation has significant effect on marketing performance; (7 social capital has no significant effect on marketing performance. The implication of this study is that the MSMEs of embroidery could improve marketing performance by increasing marketing innovation, market orientation, social capital and competitive advantage. This study also shows that competitive advantage is an intervening variable on marketing performance.

  12. A comparison of oceanic parameters during the oceanic period off the central coast of California from 01 November 1970 to 06 November 1970 (NODC Accession 7500259)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, temperature, and ocean circulation data were collected off the central coast of California using bottle casts. Data were collected and submitted by the...

  13. Economic and Policy Drivers of Agricultural Water Desalination in California's Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welle, P.; Medellin-Azuara, J.; Viers, J. H.; Mauter, M.

    2016-12-01

    Agriculture in arid regions is threatened by the twin stresses of soil salinity and uncertain water availability. Recently, water desalination has been a proposed solution for mitigating the effects of drought, soil salinization, and the ecological impacts of agricultural drainage. In this study, we combine data from earth observing systems with auxiliary information on prices, yields, and farmer behavior in order to create a decision framework which assesses the public and private costs and benefits of distributed desalination in the Central Valley (CV) of California. The use of remotely sensed crop classifiers allows us to resolve our analysis at the 30m pixel scale across the CV, a feature that allows us to characterize regional differences in technology effectiveness. We employ environmental and economic modeling to estimate the value of lower salinity irrigation water; the value of augmented water supply under present and future climate scenarios; and the human health, environmental, and climate change damages associated with generating power to desalinate water. We find that water desalination is only likely to be profitable in 4% of the CV during periods of severe drought, and that current costs would need to decrease by 70-90% for adoption to occur on the median acre. Fossil-fuel powered desalination technologies also generate air emissions that impose significant public costs in the form of human health and climate change damages, although these damages vary greatly depending on technology. The ecosystem service benefits of reduced agricultural drainage would need to be valued between 800 and 1200 per acre-foot, or nearly the full capital and operational costs of water desalination, for the net benefits of water desalination to be positive from a societal perspective.

  14. Operator Training and TEMS Support: A Survey of Unit Leaders in Northern and Central California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jason B; Galante, Joseph M; Sena, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Members of Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) teams routinely work in high-risk tactical situations. Awareness of the benefit of Tactical Emergency Medical Support (TEMS) is increasing but not uniformly emphasized. To characterize the current regional state of tactical medicine and identify potential barriers to more widespread implementation. A multiple-choice survey was administered to SWAT team leaders of 22 regional agencies in northern and central California. Questions focused on individual officer self-aid and buddy care training, the use and content of individual first aid kits (IFAKs), and the operational inclusion of a dedicated TEMS provider. Respondents included city police (54%), local county sheriff (36%), state law enforcement (5%), and federal law enforcement (5%). RESULTS showed that 100% of respondents thought it was ?Very Important? for SWAT officers to understand the basics of self-aid and buddy care and to carry an IFAK, while only 71% of respondents indicated that team members actually carried an IFAK. In addition, 67% indicated that tourniquets were part of the IFAK, and 91% of surveyed team leaders thought it was ?Very Important? for teams to have a trained medic available onsite at callouts or high-risk warrant searches. Also, 59% of teams used an organic TEMS element. The majority of SWAT team leaders recognize the benefit of basic Operator medical training and the importance of a TEMS program. Despite near 100% endorsement by unit-level leadership, a significant proportion of teams are lacking one of the key components including Operator IFAKs and/or tourniquets. Tactical team leaders, administrators, and providers should continue to promote adequate Operator training and equipment as well as formal TEMS support. 2013.

  15. Behavior of Repeating Earthquake Sequences in Central California and the Implications for Subsurface Fault Creep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Templeton, D C; Nadeau, R; Burgmann, R

    2007-07-09

    Repeating earthquakes (REs) are sequences of events that have nearly identical waveforms and are interpreted to represent fault asperities driven to failure by loading from aseismic creep on the surrounding fault surface at depth. We investigate the occurrence of these REs along faults in central California to determine which faults exhibit creep and the spatio-temporal distribution of this creep. At the juncture of the San Andreas and southern Calaveras-Paicines faults, both faults as well as a smaller secondary fault, the Quien Sabe fault, are observed to produce REs over the observation period of March 1984-May 2005. REs in this area reflect a heterogeneous creep distribution along the fault plane with significant variations in time. Cumulative slip over the observation period at individual sequence locations is determined to range from 5.5-58.2 cm on the San Andreas fault, 4.8-14.1 cm on the southern Calaveras-Paicines fault, and 4.9-24.8 cm on the Quien Sabe fault. Creep at depth appears to mimic the behaviors seen of creep on the surface in that evidence of steady slip, triggered slip, and episodic slip phenomena are also observed in the RE sequences. For comparison, we investigate the occurrence of REs west of the San Andreas fault within the southern Coast Range. Events within these RE sequences only occurred minutes to weeks apart from each other and then did not repeat again over the observation period, suggesting that REs in this area are not produced by steady aseismic creep of the surrounding fault surface.

  16. The ends of uncertainty: Air quality science and planning in Central California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fine, James [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2003-09-01

    Air quality planning in Central California is complicated and controversial despite millions of dollars invested to improve scientific understanding. This research describes and critiques the use of photochemical air quality simulation modeling studies in planning to attain standards for ground-level ozone in the San Francisco Bay Area and the San Joaquin Valley during the 1990's. Data are gathered through documents and interviews with planners, modelers, and policy-makers at public agencies and with representatives from the regulated and environmental communities. Interactions amongst organizations are diagramed to identify significant nodes of interaction. Dominant policy coalitions are described through narratives distinguished by their uses of and responses to uncertainty, their exposures to risks, and their responses to the principles of conservatism, civil duty, and caution. Policy narratives are delineated using aggregated respondent statements to describe and understand advocacy coalitions. I found that models impacted the planning process significantly, but were used not purely for their scientific capabilities. Modeling results provided justification for decisions based on other constraints and political considerations. Uncertainties were utilized opportunistically by stakeholders instead of managed explicitly. Ultimately, the process supported the partisan views of those in control of the modeling. Based on these findings, as well as a review of model uncertainty analysis capabilities, I recommend modifying the planning process to allow for the development and incorporation of uncertainty information, while addressing the need for inclusive and meaningful public participation. By documenting an actual air quality planning process these findings provide insights about the potential for using new scientific information and understanding to achieve environmental goals, most notably the analysis of uncertainties in modeling applications. Concurrently

  17. A statistical learning framework for groundwater nitrate models of the Central Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Bernard T.; Fienen, Michael N.; Lorenz, David L.

    2015-12-01

    We used a statistical learning framework to evaluate the ability of three machine-learning methods to predict nitrate concentration in shallow groundwater of the Central Valley, California: boosted regression trees (BRT), artificial neural networks (ANN), and Bayesian networks (BN). Machine learning methods can learn complex patterns in the data but because of overfitting may not generalize well to new data. The statistical learning framework involves cross-validation (CV) training and testing data and a separate hold-out data set for model evaluation, with the goal of optimizing predictive performance by controlling for model overfit. The order of prediction performance according to both CV testing R2 and that for the hold-out data set was BRT > BN > ANN. For each method we identified two models based on CV testing results: that with maximum testing R2 and a version with R2 within one standard error of the maximum (the 1SE model). The former yielded CV training R2 values of 0.94-1.0. Cross-validation testing R2 values indicate predictive performance, and these were 0.22-0.39 for the maximum R2 models and 0.19-0.36 for the 1SE models. Evaluation with hold-out data suggested that the 1SE BRT and ANN models predicted better for an independent data set compared with the maximum R2 versions, which is relevant to extrapolation by mapping. Scatterplots of predicted vs. observed hold-out data obtained for final models helped identify prediction bias, which was fairly pronounced for ANN and BN. Lastly, the models were compared with multiple linear regression (MLR) and a previous random forest regression (RFR) model. Whereas BRT results were comparable to RFR, MLR had low hold-out R2 (0.07) and explained less than half the variation in the training data. Spatial patterns of predictions by the final, 1SE BRT model agreed reasonably well with previously observed patterns of nitrate occurrence in groundwater of the Central Valley.

  18. Distribution, growth, and condition of salmonids in the central California Current Ecosystem.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Fisheries Ecology Division of NOAA’s SWFSC conducts annual surveys of salmon and their ocean habitat in the coastal waters of northern California and southern...

  19. Prediction of groundwater flowing well zone at An-Najif Province, central Iraq using evidential belief functions model and GIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abadi, Alaa M; Pradhan, Biswajeet; Shahid, Shamsuddin

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study is to delineate groundwater flowing well zone potential in An-Najif Province of Iraq in a data-driven evidential belief function model developed in a geographical information system (GIS) environment. An inventory map of 68 groundwater flowing wells was prepared through field survey. Seventy percent or 43 wells were used for training the evidential belief functions model and the reset 30 % or 19 wells were used for validation of the model. Seven groundwater conditioning factors mostly derived from RS were used, namely elevation, slope angle, curvature, topographic wetness index, stream power index, lithological units, and distance to the Euphrates River in this study. The relationship between training flowing well locations and the conditioning factors were investigated using evidential belief functions technique in a GIS environment. The integrated belief values were classified into five categories using natural break classification scheme to predict spatial zoning of groundwater flowing well, namely very low (0.17-0.34), low (0.34-0.46), moderate (0.46-0.58), high (0.58-0.80), and very high (0.80-0.99). The results show that very low and low zones cover 72 % (19,282 km(2)) of the study area mostly clustered in the central part, the moderate zone concentrated in the west part covers 13 % (3481 km(2)), and the high and very high zones extended over the northern part cover 15 % (3977 km(2)) of the study area. The vast spatial extension of very low and low zones indicates that groundwater flowing wells potential in the study area is low. The performance of the evidential belief functions spatial model was validated using the receiver operating characteristic curve. A success rate of 0.95 and a prediction rate of 0.94 were estimated from the area under relative operating characteristics curves, which indicate that the developed model has excellent capability to predict groundwater flowing well zones. The produced map of groundwater

  20. A New Endemic Focus of Chagas Disease in the Northern Region of Veraguas Province, Western Half Panama, Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldaña, Azael; Pineda, Vanessa; Martinez, Inri; Santamaria, Giovanna; Santamaria, Ana Maria; Miranda, Aracelis; Calzada, Jose E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Chagas disease was originally reported in Panama in 1931. Currently, the best knowledge of this zoonosis is restricted to studies done in historically endemic regions. However, little is known about the distribution and epidemiology of Chagas disease in other rural areas of the country. Methods and Findings A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out between May 2005 – July 2008 in four rural communities of the Santa Fe District, Veraguas Province. The study included an entomologic search to collect triatomines, bloodmeal type identification and infection rate with trypanosomes in collected vectors using a dot- blot and PCR analysis, genotyping of circulating Trypanosoma cruzi (mini-exon gene PCR analysis) and the detection of chagasic antibodies among inhabitants. The vector Rhodnius pallescens was more frequently found in La Culaca and El Pantano communities (788 specimens), where it was a sporadic household visitor. These triatomines presented darker coloration and larger sizescompared with typical specimens collected in Central Panama. Triatoma dimidiata was more common in Sabaneta de El Macho (162 specimens). In one small sub-region (El Macho), 60% of the houses were colonized by this vector. Of the examined R. pallescens, 54.7.0% (88/161) had fed on Didelphis marsupialis, and 24.6% (34/138) of T. dimidiata specimens collected inside houses were positive for human blood. R. pallescens presented an infection index with T. cruzi of 17.7% (24/136), with T. rangeli of 12.5% (17/136) and 50.7% (69/136) were mixed infections. In 117 T. dimidiata domestic specimens the infection index with T. cruzi was 21.4%. Lineage I of T. cruzi was confirmed circulating in these vectors. A T. cruzi infection seroprevalence of 2.3% (24/1,056) was found in this population. Conclusions This is the first report of Chagas disease endemicity in Santa Fe District, and it should be considered a neglected public health problem in this area of Panama. PMID:22558095

  1. Geochemical Features of Shale Hydrocarbons of the Central Part of Volga-Ural Oil and Gas Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosova, Fidania F.; Pronin, Nikita V.; Plotnikova, Irina N.; Nosova, Julia G.

    2014-05-01

    This report contains the results of the studies of shale hydrocarbons from carbonate-siliceous rocks on the territory of South-Tatar arch of Volga-Ural oil and gas province of the East European Platform. The assessment of the prospects of shale hydrocarbon in Tatarstan primarily involves finding of low permeable, poor-porous shale strata that would be rich in organic matter. Basing on the analysis of the geological structure of the sedimentary cover, we can distinguish three main objects that can be considered as promising targets for the study from the point of the possible presence of shale hydrocarbons: sedimentary deposits Riphean- Vendian; Domanicoid high-carbon rocks of Devonian time; sedimentary strata in central and side areas of Kama-Kinel deflection system. The main object of this study is Domanicoid high-carbon rocks of Devonian time. They are mainly represented by dark gray, almost black bituminous limestones that are interbedded with calcareous siliceous shales and cherts. Complex studies include the following: extraction of bitumen from the rock, determination of organic carbon content, determination of the group and elemental composition of the bitumen, gas chromatographic studies of the alkanoic lube fractions of bitumoid and oil, gas chromato-mass spectrometry of the naphthenic lube fractions of bitumoid and oil, pyrolysis studies of the rock using the Rock -Eval method (before and after extraction), study of trace-element composition of the rocks and petrologen, comparison in terms of adsorbed gas and studying of the composition of adsorbed gases. Group and elemental analyses showed that hydrocarbons scattered in the samples contain mainly resinous- and asphaltene components, the share lube fraction is smaller. The terms sediment genesis changed from weakly to strongly reducing. According to the results of gas chromatography, no biodegradation processes were observed. According to biomarker indicators in the samples studied there is some certain

  2. Volatile Compounds in Honey Produced in the Central Valley of Ñuble Province, Chile Compuestos Volatiles en Miel Producida en el Valle Central de la Provincia de Ñuble, Chile

    OpenAIRE

    María Pía Gianelli Barra; María Cristina Ponce-Díaz; César Venegas-Gallegos

    2010-01-01

    Headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) with an 85 µm Carboxen polydimethylsiloxane (CAR/PDMS) fiber was used to extract volatile compounds, and a gas chromatograph equipped with a mass spectometry detector (GC-MS) was used to identify the volatile compounds in honeys. Thirty-four different volatile compounds from the headspace of honey produced in the central valley of Ñuble Province, Chile, were extracted with fiber coating CAR/PDMS. The identified compounds were: 10 alcohols, 9 acids,...

  3. Ceramic crustulum with the representation of Nemesis-Diana from Viminatium: A contribution to the cult of goddess nemesis in roman provinces of Central Balkans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrilović Nadežda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of iconographic representation from ceramic medallion/cast for cakes (crustulum from Viminatium showed that we are dealing with a very rare type of iconographic representation of goddess Nemesis-Diana. The monuments with syncretistic presentation of goddess Nemesis-Diana are not only very rare, but they imply a very close connection of the goddess with imperial cult and with games and gladiator fights in amphitheatre. Overview and analysis of all so far known cult monuments of goddess Nemesis, opened a question about the correlation of goddess and presumed amphitheatre in Viminatium and also a question about new aspect of honouring Nemesis in the territory of Roman provinces of Central Balkans - as a patroness of agonistic competitions and protectress of gladiatorial games and gladiators. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 177007: Romanization, urbanization and transformation of urban centres of civil, military and residential character in Roman provinces on territory of Serbia

  4. Viability criteria for steelhead of the south-central and southern California coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughton, David A.; Adams, Peter B.; Anderson, Eric; Fusaro, Craig; Keller, Edward A.; Kelley, Elsie; Lentsch, Leo; Nielsen, Jennifer L.; Perry, Katie; Regan, Helen; Smith, Jerry; Swift, Camm C.; Thompson, Lisa; Watson, Fred

    2007-01-01

    Recovery planning for threatened and endangered steelhead requires measurable, objective criteria for determining an acceptably low risk of extinction. Here we propose viability criteria for two levels of biological organization: individual populations, and groups of populations within the SouthCentral/Southern California Coast Steelhead Recovery Planning Domain. For populations, we adapt criteria commonly used by the IUCN (The World Conservation Union) for identifying at-risk species. For groups of populations we implement a diversity-based “representation and redundancy rule,” in which diversity includes both life-history diversity and biogeographic groupings of populations. The resulting criteria have the potential for straightforward assessment of the risks posed by evolutionary, demographic, environmental, and catastrophic factors; and are designed to use data that are readily collected. However, our prescriptive approach led to one criterion whose threshold could not yet be specified due to inadequate data, and others in which the simplicity of the criteria may render them inefficient for populations with stable run sizes or stable life-history polymorphisms. Both of these problems could likely be solved by directed programs of research and monitoring aimed at developing more efficient (but equally risk-averse) “performance-based criteria.” Of particular utility would be data on the natural fluctuations of populations, research into the stabilizing influence of life-history polymorphisms, and research on the implications of drought, wildfires, and fluvial sediment regimes. Research on estuarine habitat could also yield useful information on the generality and reliability of its role as nursery habitat. Currently, risk assessment at the population level is not possible due to data deficiency, highlighting the need to implement a comprehensive effort to monitor run sizes, anadromous fractions, spawner densities and perhaps marine survival. Assessment at

  5. Population dynamics of dwarf mistletoe on young true firs in the central Sierra Nevada, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E Scharpf; J. R. Jr. Parmeter

    1982-01-01

    Young red firs (Abies magnifica A. Murr.) and white firs (A. concolor [Gord. & Glend.] Lindl. ex Hildebr.) on the Stanislaus National Forest, California, were inoculated with seeds of dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium abietinum) for 5 successive years. Only 3 to 4 percent of about 7000 seeds placed on branches...

  6. U.S. Geological Survey Stream Gages located in the Central Valley, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset contains the locations of, and links to USGS gages on the surface-water network for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM). The Central...

  7. Mediterranean California, Chapter 13

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.E. Fenn; E.B. Allen; L.H. Geiser

    2011-01-01

    The Mediterranean California ecoregion (CEC 1997; Fig 2.2) encompasses the greater Central Valley, Sierra foothills, and central coast ranges of California south to Mexico and is bounded by the Pacific Ocean, Sierra Nevada Mountains and Mojave Desert.

  8. Offset of latest pleistocene shoreface reveals slip rate on the Hosgri strike-slip fault, offshore central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Dartnell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Hosgri fault is the southern part of the regional Hosgri–San Gregorio dextral strike‐slip fault system, which extends primarily in the offshore for about 400 km in central California. Between Morro Bay and San Simeon, high‐resolution multibeam bathymetry reveals that the eastern strand of the Hosgri fault is crossed by an ∼265  m wide slope interpreted as the shoreface of a latest Pleistocene sand spit. This sand spit crossed an embayment and connected a western fault‐bounded bedrock peninsula and an eastern bedrock highland, a paleogeography resembling modern coastal geomorphology along the San Andreas fault. Detailed analysis of the relict shoreface with slope profiles and slope maps indicates a lateral slip rate of 2.6±0.9  mm/yr, considered a minimum rate for the Hosgri given the presence of an active western strand. This slip rate indicates that the Hosgri system takes up the largest share of the strike‐slip fault budget and is the most active strike‐slip fault west of the San Andreas fault in central California. This result further demonstrates the value and potential of high‐resolution bathymetry in characterization of active offshore faults.

  9. Remote sensing exploration for metallic mineral resources in central Baja California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, R. N.

    1977-01-01

    Remote sensor data (primarily LANDSAT) was analyzed by photogeologic and computer-assisted enhancement techniques to evaluate the metallic mineral potential of Baja California. Overlays were prepared at 1:1,000,000 and 1:500,000 and included known geologic relationships and mineral occurrences, lineament, drainage and structural patterns, tonal anomalies, and enhancement results. Computer-assisted enhancement and classification of the test sites was performed using the IMAGE 100 system to identify subtle tonal anomalies thought related to mineralization using known sites as analysis guides. Mineral potential maps of Baja California were generated from these analyses and the ten highest priority targets visited. Preliminary assay results (atomic absorption analysis) for the samples recovered showed moderate to high geochemical anomalies for Copper (10 of 12 samples), Zinc (3 of 12 samples) and Lead (4 of 12 samples).

  10. Using seabird habitat modeling to inform marine spatial planning in central California's National Marine Sanctuaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Jennifer; Hines, Ellen; Elliott, Meredith; Howar, Julie; Dransfield, Andrea; Nur, Nadav; Jahncke, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Understanding seabird habitat preferences is critical to future wildlife conservation and threat mitigation in California. The objective of this study was to investigate drivers of seabird habitat selection within the Gulf of the Farallones and Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuaries to identify areas for targeted conservation planning. We used seabird abundance data collected by the Applied California Current Ecosystem Studies Program (ACCESS) from 2004-2011. We used zero-inflated negative binomial regression to model species abundance and distribution as a function of near surface ocean water properties, distances to geographic features and oceanographic climate indices to identify patterns in foraging habitat selection. We evaluated seasonal, inter-annual and species-specific variability of at-sea distributions for the five most abundant seabirds nesting on the Farallon Islands: western gull (Larus occidentalis), common murre (Uria aalge), Cassin's auklet (Ptychorampus aleuticus), rhinoceros auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata) and Brandt's cormorant (Phalacrocorax penicillatus). The waters in the vicinity of Cordell Bank and the continental shelf east of the Farallon Islands emerged as persistent and highly selected foraging areas across all species. Further, we conducted a spatial prioritization exercise to optimize seabird conservation areas with and without considering impacts of current human activities. We explored three conservation scenarios where 10, 30 and 50 percent of highly selected, species-specific foraging areas would be conserved. We compared and contrasted results in relation to existing marine protected areas (MPAs) and the future alternative energy footprint identified by the California Ocean Uses Atlas. Our results show that the majority of highly selected seabird habitat lies outside of state MPAs where threats from shipping, oil spills, and offshore energy development remain. This analysis accentuates the need for innovative marine spatial

  11. Using seabird habitat modeling to inform marine spatial planning in central California's National Marine Sanctuaries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer McGowan

    Full Text Available Understanding seabird habitat preferences is critical to future wildlife conservation and threat mitigation in California. The objective of this study was to investigate drivers of seabird habitat selection within the Gulf of the Farallones and Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuaries to identify areas for targeted conservation planning. We used seabird abundance data collected by the Applied California Current Ecosystem Studies Program (ACCESS from 2004-2011. We used zero-inflated negative binomial regression to model species abundance and distribution as a function of near surface ocean water properties, distances to geographic features and oceanographic climate indices to identify patterns in foraging habitat selection. We evaluated seasonal, inter-annual and species-specific variability of at-sea distributions for the five most abundant seabirds nesting on the Farallon Islands: western gull (Larus occidentalis, common murre (Uria aalge, Cassin's auklet (Ptychorampus aleuticus, rhinoceros auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata and Brandt's cormorant (Phalacrocorax penicillatus. The waters in the vicinity of Cordell Bank and the continental shelf east of the Farallon Islands emerged as persistent and highly selected foraging areas across all species. Further, we conducted a spatial prioritization exercise to optimize seabird conservation areas with and without considering impacts of current human activities. We explored three conservation scenarios where 10, 30 and 50 percent of highly selected, species-specific foraging areas would be conserved. We compared and contrasted results in relation to existing marine protected areas (MPAs and the future alternative energy footprint identified by the California Ocean Uses Atlas. Our results show that the majority of highly selected seabird habitat lies outside of state MPAs where threats from shipping, oil spills, and offshore energy development remain. This analysis accentuates the need for innovative marine

  12. Mapping and characterization from aeromagnetic data of the Foum Zguid dolerite Dyke (Anti-Atlas, Morocco) a member of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouiflane, Mustapha; Manar, Ahmed; Medina, Fida; Youbi, Nasrrddine; Rimi, Abdelkrim

    2017-06-01

    A high-resolution aeromagnetic survey was carried out in the Anti- Atlas, Morocco covering the main areas traversed by the Great CAMP Foum Zguid dyke (FZD). This ;doleritic; dyke belongs to the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), a Large Igneous Province which is associated with the fragmentation of the supercontinent Pangaea and the initial stages of rifting of the Central Atlantic Ocean. It also coincides in time with the mass extinction of the Triassic - Jurassic boundary. Based on the study of geological maps and Google Earth satellite images, it appears that the FZD is poorly exposed and, often covered by Quaternary deposits. This work proposes aeromagnetic modelling and interpretation of the FZD in order to better constrain its structural extent. The data have allowed (i) mapping of the dyke over great distances, under the Quaternary deposits and through areas where it was poorly characterized on the geological map; (ii) identifying major tectonic lineaments interpreted as faults; (iii) recognizing magnetic anomalies related to mafic intrusive bodies; and (iv) informing about regional structural context.

  13. Environmental controls on spatial patterns in the long-term persistence of giant kelp in central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Mary Alida; Cavanaugh, Kyle C.; Bell, Tom W.; Raimondi, Peter T.; Edwards, Christopher A.; Drake, Patrick T.; Erikson, Li H.; Storlazzi, Curt

    2016-01-01

    As marine management is moving towards the practice of protecting static areas, it is 44 important to make sure protected areas capture and protect persistent populations. Rocky reefs in 45 many temperate areas worldwide serve as habitat for canopy forming macroalgae and these 46 structure forming species of kelps (order Laminariales) often serve as important habitat for a great 47 diversity of species. Macrocystis pyrifera is the most common canopy forming kelp species found 48 along the coast of California but the distribution and abundance of M. pyrifera varies in space and 49 time. The purpose of this study is to determine what environmental parameters are correlated with 50 the spatial and temporal persistence of M. pyrifera along the central coast of California and how 51 well those environmental parameters can be used to predict areas where M. pyrifera is more likely 52 to persist. Nine environmental variables considered in this study included depth of the seafloor, 53 structure of the rocky reef, proportion of rocky reef, size of kelp patch, biomass of kelp within a 54 patch, distance from the edge of a kelp patch, sea surface temperature, wave orbital velocities, and 55 population connectivity of individual kelp patches. Using a generalized linear mixed effects model 56 (GLMM), the persistence of M. pyrifera was significantly associated with seven of the nine 57 variables considered: depth, complexity of the rocky reef, proportion of rock, patch biomass, 58 distance from the edge of a patch, population connectivity, and wave-orbital velocities. These 59 seven environmental variables were then used to predict the persistence of kelp across the central 60 coast and these predictions were compared to a reserved dataset of M. pyrifera persistence, which 61 was not used in the creation of the GLMM. The environmental variables were shown to accurately 62 predict the persistence of M. pyrifera within the central coast of California (r = 0.71, P<0.001). 63 Because

  14. Mercury Concentration in the Tissue of Terrestrial Arthropods from the Central California Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, C.; Weiss-Penzias, P. S.; Flegal, A. R.

    2012-12-01

    The primary goal of this project was to obtain a baseline understanding and investigate the concentration of mercury (Hg) in the tissue of arthropods in coastal California. This region receives significant input of fog which may contain enhanced levels of Hg. Currently there is a lack of data on Hg concentration in the tissue of arthropods (Insecta, Malacostraca, and Arachnida). The sample collection sites were Elkhorn Slough Estuarine Reserve in Moss Landing, and the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) campus. Samples collected between February and March, 2012 had total Hg (HgT) concentrations in dry weight that ranged from 27 - 39 ng/g in the Jerusalem cricket (Orthoptera Stenopelmatidae); 80 - 110 ng/g in the camel cricket (Orthoptera Rhaphidophoridae); 21 - 219 ng/g in the ground beetle (Coleoptera Carabidae); 100 - 228 ng/g in the pill bug (Isopoda Armadillidiidae); and 285 - 423 ng/g in the wolf spider (Araneae Lycosidae). Monomethyl mercury (MMHg) concentrations in dry weight were determine to be 4.3 -28.2 ng/g for the ground beetle; 45.5 - 87.8 ng/g for the pill bug, and 252.3 - 293.7 ng/g for the wolf spider. Samples collected in July, 2012 had HgT concentrations in dry weight that ranged from 110 - 168 ng/g in the camel cricket; 337 - 562 ng/g in the ground beetle; 25 - 227 ng/g in the pill bug; and 228 - 501 ng/g in the wolf spider. The preliminary data revealed an 18% increase in the concentration of HgT for wolf spiders, and a 146% increase for ground beetles in the summer when compared to those concentrations measured in the spring. It is hypothesized that coastal fog may be a contributor to this increase of Hg concentration in coastal California arthropods.

  15. A sublittoral population of Pleurophycus gardneri Setchell and Saunders 1900 (Phaeophyceae: Laminariaceae) in central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBlaricom, Glenn R.; Reed, Daniel C.; Harrold, Christopher; Bodkin, James L.

    1986-01-01

    Published distributional records for the stipitate kelp Pleurophycus gardneri Setchell and Saunders 1900 (Phaeophyceae: Laminariaceae) indicae a geographic range from Montague Island (59°58’N, 147°22W), Alaska to Fort Bragg (39°27’N, 123°47’W), California (Druehl 1969, 1970; Kjeldsen 1972). P. gardneri is found primarily in rocky intertidal and shallow subtidal locations (Scagel 1967; Nicholson 1976). In California, populations of P. gardneri have been reported only from the lower rocky intertidal near Fort Bragg (Kjeldsen 1972).On 7 and 8 July 1982 and 23 March 1984 we censused stipitate kelps during SCUBS dives at a site 2.3 km south southeast of Pt. Sierra Nevada (35°41’ N, 121°18’W). we counted kelps in 1 x 5-m plots along a 50-m tape laid across the bottom in an arbitrarily predetermined direction from the skiff anchor. We also measured water depth at 1-m intervals along the tape, using a SCUBA depth gauge. On 20 August 1982, we used the same tehniques to sample kelp densities at a site 2.4 km east southeast of Pt. Piedras Blancas (35°39’N, 121°15’W).The most abundant kelps at the Pt. Sierra Nevada ste were Pterygophora californica Ruprect 1852 (Phaeophyceae: Alariaceae) and a species we tentatively identified as P. gardneri (Table 1). Based on specimens we collected on 8 July 1982, our field identification was subsequently confirmed by I. A. Abbot. Voucher specimens were placed in the Gilbert M. Smith Herbarium at Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, California.

  16. Genetic Variability of Two Leaffooted Bugs, Leptoglossus clypealis and Leptoglossus zonatus (Hemiptera: Coreidae) in the Central Valley of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, A L; Higbee, B S; Haviland, D R; Brailovsky, H

    2017-10-16

    Leaffooted plant bugs (LFPBs) (Leptoglossus spp., Guérin-Méneville) (Hemiptera: Coreidae) are large seed-feeding bugs native to the Western Hemisphere. In California, several Leptoglossus spp. feed on almonds, pistachios, and pomegranate and are occasional pests. The objective of this study was to survey the different species of Leptoglossus present in almond, pistachio, and pomegranate orchards in the Central Valley of California. We used two molecular markers, amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) and mitochondrial DNA COI, to determine the number of species or strains of each species, and to infer whether individuals of each species move and possibly interbreed with populations from the other host plants. Two species of leaffooted bugs were abundant, Leptoglossus clypealis Heidemann, and Leptoglossus zonatus (Dallas). L. clypealis was collected in almond and pistachio, while L. zonatus was found on all three host plants, but was the dominant species in pomegranate. The AFLP results indicated that L. clypealis consisted of one species, which suggests it moves between almonds and pistachios during the growing season. Mitochondrial DNA COI for L. clypealis found 1-2% divergence between sequences, and a high haplotype diversity of 0.979 with 17 haplotypes. The AFLP results for L. zonatus found two genetically divergent populations which were morphologically similar. The mtDNA COI sequences for L. zonatus were used for haplotype analysis; three haplotypes were found in California, with one haplotype shared with collections from Brazil. The importance of genetic variability and cryptic species for pest management are discussed. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  17. Strain Localisation at Rift Segment Boundaries: An Example from the Bocana Transfer Zone in Central Baja California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, C.; Gleadow, A. J.; Kohn, B. P.

    2012-12-01

    Rifts are commonly segmented into several hundred kilometre long zones of opposing upper-plate transport direction with boundaries defined by accommodation and transfer zones. A number of such rift segments have been recognized in the northern Gulf of California, a youthful oceanic basin that is currently undergoing the rift-drift transition. However, detailed field studies have so far failed to identify suitable structures that could accommodate the obvious deformation gradients between different rift segments, and the nature of strain transfer at segment boundaries remains enigmatic. The situation is even less clear in central and southern Baja California, where a number of rift segments have been hypothesized but it is unknown whether the intervening segment boundaries facilitate true reversals in the upper-plate transport direction, or whether they simply accommodate differences in the timing, style or magnitude of deformation. The Bocana transfer zone (BTZ) in central Baja California is a linear, WNW-ESE striking structural discontinuity separating two rift segments with different magnitudes and styles of extensional deformation. North of the BTZ, the Libertad fault is part of the Main Gulf Escarpment, which represents the breakaway fault that separates the Gulf of California rift to the east from the relatively stable western portion of the Baja peninsula. The N-striking Libertad escarpment developed during the Late Miocene (~10-8Ma) and exhibits a topographic relief of ca. 1,000m along a strike-length of ca. 50km. Finite displacement decreases from ~1000m in the central fault segment to ~500m further south, where the fault bends SE and merges with the BTZ. In the hanging wall of the Libertad fault, a series of W-tilted horsts are bound along their eastern margins by two moderate-displacement E-dipping normal faults. South of the BTZ, extension was much less than further north, which explains the comparatively subdued relief and generally shallower tilt of

  18. Tuberculosis case-finding and treatment in the central prison of Qazvin province, Islamic Republic of Iran/Depistage et traitement de la tuberculose a la prison centrale de la province de Qazvin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Assefzadeh, M; Barghi, R.Gh; Shahidi, Sh.S

    2009-01-01

    As a part of a comprehensive programme of tuberculosis (TB) control in the central prison in Qazvin, Islamic Republic of Iran, a programme of active case-finding was carried out from February 2004 to July 2005...

  19. Epidemiology of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis in a central Canadian province: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, C N; Blanchard, J F; Rawsthorne, P; Wajda, A

    1999-05-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy and utility of administrative health data in identifying persons with inflammatory bowel disease on a population basis and to determine the incidence and prevalence of this disease in the Canadian province of Manitoba. The data from Manitoba Health (the province's single insurer) were used to identify residents with physician and/or hospital contacts for Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, codes between 1984 and 1995. Of 5,182 eligible individuals, 4,514 were mailed questionnaires and 2,725 responded. Cases were defined as individuals with five or more separate medical contacts with one of these diagnoses or three or more such contacts if they were resident for less than 2 years. The accuracy of the study case definitions was high when compared with either self-report or chart review. The 1989-1994 age- and sex-adjusted annual incidence was 14.6/100,000 for Crohn's disease and 14.3/100,000 for ulcerative colitis. The prevalence of Crohn's disease in 1994 was 198.5/100,000, and that of ulcerative colitis was 169.7/100,000. In conclusion, the authors have successfully established and validated a population-based database of inflammatory bowel disease based on administrative data. The high incidence rates and dynamic epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease in Manitoba indicate the presence of important environmental risk factors, which warrants further investigation.

  20. Projected Impacts of Climate, Urbanization, Water Management, and Wetland Restoration on Waterbird Habitat in California's Central Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matchett, Elliott L; Fleskes, Joseph P

    2017-01-01

    The Central Valley of California is one of the most important regions for wintering waterbirds in North America despite extensive anthropogenic landscape modification and decline of historical wetlands there. Like many other mediterranean-climate ecosystems across the globe, the Central Valley has been subject to a burgeoning human population and expansion and intensification of agricultural and urban development that have impacted wildlife habitats. Future effects of urban development, changes in water supply management, and precipitation and air temperature related to global climate change on area of waterbird habitat in the Central Valley are uncertain, yet potentially substantial. Therefore, we modeled area of waterbird habitats for 17 climate, urbanization, water supply management, and wetland restoration scenarios for years 2006-2099 using a water resources and scenario modeling framework. Planned wetland restoration largely compensated for adverse effects of climate, urbanization, and water supply management changes on habitat areas through 2065, but fell short thereafter for all except one scenario. Projected habitat reductions due to climate models were more frequent and greater than under the recent historical climate and their magnitude increased through time. After 2065, area of waterbird habitat in all scenarios that included severe warmer, drier climate was projected to be >15% less than in the "existing" landscape most years. The greatest reduction in waterbird habitat occurred in scenarios that combined warmer, drier climate and plausible water supply management options affecting priority and delivery of water available for waterbird habitats. This scenario modeling addresses the complexity and uncertainties in the Central Valley landscape, use and management of related water supplies, and climate to inform waterbird habitat conservation and other resource management planning. Results indicate that increased wetland restoration and additional

  1. Projected Impacts of Climate, Urbanization, Water Management, and Wetland Restoration on Waterbird Habitat in California's Central Valley.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott L Matchett

    Full Text Available The Central Valley of California is one of the most important regions for wintering waterbirds in North America despite extensive anthropogenic landscape modification and decline of historical wetlands there. Like many other mediterranean-climate ecosystems across the globe, the Central Valley has been subject to a burgeoning human population and expansion and intensification of agricultural and urban development that have impacted wildlife habitats. Future effects of urban development, changes in water supply management, and precipitation and air temperature related to global climate change on area of waterbird habitat in the Central Valley are uncertain, yet potentially substantial. Therefore, we modeled area of waterbird habitats for 17 climate, urbanization, water supply management, and wetland restoration scenarios for years 2006-2099 using a water resources and scenario modeling framework. Planned wetland restoration largely compensated for adverse effects of climate, urbanization, and water supply management changes on habitat areas through 2065, but fell short thereafter for all except one scenario. Projected habitat reductions due to climate models were more frequent and greater than under the recent historical climate and their magnitude increased through time. After 2065, area of waterbird habitat in all scenarios that included severe warmer, drier climate was projected to be >15% less than in the "existing" landscape most years. The greatest reduction in waterbird habitat occurred in scenarios that combined warmer, drier climate and plausible water supply management options affecting priority and delivery of water available for waterbird habitats. This scenario modeling addresses the complexity and uncertainties in the Central Valley landscape, use and management of related water supplies, and climate to inform waterbird habitat conservation and other resource management planning. Results indicate that increased wetland restoration

  2. GOES-derived fog and low cloud indices for coastal north and central California ecological analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torregrosa, Alicia; Cindy Combs,; Peters, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Fog and low cloud cover (FLCC) changes the water, energy, and nutrient flux of coastal ecosystems. Easy-to-use FLCC data are needed to quantify the impacts of FLC on ecosystem dynamics during hot, dry Mediterranean climate summers. FLCC indices were generated from 26,000 hourly night and day FLCC maps derived from Geostationary Environmental Operational Satellite (GOES) data for June, July, August, and September, 1999- 2009 for coastal California, latitude 34.50°N, south of Monterey Bay, to latitude 41.95°N, north of Crescent City. Monthly FLCC average hours per day (h/d) range from juts into the prevailing NW winds and is lowest in the lee of major capes. FLCC advects furthest inland through low-lying NW ocean-facing valleys. At night hours of FLCC is higher more frequently on land than over the ocean. Interannual FLCC coefficient of variation shows long term geographic stability strongly associated with landform position. Contours delineating homogeneous zones of FLCC, derived from average decadal h/d FLCC, provide data to refine the commonly used term ‘fog belt.’ FLCC indices are available for download from the California Landscape Conservation Cooperative Climate Commons website. FLCC indices can be used to improve analyses of biogeographic and bioclimatic species distribution models, meteorological mechanisms driving FLCC patterns, ecohydrological investigations of evapotranspiration, solar energy feasibility studies, agricultural irrigation demand and viticultural ripening models.

  3. Architecture and evolution of an Early Permian carbonate complex on a tectonically active island in east-central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Calvin H.; Magginetti, Robert T.; Stone, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The newly named Upland Valley Limestone represents a carbonate complex that developed on and adjacent to a tectonically active island in east-central California during a brief interval of Early Permian (late Artinskian) time. This lithologically unique, relatively thin limestone unit lies within a thick sequence of predominantly siliciclastic rocks and is characterized by its high concentration of crinoidal debris, pronounced lateral changes in thickness and lithofacies, and a largely endemic fusulinid fauna. Most outcrops represent a carbonate platform and debris derived from it and shed downslope, but another group of outcrops represents one or possibly more isolated carbonate buildups that developed offshore from the platform. Tectonic activity in the area occurred before, probably during, and after deposition of this short-lived carbonate complex.

  4. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Central California: HYDRO (Hydrography Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing coastal hydrography used in the creation of the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) for Central...

  5. Modeling the consequences on late Triassic environment of intense pulse-like degassing during the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province using the GEOCLIM model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, G.; Donnadieu, Y.; Beaumont, V.; Fluteau, F.; Goddéris, Y.

    2012-06-01

    The Triassic-Jurassic boundary (TJB) is associated with one of the five largest mass extinctions of the Phanerozoic. A deep carbon cycle perturbation and a carbonate production crisis are observed during the late Triassic. The Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), one of the most important large igneous provinces of the Phanerozoic, emplaced at the TJB. To understand the carbon cycle perturbations observed at the TJB, we investigate the consequences of CO2 degassing associated to the CAMP emplacement on atmospheric and oceanic carbon cycle. The CO2 input within the atmosphere due to volcanism has been modeled using a global biogeochemical cycle box model (COMBINE) coupled with a climate model (FOAM). Weathering fluxes and CO2 equilibrium are constrained by the Rhaetian paleogeography and different scenarios of the CAMP emplacement are modeled. The study focuses (1) on the geological record and the carbonate productions crisis and (2) on the sedimentary carbon isotope record. For point (1), comparison of different modeling scenarios shows that a Gaussian CO2 emission distribution over the duration of the main activity phase of the CAMP fails in reproducing any of the geological observations, mainly the carbonate production crisis observed in the late Rhaetian sediments. Contrastingly, intense degassing peaks lead to successive decrease in carbonate production as observed in the geological record. For point (2), the perturbations of carbon cycle due to the degassing of CO2 with a mantellic carbon isotopic composition of -5‰ do not reproduce the intensity of the observed carbon isotope excursions. This was achieved in our model by assuming a mantellic carbon isotopic composition of -20‰. Even if this hypothesis requires further investigations, such low values may be associated to degassing of carbon from pools of light isotopic carbon located at the transition zone (Cartigny, 2010), possibly linked to setting of large igneous provinces (LIP's). Breakdown of

  6. Assessing the Viability of Sub-Surface Drip Irrigation for Resource-Efficient Alfalfa Production in Central and Southern California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Zaccaria

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In California, alfalfa is grown on a large area ranging between 325,000 and 410,000 hectares and ranks among the thirstiest crops. While the hay production industry is often scrutinized for the large usage of the state’s agricultural water, alfalfa is a crucial feed-supplier for the livestock and dairy sectors, which rank among the most profitable commodity groups in the state. Sub-surface drip irrigation (SDI, although only practiced on approximately 2% of the alfalfa production area in California, is claimed to have the potential to significantly increase hay yield (HY and water productivity (WP compared with surface irrigation (SI. In 2014–2016 we interviewed a number of growers pioneering SDI for alfalfa production in Central and Southern California who reported that yield improvements in the order of 10–30% and water saving of about 20–30% are achievable in SDI-irrigated fields compared with SI, according to their records and perceptions collected over few years of experience. Results from our research on SDI at the University of California, Davis, revealed significantly smaller yield gain (~5% and a slight increase of water use (~2–3% that are similar to findings from earlier research studies. We found that most of the interviewed alfalfa producers are generally satisfied with their SDI systems, yet face some challenges that call for additional research and educational efforts. Key limitations of SDI include high investment costs, use of energy to pressurize water, the need for more advanced irrigation management skills, and better understanding of soil-water dynamics by farm personnel. SDI-irrigated fields also need accurate water monitoring and control, attentive prevention and repair of rodent damages, and careful salinity management in the root zone. In this paper we attempt to evaluate the viability of the SDI technology for alfalfa production on the basis of preliminary results of our research and extension activities, with

  7. The Triassic-Liassic volcanic sequence and rift evolution in the Saharan Atlas basins (Algeria). Eastward vanishing of the Central Atlantic magmatic province

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meddah, A.; Bertrand, H.; Seddiki, A.; Tabeliouna, M.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the Triassic-Liassic sequence in ten diapirs from the Saharan Atlas (Algeria). Based on detailed mapping, two episodes are identified. The first one consists of a volcano-sedimentary sequence in which three volcanic units were identified (lower, intermediate and upper units). They are interlayered and sometimes imbricated with siliciclastic to evaporitic levels which record syn-sedimentary tectonics. This sequence was deposited in a lagoonal-continental environment and is assigned to the Triassic magmatic rifting stage. The second episode, lacking lava flows (post magmatic rifting stage), consists of carbonate levels deposited in a lagoonal to marine environment during the Rhaetian-Hettangian. The volcanic units consist of several thin basaltic flows, each 0.5 to 1m thick, with a total thickness of 10–15m. The basalts are low-Ti continental tholeiites, displaying enrichment in large ion lithophile elements and light rare earth elements [(La/Yb)n= 2.5-6] with a negative Nb anomaly. Upwards decrease of light-rare-earth-elements enrichment (e.g. La/Yb) is modelled through increasing melting rate of a spinel-bearing lherzolite source from the lower (6–10wt.%) to the upper (15–20wt.%) unit. The lava flows from the Saharan Atlas share the same geochemical characteristics and evolution as those from the Moroccan Atlas assigned to the Central Atlantic magmatic province. They represent the easternmost witness of this large igneous province so far known.

  8. Transformer oils as a potential source of environmental exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs): an assessment in three central provinces of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedi, Reza; Khakzad, Saeed; Koolivand, Ali; Dobaradaran, Sina; Khaloo, Shokooh Sadat; Jorfi, Sahand; Abtahi, Mehrnoosh

    2017-08-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination of oils from all transformers of the national electrical grid in Tehran, Qom, and Alborz, three central provinces of Iran, was assessed. The concentration of PCBs in transformer oils was determined by gas chromatography. At the national level, the proportions of transformers with oil PCB contents of 5000 ppm were determined to be 85.7, 12.4, 1.6, 0.1, and 0.1%, respectively. About 0.5% of transformer oils (66,000 kg out of 13,342,000 kg) exhibited PCB levels higher than 50 ppm that based on the Stockholm Convention should be phased out before 2025. The contaminated oils contained 91.4% of detected PCBs (132 kg PCBs out of 144 kg PCBs) and were located in 1.9% of transformers (27 transformers out of 1449 transformers). Statistical analysis indicated that the year of manufacture and manufacturing company provided significant effects on PCB contamination (p value transformer oils in Tehran was higher than that of the other provinces that could be mainly caused by the older average year of manufacture. PCB levels higher than 499 ppm were also observed only in Tehran. This study provided valuable information for future studies on identification of PCB-contaminated transformers as well as planning and design of waste management facilities for PCB-contaminated oils at the national level.

  9. IMPACT OF EXPORT HORTICULTURE FARMING ON PER CAPITA CALORIE INTAKE OF SMALLHOLDER FARMERS IN EASTERN AND CENTRAL PROVINCES IN KENYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Wambui Chege

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In attempting to achieve household food security for smallholder farmers, synergies and tradeoffs exist between cash cropping, food cropping and food security. Available evidence on the impact of cash cropping on food security shows mixed results. The objective of this paper was to assess the impact of export horticulture farming on food security of smallholder farmers in Kenya in two provinces in different agro-ecological zones with different resource and infrastructural endowments, crop growing and marketing conditions. This was done using propensity score matching. The results indicate a positive impact on food security in high potential area and a negative impact in the arid area that is already food deficit. Encouraging export horticulture or cash cropping, aiming at achieving household food security, may not be a one size fit all. Regional differences and particular growing and marketing conditions as well as intra household income distribution patterns play a role and should be considered.

  10. Variations in Element Levels Accumulated in Different Parts of Boletus edulis Collected from Central Yunnan Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Mei Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ICP-AES and microwave assisted digestion were applied to determine P, Mg, Ca, Zn, Na, Cu, Ba, Ni, V, Cd, Sr, Co, and Li in the caps and stipes of Boletus edulis collected from six spatially distant sites in Yunnan province, China. Fruiting bodies of King Bolete are abundant in P, Mg, Ca, Zn, Cu, and Na, followed by Ba, Cd, Ni, V, Li, Sr, and Co. Contents of P, Mg, Zn, and Cu are more abundant in caps than in stipes of King Bolete. However, elements such as Na, Ba, Cd, Ni, V, Li, Sr, and Co prefer to accumulate in stipes of mushrooms from Yaoan, Chuxiong. The results of this study indicate that spatial variations of elements between caps and stipes are mainly related to different bedrock soil geochemistry and enrichment capability for various elements.

  11. Ecology of a population of subsidized predators: Common ravens in the central Mojave Desert, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boarman, W.I.; Patten, M.A.; Camp, R.J.; Collis, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Human subsidies have resulted in the rapid growth of populations of common ravens (Corvus corax) in the Mojave Desert. This is a management concern because ravens prey on threatened desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii). We conducted weekly counts for 29 months at 10 sites on the US Army's National Training Center, Fort Irwin, California to evaluate factors affecting the distribution of ravens. Raven abundance varied seasonally, diurnally, and with human abundance. It was greatest near resource subsidies, specifically the landfill and sewage ponds. Although other studies have documented heavy use of landfills by ravens, the use of sewage ponds had not been previously reported in the published literature. We suggest that raven management should focus on reducing access to anthropogenic resources. ?? 2006.

  12. Diversity of pulsed field gel electrophoresis pulsotypes, serovars and antibiotic resistance among Salmonella isolates from wild amphibians and reptiles in the California central coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    A survey of cold-blooded vertebrates and associated surface waters in a produce-growing region on the Central California Coast was done between May and September, 2011 to determine the diversity of Salmonella strains in these habitats and individuals. Samples from 460 amphibians and reptiles and 119...

  13. Multisensor Analysis of Spectral Dimensionality and Soil Diversity in the Great Central Valley of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Daniel; Small, Christopher

    2018-02-14

    Planned hyperspectral satellite missions and the decreased revisit time of multispectral imaging offer the potential for data fusion to leverage both the spectral resolution of hyperspectral sensors and the temporal resolution of multispectral constellations. Hyperspectral imagery can also be used to better understand fundamental properties of multispectral data. In this analysis, we use five flight lines from the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) archive with coincident Landsat 8 acquisitions over a spectrally diverse region of California to address the following questions: (1) How much of the spectral dimensionality of hyperspectral data is captured in multispectral data?; (2) Is the characteristic pyramidal structure of the multispectral feature space also present in the low order dimensions of the hyperspectral feature space at comparable spatial scales?; (3) How much variability in rock and soil substrate endmembers (EMs) present in hyperspectral data is captured by multispectral sensors? We find nearly identical partitions of variance, low-order feature space topologies, and EM spectra for hyperspectral and multispectral image composites. The resulting feature spaces and EMs are also very similar to those from previous global multispectral analyses, implying that the fundamental structure of the global feature space is present in our relatively small spatial subset of California. Finally, we find that the multispectral dataset well represents the substrate EM variability present in the study area - despite its inability to resolve narrow band absorptions. We observe a tentative but consistent physical relationship between the gradation of substrate reflectance in the feature space and the gradation of sand versus clay content in the soil classification system.

  14. Multisensor Analysis of Spectral Dimensionality and Soil Diversity in the Great Central Valley of California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Sousa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Planned hyperspectral satellite missions and the decreased revisit time of multispectral imaging offer the potential for data fusion to leverage both the spectral resolution of hyperspectral sensors and the temporal resolution of multispectral constellations. Hyperspectral imagery can also be used to better understand fundamental properties of multispectral data. In this analysis, we use five flight lines from the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS archive with coincident Landsat 8 acquisitions over a spectrally diverse region of California to address the following questions: (1 How much of the spectral dimensionality of hyperspectral data is captured in multispectral data?; (2 Is the characteristic pyramidal structure of the multispectral feature space also present in the low order dimensions of the hyperspectral feature space at comparable spatial scales?; (3 How much variability in rock and soil substrate endmembers (EMs present in hyperspectral data is captured by multispectral sensors? We find nearly identical partitions of variance, low-order feature space topologies, and EM spectra for hyperspectral and multispectral image composites. The resulting feature spaces and EMs are also very similar to those from previous global multispectral analyses, implying that the fundamental structure of the global feature space is present in our relatively small spatial subset of California. Finally, we find that the multispectral dataset well represents the substrate EM variability present in the study area – despite its inability to resolve narrow band absorptions. We observe a tentative but consistent physical relationship between the gradation of substrate reflectance in the feature space and the gradation of sand versus clay content in the soil classification system.

  15. Decadal-scale coastal cliff retreat in southern and central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Adam P.

    2018-01-01

    Airborne LiDAR data collected in 1998 and 2009-2010 were used to measure coastal cliff erosion and retreat between the Mexico/California border and Bodega Head, California. Cliff erosion was detected along 44% of the 595 km of shoreline evaluated, while the remaining cliffs were relatively stable. The mean cliff top retreat rate was 0.12 m/yr, while mean retreat averaged over the entire cliff face was 0.04 m/yr. The maximum cliff top and face retreat rates were 4.2 and 3.8 m/yr, respectively. Historical ( 1930s to 1998) and recent retreat rates were significantly inversely correlated for areas with large historical or recent cliff retreat, such that locations with elevated historical retreat had low levels of recent retreat and locations with elevated recent retreat were preceded by low rates of historical retreat. The strength of this inverse correlation increased with cliff change magnitudes up to r2 of 0.91 for cliff top retreat rates > 2.9 m/yr. Mean recent retreat rates were 52-83% lower than mean historical retreat rates. Although beaches can protect cliffs against wave-driven erosion, cliffs fronted by beaches retreated 49% more than cliffs without beaches. On average, unarmored cliff faces retreated 0.05 m/yr between 1998 and 2009-2010, about three times faster than artificially armored cliffs. Alongshore metrics of wave-cliff impact, precipitation, and cliff hardness were generally not well correlated with recent cliff changes. A cliff hazard metric is used to detect cliff steepening and areas prone to future cliff top failures.

  16. Movements of blue rockfish (Sebastes mystinus off central California with comparisons to similar species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M Green

    Full Text Available Olive (Sebastes serranoides, black (Sebastes melanops, and blue rockfish (Sebastes mystinus are all common inhabitants of nearshore ecosystems on the West coast of North America and important components of the recreational fishery off California. Acoustic monitoring studies indicate that olive rockfish are highly residential and that black rockfish are capable of long migrations and have less site fidelity; yet little is known about the long-term movements of blue rockfish. External tag-recapture studies indicate that blue rockfish may have intermediate movements relative to these congener nearshore species. To better understand the site fidelity, and daily and seasonal movements of blue rockfish over long (>1-year time scales, we placed acoustic transmitters into 21 adult blue rockfish (30-41 cm total length in Carmel Bay, California. Blue rockfish displayed intermediate movement patterns and residency relative to other similar kelp forest rockfish species. Two-thirds of tagged blue rockfish (13 fish exhibited high residency to the study area (>12 mo. When in residence, mean home range of blue rockfish was 0.23 km2, however as many as 30% of tagged blue rockfish shifted their core home range area during the study. Most shifts in home range occurred during upwelling season, and tagged fish moved up to 3.1 km when in residence. Blue rockfish with short residence times were last detected in the study area in late winter and early spring. Blue rockfish were observed at shallower depths during day than night, likely indicative of diurnal feeding. However, over longer time scales, blue rockfish were detected at deeper depths during upwelling periods and with increased wave heights. Daily and seasonal vertical movements of blue rockfish may be influenced by upwelling conditions and local prey abundance.

  17. GOES-derived fog and low cloud indices for coastal north and central California ecological analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torregrosa, Alicia; Combs, Cindy; Peters, Jeff

    2016-02-01

    Fog and low cloud cover (FLCC) strongly influences the water, energy, and nutrient flux of coastal ecosystems. Easy-to-use FLCC data are needed to quantify the impacts of FLCC on ecosystem dynamics especially during hot and dry Mediterranean climate summers. Monthly, annual, and decadal FLCC digital maps (indices) were derived for June-September 1999-2009 for coastal California, latitude 34.50°N (south of Monterey Bay) to latitude 41.95°N (north of Crescent City) from 26,000 hourly night and day Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) images. Monthly average FLCC ranges from ocean increases from north (9 h/d) to south (14 h/d), whereas on land, FLCC is highest where land juts into the prevailing NW winds and is lowest in the lee of major capes. FLCC advects farthest inland through low-lying NW ocean-facing valleys. At night, average total hours of FLCC are higher more frequently on land than over the ocean. The interannual FLCC coefficient of variation shows long-term geographic stability that is strongly associated with landform position. FLCC hours per day mapped contours, derived from decadal average FLCC, delineate the commonly used term "fog belt" into FLCC zones with increased locational precision. FLCC indices are available for download from the California Landscape Conservation Cooperative Climate Commons website (http://climate.calcommons.org/datasets/summertime-fog). FLCC indices can improve analyses of biogeographic and bioclimatic species distribution models; understanding meteorological mechanisms driving FLCC patterns; solar energy feasibility studies; investigations of ecohydrology, evapotranspiration, and agricultural irrigation demand; and viticulture ripening models.

  18. Recharge response to interannual and multidecadal climate variability and implications for groundwater resources of the Central Valley aquifer, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuss, A. M.; Gurdak, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    Climate variability on interannual to multidecadal temporal scales has substantial implications for management and sustainability of water resources, yet are poorly understood throughout much of the United States. Climate forcings on these timescales partially control precipitation distribution, temperature fluctuations, drought occurrence and severity, streamflow, and recharge. Reliable predictions of future climate and subsequent adaptation of groundwater management strategies in vulnerable aquifers, such as the Central Valley aquifer located in central California of the United States, requires improved understanding of climate variability on interannual to multidecadal timescales and the associated responses in recharge rates. Groundwater withdrawals from the Central Valley aquifer are the second largest of all aquifers in the United States and are used to support one of the largest agricultural economies. However, the effects of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) (2 to 6 year cycle), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) (10 to 25 year cycle), and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) (50 to 80 year cycle) on recharge rates and groundwater levels in the Central Valley aquifer previously have not been quantified. In this study, singular spectrum analysis (SSA) was used to identify the principal components of groundwater level time series from selected wells in Central Valley aquifer that contribute to the greatest amount of variance in the record. In each of the time series analyzed, the PDO was the most significant contributor to groundwater level fluctuations. Wavelet analysis was also used to examine the nonstationary phase relation of multiple time series to identify significance and duration of each forcing. A consistent phase relation of multiple signals suggests possible coherence between climate forcings and groundwater levels, and also indicates the effect of the PDO on groundwater levels. These findings support the conclusion that interannual to

  19. 3D seismic interpretation of subsurface eruptive centers in a Permian large igneous province, Tazhong Uplift, central Tarim Basin, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiangfeng; Zhu, Wenbin; Guan, Da; Zhu, Beibei; Yuan, Liansheng; Xiang, Xuemei; Su, Jinbao; He, Jingwen; Wu, Xinhui

    2016-11-01

    A 1445-km2 high-resolution 3D seismic reflection dataset is used to analyze the Permian large igneous province in the subsurface of the Tazhong area in the central Tarim Basin in northwestern China. Constrained by the synthetic seismograms of four wells, the top and base of the igneous rocks were identified in the seismic data. Seven large volcanic craters, each >10 km2 in area, have been discovered via the application of coherency and amplitude attributes. The thickness and volume of the igneous rocks were obtained by time-depth transformation. In the study area, all of the igneous rocks, with thicknesses from 120 to 1133 m, were formed by eruptions in the Early Permian. These events produced huge erupted volumes (178 km3) and multiple closely spaced volcanic edifices (Tarim Basin.

  20. Hydrothermal alteration maps of the central and southern Basin and Range province of the United States compiled from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data and Interactive Data Language (IDL) logical operator algorithms were used to map hydrothermally altered rocks in the central and southern parts of the Basin and Range province of the United States. The hydrothermally altered rocks mapped in this study include (1) hydrothermal silica-rich rocks (hydrous quartz, chalcedony, opal, and amorphous silica), (2) propylitic rocks (calcite-dolomite and epidote-chlorite mapped as separate mineral groups), (3) argillic rocks (alunite-pyrophyllite-kaolinite), and (4) phyllic rocks (sericite-muscovite). A series of hydrothermal alteration maps, which identify the potential locations of hydrothermal silica-rich, propylitic, argillic, and phyllic rocks on Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) band 7 orthorectified images, and geographic information systems shape files of hydrothermal alteration units are provided in this study.

  1. Unified-planning, graded-administration, and centralized-controlling: a management modality for treating acquired immune deficiency syndrome with Chinese medicine in Henan Province of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li-Ran; Guo, Hui-jun; Liu, Zhi-bin; Li, Qiang; Yang, Ji-ping; He, Ying

    2015-04-01

    Henan Province in China has a major epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Chinese medicine (CM) has been used throughout the last decade, and a management modality was developed, which can be described by unified-planning, graded-administration, and centralized-controlling (UGC). The UGC modality has one primary concept (patient-centered medicine from CM theory), four basic foundations (classifying administrative region, characteristics of CM on disease treatment, health resource conditions, and distribution of patients living with HIV), six important relationships (the "three uniformities and three combinations," and the six relationships therein guide the treatment of AIDS with CM), and four key sections (management, operation, records, and evaluation). In this article, the authors introduce the UGC modality, which could be beneficial to developing countries or resource-limited areas for the management of chronic infectious disease.

  2. Geophysical modeling of the impact of Central Atlantic Magmatic Province emplacement on sea-level changes at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austermann, Jacqueline; Bachan, Aviv; Eyster, Athena

    2015-04-01

    Mass extinctions have been linked to the emplacement of Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs). While increasing precision in the dating of LIPs indicates that extinctions are often synchronous with LIP eruptions, the complete causal chain of events - including impacts on climate, ocean chemistry, and sea level - remains incompletely understood. Here we utilize a numerical modeling approach to examine one possible link in this chain: the capacity of LIP emplacement to drive sea-level changes. We focus on the Late Triassic and Early Jurassic, an interval encompassing the end-Triassic mass extinction and the emplacement of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP). Excursions in sea level are also well documented at this time and in many places indicate a rapid fall followed by a sea-level rise coincident with the extinction. To explore the impact of CAMP on sea-level changes we use a geophysical model of solid-Earth deformation together with a reconstructed paleotopography during the end-Triassic. We perturb the model in two steps, corresponding to two phases of LIP emplacement: (1) Uplift associated with the ascending plume that leads to the CAMP eruption; and (2) loading and flexure of the lithosphere associated with the emplaced magma. We model the former process with a mantle convection code to assess the tempo-spatial behavior of dynamic uplift for varying plume sizes. The latter process is modeled as a viscoelastic loading problem that allows us to isolate contributions from the initial elastic and subsequent viscous response. Both mechanisms are combined in a gravitationally self-consistent sea-level theory that accounts for loading effects associated with displaced water, as well as shoreline migration and perturbations in Earth rotation. We compare model outputs to geological data from a set of sites in which the direction, magnitude, and age of sea level changes have been estimated for the end-Triassic period. Our calculations place bounds on the magnitude and

  3. California avocados in Florida? Finding the perfect avocado for production in East-Central Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avocado (Persea americana Mill.) is a high-value fruit where most U.S. consumption is supplied using imported product. Cultivars with good fruit quality and horticultural traits may provide a useful alternative crop in east-central Florida and possibly in other locations throughout the state. A port...

  4. A High Explanatory Power Model of Foot and Mouth Disease Spread in Central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    America. North America, Central America, Western Europe, Australia, and New Zealand are free of FMD. 4 Figure 2. Conjectured Status of FMD...animal, and biomedical sciences, Massey university, Palmerston North, New Zealand . Retrieved from www.interspreadplus.com/info.asp Steven, R. (2010...millions of animals. Susceptible animals include cattle, water buffalo, sheep , goats, pigs, antelope, deer, hedgehogs, elephants, llama, alpaca and

  5. Contaminants in eggs of aquatic birds from the grasslands of central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hothem, R.L.; Welsh, D.

    1994-01-01

    Eggs were collected from the Grasslands of western Merced County, California, during 1986 and 1987, and at the Mendota Wildlife Area in Fresno County in 1987, as part of a reproductive study of nesting ducks and shorebirds. The eggs were analyzed to evaluate the effects of contaminants in agricultural drainwater on avian reproduction. Agricultural drainwater was the major source of water for irrigation and fall flooding in the Grasslands until the fall of 1985 when drainwater was mostly replaced by uncontaminated water. Drainwater had not been used at Mendota. Concentrations of arsenic and boron in eggs from all sites were lower than those known to harm avian reproduction. However, mean concentrations of selenium, a trace element known to impair avian reproduction at high dietary levels, were higher in eggs from the Grasslands than in eggs from the uncontaminated site. Although some selenium concentrations were as high as those found to have caused death or deformities at other sites, reproductive impairment was not observed in any ducks or shorebirds nesting in the Grasslands in 1986 or 1987.

  6. Meteorology-induced variations in the spatial behavior of summer ozone pollution in Central California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Ling; Harley, Robert A.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2010-06-23

    Cluster analysis was applied to daily 8 h ozone maxima modeled for a summer season to characterize meteorology-induced variations in the spatial distribution of ozone. Principal component analysis is employed to form a reduced dimension set to describe and interpret ozone spatial patterns. The first three principal components (PCs) capture {approx}85% of total variance, with PC1 describing a general spatial trend, and PC2 and PC3 each describing a spatial contrast. Six clusters were identified for California's San Joaquin Valley (SJV) with two low, three moderate, and one high-ozone cluster. The moderate ozone clusters are distinguished by elevated ozone levels in different parts of the valley: northern, western, and eastern, respectively. The SJV ozone clusters have stronger coupling with the San Francisco Bay area (SFB) than with the Sacramento Valley (SV). Variations in ozone spatial distributions induced by anthropogenic emission changes are small relative to the overall variations in ozone amomalies observed for the whole summer. Ozone regimes identified here are mostly determined by the direct and indirect meteorological effects. Existing measurement sites are sufficiently representative to capture ozone spatial patterns in the SFB and SV, but the western side of the SJV is under-sampled.

  7. The persistence of ethion and zolone residues on grape folliage in the central valley of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffingwell, J T; Spear, R C

    1975-01-01

    The hazard of serious intoxication of agricultural field workers by organophosphate insecticide residues has led to the establishment of reentry intervals in California. In the attempt to extend this concept nationally, it has been found that there is a lack of relevant field data for setting of such standards. In an effort to expand knowledge of the relationship between foliar residue levels and occupational hazard, an examination of the persistence and transport of ethion, Zolone, and their oxygen analogs on grape foliage was conducted. Both dislodgeable and penetrated residues were followed for 28 days post-application for both insecticides while soil surface residues were followed for ethion only. A marked difference is seen in the decay rates of the dislodgeable vs. the penetrated residues of ethion, the dislodgeable residues decaying more quickly. This difference is not apparent for Zolone. Of particular significance to worker hazard is the finding that the oxones of both ethion and Zolone in the dislodgeable residues reach a plateau after approximately seven days and do not degrade further by day 28.

  8. Paleomagnetism of the Lodo Formation and kinematic evolution of the Vallecitos Syncline, Coast Ranges, Central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, K.; Rieth, J. A.; Pluhar, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    The WNW-ESE-striking Vallecitos Syncline spans part of the California Coast Ranges, and is bounded by the Calaveras-San Andreas Fault System in the west and the Great Valley in the east. A northwest bend is observed as the syncline approaches the Calaveras and San Andreas Faults to the west, possibly a result of localized clockwise tectonic rotation. We present new paleomagnetic data from four sites across the syncline in an east-west transect to test this hypothesis. We sampled shale, sandstone, and siltstone from the Lodo Formation at Tumey Hills, Griswold Hills, New Idria, and Paicines. Using standard paleomagnetic methods, we conducted low temperature and thermal demagnetization. Data from some localities were generally scattered and difficult to interpret, suffering a major secondary chemical remanent magnetization. However the eastern end of the Vallecitos Syncline exhibited interpretable results. About a third of samples showed a strong reverse polarity at Griswold Hills and New Idria Mine, indicating that magnetization of the samples pre-date tilting of the outcrop and a secondary magnetization was acquired post deformation. Characteristic remanent magnetizations also exhibit inclination shallowing at three sites, likely the effect of compaction rather than poleward transport, since the fourth in the Tumey Hills exhibits minimal shallowing. Furthermore, results from Tumey Hills, and Griswold Hills indicate no localized tectonic rotation. Based on these findings, we tentatively conclude that the eastern end of the Vallecitos Syncline experienced no rotation, within error. Results from the western end remain inconclusive.

  9. Estuarine sedimentation, sediment character, and foraminiferal distribution in central San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, John L.; Woodrow, Donald L.; McGann, Mary; Wong, Florence L.; Fregoso, Theresa; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    Central San Francisco Bay is the deepest subembayment in the San Francisco Bay estuary and hence has the largest water volume of any of the subembayments. It also has the strongest tidal currents and the coarsest sediment within the estuary. Tidal currents are strongest over the west-central part of central bay and, correspondingly, this area is dominated by sand-size sediment. Much of the area east of a line from Angel Island to Alcatraz Island is characterized by muddy sand to sandy mud, and the area to the west of this line is sandy. The sand-size sediment over west-central bay furthermore is molded by the energetic tidal currents into bedforms of varying sizes and wavelengths. Bedforms typically occur in water depths of 15-25 m. High resolution bathymetry (multibeam) from 1997 and 2008 allow for subdivision of the west-central bayfloor into four basic types based on morphologic expression: featureless, sand waves, disrupted/man-altered, and bedrock knobs. Featureless and sand-wave morphologies dominate the bayfloor of west-central bay. Disrupted bayfloor has a direct association with areas that are undergoing alteration due to human activities, such as sand-mining lease areas, dredging, and disposal of dredge spoils. Change detection analysis, comparing the 1997 and 2008 multibeam data sets, shows that significant change has occurred in west-central bay during the roughly 10 years between surveys. The surveyed area lost about 5.45 million m3 of sediment during the decade. Sand-mining lease areas within west-central bay lost 6.77 million m3 as the bayfloor deepened. Nonlease areas gained 1.32 million m3 of sediment as the bayfloor shallowed slightly outside of sand-mining lease areas. Furthermore, bedform asymmetry did not change significantly, but some bedforms did migrate some tens of meters. Gravity cores show that the area east of Angel and Alcatraz Islands is floored by clayey silts or silty sand whereas the area to the west of the islands is floored

  10. Prevalence of Enterobius vermicularis among preschool children in 2003 and 2013 in Xinxiang city, Henan province, Central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Yao, Zhijun; Hou, Yichen; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Haizhu; Ma, Jingbo; Zhang, Luwen; Liu, Shiguo

    2016-01-01

    The present study was performed to assess the prevalence of Enterobius vermicularis infection among preschool children in Xinxiang city, Henan province, China and the changes in the egg positive rate for E. vermicularis over a 10 year period. A total of 510 preschool children in 17 kindergartens were examined using the cellophane-tape perianal swab method in 2003, while 1734 preschool children in 10 kindergartens were examined in 2013 using the same method. The overall egg positive rate for E. vermicularis was 12.75% (65 out of 510) in 2003 and 5.13% (89 out of 1734) in 2013; the former was significantly higher than the latter (p < 0.05). In both 2003 and 2013, the egg positive rate for 5 to 6-year-old children was significantly higher than that of 2 to 4-year-old children (p < 0.05). However, positive rates were not significantly dependent on gender or area. Among selected personal hygiene factors, no hand washing before eating, sucking fingers or toys, and scratching around the anus were all associated with enterobiasis. The present study confirmed that the prevalence of E. vermicularis infection among preschool children decreased significantly over the 10 year period in Xinxiang city, but infection was still prevalent. Improving sanitation and personal hygiene practices, especially hand washing, could help prevent the transmission of E. vermicularis. © S. Wang et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2016.

  11. Prevalence of Enterobius vermicularis among preschool children in 2003 and 2013 in Xinxiang city, Henan province, Central China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shuai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was performed to assess the prevalence of Enterobius vermicularis infection among preschool children in Xinxiang city, Henan province, China and the changes in the egg positive rate for E. vermicularis over a 10 year period. A total of 510 preschool children in 17 kindergartens were examined using the cellophane-tape perianal swab method in 2003, while 1734 preschool children in 10 kindergartens were examined in 2013 using the same method. The overall egg positive rate for E. vermicularis was 12.75% (65 out of 510 in 2003 and 5.13% (89 out of 1734 in 2013; the former was significantly higher than the latter (p < 0.05. In both 2003 and 2013, the egg positive rate for 5 to 6-year-old children was significantly higher than that of 2 to 4-year-old children (p < 0.05. However, positive rates were not significantly dependent on gender or area. Among selected personal hygiene factors, no hand washing before eating, sucking fingers or toys, and scratching around the anus were all associated with enterobiasis. The present study confirmed that the prevalence of E. vermicularis infection among preschool children decreased significantly over the 10 year period in Xinxiang city, but infection was still prevalent. Improving sanitation and personal hygiene practices, especially hand washing, could help prevent the transmission of E. vermicularis.

  12. Factors associated with dengue prevention and control in two villages in a central Thai province: a retrospective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakolwiboon, Smathorn; Benjatikul, Nattorn; Sathianvichitr, Kanchalika; Prapathrangsee, Kawintra; Tienmontri, Taniya; Ratanaamonsakul, Wirote; Assantachai, Prasert; Homsanit, Mayuree

    2013-08-01

    To study the factors associated with dengue prevention and control in Moo 6 (the 6th village) and Moo 7 of Tambon Kaeng-phak-kut, Thaluang District, Lopburi Province. The authors reviewed the raw data collected by public health officers and village health volunteers (VHVs) as their routine tasks. The authors analyzed the data, 30 dwellings per each village, to compare the demographics, knowledge, attitude, and practice of subjects from Moo 6, a dengue-outbreak community, with that from Moo 7, a control group, as well as larval indices between these 2 studied groups. The present retrospective study is approved by Siriraj Institutional Review Board, Certificate of Approval No. Si393/2012. Both groups of subjects had no statistically significant difference in basic dengue knowledge (p = 0.862), attitude towards dengue prevention and control, practical knowledge (p = 0.457), and actual practice to eliminate Aedes larvae and prevent it laying eggs, except for the practice of managing water container in bathroom or toilet (p = 0.015). On the other hand, dengue incidence and larval indices of both villages were apparently different. Although incorrect basic dengue and practical knowledge of subjects from both villages were similar dengue outbreak in Moo 6 of Tambon Kaeng-phak-kut was superior. It may be due to difference in actual practice on larval elimination in water container in bathroom or toilet as well as other factors other than personal factors such as public services, public places, and community surroundings.

  13. Ground referencing GRACE satellite estimates of groundwater storage changes in the California Central Valley, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Scanlon, B. R.; Longuevergne, L.; Long, D.

    2012-01-01

    International audience; [1] There is increasing interest in using Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite data to remotely monitor groundwater storage variations; however, comparisons with ground-based well data are limited but necessary to validate satellite data processing, especially when the study area is close to or below the GRACE footprint. The Central Valley is a heavily irrigated region with large-scale groundwater depletion during droughts. Here we compare updated ...

  14. Fentanyl and a Novel Synthetic Opioid U-47700 Masquerading as Street "Norco" in Central California: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenian, Patil; Olson, Alexander; Anaya, Andres; Kurtz, Alicia; Ruegner, Rawnica; Gerona, Roy R

    2017-01-01

    In 2013 and 2014, more than 700 deaths were attributed to fentanyl and fentanyl analogues in the United States. Of recent concern is the cluster of unintentional fentanyl overdoses because of tablets thought to be "Norco" purchased on the street in Northern California. U-47700 (trans-3,4-dichloro-N-[2-(dimethyl-amino)cyclohexyl]-N-methylbenz-amide) is a nonfentanyl-based synthetic opioid with 7.5 times the binding affinity of morphine to μ-opioid. We report a case of fentanyl and U-47700 intoxication from what was thought to be illicitly purchased Norco. A 41-year-old woman presented to the emergency department (ED) for altered mental status shortly after ingesting 3 beige Norco pills bearing a Watson imprint. She had pinpoint pupils and respiratory depression, which reversed after 0.4 mg naloxone administration intravenously. She had complete recovery and was discharged from the ED after a 4-hour observation period. Serum testing with liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC 1260 QTOF/MS 6550; Agilent, Santa Clara, CA) confirmed the presence of the medications the patient reported receiving, and additionally fentanyl (15.2 ng/mL) and U-47700 (7.6 ng/mL). In this case report, street Norco purchased in Central California resulted in altered mental status requiring naloxone reversal because of fentanyl and the novel synthetic opioid U-47700. Because these compounds are not detected by routine urine drug testing and physical examination findings are similar to those of a traditional opioid toxidrome, emergency providers should use the patient's history and other circumstantial details to aid in diagnosis. In cases with suspicion of opioid or opioid analogue cause, we recommend that emergency providers contact their local poison control center, medical toxicologist, or public health department to aid in the investigation. Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Geochemical constraints on the petrogenesis of the Salinian arc, central California: Implications for the origin of intermediate magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Alan D.; Ducea, Mihai N.; Kidder, Steven; Petrescu, Lucian

    2014-07-01

    Magmatic arcs are the primary locations where continental crust is distilled to an intermediate, calc-alkaline composition. The root zones of continental arcs are thought to be the primary sites of magmatic differentiation, yet few deeply exhumed arc sections are available for direct study. The Coast Ridge Belt of central coastal California provides an exceptional opportunity to directly observe the cumulative effects of melting, mixing, assimilation, and homogenization related to construction of the Latest Cretaceous California arc. We present new major and trace element chemistry, as well as radiogenic isotopic ratios determined on Coast Ridge Belt assemblages representative of 20 to 30 km crustal levels. Late Cretaceous (ca. 93 to 81 Ma) gabbro, diorite, tonalite, and granodiorite of the Coast Ridge Belt are calc-alkaline, some exhibit cumulate characteristics, and all show enriched isotopic compositions (Sri = 0.7061 to 0.7092 and εNd = + 1.4 to - 5.9). Rare earth element patterns in igneous and metaigneous rocks of the Coast Ridge Belt suggest that they are sourced deeper than the ~ 25 km paleodepth of the exposed section, but probably not significantly below 40 km. Underplating of basaltic melts derived from evolved lithospheric mantle provides the most satisfactory mechanism explaining geochemical and field evidence for partial melting and assimilation of metasedimentary framework rocks to yield gabbroic to dioritic magmas, followed soon thereafter by remelting to produce more silicic magmas. We suggest that basaltic underplating provided a source of heat to the base of the Salinian crust, leading to thermal weakening and downward flow of melt-fertile intra-arc supracrustal assemblages, thereby igniting the magmatic pulse that formed the Salinian arc.

  16. Save water or save wildlife? Water use and conservation in the central Sierran foothill oak woodlands of California, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Huntsinger

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available More frequent drought is projected for California. As water supplies constrict, and urban growth and out-migration spread to rural areas, trade-offs in water use for agriculture, biodiversity conservation, fire hazard reduction, residential development, and quality of life will be exacerbated. The California Black Rail (Laterallus jamaicensis coturniculus, state listed as "Threatened," depends on leaks from antiquated irrigation district irrigation systems for much of its remnant small wetland habitat in the north central Sierra Nevada foothills. Residents of the 1295 km² foothill habitat distribution of the Black Rail were surveyed about water use. Results show that the most Black Rail habitat is owned by those purchasing water to irrigate pasture, a use that commonly creates wetlands from leaks and tailwater. Promoting wildlife, agricultural production, and preventing wildfire are common resident goals that call for abundant and inexpensive water; social and economic pressures encourage reduction in water use and the repair of leaks that benefit wildlife and greenery. Broad inflexible state interventions to curtail water use are likely to create a multitude of unintended consequences, including loss of biodiversity and environmental quality, and alienation of residents as valued ecosystem services literally dry up. Adaptive and proactive policies are needed that consider the linkages in the social-ecological system, are sensitive to local conditions, prevent landscape dewatering, and recognize the beneficial use of water to support ecosystem services such as wildlife habitat. Much Black Rail habitat is anthropogenic, created at the nexus of local governance, plentiful water, agricultural practices, historical events, and changing land uses. This history should be recognized and leveraged rather than ignored in a rush to "save" water by unraveling the social-ecological system that created the landscape. Policy and governance needs to identify

  17. Post subduction thermal regime of the western North America and effects on the Great Valley, Sierra Nevada and northern Baja California provinces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkan, Kamil

    the region shows that there is a significant lateral component of the heat flow in to the Sierra Nevada due to Basin and Range province and due to basal heating. The model further suggests that the lateral heating results in considerable thermal uplift at the eastern edge of the Sierra Nevada region. The model is also applicable in the Northern Baja California since this region was part of the same tectonic setting as the Sierra Nevada arc before the inland jump of the San Andreas Fault. The Coast Ranges are interesting with having spots of magmatic and volcanic arc activity likely associated with the cessation of subduction. The third paper is a study related to one of these spots 90 km north of San Francisco, characterized by elevated heat flow in an area of 2500 km2 (The Geysers anomaly). The geothermal system is associated with a very young (˜2 My) bimodal volcanism and magma intrusion at crustal levels. Taking advantage of a sealed, vapor dominated geothermal system due to rocks of very low permeability, forward and inverse models of the deeper magmatic source were constructed. We used extensive heat flow data that were collected over more than 20 years time period. The models revealed that the magmatic source in the Geysers must be as shallow as 7-8 km in order to satisfy the thermal data. Furthermore, the magma system must cover most of the thermally anomalous region. Another type of geothermal system is characterized by rising of hot waters by buoyancy forces without the necessity of a magmatic source at depth. We studied one of these systems in interior Alaska, called Chena Hot Springs, in the fourth paper. The explored system is 1 km long and temperatures are only 74°C. Although the system is moderate in temperature, the low-temperature surface conditions enable the system to be exploited for production of electricity. The geochemical analyses show that the source temperatures are around 121°C. We analyzed the temperature data from 17 exploration wells in

  18. Assessing Drought Impacts on Water Storage using GRACE Satellites and Regional Groundwater Modeling in the Central Valley of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, B. R.; Zhang, Z.; Save, H.; Faunt, C. C.; Dettinger, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Increasing concerns about drought impacts on water resources in California underscores the need to better understand effects of drought on water storage and coping strategies. Here we use a new GRACE mascons solution with high spatial resolution (1 degree) developed at the Univ. of Texas Center for Space Research (CSR) and output from the most recent regional groundwater model developed by the U.S. Geological Survey to evaluate changes in water storage in response to recent droughts. We also extend the analysis of drought impacts on water storage back to the 1980s using modeling and monitoring data. The drought has been intensifying since 2012 with almost 50% of the state and 100% of the Central Valley under exceptional drought in 2015. Total water storage from GRACE data declined sharply during the current drought, similar to the rate of depletion during the previous drought in 2007 - 2009. However, only 45% average recovery between the two droughts results in a much greater cumulative impact of both droughts. The CSR GRACE Mascons data offer unprecedented spatial resolution with no leakage to the oceans and no requirement for signal restoration. Snow and reservoir storage declines contribute to the total water storage depletion estimated by GRACE with the residuals attributed to groundwater storage. Rates of groundwater storage depletion are consistent with the results of regional groundwater modeling in the Central Valley. Traditional approaches to coping with these climate extremes has focused on surface water reservoir storage; however, increasing conjunctive use of surface water and groundwater and storing excess water from wet periods in depleted aquifers is increasing in the Central Valley.

  19. Interannual Variations in Aerosol Sources and Their Impact on Orographic Precipitation Over California's Central Sierra Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamean, J. M.; Ault, A. P.; White, A. B.; Neiman, P. J.; Ralph, F. M.; Minnis, Patrick; Prather, K. A.

    2014-01-01

    Aerosols that serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) have the potential to profoundly influence precipitation processes. Furthermore, changes in orographic precipitation have broad implications for reservoir storage and flood risks. As part of the CalWater I field campaign (2009-2011), the impacts of aerosol sources on precipitation were investigated in the California Sierra Nevada. In 2009, the precipitation collected on the ground was influenced by both local biomass burning (up to 79% of the insoluble residues found in precipitation) and long-range transported dust and biological particles (up to 80% combined), while in 2010, by mostly local sources of biomass burning and pollution (30-79% combined), and in 2011 by mostly long-range transport from distant sources (up to 100% dust and biological). Although vast differences in the source of residues was observed from year-to-year, dust and biological residues were omnipresent (on average, 55% of the total residues combined) and were associated with storms consisting of deep convective cloud systems and larger quantities of precipitation initiated in the ice phase. Further, biological residues were dominant during storms with relatively warm cloud temperatures (up to -15 C), suggesting these particles were more efficient IN compared to mineral dust. On the other hand, lower percentages of residues from local biomass burning and pollution were observed (on average 31% and 9%, respectively), yet these residues potentially served as CCN at the base of shallow cloud systems when precipitation quantities were low. The direct connection of the source of aerosols within clouds and precipitation type and quantity can be used in models to better assess how local emissions versus long-range transported dust and biological aerosols play a role in impacting regional weather and climate, ultimately with the goal of more accurate predictive weather forecast models and water resource management.

  20. Characteristics of water erosion and conservation practice in arid regions of Central Asia: Xinjiang Province, China as an example

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Wentai; Zhou, Jianqin; Feng, Guanglong; Weindorf, David C.; Hu, Guiqing; Sheng, Jiandong

    2015-01-01

    Located in the inland arid area of Central Asia and northwest China, Xinjiang has recently received heightened concerns over soil water erosion, which is highly related with the sustainable utilization of barren soil and limited water resources. Data from the national soil erosion survey of China (1985–2011) and Xinjiang statistical yearbook (2000–2010) was used to analyze the trend, intensity, and serious soil water erosion regions. Results showed that the water erosion area in Xinjiang was ...

  1. Scenario earthquake hazards for the Long Valley Caldera-Mono Lake area, east-central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Branum, David M.; Wills, Chris J.; Hill, David P.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) multi-hazards project in the Long Valley Caldera-Mono Lake area, the California Geological Survey (CGS) developed several earthquake scenarios and evaluated potential seismic hazards, including ground shaking, surface fault rupture, liquefaction, and landslide hazards associated with these earthquake scenarios. The results of these analyses can be useful in estimating the extent of potential damage and economic losses because of potential earthquakes and in preparing emergency response plans. The Long Valley Caldera-Mono Lake area has numerous active faults. Five of these faults or fault zones are considered capable of producing magnitude ≥6.7 earthquakes according to the Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast, Version 2 (UCERF 2) developed by the 2007 Working Group of California Earthquake Probabilities (WGCEP) and the USGS National Seismic Hazard Mapping (NSHM) Program. These five faults are the Fish Slough, Hartley Springs, Hilton Creek, Mono Lake, and Round Valley Faults. CGS developed earthquake scenarios for these five faults in the study area and for the White Mountains Fault to the east of the study area. Earthquake scenarios are intended to depict the potential consequences of significant earthquakes. They are not necessarily the largest or most damaging earthquakes possible. Earthquake scenarios are both large enough and likely enough that emergency planners should consider them in regional emergency response plans. Earthquake scenarios presented here are based on fault geometry and activity data developed by the WGCEP, and are consistent with the 2008 Update of the United States National Seismic Hazard Maps (NSHM).For the Hilton Creek Fault, two alternative scenarios were developed in addition to the NSHM scenario to account for different opinions in how far north the fault extends into the Long Valley Caldera. For each scenario, ground motions were calculated using the current standard practice

  2. Investigation of the Goiás Alkaline Province, Central Brazil: Application of gravity and magnetic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, Alanna C.; Marangoni, Yara R.; Junqueira-Brod, Tereza C.

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the strong magnetic and gravity anomalies of the Goiás Alkaline Province (GAP), a region of Late Cretaceous alkaline magmatism along the northern border of the Paraná Basin, Brazil. The alkaline complexes (eight of which are present in outcrops, two others inferred from magnetic signals) are characterized by a series of small intrusions forming almost circular magnetic and gravimetric anomalies varying from -4000 to +6000 nT and from -10 to +40 mGal, respectively. We used the Aneuler method and Analytical Signal Amplitude to obtain depth and geometry for mapped sources from the magnetic anomaly data. These results were used as the reference models in the 3D gravity inversion. The 3D inversion results show that the alkaline intrusions have depths of 10-12 km. The intrusions in the northern GAP follow two alignments and have different sizes. In the anomaly magnetic map, dominant guidelines correlate strongly with the extensional regimes that correlate with the rise of alkaline magmatism. The emplacement of these intrusions marks mechanical discontinuities and zones of weakness in the upper crust. According to the 3D inversion results, those intrusions are located within the upper crust (from the surface to 18 km depth) and have spheres as the preferable geometry. Such spherical shapes are more consistent with magmatic chambers instead of plug intrusions. The Registro do Araguaia anomaly (˜15 by 25 km) has a particular magnetic signature that indicates that the top is deeper than 1500 m. North of this circular anomaly are lineaments with structural indices indicating contacts on their edges and dikes/sills in the interiors. Results of 3D inversion of magnetic and gravity data suggest that the Registro do Araguaia is the largest body in the area, reaching 18 km depth and indicating a circular layered structure.

  3. Demographic and clinical characteristics of the children with aminoacidopathy in Isfahan Province, Central Iran in 2007-2015

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    Reza Najafi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Aminoacidopathies refer to defects in protein synthesis pathways which result in a range of biochemical disorders and clinical presentations. The enzyme defects in intermediate metabolic pathways lead to accumulation of one or more amino acids or metabolites. Despite higher prevalence rates, screening infants for inherited metabolic disorders is not run in many Middle East countries. Aim: This research is part of a larger study of inherited metabolic disorders to characterize and measure the prevalence of aminoacidopathies. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional study in the population aged 0-17 years old in Isfahan province of Iran, 2007-2015. Subjects and Methods: Demographic characteristics, history of disease, development of clinical condition and socioeconomic status were obtained from interviews as well as patient records of pediatric tertiary referral hospitals and metabolic disorders centers. Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS qualitative and quantitative analysis. Results: The incidence rate of aminoacidopathies was derived to be 9/100,000 live births. The frequency of consanguineous marriages in this group of the patients was 89.2%. Of the patients with aminoacidopathies, 76.6% required hospitalization with tyrosinemia having the highest rate overall (>10 times. The most prevalent symptoms in this group of patients were developmental disorders and convulsions while half presented with growth disorders during follow-up. Of the 35.5% patients, who died at various ages, one-third was in the maple syrup urine disease subgroup. Conclusion: Although metabolic disorders are identified as rare diseases, they are more prevalent in the studied population of Isfahan.

  4. Analysis of 24 Y chromosomal STR haplotypes in a Chinese Han population sample from Henan Province, Central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Meisen; Liu, Yaju; Zhang, Juntao; Bai, Rufeng; Lv, Xiaojiao; Ma, Shuhua

    2015-07-01

    We analyzed haplotypes for 24 Y chromosomal STRs (Y-STRs), including 17 Yfiler loci (DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389I/II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DY438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635 and Y-GATA-H4) and 7 additional STRs (DYS388, DYS444, DYS447, DYS449, DYS522 and DYS527a/b) in 1100 unrelated Chinese Han individuals from Henan Province using AGCU Y24 STR kit systems. The calculated average gene diversity (GD) values ranged from 0.4105 to 0.9647 for the DYS388 and DYS385a/b loci, respectively. The discriminatory capacity (DC) was 72.91% with 802 observed haplotypes using 17 Yfiler loci, by the addition of 7 Y-STRs to the Yfiler system, the DC was increased to 79.09% while showing 870 observed haplotypes. Among the additional 7 Y-STRs, DYS449, DYS527a/b, DYS444 and DYS522 were major contributors to enhancing discrimination. In the analysis of molecular variance, the Henan Han population clustered with Han origin populations and showed significant differences from other Non-Han populations. In the present study, we report 24 Y-STR population data in Henan Han population, and we emphasize the need for adding additional markers to the commonly used 17 Yfiler loci to achieve more improved discriminatory capacity in a population with low genetic diversity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Crustally derived granites in Dali, SW China: new constraints on silicic magmatism of the Central Emeishan Large Igneous Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bei; Peate, David W.; Guo, Zhaojie; Liu, Runchao; Du, Wei

    2017-10-01

    We have identified a new crustally derived granite pluton that is related to the Emeishan Large Igneous Province (ELIP). This pluton (the Wase pluton, near Dali) shows two distinct SHRIMP zircon U-Pb age groups ( 768 and 253 Ma). As it has an intrusive relationship with Devonian limestone, the younger age is interpreted as its formation, which is related to the ELIP event, whereas the 768 Ma Neoproterozoic-aged zircons were inherited from Precambrian crustal component of the Yangtze Block, implying the pluton has a crustally derived origin. This is consistent with its peraluminous nature, negative Nb-Ta anomaly, enrichment in light rare earth elements, high 87Sr/86Sr(i) ratio (0.7159-0.7183) and extremely negative ɛ(Nd)(i) values (-12.15 to -13.70), indicative of melts derived from upper crust materials. The Wase pluton-intruded Devonian strata lie stratigraphically below the Shangcang ELIP sequence, which is the thickest volcanic sequence ( 5400 m) in the whole ELIP. The uppermost level of the Shangcang sequence contains laterally restricted rhyolite. Although the rhyolite has the same age as the Wase pluton, its geochemical features demonstrate a different magma origin. The rhyolite displays moderate 87Sr/86Sr(i) (0.7053), slightly negative ɛ(Nd)(i) (-0.18) and depletions in Ba, Cs, Eu and Sr, implying derivation from differentiation of a mantle-derived mafic magma source. The coexistence of crustally and mantle-derived felsic systems, along with the robust development of dike swarms, vent proximal volcanics and thickest flood basalts piles in Dali, shows that the Dali area was probably where the most active Emeishan magmatism had once existed.

  6. Drought, Land-Use Change, and Water Availability in California's Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunt, C. C.; Sneed, M.; Traum, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Central Valley is a broad alluvial-filled structural trough that covers about 52,000 square kilometers and is one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world. Because the valley is semi-arid and the availability of surface water varies substantially from year to year, season to season, and from north to south, agriculture developed a reliance on groundwater for irrigation. During recent drought periods (2007-09 and 2012-present), groundwater pumping has increased due to a combination of factors including drought and land-use changes. In response, groundwater levels have declined to levels approaching or below historical low levels. In the San Joaquin Valley, the southern two thirds of the Central Valley, the extensive groundwater pumpage has caused aquifer system compaction, resulting in land subsidence and permanent loss of groundwater storage capacity. The magnitude and rate of subsidence varies based on geologic materials, consolidation history, and historical water levels. Spatially-variable subsidence has changed the land-surface slope, causing operational, maintenance, and construction-design problems for surface-water infrastructure. It is important for water agencies to plan for the effects of continued water-level declines, storage losses, and/or land subsidence. To combat these effects, excess surface water, when available, is artificially recharged. As surface-water availability, land use, and artificial recharge continue to vary, long-term groundwater-level and land-subsidence monitoring and modelling are critical to understanding the dynamics of the aquifer system. Modeling tools, such as the Central Valley Hydrologic Model, can be used in the analysis and evaluation of management strategies to mitigate adverse impacts due to subsidence, while also optimizing water availability. These analyses will be critical for successful implementation of recent legislation aimed toward sustainable groundwater use.

  7. A preserved early Ediacaran magmatic arc at the northernmost portion of the Transversal Zone central subprovince of the Borborema Province, Northeastern South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamim Bley de Brito Neves

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Magmatic arcs are an essential part of crust-forming events in planet Earth evolution. The aim of this work was to describe an early Ediacaran magmatic arc (ca. 635-580 Ma exposed in the northernmost portion of the Transversal Zone, central subprovince of Borborema Province, northeast Brazil. Our research took advantage of several syntheses by different authors, including theses and dissertations, carried out on magmatic rocks of the study area for the last 30 years. The ca. 750 km long and up to 140 km wide arc, trending ENE-WSW, is preserved to the south of the Patos Lineament, between 35º15' and 42º30'W and 7º15' and 8ºS. About 90 different stocks and batholiths of I-type granitic rocks were mapped along this orogenic zone, preferentially intruding low-grade schists of the Cryogenian-Ediacaran Piancó-Alto Brígida (SPAB belt. Three igneous supersuites are recognized: a epidote-bearing granodiorites and tonalites ("Conceição" type; b high-K calc-alkaline granites ("Itaporanga" type; c biotite granodiorites of trondhjemite affinity ("Serrita" type. A fourth group of peralkalic and shoshonitic rocks occurs to the south of the previous ones, reflecting special tectonic conditions. NNE-SSW trending Paleoproterozoic fold belts, surrounding Archean nuclei, characterize the continental part of the northern lower plate. The oceanic fraction of this lower plate was recycled by subduction and scarce remnants of which may be seen either within the enclosing low-grade schists or as xenoliths within the arc intrusions. The upper continental plate presents WSW-ENE structural trends and is composed of Neoproterozoic fold belts and Paleoproterozoic reworked basement inliers. Available data bear clear evidence of an Ediacaran magmatic arc built at the northern portion of the Transversal Zone in the Borborema Province, northeast Brazil.

  8. The Central Atlantic Magmatic Province at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary: paleomagnetic and 40Ar/ 39Ar evidence from Morocco for brief, episodic volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, K. B.; Nomade, S.; Renne, P. R.; Marzoli, A.; Bertrand, H.; Youbi, N.

    2004-11-01

    The Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), one of the largest known flood basalt provinces formed in the Phanerozoic, is associated with the pre-rift stage of the Atlantic Ocean at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary ca. 200 Ma. Paleomagnetic sampling targeted packages of CAMP lava flows in Morocco's High Atlas divided into four basic units (the lower, intermediate, upper, and recurrent units) from sections identified on the basis of field observations and geochemistry. Oriented cores were demagnetized using both alternating field (AF) and thermal techniques. Paleomagnetic results reveal wholly normal polarity interrupted by at least one brief reversed chron located in the intermediate unit, and reveal distinct pulses of volcanic activity identified by discrete changes in declination and inclination. These variations in magnetic direction are interpreted as a record of secular variation, and they may provide an additional correlative tool for identification of spatially separated CAMP lava flows within Morocco. 40Ar/39Ar analyses of Moroccan CAMP lavas yield plateau ages indistinguishable within 2σ error limits, sharing a weighted mean age of 199.9±0.5 Ma (2σ), reinforcing the short-lived nature of these eruptions despite the presence of sedimentary horizons between them. Correlation of our sections with the E23n, E23r, E24 sequence reported in the Newark basin terrestrial section and St. Audrie's Bay marine section is suggested. Brief volcanism in sudden pulses is a potential mechanism for volcanic-induced climatic changes and biotic disruption at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. Combination of our directional group (DG) poles yields an African paleomagnetic pole at 200 Ma of λ(°N)=73.0°, ϕ(°E)=241.3° (Dp=5.0°, Dm=18.5°).

  9. Fuel deposition rates of montane and subalpine conifers in the central Sierra Nevada, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wagtendonk, J.W.; Moore, P.E.

    2010-01-01

    Fire managers and researchers need information on fuel deposition rates to estimate future changes in fuel bed characteristics, determine when forests transition to another fire behavior fuel model, estimate future changes in fuel bed characteristics, and parameterize and validate ecosystem process models. This information is lacking for many ecosystems including the Sierra Nevada in California, USA. We investigated fuel deposition rates and stand characteristics of seven montane and four subalpine conifers in the Sierra Nevada. We collected foliage, miscellaneous bark and crown fragments, cones, and woody fuel classes from four replicate plots each in four stem diameter size classes for each species, for a total of 176 sampling sites. We used these data to develop predictive equations for each fuel class and diameter size class of each species based on stem and crown characteristics. There were consistent species and diameter class differences in the annual amount of foliage and fragments deposited. Foliage deposition rates ranged from just over 50 g m-2 year-1 in small diameter mountain hemlock stands to ???300 g m-2 year-1 for the three largest diameter classes of giant sequoia. The deposition rate for most woody fuel classes increased from the smallest diameter class stands to the largest diameter class stands. Woody fuel deposition rates varied among species as well. The rates for the smallest woody fuels ranged from 0.8 g m-2 year-1 for small diameter stands of Jeffrey pine to 126.9 g m-2 year-1 for very large diameter stands of mountain hemlock. Crown height and live crown ratio were the best predictors of fuel deposition rates for most fuel classes and species. Both characteristics reflect the amount of crown biomass including foliage and woody fuels. Relationships established in this study allow predictions of fuel loads to be made on a stand basis for each of these species under current and possible future conditions. These predictions can be used to

  10. Deep soil dynamics of floodplain carbon in the Central Valley of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Kristin; Kim, Amy T.; Viers, Joshua H.; Fiener, Peter; Smart, David R.

    2017-04-01

    Active floodplains can putatively store large amounts of organic carbon (SOC) in subsoils originating from catchment erosion processes with subsequent floodplain deposition. Changes in catchment land use patterns and river management to optimize agricultural use of the floodplain or to restore the floodplain back to natural systems may alter SOC stocks in these soils. Our study focussed on the assessment of SOC pools associated with alluvial floodplain soils converting from conventional arable use to restored flooding and floodplain vegetation. We evaluated depth-dependent SOC contents using 21 drillings down to 3m and 10 drillings down to 7m along a transect through a floodplain area of the lower Cosumnes River, a non-constrained tributary to the Sacramento - San Joaquin Delta in California. In general, our data underline the importance of carbon stocks in subsoils >1m, which represent up to 19 and 6% of SOC stocks at the different sampling locations accounting for drillings down to 3 and 7m, respectively. All of our sampling sites revealed a SOC-rich buried A horizon between 70 and 130cm with SOC concentrations between 11 and 17g/kg, representative of the functioning floodplain system pre-disturbance. Radiocarbon dating showed that the 14C age in the buried horizon was younger than in the overlaying soils, indicating a substantial sedimentation phase with sediments of low SOC concentrations and higher carbon age. This sedimentation phase was probably associated with the huge upstream sediment production resulting from the hydraulic gold mining at the Cosumnes River starting around 1860. Apart from larger SOC contents in the buried horizon compared to the recent topsoil, its 13C and 15N isotopic signature also differed suggesting a change in long-term input of plant organic matter as well as different fertilization regimes during the agricultural use of the area from approx. 1890 onwards. In summary, deep alluvial soils in floodplains store large amounts of SOC

  11. A hybrid machine learning model to predict and visualize nitrate concentration throughout the Central Valley aquifer, California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Katherine M; Nolan, Bernard T; A Traum, Jonathan; Faunt, Claudia C; Bell, Andrew M; Gronberg, Jo Ann M; Wheeler, David C; Z Rosecrans, Celia; Jurgens, Bryant; Schwarz, Gregory E; Belitz, Kenneth; M Eberts, Sandra; Kourakos, George; Harter, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    Intense demand for water in the Central Valley of California and related increases in groundwater nitrate concentration threaten the sustainability of the groundwater resource. To assess contamination risk in the region, we developed a hybrid, non-linear, machine learning model within a statistical learning framework to predict nitrate contamination of groundwater to depths of approximately 500m below ground surface. A database of 145 predictor variables representing well characteristics, historical and current field and landscape-scale nitrogen mass balances, historical and current land use, oxidation/reduction conditions, groundwater flow, climate, soil characteristics, depth to groundwater, and groundwater age were assigned to over 6000 private supply and public supply wells measured previously for nitrate and located throughout the study area. The boosted regression tree (BRT) method was used to screen and rank variables to predict nitrate concentration at the depths of domestic and public well supplies. The novel approach included as predictor variables outputs from existing physically based models of the Central Valley. The top five most important predictor variables included two oxidation/reduction variables (probability of manganese concentration to exceed 50ppb and probability of dissolved oxygen concentration to be below 0.5ppm), field-scale adjusted unsaturated zone nitrogen input for the 1975 time period, average difference between precipitation and evapotranspiration during the years 1971-2000, and 1992 total landscape nitrogen input. Twenty-five variables were selected for the final model for log-transformed nitrate. In general, increasing probability of anoxic conditions and increasing precipitation relative to potential evapotranspiration had a corresponding decrease in nitrate concentration predictions. Conversely, increasing 1975 unsaturated zone nitrogen leaching flux and 1992 total landscape nitrogen input had an increasing relative impact on

  12. A hybrid machine learning model to predict and visualize nitrate concentration throughout the Central Valley aquifer, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Katherine M.; Nolan, Bernard T.; Traum, Jonathan A.; Faunt, Claudia; Bell, Andrew M.; Gronberg, Jo Ann M.; Wheeler, David C.; Zamora, Celia; Jurgens, Bryant; Schwarz, Gregory E.; Belitz, Kenneth; Eberts, Sandra; Kourakos, George; Harter, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Intense demand for water in the Central Valley of California and related increases in groundwater nitrate concentration threaten the sustainability of the groundwater resource. To assess contamination risk in the region, we developed a hybrid, non-linear, machine learning model within a statistical learning framework to predict nitrate contamination of groundwater to depths of approximately 500 m below ground surface. A database of 145 predictor variables representing well characteristics, historical and current field and landscape-scale nitrogen mass balances, historical and current land use, oxidation/reduction conditions, groundwater flow, climate, soil characteristics, depth to groundwater, and groundwater age were assigned to over 6000 private supply and public supply wells measured previously for nitrate and located throughout the study area. The boosted regression tree (BRT) method was used to screen and rank variables to predict nitrate concentration at the depths of domestic and public well supplies. The novel approach included as predictor variables outputs from existing physically based models of the Central Valley. The top five most important predictor variables included two oxidation/reduction variables (probability of manganese concentration to exceed 50 ppb and probability of dissolved oxygen concentration to be below 0.5 ppm), field-scale adjusted unsaturated zone nitrogen input for the 1975 time period, average difference between precipitation and evapotranspiration during the years 1971–2000, and 1992 total landscape nitrogen input. Twenty-five variables were selected for the final model for log-transformed nitrate. In general, increasing probability of anoxic conditions and increasing precipitation relative to potential evapotranspiration had a corresponding decrease in nitrate concentration predictions. Conversely, increasing 1975 unsaturated zone nitrogen leaching flux and 1992 total landscape nitrogen input had an increasing relative

  13. Conodont and fusulinid biostratigraphy and history of the Pennsylvanian to Lower Permian Keeler Basin, east-central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, C.H.; Stone, P.; Ritter, S.M.

    2001-01-01

    The Pennsylvanian-Lower Permian Keeler Canyon Formation and lower part of the Lower Permian Lone Pine Formation in east-central California were deposited in a deep-water basin that originated in the Morrowan (Early Pennsylvanian), was fully established by the Desmoinesian (Middle Pennsylvanian), and lasted into the Sakmarian (Early Permian). Stratigraphic studies indicate that the Keeler Canyon Formation can be divided into members recognizable throughout the area of our detailed mapping. From older to younger they are the Tinemaha Reservoir, Tihvipah Limestone, Cerro Gordo Spring, and Salt Tram Members. Rocks in this basin, here referred to as the Keeler basin, contain numerous fusulinid and conodont faunas most of which were deposited by sediment-gravity flows probably originating at the margin of the Bird Spring carbonate platform to the northeast. Sixty-one species of Atokan to Sakmarian fusulinids and 38 species of Desmoinesian to Sakmarian conodonts are recognized. These, in addition to four species of Morrowan conodonts previously reported, show that every stage from the Morrowan to Sakmarian is represented in the basin. The fusulinid faunas are composed largely of taxa of the North American craton, especially the south-central USA, with important endemic constituents and some McCloud Limestone forms, representing the Eastern Klamath terrane. Conodonts are closely similar to species in the Ural Mountains region of Russia and Kazakhstan, as well as the American midcontinent. The co-occurrence of fusulinids and conodonts in the Keeler basin results in a better correlation of zones based on these two groups of fossils than generally is possible.

  14. Wildfire and soil emissions of NOx and their consequences for ozone observed at a remote mountaintop site in Central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, E. C. C.; Caputi, D.; Conley, S. A.; Faloona, I. C.

    2016-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NOx) emissions contribute to the production of tropospheric ozone and the nutrient supply fueling primary production. Current global estimates indicate that biomass burning, including wildfires, and soil emissions represent 15 - 25 % of the total emissions. Yet estimates suggest that in North America during the summer, natural sources, including biomass burning, soil emissions and lightning, are responsible for nearly half of total emissions. Thus, as domestic air quality standards grow stricter and anthropogenic sources more regulated, constraining natural sources of NOx becomes critical. NOx concentrations in wildfire smoke differ based on the age of the plume, fire intensity and vegetation type. NOx soil emissions depend on soil moisture, soil temperature, soil porosity, and nitrogen storage. We present two years of NOx and ozone (O3) measurements from a remote mountaintop monitoring site located on Chews Ridge in the coastal mountains of Central California, airborne observations, and remotely sensed NO2 tropospheric columns retrieved using the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). We explore controls on NOx concentrations at Chews Ridge, in Monterey County, such as the age of wildfire smoke plumes and wildfire intensity (i.e. burning vs. smoldering), as well as soil moisture and precipitation, which can lead to pulsed NOx fluxes. Most recently our in situ observations fortuitously captured differing amounts of the active plume of the Soberanes wildfire, which to date has burned >45,000 acres and is expected to continue partially contained through August 2016. Implications of these episodic sources of NOx on the regional ozone budget will be discussed.

  15. A year in the life of a central California kelp forest: physical and biological insights into biogeochemical variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koweek, David A.; Nickols, Kerry J.; Leary, Paul R.; Litvin, Steve Y.; Bell, Tom W.; Luthin, Timothy; Lummis, Sarah; Mucciarone, David A.; Dunbar, Robert B.

    2017-01-01

    Kelp forests are among the world's most productive marine ecosystems, yet little is known about their biogeochemistry. This study presents a 14-month time series (July 2013-August 2014) of surface and benthic dissolved inorganic carbon and total alkalinity measurements, along with accompanying hydrographic measurements, from six locations within a central California kelp forest. We present ranges and patterns of variability in carbonate chemistry, including pH (7.70-8.33), pCO2 (172-952 µatm), and the aragonite saturation state, ΩAr (0.94-3.91). Surface-to-bottom gradients in CO2 system chemistry were as large as the spatial gradients throughout the bottom of the kelp forest. Dissolved inorganic carbon variability was the main driver of the observed CO2 system variability. The majority of spatial variability in the kelp forest can be explained by advection of cold, dense high-CO2 waters into the bottom of the kelp forest, with deeper sites experiencing high-CO2 conditions more frequently. Despite the strong imprint of advection on the biogeochemical variability of the kelp forest, surface waters were undersaturated with CO2 in the spring through fall, indicative of the strong role of photosynthesis on biogeochemical variability. We emphasize the importance of spatially distributed measurements for developing a process-based understanding of kelp forest ecosystem function in a changing climate.

  16. An Airborne Investigation of Boundary Layer Dynamics, Entrainment, and Ozone Photochemical Production During DISCOVER-AQ in California's Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, S. A.; Post, A.; Faloona, I. C.

    2014-12-01

    During the California deployment of NASA's DISCOVER-AQ project of January/February 2013, our team flew a Mooney TLS research aircraft instrumented with an in-house wind measurement system, a UV absorption ozone instrument, temperature probe, and a Picarro methane, carbon dioxide, and water vapor analyzer. Flights were focused on the lowest 1000 m across the Central Valley axis just north of Fresno in order to characterize the wintertime atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). For seven flights we report the observed ABL growth rates, and compare these with a simple mixed layer model driven by surface heat flux estimates from the North American Regional Reanalysis data set. By enforcing a mixed layer budget closure of the observed water vapor trend and the differential across the ABL top, we derive midday entrainment velocities for the region that average 1.2 (± 0.4) cm s-1. A similar budgeting method is used for ozone to estimate wintertime photochemical production rates that ranged from 0.5 to 7.0 ppb h-1, and exhibited a strong correlation with ambient temperature (see Figure) and total ozone abundance. Finally, the gross emissions of methane for this heavily agricultural region are estimated and compared to existing inventories. These results can provide important constraints on ABL growth and entrainment to aid surface studies of aerosol composition and other trace gases that are being conducted for DISCOVER-AQ.

  17. Sex-biased weaning and early childhood diet among middle holocene hunter-gatherers in Central California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eerkens, Jelmer W; Bartelink, Eric J

    2013-12-01

    This article evaluates age of weaning and early childhood diets of eight males and nine females from a Middle Holocene (4300-3000 BP) site in Central California, CA-CCO-548. All individuals died as adults. δ(15) N values from serial sections of dentin collagen in first molars suggest females were fully weaned, on average, by 3.6 years of age, about 0.4 years later than males in the sample, suggesting possible greater parental investment in female offspring. However, throughout childhood females consumed lower trophic-level foods than males. This could indicate greater investment in males through provisioning of higher quality foods, or alternatively, some degree of independent foraging by males starting as early as 2 to 3 years of age. Even as adults, these same males and females consumed a different range of foods as indicated by their bone collagen δ(13) C and δ(15) N values. Overall, the data suggest children were enculturated early into their respective gendered diets, with girls consuming greater amounts of plant foods and boys consuming greater amounts of higher-trophic level fish and meat protein. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Southern and Central California Chaparral and Oak Woodlands Ecoregion: Chapter 19 in Status and trends of land change in the Western United States--1973 to 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napton, Darrell E.

    2012-01-01

    The Southern and Central California Chaparral and Oak Woodlands Ecoregion, which covers approximately 102,110 km2 (39,425 mi2), is characterized by a Mediterranean climate with cool, moist winters and hot, dry summers (Omernik, 1987; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1997). Natural vegetation includes chaparral (for example, manzanita, Arctostaphylos spp.) and oak (Quercus spp.) woodlands with extensive grassland and shrubland cover. The low mountains and foothills of the ecoregion border or parallel the Pacific Ocean from Mexico to Point Reyes, California, and continue inland surrounding the Central California Valley Ecoregion (fig. 1). These mountains and hills are interrupted by limited areas of flat land generally used for development or agriculture. The largest developed area in the ecoregion is the Los Angeles Basin, followed by the San Francisco Bay area and the San Diego metropolitan area (fig. 1). The largest agricultural area is the Salinas River valley south of Monterey, California. Most of the ecoregion consists of rangelands classified as grassland/ shrubland and forest land covers (figs. 1,2).

  19. Priority setting and implementation in a centralized health system: a case study of Kerman province in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayatzadeh-Mahani, Akram; Fotaki, Marianna; Harvey, Gillian

    2013-08-01

    The question of how priority setting processes work remains topical, contentious and political in every health system across the globe. It is particularly acute in the context of developing countries because of the mismatch between needs and resources, which is often compounded by an underdeveloped capacity for decision making and weak institutional infrastructures. Yet there is limited research into how the process of setting and implementing health priorities works in developing countries. This study aims to address this gap by examining how a national priority setting programme works in the centralized health system of Iran and what factors influence its implementation at the meso and micro levels. We used a qualitative case study approach, incorporating mixed methods: in-depth interviews at three levels and a textual analysis of policy documents. The data analysis showed that the process of priority setting is non-systematic, there is little transparency as to how specific priorities are decided, and the decisions made are separated from their implementation. This is due to the highly centralized system, whereby health priorities are set at the macro level without involving meso or micro local levels or any representative of the public. Furthermore, the two main benefit packages are decided by different bodies (Ministry of Health and Medical Education and Ministry of Welfare and Social Security) and there is no co-ordination between them. The process is also heavily influenced by political pressure exerted by various groups, mostly medical professionals who attempt to control priority setting in accordance with their interests. Finally, there are many weaknesses in the implementation of priorities, resulting in a growing gap between rural and urban areas in terms of access to health services.

  20. Characteristics of water erosion and conservation practice in arid regions of Central Asia: Xinjiang Province, China as an example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentai Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Located in the inland arid area of Central Asia and northwest China, Xinjiang has recently received heightened concerns over soil water erosion, which is highly related with the sustainable utilization of barren soil and limited water resources. Data from the national soil erosion survey of China (1985–2011 and Xinjiang statistical yearbook (2000–2010 was used to analyze the trend, intensity, and serious soil water erosion regions. Results showed that the water erosion area in Xinjiang was 87.6×103 km2 in 2011, mainly distributed in the Ili river valley and the northern and southern Tian Mountain. Soil erosion gradient was generally slight and the average erosion modulus was 2184 t/(km2 a. During the last 26 years, the water erosion area in Xinjiang decreased by 23.2%, whereas the intensity was still increasing. The driving factors from large to small impact included: population boom and human activities>vegetation degradation>rainfall and climate change>topography and soil erodibility>tectonics movement. Soil water erosion resulted in eco-environmental and socioeconomic losses, such as destroying farmland and grassland, triggering floods, sedimentation of reservoirs, damaging transportation and irrigation facilities, and aggravating poverty. A landscape ecological design approach is suggested for integrated control of soil erosion. Currently, an average of 2.07×103 km2 of formerly eroded area is conserved each year. This study highlighted the importance and longevity of soil and water conservation efforts in Xinjiang, and offered some suggestions on ecological restoration and combating desertification in arid regions of Central Asia.

  1. Multiproxy record of the last interglacial (MIS 5e) off central and northern California, U.S.A., from Ocean Drilling Program sites 1018 and 1020

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poore, Richard Z.; Dowsett, H.J.; Barron, J.A.; Heusser, L.; Ravelo, A.C.; Mix, A.

    2000-01-01

    Environmental and climatic conditions during the last interglacial (about 125,000 years ago) along the Central and Northern California coastal region are interpreted from study of marine cores recovered by the Ocean Drilling Program at sites 1018 and 1020. Marine microfossil and pollen assemblages, oxygen isotopes in benthic foraminifers, physical properties, and calcium carbonate contents of cored sediments are proxies indicating strong links between the marine and terrestrial environments during marine isotope stage 5 (MIS 5). At the beginning of the last interglacial (MIS 5e), reduction in global ice volume, increase in surface temperature, and warming of air temperature along the Central and Northern California coast were synchronous within the resolution of our sampling record.

  2. How much groundwater did California's Central Valley lose during the 2012-2016 drought?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Mu; Koppa, Akash; Mekonnen, Zelalem; Pagán, Brianna R.; Zhan, Shengan; Cao, Qian; Aierken, Abureli; Lee, Hyongki; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.

    2017-05-01

    We estimate net groundwater storage change in the Central Valley from April 2002 to September 2016 as the difference between inflows and outflows, precipitation, evapotranspiration, and changes in soil moisture and surface water storage. We also estimate total water storage change attributable to groundwater change using Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite data, which should be equivalent to our water balance estimates. Over two drought periods within our 14-1/2 years study period (January 2007 to December 2009 and October 2012 to September 2016), we estimate from our water balance that a total of 16.5 km3 and 40.0 km3 of groundwater was lost, respectively. Our water balance-based estimate of the overall groundwater loss over the 14-1/2 years is -20.7 km3, which includes substantial recovery during nondrought periods The estimated rate of groundwater loss is greater during the recent drought (10.0 ± 0.2 versus 5.5 ± 0.3 km3/yr) than in the 2007-2009 drought, due to lower net inflows, a transition from row crops to trees, and higher crop water use, notwithstanding a reduction in irrigated area. The GRACE estimates of groundwater loss (-5.0 km3/yr for both water balance and GRACE during 2007-2009, and -11.2 km3/yr for GRACE versus -10 km3/yr for water balance during 2012-2016) are quite consistent for the two methods. However, over the entire study period, the GRACE-based groundwater loss estimate is almost triple that from the water balance, mostly because GRACE does not indicate the between-drought groundwater recovery that is inferred from our water balance.

  3. An Analysis of Health Impacts Associated with Pollutant Response to Changes in Emissions In Different Regions of Central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, C.; Tanrikulu, S.; Beaver, S.; Hilken, H.

    2011-12-01

    Exposure to ozone and particulate matter has been shown to have considerable human health impacts. Currently major air basins of central California such as the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA), Sacramento area, and the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) are all designated as in nonattainment of the Federal 8-hour ozone and 24-hour PM2.5 standards, despite California's comprehensive emission control programs for the last fifty years. Although these programs were very effective, decreasing anthropogenic emissions 40 to 50 percent in the region from 1990 to 2010 alone, the ambient response of pollutants was mixed and varied among these three interconnected regions. The purpose of this work was to investigate differences in each region's human health impact response to changes in emissions using the US EPA's BenMAP program. Inputs to BenMAP were prepared using the CMAQ model. Ambient concentrations were simulated for 2005. Then, anthropogenic emissions were reduced 10 to 60 percent across the board in 10 percent increments for the purpose of assessing pollutant responses to changes in emissions. BenMAP was run for each emission reduction scenario. The BenMAP results were normalized by county population to enable comparisons among counties that ranged from rural and agricultural to urban and densely populated. In all regions, the benefits of direct PM emission reductions were greater than those of similar precursor reductions. With respect to mortality rates, direct PM reductions produced the largest benefits in Nevada, Stanislaus, Tuolumne, and San Francisco Counties. For a 40 percent reduction in emissions, reductions in annual mortality rates ranged from 120 to 140 per million for these counties. Precursor emission reductions' benefits were maximized at the southern end of SJV, with Tulare showing the maximum reduction of around 83 mortalities per million. Monetized benefits of avoided mortalities as a result of direct PM emission reductions were significantly higher in

  4. Variability in surface water productivity in the central Gulf of California during the Medieval Climate Anomaly and Little Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, V.; Barron, J. A.; Addison, J. A.; Bukry, D.

    2016-12-01

    The 1100-km-long Gulf of California (GOC) is separated from the cool waters of the eastern North Pacific by Baja California, and experiences both a temperate and sub-tropical climatology. In the eastern GOC, extensive diatom blooms are generated by strong northwest winds that upwell nutrient-rich waters during the winter. Slackening of these upwelling-favorable winds during the late spring allows for northward flow of tropical waters up the axis of the Gulf, prompting the flow of tropical moisture into northwestern Mexico and Arizona. Similar to the eastern bias during winter upwelling, northward flowing surface currents transporting tropical waters into the GOC during summer are also strongest on the eastern side of the Gulf. This study utilizes strew slide and biogenic silica (opal) analyses of diatoms and silicoflagellates to examine changes in primary productivity, over the past 2000 years from three marine sediment cores from Guaymas Basin in the central GOC. The cores include the eastern BAM80 E-17 (27.920° N, 111.610°W, 620 m water depth); the western MD02-2517c2 at 27.485° N, 112.074°W, water depth 887 m); and the southwestern DR373-VC-214 (26.879°N, 111.339°W, 1860 m water depth). This detailed productivity transect will test the hypothesis that the surface water productivity of the eastern and western portions of the Guaymas Basin responded differently to late Holocene climatic forcings. These records document distinct changes in the east-to-west productivity gradient during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) ( 850-1250 CE) and the Little Ice Age (LIA) ( 1300-1850 CE). Diatom and silicoflagellate assemblages suggest that the MCA was characterized by a reduced east- west productivity gradient and generally warm surface water conditions. The LIA appeared to be more similar to that of modern GOC surface water conditions, with a stronger east- west productivity gradient. The data also show that a warmer interval similar to that of the MCA occurred

  5. Influence of fault trend, bends, and convergence on shallow structure and geomorphology of the Hosgri strike-slip fault, offshore central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Watt, Janet T.

    2012-01-01

    We mapped an ∼94-km-long portion of the right-lateral Hosgri fault zone in offshore central California using a dense network of high-resolution seismic reflection profiles, marine magnetic data, and multibeam bathymetry. These data document the location, length, and continuity of multiple fault strands, highlight fault-zone heterogeneity, and demonstrate the importance of fault trend, fault bends, and fault convergence in the development of shallow structure and tectonic geomorphology along strike-slip faults.

  6. Assessing the Impact of GODAE Boundary Conditions on the Estimate and Prediction of the Monterey Bay and California Central Coast Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    demonstrate the utility of ROMS data assimilation and ensemble prediction in a real-time sea-going environment aboard a Royal Carribean Cruise Line...Assessing the Impact of GODAE Boundary Conditions on the Estimate and Prediction of the Monterey Bay and California Central Coast Circulation...LONG-TERM GOALS The practical demonstration of basin-scale ocean state estimation has been realized through the Global Ocean Data Assimilation

  7. Seroepidemiological study of bovine respiratory viruses (BRSV, BoHV-1, PI-3V, BVDV, and BAV-3) in dairy cattle in central region of Iran (Esfahan province).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirvani, Edris; Lotfi, Mohsen; Kamalzadeh, Morteza; Noaman, Vahid; Bahriari, Masumeh; Morovati, Hasan; Hatami, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory diseases in calves are responsible for major economic losses in both beef and dairy production. Several viruses, such as bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine herpes virus-1 (BoHV-1), bovine parainfluenza virus-3 (BPI-3V), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), and bovine adenoviruses (BAV), are detected in most clinical cases with respiratory signs. The aim of this study is to define seroprevalences of five major viral causes of bovine respiratory infections in cattle in central region of Iran (Esfahan province). The population targeted was 642 dairy cows (Holstein-Friesian) from 25 farms. Samples of blood serum from female cattle were examined. Sera were tested by commercial ELISA kits to detect antibody against BRSV, BoHV-1, BPI-3V, BVDV, and BAV-3. The results were analyzed by Chi-square test. In the present study, seroprevalences of BRSV, BoHV-1, PI3V, BVDV, and BAV-3 were 51.1%, 72%, 84.4%, 49.2%, and 55.6%, respectively. The present study shows that infections of bovine respiratory viruses are very common in cattle in Esfahan.

  8. Fluoride in drinking water and diet: the causative factor of chronic kidney diseases in the North Central Province of Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmaratne, Ranjith W

    2015-07-01

    A significant number of people in the North Central Province of Sri Lanka suffer from chronic kidney diseases (CKD), and the author revisits existing literature related to CKD to find its causative factor. There is a direct connection between high fluoride levels in drinking water and kidney disease, and there are unhealthy levels of fluoride in the groundwater in Sri Lanka's CKD-affected areas. Based on the following observations, the author believes with confidence that excess fluoride in drinking water and in the locally grown food in the affected areas are the culprits of CKD in Sri Lanka. Fluoride excretion rate is considerably lower in children than adults, leading to renal damage of children living in areas with high fluoride. Adults who had renal damage due to fluoride in childhood are vulnerable to CKD with continued consumption of water from the same source. Patients with chronic renal insufficiency are at an increased risk of chronic fluoride toxicity. High content of fluoride in groundwater paves the way to excess fluoride in local food crops, consequently adding more fluoride to the systems of the consumers. People who work outdoors for prolonged periods consume excess water and tea, and are subjected to additional doses of fluoride in their system. In the mid-1980s, the increase in water table levels of the affected areas due to new irrigation projects paved the way to adding more fluorides to their system through drinking water and locally grown foods.

  9. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons residues in Gentile di maiale, a smoked meat product typical of some mountain areas in Latina province (Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Carrabs

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gentile di maiale is a typical meat product prepared in some traditional plants of Latina Province (Central Italy. It is obtained from dehydration, salting, smoking and ripening of swine rectum. Aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the traditional smoking process on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs content by means of high-performance liquid chromatographic/fluorescence detection. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons detected in 8 samples of raw material (swine rectum and samples of smoked gentile were: benzo[a]anthracene, chrisene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[a] pyrene, benzo[a,h]anthracene. Their residues were detected in all samples of finished product. European Regulation 835/2011 established two levels of PAHs content in meat products. According to first levels, in force until September 2014, only 2 out of 8 samples exceeded legal limit. According to the subsequent, more restrictive, limits all samples would be non-compliant. An improvement and a standardisation of traditional smoking procedures are recommended.

  10. Antibiotic consumption in Shandong Province, China: an analysis of provincial pharmaceutical centralized bidding procurement data at public healthcare institutions, 2012-16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jia; Li, Qinwei; Sun, Qiang

    2017-12-18

    To explore the trends of antibiotic consumption in public healthcare institutions through analysing the provincial centralized bidding procurement (CBP) data in Shandong, China. The Shandong CBP system has been established since 2011, covering public healthcare institutions of 500 secondary and tertiary hospitals, 600 urban primary healthcare centres (PHCs) and 1600 rural PHCs. We collected all the antibiotic procurement records from the CBP system between 2012 and 2016. Antibiotic consumption data were calculated using Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC)/DDD methodology and normalized using DDD per 1000 inhabitants per day (DID). Overall antibiotic consumption increased from 12.859 DID in 2012 to 15.802 DID in 2014, then decreased to 13.802 DID in 2016. The top three antibiotics consumed in 2016 were penicillins (4.251 DID), quinolones (2.957 DID) and macrolides (2.057 DID). PHCs consumed 80% of the total antibiotics, of which rural PHCs accounted for 88%. Antibiotic consumption peaked in 2014 for rural PHCs and in 2015 for hospitals, and declined thereafter. In urban PHCs, the consumption steadily increased from 2012 to 2016. Zero mark-up drug policies and national policies to improve rational use of antibiotic were associated with the reduction of antibiotic consumption in public healthcare institutions in Shandong Province. Regulations for antibiotic use in PHCs should be strengthened.

  11. Procedure for calculating estimated ultimate recoveries of wells in the Mississippian Barnett Shale, Bend Arch–Fort Worth Basin Province of north-central Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.

    2017-11-28

    In 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey published an assessment of technically recoverable continuous oil and gas resources of the Mississippian Barnett Shale in the Bend Arch–Fort Worth Basin Province of north-central Texas. Of the two assessment units involved in the overall assessment, one included a roughly equal number of oil wells and gas wells as classified by the U.S. Geological Survey’s standard of gas wells having production greater than or equal to 20,000 cubic feet of gas per barrel of oil and oil wells having production less than 20,000 cubic feet of gas per barrel of oil. As a result, estimated ultimate recoveries (EURs) were calculated for both oil wells and gas wells in one of the assessment units. Generally, only gas EURs or only oil EURs are calculated for an assessment unit. These EURs were calculated with data from IHS MarkitTM using DeclinePlus software in the Harmony interface and were a major component of the quantitative resource assessment. The calculated mean EURs ranged from 235 to 2,078 million cubic feet of gas and 21 to 39 thousand barrels of oil for various subsets of wells.

  12. Condition of Health Problems in The District Health Offi ce Parigi Moutong Central Sulawesi Province, Efforts in Response of Health Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Erlan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: District Parigi Moutong, Central Sulawesi Province is one of the Regional District Health Problems. Ranking Public Health Development Index Parigi Moutong to the level of Central Sulawesi was ranked 6 out of 9 districts/cities, while at the national level comes out to 320 of 440 districts/cities in Indonesia. The purpose of this study is to provide a picture of the health problems in Parigi Moutong. In more detail the objectives are observed after the implementation of such interventions and Booster Kalakarya prevention efforts in the area of health problems. Methods: The study is qualitative observational study of participatory design. Samples were taken by using purposive sampling to conduct in-depth interviews and document searches. Results: The results of in-depth interviews obtained information of some constraints inthe implementation of health programs, ie no actions/movements that were signifi cant in the response to the problem. Infant mortality in 2012, registered 7 cases. Substitution head of the health center too fast. This happens because the head of the health center has held PTT doctor working period of one year, which resulted in problems in sustainability programs in health centers. Internal monthly meeting at the Department of Health and the District Health Offi ce with the entire health center no. Effort or movement to address the problems associated Regional Health Problems has not be percieved. Conclusions: Implementation of Regional Booster Kalakarya and Health Troubled make changes to the head of health policy by forming groups Conscious Movement IHC and revitalization partnership TBA and midwives who are increasing numbers toddlersweighing scope and aid delivery by health personnel.

  13. Reprocessed 3D seismic-reflection data and neural-network fault cube of field activity P-04-11-CC, offshore Point Sal, central California, 2012-08-12 to 2012-10-05

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes reprocessed boomer 3D seismic data collected by the Fugro Consultants Inc. in 2012, offshore Point Sal, central California.

  14. The time-space distribution of Eocene to Miocene magmatism in the central Peruvian polymetallic province and its metallogenetic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissig, Thomas; Ullrich, Thomas D.; Tosdal, Richard M.; Friedman, Richard; Ebert, Shane

    2008-07-01

    Eocene to late Miocene magmatism in the central Peruvian high-plain (approx. between Cerro de Pasco and Huancayo; Lats. ˜10.2-12°S) and east of the Cordillera Occidental is represented by scattered shallow-level intrusions as well as subaerial domes and volcanic deposits. These igneous rocks are calc-alkalic and range from basalt to rhyolite in composition, and many of them are spatially, temporally and, by inference, genetically associated with varied styles of major polymetallic mineralization. Forty-four new 40Ar- 39Ar and three U/Pb zircon dates are presented, many for previously undated intrusions. Our new time constraints together with data from the literature now cover most of the Cenozoic igneous rocks of this Andean segment and provide foundation for geodynamic and metallogenetic research. The oldest Cenozoic bodies are of Eocene age and include dacitic domes to the west of Cerro de Pasco with ages ranging from 38.5 to 33.5 Ma. South of the Domo de Yauli structural dome, Eocene igneous rocks occur some 15 km east of the Cordillera Occidental and include a 39.34 ± 0.28 Ma granodioritic intrusion and a 40.14 ± 0.61 Ma rhyolite sill, whereas several diorite stocks were emplaced between 36 and 33 Ma. Eocene mineralization is restricted to the Quicay high-sulfidation epithermal deposit some 10 km to the west of Cerro de Pasco. Igneous activity in the earliest Oligocene was concentrated up to 70 km east of the Cordillera Occidental and is represented by a number of granodioritic intrusions in the Milpo-Atacocha area. Relatively voluminous early Oligocene dacitic to andesitic volcanism gave rise to the Astabamba Formation to the southeast of Domo de Yauli. Some stocks at Milpo and Atacocha generated important Zn-Pb (-Ag) skarn mineralization. After about 29.3 Ma, magmatism ceased throughout the study region. Late Oligocene igneous activity was restricted to andesitic and dacitic volcanic deposits and intrusions around Uchucchacua (approx. 25 Ma) and felsic

  15. The geometry and lithology of the Cima Sandstone Lentil: a paleoseep-bearing interbed in the Moreno Formation, central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, P. V.; Schwartz, H.

    2007-12-01

    The Cima Sandstone Lentil outcrops over a relatively small area on the western side of the San Joaquin Valley in central California. Here this unit can be found in the Panoche Hills in the northern portion of the field area and the Tumey Hills in the southern portion of the field area. The Cima Sandstone resides within the 800m Moreno Formation that spans the Maastrichtian to the Danian. The Moreno Formation comprises four members, which are the Dosados Member, the Tierra Loma Member, the Marca Shale Member, and the Dos Palos Shale Member (of which the Cima Sandstone is an interbed). The Cima Sandstone contains numerous large carbonate mounds, concretions, and pavements, indicating paleoseep activity. The Cima Sandstone has never been studied in detail, but recent interest in sandstone injectites as well as interest in paleoseeps has prompted us to examine this interbed more carefully. The Cima is an immature sandstone composed primarily of quartz along with small amounts of micas and feldspars as well as varying amounts of glauconite. These minerals are generally cemented by carbonate but, occasionally, iron oxide cement is present locally. Much variation exists within the Cima Sandstone Lentil and we seek to characterize and understand this variation. One of the most obvious sources of variability is the thickness of the unit itself. The thickness ranges from near 60m in the northern Panoche Hills to only 9m in the Tumey Hills. Induration also varies noticeably, from well cemented in the north, to unconsolidated in the south. Similarly, the sandstone is grain-supported and houses some depositional structures in the northern outcrops but becomes largely matrix-supported and lacking bedding in the southern outcrops. Preliminary data suggests that proximity to carbonate concretions, fluid conduits, and underlying injectites may have some influence over grain size and sorting.

  16. A Year in the Life of a Central California Kelp Forest: Physical and Biological Insights into Carbon Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickols, K. J.; Koweek, D.; Leary, P.; Litvin, S. Y.; Luthin, T.; Lummis, S.; Mucciarone, D. A.; Dunbar, R. B.; Bell, T. W.

    2016-02-01

    Kelp forests are among the most productive ecosystems, yet little is known about their biogeochemistry. The biogeochemical environment of kelp forests is influenced by regional processes (e.g., upwelling) that deliver offshore waters into the forest as well as local processes (e.g., production, respiration, and local hydrodynamics) that modify local water chemistry. We present a weekly-resolved 14-mo time-series (Jul 2013-Sep 2014) of water column properties (temperature, salinity, total alkalinity, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC)) within and around a central California kelp forest at wave-exposed and protected sites in conjunction with water column velocity and satellite-derived estimates of kelp biomass. CTD hydrocasts and water samples revealed strong seasonal cycles in the chemical and physical water column structure. In the winter, the water column was well-mixed, kelp abundance was low, and vertical DIC gradients were typically absent. During the upwelling season kelp growth was high, the water column was stratified, and vertical DIC gradients sometimes exceeded 200 μmol/kg. Vertical gradients were strongest in the protected side of the forest and weaker on the wave-exposed side. DIC variability is the dominant control on pH, pCO2, and carbonate mineral saturation state variability. pCO2 was generally highest in the wave exposed side of the forest, especially during the upwelling season. This side experienced stronger cross-shore currents and a smaller cross-shore kelp forest extent than the protected side, promoting cross-shore exchange of kelp forest waters with offshore waters. This study emphasizes the importance of long-term, spatially distributed measurements for mechanistic descriptions of kelp forest biogeochemistry. Understanding the contributions of physical and biological processes to CO2 system chemistry is an essential step to predicting responses of temperate nearshore habitats to climate change and ocean acidification.

  17. Strongly-sheared wind-forced currents in the nearshore regions of the central Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Marlene A.; Rosenberger, Kurt; Robertson, George L.

    2015-01-01

    Contrary to many previous reports, winds do drive currents along the shelf in the central portion of the Southern California Bight (SCB). Winds off Huntington Beach CA are the dominant forcing for currents over the nearshore region of the shelf (water depths less than 20 m). Winds control about 50–70% of the energy in nearshore alongshelf surface currents. The wind-driven current amplitudes are also anomalously high. For a relatively weak 1 dyne/cm2 wind stress, the alongshelf surface current amplitudes in this region can reach 80 cm/s or more. Mid-depth current amplitudes for the same wind stress are around 30–40 cm/s. These wind-driven surface current amplitudes are much larger than previously measured over other nearshore shelf regions, perhaps because this program is one of the few that measured currents within a meter of the surface. The near-bed cross-shelf currents over the nearshore region of the Huntington Beach shelf have an Ekman response to winds in that they upwell (downwell) for down (up) coast winds. This response disappears further offshore. Hence, there is upwelling in the SCB, but it does not occur across the entire shelf. Subthermocline water in the nearshore region that may contain nutrients and plankton move onshore when winds are southeastward, but subthermocline water over the shelf break is not transported to the beach. The currents over the outer shelf are not predominately controlled by winds, consistent with previous reports. Instead, they are mainly driven by cross-shelf pressure gradients that are independent of local wind stress.

  18. Determining the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMPS)'s Role in the Increased Flux of CO2 in the end-Triassic Mass Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, P. S.; Bachan, A.; Stanford School of Earth Sciences Department of Paleobiology

    2011-12-01

    The Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) is one of the largest flood basalt provinces known. Its empacement coincided with a period of major plant and animal extinctions-the end-Triassic mass extinction. It is postulated that the release of large amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere from the volcanics was one of the causes of this mass extinction. However,the magnitude of impact on ocean chemistry, and timescales involved remain unclear. To determine CAMP's role in this increased flux of CO2, we studied the geochemistry of samples of rock from the Triassic-Jurassic boundary, in northern Italy. Specifically, by observing the ratios of carbon isotopes 12 and 13 in the organic carbon found in these limestone sedimentary rocks, we could determine the ratio of carbonate to organic burial fluxes globally. We drilled limestone rocks from two different sections in the Southern Alps-- Pozzo Glaciale and Val Adrara. Once they were drilled to a fine powder-like form, we acidified the CaCO3 with HCl to isolate the organic carbon. Then, the organic matter was cleaned to rid the acid, and eventually was placed into tin foil to be placed into the Elemental Analyzer, which determined the percent Carbon in each sample. We tested about 200 samples, and placed them into the Mass Spectrometer machine to determine the isotopic ratios of C12 and C13. According to the data, there was a positive excursion for both sample sets, which means that there was an increase in the amount of C13 in the organic matter. The duration of this excursion was at least a few hundred thousand years. This suggests a protracted increase in the burial flux of organic carbon globally, which is consistent with the hypothesized volcanically driven increase in CO2. This further bolsters the contention that CAMP was responsible, in part, for this mass extinction. By studying the earth's recovery from increased carbon fluxes in the past, we can predict the recovery path that our anthropogenically

  19. Affects of wastewater discharge from mining on soil heavy metal pollution and enzyme activities in northern Hunan province, Central South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ying; Hu, Xue-Feng; Shu, Ying; Yan, Xiao-Juan; Luo, Fan

    2013-04-01

    Hunan province, Central South China, is rich in mineral resources and also a well-known nonferrous metal base in China. Mining and ore processing there, however, are mostly conducted in indigenous methods, and thus causing heavy metal pollution of abundant farmland. Situated in northern Hunan province, Y county has antimony, manganese, vanadium, and pyrite mines, but still belongs to a region of rice cultivation, of which, paddy fields make up 84.5% of the total farmland. Our investigations found that irrigation water is threatened by the release of mining wastewater in the county. For example, a stream used for irrigation turns dark-red after long-term receiving wastewater discharged from a pyrite company at HS Town of the county. Concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd, Fe and Mn in the stream water reach 0.03 mg kg-1, 2.14 mg kg-1, 0.02 mg kg-1, 96.0 mg kg-1 and 11.5 mg kg-1, respectively; these in the paddy soils nearby are 67.3 mg kg-1, 297 mg kg-1, 4.0 mg kg-1, 33.1 mg g-1 and 463 mg kg-1 on average, respectively, with a maximum of Cd reaching 16.8 mg kg-1. Microbial biomass and activities are significantly reduced by metal toxicity in the soils. The counts of fungal, actinomycin and bacterial colonies in the polluted soils are 8.8×103 /g (Fresh soil), 4.9×105 /g (Fresh soil) and 6.4×105 /g (Fresh soil), respectively, which are only 4.68%, 10.3% and 20.9% of these in non-polluted soils in Y county, respectively. Likewise, the microbial biomass (MB) - C and MB - N of the polluted soils are only 36.8% and 50.3% of these in the non-polluted, respectively. The activities of dehydrogenase, urease, catalase, acid and neutral phosphatase and sucrase in the polluted soils are only 41.2%, 49.8%, 56.8%, 69.9%, 80.7% and 81.0% of these in the non-polluted, respectively. There are significant negative correlations between Cu, Zn and Cd contents and the activities of dehydrogenase and catalase, suggesting that the two enzymes are the most sensitive to heavy metal toxicity in the

  20. The Upper Miocene magmatism of the Island of Elba (Central Italy): compositional characteristics, petrogenesis and implications for the origin of the Tuscany Magmatic Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Giampiero; Peccerillo, Angelo

    2016-08-01

    Late Miocene intrusive magmatism of the Island of Elba, Tuscany (central Italy), consists of stocks, laccoliths, sills, and dikes showing dominant monzogranite and granodiorite compositions, with minor leucogranitic dike-sill complexes, aplites and pegmatites. A few mafic rocks occur as dikes, and as microgranular enclaves hosted inside the main intrusions. The Elba magmatism belongs to the Tuscan Magmatic Province, an 8.5 to 0.3 Ma old association of mafic to felsic rocks, of mantle and crustal origin, cropping out in Tuscany and northern Latium. Major and trace element abundances of Elba rocks are extremely variable, testifying to complex origin and evolutionary history for magmas. 87Sr/86Sr (~ 0.708-0.723) and 143Nd/144Nd (~0.5121-0.5124) are close or within the field of upper continental crust, with mafic dikes showing the lowest Sr- and the highest Nd-isotope ratios. Petrological, geochemical and textural data of Elba igneous rocks are better explained by invoking a leading role for multiple mixing processes between crust-derived felsic magmas and mafic-intermediate melts of ultimate mantle origin, accompanied by fractional crystallisation. Proxies of crustal anatectic melts are represented by some highly radiogenic-Sr rocks from northern Monte Capanne pluton. Crustal magmas were formed by melting of sedimentary rocks, likely metagreywakes, at pressures exceeding 0.3 GPa. Mafic-intermediate magmas have calcalkaline to shoshonitic compositions and originated in an anomalous mantle, moderately contaminated by siliceous sediments. Selective enrichments in Sr, Ba and LREE are shown by some intermediate rocks (Orano dikes), revealing the occurrence of a distinct magma type at Elba. Similar compositions are also observed at Capraia island, San Vincenzo and Campiglia (southern Tuscany), suggesting a regional relevance for this magma type. Sr-Ba-LREE-rich rocks do not show obvious genetic relationships with other Tuscany magmas and may represent a distinct end

  1. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the central-eastside San Joaquin Basin, 2006: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landon, Matthew K.; Belitz, Kenneth; Jurgens, Bryant C.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Johnson, Tyler D.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 1,695-square-mile Central Eastside San Joaquin Basin (Central Eastside) study unit was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project (PBP) of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA PBP was developed in response to the California Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA Central Eastside study unit was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated-groundwater quality, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. During March through June 2006, samples were collected from 78 wells in Stanislaus and Merced Counties, 58 of which were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells), and 20 of which were sampled to evaluate changes in water chemistry along groundwater-flow paths (understanding wells). Water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database also were used for the assessment.An assessment of the current status of the groundwater quality included collecting samples from wells for analysis of anthropogenic constituents such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and pesticides, as well as naturally occurring constituents such as major ions and trace elements. The assessment of status is intended to characterize the quality of untreated-groundwater resources within the primary aquifer system, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors. The primary aquifer system (hereinafter, primary aquifer) is defined as that part of the aquifer corresponding to the perforation interval of wells listed in the CDPH database for the Central Eastside study unit. The quality of groundwater in shallower or

  2. Fault and anthropogenic processes in central California constrained by satellite and airborne InSAR and in-situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Lundgren, Paul

    2016-07-01

    The San Andreas Fault (SAF) system is the primary plate boundary in California, with the central SAF (CSAF) lying adjacent to the San Joaquin Valley (SJV), a vast structural trough that accounts for about one-sixth of the United Sates' irrigated land and one-fifth of its extracted groundwater. The CSAF displays a range of fault slip behavior with creeping in its central segment that decreases towards its northwest and southeast ends, where the fault transitions to being fully locked. At least six Mw ~6.0 events since 1857 have occurred near the Parkfield transition, most recently in 2004. Large earthquakes also occurred on secondary faults parallel to the SAF, the result of distributed deformation across the plate boundary zone. Recent studies have revealed the complex interaction between anthropogenic related groundwater depletion and the seismic activity on adjacent faults through stress interaction. Despite recent progress, many questions regarding fault and anthropogenic processes in the region still remain. For example, how is the relative plate motion accommodated between the CSAF and off-fault deformation? What is the distribution of fault creep and slip deficit at shallow depths? What are the spatiotemporal variations of fault slip? What are the spatiotemporal characteristics of anthropogenic and lithospheric processes and how do they interact with each other? To address these, we combine satellite InSAR and NASA airborne UAVSAR data to image on and off-fault deformation. The UAVSAR data cover fault perpendicular swaths imaged from opposing look directions and fault parallel swaths since 2009. The much finer spatial resolution and optimized viewing geometry provide important constraints on near fault deformation and fault slip at very shallow depth. We performed a synoptic InSAR time series analysis using ERS-1/2, Envisat, ALOS and UAVSAR interferograms. The combined C-band ERS-1/2 and Envisat data provide a long time interval of SAR data over the region

  3. Geohydrology, Geochemistry, and Ground-Water Simulation-Optimization of the Central and West Coast Basins, Los Angeles County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, Eric G.; Land, Michael; Crawford, Steven M.; Johnson, Tyler D.; Everett, Rhett; Kulshan, Trayle V.; Ponti, Daniel J.; Halford, Keith L.; Johnson, Theodore A.; Paybins, Katherine S.; Nishikawa, Tracy

    2003-01-01

    Historical ground-water development of the Central and West Coast Basins in Los Angeles County, California through the first half of the 20th century caused large water-level declines and induced seawater intrusion. Because of this, the basins were adjudicated and numerous ground-water management activities were implemented, including increased water spreading, construction of injection barriers, increased delivery of imported water, and increased use of reclaimed water. In order to improve the scientific basis for these water management activities, an extensive data collection program was undertaken, geohydrological and geochemical analyses were conducted, and ground-water flow simulation and optimization models were developed. In this project, extensive hydraulic, geologic, and chemical data were collected from new multiple-well monitoring sites. On the basis of these data and data compiled and collected from existing wells, the regional geohydrologic framework was characterized. For the purposes of modeling, the three-dimensional aquifer system was divided into four aquifer systems?the Recent, Lakewood, Upper San Pedro, and Lower San Pedro aquifer systems. Most pumpage in the two basins is from the Upper San Pedro aquifer system. Assessment of the three-dimensional geochemical data provides insight into the sources of recharge and the movement and age of ground water in the study area. Major-ion data indicate the chemical character of water containing less than 500 mg/L dissolved solids generally grades from calcium-bicarbonate/sulfate to sodium bicarbonate. Sodium-chloride water, high in dissolved solids, is present in wells near the coast. Stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen provide information on sources of recharge to the basin, including imported water and water originating in the San Fernando Valley, San Gabriel Valley, and the coastal plain and surrounding hills. Tritium and carbon-14 data provide information on relative ground-water ages. Water with

  4. Field and geochemical constraints on the relationship between the Apoteri basalts (northern Brazil, southwestern Guyana) and the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Viter M.; Santos, João Orestes S.; Ronchi, Luiz H.; Hartmann, Léo A.; Bicudo, Carlos Alberto; de Souza, Vladimir

    2017-11-01

    In northern Brazil, Roraima state and southwestern Guyana, basalt flows characterized by inflated pahoehoe structure occur along the margins of the Tacutu Rift Valley, dykes intrude the Paleoproterozoic basement close to the boundary of the rift system with concordant, NE-trend. The dykes and flows belong to Apoteri magmatism. New field, geochemical data (major, trace and rare-earth elements) and chemical stratigraphy of the Apoteri magmatism indicate petrographic and chemical homogeneity characteristic of continental tholeiitic basalts. The basalt flows of Morro Redondo and Nova Olinda sites show two distinct chemical groups: a) the lower flows with intermediate TiO2 content (ITi group) ranging from 1.09 to 1.41 wt%, MgO (5.64-6.46 wt%) and Ni (43-53 ppm) contents; and b) the upper flows with lower TiO2 content (LTi group) = 0.75 to 0.78 wt%, higher MgO = 7.95-8.85 wt% and Ni = 105-115 ppm. The two magma types share many characteristics in high field strength elements (HFSE) and rare earth elements (REE), but in detail significant differences exist in REE ratios, e.g. (La/Yb)N of ∼4.0 for ITi and 3.2 for LTi and this may be explained by fractional crystallization. The chemical compositions of the Apoteri dykes are similar the ITi group analyses, suggesting that they have the same origin. The La/Ba versus La/Nb diagram is indicative of large ion lithophile elements (LILE) enrichment and LILE/HFSE fractionation in the mantle source, and the data favor a dominant subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) component in the origin of the Apoteri flows and dykes. These data show consistent similar chemical characteristics and correspond to other tholeiitic flows from the large Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), especially eastern USA.

  5. Duration of and decoupling between carbon isotope excursions during the end-Triassic mass extinction and Central Atlantic Magmatic Province emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Joyce A.; West, A. Joshua; Corsetti, Frank A.; Berelson, William M.; Rollins, Nick E.; Rosas, Silvia; Bottjer, David J.

    2017-09-01

    Changes in δ13Ccarb and δ13Corg from marine strata occur globally in association with the end-Triassic mass extinction and the emplacement of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) during the break up of Pangea. As is typical in deep time, the timing and duration of these isotopic excursions has remained elusive, hampering attempts to link carbon cycle perturbations to specific processes. Here, we report δ13Ccarb and δ13Corg from Late Triassic and Early Jurassic strata near Levanto, Peru, where intercalated dated ash beds permit temporal calibration of the carbon isotope record. Both δ13Ccarb and δ13Corg exhibit a broad positive excursion through the latest Triassic into the earliest Jurassic. The first order positive excursion in δ13Corg is interrupted by a negative shift noted in many sections around the world coincident with the extinction horizon. Our data indicate that the negative excursion lasts 85 ± 25 kyrs, longer than inferred by previous studies based on cyclostratigraphy. A 260 ± 80 kyr positive δ13Corg shift follows, during which the first Jurassic ammonites appear. The overall excursion culminates in a return to pre-perturbation carbon isotopic values over the next 1090 ± 70 kyrs. Via chronologic, isotopic, and biostratigraphic correlation to other successions, we find that δ13Ccarb and δ13Corg return to pre-perturbation values as CAMP volcanism ceases and in association with the recovery of pelagic and benthic biota. However, the initiation of the carbon isotope excursion at Levanto predates the well-dated CAMP sills from North America, indicating that CAMP may have started earlier than thought based on these exposures, or that the onset of carbon cycle perturbations was not related to CAMP.

  6. Lifestyle factors associated with obesity in a cohort of males in the central province of Sri Lanka: a cross-sectional descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. W. I. A. Jayawardana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity has become a global epidemic. The prevalence of obesity has also increased in the South Asian region in the last decade. However, dietary and lifestyle factors associated with obesity in Sri Lankan adults are unclear. The objective of the current study was to investigate the association of dietary and lifestyle patterns with overweight and obesity in a cohort of males from the Central Province of Sri Lanka. Methods A total of 2469 males aged between 16 and 72 years ( x ¯ = 31 $$ \\overline{x}=31 $$ were included in the study. The sample comprised individuals who presented for a routine medical examination at the National Transport Medical Institute, Kandy, Sri Lanka. The Body Mass Index (BMI cutoff values for Asians were used to categorize the participants into four groups as underweight, normal weight, overweight or obese. The data on dietary and lifestyle patterns such as level of physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, sleeping hours and other socio demographic data were obtained using validated self-administered questionnaires. Multinomial logistic regression model was fitted to assess the associations of individual lifestyle patterns with overweight and obesity. Results The mean BMI of the study group was 22.7 kg m−2 and prevalence rates of overweight and obesity were 31.8 and 12.3%, respectively. Mean waist circumference of the participants was 78.6 cm with 17.1% of them being centrally obese. After adjusting for potential confounders, weight status was associated with older age (P < 0.0001, ethnicity (P = 0.0033 and higher income (P = 0.0006. While higher physical activity showed a trend for being associated with lower odds of being obese (odds ratio: 0.898 – confidence interval: 0.744–1.084, alcohol intake, consumption of fruits, level of education, sleeping hours, smoking, consumption of fish, meat, dairy, sweets or fried snacks were not significantly associated with the weight

  7. Incorporating surface indicators of reservoir permeability into reservoir volume calculations: Application to the Colli Albani caldera and the Central Italy Geothermal Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Guido; De Benedetti, Arnaldo Angelo; Bonamico, Andrea; Ramazzotti, Paolo; Mattei, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    The Quaternary Roman Volcanic Province extends for over 200 km along the Tyrrhenian margin of the Italian peninsula and is composed of several caldera complexes with significant associated geothermal potential. In spite of the massive programs of explorations conducted by the then state-owned ENEL and AGIP companies between the 1970s and 1990s, and the identification of several high enthalpy fields, this resource remains so far unexploited, although it occurs right below the densely populated metropolitan area of Roma capital city. The main reason for this failure is that deep geothermal reservoirs are associated with fractured rocks, the secondary permeability of which has been difficult to predict making the identification of the most productive volumes of the reservoirs and the localisation of productive wells uncertain. As a consequence, almost half of the many exploration deep bore-holes drilled in the area reached a dry target. This work reviews available data and re-assesses the geothermal potential of caldera-related systems in Central Italy, by analysing in detail the case of the Colli Albani caldera system, the closest to Roma capital city. A GIS based approach identifies the most promising reservoir volumes for geothermal exploitation and uses an improved volume method approach for the evaluation of geothermal potential. The approach is based on a three dimensional matrix of georeferenced spatial data; the A axis accounts for the modelling of the depth of the top of the reservoirs based on geophysical and direct data; the B axis accounts for the thermal modelling of the crust (i.e. T with depth) based on measured thermal gradients. Both A and B data are necessary but not sufficient to identify rock volumes actually permeated by geothermal fluids in fractured reservoirs. We discuss the implementation of a C axis that evaluates all surface data indicating permeability in the reservoir and actual geothermal fluid circulation. We consider datasets on: i

  8. Methods, quality assurance, and data for assessing atmospheric deposition of pesticides in the Central Valley of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Celia; Majewski, Michael S.; Foreman, William T.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey monitored atmospheric deposition of pesticides in the Central Valley of California during two studies in 2001 and 2002–04. The 2001 study sampled wet deposition (rain) and storm-drain runoff in the Modesto, California, area during the orchard dormant-spray season to examine the contribution of pesticide concentrations to storm runoff from rainfall. In the 2002–04 study, the number and extent of collection sites in the Central Valley were increased to determine the areal distribution of organophosphate insecticides and other pesticides, and also five more sample types were collected. These were dry deposition, bulk deposition, and three sample types collected from a soil box: aqueous phase in runoff, suspended sediment in runoff, and surficial-soil samples. This report provides concentration data and describes methods and quality assurance of sample collection and laboratory analysis for pesticide compounds in all samples collected from 16 sites. Each sample was analyzed for 41 currently used pesticides and 23 pesticide degradates, including oxygen analogs (oxons) of 9 organophosphate insecticides. Analytical results are presented by sample type and study period. The median concentrations of both chloryprifos and diazinon sampled at four urban (0.067 micrograms per liter [μg/L] and 0.515 μg/L, respectively) and four agricultural sites (0.079 μg/L and 0.583 μg/L, respectively) during a January 2001 storm event in and around Modesto, Calif., were nearly identical, indicating that the overall atmospheric burden in the region appeared to be fairly similar during the sampling event. Comparisons of median concentrations in the rainfall to those in the McHenry storm-drain runoff showed that, for some compounds, rainfall contributed a substantial percentage of the concentration in the runoff; for other compounds, the concentrations in rainfall were much greater than in the runoff. For example, diazinon concentrations in rainfall were about

  9. Geologic cross section C-C' through the Appalachian basin from Erie County, north-central Ohio, to the Valley and Ridge province, Bedford County, south-central Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Robert T.; Trippi, Michael H.; Swezey, Christopher S.; Crangle, Robert D.; Hope, Rebecca S.; Rowan, Elisabeth L.; Lentz, Erika E.

    2012-01-01

    Geologic cross section C-C' is the third in a series of cross sections constructed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to document and improve understanding of the geologic framework and petroleum systems of the Appalachian basin. Cross section C-C' provides a regional view of the structural and stratigraphic framework of the Appalachian basin from north-central Ohio to the Valley and Ridge province in south-central Pennsylvania, a distance of approximately 260 miles (mi). This cross section is a companion to cross sections E-E' and D-D' that are located about 50 to 125 mi and 25 to 50 mi, respectively, to the southwest. Cross section C-C' contains much information that is useful for evaluating energy resources in the Appalachian basin. Although specific petroleum systems are not identified on the cross section, many of their key elements (such as source rocks, reservoir rocks, seals, and traps) can be inferred from lithologic units, unconformities, and geologic structures shown on the cross section. Other aspects of petroleum systems (such as the timing of petroleum generation and preferred migration pathways) may be evaluated by burial history, thermal history, and fluid flow models based on what is shown on the cross section. Cross section C-C' also provides a general framework (stratigraphic units and general rock types) for the coal-bearing section, although the cross section lacks the detail to illustrate key elements of coal systems (such as paleoclimate, coal quality, and coal rank). In addition, cross section C-C' may be used as a reconnaissance tool to identify plausible geologic structures and strata for the subsurface storage of liquid waste or for the sequestration of carbon dioxide.

  10. Selective transport of palynomorphs in marine turbiditic deposits: An example from the Ascension-Monterey Canyon system offshore central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGann, Mary

    2017-01-01

    The pollen assemblage of a deep-sea core (15G) collected at lower bathyal depths (3491 m) on a levee of Monterey Canyon off central California was investigated to gain insights into the delivery processes of terrigenous material to submarine fans and the effect this transport has on the palynological record. Thirty-two samples were obtained down the length of the core, 19 from hemipelagic and mixed mud deposits considered to be the background record, and 13 others from displaced flow deposits. The pollen record obtained from the background samples documents variations in the terrestrial flora as it adapted to changing climatic conditions over the last 19,000 cal yrs BP. A Q-mode cluster analysis defined three pollen zones: a Glacial Pollen Zone (ca. 20,000–17,000 cal yr BP), an overlying Transitional Pollen Zone (ca. 17,000–11,500 cal yr BP), and an Interglacial Pollen Zone (ca. 11,500 cal yr BP to present). Another Q-mode cluster analysis, of both the background mud and flow deposits, also defined these three pollen zones, but four of the 13 turbiditic deposits were assigned to pollen zones older than expected by their stratigraphic position. This was due to these samples containing statistically significant fewer palynomorphs than the background muds as well as being enriched (∼10–35% in some cases) in hydraulically-efficient Pinus pollen. A selective bias in the pollen assemblage, such as demonstrated here, may result in incorrect interpretations (e.g., climatic shifts or environmental perturbations) based on the floral record, indicating turbiditic deposits should be avoided in marine palynological studies. Particularly in the case of fine-grained flow deposits that may not be visually distinct, granulometry and grain size frequency distribution curves may not be enough to identify these biased deposits. Determining the relative abundance and source of displaced shallow-water benthic foraminifera entrained in these sediments serves as an excellent

  11. Spatial and temporal variation of fault slip and distributed off-fault deformation, Santa Cruz Mountains, central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsman, E. M.; Graymer, R. W.

    2010-12-01

    The Santa Cruz Mountains of central California record a lengthy history of deformation, including slip on the dextral San Andreas Fault (SAF) system and off-fault deformation manifested by both slip on secondary faults as well as distributed strain. This complex history provides insight into regional deformation processes operating both before and after initiation of the SAF. We focus here on deformation SW of the SAF, where several distinct, fault-bounded crustal blocks record different histories. We evaluate the magnitude and significance of off-fault deformation SW of the SAF by considering spatial and temporal relationships between slip on secondary faults and distributed deformation. To conduct the analysis we combine a synthesis of the slip histories of five important regional faults with a new dataset constraining spatial and temporal variation of regional deformation magnitude. This new dataset is based on shortening measurements of several major unconformities compiled from more than 60 cross sections from the region. To estimate strain magnitude recorded by older surfaces, we progressively subtract shortening magnitude of young markers from older markers. Because uncertainties grow for older surfaces, this method is most reliable for younger surfaces. Results of the analysis demonstrate that strain magnitude recorded by several unconformity-bound sedimentary packages of different ages is largest within about 5 km of the SAF, providing evidence of long-term deformation partitioning near this major structure. This pattern of distributed deformation partitioning near faults is also apparent but less pronounced near the secondary faults SW of the SAF. When considering spatial and temporal ties between regional deformation and slip on secondary faults, no simple pattern emerges. Fault activity is highly variable in both space and time. Additionally, fault activity at any one time is highly localized; one fault may be active while a nearby structure is inactive

  12. Concurrent Detection of Human Norovirus and Bacterial Pathogens in Water Samples from an Agricultural Region in Central California Coast

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    Peng Tian

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens and human norovirus (HuNoV are major cause for acute gastroenteritis caused by contaminated food and water. Public waterways can become contaminated from a variety of sources and flood after heavy rain events, leading to pathogen contamination of produce fields. We initiated a survey of several public watersheds in a major leafy green produce production region of the Central California Coast to determine the prevalence of HuNoV as well as bacterial pathogens. Moore swabs were used to collect environmental samples bi-monthly at over 30 sampling sites in the region. High prevalence of HuNoV and bacterial pathogens were detected in environmental water samples in the region. The overall detection rates of HuNoV, O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC, non-O157 STEC, Salmonella, and Listeria were 25.58, 7.91, 9.42, 59.65, and 44.30%, respectively. The detection rates of Salmonella and L. monocytogenes were significantly higher in the spring. Fall and spring had elevated detection rates of O157 STEC. The overall detection rates of non-O157 STEC in the fall were lower than the other seasons but not significant. The overall detection rates of HuNoV were highest in fall, followed by spring and winter, with summer being lowest and significantly lower than other seasons. This study presented the first study of evaluating the correlation between the detection rate of HuNoV and the detection rates of four bacterial pathogens from environmental water. Overall, there was no significant difference in HuNoV detection rates between samples testing positive or negative for the four bacterial pathogens tested. Pathogens in animal-impacted and human-impacted areas were investigated. There were significant higher detection rates in animal-impacted areas than that of human-impacted areas for bacterial pathogens. However, there was no difference in HuNoV detection rates between these two areas. The overall detection levels of generic E

  13. Temporal and spatial patterns in wind stress and wind stress curl over the central Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Marlene A.; Rosenberger, Kurt J.; Rosenfeld, Leslie K.; Robertson, George L.

    2012-01-01

    In 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey, together with several other federal and municipal agencies, began a series of field programs to determine along and cross-shelf transport patterns over the continental shelves in the central Southern California Bight. As a part of these programs, moorings that monitor winds were deployed off the Palos Verdes peninsula and within San Pedro Bay for six 3–4 month summer and winter periods between 2001 and 2008. In addition, nearly continuous records of winds for this 7-year period were obtained from a terrestrial site at the coast and from a basin site offshore of the long-term coastal site. The mean annual winds are downcoast at all sites. The alongshelf components of wind stress, which are the largest part of the low-frequency wind stress fields, are well correlated between basin, shelf and coastal sites. On average, the amplitude of alongshelf fluctuations in wind stress are 3–4 times larger over the offshore basin, compared to the coastal site, irrespective of whether the fluctuations represent the total, or just the correlated portion of the wind stress field. The curl in the large-scale wind stress tends to be positive, especially in the winter season when the mean wind stress is downcoast and larger at the offshore basin site than at the beach. However, since the fluctuation in wind stress amplitudes are usually larger than the mean, periods of weak negative curl do occur, especially in the summer season when the largest normalized differences in the amplitude of wind stress fluctuations are found in the nearshore region of the coastal ocean. Even though the low-frequency wind stress field is well-correlated over the continental shelf and offshore basins, out to distances of 35 km or more from the coast, winds even 10 km inshore of the beach do not represent the coastal wind field, at least in the summer months. The seasonal changes in the spatial structures in wind stress amplitudes suggest that an assessment of the

  14. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of San Gregorio, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Dartnell, Peter; Greene, H. Gary; Watt, Janet T.; Golden, Nadine E.; Endris, Charles A.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Bretz, Carrie K.; Manson, Michael W.; Sliter, Ray W.; Ross, Stephanie L.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Chin, John L.; Cochran, Susan A.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    the northern and southern parts of the map area are the result of right-lateral motion on strands of the San Gregorio Fault system. In the south, headlands near Pescadero Point have been uplifted by motion along the west strand of the San Gregorio Fault (also called the Frijoles Fault), which separates rocks of the Pigeon Point Formation south of the fault from rocks of the Purisima Formation north of the fault. The regional uplift in this map area has caused relatively shallow water depths within California's State Waters and, thus, little accommodation space for sediment accumulation. Sediment is observed offshore in the central part of the map area, in the shelter of the headlands north of the east strand of the San Gregorio Fault (also called the Coastways Fault) around Miramontes Point (about 5 km north of the map area) and also on the outer half of the California's State Waters shelf in the south where depths exceed 40 m. Sediment in the outer shelf of California's State Waters is rippled, indicating some mobility. The Offshore of San Gregorio map area lies within the cold-temperate biogeographic zone that is called either the "Oregonian province" or the "northern California ecoregion." This biogeographic province is maintained by the long-term stability of the southward-flowing California Current, an eastern limb of the North Pacific subtropical gyre that flows from Oregon to Baja California. At its midpoint off central California, the California Current transports subarctic surface (0–500 m deep) waters southward, about 150 to 1,300 km from shore. Seasonal northwesterly winds that are, in part, responsible for the California Current, generate coastal upwelling. The south end of the Oregonian province is at Point Conception (about 350 km south of the map area), although its associated phylogeographic group of marine fauna may extend beyond to the area offshore of Los Angeles in southern California. The ocean off of central California has experienced a warming

  15. Validation and future predictions based on a new Non-Point Source Assessment Toolbox, applied to the Central Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourakos, G.; Harter, T.

    2011-12-01

    GIS platform and can be used for efficient scenario evaluations without the need to repeat groundwater model simulations. This method is applied to the southern third part of the Central Valley Aquifer, California, which is an intensively farmed semi-arid area, where the local communities rely heavily on groundwater. To obtain a detailed velocity field, the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM) developed by the USGS was used as the coarse solution, split and refined into a large number of sub-domains. The CVHM resolution is 1 sq mi, with the stresses applied to the center of each cell. In our refined model the well stresses are spatially distributed to a large number of hypothetical wells, where the pumping rates, well depths and screen lengths are obtained from empirical probability distributions, derived from real data. The NPSAT generates a time-dependent water quality probability distribution, which express the time-dependent probability for a discharge surface (e.g., well) to exceed a threshold level of contamination across at a specific time. The model result is compared against real historic nitrate data, and used for future predictions with different scenario evaluations.

  16. Molecular epidemiology of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. in mussels (Mytilus californianus) and California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) from Central California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adell, A D; Smith, W A; Shapiro, K; Melli, A; Conrad, P A

    2014-12-01

    Cryptosporidium and Giardia are of public health importance, with recognized transmission through recreational waters. Therefore, both can contaminate marine waters and shellfish, with potential to infect marine mammals in nearshore ecosystems. A 2-year study was conducted to evaluate the presence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in mussels located at two distinct coastal areas in California, namely, (i) land runoff plume sites and (ii) locations near sea lion haul-out sites, as well as in feces of California sea lions (CSL) (Zalophus californianus) by the use of direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) detection methods and PCR with sequence analysis. In this study, 961 individual mussel hemolymph samples, 54 aliquots of pooled mussel tissue, and 303 CSL fecal samples were screened. Giardia duodenalis assemblages B and D were detected in hemolymph from mussels collected near two land runoff plume sites (Santa Rosa Creek and Carmel River), and assemblages C and D were detected in hemolymph from mussels collected near a sea lion haul-out site (White Rock). These results suggest that mussels are being contaminated by protozoa carried in terrestrial runoff and/or shed in the feces of CSL. Furthermore, low numbers of oocysts and cysts morphologically similar to Cryptosporidium and Giardia, respectively, were detected in CSL fecal samples, suggesting that CSL could be a source and a host of protozoan parasites in coastal environments. The results of this study showed that Cryptosporidium and Giardia spp. from the feces of terrestrial animals and CSL can contaminate mussels and coastal environments. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of mafic-ultramafic suites of the Irindina Province, Northern Territory, Australia: Implications for the Neoproterozoic to Devonian evolution of central Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Madeline L.; Jowitt, Simon M.; Saleem, Ahmad

    2015-10-01

    Petrological and geochemical data for magmatic mafic-ultramafic suites of the Irindina and Aileron provinces of the Eastern Arunta region, Northern Territory, Australia constrain the petrogenesis and tectonic setting of magmatic events covering ~ 500 million years. Six geochemically distinct magmatic suites, here named A-F, have been identified and provide evidence of the tectonic history of this region and also are linked to two mineralisation-related magmatic events: the Lloyd Gabbro (Ni-Cu-PGE mineralisation) and the Riddoch Amphibolite (Cyprus-style Cu-Co volcanogenic massive sulphide mineralisation). The whole-rock geochemistry of Suites A and F is indicative of melts derived from a range of mantle depths (garnet to spinel lherzolite) and source enrichment. Suite D is likely related to the ~ 1070 Ma Warakurna/Giles event of central Australia, including the Alcurra (Musgrave) and Stuart (Arunta) dyke swarms, and likely formed through either: a) melting of subduction modified, sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) by an upwelling mantle plume; or b) a combination of intra-plate tectonic processes involving a long-lived thermal anomaly, lithospheric-scale architecture that focussed magmatism, and large-scale tectonism. Suite F represents more alkaline magmas, derived from a deeper source, but most likely formed during the same Warakurna LIP event (possibly contemporaneously) as Suite D. Suite E (the Riddoch Amphibolite) was most likely emplaced in a back-arc basin (BAB) setting at ~ 600 Ma, coincident with Delamerian subduction and BAB formation along the eastern Proterozoic margin of Australia from Queensland to the eastern Arunta and possibly further south. Subsequent destabilisation of the SCLM underneath the North Australian Craton generated the ~ 510 Ma Kalkarindji LIP in the form of Suite B intrusions that assimilated some of the older Suite E (Riddoch) material. This event is locally known as the ~ 506 Ma Stanovos Igneous Suite and represents the most

  18. Chaparral in southern and central coastal California in the mid-1990s: area, ownership, condition, and change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremy S. Fried; Charles L. Bolsinger; Debby. Beardsley

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes an inventory of chaparral-dominated lands in southern California conducted during the mid-1990s and provides a review of contemporary literature on the ecological dynamics of chaparral vegetation with emphases on stand development, species composition, and the role of fire. Detailed tables provide estimates of chaparral area by owner, type, size...

  19. Assessing the Vulnerability of Public-Supply Wells to Contamination: Central Valley Aquifer System near Modesto, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagucki, Martha L.; Jurgens, Bryant C.; Burow, Karen R.; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    This fact sheet highlights findings from the vulnerability study of a public-supply well in Modesto, California. The well selected for study pumps on average about 1,600 gallons per minute from the Central Valley aquifer system during peak summer demand. Water samples were collected at the public-supply well and at monitoring wells installed in the Modesto vicinity. Samples from the public-supply wellhead contained the undesirable constituents uranium, nitrate, arsenic, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and pesticides, although none were present at concentrations exceeding drinking-water standards. Of these contaminants, uranium and nitrate pose the most significant water-quality risk to the public-supply well because human activities have caused concentrations in groundwater to increase over time. Overall, study findings point to four primary factors that affect the movement and (or) fate of contaminants and the vulnerability of the public-supply well in Modesto: (1) groundwater age (how long ago water entered, or recharged, the aquifer); (2) irrigation and agricultural and municipal pumping that drives contaminants downward into the primary production zone of the aquifer; (3) short-circuiting of contaminated water down the public-supply well during the low-pumping season; and (4) natural geochemical conditions of the aquifer. A local-scale computer model of groundwater flow and transport to the public-supply well was constructed to simulate long-term nitrate and uranium concentrations reaching the well. With regard to nitrate, two conflicting processes influence concentrations in the area contributing recharge to the well: (1) Beneath land that is being farmed or has recently been farmed (within the last 10 to 20 years), downward-moving irrigation waters contain elevated nitrate concentrations; yet (2) the proportion of agricultural land has decreased and the proportion of urban land has increased since 1960. Urban land use is associated with low nitrate

  20. Occurrence of pesticides in surface water and sediments from three central California coastal watersheds, 2008-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalling, Kelly L.; Orlando, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Water and sediment (bed and suspended) were collected from January 2008 through October 2009 from 12 sites in 3 of the largest watersheds along California's Central Coast (Pajaro, Salinas, and Santa Maria Rivers) and analyzed for a suite of pesticides by the U.S. Geological Survey. Water samples were collected in each watershed from the estuaries and major tributaries during 4 storm events and 11 dry season sampling events in 2008 and 2009. Bed sediments were collected from depositional zones at the tributary sampling sites three times over the course of the study. Suspended sediment samples were collected from the major tributaries during the four storm events and in the tributaries and estuaries during three dry season sampling events in 2009. Water samples were analyzed for 68 pesticides using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. A total of 38 pesticides were detected in 144 water samples, and 13 pesticides were detected in more than half the samples collected over the course of the study. Dissolved pesticide concentrations ranged from below their method detection limits to 36,000 nanograms per liter (boscalid). The most frequently detected pesticides in water from all the watersheds were azoxystrobin, boscalid, chlorpyrifos, DCPA, diazinon, oxyfluorfen, prometryn, and propyzamide, which were found in more than 80 percent of the samples. On average, detection frequencies and concentrations were higher in samples collected during winter storm events compared to the summer dry season. With the exception of the fungicide, myclobutanil, the Santa Maria estuary watershed exhibited higher pesticide detection frequencies than the Pajaro and Salinas watersheds. Bed and suspended sediment samples were analyzed for 55 pesticides using accelerated solvent extraction, gel permeation chromatography for sulfur removal, and carbon/alumina stacked solid-phase extraction cartridges to remove interfering sediment matrices. In bed sediment samples, 17 pesticides were detected

  1. Size-resolved source apportionment of carbonaceous particulate matter in urban and rural sites in central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Walter A.; Kleeman, Michael J.

    2011-08-01

    Very little is currently known about the relationship between exposure to different sources of ambient ultrafine particles (PM 0.1) and human health effects. If human health effects are enhanced by PM 0.1's ability to cross cell membranes, then more information is needed describing the sources of ultrafine particles that are deposited in the human respiratory system. The current study presents results for the source apportionment of airborne particulate matter in six size fractions smaller than 1.8 μm particle diameter including ultrafine particles (PM 0.1) in one of the most polluted air basins in the United States. Size-resolved source apportionment results are presented at an urban site and rural site in central California's heavily polluted San Joaquin Valley during the winter and summer months using a molecular marker chemical mass balance (MM-CMB) method. Respiratory deposition calculations for the size-resolved source apportionment results are carried out with the Multiple Path Particle Dosimetry Model ( MPPD v 2.0), including calculations for ultrafine (PM 0.1) source deposition. Diesel engines accounted for the majority of PM 0.1 and PM 1.8 EC at both the urban and rural sampling locations during both summer and winter seasons. Meat cooking accounted for 33-67% and diesel engines accounted for 15-21% of the PM 0.1 OC at Fresno. Meat cooking accounted for 22-26% of the PM 0.1 OC at the rural Westside location, while diesel engines accounted for 8-9%. Wood burning contributions to PM 0.1 OC increased to as much as 12% of PM 0.1 OC during the wintertime. The modest contribution of wood smoke reflects the success of emissions control programs over the past decade. In contrast to PM 0.1, PM 1.8 OC had a higher fraction of unidentified source contributions (68-85%) suggesting that this material is composed of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) or primary organic aerosol (POA) that has been processed by atmospheric chemical reactions. Meat cooking was the largest

  2. Correlation of shallow marine, deep marine, and coastal terrestrial records of central California: asynchronous responses to paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic change during the past 19,000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGann, M.

    2016-12-01

    Benthic and planktic foraminiferal census data combined with pollen data acquired from the continental margin off central California (core S3-15G, 3491 m depth from the western levy of the Monterey Fan; 36°23.53'N, 123°20.52'W) provide a unique opportunity to document concurrent paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic changes in the region during the late Quaternary. Radiocarbon dates and the ratio of the planktic foraminiferal species Neogloboquardrina pachyderma (Ehrenberg) to Neogloboquardrina incompta (Cifelli) provide a good age-depth model for the last 19,000 years. Q-mode cluster analysis of the benthic foraminifera grouped the fauna into two clusters reflecting faunal adaptation to changing climatic conditions during the Pleistocene and Holocene, whereas the R-mode cluster analysis identified glacial (Uvigerina senticosa and Globobulimina auriculata) and interglacial (Melonis pompilioides and Gyroidina planulata) faunas. A slight increase in oxygen concentration in the deep sea across the Pleistocene-Holocene transition is suggested by a reduction in abundance of G. auriculata and increased frequency of M. pompilioides. Q-mode cluster analysis of the planktic foraminifera indicates a change in the surface water from a glacial subpolar fauna in the Pleistocene to a transitional fauna in the Holocene. The pollen flora separated into three clusters by Q-mode cluster analysis, two of Pleistocene age (glacial and transitional) and one in the Holocene (interglacial), reflecting adaptation of the flora in the California Coast Ranges of central California to the warmer climate in the Holocene. Decoupling is evident between the benthic foraminiferal, planktic foraminiferal, and terrestrial floral responses to changing oceanographic and climatic conditions. The floral response leads the surface-dwelling planktic fauna by several millennia, and is followed by the deep-dwelling benthic fauna a millennium later.

  3. Volatile Compounds in Honey Produced in the Central Valley of Ñuble Province, Chile Compuestos Volatiles en Miel Producida en el Valle Central de la Provincia de Ñuble, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Pía Gianelli Barra

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME with an 85 µm Carboxen polydimethylsiloxane (CAR/PDMS fiber was used to extract volatile compounds, and a gas chromatograph equipped with a mass spectometry detector (GC-MS was used to identify the volatile compounds in honeys. Thirty-four different volatile compounds from the headspace of honey produced in the central valley of Ñuble Province, Chile, were extracted with fiber coating CAR/PDMS. The identified compounds were: 10 alcohols, 9 acids, 6 ketones, 3 aldehydes, 2 furans, 2 terpenes and 2 lactones. Only four of the volatile compounds had never been reported before as honey compounds; these being: 1,3-propanodiol, 2-methyl butanoic acid, 3,4-dimethyl-3-hexen-2-one, and 6-methyl-5-octen-2-one. These four compounds were found in three of the 10 analyzed samples. The compounds found in the highest percentage of area were ethanol, acetic acid, 1-hydroxy-2-propane, 3-hydroxy-2-butane, and furfural. However, the analyzed samples did not present a distinctive profile.La extracción de compuestos volátiles desde el espacio de cabeza de mieles se realiza mediante microextracción en fase sólida (SPME, utilizando una fibra de 85 µm de Carboxen polidimetilsiloxano (CAR/PDMS, el análisis de los compuestos volátiles se realiza mediante cromatografía de gases con detector de masa (GC-MS. Un total de 34 diferentes compuestos volátiles fueron extraídos desde el espacio de cabeza de mieles provenientes del valle central de la provincia de Ñuble con la fibra de CAR/PDMS. Los compuestos identificados fueron 10 alcoholes, 9 ácidos, 6 cetonas, 3 aldehídos, 2 furanos, 2 terpenos y 2 lactonas. De los compuestos volátiles sólo tres no han sido reportados con anterioridad en mieles, estos compuestos fueron: 1,3-propanodiol, ácido 2-metil butanoico, 3,4-dimetil-3-hexen-2-ona, 6-metil-5-octen-2-ona. Estos cuatro compuestos se encontraron en sólo tres de las 10 muestras analizadas. Los compuestos que se

  4. Assessment of undiscovered shale gas and shale oil resources in the Mississippian Barnett Shale, Bend Arch–Fort Worth Basin Province, North-Central Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Kristen R.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Lewan, Michael D.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.; Klett, Timothy R.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Le, Phuong A.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Pitman, Janet K.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

    2015-12-17

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean volumes of 53 trillion cubic feet of shale gas, 172 million barrels of shale oil, and 176 million barrels of natural gas liquids in the Barnett Shale of the Bend Arch–Fort Worth Basin Province of Texas.

  5. Change in Total Water in California's Mountains and Groundwater in Central Valley During the 2011-2014 Drought From GPS, GRACE, and InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argus, D. F.; Fu, Y.; Landerer, F. W.; Farr, T.; Watkins, M. M.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in total water thickness in most of California are being estimated using GPS measurements of vertical ground displacement. The Sierra Nevada each year subsides about 12 mm in the fall and winter due to the load of rain and snow, then rises about the same amount in the spring and summer when the snow melts, water runs off, and soil moisture evaporates. Earth's elastic response to a surface load is well known (except at thick sedimentary basins). Changes in equivalent water thickness can thus be inferred [Argus Fu Landerer 2014]. The average seasonal change in total water thickness is found to be 0.5 meters in the Sierra Nevada and Klamath Mountains and 0.1 meters in the Great Basin. The average seasonal change in the Sierra Nevada Mountains estimated with GPS is 35 Gigatons. GPS vertical ground displacements are furthermore being used to estimate changes in water in consecutive years of either drought or heavy precipitation. Changes in the sum of snow and soil moisture during California's drought from June 2011 to June 2014 are estimated from GPS in this study. Changes in water in California's massive reservoirs are well known and removed, yielding an estimate of change in the thickness of snow plus soil moisture. Water loss is found to be largest near the center of the southern Sierra Nevada (0.8 m equivalent water thickness) and smaller in the northern Sierra Nevada and southern Klamath Mountains (0.3 m). The GPS estimates of changes in the sum of snow and soil moisture complement GRACE observations of water change in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River basin. Whereas GPS provides estimates of water change at high spatial resolution in California's mountains, GRACE observes changes in groundwater in the Central Valley. We will further compare and contrast the GPS and GRACE measurements, and also evaluate the finding of Amos et al. [2014] that groundwater loss in the southern Central Valley (Tulare Basin) is causing the mountains on either side to rise at 1 to

  6. Pandemic H1N1 influenza isolated from free-ranging Northern Elephant Seals in 2010 off the central California coast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey Goldstein

    Full Text Available Interspecies transmission of influenza A is an important factor in the evolution and ecology of influenza viruses. Marine mammals are in contact with a number of influenza reservoirs, including aquatic birds and humans, and this may facilitate transmission among avian and mammalian hosts. Virus isolation, whole genome sequencing, and hemagluttination inhibition assay confirmed that exposure to pandemic H1N1 influenza virus occurred among free-ranging Northern Elephant Seals (Mirounga angustirostris in 2010. Nasal swabs were collected from 42 adult female seals in April 2010, just after the animals had returned to the central California coast from their short post-breeding migration in the northeast Pacific. Swabs from two seals tested positive by RT-PCR for the matrix gene, and virus was isolated from each by inoculation into embryonic chicken eggs. Whole genome sequencing revealed greater than 99% homology with A/California/04/2009 (H1N1 that emerged in humans from swine in 2009. Analysis of more than 300 serum samples showed that samples collected early in 2010 (n = 100 were negative and by April animals began to test positive for antibodies against the pH1N1 virus (HI titer of ≥1∶40, supporting the molecular findings. In vitro characterizations studies revealed that viral replication was indistinguishable from that of reference strains of pH1N1 in canine kidney cells, but replication was inefficient in human epithelial respiratory cells, indicating these isolates may be elephant seal adapted viruses. Thus findings confirmed that exposure to pandemic H1N1 that was circulating in people in 2009 occurred among free-ranging Northern Elephant Seals in 2010 off the central California coast. This is the first report of pH1N1 (A/Elephant seal/California/1/2010 in any marine mammal and provides evidence for cross species transmission of influenza viruses in free-ranging wildlife and movement of influenza viruses between humans and wildlife.

  7. Influence of summer marine fog and low cloud stratus on water relations of evergreen woody shrubs (Arctostaphylos: Ericaceae) in the chaparral of central California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasey, Michael C; Loik, Michael E; Parker, V Thomas

    2012-10-01

    Mediterranean-type climate (MTC) regions around the world are notable for cool, wet winters and hot, dry summers. A dominant vegetation type in all five MTC regions is evergreen, sclerophyllous shrubland, called chaparral in California. The extreme summer dry season in California is moderated by a persistent low-elevation layer of marine fog and cloud cover along the margin of the Pacific coast. We tested whether late dry season water potentials (Ψ(min)) of chaparral shrubs, such as Arctostaphylos species in central California, are influenced by this coast-to-interior climate gradient. Lowland coastal (maritime) shrubs were found to have significantly less negative Ψ(min) than upland interior shrubs (interior), and stable isotope (δ(13)C) values exhibited greater water use efficiency in the interior. Post-fire resprouter shrubs (resprouters) had significantly less negative Ψ(min) than co-occurring obligate seeder shrubs (seeders) in interior and transitional chaparral, possibly because resprouters have deeper root systems with better access to subsurface water than shallow-rooted seeders. Unexpectedly, maritime resprouters and seeders did not differ significantly in their Ψ(min), possibly reflecting more favorable water availability for shrubs influenced by the summer marine layer. Microclimate and soil data also suggest that maritime habitats have more favorable water availability than the interior. While maritime seeders constitute the majority of local Arctostaphylos endemics, they exhibited significantly greater vulnerability to xylem cavitation than interior seeders. Because rare seeders in maritime chaparral are more vulnerable to xylem cavitation than interior seeders, the potential breakdown of the summer marine layer along the coast is of potential conservation concern.

  8. Ocean climate indicators: A monitoring inventory and plan for tracking climate change in the north-central California coast and ocean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Benet; Higgason, Kelley; Suchanek, Tom; Largier, John; Stachowicz, Jay; Allen, Sarah; Bograd, Steven; Breen, R.; Gellerman, Holly; Hill, Tessa; Jahncke, Jaime; Johnosn, Rebecca; Lonhart, Steve I.; Morgan, Steven; Wilkerson, Frances; Roletto, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The impacts of climate change, defined as increasing atmospheric and oceanic carbon dioxide and associated increases in average global temperature and oceanic acidity, have been observed both globally and on regional scales, such as in the North-central California coast and ocean, a region that extends from Point Arena to Point Año Nuevo and includes the Pacific coastline of the San Francisco Bay Area. Because of the high economic and ecological value of the region’s marine environment, the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary (GFNMS) and other agencies and organizations have recognized the need to evaluate and plan for climate change impacts. Climate change indicators can be developed on global, regional, and site-specific spatial scales, and they provide information about the presence and potential impacts of climate change. While indicators exist for the nation and for the state of California as a whole, no system of ocean climate indicators exist that specifically consider the unique characteristics of the California coast and ocean region. To that end, GFNMS collaborated with over 50 regional, federal, and state natural resource managers, research scientists, and other partners to develop a set of 2 ocean climate indicators specific to this region. A smaller working group of 13 regional partners developed monitoring goals, objectives, strategies, and activities for the indicators and recommended selected species for biological indicators, resulting in the Ocean Climate Indicators Monitoring Inventory and Plan. The working group considered current knowledge of ongoing monitoring, feasibility of monitoring, costs, and logistics in selecting monitoring activities and selected species.

  9. Ground-water modeling and the installation of deep multiple-well monitoring sites in the Central and West Coast Basins, Los Angeles County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, E. G.; Johnson, T. A.; Land, M.; Everett, R. R.; Ponti, D. J.; Edwards, B. D.; Crawford, S. M.; Kulshan, T.

    2002-12-01

    An ongoing regional study of the geohydrology and geochemistry of the Central and West Coast Basins in Los Angeles County, California has iteratively combined the drilling of deep multiple-well monitoring sites with groundwater modeling. The monitoring sites are generally between 1,000 and 1,500 ft in depth and consist of 4-6 piezometers installed within a single borehole that provide depth-dependent geohydrologic data. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Water Replenishment District of Southern California (WRDSC) drilled four monitoring sites at the beginning of the cooperative study. The data from these sites, along with data compiled from existing wells, formed the basis for developing a preliminary multi-aquifer ground-water simulation model. Initial model simulations were then used to help prioritize new drilling locations where additional geohydrologic data were needed to more accurately simulate the complex system. Additional drilling, updating the regional simulation model, and new modeling-including development of particle tracking, simulation-optimization, and solute transport models-have proceeded iteratively. As of September, 2002, 34 multiple-well monitoring sites (162 piezometers) have been constructed. The new modeling, which focuses on seawater intrusion, has identified the need for more detailed data on sequence stratigraphy, geometries of confining beds and high permeability zones, and pore-water chemistry. In response to this need, continuous coring has been conducted cooperatively by the USGS, WRDSC, and Los Angeles County Department of Public Works at six of the monitoring sites completed thus far.

  10. Regional Evaluation of Groundwater Age Distributions Using Lumped Parameter Models with Large, Sparse Datasets: Example from the Central Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgens, B. C.; Bohlke, J. K.; Voss, S.; Fram, M. S.; Esser, B.

    2015-12-01

    Tracer-based, lumped parameter models (LPMs) are an appealing way to estimate the distribution of age for groundwater because the cost of sampling wells is often less than building numerical groundwater flow models sufficiently complex to provide groundwater age distributions. In practice, however, tracer datasets are often incomplete because of anthropogenic or terrigenic contamination of tracers, or analytical limitations. While age interpretations using such datsets can have large uncertainties, it may still be possible to identify key parts of the age distribution if LPMs are carefully chosen to match hydrogeologic conceptualization and the degree of age mixing is reasonably estimated. We developed a systematic approach for evaluating groundwater age distributions using LPMs with a large but incomplete set of tracer data (3H, 3Hetrit, 14C, and CFCs) from 535 wells, mostly used for public supply, in the Central Valley, California, USA that were sampled by the USGS for the California State Water Resources Control Board Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment or the USGS National Water Quality Assessment Programs. In addition to mean ages, LPMs gave estimates of unsaturated zone travel times, recharge rates for pre- and post-development groundwater, the degree of age mixing in wells, proportion of young water (supplies being derived from it.

  11. Trace metals in sediments and Zostera marina of San Ignacio and Ojo de Liebre lagoons in the central pacific coast of Baja California, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías-Zamora, J V; Sánchez-Osorio, J L; Ríos-Mendoza, L M; Ramírez-Alvarez, N; Huerta-Díaz, M A; López-Sánchez, D

    2008-08-01

    San Ignacio and Ojo de Liebre lagoons in central Baja California, Mexico are nursery and grazing grounds for whales and turtles. Ojo de Liebre Lagoon also supports a salt mine operation. By concentrating trace metals via evaporation, this activity might harm biota. Consequently, salt mining might be incompatible with the lagoon's ecological role. Eelgrass can incorporate these elements and reroute them to other organisms. Trace metals in sediments (Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn, and Fe) were measured at both lagoons. Some (Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn) were also measured in Zostera marina patches at both lagoons. The results did not show elevated metal concentration at any lagoon, either for sediments or eelgrass. No statistically significant differences between lagoons were found. However, eelgrass at both lagoons showed larger concentration ranges than in sediments. Also, a correlation exists between sediment metal concentration and its concentration in eelgrass. Surprisingly, several sediment metal concentrations are higher than those considered as elevated for the Southern California Bight.

  12. Identifying and Addressing Genetic Counseling Challenges among Indigenous People of Oaxaca-One Center's Experience with Two Immigrant Farmworker Families in the Central Valley of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Joseph J; Carmichael, Jason; Vásquez Santos, Leoncio

    2018-02-03

    An important aspect of genetic counseling is the recognition of and adaptation to the socio-cultural uniqueness of the different populations that a genetics clinic serves. The Central Valley of California is home to a large population from Mexico, with a significant proportion of indigenous ancestry originating from the state of Oaxaca. We report on our experience with two families of this community-one extended family with an early lethal inborn error of metabolism and the other with a chronic disfiguring form of ichthyosis. We identified multiple important factors that needed to be considered, including the matching of language dialects, adaptation to different social interaction conventions, acknowledgement of traditional medicine beliefs, and effective transmission of genetic terms and concepts, all of which should be incorporated into the interactions with these families when aiming to provide comprehensive genetic counseling.

  13. Investigation of late Pleistocene and Holocene activity in the San Gregorio fault zone on the continental slope north of Monterey Canyon, offshore central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Katherine L.; Paull, Charles K.; Brothers, Daniel; Caress, David W.; McGann, Mary; Lundsten, Eve M.; Anderson, Krystle; Gwiazda, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    We provide an extensive high‐resolution geophysical, sediment core, and radiocarbon dataset to address late Pleistocene and Holocene fault activity of the San Gregorio fault zone (SGFZ), offshore central California. The SGFZ occurs primarily offshore in the San Andreas fault system and has been accommodating dextral strike‐slip motion between the Pacific and North American plates since the mid‐Miocene. Our study focuses on the SGFZ where it has been mapped through the continental slope north of Monterey Canyon. From 2009 to 2015, the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute collected high‐resolution multibeam bathymetry and chirp sub‐bottom profiles using an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV). Targeted samples were collected using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to provide radiocarbon age constraints. We integrate the high‐resolution geophysical data with radiocarbon dates to reveal Pleistocene seismic horizons vertically offset less than 5 m on nearly vertical faults. These faults are buried by continuous reflections deposited after ∼17.5  ka and likely following erosion during the last sea‐level lowstand ∼21  ka, bracketing the age of faulting to ∼32–21  ka. Clearly faulted horizons are only detected in a small area where mass wasting exhumed older strata to within ∼25  m of the seafloor. The lack of clearly faulted Holocene deposits and possible highly distributed faulting in the study area are consistent with previous interpretations that late Pleistocene and Holocene activity along the SGFZ may decrease to the south. This study illustrates the complexity of the SGFZ, offshore central California, and demonstrates the utility of very high‐resolution data from combined AUV (geophysical)–ROV (seabed sampling) surveys in offshore studies of fault activity.

  14. A shift in the dominant toxin-producing algal species in central California alters phycotoxins in food webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jester, R.; Lefebvre, K.; Langlois, G.; Vigilant, V.; Baugh, K.; Silver, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    In California, the toxic algal species of primary concern are the dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella and members of the pennate diatom genus Pseudo-nitzschia, both producers of potent neurotoxins that are capable of sickening and killing marine life and humans. During the summer of 2004 in Monterey Bay, we observed a change in the taxonomic structure of the phytoplankton community-the typically diatom-dominated community shifted to a red tide, dinoflagellate-dominated community. Here we use a 6-year time series (2000-2006) to show how the abundance of the dominant harmful algal bloom (HAB) species in the Bay up to that point, Pseudo-nitzschia, significantly declined during the dinoflagellate-dominated interval, while two genera of toxic dinoflagellates, Alexandrium and Dinophysis, became the predominant toxin producers. This change represents a shift from a genus of toxin producers that typically dominates the community during a toxic bloom, to HAB taxa that are generally only minor components of the community in a toxic event. This change in the local HAB species was also reflected in the toxins present in higher trophic levels. Despite the small contribution of A. catenella to the overall phytoplankton community, the increase in the presence of this species in Monterey Bay was associated with an increase in the presence of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins in sentinel shellfish and clupeoid fish. This report provides the first evidence that PSP toxins are present in California's pelagic food web, as PSP toxins were detected in both northern anchovies (Engraulis mordax) and Pacific sardines (Sardinops sagax). Another interesting observation from our data is the co-occurrence of DA and PSP toxins in both planktivorous fish and sentinel shellfish. We also provide evidence, based on the statewide biotoxin monitoring program, that this increase in the frequency and abundance of PSP events related to A. catenella occurred not just in Monterey Bay, but also

  15. Selenium and mercury concentrations in harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) from central California: Health implications in an urbanized estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHuron, Elizabeth A.; Harvey, James T.; Castellini, J. Margaret; Stricker, Craig A.; O'Hara, Todd M.

    2014-01-01

    We measured total selenium and total mercury concentrations ([TSe] and [THg]) in hair (n = 138) and blood (n = 73) of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) from California to assess variation by geography and sex, and inferred feeding relationships based on carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur stable isotopes. Harbor seals from Hg-contaminated sites had significantly greater [THg], and lesser [TSe] and TSe:THg molar ratios than seals from a relatively uncontaminated site. Males had significantly greater [THg] than females at all locations. Sulfur stable isotope values explained approximately 25% of the variability in [THg], indicating increased Hg exposure for seals with a greater use of estuarine prey species. Decreased [TSe] in harbor seals from Hg-contaminated regions may indicate a relative Se deficiency to mitigate the toxic effects of Hg. Further investigation into the Se status and the potential negative impact of Hg on harbor seals from Hg-contaminated sites is warranted.

  16. California GAMA Special Study: An isotopic and dissolved gas investigation of nitrate source and transport to a public supply well in California's Central Valley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singleton, M J; Moran, J E; Esser, B K; Roberts, S K; Hillegonds, D J

    2010-04-14

    This study investigates nitrate contamination of a deep municipal drinking water production well in Ripon, CA to demonstrate the utility of natural groundwater tracers in constraining the sources and transport of nitrate to deep aquifers in the Central Valley. The goal of the study was to investigate the origin (source) of elevated nitrate and the potential for the deep aquifer to attenuate anthropogenic nitrate. The site is ideal for such an investigation. The production well is screened from 165-325 feet below ground surface and a number of nearby shallow and deep monitoring wells were available for sampling. Furthermore, potential sources of nitrate contamination to the well had been identified, including a fertilizer supply plant located approximately 1000 feet to the east and local almond groves. A variety of natural isotopic and dissolved gas tracers including {sup 3}H-{sup 3}He groundwater age and the isotopic composition of nitrate are applied to identify nitrate sources and to characterize nitrate transport. An advanced method for sampling production wells is employed to help identify contaminant contributions from specific screen intervals. Nitrate transport: Groundwater nitrate at this field site is not being actively denitrified. Groundwater parameters indicate oxic conditions, the dissolved gas data shows no evidence for excess nitrogen as the result of denitrification, and nitrate-N and -O isotope compositions do not display patterns typical of denitrification. Contaminant nitrate source: The ambient nitrate concentration in shallow groundwater at the Ripon site ({approx}12 mg/L as nitrate) is typical of shallow groundwaters affected by recharge from agricultural and urban areas. Nitrate concentrations in Ripon City Well 12 (50-58 mg/L as nitrate) are significantly higher than these ambient concentrations, indicating an additional source of anthropogenic nitrate is affecting groundwater in the capture zone of this municipal drinking water well. This

  17. Five-minute grid shapefile with marine bird density data off central California, CDAS data (1980-2001)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A shapefile of five minute grids that contains marine bird density data at-sea from the CDAS Central CA data set (1980-2001). It is a shapefile representing 5 minute...

  18. A pandeid hydrozoan, Amphinema sp., new and probably introduced to central California: life history, morphology, distribution and systematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John T. Rees

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available A pandeid hydrozoan new to California, Amphinema sp., was collected in 1998 as a hydroid living on the non-indigenous bryozoan, Watersipora subtorquata, attached to floats in Bodega Harbor 80 km north of San Francisco Bay. The hydroid was cultured in the laboratory and medusae it released were raised to maturity. No species name could be assigned because although the hydroid colony structure and morphology of the polyp most closely resemble descriptions of Amphinema rugosum, the immature and adult medusae best resemble A. dinema. These two described species are known from widely-spaced locations worldwide including Europe (British Isles and the Mediterranean, New England, the Caribbean, east Africa, India, Japan and China, implying that they may transport easily between sites by man´s activities. Such wide-spread distributions of both species, coupled with the notable absence of Amphinema sp. from Bodega Harbor during a number of previous field surveys in the 1970´s, strongly intimates that Amphinemasp. has been introduced from elsewhere into Bodega Harbor during the past 25 years. Two additional species of Amphinema medusae present on the west coast of North America are discussed.

  19. Ascii grids of predicted pH in depth zones used by domestic and public drinking water supply depths, Central Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Celia; Nolan, Bernard T.; Gronberg, JoAnn M.

    2017-01-01

    The ascii grids associated with this data release are predicted distributions of continuous pH at the drinking water depth zones in the groundwater of Central Valley, California. The two prediction grids produced in this work represent predicted pH at the domestic supply and public supply drinking water depths, respectively and are bound by the alluvial boundary that defines the Central Valley. A depth of 46 m was used to stratify wells into the shallow and deep aquifer and were derived from depth percentiles associated with domestic and public supply in previous work by Burow et al. (2013). In this work, the median well depth categorized as domestic supply was 30 meters below land surface and the median well depth categorized as public supply is 100 meters below land surface. Prediction grids were created using prediction modeling methods, specifically Boosted Regression Trees (BRT) with a gaussian error distribution within a statistical learning framework within R's computing framework (http://www.r-project.org/). The statistical learning framework seeks to maximize the predictive performance of machine learning methods through model tuning by cross validation. The response variable was measured pH from 1337 wells, and was compiled from two sources: US Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Information System (NWIS) Database (all data are publicly available from the USGS: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ca/nwis/nwis) and the California State Water Resources Control Board Division of Drinking Water (SWRCB-DDW) database (water quality data are publicly available from the SWRCB: http://www.waterboards.ca.gov/gama/geotracker_gama.shtml). Only wells with measured pH and well depth data were selected, and for wells with multiple records, only the most recent sample in the period 1993-2014 was used. A total of 1003 wells (training dataset) were used to train the BRT model and 334 wells (hold-out dataset) were used to validate the prediction model. The training r-squared was

  20. Sources of methane and nitrous oxide in California's Central Valley estimated through direct airborne flux and positive matrix factorization source apportionment of groundbased and regional tall tower measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Abhinav

    Methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are two major greenhouse gases that contribute significantly to the increase in anthropogenic radiative-forcing causing perturbations to the earth's climate system. In a watershed moment in the state's history of environmental leadership and commitment, California, in 2006, opted for sharp reductions in their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and adopted a long-term approach to address climate change that includes regulation of emissions from individual emitters and source categories. There are large CH4 and N2O emissions sources in the state, predominantly in the agricultural and waste management sector. While these two gases account for inventory. Additionally, an increasing number of `top-down' studies based on ambient observations point towards underestimation of their emissions in the inventory. Three intensive field observation campaigns that were spatially and temporally diverse took place between 2010 and 2013 in the Central Valley of California where the largest known sources of CH4 and N2O (e.g. agricultural systems and dairies) and potentially significant CH4 sources (e.g. oil and gas extraction) are located. The CalNex (California Nexus - Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) field campaign during summer 2010 (May 15 - June 30) took place in the urban core of Bakersfield in the southern San Joaquin Valley, a city whose economy is built around agriculture and the oil and gas industry. During summer of 2011, airborne measurements were performed over a large spatial domain, all across and around the Central Valley as part of the CABERNET (California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects) study. Next, a one-year continuous field campaign (WGC 2012-13, June 2012 - August 2013) was conducted at the Walnut Grove tall tower near the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta in the Central Valley. Through analysis of these field measurements, this dissertation presents the apportionment of

  1. Impacts of sea level rise and climate change on coastal plant species in the central California coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendra L. Garner

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Local increases in sea level caused by global climate change pose a significant threat to the persistence of many coastal plant species through exacerbating inundation, flooding, and erosion. In addition to sea level rise (SLR, climate changes in the form of air temperature and precipitation regimes will also alter habitats of coastal plant species. Although numerous studies have analyzed the effect of climate change on future habitats through species distribution models (SDMs, none have incorporated the threat of exposure to SLR. We developed a model that quantified the effect of both SLR and climate change on habitat for 88 rare coastal plant species in San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, and Ventura Counties, California, USA (an area of 23,948 km2. Our SLR model projects that by the year 2100, 60 of the 88 species will be threatened by SLR. We found that the probability of being threatened by SLR strongly correlates with a species’ area, elevation, and distance from the coast, and that 10 species could lose their entire current habitat in the study region. We modeled the habitat suitability of these 10 species under future climate using a species distribution model (SDM. Our SDM projects that 4 of the 10 species will lose all suitable current habitats in the region as a result of climate change. While SLR accounts for up to 9.2 km2 loss in habitat, climate change accounts for habitat suitability changes ranging from a loss of 1,439 km2 for one species to a gain of 9,795 km2 for another species. For three species, SLR is projected to reduce future suitable area by as much as 28% of total area. This suggests that while SLR poses a higher risk, climate changes in precipitation and air temperature represents a lesser known but potentially larger risk and a small cumulative effect from both.

  2. Influence of weeds on Argentine ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and obscure mealybug (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) in a central California vineyard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Michael J; Welch, Mark D

    2014-06-01

    Obscure mealybug is a pest of grapes in the cool climate regions of coastal California, is found on some vineyard weeds, and is tended by the Argentine ant. A study was conducted at a vineyard in Arroyo Grande, CA, to evaluate the impact of weeds on ant activity on grapevines, and the role that ants and weeds have on obscure mealybug infestation in grape clusters. The incidence of the fungus Botrytis cinerea was recorded as well. Treatments were weed exclusion versus the presence of weeds, and ant exclusion versus the presence of ants. Ant activity was evaluated weekly using sugar-based monitoring stations, and mealybug infestation and Botrytis incidence of clusters were evaluated at harvest. Ant exclusion reduced the overall number of ant visits by 82%, and ants increased mealybug infestation of clusters by 53%. Ant activity was 33% higher in the weeds treatment, but there was no impact of weeds on mealybug infestation. We suggest that the higher ant activity recorded in the weeds treatment may have been an artifact of the sugar-based sampling method. Botrytis incidence was three times higher with ants, but did not differ between weeds and weed exclusion treatments. The study supports other research showing a relationship between mealybug infestation and the presence of ants, as well as the lack of impact of floor vegetation on mealybug infestation of grape clusters. It is the first report of a relationship between ants and Botrytis, although it is more likely that the higher Botrytis incidence found here is a result of increased mealybug density than a direct effect by ants.

  3. Quantifying large scale deformation and aquifer properties over Central Valley, California using a combination of InSAR, GPS and hydraulic head level data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, C.; Shirzaei, M.; Werth, S.; Argus, D. F.

    2016-12-01

    California's Central Valley is one of the largest productive agricultural regions in the world, which heavily relies on the underground water supply. As a result of pumping and recharge processes, the aquifer systems compact and expand, which is manifested in quasi-cyclic changes in the surface elevation and observations of hydraulic head levels. On the other hand, over last century, due to overdrafting of aquifer systems the volume of groundwater has substantially reduced, which causes irreversible decline in surface elevation. The aquifer storativity, characterizing the capacity of an aquifer to release groundwater, is affected by the excess vertical strain and permanent deformation. To quantify the capacity of the Central Valley aquifer systems to release fresh water, a valley-wide estimate of the storativity is required. Hence, we performed a joint analysis of large set of interferometric SAR and GPS data sets in conjunction with well data across the valley. In this context, we used L-band set of 420 ALOS-PALSAR SAR images. The data has been processed to generate 1604 SAR interferograms, using a pixel dimension of about 100 m x 100 m and imposing a maximum spatial and temporal baseline threshold of 2000 meter and 1500 days, respectively. In this study we rigorously integrate >500 permanent GPS stations and InSAR data to determine a time series of line of sight changes in a reference frame fixed to (CM) the center of mass of solid Earth. The result highlights an overall map of surface deformation over the entire Central valley region, due to interseismic strain accumulation along San Andreas fault system and compaction of aquifer systems. In the southern part of Central Valley i.e., San Joaquin Valley, which includes the San Joaquin and Tulare Basins, has experienced large changes in groundwater storage during the drought period. As a result, total land subsidence of 0.30-0.50 m has observed [Farr and Liu 2015], adjacent to creeping rate of 20-30 mm/year along

  4. Effects of Altered Weather Variables and Increased CO2 Concentrations on the Main Agricultural Crops of California's Central Valley Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Lopez, F.; Young, C. A.; Tansey, M.; Yates, D.

    2010-12-01

    Potential changes in crop water demand and due to climate change is a growing concern among scientists and policy makers. In this study we analyze the potential response of evapotranspiration to climate change through the estimation of agricultural crops’ water use response to altered weather variables (temperature, precipitation, solar radiation, relative humidity, and wind speed) and an increased atmospheric CO2 concentration. Changes in growing season length, production of biomass and crop yields are also estimated through the use of downscaled climate futures selected to cover a wide range of the existing GCM results. An existing model, the Land, Air, and Water Simulator (LAWS) has been modified to include algorithms that account for the effects of altered weather variables, and the modeling of the top five agricultural crops in three representative regions of the California’s Central Valley Project System (Sacramento, San Joaquin river basin and the Delta area) is described. Study results show that atmospheric conditions can have complex and opposing influences on important evaluation metrics such as plant transpiration rates and cumulative water use, initiation and duration of the growing season, biomass production and crop yields. The magnitude of changes relative to historic conditions could be significant. Additional simulations are underway to expand the scope of the results throughout the California’s Central Valley Project System. These results will be directly relevant to the development of climate adaptation strategies effecting future Delta inflows.

  5. Significance of zircon U-Pb ages from the Pescadero felsite, west-central California coast ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Robert J.; Moore, Diane E.; ,; Martens, UWE C.; Clark, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Weathered felsite is associated with the late Campanian–Maastrichtian Pigeon Point Formation near Pescadero, California. Poorly exposed, its age and correlation are uncertain. Is it part of the Pigeon Point section west of the San Gregorio–Hosgri fault? Does it rest on Nacimiento block basement? Is it dextrally offset from the Oligocene Cambria Felsite, ∼185 km to the southeast? Why is a calc-alkaline hypabyssal igneous rock intrusive into the outboard accretionary prism? To address these questions, we analyzed 43 oscillatory-zoned zircon crystals from three incipiently recrystallized pumpellyite ± prehnite ± laumontite-bearing Pescadero felsite samples by sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe–reverse geometry (SHRIMP-RG) and laser ablation–inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) techniques. Thirty-three zircons gave late Mesozoic U-Pb ages, with single-grain values ranging from 81 to 167 Ma; ten have pre-Mesozoic, chiefly Proterozoic ages. A group of the four youngest Pescadero zircons yielded an apparent maximum igneous age of ca. 86–90 Ma. Reflecting broad age scatter and presence of partly digested sandstone inclusions, we interpret the rest of the zircons (perhaps all) as xenocrysts. Twenty-three zircons were separated and analyzed from two samples of the similar Cambria Felsite, yielding a unimodal 27 Ma U-Pb age. Clearly, the origin of the Upper Oligocene Cambria Felsite is different from that of the Upper Cretaceous Pescadero felsite; these rocks are not correlated, and do not constrain displacement along the San Gregorio–Hosgri fault. Peak ages differ slightly, but relative probability curves for Mesozoic and pre-Mesozoic Pescadero zircons compare well, for example, with abundant U-Pb age data for detrital zircons from Franciscan metaclastic strata ∼100 km to the east in the Diablo Range–San Francisco Bay area, San Joaquin Great Valley Group turbidites, Upper Cretaceous Nacimiento block Franciscan strata, and Upper

  6. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Tahoe-Martis, Central Sierra, and Southern Sierra study units, 2006-2007--California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the Tahoe-Martis, Central Sierra, and Southern Sierra study units was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The three study units are located in the Sierra Nevada region of California in parts of Nevada, Placer, El Dorado, Madera, Tulare, and Kern Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board, in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The project was designed to provide statistically robust assessments of untreated groundwater quality within the primary aquifer systems used for drinking water. The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter, primary aquifers) for each study unit are defined by the depth of the screened or open intervals of the wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database of wells used for municipal and community drinking-water supply. The quality of groundwater in shallower or deeper water-bearing zones may differ from that in the primary aquifers; shallower groundwater may be more vulnerable to contamination from the surface. The assessments for the Tahoe-Martis, Central Sierra, and Southern Sierra study units were based on water-quality and ancillary data collected by the USGS from 132 wells in the three study units during 2006 and 2007 and water-quality data reported in the CDPH database. Two types of assessments were made: (1) status, assessment of the current quality of the groundwater resource, and (2) understanding, identification of the natural and human factors affecting groundwater quality. The assessments characterize untreated groundwater quality, not the quality of treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors. Relative-concentrations (sample concentrations divided by benchmark concentrations) were used for evaluating groundwater quality for those

  7. Comparison of sediment supply to San Francisco Bay from watersheds draining the Bay Area and the Central Valley of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, L.J.; Lewicki, M.; Schoellhamer, D.H.; Ganju, N.K.

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying suspended sediment loads is important for managing the world's estuaries in the context of navigation, pollutant transport, wetland restoration, and coastal erosion. To address these needs, a comprehensive analysis was completed on sediment supply to San Francisco Bay from fluvial sources. Suspended sediment, optical backscatter, velocity data near the head of the estuary, and discharge data obtained from the output of a water balance model were used to generate continuous suspended sediment concentration records and compute loads to the Bay from the large Central Valley watershed. Sediment loads from small tributary watersheds around the Bay were determined using 235 station-years of suspended sediment data from 38 watershed locations, regression analysis, and simple modeling. Over 16 years, net annual suspended sediment load to the head of the estuary from its 154,000 km2 Central Valley watershed varied from 0.13 to 2.58 (mean = 0.89) million metric t of suspended sediment, or an average yield of 11 metric t/km2/yr. Small tributaries, totaling 8145 km2, in the nine-county Bay Area discharged between 0.081 and 4.27 (mean = 1.39) million metric t with a mean yield of 212 metric t/km2/yr. The results indicate that the hundreds of urbanized and tectonically active tributaries adjacent to the Bay, which together account for just 5% of the total watershed area draining to the Bay and provide just 7% of the annual average fluvial flow, supply 61% of the suspended sediment. The small tributary loads are more variable (53-fold between years compared to 21-fold for the inland Central Valley rivers) and dominated fluvial sediment supply to the Bay during 10 out of 16 yr. If San Francisco Bay is typical of other estuaries in active tectonic or climatically variable coastal regimes, managers responsible for water quality, dredging and reusing sediment accumulating in shipping channels, or restoring wetlands in the world's estuaries may need to more carefully

  8. The influence of upper-crust lithology on topographic development in the central Coast Ranges of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, A.F.; Mahan, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental geological tenet is that as landscapes evolve over graded to geologic time, geologic structures control patterns of topographic distribution in mountainous areas such that terrain underlain by competent rock will be higher than terrain underlain by incompetent rock. This paper shows that in active orogens where markedly weak and markedly strong rocks are juxtaposed along contacts that parallel regional structures, relatively high topography can form where strain is localized in the weak rock. Such a relationship is illustrated by the topography of the central Coast Ranges between the Pacific coastline and the San Andreas fault zone (SAFZ), and along the length of the Gabilan Mesa (the "Gabilan Mesa segment" of the central Coast Ranges). Within the Gabilan Mesa segment, the granitic upper crust of the Salinian terrane is in contact with the accretionary-prism m??lange upper crust of the Nacimiento terrane along the inactive Nacimiento fault zone. A prominent topographic lineament is present along most of this lithologic boundary, approximately 50 to 65. km southwest of the SAFZ, with the higher topography formed in the m??lange on the southwest side of the Nacimiento fault. This paper investigates factors influencing the pattern of topographic development in the Gabilan Mesa segment of the central Coast Ranges by correlating shortening magnitude with the upper-crust compositions of the Salinian and Nacimiento terranes. The fluvial geomorphology of two valleys in the Gabilan Mesa, which is within the Salinian terrane, and alluvial geochronology based on optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL) age estimates, reveal that the magnitude of shortening accommodated by down-to-the-southwest tilting of the mesa since 400ka is less than 1 to 2m. Our results, combined with those of previous studies, indicate that at least 63% to 78% of late-Cenozoic, northeast-southwest directed, upper-crustal shortening across the Gabilan Mesa segment has been accommodated

  9. Regional implications of new chronostratigraphic and paleogeographic data from the Early Permian Darwin Basin, east-central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Calvin H.; Stone, Paul; Magginetti, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    The Darwin Basin developed in response to episodic subsidence of the western margin of the Cordilleran continental shelf from Late Pennsylvanian (Gzhelian) to Early Permian (late Artinskian) time. Subsidence of the basin was initiated in response to continental truncation farther to the west and was later augmented by thrust emplacement of the Last Chance allochthon. This deep-water basin was filled by voluminous fine-grained siliciclastic turbidites and coarse-grained limestone-gravity-flow deposits. Most of this sediment was derived from the Bird Spring carbonate shelf and cratonal platform to the northeast or east, but some came from an offshore tectonic ridge (Conglomerate Mesa Uplift) to the west that formed at the toe of the Last Chance allochthon. At one point in the late Artinskian the influx of extrabasinal sediment was temporarily cut off, resulting in deposition of a unique black limestone that allows precise correlation throughout the basin. Deep-water sedimentation in the Darwin Basin ended by Kungurian time when complex shallow-water to continental sedimentary facies spread across the region. Major expansion of the Darwin Basin occurred soon after the middle Sakmarian emplacement of the Last Chance allochthon. This tectonic event was approximately coeval with deformation in northeastern Nevada that formed the deep-water Dry Mountain Trough. We herein interpret the two basins to have been structurally continuous. Deposition of the unique black limestone is interpreted to mark a eustatic sea level rise that also can be recognized in Lower Permian sections in east-central Nevada and central Arizona.

  10. PRASYARAT KEBERHASILAN KERJA SAMA SISTER PROVINCE : STUDI KASUS SISTER PROVINCE ANTARA JAWA TENGAH DENGAN PROVINSI FUJIAN-CINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermini S.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of Indonesian local government autonomy gives many consequences. One of it is the augmentation of cooperation with foreign countries conducted by local government. One type of the cooperation is sister province. This cooperation still bring lack of success story and best practices. Rather brings clear profits, mostly sister province cooperation has no clear benefits. By using the case of sister province cooperation between Central Java province and Fujian, this research providing the answer why central java wants to cooperate with Fujian under the scheme sister province due to the massive criticism of Free Trade Area with China. By using Scholte’s Globalization approach, and Botenbal’s lowered politics issue this paper argue that the sister province cooperation between Central Java and Fujian is being conduct for the cause of spillover effect and due to long road historical demographic background between these two provinces.

  11. Persistence of F-Specific RNA Coliphages in Surface Waters from a Produce Production Region along the Central Coast of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravva, Subbarao V.; Sarreal, Chester Z.

    2016-01-01

    F+ RNA coliphages (FRNA) are used to source-track fecal contamination and as surrogates for enteric pathogen persistence in the environment. However, the environmental persistence of FRNA is not clearly understood and necessitates the evaluation of the survival of prototype and environmental isolates of FRNA representing all four genogroups in surface waters from the central coast of California. Water temperature played a significant role in persistence–all prototype and environmental strains survived significantly longer at 10°C compared to 25°C. Similarly, the availability of host bacterium was found to be critical in FRNA survival. In the absence of E. coli Famp, all prototypes of FRNA disappeared rapidly with a D-value (days for one log reduction) of MS2>SP>GA and at 10°C it was QB = MS2>GA>SP. Significant differences in survival were observed between prototypes and environmental isolates of FRNA. While most environmental isolates disappeared rapidly at 25°C and in the absence of the host, members of genogroups GIII and GI persisted longer with the host compared to members of GII and GIV. Consequentially, FRNA based source tracking methods can be used to detect phages from recent fecal contamination along with those that persist longer in the environment as a result of cooler temperatures and increased host presence. PMID:26784030

  12. Developing selenium-enriched animal feed and biofuel from canola planted for managing Se-laden drainage waters in the westside of central California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañuelos, G S; Da Roche, J; Robinson, J

    2010-03-01

    We studied the reuse of selenium (Se)-laden effluent for producing canola (Brassica napus) and subsequent bioproducts in central California. Canola was irrigated with poor quality waters [electrical conductivity (EC) of approximately 5 dS m(-1) sulfate-salinity, 5 mg B L(-1), and 0.25 mg Se L(-1)]. Typical seed yields were 2.2 metric tons ha(-1). Seeds were processed for their oil, and transesterified to produce ASTM-quality biodiesel (BD) blends. The resulting Se-enriched seed cake meal (containing approximately 2 mg Se kg(-1) DM) was used in a dairy feed trial. Seventy-two Jersey and Holstein cows, 36 respectively, were fed Se-enriched canola meal as 6.2% of their daily feed ration for five weeks. Blood and milk samples were collected weekly and analyzed for total Se. This study showed that Se-enriched canola meal did not significantly increase total blood Se content in either cow breed. Milk Se concentrations did, however, significantly increase to safe levels of 59 microg Se L(-1) and 52 microg Se L(-1) in Jersey and Holstein cows, respectively. The production of BD 20 biofuels and Se-enriched feed meal from canola irrigated with poor quality waters may help sustain similar phytomanagement strategies under Se-rich conditions.

  13. Predicting euphotic-depth-integrated chlorophyll-a from discrete-depth and satellite-observable chlorophyll-a off central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, Sergey; Ryan, J. P.; Chavez, F. P.

    2012-05-01

    Predicting water column integrated phytoplankton biomass from near-surface measurements has been an important effort in marine ecological research, particularly since the advent of satellite remote sensing of ocean color. Quantitative relationships between chlorophyll-aconcentrations (Chl-a) at the surface and its depth-integrated magnitude have thus far only been developed for open-ocean waters. Here we develop and test for the first time an extension of open-ocean relationships into ocean-margin waters, specifically the highly productive and variable eastern boundary upwelling ecosystem off the central California coast. This region was chosen because of the unique availability of a 30-year record of ship-based Chl-aprofiles measured using consistent methods. The extended relationship allows accurate prediction of integrated biomass from surface measurements. Further, we develop a new set of relationships for predicting the depth-integrated Chl-afrom Chl-ameasured over a range of discrete depths (i.e., as measured by fluorometers on moorings). The newly developed relationships are tested against 15,000 fluorometric Chl-aprofiles obtained from an autonomous underwater vehicle. Surprisingly, the relationship between surface Chl-aand depth-integrated Chl-aholds for profiles with high concentrations of Chl-a in persistent subsurface thin phytoplankton layers (layers <3 m thick and located below the first optical depth). The results have implications for monitoring of algal blooms and for quantifying ocean primary productivity from satellite observations of ocean color.

  14. [Lipid and apoprotein A-I and B-100 levels in school children school from five central-eastern provinces of Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveda, Elpidia; Callas, Ney; Baracaldo, César; Castillo, Carlina; Hernández, Patricia; Guerra, Martha

    2007-09-01

    Lipid and apolipoprotein are known to vary in children.These variations can be associated to physiologic changes or the environment; this last one probably induces future alterations in the lipids. The levels of total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, and apoproteins A-I and B-100 were compared in school children from five provinces of middle-eastern Colombia. Associations were made with age, gender, body mass index, fitness activity, and food preference. 741 blood samples were collected and biochemical determinations were undertaken with standard enzymatic, colorimetric, and inmunoturbidimetric methods. All values are presented as mean +/- SE, comparisons among groups were made using Student s t test, ANOVA and Scheffe. Lipid variation was observed in the school children, however in contrast, the concentrations of Apoproteins ApoB-100 and ApoA-I tended to be constant. The lipid fluctuations showed some relationship with changes in age and gender, however, changes were also observed that indicate a possible relationship with sexual maturation, diet and fitness activity. An important finding was that the HDL cholesterol value was lower that reported from other countries, while the triglycerides was higher and this may indicate a future increased risk for cardiovascular diseases. Fluctuations occur in the lipid levels and vary with age and gender. Associations with other factors may be present; however, more research is necessary to determinate the contribution of each factor. A promotion campaign among school-age children for a healthier life style may contribute to a decrease in future risk for cardiovascular diseases associated with low HDL-cholesterol levels and higher triglycerides.

  15. EFFECT OF SELECTED LAND USE TYPES ON SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF SOIL HEALTH WITHIN BUGESERA AGRO-ECOLOGICAL ZONE IN THE CENTRAL PLATEAU, EASTERN PROVINCE OF RWANDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamudu Rukangantambara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Land used for different purposes may be disturbed to differing degrees depending on management practice, application rate and timing in the areas of intensive agriculture as they vary according to soil formation factors such as parent material, topography and climate. Assessing land-use-induced changes in soil properties is essential for addressing the issue of agro-ecosystem transformation and sustainable land productivity. Effective land use, planning and management at local and regional scales are dependent on a sound knowledge of the distribution and variability of suitability land use within the agro-ecological zone. The main objective of this research was to determine the impact of selected land use types and interactions on some soil chemical, physical and biological characteristics such as soil pH, soil organic matter (SOM, bulk density (BD, water stable aggregates (WSA, hydraulic conductivity (HC, soil flora (bacteria, fungi, actnomycete and microbial biomass nutrients in surface layers (0-20 cm of topsoil of land use. The experimental design was a completely randomized block with 3 replications for each land use system .This study was carried out in Juru, Rweru and Gashora sectors in Bugesera district Eastern Province of Rwanda. The study area is traditional potential area for field crops (especially banana, maize and cassava and for natural land use (shrubs and forest lands. According to ANOVA statistical analysis, different land uses in the study area has significantly affected soil health as follows p<0.01 for SOM, WSA and HC, p<0.05 for BD, p< 0.05 for microbial biomass N and C. Besides, soil texture was significantly detected as p< 0.01

  16. The Purisima Formation and related rocks (upper Miocene - Pliocene), greater San Francisco Bay area, central California; review of literature and USGS collection now housed at the Museum of Paleontology, University of California, Berkeley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C.L.

    1998-01-01

    Sedimentary rocks more than 1.6 kilometers thick are attributed to the upper Miocene to upper Pliocene Purisima Formation in the greater San Francisco Bay area. These rocks occur as scattered, discontinuous outcrops from Point Reyes National Seashore in the north to south of Santa Cruz. Lithologic divisions of the Formation appear to be of local extent and are of limited use in correlating over this broad area. The Purisima Formation occurs in several fault-bounded terranes which demonstrate different stratigraphic histories and may be found to represent more than a single depositional basin. The precise age and stratigraphic relationship of these scattered outcrops are unresolved and until they are put into a stratigraphic and paleogeographic context the tectonic significance of the Purisima Foramtion can only be surmised. This paper will attempt to resolve some of these problems. Mollusks and echinoderms are recorded from the literature and more than 70 USGS collections that have not previously been reported. With the exception of one locality, the faunas suggest deposition in normal marine conditions at water depths of less than 50 m and with water temperatures the same or slightly cooler than exist along the present coast of central California. The single exception is a fauna from outcrops between Seal Cove and Pillar Point, where both mollusks and foraminifers suggest water depths greater than 100 m. Three molluscan faunas, the La Honda, the Pillar Point, and the Santa Cruz, are recognized based on USGS collections and published literature for the Purisima Formation. These biostratigraphically distinct faunas aid in the correlation of the scattered Purisima Formation outcrops. The lowermost La Honda fauna suggests shallow-water depths and an age of late Miocene to early Pliocene. This age is at odds with a younger age determination from an ash bed in the lower Purisima Formation along the central San Mateo County coast. The Pillar Point fauna contains only a

  17. California Bioregions

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — California regions developed by the Inter-agency Natural Areas Coordinating Committee (INACC) were digitized from a 1:1,200,000 California Department of Fish and...

  18. Multiple Stage Ore Formation in the Chadormalu Iron Deposit, Bafq Metallogenic Province, Central Iran: Evidence from BSE Imaging and Apatite EPMA and LA-ICP-MS U-Pb Geochronology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Heidarian

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Chadormalu magnetite-apatite deposit in Bafq metallogenic province, Central Iran, is hosted in the late Precambrian-lower Cambrian volcano-sedimentary rocks with sodic, calcic, and potassic alterations characteristic of iron oxide copper-gold (IOCG and iron oxide-apatite (IOA ore systems. Apatite occurs as scattered irregular veinlets and disseminated grains, respectively, within and in the marginal parts of the main ore-body, as well as apatite-magnetite veins in altered wall rocks. Textural evidence (SEM-BSE images of these apatites shows primary bright, and secondary dark areas with inclusions of monazite/xenotime. The primary, monazite-free fluorapatite contains higher concentrations of Na, Si, S, and light rare earth elements (LREE. The apatite was altered by hydrothermal events that led to leaching of Na, Si, and REE + Y, and development of the dark apatite. The bright apatite yielded two U-Pb age populations, an older dominant age of 490 ± 21 Ma, similar to other iron deposits in the Bafq district and associated intrusions, and a younger age of 246 ± 17 Ma. The dark apatite yielded a U-Pb age of 437 ± 12 Ma. Our data suggest that hydrothermal magmatic fluids contributed to formation of the primary fluorapatite, and sodic and calcic alterations. The primary apatite reequilibrated with basinal brines in at least two regional extensions and basin developments in Silurian and Triassic in Central Iran.

  19. Stratigraphy, age, and depositional setting of the Miocene Barstow Formation at Harvard Hill, central Mojave Desert, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Shannon R.; Miller, David M.; Wooden, Joseph L.; Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2010-01-01

    New detailed geologic mapping and geochronology of the Barstow Formation at Harvard Hill, 30 km east of Barstow, CA, help to constrain Miocene paleogeography and tectonics of the central Mojave Desert. A northern strand of the Quaternary ENE-striking, sinistral Manix fault divides the Barstow Formation at Harvard Hill into two distinct lithologic assemblages. Strata north of the fault consist of: a green rhyolitic tuff, informally named the Shamrock tuff; lacustrine sandstone; partially silicified thin-bedded to massive limestone; and alluvial sandstone to pebble conglomerate. Strata south of the fault consist of: lacustrine siltstone and sandstone; a rhyolitic tuff dated at 19.1 Ma (U-Pb); rock-avalanche breccia deposits; partially silicified well-bedded to massive limestone; and alluvial sandstone and conglomerate. Our U-Pb zircon dating of the Shamrock tuff by SHRIMP-RG yields a peak probability age of 18.7 ± 0.1 Ma. Distinctive outcrop characteristics, mineralogy, remanent magnetization, and zircon geochemistry (Th/U) suggest that the Shamrock tuff represents a lacustrine facies of the regionally extensive Peach Spring Tuff (PST). Here we compare zircon age and geochemical analyses from the Shamrock tuff with those of the PST at Stoddard Wash and provide new insight into the age of zircon crystallization in the PST rhyolite. Results of our field studies show that Miocene strata at Harvard Hill mostly accumulated in a lacustrine environment, although depositional environments varied from a relatively deep lake to a very shallow lake or even onshore setting. Rock-avalanche breccias and alluvial deposits near the base of the exposed section indicate proximity to a steep basin margin and detrital studies suggest a southern source for coarse-grained deposits; therefore, we may infer a southern basin-margin setting at Harvard Hill during the early Miocene. Our geochronology demonstrates that deposition of the Barstow Formation at Harvard Hill extended from before

  20. California Immigrants Today

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelius, Wayne A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper will focus on the Mexico-origin component of the California immigrant population. Drawing on the results of field studies conducted throughout California and in west-central Mexico during the last ten years,the paper will describe how the profile of Mexican migration to California has changed since the 197Os, suggest explanations for these changes, and discuss their implications for public policy. Effects of the long-running economic crisis in Mexico and of the 1986 U.S. immigra-ti...

  1. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Greene, H. Gary; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Endris, Charles A.; Seitz, Gordon G.; Sliter, Ray W.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Gutierrez, Carlos I.; Wong, Florence L.; Yoklavich, Mary M.; Draut, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Conrad, James E.; Cochran, Susan A.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The Offshore of Santa Barbara map area lies within the central Santa Barbara Channel region of the Southern California Bight. This geologically complex region forms a major biogeographic transition zone, separating the cold-temperate Oregonian province north of Point Conception from the warm-temperate California province to the south. The map area is in the southern part of the Western Transverse Ranges geologic province, which is north of the California Continental Borderland. Significant clockwise rotation—at least 90°—since the early Miocene has been proposed for the Western Transverse Ranges province, and geodetic studies indicate that the region is presently undergoing north-south shortening. Uplift rates (as much as 2.2 mm/yr) that are based on studies of onland marine terraces provide further evidence of significant shortening. The city of Santa Barbara, the main coastal population center in the map area, is part of a contiguous urban area that extends from Carpinteria to Goleta. This urban area was developed on the coalescing alluvial surfaces, uplifted marine terraces, and low hills that lie south of the east-west-trending Santa Ynez Mountains. Several beaches line the actively

  2. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Carpinteria, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Greene, H. Gary; Endris, Charles A.; Seitz, Gordon G.; Sliter, Ray W.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Wong, Florence L.; Gutierrez, Carlos I.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Draut, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The Offshore of Carpinteria map area lies within the central Santa Barbara Channel region of the Southern California Bight. This geologically complex region forms a major biogeographic transition zone, separating the cold-temperate Oregonian province north of Point Conception from the warm-temperate California province to the south. The map area is in the southern part of the Western Transverse Ranges geologic province, which is north of the California Continental Borderland. Significant clockwise rotation—at least 90°—since the early Miocene has been proposed for the Western Transverse Ranges province, and the region is presently undergoing north-south shortening. The small city of Carpinteria is the most significant onshore cultural center in the map area; the smaller town of Summerland lies west of Carpinteria. These communities rest on a relatively flat coastal piedmont that is surrounded on the north, east, and west by hilly relief on the flanks of the Santa Ynez Mountains. El Estero, a salt marsh on the coast west of Carpinteria, is an ecologically important coastal estuary. Southeast of Carpinteria, the coastal zone is narrow strip containing highway and railway transportation corridors

  3. Quaternary shortening in the central Puna Plateau of NW Argentina: Preliminary results from the Salar de Pocitos, Salta province (24.5° S, 67° W)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freymark, Jessica; Strecker, Manfred R.; Bookhagen, Bodo; Bekeschus, Benjamin; Eckelmann, Felix; Alonso, Ricardo

    2013-04-01

    Active tectonism in Cenozoic orogenic plateaus is often characterized by a combination of active extensional and strike-slip faulting subsequent to protracted phases of shortening and the build-up of high topography. In the Puna Plateau of NW Argentina, the southern part of the world's second largest orogenic plateau, the changeover from shortening to extensional tectonics is thought to have occured between 7 and 5 Ma along the southeastern plateau margin, while the central and northern plateau areas apparently changed into an extensional regime between 9 and 6 Ma (Cladouhos et al., 1994). Despite these observations of extensional structures we report on new data from the Salar de Pocitos that show sustained shortening in the south-central part of the plateau. The south-central Puna Plateau is characterized by an average elevation of about 3700 m with low relief and internally drained basins, which are bordered by reverse-fault bounded ranges. The N-S oriented Salar de Pocitos is an integral part of these contractional structures and covers an area of ~435 km². The western border of the basin constitutes the eastern flank of an anticline involving Tertiary and Quaternary sediments, while the eastern border is delimited by a N-S striking reverse fault, bounding the range front of the Sierra Qda. Honda. In the north of the Salar de Pocitos the three Miocene volcanoes Tultul, Delmedio and Pocitos form a barrier with the Salar del Rincón, and the south of the basin is bordered by fault blocks involving Ordovician lithologies that have left only a narrow valley that may have provided an outlet of the basin in the past. Multiple terraces generated during Late Pleistocene and Holocene lake highstands straddle the Pocitos Basin and serve as excellent strain markers to assess neotectonic deformation. We surveyed the terraces along N-S and E-W transects using a differential GPS. The E-W surveys are perpendicular to the structures that bound the basin and record

  4. Correlating the end-Triassic mass extinction and basalt volcanism of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province at the 100,000-year level by high-precision U-Pb age determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoene, Blair; Guex, Jean; Bartolini, Annachiara; Schaltegger, Urs; Blackburn, Terrence J.

    2010-05-01

    The end-Triassic mass extinction is one of the five largest extinctions in Earth history, though considerable uncertainty remains in terms of its duration, causes and effects. Many workers suggest that the extinction was related directly or indirectly to adverse climate following the onset of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), which erupted > 2.5x106 km3 of basalt in less than 1 Ma. However, there remains a need for precise and accurate geochronology to correlate the onset of CAMP volcanism, recorded uniquely in terrestrial sections, with the well-documented marine extinction event. We provide new chemical abrasion ID-TIMS U-Pb age determinations on ash bed and basaltic zircons using the well-calibrated EARTHTIME 202Pb-205Pb-233U-235U tracer solution, yielding data that are up to 70% more precise compared to single-Pb/single-U tracers. We show that the Triassic-Jurassic boundary (TJB) and end-Triassic biological crisis from two independent marine stratigraphic sections in northern Peru and in Nevada (USA) correlate with the onset of terrestrial flood volcanism in the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) to <150 ka. Ash bed samples reveal complicated U-Pb systematics, showing ranges in 206Pb/238U zircon dates of up to 2 Ma, representing a range of growth histories prior to eruption. Therefore, we use the youngest single closed-system zircon to approximate the eruption date. Three volcanic ash beds from the Pucara basin, northern Peru, bracket the TJB to a 206Pb/238U age of 201.31 ± 0.18/0.31/0.43 Ma (internal uncertainties/ with tracer calibration uncertainty/ with decay constant uncertainties). The first discovered ash bed from the New York canyon, Nevada, 1.5 m above TJB requires a boundary age of less than 201.33 ± 0.13 Ma. We also provide data from two laboratories which yield a new 206Pb/238U zircon age of 201.28 ± 0.02/0.22/0.31 Ma for the North Mtn. basalt, the lowest CAMP basalt from the Fundy basin, Nova Scotia. This narrows the

  5. Prevalence of shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes at public access watershed sites in a California Central Coast agricultural region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Michael B.; Quiñones, Beatriz; Oryang, David; Mandrell, Robert E.; Gorski, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Produce contaminated with enteric pathogens is a major source of foodborne illness in the United States. Lakes, streams, rivers, and ponds were sampled with Moore swabs bi-monthly for over 2 years at 30 locations in the vicinity of a leafy green growing region on the Central California Coast and screened for Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC), Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes to evaluate the prevalence and persistence of pathogen subtypes. The prevalence of STEC from 1386 samples was 11%; 110 samples (8%) contained E. coli O157:H7 with the highest prevalence occurring close to cattle operations. Non-O157 STEC isolates represented major clinical O-types and 57% contained both shiga toxin types 1 and 2 and intimin. Multiple Locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis of STEC isolates indicated prevalent strains during the period of study. Notably, Salmonella was present at high levels throughout the sampling region with 65% prevalence in 1405 samples resulting in 996 isolates with slightly lower prevalence in late autumn. There were 2, 8, and 14 sites that were Salmonella-positive over 90, 80, and 70% of the time, respectively. The serotypes identified most often were 6,8:d:-, Typhimurium, and Give. Interestingly, analysis by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis indicated persistence and transport of pulsotypes in the region over several years. In this original study of L. monocytogenes in the region prevalence was 43% of 1405 samples resulting in 635 individual isolates. Over 85% of the isolates belonged to serotype 4b with serotypes 1/2a, 1/2b, 3a, 4d with 4e representing the rest, and there were 12 and 2 sites that were positive over 50 and 80% of the time, respectively. Although surface water is not directly used for irrigation in this region, transport to the produce can occur by other means. This environmental survey assesses initial contamination levels toward an understanding of transport leading to produce recalls or outbreaks. PMID

  6. The Point Sal–Point Piedras Blancas correlation and the problem of slip on the San Gregorio–Hosgri fault, central California Coast Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Joseph P.; Stanley, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Existing models for large-magnitude, right-lateral slip on the San Gregorio–Hosgri fault system imply much more deformation of the onshore block in the Santa Maria basin than is supported by geologic data. This problem is resolved by a model in which dextral slip on this fault system increases gradually from 0–10 km near Point Arguello to ∼150 km at Cape San Martin, but such a model requires abandoning the cross-fault tie between Point Sal and Point Piedras Blancas, which requires 90–100 km of right-lateral slip on the southern Hosgri fault. We collected stratigraphic and detrital zircon data from Miocene clastic rocks overlying Jurassic basement at both localities to determine if either section contained unique characteristics that could establish how far apart they were in the early Miocene. Our data indicate that these basins formed in the early Miocene during a period of widespread transtensional basin formation in the central Coast Ranges, and they filled with sediment derived from nearby pre-Cenozoic basement rocks. Although detrital zircon data do not indicate a unique source component in either section, they establish the maximum depositional age of the previously undated Point Piedras Blancas section to be 18 Ma. We also show that detrital zircon trace-element data can be used to discriminate between zircons of oceanic crust and arc affinity of the same age, a potentially useful tool in future studies of the California Coast Ranges. Overall, we find no characteristics in the stratigraphy and provenance of the Point Sal and Point Piedras Blancas sections that are sufficiently unique to prove whether they were far apart or close together in the early Miocene, making them of questionable utility as piercing points.

  7. The influence of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycles on wave-driven sea-floor sediment mobility along the central California continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Reid, Jane A.

    2010-01-01

    Ocean surface waves are the dominant temporally and spatially variable process influencing sea floor sediment resuspension along most continental shelves. Wave-induced sediment mobility on the continental shelf and upper continental slope off central California for different phases of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events was modeled using monthly statistics derived from more than 14 years of concurrent hourly oceanographic and meteorologic data as boundary input for the Delft SWAN wave model, gridded sea floor grain-size data from the usSEABED database, and regional bathymetry. Differences as small as 0.5 m in wave height, 1 s in wave period, and 10° in wave direction, in conjunction with the spatially heterogeneous unconsolidated sea-floor sedimentary cover, result in significant changes in the predicted mobility of continental shelf surficial sediment in the study area. El Niño events result in more frequent mobilization on the inner shelf in the summer and winter than during La Niña events and on the outer shelf and upper slope in the winter months, while La Niña events result in more frequent mobilization on the mid-shelf during spring and summer months than during El Niño events. The timing and patterns of seabed mobility are addressed in context of geologic and biologic processes. By understanding the spatial and temporal variability in the disturbance of the sea floor, scientists can better interpret sedimentary patterns and ecosystem structure, while providing managers and planners an understanding of natural impacts when considering the permitting of offshore activities that disturb the sea floor such as trawling, dredging, and the emplacement of sea-floor engineering structures.

  8. Advantages of active love wave techniques in geophysical characterizations of seismographic station - Case studies in California and the central and eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Antony; Yong, Alan K.; Salomone, Larry A.

    2014-01-01

    Active-source Love waves, recorded by the multi-channel analysis of surface wave (MASLW) technique, were recently analyzed in two site characterization projects. Between 2010 and 2012, the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funded GEOVision to conduct geophysical investigations at 191 seismographic stations in California and the Central Eastern U.S. (CEUS). The original project plan was to utilize active and passive Rayleigh wave-based techniques to obtain shear-wave velocity (VS) profiles to a minimum depth of 30 m and the time-averaged VS of the upper 30 meters (VS30). Early in this investigation it became clear that Rayleigh wave techniques, such as multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASRW), were not suited for characterizing all sites. Shear-wave seismic refraction and MASLW techniques were therefore applied. In 2012, the Electric Power Research Institute funded characterization of 33 CEUS station sites. Based on experience from the ARRA investigation, both MASRW and MASLW data were acquired by GEOVision at 24 CEUS sites. At shallow rock sites, sites with steep velocity gradients, and, sites with a thin, low velocity, surficial soil layer overlying stiffer sediments, Love wave techniques generally were found to be easier to interpret, i.e., Love wave data typically yielded unambiguous fundamental mode dispersion curves and thus, reduce uncertainty in the resultant VS model. These types of velocity structure often excite dominant higher modes in Rayleigh wave data, but not in the Love wave data. It is possible to model Rayleigh wave data using multi- or effective-mode techniques; however, extraction of Rayleigh wave dispersion data was found to be difficult in many cases. These results imply that field procedures should include careful scrutiny of Rayleigh wave-based dispersion data in order to also collect Love wave data when warranted.

  9. ANALYSIS OF EROSION AND SEDIMENTATION PATTERNS USING SOFTWARE OF MIKE 21 HDFM-MT IN THE KAPUAS MURUNG RIVER MOUTH CENTRAL KALIMANTAN PROVINCE

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    Franto Novico

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The public transportation system along the Kapuas River, Central Kalimantan are highly depend on water transportation. Natural condition gives high distribution to the smoothness of the vessel traffic along the Kapuas Murung River. The local government has planned to build specific port for stock pile at the Batanjung which would face with natural phenomena of sedimentation and erosion at a river mouth. Erosion and sedimentation could be predicted not only by field observing but it is also needed hypotheses using software analysis. Hydrodynamics and transport sediment models by Mike 21 HDFM-MT software will be applied to describe the position of sedimentations and erosions at a river mouth. Model is assumed by two different river conditions, wet and dry seasons. Based on two types of conditions the model would also describe the river flow and sediment transport at spring and neap periods. Tidal fluctuations and a river current as field observation data would be verified with the result of model simulations. Based on field observation and simulation results could be known the verification of tidal has an 89.74% correlation while the river current correlation has 43.6%. Moreover, based on the simulation the sediment patterns in flood period have a larger area than ebb period. Furthermore, the erosion patterns dominantly occur during wet and dry season within ebb period. Water depths and sediment patterns should be considered by the vessels that will use the navigation channel at a river mouth.

  10. Epidemiology of venomous and semi-venomous snakebites (Ophidia: Viperidae, Colubridae) in the Kashan city of the Isfahan province in Central Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Rouhullah; Mehrpour, Omid; Shahi, Morteza Panjeh; Jazayeri, Mehrdad; Karrari, Parissa; Keyler, Dan; Zamani, Nasim

    2014-01-01

    Information on the epidemiology of venomous snake species responsible for envenomation to humans in Iran has not been well documented. In the Kashan city, venomous snakebite remains a recurring medical problem. Information providing the correct identification of snake species responsible for envenomation in this geographic region would be useful to regional medical clinics and personnel for the effective and optimal management of the patients. In this cross-sectional study, all patient data was collected from Kashan city and its suburbs. The specific data relating to the taxonomic identification of snakes responsible for envenomation were evaluated. A general approach to the diagnosis and management of patients was also provided. Snakes responsible for bites were transported to a laboratory, where their taxonomic classification was confirmed based on key anatomical features and morphological characteristics. A total of 46 snakes were examined. Of these, 37 (80%) were non-venomous species, and 9 (20%) were identified as venomous. Seven of the nine venomous snake species (78%) were of the family Viperidae, and two specimens (22%) were in the family Colubridae. Specifically, the viperid species were Macrovipera lebetina obtusa, Pseudocerastes persicus, Pseudocerastes fieldi, and Echis carinatus. The two colubrid species were Malpolon monspessulanus insignitus and Psammophis schkari. Five different species of venomous snakes responsible for envenomation in the Kashan city region were confirmed. The viper, P. fieldi, was reported for the first time in the central part of Iran.

  11. Metal Exposure and Associated Health Risk to Human Beings by Street Dust in a Heavily Industrialized City of Hunan Province, Central China

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    Guangyi Sun

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Fifty-five urban street dust samples were collected from Zhuzhou, an industrial city in central China and analyzed for a range of toxic elements. Potential carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic health effects on children and adults due to exposure to street dust were assessed. Concerning the two subgroups, the child cohort is confronted with considerably greater health risks than adults. According to the Hazard Quotient (HQ method, ingestion of dust particles poses primary risk to children and adults, followed by dermal contact and inhalation for all of the metals investigated except Hg, for which inhalation of its elemental vapor constitute a slightly higher risk than ingestion. For children, Pb, As, Cd, Cr, Hg and Sb exposure were deemed as the highest contributors to non-cancer health risks, while As and Cr represent an enhanced cancer risk for children. For adults, risk indicator values for both cancer and non-cancer effects obtained were within the safety threshold. In a comparison with other locations within and outside mainland China, exposure to arsenic is prominent for the population of Zhuzhou, indicating more attention and preventive actions should been taken.

  12. How do laboratory technicians perceive their role in tuberculosis diagnostic process: a cross-sectional study among laboratory technicians in health centers of Central Java Province, Indonesia

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    Widjanarko B

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bagoes Widjanarko,1 Dyah Anantalia Widyastari,2 Martini Martini,3 Praba Ginandjar3 1Department of Health Education and Behavior Sciences, Faculty of Public Health, Diponegoro University, Semarang, Indonesia; 2Institute for Population and Social Research, Mahidol University, Salaya, Thailand; 3Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Diponegoro University, Semarang, Indonesia Purpose: Detection of acid-fast bacilli in respiratory specimens serves as an initial pulmonary tuberculosis (TB diagnosis. Laboratories are the essential and fundamental part of all health systems. This study aimed to describe how laboratory technicians perceived their own self and work. This included perceived self-efficacy, perceived role, perceived equipment availability, perceived procedures, perceived reward and job, and perceived benefit of health education, as well as level of knowledge and attitudes related to work performance of laboratory technicians.Methods: This was a cross-sectional quantitative study involving 120 laboratory technicians conducted in Central Java. Interviews and observation were conducted to measure performance and work-related variables.Results: Among 120 laboratory technicians, 43.3% showed fairly good performance. They complied with 50%–75% of all procedures, including sputum collection, laboratory tools utilization, sputum smearing, staining, smear examination, grading of results, and universal precaution practice. Perceived role, perceived self-efficacy, and knowledge of laboratory procedures were significantly correlated to performance, besides education and years of working as a laboratory technician. Perceived equipment availability was also significantly correlated to performance after the education variable was controlled.Conclusion: Most of the laboratory technicians believed that they have an important role in TB patients’ treatment and should display proper self-efficacy in performing laboratory activities. The

  13. [Effects of different soil types on the foliar δ13C values of common local plant species in karst rocky desertification area in central Guizhou Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xue-lian; Wang, Shi-jie; Luo, Xu-qiang

    2014-09-01

    By measuring the foliar δ13C values of common local plant species grown in different soil types in Wangjiazhai catchments, a typical karst desertification area in Qingzhen City, Central Guizhou, we studied the impact of soil type and rocky desertification grade on the foliar δ13C values. The results showed that the foliar δ13C values were more negative in yellow soil area than those in black calcareous area and there was no obvious difference in foliar δ13C values between these two soil types. The distribution interval of foliar δ13C values in yellow soil area was narrower than those in black calcareous area and the variation coefficient of foliar δ13C values in yellow soil area were smaller than those in black calcareous area. With increasing degree of karst rocky desertification, the foliar δ13C values of plant community in black calcareous area increased, whereas those in yellow soil area first increased and then decreased. The result of multiple comparison showed that the difference in foliar δ13C values of plant community among rocky desertification grade was not obvious in yellow soil area, but it was obvious in black calcareous area. Correlation analysis between the foliar δ13C values of plant species and the main environmental factors indicated that slope and soil thickness were the main factors which affected the foliar δ13C values of plants in yellow soil area and soil water contant was the main factor in black calcareous area. The impact of soil on the foliar δ13C values was realized by adjusting the soil moisture in study area.

  14. Study on evaluation of environmental carrying capacity of pig breeding in Central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Bi-Bin; Liu, Wei; Ji, Xue-Qiang; Zhang, Qi-Zhen

    2017-08-01

    China’s central six provinces are located in the hinterland of the mainland of China and play an increasingly important role in the process of China’s economic and social development. This paper uses the 2016 statistical yearbook data to synthesize the environmental carrying capacity of six provinces in central China Evaluation. The results show that Shanxi Province has the highest environmental pollution carrying index, followed by Jiangxi Province, Anhui Province, Hunan Province and Hubei Province. Henan Province is with the lowest index, which shows that the carrying capacity of pig breeding in Shanxi outpaces the other provinces. And Henan Province owns the weakest carrying capacity.

  15. Stable isotopes as indicators of sources and processes influencing nitrate distributions in dairy monitoring wells and domestic supply wells in the Central Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, M. B.; Harter, T.; Kendall, C.; Silva, S. R.; Esser, B. K.; Singleton, M. J.; Holstege, D.; Lockhart, K.; Applegate, O.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrate concentrations above the 10 mg/L NO3-N maximum contaminant level (MCL) have been found in many wells throughout the Central Valley, California. This area contains many possible anthropogenic nitrate sources including current and historic agriculture, private septic systems, municipal waste water, and confined animal feeding operations (primarily dairies). In order to better understand the potential contributions of dairy manure derived nitrate to both shallow and deep groundwater, we used a combined chemical, stable isotope, and age-dating approach for water samples collected from a network of shallow groundwater monitoring wells located on seven different dairies, and from a survey of approximately 200 deeper domestic supply wells (used for drinking water and dairy operations). Groundwater from shallow monitoring wells and deep supply wells was collected in two geographic regions. In the northern region, the lower San Joaquin Valley, the water table is shallow (2- 5 m below surface) and therefore considered highly vulnerable to contamination, while in the southern region, the Tulare Lake Basin, the water table is much deeper (20 - 30 m). Mean δ15N of nitrate in dairy monitoring wells in both the north and south regions was significantly higher than the mean δ15N measured in the deeper supply wells, and also showed greater variability. Mean δ15N and δ18O values measured in the deep supply wells were not significantly different between the north and south regions. Mean nitrate concentrations, δ15N, and δ18O were significantly higher in the northern (lower San Joaquin Valley) monitoring wells in comparison to the southern (Tulare Lake Basin) monitoring wells. Nitrate isotope measurements indicated that many of the northern monitoring wells had consistently high contributions of manure-derived nitrate to the shallow groundwater during the 16 month study. Monitoring wells located in relatively new dairies in the south region showed little evidence of

  16. Coyotes (Canis latrans) as the reservoir for a human pathogenic Bartonella sp.: molecular epidemiology of Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii infection in coyotes from central coastal California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C C; Kasten, R W; Chomel, B B; Simpson, D C; Hew, C M; Kordick, D L; Heller, R; Piemont, Y; Breitschwerdt, E B

    2000-11-01

    Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii was originally isolated from a dog suffering infectious endocarditis and was recently identified as a zoonotic agent causing human endocarditis. Following the coyote bite of a child who developed clinical signs compatible with Bartonella infection in Santa Clara County, Calif., this epidemiological study was conducted. Among 109 coyotes (Canis latrans) from central coastal California, 31 animals (28%) were found to be bacteremic with B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii and 83 animals (76%) had B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii antibodies. These findings suggest these animals could be the wildlife reservoir of B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of the gltA and 16S rRNA genes for these 31 isolates yielded similar profiles that were identical to those of B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii. Partial sequencing of the gltA and 16S rRNA genes, respectively, indicated 99.5 and 100% homology between the coyote isolate and B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii (ATCC 51672). PCR-RFLP analysis of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region showed the existence of two different strain profiles, as has been reported in dogs. Six (19%) of 31 Bartonella bacteremic coyotes exhibited the strain profile that was identified in the type strain of a canine endocarditis case (B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii ATCC 51672). The other 25 bacteremic coyotes were infected with a strain that was similar to the strains isolated from healthy dogs. Based on whole bacterial genome analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with SmaI restriction endonuclease, there was more diversity in fingerprints for the coyote isolates, which had at least 10 major variants compared to the two variants described for domestic dog isolates from the eastern United States. By PFGE analysis, three Bartonella bacteremic coyotes were infected by a strain identical to the one isolated from three healthy dog carriers. Further studies are necessary

  17. Comparison of particle-tracking and lumped-parameter models for determining groundwater age distributions and nitrate in water-supply wells, Central Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgens, B. C.; Bohlke, J. K.; Kauffman, L. J.; Belitz, K.

    2013-12-01

    Age distributions for 30 production wells (mostly public-supply) were determined using two methods: 1) calibration of age tracer data with lumped parameter models (LPMs) and 2) by advective particle tracking (PT) simulations using MODPATH and a regional steady-state groundwater flow model. The LPMs were calibrated with measurements of 3H, 3He(trit), and 14C by minimizing the Chi-square test statistic using a non-linear solver. A partial exponential model (PEM) was the primary LPM used in this study and a combination of two PEMs were used in cases where binary age mixtures were identified. The PEM is a reformulated version of the exponential model that is parameterized to simulate the age distribution in a well that is screened over any finite interval within the aquifer. The regional numerical model was calibrated to water-levels and gradients, and simulated PT age tracer concentrations were calibrated to the MODPATH porosity value. Age distributions were then used to predict nitrate concentrations in wells using agricultural application rates of nitrate in the central eastside of the San Joaquin Valley, California. Both methods showed that wells in the study area captured groundwater with a broad range of ages, spanning decades to millennia. Age distributions from the LPMs predicted age tracer and nitrate concentrations more accurately than the regional PT simulation; whereas PT simulations incorporating more detailed information about water-levels and hydraulic gradients near wells also provided good fits. 14C concentrations were not simulated well by the regional steady-state model, especially for wells with a significant fraction of old groundwater, because the model simulates the current, perturbed system and does not simulate recharge rates and velocities of the predevelopment system. Results from the LPMs yielded an average recharge rate of 0.55 m/yr, which was similar to the average recharge rate of 0.54 m/yr determined from a water budget analysis for the

  18. The Majority of Genotypes of the Virulence Gene inlA Are Intact among Natural Watershed Isolates of Listeria monocytogenes from the Central California Coast.

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    Lisa Gorski

    Full Text Available Internalin A is an essential virulence gene involved in the uptake of the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes into host cells. It is intact in clinical strains and often truncated due to Premature Stop Codons (PMSCs in isolates from processed foods and processing facilities. Less information is known about environmental isolates. We sequenced the inlA alleles and did Multi Locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis (MLVA on 112 L. monocytogenes isolates from a 3-year period from naturally contaminated watersheds near a leafy green growing area in Central California. The collection contained 14 serotype 1/2a, 12 serotype 1/2b, and 86 serotype 4b strains. Twenty-seven different inlA alleles were found. Twenty-three of the alleles are predicted to encode intact copies of InlA, while three contain PMSCs. Another allele has a 9-nucleotide deletion, previously described for a clinical strain, indicating that it is still functional. Intact inlA genes were found in 101 isolates, and 8 isolates contained the allele predicted to contain the 3-amino acid deletion. Both allele types were found throughout the 3-year sampling period. Three strains contained inlA alleles with PMSCs, and these were found only during the first 3 months of the study. SNP analysis of the intact alleles indicated clustering of alleles based on serotype and lineage with serotypes 1/2b and 4b (lineage I strains clustering together, and serotype 1/2a (lineage II strains clustering separately. The combination of serotype, MLVA types, and inlA allele types indicate that the 112 isolates reflect at least 49 different strains of L. monocytogenes. The finding that 90% of environmental L. monocytogenes isolates contain intact inlA alleles varies significantly from isolates found in processing plants. This information is important to public health labs and growers as to the varieties of L. monocytogenes that could potentially contaminate fresh produce in the field by various means.

  19. Digital Geologic Map of the Redding 1° x 2° Quadrangle, Shasta, Tehama, Humboldt, and Trinity Counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraticelli, Luis A.; Albers, John P.; Irwin, William P.; Blake, Milton C.; Wentworth, Carl M.

    2012-01-01

    The Redding 1° x 2 quadrangle in northwestern California transects the Franciscan Complex and southern Klamath Mountains province as well as parts of the Great Valley Complex, northern Great Valley, and southernmost Cascades volcanic province. The tectonostratigraphic terranes of the Klamath province represent slices of oceanic crust, island arcs, and overlying sediment that range largely from Paleozoic to Jurassic in age. The Eastern Klamath terrane forms the nucleus to which the other terranes were added westward, primarily during Jurassic time, and that package was probably accreted to North America during earliest Cretaceous time. The younger Franciscan Complex consists of a sequence of westward younging tectonostratigraphic terranes of late Jurassic to Miocene age that were accreted to North America from mid-Cretaceous through Miocene time, with the easternmost being the most strongly metamorphosed. The marine Great Valley sequence, of late Jurassic and Cretaceous age, was deposited unconformably across the southernmost Klamath rocks, but in turn was underthrust at its western margin by Eastern belt Franciscan rocks. Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic rocks and sediment of the Cascades province extend into the southeastern part of the quadrangle, abutting the northernmost part of the great central valley of California. This map and database represent a digital rendition of Open-File Report 87-257, 1987, by L.A. Fraticelli, J.P. Albers, W.P. Irwin, and M.C. Blake, Jr., with various improvements and additions.

  20. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1985. Volume 2. Pacific Slope Basins from Arroyo Grande to Oregon State Line except Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S.; Markham, K.L.; Trujillo, L.F.; Shelton, W.F.; Grillo, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1985 water year for California consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; and stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 2 contains discharge records for 133 gaging stations; stage and contents for 9 lakes and reservoirs; and water quality for 34 stations. Also included are 3 low-flow partial-record stations and 1 water-quality partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  1. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1987. Volume 2. Pacific Slope Basins from Arroyo Grande to Oregon State Line Except Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S.; Markham, K.L.; Shelton, W.F.; Trujillo, L.F.

    1988-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1987 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water. quality in wells. Volume 2 contains discharge records for 123 gaging stations; stage and contents for 7 lakes and reservoirs; and water quality for 29 stations. Also included are 1 partial-record station and 24 water-quality partial-record stations, These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  2. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1988. Volume 2. Pacific Slope Basins from Arroyo Grande to Oregon State Line Except Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, K.L.; Palmer, J.R.; Shelton, W.F.; Trujillo, L.F.

    1989-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1988 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 2 contains discharge records for 123 gaging stations; stage and contents for 7 lakes and reservoirs; and water quality for 38 stations. Also included is l low-flow partial-record station and 22 water-quality partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  3. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1986. Volume 2. Pacific Slope Basins from Arroyo Grande to Oregon State Line except Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S.; Markham, K.L.; Shelton, W.F.; Trujillo, L.F.; Grillo, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1986 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 2 contains discharge records for 132 gaging stations; stage and contents for 11 lakes and reservoirs; and water quality for 32 stations. Also included are 4 partial-record stations and 24 water-quality partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  4. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1989. Volume 2. Pacific Slope Basins from Arroyo Grande to Oregon State Line except Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, J.R.; Shelton, W.F.; Trujillo, L.F.; Markham, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1989 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water. quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 2 contains discharge records for 127 gaging stations, stage and contents for 7 lakes and reservoir and water quality for 32 stations. Also included is 1 low-flow partial-record station and 22 waterquality partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the u.s. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  5. [Pollutants from a plant which burns toxic waste in the Province of Arezzo (Tuscany Region, Central Italy): human biomonitoring pilot study to evaluate the possible type of environmental exposure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellini, Elisabetta; Fondelli, Maria Cristina; Maurello, Maria Teresa; Sciarra, Gianfranco; Aprea, Maria Cristina; Carreras, Giulia

    2015-01-01

    to identify the biomarkers to use in order to evaluate the level and trend of exposure to environmental pollutants from a plant which retrieves and refines precious metals and burns toxic waste. human biomonitoring cross sectional study on a small sample of population resident in the study area. blood and urinary samples, and questionnaires from volunteers resident at least for 10 years in Civitella in Val di Chiana area (Arezzo Province, Tuscany Region, Central Italy), where the plant is located, and in a control area; they had to be 5-year non-smokers or ex-smokers, in good health status and non occupationally exposed to heavy metals and/or combustion products. geometric mean and 95th percentile (P95) of mercury (Hg) and cadmium (Cd) blood concentrations, and of the urinary concentrations of antimony (Sb), silver (Ag), arsenic (As), Cd, cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), Hg, nickel (Ni), platinum (Pt), 1-hydroxypyrene, and trans, trans-muconic acid in the two populations; quantity and pattern of porphyrins in the 24-hour urines of Civitella volunteers. Student's "t" test calculated on the means of data with logarithmic transformation was used to compare the two groups. In case of significant differences linear regression analyses have been performed using questionnaire information. The distribution of observed data was compared with specific reference values. Sb, Cd, and Ni concentrations were significantly higher in Civitella population (39 subjects), while Cr concentration was higher in the control group (18 subjects). No correlations with the individual characteristics have been observed. The 30.3%of subjects who gave their 24- hour urine had a distorted pattern of porphyrins. the results confirmed the need to perform human biomonitoring in the Civitella area, increasing the number of samples, using urine as biological matrix, and monitoring at least Sb, Cd, Ni, Pt, Ag, and porphyrins.

  6. A statistical model for determining impact of wildland fires on Particulate Matter (PM2.5) in Central California aided by satellite imagery of smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiganoush K. Preisler; Donald Schweizer; Ricardo Cisneros; Trent Procter; Mark Ruminski; Leland Tarnay

    2015-01-01

    As the climate in California warms and wildfires become larger and more severe, satellite-based observational tools are frequently used for studying impact of those fires on air quality. However little objective work has been done to quantify the skill these satellite observations of smoke plumes have in predicting impacts to PM2.5 concentrations...

  7. Use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for Improving Farm Scale Agricultural Water Management in Agriculture at a Farm Scale. A case study for field crops in the California's Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medellin-Azuara, J.; Morande, J. A.; Jin, Y.; Chen, Y.; Paw U, K. T.; Viers, J. H.

    2016-12-01

    Traditional methods for estimating consumptive water use as evapotranspiration (ET) for agriculture in areas with water limitations such as California have always been a challenge for farmers, water managers, researchers and government agencies. Direct measurement of evapotranspiration (ET) and crop water stress in agriculture can be a cumbersome and costly task. Furthermore, spatial variability of applied water and irrigation and stress level in crops, due to inherent heterogeneity in soil conditions, topography, management practices, and lack of uniformity in water applications may affect estimates water use efficiency and water balances. This situation difficult long-term management of agroecosystems. This paper presents a case study for various areas in California's Central Valley using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) for a late portion of the 2016 irrigation season These estimates are compared those obtained by direct measurement (from previously deployed stations), and energy balance approaches with remotely sensed data in a selection of field crop parcels. This research improves information on water use and site conditions in agriculture by enhancing remote sensing-based estimations through the use of higher resolution multi-spectral and thermal imagery captured by UAV. We assess whether more frequent information at higher spatial resolution from UAVs can improve estimations of overall ET through energy balance and imagery. Stress levels and ET are characterized spatially to examine irrigation practices and their performance to improve water use in the agroecosystem. Ground based data such as air and crop temperature and stem water potential is collected to validate UAV aerial measurements. Preliminary results show the potential of UAV technology to improve timing, resolution and accuracy in the ET estimation and assessment of crop stress at a farm scales. Side to side comparison with ground level stations employing surface renewal, eddy covariance and

  8. Exploring the pre-eruptive history of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) and the link with the end Triassic extinction using high precision U-Pb zircon and baddeleyite geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Joshua; Marzoli, Andrea; Bertrand, Hervé; Youbi, Nasrrddine; Schaltegger, Urs

    2015-04-01

    The Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) is a massive outpouring of basaltic lava, dykes and sills that was predominantly emplaced into the Triassic-Jurassic basins of North and South America, Europe and Africa. These basins were, at the time, in the center of the paleo-supercontinent Pangea, and the CAMP flood basalts are associated with Pangea's break-up and the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. The global climatic and environmental impact of the basalt eruption has been temporally linked with the end-Triassic mass extinction, although the extinction horizon, defined by a carbon isotope excursion, is stratigraphically below the first basaltic flows in all of the currently identified basins. Therefore, if the extinction is related to the CAMP, it must be related to a process that occurred before the eruption of the first basalt flow, or is co-incident with a currently unidentified older basalt flow. Here we present high precision TIMS zircon U-Pb geochronology on zircons from the North Mountain basalt (NMB) in the Fundy basin, Canada, and also baddeleyite from the Foum Zuid dyke (FZD) in the Anti-Atlas, Morocco. The NMB zircons have been separated from the lowermost accessible basalt flow of the NMB sequence in a coarse-grained section, rather than from a felsic residual melt pod, which is the usual target for zircon geochronology in basalts. The baddeleyites from the FZD were also separated from a coarse-grained section of the dyke. The zircons and baddeleyites from the NMB and FZD samples contain an antecrystic population with ages more than 1 Ma older than the emplacement of the basalts. The U-Pb ages presented here suggest that there was magmatic activity relating to the CAMP before the eruption of the first basalts. There are a number of possible explanations for the old zircons 1) recycling of zircon from earlier phases of magmatism, which then would have to have been re-molten and entrained into the NMB and FZD magmas. 2) Recycling of crystal mush from

  9. South America Province Boundaries, 1999 (prv6ag)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — South America is part of Region 6 (Central and South America) for the World Energy Assessment. South America was divided into 107 geologic provinces as background...

  10. Water resources data for California, water year 1975; Volume 4: Northern Central Valley basins and the Great Basin from Honey Lake basin to Oregon state line

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1977-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1975 water year for California consist of records of streamflow and contents of reservoirs at gaging stations, partial-record stations, and miscellaneous sites; records of water quality including the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of surface and ground water; and records of water levels in selected observation wells. Records for a few pertinent streamflow and water-quality stations in bordering States are also included. The records were collected and computed by the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey under the direction of Lee R. Peterson, district chief; Winchell Smith, assistant district chief for hydrologic data; and Leonard N. Jorgensen, chief of the basic data section. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the Geological Survey and cooperating local, State, and Federal agencies in California.

  11. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1991. Volume 2. Pacific Slope Basins from Arroyo Grande to Oregon State Line except Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, L.F.; Markham, K.L.; Palmer, J.R.; Friebel, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1991 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 2 contains discharge records for 130 streamflow-gaging stations, 1 low-flow partial-record station, and 6 miscellaneous measurement sites; stage and contents for 7 lakes and reservoirs; precipitation records for 3 stations; and water-quality records for 41 streamflow-gaging stations and 3 water-quality partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  12. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1990. Volume 2. Pacific Slope Basins from Arroyo Grande to Oregon State Line except Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, W.F.; Trujillo, L.F.; Markham, K.L.; Palmer, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1990 water year for. California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 2 contains discharge records for 125 streamflow-gaging stations and 1 low-flow partial-record station; stage and contents for 7 lakes and reservoirs; precipitation records for 4 stations; and water-quality records for 29 streamflow-gaging stations and 10 water-quality partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  13. Evolution of the 2014-2015 sea surface temperature warming in the central west coast of Baja California, Mexico, recorded by remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Carlos J.

    2016-07-01

    Extraordinarily warm sea surface temperatures were present in the California Current System during 2014-2015. In several locations surface waters temperature registered new record high in the recent time series. This study focuses in the evolution of the warming in the southern part of the California Current System (CCS), off the west coast of Baja California, Mexico. Analysis of monthly sea surface temperature (SST), sea level pressure, and wind speed as measured by satellite from January 1988 to December 2015 show that recent warming occurred during two distinct periods. From May 2014 to April 2015, SST warming was related to weak coastal winds not associated to El Niño. During this period occurred the longest sustained record of 15 months of negative wind anomalies in the series. A reduction of wind stress suggests a weakened coastal upwelling, and consequently, cold water not transported into the surface. The second process of warming occurred from September to December 2015, during a strong El Niño condition.

  14. PEMODELAN FAKTOR K BERBASIS RASTER SEBAGAI MASUKAN PEMODELAN EROSI DI DAS MERAWU, BANJARNEGARA, PROVINSI JAWA TENGAH (Modeling of Raster-Based of K Factor as Input for Erosion Modeling at Merawu Catchment, Banjarnegara, Central Java Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Sulistyo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengkaji ketelitian absolut pemodelan faktor K berbasis raster sebagai masukan dalam pemodelan erosi Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE di Daerah Aliran Sungai (DAS Merawu, Banjarnegara, Provinsi Jawa Tengah.Metode yang digunakan adalah dengan mengambil 30 sampel tanah secara stratified random sampling berdasarkan bentuklahan DAS Merawu. Sampel tanah tersebut kemudian dianalisis di laboratorium sehingga diperoleh tekstur, permeabilitas, bahan organik, dan struktur yang diperlukan untuk menghitung faktor K menggunakan rumus yang sudah ada. Dari 30 sampel yang diambil, 24 sampel digunakan untuk menghitung faktor K dalam pemodelan, sedangkan 6 sampel lainnya digunakan sebagai uji model. Pengeplotan nilai K pada sampel di atas peta dilakukan sesuai dengan lokasi sampel, kemudian dilakukan digitasi dan rasterisasi dan dilakukan interpolasi spasial untuk memperoleh Peta K untuk setiap piksel dengan metode Kriging. Hasil pemodelan K tersebut (Kmodel kemudian diuji pada 6 lokasi (Kaktual untuk mengetahui ketelitian pemodelan. Kmodel dikatakan teliti jika memiliki nilai ≥ 80% terhadap Kaktual.Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa pemodelan faktor K berbasis raster di DAS Merawu mempunyai ketelitian melebihi nilai ambang yang ditetapkan, yaitu sebesar 89,068%, yang menunjukkan bahwa peta hasil pemodelan menggunakan analisis Kriging dapat digunakan untuk analisis lebih lanjut dalam menghitung erosi. ABSTRACT The research was aimed at knowing the absolute accuracy of modeling of raster-based K factor as input for Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE erosion modeling at Merawu Catchment, Banjarnegara, Central Java Province. Methodology applied was by taking 30 soil samples of stratified random sampling based on landform of Merawu Catchment. Those 30 soil samples then were analised in a laboratory to get their texture, permeability, organic matter, and structure for K factor computation using the existing formula. From 30

  15. California Air Basins

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Air ResourcesCalifornia Air Resources BoardThe following datasets are from the California Air Resources Board: * arb_california_airbasins - California Air BasinsThe...

  16. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1993. Volume 2. Pacific Slope Basins from Arroyo Grande to Oregon State Line except Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, J.R.; Friebel, M.F.; Trujillo, L.F.; Markham, K.L.

    1994-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1993 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 2 contains discharge records for 119 streamflow-gaging stations, 1 low-flow partial-record streamflow station, and 6 miscellaneous measurement stations; stage and contents records for 6 lakes and reservoirs; precipitation records for 3 stations; and water-quality records for 31 streamflow-gaging stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and with other agencies.

  17. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1995. Volume 2. Pacific Slope Basins from Arroyo Grande to Oregon State Line except Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friebel, M.F.; Trujillo, L.F.; Markham, K.L.

    1996-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1995 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 2 contains discharge records for 111 streamflow-gaging stations, 1 low-flow partial-record streamflow station; and 2 miscellaneous measurement stations; stage and contents for 6 lakes and reservoirs; precipitation records for 1 station; and water-quality records for 22 streamflow-gaging stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and with other agencies.

  18. California State Waters Map Series—Offshore of Santa Cruz, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Dartnell, Peter; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Golden, Nadine E.; Greene, H. Gary; Dieter, Bryan E.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Finlayson, David P.; Endris, Charles A.; Watt, Janet T.; Davenport, Clifton W.; Sliter, Ray W.; Maier, Katherine L.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2016-03-24

    upper Quaternary shelf, estuarine, and fluvial sediments deposited as sea level fluctuated in the late Pleistocene. The inner shelf is characterized by bedrock outcrops that have local thin sediment cover, the result of regional uplift, high wave energy, and limited sediment supply. The midshelf occupies part of an extensive, shore-parallel mud belt. The thickest sediment deposits, inferred to consist mainly of lowstand nearshore deposits, are found in the southeastern and northwestern parts of the map area.Coastal sediment transport in the map area is characterized by northwest-to-southeast littoral transport of sediment that is derived mainly from ephemeral streams in the Santa Cruz Mountains and also from local coastal-bluff erosion. During the last approximately 300 years, as much as 18 million cubic yards (14 million cubic meters) of sand-sized sediment has been eroded from the area between Año Nuevo Island and Point Año Nuevo and transported south; this mass of eroded sand is now enriching beaches in the map area. Sediment transport is within the Santa Cruz littoral cell, which terminates in the submarine Monterey Canyon.Benthic species observed in the Offshore of Santa Cruz map area are natives of the cold-temperate biogeographic zone that is called either the “Oregonian province” or the “northern California ecoregion.” This biogeographic province is maintained by the long-term stability of the southward-flowing California Current, the eastern limb of the North Pacific subtropical gyre that flows from southern British Columbia to Baja California. At its midpoint off central California, the California Current transports subarctic surface (0–500 m deep) waters southward, about 150 to 1,300 km from shore. Seasonal northwesterly winds that are, in part, responsible for the California Current, generate coastal upwelling. The south end of the Oregonian province is at Point Conception (about 300 km south of the map area), although its associated

  19. Valoración socioambiental de los recursos naturales: el caso de los recursos minerales en la parte central de Baja California Sur, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis F. Beltrán Morales

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Se seleccionaron 15 localidades ubicadas en el radio de influencia de dos depósitos evaluados de fosfato, esto con la finalidad de aplicar el método de valoración contingente del recurso y su medio ambiente: el depósito de Tembabichi en el margen del Golfo de California y el depósito de Santo Domingo en la costa del Pacífico en Baja California Sur, México. Se encontró una disposición media a pagar por los habitantes del área de estudio de $29.77 pesos mensuales para colaborar con el medio ambiente de su región. Hipotéticamente se daría una valoración contingente en el total del área de estudio de $227 859.58 pesos mensuales, es decir, $2 734 314.9 pesos anuales. Es una cantidad considerable de recursos para contribuir a mejoras en el medio ambiente por comunidades rurales con signos de marginación socioeconómica.

  20. Hydrologic provinces of Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheaume, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Geological Survey Division, to describe the statewide hydrologic variations in Michigan's water resources. Twelve hydrologic provinces, which are based on similarities in aquifer lithology, yield, recharge, and ground-water- and surface-water-quality data, are described. The definition of statewide hydrologic characteristics and the delineation of hydrologic provinces improves the understanding of Michigan's water resources and provides a firm basis for realistic water-manangement decisions. The 12 provinces identified areas where bedrock aquifers provide most of the potable ground water (five provinces), where glacial-deposit aquifers provide most of the potable ground water (three provinces), and where problems with water quantity and (or) quality have limited the use of ground water as a water supply (four provinces). Subprovinces are defined on the basis of regional surface-water flow directions toward each of the Great Lakes.

  1. Methylmercury and other chemical constituents in Pacific coastal fog water from seven sites in Central/Northern California (FogNet) during the summer of 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss-Penzias, P. S.; Heim, W. A.; Fernandez, D.; Coale, K. H.; Oliphant, A. J.; Dann, D.; Porter, M.; Hoskins, D.; Dodge, C.

    2014-12-01

    This project investigates the mercury content in summertime Pacific coastal fog in California and whether fog could be an important vector for ocean emissions of mercury to be deposited via fog drip to upland coastal ecosystems. Efforts began in early 2014 with the building of 7 active-strand fog collectors based on the Colorado State University Caltech CASCC design. The new UCSC CASCC includes doors sealing the collector which open under microcomputer control based on environmental sensing (relative humidity). Seven sites spanning from Trinidad in the north to Marina in the south have collected samples June-August 2014 under a project called FogNet. Fog conditions were favorable for collecting large water volumes (> 250 mL) at many sites. Fog samplers were cleaned with soap and deionized water daily and field blanks taken immediately following cleaning. Fog water samples were collected overnight, split into an aliquot for anion and DOC/DIC analysis and the remaining sample was acidified. Monomethyl mercury (MMHg) concentrations in samples and field blanks for 3 sites in FogNet are shown in the accompanying figure. The range of MMHg concentrations from 10 fog water samples > 100 mL in volume was 0.9-9.3 ng/L (4.5-46.4 pM). Elevated MMHg concentrations (> 5 ng/L, 25 pM) were observed at 2 sites: UC Santa Cruz and Bodega Bay. The field blanks produced MMHg concentrations of 0.08-0.4 ng/L (0.4-2.0 pM), which was on average < 10% of the sample concentration and suggests the artifact due to sampling was small. The observed MMHg concentrations in fog water observed is this study are 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than MMHg concentrations seen previously in rain water samples from the California coast suggesting an additional source of MMHg to fog. Shipboard measurements of dimethyl mercury (DMHg) in coastal California seawater during the time period of FogNet operations (summer 2014) reveal surface waters that were supersaturated in DMHg which represents a potential

  2. Daily relative dog abundance, fecal density, and loading rates on intensively and minimally managed dog-friendly beaches in central California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, Stori C; Miller, Melissa A; Hardin, Dane; Dominik, Clare; Jessup, David; Smith, Woutrina A

    2017-12-15

    Due to increased concerns regarding fecal pollution at marine recreational beaches, daily relative dog abundance and fecal density were estimated on an intensively managed (Beach 1) and a minimally managed (Beach 2) dog beach in Monterey County, California. Fecal loading and factors predictive of fecal deposition also were assessed. After standardizing for beach area, daily beach use and fecal densities did not differ between beaches and yearly fecal loading estimates revealed that unrecovered dog feces likely contributes significantly to fecal contamination (1.4 and 0.2metrictonnes/beach). Detection of feces was significantly associated with beach management type, transect position relative to mean low tideline, presence of beach wrack, distance to the nearest beach entrance, and season. Methodologies outlined in this study can augment monitoring programs at coastal beaches to optimize management, assess visitor compliance, and improve coastal water quality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1992. Volume 2. Pacific Slope Basins from Arroyo Grande to Oregon State Line except Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, K.L.; Palmer, J.R.; Friebel, M.F.; Trujillo, L.F.

    1993-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1992 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 2 contains discharge records for 124 streamflow-gaging stations, 1 low-flow partial-record streamflow station, and 6 miscellaneous measurement stations; stage and contents records for 9 lakes and reservoirs; precipitation records for 3 stations; and water-quality records for 32 stream flow-gaging stations and 1 water-quality partial-record station. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and with other agencies.

  4. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Half Moon Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Dartnell, Peter; Greene, H. Gary; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Golden, Nadine E.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Manson, Michael W.; Sliter, Ray W.; Ross, Stephanie L.; Watt, Janet T.; Endris, Charles A.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Chin, John L.; Bretz, Carrie K.

    2014-01-01

    compression related to right-lateral strike-slip movement along the San Gregorio Fault Zone. The lowest elevation coincides with the deepest part of Half Moon Bay; the terrace surface rises both to the north and to the south. Uplift in this map area has resulted in relatively shallow water depths within California’s State Waters and, thus, little accommodation space for sediment accumulation. Sediment is observed in the shelter of Half Moon Bay and on the outer half of the California’s State Waters shelf. Sediment in the area is mobile, often forming dunes and sand waves. A westward bend in the San Andreas Fault Zone, southeast of the map area, coupled with right-lateral movement along the Seal Cove Fault, which comes ashore in Pillar Point Harbor, has resulted in the folding and uplifting of sedimentary rocks of the Purisima Formation in the offshore. Differential erosion of these folded and faulted layers of the Purisima Formation has exposed the parallel curved-rock ridges that are visible on the seafloor from the headland at Pillar Point. During the winter, strong North Pacific storms generate large, long-period waves that shoal and break over this bedrock reef at the world-famous surfing location known as Mavericks. The Offshore of Half Moon Bay map area lies within the cold-temperate biogeographic zone that is called either the “Oregonian province” or the “northern California ecoregion.” This biogeographic province is maintained by the long-term stability of the southward-flowing California Current, an eastern limb of the North Pacific subtropical gyre that flows from Oregon to Baja California. At its midpoint off central California, the California Current transports subarctic surface (0–500 m deep) waters southward, about 150 to 1,300 km from shore. Seasonal northwesterly winds that are, in part, responsible for the California Current, generate coastal upwelling. The south end of the Oregonian province is at Point Conception (about 365 km south of the map

  5. Tectonics and metallogenic provinces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guild, P.W.

    1983-01-01

    Various theories have been advanced to explain the well-known uneven distribution of metals and ore-deposit types in space and time. Primordial differences in the mantle, preferential concentration of elements in the crust, the prevalence of ore-forming processes at certain times and (or) places, and combinations of one or several of these factors have all been called upon to account for the "metallogenic provinces," which can be defined loosely as regions containing similar deposits of one or a group of metals or minerals. Because many, perhaps most, provinces have complex, multistage origins, the relative importance of inheritance vs. process is still controversial. In recent years the geographic relationship of many geologically young provinces to present-day plate-tectonic positions (accreting or consuming margins, intraplate structures, etc.) has been widely recognized, and the presumption is strong that older provinces had similar relationships to former plates. As most ore deposits resulted from a favorable conjunction of geological processes that are no longer operative, elucidation of their genesis requires reconstruction of the geologic history of the province, with particular emphasis on events coeval with mineralization. Tectonic analysis is an important aspect of this reconstruction; data from orbiting satellites have contributed greatly to this analysis, as the voluminous literature of the past decade testifies. Both the synoptic view of large areas and the ability to emphasize faint contrasts have revealed linear, curvilinear, and circular features not previously recognized from field studies. Some of these undoubtedly reflect basement structures that have contributed to the development, or limit the extent, of metallogenic provinces. Their recognition and delineation will be increasingly valuable to the assessment of resources available and as guides to exploration for the ores needed by future generations. ?? 1983.

  6. Assessing Drought Impacts on Water Storage Changes from New GRACE Mascons Solutions and Regional Groundwater Modeling in the Central Valley of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, B. R.; Zhang, Z.; Faunt, C. C.; Save, H.; Wiese, D. N.; Dettinger, M. D.; Longuevergne, L.; Margulis, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    There is increasing interest in the impacts of the current five year drought in California on water resources. Here we use recently released GRACE mascons solutions from Univ. Texas Center for Space Research and NASA Jet Propulsion Lab and output from a regional groundwater model developed by the U.S Geological Survey to assess changes in water storage in response to the current and past droughts. Marked declines in Total Water Storage (TWS) from GRACE are recorded during the current drought from mid-2011 - mid-2015 with slight recovery after this time. TWS declines during the current drought exceed those recorded during the previous 2007 - 2009 drought. Contributors to TWS depletion include snow water storage (very low during 2013 and 2014), reservoir storage (decline mid 2011 - late 2015, with slight recovery in spring 2016), soil moisture storage from land surface models (greater decline during early years of drought and recent slight recovery) and groundwater storage estimated as a residual. There is general consistency between GRACE derived groundwater storage decline during the drought and simulated groundwater storage depletion from the regional groundwater model. Combining remote sensing estimation of TWS trends with global and regional modeling allows estimation of the contribution of different components to TWS anomalies, and assessment of the reliability of the groundwater storage changes.

  7. Relations of hydrogeologic factors, groundwater reduction-oxidation conditions, and temporal and spatial distributions of nitrate, Central-Eastside San Joaquin Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landon, Matthew K.; Green, Christopher T.; Belitz, Kenneth; Singleton, Michael J.; Esser, Bradley K.

    2011-01-01

    In a 2,700-km2 area in the eastern San Joaquin Valley, California (USA), data from multiple sources were used to determine interrelations among hydrogeologic factors, reduction-oxidation (redox) conditions, and temporal and spatial distributions of nitrate (NO3), a widely detected groundwater contaminant. Groundwater is predominantly modern, or mixtures of modern water, with detectable NO3 and oxic redox conditions, but some zones have anoxic or mixed redox conditions. Anoxic conditions were associated with long residence times that occurred near the valley trough and in areas of historical groundwater discharge with shallow depth to water. Anoxic conditions also were associated with interactions of shallow, modern groundwater with soils. NO3 concentrations were significantly lower in anoxic than oxic or mixed redox groundwater, primarily because residence times of anoxic waters exceed the duration of increased pumping and fertilizer use associated with modern agriculture. Effects of redox reactions on NO3 concentrations were relatively minor. Dissolved N2 gas data indicated that denitrification has eliminated >5 mg/L NO3–N in about 10% of 39 wells. Increasing NO3 concentrations over time were slightly less prevalent in anoxic than oxic or mixed redox groundwater. Spatial and temporal trends of NO3 are primarily controlled by water and NO3 fluxes of modern land use.

  8. Using a Regional Cluster of AmeriFlux Sites in Central California to Advance Our Knowledge on Decadal-Scale Ecosystem-Atmosphere Carbon Dioxide Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldocchi, Dennis [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-03-24

    Continuous eddy convariance measurements of carbon dioxide, water vapor and heat were measured continuously between an oak savanna and an annual grassland in California over a 4 year period. These systems serve as representative sites for biomes in Mediterranean climates and experience much seasonal and inter-annual variability in temperature and precipitation. These sites hence serve as natural laboratories for how whole ecosystem will respond to warmer and drier conditions. The savanna proved to be a moderate sink of carbon, taking up about 150 gC m-2y-1 compared to the annual grassland, which tended to be carbon neutral and often a source during drier years. But this carbon sink by the savanna came at a cost. This ecosystem used about 100 mm more water per year than the grassland. And because the savanna was darker and rougher its air temperature was about 0.5 C warmer. In addition to our flux measurements, we collected vast amounts of ancillary data to interpret the site and fluxes, making this site a key site for model validation and parameterization. Datasets consist of terrestrial and airborne lidar for determining canopy structure, ground penetrating radar data on root distribution, phenology cameras monitoring leaf area index and its seasonality, predawn water potential, soil moisture, stem diameter and physiological capacity of photosynthesis.

  9. Reconstructed Depositional Environment and Climate Record of Western North America Over the Past 25,000 Years from Tulare Lake, South-Central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, O.; Wehunt, K.; Chumpitaz, G. A.; Bravo, B.; Ruiz, J.; Dhesi, H.; Halling, M. C.; Pyles, C. G.; Guo, J.; Negrini, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    Tulare Lake, located in the southern San Joaquin Valley, California has been the site of repeated geologic and paleoclimate studies due to its well preserved sedimentary record based on core, trench exposures, and the mapping of geomorphic features. Yet, no studies have focused on the effect of depositional environment variations on mineralogy. In this study, a series of integrated geochemical, sedimentary, and grain-size climate proxy data from core TL05-4A encompassing the last 25 cal. ka BP were analyzed. Preliminary sedimentary results as determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) reveal a clay-dominant mineral assemblage containing variable smectite, illite, kaolinite, and chlorite followed by a secondary non-clay contribution in the form of quartz, feldspar, and calcite. The relative abundance of these minerals varies with depth and is tied to regional shifts in climate as best exemplified by an observed rapid increase in bulk clay percentages (+50%) after the Tioga deglaciation event ( 14 cal. ka BP). Six climosequences were determined—three wet periods interspaced by three dry episodes over the last 25 ka. Two important dry periods characterized by gypsum and bassanite occurred from 10.7-9.4 cal. ka BP (Preboreal warming) and 8.2-5.2 cal. ka BP (Holocene Climate Optimum) indicating oxygen depletion, more intense evaporation, and reducing conditions in the lake. These abrupt dry phases may help explain the geographic range reduction and extirpation of Mammuthus primigenius and other North American megafanua as warmer and dryer regional conditions led to enhanced water stress and diminished net primary productivity.

  10. The high cost of motherhood: End-lactation syndrome in southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) on the central California, USA, coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Sarah S; Miller, Melissa A.; Tinker, M. Tim; Staedler, Michelle M.; Batac, Francesca I.; Dodd, Erin M.; Henkel, Laird A.

    2016-01-01

    Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) have exceptionally high energetic requirements, which nearly double during lactation and pup care. Thus, females are extremely vulnerable to caloric insufficiency. Despite a number of compensatory strategies, the metabolic challenge of reproduction culminates in numerous maternal deaths annually. Massive depletion of energy reserves results in a case presentation that we define as end-lactation syndrome (ELS), characterized by moderate to severe emaciation not attributable to a concurrent, independent disease process in females dying during late pup care or postweaning. We compiled detailed data for 108 adult female southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) examined postmortem that stranded in California, US, 2005–12, and assessed pathology, reproductive status, and the location and timing of stranding. We introduce simple, grossly apparent, standardized physical criteria to assess reproductive stage for female sea otters. We also describe ELS, examine associated risk factors, and highlight female life history strategies that likely optimize reproduction and survival. Our data suggest that females can reset both the timing and energetic demands of reproduction through fetal loss, pup abandonment, or early weaning as part of specific physiologic checkpoints during each reproductive cycle. Females appear to preload nutritionally during delayed implantation and gestation to increase fitness and reproductive success. We found that ELS was a major cause of death, affecting 56% of enrolled adult females. Peak ELS prevalence occurred in late spring, possibly reflecting the population trend toward fall/winter pupping. Increasing age and number of pregnancies were associated with a higher risk of ELS. Although the proportion of ELS females was highest in areas with dense sea otter populations, cases were recovered throughout the range, suggesting that death from ELS is associated with, but not solely caused by, population resource limitation.

  11. Agricultural Chemical Concentrations and Loads in Rivers Draining the Central Valley, California, to the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary: Before and During an Extended Drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagalski, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    Drought or near drought conditions have occurred in California since 2012. Although some parts of the State received near normal precipitation in water year 2016, other locations were still below average. Extended drought can impact aquatic organisms in a variety of ways because of decreased flows and elevated water temperature. However, lower precipitation and availability of irrigation water may limit subsequent runoff, resulting in reduced concentrations and loads of certain environmental toxicants, such as pesticides and ammonia, thereby limiting their toxic effects. In this study, funded by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Program, the occurrence of 227 pesticides and degradation products, and nutrients was assessed before and during this current drought in the two largest rivers draining to the San Francisco Bay: the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers. The watersheds of both rivers include substantial agricultural and urban land use. Herbicides, insecticides, fungicides, and ammonia were detected throughout the study (2010 to 2016) and models of daily concentration using the seasonal wave model (rloadest) were formulated to assess the amount of time that concentrations may have exceeded benchmark levels known to be toxic to aquatic organisms. Frequently detected pesticides included the fungicide azoxystrobin, herbicides or their degradation products such as diuron, glyphosate, and metolachlor, and insecticides such as imidacloprid. Compounds that are transported primarily by surface runoff generally showed decreasing concentrations as the drought progressed, especially in the San Joaquin River. Compounds mainly transported by groundwater, as indicated by seasonal concentration profiles, had more stable concentrations in the rivers. Mass loads to the Bay all decreased, as expected, because of the lower river discharge. When compared to aquatic-life benchmarks, modeled concentrations indicated that individual compounds were not contributing to

  12. THE HIGH COST OF MOTHERHOOD: END-LACTATION SYNDROME IN SOUTHERN SEA OTTERS (ENHYDRA LUTRIS NEREIS) ON THE CENTRAL CALIFORNIA COAST, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Sarah M; Miller, Melissa A; Tinker, M Tim; Staedler, Michelle M; Batac, Francesca I; Dodd, Erin M; Henkel, Laird A

    2016-04-28

    Sea otters ( Enhydra lutris ) have exceptionally high energetic requirements, which nearly double during lactation and pup care. Thus, females are extremely vulnerable to caloric insufficiency. Despite a number of compensatory strategies, the metabolic challenge of reproduction culminates in numerous maternal deaths annually. Massive depletion of energy reserves results in a case presentation that we define as end-lactation syndrome (ELS), characterized by moderate to severe emaciation not attributable to a concurrent, independent disease process in females dying during late pup care or postweaning. We compiled detailed data for 108 adult female southern sea otters ( Enhydra lutris nereis) examined postmortem that stranded in California, US, 2005-12, and assessed pathology, reproductive status, and the location and timing of stranding. We introduce simple, grossly apparent, standardized physical criteria to assess reproductive stage for female sea otters. We also describe ELS, examine associated risk factors, and highlight female life history strategies that likely optimize reproduction and survival. Our data suggest that females can reset both the timing and energetic demands of reproduction through fetal loss, pup abandonment, or early weaning as part of specific physiologic checkpoints during each reproductive cycle. Females appear to preload nutritionally during delayed implantation and gestation to increase fitness and reproductive success. We found that ELS was a major cause of death, affecting 56% of enrolled adult females. Peak ELS prevalence occurred in late spring, possibly reflecting the population trend toward fall/winter pupping. Increasing age and number of pregnancies were associated with a higher risk of ELS. Although the proportion of ELS females was highest in areas with dense sea otter populations, cases were recovered throughout the range, suggesting that death from ELS is associated with, but not solely caused by, population resource limitation.

  13. U-Pb ages and geochemistry of zircon from Proterozoic plutons of the Sawatch and Mosquito ranges, Colorado, U.S.A.: Implications for crustal growth of the central Colorado province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscati, Richard J.; Premo, Wayne R.; Dewitt, Ed; Wooden, Joseph L.

    2017-01-01

    A broad study of zircons from plutonic rocks of the Sawatch and Mosquito ranges of west-central Colorado (U.S.A.) was undertaken to significantly refine the magmatic chronology and chemistry of this under-studied region of the Colorado province. This region was chosen because it lies just to the north of the suspected arc-related Gunnison-Salida volcano-plutonic terrane, which has been the subject of many recent investigations—and whose origin is still debated. Our new results provide important insights into the processes active during Proterozoic crustal evolution in this region, and they have important ramifications for broader-scope crustal evolution models for southwestern North America.Twenty-four new U-Pb ages and sequentially acquired rare-earth element (REE), U, Th, and Hf contents of zircon have been determined using the sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe-reverse geometry (SHRIMP-RG). These zircon geochemistry data, in conjunction with whole-rock major- and trace-element data, provide important insights into zircon crystallization and melt fractionation, and they help to further constrain the tectonic environment of magma generation.Our detailed zircon and whole-rock data support the following three interpretations:(1) The Roosevelt Granite in the southern Sawatch Range was the oldest rock dated at 1,766 ± 7 Ma, and it intruded various metavolcanic and metasedimentary rocks. Geochemistry of both whole-rock and zircon supports the contention that this granite was produced in a magmatic arc environment and, therefore, is likely an extension of the older Dubois Greenstone Belt of the Gunnison Igneous Complex (GIC) and the Needle Mountains (1,770–1,755 Ma). Rocks of the younger Cochetopa succession of the GIC, the Salida Greenstone Belt, and the Sangre de Cristo Mountains (1,740–1,725 Ma) were not found in the Sawatch and Mosquito ranges. This observation strongly suggests that the northern edge of the Gunnison-Salida arc terrane underlies the

  14. Scenario earthquake hazards for the Long Valley Caldera-Mono Lake area, east-central California (ver. 2.0, January 2018)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Branum, David M.; Wills, Chris J.; Hill, David P.

    2014-06-30

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) multi-hazards project in the Long Valley Caldera-Mono Lake area, the California Geological Survey (CGS) developed several earthquake scenarios and evaluated potential seismic hazards, including ground shaking, surface fault rupture, liquefaction, and landslide hazards associated with these earthquake scenarios. The results of these analyses can be useful in estimating the extent of potential damage and economic losses because of potential earthquakes and also for preparing emergency response plans.The Long Valley Caldera-Mono Lake area has numerous active faults. Five of these faults or fault zones are considered capable of producing magnitude ≥6.7 earthquakes according to the Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast, Version 2 (UCERF 2) developed by the 2007 Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities (WGCEP) and the USGS National Seismic Hazard Mapping Program. These five faults are the Fish Slough, Hartley Springs, Hilton Creek, Mono Lake, and Round Valley Faults. CGS developed earthquake scenarios for these five faults in the study area and for the White Mountains Fault Zone to the east of the study area.In this report, an earthquake scenario is intended to depict the potential consequences of significant earthquakes. A scenario earthquake is not necessarily the largest or most damaging earthquake possible on a recognized fault. Rather it is both large enough and likely enough that emergency planners should consider it in regional emergency response plans. In particular, the ground motion predicted for a given scenario earthquake does not represent a full probabilistic hazard assessment, and thus it does not provide the basis for hazard zoning and earthquake-resistant building design.Earthquake scenarios presented here are based on fault geometry and activity data developed by the WGCEP, and are consistent with the 2008 Update of the United States National Seismic Hazard Maps (NSHM). Alternatives

  15. California State Waters Map Series—Offshore of Monterey, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Watt, Janet T.; Davenport, Clifton W.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Sliter, Ray W.; Maier, Katherine L.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2016-08-18

    IntroductionIn 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath bathymetry data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow subsurface geology.The Offshore of Monterey map area in central California is located on the Pacific Coast, about 120 km south of San Francisco. Incorporated cities in the map area include Seaside, Monterey, Marina, Pacific Grove, Carmel-by-the-Sea, and Sand City. The local economy receives significant resources from tourism, as well as from the Federal Government. Tourist attractions include the Monterey Bay Aquarium, Cannery Row, Fisherman’s Wharf, and the many golf courses near Pebble Beach, and the area serves as a gateway to the spectacular scenery and outdoor activities along the Big Sur coast to the south. Federal facilities include the Army’s Defense Language Institute, the Naval Postgraduate School, and the Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center (operated by the Navy). In 1994, Fort Ord army base, located between Seaside and Marina, was closed; much of former army base land now makes up the Fort Ord National Monument, managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as part of the National Landscape Conservation System. In addition, part of the old Fort Ord is now occupied by California State University, Monterey Bay.The offshore part of the map area lies entirely within the Monterey Bay National

  16. Status of groundwater quality in the Borrego Valley, Central Desert, and Low-Use Basins of the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts study unit, 2008-2010: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Mary C.; Hancock, Tracy Connell; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 963-square-mile Borrego Valley, Central Desert, and Low-Use Basins of the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts study unit was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is located in southern California in San Bernardino, Riverside, San Diego, and Imperial Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA Borrego Valley, Central Desert, and Low-Use Basins of the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of untreated (raw) groundwater in the primary aquifer system. The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from 52 wells (49 grid wells and 3 understanding wells) and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health database. The primary aquifer system was defined by the depth intervals of the wells listed in the California Department of Public Health database for the Borrego Valley, Central Desert, and Low-Use Basins of the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts study unit. The quality of groundwater in the primary aquifer system may be different from that in the shallower or deeper water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. This study assesses the status of the current quality of the groundwater resource by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. This status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources in the primary aquifer system of the Borrego Valley, Central Desert, and Low-Use Basins of the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts study unit, not the

  17. Clustering of velocities in a GPS network spanning the Sierra Nevada Block, the northern Walker Lane Belt, and the Central Nevada Seismic Belt, California-Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, James C.; Simpson, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    The deformation across the Sierra Nevada Block, the Walker Lane Belt, and the Central Nevada Seismic Belt (CNSB) between 38.5°N and 40.5°N has been analyzed by clustering GPS velocities to identify coherent blocks. Cluster analysis determines the number of clusters required and assigns the GPS stations to the proper clusters. The clusters are shown on a fault map by symbols located at the positions of the GPS stations, each symbol representing the cluster to which the velocity of that GPS station belongs. Fault systems that separate the clusters are readily identified on such a map. Four significant clusters are identified. Those clusters are strips separated by (from west to east) the Mohawk Valley-Genoa fault system, the Pyramid Lake-Wassuk fault system, and the Central Nevada Seismic Belt. The strain rates within the westernmost three clusters approximate simple right-lateral shear (~13 nstrain/a) across vertical planes roughly parallel to the cluster boundaries. Clustering does not recognize the longitudinal segmentation of the Walker Lane Belt into domains dominated by either northwesterly trending, right-lateral faults or northeasterly trending, left-lateral faults.

  18. Zircon U-Pb age of the Pescadero felsite: A late Cretaceous igneous event in the forearc, west-central California Coast Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, W.G.; Martens, U.C.; McLaughlin, R.J.; Clark, J.C.; Moore, Diane E.

    2011-01-01

    Weathered felsite is associated with the late Campanian-Maastrichtian Pigeon Point Formation near Pescadero, California. Poorly exposed, its age and correlation are uncertain. Is it part of the Pigeon Point section west of the San Gregorio-Hosgri fault? Does it rest on Nacimiento block basement? Is it dextrally offset from the Oligocene Cambria Felsite, ~185 km to the southeast? Why is a calc-alkaline hypabyssal igneous rock intrusive into the outboard accretionary prism? To address these questions, we analyzed 43 oscillatory-zoned zircon crystals from three incipiently recrystallized pumpellyite ?? prehnite ?? laumontite-bearing Pescadero felsite samples by sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe-reverse geometry (SHRIMPRG) and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) techniques. Thirty-three zircons gave late Mesozoic U-Pb ages, with single-grain values ranging from 81 to 167 Ma; ten have pre-Mesozoic, chiefl y Proterozoic ages. A group of the four youngest Pescadero zircons yielded an apparent maximum igneous age of ca. 86-90 Ma. Refl ecting broad age scatter and presence of partly digested sandstone inclusions, we interpret the rest of the zircons (perhaps all) as xenocrysts. Twenty-three zircons were separated and analyzed from two samples of the similar Cambria Felsite, yielding a unimodal 27 Ma U-Pb age. Clearly, the origin of the Upper Oligocene Cambria Felsite is different from that of the Upper Cretaceous Pescadero felsite; these rocks are not correlated, and do not constrain displacement along the San Gregorio-Hosgri fault. Peak ages differ slightly, but relative probability curves for Mesozoic and pre-Mesozoic Pescadero zircons compare well, for example, with abundant U-Pb age data for detrital zircons from Franciscan metaclastic strata ~100 km to the east in the Diablo Range- San Francisco Bay area, San Joaquin Great Valley Group turbidites, Upper Cretaceous Nacimiento block Franciscan strata, and Upper Cretaceous

  19. Characterization of potential transport pathways and implications for groundwater management near an anticline in the Central Basin area, Los Angeles County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, Daniel J.; Wagner, Brian J.; Land, Michael; Landon, Matthew K.

    2014-01-01

    The Central Groundwater Basin (Central Basin) of southern Los Angeles County includes ~280 mi2 of the Los Angeles Coastal Plain and serves as the primary source of water for more than two million residents. In the Santa Fe Springs–Whittier–Norwalk area, located in the northeastern part of the basin, several sources of volatile organic compounds have been identified. The volatile organic compunds are thought to have contributed to a large, commingled contaminant plume in groundwater that extends south-southwest downgradient from the Omega Chemical Corporation Superfund Site across folded geologic strata, known as the Santa Fe Springs Anticline. A multifaceted study—that incorporated a three-dimensional sequence-stratigraphic geologic model, two-dimensional groundwater particle-tracking simulations, and new groundwater chemistry data—was conducted to gain insight into the geologic and hydrologic controls on contaminant migration in the study area and to assess the potential for this shallow groundwater contamination to migrate into producing aquifer zones. Conceptual flow models were developed along a flow-parallel cross section based on the modeled stratigraphic architecture, observed geochemistry, and numerical model simulations that generally agree with observed water levels and contaminant distributions. These models predict that contaminants introduced into groundwater at shallow depths near the Omega Chemical Corporation Superfund Site and along the study cross section will likely migrate downgradient to depths intercepted by public supply wells. These conclusions, however, are subject to limitations and simplifications inherent in the modeling approaches used, as well as a significant scarcity of available geologic and hydrogeochemical information at depth and in the downgradient parts of the study area.

  20. Analysis of fox beating data in the provinces of Pesaro-Urbino and of Ancona (Central Italy / Analisi dei dati ottenuti dai verbali di abbattimento di Volpe (Vulpes vulpes nelle province di Pesaro-Urbino ed Ancona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Santolini

    1991-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The contro1 of fox population by beating method was examined in two Provinces of the Marches region from 1984 to 1988. The efficiency of beating was evaluated as number of killed foxes per beating per 100; in addition the following relative abundance index (I.R.A. was calculated: number of killed foxes in a season divided by the ratio between the number of beatings in the same season and the minimum number of beatings recorded in a season of the study period. The index, recorded in winter, spring and autum