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Sample records for providing stimulating discussions

  1. Strategies for Stimulating Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    practices describe ways to facilitate communication during discussion. Use constructive questioning strategies . Facilitators serve to ensure the...lecture and group discussion teaching strategies in developing critical thinking skills. Communication Education, 45, 212-227. Gilmore, T. N., & Schall, E...U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences Research Report 2008 Strategies for Stimulating Discussion

  2. Discussing Diabetes with Your Healthcare Provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Discussing Diabetes with Your Healthcare Provider Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Diabetes Medicines—Always Discuss Them with Your Healthcare Provider ...

  3. Do health care providers discuss HIV with older female patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine whether older women could recall receiving HIV-related information from health care providers. ... difference (p = 0.003; odds ratio [OR]: 0.26; 95% CI: 0.09–0.69) between their age stratification of 50 to 59 years and 60 to 80 years with respect to receiving information regarding HIV.

  4. discussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex S. Poznyak

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a version of Robust Stochastic Maximum Principle (RSMP applied to the Minimax Mayer Problem formulated for stochastic differential equations with the control-dependent diffusion term. The parametric families of first and second order adjoint stochastic processes are introduced to construct the corresponding Hamiltonian formalism. The Hamiltonian function used for the construction of the robust optimal control is shown to be equal to the Lebesque integral over a parametric set of the standard stochastic Hamiltonians corresponding to a fixed value of the uncertain parameter. The paper deals with a cost function given at finite horizon and containing the mathematical expectation of a terminal term. A terminal condition, covered by a vector function, is also considered. The optimal control strategies, adapted for available information, for the wide class of uncertain systems given by an stochastic differential equation with unknown parameters from a given compact set, are constructed. This problem belongs to the class of minimax stochastic optimization problems. The proof is based on the recent results obtained for Minimax Mayer Problem with a finite uncertainty set [14,43-45] as well as on the variation results of [53] derived for Stochastic Maximum Principle for nonlinear stochastic systems under complete information. The corresponding discussion of the obtain results concludes this study.

  5. Discussion Leader's Guide: Parent/Child Home Stimulation. The Marshalltown Project. Revised July 1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall-Poweshiek Joint County School System, Marshalltown, IA. Dept. of Special Education.

    The discussion leader's guide to a parent education course in the mental stimulation of handicapped young children is organized by the topics of the 12 sessions: orientation, responsive program, toys as learning tools, creativity, self concept, behavior modification, discipline, language, sensory/motor development I and II, and open session.…

  6. Responses evoked by a vestibular implant providing chronic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lara A; Haburcakova, Csilla; Gong, Wangsong; Lee, Daniel J; Wall, Conrad; Merfeld, Daniel M; Lewis, Richard F

    2012-01-01

    Patients with bilateral vestibular loss experience dehabilitating visual, perceptual, and postural difficulties, and an implantable vestibular prosthesis that could improve these symptoms would be of great benefit to these patients. In previous work, we have shown that a one-dimensional, unilateral canal prosthesis can improve the vestibulooccular reflex (VOR) in canal-plugged squirrel monkeys. In addition to the VOR, the potential effects of a vestibular prosthesis on more complex, highly integrative behaviors, such as the perception of head orientation and posture have remained unclear. We tested a one-dimensional, unilateral prosthesis in a rhesus monkey with bilateral vestibular loss and found that chronic electrical stimulation partially restored the compensatory VOR and also that percepts of head orientation relative to gravity were improved. However, the one-dimensional prosthetic stimulation had no clear effect on postural stability during quiet stance, but sway evoked by head-turns was modestly reduced. These results suggest that not only can the implementation of a vestibular prosthesis provide partial restitution of VOR but may also improve perception and posture in the presence of bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH). In this review, we provide an overview of our previous and current work directed towards the eventual clinical implementation of an implantable vestibular prosthesis.

  7. Barriers of healthcare providers against end-of-life discussions with pediatric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Saran; Shimizu, Ken; Kobayashi, Mariko; Inoguchi, Hironobu; Oshima, Yoshio; Dotani, Chikako; Nakahara, Rika; Takahashi, Tomomi; Kato, Masashi

    2014-08-01

    End-of-life discussions with patients can be one of the most difficult and stressful tasks for the oncologist. However, little is known about the discussions that healthcare providers have with patients in such situations and the difficulties they face. The primary end points of this study were to describe the contents of end-of-life discussion in the pediatric setting and the barriers to end-of-life discussion for pediatric patients, as perceived by pediatric healthcare providers. Participants were 10 healthcare providers. Semi-structured interviews were conducted, and the KJ method was performed to analyze the data. We found 23 barriers against end-of-life discussion with pediatric cancer patients. These barriers were classified as follows: healthcare provider factors, patient factors, parent factors and institutional or cultural factors. In addition to barriers found in previous studies, some unique barriers were uncovered such as, 'Lack of confidence to face the patient after the discussion', 'Uncertain responsibility for treatment decision-making' and 'No compelling reason to discuss'. Healthcare providers actively discussed the purpose of treatment and the patients' wishes and concerns; however, they were reluctant to deal with the patients' own impending death and their estimated prognosis. End-of-life discussion with pediatric patients differs from that with adult patients. Further studies are required to analyze pediatric cases associated with end-of-life discussion and carefully discuss its adequacy, pros and cons. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation: Five Important Issues We Aren’t Discussing (But Probably Should Be

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared Cooney Horvath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS is a neuromodulatory device often publicized for its ability to enhance cognitive and behavioral performance. These enhancement claims, however, are predicated upon electrophysiological evidence and descriptions which are far from conclusive. In fact, a review of the literature reveals a number of important experimental and technical issues inherent with this device that are simply not being discussed in any meaningful manner. In this paper, we will consider five of these topics. The first, inter-subject variability, explores the extensive between- and within-group differences found within the tDCS literature and highlights the need to properly examine stimulatory response at the individual level. The second, intra-subject reliability, reviews the lack of data concerning tDCS response reliability over time and emphasizes the importance of this knowledge for appropriate stimulatory application. The third, sham stimulation and blinding, draws attention to the importance (yet relative lack of proper control and blinding practices in the tDCS literature. The fourth, motor and cognitive interference, highlights the often overlooked body of research that suggests typical behaviors and cognitions undertaken during or following tDCS can impair or abolish the effects of stimulation. Finally, the fifth, electric current influences, underscores several largely ignored variables (such as hair thickness and electrode attachments methods influential to tDCS electric current density and flow.Through this paper, we hope to increase awareness and start an ongoing dialogue of these important issues which speak to the efficacy, reliability, and mechanistic foundations of tDCS.

  9. Patient-provider discussions about colorectal cancer screening: who initiates elements of informed decision making?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Mira L; Broder-Oldach, Ben; Fisher, James L; King, Justin; Eubanks, Kathy; Fleming, Kelly; Paskett, Electra D

    2012-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates remain low among low-income minority populations. To evaluate informed decision making (IDM) elements about CRC screening among low-income minority patients. Observational data were collected as part of a patient-level randomized controlled trial to improve CRC screening rates. Medical visits (November 2007 to May 2010) were audio-taped and coded for IDM elements about CRC screening. Near the end of the study one provider refused recording of patients' visits (33 of 270 patients). Among all patients in the trial, agreement to be audio taped was 43.5 % (103/237). Evaluable patient (n = 100) visits were assessed for CRC screening discussion occurrence, IDM elements, and who initiated discussion of each IDM element. Patients were African American (72.2 %), female (63.7 %), with annual household incomes IDM elements was five; however, only two visits included five elements. The most common IDM element discussed in addition to the nature of the decision was the assessment of the patient's understanding in 16 (33.3 %) of the visits that included a CRC discussion. A patient activation intervention initiated CRC screening discussions with health care providers; however, limited IDM occurred about CRC screening during medical visits of minority and low-income patients.

  10. Combining simulation, instructor-produced videos, and online discussions to stimulate critical thinking in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhde, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    Combining the use of several different types of technology enables an instructor to develop teaching methods to address a specific problem area that students encounter and can greatly affect student learning. This article discusses a program that was developed that utilized SimMan, instructor-produced videos, and online discussion to stimulate critical thinking in beginning-level nursing students. The goal was to make the student aware of the importance of an initial thorough assessment of a client. This is especially difficult since new students are focused on learning the skills and have not had enough clinical experience to appreciate the importance of assessment. The first two videos show a nurse who makes a very incomplete assessment of the client and misses important observations. This leads to the patient (SimMan) going into respiratory distress. The third video demonstrates a complete assessment. The students viewed and discussed the first two videos online. After the third video, students posted their own reflections of this activity including what they learned and how this would change their behavior. The outcome showed an increased awareness of the importance of assessment. Instructors observed a change in behavior, which included early assessment of the client.

  11. The role of parental attitudes and provider discussions in uptake of adolescent vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickert, Vaughn I; Rehm, Susan J; Aalsma, Matthew C; Zimet, Gregory D

    2015-01-29

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between parental vaccine attitudes, the number of specific vaccines discussed with a provider, and immunization outcomes including discussing immunization with their teen, knowledge of adolescent vaccine schedule, and their son or daughter being up-to-date on recommended vaccines using a nationally weight sample. Parents completed an internet-based survey between December 2012 and January 2013 and we computed a vaccine attitude scale (higher scores indicating stronger and more positive attitudes toward vaccination of teen) for each parent and categorized them into one of three groups: low (n=76), medium (n=207) or high (n=215). We also constructed a vaccine discussion scale representing the number of vaccines discussed with their adolescent's physician. Parents who were identified as having high vaccine attitudes were significantly more likely to report their physician talked with them about a particular vaccine. Using logistic regression and controlling for respondent's gender and age, income, and teen's gender, we found medium as compared to low-attitude parents had a 6.21 (95%CI=3.08, 12.51) greater odds of reporting that their teen had all recommended vaccines. Similarly, high as compared to low-attitude parents reported a 23.02 (95% CI=11.27, 46.99) greater odds of having a teen who was up-to-date on recommended vaccines. We detected that for each additional vaccine discussed, there was a 1.24 (95%CI=1.11, 1.39) increase in odds of the teen having all recommended vaccines. Parental immunization attitudes and provider discussion about vaccines are key ingredients to improving immunization rates among adolescents. While some parents may be reluctant to immunize their son or daughter with a recommended vaccine, vaccine-specific discussions between physicians and parents represent an important first step to continued discussions with providers regarding vaccination. Moreover, vaccine discussions must occur

  12. Providers' Experiences with a Melanoma Web-Based Course: a Discussion on Barriers and Intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Angela J; Eide, Melody J; Alexander, Gwen L; Altschuler, Andrea; Asgari, Maryam M; Geller, Alan C; Fletcher, Suzanne W; Halpern, Allan C; Weinstock, Martin A

    2017-06-01

    Primary care visits provide an opportunity for skin examinations with the potential to reduce melanoma mortality. The INFORMED (INternet curriculum FOR Melanoma Early Detection) Group developed a Web-based curriculum to improve primary care providers' (PCPs') skin cancer detection skills. This study details feedback obtained from participant focus groups, including the feasibility of implementing in other PCP practices. Practicing PCPs at Henry Ford Health System and Kaiser Permanente Northern California completed the curriculum. Feedback sessions were conducted with standardized questions focusing on four domains: (1) overall impressions of the curriculum, (2) recommendations for improvement, (3) current skin examination practices, and (4) suggestions for increasing skin screening by PCPs. Discussions at each site were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim, and de-identified. Providers (N = 54) had a positive impression of the Web-based curriculum, with suggestions to provide offline teaching aids and request assistance. Despite having improved confidence in diagnosing malignant lesions, many providers felt a lack of confidence in performing the screening and time constraints affected their current practices, as did institutional constraints. Providers intended to increase discussion with patients about skin cancer. The accessibility, effectiveness, and popularity of the curriculum indicate potential for implementation in the primary care setting. Participating providers noted that institutional barriers remain which must be addressed for successful dissemination and implementation.

  13. Older adult stroke survivors discussing poststroke depressive symptoms with a healthcare provider: a preliminary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinedinst, N Jennifer; Clark, Patricia C; Dunbar, Sandra B

    2013-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the relationship between the poststroke depressive symptoms, older adult stroke survivors' perceptions of the depressive symptoms, and the congruence with an informal caregiver about the presence of depressive symptoms, and comfort talking to the health care provider with whether or not older stroke survivors discussed their depressive symptoms with a health care provider. A cross-sectional study where 44 caregiver/older adult stroke survivor dyads completed questionnaires including the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, Symptom Perception Questionnaire, and reporting of depressive symptoms to the health care provider via one time interview. Thirty-seven percent (n = 16) of all older stroke survivors reported depressive symptoms to their health care provider. Of the stroke survivors who had high levels of depressive symptoms (CESD ≥ 16; n = 11), seven reported the depressive symptoms to their health care provider. Identifying the symptoms as possible depression and attributing the cause of the depressive symptoms to the stroke were related to stroke survivors reporting the depressive symptoms to a health care provider. High functioning, older stroke survivors may benefit from strategies to help them identify when they experience depressive symptoms, in order to be able to play an active role in their recovery by appropriately discussing their symptoms with a health care provider. (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  14. Are there socioeconomic disparities in women having discussions on human papillomavirus vaccine with health care providers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Ker

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV vaccine recommendation by a health care provider (HCP is an important predictor of vaccine receipt. We examined whether being of a minority race/ethnicity, having lower income and education, and the lack of health insurance and a regular HCP are each associated with a lower likelihood of a discussion on HPV vaccine occurring between a woman and her HCP. Methods A sample of 1,631 women aged 18 years and older was drawn from the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey. Given that only a subgroup of women who were aware of the HPV vaccine were asked if they had a discussion with their HCPs, we estimated a probit model correcting for sample selection. Results Among those aware of the HPV vaccine, 17.3% of respondents reported having discussions on the vaccine with their HCPs. Compared with Whites, African Americans were less likely to be aware of the HPV vaccine but more likely to have discussions with their HCPs concerning the vaccine. A statistically significant association between lower income and education levels and a lower likelihood of HPV vaccine awareness was observed, but low levels of income and education did not appear to affect the probability of having HPV vaccine discussions with HCPs. Conclusions Socioeconomically disadvantaged women did not show a lower propensity to have vaccine discussions with their HCPs, suggesting that HCPs can be a major catalyst in increasing vaccine receipt among the higher risk group. The results of the study suggest a two-pronged approach that seeks to raise vaccine awareness among socioeconomically disadvantaged women at the population level and encourages HCPs to intensify discussions about the HPV vaccine with patients.

  15. Providers' time spent and tools used when discussing the HPV vaccine with parents of adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Amanda F; Lockhart, Steven; Campagna, Elizabeth J; Pyrzanowski, Jennifer; Barnard, Juliana; O' Leary, Sean T

    2016-12-07

    Little is known about HPV vaccine communication tools currently used by primary care providers of adolescents, or how such tools impact the quality of HPV vaccine recommendations, which some have defined as using a "presumptive" communication style, continuing to offer vaccines despite resistance, and strongly recommending vaccines at the appropriate ages. We surveyed primary care providers to assess their current use of HPV vaccine communication tools, and how these related to their HPV vaccine recommendation quality. Cross sectional survey of 183 pediatrics and family medicine primary care providers in the Denver metro area. Response rate was 82% (n=150). Most (59%) providers used a presumptive vaccine recommendation >75% of the time, and 76% reported continuing to offer the HPV vaccine even after parent refusal. However, less than two-thirds of providers "strongly" recommended the vaccine to 11-12year olds (60% for females, 55% for males, p=0.02). The HPV vaccine information sheet from the Centers from Disease Control and Prevention was the most frequently used communication tool during clinical visits (64% used at least 75% of the time) and directing parents to preferred websites was the most frequently used between-visit communication tool (21% used >50% of visits). Use of tools was not associated with any measure of HPV vaccine recommendation quality but was associated with longer HPV vaccine discussion times. Providers use only limited types of adolescent HPV vaccine communication tools, and frequently do not use preferred vaccine communication strategies. Better engagement with existing HPV vaccine communication tools, and/or the creation of new tools may be needed to enhance providers' ability to provide high quality HPV vaccine recommendations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Obstacles to the discussion of sexual problems in menopausal women: a qualitative study of healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazanfarpour, Masoumeh; Khadivzadeh, Talat; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Mehdi Hazavehei, Seyed Mohammad

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore issues that challenge menopausal women in discussions of their sexual problems with a physician. This was done from the perspective of healthcare providers. In a descriptive exploratory qualitative study, using a semi-structured interview and purposive sampling, a sample set of 12 midwives and 13 general practitioners aged 25-70 years were selected in order to elicit meaning behind their experiences about the subject under study. Data analysis was carried out using qualitative content analysis. Results were used to identify a number of obstacles that hindered women from seeking help for sexual problems from GPs and midwives. These obstacles included the following: (1) traditional and cultural beliefs; (2) religious belief; (3) individuals' beliefs and (4) access to services. More research is needed to explore effective strategies to overcome these problems. Impact statement Current knowledge on the subject: In the literature, many reasons have been identified for the unwillingness of Iranian women to discuss their sexual problems with health providers. These include lack of time, feelings of shame and an expectation that a doctor cannot help. However, no qualitative study has addressed barriers held by menopausal women for seeking treatment for sexual problems. The contribution made by the results of this study: The results of this study add to the growing body of research on reasons that determine why most postmenopausal women rarely visit a doctor unless they were in tremendous physical or emotional pain. Also, menopausal women thought that an unmarried health provider would be less understanding about sexual and marital problems and they felt guilty about sharing such issues with them. Patients' opinions on the nature of menopause (a pathological vs. physiological process) affect the way in which the symptoms of menopause and sexual problems are handled by patient. The implications are of these findings for clinical

  17. Using Young Adult Literature to Provide Case Studies for Discussion of Bullying: An Analysis of the 2014 Pura Belpré Award Winner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing Meg Medina's young adult novel "Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass" (2013) through the lens of multidisciplinary research on school bullying provides a case study in using young adult literature (YAL) to stimulate high school discussions about bullying. Strategies for using anti-bullying YAL and recommendations of additional…

  18. Facebook Discussion Groups Provide a Robust Worldwide Platform for Free Pathology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Raul S; Amer, Sadiq M; Yahia, Nejib Ben; Costa, Felipe D'Almeida; Noatay, Manu; Qiao, Jian-Hua; Rosado, Flavia G; Rosen, Yale; Sedassari, Bruno Tavares; Yantiss, Rhonda K; Gardner, Jerad M

    2017-05-01

    - Facebook (Menlo Park, California) is one of many online sites that provide potential educational tools for pathologists. We have each founded Facebook groups dedicated to anatomic pathology, in which members can share cases, ask questions, and contribute to discussions. - To report our experiences in founding and maintaining these Facebook groups and to characterize the contributed content. - We circulated a survey among the group founders, then compiled and analyzed the responses. - The groups varied in membership and in the quality of member contribution. Most posts were of pathology cases, although other topics (such as research articles) were also shared. All groups remained active and received posts from users all over the world, although all groups had many noncontributing members and received unwanted messages (which were screened and removed). Most founders were glad they had founded the groups because they provided an opportunity to both teach and learn. - Each analyzed Facebook group had a different character, and some downsides exist, but the groups all provided a no-cost way for pathologists and others across the world to interact online with many colleagues.

  19. Knowledge Needed by a Teacher to Provide Analytic Scaffolding during Undergraduate Mathematics Classroom Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, Natasha M.; Wagner, Joseph F.

    2009-01-01

    Using case study analysis and a cognitive theoretical orientation, we examine elements of knowledge for teaching needed by a mathematician to orchestrate whole-class discussions in an undergraduate mathematics classroom. The instructor, an experienced teacher and mathematics researcher, used an inquiry-oriented curriculum to teach a differential…

  20. Ten Things Gay Men Should Discuss with Their Health Care Provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... does not seem comfortable with you as a gay man, find another provider. 2. HIV/AIDS, Safe Sex Many men who have sex with men are ... rate of HIV infection is one of the gay community’s great success stories. ... a good HIV provider. Safe sex is proven to reduce the risk of receiving ...

  1. Guarana provides additional stimulation over caffeine alone in the planarian model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustakas, Dimitrios; Mezzio, Michael; Rodriguez, Branden R; Constable, Mic Andre; Mulligan, Margaret E; Voura, Evelyn B

    2015-01-01

    The stimulant effect of energy drinks is primarily attributed to the caffeine they contain. Many energy drinks also contain other ingredients that might enhance the tonic effects of these caffeinated beverages. One of these additives is guarana. Guarana is a climbing plant native to the Amazon whose seeds contain approximately four times the amount of caffeine found in coffee beans. The mix of other natural chemicals contained in guarana seeds is thought to heighten the stimulant effects of guarana over caffeine alone. Yet, despite the growing use of guarana as an additive in energy drinks, and a burgeoning market for it as a nutritional supplement, the science examining guarana and how it affects other dietary ingredients is lacking. To appreciate the stimulant effects of guarana and other natural products, a straightforward model to investigate their physiological properties is needed. The planarian provides such a system. The locomotor activity and convulsive response of planarians with substance exposure has been shown to provide an excellent system to measure the effects of drug stimulation, addiction and withdrawal. To gauge the stimulant effects of guarana we studied how it altered the locomotor activity of the planarian species Dugesia tigrina. We report evidence that guarana seeds provide additional stimulation over caffeine alone, and document the changes to this stimulation in the context of both caffeine and glucose.

  2. Guarana provides additional stimulation over caffeine alone in the planarian model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Moustakas

    Full Text Available The stimulant effect of energy drinks is primarily attributed to the caffeine they contain. Many energy drinks also contain other ingredients that might enhance the tonic effects of these caffeinated beverages. One of these additives is guarana. Guarana is a climbing plant native to the Amazon whose seeds contain approximately four times the amount of caffeine found in coffee beans. The mix of other natural chemicals contained in guarana seeds is thought to heighten the stimulant effects of guarana over caffeine alone. Yet, despite the growing use of guarana as an additive in energy drinks, and a burgeoning market for it as a nutritional supplement, the science examining guarana and how it affects other dietary ingredients is lacking. To appreciate the stimulant effects of guarana and other natural products, a straightforward model to investigate their physiological properties is needed. The planarian provides such a system. The locomotor activity and convulsive response of planarians with substance exposure has been shown to provide an excellent system to measure the effects of drug stimulation, addiction and withdrawal. To gauge the stimulant effects of guarana we studied how it altered the locomotor activity of the planarian species Dugesia tigrina. We report evidence that guarana seeds provide additional stimulation over caffeine alone, and document the changes to this stimulation in the context of both caffeine and glucose.

  3. Guarana Provides Additional Stimulation over Caffeine Alone in the Planarian Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustakas, Dimitrios; Mezzio, Michael; Rodriguez, Branden R.; Constable, Mic Andre; Mulligan, Margaret E.; Voura, Evelyn B.

    2015-01-01

    The stimulant effect of energy drinks is primarily attributed to the caffeine they contain. Many energy drinks also contain other ingredients that might enhance the tonic effects of these caffeinated beverages. One of these additives is guarana. Guarana is a climbing plant native to the Amazon whose seeds contain approximately four times the amount of caffeine found in coffee beans. The mix of other natural chemicals contained in guarana seeds is thought to heighten the stimulant effects of guarana over caffeine alone. Yet, despite the growing use of guarana as an additive in energy drinks, and a burgeoning market for it as a nutritional supplement, the science examining guarana and how it affects other dietary ingredients is lacking. To appreciate the stimulant effects of guarana and other natural products, a straightforward model to investigate their physiological properties is needed. The planarian provides such a system. The locomotor activity and convulsive response of planarians with substance exposure has been shown to provide an excellent system to measure the effects of drug stimulation, addiction and withdrawal. To gauge the stimulant effects of guarana we studied how it altered the locomotor activity of the planarian species Dugesia tigrina. We report evidence that guarana seeds provide additional stimulation over caffeine alone, and document the changes to this stimulation in the context of both caffeine and glucose. PMID:25880065

  4. Which Cognitive Processes Support Learning during Small-Group Discussion? The Role of Providing Explanations and Listening to Others

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Blankenstein, Floris M.; Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2011-01-01

    Seventy students participated in an experiment to measure the effects of either providing explanations or listening during small group discussions on recall of related subject-matter studied after the discussion. They watched a video of a small group discussing a problem. In the first experimental condition, the video was stopped at various points…

  5. Scratch This! The IF-AT as a Technique for Stimulating Group Discussion and Exposing Misconceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotner, Sehoya; Baepler, Paul; Kellerman, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Frequent and immediate feedback is critical for learning and retaining content as well as developing effective learning teams (Michaelson, Knight, and Fink 2004). The Immediate Feedback Assessment Technique (IF-AT) provides a single and efficient way for learners to self-assess their progress in a course and to structure significant small-group…

  6. Conversations About the Weight of America’s Children: Barriers Which Prevent Healthcare Providers from Discussing Childhood Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Blow

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A systematic review of the literature was conducted to identify the barriers that prevent practitioners from identifying and counseling parents and caregivers of overweight or obese children. Once identified, barriers were organized into thematic categories (parental, provider, and professional barriers and recommendations were generated to facilitate discussion about childhood obesity between professionals and parents. Childhood obesity is a significant public health problem. Healthcare providers must be able to effectively communicate with caregivers and put childhood obesity at the front of healthcare discussions. This article provides a synthesis of the relevant literature and makes recommendations for healthcare providers to overcome the barriers allowing healthier outcomes for children.

  7. Psychosocial correlates of patient–provider family planning discussions among HIV-infected pregnant women in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez VJ

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Violeta J Rodriguez,1 Ryan R Cook,1 Stephen M Weiss,1 Karl Peltzer,2–4 Deborah L Jones1 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA; 2HIV/AIDS/STIs and TB (HAST Research Programme, Human Sciences Research Council, Pretoria, South Africa; 3ASEAN Institute for Health Development, Mahidol University, Salaya, Thailand; 4Department of Psychology, University of Limpopo, Turfloop, South Africa Abstract: Patient–provider family planning discussions and preconception counseling can reduce maternal and neonatal risks by increasing adherence to provider recommendations and antiretroviral medication. However, HIV-infected women may not discuss reproductive intentions with providers due to anticipation of negative reactions and stigma. This study aimed to identify correlates of patient–provider family planning discussions among HIV-infected women in rural South Africa, an area with high rates of antenatal HIV and suboptimal rates of prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT of HIV. Participants were N=673 pregnant HIV-infected women who completed measures of family planning discussions and knowledge, depression, stigma, intimate partner violence, and male involvement. Participants were, on average, 28 ± 6 years old, and half of them had completed at least 10–11 years of education. Most women were unemployed and had a monthly income of less than ~US$76. Fewer than half of the women reported having family planning discussions with providers. Correlates of patient–provider family planning discussions included younger age, discussions about PMTCT of HIV, male involvement, and decreased stigma (p < 0.05. Depression was indirectly associated with patient–provider family planning discussions through male involvement (b = −0.010, bias-corrected 95% confidence interval [bCI] [−0.019, −0.005]. That is, depression decreased male involvement, and in turn, male involvement

  8. The Relationship Between Cancer Survivors' Socioeconomic Status and Reports of Follow-up Care Discussions with Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMartino, Lisa D; Birken, Sarah A; Mayer, Deborah K

    2017-12-01

    Socioeconomically disadvantaged cancer survivors are less likely to have adequate follow-up care. In this study, we examined whether socioeconomically disadvantaged survivors are at risk for not having follow-up care discussions with providers, a critical determinant of access to follow-up care and desirable health outcomes. Using the 2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and Experiences with Cancer Survivorship Supplement, we used a binary logit model with sample weights to examine associations between 1320 cancer survivors' socioeconomic status (SES) and reports of follow-up care discussions with providers, controlling for clinical and demographic characteristics. The multivariable model indicated survivors with incomes ≤200 % Federal Poverty Level (FPL) had a lower probability of reporting a follow-up care discussion than survivors with incomes >400 % FPL (p  0.05). Socioeconomically disadvantaged cancer survivors are at risk for not having follow-up care discussions with providers, particularly those who report lower income and education. The development of educational interventions targeting provider communication with socioeconomically disadvantaged cancer survivors, and survivors' understanding of the benefits of follow-up care discussions, may promote access to these services. Future research assessing mechanisms underlying relationships between survivors' SES indicators and reports of follow-up care discussions with providers is also warranted.

  9. Provider-patient in-office discussions of response to hepatitis C antiviral therapy and impact on patient comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Heidi E; Nelson, Meaghan; Martin, Paul; Cotler, Scott J

    2006-04-01

    Providers need to communicate projected response rates effectively to enable patients with hepatitis C virus to make informed decisions about therapy. This study used interactional sociolinguistics (1) to evaluate how gastroenterologists and allied health professionals communicate information regarding response rates to antiviral therapy, (2) to determine how these discussions relate to where the patient is in the continuum of evaluation and treatment, (3) to assess whether patients were aligned with providers in their perceptions of response rates after office visits, and (4) to identify factors that improve provider-patient alignment. Gastroenterologists, allied health professionals, and patients with hepatitis C virus were videotaped and audiotaped during regularly scheduled visits. Postvisit interviews were conducted separately with patients and providers. Visits and postvisits were transcribed and analyzed using validated sociolinguistic techniques. The phase of hepatitis C virus treatment shaped the benchmarks of response talk, although across the treatment continuum providers overwhelmingly made strategic use of positive statistics, providing motivation. In postvisit interviews, 55% of providers and patients were aligned on response rates. Patients with a favorable outcome and patients who asked response-related questions in the visit were more likely to be aligned with providers. Areas identified for improvement included the tendency to discuss response rates before an individualized assessment could be made, balancing motivation and accuracy, and assessing the patient's perspective before delivering any bad news, if necessary. Sociolinguistic analysis provides a powerful tool to evaluate provider-patient interactions and to identify ways to improve in-office communication regarding antiviral therapy.

  10. Is it time to include point-of-care ultrasound in general surgery training? A review to stimulate discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollenkopf, Maximilian; Tait, Noel

    2013-12-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound scanning or POCUS is a focused ultrasound (US) scan, performed by non-imaging clinicians during physical examination, an invasive procedure or surgery. As this technology becomes cheaper, smaller and easier to use, its scope for use by surgeons grows, a trend that may generate a gap between use and training. Opportunities for enhanced general surgery skill sets may be reduced unless consideration is given to inclusion of POCUS in general surgery training. To stimulate discussion regarding inclusion of POCUS in the general surgery curriculum; to resource this discussion with an overview of current trends and issues around POCUS; and to discuss concerns and controversies that may arise if POCUS was adopted into general surgery training. A literature search was performed using PUBMED, MEDLINE, Google and Google Scholar, using the terms 'ultrasound', 'point-of-care-ultrasound', 'bedside ultrasound', 'portable ultrasound' and 'hand-held ultrasound'. Literature, references and non-literature resources found were reviewed for relevance to US education in general surgery. Increasingly, medical students are graduating with basic POCUS skills. Specialty-specific uses of POCUS are proliferating. Training and assessment resources are not keeping up, in accessibility or standardization. A learned surgical college led training and accreditation process would require aligned education in anatomy and US technology and collaboration with the specialist imaging community to ensure appropriate standards are clarified and met. Research is also required into how general surgery trainees can best achieve and maintain POCUS competence. © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  11. Older Adult Stroke Survivors Discussing Post-stroke Depressive Symptoms with a Healthcare Provider: A Preliminary Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinedinst, N. Jennifer; Clark, Patricia C.; Dunbar, Sandra B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purposes of this study were to examine the relationship between the post-stroke depressive symptoms, older adult stroke survivors’ perceptions of the depressive symptoms, and the congruence with an informal caregiver about the presence of depressive symptoms, and comfort talking to the healthcare provider with whether or not older stroke survivors discussed their depressive symptoms with a healthcare provider. Method A cross-sectional study where 44 caregiver/older adult stroke survivor dyads completed questionnaires including the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, Symptom Perception Questionnaire, and reporting of depressive symptoms to the healthcare provider via one time interview. Results Thirty-seven percent (n=16) of all older stroke survivors reported depressive symptoms to their healthcare provider. Of the stroke survivors who had high levels of depressive symptoms (CESD≥16; n=11), seven reported the depressive symptoms to their healthcare provider. Identifying the symptoms as possible depression and attributing the cause of the depressive symptoms to the stroke were related to stroke survivors reporting the depressive symptoms to a health care provider. Conclusions High functioning, older stroke survivors may benefit from strategies to help them identify when they experience depressive symptoms, in order to be able to play an active role in their recovery by appropriately discussing their symptoms with a healthcare provider. PMID:23855380

  12. Utility of bilateral acoustic hearing in combination with electrical stimulation provided by the cochlear implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Kerrie; Babic, Leanne

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to quantify the benefit provided by having access to amplified acoustic hearing in the implanted ear for use in combination with contralateral acoustic hearing and the electrical stimulation provided by the cochlear implant. Measures of spatial and non-spatial hearing abilities were obtained to compare performance obtained with different configurations of acoustic hearing in combination with electrical stimulation. In the combined listening condition participants had access to bilateral acoustic hearing whereas the bimodal condition used acoustic hearing contralateral to the implanted ear only. Experience was provided with each of the listening conditions using a repeated-measures A-B-B-A experimental design. Sixteen post-linguistically hearing-impaired adults participated in the study. Group mean benefit was obtained with use of the combined mode on measures of speech recognition in coincident speech in noise, localization ability, subjective ratings of real-world benefit, and musical sound quality ratings. Access to bilateral acoustic hearing after cochlear implantation provides significant benefit on a range of functional measures.

  13. Deep Brain Stimulation for Tremor Associated with Underlying Ataxia Syndromes: A Case Series and Discussion of Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genko Oyama

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deep brain stimulation (DBS has been utilized to treat various symptoms in patients suffering from movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease, dystonia, and essential tremor. Though ataxia syndromes have not been formally or frequently addressed with DBS, there are patients with ataxia and associated medication refractory tremor or dystonia who may potentially benefit from therapy.Methods: A retrospective database review was performed, searching for cases of ataxia where tremor and/or dystonia were addressed by utilizing DBS at the University of Florida Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration between 2008 and 2011. Five patients were found who had DBS implantation to address either medication refractory tremor or dystonia. The patient's underlying diagnoses included spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2, fragile X associated tremor ataxia syndrome (FXTAS, a case of idiopathic ataxia (ataxia not otherwise specified [NOS], spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 (SCA17, and a senataxin mutation (SETX.Results: DBS improved medication refractory tremor in the SCA2 and the ataxia NOS patients. The outcome for the FXTAS patient was poor. DBS improved dystonia in the SCA17 and SETX patients, although dystonia did not improve in the lower extremities of the SCA17 patient. All patients reported a transient gait dysfunction postoperatively, and there were no reports of improvement in ataxia‐related symptoms.Discussion: DBS may be an option to treat tremor, inclusive of dystonic tremor in patients with underlying ataxia; however, gait and other symptoms may possibly be worsened.Erratum published on July 27, 2016

  14. Guarana Provides Additional Stimulation over Caffeine Alone in the Planarian Model

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrios Moustakas; Michael Mezzio; Branden R Rodriguez; Mic Andre Constable; Mulligan, Margaret E.; Voura, Evelyn B.

    2015-01-01

    The stimulant effect of energy drinks is primarily attributed to the caffeine they contain. Many energy drinks also contain other ingredients that might enhance the tonic effects of these caffeinated beverages. One of these additives is guarana. Guarana is a climbing plant native to the Amazon whose seeds contain approximately four times the amount of caffeine found in coffee beans. The mix of other natural chemicals contained in guarana seeds is thought to heighten the stimulant effects of g...

  15. Spinal cord stimulation for complex regional pain syndrome type 1 with dystonia: a case report and discussion of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voet, Caroline; le Polain de Waroux, Bernard; Forget, Patrice; Deumens, Ronald; Masquelier, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    Background: Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) is a debilitating chronic pain disorder, the physiopathology of which can lead to dystonia associated with changes in the autonomic, central and peripheral nervous system. An interdisciplinary approach (pharmacological, interventional and psychological therapies in conjunction with a rehabilitation pathway) is central to progress towards pain reduction and restoration of function. Aim: This case report aims to stimulate reflection and development of mechanism-based therapeutic strategies concerning CRPS associated with dystonia. Case description: A 31 year old female CRPS-1 patient presented with dystonia of the right foot following ligamentoplasty for chronic ankle instability. She did not have a satisfactory response to the usual therapies. Multiple anesthetic blocks (popliteal, epidural and intrathecal) were not associated with significant anesthesia and analgesia. Mobilization of the foot by a physiotherapist was not possible. A multidisciplinary approach with psychological support, physiotherapy and spinal cord stimulation (SCS) brought pain relief, rehabilitation and improvement in the quality of life. Conclusion: The present case report demonstrates the occurrence of multilevel (peripheral and central) pathological modifications in the nervous system of a CRPS-1 patient with dystonia. This conclusion is based on the patient’s pain being resistant to anesthetic blocks at different levels and the favourable, at least initially, response to SCS. The importance of the bio-psycho-social model is also suggested, permitting behavioural change. PMID:25254100

  16. The electrical stimulation of carbon nanotubes to provide a cardiomimetic cue to MSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Emma; Mackle, Joseph N; Blond, David J-P; O'Cearbhaill, Eoin; Shaw, Georgina; Blau, Werner J; Barry, Frank P; Barron, Valerie; Murphy, J Mary

    2012-09-01

    Once damaged, cardiac muscle has little intrinsic repair capability due to the poor regeneration potential of remaining cardiomyocytes. One method of overcoming this issue is to deliver functional cells to the injured myocardium to promote repair. To address this limitation we sought to test the hypothesis that electroactive carbon nanotubes (CNT) could be employed to direct mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation towards a cardiomyocyte lineage. Using a two-pronged approach, MSCs exposed to medium containing CNT and MSCs seeded on CNT based polylactic acid scaffolds were electrically stimulated in an electrophysiological bioreactor. After electrical stimulation the cells reoriented perpendicular to the direction of the current and adopted an elongated morphology. Using qPCR, an upregulation in a range of cardiac markers was detected, the greatest of which was observed for cardiac myosin heavy chain (CMHC), where a 40-fold increase was observed for the electrically stimulated cells after 14 days, and a 12-fold increase was observed for the electrically stimulated cells seeded on the PLA scaffolds after 10 days. Differentiation towards a cardioprogenitor cell was more evident from the western blot analysis, where upregulation of Nkx2.5, GATA-4, cardiac troponin t (CTT) and connexin43 (C43) was seen to occur. This was echoed in immunofluorescent staining, where increased levels of CTT, CMHC and C43 protein expression were observed after electrical stimulation for both cells and cell-seeded scaffolds. More interestingly, there was evidence of increased cross talk between the cells as shown by the pattern of C43 staining after electrical stimulation. These results establish a paradigm for nanoscale biomimetic cues that can be readily translated to other electroactive tissue repair applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Health care provider communication training in rural Tanzania empowers HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy to discuss adherence problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, S; Letang, E; Glass, T R; Natamatungiro, A; Mnzava, D; Mapesi, H; Haschke, M; Duthaler, U; Berger, B; Muri, L; Bader, J; Marzolini, C; Elzi, L; Klimkait, T; Langewitz, W; Battegay, M

    2017-10-01

    Self-reported adherence assessment in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is challenging and may overestimate adherence. The aim of this study was to improve the ability of health care providers to elicit patients' reports of nonadherence using a "patient-centred" approach in a rural sub-Saharan African setting. A prospective interventional cohort study of HIV-infected patients on ART for ≥ 6 months attending an HIV clinic in rural Tanzania was carried out. The intervention consisted of a 2-day workshop for health care providers on patient-centred communication and the provision of an adherence assessment checklist for use in the consultations. Patients' self-reports of nonadherence (≥ 1 missed ART dose/4 weeks), subtherapeutic plasma ART concentrations (communication can successfully be implemented with a simple intervention in rural Africa. It increases the likelihood of HIV-infected patients reporting problems with adherence to ART; however, sustainability remains a challenge. © 2017 The Authors HIV Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British HIV Association.

  18. High-Frequency Stimulation of the Rat Entopeduncular Nucleus Does Not Provide Functional or Morphological Neuroprotection from 6-Hydroxydopamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Luke Fischer

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS is the most common neurosurgical treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD. Whereas the globus pallidus interna (GPi has been less commonly targeted than the subthalamic nucleus (STN, a recent clinical trial suggests that GPi DBS may provide better outcomes for patients with psychiatric comorbidities. Several laboratories have demonstrated that DBS of the STN provides neuroprotection of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc dopamine neurons in preclinical neurotoxin models of PD and increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. However, whether DBS of the entopeduncular nucleus (EP, the homologous structure to the GPi in the rat, has similar neuroprotective potential in preclinical models has not been investigated. We investigated the impact of EP DBS on forelimb use asymmetry and SNpc degeneration induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA and on BDNF levels. EP DBS in male rats received unilateral, intrastriatal 6-OHDA and ACTIVE or INACTIVE stimulation continuously for two weeks. Outcome measures included quantification of contralateral forelimb use, stereological assessment of SNpc neurons and BDNF levels. EP DBS 1 did not ameliorate forelimb impairments induced by 6-OHDA, 2 did not provide neuroprotection for SNpc neurons and 3 did not significantly increase BDNF levels in any of the structures examined. These results are in sharp contrast to the functional improvement, neuroprotection and BDNF-enhancing effects of STN DBS under identical experimental parameters in the rat. The lack of functional response to EP DBS suggests that stimulation of the rat EP may not represent an accurate model of clinical GPi stimulation.

  19. Quality-of-life metrics with vagus nerve stimulation for epilepsy from provider survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englot, Dario J; Hassnain, Kevin H; Rolston, John D; Harward, Stephen C; Sinha, Saurabh R; Haglund, Michael M

    2017-01-01

    Drug-resistant epilepsy is a devastating disorder associated with diminished quality of life (QOL). Surgical resection leads to seizure freedom and improved QOL in many epilepsy patients, but not all individuals are candidates for resection. In these cases, neuromodulation-based therapies such as vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) are often used, but most VNS studies focus exclusively on reduction of seizure frequency. QOL changes and predictors with VNS remain poorly understood. Using the VNS Therapy Patient Outcome Registry, we examined 7 metrics related to QOL after VNS for epilepsy in over 5000 patients (including over 3000 with ≥12months follow-up), as subjectively assessed by treating physicians. Trends and predictors of QOL changes were examined and related to post-operative seizure outcome and likelihood of VNS generator replacement. After VNS therapy, physicians reported patient improvement in alertness (58-63%, range over follow-up period), post-ictal state (55-62%), cluster seizures (48-56%), mood change (43-49%), verbal communication (38-45%), school/professional achievements (29-39%), and memory (29-38%). Predictors of net QOL improvement included shorter time to implant (odds ratio [OR], 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-1.6), generalized seizure type (OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.0-1.4), female gender (OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.0-1.4), and Caucasian ethnicity (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.0-1.5). No significant trends were observed over time. Patients with net QOL improvement were more likely to have favorable seizure outcomes (chi square [χ 2 ]=148.1, pmetrics subjectively rated by physicians. QOL improvement is associated with favorable seizure outcome and a higher likelihood of generator replacement, suggesting satisfaction with therapy. It is important to consider QOL metrics in neuromodulation for epilepsy, given the deleterious effects of seizures on patient QOL. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Intimate partner violence screening and counseling in the health care setting: Perception of provider-based discussions as a strategic response to IPV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swailes, Alexa L; Lehman, Erik B; Perry, Amanda N; McCall-Hosenfeld, Jennifer S

    2016-07-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) affects women worldwide, and is addressable in the health care setting not only via screening, but also through provider-based counseling and referral to legal or social services, as appropriate. We conducted a study in Pennsylvania (USA) examining factors associated with receipt of IPV screening and women's perceptions of counseling discussions as a strategic response. We found that women with past-year IPV were more likely to receive screening (aOR: 2.0, 95%CI: 1.2,3.5) and to consider counseling discussions to be a strategic response to IPV exposure (aOR: 2.7, 95%CI: 1.008,7.2) than women with a more distant history of IPV. Scholars and clinicians may learn that, especially for women with a recent history of IPV, screening may provide a conduit to meaningful counseling discussions and referrals that women view as a helpful strategy in responding to IPV.

  1. The noble gas xenon provides protection and trophic stimulation to midbrain dopamine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavaur, Jérémie; Le Nogue, Déborah; Lemaire, Marc; Pype, Jan; Farjot, Géraldine; Hirsch, Etienne C; Michel, Patrick P

    2017-07-01

    Despite its low chemical reactivity, the noble gas xenon possesses a remarkable spectrum of biological effects. In particular, xenon is a strong neuroprotectant in preclinical models of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. In this study, we wished to determine whether xenon retained its neuroprotective potential in experimental settings that model the progressive loss of midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons in Parkinson's disease. Using rat midbrain cultures, we established that xenon was partially protective for DA neurons through either direct or indirect effects on these neurons. So, when DA neurons were exposed to l-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid so as to increase ambient glutamate levels and generate slow and sustained excitotoxicity, the effect of xenon on DA neurons was direct. The vitamin E analog Trolox also partially rescued DA neurons in this setting and enhanced neuroprotection by xenon. However, in the situation where DA cell death was spontaneous, the protection of DA neurons by xenon appeared indirect as it occurred through the repression of a mechanism mediated by proliferating glial cells, presumably astrocytes and their precursor cells. Xenon also exerted trophic effects for DA neurons in this paradigm. The effects of xenon were mimicked and improved by the N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonist memantine and xenon itself appeared to work by antagonizing N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. Note that another noble gas argon could not reproduce xenon effects. Overall, present data indicate that xenon can provide protection and trophic support to DA neurons that are vulnerable in Parkinson's disease. This suggests that xenon might have some therapeutic value for this disorder. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Society for Neurochemistry.

  2. The Effectiveness of a Physician-Only and Physician-Patient Intervention on Colorectal Cancer Screening Discussions Between Providers and African American and Latino Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Nancy C; Ramirez-Zohfeld, Vanessa; Rademaker, Alfred W; Ferreira, M Rosario; Galanter, William L; Radosta, Jonathan; Eder, Milton Mickey; Cameron, Kenzie A

    2015-12-01

    Physician recommendation of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is a critical facilitator of screening completion. Providing patients a choice of screening options may increase CRC screening completion, particularly among racial and ethnic minorities. Our purpose was to assess the effectiveness of physician-only and physician-patient interventions on increasing rates of CRC screening discussions as compared to usual care. This study was quasi-experimental. Clinics were allocated to intervention or usual care; patients in intervention clinics were randomized to receipt of patient intervention. Patients aged 50 to 75 years, due for CRC screening, receiving care at either a federally qualified health care center or an academic health center participated in the study. Intervention physicians received continuous quality improvement and communication skills training. Intervention patients watched an educational video immediately before their appointment. Rates of patient-reported 1) CRC screening discussions, and 2) discussions of more than one screening test. The physician-patient intervention (n = 167) resulted in higher rates of CRC screening discussions compared to both physician-only intervention (n = 183; 61.1 % vs.50.3 %, p = 0.008) and usual care (n = 153; 61.1 % vs. 34.0 % p = 0.03). More discussions of specific CRC screening tests and discussions of more than one test occurred in the intervention arms than in usual care (44.6 % vs. 22.9 %,p = 0.03) and (5.1 % vs. 2.0 %, p = 0.036), respectively, but discussion of more than one test was uncommon. Across all arms, 143 patients (28.4 %) reported discussion of colonoscopy only; 21 (4.2 %) reported discussion of both colonoscopy and stool tests. Compared to usual care and a physician-only intervention, a physician-patient intervention increased rates of CRC screening discussions, yet discussions overwhelmingly focused solely on colonoscopy. In underserved patient populations where access to

  3. Strengthening Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintz, Allison B.

    2013-01-01

    "Strategy sharing" is a certain type of discussion that centers on students' ideas and occurs when children present different approaches to problems and provide information about how they solved the problem (Wood, Williams, and McNeal 2004). A teacher may orchestrate a strategy-sharing discussion to achieve one or more of the…

  4. Neurologist consistency in interpreting information provided by an interactive visualization software for deep brain stimulation postoperative programming assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallavaram, Srivatsan; Phibbs, Fenna T; Tolleson, Christopher; Davis, Thomas L; Fang, John; Hedera, Peter; Li, Rui; Koyama, Tatsuki; Dawant, Benoit M; D'Haese, Pierre-François

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative programming in deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy for movement disorders can be challenging and time consuming. Providing the neurologist with tools to visualize the electrode location relative to the patient's anatomy along with models of tissue activation and statistical data can therefore be very helpful. In this study, we evaluate the consistency between neurologists in interpreting and using such information provided by our DBS programming assistance software. Five neurologists experienced in DBS programming were each given a dataset of 29 leads implanted in 17 patients. For each patient, probabilistic maps of stimulation response, anatomical images, models of tissue activation volumes, and electrode positions were presented inside a software framework called CRAnialVault Explorer (CRAVE) developed in house. Consistency between neurologists in optimal contact selection using the software was measured. With only the efficacy map, the average consistency among the five neurologists with respect to the mode and mean of their selections was 97% and 95%, respectively, while these numbers were 93% and 89%, respectively, when both efficacy and an adverse effect map were used simultaneously. Fleiss' kappa statistic also showed very strong agreement among the neurologists (0.87 when using one map and 0.72 when using two maps). Our five neurologists demonstrated high consistency in interpreting information provided by the CRAVE interactive visualization software for DBS postoperative programming assistance. Three of our five neurologists had no prior experience with the software, which suggests that the software has a short learning curve and contact selection is not dependent on familiarity with the program tools. © 2013 Vanderbilt University.

  5. Impact of the feedback provided by a gastric electrical stimulation system on eating behavior and physical activity levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busetto, Luca; Torres, Antonio J; Morales-Conde, Salvador; Alarcón Del Agua, Isaias; Moretto, Carlo; Fierabracci, Paola; Rovera, Giuseppe; Segato, Gianni; Rubio, Miguel A; Favretti, Franco

    2017-03-01

    The closed-loop gastric electrical stimulation (CLGES) abiliti(®) system provides tailored gastric electrical stimulation activated by food entry into the stomach and sensor-based data to medical professionals. The aim of this study was to analyze behavior changes using sensor-based food intake and activity data in participants treated with the CLGES system. Food intake and activity data (3D accelerometer) were downloaded at baseline and monthly/bimonthly for 12 months in a subset of patients with obesity (N = 45) participating in a multicenter trial with CLGES. Measured food intake parameters included the number of intakes during allowed and disallowed periods, nighttime intakes, and between-meal snacks (average/d). Activity parameters included time in different levels of physical activity (min/d), sleep/sedentary (h/d), and estimated energy expenditure (EE). Weight loss at 12 months averaged 15.7 ± 7.7% of the baseline body weight. Stable reduction in the number of disallowed meals and between-meal snacks (P < 0.05), an increase in all levels of physical activity (P < 0.001), and an increase in activity-based EE (303 ± 53 kcal/d on average, P < 0.001) were seen. Significant improvement in eating and activity was seen in participants. It is hypothesized that feedback of the sensor-based data induced behavioral changes and contributed to weight loss in patients treated with CLGES. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  6. Some Clinically Useful Information that Neuropsychology Provides Patients, Carepartners, Neurologists, and Neurosurgeons About Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tröster, Alexander I

    2017-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective (but non-curative) treatment for some of the motor symptoms and treatment complications associated with dopaminergic agents in Parkinson's disease (PD). DBS can be done relatively safely and is associated with quality of life gains. In most DBS centers, neuropsychological evaluations are performed routinely before surgery, and sometimes after surgery. The purpose of such evaluation is not to decide solely on its results whether or not to offer DBS to a given candidate, but to provide the patient and treatment team with the best available information to make reasonable risk-benefit assessments. This review provides information relevant to the questions often asked by patients and their carepartners, neurologists, and neurosurgeons about neuropsychological outcomes of DBS, including neuropsychological adverse event rates, magnitude of cognitive changes, outcomes after unilateral versus bilateral surgery directed at various targets, impact of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) on outcome, factors implicated in neurobehavioral outcomes, and safety of newer interventions or techniques such as asleep surgery and current steering. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. The effects of providing visual feedback and auditory stimulation using a robotic device on balance and gait abilities in persons with stroke: a pilot study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jae Ho Park; ; Yijung Chung

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of providing visual feedback and auditory stimulation using a robotic device on balance and gait abilities in stroke patients. Design...

  8. An ethical discussion of the use of transcranial direct current stimulation for cognitive enhancement in healthy individuals: a fictional case study

    OpenAIRE

    Lapenta, Olivia M.; Valasek, Claudia A.; Brunoni, André R.; Boggio, Paulo S.

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique. Because of its low cost, ease of use, safety, and portability, tDCS has been increasingly investigated for therapeutic purposes in neuropsychiatric disorders and in experimental neuropsychological studies with healthy volunteers. These experiments on healthy cognition have shown significant effects on working memory, decision-making, and language. Such promising results have fomented reflections on st...

  9. Do studies on cortical plasticity provide a rationale for using non-invasive brain stimulation as a treatment for Parkinson's disease patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Giacomo

    2013-11-06

    Animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD) have shown that key mechanisms of cortical plasticity such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) can be impaired by the PD pathology. In humans protocols of non-invasive brain stimulation, such as paired associative stimulation (PAS) and theta-burst stimulation (TBS), can be used to investigate cortical plasticity of the primary motor cortex. Through the amplitude of the motor evoked potential these transcranial magnetic stimulation methods allow to measure both LTP-like and LTD-like mechanisms of cortical plasticity. So far these protocols have reported some controversial findings when tested in PD patients. While various studies described evidence for reduced LTP- and LTD-like plasticity, others showed different results, demonstrating increased LTP-like and normal LTD-like plasticity. Recent evidence provided support to the hypothesis that these different patterns of cortical plasticity likely depend on the stage of the disease and on the concomitant administration of l-DOPA. However, it is still unclear how and if these altered mechanisms of cortical plasticity can be taken as a reliable model to build appropriate protocols aimed at treating PD symptoms by applying repetitive sessions of repetitive TMS (rTMS) or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). The current article will provide an up-to-date overview of these issues together with some reflections on future studies in the field.

  10. Evaluation of the role of access providers. Discussion of Dutch Pirate Bay case law and introducing principles on directness, effectiveness, costs, relevance, and time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodder, A.R.; van der Meulen, N.S.

    2013-01-01

    Internet service providers (ISPs) play a pivotal role in contemporary society because they provide access to the Internet. The primary task of ISPs – to blindly transfer information across the network – has recently come under pressure, as has their status as neutral third parties. Both the public

  11. Video-Stimulated Recall as a Facilitator of a Pre-Service Teacher's Reflection on Teaching and Post-Teaching Supervision Discussion--"A Case Study from Finland"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutovac, Sonja; Kaasila, Raimo; Juuso, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    The use of video in learning to teach is not new. The vast body of research shows that both pre-service and in-service teachers benefit from analyzing video lessons conducted by experienced teachers, their peers, or themselves. In this narrative case study, we analyze one post-teaching supervision discussion about a mathematics lesson. The study…

  12. Enhancing the Collection, Discussion and Use of Family Health History by Consumers, Nurses and Other Health Care Providers: Because Family Health History Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Sandra Millon; Kelber, Sheryl

    2015-09-01

    The family health history (FHH) has long been used by nurses and other health care providers in clinical practice to determine if an individual, their family members, or their future generations are at an increased risk of heritable disease development. Information gleaned from the FHH can be used to better integrate preventive strategies into the plan of care. This report presents a summary of an exploratory pilot study that focused on the collection and use of FHH among a targeted group of Midwestern men and women. Findings suggest a need for efforts to further enhance the public's awareness of the importance of FHH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Do studies on cortical plasticity provide a rationale for using non invasive brain stimulation as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo eKoch

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Animal models of Parkinson’s disease (PD have shown that key mechanisms of cortical plasticity such as long-term potentiation (LTP and long-term depression (LTD can be impaired by the PD pathology. In humans protocols of non-invasive brain stimulation, such as paired associative stimulation (PAS and theta burst stimulation (TBS, can be used to investigate cortical plasticity of the primary motor cortex. Through the amplitude of the motor evoked potential (MEP these transcranial magnetic stimulation methods allow to measure both LTP-like and LTD-like mechanisms of cortical plasticity. So far these protocols have reported some controversial findings when tested in PD patients. While various studies described evidence for reduced LTP- and LTD-like plasticity, others showed different results, demonstrating increased LTP-like and normal LTD-like plasticity. Recent evidence provided support to the hypothesis that these different patterns of cortical plasticity likely depend on the stage of the disease and on the concomitant administration of levo-dopa. However, it still unclear how and if these altered mechanisms of cortical plasticity can be taken as a reliable model to build appropriate protocols aimed at treating PD symptoms b

  14. Stimulation of rhamnolipid biosurfactants production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa AK6U by organosulfur compounds provided as sulfur sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael Ismail

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A Pseudomonas aeruginosa AK6U strain produced rhamnolipid biosurfactants to variable extents when grown on MgSO4 or organosulfur compounds as sulfur sources and glucose as a carbon source. Organosulfur cultures produced much higher biosurfactants amounts compared to the MgSO4 cultures. The surface tension of the growth medium was reduced from 72 mN/m to 54 and 30 mN/m in cultures containing MgSO4 and 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene (4,6-DM-DBT, respectively. AK6U cultures produced different rhamnolipid congener profiles depending on the provided sulfur source. The dibenzothiophene (DBT culture produced more diverse and a higher number of rhamnolipid congeners as compared to the DBT-sulfone and MgSO4 cultures. The number of mono-rhamnolipid congeners in the DBT culture was also higher than that detected in the DBT-sulfone and MgSO4 cultures. Di-rhamnolipids dominated the congener profiles in all the analyzed cultures. The sulfur source can have a profound impact on the quality and quantity of the produced biosurfactants.

  15. Panel discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    No Author Given

    1975-01-01

    Panel discussion: summation and future projections. Introductory remarks by panelists followed by questions and comments from the floor. Panelists: Dr. Joseph Barnea (former director of Resources and Transport for the United Nations; energy consultant to the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR)); the Honorable Clyde F. Bel, Jr. (member of the Louisiana House of Representatives representing District 90 and New Orleans); Dr. David Lombard (acting chief of the Advanced Systems Branch of the Division of Geothermal Energy Research and Technology, Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA)); Fred C. Repper (vice-president of Central Power and Light Company in Corpus Christi, Texas); Dr. Hans Suter (environmental consultant in Corpus Christi, Texas; environmental columnist for the Corpus Christi Caller Times). Session chairman: Herbert Woodson.

  16. Encouraging Classroom Discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Joseph McKee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Classroom discussion has the potential to enhance the learning environment and encourages students to become active participants in the educational process. Student participation in classroom discussion has been shown to significantly improve the student learning experience. Research suggests that classroom discussion is an effective method for encouraging student classroom participation and for motivating student learning beyond the classroom. Participation in classroom discussion encourages students to become active collaborators in the learning process, while at the same time providing instructors with a practical method of assessing student learning. Classroom discussion is an effective tool for developing higher-level cognitive skills like critical thinking. Despite the potential discussion holds for student learning, many in academia lament the lack of participation in the classroom. The lack of student participation in classroom discussion is not a recent problem; it is one that has frustrated instructors for decades. Instructors report that some of the more current methods for encouraging classroom discussion can be exasperating and at times non-productive. This two-year study of 510 college and university students provides insight into the reasons why some students do not participate in classroom discussion. This study, which also elicited input from sixteen college and university professors and two high school teachers, offers some suggestions for creating and encouraging an environment conducive to student participation in the classroom.

  17. What Stimulation That Parents Can Provide to Their Child for His/Her Holistic Development from the Time of Conception till Birth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khowaja, Hina Amin

    2017-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to highlight the ways through which expected parents can support their children for their development from the time of conception till birth. This paper shares ideas to the parents about stimulation, which children are required for their development. This paper is divided into three categories: First trimester, second…

  18. Benefits and Limitations of Text Messages to Stimulate Higher Learning Among Community Providers: Participants' Views of an mHealth Intervention to Support Continuing Medical Education in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, Lora L; Larson Williams, Anna; Le, Bao Ngoc; Herman, Augusta R; Viet Nguyen, Ha; Albanese, Rebecca R; Xiong, Wenjun; Shobiye, Hezekiah Oa; Halim, Nafisa; Tran, Lien Thi Ngoc; McNabb, Marion; Hoang, Hai; Falconer, Ariel; Nguyen, Tam Thi Thanh; Gill, Christopher J

    2017-06-27

    A randomized controlled trial was conducted in 2015 to evaluate a mobile continuing medical education (mCME) intervention that provided daily text messages to community-based physicians' assistants (CBPAs) in Thai Nguyen Province, Vietnam. Although the intervention failed to improve medical knowledge over a 6-month period, a companion qualitative study provided insights on the views and experiences of intervention participants. We conducted focus group discussions (FGDs) and in-depth interviews (IDIs) among participants randomized to receive text messages containing either simple medical facts or quiz questions. Trained interviewers collected data immediately following the conclusion of the trial in December 2015. Using semi-structured question guides, respondents were queried on their views of the intervention, positive and negative, and perceived impacts of the intervention. During analysis, after learning that the intervention had failed to increase knowledge among participants, we also examined reasons for lack of improvement in medical knowledge. All analyses were performed in NVivo using a thematic approach. A total of 70 CBPAs engaged in one of 8 FGDs or an IDI. One-half were men; average age among all respondents was 40 years. Most (81%) practiced in rural settings and most (51%) focused on general medicine. The mean length of work experience was 3 years. All respondents made positive comments about the intervention; convenience, relevance, and quick feedback (quiz format) were praised. Downsides encompassed lack of depth of information, weak interaction, technology challenges, and challenging/irrelevant messages. Respondents described perceived impacts encompassing increased motivation, knowledge, collegial discussions, Internet use to search for more information, and clinical skills. Overall, they expressed a desire for the intervention to continue and recommended expansion to other medical professionals. Overreliance on the text messages, lack of

  19. Deliberative Discussion Focus Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, Erin; Anderson, Rebecca; Botkin, Jeffrey R

    2016-05-01

    This article discusses a new approach for the conduct of focus groups in health research. Identifying ways to educate and inform participants about the topic of interest prior to the focus group discussion can promote more quality data from informed opinions. Data on this deliberative discussion approach are provided from research within three federally funded studies. As healthcare continues to improve from scientific and technological advancements, educating the research participants prior to data collection about these complexities is essential to gather quality data. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Processing of Continuously Provided Punishment and Reward in Children with ADHD and the Modulating Effects of Stimulant Medication: An ERP Study

    OpenAIRE

    Groen, Yvonne; Tucha, Oliver; Wijers, Albertus A.; Althaus, Monika

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Current models of ADHD suggest abnormal reward and punishment sensitivity, but the exact mechanisms are unclear. This study aims to investigate effects of continuous reward and punishment on the processing of performance feedback in children with ADHD and the modulating effects of stimulant medication. METHODS: 15 Methylphenidate (Mph)-treated and 15 Mph-free children of the ADHD-combined type and 17 control children performed a selective attention task with three feedback conditi...

  1. Processing of Continuously Provided Punishment and Reward in Children with ADHD and the Modulating Effects of Stimulant Medication: An ERP Study

    OpenAIRE

    Groen, Yvonne; Tucha, Oliver; Wijers, Albertus A.; Althaus, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Current models of ADHD suggest abnormal reward and punishment sensitivity, but the exact mechanisms are unclear. This study aims to investigate effects of continuous reward and punishment on the processing of performance feedback in children with ADHD and the modulating effects of stimulant medication. Methods: 15 Methylphenidate (Mph)-treated and 15 Mph-free children of the ADHD-combined type and 17 control children performed a selective attention task with three feedback conditi...

  2. Early hCG addition to rFSH for ovarian stimulation in IVF provides better results and the cDNA copies of the hCG receptor may be an indicator of successful stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraskevis Dimitris

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A simple, safe and cost-effective treatment protocol in ovarian stimulation is of great importance in IVF practice, especially in the case of previous unsuccessful attempts. hCG has been used as a substitute of LH because of the degree of homology between the two hormones. The main aim of this prospective randomized study was to determine, for the first time, whether low dose hCG added to rFSH for ovarian stimulation could produce better results compared to the addition of rLH in women entering IVF-ET, especially in those women that had previous IVF failures. An additional aim was to find an indicator that would allow us to follow-up ovarian stimulation and, possibly, modify it in order to achieve a better IVF outcome; and that indicator may be the cDNA copies of the LH/hCG receptor. Group A patients (n = 58 were administered hCG and Group B rLH (n = 56 in addition to rFSH in the first days of ovarian stimulation. The number of follicles and oocytes and, most importantly, implantation and pregnancy rates were shown to be statistically significantly higher in the hCG group. This study has also determined, for the first time to our best knowledge, m-RNA for LH/hCG receptors in the lymphocytes of peripheral blood 40 h before ovum pick-up. cDNA levels of the hCG receptor after ovarian stimulation were significantly higher among women receiving hCG compared to those receiving LH. In addition, higher levels were encountered among women with pregnancy compared to those without, although this was not statistically significant due to the small number of pregnancies. It seems that hCG permits a highly effective and more stable occupancy of rLH/hCG receptors and gives more follicles and more oocytes. The determination of cDNA copies could be, in the future, a marker during ovulation induction protocols and of course a predictor for the outcome of ART in the special subgroup of patients with previous failures.

  3. Focus group discussions

    CERN Document Server

    Hennink, Monique M

    2014-01-01

    The Understanding Research series focuses on the process of writing up social research. The series is broken down into three categories: Understanding Statistics, Understanding Measurement, and Understanding Qualitative Research. The books provide researchers with guides to understanding, writing, and evaluating social research. Each volume demonstrates how research should be represented, including how to write up the methodology as well as the research findings. Each volume also reviews how to appropriately evaluate published research. Focus Group Discussions addresses the challenges associated with conducting and writing focus group research. It provides detailed guidance on the practical and theoretical considerations in conducting focus group discussions including: designing the discussion guide, recruiting participants, training a field team, moderating techniques and ethical considerations. Monique Hennink describes how a methodology section is read and evaluated by others, such as journal reviewers or ...

  4. Let's Discuss: Teaching Students about Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brank, Eve; Wylie, Lindsey

    2013-01-01

    Research consistently demonstrates the benefits of employing classroom discussions; however, there has been less attention given to teaching students about discussions. The current research compared 2 advanced social psychology courses: 1 without (control) and 1 with (experimental) a week devoted to learning about and discussing discussions.…

  5. Hydraulic Fracture Stimulation and Acid Treatment of Well Baca 20; Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1983-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program was initiated in February 1979 to pursue industry interest in geothermal well stimulation work and to develop technical expertise in areas directly related to geothermal well stimulation activities. This report provides an overview of the two experiments conducted in the high-temperature reservoir in Baca, New Mexico. The report discusses resource and reservoir properties, and provides a description of the stimulation experiment, a description of the treatment evaluation, and a summary of the experiment costs. (DJE-2005)

  6. Spinal cord stimulation for complex regional pain syndrome type 1 with dystonia: a case report and discussion of the literature [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/348

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Voet

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1 is a debilitating chronic pain disorder, the physiopathology of which can lead to dystonia associated with changes in the autonomic, central and peripheral nervous system. An interdisciplinary approach (pharmacological, interventional and psychological therapies in conjunction with a rehabilitation pathway is central to progress towards pain reduction and restoration of function. Aim: This case report aims to stimulate reflection and development of mechanism-based therapeutic strategies concerning CRPS associated with dystonia. Case description: A 31 year old female CRPS-1 patient presented with dystonia of the right foot following ligamentoplasty for chronic ankle instability. She did not have a satisfactory response to the usual therapies. Multiple anesthetic blocks (popliteal, epidural and intrathecal were not associated with significant anesthesia and analgesia. Mobilization of the foot by a physiotherapist was not possible. A multidisciplinary approach with psychological support, physiotherapy and spinal cord stimulation (SCS brought pain relief, rehabilitation and improvement in the quality of life. Conclusion: The present case report demonstrates the occurrence of multilevel (peripheral and central pathological modifications in the nervous system of a CRPS-1 patient with dystonia. This conclusion is based on the patient’s pain being resistant to anesthetic blocks at different levels and the favourable, at least initially, response to SCS. The importance of the bio-psycho-social model is also suggested, permitting behavioural change.

  7. Processing of continuously provided punishment and reward in children with ADHD and the modulating effects of stimulant medication: an ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Yvonne; Tucha, Oliver; Wijers, Albertus A; Althaus, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Current models of ADHD suggest abnormal reward and punishment sensitivity, but the exact mechanisms are unclear. This study aims to investigate effects of continuous reward and punishment on the processing of performance feedback in children with ADHD and the modulating effects of stimulant medication. 15 Methylphenidate (Mph)-treated and 15 Mph-free children of the ADHD-combined type and 17 control children performed a selective attention task with three feedback conditions: no-feedback, gain and loss. Event Related Potentials (ERPs) time-locked to feedback and errors were computed. All groups performed more accurately with gain and loss than without feedback. Feedback-related ERPs demonstrated no group differences in the feedback P2, but an enhanced late positive potential (LPP) to feedback stimuli (both gains and losses) for Mph-free children with ADHD compared to controls. Feedback-related ERPs in Mph-treated children with ADHD were similar to controls. Correlational analyses in the ADHD groups revealed that the severity of inattention problems correlated negatively with the feedback P2 amplitude and positively with the LPP to losses and omitted gains. The early selective attention for rewarding and punishing feedback was relatively intact in children with ADHD, but the late feedback processing was deviant (increased feedback LPP). This may explain the often observed positive effects of continuous reinforcement on performance and behaviour in children with ADHD. However, these group findings cannot be generalised to all individuals with the ADHD, because the feedback-related ERPs were associated with the severity of the inattention problems. Children with ADHD-combined type with more inattention problems showed both deviant early attentional selection of feedback stimuli, and deviant late processing of non-reward and punishment.

  8. Processing of continuously provided punishment and reward in children with ADHD and the modulating effects of stimulant medication: an ERP study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Groen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Current models of ADHD suggest abnormal reward and punishment sensitivity, but the exact mechanisms are unclear. This study aims to investigate effects of continuous reward and punishment on the processing of performance feedback in children with ADHD and the modulating effects of stimulant medication. METHODS: 15 Methylphenidate (Mph-treated and 15 Mph-free children of the ADHD-combined type and 17 control children performed a selective attention task with three feedback conditions: no-feedback, gain and loss. Event Related Potentials (ERPs time-locked to feedback and errors were computed. RESULTS: All groups performed more accurately with gain and loss than without feedback. Feedback-related ERPs demonstrated no group differences in the feedback P2, but an enhanced late positive potential (LPP to feedback stimuli (both gains and losses for Mph-free children with ADHD compared to controls. Feedback-related ERPs in Mph-treated children with ADHD were similar to controls. Correlational analyses in the ADHD groups revealed that the severity of inattention problems correlated negatively with the feedback P2 amplitude and positively with the LPP to losses and omitted gains. CONCLUSIONS: The early selective attention for rewarding and punishing feedback was relatively intact in children with ADHD, but the late feedback processing was deviant (increased feedback LPP. This may explain the often observed positive effects of continuous reinforcement on performance and behaviour in children with ADHD. However, these group findings cannot be generalised to all individuals with the ADHD, because the feedback-related ERPs were associated with the severity of the inattention problems. Children with ADHD-combined type with more inattention problems showed both deviant early attentional selection of feedback stimuli, and deviant late processing of non-reward and punishment.

  9. Informal group discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans Nienstaedt; Dean W. Einspahr; J. Douglas Brodie

    1973-01-01

    Editor's note: The morning's presentations were discussed during the afternoon by three groups, each group discussing one of the morning's three topics. Summaries of the discussions, prepared by the discussion leaders, follow.

  10. The APGAR rubric for scoring online discussion boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillippi, Julia C; Schorn, Mavis N; Moore-Davis, Tonia

    2015-05-01

    The World Health Organization has called for a dramatic increase in the number of midwives and supports the use of innovative programs to assist students in achieving midwifery competencies. Online discussion boards are excellent educational tools for stimulating in-depth student engagement. However, complex discussions can be difficult to grade without a well-constructed rubric. The 'discussion-board APGAR' provides clear scoring criteria for discussions of midwifery care. The discussion-board APGAR has 5 components: Application, Professionalism, Group work, Analysis, and Rationale and provides scoring criteria for unacceptable, marginal, and proficient performance. The discussion-board APGAR is based on the Core Competencies for Basic Midwifery Practice in the United States (US), consistent with the International Confederation of Midwives Essential Competencies for Basic Midwifery Practice, and can be adjusted to be congruent with other midwifery standards. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. DISCUSSION METHODS: MODIFICATION AND TRANSFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasova, A.A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article is about how to the importance of selecting the optimal methods of stimulation and motivation to learn. In modern conditions it is very important that the teacher gave the students ready knowledge, and pointed the way for the acquisition of knowledge, taught to acquire knowledge. This requires the selection of effective forms of language and literature work with texts of different types and styles of speech, listening, speaking. In this regard, special attention should be given lessons of speech development. There is a special group of methods to stimulate the development of communicative competence. Among them, and the method of discussion, which is increasingly being used in the classroom in the Russian language

  12. Design of efficient and safe neural stimulators a multidisciplinary approach

    CERN Document Server

    van Dongen, Marijn

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the design of neural stimulator systems which are used for the treatment of a wide variety of brain disorders such as Parkinson’s, depression and tinnitus. Whereas many existing books treating neural stimulation focus on one particular design aspect, such as the electrical design of the stimulator, this book uses a multidisciplinary approach: by combining the fields of neuroscience, electrophysiology and electrical engineering a thorough understanding of the complete neural stimulation chain is created (from the stimulation IC down to the neural cell). This multidisciplinary approach enables readers to gain new insights into stimulator design, while context is provided by presenting innovative design examples. Provides a single-source, multidisciplinary reference to the field of neural stimulation, bridging an important knowledge gap among the fields of bioelectricity, neuroscience, neuroengineering and microelectronics;Uses a top-down approach to understanding the neural activation proc...

  13. Ten Things Lesbians Should Discuss with Their Health Care Provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us Home About GLMA Membership Resources Advocacy Lesbian Health Fund Conference Newsroom Support GLMA About GLMA Membership Resources Advocacy Lesbian Health Fund Conference Newsroom Support GLMA Site Search ...

  14. Do health care providers discuss HIV with older female patients?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-08

    Mar 8, 2010 ... Background: The World Health Organization expressed concern that older people in Africa who are ignored and excluded from HIV-prevention programmes are increasingly being infected with HIV. Studies show an inadequate awareness of the risks of HIV in the older female population. Older women are ...

  15. Stimulants and narcotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, P; Coleman, J H

    1987-04-01

    This article focuses on the use of stimulant and narcotic drugs, as well as lookalike preparations that are subject to abuse. There is a brief discussion of the pharmacology of these agents, demographic use patterns, and treatment modalities.

  16. Learning through Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Robert A.; Calvo, Rafael; Levy, David; Tan, Kelvin

    2004-01-01

    Students studying a third-year e-commerce subject experienced face-to-face and online discussions as an important part of their learning experience. The quality of the students' experiences of learning through those discussions is investigated in this study. This study uses qualitative approaches to investigate the variation in the students'…

  17. The Use of Discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Edmund deS.; And Others

    Research on the use of discussion in adult education has been largely concerned with comparing it with the use of other instructional techniques and with measuring opinion change. Many studies, such as Kurt Lewin's study of food habits, have compared the effectiveness of group discussion as contrasted with lecture in changing opinions and…

  18. [Multisensory stimulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etchepareborda, M C; Abad-Mas, L; Pina, J

    2003-02-01

    Diagnosis in early care (EC) involves a global study that covers the child's development, their personal history, family and surroundings. The specific aims of an intervention programme in EC could be summed up in four areas: the prevention of deficits or difficulties, the detection of problems linked with a socio-family deficiency or shortages, the stimulation of development, and help and assistance for families. Multisensory stimulation (MSS) of small children is essential for their future existence. The presentation of stimuli must follow a strict schedule; indeed, this observation is so important that if the critical moment for incorporating a stimulus is missed, providing the stimulus at another time will not have the same effect. Intellectual development during early childhood was taken into account when defining the fundamental aims of a therapeutic intervention programme in EC. To develop suitable therapy according to these concepts, an EMS (Snoezelen) room with certain special characteristics is required. This room must allow the stimuli offered in each moment and under each sensory modality to be controlled. Applying intervention programmes in a proper, specific and timely manner will enable us to accompany each child, as far as is possible in each case, in the development of his or her abilities and capabilities.

  19. Discussion about magnesium phosphating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pokorny

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes results from recently published research focused on production of non-conventional magnesium phosphate Mg3(PO42・4H2O – bobierrite, or MgHPO4・3H2O – newberyite coating for both magnesium alloys and/or mild steel. This new kind of coating is categorized in the context of current state of phosphating technology and its potential advantages and crystal structure is discussed. At the same time, the suitable comparison techniques for magnesium phosphate coating and conventional zinc phosphate coating are discussed.

  20. WORKSHOP: Discussion, debate, deliberation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeliazkova, Margarita I.

    2014-01-01

    Discussing, deliberating and debating are a core part of any democratic process. To organise these processes well, a great deal of knowledge and skill is required. It is not simple to find a good balance between a number of elements: appropriate language and terminology; paying attention to solid

  1. John Cage Discusses Fluxus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Ellsworth

    1992-01-01

    Presents an informal discussion with composer John Cage which includes his response to George Maciunas' work, his recollections of Marcel Duchamp, the complex relationship between inelegant material and revealing works of art, neo-Dada and neo-Fluxus, Wittgenstein and the artist's ultimate responsibility to initiate a change in the viewer or…

  2. [Discussion paper participation research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farin, Erik

    2012-12-01

    This contribution introduces the "Diskussionspapier Teilhabeforschung" (discussion paper participation research) of the German Association for Rehabilitation (DVfR) and German Society for Rehabilitation Science (DGRW). The aim of this paper is to more clearly define current scientific research activity on the subject of participation and the significance of interdisciplinary participation research. The authors emphasise the desirability of a stronger scientific basis for instruments designed to improve the participation of disabled individuals. The paper is meant to be understood as an initial basis for the discussion about participation research development, and the authors are open to suggestions and elaboration.Participation research is understood in this discussion paper as an interdisciplinary research field with 7 goals and characteristics: 1. focussing on participation and self-determination; 2. contextual approach (taking environmental and personal factors into consideration that affect participation); 3. the participation of disabled persons in participation research; 4. interdisciplinary cooperation; 5. involving organisations and institutions whose approaches to participation research overlap; 6. referring to social and healthcare policies; 7. national and international orientations.The authors discuss the rationale behind increasing the support for participation research and theoretical models thereof. Fundamental concepts with high relevance to participation research include the biopsychosocial model of the International Classification of Functionality, Disability and Health (ICF), the inclusion concept, empowerment concept, and capabilities concept. The authors conclude their paper with recommendations for strengthening the research funding for participation research, and specify concrete steps toward greater participation research. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Geothermal-Reservoir Well-Stimulation Program. Program status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-05-01

    Seven experimental fracture stimulation treatments completed to date and the laboratory work performed to develop the stimulation technology are described. A discussion of the pre-stimulation and post-stimulation data and their evaluation is provided for each experiment. Six of the seven stimulation experiments were at least technically successful in stimulating the wells. The two fracture treatments in East Mesa 58-30 more than doubled the producing rate of the previously marginal producer. The two fracture treatments in Raft River and the two in Baca were all successful in obtaining significant production from previously nonproductive intervals. However, these treatments failed to establish commercial production due to deficiencies in either fluid temperature or flow rate. The acid etching treatment in the well at The Geysers did not have any material effect on producing rate.

  4. Discussion with CERN Directorate

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Please note that the Discussion with CERN Directorate will be transmitted also in the following rooms: Council Chamber - 503-1-001 IT Amphitheatre - 31-3-004 Prevessin 774-R-013 Simultaneous interpreting into French and English will be available in the Main Auditorium. Une interprétation simultanée en français et en anglais sera disponible dans l'amphithéâtre principal.

  5. Summaries of group discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, L. D.

    1972-01-01

    Group discussions following the presentations of reports on the remote sensing of Chesapeake Bay resources are presented. The parameters to be investigated by the remote sensors and the specifications of the sensors are described. Specific sensors for obtaining data on various aspects of the ecology are identified. Recommendations for establishing a data bank and additional efforts to obtain increased understanding of the ecology are submitted.

  6. LGBT Roundtable Discussion: Meet-up and Mentoring Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The LGBT+ Physicists group welcomes those who identify as gender sexual minorities, as LGBTQQIAAP+, or as allies to participate in a round-table discussion on mentoring physicists. The session will provide an opportunity to learn and discuss successful mentoring strategies at different career stages for physicists in all environments, including academia, industry, etc. Attendees are encouraged to attend a social event to follow the panel to continue to network. Allies are especially welcome at this event to learn how to support and mentor LGBT+ physicists.

  7. Discussion about magnesium phosphating

    OpenAIRE

    Pokorny, P.; Tej, P.; Szelag, P.

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes results from recently published research focused on production of non-conventional magnesium phosphate Mg3(PO4)2・4H2O – bobierrite, or MgHPO4・3H2O – newberyite) coating for both magnesium alloys and/or mild steel. This new kind of coating is categorized in the context of current state of phosphating technology and its potential advantages and crystal structure is discussed. At the same time, the suitable comparison techniques for magnesium phosphate coating and convention...

  8. Transcranial brain stimulation: closing the loop between brain and stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabanov, Anke; Thielscher, Axel; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2016-08-01

    To discuss recent strategies for boosting the efficacy of noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation to improve human brain function. Recent research exposed substantial intra- and inter-individual variability in response to plasticity-inducing transcranial brain stimulation. Trait-related and state-related determinants contribute to this variability, challenging the standard approach to apply stimulation in a rigid, one-size-fits-all fashion. Several strategies have been identified to reduce variability and maximize the plasticity-inducing effects of noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation. Priming interventions or paired associative stimulation can be used to 'standardize' the brain-state and hereby, homogenize the group response to stimulation. Neuroanatomical and neurochemical profiling based on magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy can capture trait-related and state-related variability. Fluctuations in brain-states can be traced online with functional brain imaging and inform the timing or other settings of transcranial brain stimulation. State-informed open-loop stimulation is aligned to the expression of a predefined brain state, according to prespecified rules. In contrast, adaptive closed-loop stimulation dynamically adjusts stimulation settings based on the occurrence of stimulation-induced state changes. Approaches that take into account trait-related and state-related determinants of stimulation-induced plasticity bear considerable potential to establish noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation as interventional therapeutic tool.

  9. Panel Discussion Vi: Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, E.; Dolgov, A.; Crothers, S.; Mitra, A.; Rubakov, V.; Zakharov, A.

    2014-03-01

    Questions to discuss: * To what extent are Dark Matter and Dark Energy necessary to explain the observed properties of the Universe? * Why are the Dark matter profiles so universal at the galactic scales? * Are there viable candidates of modified gravitational dynamics to exclude the dark components of Universe? * Do we have any perspectives to distinguish the Dark Energy from the cosmological constant? * Are there any certain indications for sterile neutrinos in the cosmos? * How does the Planck data change the view of inflation in the early Universe? What could be the origin of the inflaton plateau? So far, what else is interesting about the Planck data? * What are the nearest crucial points in cosmological observations? * Can we be more decisive discriminating between the anthropic principle, the superstringy landscape, fine tuning or dynamics as reasons for the cosmological coincidences?

  10. Advantages and drawbacks of some ERG stimulation and data-processing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, S; Szlávik, L; Sármány, J B

    1981-01-01

    In each group of diseases, electroretinographic (ERG) diagnosis requires optimal stimulation parameters and detection techniques that clearly evidence any deviations from normal values. Television tube light stimulator assemblies and stimulation techniques applying methods of the control theory are very suitable for the dynamic separation of gross ERG components. The advantages and drawbacks of flicker ERG, frequency-characteristic methods and the frequency ranges that provide useful information in data processing are discussed.

  11. Transcranial brain stimulation: closing the loop between brain and stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Karabanov, Anke; Thielscher, Axel; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To discuss recent strategies for boosting the efficacy of noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation to improve human brain function. Recent findings Recent research exposed substantial intra- and inter-individual variability in response to plasticity-inducing transcranial brain stimulation. Trait-related and state-related determinants contribute to this variability, challenging the standard approach to apply stimulation in a rigid, one-size-fits-all fashion. Several strateg...

  12. New modalities of brain stimulation for stroke rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, T. H.; Carey, J. R.; Fetz, E. E.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability, and the number of stroke survivors continues to rise. Traditional neurorehabilitation strategies aimed at restoring function to weakened limbs provide only modest benefit. New brain stimulation techniques designed to augment traditional neurorehabilitation hold promise for reducing the burden of stroke-related disability. Investigators discovered that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), trans-cranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), and epidural cortical stimulation (ECS) can enhance neural plasticity in the motor cortex post-stroke. Improved outcomes may be obtained with activity-dependent stimulation, in which brain stimulation is contingent on neural or muscular activity during normal behavior. We review the evidence for improved motor function in stroke patients treated with rTMS, tDCS, and ECS and discuss the mediating physiological mechanisms. We compare these techniques to activity-dependent stimulation, discuss the advantages of this newer strategy for stroke rehabilitation, and suggest future applications for activity-dependent brain stimulation. PMID:23192336

  13. Global interprofessional perioperative education: discussing the reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Paul R

    2008-09-01

    Many countries of the world have outlined clearly defined and distinct roles, for the perioperative environment, that are played by various individuals from a range of professions. Each of these professions tends to educate its practitioners in an environment that is almost completely isolated from the other perioperative professions and from its peers in other countries. One can only, currently, imagine the potential benefits to be gained from the sharing of educational and clinical experience between countries and between nursing and non-nursing perioperative team members, for both patient and the entire perioperative team. If such a level of sharing existed then the entire global perioperative community would benefit. The transfer of education and clinical practice, however, between countries needs careful thought. Many educational and professional disciplines have conducted research into ways of transferring/borrowing good practice between established systems and those just commencing similar practices. Perioperative practice needs a similar research base that has explored the dilemmas of transfer and borrowing between countries. It is important to determine what information should be shared, in the best interest of the patients, what sharing is affordable, and what method of sharing will fit in to an overall, global, strategy for perioperative practice. This paper seeks to use a recent example of multi-professional perioperative learning undertaken by Advanced Scrub Practitioners to provide a possible first glance in to the "crystal ball" of future practice. The aim of the discussion is to stimulate further discussion and effective research that, if carried out correctly, will seek to encourage interprofessional and international co-operation between perioperative professionals worldwide.

  14. growth stimulant

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of timing and duration of supplementation of LIVFIT VET ® (growth stimulant) as substitute for fish meal on the growth performance, haematology and clinical enzymes concentration of growing pigs.

  15. Therapeutic Stimulation for Restoration of Function After Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ievins, Aiva; Moritz, Chet T

    2017-09-01

    Paralysis due to spinal cord injury can severely limit motor function and independence. This review summarizes different approaches to electrical stimulation of the spinal cord designed to restore motor function, with a brief discussion of their origins and the current understanding of their mechanisms of action. Spinal stimulation leads to impressive improvements in motor function along with some benefits to autonomic functions such as bladder control. Nonetheless, the precise mechanisms underlying these improvements and the optimal spinal stimulation approaches for restoration of motor function are largely unknown. Finally, spinal stimulation may augment other therapies that address the molecular and cellular environment of the injured spinal cord. The fact that several stimulation approaches are now leading to substantial and durable improvements in function following spinal cord injury provides a new perspectives on the previously "incurable" condition of paralysis. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Promoting colorectal cancer screening discussion: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, Shannon M; Perkins, Susan M; Tong, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L; Skinner, Celette Sugg; Springston, Jeffrey K; Imperiale, Thomas F; Rawl, Susan M

    2013-04-01

    Provider recommendation is a predictor of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. To compare the effects of two clinic-based interventions on patient-provider discussions about CRC screening. Two-group RCT with data collected at baseline and 1 week post-intervention. African-American patients that were non-adherent to CRC screening recommendations (n=693) with a primary care visit between 2008 and 2010 in one of 11 urban primary care clinics. Participants received either a computer-delivered tailored CRC screening intervention or a nontailored informational brochure about CRC screening immediately prior to their primary care visit. Between-group differences in odds of having had a CRC screening discussion about a colon test, with and without adjusting for demographic, clinic, health literacy, health belief, and social support variables, were examined as predictors of a CRC screening discussion using logistic regression. Intervention effects on CRC screening test order by PCPs were examined using logistic regression. Analyses were conducted in 2011 and 2012. Compared to the brochure group, greater proportions of those in the computer-delivered tailored intervention group reported having had a discussion with their provider about CRC screening (63% vs 48%, OR=1.81, p<0.001). Predictors of a discussion about CRC screening included computer group participation, younger age, reason for visit, being unmarried, colonoscopy self-efficacy, and family member/friend recommendation (all p-values <0.05). The computer-delivered tailored intervention was more effective than a nontailored brochure at stimulating patient-provider discussions about CRC screening. Those who received the computer-delivered intervention also were more likely to have a CRC screening test (fecal occult blood test or colonoscopy) ordered by their PCP. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00672828. Copyright © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  17. Transcranial brain stimulation: closing the loop between brain and stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karabanov, Anke; Thielscher, Axel; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To discuss recent strategies for boosting the efficacy of noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation to improve human brain function. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent research exposed substantial intra- and inter-individual variability in response to plasticity-inducing transcranial brain...... transcranial brain stimulation. Priming interventions or paired associative stimulation can be used to ‘standardize’ the brain-state and hereby, homogenize the group response to stimulation. Neuroanatomical and neurochemical profiling based on magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy can capture trait......-related and state-related variability. Fluctuations in brain-states can be traced online with functional brain imaging and inform the timing or other settings of transcranial brain stimulation. State-informed open-loop stimulation is aligned to the expression of a predefined brain state, according to prespecified...

  18. Stimulation and recording electrodes for neural prostheses

    CERN Document Server

    Pour Aryan, Naser; Rothermel, Albrecht

    2015-01-01

    This book provides readers with basic principles of the electrochemistry of the electrodes used in modern, implantable neural prostheses. The authors discuss the boundaries and conditions in which the electrodes continue to function properly for long time spans, which are required when designing neural stimulator devices for long-term in vivo applications. Two kinds of electrode materials, titanium nitride and iridium are discussed extensively, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The influence of the counter electrode on the safety margins and electrode lifetime in a two electrode system is explained. Electrode modeling is handled in a final chapter.

  19. Brain Stimulation Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Magnetic Seizure Therapy Deep Brain Stimulation Additional Resources Brain Stimulation Therapies Overview Brain stimulation therapies can play ... for a shorter recovery time than ECT Deep Brain Stimulation Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first developed ...

  20. Human Cloning: Let's Discuss It.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taras, Loretta; Stavroulakis, Anthea M.; Ortiz, Mary T.

    1999-01-01

    Describes experiences with holding discussions on cloning at a variety of levels in undergraduate biology courses. Discusses teaching methods used and student reactions to the discussions. Contains 12 references. (WRM)

  1. Medicare Provider Data - Hospice Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Hospice Utilization and Payment Public Use File provides information on services provided to Medicare beneficiaries by hospice providers. The Hospice PUF...

  2. Tissue engineering bioreactor systems for applying physical and electrical stimulations to cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, GyuHyun; Yang, Gi-Hoon; Kim, GeunHyung

    2015-05-01

    Bioreactor systems in tissue engineering applications provide various types of stimulation to mimic the tissues in vitro and in vivo. Various bioreactors have been designed to induce high cellular activities, including initial cell attachment, cell growth, and differentiation. Although cell-stimulation processes exert mostly positive effects on cellular responses, in some cases such stimulation can also have a negative effect on cultured cells. In this review, we discuss various types of bioreactor and the positive and negative effects of stimulation (physical, chemical, and electrical) on various cultured cell types. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Noninvasive Spinal Cord Stimulation: Technical Aspects and Therapeutic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Taylor, Alexandra; Thomschewski, Aljoscha; Orioli, Andrea; Frey, Vanessa; Trinka, Eugen; Brigo, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Electrical and magnetic trans-spinal stimulation can be used to increase the motor output of multiple spinal segments and modulate cortico-spinal excitability. The application of direct current through the scalp as well as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation are known to influence brain excitability, and hence can also modulate other central nervous system structures, including spinal cord. This study aimed to evaluate the effects and the therapeutic usefulness of these noninvasive neuromodulatory techniques in healthy subjects and in the neurorehabilitation of patients with spinal cord disorders, as well as to discuss the possible mechanisms of action. A comprehensive review that summarizes previous studies using noninvasive spinal cord stimulation is lacking. PubMed (MEDLINE) and EMBASE were systematically searched to identify the most relevant published studies. We performed here an extensive review in this field. By decreasing the spinal reflex excitability, electrical and magnetic trans-spinal stimulation could be helpful in normalizing reflex hyperexcitability and treating hypertonia in subjects with lesions to upper motor neurons. Transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation, based on applying direct current through the skin, influences the ascending and descending spinal pathways as well as spinal reflex excitability, and there is increasing evidence that it also can induce prolonged functional neuroplastic changes. When delivered repetitively, magnetic stimulation could also modulate spinal cord functions; however, at present only a few studies have documented spastic-reducing effects induced by repetitive spinal magnetic stimulation. Moreover, paired peripheral and transcranial stimulation can be used to target the spinal cord and may have potential for neuromodulation in spinal cord-injured subjects. Noninvasive electrical and magnetic spinal stimulation may provide reliable means to characterize important neurophysiologic and

  4. Present and potential use of spinal cord stimulation to control chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jason J; Popescu, Adrian; Bell, Russell L

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation is an intervention that has become increasingly popular due to the growing body of literature showing its effectiveness in treating pain and the reversible nature of the treatment with implant removal. It is currently approved by the FDA for chronic pain of the trunk and limbs, intractable low back pain, leg pain, and pain from failed back surgery syndrome. In Europe, it has additional approval for refractory angina pectoris and peripheral limb ischemia. This narrative review presents the current evidence supporting the use of spinal cord stimulation for the approved indications and also discusses some emerging neuromodulation technologies that may potentially address pain conditions that traditional spinal cord stimulation has difficulty addressing. Narrative review. Spinal cord stimulation has been reported to be superior to conservative medical management and reoperation when dealing with pain from failed back surgery syndrome. It has also demonstrated clinical benefit in complex regional pain syndrome, critical limb ischemia, and refractory angina pectoris. Furthermore, several cost analysis studies have demonstrated that spinal cord stimulation is cost effective for these approved conditions. Despite the lack of a comprehensive mechanism, the technology and the complexity in which spinal cord stimulation is being utilized is growing. Newer devices are targeting axial low back pain and foot pain, areas that have been reported to be more difficult to treat with traditional spinal cord stimulation. Percutaneous hybrid paddle leads, peripheral nerve field stimulation, nerve root stimulation, dorsal root ganglion, and high frequency stimulation are actively being refined to address axial low back pain and foot pain. High frequency stimulation is unique in that it provides paresthesia free analgesia by stimulating beyond the physiologic frequency range. The preliminary results have been mixed and a large randomized control trial is underway

  5. Performance Enhancement by Brain Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Gazerani

    2017-09-01

    address these uncertainties or providing an optical protocol. Discussing neuro-enhancement with sport bodies, athletes, and authorities seems necessary to facilitate providing a technical, ethical, or regulatory framework for further investigation (Park K, 2017. In contrast to many other substances or strategies listed in prohibited performance-enhancing drugs or strategies, neuro-enhancement cannot be detected with a simple blood test. In addition, since these techniques can be used differently for different types of sport activities, it is not easy to determine whether it must be prohibited or be given legitimacy as an aid to training and development of athletes. In short, although brain stimulation is a valuable scientific tool and a beneficial medical procedure, it does not look wise to let it be used limitlessly and for non-medical purposes at least for the time being that several points are unanswered about efficacy and safety.

  6. A Discussion with Jacques Derrida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrida, Jacques

    1990-01-01

    Presents an edited transcript of a discussion held in April 1989 between Jacques Derrida and a group of students and professors concerning Derrida's "Afterword: Toward an Ethic of Discussion." Discusses Derrida's views on "deconstruction" as a term and a movement, the idea of arguments and persuasion, and specific power…

  7. Early Identification and Infant Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintz, Brenda

    1976-01-01

    This article describes the Zucker Center's program in Toledo, Ohio which identifies children with developmental delays and enrolls them in a demonstration infant stimulation program. The center provides educational programs in neonatal care, nutrition, general stimulation, and parenting techniques. Available from: PS 504 969. (JMB)

  8. Towards multifocal ultrasonic neural stimulation II: design considerations for an acoustic retinal prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naor, Omer; Hertzberg, Yoni; Zemel, Esther; Kimmel, Eitan; Shoham, Shy

    2012-04-01

    Ultrasound waves, widely used as a non-invasive diagnostic modality, were recently shown to stimulate neuronal activity. Functionally meaningful stimulation, as is required in order to form a unified percept, requires the dynamic generation of simultaneous stimulation patterns. In this paper, we examine the general feasibility and properties of an acoustic retinal prosthesis, a new vision restoration strategy that will combine ultrasonic neuro-stimulation and ultrasonic field sculpting technology towards non-invasive artificial stimulation of surviving neurons in a degenerating retina. We explain the conceptual framework for such a device, study its feasibility in an in vivo ultrasonic retinal stimulation study and discuss the associated design considerations and tradeoffs. Finally, we simulate and experimentally validate a new holographic method—the angular spectrum-GSW—for efficient generation of uniform and accurate continuous ultrasound patterns. This method provides a powerful, flexible solution to the problem of projecting complex acoustic images onto structures like the retina.

  9. Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Treating Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and their FAMILIES VAGUS NERVE STIMULATION FOR TREATING EPILEPSY This information sheet is provided to help you ... how vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) may help treat epilepsy. The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is the ...

  10. Online Discussion and Learning Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    William T. Alpert; Oskar R. Harmon; Joseph Histen

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe how we used online discussion forums to complement lecture presentations. We collected data on student usage and surveyed student opinion in several online/blended sections. Our hypothesis is that increased student participation in online discussion forums will increase learner engagement and learning outcomes. Using panel data we estimate a fixed effects model and find active participation in the discussion board has a positive effect on exam score at a statisticall...

  11. Plasmonic Nanoprobes for Stimulated Emission Depletion Nanoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Emiliano; Huidobro, Paloma A; Sinclair, Hugo G; Guldbrand, Stina; Peveler, William J; Davies, Timothy; Parrinello, Simona; Görlitz, Frederik; Dunsby, Chris; Neil, Mark A A; Sivan, Yonatan; Parkin, Ivan P; French, Paul M W; Maier, Stefan A

    2016-11-22

    Plasmonic nanoparticles influence the absorption and emission processes of nearby emitters due to local enhancements of the illuminating radiation and the photonic density of states. Here, we use the plasmon resonance of metal nanoparticles in order to enhance the stimulated depletion of excited molecules for super-resolved nanoscopy. We demonstrate stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy with gold nanorods with a long axis of only 26 nm and a width of 8 nm. These particles provide an enhancement of up to 50% of the resolution compared to fluorescent-only probes without plasmonic components irradiated with the same depletion power. The nanoparticle-assisted STED probes reported here represent a ∼2 × 103 reduction in probe volume compared to previously used nanoparticles. Finally, we demonstrate their application toward plasmon-assisted STED cellular imaging at low-depletion powers, and we also discuss their current limitations.

  12. Plasmonic nanoprobes for stimulated emission depletion microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cortes, Emiliano; Sinclair, Hugo G; Guldbrand, Stina; Peveler, William J; Davies, Timothy; Parrinello, Simona; Görlitz, Frederik; Dunsby, Chris; Neil, Mark A A; Sivan, Yonatan; Parkin, Ivan P; French, Paul M; Maier, Stefan A

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticles influence the absorption and emission processes of nearby emitters due to local enhancements of the illuminating radiation and the photonic density of states. Here, we use the plasmon resonance of metal nanoparticles in order to enhance the stimulated depletion of excited molecules for super-resolved microscopy. We demonstrate stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy with gold nanorods with a long axis of only 26 nm and a width of 8 nm that provide an enhancement of the resolution compared to fluorescent-only probes without plasmonic components irradiated with the same depletion power. These novel nanoparticle-assisted STED probes represent a ~2x10^3 reduction in probe volume compared to previously used nanoparticles and we demonstrate their application to the first plasmon-assisted STED cellular imaging. We also discuss their current limitations.

  13. The Provident Principal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, John R.

    This monograph offers leadership approaches for school principals. Discussion applies the business leadership theory of Warren Bennis and Burt Nanus to the role of the principal. Each of the booklet's three parts concludes with discussion questions. Part 1, "Visions and Values for the Provident Principal," demonstrates the importance of…

  14. What HERA may provide?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hannes [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); De Roeck, Albert [CERN, Genf (Switzerland); Bartles, Jochen [Univ. Hamburg (DE). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II] (and others)

    2008-09-15

    More than 100 people participated in a discussion session at the DIS08 workshop on the topic What HERA may provide. A summary of the discussion with a structured outlook and list of desirable measurements and theory calculations is given. (orig.)

  15. Transcranial magnetic stimulation after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Basem I; Carmody, Margaret A; Zhang, Xiaoming; Lin, Vernon W; Steinmetz, Michael P

    2015-02-01

    To review the basic principles and techniques of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and provide information and evidence regarding its applications in spinal cord injury clinical rehabilitation. A review of the available current and historical literature regarding TMS was conducted, and a discussion of its potential use in spinal cord injury rehabilitation is presented. TMS provides reliable information about the functional integrity and conduction properties of the corticospinal tracts and motor control in the diagnostic and prognostic assessment of various neurological disorders. It allows one to follow the evolution of motor control and to evaluate the effects of different therapeutic procedures. Motor-evoked potentials can be useful in follow-up evaluation of motor function during treatment and rehabilitation, specifically in patients with spinal cord injury and stroke. Although studies regarding somatomotor functional recovery after spinal cord injury have shown promise, more trials are required to provide strong and substantial evidence. TMS is a promising noninvasive tool for the treatment of spasticity, neuropathic pain, and somatomotor deficit after spinal cord injury. Further investigation is needed to demonstrate whether different protocols and applications of stimulation, as well as alternative cortical sites of stimulation, may induce more pronounced and beneficial clinical effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Small group discussion: Students perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Nachal; Manivel, Rajajeyakumar; Palanisamy, Rajendran

    2015-08-01

    Various alternative methods are being used in many medical colleges to reinforce didactic lectures in physiology. Small group teaching can take on a variety of different tasks such as problem-solving, role play, discussions, brainstorming, and debate. Research has demonstrated that group discussion promotes greater synthesis and retention of materials. The aims of this study were to adopt a problem-solving approach by relating basic sciences with the clinical scenario through self-learning. To develop soft skills, to understand principles of group dynamics, and adopt a new teaching learning methodology. Experimental study design was conducted in Phase I 1(st) year medical students of 2014-2015 batch (n = 120). On the day of the session, the students were grouped into small groups (15 each). The session started with the facilitator starting off the discussion. Feedback forms from five students in each group was taken (n = 40). A five point Likert scale was used ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree. Data were analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 21.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp. Our results show that 70% of the students opined that small group discussion were interactive, friendly, innovative, built interaction between teacher and student. Small group discussion increased their thought process and helped them in better communication. The small group discussion was interactive, friendly, and bridged the gap between the teacher and student. The student's communication skills are also improved. In conclusion, small group discussion is more effective than the traditional teaching methods.

  17. Isoconversional kinetics of thermally stimulated processes

    CERN Document Server

    Vyazovkin, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    The use of isoconversional kinetic methods for analysis of thermogravimetric and calorimetric data on thermally stimulated processes is quickly growing in popularity. The purpose of this book is to create the first comprehensive resource on the theory and applications of isoconversional methodology. The book introduces the reader to the kinetics of physical and chemical condensed phase processes that occur as a result of changing temperature and discusses how isoconversional analysis can provide important kinetic insights into them. The book will help the readers to develop a better understanding of the methodology, and promote its efficient usage and successful development.

  18. Socrates, discussion and moral education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembert, Ron B.

    1995-01-01

    For Socrates, as he appears in Plato's dialogues, the process of discussion is essential for preparing human beings to lead a moral life. Only through discussion, Socrates maintains, can we be led to an understanding of such concepts as wisdom, courage and justice. The author of this article believes that the Socratic notion of the moral value of discussion is still valid. In support of this view, he examines two recent works: Dialogues on Moral Education by John Wilson and Barbara Cowell, and Moral Education, Secular and Religious by John L. Elias. Finally, the author suggests how the Socratic concept of dialogue might be used in moral education today.

  19. Animating Geometry Discussions with Flexigons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, Ruth

    1994-01-01

    Presents activities with 10- and 4-straw flexigons, an object created by stringing together lengths of plastic drinking straws with nylon fishing line. Discusses several geometric theorems that can be demonstrated with flexigons. (MKR)

  20. Group discussion improves lie detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nadav Klein; Nicholas Epley

    2015-01-01

    ... identify when a person is lying. These experiments demonstrate that the group advantage in lie detection comes through the process of group discussion, and is not a product of aggregating individual opinions...

  1. Small group discussion: Students perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Annamalai, Nachal; Manivel, Rajajeyakumar; Palanisamy, Rajendran

    2015-01-01

    Context: Various alternative methods are being used in many medical colleges to reinforce didactic lectures in physiology. Small group teaching can take on a variety of different tasks such as problem-solving, role play, discussions, brainstorming, and debate. Research has demonstrated that group discussion promotes greater synthesis and retention of materials. Aims: The aims of this study were to adopt a problem-solving approach by relating basic sciences with the clinical scenario through s...

  2. Nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchen eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a high spatial resolution and cell-type specificity. In these techniques, a nanomaterial converts a remotely transmitted primary stimulus such as a light, magnetic or ultrasonic signal to a localized secondary stimulus such as an electric field or heat to stimulate neurons. The ease of surface modification and bio-conjugation of nanomaterials facilitates cell-type-specific targeting, designated placement and highly localized membrane activation. This review focuses on nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation techniques primarily involving opto-electric, opto-thermal, magneto-electric, magneto-thermal and acousto-electric transduction mechanisms. Stimulation techniques based on other possible transduction schemes and general consideration for these emerging neurotechnologies are also discussed.

  3. Small group discussion: Students perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Nachal; Manivel, Rajajeyakumar; Palanisamy, Rajendran

    2015-01-01

    Context: Various alternative methods are being used in many medical colleges to reinforce didactic lectures in physiology. Small group teaching can take on a variety of different tasks such as problem-solving, role play, discussions, brainstorming, and debate. Research has demonstrated that group discussion promotes greater synthesis and retention of materials. Aims: The aims of this study were to adopt a problem-solving approach by relating basic sciences with the clinical scenario through self-learning. To develop soft skills, to understand principles of group dynamics, and adopt a new teaching learning methodology. Subjects and Methods: Experimental study design was conducted in Phase I 1st year medical students of 2014–2015 batch (n = 120). On the day of the session, the students were grouped into small groups (15 each). The session started with the facilitator starting off the discussion. Feedback forms from five students in each group was taken (n = 40). A five point Likert scale was used ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree. Data were analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 21.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp. Results: Our results show that 70% of the students opined that small group discussion were interactive, friendly, innovative, built interaction between teacher and student. Small group discussion increased their thought process and helped them in better communication. Conclusions: The small group discussion was interactive, friendly, and bridged the gap between the teacher and student. The student's communication skills are also improved. In conclusion, small group discussion is more effective than the traditional teaching methods. PMID:26380202

  4. National GAP Conference 2007-Discussion Groups Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratz, Joan M.; Lamb, Berton Lee

    2010-01-01

    We led two discussion groups during the 2007 National GAP Conference. These discussion groups provided information to help develop a survey of National Gap Analysis Program (GAP) data users. One group discussed technical issues, and the second group discussed the use of GAP data for decisionmaking. Themes emerging from the technical issues group included concerns about data quality, need for information on how to use data, and passive data distribution. The decisionmaking discussion included a wide range of topics including the need to understand presentation of information, the need to connect with and understand users of data, the revision of GAP's mission, and the adaptability of products and data. The decisionmaking group also raised concerns regarding technical issues. One conclusion is that a deep commitment to ongoing information transfer and support is a key component of success for the GAP program.

  5. Learning through synchronous electronic discussion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanselaar, G.; Veerman, A.L.; Andriessen, J.E.B.

    2000-01-01

    This article reports a study examining university student pairs carrying out an electronic discussion task in a synchronous computer mediated communication (CMC) system (NetMeeting). The purpose of the assignment was to raise students' awareness concerning conceptions that characterise effective

  6. Body Art: A Panel Discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgenor, Peter; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Three camp directors discuss their policies regarding body art and body piercing. Only one director reported a strict policy prohibiting tattoos or body art based on standards that the camp portrays to families. However, all directors enforced policies prohibiting clothing or body art that mentions alcohol, tobacco, drug use, or inappropriate…

  7. Another Discussion about Academic Corruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changgeng, Li

    2007-01-01

    Academic corruption is a commonplace matter about which all people are clearly aware. However, people often overlook many hidden or latent manifestations of academic corruption. This article discusses eight of these manifestations: indiscriminate use of the academic team spirit, the proliferation of "word games," deliberate attacks on…

  8. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagus nerve stimulation Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Vagus nerve stimulation is a procedure that involves implantation of a device that stimulates the vagus nerve with electrical impulses. There's one vagus nerve ...

  9. Discussion document on the ethical aspects of the allocation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This document has been approved by the Council of the World Medical Association (WMA) for publication and distribution to the national member associations_ The document is not an expression of WMA policy, but is simply intended to stimulate reflection and discussion about the issues associated with allocation of health ...

  10. Student-Moderated Discussion Boards in a Graduate Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRay, Jeni; Goertzen, Brent; Klaus, Kaley

    2016-01-01

    This application brief describes a "Module Discussant" activity assigned in an online graduate-level leadership theory course. The assignment was designed to stimulate higher-level thinking, apply leadership theory to practice, and foster extensive communication among students in the online learning environment using a common learning…

  11. Stimulated emission of dark matter axion from condensed matter excitations

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoi, Naoto; Saitoh, Eiji

    2018-01-01

    We discuss a possible principle for detecting dark matter axions in galactic halos. If axions constitute a condensate in the Milky Way, stimulated emissions of the axions from a type of excitation in condensed matter can be detectable. We provide general mechanism for the dark matter emission, and, as a concrete example, an emission of dark matter axions from magnetic vortex strings in a type II superconductor is investigated along with possible experimental signatures.

  12. Brain plasticity, memory, and aging: a discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, E.L.; Rosenzweig, M.R.

    1977-12-01

    It is generally assumed that memory faculties decline with age. A discussion of the relationship of memory and aging and the possibility of retarding the potential decline is hampered by the fact that no satisfactory explanation of memory is available in either molecular or anatomical terms. However, this lack of description of memory does not mean that there is a lack of suggested mechanisms for long-term memory storage. Present theories of memory usually include first, neurophysiological or electrical events, followed by a series of chemical events which ultimately lead to long-lasting anatomical changes in the brain. Evidence is increasing for the biochemical and anatomical plasticity of the nervous system and its importance in the normal functioning of the brain. Modification of this plasticity may be an important factor in senescence. This discussion reports experiments which indicate that protein synthesis and anatomical changes may be involved in long-term memory storage. Environmental influences can produce quantitative differences in brain anatomy and in behavior. In experimental animals, enriched environments lead to more complex anatomical patterns than do colony or impoverished environments. This raises fundamental questions about the adequacy of the isolated animal which is frequently being used as a model for aging research. A more important applied question is the role of social and intellectual stimulation in influencing aging of the human brain.

  13. Group discussion improves lie detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Nadav; Epley, Nicholas

    2015-06-16

    Groups of individuals can sometimes make more accurate judgments than the average individual could make alone. We tested whether this group advantage extends to lie detection, an exceptionally challenging judgment with accuracy rates rarely exceeding chance. In four experiments, we find that groups are consistently more accurate than individuals in distinguishing truths from lies, an effect that comes primarily from an increased ability to correctly identify when a person is lying. These experiments demonstrate that the group advantage in lie detection comes through the process of group discussion, and is not a product of aggregating individual opinions (a "wisdom-of-crowds" effect) or of altering response biases (such as reducing the "truth bias"). Interventions to improve lie detection typically focus on improving individual judgment, a costly and generally ineffective endeavor. Our findings suggest a cheap and simple synergistic approach of enabling group discussion before rendering a judgment.

  14. MOTORIC STIMULATION RELATED TO FINE MOTORIC DEVELOPMENT ON CHILD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Triharini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Motor developmental stimulation is an activity undertaken to stimulate the children basic skills and so they can grow and develop optimally. Children who obtain a direct stimulus will grow faster than who get less stimulus. Mother’s behavior of stimulation is very important for children, it is considering as the basic needs of children and it must be fulfilled. Providing good stimulation could optimize fine motor development in children. The purpose of this study was to analyze mother’s behavior about motor stimulation with fine motor development in toddler age 4-5 years old. Method: Design have been  used in this study was cross sectional. Population were mothers and their toddler in Group A of Dharma Wanita Persatuan Driyorejo Gresik Preschool. Sample were 51 respondents recruited by using purposive sampling technique according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. The independent variable was mother’s behavior about motor stimulation whereas dependent variable was fine motor development in toddler. The data were collected using questionnaire and conducting observation on fine motor development based on Denver Development Screening Test (DDST. Data then analyzed using Spearman Rho (r test to find relation between mother’s behaviors about stimulation motor on their toddler fine motor development. Result: Results  of this study showed that there were correlations between mother’s knowledge and fine motor development in toddler (p=0.000, between mother’s attitude and fine motor development in toddler (p=0.000, and between mother’s actions and fine motor development in toddler (p=0.000. Analysis: In sort study found that there were relation between fine motor development and mother’s behavior. Discussion: Therefore mother’s behavior needed to be improved. Further research about stimulation motor and fine motor development aspects in toddler is required.

  15. Workplace Mobbing: A Discussion for Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    Workplace mobbing occurs in libraries but is usually unrecognized and unchecked because the phenomenon has not been described and given a name. This discussion provides the library profession with an overview but also with specific background details to assist with recognizing mobbing and preventing severe harm to employees and organizations.

  16. Human Relations. Discussion Topics and Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Marilyn; And Others

    Designed primarily for students in the intermediate grades, this document provides discussion topics, poetry, and activities to help students: (1) recognize the uniqueness of themselves and others; (2) become aware of their uniqueness as members of the human family; (3) become aware of individual differences, emotions, and feelings; (4) recognize…

  17. Structural Changes in Online Discussion Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yang; Medaglia, Rony

    2014-01-01

    Social networking platforms in China provide a hugely interesting and relevant source for understanding dynamics of online discussions in a unique socio-cultural and institutional environment. This paper investigates the evolution of patterns of similar-minded and different-minded interactions over...

  18. Non-invasive neural stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, William J.; Sanguinetti, Joseph L.; Fini, Maria; Hool, Nicholas

    2017-05-01

    Neurotechnologies for non-invasively interfacing with neural circuits have been evolving from those capable of sensing neural activity to those capable of restoring and enhancing human brain function. Generally referred to as non-invasive neural stimulation (NINS) methods, these neuromodulation approaches rely on electrical, magnetic, photonic, and acoustic or ultrasonic energy to influence nervous system activity, brain function, and behavior. Evidence that has been surmounting for decades shows that advanced neural engineering of NINS technologies will indeed transform the way humans treat diseases, interact with information, communicate, and learn. The physics underlying the ability of various NINS methods to modulate nervous system activity can be quite different from one another depending on the energy modality used as we briefly discuss. For members of commercial and defense industry sectors that have not traditionally engaged in neuroscience research and development, the science, engineering and technology required to advance NINS methods beyond the state-of-the-art presents tremendous opportunities. Within the past few years alone there have been large increases in global investments made by federal agencies, foundations, private investors and multinational corporations to develop advanced applications of NINS technologies. Driven by these efforts NINS methods and devices have recently been introduced to mass markets via the consumer electronics industry. Further, NINS continues to be explored in a growing number of defense applications focused on enhancing human dimensions. The present paper provides a brief introduction to the field of non-invasive neural stimulation by highlighting some of the more common methods in use or under current development today.

  19. Vagus nerve stimulation in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Adam D; Albu-Soda, Ahmed; Aziz, Qasim

    2016-11-02

    The diverse array of end organ innervations of the vagus nerve, coupled with increased basic science evidence, has led to vagus nerve stimulation becoming a management option in a number of clinical disorders. This review discusses methods of electrically stimulating the vagus nerve and its current and potential clinical uses.

  20. Do Veterinary Students See a Need for More In-Course Discussion? A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasch, Cindy; Haimerl, Peggy; Heuwieser, Wolfgang; Arlt, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Rather than merely transferring information, veterinary education should stimulate and motivate students and encourage them to think. Currently in veterinary education, most curricula use the method of frontal teaching (e.g., in lectures). A student-centered critical approach to information is rarely used. Our research sought to determine if students consider in-course discussion useful and if sufficient possibilities for discussion are provided and supported by their lecturers. In December 2013, we conducted a survey of fourth-year students. Specifically, we wanted to know if students consider in-course discussion about course content useful for successful learning and if students wish to have more opportunities for discussion during class time. Finally, we wanted to identify barriers that limit the students' motivation and ability to engage in discussion of course content. In total, 105 students completed the survey. The majority of students agreed or strongly agreed that clinical topics should be discussed during class time. Frequently stated reasons were improved learning (85.7%) and the opportunity to look at topics from different perspectives (92.4%). In conclusion, we found a considerable dearth of and request for discussion within veterinary education. In light of these findings, we emphasize the need for new teaching strategies that promote independent thinking and critical questioning. We suggest the implementation of more discussion opportunities in well considered and moderated settings in veterinary teaching.

  1. Responses evoked by a vestibular implant providing chronic stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson L.A.; Haburcakova C.; Gong W; Lee D.J.; Wall Iii C.; Merfeld D.M.; Lewis R.F.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with bilateral vestibular loss experience dehabilitating visual, perceptual, and postural difficulties, and an implantable vestibular prosthesis that could improve these symptoms would be of great benefit to these patients. In previous work, we have shown that a one-dimensional, unilateral canal prosthesis can improve the vestibulooccular reflex (VOR) in canal-plugged squirrel monkeys. In addition to the VOR, the potential effects of a vestibular prosthesis on more complex, highly in...

  2. COINCO Strategy 2025 - Discussion Paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Per Homann; Jensen, Anne; Stroschein, Christoph

     The regions and cities in the COINCO-corridor Oslo-Göteborg-Malmö-Copenhagen-Berlin have worked out a strategy proposal which is presented in this discussion paper. Behind the strategy is a political will to utilize mutual strengths and together become a leading player in a globalized world, based...... on common cultural, social and environmental values. The strategy comprises of a vision and more detailed aims and actions within three different areas: Corridor infrastructure, Innovation and Cooperation. In this way, the COINCO partners want to establish a political platform for transborder collaboration...... companies in the corridor, attracting innovative international companies, and supporting the creation of new knowledge intensive businesses is thus at the core of the strategy. New areas of collaboration will have to be identified systematically. Cooperation among COINCO businesses have...

  3. Discussing epigenetics in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    With the goal of discussing how epigenetic control and chromatin remodeling contribute to the various processes that lead to cellular plasticity and disease, this symposium marks the collaboration between the Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) in France and the University of California, Irvine (UCI). Organized by Paolo Sassone-Corsi (UCI) and held at the Beckman Center of the National Academy of Sciences at the UCI campus December 15–16, 2011, this was the first of a series of international conferences on epigenetics dedicated to the scientific community in Southern California. The meeting also served as the official kick off for the newly formed Center for Epigenetics and Metabolism at the School of Medicine, UCI (http://cem.igb.uci.edu). PMID:22414797

  4. To discuss illicit nuclear trafficking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balatsky, Galya I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Severe, William R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wallace, Richard K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The Illicit nuclear trafficking panel was conducted at the 4th Annual INMM workshop on Reducing the Risk from Radioactive and Nuclear Materials on February 2-3, 2010 in Washington DC. While the workshop occurred prior to the Nuclear Security Summit, April 12-13 2010 in Washington DC, some of the summit issues were raised during the workshop. The Communique of the Washington Nuclear Security Summit stated that 'Nuclear terrorism is one of the most challenging threats to international security, and strong nuclear security measures are the most effective means to prevent terrorists, criminals, or other unauthorized actors from acquiring nuclear materials.' The Illicit Trafficking panel is one means to strengthen nuclear security and cooperation at bilateral, regional and multilateral levels. Such a panel promotes nuclear security culture through technology development, human resources development, education and training. It is a tool which stresses the importance of international cooperation and coordination of assistance to improve efforts to prevent and respond to incidents of illicit nuclear trafficking. Illicit trafficking panel included representatives from US government, an international organization (IAEA), private industry and a non-governmental organization to discuss illicit nuclear trafficking issues. The focus of discussions was on best practices and challenges for addressing illicit nuclear trafficking. Terrorism connection. Workshop discussions pointed out the identification of terrorist connections with several trafficking incidents. Several trafficking cases involved real buyers (as opposed to undercover law enforcement agents) and there have been reports identifying individuals associated with terrorist organizations as prospective plutonium buyers. Some specific groups have been identified that consistently search for materials to buy on the black market, but no criminal groups were identified that specialize in nuclear materials or isotope

  5. Discussion on selected symbiotic stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viotti, Roberto; Hack, Margherita

    1993-01-01

    Because of its large variety of aspects, the symbiotic phenomenon is not very suitable for a statistical treatment. It is also not clear whether symbiotic stars really represent a homogeneous group of astrophysical objects or a collection of objects of different natures but showing similar phenomena. However we are especially interested in the symbiotic phenomenon, i.e., in those physical processes occurring in the atmosphere of each individual object and in their time dependence. Such a research can be performed through the detailed analysis of individual objects. This study should be done for a time long enough to cover all the different phases of their activity, in all the spectral ranges. Since the typical time scale of the symbiotic phenomena is up to several years and decades, this represents a problem since, for instance, making astronomy outside the visual region is a quite new field of research. It was a fortunate case that a few symbiotic stars (Z And, AG Dra, CH Cyg, AX Per, and PU Vul) had undergone remarkable light variations (or 'outbursts') in recent years, which could have been followed in the space ultraviolet with IUE, and simultaneously in the optical and IR with ground-based telescopes. But, in general, the time coverage of most of the symbiotic objects is too short to have a complete picture of their behavior. In this regard, one should recall Mayall's remark about the light curve of Z And: 'Z Andromedae is another variable that shows it will require several hundred years of observations before a good analysis can be made of its variations'. This pessimistic remark should be considered as a note of caution for those involved in the interpretation of the observations. We shall discuss a number of individual symbiotic stars for which the amount of observational data is large enough to draw a rather complete picture of their general behavior and to make consistent models. We shall especially illustrate the necessary steps toward an empirical model

  6. Perspective: Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage: The status after 25 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Klaas; Vitanov, Nikolay V.; Shore, Bruce W.

    2015-05-01

    The first presentation of the STIRAP (stimulated Raman adiabatic passage) technique with proper theoretical foundation and convincing experimental data appeared 25 years ago, in the May 1st, 1990 issue of The Journal of Chemical Physics. By now, the STIRAP concept has been successfully applied in many different fields of physics, chemistry, and beyond. In this article, we comment briefly on the initial motivation of the work, namely, the study of reaction dynamics of vibrationally excited small molecules, and how this initial idea led to the documented success. We proceed by providing a brief discussion of the physics of STIRAP and how the method was developed over the years, before discussing a few examples from the amazingly wide range of applications which STIRAP now enjoys, with the aim to stimulate further use of the concept. Finally, we mention some promising future directions.

  7. Muscle coordination: the discussion continues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prilutsky

    2000-01-01

    In this response, the major criticisms of the target article are addressed. Terminology from the target article that may have caused some confusion is clarified. In particular, the tasks that have the basic features of muscle coordination, as identified in the target article, have been limited in scope. A new metabolic optimization criterion suggested by Alexander (2000) is examined for its ability to predict muscle coordination in walking. Issues concerning the validation of muscle force predictions, the rules of muscle coordination, and the role of directional constraints in coordination of two-joint muscles are discussed. It is shown in particular that even in one-joint systems, the forces predicted by the criterion of Crowninshield and Brand (1981) depend upon the muscle moment arms and the physiological cross-sectional areas in much more complex ways than either previously assumed in the target article, or incorrectly derived by Herzog and Ait-Haddou (2000). It is concluded that the criterion of Crowninshield and Brand qualitatively predicts the basic coordination features of the major one- and two-joint muscles in a number of highly skilled, repetitive motor tasks performed by humans under predictable conditions and little demands on stability and accuracy. A possible functional significance of such muscle coordination may be the minimization of perceived effort, muscle fatigue, and/or energy expenditure.

  8. Sport Management Taught On-Line: A Discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William F. Stier Jr

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An introduction to the world of on-line courses (distance education/learning is presented. In addition, the world of on-line learning, as it pertains to sport management, is examined within the framework of (a pedagogy, (b finances,(c assessment, and (d choosing to transition from the traditional classroom to on-line learning. Pertinent points relative to each of the four categories are presented from the literature. In an effort to stimulate thought and discussion to the subject of on-line learning for sport management programs/courses the authors provide their reactions to the literature points by presenting their comments/reactions from a sport management perspective. Sport management professors and administrators are encouraged to critically examine the feasibility of such on-line courses (distance education/learning within their own curricula while maintaining an appropriate framework revolving around sound theoretical instructional strategies, methods as well as appropriate use of instructional tools, including but not limited to, computersand the WWW.

  9. Non-Invasive Electrical Brain Stimulation Montages for Modulation of Human Motor Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curado, Marco; Fritsch, Brita; Reis, Janine

    2016-02-04

    Non-invasive electrical brain stimulation (NEBS) is used to modulate brain function and behavior, both for research and clinical purposes. In particular, NEBS can be applied transcranially either as direct current stimulation (tDCS) or alternating current stimulation (tACS). These stimulation types exert time-, dose- and in the case of tDCS polarity-specific effects on motor function and skill learning in healthy subjects. Lately, tDCS has been used to augment the therapy of motor disabilities in patients with stroke or movement disorders. This article provides a step-by-step protocol for targeting the primary motor cortex with tDCS and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS), a specific form of tACS using an electrical current applied randomly within a pre-defined frequency range. The setup of two different stimulation montages is explained. In both montages the emitting electrode (the anode for tDCS) is placed on the primary motor cortex of interest. For unilateral motor cortex stimulation the receiving electrode is placed on the contralateral forehead while for bilateral motor cortex stimulation the receiving electrode is placed on the opposite primary motor cortex. The advantages and disadvantages of each montage for the modulation of cortical excitability and motor function including learning are discussed, as well as safety, tolerability and blinding aspects.

  10. Shaping virtual companies: a brief discussion

    OpenAIRE

    Yousef Ibrahim Daradkeh; Postica. Doru; Luis. B. Gouveia

    2016-01-01

    This work proposes to discuss the emerging virtual enterprise and information management as being two combined issues that requires attention within a knowledge based economy context. We defend that he virtual enterprise as regarded from both the management level and the executive level, must incorporate proficient software and hardware in order to provide the best digital support possible. Also, the virtual company as it is presented and understood, is in fact a transitional form towards a b...

  11. Bruxism: Conceptual discussion and review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, R. V.; Rangarajan, Priyadarshni; Mounissamy, Anjana

    2015-01-01

    Bruxism is commonly considered a detrimental motor activity, potentially causing overload of the stomatognathic structures. The etiology of bruxism is unclear, but the condition has been associated with stress, occlusal disorders, allergies and sleep positioning. Due to its nonspecific pathology, bruxism may be difficult to diagnose. Unfortunately, very little data exists on the subject of a cause-and-effect relationship of bruxism to the point that expert opinions and cautionary approaches are still considered the best available sources for suggesting good practice indicators. The present paper reviewed current concepts on bruxism, etiology, diagnosis and management, underlining its effects on dental structures in an attempt to provide clinically useful suggestions based on scientifically sound data. PMID:26015729

  12. Bruxism: Conceptual discussion and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R V Murali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bruxism is commonly considered a detrimental motor activity, potentially causing overload of the stomatognathic structures. The etiology of bruxism is unclear, but the condition has been associated with stress, occlusal disorders, allergies and sleep positioning. Due to its nonspecific pathology, bruxism may be difficult to diagnose. Unfortunately, very little data exists on the subject of a cause-and-effect relationship of bruxism to the point that expert opinions and cautionary approaches are still considered the best available sources for suggesting good practice indicators. The present paper reviewed current concepts on bruxism, etiology, diagnosis and management, underlining its effects on dental structures in an attempt to provide clinically useful suggestions based on scientifically sound data.

  13. Spinal cord stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007560.htm Spinal cord stimulation To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Spinal cord stimulation is a treatment for pain that uses a ...

  14. Feldspar, Infrared Stimulated Luminescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank

    2014-01-01

    This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars.......This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars....

  15. [Early stimulation > programs evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnier, C

    2007-09-01

    Early intervention include educational and neuroprotection strategies. Early educational strategies are based on the cerebral plasticity concept. Neuroprotection, initially reserved for molecules preventing cell death phenomena, can be extended now to all actions promoting harmonious development and preventing handicaps, and include organisational, therapeutic and environmental aspects. Early stimulation programs have been first devised in United States for vulnerable children who belong to an unfavorable socio-economic category ; positive effects were recorded in school failure rates and social problems ; programs have also been launched in several countries for premature infants and infants with a low birth weight, population exposed to a high risk of deficiencies. The programs are targetted either to the child, or to the parents, or combined to provide assistance for both the child and the parents. The programs given the best evaluation are NIDCAP Program in Sweden (Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program), intended for babies neonatal intensive care units, then a longitudinal, multisite program, known as IHDP (Infant Health and Development Program). It was launched in United States for infants stimulation is maintained and when mothers have a low level of education.

  16. Stimulated coherent transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung-chi Lihn

    1996-03-01

    Coherent radiation emitted from a relativistic electron bunch consists of wavelengths longer than or comparable to the bunch length. The intensity of this radiation out-numbers that of its incoherent counterpart, which extends to wavelengths shorter than the bunch length, by a factor equal to the number of electrons in the bunch. In typical accelerators, this factor is about 8 to 11 orders of magnitude. The spectrum of the coherent radiation is determined by the Fourier transform of the electron bunch distribution and, therefore, contains information of the bunch distribution. Coherent transition radiation emitted from subpicosecond electron bunches at the Stanford SUNSHINE facility is observed in the far-infrared regime through a room-temperature pyroelectric bolometer and characterized through the electron bunch-length study. To measure the bunch length, a new frequency-resolved subpicosecond bunch-length measuring system is developed. This system uses a far-infrared Michelson interferometer to measure the spectrum of coherent transition radiation through optical autocorrelation with resolution far better than existing time-resolved methods. Hence, the radiation spectrum and the bunch length are deduced from the autocorrelation measurement. To study the stimulation of coherent transition radiation, a special cavity named BRAICER is invented. Far-infrared light pulses of coherent transition radiation emitted from electron bunches are delayed and circulated in the cavity to coincide with subsequent incoming electron bunches. This coincidence of light pulses with electron bunches enables the light to do work on electrons, and thus stimulates more radiated energy. The possibilities of extending the bunch-length measuring system to measure the three-dimensional bunch distribution and making the BRAICER cavity a broadband, high-intensity, coherent, far-infrared light source are also discussed.

  17. Brain Stimulation in Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salling, Michael C; Martinez, Diana

    2016-11-01

    Localized stimulation of the human brain to treat neuropsychiatric disorders has been in place for over 20 years. Although these methods have been used to a greater extent for mood and movement disorders, recent work has explored brain stimulation methods as potential treatments for addiction. The rationale behind stimulation therapy in addiction involves reestablishing normal brain function in target regions in an effort to dampen addictive behaviors. In this review, we present the rationale and studies investigating brain stimulation in addiction, including transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, and deep brain stimulation. Overall, these studies indicate that brain stimulation has an acute effect on craving for drugs and alcohol, but few studies have investigated the effect of brain stimulation on actual drug and alcohol use or relapse. Stimulation therapies may achieve their effect through direct or indirect modulation of brain regions involved in addiction, either acutely or through plastic changes in neuronal transmission. Although these mechanisms are not well understood, further identification of the underlying neurobiology of addiction and rigorous evaluation of brain stimulation methods has the potential for unlocking an effective, long-term treatment of addiction.

  18. Reducing Prejudice Through Brain Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellaro, Roberta; Derks, Belle; Nitsche, Michael A; Hommel, Bernhard; van den Wildenberg, Wery P M; van Dam, Kristina; Colzato, Lorenza S

    2015-01-01

    Social categorization and group identification are essential ingredients for maintaining a positive self-image that often lead to negative, implicit stereotypes toward members of an out-group. The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) may be a critical component in counteracting stereotypes activation. Here, we assessed the causal role of the mPFC in these processes by non-invasive brain stimulation via transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Participants (n = 60) were randomly and equally assigned to receive anodal, cathodal, or sham stimulation over the mPFC while performing an Implicit Association Test (IAT): They were instructed to categorize in-group and out-group names and positive and negative attributes. Anodal excitability-enhancing stimulation decreased implicit biased attitudes toward out-group members compared to excitability-diminishing cathodal and sham stimulation. These results provide evidence for a critical role of the mPFC in counteracting stereotypes activation. Furthermore, our results are consistent with previous findings showing that increasing cognitive control may overcome negative bias toward members of social out-groups. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Discussing Ethical Issues in the Classroom: Leveraging Pedagogical Moments that May Otherwise Undermine Important Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Douglas J.; Hull, William J., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The authors identify, examine, and clarify three kinds of hindrances (dismissive/evasive tactics, logical stoppers, and ad hominem arguments) to teaching about ethical issues in P-12 schools. In discussing these three types of obstacles, they stress that the barriers themselves provide both challenges and opportunities for teachers. Indeed, they…

  20. Practice nurses mental health provide space to patients to discuss unpleasant emotions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griep, E.C.; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, S. van

    2016-01-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: A core skill of practice nurses' mental health is to recognize and explore patients' unpleasant emotions. Patients rarely express their unpleasant emotions directly and spontaneously, but instead give indirect signs that something is worrying them. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS

  1. Practice nurses mental health provide space to patients to discuss unpleasant emotions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griep, E.C.M.; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, A.M. van

    2016-01-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? A core skill of practice nurses' mental health is to recognize and explore patients' unpleasant emotions. Patients rarely express their unpleasant emotions directly and spontaneously, but instead give indirect signs that something is worrying them.

  2. A high voltage, constant current stimulator for electrocutaneous stimulation through small electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletto, C J; Van Doren, C L

    1999-08-01

    A high-voltage stimulator has been designed to allow transcutaneous stimulation of tactile fibers of the fingertip. The stimulator's output stage was based upon an improved Howland current pump topology, modified to allow high load impedances and small currents. The compliance voltage of approximately 800 V is achieved using commercially available high-voltage operational amplifiers. The output current accuracy is better than +/- 5% over the range of 1 to 25 mA for 30 microseconds or longer pulses. The rise time for square pulses is less than 1 microsecond. High-voltage, common-mode, latch-up power supply problems and solutions are discussed. The stimulator's input stage is optically coupled to the controlling computer and complies with applicable safety standards for use in a hospital environment. The design presented here is for monophasic stimulation only, but could be modified for biphasic stimulation.

  3. Case-based discussion: perceptions of feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanaruban, Aruchuna; Flanders, Lucy; Rees, Huw

    2017-04-12

    Over recent years there has been a trend towards developing high-quality assessments to assess a doctor's performance in the workplace. Case-based discussion (CbD) is a form of workplace-based assessment that has the potential to provide feedback to trainees on their performance or management of a specific case. The aim of this study was to explore how CbDs are perceived and implemented in practice amongst a UK cohort of medical trainees. This study involved 78 medical trainees at a UK hospital completing a questionnaire rating their last CbD experience, including the duration spent receiving feedback, whether it was pre-planned or ad hoc and how they responded to the feedback received. Focus groups were conducted involving 12 trainees to discuss common themes on feedback arising from the questionnaire, and thematic analysis was carried out following these discussions. Only 19 per cent of assessments were pre-planned and the average duration of assessments was 6-10 minutes, with feedback lasting less than 5 minutes. A total of 76 per cent of trainees responded to the feedback they received by completing self-directed learning or by addressing the specific action points arising from the feedback. The focus groups highlighted the barriers to incorporating these assessments into everyday practice, including appreciating the time constraints and the importance of trainer engagement in the assessment process. The aim of this study was to explore how CbDs are perceived and implemented in practice CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that most trainees appreciate the educational value of CbDs, but more emphasis and training is required in planning these assessments and in providing feedback that is both specific and actionable. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  4. Turning Lurkers into Learners: Increasing Participation in Your Online Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, Jason; Greenhaus, Karen

    2007-01-01

    Communication and discussion are keys to student learning and understanding in online environments. With more teachers and K-12 school systems adopting course management tools such as Blackboard and SharePoint, online discussion has become another means of engaging students in curriculum-based learning. Online discussions provide opportunities for…

  5. Intravaginal stimulation randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J J

    1996-01-01

    The effectiveness of intravaginal electrical stimulation was compared to standard therapy in the treatment of genuine stress urinary incontinence and detrusor instability. A total of 57 women with urinary incontinence was evaluated with video urodynamics and voiding diaries before and after treatment. Of the women 18 with stress urinary incontinence were randomized to electrical stimulation or Kegel exercise and 38 with detrusor instability were randomized to anticholinergic therapy or electrical stimulation. Of patients using electrical stimulation in the stress urinary incontinence group 66% improved and 72% of the patients with detrusor instability treated with electrical stimulation improved. These rates were not statistically significant when compared to traditional therapy. Electrical stimulation is safe and at least as effective as properly performed Kegel and anticholinergic therapy in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence and detrusor instability.

  6. Twiddler's syndrome in spinal cord stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mahfoudh, Rafid; Chan, Yuen; Chong, Hsu Pheen; Farah, Jibril Osman

    2016-01-01

    The aims are to present a case series of Twiddler's syndrome in spinal cord stimulators with analysis of the possible mechanism of this syndrome and discuss how this phenomenon can be prevented. Data were collected retrospectively between 2007 and 2013 for all patients presenting with failure of spinal cord stimulators. The diagnostic criterion for Twiddler's syndrome is radiological evidence of twisting of wires in the presence of failure of spinal cord stimulation. Our unit implants on average 110 spinal cord stimulators a year. Over the 5-year study period, all consecutive cases of spinal cord stimulation failure were studied. Three patients with Twiddler's syndrome were identified. Presentation ranged from 4 to 228 weeks after implantation. Imaging revealed repeated rotations and twisting of the wires of the spinal cord stimulators leading to hardware failure. To the best of our knowledge this is the first reported series of Twiddler's syndrome with implantable pulse generators (IPGs) for spinal cord stimulation. Hardware failure is not uncommon in spinal cord stimulation. Awareness and identification of Twiddler's syndrome may help prevent its occurrence and further revisions. This may be achieved by implanting the IPG in the lumbar region subcutaneously above the belt line. Psychological intervention may have a preventative role for those who are deemed at high risk of Twiddler's syndrome from initial psychological screening.

  7. Nanotechnology for Stimulating Osteoprogenitor Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, A.; Bulstrode, N.W.; Whitaker, I.S.; Eastwood, D.M.; Dunaway, D.; Ferretti, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bone is the second most transplanted tissue and due to its complex structure, metabolic demands and various functions, current reconstructive options such as foreign body implants and autologous tissue transfer are limited in their ability to restore defects. Most tissue engineering approaches target osteoinduction of osteoprogenitor cells by modifying the extracellular environment, using scaffolds or targeting intracellular signaling mechanisms or commonly a combination of all of these. Whilst there is no consensus as to what is the optimal cell type or approach, nanotechnology has been proposed as a powerful tool to manipulate the biomolecular and physical environment to direct osteoprogenitor cells to induce bone formation. Methods: Review of the published literature was undertaken to provide an overview of the use of nanotechnology to control osteoprogenitor differentiation and discuss the most recent developments, limitations and future directions. Results: Nanotechnology can be used to stimulate osteoprogenitor differentiation in a variety of way. We have principally classified research into nanotechnology for bone tissue engineering as generating biomimetic scaffolds, a vector to deliver genes or growth factors to cells or to alter the biophysical environment. A number of studies have shown promising results with regards to directing ostroprogenitor cell differentiation although limitations include a lack of in vivo data and incomplete characterization of engineered bone. Conclusion: There is increasing evidence that nanotechnology can be used to direct the fate of osteoprogenitor and promote bone formation. Further analysis of the functional properties and long term survival in animal models is required to assess the maturity and clinical potential of this. PMID:28217210

  8. Anaesthesia and deep brain stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barkha Bindu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS is becoming an increasingly popular minimally invasive surgical procedure for various movement disorders, especially Parkinson′s disease. Different nuclei have been identified depending on patients′ symptoms, but the success or failure of the procedure depends on various other factors such as proper patient selection and risk-benefit analysis. While various techniques of anaesthesia including monitored anaesthesia care, conscious sedation and general anaesthesia are being used routinely, no clear-cut evidence exists as to the best technique for this procedure. This review article discusses the surgical procedure of DBS, devices currently available, perioperative anaesthetic concerns and techniques, effect of anaesthetic drugs on microelectrode recordings and macro-stimulation and associated complications.

  9. The Development of a Discussion Rubric for Online Courses: Standardizing Expectations of Graduate Students in Online Scholarly Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, Vanessa L.; Freedman, Debra; Siebert, Cathy J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the design and evaluation of a rubric for assessing discussions in online graduate level education courses. The aims of the research were twofold. The first goal was to develop a discussion rubric that provides guidance to graduate students participating in online courses that are heavily discussion based. The second goal was…

  10. Vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cortical spreading depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Pin; Ay, Ilknur; de Morais, Andreia Lopes; Qin, Tao; Zheng, Yi; Sadeghian, Homa; Oka, Fumiaki; Simon, Bruce; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Ayata, Cenk

    2016-04-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation has recently been reported to improve symptoms of migraine. Cortical spreading depression is the electrophysiological event underlying migraine aura and is a trigger for headache. We tested whether vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cortical spreading depression to explain its antimigraine effect. Unilateral vagus nerve stimulation was delivered either noninvasively through the skin or directly by electrodes placed around the nerve. Systemic physiology was monitored throughout the study. Both noninvasive transcutaneous and invasive direct vagus nerve stimulations significantly suppressed spreading depression susceptibility in the occipital cortex in rats. The electrical stimulation threshold to evoke a spreading depression was elevated by more than 2-fold, the frequency of spreading depressions during continuous topical 1 M KCl was reduced by ∼40%, and propagation speed of spreading depression was reduced by ∼15%. This effect developed within 30 minutes after vagus nerve stimulation and persisted for more than 3 hours. Noninvasive transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation was as efficacious as direct invasive vagus nerve stimulation, and the efficacy did not differ between the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres. Our findings provide a potential mechanism by which vagus nerve stimulation may be efficacious in migraine and suggest that susceptibility to spreading depression is a suitable platform to optimize its efficacy.

  11. Neural adaptations to electrical stimulation strength training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hortobagyi, Tibor; Maffiuletti, Nicola A.

    2011-01-01

    This review provides evidence for the hypothesis that electrostimulation strength training (EST) increases the force of a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) through neural adaptations in healthy skeletal muscle. Although electrical stimulation and voluntary effort activate muscle differently, there

  12. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Modulates Efficiency of Reading Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny eThomson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a neuromodulatory technique that offers promise as an investigative method for understanding complex cognitive operations such as reading. This study explores the ability of a single session of tDCS to modulate reading efficiency and phonological processing performance within a group of healthy adults. Half the group received anodal or cathodal stimulation, on two separate days, of the left temporo-parietal junction while the other half received anodal or cathodal stimulation of the right homologue area. Pre- and post-stimulation assessment of reading efficiency and phonological processing was carried out. A larger pre-post difference in reading efficiency was found for participants who received right anodal stimulation compared to participants who received left anodal stimulation. Further, there was a significant post-stimulation increase in phonological processing speed following right hemisphere anodal stimulation. Implications for models of reading and reading impairment are discussed.

  13. Transcranial direct current stimulation modulates efficiency of reading processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Jennifer M; Doruk, Deniz; Mascio, Bryan; Fregni, Felipe; Cerruti, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a neuromodulatory technique that offers promise as an investigative method for understanding complex cognitive operations such as reading. This study explores the ability of a single session of tDCS to modulate reading efficiency and phonological processing performance within a group of healthy adults. Half the group received anodal or cathodal stimulation, on two separate days, of the left temporo-parietal junction while the other half received anodal or cathodal stimulation of the right homologue area. Pre- and post-stimulation assessment of reading efficiency and phonological processing was carried out. A larger pre-post difference in reading efficiency was found for participants who received right anodal stimulation compared to participants who received left anodal stimulation. Further, there was a significant post-stimulation increase in phonological processing speed following right hemisphere anodal stimulation. Implications for models of reading and reading impairment are discussed.

  14. Best friends' discussions of social dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kristina L; Malti, Tina; Killen, Melanie; Rubin, Kenneth H

    2014-02-01

    Peer relationships, particularly friendships, have been theorized to contribute to how children and adolescents think about social and moral issues. The current study examined how young adolescent best friends (191 dyads; 53.4% female) reason together about multifaceted social dilemmas and how their reasoning is related to friendship quality. Mutually-recognized friendship dyads were videotaped discussing dilemmas entailing moral, social-conventional and prudential/pragmatic issues. Both dyad members completed a self-report measure of friendship quality. Dyadic data analyses guided by the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model indicated that adolescent and friend reports of friendship qualities were related to the forms of reasoning used during discussion. Friends who both reported that they could resolve conflicts in a constructive way were more likely to use moral reasoning than friends who reported that their conflict resolution was poor or disagreed on the quality of their conflict resolution. The findings provide evidence for the important role that friendship interaction may play in adolescents' social and moral development.

  15. Best Friends’ Discussions of Social Dilemmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kristina L.; Malti, Tina; Killen, Melanie; Rubin, Kenneth H.

    2013-01-01

    Peer relationships, particularly friendships, have been theorized to contribute to how children and adolescents think about social and moral issues. The current study examined how young adolescent best friends (191 dyads; 53.4% female) reason together about multifaceted social dilemmas and how their reasoning is related to friendship quality. Mutually-recognized friendship dyads were videotaped discussing dilemmas entailing moral, social-conventional and prudential/pragmatic issues. Both dyad members completed a self-report measure of friendship quality. Dyadic data analyses guided by the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model indicated that adolescent and friend's reports of friendship qualities were related to the forms of reasoning used during discussion. Friends who both reported that they could resolve conflicts in a constructive way were more likely to use moral reasoning than friends who reported that their conflict resolution was poor or disagreed on the quality of their conflict resolution. The findings provide evidence for the important role that friendship interaction may play in adolescents’ social and moral development. PMID:23666555

  16. Is rational discussion of open access possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick Anderson

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Open Access (OA, like any other model or strategy for the dissemination of knowledge, carries with it clear benefits as well as costs and downsides. These vary depending on the OA strategy in question, and in order for OA to bring maximum benefit to the world of scholarship, its costs and benefits need be examined carefully and dispassionately so that the former can be maximized and the latter minimized. Unfortunately, the OA advocacy community tends to resist all attempts to examine OA in this way, to the point that those who approach OA in a spirit of critical analysis (rather than celebration and evangelism are attacked and punished. This article describes the problem, provides examples of it, and proposes strategies for promoting a more rigorous and analytical discussion of OA.

  17. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Garvey, Marjorie A.; Mall, Volker

    2008-01-01

    Developmental disabilities (e.g. attention deficit disorder; cerebral palsy) are frequently associated with deviations of the typical pattern of motor skill maturation. Neurophysiologic tools, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which probe motor cortex function, can potentially provide insights into both typical neuromotor maturation and the mechanisms underlying the motor skill deficits in children with developmental disabilities. These insights may set the stage for finding ef...

  18. Cognitive stimulation in healthy older adults: a cognitive stimulation program using leisure activities compared to a conventional cognitive stimulation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaud, Élisabeth; Taconnat, Laurence; Clarys, David

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare two methods of cognitive stimulation for the cognitive functions. The first method used an usual approach, the second used leisure activities in order to assess their benefits on cognitive functions (speed of processing; working memory capacity and executive functions) and psychoaffective measures (memory span and self esteem). 67 participants over 60 years old took part in the experiment. They were divided into three groups: 1 group followed a program of conventional cognitive stimulation, 1 group a program of cognitive stimulation using leisure activities and 1 control group. The different measures have been evaluated before and after the training program. Results show that the cognitive stimulation program using leisure activities is as effective on memory span, updating and memory self-perception as the program using conventional cognitive stimulation, and more effective on self-esteem than the conventional program. There is no difference between the two stimulated groups and the control group on speed of processing. Neither of the two cognitive stimulation programs provides a benefit over shifting and inhibition. These results indicate that it seems to be possible to enhance working memory and to observe far transfer benefits over self-perception (self-esteem and memory self-perception) when using leisure activities as a tool for cognitive stimulation.

  19. 21 CFR 882.5860 - Implanted neuromuscular stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted neuromuscular stimulator. 882.5860... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5860 Implanted neuromuscular stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted neuromuscular stimulator is a device that provides...

  20. Somatosensory Event-related Potentials from Orofacial Skin Stretch Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takayuki; Ostry, David J; Gracco, Vincent L

    2015-12-18

    Cortical processing associated with orofacial somatosensory function in speech has received limited experimental attention due to the difficulty of providing precise and controlled stimulation. This article introduces a technique for recording somatosensory event-related potentials (ERP) that uses a novel mechanical stimulation method involving skin deformation using a robotic device. Controlled deformation of the facial skin is used to modulate kinesthetic inputs through excitation of cutaneous mechanoreceptors. By combining somatosensory stimulation with electroencephalographic recording, somatosensory evoked responses can be successfully measured at the level of the cortex. Somatosensory stimulation can be combined with the stimulation of other sensory modalities to assess multisensory interactions. For speech, orofacial stimulation is combined with speech sound stimulation to assess the contribution of multi-sensory processing including the effects of timing differences. The ability to precisely control orofacial somatosensory stimulation during speech perception and speech production with ERP recording is an important tool that provides new insight into the neural organization and neural representations for speech.

  1. What HERA May Provide?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hannes; /DESY; De Roeck, Albert; /CERN; Bartels, Jochen; /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II; Behnke, Olaf; Blumlein, Johannes; /DESY; Brodsky, Stanley; /SLAC /Durham U., IPPP; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; /Oxford U.; Deak, Michal; /DESY; Devenish, Robin; /Oxford U.; Diehl, Markus; /DESY; Gehrmann, Thomas; /Zurich U.; Grindhammer, Guenter; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Gustafson, Gosta; /CERN /Lund U., Dept. Theor. Phys.; Khoze, Valery; /Durham U., IPPP; Knutsson, Albert; /DESY; Klein, Max; /Liverpool U.; Krauss, Frank; /Durham U., IPPP; Kutak, Krzysztof; /DESY; Laenen, Eric; /NIKHEF, Amsterdam; Lonnblad, Leif; /Lund U., Dept. Theor. Phys.; Motyka, Leszek; /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II /Birmingham U. /Southern Methodist U. /DESY /Piemonte Orientale U., Novara /CERN /Paris, LPTHE /Hamburg U. /Penn State U.

    2011-11-10

    More than 100 people participated in a discussion session at the DIS08 workshop on the topic What HERA may provide. A summary of the discussion with a structured outlook and list of desirable measurements and theory calculations is given. The HERA accelerator and the HERA experiments H1, HERMES and ZEUS stopped running in the end of June 2007. This was after 15 years of very successful operation since the first collisions in 1992. A total luminosity of {approx} 500 pb{sup -1} has been accumulated by each of the collider experiments H1 and ZEUS. During the years the increasingly better understood and upgraded detectors and HERA accelerator have contributed significantly to this success. The physics program remains in full swing and plenty of new results were presented at DIS08 which are approaching the anticipated final precision, fulfilling and exceeding the physics plans and the previsions of the upgrade program. Most of the analyses presented at DIS08 were still based on the so called HERA I data sample, i.e. data taken until 2000, before the shutdown for the luminosity upgrade. This sample has an integrated luminosity of {approx} 100 pb{sup -1}, and the four times larger statistics sample from HERA II is still in the process of being analyzed.

  2. Changing attitudes and behaviour by means of providing information. A study on private car use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tertoolen, G.; Verstraten, E.C.H. [Section of Social and Organizational Psychology, University of Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    In a field experiment the authors attempted to stimulate car users to come to a more selective use of their vehicle by means of providing information and feedback about different negative consequences of their car use. Attitude change was observed but the experimental treatments did not lead to behavioural changes. Attempts to influence car use arouse psychological resistance. Therefore, effects opposite to those intended occurred. We discuss the possible implications of the results for policy-making. 1 fig., 2 refs.

  3. Avoiding Internal Capsule Stimulation With a New Eight-Channel Steering Deep Brain Stimulation Lead

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Kees J.; Verhagen, Rens; Bour, Lo J.; Heida, Ciska; Veltink, Peter H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Novel deep brain stimulation (DBS) lead designs are currently entering the market, which are hypothesized to provide a way to steer the stimulation field away from neural populations responsible for side effects and towards populations responsible for beneficial effects. The objective of

  4. Avoiding Internal Capsule Stimulation With a New Eight-Channel Steering Deep Brain Stimulation Lead

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Kees J.; Verhagen, Rens; Bour, Lo J.; Heida, Ciska; Veltink, Peter H.

    2017-01-01

    Novel deep brain stimulation (DBS) lead designs are currently entering the market, which are hypothesized to provide a way to steer the stimulation field away from neural populations responsible for side effects and towards populations responsible for beneficial effects. The objective of this study

  5. An Internet-based discussion forum as a useful resource for the discussion of clinical cases and an educational tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foong Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: An Internet-based group of plastic surgeons was formed in India in February 2001. It has 1290 members and seeks to facilitate online discussion. These discussions were reviewed to assess their value in education and aiding patient management. Materials and Methods: All messages and discussions between August 2007 and July 2008 were examined retrospectively. Data were collected regarding topics, replies, and use of clinical images. Results: A total of 2217 messages were exchanged within 330 separate discussions (mean = 6.7 messages per discussion, range = 0-45. A total of 164 discussions contained photographs (50%. Mean number of photographs per discussion was five (range = 0-34. Discussions included requests for advice on complex cases (40%, interesting cases and their management/outcome (25% and courses/conferences (30%. Topics discussed include training/courses (26.7%, cleft (15.4%, aesthetics (13.1%, trauma (12.5%, head and neck (8.4%, cutaneous (6.4%, perineal/genital reconstruction (6.1%, and scar management (4.7%. Discussion: Forums like this facilitate discussion between individuals in remote locations. They provide easy access to the expertise of a large cohort of highly experienced surgeons. Most discussions were clinical, involving challenging situations. The discussions are open and nonjudgmental, hence encouraging contribution and healthy debate. We encourage its use as an educational tool and a platform for discussion.

  6. The Science of Drug Use: Discussion Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Science of Drug Use: Discussion Points The Science of Drug Use: Discussion Points Email Facebook Twitter ... was last updated February 2017 Related Topics Addiction Science Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal ...

  7. Cerebellar stimulation in ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groiss, Stefan Jun; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2012-06-01

    The cerebellum plays an important role in movement execution and motor control by modulation of the primary motor cortex (M1) through cerebello-thalamo-cortical connections. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) allows direct investigations of neural networks by stimulating neural structures in humans noninvasively. The motor evoked potential to single-pulse TMS of M1 is used to measure the motor cortical excitability. A conditioning stimulus over the cerebellum preceding a test stimulus of the contralateral M1 enables us to study the cerebellar regulatory functions on M1. In this brief review, we describe this cerebellar stimulation method and its usefulness as a diagnostic tool in clinical neurophysiology.

  8. An Independent Scientific Assessment of Well Stimulation in California Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Jane C.S. [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Feinstein, Laura C. [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Jordan, Preston [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Houseworth, James [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dobson, Patrick F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Heberger, Matthew [Pacific Inst., Oakland, CA (United States); Gautier, Donald L. [Dr. Donald Dautier, LLC., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, the California Legislature passed Senate Bill 4 (SB 4), setting the framework for regulation of well stimulation technologies in California, including hydraulic fracturing. SB 4 also requires the California Natural Resources Agency to conduct an independent scientific study of well stimulation technologies in California to assess current and potential future practices, including the likelihood that well stimulation technologies could enable extensive new petroleum production in the state, evaluate the impacts of well stimulation technologies and the gaps in data that preclude this understanding, identify risks associated with current practices, and identify alternative practices which might limit these risks. The study is issued in three volumes. This document, Volume I, provides the factual basis describing well stimulation technologies, how and where operators deploy these technologies for oil and gas production in California, and where they might enable production in the future. Volume II discusses how well stimulation affects water, the atmosphere, seismic activity, wildlife and vegetation, traffic, light and noise levels; it will also explore human health hazards, and identify data gaps and alternative practices. Volume III presents case studies to assess environmental issues and qualitative

  9. Students' Critical Thinking in Online Discussion Forum

    OpenAIRE

    Fitriana, Sela; Anggia, Helta

    2016-01-01

    Online discussion forum is well-known in educational technology development especially in blended learning because it supports the traditional face to face (f2f) class. Online discussion forum is familiar as the leading of critical thinking process. This paper reports about qualitative study on web-based class by using blended learning focuses on online discussion forum. This study is held in order to analyze the critical thinking process that appears during online discussion forum class. Thi...

  10. Encouraging Critical Thinking in Online Threaded Discussions

    OpenAIRE

    Bridget Arend

    2009-01-01

    Critical thinking is a highly desirable goal of online higher education courses. This article presents qualitative data from a mixed-method study that explores how asynchronous discussions within online courses influence critical thinking among students. In this study, online discussions were related to higher levels of critical thinking, but qualitative data indicate that the way discussions are used and facilitated is vital for encouraging critical thinking. Online discussions typically hav...

  11. Learning through Discussions in Blended Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, R. A.; Calvo, R. A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports research into the student experience of learning through discussions in a blended environment. Third year engineering students studying e-commerce engaged in both face-to-face discussions and online asynchronous discussions as key aspects of their learning experience. Adopting a quantitative methodology, questionnaires were…

  12. Geothermal Well Stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, D. A.; Morris, C. W.; Sinclair, A. R.; Hanold, R. J.; Vetter, O. J.

    1981-03-01

    The stimulation of geothermal wells presents some new and challenging problems. Formation temperatures in the 300-600 F range can be expected. The behavior of stimulation fluids, frac proppants, and equipment at these temperatures in a hostile brine environment must be carefully evaluated before performance expectations can be determined. In order to avoid possible damage to the producing horizon of the formation, high temperature chemical compatibility between the in situ materials and the stimulation materials must be verified. Perhaps most significant of all, in geothermal wells the required techniques must be capable of bringing about the production of very large amounts of fluid. This necessity for high flow rates represents a significant departure from conventional petroleum well stimulation and demands the creation of very high near-wellbore permeability and/or fractures with very high flow conductivity.

  13. Older Patients' Recall of Lifestyle Discussions in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardach, Shoshana H; Schoenberg, Nancy E; Howell, Britteny M

    2017-04-01

    Despite the known benefits of engaging in healthy diet and physical activity across the life span, suboptimal diet and physical inactivity are pervasive among older adults. While health care providers can promote patients' engagement in health behaviors, patient recall of recommendations tends to be imperfect. This study sought to better understand older adults' recall of dietary and physical activity discussions in primary care. One hundred and fifteen adults aged 65 and older were interviewed immediately following a routine primary care visit on whether and what they recalled discussing pertaining to diet and physical activity. Compared against transcripts, most patients accurately recalled their diet and physical activity discussions. The inclusion of a recommendation, and for diet discussions longer duration, increased the likelihood of patient recall for these health behavior discussions. These findings suggest that specific recommendations and an extra minute of discussion, at least for dietary discussions, increase the likelihood of accurate patient recall.

  14. Thermally stimulated discharge current (TSDC) and dielectric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2001-10-09

    Oct 9, 2001 ... current (TSDC) peak above room temperature. Hong and Day (1979) applied the techniques of thermally stimulated polarization and depolarization current for studying alkaline ion motion in glasses of sodium silicate and lead silicate. The peaks observed are discussed on the basis of d.c. conductivity and ...

  15. Thermally stimulated discharge conductivity in polymer composite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. This paper describes the results of thermally stimulated discharge conductivity study of activated charcoal–polyvinyl chloride (PVC) thin film thermoelectrets. TSDC has been carried out in the temperature range 308–400°K and at four different polarizing fields. Results are discussed on the basis of mobility of acti-.

  16. Thermally stimulated discharge conductivity in polymer composite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper describes the results of thermally stimulated discharge conductivity study of activated charcoal–polyvinyl chloride (PVC) thin film thermoelectrets. TSDC has been carried out in the temperature range 308–400°K and at four different polarizing fields. Results are discussed on the basis of mobility of activated ...

  17. Applying Geography in the Classroom through Structured Discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Ed

    1991-01-01

    Suggests using classroom discussion as a tool in learning geographical concepts and critical thinking skills. Provides structure for preparing class discussion in small group environments. Considers direct student participation to increase the likelihood of long-term retention and interpersonal skills development. Presents an example of discussion…

  18. Facilitating Meaningful Discussion Groups in the Primary Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Lindsey; Ogden, Meridith; Kelly, Laura Beth

    2015-01-01

    This Teaching Tips describes a yearlong process of facilitating meaningful discussion groups about literature with first-grade students in an urban Title I school. At the beginning of the year, the teacher provided explicit instruction in speaking and listening skills to support students with the social skills needed for thoughtful discussion. She…

  19. A summarized discussion of current good manufacturing practice regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Loyd V

    2013-01-01

    In light of recent events and discussions of compounding pharmacy, it is important to discuss and understand the purpose of good manufacturing practices. This article provides a summary of the current Good Manufacturing Practice Regulations which were established by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  20. Expert Discussion on Taking a Spiritual History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paal, Piret; Frick, Eckhard; Roser, Traugott; Jobin, Guy

    2017-01-01

    This article elaborates on the hazards of spiritual history taking. It provides expert insights to consider before entering the field. In summer 2012, a group of spiritual care experts were invited to discuss the complexity of taking spiritual histories in a manner of hermeneutic circle. Thematic analysis was applied to define the emerging themes. The results demonstrate that taking a spiritual history is a complex and challenging task, requiring a number of personal qualities of the interviewer, such as 'being present', 'not only hearing, but listening', 'understanding the message beyond the words uttered', and 'picking up the words to respond'. To 'establish a link of sharing', the interviewer is expected 'to go beyond the ethical stance of neutrality'. The latter may cause several dilemmas, such as 'fear of causing more problems', 'not daring to take it further', and above all, 'being ambivalent about one's role'. Interviewer has to be careful in terms of the 'patient's vulnerability'. To avoid causing harm, it is essential to propose 'a follow-up contract' that allows responding to 'patient's yearning for genuine care'. These findings combined with available literature suggest that the quality of spiritual history taking will remain poor unless the health-care professionals revise the meaning of spirituality and the art of caring on individual level.

  1. [Discussion on twirling reinforcing-reducing method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Te-Li

    2014-01-01

    The essence of twirling reinforcing-reducing method is discussed to provide theoretical guidance for clinical application of reinforcing-reducing method. Through retrospection on historical literature of twirling reinforcing-reducing method, records and explanatory notes are thoroughly explored. Several existing opinions are analyzed and explained for instance twirling method has connection with circulation direction of channels; twirling method is subdivided into right and left, male and female, hand and foot; twriling method is related to quantity of stimulus and operation time; twriling method belongs to spiral motion and so on. As a result, it is found that the key of twirling reinforcing-reducing method is the posture of needle-holding hand that defines three-dimensional motion. If twirling method is subdivided into right and left, male and female, hand and foot and so on, steric effects of lifting-thrusting movement that come along with twirling method could be ignored at the same time. It is that the essence of twirling reinforcing-reducing method is close to the principle of lifting-thrusting reinforcing-reducing method, enriching effect with slow insertion and fast withdrawal of needle while reducing effect with fast insertion and slow withdrawal, which is recorded in Miraculous Pivot: Nine needle and Twelve Yuan. With this principle as guide, manipulation could be avoided to become a mere formality and illusory metaphysics during clinical application of twirling reinforcing-reducing method.

  2. Indigenous healing practice: ayahuasca. Opening a discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prue, Robert; Voss, Richard W

    2014-01-01

    This essay frames an invitation to pastoral counselors and pastoral theologians to examine connections and perhaps interactions between themselves and traditional shamanic healers who use ayahuasca in their healing ceremonies. Indigenous people in South America have used ayahuasca for centuries, and the ritual has become common among the mestizo populations in urban areas of the Amazon, particularly as a curing ritual for drug addiction (Dobkin de Rios, 1970; Moir, 1998). Like peyote in the United States (Calabrese, 1997) ayahuasca use amongst the indigenous people of the Amazon is a form of cultural psychiatry. A review of the literature reveals very little commentary or discussion of shamanic practice in Pastoral Counseling (Pastoral Theology). The scant literature identifies an antithetical relationship at best. The current authors wonder about the possibility of to including shamanic practices in the context of pastoral counseling? This essay seeks to provide some basic information about the ritual use of ayahuasca and to offer a rationale for pastoral counselors to engage in a dialogue about its utility.

  3. Mild ovarian stimulation for IVF: 10 years later

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fauser, Bart C J M; Nargund, Geeta; Andersen, Anders Nyboe

    2010-01-01

    is to summarize the studies performed during the last decade to develop the concept of mild stimulation aiming to obtain fewer than eight oocytes. Here we examine the balance between IVF success and patient discomfort, and complications and cost, and how these might improve by simpler ovarian stimulation...... protocols aimed at retrieving fewer oocytes. We intend to analyse why progress has been rather slow and why there is much resistance to mild stimulation. Finally, presumed useful directions for future research will be discussed....

  4. Cathodal, anodal or bifocal stimulation of the motor cortex in the management of chronic pain?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holsheimer, J.; Nguyen, J.-P.; Lefaucheur, J.-P.; Manola, L.; Sakas, D.E.; Simpson, B.A

    The conditions of motor cortex stimulation (MCS) applied with epidural electrodes, in particular monopolar (cathodal or anodal) and bipolar stimulation, are discussed. The results of theoretical studies, animal experiments and clinical studies lead to similar conclusions. Basically, cortical nerve

  5. Bimodal stimulation: benefits for music perception and sound quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucher, Catherine M; McDermott, Hugh J

    2009-01-01

    With recent expansions in cochlear implantation candidacy criteria, increasing numbers of implantees can exploit their remaining hearing by using bimodal stimulation (combining electrical stimulation via the implant with acoustic stimulation via hearing aids). This study examined the effect of bimodal stimulation on music perception and perceived sound quality. The perception of music and sound quality by nine post-lingually deafened adult implantees was examined in three conditions: implant alone, hearing aid alone and bimodal stimulation. On average, bimodal stimulation provided the best results for music perception and perceived sound quality when compared with results obtained with electrical stimulation alone. Thus, for implantees with usable acoustic hearing, bimodal stimulation may be advantageous when listening to music and other non-speech sounds. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. [Effect of stimulating pulse width on the threshold of electrically evoked compound action potential].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhongde; Xiao, Ling; Li, Ping; Meng, Li; Zi, Rui; Fei, Xingbo

    2014-12-01

    This paper discusses the relationship between stimulating pulse width and the threshold of electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP). Firstly, the rheobase and chronaxy from strength-duration curve of nerve fiber was computed using the shepherd's experiment results. Secondly, based on the relationship between ECAP and the action potential of nerve fiber, a mathematical expression to describe the relationship between stimulating pulse width and ECAP threshold was proposed. Thirdly, the parameters were obtained and the feasibility was proved to the expression with the results of experiment using guinea pigs. Research result showed that with ECAP compared to the action potential of nerve fiber, their threshold function relationship with stimulating pulse width was similar, and rheobase from the former was an order smaller in the magnitude than the latter, but the chronaxy was close to each other. These findings may provide meaningful guidance to clinical ECAP measurement and studying speech processing strategies of cochlear implant.

  7. Assessment and modulation of neuroplasticity in rehabilitation with transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Shahid; Mizrahi, Ilan; Weaver, Kayleen; Fregni, Felipe; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Despite intensive efforts towards the improvement of outcomes after acquired brain injury functional recovery is often limited. One reasons is the challenge in assessing and guiding plasticity after brain injury. In this context, Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) - a noninvasive tool of brain stimulation - could play a major role. TMS has shown to be a reliable tool to measure plastic changes in the motor cortex associated with interventions in the motor system; such as motor training and motor cortex stimulation. In addition, as illustrated by the experience in promoting recovery from stroke, TMS a promising therapeutic tool to minimize motor, speech, cognitive, and mood deficits. In this review, we will focus on stroke to discuss how TMS can provide insights into the mechanisms of neurological recovery, and can be used for measurement and modulation of plasticity after an acquired brain insult. PMID:21172687

  8. Enhanced Working Memory Binding by Direct Electrical Stimulation of the Parietal Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustina Birba

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent works evince the critical role of visual short-term memory (STM binding deficits as a clinical and preclinical marker of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. These studies suggest a potential role of posterior brain regions in both the neurocognitive deficits of Alzheimer’s patients and STM binding in general. Thereupon, we surmised that stimulation of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC might be a successful approach to tackle working memory deficits in this condition, especially at early stages. To date, no causal evidence exists of the role of the parietal cortex in STM binding. A unique approach to assess this issue is afforded by single-subject direct intracranial electrical stimulation of specific brain regions during a relevant cognitive task. Electrical stimulation has been used both for clinical purposes and to causally probe brain mechanisms. Previous evidence of electrical currents spreading through white matter along well defined functional circuits indicates that visual working memory mechanisms are subserved by a specific widely distributed network. Here, we stimulated the parietal cortex of a subject with intracranial electrodes as he performed the visual STM task. We compared the ensuing results to those from a non-stimulated condition and to the performance of a matched control group. In brief, direct stimulation of the parietal cortex induced a selective improvement in STM. These results, together with previous studies, provide very preliminary but promising ground to examine behavioral changes upon parietal stimulation in AD. We discuss our results regarding: (a the usefulness of the task to target prodromal stages of AD; (b the role of a posterior network in STM binding and in AD; and (c the potential opportunity to improve STM binding through brain stimulation.

  9. The Codacs™ direct acoustic cochlear implant actuator: exploring alternative stimulation sites and their stimulation efficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Grossöhmichen

    Full Text Available This work assesses the efficiency of the Codacs system actuator (Cochlear Ltd., Sydney Australia in different inner ear stimulation modalities. Originally the actuator was intended for direct perilymph stimulation after stapedotomy using a piston prosthesis. A possible alternative application is the stimulation of middle ear structures or the round window (RW. Here the perilymph stimulation with a K-piston through a stapes footplate (SFP fenestration (N = 10 as well as stimulation of the stapes head (SH with a Bell prosthesis (N = 9, SFP stimulation with an Omega/Aerial prosthesis (N = 8 and reverse RW stimulation (N = 10 were performed in cadaveric human temporal bones (TBs. Codacs actuator output is expressed as equivalent sound pressure level (eq. SPL using RW and SFP displacement responses, measured by Laser Doppler velocimetry as reference. The axial actuator coupling force in stimulation of stapes and RW was adjusted to ~5 mN. The Bell prosthesis and Omega/Aerial prosthesis stimulation generated similar mean eq. SPLs (Bell: 127.5-141.8 eq. dB SPL; Omega/Aerial: 123.6-143.9 eq. dB SPL, being significantly more efficient than K-piston perilymph stimulation (108.6-131.6 eq. dB SPL and RW stimulation (108.3-128.2 eq. dB SPL. Our results demonstrate that SH, SFP and RW are adequate alternative stimulation sites for the Codacs actuator using coupling prostheses and an axial coupling force of ~5 mN. Based on the eq. SPLs, all investigated methods were adequate for in vivo hearing aid applications, provided that experimental conditions including constant coupling force will be implemented.

  10. The Codacs™ direct acoustic cochlear implant actuator: exploring alternative stimulation sites and their stimulation efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossöhmichen, Martin; Salcher, Rolf; Kreipe, Hans-Heinrich; Lenarz, Thomas; Maier, Hannes

    2015-01-01

    This work assesses the efficiency of the Codacs system actuator (Cochlear Ltd., Sydney Australia) in different inner ear stimulation modalities. Originally the actuator was intended for direct perilymph stimulation after stapedotomy using a piston prosthesis. A possible alternative application is the stimulation of middle ear structures or the round window (RW). Here the perilymph stimulation with a K-piston through a stapes footplate (SFP) fenestration (N = 10) as well as stimulation of the stapes head (SH) with a Bell prosthesis (N = 9), SFP stimulation with an Omega/Aerial prosthesis (N = 8) and reverse RW stimulation (N = 10) were performed in cadaveric human temporal bones (TBs). Codacs actuator output is expressed as equivalent sound pressure level (eq. SPL) using RW and SFP displacement responses, measured by Laser Doppler velocimetry as reference. The axial actuator coupling force in stimulation of stapes and RW was adjusted to ~5 mN. The Bell prosthesis and Omega/Aerial prosthesis stimulation generated similar mean eq. SPLs (Bell: 127.5-141.8 eq. dB SPL; Omega/Aerial: 123.6-143.9 eq. dB SPL), being significantly more efficient than K-piston perilymph stimulation (108.6-131.6 eq. dB SPL) and RW stimulation (108.3-128.2 eq. dB SPL). Our results demonstrate that SH, SFP and RW are adequate alternative stimulation sites for the Codacs actuator using coupling prostheses and an axial coupling force of ~5 mN. Based on the eq. SPLs, all investigated methods were adequate for in vivo hearing aid applications, provided that experimental conditions including constant coupling force will be implemented.

  11. Facilitating hospice discussions: a six-step roadmap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jennifer; Casarett, David

    2011-01-01

    Hospice programs provide comprehensive, compassionate care to dying patients and their families. However, many patients do not enroll in hospice, and those who do generally receive hospice care only in the last weeks of life. Although patients and families rely on their physicians to discuss hospice, there is often inadequate communication between patients and physicians about end-of-life issues. We describe a Six-Step Roadmap for navigating discussions about hospice adapted from the SPIKES protocol for delivering bad news: setting up the discussion, assessing the patient's perception, inviting a patient to discuss individual goals and needs, sharing knowledge, empathizing with the patient's emotions, and summarizing and strategizing the next steps.

  12. Glutamate stimulation of (/sup 3/H)dopamine release from dissociated cell cultures of rat ventral mesencephalon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mount, H.; Welner, S.; Quirion, R.; Boksa, P.

    1989-04-01

    In dissociated cell cultures of fetal rat ventral mesencephalon preloaded with (3H)dopamine, glutamate (10(-5)-10(-3) M) stimulated the release of (3H)dopamine. Glutamate stimulation of (3H)dopamine release was Ca2+ dependent and was blocked by the glutamate antagonist, cis-2,3-piperidine dicarboxylic acid. Glutamate stimulation of (3H)dopamine release was not due to glutamate neurotoxicity because (1) glutamate did not cause release of a cytosolic marker, lactate dehydrogenase, and (2) preincubation of cultures with glutamate did not impair subsequent ability of the cells to take up or release (3H)dopamine. Thus, these dissociated cell cultures appear to provide a good model system to characterize glutamate stimulation of dopamine release. Release of (3H)dopamine from these cultures was stimulated by veratridine, an activator of voltage-sensitive Na+ channels, and this stimulation was blocked by tetrodotoxin. However, glutamate-stimulated (3H)dopamine release was not blocked by tetrodotoxin or Zn2+. Substitution of NaCl in the extracellular medium by sucrose, LiCl, or Na2SO4 had no effect on glutamate stimulation of (3H)dopamine release; however, release was inhibited when NaCl was replaced by choline chloride or N-methyl-D-glucamine HCl. Glutamate-stimulated (3H)-dopamine release was well maintained (60-82% of control) in the presence of Co2+, which blocks Ca2+ action potentials, and was unaffected by the local anesthetic, lidocaine. These results are discussed in terms of the receptor and ionic mechanisms involved in the stimulation of dopamine release by excitatory amino acids.

  13. Data-prompted interviews: Using individual ecological data to stimulate narratives and explore meanings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwasnicka, Dominika; Dombrowski, Stephan U; White, Martin; Sniehotta, Falko F

    2015-12-01

    An emerging trend in qualitative research is to use individual participant data to stimulate narratives in interviews. This article describes the method of the data-prompted interview (DPI) and highlights its potential benefits and challenges. DPIs use personal ecological data gathered prior to the interview to stimulate discussion during the interview. Various forms of data can be used including photographs, videos, audio recordings, graphs, and text. This data can be gathered by the researcher or generated by the participant and may utilize ecological momentary assessment. Using individual data in DPIs can stimulate visual and auditory senses, enhance memory, and prompt rich narratives anchored in personal experiences. For the researcher, DPIs provide an opportunity to explore the meaning of the data and to explain data patterns. For the participant, presented stimuli give guidance for discussion and allow them to reflect. The challenges associated with conducting DPIs include practical issues such as data selection and presentation. Data analyses require narratives to be interpreted together with the data. Ethical challenges of DPI include concerns around data anonymity and sensitivity. Combining various sources of data to stimulate the interview provides a novel opportunity to enhance participants' memories and to meaningfully assess and analyze data patterns. In the context of health promotion and illness prevention, DPI offers a unique opportunity to explore reasons, opinions, and motivations for health-related behaviors in the light of previously gathered data. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Numerical dosimetry of transcranial magnetic stimulation coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2014-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive neuromodulation technique capable of stimulating neurons by means of electromagnetic induction. TMS can be used to map brain function and shows promise for the diagnosis and treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Calculation of fields induced in the brain are necessary to accurately identify stimulated neural tissue during TMS. This allows the development of novel TMS coil designs capable of stimulating deeper brain regions and increasing the localization of stimulation that can be achieved. We have performed numerical calculations of magnetic and electric field with high-resolution anatomically realistic human head models to find these stimulated brain regions for a variety of proposed TMS coil designs. The realistic head models contain heterogeneous tissue structures and electrical conductivities, yielding superior results to those obtained from the simplified homogeneous head models that are commonly employed. The attenuation of electric field as a function of depth in the brain and the localization of stimulating field have been methodically investigated. In addition to providing a quantitative comparison of different TMS coil designs the variation of induced field between subjects has been investigated. We also show the differences in induced fields between adult, adolescent and child head models to preemptively identify potential safety issues in the application of pediatric TMS.

  15. Role of cis-Acting Sites in Stimulation of the Phage λ PRM Promoter by CI-Mediated Looping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalowski, Christine B.

    2013-01-01

    The lysogenic state of phage λ is maintained by the CI repressor. CI binds to three operators each in the right operator (OR) and left operator (OL) regions, which lie 2.4 kb apart. At moderate CI levels, the predominant binding pattern is two dimers of CI bound cooperatively at each regulatory region. The resulting tetramers can then interact, forming an octamer and a loop of the intervening DNA. CI is expressed from the PRM promoter, which lies in the OR region and is subjected to multiple regulatory controls. Of these, the most recently discovered is stimulation by loop formation. In this work, we have investigated the mechanism by which looping stimulates PRM. We find that two cis-acting sites lying in the OL region are involved. One site, an UP element, is required for stimulation. Based on the behavior of other promoters with UP elements located upstream of the −35 region, we suggest that a subunit of RNA polymerase (RNAP) bound at PRM binds to the UP element located in the OL region. In addition, adjacent to the UP element lies a binding site for integration host factor (IHF); this site plays a less critical role but is required for stimulation of the weak prm240 allele. A loop with CI at the OL2 and OL3 operators does not stimulate PRM, while one with CI only at OL2 provides some stimulation. We discuss possible mechanisms for stimulation. PMID:23708136

  16. Exploring Discipline Differentiation in Online Discussion Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Petrea; Devine, Jo; Basson, Marita

    2014-01-01

    Online discussion forums are often the only interaction or communication a student in an online learning environment will have with the course instructor and fellow students. Discussion forums are intended to elicit a range of thinking skills from the students, from purely social interaction to metacognition in order to achieve deep learning.…

  17. Preparing Teachers to Lead Mathematics Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerst, Timothy A.; Sleep, Laurie; Ball, Deborah Loewenberg; Bass, Hyman

    2011-01-01

    Background/Context: Discussion is central to mathematics teaching and learning, as well as to mathematics as an academic discipline. Studies have shown that facilitating discussions is complex work that is not easily done or learned. To make such complex aspects of the work of teaching learnable by beginners, recent research has focused on…

  18. Online discussion: Enhancing students' critical thinking skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathakrishnan, Mohan; Ahmad, Rahayu; Suan, Choo Ling

    2017-10-01

    Online discussion has become one of the important strategies for the teacher to teach the students to think critically when conveying their ideas and become more proactive and creative. In this paper, padlet online discussion communication was conducted to examine its effectiveness in enhancing critical thinking. In this study, there are two types of critical thinking: macro and micro critical thinking. A total of 70 Universiti Utara Malaysia Management Foundation Programme students involved in this experimental research design. The students in treatment class are divided to few groups. Every group uses padlet online discussion to discuss the topic given. All the group members discuss and write their ideas in padlet. Ideas that are posted in padlet will be displayed in front of the class so that the entire group in the treatment class could see the given ideas. Paul's (1993) model was used to analyze student's macro and micro critical thinking in padlet online discussion and communication. The finding shows that students who used padlet online discussion backchannel communication have greater macro and micro critical thinking level than students who do not use online discussion.

  19. Online Discussion, Student Engagement, and Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Leonard; Lahman, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Recent research into the merits of online discussion (computer-mediated communication) has shown that it promotes active learning behaviors and enhances learner outcomes. Scholars have also shown that, when instructors employ effective questioning and moderating skills, students can show higher levels of critical thinking in online discussion. In…

  20. Enhancing Understanding and Interest through Group Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Group discussion allows students to learn how to "talk to someone." Through group discussion, students can acquire or refine a broad range of attributes, from basic oratory skills to a more sophisticated development of communicative competence to embracing and valuing dialogic interchange and reflexivity. In this article, the author explains how…

  1. Interteaching: Discussion Group Size and Course Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truelove, Jacob C.; Saville, Bryan K.; Van Patten, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have yet to examine whether discussion group size affects student performance in an interteaching-based course. In the current study, we addressed this question by manipulating discussion group size (smaller groups of 2 students vs. larger groups of 4 students) across 2 sections of an undergraduate psychology course. We found no…

  2. Engaging All Students in Mathematical Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Damon L.; Bahr, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Many teachers try to engage their students in meaningful mathematical discussions in which one or more students share their thinking about a problem while the other students are expected to listen and learn from the sharing. Indeed, such discussions can help students learn from one another and promote high levels of mathematical proficiency.…

  3. Learning Reading Strategies with Online Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, I-Fang; Ko, Hwa-Wei; Wu, Sheng-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Teachers experience difficulty demonstrating prediction strategies and leading discussions in traditional classrooms. It is also unclear whether online discussion can contribute to reading comprehension. The purpose of this study is to create an online reading system to investigate whether learners can acquire reading strategies and enhance their…

  4. Encouraging Critical Thinking in Online Threaded Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arend, Bridget

    2009-01-01

    Critical thinking is a highly desirable goal of online higher education courses. This article presents qualitative data from a mixed-method study that explores how asynchronous discussions within online courses influence critical thinking among students. In this study, online discussions were related to higher levels of critical thinking, but…

  5. Three discussions on object-oriented typing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff; Palsberg, Jens

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes three discussions conducted at the ECOOP'91 W5 Workshop on "Types, Inheritance, and Assignments" Tuesday July 16, 1991 in Geneva, Switzerland, organized by the authors.......This paper summarizes three discussions conducted at the ECOOP'91 W5 Workshop on "Types, Inheritance, and Assignments" Tuesday July 16, 1991 in Geneva, Switzerland, organized by the authors....

  6. The Use of Dream Discussions in Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark J.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Reviews the historical underpinnings of dream theories and suggests that discussions of dreams in counseling can aid in setting up and maintaining therapeutic contact with clients. A number of theoretical positions on the function of dreams are discussed. Specific dream counseling techniques are also delineated. (JAC)

  7. Improving Classroom Discussion: A Rhetorical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruss, Kristine S.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed to take the dread out of discussion in a first-year interdisciplinary humanities course at Sewanee: The University of the South, a private liberal arts college in Tennessee. The Responsible Intellectual Discussion project, known as RID, was created in conjunction with the college's Eloquence…

  8. Considering the Move to Electronic Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Bruce E.

    2005-01-01

    Over the past four years, the author has attempted to compare students' participation patterns during electronic threaded discussions and face-to-face classroom discussions. Most recently, he considered the interactions of 40 students in two world history classes at a public high school. These students regularly engaged in classroom discussions…

  9. The Lecture-Discussion Format Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, James S.

    1979-01-01

    A new look at the standard lecture/discussion format for the large introductory college course is offered, along with suggestions to upgrade its quality. Foci for improvement include organization of lecture material, teacher-student interaction, lecture delivery, feedback, discussion group supervision, and course evaluation. (JMD)

  10. Facilitating online discussions by automatic summarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wubben, S.; Verberne, S.; Krahmer, E.J.; Bosch, A.P.J. van den

    2015-01-01

    In the DISCOSUMO project, we aim to develop a computational toolkit to automatically summarize discussion forum threads. In this paper, we present the initial design of the toolkit, the data that we work with and the challenges we face. Discussion threads on a single topic can easily consist

  11. Do randomized controlled trials discuss healthcare costs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Michael Allan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Healthcare costs, particularly pharmaceutical costs, are a dominant issue for most healthcare organizations, but it is unclear if randomized controlled trials (RCTs routinely discuss costs. Our objective was to assess the frequency and factors associated with the inclusion of costs in RCTs. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We randomly sampled 188 RCTs spanning three years (2003-2005 from six high impact journals. The sample size for RCTs was based on a calculation to estimate the inclusion of actual drug costs with a precision of +/-3%. Two reviewers independently extracted cost data and study characteristics. Frequencies were calculated and potential characteristics associated with the inclusion of costs were explored. Actual drug costs were included in 4.7% (9/188 of RCTs; any actual costs were included in 7.4% (14/188 of RCTs; and any mention of costs was included in 27.7% (52/188 of RCTs. As the amount of industry funding increased across RCTs, from non-profit to mixed to fully industry funded RCTs, there was a statistically significant reduction in the number of RCTs with any actual costs (Cochran-Armitage test, p = 0.005 and any mention of costs (Cochran-Armitage test, p = 0.02. Logistic regression analysis also indicated funding was associated with the inclusion of any actual cost (OR = 0.34, p = 0.009 or any mention of costs (OR = 0.63, p = 0.02. Journal, study conclusions, study location, primary author's country and product age were not associated with inclusion of cost information. CONCLUSION: While physicians are encouraged to consider costs when prescribing drugs for their patients, actual drug costs were provided in only 5% of RCTs and were not mentioned at all in 72% of RCTs. Industry funded trials were less likely to include cost information. No other factors were associated with the inclusion of cost information.

  12. The group discussion effect: integrative processes and suggestions for implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleady, Rose; Hopthrow, Tim; Crisp, Richard J

    2013-02-01

    One of the most consistent findings in experimental social dilemmas research is the positive effect group discussion has on cooperative behavior. At a time when cooperation and consensus is critical to tackle global problems, ranging from debt to deforestation, understanding the dynamics of group discussion is a pressing need. Unfortunately, research investigating the underlying processes and implementation of the effect has been inconclusive. The authors present a critical review of existing explanations and integrate these perspectives into a single process model of group discussion, providing a more complete theoretical picture of how interrelated factors combine to facilitate discussion-induced cooperation. On the basis of this theoretical analysis, they consider complimentary approaches to the indirect and feasible implementation of group discussion. They argue that such strategies may overcome the barriers to direct discussion observed across a range of groups and organizations.

  13. Challenges to code status discussions for pediatric patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E Kruse

    Full Text Available In the context of serious or life-limiting illness, pediatric patients and their families are faced with difficult decisions surrounding appropriate resuscitation efforts in the event of a cardiopulmonary arrest. Code status orders are one way to inform end-of-life medical decision making. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the extent to which pediatric providers have knowledge of code status options and explore the association of provider role with (1 knowledge of code status options, (2 perception of timing of code status discussions, (3 perception of family receptivity to code status discussions, and (4 comfort carrying out code status discussions.Nurses, trainees (residents and fellows, and attending physicians from pediatric units where code status discussions typically occur completed a short survey questionnaire regarding their knowledge of code status options and perceptions surrounding code status discussions.Single center, quaternary care children's hospital.203 nurses, 31 trainees, and 29 attending physicians in 4 high-acuity pediatric units responded to the survey (N = 263, 90% response rate. Based on an objective knowledge measure, providers demonstrate poor understanding of available code status options, with only 22% of providers able to enumerate more than two of four available code status options. In contrast, provider groups self-report high levels of familiarity with available code status options, with attending physicians reporting significantly higher levels than nurses and trainees (p = 0.0125. Nurses and attending physicians show significantly different perception of code status discussion timing, with majority of nurses (63.4% perceiving discussions as occurring "too late" or "much too late" and majority of attending physicians (55.6% perceiving the timing as "about right" (p<0.0001. Attending physicians report significantly higher comfort having code status discussions with families than do nurses or trainees

  14. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The vagus nerve is a major component of the autonomic nervous system, has an important role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, and plays a key role in the neuroendocrine-immune axis to maintain homeostasis through its afferent and efferent pathways. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) refers to any technique that stimulates the vagus nerve, including manual or electrical stimulation. Left cervical VNS is an approved therapy for refractory epilepsy and for treatment resistant depression. Right cervical VNS is effective for treating heart failure in preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial. The effectiveness of various forms of non-invasive transcutaneous VNS for epilepsy, depression, primary headaches, and other conditions has not been investigated beyond small pilot studies. The relationship between depression, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease might be mediated by the vagus nerve. VNS deserves further study for its potentially favorable effects on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, metabolic, and other physiological biomarkers associated with depression morbidity and mortality. PMID:24834378

  15. Rewiring neural interactions by micro-stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Rebesco

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Plasticity is a crucial component of normal brain function and a critical mechanism for recovery from injury. In vitro, associative pairing of presynaptic spiking and stimulus-induced postsynaptic depolarization causes changes in the synaptic efficacy of the presynaptic neuron, when activated by extrinsic stimulation. In vivo, such paradigms can alter the responses of whole groups of neurons to stimulation. Here, we used in vivo spike-triggered stimulation to drive plastic changes in rat forelimb sensorimotor cortex, which we monitored using a statistical measure of functional connectivity inferred from the spiking statistics of the neurons during normal, spontaneous behavior. These induced plastic changes in inferred functional connectivity depended on the latency between trigger spike and stimulation, and appear to reflect a robust reorganization of the network. Such targeted connectivity changes might provide a tool for rerouting the flow of information through a network, with implications for both rehabilitation and brain-machine interface applications.

  16. Chinese women's participation in fertility discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L

    1993-01-01

    In an attempt to better understand the process through which the family planning (FP) programs and socioeconomic developments in China affect fertility, women's participation in fertility discussions with their husbands are examined as an intermediate factor in a study based on results of a random survey of 6654 ever-married women of reproductive age from 7 cities and 30 counties of Guangdong. First, it must be noted that Chinese couples do have individual choices (albeit quite limited ones) about their fertility; they can choose to follow or ignore government policy or they can choose to remain childless. The present study has 3 major hypotheses: 1) the more a woman is involved in fertility discussions with her husband, the fewer children she will have; 2) urban women with a higher educational status will be more likely to have such discussions; and 3) women who are contacted individually by FP personnel are more likely to be involved in fertility discussions. After a discussion of data collection and variables (number of living children, education of wife and husband, age at marriage, residence, living with parents, contacted by FP personnel, and discussion with husband), the results are presented in terms of zero-order correlation coefficients indicating their relationships. The bivariate analysis supported the hypotheses. Multiple regression analysis showed that age at marriage, education of wives and husbands, FP contacts, and participation in discussions remain significant fertility determinants (but the correlation between fertility and residence becomes trivial). A further regression model indicated that a woman's educational attainment is the most significant positive indication of their participation in fertility discussions. These results imply that as women's status continues to improve in China and the deeply-rooted patriarchal tradition loses hold, increased gender equity and education will influence a fertility decline. FP personnel could also

  17. [Deep brain stimulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraix, V; Pollak, P; Chabardes, S; Ardouin, C; Koudsie, A; Benazzouz, A; Krack, P; Batir, A; Le Bas, J-F; Benabid, A-L

    2004-05-01

    The present renewal of the surgical treatment of Parkinson's disease, almost abandoned for twenty Years, arises from two main reasons. The first is the better understanding of the functional organization of the basal ganglia. It was demonstrated in animal models of Parkinson's disease that the loss of dopaminergic neurons within the substantia nigra, at the origin of the striatal dopaminergic defect, induces an overactivity of the excitatory glutamatergic subthalamo-internal pallidum pathway. The decrease in this hyperactivity might lead to an improvement in the pakinsonian symptoms. The second reason is the improvement in stereotactic neurosurgery in relation with the progress in neuroimaging techniques and with intraoperative electrophysiological microrecordings and stimulations, which help determine the location of the deep brain targets. In the 1970s chronic deep brain stimulation in humans was applied to the sensory nucleus of the thalamus for the treatment of intractable pain. In 1987, Benabid and colleagues suggested high frequency stimulation of the ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus in order to treat drug-resistant tremors and to avoid the adverse effects of thalamotomies. How deep brain stimulation works is not well known but it has been hypothetized that it could change the neuronal activities and thus avoid disease-related abnormal neuronal discharges. Potential candidates for deep brain stimulation are selected according to exclusion and inclusion criteria. Surgery can be applied to patients in good general and mental health, neither depressive nor demented and who are severely disabled despite all available drug therapies but still responsive to levodopa. The first session of surgery consists in the location of the target by ventriculography and/or brain MRI. The electrodes are implanted during the second session. The last session consists in the implantation of the neurostimulator. The ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus was the

  18. National library associations: websites and electronic discussion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    National library associations: websites and electronic discussion groups. ... Recommended improvements for websites include proper hosting services and URL registrations, promotion through links with weblogs, assistance in training webmasters, and encouragement so that they can network and share experiences.

  19. Dr. Irvin Yalom Discusses Group Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forester-Miller, Holly

    1989-01-01

    In this interview, Dr. Irvin Yalom, director of the Adult Psychiatry Clinic at Stanford University School of Medicine, discusses his beginnings as a group psychotherapist, current issues in group work, and the future of group work. (Author/TE)

  20. How To Discuss Sleep With Your Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How To Discuss Sleep With Your Doctor Doctors might not ... habits. Before you see the doctor, think about how to describe your problems, including: How often you have ...

  1. Investigation of Peer Discussions on Genetic Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Karin Westman

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study is an investigation on how students express their understanding of genetic concepts and their relations during peer discussions. Participants in this study were non-major students from a Swedish upper secondary school. Special attention was paid to how the groups treated the domain- specific vocabulary, how they expressed their understanding of reduction division and how they connected concepts from different biological organization levels. These subject areas have been reported as difficult for students in earlier studies. The results show discussions concerning the three subject areas and in the discussions the students help each other to make the meaning of the genetic concepts clear. The analysis is based on socio-cultural perspectives with focus on how the participants treated the genetic content from the previously presented subject areas in their discussions.

  2. Discussion Paper: Researchers and Open Science

    OpenAIRE

    Picarra, Mafalda

    2016-01-01

    This discussion paper introduces the concept of Open Science to policymakers and discusses how Open Science is fomenting change in the way scientific research is conducted, communicated, accessed and shared. The key highlights of this paper include an overview of the European Commission’s agenda for transforming science and democratising research through Open Science and considers the implications of Open Science for researchers’ and policymakers.

  3. Discussion of selected themes of life

    OpenAIRE

    Novak, Diana

    2012-01-01

    The master thesis discusses three selected themes of life (divorce, death and homosexual partnership) and how to deal those themes at school. The first part of the master thesis discusses family, themes of life (divorce, death and homosexual partnership), stress, cooperation between school and family and the sensibility of the mentioned themes. There is also presented a connection between selected themes of life and teaching contents from the first to the sixth grade in two school subjects: ...

  4. Discussion forum: management of population education programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    This discussion adopts a relatively simple management process, which consists of the elements of planning, organization, direction, and control, as the basis for analyzing management activities of population education programs. Each of these elements is analyzed in the context of programming, implementing, and evaluating country programs in population education. The planning process that applies well to population education is that of working out a scheme, a method of design for the attainment of an objective. This involves identifying what is to be done, when, and how; defining objectives; choosing from alternatives; and making a plan of action and communication. A few country programs in population education in Asia are lagging behind the realization of project objectives in part because the organizational scheme has been taken for granted. Specific problem areas include: facilities, equipment, and staff; grouping component jobs; structure of authority; methods and procedures; and selection and training of staff. Despite these problem areas, it is believed that the organization of population education could be enhanced if the following 2 aspects are taken care of: dividing labor and allocationg workloads to individuals as well as groups of individuals; and establishing lines of communication, influence, and authority among individuals and groups of individuals handling allotted work loads to ensure the coordination of their activities in relation to give objective. The soundness of a population education program hinges on efficiency, effectiveness, and continuity. Direction includes motivation, supervision, and coordination, all of which are applicalbe to population education. Direction consists of setting a detailed time and cost framework, initiating and providing leadership in carrying out plans by making decisiions, issuing specific instructions, and guilding, motivating, and supervising. Control consists of evaluation of performance compared to plan

  5. Copeptin under glucagon stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Krzysztof C; Lewiński, Andrzej; Skowrońska-Jóźwiak, Elżbieta; Stasiak, Magdalena; Horzelski, Wojciech; Brabant, Georg

    2016-05-01

    Stimulation of growth hormone (GH) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secretion by glucagon is a standard procedure to assess pituitary dysfunction but the pathomechanism of glucagon action remains unclear. As arginine vasopressin (AVP) may act on the release of both, GH and ACTH, we tested here the role of AVP in GST by measuring a stable precursor fragment, copeptin, which is stoichiometrically secreted with AVP in a 1:1 ratio. ACTH, cortisol, GH, and copeptin were measured at 0, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180 min during GST in 79 subjects: healthy controls (Group 1, n = 32), subjects with pituitary disease, but with adequate cortisol and GH responses during GST (Group 2, n = 29), and those with overt hypopituitarism (Group 3, n = 18). Copeptin concentrations significantly increased over baseline 150 and 180 min following glucagon stimulation in controls and patients with intact pituitary function but not in hypopituitarism. Copeptin concentrations were stimulated over time and the maximal increment correlated with ACTH, while correlations between copeptin and GH were weaker. Interestingly, copeptin as well as GH secretion was significantly attenuated when comparing subjects within the highest to those in the lowest BMI quartile (p Copeptin is significantly released following glucagon stimulation. As this release is BMI-dependent, the time-dependent relation between copeptin and GH may be obscured, whereas the close relation to ACTH suggests that AVP/copeptin release might be linked to the activation of the adrenal axis.

  6. Stimulant Medication for ADHD

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1990-01-01

    The use of stimulant medication by primary care physicians in treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder was evaluated by a random national survey of family practitioners and direct screening of 457 patients in midwestern cities and is reported from the Division of Developmental Disabilities, Departments of Pediatrics and Preventive Medicine University of Iowa, Iowa City and Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky, Lexington.

  7. Development Block or Stimulant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katznelson, Ron D; Howells, John

    subsequent to the courts upholding the validity of Edison's claim 2. We argue that Edison's patent had the effect of stimulating downstream invention. This analysis is contrary to several recent papers that have been published in the student-reviewed US law literature that assume Edison's patent was used...

  8. A systematic review investigating the relationship between efficacy and stimulation parameters when using transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation after knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Beckwée

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation in the treatment of postoperative knee arthroplasty pain and to relate these results to the stimulation parameters used. Data Sources: PubMed, Pedro and Web of Knowledge were systematically screened for studies investigating effects of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation on postoperative knee arthroplasty pain. Review Methods: Studies were screened for their methodological and therapeutical quality. We appraised the influence of the stimulation settings used and indicated whether or not a neurophysiological and/or mechanistic rationale was given for these stimulation settings. Results: A total of 5 articles met the inclusion criteria. In total, 347 patients were investigated. The number of patients who received some form of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation was 117, and 54 patients received sham transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation. Pain was the primary outcome in all studies. The stimulation settings used in the studies (n = 2 that reported significant effects differed from the others as they implemented a submaximal stimulation intensity. Stimulation parameters were heterogeneous, and only one study provided a rationale for them. Conclusion: This review reveals that an effect of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation might have been missed due to low methodological and therapeutical quality. Justifying the choice of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation parameters may improve therapeutical quality.

  9. Assessing Student Perceptions of the Benefits of Discussions in Small-Group, Large-Class, and Online Learning Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Kerstin; Pollock, Philip H.; Wilson, Bruce M.

    2012-01-01

    A large literature establishes the benefits of discussions for stimulating student engagement and critical thinking skills. However, we know considerably less about the differential effects of various discussion environments on student learning. In this study, we assess student perceptions concerning the benefits of discussions in an upper-level…

  10. Pathways of translation: deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gionfriddo, Michael R; Greenberg, Alexandra J; Wahegaonkar, Abhijeet L; Lee, Kendall H

    2013-12-01

    Electrical stimulation of the brain has a 2000 year history. Deep brain stimulation (DBS), one form of neurostimulation, is a functional neurosurgical approach in which a high-frequency electrical current stimulates targeted brain structures for therapeutic benefit. It is an effective treatment for certain neuropathologic movement disorders and an emerging therapy for psychiatric conditions and epilepsy. Its translational journey did not follow the typical bench-to-bedside path, but rather reversed the process. The shift from ancient and medieval folkloric remedy to accepted medical practice began with independent discoveries about electricity during the 19th century and was fostered by technological advances of the 20th. In this paper, we review that journey and discuss how the quest to expand its applications and improve outcomes is taking DBS from the bedside back to the bench. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Optically stimulated luminescence techniques in retrospective dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence signals from natural quartz and feldspar are now used routinely in dating geological and archaeological materials. More recently they have also been employed in accident dosimetry, i.e. the retrospective assessment of doses received as a result of a nuclear...... accident. Since 1990 the exploration of this wide variety of applications has driven an intensive investigation and development programme at Riso, in measurement facilities and techniques. This paper reviews some of the outcomes of this programme, including (i) optimisation of stimulation and emission...... windows, and detection sensitivity, (ii) experience with various stimulation light sources, including filtered incandescent lamps (420-550 nm) and high intensity light emitting diodes (470 nm) and laser diodes (830-850 nm). We also discuss recently developed high-precision single-aliquot measurement...

  12. Multisensory stimulation in stroke rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbro Birgitta Johansson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The brain has a large capacity for automatic simultaneous processing and integration of sensory information. Combining information from different sensory modalities facilitates our ability to detect, discriminate, and recognize sensory stimuli, and learning is often optimal in a multisensory environment. Currently used multisensory stimulation methods in stroke rehabilitation include motor imagery, action observation, training with a mirror or in a virtual environment, or various kinds of music therapy. Several studies have shown positive effects been reported but to give general recommendation more studies are needed. Patient heterogeneity and the interactions of age, gender, genes and environment are discussed. Randomized controlled longitudinal trials starting earlier post stroke are needed. The advance in brain network science and neuroimaging enabling longitudinal studies of structural and functional networks are likely to have an important impact on patient selection for specific interventions in future stroke rehabilitation.

  13. Physician–Patient Discussions of Controversial Cancer Screening Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Andrew S.; Shridharani, Kanan V.; Lou, Wendy; Bernstein, Jeffrey; Horowitz, Carol R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Screening mammography for younger women and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurement have controversial benefits and known potential adverse consequences. While providing informed consent and eliciting patient preference have been advocated for these tests, little is known about how often these discussions take place or about barriers to these discussions. Methods We administered a survey to medical house staff and attending physicians practicing primary care. The survey examined physicians’ likelihood of discussing screening mammography and PSA testing, and factors influencing the frequency and quality of these discussions. Results For the three scenarios, 16% to 34% of physicians stated that they do not discuss the screening tests. The likelihood of having a discussion was significantly associated with house staff physicians’ belief that PSA screening is advantageous; house staff and attending physicians’ intention to order a PSA test, and attending physicians’ intention to order a mammogram; and a controversial indication for screening. The most commonly identified barriers to discussions were lack of time, the complexity of the topic, and a language barrier. Conclusions Physicians report they often do not discuss cancer screening tests with their patients. Our finding that physicians’ beliefs and intention to order the tests, and extraneous factors such as time constraints and a language barrier, are associated with discussions indicates that some patients may be inappropriately denied the opportunity to choose whether to screen for breast and prostate cancer. PMID:11165455

  14. Cognitive stimulation to improve cognitive functioning in people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Bob; Aguirre, Elisa; Spector, Aimee E; Orrell, Martin

    2012-02-15

    Cognitive stimulation is an intervention for people with dementia which offers a range of enjoyable activities providing general stimulation for thinking, concentration and memory usually in a social setting, such as a small group. Its roots can be traced back to Reality Orientation (RO), which was developed in the late 1950s as a response to confusion and disorientation in older patients in hospital units in the USA. RO emphasised the engagement of nursing assistants in a hopeful, therapeutic process but became associated with a rigid, confrontational approach to people with dementia, leading to its use becoming less and less common.Cognitive stimulation is often discussed in normal ageing as well as in dementia. This reflects a general view that lack of cognitive activity hastens cognitive decline. With people with dementia, cognitive stimulation attempts to make use of the positive aspects of RO whilst ensuring that the stimulation is implemented in a sensitive, respectful and person-centred manner.There is often little consistency in the application and availability of psychological therapies in dementia services, so a systematic review of the available evidence regarding cognitive stimulation is important in order to identify its effectiveness and to place practice recommendations on a sound evidence base. To evaluate the effectiveness and impact of cognitive stimulation interventions aimed at improving cognition for people with dementia, including any negative effects. The trials were identified from a search of the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group Specialized Register, called ALOIS (updated 6 December 2011). The search terms used were: cognitive stimulation, reality orientation, memory therapy, memory groups, memory support, memory stimulation, global stimulation, cognitive psychostimulation. Supplementary searches were performed in a number of major healthcare databases and trial registers to ensure that the search was up to date and

  15. Therapy Provider Phase Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Therapy Provider Phase Information dataset is a tool for providers to search by their National Provider Identifier (NPI) number to determine their phase for...

  16. Irish Culinary Manuscripts and Printed Books:a Discussion

    OpenAIRE

    Mac Con Iomaire, Máirtín; Cashman, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a discussion of Irish Culinary Manuscripts and Printed Cookbooks. It covers Gaelic hospitality and aristocratic hospitality, setting the background for the Anglo-Irish households from which many manuscripts emerge. It charts the growing sources of information on Irish culinary history. It outlines Barbara Wheaton's framework for reading historic cookbooks and discusses the growing manuscript cookbook collection in the National Library of Ireland.

  17. A discussion of molecular biology methods for protein engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawaira, Alexander; Pooran, Anil; Barichievy, Samantha; Chopera, Denis

    2012-05-01

    A number of molecular biology techniques are available to generate variants from a particular start gene for eventual protein expression. We discuss the basic principles of these methods in a repertoire that may be used to achieve the elemental steps in protein engineering. These include site-directed, deletion and insertion mutagenesis. We provide detailed case studies, drawn from our own experiences, packaged together with conceptual discussions and include an analysis of the techniques presented with regards to their uses in protein engineering.

  18. Deep-brain stimulation for anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hemmings; Van Dyck-Lippens, Pieter Jan; Santegoeds, Remco; van Kuyck, Kris; Gabriëls, Loes; Lin, Guozhen; Pan, Guihua; Li, Yongchao; Li, Dianyou; Zhan, Shikun; Sun, Bomin; Nuttin, Bart

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and severe, sometimes life-threatening, psychiatric disorder with high relapse rates under standard treatment. After decades of brain-lesioning procedures offered as a last resort, deep-brain stimulation (DBS) has come under investigation in the last few years as a treatment option for severe and refractory AN. In this jointly written article, Sun et al. (the Shanghai group) report an average of 65% increase in body weight in four severe and refractory patients with AN after they underwent the DBS procedure (average follow-up: 38 months). All patients weighed greater than 85% of expected body weight and thus no longer met the diagnostic criteria of AN at last follow-up. Nuttin et al. (the Leuven group) describe other clinical studies that provide evidence for the use of DBS for AN and further discuss patient selection criteria, target selection, and adverse event of this evolving therapy. Preliminary results from the Shanghai group and other clinical centers showed that the use of DBS to treat AN may be a valuable option for weight restoration in otherwise-refractory and life-threatening cases. The nature of this procedure, however, remains investigational and should not be viewed as a standard clinical treatment option. Further scientific investigation is essential to warrant the long-term efficacy and safety of DBS for AN. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Principled Approaches to Direct Brain Stimulation for Cognitive Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnu Sreekumar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this brief review, we identify key areas of research that inform a systematic and targeted approach for invasive brain stimulation with the goal of modulating higher cognitive functions such as memory. We outline several specific challenges that must be successfully navigated in order to achieve this goal. Specifically, using direct brain stimulation to support memory requires demonstrating that (1 there are reliable neural patterns corresponding to different events and memory states, (2 stimulation can be used to induce these target activity patterns, and (3 inducing such patterns modulates memory in the expected directions. Invasive stimulation studies typically have not taken into account intrinsic brain states and dynamics, nor have they a priori targeted specific neural patterns that have previously been identified as playing an important role in memory. Moreover, the effects of stimulation on neural activity are poorly understood and are sensitive to multiple factors including the specific stimulation parameters, the processing state of the brain at the time of stimulation, and neuroanatomy of the stimulated region. As a result, several studies have reported conflicting results regarding the use of direct stimulation for memory modulation. Here, we review the latest findings relevant to these issues and discuss how we can gain better control over the effects of direct brain stimulation for modulating human memory and cognition.

  20. Principled Approaches to Direct Brain Stimulation for Cognitive Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreekumar, Vishnu; Wittig, John H; Sheehan, Timothy C; Zaghloul, Kareem A

    2017-01-01

    In this brief review, we identify key areas of research that inform a systematic and targeted approach for invasive brain stimulation with the goal of modulating higher cognitive functions such as memory. We outline several specific challenges that must be successfully navigated in order to achieve this goal. Specifically, using direct brain stimulation to support memory requires demonstrating that (1) there are reliable neural patterns corresponding to different events and memory states, (2) stimulation can be used to induce these target activity patterns, and (3) inducing such patterns modulates memory in the expected directions. Invasive stimulation studies typically have not taken into account intrinsic brain states and dynamics, nor have they a priori targeted specific neural patterns that have previously been identified as playing an important role in memory. Moreover, the effects of stimulation on neural activity are poorly understood and are sensitive to multiple factors including the specific stimulation parameters, the processing state of the brain at the time of stimulation, and neuroanatomy of the stimulated region. As a result, several studies have reported conflicting results regarding the use of direct stimulation for memory modulation. Here, we review the latest findings relevant to these issues and discuss how we can gain better control over the effects of direct brain stimulation for modulating human memory and cognition.

  1. A Discussion of the Term Digital Tectonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ida Kristina; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2006-01-01

    For almost twenty years, digital architecture of different themes and characters has been produced. Through this time it has become possible to develop new and geometrically free forms, as well as calculate and simulate different technical matters of future constructions using digital tools...... discussions of digital architecture, digital tectonics is a commonly occurring term, and in this article the focus will be on this particular term. The term of tectonics has been used by architectural theorists for several centuries, but through time there have been many different opinions on what the term...... contains. In this article the term tectonics will first be defined through analysing of different architectural theories, and thereafter the term will be discussed in relation to digital architecture. Through this discussion a comprehension of the terms of tectonics and digital architecture is reached...

  2. Technological Advances in Deep Brain Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ughratdar, Ismail; Samuel, Michael; Ashkan, Keyoumars

    2015-01-01

    Functional and stereotactic neurosurgery has always been regarded as a subspecialty based on and driven by technological advances. However until recently, the fundamentals of deep brain stimulation (DBS) hardware and software design had largely remained stagnant since its inception almost three decades ago. Recent improved understanding of disease processes in movement disorders as well clinician and patient demands has resulted in new avenues of development for DBS technology. This review describes new advances both related to hardware and software for neuromodulation. New electrode designs with segmented contacts now enable sophisticated shaping and sculpting of the field of stimulation, potentially allowing multi-target stimulation and avoidance of side effects. To avoid lengthy programming sessions utilising multiple lead contacts, new user-friendly software allows for computational modelling and individualised directed programming. Therapy delivery is being improved with the next generation of smaller profile, longer-lasting, re-chargeable implantable pulse generators (IPGs). These include IPGs capable of delivering constant current stimulation or personalised closed-loop adaptive stimulation. Post-implantation Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has long been an issue which has been partially overcome with 'MRI conditional devices' and has enabled verification of DBS lead location. Surgical technique is considering a shift from frame-based to frameless stereotaxy or greater role for robot assisted implantation. The challenge for these contemporary techniques however, will be in demonstrating equivalent safety and accuracy to conventional methods. We also discuss potential future direction utilising wireless technology allowing for miniaturisation of hardware.

  3. A novel dual-wavelength laser stimulator to elicit transient and tonic nociceptive stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoxi; Liu, Tianjun; Wang, Han; Yang, Jichun; Chen, Zhuying; Hu, Yong; Li, Yingxin

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to develop a new laser stimulator to elicit both transient and sustained heat stimulation with a dual-wavelength laser system as a tool for the investigation of both transient and tonic experimental models of pain. The laser stimulator used a 980-nm pulsed laser to generate transient heat stimulation and a 1940-nm continuous-wave (CW) laser to provide sustained heat stimulation. The laser with 980-nm wavelength can elicit transient pain with less thermal injury, while the 1940-nm CW laser can effectively stimulate both superficial and deep nociceptors to elicit tonic pain. A proportional integral-derivative (PID) temperature feedback control system was implemented to ensure constancy of temperature during heat stimulation. The performance of this stimulator was evaluated by in vitro and in vivo animal experiments. In vitro experiments on totally 120 specimens fresh pig skin included transient heat stimulation by 980-nm laser (1.5 J, 10 ms), sustained heat stimulation by 1940-nm laser (50-55 °C temperature control mode or 1.5 W, 5 min continuous power supply), and the combination of transient/sustained heat stimulation by dual lasers (1.5 J, 10 ms, 980-nm pulse laser, and 1940-nm laser with 50-55 °C temperature control mode). Hemoglobin brushing and wind-cooling methods were tested to find better stimulation model. A classic tail-flick latency (TFL) experiment with 20 Wistar rats was used to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of transient and tonic pain stimulation with 15 J, 100 ms 980-nm single laser pulse, and 1.5 W constant 1940-nm laser power. Ideal stimulation parameters to generate transient pain were found to be a 26.6 °C peak temperature rise and 0.67 s pain duration. In our model of tonic pain, 5 min of tonic stimulation produced a temperature change of 53.7 ± 1.3 °C with 1.6 ± 0.2% variation. When the transient and tonic stimulation protocols were combined, no significant difference was observed depending on the order

  4. A discussion of individual variability, in activity-based interventions, using the niche concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dada, S; Granlund, M; Alant, E

    2007-07-01

    Activity-based intervention has been defined as a child-directed, transactional approach that uses logically occurring antecedents and consequences to develop functional and generative skills by embedding intervention of children's individual goals and objectives in routine, planned or child-initiated activities. In this approach, clear goals and objectives that are functional and embedded in a play activities or routines are developed. The teacher mediates the child's environment to facilitate learning with the child directing the teacher on the pace, duration spent on the objective. Learning and development in this framework occur through both a carefully planned environment and adult facilitation. Progress made by a child using this approach focuses on observational data that describe if the child is able to respond in functional and generative ways. While activity-based interventions are usually provided for a group of children, progress is measured by describing individual children's responses. Individual variations in the children's progress, despite exposure to the same interventions are an area that is seldom discussed. This article aims to explore the niche concept and its application to explaining this variation between individuals. Four children participated in this single-subject, multiple-probe study across four participants. A 3-week long activity-based aided language stimulation programme was developed. The effect of the programme was determined by describing the individual participants understanding of the 24 targeted vocabulary items. The results of the activity-based language programme are presented and the variability among the participants is discussed using the niche concept. The role of the niche concept in individual development is described and the implications thereof are discussed. Finally, activity-based intervention research is placed in a systems perspective and possible outcome measures of this intervention are discussed from a

  5. Closing the loop of deep brain stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain eCARRON

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency deep brain stimulation is used to treat a wide range of brain disorders, like Parkinson's disease. The stimulated networks usually share common electrophysiological signatures, including hyperactivity and/or dysrhythmia. From a clinical perspective, HFS is expected to alleviate clinical signs without generating adverse effects. Here, we consider whether the classical open-loop HFS fulfils these criteria and outline current experimental or theoretical research on the different types of closed-loop DBS that could provide better clinical outcomes. In the first part of the review, the two routes followed by HFS-evoked axonal spikes are explored. In one direction, orthodromic spikes functionally de-afferent the stimulated nucleus from its downstream target networks. In the opposite direction, antidromic spikes prevent this nucleus from being influenced by its afferent networks. As a result, the pathological synchronized activity no longer propagates from the cortical networks to the stimulated nucleus. The overall result can be described as a reversible functional de-afferentation of the stimulated nucleus from its upstream and downstream nuclei. In the second part of the review, the latest advances in closed-loop DBS are considered. Some of the proposed approaches are based on mathematical models, which emphasize different aspects of the parkinsonian basal ganglia: excessive synchronization, abnormal firing-rate rhythms, and a deficient thalamo-cortical relay. The stimulation strategies are classified depending on the control-theory techniques on which they are based: adaptive and on-demand stimulation schemes, delayed and multi-site approaches, stimulations based on proportional and/or derivative control actions, optimal control strategies. Some of these strategies have been validated experimentally, but there is still a large reservoir of theoretical work that may point to ways of improving practical treatment.

  6. [Novel functional electrical stimulation for neurorehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Yukihiro

    2010-02-01

    Our understanding of motor learning, neuroplasticity, and functional recovery after the occurrence of brain lesions has increased considerably. New findings in basic neuroscience have provided an impetus for research in motor rehabilitation. Several prospective studies have shown that repeated motor practice and motor activity in a real world environment have a favorable effect on motor recovery in stroke patients. Electrical stimulation can be applied in a variety of ways to the hemiparetic upper extremity following a stroke. In particular, electromyography (EMG)-triggered electrical muscle stimulation improves the motor function of the hemiparetic arm and hand. Triggered electrical stimulation is reported to be more effective than non-triggered electrical stimulation in facilitating upper extremity motor recovery after stroke. Power-assisted functional electrical stimulation (FES) induces greater muscle contraction by electrical stimulation that is in proportion to voluntary integrated EMG signals. Daily power-assisted FES home-program therapy with novel equipment has been shown to effectively improve wrist, finger extension, and shoulder flexion. Combined modulation of voluntary movement, proprioceptive sensory feedback, and electrical stimulation might play an important role in improving impaired sensory-motor integration by power-assisted FES therapy. A multi-channel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) studies in which the hemoglobin levels in the brain were non-invasively and dynamically measured during functional activity found that the cerebral blood flow in the injured sensory-motor cortex area is greater during a power-assisted FES session than during simple active movement or simple electrical stimulation. A novel power-assisted FES sleeve (Cyberhand) has been developed for the rehabilitation of hemiplegic upper extremities.

  7. Effect of stimulation in coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karma, Deepa; Rawat, A K

    2006-10-01

    To find out efficacy and benefits of early starting of stimulation therapy in coma patients. Randomized controlled trial. Sixty children admitted to the Department of Pediatrics, having coma due to non-traumatic neurological insult were randomly selected. Both study and control groups had 30 patients each. Children in the study group were given stimulation therapy while those in control group received no stimulation. The level of consciousness was assessed before and two weeks after giving stimulation therapy. Improvement in level of consciousness was better in study group as compared to control after two weeks of stimulation therapy. Stimulation therapy was found to be highly effective in coma patients.

  8. Transcranial brain stimulation: closing the loop between brain and stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karabanov, Anke; Thielscher, Axel; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2016-01-01

    stimulation. Trait-related and state-related determinants contribute to this variability, challenging the standard approach to apply stimulation in a rigid, one-size-fits-all fashion. Several strategies have been identified to reduce variability and maximize the plasticity-inducing effects of noninvasive......-related and state-related variability. Fluctuations in brain-states can be traced online with functional brain imaging and inform the timing or other settings of transcranial brain stimulation. State-informed open-loop stimulation is aligned to the expression of a predefined brain state, according to prespecified...... rules. In contrast, adaptive closed-loop stimulation dynamically adjusts stimulation settings based on the occurrence of stimulation-induced state changes. SUMMARY: Approaches that take into account trait-related and state-related determinants of stimulation-induced plasticity bear considerable...

  9. Discussion of the feasibility of air injection for enhanced oil recovery in shale oil reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Jia

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Air injection in light oil reservoirs has received considerable attention as an effective, improved oil recovery process, based primarily on the success of several projects within the Williston Basin in the United States. The main mechanism of air injection is the oxidation behavior between oxygen and crude oil in the reservoir. Air injection is a good option because of its wide availability and low cost. Whether air injection can be applied to shale is an interesting topic from both economic and technical perspectives. This paper initiates a comprehensive discussion on the feasibility and potential of air injection in shale oil reservoirs based on state-of-the-art literature review. Favorable and unfavorable effects of using air injection are discussed in an analogy analysis on geology, reservoir features, temperature, pressure, and petrophysical, mineral and crude oil properties of shale oil reservoirs. The available data comparison of the historically successful air injection projects with typical shale oil reservoirs in the U.S. is summarized in this paper. Some operation methods to improve air injection performance are recommended. This paper provides an avenue for us to make use of many of the favorable conditions of shale oil reservoirs for implementing air injection, or air huff ‘n’ puff injection, and the low cost of air has the potential to improve oil recovery in shale oil reservoirs. This analysis may stimulate further investigation.

  10. Learning through online discussion: a framework evidenced in learners' interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne C. Bain

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Online learning, often supported through online discussion, is not only a popular means of supporting off-campus learners, but increasingly has a place within campus-based learning courses. Laurillard and others suggest that there are assumptions being made about learning through online discussion that have yet to be fully tested, and therefore there is a need to examine this area further. Tutors and learners may benefit from having a greater insight and understanding of how engaging in asynchronous online discussion presents opportunities for learning on an individual and a collective basis. This research study focused on learners' engagement with online discussion and their perceptions of how engaging in online discussion impacts on learning. This paper revisits learning through online discussion and proposes a framework, which emerges from the analysis of learners' experiences. A grounded theory approach was used in the collection and analysis of six learner case studies within a higher education setting, exploring learners' interactions in online discussion, and their perceptions of learning through online discussion. Insights into the learners' interactions were provided by the learners themselves through semi-structured interviews. The grounded approach to the analysis of the interviews enabled the learners' voices to be heard in terms of what they thought about learning through online discussion. The insight enabled through the depth of description from the learners and the examination of the online interactions led to the development of a framework for learning through online discussion. The framework raises the importance of articulation as a key process in learning whilst highlighting the opportunities for collaborative informed thinking by engaging with the ideas of others. The focus given to the learning process through the framework will be of interest to tutors and learners who use online asynchronous discussion environments for

  11. Why discuss spatial justice in urbanism studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rocco de Campos Pereira, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    It is very difficult to discuss the issue of spatial justice within the context of a country that enjoys so much of it. The Netherlands is probably one of the places in the world where the overarching objectives of spatial planning and design have been most fully attained: healthy, fairly

  12. Answer and discussion paediatric neuroimaging quiz case

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-06-30

    Jun 30, 2016 ... Dr Samuel Mannikam, Dr Thandi Buthelezi, Dr Philip Janse van Rensburg and Dr Ian. Haynes, however, the prize of R2000 was awarded to Dr Richard Busayo Ulatunji for the most inclusive answer. Answer and discussion paediatric neuroimaging quiz case. Read online: Scan this QR code with your.

  13. Analyzing online political discussions: Methodological considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergeer, M.R.M.; Hermans, E.A.H.M.

    2008-01-01

    Online political discussions are thought to lead to more political engagement and empowerment of peripheral groups in society and thereby contributing to deliberative citizenship. Because people have increased opportunities to voice their political opinions and publish these for a potentially large

  14. School PE through Internet Discussion Forums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritsalo, Kirsti; Sääkslahti, Arja; Rasku-Puttonen, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Background: Physical education is a subject that generates strong feelings and emotions, as can be seen in written accounts of PE experiences. It is also important to listen to students' voices in the research context. Nowadays, students can be listened to in a new way--through the Internet. Various discussion forums on the Internet make it…

  15. School Education | Discussion Meetings | Events | Indian Academy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    All the issues have no doubt been discussed before, but there was room for a different perspective on some of them, and even if we are not able to offer a different ... that deal with education policies seem to be meetings of people into the management of education rather than teachers who do actual classroom teaching.

  16. Theses "Discussion" Sections: A Structural Move Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali Salmani; Khakbaz, Nafiseh

    2011-01-01

    The current study aimed at finding the probable differences between the move structure of Iranian MA graduates' thesis discussion subgenres and those of their non-Iranian counterparts, on the one hand, and those of journal paper authors, on the other. It also aimed at identifying the moves that are considered obligatory, conventional, or optional…

  17. Political discussions with family and friends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Klaus; Yndigegn, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Young people's engagement in political discussions with parents and friends represents a significant component of the political socialization process and can be seen as an activity where they learn some very basic democratic skills. Based on data from qualitative interviews and a questionnaire su...

  18. The Problem of Retraction in Critical Discussion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbe, Erik C. W.

    2001-01-01

    In many contexts a retraction of commitment is frowned upon. For instance, it is not appreciated, generally, if one withdraws a promise or denies an earlier statement. Critical discussion, too, can easily be disrupted by retractions, if these occur too frequently and at critical points. But on the

  19. Interaction in online interprofessional education case discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterston, Rosemary

    2011-07-01

    This study investigated online interaction within a curriculum unit at the University of Toronto, Canada that included an interprofessional case study discussion in a mixed-mode (face-to-face and online) format. Nine of the 81 teams that completed the four-day curriculum were selected for detailed review based on the attitudes students expressed on a survey about the value of collaborating online for enhancing their appreciation of other health care professions. Five of the teams selected were 'positive' and four were 'negative'. The responses to other survey items by members of these teams were then compared, as well as their message posting patterns and the content of their online discussions. Differences between the two sets were situated within a theoretical framework drawn from the contact theory, social interdependence theory, and the Community of Inquiry model. Institutional support in the form of facilitator involvement, individual predispositions to online and group learning, the group composition, the learning materials, task and assignment, and technical factors all affected the levels of participation online. Discourse and organizational techniques were identified that related to interactivity within the online discussions. These findings can help curriculum planners design interprofessional case studies that encourage the interactivity required for successful online discussions.

  20. Discussed Issues in Preventive Intervention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocak, Sakire

    2011-01-01

    The growing number of studies in the field of prevention science and related advancements in evidence based programs leads to some discussions about the fundamental issues such as efficacy, effectiveness, dissemination, adaptation, fidelity and continuity in recent years. In this article it is intended to report the common views of early childhood…

  1. Developing algebraic thinking through group discussion | Fletcher ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explores the potential of group discussion in generating algebraic thinking among learners. Algebraic thinking, particularly the recognition and articulation of generality, is vital and ought to be within reach of all learners if they are to participate fully in society. Furthermore, generalisation, being fundamental to ...

  2. From Good to Great: Discussion Starter Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Great Teachers and Leaders, 2014

    2014-01-01

    In the report "From Good to Great: Exemplary Teachers Share Perspectives on Increasing Teacher Effectiveness across the Career Continuum," (See full report in ERIC at ED555657) National and State Teachers of the Year shared their views on what helped them become great teachers. This accompanying "Discussion Starter Tool" builds…

  3. Conflicting perspectives compromising discussions on cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Groarke, J

    2010-09-01

    Healthcare professionals, patients and their relatives are expected to discuss resuscitation together. This study aims to identify the differences in the knowledge base and understanding of these parties. Questionnaires examining knowledge and opinion on resuscitation matters were completed during interviews of randomly selected doctors, nurses and the general public. 70% doctors, 24% nurses and 0% of a public group correctly estimated survival to discharge following in-hospital resuscitation attempts. Deficiencies were identified in doctor and nurse knowledge of ethics governing resuscitation decisions. Public opinion often conflicts with ethical guidelines. Public understanding of the nature of cardiopulmonary arrests and resuscitation attempts; and of the implications of a \\'Do Not Attempt Resuscitation (DNAR)\\' order is poor. Television medical dramas are the primary source of resuscitation knowledge. Deficiencies in healthcare professionals\\' knowledge of resuscitation ethics and outcomes may compromise resuscitation decisions. Educational initiatives to address deficiencies are necessary. Parties involved in discussion on resuscitation do not share the same knowledge base reducing the likelihood of meaningful discussion. Public misapprehensions surrounding resuscitation must be identified and corrected during discussion.

  4. Sociolinguistic Transfer: A Classification and Discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Leslie M.

    A discussion of the role of transfer of native-language knowledge to second language learning proposes that language transfer is as much a sociolinguistic process as a psycholinguistic one. The term "sociolinguistics" is used in a broad sense to incorporate all social factors that affect language, both the relatively static characteristics of an…

  5. Discussion Meetings | Events | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Discussion Meeting on School Education Auditorium, Raman Research Institute, 18 to 20 August 2017 ... Function and plasticity of adult brain. Orange County resort, 25 February 2001 to 28 February 2001. Participants: John Nicholls, Wesley Thompson, C. Michael Bate, Jonathan Bacon, Chun-Fang Wu, Eve Marder, Ken ...

  6. NPS Panel Discusses ISIS Expansion, Policy Options

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School’s (NPS) Department of Defense Analysis, the Naval War College (NWC) Monterey, and the Global Education Community Collaboration Online (GlobalECCO) counter terrorism program recently hosted a panel discussion titled, “The Islamic State: Remaining and Expanding?” in Ingersoll Hall.

  7. QCD under extreme conditions: an informal discussion

    CERN Document Server

    Fraga, E.S.

    2015-05-22

    We present an informal discussion of some aspects of strong interactions un- der extreme conditions of temperature and density at an elementary level. This summarizes lectures delivered at the 2013 and 2015 CERN – Latin-American Schools of High-Energy Physics and is aimed at students working in experi- mental high-energy physics.

  8. Maps of student discussions about sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindahl, Mats; Bruun, Jesper; Linder, Cedric

    We use a combination of network analysis (NA), text-mining (TM) techniques, and thematic discourse analysis (TDA) to characterise and compare student discussions about sustainable development. Three student groups at three different times were analysed. The analysis entails an iterative design...

  9. How to Facilitate Discussions in History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisman, Abby

    2017-01-01

    In this article, Abby Reisman offers four instructional practices that educators can use to help students grapple with history's contradictions and engage in meaningful text-based discussions. Reisman details two suggestions that can be used in history classrooms and across the disciplines: orient students to one another and orient students to the…

  10. Stimulated Black Hole Evaporation

    CERN Document Server

    Spaans, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Black holes are extreme expressions of gravity. Their existence is predicted by Einstein's theory of general relativity and is supported by observations. Black holes obey quantum mechanics and evaporate spontaneously. Here it is shown that a mass rate $R_f\\sim 3\\times 10^{-8} (M_0/M)^{1/2}$ $M_0$ yr$^{-1}$ onto the horizon of a black hole with mass $M$ (in units of solar mass $M_0$) stimulates a black hole into rapid evaporation. Specifically, $\\sim 3 M_0$ black holes can emit a large fraction of their mass, and explode, in $M/R_f \\sim 3\\times 10^7 (M/M_0)^{3/2}$ yr. These stimulated black holes radiate a spectral line power $P \\sim 2\\times 10^{39} (M_0/M)^{1/2}$ erg s$^{-1}$, at a wavelength $\\lambda \\sim 3\\times 10^5 (M/M_0)$ cm. This prediction can be observationally verified.

  11. Raft River well stimulation experiments: geothermal reservoir well stimulation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-01

    The Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) performed two field experiments at the Raft River KGRA in 1979. Wells RRGP-4 and RRGP-5 were selected for the hydraulic fracture stimulation treatments. The well selection process, fracture treatment design, field execution, stimulation results, and pre- and post-job evaluations are presented.

  12. Dorsal column stimulator applications

    OpenAIRE

    Yampolsky, Claudio; Hem, Santiago; Bendersky, Damián

    2012-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been used to treat neuropathic pain since 1967. Following that, technological progress, among other advances, helped SCS become an effective tool to reduce pain. Methods: This article is a non-systematic review of the mechanism of action, indications, results, programming parameters, complications, and cost-effectiveness of SCS. Results: In spite of the existence of several studies that try to prove the mechanism of action of SCS, it still remains...

  13. [Discussion on quantum entanglement theory and acupuncture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Wu, Bin; Chen, Sheng

    2017-11-12

    The quantum entanglement is a new discovery of modern physics and has drawn a widely attention in the world. After learning the quantum entanglement, the authors have found that many characteristics of quantum are reflected in TCM, acupuncture theory and clinical practice. For example, the quantum entanglement phenomenon is mutually verified with the holism, yinyang doctrine, the theory of primary, secondary, root and knot in TCM, etc. It can be applied to interpret the clinical situations which is difficult to be explained in clinical practice, such as the instant effect of acupuncture, multi-point stimulation in one disorder and the points with specific effects. On the basis of the discovery above, the quantum entanglement theory achieved the mutual treatment among the relatives in acupuncture clinical practice and the therapeutic effects were significant. The results suggest that the coupling relationship in quantum entanglement presents between the diseases and the acupoints in the direct relative. The authors believe that the discovery in this study contributes to the exploration on the approaches to the acupuncture treatment in clinical practice and enrich the ideas on the disease prevention.

  14. Argument, Counterargument, and Integration? Patterns of Argument Reappraisal in Controversial Classroom Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronostay, Dorothee

    2016-01-01

    Being challenged by opposing views in a controversial discussion can stimulate the production of more elaborate and sophisticated argumentations. According to the model of argument reappraisal (Leitão, 2000), such processes require transactivity, meaning that students do not only give reasons to support their own position (e.g., pro/contra…

  15. Discussion of “Attitude of Physicians Towards Automatic Alerting in Computerized Physician Order Entry Systems”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bates, D. W.; Baysari, M. T.; Dugas, M.

    2013-01-01

    With these comments on the paper “Attitude of Physicians Towards Automatic Alerting in Computerized Physician Order Entry Systems”, written by Martin Jung and coauthors, with Dr. Elske Ammenwerth as senior author, the journal wants to stimulate a broad discussion on computerized physician order...

  16. Potential mechanisms supporting the value of motor cortex stimulation to treat chronic pain syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Fabio DosSantos

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the first years of the twenty-first century, neurotechnologies such as motor cortex stimulation (MCS, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS have attracted scientific attention and been considered as potential tools to centrally modulate chronic pain, especially for those conditions more difficult to manage and refractory to all types of available pharmacological therapies. Interestingly, although the role of the motor cortex in pain has not been fully clarified, it is one of the cortical areas most commonly targeted by invasive and non-invasive neuromodulation technologies. Recent studies have provided significant advances concerning the establishment of the clinical effectiveness of primary motor cortex stimulation to treat different chronic pain syndromes. Concurrently, the neuromechanisms related to each method of primary motor cortex (M1 modulation have been unveiled. In this respect, the most consistent scientific evidence originates from MCS studies, which indicate the activation of top-down controls driven by M1 stimulation. This concept has also been applied to explain M1-TMS mechanisms. Nevertheless, activation of remote areas in the brain, including cortical and subcortical structures, has been reported with both invasive and non-invasive methods and the participation of major neurotransmitters (e.g. glutamate, GABA and serotonin as well as the release of endogenous opioids has been demonstrated. In this critical review, the putative mechanisms underlying the use of motor cortex stimulation to provide relief from chronic migraine and other types of chronic pain are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the most recent scientific evidence obtained from chronic pain research studies involving MCS and non-invasive neuromodulation methods (e.g. tDCS and TMS, which are analyzed comparatively.

  17. Promoting Discussion in Peer Instruction: Discussion Partner Assignment and Accountability Scoring Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chih-Yueh; Lin, Pin-Hsun

    2015-01-01

    Peer instruction (PI) involves students answering questions and peer discussion learning activities. PI can enhance student performance and engagement in classroom instruction. However, some students do not engage in the discussions. This study proposes two mechanisms, discussion partner assignment and accountability scoring mechanisms, to form…

  18. DIALOGISM IN THE DISCUSSION FORUMS IN ONLINE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmem Lúcia de Oliveira MARINHO

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The digital genre, Discussion Forums, if constitutes as the main instrument of asynchronous communication and interaction of the Education in the distance online. Essentially a space of debates, in the education/learning modality, the Forum possess a pedagogical character, instrument that can promote of the collective and collaborative construction of the knowledge in Virtual Environments of Learning. The use of the dialogic language practiced by Educators and learners in Forums should, in thesis, to stimulate the debate, specifically the verbal interaction between these interlocutors. This article searched to analyze the verbal communication between educators and learners in Discussion Forums. When analyzing a Forum promoted in a course in the modality Blended Learning, on the basis of the Dialogism, theoretical boarding presented by Bakhtin (1995, 2011, and in studies of the EAD as Moore and Kearsley (2010 and Cabral and Cavalcante (2010, this work evidenced that, even integral of language, the Dialogism still is hidden in discourses in this genre, harming the interaction and collaborative construction of knowledge in modality.

  19. DISCUSSING NURSING DIAGNOSIS APPLIED BY NURSING STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. H. Cavalcante

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aimed to identify and discuss nursing diagnosis present in 50 Case Studies developed by students of graduation nursing of Federal University of Mato Grosso - Campus of Sinop, in a unit of clinical medical. Documentary research that addressed quantitatively the nursing diagnosis proposed using the Taxonomy II of NANDA-I (2009-2011. It was documented 82 different diagnosis, and covered all the 13 domains. The involvement of all the domains and the large variability of diagnoses identified suggested a possible holistic view of patient care and emphasized the individuality of the care plan. However, it may indicate an immaturity of these students, because often different diagnosis are related, and interventions set to one of these can solve the other, so opting for one avoids large health plans. Researchers and professors should conduct investigations and discussions to be identified teaching methods best suited to the teaching of the diagnostic process.

  20. Skilled Toy Train Discussions about Business Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buur, Jacob; Beuthel, Marie Rosa

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we show how industrialists in an innovation workshop employ tangible material – a toy train set – to innovate their business model. In multidisciplinary teams the process of co-creating new understandings is crucial for work to progress. Based on video data form this participatory i...... encouraging group discussion of the ‘customer journey’, it keeps both hands and mind busy, it allows silent participation, and it expands the vocabulary of the discussion....... innovation session, we investigate how participants get to new concepts through analysing their skilled behaviours, movements, actions and negotiations. We observe that the final result of the workshop is indeed innovative and is co-constructed by all group members. We show why the toy train works: While...

  1. Restorative culture in school. Continuation of discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Pentin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the lack of effective ways of building relationships, parenting responsibility and conflict solving in the school community. It is addressed to the whole school community – to the administration, psychologists and social workers, to the faculty, parents and students. We discuss the key concepts and principles of “restorative culture” and the reasons for its introduction in educational institutions. The restorative culture refers to activities on formation and spread of interpersonal relations value in the aspect of its understanding, trust, acceptance of active responsibility, separation of problems and subjects, and focus on the successful experience. We briefly discuss the theory of restorative justice and narrative practice. Particular attention is paid to the typical methods of school response to conflicts, and to zero-tolerance policy. We propose that the school community needs a number of specific technologies that would optimally suit for different types of situations and would constitute a part of the system

  2. CERN in discussions with its neighbours

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    CERN recently invited local partners, elected representatives, and representatives of local administrations and associations to an information and discussion evening, giving those invited an opportunity to raise various topics linked to CERN’s presence in the local area. On Tuesday, 20 October the Globe of Science and Innovation took on a distinctly regional flavour when some 60 representatives of local administrations and public bodies in Switzerland and France as well as teachers, heads of local schools and chairs of local associations attended an information and discussion evening at the invitation of the Director-General. In his opening address, the Director-General underlined CERN’s commitment to transparency and the desire to enhance its communication with the local community. This address was followed by four presentations. Philippe Bloch, head of the Physics Department, explained the scientific goals of the LHC and the L...

  3. Gastric Electrical Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this analysis was to assess the effectiveness, safety and cost-effectiveness of gastric electrical stimulation (GES) for the treatment of chronic, symptomatic refractory gastroparesis and morbid obesity. Background Gastroparesis - Epidemiology Gastroparesis (GP) broadly refers to impaired gastric emptying in the absence of obstruction. Clinically, this can range from the incidental detection of delayed gastric emptying in an asymptomatic person to patients with severe nausea, vomiting and malnutrition. Symptoms of GP are nonspecific and may mimic structural disorders such as ulcer disease, partial gastric or small bowel obstruction, gastric cancer, and pancreaticobiliary disorders. Gastroparesis may occur in association with diabetes, gastric surgery (consequence of peptic ulcer surgery and vagotomy) or for unknown reasons (idiopathic gastroparesis). Symptoms include early satiety, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and weight loss. The majority of patients with GP are women. The relationship between upper gastrointestinal symptoms and the rate of gastric emptying is considered to be weak. Some patients with markedly delayed gastric emptying are asymptomatic and sometimes, severe symptoms may remit spontaneously. Idiopathic GP may represent the most common form of GP. In one tertiary referral retrospective series, the etiologies in 146 GP patients were 36% idiopathic, 29% diabetic, 13% postgastric surgery, 7.5% Parkinson’s disease, 4.8% collagen vascular disorders, 4.1% intestinal pseudoobstruction and 6% miscellaneous causes. The true prevalence of digestive symptoms in patients with diabetes and the relationship of these symptoms to delayed gastric emptying are unknown. Delayed gastric emptying is present in 27% to 58% of patients with type 1 diabetes and 30% with type 2 diabetes. However, highly variable rates of gastric emptying have been reported in type 1 and 2 diabetes, suggesting that development of GP in

  4. Non-invasive brain stimulation for the treatment of brain diseases in childhood and adolescence: state of the art, current limits and future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo Mario Vicario

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades interest in application of non-invasive brain stimulation for enhancing neural functions is growing continuously. However, the use of such techniques in pediatric populations remains rather limited and mainly confined to the treatment of severe neurological and psychiatric diseases. In this article we provide a complete review of non-invasive brain stimulation studies conducted in pediatric populations. We also provide a brief discussion about the current limitations and future directions in a field of research still very young and full of issues to be explored.

  5. Best Friends’ Discussions of Social Dilemmas

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, Kristina L.; Malti, Tina; Killen, Melanie; Rubin, Kenneth H.

    2013-01-01

    Peer relationships, particularly friendships, have been theorized to contribute to how children and adolescents think about social and moral issues. The current study examined how young adolescent best friends (191 dyads; 53.4% female) reason together about multifaceted social dilemmas and how their reasoning is related to friendship quality. Mutually-recognized friendship dyads were videotaped discussing dilemmas entailing moral, social-conventional and prudential/pragmatic issues. Both dyad...

  6. Discussing three pillars of corporate governance

    OpenAIRE

    Andrei STĂNCULESCU; Eugen MITRICĂ

    2015-01-01

    This paper is a meaningful attempt to critically analyze the cohesion and relationship between three fundamental pillars of the corporate governance system: the shareholders, the board of directors and the employees. We present the characteristics of each pillar and discuss its relevance in corporate governance. A couple of world-renowned corporate governance models are considered. A synthetic conclusion is drawn based on information presented.

  7. Finding Malicious Cyber Discussions in Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-02

    can post information using news feeds or forums that only contain a small percent- age of cyber content. A more efficient and effective approach we...moderated set of forums with main topics called sub-Reddit and many indi - vidual threads or discussions under each topic. Twitter data consist of short...buy, cell, chip, chord, circuit, clock, credit, current, datasheet, design, electron, film , frac, frequency, fund, graph, hi, invest, microcontroller

  8. Intertextuality in Text-based Discussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidah Mohd Ismail

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One  of  the  main  issues  often  discussed  among  academics  is  how  to  encourage  active participation by students during classroom discussions. This applies particularly to students at the tertiary level who are expected to possess creative and critical thinking skills. Hence, this paper reports on a study that examined how these skills were demonstrated by a group of university students  who  employed  intertextual  links  during  a  follow-up  reading  activity involving  small-group  text  discussions.  Thirty  undergraduates  who  were  in  their  fifth semester of a TESL degree programme were prescribed reading texts consisting of two chapters taken  from  a  book.  Findings  reveal  that  intertextual  links  made  during  text discussions created successfully a “collaborative environment” where beliefs and values were shared judicially among participants. Pedagogical implications for ESL classroom practice include  heightening  the  awareness  amongst  academics  and  students  of  the  role  of intertextuality in order to promote students’ use of their critical and creative thinking skills in a supportive classroom environment.

  9. Islamophobia? The German Discussion about Islamophobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Bötticher

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Islamophobia is a term which is relatively new in the world of social science; it is a neologism. Kofi Annan has warned about it but there is not a clear, undoubted concept to it yet – and it is questionable if there ever will be, especially if one looks into the German controversy about the term. The German discussion is not unique though, and must fall into the pattern of wider, European discussion about the Islamic minority. Prominent figures of Islamic hatred in Europe are for instance Oriana Fallaci and Brigitte Bardot. Against them, there stands a more liberal community that does not want to follow the language of violence and hatred. Two different standpoints are the main poles of discussion. One group wants to use Islamophobia as a concept, the other group opposes the term. In between, there is the scientific concept of Islamophobia that is threatened to be pulverized before it is even fully conceptualized. In the middle position there are also intellectuals known as Islamic reformers who argue that Islamophobia should be replaced by the term Islam-critique.

  10. Stimulating Strategically Aligned Behaviour among Employees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.B.M. van Riel (Cees); G.A.J.M. Berens (Guido); M. Dijkstra (Majorie)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractStrategically aligned behaviour (SAB), i.e., employee action that is consistent with the company’s strategy, is of vital importance to companies. This study provides insights into the way managers can promote such behaviour among employees by stimulating employee motivation and by

  11. Fidget Blankets: A Sensory Stimulation Outreach Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroustos, Kelly Reilly; Trautwein, Heidi; Kerns, Rachel; Sobota, Kristen Finley

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) include behaviors such as aberrant motor behavior, agitation, anxiety, apathy, delusions, depression, disinhibition, elation, hallucinations, irritability, and sleep or appetite changes. A student-led project to provide sensory stimulation in the form of "fidget blankets" developed into a community outreach program. The goal was to decrease the use of antipsychotics used for BPSD.

  12. Pretest online discussion groups to augment teaching and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Jonathan; Hasbargen, Barbara; Miziniak, Halina

    2010-01-01

    Tests and final examination scores of three semesters of control students in a nursing foundation course were compared with tests and final examination scores of three semesters of participating students. Participating students were offered access to an asynchronous pretest online discussion activity with a faculty e-moderator. While the simplified Bloom's revised taxonomy assisted in creating appropriate preparatory test and final examination questions for pretest online discussion, Salmon's five-stage online method provided direction to the e-moderator on how to encourage students to achieve Bloom's higher-order thinking skills during the pretest online discussions. Statistical analysis showed the pretest online discussion activity had a generally positive impact on tests and final examination scores, when controlling for a number of possible confounding variables, including instructor, cumulative grade point average, age, and credit hours.

  13. International Discussion Meeting on High-Tc Superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    1988-01-01

    In the past two years conferences on superconductivity have been characterized by the attendance of hundreds of scientists. Consequently, the organizers were forced to schedule numerous parallel sessions and poster presentations with an almost unsurveyable amount of information. It was, therefore, felt that a more informal get-together, providing ample time for a thourough discussion of some topics of current interest in high-temperature superconductivity, was timely and benefitial for leading scientists as well as for newcomers in the field. The present volume contains the majority of papers presented at the International Discussion Meeting on High-Tc Superconductors held at the Mauterndorf Castle in the Austrian Alps from February 7 to 11, 1988. Each subject was introduced in review form by a few invited speakers and then discussed together with the contributed poster presentations. These discussion sessions chaired by selected scientists turned out to be the highlights of the meeting, not only because all ...

  14. Transcranial magnetic stimulation, deep brain stimulation and personal identity: ethical questions, and neuroethical approaches for medical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jotterand, Fabrice; Giordano, James

    2011-10-01

    Neurotechnology provides means to engage micro- and macrostructural networks of the brain to both mitigate the manifestations of several neurological and psychiatric disorders, and alter cognition and motoric activity. Such capacity also generates questions of how these interventions may affect personal identity. This paper discusses the ethical implications regarding changes to personal identity that arise from the therapeutic use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and deep brain stimulation (DBS) technologies. In addition, we raise the question of whether changes in personal identity, as a side effect of these interventions, are ethically acceptable and whether such alterations of personality foster patients' sense of well-being and autonomy. First, we provide a series of case vignettes that afford an overview of the ways that various neurological interventions can affect personal identity. Second, we offer a brief working definition of personal identity in order to delineate an ethical framework that we deem necessary for the responsible use of neurostimulation technologies. In so doing, we argue that neurostimulation therapy, as a doctoring act, should be directed, and adherent to goals of restoring and/or preserving patients' personal identity. To this end, we offer an ethical framework that we believe enables sound decisions about the right and good use of TMS and DBS.

  15. [Virtual discussion groups: a proposal for nursing teaching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Pai, Daiane; Lautert, Liana

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes a teaching experience aimed at providing interactivity to the technique of field diary by using a virtual learning environment. The educational proposal derives from the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS)'s Teaching Training Program of the Stricto Sensu Post-Graduation Program in Nursing, in which the author, a Master's degree candidate, oriented by her advisor, proposed forming virtual discussion groups in order to write the field diary for an undergraduate discipline in Nursing, with the aim of providing an opportunity for a joint discussion of academic experiences in the realm of practice. The instructors of the discipline in which the proposal was developed also participated in the activities. The virtual technology gave new dynamism to the technique of field diary, making possible an exchange of experiences among the students, the instructor and the author, as well as moments of reflection and discussion regarding the themes faced in the Nursing practice.

  16. A Blueprint for Implementing Small-Group Collaborative Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu-Jones, Lisa; Proctor, C. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The adoption of the Common Core in many states across the country means we need to explore instructional approaches that promote student language use in order to meet many of the complex linguistic standards that comprise the Common Core. In this Teaching Tip, we provide a blueprint for a 4-week collaborative discussion mini-unit that a second…

  17. A Discussion of Art Therapy as a Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Linda M.

    1998-01-01

    Examines four factors that may cause art therapists to reject the scientific method. Gives an overview of historical developments in science to provide a background for a discussion of each factor. Includes material from anthropology, psychoanalysis, and alternative health care. Offers suggestions for training art therapists in scientific…

  18. What Is the Use of Theory? A Psychoanalytic Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britzman, Deborah P.

    2012-01-01

    Freud asking whether psychoanalysis could be taught in the university, and then whether it could be learned, provides an occasion for asking about the emotional uses of theory. The paper draws from literature, clinical writing and pedagogy to build a psychoanalytic discussion of teaching and learning that takes seriously phantasies of knowledge…

  19. Lexical Bundles: Facilitating University "Talk" in Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Chan Swee; Kashiha, Hadi; Tan, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Group discussion forms an integral language experience for most language learners, providing them with an opportunity to express themselves in a naturalistic setting. Multi-word expressions are commonly used and one of them is lexical bundles. Lexical bundles are types of extended collocations that occur more commonly than we expect; they are…

  20. Revision by Means of Computer-Mediated Peer Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, Benson; Mercer, Neil; Er, Siew Shin

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we provide a discussion on our revision method (termed "prescriptive tutoring") aimed at revealing students' misconceptions and misunderstandings by getting them to solve physics problems with an anonymous partner via the computer. It is currently being implemented and evaluated in a public secondary school in Singapore,…

  1. Promoting Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors: The Heart Smart Discussion Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCalla, Judith R.; Juarez, Cheryl L.; Williams, Lucia E.; Brown, Judy; Chipungu, Katie; Saab, Patrice G.

    2012-01-01

    The health habits of high school students affect not only their current health but also their future risk for obesity and cardiovascular disease. The "Heart Smart Discussion Activity" was developed to provide information about heart health, good nutrition, physical activity, and stress management. It encourages students to discuss…

  2. Myoelectric intuitive control and transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the forearm for vibrotactile sensation feedback applied to a 3D printed prosthetic hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germany, Enrique I; Pino, Esteban J; Aqueveque, Pablo E

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the development of a myoelectric prosthetic hand based on a 3D printed model. A myoelectric control strategy based on artificial neural networks is implemented on a microcontroller for online position estimation. Position estimation performance achieves a correlation index of 0.78. Also a study involving transcutaneous electrical stimulation was performed to provide tactile feedback. A series of stimulations with controlled parameters were tested on five able-body subjects. A single channel stimulator was used, positioning the electrodes 8 cm on the wrist over the ulnar and median nerve. Controlling stimulation parameters such as intensity, frequency and pulse width, the subjects were capable of distinguishing different sensations over the palm of the hand. Three main sensations where achieved: tickling, pressure and pain. Tickling and pressure were discretized into low, moderate and high according to the magnitude of the feeling. The parameters at which each sensation was obtained are further discussed in this paper.

  3. Evaluation of Intradural Stimulation Efficiency and Selectivity in a Computational Model of Spinal Cord Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Bryan; Lad, Shivanand P.; Grill, Warren M.

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is an alternative or adjunct therapy to treat chronic pain, a prevalent and clinically challenging condition. Although SCS has substantial clinical success, the therapy is still prone to failures, including lead breakage, lead migration, and poor pain relief. The goal of this study was to develop a computational model of SCS and use the model to compare activation of neural elements during intradural and extradural electrode placement. We constructed five patient-specific models of SCS. Stimulation thresholds predicted by the model were compared to stimulation thresholds measured intraoperatively, and we used these models to quantify the efficiency and selectivity of intradural and extradural SCS. Intradural placement dramatically increased stimulation efficiency and reduced the power required to stimulate the dorsal columns by more than 90%. Intradural placement also increased selectivity, allowing activation of a greater proportion of dorsal column fibers before spread of activation to dorsal root fibers, as well as more selective activation of individual dermatomes at different lateral deviations from the midline. Further, the results suggest that current electrode designs used for extradural SCS are not optimal for intradural SCS, and a novel azimuthal tripolar design increased stimulation selectivity, even beyond that achieved with an intradural paddle array. Increased stimulation efficiency is expected to increase the battery life of implantable pulse generators, increase the recharge interval of rechargeable implantable pulse generators, and potentially reduce stimulator volume. The greater selectivity of intradural stimulation may improve the success rate of SCS by mitigating the sensitivity of pain relief to malpositioning of the electrode. The outcome of this effort is a better quantitative understanding of how intradural electrode placement can potentially increase the selectivity and efficiency of SCS, which, in turn

  4. Evaluation of intradural stimulation efficiency and selectivity in a computational model of spinal cord stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Howell

    Full Text Available Spinal cord stimulation (SCS is an alternative or adjunct therapy to treat chronic pain, a prevalent and clinically challenging condition. Although SCS has substantial clinical success, the therapy is still prone to failures, including lead breakage, lead migration, and poor pain relief. The goal of this study was to develop a computational model of SCS and use the model to compare activation of neural elements during intradural and extradural electrode placement. We constructed five patient-specific models of SCS. Stimulation thresholds predicted by the model were compared to stimulation thresholds measured intraoperatively, and we used these models to quantify the efficiency and selectivity of intradural and extradural SCS. Intradural placement dramatically increased stimulation efficiency and reduced the power required to stimulate the dorsal columns by more than 90%. Intradural placement also increased selectivity, allowing activation of a greater proportion of dorsal column fibers before spread of activation to dorsal root fibers, as well as more selective activation of individual dermatomes at different lateral deviations from the midline. Further, the results suggest that current electrode designs used for extradural SCS are not optimal for intradural SCS, and a novel azimuthal tripolar design increased stimulation selectivity, even beyond that achieved with an intradural paddle array. Increased stimulation efficiency is expected to increase the battery life of implantable pulse generators, increase the recharge interval of rechargeable implantable pulse generators, and potentially reduce stimulator volume. The greater selectivity of intradural stimulation may improve the success rate of SCS by mitigating the sensitivity of pain relief to malpositioning of the electrode. The outcome of this effort is a better quantitative understanding of how intradural electrode placement can potentially increase the selectivity and efficiency of SCS

  5. Rhinoplasty across Latin America: case discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobo, Roxana; Montes, Jose Juan; Patrocinio, Lucas G; Pedroza, Fernando; Patrocinio, Jose A

    2013-06-01

    A presentation of four different rhinoplasty cases performed by four different surgeons in Latin America is presented. For each case, presurgical photographs and discussion of the patient are presented. Intrasurgical photographs and description of surgical techniques employed as well as postsurgical pictures are included for each case. This will give readers the opportunity of seeing how different surgical techniques can be used effectively in treating patients of mixed races with good cosmetic long-term results. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. Distributed low-frequency functional electrical stimulation delays muscle fatigue compared to conventional stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malesević, Nebojsa M; Popović, Lana Z; Schwirtlich, Laszlo; Popović, Dejan B

    2010-10-01

    We present a low-frequency stimulation method via multi-pad electrodes for delaying muscle fatigue. We compared two protocols for muscle activation of the quadriceps in paraplegics. One protocol involved a large cathode at 30 HZ (HPR, high pulse-rate), and the other involved four smaller cathodes at 16 HZ (LPR, low pulse-rate). The treatment included 30-min daily sessions for 20 days. One leg was treated with the HPR protocol and the other with the LPR protocol. Knee-joint torque was measured before and after therapy to assess the time interval before the knee-joint torque decreased to 70% of the initial value. The HPR therapy provided greater increases in muscle endurance and force in prolonged training. Yet the LPR stimulation produced less muscle fatigue compared to the HPR stimulation. The results suggest that HPR is the favored protocol for training, and LPR is better suited for prolonged stimulation.

  7. Preferred provider organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, J D

    1984-05-01

    The 1980s has marked the beginning of a new alternative health care delivery system: the preferred provider organization ( PPO ). This system has developed from the health maintenance organization model and is predominant in California and Colorado. A PPO is a group of providers, usually hospitals and doctors, who agree to provide health care to subscribers for a negotiated fee that is usually discounted. Preferred provider organizations are subject to peer review and strict use controls in exchange for a consistent volume of patients and speedy turnaround on claims payments. This article describes the factors leading to the development of PPOs and the implications for occupational therapy.

  8. Spinal Cord Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a surgical treatment for chronic neuropathic pain that is refractory to other treatment. Originally described by Shealy et al. in 1967(1), it is used to treat a range of conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS I)(2), angina pectoris(3), radicular...... pain after failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS)(4), pain due to peripheral nerve injury, stump pain(5), peripheral vascular disease(6) and diabetic neuropathy(7,8); whereas phantom pain(9), postherpetic neuralgia(10), chronic visceral pain(11), and pain after partial spinal cord injury(12) remain more...

  9. Semiology of aphasias: a critical discussion / Semiologia das afasias: uma discussão crítica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana do Carmo Novaes Pinto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the semiology of aphasias, which started being developed in the 19th century by Broca and Wernicke. We do not provide an exhaustive list of symptoms and syndromes to address the theme, since we aim to critically discuss why the semiology of aphasias is still based mainly on organic perspectives in clinical practice and scientific research. We also discuss the contributions of Luria and Jakobson to a better understanding of how language is affected in aphasias and how Modern Linguistics, in special the Discursive Neurolinguistics, may enlighten the debate. We analyze some data to illustrate the theoretical and methodological assumptions of the above mentioned approaches and also discuss the excessive strength that classifications have in the clinical context.

  10. Long-term motor cortex stimulation for phantom limb pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Erlick A C; Moore, Tom; Moir, Liz; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2015-04-01

    We present the long-term course of motor cortex stimulation to relieve a case of severe burning phantom arm pain after brachial plexus injury and amputation. During 16-year follow-up the device continued to provide efficacious analgesia. However, several adjustments of stimulation parameters were required, as were multiple pulse generator changes, antibiotics for infection and one electrode revision due to lead migration. Steady increases in stimulation parameters over time were required. One of the longest follow-ups of motor cortex stimulation is described; the case illustrates challenges and pitfalls in neuromodulation for chronic pain, demonstrating strategies for maintaining analgesia and overcoming tolerance.

  11. Wireless control of functional electrical stimulation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matjacić, Z; Munih, M; Bajd, T; Kralj, A; Benko, H; Obreza, P

    1997-03-01

    With the assistance of crutches and functional electrical stimulation (FES), we are able to restore standing and simple gait in some spinal cord injured (SCI) patients. In present rehabilitative systems, the patient divides the gait cycle into stance and swing phases via pushbuttons mounted on the handles of the crutches, which are hardwired to the functional electrical stimulator. The surface-mount technology based telemetry system, which makes use of the radiofrequency medium at 40 MHz, was developed to provide wireless control of the FES system. Signals from crutch pushbuttons were coded and transferred from the transmitter to the receiver. The receiver was firmly attached to the patient's waist and was connected to the stimulator.

  12. Accelerating Cleanup: Focus on 2006. Discussion draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1997-06-01

    This executive summary addresses the activities associated with the National Transuranic (TRU) Program managed by the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO). The CAO programmatically reports to the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management and receives administrative support through the Albuquerque Operations Office. The mission of the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) is to protect human health and the environment by opening and operating the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for site disposal of TRU waste and by establishing an effective system for management of TRU waste from generation to disposal. It includes personnel assigned to the CAO, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site operations, and other activities associated with the National TRU Program. The CAO develops and directs implementation of the program, while the DOE Headquarters establishes policy and guidelines. The CAO assesses compliance with the program guidance, as well as the commonality of activities and assumptions among all the sites. Since the development of the February 28, 1997, database used to develop this Discussion Draft, the opening of the WIPP facility for receipt of Contact Handled waste has been delayed from November 1997 to May 1998. This slippage is significant enough to require a change in the milestones and volumes included in the documents to be reviewed by our stakeholders. Changes have been incorporated into this Discussion Draft and its supporting Project Baseline Summaries (PBSs).

  13. Student decision making in large group discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustusch, Mary Bridget; Ptak, Corey; Sayre, Eleanor C.; Franklin, Scott V.

    2015-04-01

    It is increasingly common in physics classes for students to work together to solve problems and perform laboratory experiments. When students work together, they need to negotiate the roles and decision making within the group. We examine how a large group of students negotiates authority as part of their two week summer College Readiness Program at Rochester Institute of Technology. The program is designed to develop metacognitive skills in first generation and Deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) STEM undergraduates through cooperative group work, laboratory experimentation, and explicit reflection exercises. On the first full day of the program, the students collaboratively developed a sign for the word ``metacognition'' for which there is not a sign in American Sign Language. This presentation will focus on three aspects of the ensuing discussion: (1) how the instructor communicated expectations about decision making; (2) how the instructor promoted student-driven decision making rather than instructor-driven policy; and (3) one student's shifts in decision making behavior. We conclude by discussing implications of this research for activity-based physics instruction.

  14. Building Service Provider Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandl, Kristin; Jaura, Manya; Ørberg Jensen, Peter D.

    In this paper we study whether and how the interaction between clients and the service providers contributes to the development of capabilities in service provider firms. In situations where such a contribution occurs, we analyze how different types of activities in the production process...

  15. Providing free autopoweroff plugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten Lynge; Hansen, Lars Gårn; Fjordbak, Troels

    2012-01-01

    Experimental evidence of the effect of providing households with cheap energy saving technology is sparse. We present results from a field experiment in which autopoweroff plugs were provided free of charge to randomly selected households. We use propensity score matching to find treatment effects...

  16. Overview of the Clinical Applications of Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekwilder, J.P.; Beems, T.

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has become an established therapy for difficult-to-treat epilepsy during the past 20 years. The vagus nerve provides a unique entrance to the brain. Electrical stimulation of this structure in the cervical region allows direct modulative access to subcortical brain

  17. Luminescence from potassium feldspars stimulated by infrared and green light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duller, G.A.T.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    1993-01-01

    A series of experiments are reported which investigate stimulated luminescence from potassium feldspar. The aim is to provide a basic phenomenological description of the response of the material to stimulation by heat, infrared radiation (875 DELTA 80 nm) and a green light wavelength band from 5 15...

  18. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) in dentistry- A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasat, Vikrant; Gupta, Aditi; Ladda, Ruchi; Kathariya, Mitesh; Saluja, Harish; Farooqui, Anjum-Ara

    2014-12-01

    Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-pharmacological method which is widely used by medical and paramedical professionals for the management of acute and chronic pain in a variety of conditions. Similarly, it can be utilized for the management of pain during various dental procedures as well as pain due to various conditions affecting maxillofacial region. This review aims to provide an insight into clinical research evidence available for the analgesic and non analgesic uses of TENS in pediatric as well as adult patients related to the field of dentistry. Also, an attempt is made to briefly discuss history of therapeutic electricity, mechanism of action of TENS, components of TENs equipment, types, techniques of administration, advantages and contradictions of TENS. With this we hope to raise awareness among dental fraternity regarding its dental applications thereby increasing its use in dentistry. Key words:Dentistry, pain, TENS.

  19. Toward rational design of electrical stimulation strategies for epilepsy control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderam, Sridhar; Gluckman, Bruce; Reato, Davide; Bikson, Marom

    2009-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is emerging as a viable alternative for epilepsy patients whose seizures are not alleviated by drugs or surgery. Its attractions are temporal and spatial specificity of action, flexibility of waveform parameters and timing, and the perception that its effects are reversible unlike resective surgery. However, despite significant advances in our understanding of mechanisms of neural electrical stimulation, clinical electrotherapy for seizures relies heavily on empirical tuning of parameters and protocols. We highlight concurrent treatment goals with potentially conflicting design constraints that must be resolved when formulating rational strategies for epilepsy electrotherapy: namely seizure reduction versus cognitive impairment, stimulation efficacy versus tissue safety, and mechanistic insight versus clinical pragmatism. First, treatment markers, objectives, and metrics relevant to electrical stimulation for epilepsy are discussed from a clinical perspective. Then the experimental perspective is presented, with the biophysical mechanisms and modalities of open-loop electrical stimulation, and the potential benefits of closed-loop control for epilepsy. PMID:19926525

  20. Deep brain stimulation: foundations and future trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aum, David J; Tierney, Travis S

    2018-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has emerged as a revolutionary treatment option for essential tremor (ET), Parkinson's disease (PD), idiopathic dystonia, and severe obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). This article reviews the historical foundations of DBS including basal ganglia pathophysiological models, classic principles of electrical stimulation, technical components of the DBS system, treatment risks, and future directions for DBS. Chronic high frequency stimulation induces a number of functional changes from fast physiological to slower metabolic effects and ultimately leads to structural reorganization of the brain, so-called neuroplasticity. Examples of each of these fast, slow, and long-term changes are given in the context of Parkinson's disease where these mechanisms have perhaps been the most intensely investigated. In particular, details of striatal dopamine release, expression of trophic factors, and a possible neuroprotective mechanism of DBS are highlighted. We close with a brief discussion of technical and clinical considerations for improvement. Deep brain stimulation will continue to offer a reversible and safe therapeutic option for a host of neurological conditions and remains one of the best windows into human brain physiology.

  1. Panel discussion: Gas emissions with diesel efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, J. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The second of three papers in the panel discussion outlined the characteristics of spark-ignited natural gas (SING) engines. Currently, the SING engine is considered less efficient than a diesel engine because of the reduced compression ratio, the use of air-throttles, retarded ignition for low NOx, and increased heat transfer. To improve upon these characteristics and to make the SING engine equal to, or even surpass the diesel engine in efficiency, more research work needs to be done on advanced controls. These include (knock, misfire, humidity detection), various ignition enhancements (variable energy/gap plug, long-life plug, laser ignition), and possibly camless operation (cylinder deactivation, throttleless operation). The late-cycle High Pressure Gas Injection (LaCHIP) as an alternate means of improving the efficiency of natural gas engines was also described.

  2. Discussion of Muskingum method parameter X

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Xiaofang

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The parameter X of the Muskingum method is a physical parameter that reflects the flood peak attenuation and hydrograph shape flattening of a diffusion wave in motion. In this paper, the historic process that hydrologists have undergone to find a physical explanation of this parameter is briefly discussed. Based on the fact that the Muskingum method is the second-order accuracy difference solution to the diffusion wave equation, its numerical stability condition is analyzed, and a conclusion is drawn: X ≤ 0.5 is the uniform condition satisfying the demands for its physical meaning and numerical stability. It is also pointed out that the methods that regard the sum of squares of differences between the calculated and observed discharges or stages as the objective function and the routing coefficients C0, C1 and C2 of the Muskingum method as the optimization parameters cannot guarantee the physical meaning of X.

  3. Helping business english learners improve discussion skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Lucia Uribe Enciso

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Developing discussion skills is a central task in Business English (BE, as doing business involves negotiating meaning and persuasivepower in order to realize one’s transactional intentions. A group of BE learners in Colombia did not recognize L2 verbal and non-verbal turnyieldingconventions, nor did they know how to interrupt or to deal with interruptions successfully. Additionally, they did not know how to dealwith backchannels. Consequently, some classroom activities were aimed at helping learners notice how spoken communication devices workin different cultures, using mechanisms to signpost their turn and deal with unexpected interruptions, and becoming familiar with backchannels.After eight three-hour lessons learners became more sensitive to spoken discourse elements and expanded their gambits and backchannelsrepertoire.

  4. Transgenerational epigenetic inheritance: an open discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Corina; Turecki, Gustavo

    2015-08-01

    Much controversy surrounds the idea of transgenerational epigenetics. Recent papers argue that epigenetic marks acquired through experience are passed to offspring, but as in much of the field of epigenetics, there is lack of precision in the definitions and perhaps too much eagerness to translate animal research to humans. Here, we review operational definitions of transgenerational inheritance and the processes of epigenetic programing during early development. Subsequently, based on this background, we critically examine some recent findings of studies investigating transgenerational inheritance. Finally, we discuss possible mechanisms that may explain transgenerational inheritance, including transmission of an epigenetic blueprint, which may predispose offspring to specific epigenetic patterning. Taken together, we conclude that presently, the evidence suggesting that acquired epigenetic marks are passed to the subsequent generation remains limited.

  5. Avoiding the Theory Trap When Discussing Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, David

    2006-02-01

    Public opinion polls tell us that we are losing the battle to explain the nature of evolution and its central role in science. One problem, I believe, is letting the opponents of evolution frame the discussion to our disadvantage. Framing involves the selective use of language or context to trigger responses, either support or opposition. As a prime example, we undercut our communications efforts with many nonscientists by defending the `theory of evolution.' Theory is the wrong word to use in addressing the public. In the contemporary U.S., theory means a hunch or idea that has not been established by evidence. It is thus no surprise that polls show that nearly three quarters of U.S. people think that ``evolution is commonly referred to as the theory of evolution because it has not yet been proven scientifically.'' Those who advocate adding ``only a theory'' disclaimers in textbooks know that to call evolution a theory is sufficient to undermine its acceptance.

  6. Faraday Discussions meeting Catalysis for Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Nico; Kondrat, Simon A; Shozi, Mzamo

    2017-05-02

    Welcome to Africa was the motto when after more than 100 years the flag ship conference series of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Faraday Discussions was hosted for the first time on the African Continent. Under the fitting topic 'Catalysis for Fuels' over 120 delegates followed the invitation by the conference chair Prof. Graham Hutchings FRS (Cardiff Catalysis Institute), his organizing committee and the co-organizing DST-NRF Centre of Excellence in Catalysis c*change (). In the presentations of 21 invited speakers and 59 posters, cutting edge research in the field of catalysis for fuels, designing new catalysts for synthetic fuels, hydrocarbon conversion in the production of synthetic fuels and novel photocatalysis was presented over the two-day meeting. The scene was set by the opening lecture of Prof. Enrique Iglesias (UC Berkeley) and wrapped-up with the concluding remarks by Philip Gibson (SASOL).

  7. WTC. A discussion on built space regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Mihăilă

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Before 9/11 WTC was an international landmark. The definition of the two high-rise buildings identity, their tourist, social, visual and economic significance, disappeared with the destruction of their materiality. As a result, the contemplative visual and unwritten discourse of the Lower Manhattan disappeared together with the architectural, urban, technological essence and also with the philosophy of stability and equilibrium of a prosperous society. At the social-mental level this event triggers a crisis in personal and collective consciences (of the American Nation but also of the Nations, and a crisis of humanity. The architectural - urban and ideas competition organized to select the best urban-social-architectural concept proved to be a difficult task. Not only it had to “fill” a particular place on earth, but it also needed to configure a philosophy of place that would ‘heal” the wounds of the local and international communities, namely the lack of security and prosperity brought on by a no longer hidden technology of aggression bringing cities and communities under threats never experienced before at times of peace. In its first part the article discusses the competition, proposals and the finalized urban project. The particular challenges related to the selection of design in the case of WTC are doubled by a certain complexity related to the institutional arrangements common to most large urban development projects. It is also clear that there is interdependency between the project governance and the project results. These aspects are discussed in the second part of the article.

  8. Electrical Stimulation of the Retina to Produce Artificial Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, James D; Walston, Steven T; Humayun, Mark S

    2016-10-14

    Retinal prostheses aim to restore vision to blind individuals suffering from retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. These devices function by electrically stimulating surviving retinal neurons, whose activation is interpreted by the brain as a visual percept. Many prostheses are currently under development. They are categorized as epiretinal, subretinal, and suprachoroidal prostheses on the basis of the placement of the stimulating microelectrode array. Each can activate ganglion cells through direct or indirect stimulation. The response of retinal neurons to these modes of stimulation are discussed in detail and are placed in context of the visual percept they are likely to evoke. This article further reviews challenges faced by retinal prosthesis and discusses potential solutions to address them.

  9. Discussion paper on managing composite blade waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skelton, Kristen

    recyclable and treated accordingly. Nevertheless, wind turbine blades represent a challenge due to the materials used and their complex composition. The objective of this research note is to provide an overview of the different methods used for sectioning and recycling wind turbine blades as well...

  10. Admiral discusses Navy humanitarian aid efforts

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, John; Kiel, Jackie

    2006-01-01

    Rear Adm. Michael LeFever, Commander of the Navy’s Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) 1, which provided humanitarian aid to Pakistan after an October 2005 earthquake there killed more than 70,000 people, will speak to Naval Postgraduate School students and faculty about the relief operation.

  11. Electrical stimulation for urinary incontinence in women: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Lucas; Santos, Thais Guimarães dos; Souza, Alessandra Borba Anton de; Nygaard, Christiana Campani; Silva Filho, Irenio Gomes da

    2013-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is commonly recommended to treat urinary incontinence in women. It includes several techniques that can be used to improve stress, urge, and mixed symptoms. However, the magnitude of the alleged benefits is not completely established. To determine the effects of electrical stimulation in women with symptoms or urodynamic diagnoses of stress, urge, and mixed incontinence. Our review included articles published between January 1980 and January 2012. We used the search terms ″urinary incontinence″, ″electrical stimulation ″, ″ intravaginal ″, ″ tibial nerve ″ and ″ neuromodulation ″ for studies including female patients. We evaluated randomized trials that included electrical stimulation in at least one arm of the trial, to treat women with urinary incontinence. Two reviewers independently assessed the data from the trials, for inclusion or exclusion, and methodological analysis. A total of 30 randomized clinical trials were included. Most of the trials involved intravaginal electrical stimulation. Intravaginal electrical stimulation showed effectiveness in treating urge urinary incontinence, but reported contradictory data regarding stress and mixed incontinence. Tibial-nerve stimulation showed promising results in randomized trials with a short follow-up period. Sacral-nerve stimulation yielded interesting results in refractory patients. Tibial-nerve and intravaginal stimulation have shown effectiveness in treating urge urinary incontinence. Sacral-nerve stimulation provided benefits in refractory cases. Presently available data provide no support for the use of intravaginal electrical stimulation to treat stress urinary incontinence in women. Further randomized trials are necessary to determine the magnitude of benefits, with long-term follow-up, and the effectiveness of other electrical-stimulation therapies.

  12. Stimulated Brillouin scatter and stimulated ion Bernstein scatter during electron gyroharmonic heating experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, H.; Scales, W. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Samimi, A.; Mahmoudian, A.; Briczinski, S. J.; McCarrick, M. J.

    2013-09-01

    Results of secondary radiation, Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission (SEE), produced during ionospheric modification experiments using ground-based high-power radio waves are reported. These results obtained at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility specifically considered the generation of Magnetized Stimulated Brillouin Scatter (MSBS) and Stimulated Ion Bernstein Scatter (SIBS) lines in the SEE spectrum when the transmitter frequency is near harmonics of the electron gyrofrequency. The heater antenna beam angle effect was investigated on MSBS in detail and shows a new spectral line postulated to be generated near the upper hybrid resonance region due to ion acoustic wave interaction. Frequency sweeping experiments near the electron gyroharmonics show for the first time the transition from MSBS to SIBS lines as the heater pump frequency approaches the gyroharmonic. Significantly far from the gyroharmonic, MSBS lines dominate, while close to the gyroharmonic, SIBS lines strengthen while MSBS lines weaken. New possibilities for diagnostic information are discussed in light of these new observations.

  13. Literature Discussion Groups: The Role of Teacher Talk in Discussing Social Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how teacher talk influenced the way issues of race, culture, and disability were addressed in literature discussion groups. Discussions of one teacher with two groups of students, of varying reading levels, were studied. The research questions were: 1) How does the teacher's perspective on the students…

  14. L'environnement providence

    OpenAIRE

    Bouleau, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    We discuss, by a philosophical method inspired of Quine, the nature of the risk posed by GMOs. Our analysis concludes to the religious origin of the belief of researchers to overall resilience of nature to perturbations of the genetic molecular combination.; Nous discutons, par une méthode philosophique inspirée de Quine, la nature du risque que représentent les OGM. Notre analyse conclut à la nature religieuse de la croyance des chercheurs à une résilience globale de la nature aux perturbati...

  15. Luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone synergy: A review of role in controlled ovarian hyper-stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottumukkala Achyuta Rama Raju

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Luteinizing hormone (LH in synergy with follicle stimulating hormone (FSH stimulates normal follicular growth and ovulation. FSH is frequently used in assisted reproductive technology (ART. Recent studies have facilitated better understanding on the complementary role of the LH to FSH in regulation of the follicle; however, role of LH in stimulation of follicle, optimal dosage of LH in stimulation and its importance in advanced aged patients has been a topic of discussion among medical fraternity. Though the administration of exogenous LH with FSH is obligatory for controlled ovarian stimulation in patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, there is still a paucity of information of its usage in other patient population. In this review we looked in to the multiple roles that LH plays complementary to FSH to better understand the LH requirement in patients undergoing ART.

  16. Non-invasive neuromuscular electrical stimulation in patients with central nervous system lesions: an educational review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhfried, Othmar; Crevenna, Richard; Fialka-Moser, Veronika; Paternostro-Sluga, Tatjana

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this educational review is to provide an overview of the clinical application of transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the extremities in patients with upper motor neurone lesions. In general two methods of electrical stimulation can be distinguished: (i) therapeutic electrical stimulation, and (ii) functional electrical stimulation. Therapeutic electrical stimulation improves neuromuscular functional condition by strengthening muscles, increasing motor control, reducing spasticity, decreasing pain and increasing range of motion. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation may be used for neuromuscular electrical stimulation inducing repetitive muscle contraction, electromyography-triggered neuromuscular electrical stimulation, position-triggered electrical stimulation and subsensory or sensory transcutaneous electric stimulation. Functional electrical stimulation provokes muscle contraction and thereby produces a functionally useful movement during stimulation. In patients with spinal cord injuries or stroke, electrical upper limb neuroprostheses are applied to enhance upper limb and hand function, and electrical lower limb neuroprostheses are applied for restoration of standing and walking. For example, a dropped foot stimulator is used to trigger ankle dorsiflexion to restore gait function. A review of the literature and clinical experience of the use of therapeutic electrical stimulation as well as of functional electrical stimulation in combination with botulinum toxin, exercise therapy and/or splinting are presented. Although the evidence is limited we conclude that neuromuscular electrical stimulation in patients with central nervous system lesions can be an effective modality to improve function, and that combination with other treatments has an additive therapeutic effect.

  17. [Apparatus "Stimul-1" foe electric stimulation of muscles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianova, G G; Prokopenko, G I; Shabashevich, L B; Khvostov, L N

    1977-01-01

    The apparatus "Stimul-1" has been designed and recommended for batch production, its purpose being broad application in the medical practice of electrical stimulation of the muscles. For stimulation is used sinusoidal a.c. current with frequency of 2 kHz, which produces and effective contraction of the muscles without causing any sensation of pain. The unit is constructed by using up-to-date components, including microminiature logic circuits, operational amplifiers and field-effect transistors.

  18. Caesarean section in a parturient with a spinal cord stimulator.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sommerfield, D

    2010-01-01

    A 35-year-old G2P1 parturient at 32 weeks of gestation with an implanted spinal cord stimulator was admitted for urgent caesarean section. Spinal anaesthesia was performed below the spinal cord stimulator leads at the L4-5 level, and a healthy female infant was delivered. A basic description of the technology and resulting implications for the parturient are discussed.

  19. Soft Encapsulation of Flexible Electrical Stimulation Implant: Challenges and Innovations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Debelle

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this document we discuss the main challenges encountered when producing flexible electrical stimulation implants, and present our approach to solving them for prototype production. We include a study of the optimization of the flexible PCB design, the selection of additive manufacturing materials for the mold, and the chemical compatibility of the different materials. Our approach was tested on a flexible gastro-stimulator as part of the ENDOGES research program.

  20. Mechanisms and Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, James; Bikson, Marom; Kappenman, Emily S; Clark, Vincent P; Coslett, H Branch; Hamblin, Michael R; Hamilton, Roy; Jankord, Ryan; Kozumbo, Walter J; McKinley, R Andrew; Nitsche, Michael A; Reilly, J Patrick; Richardson, Jessica; Wurzman, Rachel; Calabrese, Edward

    2017-01-01

    The US Air Force Office of Scientific Research convened a meeting of researchers in the fields of neuroscience, psychology, engineering, and medicine to discuss most pressing issues facing ongoing research in the field of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and related techniques. In this study, we present opinions prepared by participants of the meeting, focusing on the most promising areas of research, immediate and future goals for the field, and the potential for hormesis theory to inform tDCS research. Scientific, medical, and ethical considerations support the ongoing testing of tDCS in healthy and clinical populations, provided best protocols are used to maximize safety. Notwithstanding the need for ongoing research, promising applications include enhancing vigilance/attention in healthy volunteers, which can accelerate training and support learning. Commonly, tDCS is used as an adjunct to training/rehabilitation tasks with the goal of leftward shift in the learning/treatment effect curves. Although trials are encouraging, elucidating the basic mechanisms of tDCS will accelerate validation and adoption. To this end, biomarkers (eg, clinical neuroimaging and findings from animal models) can support hypotheses linking neurobiological mechanisms and behavioral effects. Dosage can be optimized using computational models of current flow and understanding dose-response. Both biomarkers and dosimetry should guide individualized interventions with the goal of reducing variability. Insights from other applied energy domains, including ionizing radiation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and low-level laser (light) therapy, can be prudently leveraged.

  1. Mechanisms and Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Giordano

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The US Air Force Office of Scientific Research convened a meeting of researchers in the fields of neuroscience, psychology, engineering, and medicine to discuss most pressing issues facing ongoing research in the field of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS and related techniques. In this study, we present opinions prepared by participants of the meeting, focusing on the most promising areas of research, immediate and future goals for the field, and the potential for hormesis theory to inform tDCS research. Scientific, medical, and ethical considerations support the ongoing testing of tDCS in healthy and clinical populations, provided best protocols are used to maximize safety. Notwithstanding the need for ongoing research, promising applications include enhancing vigilance/attention in healthy volunteers, which can accelerate training and support learning. Commonly, tDCS is used as an adjunct to training/rehabilitation tasks with the goal of leftward shift in the learning/treatment effect curves. Although trials are encouraging, elucidating the basic mechanisms of tDCS will accelerate validation and adoption. To this end, biomarkers (eg, clinical neuroimaging and findings from animal models can support hypotheses linking neurobiological mechanisms and behavioral effects. Dosage can be optimized using computational models of current flow and understanding dose–response. Both biomarkers and dosimetry should guide individualized interventions with the goal of reducing variability. Insights from other applied energy domains, including ionizing radiation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and low-level laser (light therapy, can be prudently leveraged.

  2. Vagus nerve stimulation therapy in partial epilepsy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, Mariangela; Zavanone, Chiara; Dupont, Sophie; Restivo, Domenico A; Pavone, Antonino

    2016-09-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder characterized by recurrent, unprovoked epileptic seizures. The majority of people given a diagnosis of epilepsy have a good prognosis, but 20-30 % will develop drug-resistant epilepsy. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a neuromodulatory treatment that is used as an adjunctive therapy for treating people with medically refractory epilepsy. It consists of chronic intermittent electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve, delivered by a programmable pulse generator (Neuro-Cybernetic Prosthesis). In 1997, the Food and Drug Administration approved VNS as adjunctive treatment for medically refractory partial-onset seizures in adults and adolescents. This article reviews the literature from 1988 to nowadays. We discuss thoroughly the anatomy and physiology of vagus nerve and the potential mechanisms of actions and clinical applications involved in VNS therapy, as well as the management, safety, tolerability and effectiveness of VNS therapy. VNS for partial seizures appears to be an effective and well tolerated treatment in adult and pediatric patients. People noted improvements in feelings of well-being, alertness, memory and thinking skills, as well as mood. The adverse effect profile is substantially different from the adverse effect profile associated with antiepileptic drugs, making VNS a potential alternative for patients with difficulty tolerating antiepileptic drug adverse effects. Despite the passing years and the advent of promising neuromodulation technologies, VNS remains an efficacy treatment for people with medically refractory epilepsy. Past and ongoing investigations in other indications have provided signals of the therapeutic potential in a wide variety of conditions.

  3. The use of a virtual learning environment in promoting virtual journal clubs and case-based discussions in trauma and orthopaedic postgraduate medical education: the Leicester experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palan, J; Roberts, V; Bloch, B; Kulkarni, A; Bhowal, B; Dias, J

    2012-09-01

    The use of journal clubs and, more recently, case-based discussions in order to stimulate debate among orthopaedic surgeons lies at the heart of orthopaedic training and education. A virtual learning environment can be used as a platform to host virtual journal clubs and case-based discussions. This has many advantages in the current climate of constrained time and diminishing trainee and consultant participation in such activities. The virtual environment model opens up participation and improves access to journal clubs and case-based discussions, provides reusable educational content, establishes an electronic record of participation for individuals, makes use of multimedia material (including clinical imaging and photographs) for discussion, and finally, allows participants to link case-based discussions with relevant papers in the journal club. The Leicester experience highlights the many advantages and some of the potential difficulties in setting up such a virtual system and provides useful guidance for those considering such a system in their own training programme. As a result of the virtual learning environment, trainee participation has increased and there is a trend for increased consultant input in the virtual journal club and case-based discussions. It is likely that the use of virtual environments will expand to encompass newer technological approaches to personal learning and professional development.

  4. SU-A-BRA-05: Panel Discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montemayor, V. [Germantown Academy (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Vic Montemayor - No one has been more passionate about improving the quality and effectiveness of the teaching of Medical Physics than Bill Hendee. It was in August of 2008 that the first AAPM Workshop on Becoming a Better Teacher of Medical Physics was held, organized and run by Bill Hendee. This was followed up in July of 2010 with a summer school on the same topic, again organized by Bill. There has been continued interest in alternate approaches to teaching medical physics since those initial gatherings. The momentum established by these workshops is made clear each year in the annual Innovation in Medical Physics Education session, which highlights work being done in all forms of medical physics education, from one-on-one residencies or classroom presentations to large-scale program revisions and on-line resources for international audiences. This symposium, presented on behalf of the Education Council, highlights the work of three finalists from past Innovation in Education sessions. Each will be presenting their approaches to and innovations in teaching medical physics. It is hoped that audience members interested in trying something new in their teaching of medical physics will find some of these ideas and approaches readily applicable to their own classrooms. Rebecca Howell - The presentation will discuss ways to maximize classroom learning, i.e., increasing the amount of material covered while also enhancing students’ understanding of the broader implications of the course topics. Specifically, the presentation will focus on two teaching methodologies, project based learning and flip learning. These teaching methods will be illustrated using an example of graduate medical physics course where both are used in conjunction with traditional lectures. Additionally, the presentation will focus on our experience implementing these methods including challenges that were overcome. Jay Burmeister - My presentation will discuss the incorporation of active

  5. Vagus Nerve Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekçi, Hakan; Kaptan, Hülagu

    2017-06-15

    The vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an approach mainly used in cases of intractable epilepsy despite all the efforts. Also, its benefits have been shown in severe cases of depression resistant to typical treatment. The aim of this study was to present current knowledge of vagus nerve stimulation. A new value has emerged just at this stage: VNS aiming the ideal treatment with new hopes. It is based on the placement of a programmable generator on the chest wall. Electric signals from the generator are transmitted to the left vagus nerve through the connection cable. Control on the cerebral bioelectrical activity can be achieved by way of these signal sent from there in an effort for controlling the epileptic discharges. The rate of satisfactory and permanent treatment in epilepsy with monotherapy is around 50%. This rate will increase by one-quarters (25%) with polytherapy. However, there is a patient group roughly constituting one-thirds of this population, and this group remains unresponsive or refractory to all the therapies and combined regimes. The more the number of drugs used, the more chaos and side effects are observed. The anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) used will have side effects on both the brain and the systemic organs. Cerebral resection surgery can be required in some patients. The most commonly encountered epilepsy type is the partial one, and the possibility of benefiting from invasive procedures is limited in most patients of this type. Selective amygdala-hippocampus surgery is a rising value in complex partial seizures. Therefore, as epilepsy surgery can be performed in very limited numbers and rather developed centres, success can also be achieved in limited numbers of patients. The common ground for all the surgical procedures is the target of preservation of memory, learning, speaking, temper and executive functions as well as obtaining a good control on seizures. However, the action mechanism of VNS is still not exactly known. On the other hand

  6. Deep brain stimulation for obesity: past, present, and future targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, Derrick A; Tomycz, Nestor; Oh, Michael Y; Whiting, Donald

    2015-06-01

    The authors review the history of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in patients for treating obesity, describe current DBS targets in the brain, and discuss potential DBS targets and nontraditional stimulation parameters that may improve the effectiveness of DBS for ameliorating obesity. Deep brain stimulation for treating obesity has been performed both in animals and in humans with intriguing preliminary results. The brain is an attractive target for addressing obesity because modulating brain activity may permit influencing both sides of the energy equation--caloric intake and energy expenditure.

  7. A discussion of numerical subduction initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buiter, Susanne; Ellis, Susan

    2016-04-01

    if subduction can numerically initiate. However, once a setup has been found that successfully initiates subduction, a small change in either rheology or geometry can again lead to subduction initiation failure. We will discuss subduction setups that have been known to fail and how to avoid them, thus potentially leading to successful recipes for numerical subduction initiation. A further point we will discuss is how the geometry of weak zones and pre-existing slabs that are used to initiate a subduction model can impact subsequent subduction style and velocity. For example, using simple linear viscous subduction models we find that initiation along shallow initial pre-existing weak zones and/or pre-existing slabs results in shallow, forward dipping slabs, whereas steep initial dip angles lead to steep slab dips and an overturned slab.

  8. Animating the Discussion about Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, A.

    2016-12-01

    Abstract concepts such as climate change are extremely difficult for both students and adults to grasp. Given that many of these concepts involve issues at global scales or at a microscopic level, photos and video are simply insufficient much of the time. Through an innovative partnership between The Marine Mammal Center, a marine mammal hospital and education facility, and the California College of the Arts Animation Department, we have been able to provide animation students real-world experience in producing scientific animations, and the Center has been able to create an animated video highlighting the science of climate change and effects on marine mammals. Using the science direct from our veterinary and research teams, along with scientifically tested communication strategies related to climate change from the National Network of Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation and Frameworks Institute, this video enables us to teach students and adults of all ages these complex scientific concepts in a fun, engaging, and easily understandable way. Utilizing the skill set and expertise of the College professor as director (currently a lead animator at Pixar Animation), this video provided animation students critical experience in the animation field, exposure and engagement in a critical environmental issue, and an understanding of the opportunities available within the field of animation for educational and scientific purposes. This presentation will highlight the opportunities to utilize animation for educational purposes and provide resources surrounding climate change that could be beneficial to educators at their own organizations.

  9. An Arbitrary Waveform Wearable Neuro-stimulator System for Neurophysiology Research on Freely Behaving Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Samani, Mohsen Mosayebi; Mahnam, Amin; HOSSEINI, Nasrin

    2014-01-01

    Portable wireless neuro-stimulators have been developed to facilitate long-term cognitive and behavioral studies on the central nervous system in freely moving animals. These stimulators can provide precisely controllable input(s) to the nervous system, without distracting the animal attention with cables connected to its body. In this study, a low power backpack neuro-stimulator was developed for animal brain researches that can provides arbitrary stimulus waveforms for the stimulation, whil...

  10. Improving working memory: exploring the effect of transcranial random noise stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation on the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulquiney, Paul G; Hoy, Kate E; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if working memory (WM) performance is significantly improved after the delivery of transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), compared to an active comparator or sham. Ten participants undertook three experimental sessions in which they received 10 min of anodal tDCS (active comparator), tRNS or sham tDCS whilst performing the Sternberg WM task. Intra-stimulation engagement in a WM task was undertaken as this has been previously shown to enhance the effects of tDCS. Experimental sessions were separated by a minimum of 1 week. Immediately prior to and after each stimulation session the participants were measured on speed and accuracy of performance on an n-back task. There was significant improvement in speed of performance following anodal tDCS on the 2-back WM task; this was the only significant finding. The results do not provide support for the hypothesis that tRNS improves WM. However, the study does provide confirmation of previous findings that anodal tDCS enhances some aspects of DLPFC functioning. Methodological limitations that may have contributed to the lack of significant findings following tRNS are discussed. Anodal tDCS may have significant implications for WM remediation in psychiatric conditions, particularly schizophrenia. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthetic biology analysed tools for discussion and evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology is a dynamic, young, ambitious, attractive, and heterogeneous scientific discipline. It is constantly developing and changing, which makes societal evaluation of this emerging new science a challenging task, prone to misunderstandings. Synthetic biology is difficult to capture, and confusion arises not only regarding which part of synthetic biology the discussion is about, but also with respect to the underlying concepts in use. This book offers a useful toolbox to approach this complex and fragmented field. It provides a biological access to the discussion using a 'layer' model that describes the connectivity of synthetic or semisynthetic organisms and cells to the realm of natural organisms derived by evolution. Instead of directly reviewing the field as a whole, firstly our book addresses the characteristic features of synthetic biology that are relevant to the societal discussion. Some of these features apply only to parts of synthetic biology, whereas others are relevant to synthetic bi...

  12. Discussion on ``Foundations of the Second Law''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbey, Robert; Ao, Ping; Beretta, Gian Paolo; Cengel, Yunus; Foley, Andrew; Freedman, Steven; Graeff, Roderich; Keck, James C.; Lloyd, Seth; Maroney, Owen; Nieuwenhuizen, Theodorus M.; Weissman, Michael

    2008-08-01

    This article reports an open discussion that took place during the Keenan Symposium "Meeting the Entropy Challenge" (held in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on October 4, 2007) following the short presentations—each reported as a separate article in the present volume—by Seth Lloyd, Owen Maroney, Silviu Guiasu, Ping Ao, Jochen Gemmer, Bernard Guy, Gian Paolo Beretta, Speranta Gheorghiu-Svirschevski, and Dorion Sagan. All panelists and the audience were asked to address the following questions • Why is the second law true? Is it an inviolable law of nature? If not, is it possible to develop a perpetual motion machine of the second kind? • Are second law limitations objective or subjective, real or apparent, due to the nature of physical states or the representation and manipulation of information? Is entropy a physical property in the same sense as energy is universally understood to be an intrinsic property of matter? • Does the second law conflict with quantum mechanics? Are the differences between mechanical and thermodynamic descriptions of physical phenomena reconcilable? Does the reversible law of motion of hamiltonian mechanics and quantum mechanics conflict with the empirical observation of irreversible phenomena?

  13. ECONOMICS OF HAPPINESS: CURRENT RESEARCH AND DISCUSSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinakova N. V.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the origin and development of the «economics of happiness», exploring how the subjective well-being depends on the income level. The paper presents various ways to measure of subjective well-being, the laws and relationships identified through an analysis opinion polls, presented the main conclusions obtained by different research teams. The centerpiece of the article covers the analysis of the debate around the Easterlin’s happiness-income paradox. The main purpose of the paper is to designate questions and discussion of current research topics in «economics of happiness», to identify gaps in approaches to research that gave rise to the debate around the happiness-income paradox. The main result is the identification of differences in the approaches to research that lead different groups of scientists to contradictory conclusions about the happiness-income relationship in the long term. The result can be used both in educational process and in research and development.

  14. Assessing clinical competency: reports from discussion groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnwald, Grant; Stone, Elizabeth; Bristol, David; Fuentealba, Carmen; Hardie, Lizette; Hellyer, Peter; Jaeger, Laurie; Kerwin, Sharon; Kochevar, Deborah; Lissemore, Kerry; Olsen, Christopher; Rogers, Kenita; Sabin, Beth; Swanson, Cliff; Warner, Angeline

    2008-01-01

    This report describes proposed new models for assessment of eight of the nine clinical competencies the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education requires for accreditation. The models were developed by discussion groups at the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges' Clinical Competency Symposium. Clinical competencies and proposed models (in parentheses) are described. Competency 1: comprehensive patient diagnosis (neurologic examination on a dog, clinical reasoning skills); Competency 2: comprehensive treatment planning (concept mapping, computerized case studies); Competency 3: anesthesia, pain management (student portfolio); Competency 4: surgery skills (objective structured clinical examination, cased-based examination, "super dog" model); Competency 5: medicine skills (clinical reasoning and case management, skills checklist); Competency 6: emergency and intensive care case management (computerized case study or scenario); Competency 7: health promotion, disease prevention/biosecurity (360 degrees evaluation, case-based computer simulation); Competency 8: client communications and ethical conduct (Web-based evaluation forms, client survey, communicating with stakeholders, telephone conversation, written scenario-based cases). The report also describes faculty recognition for participating in clinical competency assessments.

  15. Traditional Chinese medicine information digitalization discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qi; Cui, Meng; Wu, Zhen-Dou; Zhao, Hong

    2010-11-01

    With the rapid development of information science, the ancient Traditional Chinese Medicine is combining with it rapidly, and forming a new discipline: Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Informatics. TCM information digitalization is the process of digital processing, which uses modern information technology to obtain, process, store, and analyze TCM-related data, information, and knowledge. It gathers research, application development, and service in an integrated whole. This article systematically analyzes the key research issues of TCM informatics (e.g., on data resources, data standard, data system construction). Also, the methodology and technology of TCM information digitalization research are thoroughly discussed. The starting point of the research on traditional Chinese medical information digitalization was in question. The research from the current study research was drawn from collected information that was stored, transferred, and utilized. This process helped to place an emphasis on the topic, as well as extending its research areas. In addition, an innovative TCM information virtual study center was set up to support a great deal of fundamental work.

  16. Improving Discussion in Astronomy Courses Taught Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troischt, Parker

    2017-06-01

    Astronomy courses that are either hybrid in nature or offered in a completely online format are becoming more common at colleges and universities. In particular, faculty members at small colleges are being encouraged to develop courses that can be taught online in order to give students increased flexibility in scheduling classes and reach a separate population of learners. For instructors accustomed to teaching students in person using plenty of interaction, making the switch to teaching even one online course a year can be challenging. However, some topics are developing so rapidly (exoplanets) that it is difficult to imagine having students rely on a standard textbook at all, and the use of online resources become essential. Here, we describe methods used to promote discussion, evaluate its content and effectively incorporate the use of recently released articles in order to keep students engaged. We present efforts to produce a lively classroom atmosphere centered on recent advances and several debated topics. Lastly, we report on successes, challenges and plans for improving online courses in the future.

  17. Engagement sensitive visual stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepesh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Early detection during golden hour and treatment of individual neurological dysfunction in stroke using easy-to-access biomarkers based on a simple-to-use, cost-effective, clinically-valid screening tool can bring a paradigm shift in healthcare, both urban and rural. In our research we have designed a quantitative automatic home-based oculomotor assessment tool that can play an important complementary role in prognosis of neurological disorders like stroke for the neurologist. Once the patient has been screened for stroke, the next step is to design proper rehabilitation platform to alleviate the disability. In addition to the screening platform, in our research, we work in designing virtual reality based rehabilitation exercise platform that has the potential to deliver visual stimulation and in turn contribute to improving one’s performance.

  18. Collective stimulated Brillouin scatter

    CERN Document Server

    Korotkevich, Alexander O; Rose, Harvey A

    2011-01-01

    We develop a statistical theory of stimulated Brillouin backscatter (BSBS) of a spatially and temporally partially incoherent laser beam for laser fusion relevant plasma. We find a new collective regime of BSBS which has a much larger threshold than the classical threshold of a coherent beam in long-scale-length laser fusion plasma. We identify two contributions to BSBS convective instability increment. The first is collective with intensity threshold independent of the laser correlation time and controlled by diffraction. The second is independent of diffraction, it grows with increase of the correlation time and does not have an intensity threshold. The instability threshold is inside the typical parameter region of National Ignition Facility (NIF). We also find that the bandwidth of KrF-laser-based fusion systems would be large enough to allow additional suppression of BSBS.

  19. Collective stimulated Brillouin backscatter

    CERN Document Server

    Lushnikov, Pavel M

    2007-01-01

    We develop the statistical theory of the stimulated Brillouin backscatter (BSBS) instability of a spatially and temporally partially incoherent laser beam for laser fusion relevant plasma. We find a new regime of BSBS which has a much larger threshold than the classical threshold of a coherent beam in long-scale-length laser fusion plasma. Instability is collective because it does not depend on the dynamics of isolated speckles of laser intensity, but rather depends on averaged beam intensity. We identify convective and absolute instability regimes. Well above the incoherent threshold the coherent instability growth rate is recovered. The threshold of convective instability is inside the typical parameter region of National Ignition Facility (NIF) designs although current NIF bandwidth is not large enough to insure dominance of collective instability and suggests lower instability threshold due to speckle contribution. In contrast, we estimate that the bandwidth of KrF-laser-based fusion systems would be larg...

  20. Induction of neuroplasticity and recovery in post-stroke aphasia by non-invasive brain stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka eShah

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Stroke victims tend to prioritize speaking, writing and walking as the three most important rehabilitation goals. Of note is that two of these goals involve communication. This underscores the significance of developing successful approaches to aphasia treatment for the several hundred thousand new aphasia patients each year and over 1 million stroke survivors with chronic aphasia in the U.S. alone. After several years of growth as a research tool, noninvasive brain stimulation (NBS is gradually entering the arena of clinical aphasiology. In this review, we first examine the current state of knowledge of post-stroke language recovery including the contributions from the dominant and non-dominant hemispheres. Next, we briefly discuss the methods and the physiologic basis of the use of inhibitory and excitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS as research tools in patients who experience post-stroke aphasia. Finally, we provide a critical review of the most influential evidence behind the potential use of these two brain stimulation methods as clinical rehabilitative tools.

  1. Preventing Facial Nerve Stimulation by Triphasic Pulse Stimulation in Cochlear Implant Users: Intraoperative Recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmer, Andreas; Adel, Youssef; Baumann, Uwe

    2017-12-01

    Triphasic pulse stimulation of the auditory nerve can prevent unintended facial nerve stimulation (FNS) due to a different electromyographic (EMG) input-output function compared with biphasic pulses. FNS is sometimes observed in cochlear implant (CI) users as an unpleasant side effect of electrical stimulation using biphasic pulse patterns (BPP). Clinical remedies to alleviate FNS are 1) to extend stimulus phase duration or 2) to completely deactivate the electrode. In some cases, these options do not provide sufficient FNS reduction or are detrimental to subject performance. Stimulation using triphasic pulse patterns (TPP) has been shown to prevent FNS more effectively, yet the underlying mechanism remains unclear. EMG potentials of muscles innervated by the facial nerve (orbicularis oculi and oris muscles) were recorded to quantitatively compare the effect of BPP and TPP stimulation on FNS. Recordings were conducted in five subjects during CI surgery. In two exemplary cases, different leading phase polarities in alternating and non-alternating order were tested. Compared with our previous study in awake patients using surface electrodes (Bahmer and Baumann, 2016), intraoperative recordings using subdermal electrodes showed lower noise content and allowed higher sampling resolution. While inter-subject variation remained high, intra-subject results for different electrode positions were comparable: FNS was strongly reduced for cathodic-first TPP stimulation. In contrast, exemplary cases showed little reduction for anodic-first TPP as well as for alternating stimulation. FNS in CI users can be reduced using TPP stimulation, but the ameliorative effect appears to be dependent on the leading stimulus polarity.

  2. Use of global context for handling noisy names in discussion texts of a homeopathy discussion forum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukta Majumder

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The task of identifying named entities from the discussion texts in Web forums faces the challenge of noisy names. As the names are often misspelled or abbreviated, the conventional techniques have failed to detect the noisy names properly. In this paper we propose a global context based framework for handling the noisy names. The framework is tested on a named entity recognition system designed to identify the names from the discussion texts in a homeopathy diagnosis discussion forum. The proposed global context-based framework is found to be effective in improving the accuracy of the named entity recognition system.

  3. Deep brain stimulation for cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grover, Patrick J; Pereira, Erlick A C; Green, Alexander L

    2009-01-01

    Cluster headache is a severely debilitating disorder that can remain unrelieved by current pharmacotherapy. Alongside ablative neurosurgical procedures, neuromodulatory treatments of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and occipital nerve simulation have emerged in the last few years as effective...... treatments for medically refractory cluster headaches. Pioneers in the field have sought to publish guidelines for neurosurgical treatment; however, only small case series with limited long-term follow-up have been published. Controversy remains over which surgical treatments are best and in which...... circumstances to intervene. Here we review current data on neurosurgical interventions for chronic cluster headache focusing upon DBS and occipital nerve stimulation, and discuss the indications for and putative mechanisms of DBS including translational insights from functional neuroimaging, diffusion weighted...

  4. Anal sphincter responses after perianal electrical stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ejnar; Klemar, B; Schrøder, H D

    1982-01-01

    By perianal electrical stimulation and EMG recording from the external anal sphincter three responses were found with latencies of 2-8, 13-18 and 30-60 ms, respectively. The two first responses were recorded in most cases. They were characterised by constant latency and uniform pattern, were...... stimulation to a minimum of 30-60 ms. This response represented the clinical observable spinal reflex, "the classical anal reflex". The latencies of the two first responses were so short that they probably do not represent spinal reflexes. This was further supported by the effect of epidural anaesthesia which...... left the first responses unaffected but abolished the classical anal reflex. The origin of the two first responses is discussed and models involving antidromal impulse propagation in the efferent fibre as the afferent limbs of the responses are proposed....

  5. Provider of Services File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The POS file consists of two data files, one for CLIA labs and one for 18 other provider types. The file names are CLIA and OTHER. If downloading the file, note it...

  6. care Providers in Ibadan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three hundred and eighty six respondents (77.7%) were aware of intermittent preventive treatment (IPT). Awareness ... Key Words: malaria in pregnancy, intermittent preventive treatment, malaria control, health care providers. Department of Obstetrics .... Auxiliary nurses do not have formal training prior to employment.

  7. Bioethics and multiculturalism: nuancing the discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, Chris

    2018-02-01

    In his recent analysis of multiculturalism, Tom Beauchamp has argued that those who implement multicultural reasoning in their arguments against common morality theories, such as his own, have failed to understand that multiculturalism is neither a form of moral pluralism nor ethical relativism but is rather a universalistic moral theory in its own right. Beauchamp's position is indeed on the right track in that multiculturalists do not consider themselves ethical relativists. Yet, Beauchamp tends to miss the mark when he argues that multiculturalism is in effect a school of thought that endorses a form of moral universalism that is akin to his own vision of a common morality. As a supporter of multiculturalism, I would like to discuss some aspects of Beauchamp's comments on multiculturalism and clarify what a multicultural account of public bioethics might look like. Ultimately, multiculturalism is purported as a means of managing diversity in the public arena and should not be thought of as endorsing either a version of moral relativism or a universal morality. By simultaneously refraining from the promotion of a comprehensive common moral system while it attempts to avoid a collapse into relativism, multiculturalism can serve as the ethico-political framework in which diverse moralities can be managed and in which opportunities for ethical dialogue, debate and deliberation on the prospects of common bioethical norms are made possible. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Proxies and consent discussions for dementia research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarman, Jeremy; Roter, Debra; Cain, Carole; Wallace, Roberta; Schmechel, Don; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A

    2007-04-01

    To better understand the nature of informed consent encounters for research involving patients with dementia that requires proxy consent. Audiotaping of informed-consent encounters for a study of genetic markers for sporadic Alzheimer's disease. Outpatients at an Alzheimer's disease research center. Patients with dementia and their companions. Audiotapes were analyzed to characterize communication style and coverage of the standard elements of informed consent and, using the Roter Interaction Analysis System, to capture the dynamics of three-way interaction between the patient, their companion, and the physician investigator. Of 26 informed consent encounters, all involved a patient, a companion, and a physician. Patients had a mean Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score of 21.8. For patients, 49% of their interactions involved agreement and approval (positive statements), 16% psychosocial information, 7% biomedical information, 7% asking questions, and 7% expressing emotion. Companion interactions involved 37% positive statements and 19% biomedical information. Physician interactions involved emotional expressiveness (30%) and positive statements (19%). Discussion length was positively related to MMSE score (Spearman rho=0.45; Pinformed consent was fairly comprehensive and had no relationship to patients' MMSE scores. These data should inform policies regarding the ethically appropriate ways of conducting research with cognitively impaired adults. For example, patients in this study were more silent than their companions and the physician, but when patients spoke, they primarily agreed with what was said. Although this might first seem to signal assent, such an interpretation should be made with caution for persons with dementia. In addition, previous work on informed consent has focused on its cognitive aspects, but these data reveal that the emotional and social dimensions warrant attention.

  9. Patient Perspectives on Discussions of Electronic Cigarettes in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doescher, Mark P; Wu, Ming; Rainwater, Elizabeth; Khan, Ali S; Rhoades, Dorothy A

    2018-01-01

    Patient preferences regarding the role of the primary care provider (PCP) in discussing electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use are unknown. We administered a cross-sectional survey to 568 adult patients in a family medicine clinic to explore e-cigarette use, sources of information on e-cigarettes, perceived knowledge about e-cigarette health effects, views regarding PCP knowledge of e-cigarettes, interest in discussing e-cigarettes with PCPs and preferred format for e-cigarette information. We performed χ2 testing with a 2-tailed P 30 days) use. Prevalence was significantly higher among those who were younger, less educated, or smoked cigarettes, but did not vary by sex or self-reported health status. Roughly one quarter of participants believed they were knowledgeable about the health effects of e-cigarettes, secondhand smoke, and quitting cigarettes. Sources of e-cigarette information included television advertisements (56.6%), friends and family (49.9%), or e-cigarette shops (25.5%), but included physician offices much less frequently (6.0%). Although 30.2% disagreed that their PCP knew a lot about e-cigarettes, 62.0% were comfortable discussing e-cigarettes with their PCP. However, only 25% of all patients wanted their PCP to discuss e-cigarettes with them, but 62.0% of recent e-cigarette users wanted such a discussion. Most preferred a brief discussion or handout to a lengthy discussion. PCPs were infrequent sources of information for patients regarding e-cigarette use. PCPs need evidence-based strategies to help them address e-cigarettes in primary care. © Copyright 2018 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  10. Reflective journal prompts: a vehicle for stimulating emotional competence in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Paula A; Fopma-Loy, Joan L

    2010-11-01

    This article focuses on the development and pilot-testing of 10 reflective journal prompts designed to stimulate reflection on emotional intelligence competencies. Goleman's framework of emotional intelligence domains and 18 competencies was used to guide development of the prompts and analysis of student (N = 16) responses. A review of the literature related to emotional intelligence competencies and nursing education and practice is presented, and assumptions derived from the literature and guiding the project are summarized. Journal prompts are presented, and examples of student responses illustrating reflection on competencies are provided. The findings suggest that these progressive journal prompts are useful tools for introducing and stimulating reflection on emotional intelligence competencies in nursing students. Recommendations for use in a variety of nursing courses are discussed. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Non-invasive brain stimulation: enhancing motor and cognitive functions in healthy old subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximo Zimerman

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Healthy aging is accompanied by changes in cognitive and motor functions that result in impairment of activities of daily living. This process involves a number of modifications in the brain and is associated with metabolic, structural and physiological changes; some of these serving as adaptive responses to the functional declines. Up to date there are no universally accepted strategies to ameliorate declining functions in this population. An essential basis to develop such strategies is a better understanding of neuroplastic changes during healthy aging. In this context, non-invasive brain stimulation techniques, such as transcranial direct current or transcranial magnetic stimulation, provide an attractive option to modulate cortical neuronal assemblies, even with subsequent changes in neuroplasticity. Thus, in the present review we discuss the use of these techniques as a tool to study underlying cortical mechanisms during healthy aging and as an interventional strategy to enhance declining functions and learning abilities in aged subjects.

  12. Modeling the effects of noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation at the biophysical, network, and cognitive Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwigsen, Gesa; Bergmann, Til Ole; Herz, Damian Marc

    2015-01-01

    these approaches advance the scientific potential of NTBS as an interventional tool in cognitive neuroscience. (i) Leveraging the anatomical information provided by structural imaging, the electric field distribution in the brain can be modeled and simulated. Biophysical modeling approaches generate testable......Noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation (NTBS) is widely used to elucidate the contribution of different brain regions to various cognitive functions. Here we present three modeling approaches that are informed by functional or structural brain mapping or behavior profiling and discuss how...... predictions regarding the impact of interindividual variations in cortical anatomy on the injected electric fields or the influence of the orientation of current flow on the physiological stimulation effects. (ii) Functional brain mapping of the spatiotemporal neural dynamics during cognitive tasks can...

  13. Work discussion groups in clinical supervision in mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Danny

    This study aims to explore the value and meaning of a psychodynamic work discussion for mental health nurses, and its potential as an approach in staff clinical supervision. Data were generated by using a focus group with a purposive sample of six mental health nurses, and analysed by the 'collapsing of data' from labels to form categories and formulate themes. The findings suggest that staff emotion generated from clinical work is dealt with in many personal ways though rarely in clinical supervision. Although the idea of a work discussion group is not readily known among the focus group, staff appear to be open to its potential to provide a helpful emotional perspective. Education in the form of an introduction and exposure to some basic psychodynamic ideas could provide the first step towards unlocking its potential. Sharing personal experiences of an emotional nature within a safe, secure environment seems significant in this education process.

  14. A Systematic Review of Electric-Acoustic Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Teresa Y. C.; Cowan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Cochlear implant systems that combine electric and acoustic stimulation in the same ear are now commercially available and the number of patients using these devices is steadily increasing. In particular, electric-acoustic stimulation is an option for patients with severe, high frequency sensorineural hearing impairment. There have been a range of approaches to combining electric stimulation and acoustic hearing in the same ear. To develop a better understanding of fitting practices for devices that combine electric and acoustic stimulation, we conducted a systematic review addressing three clinical questions: what is the range of acoustic hearing in the implanted ear that can be effectively preserved for an electric-acoustic fitting?; what benefits are provided by combining acoustic stimulation with electric stimulation?; and what clinical fitting practices have been developed for devices that combine electric and acoustic stimulation? A search of the literature was conducted and 27 articles that met the strict evaluation criteria adopted for the review were identified for detailed analysis. The range of auditory thresholds in the implanted ear that can be successfully used for an electric-acoustic application is quite broad. The effectiveness of combined electric and acoustic stimulation as compared with electric stimulation alone was consistently demonstrated, highlighting the potential value of preservation and utilization of low frequency hearing in the implanted ear. However, clinical procedures for best fitting of electric-acoustic devices were varied. This clearly identified a need for further investigation of fitting procedures aimed at maximizing outcomes for recipients of electric-acoustic devices. PMID:23539259

  15. Internet Medline providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vine, D L; Coady, T R

    1998-01-01

    Each database in this review has features that will appeal to some users. Each provides a credible interface to information available within the Medline database. The major differences are pricing and interface design. In this context, features that cost more and might seem trivial to the occasional searcher may actually save time and money when used by the professional. Internet Grateful Med is free, but Ms. Coady and I agree the availability of only three ANDable search fields is a major functional limitation. PubMed is also free but much more powerful. The command line interface that permits very sophisticated searches requires a commitment that casual users will find intimidating. Ms. Coady did not believe the feedback currently provided during a search was sufficient for sustained professional use. Paper Chase and Knowledge Finder are mature, modestly priced Medline search services. Paper Chase provides a menu-driven interface that is very easy to use, yet permits the user to search virtually all of Medline's data fields. Knowledge Finder emphasizes the use of natural language queries but fully supports more traditional search strategies. The impact of the tradeoff between fuzzy and Boolean strategies offered by Knowledge Finder is unclear and beyond the scope of this review. Additional software must be downloaded to use all of Knowledge Finders' features. Other providers required no software beyond the basic Internet browser, and this requirement prevented Ms. Coady from evaluating Knowledge Finder. Ovid and Silver Platter offer well-designed interfaces that simplify the construction of complex queries. These are clearly services designed for professional users. While pricing eliminates these for casual use, it should be emphasized that Medline citation access is only a portion of the service provided by these high-end vendors. Finally, we should comment that each of the vendors and government-sponsored services provided prompt and useful feedback to e

  16. Electrical Stimulation for Urinary Incontinence in Women: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Schreiner

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Electrical stimulation is commonly recommended to treat urinary incontinence in women. It includes several techniques that can be used to improve stress, urge, and mixed symptoms. However, the magnitude of the alleged benefits is not completely established. Objectives To determine the effects of electrical stimulation in women with symptoms or urodynamic diagnoses of stress, urge, and mixed incontinence. Search Strategy: Our review included articles published between January 1980 and January 2012. We used the search terms “urinary incontinence”, “electrical stimulation”, “intravaginal”, “tibial nerve” and “neuromodulation” for studies including female patients. Selection Criteria We evaluated randomized trials that included electrical stimulation in at least one arm of the trial, to treat women with urinary incontinence. Data Collection and Analysis Two reviewers independently assessed the data from the trials, for inclusion or exclusion, and methodological analysis. Main Results A total of 30 randomized clinical trials were included. Most of the trials involved intravaginal electrical stimulation. Intravaginal electrical stimulation showed effectiveness in treating urge urinary incontinence, but reported contradictory data regarding stress and mixed incontinence. Tibial-nerve stimulation showed promising results in randomized trials with a short follow-up period. Sacral-nerve stimulation yielded interesting results in refractory patients. Conclusions Tibial-nerve and intravaginal stimulation have shown effectiveness in treating urge urinary incontinence. Sacral-nerve stimulation provided benefits in refractory cases. Presently available data provide no support for the use of intravaginal electrical stimulation to treat stress urinary incontinence in women. Further randomized trials are necessary to determine the magnitude of benefits, with long-term follow-up, and the effectiveness of other electrical-stimulation

  17. Providing plastic zone extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchiraju, Venkata Kiran; Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.; Yu, Zhenzhen

    2017-04-11

    Plastic zone extrusion may be provided. First, a compressor may generate frictional heat in stock to place the stock in a plastic zone of the stock. Then, a conveyer may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor and transport the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor. Next, a die may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the conveyer and extrude the stock to form a wire.

  18. Electrical carotid sinus stimulation in treatment resistant arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jens; Heusser, Karsten; Brinkmann, Julia; Tank, Jens

    2012-12-24

    Treatment resistant arterial hypertension is commonly defined as blood pressure that remains above goal in spite of the concurrent use of three antihypertensive agents of different classes. The sympathetic nervous system promotes arterial hypertension and cardiovascular as well as renal damage, thus, providing a logical treatment target in these patients. Recent physiological studies suggest that baroreflex mechanisms contribute to long-term control of sympathetic activity and blood pressure providing an impetus for the development of electrical carotid sinus stimulators. The concept behind electrical stimulation of baroreceptors or baroreflex afferent nerves is that the stimulus is sensed by the brain as blood pressure increase. Then, baroreflex efferent structures are adjusted to counteract the perceived blood pressure increase. Electrical stimulators directly activating afferent baroreflex nerves were developed years earlier but failed for technical reasons. Recently, a novel implantable device was developed that produces an electrical field stimulation of the carotid sinus wall. Carefully conducted experiments in dogs provided important insight in mechanisms mediating the depressor response to electrical carotid sinus stimulation. Moreover, these studies showed that the treatment success may depend on the underlying pathophysiology of the hypertension. Clinical studies suggest that electrical carotid sinus stimulation attenuates sympathetic activation of vasculature, heart, and kidney while augmenting cardiac vagal regulation, thus lowering blood pressure. Yet, not all patients respond to treatment. Additional clinical trials are required. Patients equipped with an electrical carotid sinus stimulator provide a unique opportunity gaining insight in human baroreflex physiology. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Auditory beat stimulation and its effects on cognition and mood states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila eChaieb

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Auditory beat stimulation may be a promising new tool for the manipulation of cognitive processes and the modulation of mood-states. Here we aim to review the literature examining the most current applications of auditory beat stimulation and its targets. We give a brief overview of research on auditory steady-state responses and its relationship to auditory beat stimulation. We have summarized relevant studies investigating the neurophysiological changes related to auditory beat stimulation and how they impact upon the design of appropriate stimulation protocols. Focusing on binaural beat stimulation, we then discuss the role of monaural and binaural beat frequencies in cognition and mood-states, in addition to their efficacy in targeting disease symptoms. We aim to highlight important points concerning stimulation parameters and try to address why there are often contradictory findings with regard to the outcomes of auditory beat stimulation.

  20. Electrical stimulation vs. pulsed and continuous-wave optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves, in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, William C.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2015-07-01

    Identification and preservation of the cavernous nerves (CNs) during prostate cancer surgery is critical for post-operative sexual function. Electrical nerve stimulation (ENS) mapping has previously been tested as an intraoperative tool for CN identification, but was found to be unreliable. ENS is limited by the need for electrode-tissue contact, poor spatial precision from electrical current spreading, and stimulation artifacts interfering with detection. Alternatively, optical nerve stimulation (ONS) provides noncontact stimulation, improved spatial selectivity, and elimination of stimulation artifacts. This study compares ENS to pulsed/CW ONS to explore the ONS mechanism. A total of eighty stimulations were performed in 5 rats, in vivo. ENS (4 V, 5 ms, 10 Hz) was compared to ONS using a pulsed diode laser nerve stimulator (1873 nm, 5 ms, 10 Hz) or CW diode laser nerve stimulator (1455 nm). Intracavernous pressure (ICP) response and nerve compound action potentials (nCAPs) were measured. All three stimulation modes (ENS, ONS-CW, ONS-P) produced comparable ICP magnitudes. However, ENS demonstrated more rapid ICP response times and well defined nCAPs compared to unmeasurable nCAPs for ONS. Further experiments measuring single action potentials during ENS and ONS are warranted to further understand differences in the ENS and ONS mechanisms.

  1. Current Discussions Between ESO and Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-04-01

    [Joint Press Release by the Government of the Republic of Chile and the European Southern Observatory. The text is issued simultaneously in Santiago de Chile (in Spanish) and at the ESO Headquarters in Garching (in English).] Today, Tuesday, 18 April 1995, at the ESO Headquarters in Garching (Germany), Mr. Roberto Cifuentes, Plenipotentiary Ambassador representing the Government of the Republic of Chile, and the Director General of the European Southern Observatory, Professor Riccardo Giacconi, have signed a Supplementary, Interpretative and Amending Agreement to the Convention of 6 November 1963 which governs the relations between Chile and this International Organisation. This Agreement which in practice signifies a widening and strengthening of the cooperative relations between the Organisation and the Chilean scientific community will hereafter be submitted for ratification by the National Congress of the Republic of Chile (the Parliament) and by the ESO Council. According to the Agreement signed today, Chilean astronomers will have privileged access within up to 10 percent observing time on all present and future ESO telescopes in Chile. Moreover, ESO accepts to incorporate into its labour regulations for Chilean personnel concepts like freedom of association and collective bargaining. This signing of the Supplementary, Interpretative and Amending Agreement to the original Convention of 1963 follows after months of constructive dialogue between the parties. It constitutes an important step towards a solution of some of the pending points on the current agenda for discussions between the Government of Chile and ESO. Among the issues still pending, ESO has informed the Government of Chile that respect for its immunities by the Chilean State is of vital importance for the continuation of the construction of the world's largest telescope at Paranal, as well as the continued presence of the Organisation in Chile. The Chilean Government, on its side, and concerning

  2. A Discussion on Governmental Research Grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hui

    2015-10-01

    Governmental research grants are financially supported by taxpayers to meet financial requirements of research, particularly research that is unlikely to be supported by private funds. Researchers reward donors by producing knowledge. Publishing research results in an academic journal reflects achievement by researchers; however, receiving a grant award does not. The latter only provides the researcher with the capacity to perform his/her research. Applicants may receive more financial support than they actually need because there is no strict audit on the amount of money requested by each research proposal. There are fewer opportunities to apply for a governmental grant than there are for publishing an academic article, and the application process for governmental grants is not flexible. Some potentially innovative research may be impeded by the intense competition among scientific researchers applying for financial support. Researchers face stiffer competition at this stage than at the stage of publishing results. This paper suggests that scientific foundations can improve their efficiency by giving funding preference to economic proposals. Methods for estimating the efficiency of grants are proposed. The practice followed by the Small Grants for Exploratory Research programme of the National Science Foundation validates my analysis and recommendations.

  3. Transformational leadership in nursing and medication safety education: a discussion paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Griffiths, Pauline; Turunen, Hannele; Jordan, Sue

    2016-10-01

    This paper discusses the application of transformational leadership to the teaching and learning of safe medication management. The prevalence of adverse drug events (ADEs) and medication-related hospitalisations (one hundred thousand each year in the USA) are of concern. This discussion is based on a narrative literature review and scrutiny of international nursing research to synthesise pedagogical strategies for the application of transformational leadership to teaching medication safety. The four elements relating transformational leadership to medication safety education are: 'Idealised influence' or role modelling, both actual and exemplary, 'Inspirational motivation' providing students with commitment to medication safety, 'Intellectual stimulation' encouraging students to value improvement and change, and 'Individualised consideration' of individual students' educational goals, practice development and patient outcomes. The model lends itself to experiential learning and a case-study approach to teaching, offering an opportunity to reduce nursing's theory-practice gap. Transformational leadership for medication safety education is characterised by a focus on the role of nurse educators and mentors in the development of students' abilities, creation of a supportive culture, and enhancement of students' creativity, motivation and ethical behaviour. This will prepare nursing graduates with the competencies necessary to be diligent about medication safety and the prevention of errors. Teaching medication safety through transformational leadership requires the close collaboration of educators, managers and policy makers. Investigation of strategies to reduced medication errors and consequent patient harm should include exploration of the application of transformational leadership to education and its impact on the number and severity of medication errors. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Providing Compassion through Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Royeen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Meg Kral, MS, OTR/L, CLT, is the cover artist for the Summer 2015 issue of The Open Journal of Occupational Therapy. Her untitled piece of art is an oil painting and is a re-creation of a photograph taken while on vacation. Meg is currently supervisor of outpatient services at Rush University Medical Center. She is lymphedema certified and has a specific interest in breast cancer lymphedema. Art and occupational therapy serve similar purposes for Meg: both provide a sense of flow. She values the outcomes, whether it is a piece of art or improved functional status

  5. Providing Contraception to Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raidoo, Shandhini; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2015-12-01

    Adolescents have high rates of unintended pregnancy and face unique reproductive health challenges. Providing confidential contraceptive services to adolescents is important in reducing the rate of unintended pregnancy. Long-acting contraception such as the intrauterine device and contraceptive implant are recommended as first-line contraceptives for adolescents because they are highly effective with few side effects. The use of barrier methods to prevent sexually transmitted infections should be encouraged. Adolescents have limited knowledge of reproductive health and contraceptive options, and their sources of information are often unreliable. Access to contraception is available through a variety of resources that continue to expand. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ysla S. Catalina & Providence

    OpenAIRE

    Diazgranados, Carlos Nicolás; Torres Carreño, Guillermo Andrés; Castell, Edmon; Moreno, Santiago; Ramirez, Natalia

    2010-01-01

    Esta Hoja de Mano pertenece a la exposición temporal "Ysla S. Catalina & Providence". Contiene un resumen histórico de las Islas de Santa Catalina y Providencia en los idiomas inglés y español y un mapa del siglo VI que lo hace más didáctico apoyado por figuras recortables. Esta muestra hace parte del proyecto IDA y VUELTA del Sistema de Patrimonio Cultural y Museos SPM que gestiona la descentralización del patrimonio cultural de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia a otras ciudades del pa...

  7. Nanowire electrodes for high-density stimulation and measurement of neural circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob T. Robinson

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs that can precisely monitor and control neural activity will likely require new hardware with improved resolution and specificity. New nanofabricated electrodes with feature sizes and densities comparable to neural circuits may lead to such improvements. In this perspective, we review the recent development of vertical nanowire (NW electrodes that could provide highly parallel single-cell recording and stimulation for future BMIs. We compare the advantages of these devices and discuss some of the technical challenges that must be overcome for this technology to become a platform for next-generation closed-loop BMIs.

  8. The Emerging Role of Tractography in Deep Brain Stimulation: Basic Principles and Current Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson B. Rodrigues

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI is an MRI-based technique that delineates white matter tracts in the brain by tracking the diffusion of water in neural tissue. This methodology, known as “tractography”, has been extensively applied in clinical neuroscience to explore nervous system architecture and diseases. More recently, tractography has been used to assist with neurosurgical targeting in functional neurosurgery. This review provides an overview of DTI principles, and discusses current applications of tractography for improving and helping develop novel deep brain stimulation (DBS targets.

  9. Decolonizing Trauma Studies Round-Table Discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stef Craps

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This round-table, which featured literary critics Professor Stef Craps, Professor Bryan Cheyette and Dr. Alan Gibbs, was recorded as part of the “Decolonizing Trauma Studies” symposium organized by Dr. Sonya Andermahr and Dr. Larissa Allwork at The School of The Arts, The University of Northampton (15 May 2015. Convened a week after the University of Zaragoza’s “Memory Frictions” conference, where Cheyette, Gibbs, Andermahr and Allwork gave papers, the Northampton symposium and round-table was sponsored by The School of The Arts to coincide with Andermahr’s guest editorship of this special issue of Humanities. Craps, Cheyette and Gibbs addressed five questions during the round-table. Namely, does trauma studies suffer from a form of psychological universalism? Do you see any signs that trauma studies is becoming more decolonized? What are the challenges of a decolonized trauma studies for disciplinary thinking? How does a decolonized trauma studies relate to pedagogical ethics? Finally, where do you see the future of the field? While this edited transcript retains a certain informality of style, it offers a significant contribution to knowledge by capturing a unique exchange between three key thinkers in contemporary trauma studies, providing a timely analysis of the impact of postcolonial theory on trauma studies, the state of the field and its future possibilities. Issues addressed include the problematic scholarly tendency to universalize a western model of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD; the question of the centrality of the Holocaust in trauma studies and the implications of this for the study of atrocities globally; the vexed issues posed by the representation of perpetrators; as well as how the basic tenets of western cultural trauma theory, until recently so often characterized by a Caruth-inspired focus on belatedness and afterwardness, are being rethought, both in response to developments in the US and in answer to

  10. Subliminal Stimulation: Hoax or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trank, Douglas M.

    Subliminal stimulation is defined as that which is perceived by an individual below the threshold of awareness or cognizance. This article traces the history of research in subliminal stimulation to illustrate that under certain circumstances and conditions, this behavioral phenomenon does occur. Although subliminal stimuli do affect human…

  11. EOR by stimulated microflora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svarovskaya, L.I.; Altunina, L.K.; Rozhenkova, Z.A.; Bulavin, V.D. [Institute of Petroleum Chemistry, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    A combined microbiological and physico-chemical method for EOR has been developed for flooded West Siberia oil fields with formation temperature of 45{degrees}-95{degrees}C (318-365K). Formation water includes rich and various biocenoses numbering up to 2 x 10{sup 7} cells per ml. Representatives of genera, i.e, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Actinomyces, Micrococcus, Mycobacterium, Sarcina, etc. were found to be the most widely distributed microorganisms. The method is based on injection of systems exhibiting high oil displacing capacity and at the same time being an additional nitrous nutrient for endemic populations of microorganisms. Their injection into formation water favors biomass growth by 4-6 orders and promotes syntheses of biosurfactants, biopolymers, acids, etc., and gaseous products. The features of residual oil displacement have been studied on laboratory models using a combined microbiological and physico-chemical method. A curve for the yield of residual oil is presented by two peaks. The first peak is stipulated by the washing action of oil displacement system, and the second one by the effect of metabolites produced at stimulation of biogenic processes. Oil displacement index increases by 15%-30%.

  12. Three-beam double stimulated Raman scatterings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Minhaeng

    2018-01-07

    Two-beam stimulated Raman scattering with pump and Stokes beams is manifest in both the Raman loss of the pump beam and the Raman gain of the Stokes beam, and it has been used in various label-free bioimaging applications. Here, a three-beam stimulated Raman scattering that involves pump, Stokes, and depletion beams is considered, where two stimulated Raman gain-loss processes are deliberately made to compete with each other. It is shown that the three-beam Raman scattering process can be described by coupled differential equations for the increased numbers of Stokes and depletion beam photons. From approximate solutions of the coupled differential equations and numerical calculation results, it is shown that a highly efficient suppression of the Stokes Raman gain is possible by using an intense depletion beam whose frequency difference from that of the pump beam is identical to another acceptor Raman mode frequency. I anticipate that the present work will provide a theoretical framework for super-resolution stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

  13. Central nervous system stimulants and sport practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avois, L; Robinson, N; Saudan, C; Baume, N; Mangin, P; Saugy, M

    2006-07-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) stimulants may be used to reduce tiredness and increase alertness, competitiveness, and aggression. They are more likely to be used in competition but may be used during training to increase the intensity of the training session. There are several potential dangers involving their misuse in contact sports. This paper reviews the three main CNS stimulants, ephedrine, amfetamine, and cocaine, in relation to misuse in sport. Description of the pharmacology, actions, and side effects of amfetamine, cocaine, and ephedrine. CNS stimulants have psychotropic effects that may be perceived to be ergogenic. Some are prescription drugs, such as Ephedra alkaloids, and there are issues regarding their appropriate therapeutic use. Recently attention has been given to their widespread use by athletes, despite the lack of evidence regarding any ergogenic or real performance benefit, and their potentially serious side effects. Recreational drugs, some of which are illegal (cocaine, amfetamines), are commonly used by athletes and cause potential ergolytic effects. Overall, these drugs are important for their frequent use and mention in anti-doping laboratories statistics and the media, and their potentially serious adverse effects. Doping with CNS stimulants is a real public health problem and all sports authorities should participate in its prevention. Dissemination of information is essential to prevent doping in sport and to provide alternatives. Adequate training and education in this domain should be introduced.

  14. Perspective on opportunities for research and interventions provided ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To stimulate interest in utilisation CBHIS for research and interventions, with an illustration of potential using on Motivational Interviewing intervention. Data Source:Literature searched electronically, discussion with behavioural experts, health system researchers, and maternal and Newborn Health (MNH) ...

  15. Penetrating multichannel stimulation and recording electrodes in auditory prosthesis research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David J

    2008-08-01

    Microelectrode arrays offer the auditory systems physiologists many opportunities through a number of electrode technologies. In particular, silicon substrate electrode arrays offer a large design space including choice of layout plan, range of surface areas for active sites, a choice of site materials and high spatial resolution. Further, most designs can double as recording and stimulation electrodes in the same preparation. Scala tympani auditory prosthesis research has been aided by mapping electrodes in the cortex and the inferior colliculus to assess the CNS responses to peripheral stimulation. More recently silicon stimulation electrodes placed in the auditory nerve, cochlear nucleus and the inferior colliculus have advanced the exploration of alternative stimulation sites for auditory prostheses. Multiplication of results from experimental effort by simultaneously stimulating several locations, or by acquiring several streams of data synchronized to the same stimulation event, is a commonly sought after advantage. Examples of inherently multichannel functions which are not possible with single electrode sites include (1) current steering resulting in more focused stimulation, (2) improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for recording when noise and/or neural signals appear on more than one site and (3) current source density (CSD) measurements. Still more powerful are methods that exploit closely-spaced recording and stimulation sites to improve detailed interrogation of the surrounding neural domain. Here, we discuss thin-film recording/stimulation arrays on silicon substrates. These electrode arrays have been shown to be valuable because of their precision coupled with reproducibility in an ever expanding design space. The shape of the electrode substrate can be customized to accommodate use in cortical, deep and peripheral neural structures while flexible cables, fluid delivery and novel coatings have been added to broaden their application. The use of

  16. Panel Discussion: Life in the Cosmos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) probe has found that both the North and South Polar Caps of Mars are approximately 3.5 km thick and are composed almost entirely of water ice. In winter, a thin dry ice layer covers the caps, but it sublimates directly to CO2 in the spring. The ESA Mars Express Orbiter images reveal Rupes Tenuis to be a vast snow-laden region on the southern edge of the Martian North Polar Cap. The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit found alkaline volcanic rocks in the Gusev Crater and the Phoenix Mars Lander has shown that the soil of Mars is much more alkaline than previously expected. The Phoenix Mars Lander has also made direct observations of frozen and liquid water on Mars. It is known that microorganisms from Alaska, Siberia and Antarctica can remain alive frozen in permafrost or ice for long periods of time. These discoveries increase the possibility that the Labeled Release Experiment may have discovered life on Mars during the Viking Mission and provide strong impetus for the return of life detection experiments to Mars. Changes in the spin rate of Saturn's moon Titan indicate that it may also harbor a 300 km thick liquid water ocean beneath its icy crust. The NASA/ESA/Italian Space Agency Cassini Spacecraft has imaged geysers containing water vapor, methane, carbon dioxide and organics erupting from the "tiger stripe" regions near the South Pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus. The high temperatures observed, the water vapor and large number of ice particles expelled suggest that a liquid water lake may exist beneath the "tiger stripe" ice cracks of Enceladus. The NASA Deep Impact probe found the surface temperature of comet 9P/Temple 1 at 1.5 AY was slightly above the ice/water phase change temperature (273 K). This suggests melting of water ice near the comet surface. A spectrometer the spacecraft detected a mixture of clay and carbonate minerals (that form in the presence of liquid water) streaming off the comet after the collision with the

  17. Does Feedback Influence Student Postings to Online Discussions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina A. Meyer, Ph.D.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Feedback theory proposes that feedback influences the behavior of a system and its parts and that is governed by rules. This exploratory study attempts to test this theory in a graduate-level class on leadership theory. Twelve students were asked to participate in five online discussions, each lasting one week. The questions for each discussion were selected to be provocative and rich, without having any correct answer. At the end of the discussion, students were asked to indicate which posting and poster they felt was “best” or most valuable and why they felt the posting was “best.” There is mixed evidence that the voting influenced subsequent postings; some individuals did improve while others were consistently good or poor posters. Students selected postings that were (in declining frequency of occurrence: thoughtful or thought-provoking, well written or justified, uplifting, presented new information, same as their own opinions, changed me, or complex. These reasons are similar to those of the instructor, although the students’ difficulty in choosing and rationalizing a choice and the frequency at which students chose posts that captured their own thoughts and opinions are of some concern. This study provides some evidence that these graduate students could evaluate their own discussions without the instructor intruding or dictating an evaluation scheme, although this may not be true for other groups of online students.

  18. A Thematic Analysis of Online Discussion Boards for Vasectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samplaski, Mary K

    2017-09-28

    To examine posts on Internet discussion groups related to vasectomies, and identify common ideas through a structured theme analysis. Internet discussion boards were identified using the search term "vasectomy." Three discussion boards were identified as having the most posts and were chosen for analysis. Using an iterative and structured analysis process, each post was analyzed using thematic analysis in 3 steps (open coding, axial coding, and selective coding) to determine common themes. A total of 129 posts were analyzed. The most common posts related to changes in sexual function after vasectomy. The second most common theme was pain after vasectomy. There were also posts about considerations before vasectomy, planning for postvasectomy care, what to expect after vasectomy, potential issues after vasectomy and how to manage these, and feelings about vasectomy. Some of the information present did not have a factual basis. Posts dedicated to postvasectomy pain and sexual dysfunction were of the highest quantity. There was no medical provider input to these discussion boards. Educational efforts should be targeted to these areas and should include a health-care professional. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Stimulated-emission-depletion microscopy with a multicolor stimulated-Raman-scattering light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Brian R; Kellner, Robert R; Hell, Stefan W

    2008-11-01

    We describe a subdiffraction-resolution far-field fluorescence microscope employing stimulated emission depletion (STED) with a light source consisting of a microchip laser coupled into a standard single-mode fiber, which, via stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), yields a comb-like spectrum of seven discrete peaks extending from the fundamental wavelength at 532 nm to 620 nm. Each of the spectral peaks can be used as STED light for overcoming the diffraction barrier. This SRS light source enables the simple implementation of multicolor STED and provides a spectral output with multiple available wavelengths from green to red with potential for further expansion.

  20. Comparative Evaluation of Tactile Sensation by Electrical and Mechanical Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yem, Vibol; Kajimoto, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    An electrotactile display is a tactile interface that provides tactile perception by passing electrical current through the surface of the skin. It is actively used instead of mechanical tactile displays for tactile feedback because of several advantages such as its small and thin size, light weight, and high responsiveness. However, the similarities and differences between these sensations is still not clear. This study directly compares the intensity sensation of electrotactile stimulation to that of mechanical stimulation, and investigates the characteristic sensation of anodic and cathodic stimulation. In the experiment, participants underwent a 30 pps electrotactile stimulus every one second to their middle finger, and were asked to match this intensity by adjusting the intensity of a mechanical tactile stimulus to an index finger. The results showed that anodic stimulation mainly produced vibration sensation, whereas cathodic sensation produced both vibration and pressure sensations. Relatively low pressure sensation was also observed for anodic stimulation but it remains low, regardless of the increasing of electrical intensity.

  1. Spinal cord stimulation for chronic non-cancer pain: a review of current evidence and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, S Sc; Chan, C W; Cheung, C W

    2017-10-01

    Spinal cord stimulation provides analgesia through electrical stimulation of the dorsal column of the spinal cord via electrode leads placed into the epidural space. In traditional tonic stimulation, a painful sensation is replaced with paraesthesia. Spinal cord stimulation is effective in reducing neuropathic pain, enhancing function, and improving quality of life in different chronic pain conditions. Currently, there is most evidence to support its use for failed back surgery syndrome when multidisciplinary conventional management is unsuccessful. Temporary trial leads are inserted in carefully selected patients to test their responsiveness prior to permanent implantation. Newer neuromodulation modalities are now available. These include burst stimulation, high-frequency stimulation, and dorsal root ganglion stimulation. Results are encouraging to date, and they may provide superior analgesia and cover for deficiencies of traditional tonic stimulation. Although complications are not uncommon, they are rarely life threatening or permanently disabling. Nonetheless, device removal is occasionally needed.

  2. Panel Discussion: Life in the Cosmos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) probe has found that both the North and South Polar Caps of Mars are approximately 3.5 km thick and are composed almost entirely of water ice. In winter, a thin dry ice layer covers the caps, but it sublimates directly to CO2 in the spring. The ESA Mars Express Orbiter images reveal Rupes Tenuis to be a vast snow-laden region on the southern edge of the Martian North Polar Cap. The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit found alkaline volcanic rocks in the Gusev Crater and the Phoenix Mars Lander has shown that the soil of Mars is much more alkaline than previously expected. The Phoenix Mars Lander has also made direct observations of frozen and liquid water on Mars. It is known that microorganisms from Alaska, Siberia and Antarctica can remain alive frozen in permafrost or ice for long periods of time. These discoveries increase the possibility that the Labeled Release Experiment may have discovered life on Mars during the Viking Mission and provide strong impetus for the return of life detection experiments to Mars. Changes in the spin rate of Saturn's moon Titan indicate that it may also harbor a 300 km thick liquid water ocean beneath its icy crust. The NASA/ESA/Italian Space Agency Cassini Spacecraft has imaged geysers containing water vapor, methane, carbon dioxide and organics erupting from the "tiger stripe" regions near the South Pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus. The high temperatures observed, the water vapor and large number of ice particles expelled suggest that a liquid water lake may exist beneath the "tiger stripe" ice cracks of Enceladus. The NASA Deep Impact probe found the surface temperature of comet 9P/Temple 1 at 1.5 AY was slightly above the ice/water phase change temperature (273 K). This suggests melting of water ice near the comet surface. A spectrometer the spacecraft detected a mixture of clay and carbonate minerals (that form in the presence of liquid water) streaming off the comet after the collision with the

  3. Motor cortex-induced plasticity by noninvasive brain stimulation: a comparison between transcranial direct current stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simis, Marcel; Adeyemo, Bamidele O; Medeiros, Liciane F; Miraval, Forella; Gagliardi, Rubens J; Fregni, Felipe

    2013-12-04

    The aim of this study was to test and compare the effects of a within-subject design of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) [coupled with sham transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS)] and tDCS (coupled with sham rTMS) on the motor cortex excitability and also compare the results against sham tDCS/sham rTMS. We conducted a double-blinded, randomized, sham-controlled, cross-over trial. Eleven right-handed, healthy individuals (five women, mean age: 39.8 years, SD 13.4) received the three interventions (cross-over design) in a randomized order: (a) high-frequency (HF) rTMS (+sham tDCS), (b) anodal tDCS (+sham rTMS), and (c) sham stimulation (sham rTMS+sham tDCS). Cortical excitability measurements [motor threshold, motor evoked potential (MEP), intracortical facilitation and inhibition, and transcallosal inhibition] and motor behavioral assessments were used as outcome measures. Between-group analysis of variance showed that MEP amplitude after HF rTMS was significantly higher than MEP amplitude after anodal tDCS (P=0.001). Post-hoc analysis showed a significant increase in MEP amplitude after HF rTMS (25.3%, P=0.036) and a significant decrease in MEP amplitude after anodal tDCS (-32.7%, P=0.001). There was a similar increase in motor function as indexed by Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test in the two active groups compared with sham stimulation. In conclusion, here, we showed that although both techniques induced similar motor gains, they induce opposing results in cortical excitability. HF rTMS is associated with an increase in corticospinal excitability, whereas 20 min of tDCS induces the opposite effect. We discuss potential implications of these results to future clinical experiments using rTMS or tDCS for motor function enhancement.

  4. Comparison of Small-Class Versus Large-Class Tutorial Discussions

    OpenAIRE

    Ridawati, Indah Dewi; Prihatiningsih, Titi Savitri; Widyandana, Widyandana

    2017-01-01

    Background: Not all small tutorial discussion groups discuss national integrated antenatal care. Tutorial discussion in a large class provide discussion together among small discussion groups of the seventh jump.Method: This study was an explanatory design, mixed-methods study. The research sample amounted to 60 students of 2.6 block in the Gadjah Mada University Bachelor Nursing Program and semi-structured interviews conducted on 10 respondents were included in the quantitative study. The da...

  5. Cranial electrotherapy stimulation and fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilula, Marshall F

    2007-07-01

    Cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES) is a well-documented neuroelectrical modality that has been proven effective in some good studies of fibromyalgia (FM) patients. CES is no panacea but, for some FM patients, the modality can be valuable. This article discusses aspects of both CES and FM and how they relate to the individual with the condition. FM frequently has many comorbidities such as anxiety, depression, insomnia and a great variety of different rheumatologic and neurological symptoms that often resemble multiple sclerosis, dysautonomias, chronic fatigue syndrome and others. However, despite long-standing criteria from the American College of Rheumatology for FM, some physicians believe there is probably no single homogeneous condition that can be labeled as FM. Whether it is a disease, a syndrome or something else, sufferers feel like they are living one disaster after another. Active self-involvement in care usually enhances the therapeutic results of various treatments and also improves the patient's sense of being in control of the condition. D-ribose supplementation may prove to significantly enhance energy, sleep, mental clarity, pain control and well-being in FM patients. A form of evoked potential biofeedback, the EPFX, is a powerful stress reduction technique which assesses the chief stressors and risk factors for illness that can impede the FM patient's built-in healing abilities. Future healthcare will likely expand the diagnostic criteria of FM and/or illuminate a group of related conditions and the ways in which the conditions relate to each other. Future medicine for FM and related conditions may increasingly involve multimodality treatment that features CES as one significant part of the therapeutic regimen. Future medicine may also include CES as an invaluable, cost-effective add-on to many facets of clinical pharmacology and medical therapeutics.

  6. Tissue damage thresholds during therapeutic electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, Stuart F.; Ludwig, Kip A.; Welle, Cristin G.; Takmakov, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Recent initiatives in bioelectronic modulation of the nervous system by the NIH (SPARC), DARPA (ElectRx, SUBNETS) and the GlaxoSmithKline Bioelectronic Medicines effort are ushering in a new era of therapeutic electrical stimulation. These novel therapies are prompting a re-evaluation of established electrical thresholds for stimulation-induced tissue damage. Approach. In this review, we explore what is known and unknown in published literature regarding tissue damage from electrical stimulation. Main results. For macroelectrodes, the potential for tissue damage is often assessed by comparing the intensity of stimulation, characterized by the charge density and charge per phase of a stimulus pulse, with a damage threshold identified through histological evidence from in vivo experiments as described by the Shannon equation. While the Shannon equation has proved useful in assessing the likely occurrence of tissue damage, the analysis is limited by the experimental parameters of the original studies. Tissue damage is influenced by factors not explicitly incorporated into the Shannon equation, including pulse frequency, duty cycle, current density, and electrode size. Microelectrodes in particular do not follow the charge per phase and charge density co-dependence reflected in the Shannon equation. The relevance of these factors to tissue damage is framed in the context of available reports from modeling and in vivo studies. Significance. It is apparent that emerging applications, especially with microelectrodes, will require clinical charge densities that exceed traditional damage thresholds. Experimental data show that stimulation at higher charge densities can be achieved without causing tissue damage, suggesting that safety parameters for microelectrodes might be distinct from those defined for macroelectrodes. However, these increased charge densities may need to be justified by bench, non-clinical or clinical testing to provide evidence of device

  7. Stimulant alcohol effects prime within session drinking behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, William R; Gearhardt, Ashley; Fromme, Kim

    2008-04-01

    Individual differences in subjective alcohol effects have been shown to differ by risk status (e.g., family history of alcoholism) and to predict future risk for alcohol-related problems. Presumably, individual differences in both stimulant and sedative responses affect the rewarding value of drinking which, in turn, impacts future drinking behavior. Although plausible, this theoretical model is largely untested. The current study attempted to provide experimental evidence for the impact of subjective alcohol responses on within session drinking behavior. Using a placebo-controlled between-subjects alcohol administration paradigm, experiences and evaluations of stimulant and sedative alcohol effects (after a target dose of 0.06 g%) were assessed as predictors of ad-libitum consumption in the context of anticipatory stress. Analyses indicated that an initial dose of alcohol increased experiences of both stimulation and sedation although stimulant effects were evaluated much more positively. In addition, stimulant effects after a priming dose predicted further consumption, whereas sedative effects did not. At least among moderate to heavy drinking college students, stimulant alcohol effects are more reinforcing and predict within session drinking behavior under social stress. Increased attention should be given to stimulant alcohol effects as a risk factor for excessive consumption in this population. Incorporating information about stimulant alcohol effects in prevention and intervention programs may also be important if additional research supports the current results.

  8. Digital electronic bone growth stimulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention relates to the electrical treatment of biological tissue. In particular, the present invention discloses a device that produces discrete electrical pulse trains for treating osteoporosis and accelerating bone growth. According to its major aspects and broadly stated, the present invention consists of an electrical circuit configuration capable of generating Bassett-type waveforms shown with alternative signals provide for the treatment of either fractured bones or osteoporosis. The signal generator comprises a quartz clock, an oscillator circuit, a binary divider chain, and a plurality of simple, digital logic gates. Signals are delivered efficiently, with little or no distortion, and uniformly distributed throughout the area of injury. Perferably, power is furnished by widely available and inexpensive radio batteries, needing replacement only once in several days. The present invention can be affixed to a medical cast without a great increase in either weight or bulk. Also, the disclosed stimulator can be used to treat osteoporosis or to strengthen a healing bone after the cast has been removed by attaching the device to the patient`s skin or clothing.

  9. Fundamentals of Transcranial Electric and Magnetic Stimulation Dose: Definition, Selection, and Reporting Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterchev, Angel V.; Wagner, Timothy A.; Miranda, Pedro C.; Nitsche, Michael A.; Paulus, Walter; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Bikson, Marom

    2011-01-01

    The growing use of transcranial electric and magnetic (EM) brain stimulation in basic research and in clinical applications necessitates a clear understanding of what constitutes the dose of EM stimulation and how it should be reported. The biological effects of EM stimulation are mediated through an electromagnetic field injected (via electric stimulation) or induced (via magnetic stimulation) in the body. Therefore, transcranial EM stimulation dose ought to be defined by all parameters of the stimulation device that affect the electromagnetic field generated in the body, including the stimulation electrode or coil configuration parameters: shape, size, position, and electrical properties, as well as the electrode or coil current (or voltage) waveform parameters: pulse shape, amplitude, width, polarity, and repetition frequency; duration of and interval between bursts or trains of pulses; total number of pulses; and interval between stimulation sessions and total number of sessions. Knowledge of the electromagnetic field generated in the body may not be sufficient but is necessary to understand the biological effects of EM stimulation. We believe that reporting of EM stimulation dose should be guided by the principle of reproducibility: sufficient information about the stimulation parameters should be provided so that the dose can be replicated. This paper provides fundamental definition and principles for reporting of dose that encompass any transcranial EM brain stimulation protocol. PMID:22305345

  10. Burst spinal cord stimulation for limb and back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ridder, Dirk; Plazier, Mark; Kamerling, Niels; Menovsky, Tomas; Vanneste, Sven

    2013-11-01

    Spinal cord stimulation via epidurally implanted electrodes is a common treatment for medically intractable neuropathic pain of different origins. Because tonic electrical stimulation evokes paresthesias over the painful area, this method has never been proven scientifically to be superior to placebo. Recently, burst stimulation (in which closely spaced, high-frequency stimuli are delivered to the spinal cord) has been developed, which does not generate paresthesias. A randomized placebo controlled trail in which we compared three stimulation paradigms (burst, tonic, and placebo) was performed on 15 consecutive pain patients. In contrast to tonic stimulation, burst stimulation was able to provide pain relief without the generation of paresthesias, permitting us to use a double-blinded placebo controlled approach. Primary outcome measures were visual analog scale pain scores for back pain, limb pain, and general pain. Secondary outcome measures included the pain vigilance and awareness questionnaire, which is used to measure attention to pain and pain changes, and visual analog scale of the worst, least, and momentary pain. In a subgroup of five patients, a source-localized electroencephalogram was performed under four conditions: baseline, tonic, burst, and placebo stimulation. Burst stimulation was able to improve back, limb, and general pain by 51%, 53%, and 55% and tonic stimulation by 30%, 52%, and 31%, respectively. Pain now, least, and worst pain were improved by 50%, 73%, and 36% by burst stimulation, respectively, and 26%, 46%, and 13% by tonic stimulation. In comparison with placebo, burst, corrected for multiple comparisons, was significantly better for all measurements. However, the greatest differences were obtained in the pain vigilance and awareness questionnaire measurements: burst improved the attention to pain and pain changes, whereas tonic and placebo worsened these measurements. The analysis via encephalogram demonstrates burst stimulation

  11. Modulatory Effect of Association of Brain Stimulation by Light and Binaural Beats in Specific Brain Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calomeni, Mauricio Rocha; Furtado da Silva, Vernon; Velasques, Bruna Brandão; Feijó, Olavo Guimarães; Bittencourt, Juliana Marques; Ribeiro de Souza E Silva, Alair Pedro

    2017-01-01

    One of the positive effects of brain stimulation is interhemispheric modulation as shown in some scientific studies. This study examined if a type of noninvasive stimulation using binaural beats with led-lights and sound would show different modulatory effects upon Alfa and SMR brain waves of elderlies and children with some disease types. The sample included 75 individuals of both genders, being, randomly, divided in 6 groups. Groups were named elderly without dementia diagnosis (EWD), n=15, 76±8 years, elderly diagnosed with Parkinson's disease (EDP), n=15, 72±7 years, elderly diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (EDA), n=15, 81±6 years. The other groups were named children with Autism (CA), n=10, 11±4 years, children with Intellectual Impairment (CII), n=10, 12 ±5 years and children with normal cognitive development (CND), n=10, 11±4 years. Instruments were the Mini Mental State Examination Test (MMSE), EEG-Neurocomputer instrument for brain waves registration, brain stimulator, Digit Span Test and a Protocol for working memory training. Data collection followed a pre and post-conjugated stimulation version. The results of the inferential statistics showed that the stimulation protocol had different effects on Alpha and SMR brain waves of the patients. Also, indicated gains in memory functions, for both, children and elderlies as related to gains in brain waves modulation. The results may receive and provide support to a range of studies examining brain modulation and synaptic plasticity. Also, it was emphasized in the results discussion that there was the possibility of the technique serving as an accessory instrument to alternative brain therapies.

  12. Electrical stimulation in exercise training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Walter

    1994-01-01

    Electrical stimulation has a long history of use in medicine dating back to 46 A.D. when the Roman physician Largus found the electrical discharge of torpedo fishes useful in the treatment of pain produced by headache and gout. A rival Greek physician, Dioscorides, discounted the value of the torpedo fish for headache relief but did recommend its use in the treatment of hemorrhoids. In 1745, the Leyden jar and various sized electrostatic generators were used to treat angina pectoris, epilepsy, hemiplegia, kidney stones, and sciatica. Benjamin Franklin used an electrical device to treat successfully a young woman suffering from convulsive fits. In the late 1800's battery powered hydroelectric baths were used to treat chronic inflammation of the uterus while electrified athletic supporters were advertised for the treatment of male problems. Fortunately, such an amusing early history of the simple beginnings of electrical stimulation did not prevent eventual development of a variety of useful therapeutic and rehabilitative applications of electrical stimulation. Over the centuries electrical stimulation has survived as a modality in the treatment of various medical disorders with its primary application being in the rehabilitation area. Recently, a surge of new interest in electrical stimulation has been kindled by the work of a Russian sport scientist who reported remarkable muscle strength and endurance improvements in elite athletes. Yakov Kots reported his research on electric stimulation and strength improvements in 1977 at a Canadian-Soviet Exchange Symposium held at Concordia University in Montreal. Since then an explosion of new studies has been seen in both sport science and in medicine. Based upon the reported works of Kots and the present surge of new investigations, one could be misled as to the origin of electrical stimulation as a technique to increase muscle strength. As a matter of fact, electric stimulation has been used as a technique to improve

  13. Low intensity transcranial electric stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antal, A.; Alekseichuk, I.; Bikson, M.

    2017-01-01

    Low intensity transcranial electrical stimulation (TES) in humans, encompassing transcranial direct current (tDCS), transcutaneous spinal Direct Current Stimulation (tsDCS), transcranial alternating current (tACS), and transcranial random noise (tRNS) stimulation or their combinations, appears...... to suboptimal electrode-skin contact. Very rarely mania or hypomania was induced in patients with depression (11 documented cases), yet a causal relationship is difficult to prove because of the low incidence rate and limited numbers of subjects in controlled trials. Mild AEs (MAEs) include headache and fatigue...

  14. A Student Panel Discussion to Practice Argumentation Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Gensowski

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Economics students are used to lectures of the “chalk-and-talk” variety. In this project, I develop, describe, and evaluate a pedagogical intervention that provides students with the opportunity to practice their argumentation skills. The development of these skills is not usually part of the core curriculum. For this project, a panel discussion format is used to enable students to develop arguments using empirical evidence, and generally navigate a space where there is no single right or wrong answer. The peer-learning environment allows students to develop argumentation and evaluation skills in a setting where they receive informal formative assessment.

  15. Book discussion course: timely topics for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Donna F; Woodson, Deidra; Jones, Dee

    2014-01-01

    Several library faculty members at the Louisiana State University Health Shreveport Health Sciences Library offered a book discussion course as an elective for first-year medical students. This article provides details on how the librarians developed, taught, and evaluated this elective. The librarians took a team-teaching approach, required the students to read two books, and outlined the criteria for participation. At the end of the course, the students completed an evaluation, commenting on positive and negative aspects of the course. The elective proved to be successful, and the librarians look forward to offering the course again in the spring of 2014.

  16. Physiological Mechanisms in Combined Electric-Acoustic Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Mika; Baumhoff, Peter; Tillein, Jochen; Kral, Andrej

    2017-09-01

    Electrical stimulation is normally performed on ears that have no hearing function, i.e., lack functional hair cells. The properties of electrically-evoked responses in these cochleae were investigated in several previous studies. Recent clinical developments have introduced cochlear implantation (CI) in residually-hearing ears to improve speech understanding in noise. The present study documents the known physiological differences between electrical stimulation of hair cells and of spiral ganglion cells, respectively, and reviews the mechanisms of combined electric and acoustic stimulation in the hearing ears. Literature review from 1971 to 2016. Compared with pure electrical stimulation the combined electroacoustic stimulation provides additional low-frequency information and expands the dynamic range of the input. Physiological studies document a weaker synchronization of the evoked activity in electrically stimulated hearing ears compared with deaf ears that reduces the hypersynchronization of electrically-evoked activity. The findings suggest the possibility of balancing the information provided by acoustic and electric input using stimulus intensity. Absence of distorting acoustic-electric interactions allows exploiting these clinical benefits of electroacoustic stimulation.

  17. PRESYNAPTIC DOPAMINE MODULATION BY STIMULANT SELF ADMINISTRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    España, Rodrigo A.; Jones, Sara R.

    2013-01-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine system is an essential participant in the initiation and modulation of various forms of goal-directed behavior, including drug reinforcement and addiction processes. Dopamine neurotransmission is increased by acute administration of all drugs of abuse, including the stimulants cocaine and amphetamine. Chronic exposure to these drugs via voluntary self-administration provides a model of stimulant abuse that is useful in evaluating potential behavioral and neurochemical adaptations that occur during addiction. This review describes commonly used methodologies to measure dopamine and baseline parameters of presynaptic dopamine regulation, including exocytotic release and reuptake through the dopamine transporter in the nucleus accumbens core, as well as dramatic adaptations in dopamine neurotransmission and drug sensitivity that occur with acute non-contingent and chronic, contingent self-administration of cocaine and amphetamine. PMID:23277050

  18. Fast simulation and optimization tool to explore selective neural stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélissa Dali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In functional electrical stimulation, selective stimulation of axons is desirable to activate a specific target, in particular muscular function. This implies to simulate a fascicule without activating neighboring ones i.e. to be spatially selective. Spatial selectivity is achieved by the use of multicontact cuff electrodes over which the stimulation current is distributed. Because of the large number of parameters involved, numerical simulations provide a way to find and optimize electrode configuration. The present work offers a computation effective scheme and associated tool chain capable of simulating electrode-nerve interface and find the best spread of current to achieve spatial selectivity.

  19. Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-05-01

    The following are included: review of available data from previous fracturing stimulation operations, stimulation process variables, fracturing fluid design, hydraulic fracture design, stimulation case histories, and selected bibliography. (MHR)

  20. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Schizophrenia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dougall, Nadine; Maayan, Nicola; Soares-Weiser, Karla; McDermott, Lisa M; McIntosh, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    .... One proposed alternative to drug treatments is transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). To date, many research trials to assess effectiveness of TMS for people with symptoms of schizophrenia have been conducted worldwide...

  1. Enteral feeding without pancreatic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaushik, Neeraj; Pietraszewski, Marie; Holst, Jens Juul

    2005-01-01

    .5 g protein/kg ideal body weight/d. Plasma gut peptide responses were monitored in 15 subjects. RESULTS: In comparison with basal fasting trypsin secretion rates (mean = 134 [standard error = 22] U/h), duodenal feeding with the polymeric and elemental formulae stimulated trypsin secretion (mean = 408...... in enteral feeding without pancreatic stimulation, with particular reference to trypsin, because the avoidance of trypsin stimulation may optimize enteral feeding in acute pancreatitis. METHODS: The pancreatic secretory responses to feeding were studied in 36 healthy volunteers by standard double...... [standard error = 51] U/h; P standard error = 34] U/h) and mid-distal jejunal (mean = 119 [standard error = 16] U/h) did not. Stimulation was associated with an increase in plasma cholecystokinin, whereas distal jejunal feeding resulted in an increase...

  2. Mechanisms of deep brain stimulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Herrington, Todd M; Cheng, Jennifer J; Eskandar, Emad N

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is widely used for the treatment of movement disorders including Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and dystonia and, to a lesser extent, certain treatment-resistant neuropsychiatric disorders...

  3. The Role of Online Instructors in Asynchronous Discussion Forums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddison, Sarah T.; Mazzolini, M. M.; Gay, P. L.

    2007-05-01

    We present qualitative results and advice on the role of online instructors in asynchronous discussion forums and the technologies used to support online interactive learning. Results are based on six years of designing, coordinating, evaluating and teaching into the distance learning program Swinburne Astronomy Online. We discuss why we chose to use asynchronous rather than synchronous discussion forums and how we have implemented them; how we train our online instructors and their role as a 'guide on the side'; techniques for moderating the volume of forum postings while ensuring a constructive learning environment; and methods for dealing with both mixed class preparedness and 'challenging' students within an online environment. Our research into the interaction between students and instructors in online forums provides some interesting (and often counter-intuitive) insights into the relationship between the number and length of student postings and the posting patterns of their instructors. We compare these results with qualitative feedback from both students and instructors on their perception of the online learning and teaching experience.

  4. Family discussions on life-sustaining interventions in neurocritical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adil, M M; Larriviere, D

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 20% of all deaths in the USA occur in the intensive care unit (ICU) and the majority of ICU deaths involves decision of de-escalation of life-sustaining interventions. Life-sustaining interventions may include intubation and mechanical ventilation, artificial nutrition and hydration, antibiotic treatment, brain surgery, or vasoactive support. Decision making about goals of care can be defined as an end-of-life communication and the decision-making process between a clinician and a patient (or a surrogate decision maker if the patient is incapable) in an institutional setting to establish a plan of care. This process includes deciding whether to use life-sustaining treatments. Therefore, family discussion is a critical element in the decision-making process throughout the patient's stay in the neurocritical care unit. A large part of care in the neurosciences intensive care unit is discussion of proportionality of care. This chapter provides a stepwise approach to hold these conferences and discusses ways to do it effectively. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Transcranial electrical stimulation: An introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Tarazona, Carlos G; Chávez, Laura; Andrade, Sebastián

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the electrical stimulation of the brain is to generate action potentials from the application of electromagnetic fields. Among the available techniques, transcranial electrical stimulation (TES) represents a popular method of administration that has the advantage of being non-invasive and economically more affordable. This article aims to briefly introduce the reader into the understanding of TES in terms of the physics involved as well as for some of the relevant results of studies applying this technique.

  6. A Roundtable Discussion: Combination Products: Twice the Challenge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Nolan; Binion, Steven B; Cammack, Jon; Paine, Stephanie Del; Gonzales, Rosemary; Passut, Jena; Weiner, John Barlow Barr

    2015-01-01

    Combination products are therapeutic or diagnostic medical products that combine drugs, devices, and/or biological products with one another. FDA developed a regulation (final rule) on Current Good Manufacturing Practices (CGMP) for combination products that became effective July 22, 2013 (21 CFR Part 4). AAMI recently developed a technical information report (TIR) that provides information on how to effectively implement FDA's regulation. The overall goal of the TIR is to aid informed, risk-based decisions in establishing CGMP operating systems that support development, manufacture, premarket regulatory evaluation, and ultimately commercialization of combination products. This article, a result of an discussion with industry and FDA representatives, explores the landscape of combination products, highlights important considerations in developing and seeking marketing clearance for these innovative products, and provides insight on trends in the area.

  7. Emergency medicine narratives: a systematic discussion of definition and utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Seth Collings

    2004-07-01

    A substantial number of emergency medicine providers are publishing stories and other creative expressions related to their medical experiences. This is a systematic review of such publications, introduces the term "emergency medicine narratives" to describe such pieces, and proposes a framework to classify the various forms of expression. Specifically, six genres of emergency medicine narratives are discussed: medical autobiography, clinical narratives, creative narratives, out-of-hospital narratives, lay exposition, and photojournalism. This review explores the utility of these narratives and the role they play within the field of emergency medicine, provides a bibliography of emergency narratives, and suggests future questions that might be addressed regarding this growing phenomenon in the field of emergency medicine.

  8. LABOR MOTIVATION AND STIMULATION AS ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Tregoubova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Main organizational behavior management methods are material incentives, wages, rewards, participation in profits. Motivation andstimulation concepts are specified, components of the mechanism of forming the system of personnel stimulus and motives are discussed along with organization personnel motivation and stimulation forms and methods.

  9. Somatosensory Event-related Potentials from Orofacial Skin Stretch Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Takayuki; Ostry, David J; Gracco, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Cortical processing associated with orofacial somatosensory function in speech has received limited experimental attention due to the difficulty of providing precise and controlled stimulation. This article introduces a technique for recording somatosensory event-related potentials (ERP) that uses a novel mechanical stimulation method involving skin deformation using a robotic device. Controlled deformation of the facial skin is used to modulate kinesthetic inputs thro...

  10. Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home » Disorders » All Disorders Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page What research is being done? The ...

  11. A template for non-religious-based discussions against euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloodworth, Melissa; Bloodworth, Nathaniel; Ely, E Wesley

    2015-02-01

    We submit this manuscript as part of the ongoing conversation in society at large about physician-assisted death (PAD) and euthanasia. This outlines an approach used by lay healthcare professionals in arguing against PAD/euthanasia during a 1-hour debate conducted on a secular medical school campus. We have included the elements chosen for the "con" side of the argument (i.e., against PAD) by the medical students and attending physician. The goal of this manuscript is to provide a focused and pithy template upon which to build an approach that honors the dignity of life in all circumstances. Lay summary: The discussion over physician assisted death and euthanasia remains ongoing in secular academic medical institutions across the United States and much of the western world. These debates have incentivized efforts to develop a framework for arguments against Euthanasia that will find traction in an environment generally hostile to religion and religious thought. In this essay, we present arguments given by the "con" side in a student-led debate over physician assisted death and euthanasia at Vanderbilt University with the hope that they will provide a foundation for future discussions promoting truth and life without alienating our secular colleagues.

  12. Fostering professionalism among doctors: the role of workplace discussion groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Deborah; Griffin, Ann; Launer, John

    2014-10-01

    The professionalism of doctors has come in for increasing scrutiny and discussion, within the profession and in society. Professionalism has also become of central interest in undergraduate and postgraduate medical education. There is a great deal of debate about the nature of medical professionalism, how to promote it and what approaches to learning are most effective. This study aims to identify the role of workplace-based discussion groups in encouraging and supporting the development of professionalism among doctors. Workplace-based discussion groups including doctors from all non-consultant grades and specialties were established in five hospitals over a 6 month period in 2010-2011. A mixed-methods approach was used to identify the perceived impact of these groups on participants, which included interviewing the group facilitators and education leaders at participating hospitals. Understanding of professionalism at an individual level was improved along with an increased awareness of the collective nature of professionalism in everyday clinical practice. Key to the success of the groups was the creation of a legitimate space to explore professionalism and professional challenges and the use of experienced facilitators who could build trust in the groups. A purely individualistic approach to professionalism does not resonate with contemporary, team-based healthcare. Work-based groups can provide a focus for an approach to professionalism that is mindful of self, the team, the culture and the organisation. This evaluation provides guidance to a range of stakeholders on how to develop educational interventions that foster professionalism, personal and collective, and offers some pointers towards the range of factors that may impact on the outcomes of such activities. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Limited output transcranial electrical stimulation (LOTES-2017): Engineering principles, regulatory statutes, and industry standards for wellness, over-the-counter, or prescription devices with low risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikson, Marom; Paneri, Bhaskar; Mourdoukoutas, Andoni; Esmaeilpour, Zeinab; Badran, Bashar W; Azzam, Robin; Adair, Devin; Datta, Abhishek; Fang, Xiao Hui; Wingeier, Brett; Chao, Daniel; Alonso-Alonso, Miguel; Lee, Kiwon; Knotkova, Helena; Woods, Adam J; Hagedorn, David; Jeffery, Doug; Giordano, James; Tyler, William J

    We present device standards for low-power non-invasive electrical brain stimulation devices classified as limited output transcranial electrical stimulation (tES). Emerging applications of limited output tES to modulate brain function span techniques to stimulate brain or nerve structures, including transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), and transcranial pulsed current stimulation (tPCS), have engendered discussion on how access to technology should be regulated. In regards to legal regulations and manufacturing standards for comparable technologies, a comprehensive framework already exists, including quality systems (QS), risk management, and (inter)national electrotechnical standards (IEC). In Part 1, relevant statutes are described for medical and wellness application. While agencies overseeing medical devices have broad jurisdiction, enforcement typically focuses on those devices with medical claims or posing significant risk. Consumer protections regarding responsible marketing and manufacture apply regardless. In Part 2 of this paper, we classify the electrical output performance of devices cleared by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) including over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription electrostimulation devices, devices available for therapeutic or cosmetic purposes, and devices indicated for stimulation of the body or head. Examples include iontophoresis devices, powered muscle stimulators (PMS), cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES), and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) devices. Spanning over 13 FDA product codes, more than 1200 electrical stimulators have been cleared for marketing since 1977. The output characteristics of conventional tDCS, tACS, and tPCS techniques are well below those of most FDA cleared devices, including devices that are available OTC and those intended for stimulation on the head. This engineering analysis demonstrates that with

  14. Effects of Tagcloud-Anchored Group Discussions on Pre-Service Teachers' Collaborative Knowledge Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Yuan; Xie, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Group discussions are critical for students constructing new understanding and knowledge in both classroom and distance education. Tagclouds can provide an intuitive overview about the group's collective knowledge and could potentially be used as an anchor for group discussions. The effect of using tagclouds as anchors for group discussions was…

  15. Critically Thinking about Harry Potter: A Framework for Discussing Controversial Works in the English Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Joanne M.

    2003-01-01

    Notes that at the school level and in the classroom, English educators can lead the way in open discussion, particularly discussion about books such as the Harry Potter series. Offers a seven-step framework as a way to begin an open discussion. Concludes that the framework acknowledges those concerns and provides a voice for them while also…

  16. Chemosensory stimulation during sleep - Arousal responses to gustatory stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuck, B A; Moutsis, T T; Bingel, U; Sommer, J U

    2016-05-13

    The processing of nociceptive, visual, vibrotactile, thermal and acoustic stimuli during sleep has been extensively investigated in the past. Recently, interest has focused on the impact of olfactory stimulation on sleep. In contrast to all other sensory systems, olfactory stimulation does not lead to an increased arousal frequency, regardless of hedonicity and concentration. The impact of the second chemosensory system, gustation, on sleep however has not been investigated to date. Twenty-one normosmic and normogeusic volunteers of both genders, aged 19-33 years, participated in the trial. Stimulation was performed with a gustometer using the following aqueous solutions: saccharose 20% (sweet), sodium chloride (NaCl) 7.5% (salty), citrate 5% (sour), and quinine 0.02% (bitter). A tasteless solution was used as negative control. Capsaicin, a strong trigeminal stimulus, served as positive control. Primary outcome was arousal frequency per stimulus in each sleep stage, as assessed with polysomnography. The frequency of arousals decreased in deeper sleep stages (N1: 211 arousals of 333 stimuli=63%, N2: 676/2728=25%, N3: 43/1378=3%, REM: 57/1010=6%). Statistically significant differences in terms of arousal frequency were found in N2 between the negative control and NaCl 100 μl (pgustatory stimulation during sleep induces arousals depending on stimulus intensity and sleep stage, which is different to olfactory stimulation and may be related to differences in central processing of the two chemosensory systems. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Semiologia das afasias: uma discussão crítica Semiology of aphasias: a critical discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana do Carmo Novaes Pinto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available O artigo discute a semiologia das afasias, que teve início no século XIX com Broca e Wernicke. Não é nosso objetivo fornecer uma lista exaustiva de sintomas e síndromes para tratar do tema, já que buscamos discutir criticamente por que a semiologia das afasias ainda se baseia principalmente em perspectivas orgânicas na prática clínica e na pesquisa científica. Também discutimos as contribuições de Luria e de Jakobson para uma melhor compreensão de como a linguagem está comprometida nas afasias e como a Lingüística Moderna, sobretudo a Neurolingüística Discursiva, pode iluminar o debate. Analisamos alguns dados para ilustrar os pressupostos teóricos e metodológicos das referidas abordagens e discutimos ainda o peso excessivo que as classificações têm no contexto clínico.The article discusses the semiology of aphasias, which started being developed in the 19th century by Broca and Wernicke. We do not provide an exhaustive list of symptoms and syndromes to address the theme, since we aim to critically discuss why the semiology of aphasias is still based mainly on organic perspectives in clinical practice and scientific research. We also discuss the contributions of Luria and Jakobson to a better understanding of how language is affected in aphasias and how Modern Linguistics, in special the Discursive Neurolinguistics, may enlighten the debate. We analyze some data to illustrate the theoretical and methodological assumptions of the above mentioned approaches and also discuss the excessive strength that classifications have in the clinical context.

  18. The Impact of Monaural Beat Stimulation on Anxiety and Cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Chaieb

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Application of auditory beat stimulation has been speculated to provide a promising new tool with which to alleviate symptoms of anxiety and to enhance cognition. In spite of reportedly similar EEG effects of binaural and monaural beats, data on behavioral effects of monaural beats are still lacking. Therefore, we examined the impact of monaural beat stimulation on anxiety, mood and memory performance. We aimed to target states related to anxiety levels and general well-being, in addition to long-term and working memory processes, using monaural beats within the range of main cortical rhythms. Theta (6 Hz, alpha (10 Hz and gamma (40 Hz beat frequencies, as well as a control stimulus were applied to healthy participants for 5 min. After each stimulation period, participants were asked to evaluate their current mood state and to perform cognitive tasks examining long-term and working memory processes, in addition to a vigilance task. Monaural beat stimulation was found to reduce state anxiety. When evaluating responses for the individual beat frequencies, positive effects on state anxiety were observed for all monaural beat conditions compared to control stimulation. Our results indicate a role for monaural beat stimulation in modulating state anxiety and are in line with previous studies reporting anxiety-reducing effects of auditory beat stimulation.

  19. Laryngeal elevation by selective stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Aaron J.; Kolb, Ilya; Tyler, Dustin J.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Laryngeal elevation protects the airway and assists opening of the esophagus during swallowing. The GH, thyrohyoid, and MH muscles provide a majority of this elevatory motion. This study applied functional electrical stimulation to the XII/C1 nerve complex using a nerve cuff electrode to determine the capabilities of neural stimulation to induce laryngeal elevation. Approach. Multi-contact FINE electrodes were implanted onto the XII/C1 nerve complex at locations proximal and distal to the thyrohyoid branching point in five anesthetized canines. Motion of the thyroid cartilage and the hyoid bone was recorded during stimulation of nerve cuffs and intramuscular electrodes. Main Results. Nerve stimulation induced 260% more laryngeal elevation than intramuscular stimulation (18.8 mm versus 5.2 mm, p ≪ 0.01), and 228% higher velocity (143.8 versus 43.9 mm s-1, p ≪ 0.01). While stimulation at all cuff and electrode locations elevated the larynx, only the proximal XII/C1 nerve cuff significantly elicited both thyroid-hyoid approximation and hyoid elevation. In all proximal XII/C1 nerve cuffs (n = 7), stimulation was able to obtain selectivity of greater than 75% of at least one elevatory muscle. Significance. These results support the hypothesis that an implanted neural interface system can produce increased laryngeal elevation, a significant protective mechanism of deglutition.

  20. Planning of road construction projects with a view to stimulating economic growth and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wessel Pienaar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an outline of how the economic evaluation and selection of road construction projects can be complemented by social evaluation with a view to achieving a more equitable welfare distribution within a developing country. The article commences by elaborating on the general economic benefits that can arise from investment in economically justified road infrastructure. The different classes of non-road-user beneficiaries are idenified and discussed. The operational characteristics of road transport that are conducive to the stimulation of economic activity are identified and described. The present inequality of income distribution in South Africa is dealt with briefly, followed by a discussion and analysis on the use of equity weights in project evaluation to help bring about a more equitable welfare distribution.

  1. Criteria for transcranial electrical motor evoked potential monitoring during spinal deformity surgery - A review and discussion of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langeloo, D. -D.; Journee, H. -L.; de Kleuver, M.; Grotenhuis, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    Transcranial electrical stimulated motor evoked potential monitoring (TES-MEP) has proven to be a successful and reliable neuromonitoring technique during spinal correction surgery. However, three criteria for TES-MEP monitoring have been described in the literature. This study aims at discussing

  2. Effect of an Animated Classroom Story Embedded in Online Discussion on Helping Mathematics Teachers Learn to Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieu, Vu Minh; Herbst, Patricio; Weiss, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Rich-media representations of teaching using animated cartoons can be effective at stimulating teachers' discussion about practice and hence help them learn productively from one another about their profession. Our research aims to design web-based interactive rich-media virtual settings for teachers to learn to do the practice of teaching. For…

  3. Stimulation seeking and hyperactivity in children with ADHD. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antrop, I; Roeyers, H; Van Oost, P; Buysse, A

    2000-02-01

    Thirty hyperactive and 30 non-hyperactive children were confronted with a delay, consisting of a waiting situation of 15 minutes, either with or without extra stimulation provided by the presentation of a videotape. The behaviour of the child during the waiting period was videotaped and later coded by two naive observers. In line with theories that emphasise the stimulation-seeking function of hyperactive behaviours, such as the optimal stimulation account and the delay aversion theory, a group by stimulation effect was hypothesised. For two categories of activity this was found, with ADHD children displaying more activity than non-ADHD children in the no-stimulation but not in the stimulation condition. These data provide support for the stimulation-seeking function of certain features of ADHD hyperactivity.

  4. Surface tension of HCl-based stimulation fluids at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasr-El-Din, H.A.; Al-Othman, A.M.; Taylor, K.C.; Al-Ghamdi, A.H. [RandD Center, Saudi Aramco, PO Box 62, Dhahran 31311 (Saudi Arabia)

    2004-06-01

    Surface tension of hydrochloric acid (HCl) solutions plays a key role in matrix stimulation of gas wells. A low surface tension is required to reduce the capillary forces that trap the aqueous phase in the formation. Accumulation of the aqueous phase near the well-bore area, known as water blockage, leads to a significant reduction in gas production. This work provides, for the first time, surface tension of acid-stimulating fluids at temperatures up to 120 C, HCl concentrations up to 28 wt.%, and pressures up to 220 bar. A pendant drop apparatus specially designed for corrosive fluids was used to measure the surface tension between acid solutions and nitrogen. The effects of commonly used acid additives on the surface tension of HCl solutions were also studied in detail. These additives included corrosion inhibitors, acetic acid, formic acid, methanol, mutual solvent, a nonionic fluorocarbon surfactant, iron control chemicals, and hydrogen sulfide scavengers. In addition to surface tension values of HCl up to 28 wt.% HCl at temperatures up to 120 C, experimental results indicated that several acid additives are capable of significantly lowering the surface tension of HCl solutions. The trends discussed in this study can be used to better design acid formulae used to stimulate deep gas wells.

  5. Nanotechnologies for stimulating and recording excitable events in neurons and cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Gabriel A; Khraiche, Massoud L

    2013-06-01

    Nanotechnologies are engineered materials and devices that have a functional organization in at least one dimension on the nanometer scale, ranging from a few to about 100 nanometers. Functionally, nanotechnologies can display physical, chemical, and engineering properties that go beyond the component building block molecules or structures that make them up. Given such properties and the physical scale involved, these technologies are capable of interacting and interfacing with target cells and tissues in unique ways. One particular emerging application of wide spread interest is the development of nanotechnologies for stimulating and recording excitable cells such as neurons and cardiomyocytes. Such approaches offer the possibility of achieving high density stimulation and recording at sub-cellular resolutions in large populations of cells. This would provide a scale of electrophysiological interactions with excitable cells beyond anything achievable by current existing methods. In this review we introduce the reader to the key concepts and methods associated with nanotechnology and nanoengineering, and discuss the work of some of the key groups developing nanoscale stimulation and recording technologies.

  6. Remote modulation of network excitability during deep brain stimulation for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong-Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2017-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become a well-accepted medical therapy in the treatment of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease, and is currently under investigation as a treatment for other disorders, including epilepsy. Although DBS is widely used, its therapeutic mechanisms remain poorly understood. Recent research shows that seizures are network-level phenomena, but the incomplete knowledge of neural circuit function has left a gap in our understanding of how disruption at a molecular or cellular level generates epilepsy. In addition, DBS may potentially provide the opportunity to selectively modulate targeted brain regions and related networks. Therefore, a better understanding of the relationship between normal neural networks and epileptogenic networks, as well as the role of DBS in the modulation of neural networks will help us to find the optimal stimulation targets and parameters to achieve a better therapeutic effect. This review will outline the most recent advances in the relationship between normal brain networks and epileptogenic networks, and the modulation of DBS on the excitability of epileptogenic networks. We will then discuss how to optimize DBS stimulation targets and parameters by taking into consideration the concept of network modulation in order to improve treatment of epilepsy in the future. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Using noninvasive brain stimulation to accelerate learning and enhance human performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasuraman, Raja; McKinley, Richard A

    2014-08-01

    The authors evaluate the effectiveness of noninvasive brain stimulation, in particular, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), for accelerating learning and enhancing human performance on complex tasks. Developing expertise in complex tasks typically requires extended training and practice. Neuroergonomics research has suggested new methods that can accelerate learning and boost human performance. TDCS is one such method. It involves the application of a weak DC current to the scalp and has the potential to modulate brain networks underlying the performance of a perceptual, cognitive, or motor task. Examples of tDCS studies of declarative and procedural learning are discussed. This mini-review focuses on studies employing complex simulations representative of surveillance and security operations, intelligence analysis, and procedural learning in complex monitoring. The evidence supports the view that tDCS can accelerate learning and enhance performance in a range of complex cognitive tasks. Initial findings also suggest that such benefits can be retained over time, but additional research is needed on training schedules and transfer of training. Noninvasive brain stimulation can accelerate skill acquisition in complex tasks and may provide an alternative or addition to other training methods.

  8. Designing Discussion Activities to Achieve Desired Learning Outcomes: Choices Using Mode of Delivery and Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sautter, Pookie

    2007-01-01

    The article provides insights on how the design of discussion activities can be used to facilitate alternative learning objectives in the marketing curriculum. A review of the literature provides insight for making choices with regards to two aspects of discussion design: (a) the choice between face-to-face and online (i.e., threaded bulletin…

  9. Providing a sense of touch to prosthetic hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, Bao Tram; Sando, Ian C; Gillespie, R Brent; McLaughlin, Bryan L; Gerling, Gregory J; Langhals, Nicholas B; Urbanchek, Melanie G; Cederna, Paul S

    2015-06-01

    Each year, approximately 185,000 Americans suffer the devastating loss of a limb. The effects of upper limb amputations are profound because a person's hands are tools for everyday functioning, expressive communication, and other uniquely human attributes. Despite the advancements in prosthetic technology, current upper limb prostheses are still limited in terms of complex motor control and sensory feedback. Sensory feedback is critical to restoring full functionality to amputated patients because it would relieve the cognitive burden of relying solely on visual input to monitor motor commands and provide tremendous psychological benefits. This article reviews the latest innovations in sensory feedback and argues in favor of peripheral nerve interfaces. First, the authors examine the structure of the peripheral nerve and its importance in the development of a sensory interface. Second, the authors discuss advancements in targeted muscle reinnervation and direct neural stimulation by means of intraneural electrodes. The authors then explore the future of prosthetic sensory feedback using innovative technologies for neural signaling, specifically, the sensory regenerative peripheral nerve interface and optogenetics. These breakthroughs pave the way for the development of a prosthetic limb with the ability to feel.

  10. New stimulation regimens: endogenous and exogenous progesterone use to block the LH surge during ovarian stimulation for IVF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massin, Nathalie

    2017-03-01

    The advent of embryo and oocyte vitrification today gives reproductive specialists an opportunity to consider new strategies for improving the practice and results of IVF attempts. As the freezing of entire cohorts does not compromise, and may even improve, the results of IVF attempts, it is possible to break away from the standard sequence of stimulation-retrieval-transfer. The constraints associated with ovarian stimulation in relation to the potential harmful effects of the hormonal environment on endometrial receptivity can be avoided. This review will look at the new stimulation protocols where progesterone is used to block the LH surge. Thanks to 'freeze all' strategies, the increase in progesterone could actually be no longer a cause for concern. There are two ways of using progesterone, whether it be endogenous, as in luteal phase stimulation, or exogenous, as in the use of progesterone in the follicular phase i.e. progestin primed ovarian stimulation. A literature search was carried out (until September 2016) on MEDLINE. The following text words were utilized to generate the list of citations: progestin primed ovarian stimulation, luteal phase stimulation, luteal stimulation, duostim, double stimulation, random start. Articles and their references were then examined in order to identify other potential studies. All of the articles are reported in this review. The use of progesterone during ovarian stimulation is effective in blocking the LH surge, whether endogenous or exogenous, and it does not affect the number of oocytes collected or the quality of the embryos obtained. Its main constraint is that it requires total freezing and delayed transfer. A variety of stimulation protocols can be derived from these two methods, and their implications are discussed, from fertility preservation to ovarian response profiles to organization for the patients and clincs. These new regimens enable more flexibility and are of emerging interest in daily practice. However

  11. Evoked Electromyographically Controlled Electrical Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiro Hayashibe

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Time-variant muscle responses under electrical stimulation (ES are often problematic for all the applications of neuroprosthetic muscle control. This situation limits the range of ES usage in relevant areas, mainly due to muscle fatigue and also to changes in stimulation electrode contact conditions, especially in transcutaneous ES. Surface electrodes are still the most widely used in noninvasive applications.Electrical field variations caused by changes in the stimulation contact condition markedly affect the resulting total muscle activation levels. Fatigue phenomena under functional electrical stimulation (FES are also well known source of time-varying characteristics coming from muscle response under ES. Therefore it is essential to monitor the actual muscle state and assess the expected muscle response by ES so as to improve the current ES system in favour of adaptive muscle-response-aware FES control. To deal with this issue, we have been studying a novel control technique using evoked electromyography (eEMG signals to compensate for these muscle time-variances under ES for stable neuroprosthetic muscle control. In this perspective article, I overview the background of this topic and highlight important points to be aware of when using ES to induce the desired muscle activation regardless of the time-variance. I also demonstrate how to deal with the common critical problem of ES to move toward robust neuroprosthetic muscle control with the Evoked Electromyographically Controlled Electrical Stimulation paradigm.

  12. Ovarian stimulation, endometrium and implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mandana Beigi Boroujeni

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the Paper article, the collection of the studies related to the effect of ovarian stimulation on endometrium of uterus and implantation have been investigated. History: Monash group used ovarian stimulation method for the first time in infertility treatment and also, they could increase the pregnancy rate using this method. However, the percentage of successful embryonic implantation has been decreased by this method due to imbalance of hormones and the effect of these hormonal changes on endometrium. Materials and Methods: Studies done by researchers have shown that ovarian stimulation causes undesirable changes in endometrium which in turn such alterations lead to inadequate attachment of embryo to endometrium and finally decrease the percentage of embryonic implantation. Conclusion: Based on several researches and the importance of using the ovarian stimulation method in treatment of infertility, also due to undesirable effects that ovarian stimulation has on endometrium during embryonic implantation it is inevitable that more investigations should be done for improvement of treatment methods in infertility clinics.

  13. Retinal Stimulation on Rabbit Using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Based Multichip Flexible Stimulator toward Retinal Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Takashi; Asano, Ryosuke; Sugitani, Sachie; Taniyama, Mari; Terasawa, Yasuo; Nunoshita, Masahiro; Nakauchi, Kazuaki; Fujikado, Takashi; Tano, Yasuo; Ohta, Jun

    2008-04-01

    The Functionality of a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) LSI-based, multichip flexible retinal stimulator was demonstrated in retinal stimulation experiments on rabbits. A 1×4-configured multichip stimulator was fabricated for application to experiments on animals. An experimental procedure including surgical operations was developed, and retinal stimulation was performed with the fabricated multichip stimulator. Neural responses on the visual cortex were successfully evoked by the fabricated stimulator. The stimulator is confirmed to be applicable to acute animal experiments.

  14. Steam-heat stimulation of depleted petroluem deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelenichka, L.G.; Mikhalevich, V.I.

    1982-01-01

    The authors analyze the results obtained to date with the steam-heat stimulation of depleted deposits. The history of such deposits is described for the periods prior to their development and leading up to steam-heat stimulation operations. The reasons for low effectiveness of technical processes used in the earlier stages of development are discussed. The authors conclude by suggesting certain measures which could be used to significantly increase the effectiveness of steam-heat treatments of depleted deposits under complex geological, physical, and technological conditions.

  15. Mechanisms of deep brain stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jennifer J.; Eskandar, Emad N.

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is widely used for the treatment of movement disorders including Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and dystonia and, to a lesser extent, certain treatment-resistant neuropsychiatric disorders including obsessive-compulsive disorder. Rather than a single unifying mechanism, DBS likely acts via several, nonexclusive mechanisms including local and network-wide electrical and neurochemical effects of stimulation, modulation of oscillatory activity, synaptic plasticity, and, potentially, neuroprotection and neurogenesis. These different mechanisms vary in importance depending on the condition being treated and the target being stimulated. Here we review each of these in turn and illustrate how an understanding of these mechanisms is inspiring next-generation approaches to DBS. PMID:26510756

  16. Gustatory and olfactory responses to stimulation of the human insula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Laure; Royet, Jean-Pierre; Catenoix, Hélène; Montavont, Alexandra; Isnard, Jean; Mauguière, François

    2017-09-01

    Despite numerous studies suggesting the role of insular cortex in the processing of gustatory and olfactory inputs, the exact location of olfactogustatory representation in the insula remains controversial. Here we provide a functional mapping of olfactory-gustatory responses to stimulation of the human insular cortex. We reviewed 651 electrical stimulations of the insula that were performed in 221 patients, using stereotactically implanted depth electrodes, during the presurgical evaluation of drug-refractory epilepsy. Gustatory sensations were evoked in 15 (2.7%) of the 550 stimulations that elicited a clinical response. They were exclusively obtained after stimulation of a relatively delimited zone of insula, located in its mid-dorsal part (posterior short gyrus). Six olfactory sensations (1.1%) could be obtained during stimulations of an insular region that partially overlapped with the gustatory representation. Our study provides a functional mapping of gustatory representation in the insular posterior short gyrus and the first detailed description of olfactory sensations obtained by direct stimulation of mid-dorsal insula. Our data also show a spatial overlap between gustatory, olfactory, and oral somatosensory representation in the mid-dorsal insula, and suggest that this part of the insula may be an integrated oral sensory region that plays a key role in flavor perception. It also indicates that dysfunction in this region should be considered during the evaluation of gustatory and olfactory epileptic seizures. Ann Neurol 2017;82:360-370. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  17. A Stimulating Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namik Top

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the views of international Science Olympiad participants on the benefits of the competition and the factors that affected their career aspirations. We also investigated how students’ choice of competition category varied with respect to gender. The sample included 273 International Sustainable World Energy, Engineering, and Environment Project (I-SWEEEP participants from 39 countries. Mixed-methods were used to analyze the data. Descriptive statistics and t-statistics were provided to answer the first question. As a means of addressing the second question, a chi-square test was utilized to examine how participants’ category selection differed by gender. Qualitative analysis was used to reveal the types of benefits students reaped from participation in the I-SWEEEP. Results indicated that students were most affected by their teachers, parents, and personal interests. Although the relationship between gender and competition category was not statistically significant, there nevertheless emerged a pattern showing that girls preferred environmental science projects (45.5% to engineering projects (24.4%. Qualitative analyses revealed six themes as benefits that students gained from participation in the I-SWEEEP. The relationship among the fundamental themes was also examined and revealed important findings. The results have educational implications for helping students accomplish to be science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM professionals in the future.

  18. Science motivation by discussion and controversy (SMDC) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadi, Dina; Mora Ley, César Eduardo; Ramírez Díaz, Mario Humberto

    2017-05-01

    Succeeding theories and empirical investigations have often been built over conceptual understanding to develop talent education. Opportunities provided by society are crucial at every point in the talent-development process. Abilities differ and can vary among boys and girls. Although they have some responsibility for their own growth and development, the educational system and psychosocial variables influence on the successful development of high levels of education. This research explores students’ attitudes to science education to establish why many disengage with the subject in class and what can be done to reverse this trend to produce unimaginable scientific and practical benefits to society. The control group is students from several schools with traditional education in Iran and the experimental group is teams who have taken part in several activities such as national and international tournaments (2005-2013). This research has two parts: 1—how innovation in teaching and 2—discussion and controversy in class can improve science education and cause motivation. The average scores are divided into 5 ranges in both experimental and traditional groups. As shown by Spearman’s correlation rank (ρ) the difference between boys’ and girls’ average scores is about (2.71) in the control group but it has decreased to (0.29) in the experimental group. The main point of discussion is on problems in class which advance a set of interrelated scientific arguments for outstanding achievement.

  19. Crisis discussions in psychology--New historical and philosophical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Thomas; Mülberger, Annette

    2012-06-01

    In this introductory article, we provide a historical and philosophical framework for studying crisis discussions in psychology. We first trace the various meanings of crisis talk outside and inside of the sciences. We then turn to Kuhn's concept of crisis, which is mainly an analyst's category referring to severe clashes between theory and data. His view has also dominated many discussions on the status of psychology: Can it be considered a "mature" science, or are we dealing here with a pre- or multi-paradigmatic discipline? Against these Kuhnian perspectives, we point out that especially, but not only in psychology distinctive crisis declarations and debates have taken place since at least the late 19th century. In these, quite different usages of crisis talk have emerged, which can be determined by looking at (a) the content and (b) the dimensions of the declarations, as well as (c) the functions these declarations had for their authors. Thus, in psychology at least, 'crisis' has been a vigorous actor's category, occasionally having actual effects on the future course of research. While such crisis declarations need not be taken at face value, they nevertheless help to break the spell of Kuhnian analyses of psychology's history. They should inform ways in which the history and philosophy of psychology is studied further. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Preferences of Patients for Discussing Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sūna Normunds

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available People with epilepsy have increased mortality rates, which is partially attributed to sudden unexpected death in epilepsy syndrome (SUDEP. Poor seizure control appears to be the strongest SUDEP risk factor. Management of epilepsy and adherence to therapy is critical to seizure control. The belief by caregivers of negative influence caused by being informed about the syndrome is the main reason SUDEP is not disclosed. There are no clear recommendations when to disclose the risk of SUDEP and how much information should be provided. We addressed the preferences of Latvian epilepsy patients for discussing SUDEP as well as awareness of the syndrome. Our study involved 55 epilepsy patients. We found that, as in other studies, our patients were relatively well informed about SUDEP. We found that a considerable proportion of patients preferred to receive information about SUDEP from a general practitioner. We note the belief of patients that the disclosure of SUDEP would either improve or have no effect on the quality of life. We were able to identify groups of patients with a self-reported belief of more frequent expected anxiety and poor adherence to medical treatment. Our data improves the understanding of preferences of patient for discussing the negative aspects of epilepsy.

  1. Functional electrical stimulation and spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chester H; Triolo, Ronald J; Elias, Anastasia L; Kilgore, Kevin L; DiMarco, Anthony F; Bogie, Kath; Vette, Albert H; Audu, Musa L; Kobetic, Rudi; Chang, Sarah R; Chan, K Ming; Dukelow, Sean; Bourbeau, Dennis J; Brose, Steven W; Gustafson, Kenneth J; Kiss, Zelma H T; Mushahwar, Vivian K

    2014-08-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCI) can disrupt communications between the brain and the body, resulting in loss of control over otherwise intact neuromuscular systems. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) of the central and peripheral nervous system can use these intact neuromuscular systems to provide therapeutic exercise options to allow functional restoration and to manage medical complications following SCI. The use of FES for the restoration of muscular and organ functions may significantly decrease the morbidity and mortality following SCI. Many FES devices are commercially available and should be considered as part of the lifelong rehabilitation care plan for all eligible persons with SCI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Combatting Electoral Traces: The Dutch Tempest Discussion and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Wolter

    In the Dutch e-voting debate, the crucial issue leading to the abandonment of all electronic voting machines was compromising radiation, or tempest: it would be possible to eavesdrop on the choice of the voter by capturing the radiation from the machine. Other countries, however, do not seem to be bothered by this risk. In this paper, we use actor-network theory to analyse the socio-technical origins of the Dutch tempest issue in e-voting, and we introduce concepts for discussing its implications for e-voting beyond the Netherlands. We introduce the term electoral traces to denote any physical, digital or social evidence of a voter’s choices in an election. From this perspective, we provide a framework for risk classification as well as an overview of countermeasures against such traces.

  3. Contribution to the discussion on the criminalization of stalking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miladinović-Stefanović Dušica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The serious and complex nature of stalking, as a social phenomenon, is reflected in diverse forms of this illicit act, the severity of consequences caused by its commission, and the likelihood of being turned into violence. Whereas it may be observed from different perspectives, in this paper stalking is examined from the aspect of substantive criminal law. In the first part of this article, the author provides an overview of legal provisions on the crime of stalking as envisaged in selected European legislations. In the second part of the paper, the author re-examines the capacity of the existing Serbian criminal legislation to respond to this problem, especially through the envisaged criminal offence of endangering safety of another. In conclusion, the author discusses the inadequacy of the existing legislation and the need for further legislative intervention in this area.

  4. Bacterial contamination of test stimulation leads during percutaneous nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannek, Jürgen; Grigoleit, Ute; Hinkel, Andreas

    2005-06-01

    To analyze the bacterial contamination of conventional percutaneous nerve stimulation (PNE) leads. Sacral neuromodulation has become an important tool for the treatment of urgency and chronic retention. Patients likely to benefit from this type of therapy are identified by PNE testing before implantation of the definitive system. Recently, a new system was introduced, using a self-blocking electrode that remains in place for both PNE testing and final implantation. PNE testing warrants an extracorporeal stimulator. Thus, using the same electrode for both external stimulation and definitive implantation may carry a significant risk of infection. Bilateral PNE testing was performed in 11 consecutive patients (8 women and 3 men, mean age 41.6 years) for either urgency (n = 7) or chronic retention (n = 4). Electrodes were placed under aseptic conditions and stimulated for 3 days. At the end of each test, the electrodes were removed and evaluated microbiologically. In 5 of the 11 patients (9 of 22 leads), significant bacterial growth was detected: Staphylococcus epidermidis in 5, Escherichia coli in 3, and Enterococcus faecalis in 1. However, no patient showed signs of inflammation at the electrode insertion sites. Bacterial growth was found in 45.5% of the patients after conventional PNE testing under aseptic conditions. Therefore, the new electrodes may well carry an elevated risk of infection. Infection of the implant can lead to major surgical revision or even explantation. Thus, additional studies of the infection risk of this new electrode are warranted before its general use can be recommended.

  5. Framing Classroom Discussion of Same-Sex Marriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Assuming that the issue of same-sex marriage should be discussed in schools, how should the discussion be framed? Michael Hand first distinguishes this question from the related but distinct question of whether discussion on this topic should be steered. He then examines three possible frames for discussion of same-sex marriage: the perfectionist…

  6. Use of Robotic Pets in Providing Stimulation for Nursing Home Residents with Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganuma, M; Ohkubo, E; Kato, N

    2015-01-01

    Trial experiments utilized robotic pets to facilitate self-reliance in nursing home residents. A remote-control robot modeled clear and meaningful behaviors to elderly residents. Special attention was paid to its effects on mental and social domains. Employing the robot as a gaze target and center of attention created a cue to initiate a communication channel between residents who normally show no interest in each other. The Sony AIBO robot in this study uses commercially available wireless equipment, and all its components are easily accessible to any medical or welfare institution interested in additional practice of these activities.

  7. Integrating Project Management, Product Design with Industry Sponsored Projects provides Stimulating Senior Capstone Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip A. Sanger

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract ¾ Many students are uncomfortable with real world engineering problems where needs and requirements must be concretely defined and the selection of design solutions is not black and white. This paper describes a two semester, multi-disciplinary senior capstone project for students from three Engineering and Technology Department programs (electrical engineering, electrical and computer engineering technology, and engineering technology that brings together the tools of project management and the creative product development process into industry sponsored projects.  The projects are fully integrated with the Center for Rapid Product Realization with its dual goals of economic development and enhanced learning.  The stage/gate development process is used with six formal reviews covering the development of the proposal through to the fabrication and testing of the project’s output.  Over the past four years thirty five (35 projects have been undertaken with students getting an exciting authentic life experience and introducing them to the real world of engineering.

  8. Can pay-for-performance to primary care providers stimulate appropriate use of antibiotics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrichson, Jens; Maria Ellegård, Lina; Anell, Anders

    2018-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major threat to public health worldwide. As the health care sector's use of antibiotics is an important contributor to the development of resistance, it is crucial that physicians only prescribe antibiotics when needed and that they choose narrow-spectrum antibiotics, w...

  9. The modulatory effect of adaptive deep brain stimulation on beta bursts in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkhauser, Gerd; Pogosyan, Alek; Little, Simon; Beudel, Martijn; Herz, Damian M; Tan, Huiling; Brown, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Adaptive deep brain stimulation uses feedback about the state of neural circuits to control stimulation rather than delivering fixed stimulation all the time, as currently performed. In patients with Parkinson's disease, elevations in beta activity (13-35 Hz) in the subthalamic nucleus have been demonstrated to correlate with clinical impairment and have provided the basis for feedback control in trials of adaptive deep brain stimulation. These pilot studies have suggested that adaptive deep brain stimulation may potentially be more effective, efficient and selective than conventional deep brain stimulation, implying mechanistic differences between the two approaches. Here we test the hypothesis that such differences arise through differential effects on the temporal dynamics of beta activity. The latter is not constantly increased in Parkinson's disease, but comes in bursts of different durations and amplitudes. We demonstrate that the amplitude of beta activity in the subthalamic nucleus increases in proportion to burst duration, consistent with progressively increasing synchronization. Effective adaptive deep brain stimulation truncated long beta bursts shifting the distribution of burst duration away from long duration with large amplitude towards short duration, lower amplitude bursts. Critically, bursts with shorter duration are negatively and bursts with longer duration positively correlated with the motor impairment off stimulation. Conventional deep brain stimulation did not change the distribution of burst durations. Although both adaptive and conventional deep brain stimulation suppressed mean beta activity amplitude compared to the unstimulated state, this was achieved by a selective effect on burst duration during adaptive deep brain stimulation, whereas conventional deep brain stimulation globally suppressed beta activity. We posit that the relatively selective effect of adaptive deep brain stimulation provides a rationale for why this approach could

  10. The modulatory effect of adaptive deep brain stimulation on beta bursts in Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkhauser, Gerd; Pogosyan, Alek; Little, Simon; Beudel, Martijn; Herz, Damian M.; Tan, Huiling

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Adaptive deep brain stimulation uses feedback about the state of neural circuits to control stimulation rather than delivering fixed stimulation all the time, as currently performed. In patients with Parkinson’s disease, elevations in beta activity (13–35 Hz) in the subthalamic nucleus have been demonstrated to correlate with clinical impairment and have provided the basis for feedback control in trials of adaptive deep brain stimulation. These pilot studies have suggested that adaptive deep brain stimulation may potentially be more effective, efficient and selective than conventional deep brain stimulation, implying mechanistic differences between the two approaches. Here we test the hypothesis that such differences arise through differential effects on the temporal dynamics of beta activity. The latter is not constantly increased in Parkinson’s disease, but comes in bursts of different durations and amplitudes. We demonstrate that the amplitude of beta activity in the subthalamic nucleus increases in proportion to burst duration, consistent with progressively increasing synchronization. Effective adaptive deep brain stimulation truncated long beta bursts shifting the distribution of burst duration away from long duration with large amplitude towards short duration, lower amplitude bursts. Critically, bursts with shorter duration are negatively and bursts with longer duration positively correlated with the motor impairment off stimulation. Conventional deep brain stimulation did not change the distribution of burst durations. Although both adaptive and conventional deep brain stimulation suppressed mean beta activity amplitude compared to the unstimulated state, this was achieved by a selective effect on burst duration during adaptive deep brain stimulation, whereas conventional deep brain stimulation globally suppressed beta activity. We posit that the relatively selective effect of adaptive deep brain stimulation provides a rationale for why this

  11. Alternate Intraspinal Targets for Spinal Cord Stimulation: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang Chien, George C; Mekhail, Nagy

    2017-10-01

    Conventional dorsal column spinal cord stimulation (SCS) provides less than optimal pain relief for certain pain syndromes and anatomic pain distributions. Practitioners have sought to treat these challenging therapeutic areas with stimulation of alternate intraspinal targets. To identify and systematically review the evidence for the value neuromodulating specific neuronal targets within the spinal canal to achieve relief of chronic pain. A systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed for clinical trials published from 1966 to March 1, 2015 to identify neurostimulation studies that employed non-dorsal column intraspinal stimulation to achieve pain relief. Identified studies on such targeted intraspinal stimulation were reviewed and graded using Evidence Based Interventional Pain Medicine criteria. We found a total of 13 articles that satisfied our search criteria on targeted, non-dorsal column intraspinal stimulation for pain. We identified five studies on neurostimulation of the cervicomedullary junction, six studies on neurostimulation of the dorsal root ganglion, two studies on the neurostimulation of the conus medullaris, unfortunately none was found on intraspinal nerve root stimulation. The limitations of this review include the relative paucity of well-designed prospective studies on targeted SCS. Clinical use of intraspinal neurostimulation is expanding at a very fast pace. Intraspinal stimulation of non-dorsal column targets may well be the future of neurostimulation as it provides new clinically significant neuromodulation of specific therapeutic targets that are not well or not easily addressed with conventional dorsal column SCS. In addition, they may avoid undesired stimulation induced paraesthesia, particularly in non-painful areas of the body. © 2017 International Neuromodulation Society.

  12. Activation of sensory cortex by imagined genital stimulation: an fMRI analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Nan J; Frangos, Eleni; Komisaruk, Barry R

    2016-01-01

    During the course of a previous study, our laboratory made a serendipitous finding that just thinking about genital stimulation resulted in brain activations that overlapped with, and differed from, those generated by physical genital stimulation. This study extends our previous findings by further characterizing how the brain differentially processes physical 'touch' stimulation and 'imagined' stimulation. Eleven healthy women (age range 29-74) participated in an fMRI study of the brain response to imagined or actual tactile stimulation of the nipple and clitoris. Two additional conditions - imagined dildo self-stimulation and imagined speculum stimulation - were included to characterize the effects of erotic versus non-erotic imagery. Imagined and tactile self-stimulation of the nipple and clitoris each activated the paracentral lobule (the genital region of the primary sensory cortex) and the secondary somatosensory cortex. Imagined self-stimulation of the clitoris and nipple resulted in greater activation of the frontal pole and orbital frontal cortex compared to tactile self-stimulation of these two bodily regions. Tactile self-stimulation of the clitoris and nipple activated the cerebellum, primary somatosensory cortex (hand region), and premotor cortex more than the imagined stimulation of these body regions. Imagining dildo stimulation generated extensive brain activation in the genital sensory cortex, secondary somatosensory cortex, hippocampus, amygdala, insula, nucleus accumbens, and medial prefrontal cortex, whereas imagining speculum stimulation generated only minimal activation. The present findings provide evidence of the potency of imagined stimulation of the genitals and that the following brain regions may participate in erogenous experience: primary and secondary sensory cortices, sensory-motor integration areas, limbic structures, and components of the 'reward system'. In addition, these results suggest a mechanism by which some individuals may

  13. Activation of sensory cortex by imagined genital stimulation: an fMRI analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan J. Wise

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: During the course of a previous study, our laboratory made a serendipitous finding that just thinking about genital stimulation resulted in brain activations that overlapped with, and differed from, those generated by physical genital stimulation. Objective: This study extends our previous findings by further characterizing how the brain differentially processes physical ‘touch’ stimulation and ‘imagined’ stimulation. Design: Eleven healthy women (age range 29–74 participated in an fMRI study of the brain response to imagined or actual tactile stimulation of the nipple and clitoris. Two additional conditions – imagined dildo self-stimulation and imagined speculum stimulation – were included to characterize the effects of erotic versus non-erotic imagery. Results: Imagined and tactile self-stimulation of the nipple and clitoris each activated the paracentral lobule (the genital region of the primary sensory cortex and the secondary somatosensory cortex. Imagined self-stimulation of the clitoris and nipple resulted in greater activation of the frontal pole and orbital frontal cortex compared to tactile self-stimulation of these two bodily regions. Tactile self-stimulation of the clitoris and nipple activated the cerebellum, primary somatosensory cortex (hand region, and premotor cortex more than the imagined stimulation of these body regions. Imagining dildo stimulation generated extensive brain activation in the genital sensory cortex, secondary somatosensory cortex, hippocampus, amygdala, insula, nucleus accumbens, and medial prefrontal cortex, whereas imagining speculum stimulation generated only minimal activation. Conclusion: The present findings provide evidence of the potency of imagined stimulation of the genitals and that the following brain regions may participate in erogenous experience: primary and secondary sensory cortices, sensory-motor integration areas, limbic structures, and components of the

  14. The effects of combined repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation on motor function in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Tae Gun; Park, Eunhee; Kang, Chung; Chang, Won Hyuk; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2016-11-22

    Both transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), when provided to stroke patients in combination with motor training, enhance therapeutic efficacy and motor function. However, the majority of previous studies have only examined a single treatment modality. The authors investigated the modulating influence of combination dual-mode brain stimulation upon bihemispheric stimulation with motor training in stroke patients. Twenty stroke patients with hemiparesis underwent five randomly arranged sessions of diverse combinations of rTMS and tDCS. We applied cathodal or anodal tDCS over the contralesional primary motor cortex (cM1) and 10 Hz rTMS over the ipsilesional primary motor cortex (iM1) in a simultaneous or preconditioning method including sham stimulation. Immediately after dual-mode stimulation, sequential hand motor training was performed for 5 minutes. The total pulses of rTMS and the duration of tDCS and motor training were the same for all sessions. Cortical excitability and sequential motor performance were evaluated before and after each session. Motor function and corticomotor excitability following simultaneous stimulation via cathodal tDCS over the cM1 combined with 10 Hz rTMS over the iM1 were significantly increased after the intervention, with significantly greater motor improvement than seen with other treatment conditions (P stimulation of cathodal tDCS and 10 Hz rTMS results in better motor performance in stroke patients than other combination methods. This result seemed to be related to effective modulation of interhemispheric imbalance of cortical excitability by dual-mode stimulation.

  15. Discussing Occupy Wall Street on Twitter: longitudinal network analysis of equality, emotion, and stability of public discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Jun; Wang, Pian-Pian; Zhu, Jonathan J H

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the quality of public discussion about social movements on Twitter and to understand the structural features and evolution of longitudinal discussion networks, we analyze tweets about the Occupy Wall Street movement posted over the course of 16 days by investigating the relationship between inequality, emotion, and the stability of online discussion. The results reveal that (1) the discussion is highly unequal for both initiating discussions and receiving conversations; (2) the stability of the discussion is much higher for receivers than for initiators; (3) the inequality of online discussions moderates the stability of online discussions; and (4) on an individual level, there is no significant relationship between emotion and political discussion. The implications help evaluate the quality of public discussion, and to understand the relationship between online discussion and social movements.

  16. Modulation of Brain Activity with Noninvasive Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS: Clinical Applications and Safety Concerns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haichao Zhao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a widely-used tool to induce neuroplasticity and modulate cortical function by applying weak direct current over the scalp. In this review, we first introduce the underlying mechanism of action, the brief history from discovery to clinical scientific research, electrode positioning and montages, and parameter setup of tDCS. Then, we review tDCS application in clinical samples including people with drug addiction, major depression disorder, Alzheimer's disease, as well as in children. This review covers the typical characteristics and the underlying neural mechanisms of tDCS treatment in such studies. This is followed by a discussion of safety, especially when the current intensity is increased or the stimulation duration is prolonged. Given such concerns, we provide detailed suggestions regarding safety procedures for tDCS operation. Lastly, future research directions are discussed. They include foci on the development of multi-tech combination with tDCS such as with TMS and fMRI; long-term behavioral and morphological changes; possible applications in other research domains, and more animal research to deepen the understanding of the biological and physiological mechanisms of tDCS stimulation.

  17. CO sub 2 -foam fracturing with methanol successfully stimulates canyon gas sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craft, J.R.; Waddell, S.P. (American Cometra Inc. (US)); McFatridge, D.G. (Halliburton Services (US))

    1992-05-01

    Successful stimulation using CO{sub 2} foam with methanol has revived the economically marginal Canyon gas-sand reservoir of Sterling County, TX. Field experience in the Conger (Penn) field demonstrated that CO{sub 2} foam (1) lessened the water required in the fluid and (2) provided a gas assist to help remove water and lower interfacial tension (IFT). The low pH of the fluid, combined with additional clay stabilization, iron control, and enhanced water recovery additives, proved helpful in initial well response and subsequent performances. Since the CO{sub 2}-foam fracture treatments were administered, production from Sterling County Canyon gas sands met or surpassed initial rates, even though formation pressure in the field declined 33.2%. Stimulation is essential for commercial production in these sands. However, water blockage, caused by stimulation, was encountered in designing an effective completion technique for a tight formation with reduced bottomhole pressure (HBP). Production in tight, low-pressure gas wells can be completely blocked if formation pressure does not exceed the capillary pressure increase caused by injected fracture fluid. Original stimulation techniques consisted mainly of gelled-water fracture treatments containing 65,000 lbm of 20/40-mesh sand with a maximum concentration of 2 1/2 lbm/gal. In many cases, several weeks of swabbing were required to ensure continuous flow. After the fracture treatments, about 40% water recovery was realized throughout the field. This paper discusses CO{sub 2}-foam fracture treatments and job design and presents case histories from several Conger (Penn) field CO{sub 2}-foam fracture treatments.

  18. Central neurogenic hyperventilation: a case report and discussion of pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarulli, Andrew W; Lim, Chun; Bui, Jonathan D; Saper, Clifford B; Alexander, Michael P

    2005-10-01

    Central neurogenic hyperventilation is a rare condition with poorly understood pathophysiology. To describe a patient with central neurogenic hyperventilation caused by an infiltrative brainstem lymphoma. Based on analysis of this patient and other case reports, we propose that central neurogenic hyperventilation is uniquely the result of infiltrative tumors that stimulate pontine respiratory centers and central chemoreceptors.

  19. Coupling brain-machine interfaces with cortical stimulation for brain-state dependent stimulation: enhancing motor cortex excitability for neurorehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza eGharabaghi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Motor recovery after stroke is an unsolved challenge despite intensive rehabilitation training programs. Brain stimulation techniques have been explored in addition to traditional rehabilitation training to increase the excitability of the stimulated motor cortex. This modulation of cortical excitability augments the response to afferent input during motor exercises, thereby enhancing skilled motor learning by long-term potentiation-like plasticity. Recent approaches examined brain stimulation applied concurrently with voluntary movements to induce more specific use-dependent neural plasticity during motor training for neurorehabilitation. Unfortunately, such approaches are not applicable for the many severely affected stroke patients lacking residual hand function. These patients require novel activity-dependent stimulation paradigms based on intrinsic brain activity. Here, we report on such brain state-dependent stimulation (BSDS combined with haptic feedback provided by a robotic hand orthosis. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex and haptic feedback to the hand were controlled by sensorimotor desynchronization during motor-imagery and applied within a brain-machine interface environment in one healthy subject and one patient with severe hand paresis in the chronic phase after stroke. BSDS significantly increased the excitability of the stimulated motor cortex in both healthy and post-stroke conditions, an effect not observed in non-BSDS protocols. This feasibility study suggests that closing the loop between intrinsic brain state, cortical stimulation and haptic feedback provides a novel neurorehabilitation strategy for stroke patients lacking residual hand function, a proposal that warrants further investigation in a larger cohort of stroke patients.

  20. Ovarian stimulation and embryo quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baart, Esther; Macklon, Nick S.; Fauser, Bart J. C. M.

    To Study the effects of different ovarian stimulation approaches on oocyte and embryo quality, it is imperative to assess embryo quality with a reliable and objective method. Embryos rated as high quality by standardized morphological assessment are associated with higher implantation and pregnancy