WorldWideScience

Sample records for providing staff training

  1. Providing Staff Training and Programming to Support People with Disabilities: An Academic Library Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannen, Michelle H.; Milewski, Steven; Mack, Thura

    2017-01-01

    This case study explores services academic libraries provide to students with disabilities and the impact these can have on the success and experience of these students. The study focuses on staff training and outreach programming. The authors examine the academic library literature surrounding these topics, provide examples of programming…

  2. Training residential supervisors to provide feedback for maintaining staff teaching skills with people who have severe disabilities.

    OpenAIRE

    Parsons, M B; Reid, D H

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated procedures for training supervisors in a residential setting to provide feedback for maintaining direct-service staff members ' teaching skills with people who have severe disabilities. Using classroom-based instruction and on-the-job observation and feedback, 10 supervisors were initially trained to implement teaching programs themselves. The training improved supervisors' teaching skills but was insufficient to improve the quality of feedback they provided to direct-service sta...

  3. Addiction treatment provider attitudes on staff capacity and evidence-based clinical training: results from a national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Lena; Amodeo, Maryann; Krull, Ivy; Chassler, Deborah; Weidenfeld, Rachel; de Saxe Zerden, Lisa; Gowler, Rebekah; Lederer, Jaime; Cohen, Alexander; Beltrame, Clelia

    2011-01-01

    This national study of addiction-treatment organizations' implementation of evidence-based practices examines: (1) organizational/leadership factors associated with director (n = 212) attitudes regarding staff resistance to organizational change, and (2) organizational/staff factors associated with staff (n = 312) attitudes regarding evidence-based clinical training. Linear regression analyses, controlling for type of treatment unit, leadership/staff characteristics and organizational readiness to change, identified that directors who perceived their organization needed more guidance and had less staff cohesion and autonomy rated staff resistance to organizational change significantly higher. Staff with higher levels of education and greater agreement that their organization supported change had greater preference for evidence-based trainings. Federal addiction treatment policy should both promote education and training of treatment staff and organizational development of treatment CBOs.  © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  4. Short Communication Employee -Driven Staff Training and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the concept of staff training and development within the South African context. The changing labour legislation in South Africa makes it mandatory for the employer to provide training and development. However, staff have an important role to play in staff training and development. The paper gives an ...

  5. Development of a hospital reiki training program: training volunteers to provide reiki to patients, families, and staff in the acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Julie; Reilly, Patricia M; Buchanan, Teresa M

    2014-01-01

    Creating a healing and healthy environment for patients, families, and staff is an ongoing challenge. As part of our hospital's Integrative Care Program, a Reiki Volunteer Program has helped to foster a caring and healing environment, providing a means for patients, family, and staff to reduce pain and anxiety and improve their ability to relax and be present. Because direct care providers manage multiple and competing needs at any given time, they may not be available to provide Reiki when it is needed. This program demonstrates that a volunteer-based program can successfully support nurses in meeting patient, family, and staff demand for Reiki services.

  6. Teaching Staff Advanced Training: European Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Kovalchuk Vasyl

    2015-01-01

    The issue of teaching staff advanced training is paid much attention in many countries. In the Republic of Moldova progressive professional credits system is used. Credits are scored not only in assigning teaching degrees or issuing a certificate of continuing professional education, but also for teachers’ evaluation at the educational institution. Advanced training of teaching staff in France is provided by various institutions of postgraduate education, university institutes and regional ce...

  7. Battle Command Staff Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-01

    Table (Table lA ) and a Reaction Table (Table IB). In sum, METT-T is varied to increase the difficulty of the Tables- "crawl, walk, run." Training...Delay 0800 0900 1000 1100 1200 1300 1400 I~~~ Frag OrdraOd f ofsty D , ,elay Snapshots of Battle Proposed as Bn and FS Tables 1~ lA Hasty Attack...for subsequent development of CSS vertical BCST Tabics whether executed in virtud or constructive simulation. Draw on the expertise and counsel of the

  8. Data Intelligence Training for Library Staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rombouts, J.; Princic, A.; Verbakel, E.; Potters, N.; De Smaele, M.; Noordegraaf, M.

    2013-01-01

    The Data Intelligence 4 Librarians course was developed by 3TU.Datacentrum at the end of 2011 to provide online resources and training for digital preservation practitioners, specifically for library staff. The course objectives are to transfer and exchange knowledge about data management, and to

  9. Teaching Staff Advanced Training: European Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalchuk Vasyl

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The issue of teaching staff advanced training is paid much attention in many countries. In the Republic of Moldova progressive professional credits system is used. Credits are scored not only in assigning teaching degrees or issuing a certificate of continuing professional education, but also for teachers’ evaluation at the educational institution. Advanced training of teaching staff in France is provided by various institutions of postgraduate education, university institutes and regional centers of education in order to help teachers to renew their professional knowledge and at the same time to refocus it on the level of consciousness according to the real problems of school and the community. The feature of teaching staff advanced training in France is that it is teachers’ personal matter and duration of all periods of training should come to one year during all professional career. In Finland, teaching staff advanced training is organized directly in schools under aegis of the National Board of Education, the National Centre for Advanced Training in Education, departments of teacher education and other faculties of higher educational institutions on credit system basis. Among the topical forms there are targeted, cascade, common (cooperative teaching and learning by own example. In the UK, advanced training takes place in two models: the course model based on higher educational establishments and school based in-service education. The main purpose of advanced training system is to familiarize teachers with theoretical and practical innovations in educational activities, progressive teaching technologies, and consolidate their skills of independent acquisition of knowledge necessary for their professional development.

  10. Training Sessional Academic Staff to Provide Quality Feedback on University Students' Assessment: Lessons from a Faculty of Law Learning and Teaching Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Kelly; Bell, Tamara; Dwyer, Angela

    2017-01-01

    The quality of feedback provided to university students has long been recognised as the most important predictor of student learning and satisfaction. However, providing quality feedback to students is challenging in the current context, in which universities increasingly rely on casualised and inexperienced academic staff to assess undergraduate…

  11. Training Staff to Manage Challenging Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M. W. J.; Embregts, Petri J. C. M.; Bosman, Anna M. T.; Jahoda, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Background: A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about dealing with incidents and limit physical risk of…

  12. Training staff to manage challenging behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oorsouw, W.M.W.J. van; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Jahoda, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background - A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about

  13. Training Staff to Manage Challenging Behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oorsouw, W.M.W.J. van; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Jahoda, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background - A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about

  14. A systems approach to developing staff training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giffort, D W

    1998-01-01

    This chapter shows how concepts from organizational psychology can be used to design a comprehensive staff training model for a statewide mental health service system, and emphasizes the importance of competency identification in this model.

  15. Refocusing the training of psychiatric rehabilitation staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, P W; McCracken, S G

    1995-11-01

    The authors describe an approach to training staff in psychiatric rehabilitation programs that is based on principles of organizational psychology. The approach promotes two shifts in the focus of training. First, training efforts should not only educate individual staff members about state-of-the-art rehabilitation skills but also organize the treatment team into a system that will consistently carry out these skills. Second, training should help the team develop user-friendly programs rather than insisting on faithful implementation of state-of-the-art interventions. A four-phase, eight-step training method called interactive staff training that can help programs achieve these goals is presented. The first phase involves obtaining administrative support for change, assessing staff needs, and forming a program committee. In the second phase, staff participate in decision making about program components, and a facilitator conducts sessions to reach consensus on a draft program. A pilot program is implemented and evaluated in the third phase. In the final phase, a user-friendly program is maintained through continuous quality improvement.

  16. Customer care a training manual for library staff

    CERN Document Server

    Gannon-Leary, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Customer Care provides a detailed course suitable for delivery to library staff at all levels. It can be used as a stand-alone reference work for customer care processes and procedures or, alternatively, it can be used by library staff to tailor a customer care course to suit the requirements and training needs of their own staff.Dual use - reference work and/or training manualPotential as a text bookApplicable to a wider context than LIS - could be used for a whole HEI institutional approach to customer care or in local authorities/public services

  17. Teaching Staff Advanced Training: European Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Vasyl

    2015-01-01

    The issue of teaching staff advanced training is paid much attention in many countries. In the Republic of Moldova progressive professional credits system is used. Credits are scored not only in assigning teaching degrees or issuing a certificate of continuing professional education, but also for teachers' evaluation at the educational…

  18. House Staff Communication Training and Patient Experience Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oladoyin A Oladeru MPH

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess whether communication training for house staff via role-playing exercises (1 is well received and (2 improves patient experience scores in house staff clinics. Methods: We conducted a pre–post study in which the house staff for 3 adult hospital departments participated in communication training led by trained faculty in small groups. Sessions centered on a published 5-step strategy for opening patient-centered interviews using department-specific role-playing exercises. House staff completed posttraining questionnaires. For 1 month prior to and 1 month following the training, patients in the house staff clinics completed surveys with Clinician and Group Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CG-CAHPS questions regarding physician communication, immediately following clinic visits. Preintervention and postintervention results for top-box scores were compared. Results: Forty-four of a possible 45 house staff (97.8% participated, with 31 (70.5% indicating that the role-playing exercise increased their perception of the 5-step strategy. No differences in patient responses to CG-CAHPS questions were seen when comparing 63 preintervention surveys to 77 postintervention surveys. Conclusion: Demonstrating an improvement in standard patient experience surveys in resident clinics may require ongoing communication coaching and investigation of the “hidden curriculum” of training.

  19. STAFF TRAINING MANAGEMENT IN AN COMMERCIAL BANK: EFFECTS AND SYNERGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey V. Artemyev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the dependence of a commercial bank on a staff number and a profit on staff training expenses. Necessity of an address approach in the process of the staff training is proved. The key features of this approach are revealed. The authors describe its realization in the automated system of training control.

  20. Building Multicultural Residential Communities: A Model for Training Student Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryk, Taryn; Thompson, Monita C.; Boynton, Trelawny

    2013-01-01

    The growing diversity and changing demographics within the United States increases the importance of students developing skills to engage across identity difference. The purpose of this chapter is to describe how a pre-employment course for student staff members is used as a multicultural intervention training to provide students with the…

  1. Staff Training for Nanoindustry in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidorov Sergey Grigoryevich

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The nanotechnology industry represents such a direction of the development of science, technologies and industries by means of which Russia will be able to achieve advanced positions in the world. For the last decade the necessary regulatory base for nanotech industry development was created in the country, beginning with the concept of nanotechnological works, and the strategy of nanotech industry development, and finishing by the program of nanotech industry development in Russia till 2015. The special place is allocated for education in the field of nanotechnologies and nanomaterials. The system of staff training for nanotech industry is developing very quickly. The departments of nanotechnologies are established almost in all leading higher education institutions of Russia, the institutes of scientific and educational centers as well as the centers of collective use are introduced in the country, the national nanotechnological network is functioning. RUSNANO State Corporation of Nanotechnologies makes significant contribution to the training of innovation staff. The corporation is planning to create at least 100 educational programs of staff training and retraining for the needs of nanotech industry. The fund of infrastructure and educational programs was established in RUSNANO which in 2012 launched the project on creation of training system in the field of nanotechnology in the e-Learning mode. In 2013 the fund created the autonomous non-profit organization “Electronic Education for Nanotech Industry” (“eNano” which became the leading developer of innovative branch educational resources and the operator on rendering educational services for nanotech industry. Since 2011 in RUSNANO there is a School League which set for itself the task to make the contribution to improvement of the situation in teaching naturalscience disciplines at schools. At the same time, according to the results of students enrolment in Russia in 2011-2014, the

  2. Effectiveness of behavioral skills training on staff performance in a job training setting for high-functioning adolescents with autism spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palmen, A.M.J.W.; Didden, H.C.M.; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have focused on improving staff performance in naturalistic training settings for high-functioning adolescents with autism spectrum disorders. Behavioral skills training, consisting of group instruction and supervisory feedback, was used to improve staff performance on (a) providing

  3. Correctional Staff Training Institutes. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Illinois Univ., East St. Louis, Center for the Study of Crime, Delinquency and Corrections.

    Three national institutes for correctional staff trainers incorporated new techniques in an attempt to upgrade corrections programs through improved staff development. There were 78 trainer and 200 middle management staff and correctional officers involved in the program, representing more than 100 correctional institutions in the United States.…

  4. Using psychological science to improve summer camp staff training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Ethan D

    2007-10-01

    Preseason staff training is an exciting and stressful time for all camping professionals. By using principles of developmental psychology, learning theory, and self-monitoring, however, we can maximize the usefulness of training sessions. This article also discusses educating staff about children's mental health issues and managing challenging situations with adolescents.

  5. Battle Staff Training System II: Computer-Based Instruction Supporting the Force XXI Training Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wampler, Richard

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the methodology and lessons learned in the development of the Innovative Tools and Techniques for Brigade and Below Staff Training II - Battle Staff Training System II (ITTBBST-BSTS II...

  6. Adapting existing training standards for unmanned aircraft: finding ways to train staff for unmanned aircraft operations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Burger, CR

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available As unmanned aircraft are introduced into civil airspace, a framework for training and licencing of dispatch and operating staff will be required. This paper assesses existing pilot training unit standards and proposes a framework within which staff...

  7. Community health center provider and staff's Spanish language ability and cultural awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Arshiya A; Benitez, Amanda; Locklin, Cara A; Campbell, Amanda; Schaefer, Cynthia T; Heuer, Loretta J; Lee, Sang Mee; Solomon, Marla C; Quinn, Michael T; Burnet, Deborah L; Chin, Marshall H

    2014-05-01

    Many community health center providers and staff care for Latinos with diabetes, but their Spanish language ability and awareness of Latino culture are unknown. We surveyed 512 Midwestern health center providers and staff who managed Latino patients with diabetes. Few respondents had high Spanish language (13%) or cultural awareness scores (22%). Of respondents who self-reported 76-100% of their patients were Latino, 48% had moderate/low Spanish language and 49% had moderate/low cultural competency scores. Among these respondents, 3% lacked access to interpreters and 27% had neither received cultural competency training nor had access to training. Among all respondents, Spanish skills and Latino cultural awareness were low. Respondents who saw a significant number of Latinos had good access to interpretation services but not cultural competency training. Improved Spanish-language skills and increased access to cultural competency training and Latino cultural knowledge are needed to provide linguistically and culturally tailored care to Latino patients.

  8. The effectiveness of staff training focused on increasing emotional intelligence and improving interaction between support staff and clients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlmans, L.J.M.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Derksen, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent research addressed the relationship between staff behaviour and challenging behaviour of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). Consequently, research on interventions aimed at staff is warranted. The present study focused on the effectiveness of a staff training aimed

  9. Assessment of Non-Professional Staff Training programme In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The type of training available to them include job orientation, formal in-service training, job rotation, typewriting, computer training, Factors like lack of finance, poor remuneration for teachers, delay in releasing the results, lack of basic teaching facilities, lukewarm attitude of staff militate against effective establishment of ...

  10. Training needs of recreation staff at recreation centres: Supervising ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results suggest that staff do not possess the basic recreation knowledge and that, in turn, may lead to unnecessary work pressure on the supervising area manager. In the local government, procedures are already in place that could help the staff if they needed funding for further training. Unfortunately, the available ...

  11. Training and Support of Sessional Staff to Improve Quality of Teaching and Learning at Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Gillian; Crane, Linda; Heslop, Ian; Glass, Beverley D

    2015-06-25

    Sessional staff is increasingly involved in teaching at universities, playing a pivotal role in bridging the gap between theory and practice for students, especially in the health professions, including pharmacy. Although sessional staff numbers have increased substantially in recent years, limited attention has been paid to the quality of teaching and learning provided by this group. This review will discuss the training and support of sessional staff, with a focus on Australian universities, including the reasons for and potential benefits of training, and structure and content of training programs. Although sessional staff views these programs as valuable, there is a lack of in-depth evaluations of the outcomes of the programs for sessional staff, students and the university. Quality assurance of such programs is only guaranteed, however, if these evaluations extend to the impact of this training and support on student learning.

  12. DOE Handbook: Guide to good practices for training of technical staff and managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    Training programs at DOE facilities should prepare personnel to safely and efficiently operate the facilities in accordance with DOE requirements. This guide contains information that can be used to develop or validate training programs for technical staff and managers at DOE nuclear facilities. Training programs based on the content of this guide should provide assurance that these personnel perform their jobs safely and competently.

  13. Teaching Staff Advanced Training in Russia, the Republic of Kazakhstan, the USA and Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalchuk Vasyl

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article the peculiarities in organization of postgraduate teacher training in foreign countries have been highlighted; the basic problems and prospects for advanced training which stipulate for reforming the relevant national systems have been revealed; common and distinctive trends in their development have been justified. In Russia there is a cascade (cyclic system of teaching staff advanced training, based on the principles of andragogy, namely, continuity, self-control and self-analysis of professional activities by teachers and the use of their own experience during the advanced training. The abovementioned system consists of three phases such as pre-course, course and implementing. Each element of this model is a constituent part of the other, providing cycling and growth. Tasks for teachers are grounded on all the phases of the described system and influence their professional development. In the Republic of Kazakhstan there are three basic systems for teaching staff advanced training, namely, centers of educational excellence at the “Nazarbayev Intellectual Schools”, JSC “National Centre of Teaching Staff Advanced Training” (based on RIPKSO and 16 regional teaching staff advanced training institutes, teaching staff advanced training centres at universities and experimental sections. According to the defined module in the terms of the complex 3-month courses combining face-to-face and online training are provided. In the USA advanced training is provided by multilevel higher educational institutions which offer a wide range of different full-time and distance training programs and some programs are taught directly in educational establishments. The content of advanced training is determined by standards of professional pedagogical education according to the educational program and provides for fundamental, psychological, pedagogical, methodical, IT, practical, social and humanitarian training. Teaching staff advanced

  14. Staff training and development, enhancement of job performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The success of any organization/institution lies on the ability of its workforce to deliver. This ability/skill is acquired through training, which enhances job performance. In essence, the research examined the training and development programmes enjoyed by all senior staff of FUTO library with the aim of finding out its effects ...

  15. Case study: Grundtvig In-service Staff Training for Adult Education Staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friche, Nanna; Rasmussen, Palle

    2010-01-01

    This case study investigates the implementation in Denmark of a specific action under the European Commission's Grundtvig programme, the scheme of individual grants to adult education staff for participating in in-service training courses abroad. The emphasis in the case study is on the individual...

  16. Suicide Intervention Training for College Staff: Program Evaluation and Intervention Skill Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannonhouse, Laura; Lin, Yung-Wei Dennis; Shaw, Kelly; Wanna, Reema; Porter, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Suicide remains a pressing issue for college communities. Consequently, gatekeeper trainings are often provided for staff. This study examines the effect of one such program, Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST). Participants: 51 college employees received ASIST in August of 2014 and were compared to 30 wait-list control…

  17. The effectiveness of staff training focused on increasing emotional intelligence and improving interaction between support staff and clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlmans, L J M; Embregts, P J C M; Gerits, L; Bosman, A M T; Derksen, J J L

    2015-07-01

    Recent research addressed the relationship between staff behaviour and challenging behaviour of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). Consequently, research on interventions aimed at staff is warranted. The present study focused on the effectiveness of a staff training aimed at emotional intelligence and interactions between staff and clients. The effects of the training on emotional intelligence, coping style and emotions of support staff were investigated. Participants were 214 support staff working within residential settings for individuals with ID and challenging behaviour. The experimental group consisted of 76 staff members, 138 staff members participated in two different control groups. A pre-test, post-test, follow-up control group design was used. Effectiveness was assessed using questionnaires addressing emotional intelligence, coping and emotions. Emotional intelligence of the experimental group changed significantly more than that of the two control groups. The experimental group showed an increase in task-oriented coping, whereas one control group did not. The results with regard to emotions were mixed. Follow-up data revealed that effects within the experimental group were still present four months after the training ended. A staff training aimed at emotional intelligence and staff-client interactions is effective in improving emotional intelligence and coping styles of support staff. However, the need for more research aiming at the relationship between staff characteristics, organisational factors and their mediating role in the effectiveness of staff training is emphasised. © 2014 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Training Needs of Vocational Forestry Staff in Ogun State Nigeria.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Onyii Ogbonna

    Department of Agricultural Economics and Extension, Bowen University, Iwo, Osun State. ... Keywords:- Vocational staff, Training needs, Forestry Activities, Knowledge level,. Skill level. Introduction. Forests contribute in different forms to national and .... SSCE/GCE certificate; 32.17% had been on the job for 1-5years.

  19. Enhancing Training of Staff of the Agricultural Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper, identified the areas where staff of the Agricultural Development Programme (ADP) that carry out grassroots extension service delivery need to be trained and the field problems requiring research intervention. Secondary data from Annual Performance Survey (APS) report of NAERLS and NPAFS between 2010 ...

  20. Evaluation of a Staff Training Programme using Positive Psychology coaching with film and theatre elements in care homes: views and attitudes of residents, staff and relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Azucena; Wenborn, Jennifer; Ledgerd, Ritchard; Orrell, Martin

    2017-03-01

    There is a recognised need to improve staff training in care homes. The aim of this study was to conduct a qualitative evaluation of the Ladder to the Moon Culture Change Studio Engagement Programme (CCSEP), a staff training programme aimed at enhancing staff-resident communication. Focus groups were conducted with residents able to provide consent; staff and relatives and managers were interviewed in two care homes. A theoretical framework was developed to interpret the impact of CCSEP using Framework Analysis. Residents noted that the programme appeared to result in staff interacting more with them, as well as enjoying working together as a team. Staff reported an improved sense of teamwork, developing more positive attitudes towards residents, as well as their concerns about using theatrical techniques in the care setting. Relatives identified care home organisational aspects as being barriers to implementation, and some regarded CCSEP simply as 'entertainment' rather than 'creative care'. This study provides an insight into the potential of this staff training programme to improve staff-resident interactions. However, participants' varying views of CCSEP highlight the need to brief staff, residents and relatives before implementation so as to enable full understanding of the aim. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The Effectiveness of Staff Training Focused on Increasing Emotional Intelligence and Improving Interaction between Support Staff and Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlmans, L. J. M.; Embregts, P. J. C. M.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A. M. T.; Derksen, J. J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent research addressed the relationship between staff behaviour and challenging behaviour of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). Consequently, research on interventions aimed at staff is warranted. The present study focused on the effectiveness of a staff training aimed at emotional intelligence and interactions…

  2. MASSIVE OPEN ONLINE COURSES FOR PEDAGOGICAL STAFF TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Gyshchina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. At the present time much attention of the society is fixed more and more to the problem of qualification improvement of pedagogical staff on account of total informatization of society, cardinal technological changes, becoming stronger interrelation of education, science and production, and active introduction in practice of professional standards. The existing system of professional development of pedagogical staff stands in need of reorganization and modernization. The search of the formats corresponding to modern realities, models and technologies of continuous training and retraining of education experts is becoming urgent today.The aim of the article is to show the possibilities of innovative forms of distance learning, realized in the form of a massive open online course (MOOC, for the training and continuous training of pedagogical staff.Methodology and research methods. The methods involve system-based analysis, synthesis, and generalization.Results and scientific novelty. The concept «mass open online course» (MOOC is clarified. MOOC is considered as a form of electronic distance training carried out on the basis of educational multimedia content, and wherein a large number of participants are involved online. The advantages of MOOC in the organization of hybrid forms of distance learning are shown: these online courses enable to combine planned online interactions of students with lecturers and tutors; mass discussions on topical professional subjects; offline study of records of training materials, and independent participants’ online coursework.The model of professional development of pedagogical staff on the basis of MOOC and realization of the principles of open education is presented: open platform, open schedule, open training, and open certification. The main approaches to the formation of new educational environment based on MOOC are designated as an innovative platform of preparation and professional

  3. Private Training Providers: Their Characteristics and Training Activities. Support Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Roger; Simons, Michele; McCarthy, Carmel

    2006-01-01

    This document was produced by the authors based on their research for the report, "Private Training Providers: Their Characteristics and Training Activities," [ED495181] and is an added resource for further information. That study examined the nature of the training activity of private registered training organisations (RTOs) offered to…

  4. A Survey on Dementia Training Needs among Staff at Community-Based Outpatient Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Geri; Lawrence, Briana M.; Ounpraseuth, Songthip T.; Asghar-Ali, Ali Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is a major public health concern. Educating health-care providers about dementia warning signs, diagnosis, and management is paramount to fostering clinical competence and improving patient outcomes. The objective of this project was to describe and identify educational and training needs of staff at community-based outpatient clinics…

  5. Principles and Strategies for Coaching and Mentoring: Ideas for Training Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Margie

    1998-01-01

    Presents principles and strategies for child care coaching and mentoring systems, including: (1) think in terms of a learning and empowerment process; (2) treat staff as you would have them treat children; (3) provide training for different needs and interests; (5) emphasize dispositions as much as skills and knowledge; and (6) build a community…

  6. Advanced trauma life support training for hospital staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Sudha; Sethi, Dinesh; Chinnock, Paul; Wong, Roger

    2014-08-22

    Injury is responsible for an increasing global burden of death and disability. As a result, new models of trauma care have been developed. Many of these, though initially developed in high-income countries (HICs), are now being adopted in low and middle-income countries (LMICs). One such trauma care model is advanced trauma life support (ATLS) training in hospitals, which is being promoted in LMICs as a strategy for improving outcomes for victims of trauma. The impact of this health service intervention, however, has not been rigorously tested by means of a systematic review in either HIC or LMIC settings. To quantify the impact of ATLS training for hospital staff on injury mortality and morbidity in hospitals with and without such a training program. The search for studies was run on the 16th May 2014. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group's Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library), Ovid MEDLINE(R), Ovid MEDLINE(R) In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE(R) Daily and Ovid OLDMEDLINE(R), Embase Classic+Embase (Ovid), ISI WOS (SCI-EXPANDED, SSCI, CPCI-S & CPSI-SSH), CINAHL Plus (EBSCO), PubMed and screened reference lists. Randomised controlled trials, controlled trials and controlled before-and-after studies comparing the impact of ATLS-trained hospital staff versus non-ATLS trained hospital staff on injury mortality and morbidity. Three authors applied the eligibility criteria to trial reports for inclusion, and extracted data. None of the studies identified by the search met the inclusion criteria for this review. There is no evidence from controlled trials that ATLS or similar programs impact the outcome for victims of injury, although there is some evidence that educational initiatives improve knowledge of hospital staff of available emergency interventions. Furthermore, there is no evidence that trauma management systems that incorporate ATLS training impact positively on outcome

  7. Training Residential Staff to Conduct Trial-Based Functional Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Joseph M.; Bloom, Sarah E.; Kunnavatana, S. Shanun; Collins, Shawnee D.; Clay, Casey J.

    2013-01-01

    We taught 6 supervisors of a residential service provider for adults with developmental disabilities to train 9 house managers to conduct trial-based functional analyses. Effects of the training were evaluated with a nonconcurrent multiple baseline. Results suggest that house managers can be trained to conduct trial-based functional analyses with…

  8. Perceived needs for support among care home staff providing end of life care for people with dementia: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandrevala, T; Samsi, K; Rose, C; Adenrele, C; Barnes, C; Manthorpe, J

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the current exploratory study was to investigate the impact on care home staff when working with people with dementia at the end of life and to explore how they cope with this aspect of their work. With UK policy encouraging death in the place of residence, rather than hospital, more people with dementia are dying in care homes. A qualitative approach was employed; 20 care home staff working in five English care homes were interviewed. Thematic Analysis was used to analyse the data. Care home staff found the external demands on them and difficulties associated with interacting with people with dementia sometimes challenging, stressful and anxiety-provoking, particularly as residents approached end of life. Emotional aspects of caring for dying residents were sometimes heightened by close attachments with residents and their families. Staff were able to recognise these unmet needs and identified a need for further training and emotional support to manage these stressors. This study revealed rich and complex understandings of the practice dimensions of caring for people with dementia at the end of life and the impact these have on staff. There is a need to develop effective psychosocial interventions that focus on emotional support for care home staff. There will be challenges in providing this in employment settings that are generally low paid, low status, have high turnover and are reliant on temporary or migrant staff, where training is not rewarded, mandatory or culturally valued. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Mental Health First Aid Training among Student Affairs Staff at a Canadian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Jennifer; Brooks, Meghan; Burrow, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of providing the Mental Health First Aid training program to student affairs staff. The objective of the training was to increase knowledge of mental health, enhance sensitivity, and raise confidence to intervene and assist individuals experiencing a mental health issue. We found the training successfully met…

  10. A Staff-Training Program to Increase Spontaneous Vocal Requests in Children With Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Dyer, Kathleen; Karp, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated a staff-training and feedback program to increase (a) staff use of naturalistic language training techniques, and (b) child production of spontaneous vocal requests in a school setting for young children with autism. Training was conducted in integrated preschool centers and in an art group. The results revealed that the training and feedback procedure was successful in increasing staff use of naturalistic language training techniques. Further, these increased strategies ...

  11. ENGINEERING STAFF TRAINING WITH CONSIDERATION OF MODERN ECONOMIC SCIENCE ACHIEVEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Litvintseva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Achievements in various fields of modern science have an impact not only on the development of science itself, but also on the formation of human capital, including training of technical personnel needed for the transition to an information society.The aim of the article is to show interinfluence of different sciences of engineering staff training and specific aspects of their training in modern conditions.Methodology and research methods. The research is based on the system-based approach, experimental knowledge generalization, comparative analysis and economics methodology. We used analysis of national and foreign literature, official documents and statistic data of the Russian Federation, Global Competitiveness Index. Also, information processing was carried out using graphic methods.Results. The influence of natural sciences on economic knowledge development as well as on perfection of engineering and engineering education is shown. Decrease in researcher numbers as well as lack of young people in engineering sciences is revealed. In particular, the following disturbing facts are established and emphasized: engineers are a fifth part among graduates and this share has been nearly constant during the last 10 years. However, the number of engineering specialists going abroad for work continues to grow.Scientific novelty. The conclusions on the influence of natural sciences on economic theory development as well applied economics on engineering development are made. Special aspects of modern engineers training as knowledge integrator are highlighted.Practical significance. Based on the analysis of official statistics, data the trend of engineering specialists decrease in Russia is shown. In connection with engineering staff aging and low number of engineering companies, the necessity for new engineering model implementation and new type of engineers training is emphasized.

  12. Using Computer-Based Continuing Professional Education of Training Staff to Develop Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sooraksa, Nanta

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a career development program for staff involved in providing training for small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Thailand. Most of these staff were professional vocational teachers in schools. The program uses information communication technology (ICT), and its main objective is to teach Moodle software as a tool for…

  13. Effect of Nursing Home Staff Training on Quality of Patient Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Margaret W.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Assessed effects of nursing home staff training in care for the dying on quality of life of 306 terminally ill patients in 5 pairs of matched nursing homes assigned randomly to trained and not trained staff groups. Patients in trained homes had less depression and greater satisfaction with care than patients in control homes at 1 and 3 months.…

  14. Training residential staff and supervisors to conduct traditional functional analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Joseph M; Bloom, Sarah E; Clay, Casey J; Kunnavatana, S Shanun; Collins, Shawnee D

    2014-07-01

    In this study we extended a training outlined by Iwata to behavioral technicians working for a residential service provider for adults with developmental disabilities. Specifically, we trained ten supervisors and four assistants to organize, conduct, collect data for, and interpret the results of traditional functional analyses (FA; Iwata et al.,1994). Performance was initially low and improved across all measures following training. Results extend previous FA training research by including a tangible condition and by demonstrating that individuals with little to no prior experience conducting FAs can be taught all of the skills required to autonomously conduct them in a relatively short period of time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Staff training effective in increasing learning opportunities for school-aged children with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huskens, Bibi; Reijers, Hilde; Didden, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on staff's ABA skills during one-to-one play situations and initiations of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Data were collected within a multiple baseline design across 5 dyads. A continuous 20 s interval recording system was used to record motivation, creating opportunities, prompting and reinforcement of staff and child initiations. Training included instruction, consisting of instructions, video examples and role-plays. After this, a 4-h delayed video feedback condition started. Three staff members created significantly more learning opportunities during post-instruction and a significant increase occurred during video feedback for one staff member. Initiatives increased significantly in two children during post-instruction. During follow-up, three children showed unprompted initiatives. The mean percentage of spontaneous initiations increased during follow-up. The findings provide support for training staff in a clinical setting to create learning opportunities, which also may result in concomittant improvement in child initiations.

  16. The Training Project of Star Researchers, Outstanding Teaching Staff and Leaders with Facilities Available

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer KARAHAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a general consensus on the requirement of a serious regulation at our universities. It is argued that it is necessary to change Constitution and Institution of Higher Education Law for the serious regulation. However, it is impossible to say that all the facilities of the present legislation are used. Our aim is to create a project based on benefiting from continuing education centers to meet the need of star researchers, outstanding teaching staff and leaders in Turkey via the legislation in force. In this study, accessible studies from publications related to university, higher education and continuing education centers are studied. Th e current situation and solution off ers, applications and continuing education centers'activities have been determined. In accordance with these data, solution off ers have been proposed and discussed in line with the literature. According to the data obtained, our students who come with deficiencies from high schools to universities are not given the adequate undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate education. Th ere are studies such as ‘Double Major Program', ‘Medical-Science Physicians Integrated (MD-PhD Doctorate Program which upgrade the qualities. However, these programs are not suff icient and common. Th erefore, it is imposssible to train outstanding teaching staff , star researchesr and leaders who will meet the needs of our country and contribute to the World. Our academic potential needs a quality training except for branch training. On the other hand, the contribution of the Continuing Education Centers existing in university embodiments is limited. It is possible to provide basic skills, integration and research education to the outstanding teaching staff , star researcher and leader candidates. Th ese trainings should be given in a continuous instutionalization and in the formal education system. For this purpose, an academician school can be established within the body continuing

  17. A Staff-Training Program to Increase Spontaneous Vocal Requests in Children With Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated a staff-training and feedback program to increase (a) staff use of naturalistic language training techniques, and (b) child production of spontaneous vocal requests in a school setting for young children with autism. Training was conducted in integrated preschool centers and in an art group. The results revealed that the training and feedback procedure was successful in increasing staff use of naturalistic language training techniques. Further, these increased strategies were associated with corresponding increases in spontaneous vocal requests for all children during embedded training and ongoing feedback conditions. In addition, probes collected by an unobtrusive observer revealed durability of child requesting when staff feedback was discontinued. Social validity measures from front-line staff regarding the intervention revealed positive ratings. The results are discussed in relation to the continued search for effective service-delivery systems to improve communication for children with autism in the public school setting. PMID:27999635

  18. Staff Training in Autism: The One-Eyed Wo/Man…

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karola Dillenburger

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Having well-trained staff is key to ensuring good quality autism services, especially since people affected with autism generally tend to have higher support needs than other populations in terms of daily living, as well as their mental and physical health. Poorly-trained staff can have detrimental effects on service provision and staff morale and can lead to staff burn-out, as well as increased service user anxiety and stress. This paper reports on a survey with health, social care, and education staff who work within the statutory autism services sector in the UK that explored their knowledge and training with regards to autism. Interview data obtained from staff and service users offer qualitative illustrations of survey findings. Overall, the findings expose an acute lack of autism-specific training that has detrimental impacts. At best, this training was based on brief and very basic awareness raising rather than on in-depth understanding of issues related to autism or skills for evidence-based practice. Service users were concerned with the effects that the lack of staff training had on the services they received. The paper concludes with a discussion of policy routes to achieving quality staff training based on international best practice. The focus is on improving the quality of life and mental health for services users and staff, as well as making potentially significant cost-savings for governments.

  19. Staff Perspectives of Service User Involvement on Two Clinical Psychology Training Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Simon P.; Holttum, Sue

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated both negative and positive staff perspectives of service user involvement on two clinical psychology training courses as part of an ongoing process of service evaluation. Ten clinical psychology staff from two training courses were interviewed over the telephone by a current trainee clinical psychologist using a…

  20. Effects of a recovery-oriented cognitive therapy training program on inpatient staff attitudes and incidents of seclusion and restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Nadine A; Grant, Paul M; Luther, Lauren; Beck, Aaron T

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the feasibility of implementing a recovery-oriented cognitive therapy (CT-R) milieu training program in an urban acute psychiatric inpatient unit. Over a 1-month period, 29 staff members learned short-term CT-R strategies and techniques in an 8-h workshop. Trainees' perceptions of CT-R, beliefs about the therapeutic milieu, and attitudes about working with individuals with psychosis were evaluated both before the workshop and 6 months after the workshop had been completed. Incidents of seclusion and restraint on the unit were also tallied prior to and after the training. Results indicate that staff perceptions of CT-R and their beliefs about the therapeutic environment significantly improved, whereas staff attitudes towards individuals with psychosis remained the same. Incidents of seclusion and restraint also decreased after the training. These findings provide evidence that CT-R training is feasible and can improve the therapeutic milieu of an acute psychiatric inpatient unit.

  1. Training Needs of Vocational Forestry Staff in Ogun State Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These concerns gave rise to this study with specific objectives to level of knowledge and level of skills of vocational staff in forestry activities. Data were collected using a simple random sampling technique in the selection of 50% of vocational staff totaling 143 respondents. Descriptive statistics and inferential statistics were ...

  2. Evaluating nonphysician staff members' self-perceived ability to provide multisource evaluations of residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikels, Susan Michelle; Guiton, Gretchen; Loeb, Danielle; Brandenburg, Suzanne

    2013-03-01

    Multisource evaluations of residents offer valuable feedback, yet there is little evidence on the best way to collect these data from a range of health care professionals. This study evaluated nonphysician staff members' ability to assess internal medicine residents' performance and behavior, and explored whether staff members differed in their perceived ability to participate in resident evaluations. We distributed an anonymous survey to nurses, medical assistants, and administrative staff at 6 internal medicine residency continuity clinics. Differences between nurses and other staff members' perceived ability to evaluate resident behavior were examined using independent t tests. The survey response rate was 82% (61 of 74). A total of 55 respondents (90%) reported that it was important for them to evaluate residents. Participants reported being able to evaluate professional behaviors very well (62% [36 of 58] on the domain of respect to staff; 61% [36 of 59] on attire; and 54% [32 of 59] on communication). Individuals without a clinical background reported being uncomfortable evaluating medical knowledge (60%; 24 of 40) and judgment (55%; 22 of 40), whereas nurses reported being more comfortable evaluating these competencies. Respondents reported that the biggest barrier to evaluation was limited contact (86%; 48 of 56), and a significant amount of feedback was given verbally rather than on written evaluations. Nonphysician staff members agree it is important to evaluate residents, and they are most comfortable providing feedback on professional behaviors. A significant amount of feedback is provided verbally but not necessarily captured in a formal written evaluation process.

  3. Infection prevention and mass vaccination training for U.S. point of dispensing staff and volunteers: a national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebmann, Terri; Loux, Travis M; Zink, Thomas K; Swick, Zachary; Wakefield, Mary

    2015-03-01

    Points of dispensing (PODs) are deployed for medical countermeasure mass dispensing. However, infection prevention and vaccine administration pre-event training offered and just-in-time (JIT) education planned for POD workers have not been assessed. Disaster planners were sent an online questionnaire in 2013. McNemar tests compared training offered to staff versus volunteers and pre-event training versus JIT training. In total, 301 disaster planners participated. The most frequent pre-event training included hand hygiene (59.1% and 28.0%) and personal protective equipment (PPE) selection (52.1% and 24.1%) for staff and volunteers, respectively. Few provided pre-event training on the cold chain technique (14.8% and 5.1%) or smallpox vaccine administration (4.7% and 2.3%) for staff or volunteers. For all topics except smallpox vaccine administration, more staff than volunteers received pre-event training (P vaccine administration to ensure safe and successful POD deployment. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. ILearning and EHomeStudy: Multimedia Training and Assessments for Field Survey Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Loftis

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Survey data collection projects strive to collect high quality data from survey respondents. The quality of the data collected is greatly dependent upon the effectiveness of field interviewers (FIs to conduct inperson screenings and interviews. Training FIs and subsequently assessing their knowledge of project protocol, methods and interviewing techniques is critical to the overall success of any data collection effort. For large surveys, as the number of FIs increase, the cost of inperson training can become prohibitively large. As a cost effective solution to increase the quality of the field data, we developed a suite of web and media based training and assessment tools called iLearning and eHomeStudy for training field staff. Besides saving the project costs associated with inperson training, we are also able to provide refresher trainings throughout the year. This application also enables FIs to view standardized training courses at their convenience and at their own pace. This paper describes the technical details, key features and benefits of this application suite, and also it includes some details on user satisfaction and future directions.

  5. Telephone techniques and etiquette: a medical practice staff training tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura Sachs

    2007-01-01

    The telephone is usually the first contact a prospective or new patient has with a medical practice. It is also the method that existing patients and others commonly use to ask questions or convey information. At the same time, a telephone that rings off the hook can be one of the biggest drains on staff time and a source of tremendous frustration. This article suggests practical techniques for managing the medical practice telephone. It provides seven never-fail strategies for saving time on the phone while remaining courteous and attentive to callers. It offers tips to help readers avoid getting caught in an endless game of telephone tag. The article highlights strategies that work particularly well when placing calls and when dealing with a busy signal or voicemail system problem in the practice. It also describes the fine points for taking accurate and complete telephone messages without turning off callers or misleading them. This article further explores practical strategies for using and not abusing the hold button and offers additional tips for telephone equipment and accessories readers may find helpful. Finally, this article suggests guidelines for using an answering machine or voicemail system and provides a 25-question quiz to help readers assess their own telephone technique.

  6. The influence of staff training and education on prosthetic and orthotic service quality: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghany, Saeed; Sadeghi-Demneh, Ebrahim; Trinler, Ursula; Onmanee, Pornsuree; Dillon, Michael P; Baker, Richard

    2017-07-01

    Education and training in prosthetics and orthotics typically comply with International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics standards based on three categories of prosthetic and orthotic professionals. This scoping study sought to describe the evidence base available to answer the question, How are prosthetic and orthotic services influenced by the training of staff providing them? Scoping review. A structured search of the peer-reviewed literature catalogued in major electronic databases yielded 3039 papers. Following review of title and abstract, 93 articles were considered relevant. Full-text review reduced this number to 25. Only two articles were identified as providing direct evidence of the effects of training and education on service provision. While both suggested that there was an impact, it is difficult to see how the more specific conclusions of either could be generalised. The other 23 articles provide a useful background to a range of issues including the specification of competencies that training programmes should deliver (3 articles), descriptions of a range of training programmes and the effects of training and education on student knowledge and skills. Although it is considered axiomatic, the service quality is dependent on practitioner education and training. There is insufficient evidence to establish whether levels of training and education in prosthetics and orthotics have an effect on the quality of prosthetic and orthotic services. Clinical relevance There is very little evidence about the effects of training and education of prosthetists and orthotists on service quality. While this is a somewhat negative finding, we feel that it is important to bring this to the attention of the prosthetics and orthotics community.

  7. Influence of staff infection control training on infection-related quality measures in US nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jasjit; Stone, Patricia W; Travers, Jasmine L; Cohen, Catherine C; Herzig, Carolyn T A

    2017-09-01

    Health care-associated infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in US nursing home residents. Ongoing training of nursing home staff is vital to the implementation of infection prevention and control processes. Our aim was to describe associations between methods, frequency, and timing of staff infection prevention and control training and infection-related quality measures. In this national survey of nursing homes, timing of staff infection prevention and control training was associated with reduced indwelling urinary catheter use. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of the 'Ladder to the Moon, Culture Change Studio Engagement Programme' staff training: Two quasi-experimental case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Azucena; Wenborn, Jennifer; Swinson, Tom; Orrell, Martin

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of the CCSEP on care home staff in two care settings for older people in one nursing home and one residential home. Care homes provide personal care and accommodation for older people. The English Dementia Strategy aims to improve the quality of service provision for people with dementia. This includes specific mention of improving the quality of life in care homes and as such includes objectives related to developing the workforce knowledge and skills. The Ladder to the Moon Culture Change Studio Engagement Programme (CCSEP) is a staff training approach based on the Positive Psychology framework that uses theatre- and film-based activities. This study used a wait-list controlled design. However, the data analysis plan was amended to reflect difficulties in data collection, and a quasi-experimental case study approach was consequently utilised. Outcome measures for staff attitudes and beliefs were as follows: Sense of Competence in Dementia Care Staff; Approaches to Dementia Questionnaire; Job Satisfaction Index; Brief Learning Transfer System Inventory; and Scale of Positive and Negative Experience. The Quality of Interaction Schedule (QUIS) was used to observe changes in staff-resident interaction. Fifty staff in two care homes completed the questionnaires and forty-one undertook formal CCSEP training. In Home A (nursing home), there was no significant change in any of the measures. In Home B (residential home), the QUIS showed an increase in positive interactions post intervention; a significant increase in the Building Relationship subscale of Sense of Competence; and a significant increase in staff sense of hopefulness towards people with dementia. The Brief Learning Transfer System Inventory showed a significant decrease post-intervention. The intervention did not significantly affect the happiness or job satisfaction of care home staff. The results of this study provide tentative evidence about the efficacy of this staff training

  9. Physical examination skills training: Faculty staff vs. patient instructor feedback-A controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Krautter

    Full Text Available Standardized patients are widely used in training of medical students, both in teaching and assessment. They also frequently lead complete training sessions delivering physical examination skills without the aid of faculty teaching staff-acting as "patient instructors" (PIs. An important part of this training is their ability to provide detailed structured feedback to students which has a strong impact on their learning success. Yet, to date no study has assessed the quality of physical examination related feedback by PIs. Therefore, we conducted a randomized controlled study comparing feedback of PIs and faculty staff following a physical examination assessed by students and video assessors.14 PIs and 14 different faculty staff physicians both delivered feedback to 40 medical students that had performed a physical examination on the respective PI while the physicians observed the performance. The physical examination was rated by two independent video assessors to provide an objective performance standard (gold standard. Feedback of PI and physicians was content analyzed by two different independent video assessors based on a provided checklist and compared to the performance standard. Feedback of PIs and physicians was also rated by medical students and video assessors using a questionnaire consisting of 12 items.There was no statistical significant difference concerning overall matching of physician or PI feedback with gold standard ratings by video assessment (p = .219. There was also no statistical difference when focusing only on items that were classified as major key steps (p = .802, mistakes or parts that were left out during physical examination (p = .219 or mistakes in communication items (p = .517. The feedback of physicians was significantly better rated than PI feedback both by students (p = .043 as well as by video assessors (p = .034.In summary, our study demonstrates that trained PIs are able to provide feedback of equal

  10. The Effect of Peer-to-Peer Training on Staff Interactions with Adults with Dual Diagnoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Lori L.; Sturmey, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Researchers have demonstrated the importance of training behavioral skills to staff members working with consumers with developmental disabilities. A training program that does not rely solely on consultants or administrators may benefit human services agencies that have limited resources to allocate to training. In the present study, the…

  11. Development and Evaluation of a Staff Training Program on Palliative Care for Persons with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Joan E.; Cadogan, Mary P.

    2011-01-01

    Persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) face barriers and disparities at end of life. Among these barriers are limited educational opportunities and a paucity of targeted training materials on palliative care for staff who provide their day-to-day care. This paper reports on a three-phase project undertaken to develop,…

  12. Principles for Developing Benchmark Criteria for Staff Training in Responsible Gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, Stefan; Banzer, Raphaela; Gruenerbl, Agnes; Malischnig, Doris; Griffiths, Mark D; Haring, Christian

    2017-03-01

    One approach to minimizing the negative consequences of excessive gambling is staff training to reduce the rate of the development of new cases of harm or disorder within their customers. The primary goal of the present study was to assess suitable benchmark criteria for the training of gambling employees at casinos and lottery retailers. The study utilised the Delphi Method, a survey with one qualitative and two quantitative phases. A total of 21 invited international experts in the responsible gambling field participated in all three phases. A total of 75 performance indicators were outlined and assigned to six categories: (1) criteria of content, (2) modelling, (3) qualification of trainer, (4) framework conditions, (5) sustainability and (6) statistical indicators. Nine of the 75 indicators were rated as very important by 90 % or more of the experts. Unanimous support for importance was given to indicators such as (1) comprehensibility and (2) concrete action-guidance for handling with problem gamblers, Additionally, the study examined the implementation of benchmarking, when it should be conducted, and who should be responsible. Results indicated that benchmarking should be conducted every 1-2 years regularly and that one institution should be clearly defined and primarily responsible for benchmarking. The results of the present study provide the basis for developing a benchmarking for staff training in responsible gambling.

  13. Training the Staff of a Drug Addiction Treatment Facility: A Case Study of Hogar De Encuentro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Andrew A.; Leske, M. Cristina

    1977-01-01

    This paper, presented at the American Public Health Association meeting; Chicago, November 1975, discusses a staff training program at a drug addiction treatment facility established for Spanish-speaking (and other) drug addicts. Staff improved counseling skills and knowledge of drug addiction, but changed little in attitudes toward drug use and…

  14. Assessing the Impact of In-Service Training on Staff Performance at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    performance in terms of knowledge and skills gained. It was recommended that more research is undertaken on all UEW campuses to add to both literature and knowledge of INSET. Keywords: Staff Performance, In-Service Training, Staff Development International Journal of Educational Research Vol. 3 (2) 2007 pp. 217- ...

  15. Customer Service Training for Public Services Staff at Temple University's Central Library System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Gwen

    Arguing that good interpersonal interactions between library staff and their patrons is a major determinant of overall patron satisfaction, this paper describes Temple University's customer service training program for its public services staff. Dubbed the "A+ Service" program, the program focuses on six aspects of library service: (1)…

  16. Training Initiatives for Skills Acquisition in Icts by Academic Staff of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study sought to assess training initiatives for skills acquisition in ICTs by academic staff of the University of Calabar. A descriptive survey design and the random sampling procedure were used to administer 150 copies of a validated questionnaire to academic staff of the university. Of these, 90 usable copies ...

  17. Partnership working by default: district nurses and care home staff providing care for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Claire; Robb, Nadia; Drennan, Vari; Woolley, Rosemary

    2005-11-01

    Older people residents in care homes that only offer residential care rely on primary health care services for medical and nursing needs. Research has investigated the demands that care homes staff and residents make on general practice, but not the involvement of other members of the primary health care team. This paper describes two consecutive studies completed in 2001 and 2003 that involved focus groups and survey methods of enquiry conducted in two settings: an England shire and inner London. The research questions that both studies had in common were (1) What is the contribution of district nursing and other primary care services to care homes that do not have on-site nursing provision? (2) What strategies promote participation and collaboration between residents, care home staff and NHS primary care nursing staff? and (3) What are the current obstacles and aids to effective partnership working and learning? A total of 74 community-based nurses and care home managers and staff took part in 10 focus groups, while 124 care home managers (73% of the 171 surveyed) and 113 district nurse team leaders (80% of the 142 surveyed) participated in the surveys. Findings from both studies demonstrated that nurses were the most frequent NHS professional visiting care homes. Although care home managers and district nurses believed that they had a good working relationship, they had differing expectations of what the nursing contribution should be and how personal and nursing care were defined. This influenced the range of services that older people had access to and the amount of training and support care home staff received from district nurses and the extent to which they were able to develop collaborative and reciprocal patterns of working. Findings indicate that there is a need for community-based nursing services to adopt a more strategic approach that ensures older people in care homes can access the services they are entitled to and receive equivalent health care to

  18. 78 FR 11654 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Providing Information About...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... entitled ``Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Providing Information About...

  19. Staff Training As Correlate Of Workers' Productivity In Selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many studies have been carried out on the relationship between training and productivity of workers but none has been carried out on the correlation of training on the individual indices of productivity and workers productivity. It is against this background that this paper investigate the correlation of training on indices of ...

  20. Assessment of training needs of extension staff of agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study identified strong training needs for Edo State extension agents on communication skills (X= 4.60), planning demonstration (X=4.60), evaluation of trials (X= 4.57) and farmers training (X=4.56). The correlation analysis showed that education had significant relationship many areas of the respondents' training ...

  1. Effects of an Education Intervention about HPV Self-Testing for Healthcare Providers and Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presser, Brynne E; Katz, Mira L; Shoben, Abigail B; Moore, Deborah; Ruffin, Mack T; Paskett, Electra D; Reiter, Paul L

    2017-01-10

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) self-testing is an emerging cervical cancer screening strategy, yet efforts to educate healthcare providers and staff about HPV self-testing are lacking. We report the findings of a brief education intervention about HPV self-testing for healthcare providers and staff. We conducted education sessions during 2015 with healthcare providers and staff (n = 33) from five federally qualified health centers located in Appalachian Ohio. Participants attended a one-time session and completed pre- and post-intervention surveys. Analyses for paired data assessed changes in knowledge and beliefs about HPV, HPV-related disease, and HPV self-testing. The intervention increased participants' knowledge and affected many of the beliefs examined. Participants answered an average of 4.67 of six knowledge items correctly on pre-intervention surveys and 5.82 items correctly on post-intervention surveys (p < 0.001). The proportion of participants who answered all six knowledge items correctly increased substantially (pre-intervention =9% vs. post-intervention =82%, p < 0.001). Compared to pre-intervention surveys, participants more strongly believed on post-intervention surveys that it is important to examine HPV self-testing as a potential cervical cancer screening strategy, that their female patients would be willing to use an HPV self-test at home by themselves, and that they have the knowledge to talk with their patients about HPV self-testing (all p < 0.05). A brief education intervention can be a viable approach for increasing knowledge and affecting beliefs about HPV self-testing among healthcare providers and staff. Findings will be valuable for planning and developing future HPV self-test interventions that include an education component for healthcare providers and staff.

  2. Physical examination skills training: Faculty staff vs. patient instructor feedback—A controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbacher, Katja; Schultz, Jobst-Hendrik; Maatouk, Imad; Herrmann-Werner, Anne; Koehl-Hackert, Nadja; Herzog, Wolfgang; Nikendei, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Background Standardized patients are widely used in training of medical students, both in teaching and assessment. They also frequently lead complete training sessions delivering physical examination skills without the aid of faculty teaching staff–acting as “patient instructors” (PIs). An important part of this training is their ability to provide detailed structured feedback to students which has a strong impact on their learning success. Yet, to date no study has assessed the quality of physical examination related feedback by PIs. Therefore, we conducted a randomized controlled study comparing feedback of PIs and faculty staff following a physical examination assessed by students and video assessors. Methods 14 PIs and 14 different faculty staff physicians both delivered feedback to 40 medical students that had performed a physical examination on the respective PI while the physicians observed the performance. The physical examination was rated by two independent video assessors to provide an objective performance standard (gold standard). Feedback of PI and physicians was content analyzed by two different independent video assessors based on a provided checklist and compared to the performance standard. Feedback of PIs and physicians was also rated by medical students and video assessors using a questionnaire consisting of 12 items. Results There was no statistical significant difference concerning overall matching of physician or PI feedback with gold standard ratings by video assessment (p = .219). There was also no statistical difference when focusing only on items that were classified as major key steps (p = .802), mistakes or parts that were left out during physical examination (p = .219) or mistakes in communication items (p = .517). The feedback of physicians was significantly better rated than PI feedback both by students (p = .043) as well as by video assessors (p = .034). Conclusions In summary, our study demonstrates that trained PIs are able

  3. MO-DE-BRA-04: Hands-On Fluoroscopy Safety Training with Real-Time Patient and Staff Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanderhoek, M; Bevins, N [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) are routinely performed across many different hospital departments. However, many involved staff members have minimal training regarding safe and optimal use of fluoroscopy systems. We developed and taught a hands-on fluoroscopy safety class incorporating real-time patient and staff dosimetry in order to promote safer and more optimal use of fluoroscopy during FGI. Methods: The hands-on fluoroscopy safety class is taught in an FGI suite, unique to each department. A patient equivalent phantom is set on the patient table with an ion chamber positioned at the x-ray beam entrance to the phantom. This provides a surrogate measure of patient entrance dose. Multiple solid state dosimeters (RaySafe i2 dosimetry systemTM) are deployed at different distances from the phantom (0.1, 1, 3 meters), which provide surrogate measures of staff dose. Instructors direct participating clinical staff to operate the fluoroscopy system as they view live fluoroscopic images, patient entrance dose, and staff doses in real-time. During class, instructors work with clinical staff to investigate how patient entrance dose, staff doses, and image quality are affected by different parameters, including pulse rate, magnification, collimation, beam angulation, imaging mode, system geometry, distance, and shielding. Results: Real-time dose visualization enables clinical staff to directly see and learn how to optimize their use of their own fluoroscopy system to minimize patient and staff dose, yet maintain sufficient image quality for FGI. As a direct result of the class, multiple hospital departments have implemented changes to their imaging protocols, including reduction of the default fluoroscopy pulse rate and increased use of collimation and lower dose fluoroscopy modes. Conclusion: Hands-on fluoroscopy safety training substantially benefits from real-time patient and staff dosimetry incorporated into the class. Real-time dose display helps

  4. Improving staff perception of a safety climate with crew resource management training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuy, SreyRam; Romero, Ramon A L

    2017-06-01

    Communication failure is one of the top root causes in patient safety adverse events. Crew resource management (CRM) is a team building communication process intended to improve patient safety by improving team dynamics. First, to describe implementation of CRM in a Veterans Affair (VA) surgical service. Second, to assess whether staff CRM training is related to improvement in staff perception of a safety climate. Mandatory CRM training was implemented for all surgical service staff at a VA Hospital at 0 and 12 mo. Safety climate questionnaires were completed by operating room staff at a baseline, 6 and 12 mo after the initial CRM training. Participants reported improvement on all 27 points on the safety climate questionnaire at 6 mo compared with the baseline. At 12 mo, there was sustained improvement in 23 of the 27 areas. This is the first published report about the effect of CRM training on staff perception of a safety climate in a VA surgical service. We demonstrate that CRM training can be successfully implemented widespread in a surgical program. Overall, there was improvement in 100% of areas assessed on the safety climate questionnaire at 6 mo after CRM training. By 1 y, this improvement was sustained in 23 of 27 areas, with the areas of greatest improvement being the performance of briefings, collaboration between nurses and doctors, valuing nursing input, knowledge about patient safety, and institutional promotion of a patient safety climate. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Communicating about Death and Dying: Developing Training for Staff Working in Services for People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuffrey-Wijne, Irene; Rose, Tracey; Grant, Robert; Wijne, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many people with intellectual disabilities are affected by death, yet conversations about death are often avoided by staff working with them. This study aimed to assess staff training needs and to develop, trial and evaluate a training course on communicating about death and dying. Method:(i) Semi-structured interviews with 20 staff in…

  6. Perceptions of homelessness in older homeless veterans, VA homeless program staff liaisons, and housing intervention providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Victor A; Brown, Lisa M; Frahm, Kathryn A; Schinka, John A; Casey, Roger

    2013-05-01

    To understand the needs and challenges encountered by older homeless veterans. We conducted six focus groups of older veterans, two focus groups, and one semi-structured interview of VA staff liaisons, and two focus groups and one semi-structured interview of housing intervention providers. Major themes for older veterans: 1) negative homelessness experience; 2) benefits of the structured transitional housing program; 3) importance of peer outreach; and 4) need for age-tailored job placement programs. Major themes for VA staff liaison/housing intervention providers: 1) belief that the transitional housing program has made a positive change; 2) need for individualized criteria to address the unique needs of veterans; 3) distinct differences between older and younger homeless veterans; 4) outreach services; 5) permanent housing issues; and 6) coordination of services. Compared with younger veterans, older veterans have less social support, greater employment and health challenges, and, perhaps greater motivation to change.

  7. Training staff serving clients with intellectual disabilities: A meta-analysis of aspects determining effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oorsouw, W.M.W.J. van; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Jahoda, A.

    2009-01-01

    The last decades have seen increased emphasis on the quality of training for direct-care staff serving people with intellectual disabilities. Nevertheless, it is unclear what the key aspects of effective training are. Therefore, the aim of the present meta-analysis was to establish the ingredients

  8. Video Feedback in Key Word Signing Training for Preservice Direct Support Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombouts, Ellen; Meuris, Kristien; Maes, Bea; De Meyer, Anne-Marie; Zink, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Research has demonstrated that formal training is essential for professionals to learn key word signing. Yet, the particular didactic strategies have not been studied. Therefore, this study compared the effectiveness of verbal and video feedback in a key word signing training for future direct support staff. Method: Forty-nine future…

  9. Evaluating the MESSAGE Communication Strategies in Dementia training for use with community-based aged care staff working with people with dementia: a controlled pretest-post-test study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Erin R; Chenery, Helen J

    2016-04-01

    The study aims to evaluate the effects of a communication skills training programme on community aged care staff's knowledge of communication support in dementia and on staff's care experience. Dementia can lead to impairments in communication. Therefore, quality community-based dementia care requires that staff be skilled communicators, equipped to facilitate interactions with people with dementia. The current investigation evaluated the effectiveness of the MESSAGE Communication Strategies in Dementia for Care Staff training programme with respect to knowledge of communication support and the staff/caregiver experience. A multi-centre controlled pretest/post-test design with randomised cohort allocation was used. Outcome measures were completed at baseline, immediately after training (training group only), and at three-month follow-up. Thirty-eight care staff working in community aged care participated and completed all outcome measures (training = 22; control = 16).Training and control groups completed the following outcome measures: knowledge of communication support strategies, self-efficacy, preparedness to provide care, strain in nursing care and attitude to dementia care. Staff in the training group provided written feedback on the training. A significant improvement in knowledge scores from baseline was found for the training group both immediately after training and at three-month follow-up. There was also a significant training effect for self-efficacy and preparedness to provide care. No significant difference was found for the control group for any measure. No significant training effects were found for measures of strain or attitudes to dementia care. Feedback from staff suggests that the training was well received. The MESSAGE training was positively received by staff and had a significant effect on care staff knowledge, and confidence to provide care for people with dementia. The easily accessible multimedia training programme is well received by

  10. Train the trainer in dementia care. A program to foster communication skills in nursing home staff caring for dementia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzmann, J; Haberstroh, J; Pantel, J

    2016-04-01

    Improvement of communication skills in nursing home staff is key to provide better care for dementia patients and decrease occupational mental stress. An innovative train-the-trainer program to improve and maintain professional caregivers' social competencies in nursing home dementia care is described. Over a period of 6 months, a group of 6 senior staff members were qualified as program trainers (multiplicators) for the TANDEM training program, which qualified them to design, deliver, and evaluate training sessions that foster specific social competencies in dementia care. In a subsequent intervention study with 116 geriatric caregivers in 14 nursing homes, training was provided either by multiplicators (intervention group) or directly by project coworkers (control group). Participants in both groups improved their dementia-specific communication skills. In a follow-up survey, the intervention group also reported lasting reductions in mental stressors at work (p nursing homes to be multiplicators for the TANDEM train-the-trainer program for dementia-specific communication skills has a beneficial influence on social competencies, mental stressors at work, and occupational mental stress of staff who care for dementia patients and may contribute to a sustainable implementation of dementia-specific social competencies.

  11. Providing emotional stability through relaxation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janbozorgi, M; Zahirodin, A; Norri, N; Ghafarsamar, R; Shams, J

    2009-01-01

    To determine the effects of integrative relaxation training (IRT) on emotional stability, we exposed 32 patients diagnosed with anxiety disorder to a pre-test (16PF) and to 12 sessions of group psychoeducation training. Patients were randomly assigned to 2 groups (study 17 and control 15 patients). The study group received 12 weekly group sessions of IRT. Level of anxiety was evaluated in a post-test using a questionnaire and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Emotional stability and level of anxiety were significantly reduced in the study group: there was a marked increase in scores for emotionally s and venturesome and a decrease in scores for apprehensive and tense. The STAI score was statistically significantly lower in the study group.

  12. Public Library Staff as Community Health Partners: Training Program Design and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Anna U; D'Alonzo, Bernadette A; Dupuis, Roxanne; Whiteman, Eliza D; Kallem, Stacey; McClintock, Autumn; Fein, Joel A; Klusaritz, Heather; Cannuscio, Carolyn C

    2017-10-01

    Public libraries are free and open to all-and accessed at high rates by vulnerable populations-which positions them to be key public health allies. However, library staff themselves often feel ill-equipped to address the health and social concerns of their patrons. To fill this gap, we developed a case-based training curriculum to help library staff recognize, engage, and refer vulnerable patrons to appropriate resources. Topics addressed in the training, including homelessness, mental health and substance use disorders, immigration, and trauma, were selected based on findings from a prior community needs assessment. Using a modified measure of self-efficacy, participants ( n = 33) were surveyed before and after each session. Several participants ( n = 7) were also interviewed 4 months after the training was completed. Overall, staff reported significant increases in comfort, confidence, and preparedness in assisting vulnerable patrons across all topic areas. Qualitative findings reflected positive perceived impact and value of the trainings. Staff felt training resources should be made more readily accessible. Improving library staff capacity to address the health and social needs of their patrons can further establish public libraries as partners in improving population health.

  13. An A BWR demonstration simulator for training and developing technical staff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J. [Toshiba America Nuclear Energy, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Yonezawa, H.; Aoyagi, Y.; Kataoka, K., E-mail: jim.powers@toshiba.com [Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the US NRC, is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. Toshiba has developed a Demonstration Simulator of the A BWR control room that provides a realistic experience for training and education on BWR principles and operations fundamentals. The Demonstration Simulator is located in the Toshiba America Nuclear Energy (Tane) office in Charlotte, North Carolina and is composed of standard office computer equipment set up in a specific arrangement that is representative of the layout of an A BWR control room. The Demonstration Simulator is not intended for licensed operator training, but can provide a framework for encouraging entry level technically oriented nuclear workers to enter the operations field; strengthening the linkage between university energy field curricula and real-life application of theory; and, improving understanding of integrated plant operations for developing station technical staff. This paper describes the A BWR Demonstration Simulator and its applications for training and educating future nuclear workers. (Author)

  14. Outcomes of classroom-based team training interventions for multiprofessional hospital staff. A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, Louise Isager; Østergaard, Doris; Mogensen, Torben

    2010-01-01

    Several studies show that communication errors in healthcare teams are frequent and can lead to adverse events. Team training has been suggested as a way to safer communication and has been implemented in healthcare as classroom-based or simulation-based team training or a combination of both....... The objective of this paper is to systematically review studies evaluating the outcomes of classroom-based multiprofessional team training for hospital staff....

  15. Teaching Staff Advanced Training in Russia, the Republic of Kazakhstan, the USA and Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Kovalchuk Vasyl

    2015-01-01

    In the article the peculiarities in organization of postgraduate teacher training in foreign countries have been highlighted; the basic problems and prospects for advanced training which stipulate for reforming the relevant national systems have been revealed; common and distinctive trends in their development have been justified. In Russia there is a cascade (cyclic) system of teaching staff advanced training, based on the principles of andragogy, namely, continuity, self-control and self-an...

  16. Providing initial transthoracic echocardiography training for anesthesiologists: simulator training is not inferior to live training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edrich, Thomas; Seethala, Raghu R; Olenchock, Benjamin A; Mizuguchi, Annette K; Rivero, Jose M; Beutler, Sascha S; Fox, John A; Liu, Xiaoxia; Frendl, Gyorgy

    2014-02-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is finding increased use in anesthesia and critical care. Efficient options for training anesthesiologists should be explored. Simulator mannequins allow for training of manual acquisition and image recognition skills and may be suitable due to ease of scheduling. The authors tested the hypothesis that training with a simulator would not be inferior to training using a live volunteer. Prospective, randomized trial. University hospital. Forty-six anesthesia residents, fellows, and faculty. After preparation with a written and video tutorial, study subjects received 80 minutes of TTE training using either a simulator or live volunteer. Practical and written tests were completed before and after training to assess improvement in manual image acquisition skills and theoretic knowledge. The written test was repeated 4 weeks later. Performance in the practical image-acquisition test improved significantly after training using both the live volunteer and the simulator, improving by 4.0 and 4.3 points out of 15, respectively. Simulator training was found not to be inferior to live training, with a mean difference of -0.30 points and 95% confidence intervals that did not cross the predefined non-inferiority margin. Performance in the written retention test also improved significantly immediately after training for both groups but declined similarly upon repeat testing 4 weeks later. When providing initial TTE training to anesthesiologists, training using a simulator was not inferior to using live volunteers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Leadership Training Program for Medical Staff in Belgium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Neree; Brabanders, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Today healthcare is facing many challenges in a volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous environment. There is a need to develop strong leaders who can cope with these challenges. This article describes the process of a leadership training program for healthcare professionals in Belgium (named "Clinical Leadership Program" or…

  18. A 'Communication and Patient Safety' training programme for all healthcare staff: can it make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peter; Allen, Kellie; Daly, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Communication breakdown is a factor contributing to most cases of patient harm, and this harm continues to occur at unacceptable levels. Responding to this evidence, the Metro South District of Queensland Health (Australia) has developed a communication skills training programme titled 'Communication and Patient Safety'. The three modules, each lasting 3½ h, cover both staff-to-patient and staff-to-staff communication issues, and an unusual feature is that clinical and non-clinical staff attend together. Following positive evaluation data from our initial pilot programme (involving 350 staff in a single hospital), the programme was expanded to all five hospitals in the district, and has now been completed by over 3000 staff. The results show that despite the significant time commitment, participants find the courses useful and relevant (Kirkpatrick level 1), they learn and retain new material (level 2), and they report changes in behaviour at individual, team and facility levels (level 3). Although it remains a challenge to obtain quantitative data showing that training such as this directly improves patient safety (level 4), our qualitative and informal feedback indicates that participants and their managers perceive clear improvements in the 'communication culture' after a workplace team has attended the courses. Improving 'communication for safety' in healthcare is a worldwide imperative, and other healthcare jurisdictions should be able to obtain similar results to ours if they develop and support interactive, non-didactic training in communication skills.

  19. A Pilot Investigation into the Efficacy of a Signing Training Strategy for Staff Working with Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Darren D.; Jolliffe, Jane

    2009-01-01

    To contribute to increasing the quality and quantity of communication between staff and adults with intellectual disabilities, training was undertaken to enhance the awareness and knowledge of signing as a method of communication. Multidisciplinary team members, residential and day centre staff were trained to use 20 core signs. Training methods…

  20. Effectiveness of a Psycho-Educational Staff Training Program on Attitudes of Staff in a Long-Term Care Facility: A Pilot Study and Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elpers, Kathy; Amano, Takashi; DeCoster, Vaughn; Johnson, Missy

    2017-01-01

    Managing Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) is a significant challenge for staff working in long-term care facilities. This study examines the effectiveness of a psycho-educational training aimed at changing staff's attitudes. The results indicated that participants' attitudes toward dementia were more positive,…

  1. Work hours regulations for house staff in psychiatry: bad or good for residency training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasminsky, Sonya; Lomonaco, Allison; Auchincloss, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    The movement to limit work hours for house staff has gained momentum in recent years. The authors set out to review the literature on work hours reform, particularly as it applies to psychiatric residency training, and to provide two different viewpoints on the controversy. The authors present the historical background of work hours reform in the United States and review recent literature about resident work hours limitations. Using a debate format, the authors discuss whether the new regulations are having a positive or negative impact on residency training in psychiatry. Drs. Lomonaco and Auchincloss argue that currently-existing work hours restrictions may have unintended consequences for the health of patients and an untoward impact on residents' professional development and academic medicine's overall structure. Dr. Rasminsky argues that work hours restrictions do not go far enough in protecting residents and patients from the harmful effects of fatigue, and that our definition of professionalism needs to be reexamined in light of emerging scientific literature. There should be some limitation on resident work hours, with exact numbers to be determined by growing scientific knowledge about the effects of prolonged wakefulness. More study is needed, particularly in the area of psychiatric residency training.

  2. Potentials of Information and Organisational Process Improvement Through Trained Office Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chromjaková Felicita

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the main possibilities on how to improve the production rate, total ef- ficiency and profit-cost ratio in the administrative processes of public administrative offices. The results that are realized from this research serves as an important output for public administration offices in Slovakia. Process improvements can be achieved through the efficient utilization of own-staff potentials, especially by the optimal use of training modules. Well trained own-staff can radically improve the efficiency of office works, jobs and processes and can influence the satisfaction of internal and external stakeholders.

  3. Rapid realist review of the evidence : achieving lasting change when mental health rehabilitation staff undertake recovery-oriented training

    OpenAIRE

    Gee, Melanie; Bhanbhro, Sadiq; Cook, Sarah; Killaspy, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To identify the factors contributing to lasting change in practice following a recovery-based training intervention for inpatient mental health rehabilitation staff.\\ud \\ud Background: Staff training may help nurses and other staff groups in inpatient mental health rehabilitative settings to increase their recovery-oriented practice. There are no published reviews on the effectiveness of such training and few long-term evaluations. This review informed a realist evaluation of a specific ...

  4. Identifying the HIV Testing Beliefs of Healthcare Provider Staff at a University Student Health Center: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Cornelia A.

    2012-01-01

    This research project examined the views and perceptions of healthcare provider staff regarding HIV testing and the implementation of HIV testing as a routine part of medical practice in a university student health center at a Historically Black College or University (HBCU). This study further explored whether healthcare provider staff promoted…

  5. Provision of Support for Psychological Distress by University Staff, and Receptiveness to Mental Health Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margrove, K. L.; Gustowska, M.; Grove, L. S.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing concern over the number of university students and university staff who require psychological support; however, little is known about the impact of this on higher education (HE) staff. University employees (n = 91) from two UK universities completed an anonymous survey which explored their experience of providing support for…

  6. EDUCATION QUALITY AND ISSUES OF PEDAGOGICAL STAFF TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir P. Borisenkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to reveal the reasons of deterioration of education quality at the Soviet and Post-Soviet school and, adopting the best experience of the countries that are recognised as world leaders in education; to plan the solution ways to current problems and situation at the Russian school. Methods. The principle of a historicism that expresses the necessity of concrete historical studying of the public phenomena is put in a basis of methodology of the research conducted by the author; it includes pedagogical phenomena (in the course of its origin, its development and transformation, taking into account variety of its communications, dependences and mediations. The concrete methods used in work, are typical for theoretical research: the analysis, an estimation and reduction in system of the empirical and generalised material on the selected theme. Large corpus of the scientific literature is studied. The data of the published international researches on education in which our country is widely involved (PISA, TIMSS, and also the national researches undertaken in the USA, Great Britain and other countries are considered. Methods of expert estimations, and direct supervision of educational process in secondary and higher educational institutions are applied. Results. The general characteristic of evolution of quality of the Russian education is presented during the Soviet and Post-Soviet periods. The factors which have had negative influence on quality of school training during the various periods are revealed. The estimation of the reasons which have caused failures of school reforms, carried out in the USSR in the 60–80s and within two last decades in modern Russia is given. The concurrent important positive shifts in this sphere, taking place in the same years are noted. Results of the international researches on education (PISA and TIMSS are presented; the scoring of Russia among other states is defined, following

  7. Training of Residential Social Care Staff to Meet the Needs of Older People with Intellectual Disabilities who Develop Age-Related Health Problems: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northway, Ruth; Jenkins, Robert; Holland-Hart, Daniella

    2017-09-01

    Despite awareness of the age related health needs of people with intellectual disabilities little is known regarding how residential social care staff are prepared to meet such needs. Data were gathered via semi-structured interviews from 14 managers of supported living settings. Transcripts were thematically analysed. Staff may work in supported living settings with no prior experience of care work, and previous knowledge/experience of supporting people in relation to their health is not required. Whilst health related training is provided there is a lack of specific training regarding healthy ageing, and training seems to be reactive to changing needs of tenants meaning that proactive monitoring for changes in health status may not occur. Whilst some training is provided for residential social care staff in relation to health and ageing a more proactive approach is required which should include a focus on healthy ageing. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Addressing Adolescent Depression in Schools: Evaluation of an In-Service Training for School Staff in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Carmen R.; Budge, Stephanie L.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated an adolescent depression in-service training for school staff in the United States. A total of 252 school staff (e.g., teachers, principals, counselors) completed assessments prior to and following the in-service and a subsample of these staff participated in focus groups following the in-service and three months later.…

  9. ALOHA to New Learning: Uniting Student and Career Staff through Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Lynn N.

    2007-01-01

    This article examines staff training from a different perspective, as a means of transmitting organizational culture to student employees through a closer communication between career and student part-time employees. Results of a qualitative survey suggest communication supports multigenerational relationships and administrators who invest in…

  10. Can primary health care staff be trained in basic life-saving surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Task-shifting at this time in South Sudan is a controversial topic and is not presently government policy. Please send us your views and tell us if you agree with the authors of this article. For example: Can rural middle level non-medical health staff be trained to safely carry out basic emergency surgical procedures?

  11. Effects of staff training on the care of mechanically ventilated patients: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloos, F; Müller, S; Harz, A; Gugel, M; Geil, D; Egerland, K; Reinhart, K; Marx, G

    2009-08-01

    Adherence to guidelines to avoid complications associated with mechanical ventilation is often incomplete. The goal of this study was to assess whether staff training in pre-defined interventions (bundle) improves the quality of care in mechanically ventilated patients. This study was performed on a 50-bed intensive care unit of a tertiary care university hospital. Application of a ventilator bundle consisting of semirecumbent positioning, lung protective ventilation in patients with acute lung injury (ALI), ulcer prophylaxis, and deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis (DVTP) was assessed before and after staff training in post-surgical patients requiring mechanical ventilation for at least 24 h. A total of 133 patients before and 141 patients after staff training were included. Overall bundle adherence increased from 15 to 33.8% (P90% was achieved in both groups. Median tidal volume in patients with ALI remained unaltered. Days on mechanical ventilation were reduced from 6 (interquartile range 2.0-15.0) to 4 (2.0-9.0) (P=0.017). Rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), ICU length of stay, and ICU mortality remained unaffected. In patients with VAP, the median ICU length of stay was reduced by 9 days (P=0.04). Staff training by an ICU change team improved compliance to a pre-defined ventilator bundle. This led to a reduction in the days spent on mechanical ventilation, despite incomplete bundle implementation.

  12. STAFF DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP ON ADULT TRAINING PROGRAMS, REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS (OTTAWA, APRIL 18-19, 1966).

    Science.gov (United States)

    TURNER, W.S.

    REPORTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FROM A STAFF DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE ON ADULT TRAINING PROGRAMS HELD IN OTTAWA, CANADA, 1966 ARE REPORTED. PARTICIPANTS INCLUDED TRADE AND OCCUPATIONAL INSTRUCTORS, BASIC EDUCATION INSTRUCTORS, AND TRAINERS IN INDUSTRY AND TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTES. THE FOLLOWING TOPICS WERE DISCUSSED--THE ROLE OF GOVERNMENT, INDUSTRY,…

  13. Care staff training in detection of depression in residential homes for the elderly - Randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisses, AMH; Kluiter, H; Jongenelis, K; Beekman, ATF; Ormel, J

    Background. Many people with depression in residential care homes for the elderly do not receive treatment because their depression remains undetected. Aims. To determine the effects of staff training on the detection, treatment and outcome of depression in residents often homes. Method. We

  14. An Evaluation of Strategies for Training Staff to Implement the Picture Exchange Communication System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Clarissa S.; Dunning, Johnna L.; Rehfeldt, Ruth Anne

    2011-01-01

    The picture exchange communication system (PECS) is a functional communication system frequently used with individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders who experience severe language delays (Frost & Bondy, 2002). Few empirical investigations have evaluated strategies for training direct care staff how to effectively implement PECS with…

  15. 75 FR 69449 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff on Dear Health Care Provider...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-12

    ... Staff on Dear Health Care Provider Letters: Improving Communication of Important Safety Information... Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft guidance for industry and FDA staff entitled... include in a DHCP letter, how to organize that information, and formatting techniques to make the...

  16. Resilience Training for Healthcare Staff (RTHS) Implementation Evaluation Phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-05

    Based on the Care Provider Support Program (CPSP), the Army Medical Department Center and School (AMEDDC&S) and the Walter Reed Army Institute of... Public Health ) who would oversee the implementation of RTHS. The PM would serve as the point of contact for all issues related to RTHS policies and...DCoS) for Public Health on next steps. 7. POINT OF CONTACT: For further information, please contact Dr. Amanda Start at WRAIR RTO (301-319-9701

  17. Importance of staff training in hotel industry Case Study: Hotel Dukagjini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MSc. Albana Gazija

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In every business, independently of the activity, human resources are the most precious capital. In terms of global competition and rapid change, personnel training are essential. Every manager should be able to attract qualified and capable personnel, in order to use their skills in achieving organizational objectives. In a market economy where uncertainty is rather widespread, obtaining knowledge and information is becoming a source for creating competing advantages. One of the most important aspects in contemporary hotel industry is getting to know the new methods and techniques through training. Staff training is an important part in Human Resource Management, in order to improve employee performance, respectively it helps putting their skills to better use and specialization in their work. Application of an efficient training process has an important impact in increasing employee performance.      The aim of this study is to understand the importance of personnel training in hotel industry. The study includes the theoretical part for staff training, importance and benefits. The empirical part is composed by a qualitative method research of Hotel Dukagjini in Peja. The paper’s results have shown that management has a relatively good understan-ding of the importance of personnel training; the hotel may be in a favorable situation if the employees keep taking continuous training.

  18. The Association between Attitude towards the Implementation of Staff Development Training and the Practice of Knowledge Sharing among Lecturers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, Abd. Latif; Raman, Arumugam; Don, Yahya; Daud, Yaakob; Omar, Mohd Sofian

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to identify the association of teachers' attitude towards the implementation of Staff Development Training with Knowledge Sharing Practices among the lecturers of the Teacher Training Institution (TTI). In addition, this study was also to examine the differences in attitudes towards the implementation of Staff Development…

  19. Towards a framework in interaction training for staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities and challenging behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, A.P.A.M.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Hendriks, A.H.C.; Bosman, A.M.T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Training support staff in dealing with challenging behaviour in clients with intellectual disabilities (ID) is needed. The goal of this study is to determine which elements need to be incorporated in a training on staff interactions with these clients, building upon a framework and an

  20. Towards a framework in interaction training for staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, A.P.A.M.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Hendriks, A.H.C.; Bosman, A.M.T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Training support staff in dealing with challenging behaviour in clients with intellectual disabilities (ID) is needed. The goal of this study is to determine which elements need to be incorporated in a training on staff interactions with these clients, building upon a framework and an

  1. CASE- METHODOLOGY FOR TRAINING THE SCIENTIFIC PEDAGOGICAL STAFF FOR SERVICES OF A DIGITAL LIBRARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Novytska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a technique using a case method in preparing teaching staff to use digital library services as an example of a training exercise. It has been suggested program, which will be trained users, editors and administrators DL. Developed scale assessment of knowledge and skills of teaching staff for the results of card problems. Created test questions for the training sessions. Discovered the case-method as type of learning method. Discovered the basic characteristics of situational teaching method: analytical and cognitive. Analytical activities may include problem analysis and/or systems analysis and/or causal analysis, and/or praxeological analysis, and/or prognostic analysis and/or target-oriented analysis. Investigated the principle of formation of bibliographic descriptions DL resource based metadata concept of «quality metadata DL». Proved that mistake when making metadata may somehow block access to the DL.

  2. Emotional Intelligence and Occupational Stress among Rehabilitation Staffs working in Tehran’s Training Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khaniyan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between emotional intelligence and occupational stress among rehabilitation staffs in Tehran’s training hospitals . Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 169 staff members selected from a total of 300 rehabilitation staffs working in Tehran’s training hospitals, recruited by random cluster sampling. Two questionnaires were used: The emotional intelligence questionnaire designed by Petrides and Furnham and HSE occupational stress questionnaire. Data obtained from this study were analyzed using Pearson’s correlation and multiple regression tests. Results: An inverse significant relationship existed between occupational stress and emotional intelligence (P<0.001, r=-0.33. There are, also, significant relationships between subscales of emotional intelligence including self-awareness (P=0.031, r=-0.18, social skills (P<0.001, r=-0.302, empathy (P=0.006, r=-0.238 and occupational stress. The results of multiple regressions indicated that the two subscales of ‘understanding other’s emotions’ and ‘social skills’ can be used for predicting occupational stress. Discussion: This study confirmed the relationship between emotional intelligence and occupational stress. Promotion of emotional intelligence through implementing training courses may lower rehabilitation staffs occupational stress or prevent it.

  3. 25 CFR 26.30 - Does the Job Training Program provide part-time training or short-term training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Does the Job Training Program provide part-time training or short-term training? 26.30 Section 26.30 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES JOB PLACEMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM Training Services § 26.30 Does the Job Training...

  4. Implementation of online suicide-specific training for VA providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Elizabeth; York, Janet; Magruder, Kathryn; Yeager, Derik; Knapp, Rebecca; De Santis, Mark L; Burriss, Louisa; Mauldin, Mary; Sulkowski, Stan; Pope, Charlene; Jobes, David A

    2014-10-01

    Due to the gap in suicide-specific intervention training for mental health students and professionals, e-learning is one solution to improving provider skills in the Veterans Affairs (VA) health system. This study focused on the development and evaluation of an equivalent e-learning alternative to the Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality (CAMS) in-person training approach at a Veteran Health Affairs medical center. The study used a multicenter, randomized, cluster, and three group design. the development of e-CAMS was an iterative process and included pilot testing. Eligible and consenting mental health providers, who completed a CAMS pre-survey, were randomized. Provider satisfaction was assessed using the standard VA evaluation of training consisting of 20 items. Two post training focus groups, divided by learning conditions, were conducted to assess practice adoption using a protocol focused on experiences with training and delivery of CAMS. A total of 215 providers in five sites were randomized to three conditions: 69 to e-learning, 70 to in-person, 76 to the control. The providers were primarily female, Caucasian, midlife providers. Based on frequency scores of satisfaction items, both learning groups rated the trainings positively. In focus groups representing divided by learning conditions, participants described positive reactions to CAMS training and similar individual and institutional barriers to full implementation of CAMS. This is the first evaluation study of a suicide-specific e-learning training within the VA. The e-CAMS appears equivalent to the in-person CAMS in terms of provider satisfaction with training and practice adoption, consistent with other comparisons of training deliveries across specialty areas. Additional evaluation of provider confidence and adoption and patient outcomes is in progress. The e-CAMS has the potential to provide ongoing training for VA and military mental health providers and serve as a tutorial for

  5. Training providers: beyond the basics of electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredfeldt, Christine E; Awad, Elias Bruce; Joseph, Kenneth; Snyder, Mark H

    2013-12-02

    Training is a critical part of health information technology implementations, but little emphasis is placed on post-implementation training to support day-to-day activities. The goal of this study was to evaluate the impact of post-implementation training on key electronic health record activities. Based on feedback from providers and requests for technical support, we developed two classes designed to improve providers' effectiveness with the electronic health record. Training took place at Kaiser Permanente, Mid-Atlantic States. The classes focused on managing patient-level information using problem lists and medication lists, as well as efficient documentation and chart review. Both classes used the blended learning method, integrating concrete scenarios, hands-on exercises and take-home materials to reinforce class concepts. To evaluate training effectiveness, we used a case-control study with a 1:4 match on pre-training performance. We measured the usage rate of two key electronic health record functions (problem list and medication list management) for six months before and after training. Change scores were compared using the Wilcoxon sign rank test. 36 participants and 144 non-participants were included in the training evaluation. Training participants were more likely to manage both medication lists and problem lists after training. Class material is now being incorporated into an enterprise-wide multi-modal training program available to all providers at Kaiser Permanente in the Mid-Atlantic States. Ongoing information technology training is well-received by healthcare providers, who expressed a clear preference for additional training. Training improved use of two important electronic health record features that are included as part of the Meaningful Use criteria.

  6. A management framework for training providers to improve skills ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    Training providers need an internal management framework to enable them to improve workplace skills development. ... The management role of workplace training providers in the midst of the skills revolution is under ...... Benefit Analysis to determine a Return on Investment; TQM or Total. Quality Management; and PMF or ...

  7. Exploring Staff Clinical Knowledge and Practice with LGBT Residents in Long-Term Care: A Grounded Theory of Cultural Competency and Training Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Weston V; Vacha-Haase, Tammi

    2016-01-01

    Existing literature shows that LGBT residents are likely to face suboptimal care in LTC facilities due to prejudice and discriminatory policies. The aim of this project was to assess the LGBT cultural competency of staff working in LTC facilities, identify their current training needs, and develop a framework for understanding LGBT cultural competency among LTC staff and providers. This grounded theory study comprised data from focus groups of interdisciplinary staff from three LTC facilities. Results suggested that LTC staff struggle with how to be sensitive to LGBT residents' needs. Tension appeared to exist between wanting to provide an equal standard of care to all LTC residents and fearing they would show "favoritism" or "special treatment," which might be viewed as unprofessional. Participants indicated training could help to address the ambivalence they experience about providing sensitive care to subpopulations of residents who face stigma and oppression. LTC staff stand to benefit from cultural competency training focused on LGBT residents. Training should be not only informational in nature, but also facilitate greater self-awareness and self-efficacy with respect to providing care to LGBT people.

  8. Clinical staff perceptions of palliative care-related quality of care, service access, education and training needs and delivery confidence in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Rosemary; Gott, Merryn; Raphael, Deborah; O'Callaghan, Anne; Robinson, Jackie; Boyd, Michal; Laking, George; Manson, Leigh; Snow, Barry

    2014-12-01

    Central to appropriate palliative care management in hospital settings is ensuring an adequately trained workforce. In order to achieve optimum palliative care delivery, it is first necessary to create a baseline understanding of the level of palliative care education and support needs among all clinical staff (not just palliative care specialists) within the acute hospital setting. The objectives of the study were to explore clinical staff: perceptions concerning the quality of palliative care delivery and support service accessibility, previous experience and education in palliative care delivery, perceptions of their own need for formal palliative care education, confidence in palliative care delivery and the impact of formal palliative care training on perceived confidence. A purposive sample of clinical staff members (598) in a 710-bed hospital were surveyed regarding their experiences of palliative care delivery and their education needs. On average, the clinical staff rated the quality of care provided to people who die in the hospital as 'good' (x̄=4.17, SD=0.91). Respondents also reported that 19.3% of their time was spent caring for end-of-life patients. However, only 19% of the 598 respondents reported having received formal palliative care training. In contrast, 73.7% answered that they would like formal training. Perceived confidence in palliative care delivery was significantly greater for those clinical staff with formal palliative care training. Formal training in palliative care increases clinical staff perceptions of confidence, which evidence suggests impacts on the quality of palliative care provided to patients. The results of the study should be used to shape the design and delivery of palliative care education programmes within the acute hospital setting to successfully meet the needs of all clinical staff. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Sources of moral distress for nursing staff providing care to residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spenceley, Shannon; Witcher, Chad Sg; Hagen, Brad; Hall, Barry; Kardolus-Wilson, Arron

    2017-10-01

    The World Health Organization estimates the number of people living with dementia at approximately 35.6 million; they project a doubling of this number by 2030 and tripling by 2050. Although the majority of people living with a dementia live in the community, residential facility care by nursing care providers is a significant component of the dementia journey in most countries. Research has also shown that caring for persons with dementia can be emotionally, physically, and ethically challenging, and that turnover in nursing staff in residential care settings tends to be high. Moral distress has been explored in a variety of settings where nurses provide acute or intensive care. The concept, however, has not previously been explored in residential facility care settings, particularly as related to the care of persons with dementia. In this paper, we explore moral distress in these settings, using Nathaniel's definition of moral distress: the pain or anguish affecting the mind, body, or relationships in response to a situation in which the person is aware of a moral problem, acknowledges moral responsibility, makes a moral judgment about the correct action and yet, as a result of real or perceived constraints, cannot do what is thought to be right. We report findings from a qualitative study of moral distress in a single health region in a Canadian province. Our aim in this paper is to share findings that elucidate the sources of moral distress experienced by nursing care providers in the residential care of people living with dementia.

  10. Crisis Preparedness in Schools: Evaluating Staff Perspectives and Providing Recommendations for Best Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olinger Steeves, Rachel M.; Metallo, Sarah A.; Byrd, Shelby M.; Erickson, Megan R.; Gresham, Frank M.

    2017-01-01

    The current study investigated the content of school crisis plans and perceptions of crisis preparedness among school staff in six public elementary schools. Surveys were administered to 72 teachers, administrators, and other school staff members measuring their perceptions of crisis preparedness and performance of activities related to crisis…

  11. Guidelines for Professional Training of Junior Medical Staff in the Context of European Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sosnova Myroslava

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with outlining guidelines for improving professional training of junior medical staff based on European experience. Consequently, guidelines and recommendations on enhancing the efficiency of medical education in general and junior medical specialists’ professional training, in particular, published by European Union of Medical Specialists, General Medical Council, World Federation for Medical Education have been studied, analyzed, justified and presented in the paper. According to European Union of Medical Specialists it has been concluded that general aspects of medical specialists’ training are based on the selection process for the access to the medical specialists’ training, duration of training, common trunk, training program and quality assurance; requirements for training institutions involve recognition, size, quality assurance and teaching infructructure; requirements for instructors encompass qualification, training program, teacher/trainee ratio; requirements for trainees cover experience, language and logbook. In addition, the components that define the quality of junior medical specialists’ professional training based on N. Novosolova’s ideas have been indicated. Finally, based on the positive aspects of the guidelines analyzed the appropriate ones that, in our opinion, may be of use in Ukraine, have been presented.

  12. Staff experiences of providing maternity services in rural southern Tanzania – a focus on equipment, drug and supply issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The poor maintenance of equipment and inadequate supplies of drugs and other items contribute to the low quality of maternity services often found in rural settings in low- and middle-income countries, and raise the risk of adverse patient outcomes through delaying care provision. We aim to describe staff experiences of providing maternal and neonatal care in rural health facilities in Southern Tanzania, focusing on issues related to equipment, drugs and supplies. Methods Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews were conducted with different staff cadres from all facility levels in order to explore experiences and views of providing maternity care in the context of poorly maintained equipment, and insufficient drugs and other supplies. A facility survey quantified the availability of relevant items. Results The facility survey, which found many missing or broken items and frequent stock outs, corroborated staff reports of providing care in the context of missing or broken care items. Staff reported increased workloads, reduced morale, difficulties in providing optimal maternity care, and carrying out procedures with potential health risks to themselves as a result. Conclusions Inadequately stocked and equipped facilities compromise the health system’s ability to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity by affecting staff personally and professionally, which hinders the provision of timely and appropriate interventions. Improving stock control and maintaining equipment could benefit mothers and babies, not only through removing restrictions to the availability of care, but also through improving staff working conditions. PMID:23410228

  13. Staff experiences of providing maternity services in rural southern Tanzania - a focus on equipment, drug and supply issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penfold, Suzanne; Shamba, Donat; Hanson, Claudia; Jaribu, Jennie; Manzi, Fatuma; Marchant, Tanya; Tanner, Marcel; Ramsey, Kate; Schellenberg, David; Schellenberg, Joanna Armstrong

    2013-02-14

    The poor maintenance of equipment and inadequate supplies of drugs and other items contribute to the low quality of maternity services often found in rural settings in low- and middle-income countries, and raise the risk of adverse patient outcomes through delaying care provision. We aim to describe staff experiences of providing maternal and neonatal care in rural health facilities in Southern Tanzania, focusing on issues related to equipment, drugs and supplies. Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews were conducted with different staff cadres from all facility levels in order to explore experiences and views of providing maternity care in the context of poorly maintained equipment, and insufficient drugs and other supplies. A facility survey quantified the availability of relevant items. The facility survey, which found many missing or broken items and frequent stock outs, corroborated staff reports of providing care in the context of missing or broken care items. Staff reported increased workloads, reduced morale, difficulties in providing optimal maternity care, and carrying out procedures with potential health risks to themselves as a result. Inadequately stocked and equipped facilities compromise the health system's ability to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity by affecting staff personally and professionally, which hinders the provision of timely and appropriate interventions. Improving stock control and maintaining equipment could benefit mothers and babies, not only through removing restrictions to the availability of care, but also through improving staff working conditions.

  14. A comprehensive professional development training's effect on afterschool program staff behaviors to promote healthy eating and physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Robert Glenn; Beets, Michael W; Saunders, Ruth P; Beighle, Aaron; Webster, Collin

    2014-01-01

    Evaluate a comprehensive intervention designed to support staff and program leaders in the implementation of the YMCA of USA healthy eating and physical activity (HEPA) standards for their afterschool programs (3-6 pm). Pre- (fall 2011) and postassessment (spring 2012) no-control group. Four large-scale YMCA afterschool programs serving approximately 500 children. Professional development training founded on the 5Ms (ie, Mission, Model, Manage, Monitor, and Maximize) and LET US Play principles (ie, Lines, Elimination, Team size, Uninvolved staff/kids, and Space, equipment, and rules), on-site booster training sessions, workshops, and ongoing technical support for staff and program leaders from January to May 2012. System for Observing Staff Promotion of Activity and Nutrition. Multilevel mixed-effects linear (ie, staff behaviors expressed as a percentage of the number of scans observed) and logistic regression. A total of 5328 System for Observing Staff Promotion of Activity and Nutrition scans were completed over the 2 measurement periods. Of the 20 staff behaviors identified in HEPA standards and measured in this study, 17 increased or decreased in the appropriate direction. For example, the proportion staff engaged in physical activity with children increased from 26.6% to 37% and the proportion of staff eating unhealthy foods decreased from 42.1% to 4.5%. Comprehensive professional development training, founded on the 5Ms and LET US Play principles, and ongoing technical assistance can have a sizable impact on key staff behaviors identified by HEPA standards for afterschool programs.

  15. Providing Logistics Support to CDC-Deployed Staff for the Ebola Response in Liberia, Guinea, and Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopson, Stephanie A; Rodriguez, Rockie; Rouse, Edward N

    2015-11-01

    The first Ebola cases in West Africa were reported by the Guinea Ministry of Health on March 23, 2014, and by June it became the largest recorded Ebola outbreak. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention field teams were deployed to West Africa, including in-country logistics staff who were critical for ensuring the movement of staff, equipment, and supplies to locations where public health knowledge and experience were applied to meet mission-related requirements. The logistics role was critical to creating the support for epidemiologists, medical doctors, laboratory staff, and health communicators involved in health promotion activities to successfully respond to the epidemic, both in the capital cities and in remote villages. Logistics personnel worked to procure equipment, such as portable video projectors, and have health promotion materials printed. Logistics staff also coordinated delivery of communication and health promotion materials to the embassy and provided assistance with distribution to various partners. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  16. Impact of Health Care Provider's Training on Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Comprehensive patient's health care provider's (HCP) communication usually increases patients' participation in their health management on childbirth. Objective: This is a quasi interventional study for assessing impact of health care providers (HCP) training on patient- provider's communication during ...

  17. Empowering education: A new model for in-service training of nursing staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHMUD CHAGHARI

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In-service training of nurses plays an indispensable role in improving the quality of inpatient care. Need to enhance the effectiveness of in-service training of nurses is an inevitable requirement. This study attempted to design a new optimal model for in-service training of nurses. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted in two stages during 2015-2016. In the first stage, the Grounded Theory was adopted to explore the process of training 35 participating nurses. The sampling was initially purposeful and then theoretically based on emerging concept. Data were collected through interview, observation and field notes. Moreover, the data were analyzed through Corbin-Strauss method and the data were coded through MAXQDA-10. In the second stage, the findings were employed through Walker and Avant’s strategy for theory construction so as to design an optimal model for in-service training of nursing staff. Results: In the first stage, there were five major themes including unsuccessful mandatory education, empowering education, organizational challenges of education, poor educational management, and educational-occupational resiliency. Empowering education was the core variable derived from the research, based on which a grounded theory was proposed. The new empowering education model was composed of self-directed learning and practical learning. There are several strategies to achieve empowering education, including the fostering of searching skills, clinical performance monitoring, motivational factors, participation in the design and implementation, and problem-solving approach. Conclusion: Empowering education is a new model for in-service training of nurses, which matches the training programs with andragogical needs and desirability of learning among the staff. Owing to its practical nature, the empowering education can facilitate occupational tasks and achieving greater mastery of professional skills among the nurses.

  18. Empowering Education: A New Model for In-service Training of Nursing Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaghari, Mahmud; Saffari, Mohsen; Ebadi, Abbas; Ameryoun, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    In-service training of nurses plays an indispensable role in improving the quality of inpatient care. Need to enhance the effectiveness of in-service training of nurses is an inevitable requirement. This study attempted to design a new optimal model for in-service training of nurses. This qualitative study was conducted in two stages during 2015-2016. In the first stage, the Grounded Theory was adopted to explore the process of training 35 participating nurses. The sampling was initially purposeful and then theoretically based on emerging concept. Data were collected through interview, observation and field notes. Moreover, the data were analyzed through Corbin-Strauss method and the data were coded through MAXQDA-10. In the second stage, the findings were employed through 'Walker and Avants strategy for theory construction so as to design an optimal model for in-service training of nursing staff. In the first stage, there were five major themes including unsuccessful mandatory education, empowering education, organizational challenges of education, poor educational management, and educational-occupational resiliency. Empowering education was the core variable derived from the research, based on which a grounded theory was proposed. The new empowering education model was composed of self-directed learning and practical learning. There are several strategies to achieve empowering education, including the fostering of searching skills, clinical performance monitoring, motivational factors, participation in the design and implementation, and problem-solving approach. Empowering education is a new model for in-service training of nurses, which matches the training programs with andragogical needs and desirability of learning among the staff. Owing to its practical nature, the empowering education can facilitate occupational tasks and achieving greater mastery of professional skills among the nurses.

  19. Readiness Enhancement Management Strategies (REMS): a proof of concept and evaluation feasibility study of staff training to improve service engagement by people with personality difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, M; Jinks, M; McMurran, M

    2015-09-01

    One third of people diagnosed with PD do not complete treatment and non-completion is associated with poorer clinical outcomes. Equipping staff to be better able to engage this client group is important, and web-based, self-directed learning is a potentially cost-effective way to train staff. This study examined the implementation of a web-based training programme called Readiness Enhancement Management Strategies (REMS) in three types of service. Completion rates were 94.4% in community health services; 92.3% in prison offender health services; and 46.5% in probation services. Staff found the content of REMS acceptable and useful. This study demonstrated that staff in NHS and criminal justice settings can complete REMS, but staff in probation services are challenged by time pressures and limited computer access. Staff at probation sites were less familiar with PD issues compared with the NHS staff. A web-based staff training programme called Readiness Enhancement Management Strategies (REMS) was developed to promote the engagement of people with personality difficulties in treatment. This 'proof of concept' study examined the REMS implementation process, its acceptability and the feasibility of using service data for future evaluation. Staff in six services working with people diagnosed with personality disorder or undiagnosed people with personality difficulties were eligible to participate: two community health services, two prison offender health services and two probation services. Of 92 eligible staff, 74 were available to undertake REMS. These staff completed knowledge and acceptability surveys and rated service user engagement with treatment. The proportion of treatment sessions attended by service users was collected for a 30-week period. REMS completion rates were community - 94.4%, prison - 92.3% and probation - 46.5%. Three quarters of participants rated REMS as 7 out of 10 or higher. All teams were able to provide service data for the study period

  20. [The current situation in training and education of assistant staff in interventional cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baberg, H T; Machraoui, A; Barmeyer, J

    1999-02-01

    The number of heart catheter laboratories in Germany has been increasing for years. While there are general training regulations for cardiologists, nothing comparable exists for the assistant staff in interventional cardiology. Qualification is settled within the department. Aim of this study was the determination of the demand in general training and qualification courses. All heart catheter laboratories in North Rhine-Westphalia were questioned. Assistants (227) and medical directors (43) from 48 laboratories (54.0% returns) answered. Of the assistants 59.1% were qualified nurses, 28.2% consulting room assistants, and 10.1% medical technicians. Most of them were female (85.0%); the average age was 34.3 years. Of the assistants 73.1% were not trained in their current hospital or practice. Before their occupation in cardiac catheterization, 51.8% worked in nursing and 17.6% in ECG, sonography, etc. None of the 227 assistants was still in training at the time of questioning although 68.3% of the hospitals and practices accept trainees. Nine out of ten laboratories offer inhouse qualification, mainly in radiation protection (82.1%) and medical fields (66.7%), and 85.3% of the assistants have already attended these. Of the medical directors 90.0% and 99.2% of the assistants consider general training and qualification courses to be necessary. When asked for important fields for training programs, the assistant staff mentions "medicine" (77.6%), "examination assistance" (67.0%), and "EDP" (60.4%), while the medical directors place importance on "quality management" (89.2%) and "radiation protection" (86.5%). The job market for assistants the interventional cardiology is still good: 14.3% of the laboratories plan to take on new employees, 61.9% want to keep their number of assistants. The share of part-time work is low (16.8%). The momentary qualification and training of assistant staff in interventional cardiology does not match the demand. General programs for trainees

  1. Continuity and Change: Employers' Training Practices and Partnerships with Training Providers. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Erica; Smith, Andy; Tuck, Jacqueline; Callan, Victor

    2017-01-01

    A number of factors influence the motivations of employers to train their workforce and the ways in which they engage with the training system. This study combines a national survey and interviews with Australian employers and registered training organisations (RTOs) to provide a comprehensive picture of the way in which employers navigate the…

  2. Training community practitioners to work more effectively with parents to prevent childhood obesity: the impact of HENRY upon Children's Centres and their staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, T A; Potrata, B; Hunt, C; Rudolf, M C J

    2012-10-01

    One in four children in England is overweight/obese upon starting school. HENRY (Health Exercise Nutrition for the Really Young) offers a novel, preventive approach to this problem by training practitioners to work more effectively with the parents of preschool children around obesity and lifestyle issues. The programme is being delivered to all Sure Start Children's Centres (the UK government initiative providing family support and childcare in disadvantaged areas) in Leeds, UK. The evaluation covered the first 12 Centres to be trained (these had a reach of approximately 5000 families). A series of semi-structured interviews were conducted with Centre managers, and 'drop boxes' were provided for all staff to leave their comments. Interviews took place up to 11 months post-training, allowing a consideration of any long-term impact. Data from 12 interviews and 106 comment slips indicated that HENRY training was associated with considerable changes to the Centre environment. Immediate effects included changes to Centre policy and practice, including the provision of age-appropriate portion sizes and the introduction of healthy snacks; a strengthening of team working and increased staff confidence around tackling lifestyle change; and enhanced skills when working with families. Training also induced changes within the staff's personal lives (e.g. increased physical activity and family mealtimes). The findings suggest that positive and lasting lifestyle effects can be achieved by brief training courses involving Children's Centre staff teams. Both staff and attendant families appear to benefit. The effect on levels of preschool obesity across the city once HENRY has extended to the remaining Centres is yet to be seen. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2012 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  3. Marital Violence Complainants and the Services Provided by a Women’s Police Station According to its Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirian Beccheri Cortez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available It was investigated the perceptions of a Women’s Police Station’s team about women complainants and the implications of their perception in evaluating everyday jobs they perform. Thematic Content Analysis were applied on individual interviews with 14 professional staff and generated the categories: “Poor woman” and “Rare cases” that characterizes women complainants and the more and less frequent denounces; “Why do they talk?” and “Why do other women keep silent?” aggregate material about the decision of report or not violence (fear, children, emotional and financial dependence, violence control. Dropouts process and recurrence of violence implicate on professional frustration, which seems to be favored also by perceptions about the women and on denunciation decisions. We highlight the importance of proper training and psychosocial support for these staff.

  4. Culturally Competent Palliative and Hospice Care Training for Ethnically Diverse Staff in Long-Term Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka-Yahiro, Merle R; McFarlane, Sandra; Koijane, Jeannette; Li, Dongmei

    2017-05-01

    Between 2013 and 2030, older adults 65 years and older of racial/ethnic populations in the U.S. is projected to increase by 123% in comparison to the Whites (Non-Hispanics). To meet this demand, training of ethnically diverse health staff in long-term care facilities in palliative and hospice care is imperative. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a palliative and hospice care training of staff in two nursing homes in Hawaii - (a) to evaluate knowledge and confidence over three time periods, and (b) to compare staff and family caregiver satisfaction at end of program. The educational frameworks were based on cultural and communication theories. Fifty-two ethnically diverse staff, a majority being Asian (89%), participated in a 10-week module training and one 4 hour communication skills workshop. Staff evaluation included knowledge and confidence surveys, pre- and post-test knowledge tests, and FAMCARE-2 satisfaction instrument. There were nine Asian (89%) and Pacific Islander (11%) family caregivers who completed the FAMCARE-2 satisfaction instrument. The overall staff knowledge and confidence results were promising. The staff rated overall satisfaction of palliative care services lower than the family caregivers. Implications for future research, practice, and education with palliative and hospice care training of ethnically diverse nursing home staff is to include patient and family caregiver satisfaction of palliative and hospice care services, evaluation of effectiveness of cross-cultural communication theories in palliative and hospice care staff training, and support from administration for mentorship and development of these services in long term care facilities.

  5. Outcomes in knowledge, attitudes and confidence of nursing staff working in nursing and residential care homes following a dementia training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerri, Anthony; Scerri, Charles

    2017-11-08

    Dementia training programmes for staff working in long-term care settings have been found to be effective in improving staff outcomes. This study investigated the impact of a dementia training programme for all Maltese nursing staff working in public nursing/residential homes on their knowledge, attitudes and confidence. Additionally, we identified the predictors of these domains before and after the programme. A 14-hour training programme focusing on dementia management, care and policy was developed for all nursing staff working in public nursing and residential homes in Malta. A pretest-posttest design was used to evaluate the participants' knowledge of dementia, attitudes and confidence in working with residents with dementia using validated tools. Demographic variables were measured and compared with each staff domain. The majority of nursing staff attended the training programme with 261 fully completed questionnaires being collected pre-training and 214 post-training. The programme significantly improved nursing staff knowledge, attitudes and confidence. Stepwise regression analysis of each staff domain showed that the strongest predictor in all models at pre-training was the intensity of previous training programmes. Furthermore, staff who attended previous training continued to improve in their attitudes and confidence following programme completion. The study continues to shed further evidence on the impact of dementia training programs on staff outcomes. It also indicated that the intensity of previous participation in dementia training programmes was related to the participants' knowledge, attitudes and confidence and that continual exposure to training had a cumulative effect.

  6. Should trained lay providers perform HIV testing? A systematic review to inform World Health Organization guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, C E; Yeh, P T; Johnson, C; Baggaley, R

    2017-12-01

    New strategies for HIV testing services (HTS) are needed to achieve UN 90-90-90 targets, including diagnosis of 90% of people living with HIV. Task-sharing HTS to trained lay providers may alleviate health worker shortages and better reach target groups. We conducted a systematic review of studies evaluating HTS by lay providers using rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). Peer-reviewed articles were included if they compared HTS using RDTs performed by trained lay providers to HTS by health professionals, or to no intervention. We also reviewed data on end-users' values and preferences around lay providers preforming HTS. Searching was conducted through 10 online databases, reviewing reference lists, and contacting experts. Screening and data abstraction were conducted in duplicate using systematic methods. Of 6113 unique citations identified, 5 studies were included in the effectiveness review and 6 in the values and preferences review. One US-based randomized trial found patients' uptake of HTS doubled with lay providers (57% vs. 27%, percent difference: 30, 95% confidence interval: 27-32, p Cambodia, Malawi, and South Africa comparing testing quality between lay providers and laboratory staff found little discordance and high sensitivity and specificity (≥98%). Values and preferences studies generally found support for lay providers conducting HTS, particularly in non-hypothetical scenarios. Based on evidence supporting using trained lay providers, a WHO expert panel recommended lay providers be allowed to conduct HTS using HIV RDTs. Uptake of this recommendation could expand HIV testing to more people globally.

  7. A management framework for training providers to improve skills ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa is in a skills revolution, launched by the Department of Labour via the Skills Development Act in 1998 and the Skills Development Levies Act in 1999. The skills revolution challenges workplace training providers through employers who pay a percentage of payroll towards skills levies and want to recover these ...

  8. A study into the effectiveness of a postural care training programme aimed at improving knowledge, understanding and confidence in parents and school staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotham, S; Hamilton-West, K E; Hutton, E; King, A; Abbott, N

    2017-09-01

    Parents and school staff lack knowledge and confidence when providing postural care to physically disabled children. This can act as a barrier to the successful implementation of therapy. To address this problem, we developed a novel training programme to improve knowledge and confidence in providing postural care and evaluate the impact of the training programme in parents and school staff. The postural care training programme included three elements: a 2-h interactive workshop facilitated by physiotherapists and occupational therapists, a follow-up home/school visit and a follow-up telephone call. The Understanding, Knowledge and Confidence in Providing Postural Care for Children with Disabilities questionnaire was utilized to evaluate the impact and includes subscales assessing knowledge and understanding, concerns and confidence in providing postural care. The Understanding, Knowledge and Confidence in Providing Postural Care for Children with Disabilities questionnaire was completed at baseline and 6 weeks later. The training programme was delivered to N = 75 parents and school staff. Of these, N = 65 completed both baseline and follow-up measures and were used in the data analysis. Participants and therapists were also invited to provide further feedback on the overall training programme via interviews and focus groups. Paired samples t-tests were used to determine statistically significant differences between baseline and follow-up scores for each of the three subscales. Mean levels of understanding and knowledge and confidence improved (P confidence in parents and school staff that care for children with significant physical postural care impairments. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A coordinated comprehensive professional development training's effect on summer day camp staff healthy eating and physical activity promoting behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, R Glenn; Beets, Michael W; Saunders, Ruth P; Beighle, Aaron

    2014-08-01

    The YMCA of USA recently adopted Healthy Eating and Physical Activity (HEPA) Standards for their summer-day- camps (SDCs). Standards call for staff to exhibit HEPA promoting behaviors while eliminating HEPA discouraging behaviors. No studies have evaluated training programs to influence policy specified staff behaviors and related changes in child activity in SDCs. Four YMCA SDCs serving approximately 800 children/week participated in this no control group pre/post pilot study. Professional development training founded in the 5 Ms (Mission, Model, Manage, Monitor, Maximize) and LET US Play principles (lines; elimination; team size; uninvolved staff/kids; and space, equipment, and rules) was delivered to staff. Outcomes were staff promotion behaviors and child activity assessed via systematic observation instruments. Twelve of 17 HEPA staff behaviors changed in the appropriate direction from baseline to postassessment with 5 behaviors reaching statistically significant changes. The percentage of girls and boys observed in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity increased from 15.3% to 18.3% (P > .05) and 17.9% to 21.2%, whereas sedentary behavior decreased from 66.8% to 59.8% and 62.3% to 53.6%, respectively. Evidence suggests that the professional development training designed to assist SDCs to meet the HEPA Standards can lead to important changes in staff behaviors and children's physical activity.

  10. Evaluation of staff cultural awareness before and after attending cultural awareness training in an Australian emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Rose; Martin, Catherine; Smith, Tammy

    2014-10-01

    Cultural awareness of emergency department staff is important to ensure delivery of appropriate health care to people from all ethnic groups. Cultural awareness training has been found to increase knowledge about other cultures and is widely used as a means of educating staff, however, debate continues as to the effectiveness of these programs. To determine if an accredited cultural awareness training program affected emergency department staff knowledge, familiarity, attitude of and perception towards Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. One group pre-test and post-test intervention study compared the cultural awareness of 44 emergency department staff towards Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people before and after training. The cultural awareness training was delivered in six hours over three sessions and was taught by an accredited cultural awareness trainer. The cultural awareness training changed perception but did not affect attitude towards Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in this group. Future strategies to improve staff cultural awareness need to be investigated, developed, implemented and evaluated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. E3 Success Story - Whirlpool Trains Staff on Lean and Green Advantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whirlpool Corporation invited Green Suppliers Network representatives to its Monterrey facility to provide training on the Lean and Green Advantage. The project sought to expand E3 initiatives to every part of the company's operations.

  12. Classroom-based and distance learning education and training courses in end-of-life care for health and social care staff: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsford, David; Jackson, Georgina; O'Brien, Terri; Yates, Sue; Duxbury, Joy

    2013-03-01

    Staff from a range of health and social care professions report deficits in their knowledge and skills when providing end-of-life and palliative care, and education and training has been advocated at a range of levels. To review the literature related to classroom-based and distance learning education and training initiatives for health and social care staff in end-of-life and palliative care, in terms of their target audience, extent, modes of delivery, content and teaching and learning strategies, and to identify the most effective educational strategies for enhancing care. A systematic review of the literature evaluating classroom-based and distance learning education and training courses for health and social care staff in end-of-life and palliative care. Online databases CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and PSYCHINFO between January 2000 and July 2010. Studies were selected that discussed specific education and training initiatives and included pre-and post-test evaluation of participants' learning. 30 studies met eligibility criteria. The majority reported successful outcomes, though there were some exceptions. Level of prior experience and availability of practice reinforcement influenced learning. Participative and interactive learning strategies were predominantly used along with discussion of case scenarios. Multi-professional learning was infrequently reported and service user and carer input to curriculum development and delivery was reported in only one study. Classroom-based education and training is useful for enhancing professionals' skills and perceived preparedness for delivering end-of-life care but should be reinforced by actual practice experience.

  13. Staff experiences of providing maternity services in rural southern Tanzania - a focus on equipment, drug and supply issues

    OpenAIRE

    Penfold, S.; Shamba, D; C Hanson; Jaribu, J; Manzi, F.; T Marchant; Tanner, M; Ramsey, K.; SCHELLENBERG, D.; Schellenberg, JA

    2013-01-01

    Background The poor maintenance of equipment and inadequate supplies of drugs and other items contribute to the low quality of maternity services often found in rural settings in low- and middle-income countries, and raise the risk of adverse patient outcomes through delaying care provision. We aim to describe staff experiences of providing maternal and neonatal care in rural health facilities in Southern Tanzania, focusing on issues related to equipment, drugs and supplies. Methods Focus gro...

  14. Development and Evaluation of a Train-the-Trainer Workshop for Hong Kong Community Social Service Agency Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qianling; Stewart, Sunita M; Wan, Alice; Leung, Charles Sai-Cheong; Lai, Agnes Y; Lam, Tai Hing; Chan, Sophia Siu-Chee

    2017-01-01

    Capacity building approaches are useful in large-scale community-based health promotion interventions. However, models to guide and evaluate capacity building among social service agency staff in community settings are rare in the literature. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a 1-day (7 h) train-the-trainer (TTT) workshop for the "Enhancing Family Well-Being Project". The workshop aimed at equipping staff from different community agencies with the knowledge and skills to design, implement, and evaluate positive psychology-based interventions for their clients in Sham Shui Po, an over-crowded and low-income district in Hong Kong. The current TTT extended and improved on our previous successful model by adding research and evaluation methods (including the Logic Model, process evaluation, and randomized controlled trial), which are important to plan and evaluate the community interventions. Evaluation of the TTT was guided by the Integrated Model of Training Evaluation and Effectiveness (IMTEE), with quantitative and qualitative methods. Quantitative data were collected from pretraining (T1), post-training (T2), and 6-month (T3) and 12-month (T4) follow-up surveys. Qualitative data were collected from four focus groups of agency staff after the intervention. Ninety-three staff from 30 community agencies attended the training, and 90 completed the baseline survey. Eighty-eight, 63, and 57 staff performed the evaluations at T2, T3, and T4, respectively. Agency staff were satisfied with the TTT. Immediate enhancement of knowledge, self-efficacy, and positive attitudes toward the training content was found at T2 (Cohen's d ranged from 0.24 to 1.22, all p building among social service agency staff for community brief, universal family health promotion interventions in diverse settings.

  15. The challenge of training for family medicine across different contexts: Insights from providing training in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Sandars

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Physicians with expertise in providing training for family medicine, at both undergraduate level and postgraduate level, are frequently invited to run training workshops in countries with developing systems of family medicine but this approach is often a challenge for the incoming external trainers. There are general challenges in working across different contexts, especially cultural factors, the different approaches to training, including the aims, methods, and assessment, and additional organizational factors, influenced by the wider sociopolitical environment of the host country. Practical responses to these challenges are discussed, with relevance to both external trainers and those responsible for requesting training. This commentary contains insights from the experiences of the authors in providing training for family medicine in China.

  16. Providing a children's palliative care service in the community through fixed-term grants: the staff perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, A J; Eaton, N M; Jones, G L

    2007-09-01

    Children's palliative care services have recently been awarded fixed-term grants, aimed at improving the provision of care for children with life-limiting conditions in the community. We report findings of a qualitative study to investigate the experience of a cohort of community children's nurses from teams involved in setting up or extending community-based children's palliative care services. The purpose of the study was to identify factors that affect service delivery, from the staff perspective, and to suggest ways of promoting their sustainable development. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 21 nurses from 12 different teams providing palliative care for children at home and in hospices. Participants were questioned about the services they provided and their own roles in that provision. NVIVO qualitative data analysis software was used to explore themes arising from the transcribed recorded interviews. Key findings were the importance of physical location in facilitating multidisciplinary communication, the importance of defining role boundaries between existing and new providers of children's palliative care, and the potentially detrimental impact of insecure funding on referral patterns and recruitment to posts. Staff named the opportunity to offer direct 'hands-on' care to families, access to work-based support and networking opportunities as important factors in helping them cope with the stresses involved in managing finite resources and the emotional challenges of their work. The maintenance of a mixed caseload with a significant proportion of direct care, provision of ongoing support and clearly defined roles are recommended as means of bolstering the ability of staff to develop their services. The deliberate locating of services to enhance communication between staff and guidance on the preparation of funding applications may further contribute to the sustainability of these services.

  17. Compassion training in healthcare: what are patients' perspectives on training healthcare providers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Shane; Torres, Mia-Bernadine; Raffin-Bouchal, Shelley; Hack, Thomas F; McClement, Susan; Hagen, Neil A; Chochinov, Harvey M

    2016-07-11

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate advanced cancer patients' perspectives on the importance, feasibility, teaching methods, and issues associated with training healthcare providers in compassionate care. This study utilized grounded theory, a qualitative research method, to develop an empirical understanding of compassion education rooted in direct patient reports. Audio-recorded semi-structured interviews were conducted to obtain an in-depth understanding of compassion training from the perspectives of hospitalized advanced cancer patients (n = 53). Data were analyzed in accordance with grounded theory to determine the key elements of the underlying theory. Three overarching categories and associated themes emerged from the data: compassion aptitude, cultivating compassion, and training methods. Participants spoke of compassion as an innate quality embedded in the character of learners prior to their healthcare training, which could be nurtured through experiential learning and reflective practices. Patients felt that the innate qualities that learners possessed at baseline were further fashioned by personal and practice experiences, and vocational motivators. Participants also provided recommendations for compassion training, including developing an interpersonal relationship with patients, seeing the patient as a person, and developing a human connection. Teaching methods that patients suggested in compassion training included patient-centered communication, self-reflection exercises, and compassionate role modeling. This study provides insight on compassion training for both current and future healthcare providers, from the perspectives of the end recipients of healthcare provider training - patients. Developing a theoretical base for patient centred, evidence-informed, compassion training is a crucial initial step toward the further development of this core healthcare competency.

  18. Block periodization of high-intensity aerobic intervals provides superior training effects in trained cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rønnestad, B R; Hansen, J; Ellefsen, S

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of two different methods of organizing endurance training in trained cyclists. One group of cyclists performed block periodization, wherein the first week constituted five sessions of high-intensity aerobic training (HIT), followed by 3 weeks of one weekly HIT session and focus on low-intensity training (LIT) (BP; n = 10, VO2max  = 62 ± 2 mL/kg/min). Another group of cyclists performed a more traditional organization, with 4 weeks of two weekly HIT sessions interspersed with LIT (TRAD; n = 9, VO2max  = 63 ± 2 mL/kg/min). Similar volumes of both HIT and LIT was performed in the two groups. While BP increased VO2max , peak power output (Wmax) and power output at 2 mmol/L [la(-)] by 4.6 ± 3.7%, 2.1 ± 2.8%, and 10 ± 12%, respectively (P training compared with TRAD training (ES = 1.34, ES = 0.85, and ES = 0.71, respectively). The present study suggests that block periodization of training provides superior adaptations to traditional organization during a 4-week endurance training period, despite similar training volume and intensity. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Cancer education and training in primary health care--a national audit of training providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAvoy, Brian Ramsay; Fletcher, Jane M; Elwood, Mark

    2007-11-01

    Primary care professionals play a critical role in cancer care but relatively little is known about their education and training. This article presents the results of a national audit of education and training providers in relation to primary care and cancer. A semistructured telephone questionnaire. The response rate was very high (96%) with 210 organisations participating. Forty-two percent provided cancer education and training. Evidence of good adult education practice was demonstrated, and 95% of organisations ran accredited programs. Although pharmaceutical industry support was not favoured, the majority (78%) described this as their main source of funding. There is optimism and strong commitment among primary care cancer education and training providers. Their content seems appropriate and their approach is consistent with good adult learning principles and multidisciplinary care, but this could be enhanced with increased funding and improved collaboration and communication between organisations.

  20. Training Pediatric Residents to Provide Smoking Cessation Counseling to Parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca L. Collins

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to assess the effectiveness of a smoking cessation educational program on pediatric residents' counseling. Residents were randomly selected to receive the intervention. Residents who were trained were compared to untrained residents. Self-reported surveys and patient chart reviews were used. Measures included changes in self-reported knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of residents, and differences in chart documentation and caretaker-reported physician counseling behaviors. The intervention was multidimensional including a didactic presentation, a problem-solving session, clinic reminders, and provision of patient education materials. Results showed that residents who were trained were more likely to ask about tobacco use in their patients' households. They were also more likely to advise caretakers to cut down on or to quit smoking, to help set a quit date, and to follow up on the advice given at a subsequent visit. Trained residents were more likely to record a history of passive tobacco exposure in the medical record. These residents also reported improved confidence in their counseling skills and documented that they had done such counseling more often than did untrained residents. Caretakers of pediatric patients who smoke seen by intervention residents were more likely to report that they had received tobacco counseling. Following this intervention, pediatric residents significantly improved their behaviors, attitudes, and confidence in providing smoking cessation counseling to parents of their pediatric patients.

  1. The standard system for conducting the TNA (Training Needs Analysis) of Staff (delrapport fra EU Erasmus+ project SMART

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ulla Højmark

    2016-01-01

    The Training Needs Analysis (TNA) has been carried out with the staff of the partner organisations. A standard system for conducting a quantitative and a qualitative training needs analysis had been developed and it has been used as a framework for the analysis from the 4 partners: Limerick...... and translation of the standardised system to suit their own individual context. Limerick and Palermo have completed both a quantitative and a qualitative training needs analyses. Copenhagen and Esbjerg have completed a qualitative training needs analysis. This report summarises the findings of the four partners...

  2. Experiences of mental health nursing staff at occupational stressors in a service provider institution in Cali, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Ruíz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nursing staff, who attend psychiatric patients, are confronted with differentiated occupational stressors. Objective: Interpret the experiences of mental health nursing staff when facing occupational stressors, ranging from three transactional cut stress models and Goffman paper theory. Materials and methods: A qualitative and phenomenological study was conducted. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with nurses from a health care institution. The analysis of content and map of the association of ideas was employed for the analysis. Results: The main occupational stressors found were: unfavorable physical resources and absence of others, patient characteristics, labor overload, interpersonal conflicts, lack of preparation and unpunctuality in salary. As a result, changes in the mental health of the staff and the provision of the services provided were found. Conclusions: The way in which the system of work is configured in the institution presents occupational stressors that affect all the participants, who confront them through their personal capacities, the available resources, the networks of support and the experience acquired; all this is permeated by the ways in which they understand and interpret their role in the framework of work.

  3. Mobile emergency simulation training for rural health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Douglas; Bekiaris, Brent; Hansen, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Mobile emergency simulation offers innovative continuing medical educational support to regions that may lack access to such opportunities. Furthermore, satisfaction is a critical element for active learning. Together, the authors evaluated Canadian rural healthcare providers' satisfaction from high fidelity emergency simulation training using a modified motorhome as a mobile education unit (MEU). Over a 5-month period, data was collected during 14 educational sessions in nine different southern Manitoban communities. Groups of up to five rural healthcare providers managed emergency simulation cases including polytrauma, severe sepsis, and inferior myocardial infarction with right ventricular involvement, followed by a debrief. Participants anonymously completed a feedback form that contained 11 questions on a five-point Likert scale and six short-answer questions. Data from 131 respondents were analyzed, for a response rate of 75.6%. Respondents included nurses (27.5%), medical residents (26.7%), medical first responders (16.0%), and physicians (12.2%). The median response was 5 for overall quality of learning, development of clinical reasoning skills and decision-making ability, recognition of patient deterioration, and self-reflection. The post-simulation debrief median response was also 5 for summarizing important issues, constructive criticism, and feedback to learn. Respondents also reported that the MEU provided a believable working environment (87.0%, n=114), they had limited or no previous access to high fidelity mannequins (82.7%, n=107), and they had no specific training in crisis resource management or were unfamiliar with the term (92%, n=118). A high level of satisfaction was reported in rural health providers with mobile emergency simulation. Access to and experience with high fidelity mannequins was limited, suggesting areas for potential educational growth.

  4. SYSTEM OF TRAINING AND RETRAINING OF MANAGERIAL STAFF FOR THE COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ARCTIC ZONE OF THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Tsukerman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The work discusses the problems of training and retraining of administrative staff as the most important factor of development based on programoriented management of complex development of the Russian Arctic. Diff erent ways and areas of training and retraining of managerial staff for the Russian Arctic. The analysis of the dynamics of the number of students, graduate students and faculty of educational institutions of higher education. The analysis showed a defi cit of managerial staff and mismatch problems of innovative development of economy and social sphere of the Russian Arctic. The need for interdisciplinary collaboration, including a detailed study severovedeniya. The experience of the functioning of the universities in small towns Arctic countries. Presented proposals for adjustment of legislative regulation of the educational sphere.

  5. [Predonation interview by a trained and authorized paramedical staff: feasibility, reliability and safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffe, C; Romieu, B; Adjou, C; Giraudeau, B; Bastard, B; Danic, B; Pelletier, B

    2011-04-01

    Predonation interview accounts for a major step in transfusion safety. In France, it must be performed by a physician, following a methodical questioning and a standardized questionnaire. Faced with this evolution, the value of a strictly medical expertise has been progressively losing importance. In many countries, blood donor selection is being organized by non medical trained staff (Québec, Switzerland, e.g.). A decree of April 30, 2006 allowed the Établissement français du sang to experiment a predonation interview by an authorized paramedical staff in the form of a two-phase prospective multicenter study over a year. Phase I "experimental situation": six physician/nurse teams among three blood transfusion centres interviewed 1940 blood-donation candidates, including 253 new donors (13% out of total). Phase 2 "observational study": 3222 blood-donation candidates were interviewed either by a physician or a nurse. In phase I, nurses were able to make a decision without the physician's help in 1921 cases. A total of 1628 candidates were decided capable of donating blood both by physicians and nurses, 174 donors were rejected both by physicians and nurses and 69 were rejected either by physicians or nurses. In phase 2, out of 3222 blood-donation candidates, an average of 12.1% were rejected by nurses and 10% by physicians. The study reported a weaker variability among nurses. Results show that nurses were able to perform predonation interviews with high reliability, without additional risk. The reproducibility of their answers in the field of recipient-risk evaluation was better than the physicians. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  6. Testing a computer-based ostomy care training resource for staff nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, Isabel

    2010-05-01

    Fragmented teaching and ostomy care provided by nonspecialized clinicians unfamiliar with state-of-the-art care and products have been identified as problems in teaching ostomy care to the new ostomate. After conducting a literature review of theories and concepts related to the impact of nurse behaviors and confidence on ostomy care, the author developed a computer-based learning resource and assessed its effect on staff nurse confidence. Of 189 staff nurses with a minimum of 1 year acute-care experience employed in the acute care, emergency, and rehabilitation departments of an acute care facility in the Midwestern US, 103 agreed to participate and returned completed pre- and post-tests, each comprising the same eight statements about providing ostomy care. F and P values were computed for differences between pre- and post test scores. Based on a scale where 1 = totally disagree and 5 = totally agree with the statement, baseline confidence and perceived mean knowledge scores averaged 3.8 and after viewing the resource program post-test mean scores averaged 4.51, a statistically significant improvement (P = 0.000). The largest difference between pre- and post test scores involved feeling confident in having the resources to learn ostomy skills independently. The availability of an electronic ostomy care resource was rated highly in both pre- and post testing. Studies to assess the effects of increased confidence and knowledge on the quality and provision of care are warranted.

  7. Enhancing Recognition of High Quality, Functional IEP Goals: A Training Activity for Early Childhood Special Education Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Anne; Gillaspy, Kathi; Peters, Mary Louise; Hurth, Joicey

    2014-01-01

    This training activity was created to support participants' understanding of the criteria needed to develop and write high quality, participation-based Individualized Education Program (IEP) goals. The term "functional" is often used to describe what goals ought to be, yet many Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE) staff (e.g.,…

  8. Staff Training for Business Process Improvement: The Benefit of Role-Plays in the Case of KreditSim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borner, Rene; Moormann, Jurgen; Wang, Minhong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to explore staff's experience with role-plays using the example of training bank employees in Six Sigma as a major methodology for business process improvement. Design/methodology/approach: The research is based on a case study. A role-play, KreditSim, is used to simulate a loan approval process that has to be improved by…

  9. Impact of Training on Cognitive Representation of Challenging Behaviour in Staff Working with Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Martin; Hogg, James

    2008-01-01

    Background: Cognitive representations of challenging behaviour among staff may influence therapeutic outcomes. This study looked at how cognitive dimensions of Identity, Cause, Consequences, Emotional Reaction and Treatment/Control are affected by training. Materials and Methods: A theoretically derived questionnaire was used to measure the impact…

  10. Impact of Extended Education/Training in Positive Behaviour Support on Staff Knowledge, Causal Attributions and Emotional Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Peter; Bradshaw, Jill; Hughes, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Background: This study sought to gather information about the impact of extended training in positive behaviour support on staff knowledge, causal attributions and emotional responses. Methods: Students completed questionnaires at the beginning, middle and end of a University Diploma course to measure changes in their knowledge of challenging…

  11. Using Behavioral Skills Training to Promote Safe and Correct Staff Guarding and Ambulation Distance of Students with Multiple Physical Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeyama, Bobby; Sturmey, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The study analyzed the effects of self-recording and behavioral skills training on guarding responses of 3 staff members while they assisted 3 students with multiple disabilities to ambulate. The intervention increased the percentage of correct posture and guarding responses and the distance that students ambulated. These effects generalized when…

  12. The Effect of Training Program for Staff Members to Develop Their Skills of Using Virtual Classrooms at King Saud University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Khaled Nahes; Almutairy, Sultan

    2012-01-01

    The present study aims at showing the effectiveness of a suggested training program for staff members at Teachers' College of King Saud University to develop their skills of using virtual classrooms. The research is empirical as it used two experimental groups. The first group is taught how to use the common teaching method and the second group is…

  13. What works in delivering dementia education or training to hospital staff? A critical synthesis of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surr, Claire A; Gates, Cara

    2017-10-01

    The quality of care delivered to people with dementia in hospital settings is of international concern. People with dementia occupy up to one quarter of acute hospital beds, however, staff working in hospitals report lack of knowledge and skills in caring for this group. There is limited evidence about the most effective approaches to training hospital staff on dementia. The purpose of this literature review was to examine published evidence on the most effective approaches to dementia training and education for hospital staff. The review was conducted using critical synthesis and included qualitative, quantitative and mixed/multi- methods studies. Kirkpatrick's four level model for the evaluation of training interventions was adopted to structure the review. The following databases were searched: MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, AMED, British Education Index, Education Abstracts, ERIC (EbscoHost), The Cochrane Library-Cochrane reviews, Economic evaluations, CENTRAL (Wiley), HMIC (Ovid), ASSIA, IBSS (Proquest), Conference Proceedings Citation Indexes (Web of Science), using a combination of keyword for the following themes: Dementia/Alzheimer's, training/education, staff knowledge and patient outcomes. A total of 20 papers were included in the review, the majority of which were low or medium quality, impacting on generalisability. The 16 different training programmes evaluated in the studies varied in terms of duration and mode of delivery, although most employed face-to-face didactic techniques. Studies predominantly reported on reactions to training and knowledge, only one study evaluated outcomes across all of the levels of the Kirkpatrick model. Key features of training that appeared to be more acceptable and effective were identified related to training content, delivery methods, practicalities, duration and support for implementation. The review methodology enabled inclusion of a broad range of studies and permitted common features of successful programmes to be

  14. Training intervention for health care staff in the provision of existential support to patients with cancer: a randomized, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henoch, Ingela; Danielson, Ella; Strang, Susann; Browall, Maria; Melin-Johansson, Christina

    2013-12-01

    When a patient receives a cancer diagnosis, existential issues become more compelling. Throughout the illness trajectory, patients with cancer are cared for in oncology wards, by home care teams or in hospices. Nurses working with these patients are sometimes aware of the patients' existential needs but do not feel confident when discussing these issues. To determine the effects of a training intervention, where the focus is on existential issues and nurses' perceived confidence in communication and their attitude toward caring for dying patients. This was a randomized, controlled trial with a training intervention comprising theoretical training in existential issues combined with individual and group reflection. In total, 102 nurses in oncology and hospice wards and in palliative home care teams were randomized to a training or non-training group. Primary outcomes, confidence in communication, and attitude toward the care of dying patients were measured at baseline, immediately after the training, and five to six months later. Confidence in communication improved significantly in the training group from baseline (before the training) to both the first and second follow-up, that is, immediately after the training and five months later. The attitude toward caring for the dying did not improve in the training group. This study shows that short-term training with reflection improves the confidence of health care staff when communicating, which is important for health care managers with limited resources. Further studies are needed to explore how patients experience the communication skills of health care staff after such training. Copyright © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Emotional intelligence competencies provide a developmental curriculum for medical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, James K; Taylor, Christine A; Farver, Carol F

    2013-01-01

    Since healthcare faces challenges of access, quality, and cost, effective leadership for healthcare is needed. This need is especially acute among physicians, whose demanding training focuses on scientific and clinical skills, eclipsing attention to leadership development. Among the competencies needed by leaders, emotional intelligence (EI) - defined as the ability to understand and manage oneself and to understand others and manage relationships - has been shown to differentiate between great and average leaders. In this context, teaching EI as part of the medical training curriculum is recommended. Furthermore, because physicians' developmental needs evolve over the course of prolonged training, specific components of EI (e.g., teambuilding, empathy, and negotiation) should be taught at various phases of medical training. Consistent with the concept of a spiral curriculum, such EI competencies should be revisited iteratively throughout training, with differing emphasis and increasing sophistication to meet evolving needs. For example, teamwork training is needed early in undergraduate medical curricula to prompt collaborative learning. Teamwork training is also needed during residency, when physicians participate with differing roles on patient care teams. Training in EI should also extend beyond graduate medical training to confer the skills needed by clinicians and by faculty in academic medical centers.

  16. Use of Community Readiness Model to Develop and Evaluate a Pilot Culinary Training Program for School Nutrition Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Deana A; Blevins, Priscilla; Carl, Lillian; Brown, Barbara; Betts, Nancy M; Poe, Tiffany

    2018-02-01

    Use the Community Readiness Model (CRM) to develop and evaluate a contextually appropriate pilot culinary training program for school nutrition staff members. Mixed methods to guide intervention development. Six school districts in rural and urban areas of a southwestern state. School nutrition staff (n = 36; female; 20 years' experience). Pre- and post-training assessments used the CRM. Findings from the pre-assessment were used to develop the pilot culinary training intervention. Readiness to integrate new food preparation methods into existing practices. The researchers used t and Wilcoxon tests to compare overall readiness and dimension scores (P ≤ .05). Thematic analysis was used to identify themes from the discussion component of the assessments. Overall readiness increased from vague awareness to preparation (P = .02). Improved dimensions were knowledge of efforts (P = .004), leadership (P = .05), and knowledge of issues (P = .04). Themes included barriers, leadership, and motivation. The CRM was useful for developing and evaluating a contextually appropriate and effective culinary training program for school nutrition staff. Future efforts should address the provision of additional resources such as on-site chefs, small equipment grants, and engaging school stakeholders. Copyright © 2017 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. 20 CFR 663.400 - How are training services provided?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... they receive a waiver from the Governor and meet the requirements of 20 CFR 661.310 and WIA section 117... Section 663.400 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND...(d)(4)(G)(ii) and § 663.430(a), the Individual Training Account (ITA) is established for eligible...

  18. The Role of Training Providers in Manpower Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Lynton

    1993-01-01

    Research in Nigeria and Thailand is used to demonstrate that, where vocational training is cost effective (graduates get appropriate jobs), links with employers are closer than in other labor markets. Techniques such as reverse tracer studies, labor market signaling, and skills analysis can be used to improve training effectiveness. (SK)

  19. Group Training of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Knowledge Competencies to Community-Based Service Providers for Adults with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiselli, James K.; St. Amand, CarrieAnne; MaGee, Christine; Sperry, James M.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a training program to teach applied behavior analysis (ABA) knowledge competencies to paraprofessional staff (N = 47) at a habilitation services agency for adults with developmental disabilities. Before and following training, staff completed assessment of knowledge tests for three content areas: basic learning principles,…

  20. Providing Experiential Business and Management Training for Biomedical Research Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Kimberly A; Carnahan, Robert H; Brown, Abigail M; Gould, Kathleen L

    2017-01-01

    Many biomedical PhD trainees lack exposure to business principles, which limits their competitiveness and effectiveness in academic and industry careers. To fill this training gap, we developed Business and Management Principles for Scientists, a semester-long program that combined didactic exposure to business fundamentals with practical team-based projects aimed at solving real business problems encountered by institutional shared--resource core facilities. The program also included a retreat featuring presentations by and networking with local life science entrepreneurs and final team presentations to expert judges. Quantitative and qualitative metrics were used to evaluate the program's impact on trainees. A pretest-posttest approach was used to assess trainees' baseline knowledge and mastery of module concepts, and each individual's pretest and posttest responses were compared. The mean score improved by more than 17 percentage points. Trainees also took an online survey to provide feedback about the module. Nearly all participants agreed or strongly agreed that the module was a valuable use of their time and will help guide their career decisions and that project work helped drive home module concepts. More than 75% of trainees reported discussing the module with their research advisors, and all of these participants reported supportive or neutral responses. Collectively, the trainee feedback about the module, improvement in test scores, and trainee perception of advisor support suggest that this short module is an effective method of providing scientists with efficient and meaningful exposure to business concepts. © 2017 K. A. Petrie et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http

  1. [Medical university teaching staff training for formation of communicative competence in dentists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopanova, E V; Lomiashvili, L M

    2015-01-01

    Psychology and pedagogical preparation provides improvement of the ability of psychological interaction with the patient, promotes deepening of constructive cooperation between them. It facilitates collecting and analysis of clinical data and has direct impact on efficiency of treatment and prophylactic actions. Formation of communicative competence becomes one of key problems of continuous medical education. Introduction of the Medical Communication module in the program of professional development will provide modern technologies of training in technics of active hearing, effective communication, adjustment of contact, feedback, behavior in a stress situation.

  2. Rapid realist review of the evidence: achieving lasting change when mental health rehabilitation staff undertake recovery-oriented training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Melanie; Bhanbhro, Sadiq; Cook, Sarah; Killaspy, Helen

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the factors contributing to lasting change in practice following a recovery-based training intervention for inpatient mental health rehabilitation staff. Staff training may help nurses and other staff groups in inpatient mental health rehabilitative settings to increase their recovery-oriented practice. There are no published reviews on the effectiveness of such training and few long-term evaluations. This review informed a realist evaluation of a specific intervention (GetREAL). Rapid realist review methodology was used to generate and prioritize programme theories. ASSIA, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Medline, PsycINFO, Scopus, Web of Science and grey literature searches were performed in September 2014-March 2015 with no date restrictions. Stakeholders suggested further documents. GetREAL project documentation was consulted. Programme theory development took place iteratively with literature identification. Stakeholders validated and prioritized emerging programme theories and the prioritized theories were refined using literature case studies. Fifty-one relevant documents fed into 49 programme theories articulating seven mechanisms for lasting change. Prioritized mechanisms were: staff receptiveness to change; and staff feeling encouraged, motivated and supported by colleagues and management to change. Seven programme theories were prioritized and refined using data from four case studies. Lasting change can be facilitated by collaborative action planning, regular collaborative meetings, appointing a change agent, explicit management endorsement and prioritization and modifying organizational structures. Conversely, a challenging organizational climate, or a prevalence of 'change fatigue', may block change. Pre-intervention exploration may help identify any potential barriers to embedding recovery in the organizational culture. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Care staff training based on person-centered care and dementia care mapping, and its effects on the quality of life of nursing home residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Mami; Sakakibara, Hisataka

    2017-09-01

    To assess the effects of care staff training based on person-centered care (PCC) and dementia care mapping (DCM) on the quality of life (QOL) of residents with dementia in a nursing home. An intervention of staff training based on PCC and DCM was conducted with 40 care staff members at a geriatric nursing home. The effects of the staff training on the QOL of residents with dementia were evaluated by the DCM measurements of 40 residents with dementia three times at about one-month intervals (first, baseline; second, pre-intervention; third, post-intervention). The well-being and ill-being values (WIB values) of the residents with dementia measured by DCM were not different between the first and second rounds before the staff training (p = 0.211). Meanwhile, the WIB values increased from the first and second rounds to the third post-intervention round (p = 0.035 and p dementia.

  4. Teaching and the Pedagogical Training of University Teaching Staff – Practice and Opinions under Slovenian Higher Education Legislation

    OpenAIRE

    Aškerc, Katarina; Kočar, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the teaching in higher education in Slovenia, with an emphasis on the pedagogical training and pedagogical qualification of university teaching staff. Various aspects of the latter were examined among 513 respondents. The results showed that university teachers attribute significant importance topedagogical work (the term used in Slovenian higher education legislation), yet nearly half of them had never been involved in any kind of pedagogical courses. The other half of th...

  5. The effect of providing resuscitation training to front- line staff on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Table 3 – Lecture topics delivered on the HOT course. The structured approach to all emergencies. Triage of multiple emergencies. How to effect the safe transfer of a patient. Evaluation and management of shock. Management of head injuries. Massive Obstetric haemorrhage. Management of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia.

  6. 38 CFR 21.382 - Training and staff development for personnel providing assistance under Chapter 31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... disability; (4) Counseling theory and techniques; (5) Personal and vocational adjustment; (6) Occupational...: (1) Employ the services of consultants; (2) Make grants to and contract with public and private... shall coordinate with the Commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration and the Assistant...

  7. 42 CFR 432.31 - Training and use of subprofessional staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-time or part-time employment of persons of low income, including: (1) Young, middle-aged, and older... staffing plan must include the kinds of jobs that subprofessional staff can perform. (e) Career service...

  8. 20 CFR 663.585 - May individuals choose training providers located outside of the local area?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May individuals choose training providers... INVESTMENT ACT Eligible Training Providers § 663.585 May individuals choose training providers located outside of the local area? Yes, individuals may choose any of the eligible providers and programs on the...

  9. Providing Experiential Business and Management Training for Biomedical Research Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Kimberly A.; Carnahan, Robert H.; Brown, Abigail M.; Gould, Kathleen L.

    2017-01-01

    Many biomedical PhD trainees lack exposure to business principles, which limits their competitiveness and effectiveness in academic and industry careers. To fill this training gap, we developed Business and Management Principles for Scientists, a semester-long program that combined didactic exposure to business fundamentals with practical…

  10. Let’s Wiggle with 5-2-1-0: Curriculum Development for Training Childcare Providers to Promote Activity in Childcare Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra M. Vinci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Overweight and obesity are increasing in preschool children in the US. Policy, systems, and environmental change interventions in childcare settings can improve obesity-related behaviors. The aim of this study was to develop and pilot an intervention to train childcare providers to promote physical activity (PA in childcare classrooms. An evidence scan, key informant (n=34 and focus group (n=20 interviews with childcare directors and staff, and environmental self-assessment of childcare facilities (n=22 informed the design of the training curriculum. Feedback from the interviews indicated that childcare providers believed in the importance of teaching children about PA and were supportive of training teachers to incorporate PA into classroom settings. The Promoting Physical Activity in Childcare Setting Curriculum was developed and training was implemented with 16 teachers. Participants reported a positive experience with the hands-on training and reported acquiring new knowledge that they intended to implement in their childcare settings. Our findings highlight the feasibility of working with childcare staff to develop PA training and curriculum. Next steps include evaluating the curriculum in additional childcare settings and childcare staff implementation of the curriculum to understand the effectiveness of the training on PA levels of children.

  11. The Beck Initiative: Training School-Based Mental Health Staff in Cognitive Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrey A. Creed

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A growing literature supports cognitive therapy (CT as an efficacious treatment for youth struggling with emotional or behavioral problems. Recently, work in this area has extended the dissemination of CT to school-based settings. The current study has two aims: 1 to examine the development of therapists’ knowledge and skills in CT, an evidence-based approach to promoting student well-being, and 2 to examine patterns of narrative feedback provided to therapists participating in the program. As expected, school therapists trained in CT demonstrated significant gains in their knowledge of CT theory and in their demonstration of CT skills, with the majority of therapists surpassing the accepted threshold of competency in CT. In addition, an examination of feedback content suggested that narrative feedback provided to therapists most frequently consisted of positive feedback and instructions for future sessions. Suggestions for future research regarding dissemination of CT are discussed in light of increasing broad access to evidence based practices.

  12. Effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on staff's use of prompts and children's adaptive responses during one-to-one training in children with severe to profound intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonderen, A.M.H. van; Swart, C.C.W. de; Didden, H.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Although relatively many studies have addressed staff training and its effect on trainer behavior, the effects of staff training on trainee's adaptive behaviors have seldomly been examined. We therefore assessed effectiveness of staff training, consisting of instruction and video feedback, on (a)

  13. Comparison of Computer Based Instruction to Behavior Skills Training for Teaching Staff Implementation of Discrete-Trial Instruction with an Adult with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosik, Melissa R.; Williams, W. Larry; Garrido, Natalia; Lee, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, behavior skills training (BST) is compared to a computer based training package for teaching discrete trial instruction to staff, teaching an adult with autism. The computer based training package consisted of instructions, video modeling and feedback. BST consisted of instructions, modeling, rehearsal and feedback. Following…

  14. Increasing Opportunities for Question-Asking in School-Aged Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Effectiveness of Staff Training in Pivotal Response Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuur, Rianne; Huskens, Bibi; Verhoeven, Ludo; Didden, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Deficits in question-asking are common in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Furthermore, their opportunities to self-initiate questions are often hindered by directive behavior of their conversation partners. This study assessed the effectiveness of staff training in pivotal response treatment (PRT) on staff member-created…

  15. Effects of a Competency-Based Professional Development Training on Children's Physical Activity and Staff Physical Activity Promotion in Summer Day Camps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, R. Glenn; Beets, Michael W.; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Webster, Collin A.; Moore, Justin

    2014-01-01

    The YMCA of the USA serves more than nine million youth in its summer day camping programs nationwide. In spring 2011, the YMCA of Columbia, SC, with support from the University of South Carolina, adopted a competency-based staff-level training approach in an attempt to align staff behaviors with the YMCA of the USA new physical activity standards…

  16. Evaluating a staff training program on the interaction between staff and people with intellectual disability and challenging behaviour : An observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Zijlmans, L.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A.M.T.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a training program focusing on improvement of emotional intelligence (EI) and support staffs’ awareness of their behaviour towards people with an intellectual disability based on interactional patterns. The support provided regarding

  17. COMPOSITION OF STAFF REVIEW ADVISORY BODIES - 2000 COMPOSITION OF THE JOINT TRAINING BOARD (JTB) - 2000/2001

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Division

    2000-01-01

    For the present staff review, the advisory bodies set up to prepare recommendations are composed as follows:Senior Staff Advancement Committee (SSAC)D. Treille / EP (Convener)C. Benvenuti / ESTD. O. Williams /ITTechnical Engineers & Administrative Careers Committee (TEACC) C. Hauviller / EPL. Leistam / ESTS. Jarp / IT [Chairman]F. Pedersen / PSR. Lauckner / SLC. Roche / ETTLong-term contract Boards (LTCBs) (Categories 2 &5a)Tiziano Camporesi / EP [Convener]Florence Ranjard / EP\t[Alternate]Jacques Gruber / PSPeter Sievers / LHCThomas Pettersson / ESTMichel Mayoud / ESTSue Foffano / ASThierry Lagrange / SPLWerner Zapf / HR (Secretary) LTCB 2(Categories 3, 4, 5b & 5c)Véronique Paris / SL [Convener]Fabien Pérriolat / PS\t [Alternate]Mats Wilhelmsson / STVéronique Fassnacht / TISLucie Linssen / EPMichel Mayoud / ESTPatrick Geeraert / FIJohn Cuthbert / HRSeamus Hegarty / HR (Secretary) Composition of the Joint Training Board (JT...

  18. Training and Staff Development in Early Childhood Education: Beneath the Veneers of Resistance and Professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shareef, Intisar; Gonzalez-Mena, Janet

    1997-01-01

    Describes infant-toddler training-of-trainers workshop in which trainers respond to trainee resistance through role-plays illustrating respectful and disrespectful ways of training and through discussions focusing on accepting and acknowledging the feelings of trainees and trainers. Asserts that forming diverse training teams, valuing opposing…

  19. Dying at home: a qualitative study of family carers' views of support provided by GPs community staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seamark, David; Blake, Susan; Brearley, Sarah G; Milligan, Christine; Thomas, Carol; Turner, Mary; Wang, Xu; Payne, Sheila

    2014-12-01

    Dying at home is the preference of many patients with life-limiting illness. This is often not achieved and a key factor is the availability of willing and able family carers. To elicit family carers' views about the community support that made death at home possible. Qualitative study in East Devon, North Lancashire, and Cumbria. Participants were bereaved family carers who had provided care at the end of life for patients dying at home. Semi-structured interviews were conducted 6-24 months after the death. Fifty-nine bereaved family carers were interviewed (54% response rate; 69% female). Two-thirds of the patients died from cancer with median time of home care being 5 months and for non-cancer patients the median time for home care was 30 months. An overarching theme was of continuity of care that divided into personal, organisational, and informational continuity. Large numbers and changes in care staff diluted personal continuity and failure of the GPs to visit was viewed negatively. Family carers had low expectations of informational continuity, finding information often did not transfer between secondary and primary care and other care agencies. Organisational continuity when present provided comfort and reassurance, and a sense of control. The requirement for continuity in delivering complex end-of-life care has long been acknowledged. Family carers in this study suggested that minimising the number of carers involved in care, increasing or ensuring personal continuity, and maximising the informational and organisational aspects of care could lead to a more positive experience. © British Journal of General Practice 2014.

  20. Smartphone app use among medical providers in ACGME training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franko, Orrin I; Tirrell, Timothy F

    2012-10-01

    The past decade has witnessed the advent of the smartphone, a device armed with computing power, mobility and downloadable "apps," that has become commonplace within the medical field as both a personal and professional tool. The popularity of medically-related apps suggests that physicians use mobile technology to assist with clinical decision making, yet usage patterns have never been quantified. A digital survey examining smartphone and associated app usage was administered via email to all ACGME training programs. Data regarding respondent specialty, level of training, use of smartphones, use of smartphone apps, desired apps, and commonly used apps were collected and analyzed. Greater than 85% of respondents used a smartphone, of which the iPhone was the most popular (56%). Over half of the respondents reported using apps in their clinical practice; the most commonly used app types were drug guides (79%), medical calculators (18%), coding and billing apps (4%) and pregnancy wheels (4%). The most frequently requested app types were textbook/reference materials (average response: 55%), classification/treatment algorithms (46%) and general medical knowledge (43%). The clinical use of smartphones and apps will likely continue to increase, and we have demonstrated an absence of high-quality and popular apps despite a strong desire among physicians and trainees. This information should be used to guide the development of future healthcare delivery systems; expanded app functionality is almost certain but reliability and ease of use will likely remain major factors in determining the successful integration of apps into clinical practice.

  1. Effects of theory training, hands-on supervision and a self-instructional treatment manual on staff competency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Teikari Hatlenes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Employing a randomized control group design, this study compared the efficacy of staff training using theory training, hands-on supervision and a self-instructional teaching manual. Participants were 12 undergraduate, health or social-work students. Initially, participants were given a three-hour lecture, and as a result, staff-participants increased their use of correct teaching procedures, but not to mastery. Participants in both groups continued to increase their teaching skills after intervention with either hands-on training or the self-instructional manual, though best effect was achieved with hands-on supervision. This effect was maintained at a two-month follow-up. At the end of the experiment, participants in the treatment manual group received hands-on supervision. As a result, their performances increased to the same levels as the participants in the hands-on supervision group. Hence, hands-on supervision was superior in increasing teaching performances. Participants receiving hands-on supervision reported that they were comfortable receiving this type of supervision, that the hands-on supervision was the best way to learn correct teaching procedures and that they would prefer hands-on supervision in a future job situation. Also, independent assessors rated hands-on supervision as the most suitable intervention.

  2. Training of Advanced Cardiac Life Support Skills to Nursing Staff in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in collaboration with resuscitation service, unit managers and clinical mentors. Prior to ACLS certification, classes of Basic Life Support (BLS) were held every week for the staff nurses at King Faisal Hospital. Objectives. The purpose of this innovation was threefold, to: 1.Improve outcomes of patients requiring resuscitation.

  3. Assembling a solid staff. Job rotation, job shaping and cross-training help employee retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redling, Robert

    2003-03-01

    Qualified workers for medical practices are in short supply, and you want to keep the good staff you have. Here are strategies to match employees with the right positions, ease workplace stress, heighten morale and ensure coverage of duties when you're down a position or two.

  4. Training Teaching Staff to Facilitate Spontaneous Communication in Children with Autism: Adult Interactive Style Intervention (AISI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossyvaki, Lila; Jones, Glenys; Guldberg, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that the way adults interact with children with autism can have a great impact on their spontaneous communication. However, to date, few studies have focused on modifying adults' behaviour and even fewer have been conducted in school settings which actively involve teaching staff in designing the intervention.…

  5. Arts-based palliative care training, education and staff development: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, Benjamin Mark; Williams, Sion; Burton, Christopher R; Williams, Lynne

    2017-06-01

    The experience of art offers an emerging field in healthcare staff development, much of which is appropriate to the practice of palliative care. The workings of aesthetic learning interventions such as interactive theatre in relation to palliative and end-of-life care staff development programmes are widely uncharted. To investigate the use of aesthetic learning interventions used in palliative and end-of-life care staff development programmes. Scoping review. Published literature from 1997 to 2015, MEDLINE, CINAHL and Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts, key journals and citation tracking. The review included 138 studies containing 60 types of art. Studies explored palliative care scenarios from a safe distance. Learning from art as experience involved the amalgamation of action, emotion and meaning. Art forms were used to transport healthcare professionals into an aesthetic learning experience that could be reflected in the lived experience of healthcare practice. The proposed learning included the development of practical and technical skills; empathy and compassion; awareness of self; awareness of others and the wider narrative of illness; and personal development. Aesthetic learning interventions might be helpful in the delivery of palliative care staff development programmes by offering another dimension to the learning experience. As researchers continue to find solutions to understanding the efficacy of such interventions, we argue that evaluating the contextual factors, including the interplay between the experience of the programme and its impact on the healthcare professional, will help identify how the programmes work and thus how they can contribute to improvements in palliative care.

  6. Staff training effective in increasing learning opportunities for school-aged children with autism spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huskens, B.E.B.M.; Reijers, H.T.J.; Didden, H.C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on staff's ABA skills during one-to-one play situations and initiations of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Methods: Data were collected within a multiple baseline design across 5 dyads. A continuous

  7. Canadian Public Libraries Are Aware of Their Role as Information Literacy Training Providers, but Face Several Challenges. A Review of: Lai, H.-J. (2011. Information literacy training in public libraries: A case from Canada. Educational Technology & Society, 14(2, 81-88.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Newton Miller

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective– To explore the current state of information literacy (IL training in Canadian public libraries, and to identify strategies used for improving IL training skills for staff and patrons.Design – Mixed-methods approach, including document analysis, observations, and focus group interviews.Setting – Two libraries of a large public library system in Canada: the central library and one branch library.Subjects – Six staff members (manager, administrator, training coordinator, instructor, and computer technician who have been involved in designing and teaching information literacy courses for library patrons and staff.Methods – The researcher analyzed internal and external library documents related to information literacy, including, but not limited to, reports, posters, lesson plans, newsletters, and training scripts. He also observed interactions and behaviours of patrons during IL training sessions. Finally, he conducted a focus group with people involved in IL training, asking questions about facilities and resources, programs, patron reaction, librarian knowledge of IL theory, and impediments and benefits of IL training programs in public libraries.Main Results – Staff were aware of the importance of IL training in the library. Attracting more library patrons (including building partnerships with other organizations, improving staff IL and training skills, employing effective strategies for running training programs, and dealing with financial issues were all concerns about running IL training that were highlighted.Conclusion – Canadian public libraries are well aware of their role as IL training providers, but they still face several challenges in order to improve their effectiveness.

  8. Evaluation of the proficiency of trained non-laboratory health staffs and laboratory technicians using a rapid and simple HIV antibody test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanal, Koum; Chou, Thai Leang; Sovann, Ly; Morikawa, Yasuo; Mukoyama, Yumi; Kakimoto, Kazuhiro

    2005-05-20

    In Cambodia, nearly half of pregnant women attend antenatal care (ANC), which is an entry point of services for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT). However, most of ANC services are provided in health centres or fields, where laboratory services by technicians are not available. In this study, those voluntary confidential counselling and testing (VCCT) counsellors involved in PMTCT were trained by experienced laboratory technicians in our centre on HIV testing using Determine (Abbot Laboratories) HIV1/2 test kits through a half-day training course, which consisted of use of a pipette, how to process whole blood samples, and how to read test result. The trained counsellors were midwives working for ANC and delivery ward in our centre without any experience on laboratory works. The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of the training by evaluating the proficiency of the trained non-laboratory staffs. The trained counsellors withdrew blood sample after pre-test counselling following ANC, and performed the rapid test. Laboratory technicians routinely did the same test and returned reports of the test results to counsellors. Reports by the counsellors and the laboratory technicians were compared, and discordant reports in two groups were re-tested with the same rapid test kit using the same blood sample. Cause of discordance was detected in discussion with both groups. Of 563 blood samples tested by six trained VCCT counsellors and three laboratory technicians, 11 samples (2.0%) were reported positive in each group, however four discordant reports (0.7%) between the groups were observed, in which two positive reports and two negative reports by the counsellors were negative and positive by the laboratory technicians, respectively. Further investigation confirmed that all the reports by the counsellors were correct, and that human error in writing reports in the laboratory was a cause of these discordant reports. These findings

  9. Evaluation of the proficiency of trained non-laboratory health staffs and laboratory technicians using a rapid and simple HIV antibody test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukoyama Yumi

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In Cambodia, nearly half of pregnant women attend antenatal care (ANC, which is an entry point of services for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT. However, most of ANC services are provided in health centres or fields, where laboratory services by technicians are not available. In this study, those voluntary confidential counselling and testing (VCCT counsellors involved in PMTCT were trained by experienced laboratory technicians in our centre on HIV testing using Determine (Abbot Laboratories HIV1/2 test kits through a half-day training course, which consisted of use of a pipette, how to process whole blood samples, and how to read test result. The trained counsellors were midwives working for ANC and delivery ward in our centre without any experience on laboratory works. The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of the training by evaluating the proficiency of the trained non-laboratory staffs. The trained counsellors withdrew blood sample after pre-test counselling following ANC, and performed the rapid test. Laboratory technicians routinely did the same test and returned reports of the test results to counsellors. Reports by the counsellors and the laboratory technicians were compared, and discordant reports in two groups were re-tested with the same rapid test kit using the same blood sample. Cause of discordance was detected in discussion with both groups. Of 563 blood samples tested by six trained VCCT counsellors and three laboratory technicians, 11 samples (2.0% were reported positive in each group, however four discordant reports (0.7% between the groups were observed, in which two positive reports and two negative reports by the counsellors were negative and positive by the laboratory technicians, respectively. Further investigation confirmed that all the reports by the counsellors were correct, and that human error in writing reports in the laboratory was a cause of these discordant

  10. Teaching Staff Advanced Training in Russia, the Republic of Kazakhstan, the USA and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Vasyl

    2015-01-01

    In the article the peculiarities in organization of postgraduate teacher training in foreign countries have been highlighted; the basic problems and prospects for advanced training which stipulate for reforming the relevant national systems have been revealed; common and distinctive trends in their development have been justified. In Russia there…

  11. Outcomes of classroom-based team training interventions for multiprofessional hospital staff. A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, Louise Isager; Østergaard, Doris; Mogensen, Torben

    2010-01-01

    Several studies show that communication errors in healthcare teams are frequent and can lead to adverse events. Team training has been suggested as a way to safer communication and has been implemented in healthcare as classroom-based or simulation-based team training or a combination of both...

  12. Conversion of Provider EMR Training from Instructor-Led Training to eLearning at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Karen; Williams, Michele; Aldrich, Alison; Bogacz, Adrienne; Denier, Sighle; McAlearney, Ann S

    2017-07-26

    This case study overviews the conversion of provider training of the electronic medical record (EMR) from an instructor-led training (ILT) program to eLearning at an Academic Medical Center (AMC). This conversion provided us with both a useful training tool and the opportunity to maximize efficiency within both our training and optimization team and organization. eLearning Development Principles were created and served as a guide to assist us with designing an eLearning curriculum using a five step process. The result was a new training approach that allowed learners to complete training at their own pace, and even test out of sections based on demonstrated competency. The information we have leads us to believe that a substantial return on our investment can be obtained from the conversion with positive impacts that have served as the foundation for the future of end user EMR training at our AMC.

  13. In-vivo job development training among peer providers of homeless veterans supported employment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ni; Dolce, Joni; Rio, John; Heitzmann, Carma; Loving, Samantha

    2016-06-01

    This column describes a goal-oriented, time-limited in vivo coaching/training approach for skills building among peer veterans vocational rehabilitation specialists of the Homeless Veteran Supported Employment Program (HVSEP). Planning, implementing, and evaluating the training approach for peer providers was intended, ultimately, to support veterans in their goal of returning to community competitive employment. The description draws from the training experience that aimed to improve the ability of peer providers to increase both rates of employment and wages of the homeless veterans using their services. Training peers using an in vivo training approach provided a unique opportunity for the veterans to improve their job development skills with a focus to support employment outcomes for the service users. Peers who received training also expressed that learning skills through an in vivo training approach was more engaging than typical classroom trainings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Required formation and training of frontline staff. A research proposal Formación y entrenamiento para personal de contacto en empresas de servicios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Sanclemente

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is a research proposal related to the elements that should be part of some managerial practices such as formation and training, which are developed by enterprises in order to provide satisfaction to their frontline staff (this being defined as the staff that has direct contact with customers in service enterprises and that interacts with them in the so-called service encounter. Hence, it is intended to analyze the different dimensions of the formation and training constructs, and prove the influence that such practices have in staff satisfaction, and how the latter influences the performance of the corresponding activities affecting the quality of the service that is offered to customers and how they perceive it. The research proposes to select a specific service enterprise that offers insurance and investment services nationally and that is located in the city of. At the end of the proposal, the main interest of the research for managerial practices is shown and additional topics for complementary research in the abovementioned field are suggested.El artículo presenta los resultados de una investigación en una empresa de serviciosque ofrece seguros e inversiones a nivel nacional, localizada en Medellín. El objetivoes analizar las distintas dimensiones que hacen parte de los constructos formación yentrenamiento, prácticas administrativas que desarrollan las empresas para brindarsatisfacción a sus empleados de contacto, aquellos que tienen trato directo con losclientes e interactúan con ellos. Se examina la influencia que dichas prácticas tienenen la satisfacción de los funcionarios y en el desempeño de su actividad, evaluando laincidencia en la calidad del servicio que se les presta a los clientes y la manera cómo estosla perciben.

  15. The Efficiency of the University Teaching and Learning Training Program (UTL) on Developing the Teaching Competencies of the Teaching Staff at Imam University

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlRweithy, Eman; Alsaleem, Basma Issa

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at presenting the University Teaching and Learning training program UTL and determining the efficiency of the UTL on developing the teaching competencies of the teaching staff at Imam University in Saudi Arabia. The results revealed that there were statistically significant differences between the performance of the training group…

  16. Training in Information Management for Army Brigade and Battalion Staff: Methods and Preliminary Findings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Freeman, Jared

    1997-01-01

    .... The instruction focused on selected skills concerning critical thinking and team coordination. The results of a pilot study suggest that training may have beneficial effects on the targeted skills...

  17. 20 CFR 669.410 - What training services may be provided to eligible MSFW's?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... activities under a contract between the participating employer and the grantee; (2) Training-related... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What training services may be provided to eligible MSFW's? 669.410 Section 669.410 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION...

  18. A pilot training programme for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to lesbian, gay and bisexual patients in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reygan, Finn C G

    2012-05-09

    OBJECTIVE: The international literature points to the specific cancer risks and palliative care needs of lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) populations. However, with the exception of a programme in the USA, there is a lack of training internationally for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to LGB patients. In Ireland, a training project funded by the Irish Cancer Society, the Irish Hospice Foundation and the Health Service Executive developed a training pilot programme for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to LGB patients. METHODS: Over 200 (N = 201) oncology and palliative care staff participated in 17 brief, 50-min trainings in pilot sites. Evaluation of the training included self-report questionnaires at the end of each training and an evaluation interview with one participant from each of the four sites. RESULTS: The majority of participants reported that they would recommend the training to their colleagues, were interested in further training in the area and found the training useful for their practice. They also reported becoming more familiar with LGB-related language and terminology, became more knowledgeable of LGB health issues and reported becoming more confident in providing care to LGB patients. CONCLUSIONS: Recommendations are that the training be made available across the health services in Ireland and included in postgraduate courses for trainee health and social care professionals. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Interprofessional training for final year healthcare students: a mixed methods evaluation of the impact on ward staff and students of a two-week placement and of factors affecting sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGettigan, Patricia; McKendree, Jean

    2015-10-26

    Multiple care failings in hospitals have led to calls for increased interprofessional training in medical education to improve multi-disciplinary teamwork. Providing practical interprofessional training has many challenges and remains uncommon in medical schools in the UK. Unlike most previous research, this evaluation of an interprofessional training placement takes a multi-faceted approach focusing not only on the impact on students, but also on clinical staff delivering the training and on outcomes for patients. We used mixed methods to examine the impact of a two-week interprofessional training placement undertaken on a medical rehabilitation ward by three cohorts of final year medical, nursing and therapy students. We determined the effects on staff, ward functioning and participating students. Impact on staff was evaluated using the Questionnaire for Psychological and Social factors at work (QPSNordic) and focus groups. Ward functioning was inferred from standard measures of care including length of stay, complaints, and adverse events. Impact on students was evaluated using the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Survey (RIPLS) among all students plus a placement survey among medical students. Between 2007 and 2010, 362 medical students and 26 nursing and therapy students completed placements working alongside the ward staff to deliver patient care. Staff identified benefits including skills recognition and expertise sharing. Ward functioning was stable. Students showed significant improvements in the RIPLS measures of Teamwork, Professional Identity and Patient-Centred Care. Despite small numbers of students from other professions, medical students' rated the placement highly. Increasing student numbers and budgetary constraints led to the cessation of the placement after three years. Interprofessional training placements can be delivered in a clinical setting without detriment to care and with benefits for all participants. While financial support is

  20. The Training of Technical Staff in Libyan Industrial Companies: Issues in Traning Needs Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Shibani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available By implementing Training Needs Analysis (TNA, organisations can improve the training need identification process and minimise the influence of social factors on nominations for training; such as kinship and friendship, which makes the managers exercised mediation "wasta" and favouritism when they perform their tasks. Therefore, paper presents the results of an investigation into current TNA practice in Libyan industrial companies (LICs, including the barriers that prevent its successful implementation and how it might be improved. A qualitative approach was adopted in collecting data by means of semi-structured interviews with 17 senior managers in two selected companies. The findings show that training needs are mostly identified through an analysis at the individual level only and that no consideration is given to organisational or operational levels. The paper contributes to existing knowledge on the application and effectiveness of TNA in industrial sectors by specifically investigating the implementation of TNA in the Libyan industrial context; it offers ideas and insights to those responsible for training in LICs to improve their understanding of the role of TNA and how they can manage the TNA process to help develop their employees.

  1. Training degree assessment of staff producing parenteral nutrition in Pharmacy Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Mª Romero Jiménez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the level of expertise of Pharmacy personnel in the manufacturing of total parenteral nutrition. Material and methods: An on-line survey including 17 questions concerning key aspects of TPN manufacturing was designed. Survey monkey software was used to create the survey and to analize its results. Results: 135 answers were received. 95% of the participant Pharmacy services had written standard manufacturing procedures. 67% answered that phosphate salts should be the first electrolite to be additioned into the total parenteral nutrition and 34% affirmed that validation of the aseptic manufacturing technique was not performed. As far as personnel training was concerned, 19% of respondents had not received any specific training, although 99% considered it would be necessary to receive it. Conclusions: The polled personell has an acceptable level of expertise but adequate training courses are still necessary and should be promoted from Pharmacy services

  2. Marital Violence Complainants and the Services Provided by a Women’s Police Station According to its Staff

    OpenAIRE

    Mirian Beccheri Cortez; Lídio Souza

    2016-01-01

    It was investigated the perceptions of a Women’s Police Station’s team about women complainants and the implications of their perception in evaluating everyday jobs they perform. Thematic Content Analysis were applied on individual interviews with 14 professional staff and generated the categories: “Poor woman” and “Rare cases” that characterizes women complainants and the more and less frequent denounces; “Why do they talk?” and “Why do other women keep silent?” aggregate material about the ...

  3. Food production and wastage in relation to nutritional intake in a general district hospital - wastage is not reduced by training the staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, T.; Viggers, L.; Beck, Anne Marie

    2003-01-01

    Background and Aims: To assess the amount of food produced in a hospital kitchen and the amount wasted. To assess the amount of food eaten by patients in relation to their energy needs. To assess whether the food production and wastage could be reduced by training members of the staff. Methods...... a reorganization of nutrition in hospitals, so that this is made the responsibility of specific staff members...

  4. Benefits of Exercise Training For Computer-Based Staff: A Meta Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mothna Mohammed

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Office workers sit down to work for approximately 8 hours a day and, as a result, many of them do not have enough time for any form of physical exercise. This can lead to musculoskeletal discomforts, especially low back pain and recently, many researchers focused on home/office-based exercise training for prevention/treatment of low back pain among this population. Objective: This Meta analyses paper tried to discuss about the latest suggested exercises for the office workers based on the mechanisms and theories behind low back pain among office workers. Method: In this Meta analyses the author tried to collect relevant papers which were published previously on the subject. Google Scholar, Scopus, and PubMed were used as sources to find the articles. Only articles that were published using the same methodology, including office workers, musculoskeletal discomforts, low back pain, and exercise training keywords, were selected. Studies that failed to report sufficient sample statistics, or lacked a substantial review of past academic scholarship and/or clear methodologies, were excluded. Results: Limited evidence regarding the prevention of, and treatment methods for, musculoskeletal discomfort, especially those in the low back, among office workers, is available. The findings showed that training exercises had a significant effect (p<0.05 on low back pain discomfort scores and decreased pain levels in response to office-based exercise training. Conclusion: Office-based exercise training can affect pain/discomfort scores among office workers through positive effects on flexibility and strength of muscles. As such, it should be suggested to occupational therapists as a practical way for the treatment/prevention of low back pain among office workers.

  5. Private Training Providers in Australia: Their Characteristics and Training Activities. A National Vocational Education and Training Research and Evaluation Program Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Roger; Simons, Michele; McCarthy, Carmel

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the nature of the training activity of private registered training organisations (RTOs) offered to Australian students in 2003, based on data from a national sample of 330 RTOs. The study also provides estimates of the private sector's overall contribution to the total vocational education and training (VET) effort in Australia…

  6. [The system of selection and training of military-medical staff for the 40th army (1979-1989)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabinkin, V V

    2015-10-01

    In December 1979 in order to fulfil their internationalist duty troops and units of the 40th Army of the Armed Forces of the USSR was brought into Afghanistan. For complete and qualitative manning of the army with the military doctors it was needed in a short time to create a system capable to carry out candidates selection, their education and specialized training for work in extreme conditions of combat operations. This system was created in a short time. The article presents information about its features, advantages and problems that had to be solved during the entire period of the Soviet-Afghan war. The complex staff arrangements had allowed solving medical support problems of the 40th Army on the high level.

  7. The Impact of Firm-Provided Training on Production: Testing for Firm-Size Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.P. de Kok (Jan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe returns to firm-provided training depend on many different factors. Firm size is an important indicator of various of these factors, but recent research tends to neglect it. In this study the returns to firm-provided training are estimated, taking account of three possible firm-size

  8. Importance of staff training in hotel industry Case Study: Hotel Dukagjini

    OpenAIRE

    MSc. Albana Gazija

    2011-01-01

    In every business, independently of the activity, human resources are the most precious capital. In terms of global competition and rapid change, personnel training are essential. Every manager should be able to attract qualified and capable personnel, in order to use their skills in achieving organizational objectives. In a market economy where uncertainty is rather widespread, obtaining knowledge and information is becoming a source for creating competing advantages. One of the most imp...

  9. A combined intervention to reduce interruptions during medication preparation and double-checking: a pilot-study evaluating the impact of staff training and safety vests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckels-Baumgart, Saskia; Niederberger, Milena; Manser, Tanja; Meier, Christoph R; Meyer-Massetti, Carla

    2017-10-01

    The aim was to evaluate the impact of staff training and wearing safety vests as a combined intervention on interruptions during medication preparation and double-checking. Interruptions and errors during the medication process are common and an important issue for patient safety in the hospital setting. We performed a pre- and post-intervention pilot-study using direct structured observation of 26 nurses preparing and double-checking 431 medication doses (225 pre-intervention and 206 post-intervention) for 36 patients (21 pre-intervention and 15 post-intervention). With staff training and the introduction of safety vests, the interruption rate during medication preparation was reduced from 36.8 to 28.3 interruptions per hour and during double-checking from 27.5 to 15 interruptions per hour. This pilot-study showed that the frequency of interruptions decreased during the critical tasks of medication preparation and double-checking after the introduction of staff training and wearing safety vests as part of a quality improvement process. Nursing management should acknowledge interruptions as an important factor potentially influencing medication safety. Unnecessary interruptions can be successfully reduced by considering human and system factors and increasing both staff and nursing managers' awareness of 'interruptive communication practices' and implementing physical barriers. This is the first pilot-study specifically evaluating the impact of staff training and wearing safety vests on the reduction of interruptions during medication preparation and double-checking. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Training and Certification for Domestic Violence Service Providers: The Need for a National Standard Curriculum and Training Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Stover, Carla Smith; Lent, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Domestic violence (DV) continues to constitute an enormous public health problem in the United States. Knowledge and understanding of the complexities involved in DV has grown significantly in recent years revealing a need for providers who have broad training in a variety of legal, safety, developmental, and clinical issues that face families impacted by DV. This paper reviews current approaches to training and the ability of such methods to adequately prepare providers. There are no nationa...

  11. Emergency preparedness training preferences and perceived barriers to training among various healthcare providers and public health practitioners in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broach, John; Smith, Mary-Elise

    2017-01-01

    Emergency preparedness training is vital to a wide range of healthcare and public health disciplines. Although agencies may try to tailor their training efforts based on perceived need, the topics and methods of instruction may be misguided, resulting in wasted effort and poor participation in training events. The objective of this study was to understand in a rigorous way, the training preferences and barriers to training among practitioners in Massachusetts. In August 2013, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health distributed an online survey to health professionals in Massachusetts regarding their emergency preparedness training topic preferences and any perceived barriers and challenges associated with obtaining this training. A total of 796 healthcare and public health professionals responded to the survey and answered some or all of the questions asked. The results of the survey identified important differences in preference for some topics based on a provider's practice location and discipline. However, Community Recovery and Community Preparedness were seen as desirable by all disciplines with more than 80 percent of respondents rating each of these issues as being highly important. Barriers to training were also assessed. Time spent away from work was the most commonly identified barrier (77.41 percent). Travel distance and financial constraints were also rated highly with scores of 65.48 and 63.71 percent, respectively. This study demonstrates important areas of agreement with respect to desired training topics and points out areas where providers in different disciplines and from different geographic areas may have differing educational preferences. Even within the limitation of this investigation, we expect that this study will be a valuable tool for those attempting to effectively target emergency preparedness training and structure course offerings in ways that minimize the impact of barriers to training.

  12. Evidence-based training in the era of evidence-based practice: Challenges and opportunities for training of PTSD providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Raymond C; Ruzek, Josef I; Karlin, Bradley E

    2017-01-01

    There is a pressing global need for trained and competent mental health clinicians to deliver evidence-based psychological therapies to millions of trauma survivors in need of care. Three model, large-scale training programs were initiated a decade ago, one in the United Kingdom (U.K.), and two in the United States (U.S.), to disseminate high-quality, evidence-based psychological care to traumatized children and adults in need of assistance. Milestone contributions to implementation science have been made by each of these training programs, although limitations and challenges remain to be considered. In contrast, culturally adapted and simplified PTSD interventions and therapy training programs have also been developed and tested during the past decade, three of which show particular promise for broader implementation. These simplified but evidence-based interventions have been developed for use by lay counsellors or health technicians with minimal or no prior mental health training. Finally, a growing range of technology-based and technology-assisted training models for PTSD providers have also been developed and disseminated in the past decade. This trend is expected to accelerate as more providers become accustomed to acquiring clinical training in this modality or format, although significant barriers to technology-based training will need to be overcome. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Mental health knowledge and skills among preschool nurseries' staff in Alexandria and the effect of an in-service training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Din, Amira G Self; Shokeir, Nagwa Fouad; Ziady, Hany Hassan

    2002-01-01

    Day care centres and kindergartens, have potential effects on children's physical, social and mental developments. The present study was carried out to assess the knowledge and skills of nurseries' staff in Alexandria as regard child mental health, and to evaluate the outcome of an in-service child mental health training programme. For this purpose 10% of the registered nurseries in Alexandria were selected by the stratified random sampling technique using proportional allocation (n = 54) to represent the six districts of Alexandria. Data were collected from all staff members of selected nurseries present during the visits to the nurseries (n = 172). A self-administered questionnaire was used and including general information about the respondents, and their knowledge and skills regarding child mental health. From the total sample, 52 were randomly selected to attend a 2-day in-service mental health training programme. Results of the study revealed deficiency of knowledge and skills of the staff in most of the tested items. However, staff who were graduates of Faculties of Kindergarten, Education and Arts were significantly better than other educational categories regarding the number of correct or partially correct answers. The training programme proved to cause a significant improvement in knowledge and skills of the staff in most of the items. It was recommended to increase the staff who have educational background of kindergarten and education, to give more attention to continuous evaluation of nurseries' staff knowledge and skills, and to apply a maintained system of pre and in-service child mental health training programmes for them.

  14. [Breast-feeding training for the nursing staff at the General Hospital of Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Garduño, A G; de la Rosa-Ruiz, L

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the change of knowledge in nurses attending an eighteen-hour lactation course at the General Hospital of Mexico. The study was conducted from May 1996 to May 1997 and consisted of a breastfeeding training course and pre and post-test course evaluations of nurse participants. One-hundred-and-forty out of 152 nurses were trained and evaluated. Statistical analysis consisted of a paired t-test and analysis of variance. Of 152 nurses attending the course, 140 (92%) completed pre and post-course evaluations. Global results of pre and post-tests were 5.39 +/- 1.37 and 7.74 +/- 0.79, (p < 0.001). The difference was still significant after we compared the instruction level of participants. There was a trend towards a higher level of instruction among those with higher knowledge on lactation in the post-course evaluation (p = 0.004). An 18-hour course given to nurses significantly increased in knowledge on lactation.

  15. Evaluation of Basic Life Support Training Program Provided for Nurses in A University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Terzi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study was conducted to assess the efficiency of the basic life support (BLS training program provided for nurses in a university hospital. To evaluate the efficiency of the BLS training program provided for nurses in a university hospital. Methods: In this a quasi-experimental study, a total of 404 nurses who received BLS training were enrolled. The study was performed in two stages. In stage one, the participant nurses were given a pre-test that consisted of 25 questions, four points each, before the training on the first day of the 2-day BLS training. The post-test was conducted in addition to practical exams on manikins to determine nurses’ practice skills on BLS. Results: There was a statistically significant difference between the nurses with previous BLS training and the difference between their pre- and post-test results (p<0.05, and high statistically significant difference was found between the nurses with previous advanced life support (ALS training and the difference between their pre- and post-test results (p<0.001. Conclusion: Nurses should receive BLS training in hospitals and the training should be repeated on a regular basis. The BLS training that the nurses received in this study was effective and increased their knowledge level on BLS

  16. A cluster randomised controlled trial of a staff-training intervention in residential units for people with long-term mental illness in Portugal: the PromQual trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Graça; Papoila, Ana; Tomé, Gina; Killaspy, Helen; King, Michael; Caldas-de-Almeida, José Miguel

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a staff-training intervention to improve service users' engagement in activities and quality of care, by means of a cluster randomised controlled trial. All residential units with at least 12-h a day staff support (n = 23) were invited to participate. Quality of care was assessed with the Quality Indicator for Rehabilitative Care (QuIRC) filled online by the unit's manager. Half the units (n = 12) were randomly assigned to continue providing treatment as usual, and half (n = 11) received a staff-training intervention that focused on skills for engaging service users in activities, with trainers working alongside staff to embed this learning in the service. The primary outcome was service users' level of activity (measured with the Time Use Diary), reassessed at 4 and 8 months. Secondary outcomes were the quality of care provided (QuIRC), and service users' quality of life (Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life) reassessed at 8 months. Generalized linear mixed effect models were used to assess the difference in outcomes between units in the two trial arms. The trial was registered with Current Controlled Trials (Ref NCT02366117). Knowledge acquired by the staff during the initial workshops increased significantly (p ≤ 0.01). However, the intervention and comparison units did not differ significantly in primary and secondary outcomes at either follow-up. The intervention increased the level of knowledge of staff without leading to an improvement in service users' engagement in activities, quality of life, or quality of care in the units.

  17. Technical Staff Training at the Ural Private Mining Plants in the First Part of the XIX Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Dashkevitch

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the level and quality of employees’ technical training at the private factories in the Ural region in the pre-reform period of the XIX century, which appears to be one of the least explored aspects in the history of education. Analyzing the existing data and preserved documents, the author attempts to fill the above gaps and demonstrates the dynamics of the private schools development in the factory settlements of the region, their curricula and the government’s attitude to the issue of the factory serfs’ training. The research findings reveal that despite the government’s resistance the number of educated professionals and technicians was gradu- ally increasing in the first half of the XIX century. It was especially noticeable in the large private factories owned by the Demidovs, Stroganoffs and Vsevolozhskys. In the middle of the century, the expertise and skills of the top and senior managerial and technical staff had met the existing requirements. However, the top managers and factory owners anticipated the forthcoming changes in the personnel policy due to the engineering and industrial development in the last half of the century. 

  18. Technical Staff Training at the Ural Private Mining Plants in the First Part of the XIX Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Dashkevitch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the level and quality of employees’ technical training at the private factories in the Ural region in the pre-reform period of the XIX century, which appears to be one of the least explored aspects in the history of education. Analyzing the existing data and preserved documents, the author attempts to fill the above gaps and demonstrates the dynamics of the private schools development in the factory settlements of the region, their curricula and the government’s attitude to the issue of the factory serfs’ training. The research findings reveal that despite the government’s resistance the number of educated professionals and technicians was gradu- ally increasing in the first half of the XIX century. It was especially noticeable in the large private factories owned by the Demidovs, Stroganoffs and Vsevolozhskys. In the middle of the century, the expertise and skills of the top and senior managerial and technical staff had met the existing requirements. However, the top managers and factory owners anticipated the forthcoming changes in the personnel policy due to the engineering and industrial development in the last half of the century. 

  19. Training and Certification for Domestic Violence Service Providers: The Need for a National Standard Curriculum and Training Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, Carla Smith; Lent, Kimberly

    2014-04-01

    Domestic violence (DV) continues to constitute an enormous public health problem in the United States. Knowledge and understanding of the complexities involved in DV has grown significantly in recent years revealing a need for providers who have broad training in a variety of legal, safety, developmental, and clinical issues that face families impacted by DV. This paper reviews current approaches to training and the ability of such methods to adequately prepare providers. There are no national standards for providers at any level from DV advocates to batterer interventionists, to clinicians with the required hours of training in most states at an alarmingly low level. Few states require cross training for those working as victim advocates or batterer interventionists. The systems that currently provide segregated and limited training create silos of service that are less effective. A proposed set of standards and training guidelines are proposed for DV advocates, batterer interventionists, and clinicians along with a discussion of the implications of such standards for the field.

  20. Building workforce capacity to detect and respond to child abuse and neglect cases: A training intervention for staff working in emergency settings in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemington, Tara; Fraser, Jennifer

    2017-09-01

    Too many children are brought to hospital emergency departments on numerous occasions before they are recognised as victims of child abuse and neglect. For this reason, improving knowledge and response behaviors of emergency staff at all levels is likely to have a significant impact on better outcomes. An Australian based training programme was the first of its kind to address this issue in a Vietnamese Emergency Department. Titled 'Safe Children Vietnam', the programme aimed to improve knowledge, attitudes and reporting behaviors concerning child abuse in the emergency setting. A pre-post test design was used to evaluate the impact of 'Safe Children Vietnam' on emergency staff knowledge, attitudes and intentions to report child abuse and neglect. Emergency staff including doctors, nurses and healthcare staff (n=116) participated in the clinical training programme. Linear Mixed Model analyses showed that on programme completion, they were more likely to recognise serious cases of all types of abuse. The 'Safe Children Vietnam' programme was effective at improving emergency staff knowledge of child abuse and neglect. A systems wide approach may be necessary to impact on emergency staff attitudes towards reporting cases of abuse. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. New dimensions in surgical training: immersive virtual reality laparoscopic simulation exhilarates surgical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Tobias; Paschold, Markus; Hansen, Christian; Wunderling, Tom; Lang, Hauke; Kneist, Werner

    2017-11-01

    Virtual reality (VR) and head mount displays (HMDs) have been advanced for multimedia and information technologies but have scarcely been used in surgical training. Motion sickness and individual psychological changes have been associated with VR. The goal was to observe first experiences and performance scores using a new combined highly immersive virtual reality (IVR) laparoscopy setup. During the study, 10 members of the surgical department performed three tasks (fine dissection, peg transfer, and cholecystectomy) on a VR simulator. We then combined a VR HMD with the VR laparoscopic simulator and displayed the simulation on a 360° video of a laparoscopic operation to create an IVR laparoscopic simulation. The tasks were then repeated. Validated questionnaires on immersion and motion sickness were used for the study. Participants' times for fine dissection were significantly longer during the IVR session (regular: 86.51 s [62.57 s; 119.62 s] vs. IVR: 112.35 s [82.08 s; 179.40 s]; p = 0.022). The cholecystectomy task had higher error rates during IVR. Motion sickness did not occur at any time for any participant. Participants experienced a high level of exhilaration, rarely thought about others in the room, and had a high impression of presence in the generated IVR world. This is the first clinical and technical feasibility study using the full IVR laparoscopy setup combined with the latest laparoscopic simulator in a 360° surrounding. Participants were exhilarated by the high level of immersion. The setup enables a completely new generation of surgical training.

  2. THEORY AND PRACTICE OF RHYTHM IN THE PROFESSIONAL TRAINING SYSTEM FOR ATHLETES AND TEACHING STAFF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Aftimichuk

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background . Rhythm is important for the implementation of all processes as in nature and in living organisms. It organizes motor human activity making it more productive and rational. On teaching working and sports motions the process of the impellent work correct rhythm assimilation plays an important role because it determines the movement performance optimum that is shown in its automation process reduction. As a result, man’s physical strength and nervous energy are saved. Rhythm category acquires a special status for the physical training specialist. All his activity including the motor component depends on the rhythm. The aim of the research is to study the physiology of rhythm and justify the more efficient training process for future teachers and coaches. Methods . The following theoretical research methods were used: the abstract and axiomatic methods, analysis and synthesis, induction and deduction, idealization, comparison and generalization. Results. As a result of study of materials from the natural sciences, numerology, psychology, music, cybernetics, synergetic, physiology, was found that the change of different states, as in nature and in living organisms, is an undulating rhythmic character. Physiological basis of the same rhythm is dynamic change excitation and inhibition processes occurring in the central nervous system. In this paper features of rhythm were identified. To accelerate the assimilation of motor action rational rhythm it is necessary to develop a sense of rhythm which is successfully formed in during the musical-motor activities. Conclusions. For today the study of the rhythm phenomenon in professional preparation on physical education and sport, in our opinion, requires the further study. Adding exercises involving certain motor skills elements similar in rhythmic structure with professional and technical actions to the coaches and teachers education and the competitive technology formation should be

  3. Organising, Providing and Evaluating Technical Training for Early Career Researchers: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Besouw, Rachel M.; Rogers, Katrine S.; Powles, Christopher J.; Papadopoulos, Timos; Ku, Emery M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers the importance of providing technical training opportunities for Early Career Researchers (ECRs) worldwide through the case study of a MATLAB training programme, which was proposed, organised, managed and evaluated by a team of five ECRs at the University of Southampton. The effectiveness of the programme in terms of the…

  4. Industry Perceptions of Industry-Based Training Provided by Technical Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, Judith; Stone, James R., III

    1990-01-01

    Focus groups and interviews with representatives of 36 businesses explored business and industry perceptions regarding industry-based training (IBT) provided by technical colleges. The study found that several types of programs were being used; the more successful models were personalized or standardized generic occupational training. (JOW)

  5. Training providers on issues of race and racism improve health care equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Stephen C; Prasad, Shailendra; Hackman, Heather W

    2015-05-01

    Race is an independent factor in health disparity. We developed a training module to address race, racism, and health care. A group of 19 physicians participated in our training module. Anonymous survey results before and after the training were compared using a two-sample t-test. The awareness of racism and its impact on care increased in all participants. White participants showed a decrease in self-efficacy in caring for patients of color when compared to white patients. This training was successful in deconstructing white providers' previously held beliefs about race and racism. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The Impact of a Computer Training Program on the Ministry of Education and Higher Education Staff to Improve Computer Skills and Productive Performances

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed S. AbuShugair; Magdy Aqel; Ali. H. Abuseada

    2015-01-01

    The current study aims at identifying the impact of the training program (International Computer Driving Licence, CDL), which is used to improve skills and productivity performances, on the of Education and Higher Education Ministry staff, the sample consisted of 216 school head teachers and head teachers assistant in east and west directorates in Gaza city. The researchers applied the two study tools, which were the computer skills questionnaire, and training impact measuring questionnaire, ...

  7. Effectiveness of the 'Who's Challenging Who' support staff training intervention to improve attitudes and empathy towards adults with intellectual disability and challenging behaviours: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randell, Elizabeth; Hastings, Richard P; McNamara, Rachel; Knight, Roseanna; Gillespie, David; Taylor, Zachary

    2017-10-05

    Findings suggest approximately one in six people with intellectual disability engage in 'challenging behaviours', which include aggression towards others/property and self-injurious actions. In residential settings, actions of staff members can make challenging behaviours more likely to occur, or make these behaviours worse. In particular, negative attitudes from members of staff and lack of understanding about the reasons for challenging behaviour are contributory factors. 'Who's Challenging Who?' (WCW) training is designed to emphasise the role of staff in residential settings as a challenge also to people with intellectual disability. The course is delivered jointly by a trainer with intellectual disability who has been labelled as having challenging behaviour, along with a trainer without intellectual disability. This is a cluster randomised two-arm trial of WCW training versus a waiting list control. Overall, 118 residential settings will be recruited and randomised on a 1:1 ratio. Within each setting, two members of staff will be invited to take part in the trial. Participants will complete assessments at baseline and at 6 and 20 weeks. WCW is a half day initial training course with some follow-on coaching to ensure implementation. The primary outcome is changes in staff empathy towards people with challenging behaviour. Secondary outcomes at the staff level include confidence, attitudes and work-related well-being. Secondary outcomes at the residential setting level include recorded incidents of aggressive challenging behaviour, and use of any restrictive practices. If the results of the cluster randomised trial are positive, we will disseminate the findings widely and make all training manuals and materials freely available for anyone in intellectual disability services (and beyond) to use. Our training approach may have wider implications in other areas of social care. It may also provide a generally applicable model for how to train people with

  8. Increasing opportunities for question-asking in school-aged children with autism spectrum disorder: Effectiveness of staff training in pivotal response treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuur, R.; Huskens, B.E.B.M.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.; Didden, H.C.M.

    2017-01-01

    Deficits in question-asking are common in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Furthermore, their opportunities to self-initiate questions are often hindered by directive behavior of their conversation partners. This study assessed the effectiveness of staff training in pivotal response

  9. Impact of In-Service Training and Staff Development on Workers' Job Performance and Optimal Productivity in Public Secondary Schools in Osun State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejoh, Johnson; Faniran, Victoria Loveth

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of in-service training and staff development on workers' job performance and optimal productivity in public secondary schools in Osun State, Nigeria. The study used the ex-post-facto research design. Three research questions and three hypotheses were generated and tested using questionnaire items adapted from…

  10. How to Support and Engage Students in Alternative Forms of Education and Training? A Qualitative Study of School Staff Members in Flanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Praag, Lore; Van Caudenberg, Rut; Nouwen, Ward; Clycq, Noel; Timmerman, Christiane

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on how students, who for a variety of reasons struggle in mainstream secondary schools, can be supported and engaged by alternative forms of education and training to attain a (formal) qualification. Interviews and focus groups are carried out with school staff members of distinct types of alternative learning arenas in Flanders…

  11. Instruction and video feedback to improve staff's trainer behaviour and response prompting during one-to-one training with young children with severe intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonderen, A.M.H. van; Duker, P.C.C.; Didden, H.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on correct trainer behaviour and the use of prompt sequences of 10 direct-care staff during one-to-one training with 10 young children with severe intellectual disability. Following baseline, trainers received instruction (written

  12. Tracking working status of HIV/AIDS-trained service providers by means of a training information monitoring system in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadew Mesrak

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Federal Ministry of Health of Ethiopia is implementing an ambitious and rapid scale-up of health care services for the prevention, care and treatment of HIV/AIDS in public facilities. With support from the United States President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, 38 830 service providers were trained, from early 2005 until December 2007, in HIV-related topics. Anecdotal evidence suggested high attrition rates of providers, but reliable quantitative data have been limited. Methods With that funding, Jhpiego supports a Training Information Monitoring System, which stores training information for all HIV/AIDS training events supported by the same funding source. Data forms were developed to capture information on providers' working status and were given to eight partners who collected data during routine site visits on individual providers about working status; if not working at the facility, date of and reason for leaving; and source of information. Results Data were collected on 1744 providers (59% males in 53 hospitals and 45 health centres in 10 regional and administrative states. The project found that 32.6% of the providers were no longer at the site, 57.6% are still working on HIV/AIDS services at the same facility where they were trained and 10.4% are at the facility, but not providing HIV/AIDS services. Of the providers not at the facility, the two largest groups were those who had left for further study (27.6% and those who had gone to another public facility (17.6%. Of all physicians trained, 49.2% had left the facility. Regional and cadre variation was found, for example Gambella had the highest percent of providers no longer at the site (53.7% while Harari had the highest percentage of providers still working on HIV/AIDS (71.6%. Conclusion Overall, the project found that the information in the Training Information Monitoring System can be used to track the working status of trained providers. Data generated from

  13. Assessing the efficacy of LGBT cultural competency training for aging services providers in California's central valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva, Valerie L; Breshears, Elizabeth M; Ringstad, Robin

    2014-01-01

    This study reviews the outcomes of a cultural competency training for aging services providers regarding lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) older adults. Results indicate that participants significantly increased their knowledge, skills, and positive attitudes about working with LGBT older adults, with men and non-LGBT individuals reporting the most gain. Recommendations for future research include determining which factors influence the enduring effects of this type of training and developing a standardized instrument for measuring such success. Legislative and policy changes targeted at requiring this type of cultural competency training for all direct service providers are considered.

  14. Learning and performance outcomes of mental health staff training in de-escalation techniques for the management of violence and aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Owen; Baker, John; Bee, Penny; Lovell, Karina

    2015-06-01

    De-escalation techniques are a recommended non-physical intervention for the management of violence and aggression in mental health. Although taught as part of mandatory training for all National Health Service (NHS) mental health staff, there remains a lack of clarity around training effectiveness. To conduct a systematic review of the learning, performance and clinical safety outcomes of de-escalation techniques training. The review process involved a systematic literature search of 20 electronic databases, eligibility screening of results, data extraction, quality appraisal and data synthesis. A total of 38 relevant studies were identified. The strongest impact of training appears to be on de-escalation-related knowledge, confidence to manage aggression and deescalation performance (although limited to artificial training scenarios). No strong conclusions could be drawn about the impact of training on assaults, injuries, containment and organisational outcomes owing to the low quality of evidence and conflicting results. It is assumed that de-escalation techniques training will improve staff's ability to de-escalate violent and aggressive behaviour and improve safety in practice. There is currently limited evidence that this training has these effects. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  15. Training veterans to provide peer support in a weight-management program: MOVE!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allicock, Marlyn; Haynes-Maslow, Lindsey; Carr, Carol; Orr, Melinda; Kahwati, Leila C; Weiner, Bryan J; Kinsinger, Linda

    2013-11-07

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has implemented MOVE!, a weight-management program for veterans designed to address the increasing proportion of overweight and obese veterans. The objective of our study was to determine whether peer support employing motivational interviewing (MI) could positively influence lifestyle changes, thus expanding the reach of the MOVE! program. We describe the initial evaluation of the peer training program. We developed an MI peer ounselor training program for volunteer veterans, the "Buddies" program, to provide one-on-one telephone support for veterans enrolled in MOVE!. Buddies were recruited at 5 VHA sites and trained to provide peer support for the 6-month MOVE! intervention. We used a DVD to teach MI skills and followed with 2 to 3 booster sessions. We observed training, conducted pre- and posttraining surveys, and debriefed focus groups to assess training feasibility. Fifty-six Buddies were trained. Results indicate positive receipt of the program (89% reported learning about peer counseling and 87% reported learning communication skills). Buddies showed a small improvement in MI self-efficacy on posttraining surveys. We also identified key challenges to learning MI and training implementation. MI training is feasible to implement and acceptable to volunteer Buddies. Trainers must assess how effectively volunteers learn MI skills in order to enhance its effective use in health promotion.

  16. Staff evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, A J

    1979-02-01

    The necessity for evaluating hospital pharmacy department personnel, and the recognized methods for performing such evaluations, including their advantages and deficiencies, are reviewed. Performance appraisal systems using ranking, person-to-person comparison, grading, graphic scales, checklists, forced-choice description, selection of critical incidents and management by objectives (MBO) are detailed, with emphasis upon their use in hospital pharmacy departments. All of these systems, with the exception of MBO, place inappropriate emphasis upon various subjective personality trails while failing to include objective results attained by personnel. Most of these methods (again excepting MBO) deny the evaluate-manager the opportunity to coach staff members in an attempt to improve results achievement. Staff evaluation, when carried out under an MBO system, is more likely to provide the hospital pharmacy department and its director with improved staff performance and development.

  17. SCAN-ECHO for Pain Management: Implementing a Regional Telementoring Training for Primary Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Sherry; Wilson, Brigid; Ober, Scott; Mchaourab, Ali

    2017-05-19

     The Specialty Care Access Network-Extension for Community Health Outcomes (SCAN-ECHO) is a video teleconferencing-based training program where primary care providers are trained by a specialty care team to provide specialty care. A multidisciplinary team of pain management specialists at the Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center established such a program for pain management; a description and preliminary effectiveness assessment of this training program is presented.  Primary care provider participants in the Specialty Care Access Network program in pain management completed pre- and post-training questionnaires. A subset of these participants also participated in a group session semistructured interview.  Twenty-four primary care providers from Cleveland, South Texas, or Wisconsin Veterans Affairs Medical Centers who regularly attended pain management SCAN-ECHO sessions during 2011, 2012, 2013, or 2014 completed pre- and post-training questionnaires.  Pre- and post-training questionnaires were conducted to measure confidence in treating and knowledge of pain management. Questionnaire responses were tested for significance using R. Qualitative data were analyzed using inductive coding and content analysis.  Statistically significant increases in confidence ratings and scores on knowledge questionnaires were noted from pre- to post-pain management SCAN-ECHO training. Program participants felt more knowledgeable and reported improved communication between specialty and primary care providers.  This pilot study reveals positive outcomes in terms of primary care providers' confidence and knowledge in treating patients with chronic pain. Results suggest that involving primary care providers in a one-year academic project such as this can improve their knowledge and skills and has the potential to influence their opioid prescribing practices.

  18. A management framework for training providers to improve skills development in the workplace

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    D.Ed. A skills revolution was launched in the South African workplace by the Department of Labour in 1998. Various skills development legislation were introduced to meet international standards, redress skills imbalances, curb skills shortages and improve the general skills in the current workforce. Training providers were the drivers of workplace training, yet are now displaced by skills authorities, such as the SET As, the ETQAs and SAQA. While the custody of skills development is placed...

  19. Training School Mental Health Providers to Deliver Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beidas, Rinad S; Mychailyszyn, Matthew P; Edmunds, Julie M; Khanna, Muniya S; Downey, Margaret Mary; Kendall, Philip C

    2012-12-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent mental health difficulties experienced by youth. A well-established literature has identified cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) as the gold-standard psychosocial treatment for youth anxiety disorders. Access to CBT in community clinics is limited, but a potential venue for the provision of CBT for child anxiety disorders is the school setting. The present study examined a subset of data from a larger study in which therapists from a variety of settings, including schools, were trained in CBT for child anxiety (N = 17). The study investigated the relationship between provider- and organizational-level variables associated with training and implementation among school mental health providers. The present findings indicate a positive relationship between provider attitudes and adherence to CBT. Self-reported barriers to implementation were also identified. Integrating CBT into school mental health providers' repertoires through training and consultation is a critical step for dissemination and implementation of empirically supported psychosocial treatments.

  20. Nonsuicidal Self-Injury among Adolescents: A Training Priority for Primary Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taliaferro, Lindsay A.; Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.; Hetler, Joel; Edwall, Glenace; Wright, Catherine; Edwards, Anne; Borowsky, Iris W.

    2013-01-01

    Primary care providers were surveyed to determine how prepared they feel to address nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among adolescents, their interest in training on NSSI, and factors associated with routinely asking about NSSI when providing health supervision. Participants included family medicine physicians ("n" = 260), pediatricians…

  1. 75 FR 21297 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Web Based Training for Pain Management Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-23

    ... Based Training for Pain Management Providers, via the Web site PainAndAddictionTreatment.com , to... addiction co-occurring in the provider's patients. In order to evaluate the effectives of the program... collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Direct Comments to OMB: Written comments and...

  2. 75 FR 6208 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Web Based Training for Pain Management Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-08

    ... Based Training for Pain Management Providers, via the Web site PainAndAddictionTreatment.com , to... addiction co-occurring in the provider's patients. In order to evaluate the effectives of the program... technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...

  3. Professional Quality of Life of Veterans Affairs Staff and Providers in a Patient-Centered Care Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Sara M; LaVela, Sherri L

    2015-01-01

    Changes to the work environment prompted by the movement toward patient-centered care have the potential to improve occupational stress among health care workers by improving team-based work activities, collaboration, and employee-driven quality improvement. This study was conducted to examine professional quality of life among providers at patient-centered care pilot facilities. Surveys were conducted with 76 Veterans Affairs employees/providers at facilities piloting patient-centered care interventions, to assess demographics, workplace practices and views (team-based environment, employee voice, quality of communication, and turnover intention), and professional quality of life (compassion satisfaction, burnout, and secondary traumatic stress).Professional quality-of-life subscales were not related to employee position type, age, or gender. Employee voice measures were related to lower burnout and higher compassion satisfaction. In addition, employees who were considering leaving their position showed higher burnout and lower compassion satisfaction scores. None of the work practices showed relationships with secondary traumatic stress.

  4. Perceived needs of health tutors in rural and urban health training institutions in Ghana: Implications for health sector staff internal migration control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Kaba Alhassan

    Full Text Available The population of Ghana is increasingly becoming urbanized with about 70% of the estimated 27 million people living in urban and peri-urban areas. Nonetheless, eight out of the ten regions in Ghana remain predominantly rural where only 32% of the national health sector workforce works. Moreover, the rural-urban disparities in the density of health tutors (staff responsible for pre-service training of health professionals are enormous. This paper explores perceived needs of health tutors in rural and urban health training institutions in Ghana.This is a descriptive qualitative study conducted in the Greater Accra and Northern regions of Ghana. The Study used the deductive thematic and sub-thematic analysis approaches. Five health training institutions were randomly sampled, and 72 tutors engaged in separate focus group discussions with an average size of 14 participants per group in each training institution.Perceived rural-urban disparities among health tutors were found in the payment of extra duty allowances; school infrastructure including libraries and internet connectivity; staff accommodation; and opportunities for scholarships and higher education. Health tutors in rural areas generally expressed more frustration with these work conditions than those in urban areas.There is the need to initiate and sustain work incentives that promote motivation of rural health tutors to control ongoing rural-urban migration of qualified staff. It is recommended the following incentives be prioritized to promote retention of qualified health tutors in rural health training schools: payment of research, book and rural allowances; early promotion of rural staff; prioritizing rural tutors for scholarships, and introduction of national best health tutor awards.

  5. Perceived needs of health tutors in rural and urban health training institutions in Ghana: Implications for health sector staff internal migration control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyere, Christopher B.; Nketiah-Amponsah, Edward; Mwini-Nyaledzigbor, Prudence P.

    2017-01-01

    Background The population of Ghana is increasingly becoming urbanized with about 70% of the estimated 27 million people living in urban and peri-urban areas. Nonetheless, eight out of the ten regions in Ghana remain predominantly rural where only 32% of the national health sector workforce works. Moreover, the rural-urban disparities in the density of health tutors (staff responsible for pre-service training of health professionals) are enormous. This paper explores perceived needs of health tutors in rural and urban health training institutions in Ghana. Methods This is a descriptive qualitative study conducted in the Greater Accra and Northern regions of Ghana. The Study used the deductive thematic and sub-thematic analysis approaches. Five health training institutions were randomly sampled, and 72 tutors engaged in separate focus group discussions with an average size of 14 participants per group in each training institution. Results Perceived rural-urban disparities among health tutors were found in the payment of extra duty allowances; school infrastructure including libraries and internet connectivity; staff accommodation; and opportunities for scholarships and higher education. Health tutors in rural areas generally expressed more frustration with these work conditions than those in urban areas. Conclusions There is the need to initiate and sustain work incentives that promote motivation of rural health tutors to control ongoing rural-urban migration of qualified staff. It is recommended the following incentives be prioritized to promote retention of qualified health tutors in rural health training schools: payment of research, book and rural allowances; early promotion of rural staff; prioritizing rural tutors for scholarships, and introduction of national best health tutor awards. PMID:28982194

  6. Brief Training on Patient Anger Increases Oncology Providers' Self-Efficacy in Communicating With Angry Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhart, James I; Sanchez Varela, Veronica; Burns, John W

    2017-09-01

    Anger is a common reaction to pain and life-limiting and life-threatening illness, is linked to higher levels of pain, and may disrupt communication with medical providers. Anger is understudied compared with other emotions in mental health and health care contexts, and many providers have limited formal training in addressing anger. The objective of this study was to assess if a brief provider training program is a feasible method for increasing providers' self-efficacy in responding to patient anger. Providers working in stem cell transplant and oncology units attending a brief training session on responding to patient anger. The program was informed by cognitive behavioral models of anger and included didactics, discussion, and experiential training on communication and stress management. Provider-rated self-efficacy was significantly higher for nine of 10 skill outcomes (P didactics, and experiential exercises can support provider awareness of anger, shape adaptive communication, and foster stress management skills. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Disruptive staff interactions: a serious source of inter-provider conflict and stress in health care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Mona; Stecker, Mark M

    2014-07-01

    This study sought to explore the prevalence of workplace stress, gender differences, and the relationship of workplace incivility to the experience of stress. Effects of stress on performance have been explored for many years. Work stress has been at the root of many physical and psychological problems and has even been linked to medical errors and suboptimal patient outcomes. In this study, 617 respondents completed a Provider Conflict Questionnaire (PCQ) as well as a ten-item stress survey. Work was the main stressor according to 78.2% of respondents. The stress index was moderately high, ranging between 10 and 48 (mean = 25.5). Females demonstrated a higher stress index. Disruptive behavior showed a significant positive correlation with increased stress. This study concludes that employees of institutions with less disruptive behavior exhibited lower stress levels. This finding is important in improving employee satisfaction and reducing medical errors. It is difficult to retain experienced nurses, and stress is a significant contributor to job dissatisfaction. Moreover, workplace conflict and its correlation to increased stress levels must be managed as a strategy to reduce medical errors and increase job satisfaction.

  8. Improving the rehabilitative management of client sexual health concerns after neurological disability: evaluation of a staff sexuality training programme in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Grahame; Anwar, Samir; Wilson, Joan; Bertapelle, Tanya

    2006-10-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a staff sexuality training programme as a means of improving the rehabilitative management of client sexual health concerns after neurological disability. A prospective controlled pre- and posttest evaluation design with six-month follow-up. Seventy-four multidisciplinary rehabilitation and disability staff who attended a two-day workshop, and a control group of 25 staff members who did not receive the training. Two workshops were held at major rehabilitation centres in the North and South Islands of New Zealand respectively. The Sex Attitude Scale, as well as three purpose-designed measures including an objective knowledge test, a self-rating inventory of skills and clinical activity, and a single-item measure of the degree of staff comfort. Workshop participants showed significant increases in knowledge, skills and comfort comparing pre-to post-workshop scores. A number of these gains were maintained at the six-month follow-up. There was an associated increase in the level of reported staff activity in addressing patient/client sexual health concerns in the six months to follow-up, compared to a similar time period preceding the workshop. In contrast, the control group had similar pre-workshop scores to the workshop participants, but recorded no increase on the measures, or in their level of reported activity, at the six-month follow-up. The programme showed initial promise as an effective intervention in upgrading the capacity of staff working in rehabilitation and disability agencies to address the sexual health concerns of their patients/clients.

  9. An Educational Training on Cervical Cancer Screening Program for Rural Healthcare Providers in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Caroline Isaac

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional, cytology based Cervical cancer screening programmes used in the developed world is often not practical in developing countries. Training of health care work force on a feasible, low-tech, screening methods is urgently needed in low resource settings. Twenty providers including doctors and nurses participated in a 2-days training workshop organized by a Community Health Center in rural South India. The pre-post-training assessment showed significant improvement in knowledge about cervical cancer, ‘low tech’ screening, treatment options and counseling among the participants.  Twenty volunteers screened at the workshop, 2 women (10% tested positive and one had CINIII lesion and the other had cervical cancer stage IIIB. After the training, the participants felt confident about their ability to counsel and screen women for cervical cancer.

  10. Communication training improves patient-centered provider behavior and screening for soldiers' mental health concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Susan R; Vides de Andrade, Ana Regina; Boyd, Stephanie; Leslie, Melanie; Webb, Lynn; Davis, Lauren; Fraine, Melissa; Frazer, Nicole L; Hargraves, Ryan; Bickman, Leonard

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of patient-centered communication training for military providers who conduct post-deployment health screening. The half-day interactive workshop included simulated Soldier patients using video technology. Using a quasi-experimental design, all health care providers at four military treatment facilities were recruited for data collection during a four- to nine-day site visit (23 trained providers, 28 providers in the control group, and one provider declined to participate). All Soldiers were eligible to participate and were blinded to provider training status. Immediately after screening encounters, providers reported on their identification of mental health concerns and Soldiers reported on provider communication behaviors resulting in 1,400 matched pairs. Electronic health records were also available for 26,005 Soldiers. The workshop was found to increase (1) providers' patient-centered communication behaviors as evaluated by Soldiers; (2) provider identification of Soldier mental health concerns; and (3), related health outcomes including provision of education and referral to a confidential counseling resource. Results are promising, but with small effect sizes and study limitations, further research is warranted. A brief intensive workshop on patient-centered communication tailored to the military screening context is feasible and may improve key outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Training Emotional Intelligence Related to Treatment Skills of Staff Working with Clients with Intellectual Disabilities and Challenging Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlmans, L. J. M.; Embregts, P. J. C. M.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A. M. T.; Derksen, J. J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities (ID) who display challenging behaviour may contribute to the continuation of this behaviour, because it causes emotional reactions such as anxiety, anger and annoyance, which may prohibit adequate response behaviour. To enhance staff behaviour and treatment skills a training…

  12. Staff Views of the Importance of Relationships for Knowledge Development: Is Training by Specialists a Waste of Money?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Jill; Goldbart, Juliet

    2013-01-01

    Background: The provision of skilled support is dependent on staff knowledge and understanding (Beadle-Brown J., Beecham J., Mansell J., Baumker T., Leigh J., Whelton R. & Richardson L, unpublished data). Influencing staff knowledge and understanding is an important component of interventions. Materials and Methods: Fourteen individual…

  13. Do LGBT aging trainings effectuate positive change in mainstream elder service providers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Kristen E; Krinsky, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to provide empirical evidence regarding whether attitudes, beliefs, and intentions of elder-service providers can be positively affected as a result of attending cultural competency training on the unique challenges of sexual and gender minorities. Stigmatization throughout the lifespan may have a causal influence on barriers to care, social isolation, and concomitant health disparities. Data were collected for this study at 4 Massachusetts training events to pilot a cultural competency workshop on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) aging for mainstream elder service providers. This quasi-experimental study included the analysis of pre- and posttest surveys completed by the service-provider attendees (N = 76). The analytic strategy included descriptive statistics, paired t tests, chi-square analyses, and repeated measures analyses of variance. Findings revealed statistically significant improvement in numerous aspects of providers' knowledge, attitudes, and behavioral intentions subsequent to the training sessions. These included (p = .000) awareness of LGBT resources, policy disparities, spousal benefits for same-sex couples, and the intention to challenge homophobic remarks. This study concludes that mainstream elder-service provider training on LGBT aging issues results in positive change. Recommendations include long-term follow up of participants, the inception of agency-level surveys to appraise institutional culture change, and increased curriculum on transgender older adults.

  14. Explaining Research Utilization Among 4-H Faculty, Staff, and Volunteers: The Role of Self-Efficacy, Learning Goal Orientation, Training, and Previous Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julianne Tillman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of factors that facilitate the utilization of research evidence among faculty, staff, and volunteers in the 4-H Youth Development Program is presented in this paper. Participants (N= 368; 86 4-H faculty, 153 staff, and 129 volunteers represented 35 states; structural equation modeling was utilized in the analyses. Results of the path analysis explained 56% of variance in research utilization and 28% in research utilization self-efficacy. Among the factors impacting research utilization, self-efficacy played the most important role. In turn, self-efficacy for research utilization was positively influenced by participants’ learning goal orientation, frequency of 4-H training during the last 12 months, education in research-related areas, and investigative career interests. In addition, 4-H staff who were exposed to research at higher levels reported higher research utilization self-efficacy. The findings reinforce the importance of fostering research utilization self-efficacy among 4-H faculty, staff, and volunteers. Among the suggestions presented are regular 4-H training opportunities and on-going exposure to program evaluation and program improvement experiences.

  15. A management framework for training providers to improve workplace skills development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Govender

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Deputy President, Ms Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, says a skills revolution is necessary for South Africa’s (SA skills crisis. The SA skills revolution began with the skills legislation of 1998-9 when the Departments of Labour (DOL and Education (DOE intended a seamless, integrated approach to rapid skills development. The National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS, the Sector Education and Training Providers (SETAs, the South African Qualifications Authorities (SAQA and the National Qualifications Framework (NQF were established to drive the human resource and skills development revolutionary strategy. The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of the 2001-3 research investigating an internal management framework for training providers, employers and managers to accelerate workplace skills development. Design/Methodology/Approach: An integrated, multi-method research model was employed to gather empirical evidence on skills practices. A robust quantitative survey was conducted within 600 organisations. Simultaneously, rich, descriptive data was gathered from managers and employees using a structured qualitative interview strategy. The integrated data pool was factor analysed. The research findings, conclusion and recommended framework were reported in a PhD thesis. Findings: The research findings reveal major gaps in the effectiveness of SA training providers to radically accelerate and improve workplace skills development as per national skills legislation, implementation and management criteria. Implications: If the skills revolution in SA is to succeed, training providers especially, must become less complacent, more assertive and fully equipped when participating in the skills development arena. Originality/Value: Via this research, training providers will gain critical, reflective insight into their management framework for meeting skills legislative criteria and for managing training interventions and skills projects.

  16. A situational analysis of training for behaviour change counselling for primary care providers, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zelra Malan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-communicable diseases and associated risk factors (smoking, alcohol abuse, physical inactivity and unhealthy diet are a major contributor to primary care morbidity and the burden of disease. The need for healthcare-provider training in evidence-based lifestyle interventions has been acknowledged by the National Department of Health. However, local studies suggest that counselling on lifestyle modification from healthcare providers is inadequate and this may, in part, be attributable to a lack of training.Aim: This study aimed to assess the current training courses for primary healthcare providers in the Western Cape.Setting: Stellenbosch University and University of Cape Town.Methods: Qualitative interviews were conducted with six key informants (trainers of primary care nurses and registrars in family medicine and two focus groups (nine nurses and eight doctors from both Stellenbosch University and the University of Cape Town.Results: Trainers lack confidence in the effectiveness of behaviour change counselling and in current approaches to training. Current training is limited by time constraints and is not integrated throughout the curriculum – there is a focus on theory rather than modelling and practice, as well as a lack of both formative and summative assessment. Implementation of training is limited by a lack of patient education materials, poor continuity of care and record keeping, conflicting lifestyle messages and an unsupportive organisational culture.Conclusion: Revising the approach to current training is necessary in order to improve primary care providers’ behaviour change counselling skills. Primary care facilities need to create a more conducive environment that is supportive of behaviour change counselling.

  17. A situational analysis of training for behaviour change counselling for primary care providers, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mash, Bob; Everett-Murphy, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Non-communicable diseases and associated risk factors (smoking, alcohol abuse, physical inactivity and unhealthy diet) are a major contributor to primary care morbidity and the burden of disease. The need for healthcare-provider training in evidence-based lifestyle interventions has been acknowledged by the National Department of Health. However, local studies suggest that counselling on lifestyle modification from healthcare providers is inadequate and this may, in part, be attributable to a lack of training. Aim This study aimed to assess the current training courses for primary healthcare providers in the Western Cape. Setting Stellenbosch University and University of Cape Town. Methods Qualitative interviews were conducted with six key informants (trainers of primary care nurses and registrars in family medicine) and two focus groups (nine nurses and eight doctors) from both Stellenbosch University and the University of Cape Town. Results Trainers lack confidence in the effectiveness of behaviour change counselling and in current approaches to training. Current training is limited by time constraints and is not integrated throughout the curriculum – there is a focus on theory rather than modelling and practice, as well as a lack of both formative and summative assessment. Implementation of training is limited by a lack of patient education materials, poor continuity of care and record keeping, conflicting lifestyle messages and an unsupportive organisational culture. Conclusion Revising the approach to current training is necessary in order to improve primary care providers’ behaviour change counselling skills. Primary care facilities need to create a more conducive environment that is supportive of behaviour change counselling. PMID:26245589

  18. Collaborative learning: A next step in the training of peer support providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronise, Rita

    2016-09-01

    This column explores how peer support provider training is enhanced through collaborative learning. Collaborative learning is an approach that draws upon the "real life" experiences of individual learners and encompasses opportunities to explore varying perspectives and collectively construct solutions that enrich the practice of all participants. This description draws upon published articles and examples of collaborative learning in training and communities of practice of peer support providers. Similar to person-centered practices that enhance the recovery experience of individuals receiving services, collaborative learning enhances the experience of peer support providers as they explore relevant "real world" issues, offer unique contributions, and work together toward improving practice. Three examples of collaborative learning approaches are provided that have resulted in successful collaborative learning opportunities for peer support providers. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Optimizing the balance between radiation dose and image quality in pediatric head CT: findings before and after intensive radiologic staff training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolicchi, Fabio; Faggioni, Lorenzo; Bastiani, Luca; Molinaro, Sabrina; Puglioli, Michele; Caramella, Davide; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the radiation dose and image quality of pediatric head CT examinations before and after radiologic staff training. Outpatients 1 month to 14 years old underwent 215 unenhanced head CT examinations before and after intensive training of staff radiologists and technologists in optimization of CT technique. Patients were divided into three age groups (0-4, 5-9, and 10-14 years), and CT dose index, dose-length product, tube voltage, and tube current-rotation time product values before and after training were retrieved from the hospital PACS. Gray matter conspicuity and contrast-to-noise ratio before and after training were calculated, and subjective image quality in terms of artifacts, gray-white matter differentiation, noise, visualization of posterior fossa structures, and need for repeat CT examination was visually evaluated by three neuroradiologists. The median CT dose index and dose-length product values were significantly lower after than before training in all age groups (27 mGy and 338 mGy ∙ cm vs 107 mGy and 1444 mGy ∙ cm in the 0- to 4-year-old group, 41 mGy and 483 mGy ∙ cm vs 68 mGy and 976 mGy ∙ cm in the 5- to 9-year-old group, and 51 mGy and 679 mGy ∙ cm vs 107 mGy and 1480 mGy ∙ cm in the 10- to 14-year-old group; p staff training can be effective in reducing radiation dose while preserving diagnostic image quality in pediatric head CT examinations.

  20. Methodological Approaches and Principles of Foreign Language Teachers’ Training to Provide Schoolchildren with Ethnic Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botakoz A. Zhekibaeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents description of the main methodological approaches and principles of foreign language teachers’ training to provide schoolchildren with ethic education, including: person-centered, ethno-cultural, didactic, ethno-pedagogical, system, pragmatic approaches and principles of cultural conformity, dialectical unity of universal and national-ethnic, dialogue and cultural interaction. This analysis of methodological approaches and principles allowed us to define the content of foreign language teachers’ training to provide schoolchildren with ethic education, including combination of ethnic education knowledge, skills, its essence and features and to identify the forms, methods and means of teaching, enabling to train the foreign language teachers this branch of activity in the shortest time

  1. Vertical integration of teaching in Australian general practice--a survey of regional training providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, Nigel P; Frank, Oliver; Linn, Andrew M; Anderson, Katrina; Meertens, Sarah

    2011-06-06

    To examine vertical integration of teaching and clinical training in general practice and describe practical examples being undertaken by Australian general practice regional training providers (RTPs). A qualitative study of all RTPs in Australia, mid 2010. All 17 RTPs in Australia responded. Eleven had developed some vertical integration initiatives. Several encouraged registrars to teach junior doctors and medical students, others encouraged general practitioner supervisors to run multilevel educational sessions, a few coordinated placements, linkages and support across their region. Three RTPs provided case studies of vertical integration. Many RTPs in Australia use vertical integration of teaching in their training programs. RTPs with close associations with universities and rural clinical schools seem to be leading these initiatives.

  2. The development of a blended learning approach to delivering information skills training to large health related student audiences with limited staff resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Fiona

    2011-09-01

    This feature considers the challenges that academic librarians are increasingly being faced with in the delivery of information skills training to large student numbers with limited time and staff resources. A case study is presented of how an academic liaison librarian used a blended learning approach and innovative teaching practice to successfully deliver information skills training to large student numbers within the Faculty of Health and Social Care at Hull University. © 2011 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2011 Health Libraries Group.

  3. 20 CFR 670.505 - What types of training must Job Corps centers provide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... LABOR THE JOB CORPS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Program Activities and Center... standards and guidelines. (b) Each center must provide students with competency-based or individualized training in an occupational area that will best contribute to the students' opportunities for permanent...

  4. Web-Based SBIRT Skills Training for Health Professional Students and Primary Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, T. Bradley; Wilhelm, Susan E.; Rossie, Karen M.; Metcalf, Mary P.

    2012-01-01

    The authors have developed and assessed 2 innovative, case-based, interactive training programs on substance abuse, one for health professional students on alcohol and one for primary care providers on screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT). Both programs build skills in substance abuse SBIRT. Real-world effectiveness…

  5. Providing Alternative Reinforcers to Facilitate Tolerance to Delayed Reinforcement Following Functional Communication Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Jillian E.; Tiger, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    The earliest stages of functional communication training (FCT) involve providing immediate and continuous reinforcement for a communicative response (FCR) that is functionally equivalent to the targeted problem behavior. However, maintaining immediate reinforcement is not practical, and the introduction of delays is associated with increased…

  6. [Training future nurses in providing care for patients who committed criminal acts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvest, Karina; Royer, Gilles Ripaille-Le; Dugardin, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Providing care for patients who have carried out criminal acts is a source of questioning for caregivers, who must position themselves in this specific care relationship. For three years, the nursing training institute (IFSI) in Orthez has offered students an optional module in criminology. Through discussions and critical reflection, its aim is to enable future nurses to be better prepared.

  7. Effects of a late-life suicide risk--assessment training on multidisciplinary healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Joung T; Weaver, Christopher M; Martin, Jennifer L; Caskey, Nicholas H; O'Riley, Alisa; Kramer, Betty Josea

    2012-04-01

    Older adults are among the highest at risk for completing suicide, and they are more likely to seek mental health services from providers outside of traditional mental health care, but providers across the spectrum of care have limited training in suicide risk assessment and management and particularly lack training in suicide prevention for older adults. An educational program was developed to increase awareness and improve suicide risk assessment and management training for a range of healthcare providers who may see older adults in their care settings. One hundred thirty-two participants from two Veterans Affairs Medical Centers participated in a 6.5-hour-long workshop in the assessment and management of suicide risk in older adults. Participants were asked to complete pre- and postworkshop case notes and report on subjective changes in knowledge, attitudes, and confidence in assessment and managing suicide risk in older adults. Participants included social workers, nurses, physicians, psychologists, and occupational therapists from a variety of care settings, including outpatient and inpatient medical, outpatient and inpatient mental health, specialty clinics, home, and community. After the workshop, participants demonstrated improvement in the overall quality of case notes (P = .001), greater ability to recognize important conceptual suicide risk categories (P = .003), and reported heightened awareness of the importance of late-life suicide. The results suggest that educational training may have beneficial effect on the ability of multidisciplinary care providers to identify and manage suicide risk in elderly adults. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  8. The Assessment of Athletic Training Students' Knowledge and Behavior to Provide Culturally Competent Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nynas, Suzette Marie

    2015-01-01

    Context: Culturally competent knowledge and skills are critical for all healthcare professionals to possess in order to provide the most appropriate health care for their patients and clients. Objective: To investigate athletic training students' knowledge of culture and cultural differences, to assess the practice of culturally competent care,…

  9. Standardized Patients Provide a Reliable Assessment of Athletic Training Students' Clinical Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Kirk J.; Jarriel, Amanda J.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Providing students reliable objective feedback regarding their clinical performance is of great value for ongoing clinical skill assessment. Since a standardized patient (SP) is trained to consistently portray the case, students can be assessed and receive immediate feedback within the same clinical encounter; however, no research, to our…

  10. Intimate partner violence and health provider training and screening in the news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganello, Jennifer A; Webster, Daniel; Campbell, Jacquelyn C

    2006-01-01

    Intimate partner violence is a significant women's health issue. Since the news media can play a role in policy development, it is important to understand how newspapers have portrayed training and screening. The purpose of this study was to describe the frequency and nature of print news coverage of health issues related to partner violence, specifically, provider training and screening by health providers. We conducted a content analysis on articles obtained from major city and state capital daily newspapers from 20 states. News articles and editorials mentioning intimate partner violence and provider training and screening were examined for the years 1994 through 2001 (N = 188). Results showed that print news coverage was limited and received low levels of attention, indicating little potential to influence either policy or individual behavior. However, when the issue was covered, little debate or controversy was present, and a broad discussion of the issue was generally provided. News coverage of training and screening could be improved by increasing dissemination of research results, illustrating the policy implications of these issues, and offering resource information to women experiencing violence.

  11. Overcoming Learned Helplessness in Elderly Clients: Skills Training for Service Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priddy, J. Michael; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Relates the theory of learned helplessness to the losses of aging, and describes a brief experiential training program for service providers, teaching interpersonal skills useful in working with the depressed elderly. Focuses on reducing helplessness by allowing the elderly to have impact within the counseling interaction. (RC)

  12. High-fidelity multiactor emergency preparedness training for patient care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lancer A; Maddux, P Tim; Schnellmann, Jennifer; Hayes, Lauren; Tolley, Jessica; Wahlquist, Amy E

    2012-01-01

    Providing comprehensive emergency preparedness training (EPT) for patient care providers is important to the future success of emergency preparedness operations in the United States. Disasters are rare, complex events involving many patients and environmental factors that are difficult to reproduce in a training environment. Few EPT programs possess both competency-driven goals and metrics to measure life-saving performance during a multiactor simulated disaster. The development of an EPT curriculum for patient care providers-provided first to medical students, then to a group of experienced disaster medical providers-that recreates a simulated clinical disaster using a combination of up to 15 live actors and six high-fidelity human simulators is described. Specifically, the authors detail the Center for Health Professional Training and Emergency Response's (CHPTER's) 1-day clinical EPT course including its organization, core competency development, medical student self-evaluation, and course assessment. Two 1-day courses hosted by CHPTER were conducted in a university simulation center. Students who completed the course improved their overall knowledge and comfort level with EPT skills. The authors believe this is the first published description of a curriculum method that combines high-fidelity, multiactor scenarios to measure the life-saving performance of patient care providers utilizing a clinical disaster scenario with > 10 patients at once. A larger scale study, or preferably a multicenter trial, is needed to further study the impact of this curriculum and its potential to protect provider and patient lives.

  13. Provider training and experience for people living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackal, Julia M; Tynan, Anne-Marie; Handford, Curtis D; Rzeznikiewiz, Damian; Agha, Ayda; Glazier, Richard

    2011-06-15

    The complexity of HIV/AIDS raises challenges for the effective delivery of care. It is important to ensure that the expertise and experience of care providers is of high quality. Training and experience of HIV/AIDS providers may impact not only individual patient outcomes but increasingly on health care costs as well. The objective of this review is to assess the effects of provider training and experience on people living with HIV/AIDS on the following outcomes: immunological (ie. viral load, CD4 count), medical (ie. mortality, proportion on antiretrovirals), psychosocial (ie. quality of life measures) and economic outcomes (ie health care costs). We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Dissertation Abstracts International (DAI), CINAHL, HealthStar, PsycInfo, PsycLit, Social Sciences Abstracts, and Sociological Abstracts from January 1, 1980 through May 29, 2009.  Electronic searches were performed for abstracts from major international AIDS conferences. Reference lists from pertinent articles, books and review articles were retrieved and reviewed. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials, cohort, case control, cross-sectional studies and controlled before and after designs that examined the qualifications/training and patient volume of HIV/AIDS care of providers caring for persons known to be infected with HIV/AIDS were included. At least two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Study authors were contacted for further information as required. Assessment of confounding factors was undertaken independently by two reviewers. A total of four studies (one randomized controlled trial, three non- randomized studies) involving 8488 people living with HIV/AIDS were included. The main findings of this review demonstrated a trend to improved outcomes when treated by a provider with more training/expertise in HIV/AIDS care in the outpatient (clinic) setting. Due to the heterogeneity of the included studies, we could not perform a

  14. Training emotional intelligence related to treatment skills of staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlmans, L.J.M.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Derksen, J.J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Background - Staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities (ID) who display challenging behaviour may contribute to the continuation of this behaviour, because it causes emotional reactions such as anxiety, anger and annoyance, which may prohibit adequate response behaviour. To enhance

  15. A comparison between the effect of training performed by teachers and by health staff on the knowledge of high school students about AIDS in Bushehr/Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherafat Akaberian

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available A.I.D.S as a worldwide crisis continues to spread in Iran too. The number of afflicted patients has reached 5780 subjects most of them are between 20 to 40 years of age. Prevention is one of the most effective methods to combat this human hazard. Promotion of general knowledge is thought to be the preliminary measure in this regard. Although, schools have turned to be the most favorable environment for health education, the issue of the group to afford training has remained controversial in our country yet. The aim of this research is a comparison between the effect of training performed by teachers or health staff on the knowledge of students of the first high school grade in Bushehr/ Iran. A total of 684 male and female students of the first high school grade were selected according to cluster random sampling. The selected students were divided into two groups and training for A.I.D.S using the same contents was done by their teachers and health staff separately. Before intervention, the mean knowledge scores of female & male students about A.I.D.S were 16.68 and 15.52, respectively. There was no significant difference in female students in two groups but teacher trained male students showed an increment score of 4.17 while in health staff ones, the score increment was 2.22 (P<0.01. In conclusion, the level of knowledge about A.I.D.S was not satisfactory in the high school students in Bushehr and for education in this group their sex in conjunction to different training methods should be considered.

  16. Resources for Educating, Training, and Mentoring All Physicians Providing Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downar, James

    2018-01-01

    This article presents a rapid review of the published literature and available resources for educating Canadian physicians to provide palliative and end-of-life care. Several key messages emerge from the review. First, there are many palliative care educational resources already available for Canadian physicians. Second, the many palliative care education resources are often not used in physician training. Third, we know that some palliative care educational interventions are inexpensive and scalable, while others are costly and time-consuming; we know very little about which palliative care educational interventions impact physician behavior and patient care. Fourth, two palliative care competency areas in particular can be readily taught: symptom management and communication skill (e.g., breaking bad news and advance care planning). Fifth, palliative care educational interventions are undermined by the "hidden curriculum" in medical education; interventions must be accompanied by continuing education and faculty development to create lasting change in physician behavior. Sixth, undergraduate and postgraduate medical training is shifting from a time-based training paradigm to competency-based training and evaluation. Seventh, virtually every physician in Canada should be able to provide basic palliative care; physicians in specialized areas of practice should receive palliative care education that is tailored to their area, rather than generic educational interventions. For each key message, one or more implications are provided, which can serve as recommendations for a framework to improve palliative care as a whole in Canada.

  17. Deficiencies in postgraduate training for healthcare professionals who provide diabetes education and support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrne, J. L.; Davies, Melanie J; Willaing, I.

    2017-01-01

    : The present study shows that healthcare professionals report being insufficiently equipped to provide diabetes self-management education, including emotional and psychological aspects of diabetes, and many are not receiving postgraduate training in any part (including medical care) of the management......Aims: To consider the global provision of self-management diabetes education and training for healthcare professionals using data from the second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2) study. Methods: A total of 4785 healthcare professionals caring for people with diabetes were surveyed in 17...... in a domain was positively associated with a perceived need for further training. Communication skills, for example, listening (76.9%) and encouraging questions (76.1%), were the skills most widely used. Discussion of emotional issues was limited; 31–60% of healthcare professionals across the different...

  18. Win/win: creating collaborative training opportunities for behavioral health providers within family medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Nancy Breen; Borresen, Dorothy; Myerholtz, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Integrating behavioral health into primary healthcare offers multiple advantages for patients and health professionals. This model requires a new skill set for all healthcare professionals that is not emphasized in current educational models. The new skills include interprofessional team-based care competencies and expanded patient care competencies. Health professionals must learn new ways to efficiently and effectively address health behavior change, and manage behavioral health issues such as depression and anxiety. Learning environments that co-train mental health and primary care professionals facilitate acquisition of both teamwork and patient care competencies for mental health and primary care professional trainees. Family Medicine Residency programs provide an excellent opportunity for co-training. This article serves as a "how to" guide for residency programs interested in developing a co-training program. Necessary steps to establish and maintain a program are reviewed, as well as goals and objectives for a co-training curriculum and strategies to overcome barriers and challenges in co-training models.

  19. Training medical providers in evidence-based approaches to suicide prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHay, Tamara; Ross, Sarah; McFaul, Mimi

    2015-01-01

    Suicide is a significant issue in the United States and worldwide, and its prevention is a public health imperative. Primary care practices are an important setting for suicide prevention, as primary care providers have more frequent contact with patients at risk for suicide than any other type of health-care provider. The Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, in partnership with the Suicide Prevention Resource Center, has developed a Suicide Prevention Toolkit and an associated training curriculum. These resources support the education of primary care providers in evidence-based strategies for identifying and treating patients at risk for suicide. The application of this curriculum to post-graduate medical training is presented here. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Training and Regulating those providing Publicly Funded Legal Advice Services\\ud \\ud A Case Study of Civil Provision

    OpenAIRE

    Sanderson, Pete; Sommerlad, Hilary

    2008-01-01

    This report summarises the results of a two year project funded by the Ministry of Justice, evaluating the impact of regulatory and training regimes on the front line experiences of solicitors and advice agency staff involved in the delivery of publicly funded legal advice. The findings shed light on the impact of contractual regulation on the organization and objectives of private firms and voluntary organizations, and rpovide insight into the nature of work-based learning.

  1. The impact of a 17-day training period for an international championship on mucosal immune parameters in top-level basketball players and staff members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Alexandre; Arsati, Franco; Cury, Patrícia Ramos; Franciscon, Clóvis; Simões, Antonio Carlos; de Oliveira, Paulo Roberto; de Araújo, Vera Cavalcanti

    2008-10-01

    This investigation examined the impact of a 17-d training period (that included basketball-specific training, sprints, intermittent running exercises, and weight training, prior to an international championship competition) on salivary immunoglobulin A (SIgA) levels in 10 subjects (athletes and staff members) from a national basketball team, as a biomarker for mucosal immune defence. Unstimulated saliva samples were collected at rest at the beginning of the preparation for the Pan American Games and 1 d before the first game. The recovery interval from the last bout of exercise was 4 h. The SIgA level was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and expressed as absolute concentrations, secretion rate, and SIgA level relative to total protein. The decrease in SIgA levels following training was greater in athletes than in support staff; however, no significant differences between the two groups were detected. A decrease in SIgA level, regardless of the method used to express IgA results, was verified for athletes. Only one episode of upper respiratory tract illness symptoms was reported, and it was not associated with changes in SIgA levels. In summary, a situation of combined stress for an important championship was found to decrease the level of SIgA-mediated immune protection at the mucosal surface in team members, with greater changes observed in the athletes.

  2. Multidisciplinary Training on Spiritual Care for Patients in Palliative Care Trajectories Improves the Attitudes and Competencies of Hospital Medical Staff: Results of a Quasi-Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Geer, Joep; Veeger, Nic; Groot, Marieke; Zock, Hetty; Leget, Carlo; Prins, Jelle; Vissers, Kris

    2018-02-01

    Patients value health-care professionals' attention to their spiritual needs. However, this is undervalued in health-care professionals' education. Additional training is essential for implementation of a national multidisciplinary guideline on spiritual care (SC) in palliative care (PC). Aim of this study is to measure effects of a training program on SC in PC based on the guideline. A pragmatic multicenter trial using a quasi-experimental pretest-posttest design as part of an action research study. Eight multidisciplinary teams in regular wards and 1 team of PC consultants, in 8 Dutch teaching hospitals, received questionnaires before training about perceived barriers for SC, spiritual attitudes and involvement, and SC competencies. The effect on the barriers on SC and SC competencies were measured both 1 and 6 months after the training. For nurses (n = 214), 7 of 8 barriers to SC were decreased after 1 month, but only 2 were still after 6 months. For physicians (n = 41), the training had no effect on the barriers to SC. Nurses improved in 4 of 6 competencies after both 1 and 6 months. Physicians improved in 3 of 6 competencies after 1 month but in only 1 competency after 6 months. Concise SC training programs for clinical teams can effect quality of care, by improving hospital staff competencies and decreasing the barriers they perceive. Differences in the effects of the SC training on nurses and physicians show the need for further research on physicians' educational needs on SC.

  3. 20 CFR 663.430 - Under what circumstances may mechanisms other than ITA's be used to provide training services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... are on-the-job training (OJT) or customized training; (2) When the Local Board determines that there...; attainment of the skills, certificates or degrees the program is designed to provide; placement after...

  4. Proposal for the conclusion of a partnership agreement, without competitive tendering, for the management of medical emergencies on the CERN site and the training of CERN's medical staff and firefighters in emergency situations

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Proposal for the conclusion of a partnership agreement, without competitive tendering, for the management of medical emergencies on the CERN site and the training of CERN's medical staff and firefighters in emergency situations

  5. A first aid training course for primary health care providers in Nagorno Karabagh: assessing knowledge retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael E; Harutyunyan, Tsovinar L; Dorian, Alina H

    2012-12-01

    Conflict in the South Caucasus' Nagorno Karabagh region has damaged health facilities and disrupted the delivery of services and supplies as well as led to depletion of human and fixed capital and weakened the de facto government's ability to provide training for health care providers. In response to documented medical training deficits, the American University of Armenia organized a first aid training course (FATC) for primary health care providers within the scope of the USAID-funded Humanitarian Assistance Project in Nagorno Karabagh. This paper reports the follow-up assessments conducted to inform policy makers regarding FATC knowledge and skill retention and the potential need for periodic refresher training. Follow-up assessments were conducted six months and 18 months following the FATC to assess the retention of knowledge, attitudes, and self-reported practices. Eighty-four providers participated in the first follow-up and 210 in the second. The assessment tool contained items addressing the use and quality of the first aid skills, trainee's evaluation of the course, and randomly selected test questions to assess knowledge retention. At both follow-up points, the participants' assessment of the course was positive. More than 85% of the trainees self-assessed their skills as "excellent" or "good" and noted that skills were frequently practiced. Scores of approximately 58% on knowledge tests at both the first and second follow-ups indicated no knowledge decay between the first and second survey waves, but substantial decline from the immediate post-test assessment in the classroom. The trainees assessed the FATC as effective, and the skills covered as important and well utilized. Knowledge retention was modest, but stable. Refresher courses are necessary to reverse the decay of technical knowledge and to ensure proper application in the field.

  6. Evaluation of a Training to Reduce Provider Bias Toward Pregnant Patients With Substance Abuse

    OpenAIRE

    SEYBOLD, DARA; CALHOUN, BYRON; BURGESS, DENISE; LEWIS, TAMMI; GILBERT, KELLY; CASTO, ANGIE

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is not to present a scientific or systematic study, but to provide an initial framework for designing a training workshop to enhance health practitioners’ (nurses, social workers, physicians, etc.) knowledge regarding substance abuse treatment and to decrease their bias toward substance-abusing women, particularly pregnant women in rural communities. We incorporated the 4 Transdisciplinary Foundations from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administra...

  7. Effect of Skin Cancer Training Provided to Maritime High School Students on Their Knowledge and Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sümen, Adem; Öncel, Selma

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted with the purpose of evaluating the effect of skin cancer training provided to maritime high school students on their knowledge and behaviour. The study had a quasi-experimental design with pre-test and post-test intervention and control groups. Two maritime high schools located in the city of Antalya were included within the scope of the study between March and June 2013, covering a total of 567 students. While the knowledge mean scores of students regarding skin cancer and sun protection did not vary in the pre-test (6.2 ± 1.9) and post-test (6.8 ± 1.9) control group, the knowledge mean scores of students in the experimental group increased from 6.0 ± 2.3 to 10.6 ± 1.2 after the provided training. Some 25.4% of students in the experimental group had low knowledge level and 62.2% had medium knowledge level in the pre-test; whereas no students had low knowledge level and 94.3% had high knowledge level in the post-test. It was determined that tenth grade students, those who had previous knowledge on the subject, who considered themselves to be protecting from the sun better, had higher knowledge levels and their knowledge levels increased as the risk level increased. It was found that the provided training was effective and increased positively the knowledge, attitude and behaviour levels of students in the experimental group in terms of skin cancer and sun protection. Along with the provided training which started to form a lifestyle, appropriate attitudes and behaviours concerning skin cancer and sun protection could be brought to students who will work in outdoor spaces and are members of the maritime profession within the risk group.

  8. A TRAINING PROGRAM FOR NURSING STAFF ON HEALTH HAZARDS OF CHEMICAL INSECTICIDES EXPOSURE IN A PRACTICAL FIELD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bahnasawy, Mamdouh M; Mohammad, Amina El-Hosini; Ragab, Ibrahim Fahmy; Morsy, Tosson A

    2015-08-01

    An insecticide is an agent used against insects, ticks, mites and other animals affecting human welfare. Exposure to Insecticides is one of the most important occupational risks among staff worker in Military camp, veterinary medicine, industry and household as well as schools and hospitals. This study Aimed to improve nursing staff knowledge regarding adverse health effects of chemical insecticides exposure in a military field. The study was conducted in one of the Main Military Hospital. was used a quasi-experimental research design to conduct this study. all nursing staff who work in a Military Hospital (n=55) who accept to participate in the research study. A significant improvement in the Nurses' Total knowledge score was found in post-test as compared to that in pre-test. All nurses obtained a satisfactory level of knowledge after the 1st & 2nd post-tests; all of them evaluate the program in relation to trainees' exnectations as "excellent".

  9. [The anxiety and influence factors of care managers who provide a home palliative care for terminal cancer patients--a comparison between nursing staffs and others].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumoto, Naoko; Hirose, Kyoko; Shobatake, Tadataka; Yano, Hidemi; Okazaki, Noriko

    2010-12-01

    In home palliative care, care managers play an important part. But we suspect that care managers, who don't have a medical license, may feel an anxiety. So, we investigated if these care managers felt an anxiety, and would like to report a role of nursing staffs in home palliative care. We surveyed care managers who were working in the western part of Hiroshima. The number of care managers was 199. And 129 of them(86.9%)filled out the questionnaire. We used c 2 -test and analyzed the difference of an anxiety between nursing staffs and the others. The care managers felt an anxiety about the patient's condition and the therapy rather than nursing staffs. Nursing staffs play an important role by doing a therapeutic management for terminal cancer patients, an explanation for the family of patients, and a cooperation with other staffs.

  10. Foodborne Illness Outbreak Investigation Training Needs: A Survey Among State Public Health Staff in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Alphina; Pennell-Huth, Paula; Newman, Alexandra; Zansky, Shelley; Wiedmann, Martin

    In 2011, the Food Safety and Modernization Act established Integrated Food Safety Centers of Excellence across the United States to train, educate, and enhance the skill of foodborne illness outbreak investigation teams. To target regional training efforts, the New York Integrated Food Safety Center of Excellence (NYCoE) identified training needs in food safety and foodborne illness investigations among public heath staff in 11 states and 1 large metropolitan area in the Northeast. To identify topics so as to develop training materials relevant to food safety and foodborne disease outbreaks in order to improve and impact foodborne outbreak investigations regionally and nationally. Cross-sectional, paper-based survey conducted in January-February 2016. Eleven Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states, and 1 large metropolitan area. Foodborne illness outbreak investigators in the NYCoE region. Identification of training needs, as self-reported by participants, regarding general foodborne outbreak investigation needs and those specific to epidemiologists, environmental health specialists, and laboratorians. Topics included basic food safety/processing knowledge, communication and metrics, and training formats. Information regarding demographics, utility of the NYCoE, and certificate programs was also collected. Surveys returned from 33 respondents (from 10 states and 1 metropolitan area) identified metrics (100%), increasing use of culture-independent diagnostic tests (85%), and guidance on implementation of the Council to Improve Foodborne Outbreak Response (guidelines (89%) as the top training needs. By field, epidemiologists cited training in applying whole genome sequencing (100%), environmental health specialists cited training on the National Outbreak Reporting System (67%), and laboratorians cited training on whole genome sequencing (91%) as important. Short, online, or in-person, 1- to 2-day trainings were the preferred training formats (≥91%). Respondents wanted

  11. ENTREPRENEURSHIP: INFLUENCE OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP TRAINING COURSES ON ENTREPRENEURIAL BEHAVIOUR OF THE STAFF IN OFFICES OF YOUTH AND SPORTS IN YAZD PROVINCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benar Nooshin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to analyze the entrepreneurial behaviour of the staff of Offices of Youth and Sports in Yazd province and the influence of entrepreneurial training courses on their behaviour. The population under study were all the staff, a total number of 101 persons, of nine (9 Offices of Youth and Sports in Yazd province. The population for pre-testing was equal to the actual population of the study. In terms of methodology it was a descriptive study and in terms of purpose an applicable one. Instrument for data gathering was a survey questionnaire prepared by the researcher and the validity of which was examined by the professors of the university and approved based on their suggestions and views. It consisted of 55 questions in order to measure and evaluate behavioural characteristics of entrepreneurs (Balanced Risk-taking, Locus of Control, Mental Health, Challenge Seeking, Success Seeking or need for achievement, Dreaming or fantasizing, Activism or pro-active, and Ambiguity Tolerance. The stability of the questionnaire was tested and measured byCronbach Alpha Coefficient which was alfa=0.87. The gathered data were analysed using descriptive statistical methods (Mean, Standard Deviation, Charts/Figures and deductive (non-parametric methods (Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Friedman, Mann-Whitney U, Spearman and Pearson.The results showed that there is a significant and positive relationship between activism, dreaming and risk taking characteristics with challenge seeking; and between achievement seeking, mental health and ambiguity tolerance with locus of control characteristic. On the other hand, ranking the characteristics of entrepreneurial behaviour of staff demonstrated that the highest ranking belongs to dreaming and mental health and the lowest ranking belongs to activism and locus of control. Overall, there is a significant relationship between entrepreneurial behaviour and entrepreneurial training. Based on these

  12. Effects of Provided Trainings Regarding Non-Invasive Mechanical Ventilation on the Knowledge Level of Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonay Göktaş

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Having experienced members in the team for obtaining successful outcomes in non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV is important. The aim of our study is to determine the effectiveness of training on nurse’s level of knowledge about NIMV Methods: This study was done with 70 nurses who were working at an university hospital. The data collection tools that were used were form for individual characteristics and knowledge test questions form consisting of multiple-choice for NIMV. Firstly, Pre-tests have been collected in the survey. Secondly, courses regarding NIMV indications, contraindications and patients management topics were given verbally by researchers. Finally, final tests were performed and data were collected. Analyzing for data were used frequency, percentage, wilcoxon and dependent samples Mc Nemar tests. Results: Mean age were 33.2±7.3, 87.1% were female, 68.6% had bachelor degrees. Of 47.1% were working in intensive care. 54.3% often provide care to NIMV applied patients. 94.7% mentioned that they don’t have any knowledge of NIMV applications. The differences between the pre-post training scores were higher statistically (p<0.001. It was determined that knowledge levels of nurses about NIMV indications and contraindications after training increased statistically significantly. (p<0.05. Conclusion: In our research it was understood that nurses’ knowledge has increased significantly after the training for non-invasive applications. By means of these trainings that will develop the affective, cognitive and psychomotor skills of nurses, it is expected to reveal the results of the extensive research and successful outcomes for NIMV applications will increase.

  13. Physical training of teaching staff at higher educational establishment of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Ukraine and attitude of officers-instructors to its improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bezpaliy S.M.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The attitude of teaching staff to the modern state of organizing and conducting physical training at higher educational establishment of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Ukraine and directions of its improvement is shown. 126 officers-instructors took part іn an experiment in age 30-50 years old. The questioning was conducted after an author questionnaire. Тhe insufficient efficiency of the operating system of physical training of teaching staff at higher educational establishment has been confirmed and the reasons of low level of physical preparedness and health of officers-instructors have been exposed. It is definite, that about 50% officers-instructors are skipped the employments on physical training systematically. It is set, that principal reasons of admissions of employments are: absence of time (70,7%, unclear planning of employments (11,9%, large volume of tasks of everyday activity (9,5%. It is sat, that officers-instructors desire to be regularly engaged in physical exercises and sport, the advantage is given by independent employment in the mode of day, directed on the improvement of general physical preparedness.

  14. A comparative study of the effect of triage training by role-playing and educational video on the knowledge and performance of emergency medical service staffs in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghababaeian, Hamidreza; Sedaghat, Soheila; Tahery, Noorallah; Moghaddam, Ali Sadeghi; Maniei, Mohammad; Bahrami, Nosrat; Ahvazi, Ladan Araghi

    2013-12-01

    Educating emergency medical staffs in triage skills is an important aspect of disaster preparedness. The aim of the study was to compare the effect of role-playing and educational video presentation on the learning and performance of the emergency medical service staffs in Khozestan, Iran A total of 144 emergency technicians were randomly classified into two groups. A researcher trained the first group using an educational video method and the second group with a role-playing method. Data were collected before, immediately, and 15 days after training using a questionnaire covering the three domains of demographic information, triage knowledge, and triage performance. The data were analyzed using defined knowledge and performance parameters. There was no significant difference between the two training methods on performance and immediate knowledge (P = .2), lasting knowledge (P=.05) and immediate performance (P = .35), but there was a statistical advantage for the role-playing method on lasting performance (P = .02). The two educational methods equally increase knowledge and performance, but the role-playing method may have a more desirable and lasting effect on performance.

  15. Utility of Staff Training on Correcting Sleep Problems in People With Intellectual Disabilities Living in Residential Settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hylkema, T.; Petitiaux, W.; Vlaskamp, C.

    While sleep problems in people with intellectual disabilities (ID) living in residential settings are very common, scant attention is paid to them. This study examined how to improve the knowledge and understanding of sleep quality and sleep problems in people with ID among care staff at a

  16. Don't Count on Clairvoyance: A Librarian and an Independent Consultant Plan a Staff Training Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezell, Charlaine; McMahon, Patrick

    1991-01-01

    Presents a scenario outlined by a librarian interested in sponsoring a staff development program together with a hired consultant. It is argued that, through candid discussions and a commitment to shared program goals, a successful match can be made between a librarian and the consultant. (MAB)

  17. Resource approach in providing health-saving process of future teachers training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykytiuk S.A.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the mechanisms of resource approach realization in the organization of pedagogical education. There were defined the ways of providing health-saving teacher training, namely: assessment criteria of adjustment of social order and personal professional development needs, means of implementing the tasks of pedagogical education concept according to the resource approach. In this article the author concretized methods of preserving and strengthening the spiritual health of future teachers in the process of professional training. On the basis of analysis of editions of the home and foreign authors sanctified to the problems of health of young people, it is exposed, that the problem of health of student young people can be considered in the context of exposure of values of health in the field of thinking of students, and also descriptions of their life in the modern terms of maintenance of human capitals.

  18. The relationship between empowerment and effectiveness of staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different dimensions of empowerment (servicing staff, staff monitoring, consulting staff, and training staff) on dimensions of effectiveness of staff (staff satisfaction and staff performance). This study is applied in terms of data collection and it is survey type of descriptive study ...

  19. Education and training to enhance end-of-life care for nursing home staff: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstey, Sally; Powell, Tom; Coles, Bernadette; Hale, Rachel; Gould, Dinah

    2016-09-01

    The delivery of end-of-life care in nursing homes is challenging. This situation is of concern as 20% of the population die in this setting. Commonly reported reasons include limited access to medical care, inadequate clinical leadership and poor communication between nursing home and medical staff. Education for nursing home staff is suggested as the most important way of overcoming these obstacles. To identify educational interventions to enhance end-of-life care for nursing home staff and to identify types of study designs and outcomes to indicate success and benchmark interventions against recent international guidelines for education for palliative and end-of-life care. Thirteen databases and reference lists of key journals were searched from the inception of each up to September 2014. Included studies were appraised for quality and data were synthesised thematically. Twenty-one studies were reviewed. Methodological quality was poor. Education was not of a standard that could be expected to alter clinical behaviour and was evaluated mainly from the perspectives of staff: self-reported increase in knowledge, skills and confidence delivering care rather than direct evidence of impact on clinical practice and patient outcomes. Follow-up was often short term, and despite sound economic arguments for delivering effective end-of-life care to reduce burden on the health service, no economic analyses were reported. There is a clear and urgent need to design educational interventions that have the potential to improve end-of-life care in nursing homes. Robust evaluation of these interventions should include impact on residents, families and staff and include economic analysis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. End-of-life care in U.S. nursing homes: nursing homes with special programs and trained staff for hospice or palliative/end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Susan C; Han, Beth

    2008-07-01

    The degree to which nursing homes have internal programs for hospice and palliative care is unknown. We used self-reported data from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey (NNHS) to estimate the prevalence of special programs and (specially) trained staff (SPTS) for hospice or palliative/end-of-life care in U.S. nursing homes. Factors associated with the presence of SPTS for hospice or palliative/end-of-life care were identified. We merged 2004 NNHS data for 1174 nursing homes to county-level data from the 2004 Area Resource File and to Nursing Home 2004 Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting data. chi(2) tests and logistic regression models were applied. Twenty-seven percent of U.S. nursing homes reported (internal) SPTS for hospice or palliative/end-of-life care. After controlling for covariates, we found nonprofit status, being in the southern region of the United States, having an administrator certified by the American College of Health Care Administrators, contracting with an outside hospice provider, and having other specialty programs to be associated with a greater likelihood of nursing homes having SPTS for hospice or palliative/end-of-life care. The largest effects were observed for nursing homes with programs for behavioral problems (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 3.59; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.40, 5.37) and for pain management (AOR 5.92; 95% CI 4.09, 8.57). The presence of internal SPTS for hospice or palliative/end-of-life care is prevalent in U.S. nursing homes, and may be preceded by hospice contracting and/or the implementation of specialty programs that assist nursing homes in developing the expertise needed to establish their own palliative care programs.

  1. An Evaluation of Training for Lay Providers in the Use of Motivational Interviewing to Promote Academic Achievement among Urban Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Patricia; Ward, Nadia L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined training outcomes for lay service providers who participated in a motivational interviewing (MI) training program designed to help increase intrinsic motivation and academic achievement among urban, low-income minority youth. Seventeen lay academic advisors received 16 hours of workshop training in MI. Additionally, two 2-hour…

  2. Privately Provided Accommodation Service Quality and Customer Satisfaction: The Case of Nsamizi Training Institute of Social Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mugambwa, Joshua; Mugerwa, George William; Mutumba, Wilson Williams; Muganzi, Claire; Namubiru, Bridget; Waswa, Yusuf; Kayongo, Isaac Newton

    2016-01-01

    .... This research took a case study of Nsamizi Training Institute of Social Development (NTISD) to determine the relationship between privately provided accommodation service quality and customer satisfaction...

  3. Training pediatric health care providers in prevention of dental decay: results from a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeldin Leslie P

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physicians report willingness to provide preventive dental care, but optimal methods for their training and support in such procedures are not known. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of three forms of continuing medical education (CME on provision of preventive dental services to Medicaid-enrolled children by medical personnel in primary care physician offices. Methods Practice-based, randomized controlled trial. Setting: 1,400 pediatric and family physician practices in North Carolina providing care to an estimated 240,000 Medicaid-eligible children aged 0–3 years. Interventions: Group A practices (n = 39 received didactic training and course materials in oral health screening, referral, counseling and application of fluoride varnish. Group B practices (n = 41 received the same as Group A and were offered weekly conference calls providing advice and support. Group C practices (n = 41 received the same as Group B and were offered in-office visit providing hands-on advice and support. In all groups, physicians were reimbursed $38–$43 per preventive dental visit. Outcome measures were computed from reimbursement claims submitted to NC Division of Medical Assistance. Primary outcome measure: rate of preventive dental services provision per 100 well-child visits. Secondary outcome measure: % of practices providing 20 or more preventive dental visits. Results 121 practices were randomized, and 107 provided data for analysis. Only one half of Group B and C practices took part in conference calls or in-office visits. Using intention-to-treat analysis, rates of preventive dental visits did not differ significantly among CME groups: GroupA = 9.4, GroupB = 12.9 and GroupC = 8.5 (P = 0.32. Twenty or more preventive dental visits were provided by 38–49% of practices in the three study groups (P = 0.64. Conclusion A relatively high proportion of medical practices appear capable of adopting these preventive dental services

  4. Errorless learning for training individuals with schizophrenia at a community mental health setting providing work experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Robert S; Liberman, Robert P; Becker, Deborah R; Drake, Robert E; Sugar, Catherine A; Green, Michael F

    2009-07-01

    The effects of errorless learning (EL) on work performance, tenure, and personal well-being were compared with conventional job training in a community mental health fellowship club offering 12-week time-limited work experience. Participants were 40 clinically stable schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder outpatients randomly assigned to EL vs conventional instruction (CI) at a thrift-type clothing store. EL participants received training on how to perform their assigned job tasks based on principles of EL, such as error reduction and automation of task performance. CI participants received training common to other community-based entry-level jobs that included verbal instruction, a visual demonstration, independent practice, and corrective feedback. Participants were scheduled to work 2 hours per week for 12 weeks. For both groups, job training occurred during the first 2 weeks at the worksite. Work performance (assessed using the Work Behavior Inventory, WBI) and personal well-being (self-esteem, job satisfaction, and work stress) were assessed at weeks 2, 4, and 12. Job tenure was defined as the number of weeks on the job or total number of hours worked prior to quitting or study end. The EL group performed better than the CI group on the Work Quality Scale from the WBI, and the group differences were relatively consistent over time. Results from the survival analyses of job tenure revealed a non-significant trend favoring EL. There were no group differences on self-esteem, job satisfaction, or work stress. The findings provide modest support for the extensions of EL to community settings for enhancing work performance.

  5. Teaching Applied Behavior Analysis Knowledge Competencies to Direct-Care Service Providers: Outcome Assessment and Social Validation of a Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiselli, James K.; Bass, Jennifer D.; Whitcomb, Sara A.

    2010-01-01

    Staff training is a critical performance improvement objective within behavioral health care organizations. This study evaluated a systematic training program for teaching applied behavior analysis knowledge competencies to newly hired direct-care employees at a day and residential habilitation services agency for adults with intellectual and…

  6. Highway construction on-the-job training program review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    "This study provides information about the experiences of trainees, contractors, Montana Department of : Transportation (MDT) field staff, and other state DOT staff in their states On-the-Job Training (OJT) Program. : Obtaining this information is...

  7. Building skills, knowledge and confidence in eating and exercise behavior change: brief motivational interviewing training for healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Elizabeth J; Stapleton, Peta; Williams, Kelly; Ball, Lauren

    2015-05-01

    Obesity related health problems affect individuals, families, communities and the broader health care system, however few healthcare providers (e.g., doctors, nurses, social workers, psychologists, counselors) receive formal training in obesity prevention interventions. We examined the effectiveness of training healthcare providers in brief motivational interviewing (brief MI) targeting eating and exercise behavior change. 163 healthcare providers participated. 128 participants completed a one-day experiential brief MI training workshop followed by electronic peer-support and a further 35 matched controls did not receive the training. Participant's knowledge of brief MI and confidence in their ability to counsel patients using brief MI significantly improved following training (pskills assessed during the simulated patient interactions indicated a significant improvement across two practical training blocks (pskills and knowledge quickly and confidence in their counseling abilities improves and is sustained. Healthcare providers may consider brief MI as an obesity prevention intervention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Virtual reality triage training provides a viable solution for disaster-preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreatta, Pamela B; Maslowski, Eric; Petty, Sean; Shim, Woojin; Marsh, Michael; Hall, Theodore; Stern, Susan; Frankel, Jen

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the relative impact of two simulation-based methods for training emergency medicine (EM) residents in disaster triage using the Simple Triage and Rapid Treatment (START) algorithm, full-immersion virtual reality (VR), and standardized patient (SP) drill. Specifically, are there differences between the triage performances and posttest results of the two groups, and do both methods differentiate between learners of variable experience levels? Fifteen Postgraduate Year 1 (PGY1) to PGY4 EM residents were randomly assigned to two groups: VR or SP. In the VR group, the learners were effectively surrounded by a virtual mass disaster environment projected on four walls, ceiling, and floor and performed triage by interacting with virtual patients in avatar form. The second group performed likewise in a live disaster drill using SP victims. Setting and patient presentations were identical between the two modalities. Resident performance of triage during the drills and knowledge of the START triage algorithm pre/post drill completion were assessed. Analyses included descriptive statistics and measures of association (effect size). The mean pretest scores were similar between the SP and VR groups. There were no significant differences between the triage performances of the VR and SP groups, but the data showed an effect in favor of the SP group performance on the posttest. Virtual reality can provide a feasible alternative for training EM personnel in mass disaster triage, comparing favorably to SP drills. Virtual reality provides flexible, consistent, on-demand training options, using a stable, repeatable platform essential for the development of assessment protocols and performance standards.

  9. How can web-based training facilitate a more carer friendly practice in community-based health and social care services in Norway? Staff experiences and implementation challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanssen, Helene; Norheim, Anne; Hanson, Elizabeth

    2017-03-01

    It is a central feature of current Norwegian health and social care policy to see informal carers as active partners. However, research has revealed that carers often experience a lack of recognition by professionals. In 2010, the Norwegian Directorate of Health initiated a web-based competence-building programme (CBP) for health and social care practitioners aimed at facilitating collaboration with carers. The programme comprised case presentations, e-lectures, exercises and topics for discussion, and was introduced in 2012. It was flexible and free of charge. This article is based on a study (2012-2013) that followed the piloting of this CBP in four settings. The study aimed to explore factors that influenced the implementation of the programme and whether or not using it affected health and social care practitioners' attitudes and perceived capacity for collaboration with carers. The study employed a mixed-methods design. A questionnaire was distributed to all staff before and 5 months after the CBP was introduced, followed by focus group interviews with a sample of staff members and individual interviews with the leadership in the involved settings and those who introduced the programme. The quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics, which subsequently formed the basis for the focus group interviews. The qualitative data were analysed by means of content analysis. The programme's introduction was similar across all research settings. Nevertheless, whether or not it was adopted depended to a large extent on leadership commitment and engagement. In settings where the programme's use was monitored, supported by management and formed part of on-the-job training, there seemed to be a positive impact on staff attitudes concerning collaboration with carers. Participant staff reported that their awareness of, motivation for and confidence in collaboration with carers were all strengthened. In contrast, the programme was of minimal benefit in

  10. Studying feasibility and effects of a two-stage nursing staff training in residential geriatric care using a 30 month mixed-methods design [ISRCTN24344776

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hantikainen Virpi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transfer techniques and lifting weights often cause back pain and disorders for nurses in geriatric care. The Kinaesthetics care conception claims to be an alternative, yielding benefits for nurses as well as for clients. Starting a multi-step research program on the effects of Kinaesthetics, we assess the feasibility of a two-stage nursing staff training and a pre-post research design. Using quantitative and qualitative success criteria, we address mobilisation from the bed to a chair and backwards, walking with aid and positioning in bed on the staff level as well as on the resident level. In addition, effect estimates should help to decide on and to prepare a controlled trial. Methods/Design Standard basic and advanced Kinaesthetics courses (each comprising four subsequent days and an additional counselling day during the following four months are offered to n = 36 out of 60 nurses in a residential geriatric care home, who are in charge of 76 residents. N = 22 residents needing movement support are participating to this study. On the staff level, measurements include focus group discussions, questionnaires, physical strain self-assessment (Borg scale, video recordings and external observation of patient assistance skills using a specialised instrument (SOPMAS. Questionnaires used on the resident level include safety, comfort, pain, and level of own participation during mobilisation. A functional mobility profile is assessed using a specialised test procedure (MOTPA. Measurements will take place at baseline (T0, after basic training (T1, and after the advanced course (T2. Follow-up focus groups will be offered at T1 and 10 months later (T3. Discussion Ten criteria for feasibility success are established before the trial, assigned to resources (missing data, processes (drop-out of nurses and residents and science (minimum effects criteria. This will help to make rational decision on entering the next stage of the research

  11. STAFF NEEDED

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    The English National Programme, part of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire (France) needs the following staff for September 2001: A part-time teacher of primary English The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system: Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée, Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team, Induction & training are offered. A part time teacher of senior secondary history-geography in English A part time teacher of secondary mathematics in English Teachers must be mother-tongue English speakers and have a relevant degree and/or teaching qualification. For the history-geography post, either history or geography degrees are acceptable. Please send your c.v. and a letter of application to Peter Woodburn, Head, English National Programme, Lycée International, 01216 Ferney-Voltaire, France. (Email: engnat@hotmail.com) Telephone 04 50 40 82 66 for further details of posts. Ple...

  12. Are doctor of pharmacy curricula in developing countries adequate to train graduates to provide pharmaceutical care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramalingam Peraman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD program is a new dimension of pharmacy education in developing countries. The PharmD graduates are expected to participate in patient health care by providing pharmaceutical care. The graduates should have enough necessary clinical knowledge, competitiveness and skills in community, hospital and clinical pharmacy related services. There is a need of curriculum that fit into the program outcome that helps to attain graduate competency. Programs in India, Pakistan, Iran and Nepal were reviewed based on the available literature. Even though it is evident that the PharmD curriculum in developing countries has made an attempt to provide patient-oriented approach for pharmacists, the existing curriculum, training and orientation have several pitfalls. It needs assessment, evaluation and improvement.

  13. Key Factors for Providing Appropriate Medical Care in Secondary School Athletics: Athletic Training Services and Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wham, George S.; Saunders, Ruth; Mensch, James

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Context: Research suggests that appropriate medical care for interscholastic athletes is frequently lacking. However, few investigators have examined factors related to care. Objective: To examine medical care provided by interscholastic athletics programs and to identify factors associated with variations in provision of care. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Mailed and e-mailed survey. Patients or Other Participants: One hundred sixty-six South Carolina high schools. Intervention(s): The 132-item Appropriate Medical Care Assessment Tool (AMCAT) was developed and pilot tested. It included 119 items assessing medical care based on the Appropriate Medical Care for Secondary School-Age Athletes (AMCSSAA) Consensus Statement and Monograph (test-retest reliability: r  =  0.89). Also included were items assessing potential influences on medical care. Presence, source, and number of athletic trainers; school size; distance to nearest medical center; public or private status; sports medicine supply budget; and varsity football regional championships served as explanatory variables, whereas the school setting, region of state, and rate of free or reduced lunch qualifiers served as control variables. Main Outcome Measure(s): The Appropriate Care Index (ACI) score from the AMCAT provided a quantitative measure of medical care and served as the response variable. The ACI score was determined based on a school's response to items relating to AMCSSAA guidelines. Results: Regression analysis revealed associations with ACI score for athletic training services and sports medicine supply budget (both P sports medicine supply budget. Conclusions: The AMCAT offers an evaluation of medical care provided by interscholastic athletics programs. In South Carolina schools, athletic training services and the sports medicine supply budget were associated with higher levels of medical care. These results offer guidance for improving the medical care provided for

  14. Key factors for providing appropriate medical care in secondary school athletics: athletic training services and budget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wham, George S; Saunders, Ruth; Mensch, James

    2010-01-01

    Research suggests that appropriate medical care for interscholastic athletes is frequently lacking. However, few investigators have examined factors related to care. To examine medical care provided by interscholastic athletics programs and to identify factors associated with variations in provision of care. Cross-sectional study. Mailed and e-mailed survey. One hundred sixty-six South Carolina high schools. The 132-item Appropriate Medical Care Assessment Tool (AMCAT) was developed and pilot tested. It included 119 items assessing medical care based on the Appropriate Medical Care for Secondary School-Age Athletes (AMCSSAA) Consensus Statement and Monograph (test-retest reliability: r = 0.89). Also included were items assessing potential influences on medical care. Presence, source, and number of athletic trainers; school size; distance to nearest medical center; public or private status; sports medicine supply budget; and varsity football regional championships served as explanatory variables, whereas the school setting, region of state, and rate of free or reduced lunch qualifiers served as control variables. The Appropriate Care Index (ACI) score from the AMCAT provided a quantitative measure of medical care and served as the response variable. The ACI score was determined based on a school's response to items relating to AMCSSAA guidelines. Regression analysis revealed associations with ACI score for athletic training services and sports medicine supply budget (both P athletic trainer and the size of the sports medicine supply budget. The AMCAT offers an evaluation of medical care provided by interscholastic athletics programs. In South Carolina schools, athletic training services and the sports medicine supply budget were associated with higher levels of medical care. These results offer guidance for improving the medical care provided for interscholastic athletes.

  15. The impact of staff training on special educational needs professionals' attitudes toward and understanding of applied behavior analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Sinéad; Reading, Benjamin E; McDowell, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Research-based evidence points to the efficacy and value of applied behavior analysis (ABA) in meeting the needs of individuals with learning disabilities and autism. Nonetheless, public, government, and professional perception of ABA can be negative. The current study was designed to measure the impact of a short intervention on professionals' attitudes toward, and knowledge of, ABA. Teachers and classroom assistants from two separate schools for children with severe learning difficulties completed a self-report survey on knowledge of and attitudes toward ABA. They were then presented with a 90-min training module designed to increase their knowledge of the history of ABA and their functional assessment skills. Following training, the self-report was readministered. The mean scores for each group increased only after the training had been delivered. Further research is needed to address the impact of training on classroom practice.

  16. Contingency contracting with delinquents: effects of a brief training manual on staff contract negotiation and writing skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, S J; Holborn, S W

    1988-01-01

    A brief training manual was developed for the purpose of teaching child-care workers to contingency contract with delinquent youths living in residential care facilities. The manual was designed to require minimal supplementary training by a professional. In Experiment 1 a multiple baseline design was used to assess the effect of the manual on 4 child-care workers' contract negotiation and writing behaviors. Experiment 2 consisted of four A-B systematic replications. Behaviors were assessed within the context of analogue training simulations and generalization tests with delinquent youths. Results from the analogue simulations indicated that the manual was successful in increasing both types of behaviors to a level of proficiency that equaled or surpassed that of behaviorally trained graduate students, and results from the generalization tests indicated that the child-care workers were able to apply their newly acquired contracting skills with delinquent youths. Procedural reliability varied across child-care workers, but was usually high.

  17. Effects of Training, Prompting, and Self-Monitoring on Staff Behavior in a Classroom for Students with Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Petscher, Erin Seligson; Bailey, Jon S.

    2006-01-01

    This study extended the limited research on the utility of tactile prompts and examined the effects of a treatment package on implementation of a token economy by instructional assistants in a classroom for students with disabilities. During baseline, we measured how accurately the assistants implemented a classroom token economy based on the routine training they had received through the school system. Baseline was followed by brief in-service training, which resulted in no improvement of to...

  18. Hiring Costs of Skilled Workers and the Supply of Firm-Provided Training

    OpenAIRE

    Blatter, Marc; Mühlemann, Samuel; Schenker, Samuel; Wolter, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes how the costs of hiring skilled workers from the external labor market affect a firm's supply of training. Using administrative survey data with detailed information on hiring and training costs for Swiss firms, we find evidence for substantial and increasing marginal hiring costs. However, firms can invest in internal training of unskilled workers and thereby avoid costs for external hiring. Controlling for a firm's training investment, we find that a one standard deviati...

  19. Impact of supplemental training programs on improving medical students' confidence in providing diabetes self-management education and support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazel, Maryam T; Fazel, Mohammad; Bedrossian, Nora L; Picazo, Fernando; Sobel, Julia D; Fazel, Mahdieh; Te, Charisse; Pendergrass, Merri L

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of supplemental diabetes-related training modalities and volunteer activities in increasing first-year medical students' knowledge/comfort in providing diabetes self-management education and support (DSMES) to patients. A group of medical students developed supplemental diabetes-related training/volunteer programs. The training modalities included an optional 7-session interprofessionally taught Diabetes Enrichment Elective and a 3-hour endocrinologist-led training session intended to prepare students for involvement in an inpatient DSMES volunteer program. The volunteer program provided the students with the opportunity to provide DSMES to patients with diabetes admitted to an academic medical center. Those participating in any of the stated programs were compared to those with no such training regarding confidence in providing DSMES using an optional online survey. The results were analyzed by using Mann-Whitney U test and descriptive analyses. A total of 18 first-year medical students responded to the optional survey with a response rate of ~30% (10 of 33) among participants in any training/volunteer program. First-year medical students who attended any of the offered optional programs had statistically significant higher comfort level in 4 of the 6 areas assessed regarding providing DSMES compared with those with no such training (ptraining modalities/volunteer programs can provide benefit in providing medical students with practical knowledge while improving their confidence in providing DSMES to patients with diabetes.

  20. Dental hygiene education for nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullberg, Erika; Forsell, Marianne; Wedel, Peter; Sjögren, Petteri; Johansson, Olle; Herbst, Bertil; Hoogstraate, Janet

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a new dental hygiene education program for nursing staff and to report experiences from the program at a nursing home in Stockholm, Sweden (2006). This strategy comprises 3 steps. The first is individual instruction for nursing staff about oral care for patients and hands-on training in toothbrushing technique using an electric toothbrush. The second step was small discussion groups of 4 to 8 nursing staff, led by a dental hygienist and a psychologist. The third step was a theoretical lecture focusing on the associations among dental hygiene, oral health, and general health among the elderly. During the dental hygiene education program, a negative attitude toward oral care was noted among members of the nursing staff, although they did consider oral care important for their patients. Increased self-confidence of staff in providing oral care was noted after completing the dental hygiene education program. Nursing staff members stated that they had received more detailed knowledge about oral care during the program. This dental hygiene education program appears to result in increased knowledge and interest in oral hygiene tasks among the nursing staff and may lead to improved dental hygiene among nursing home residents.

  1. Shedding Light: Private "For Profit" Training Providers and Young Early School Leavers. NCVER Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myconos, George; Clarke, Kira; te Riele, Kitty

    2016-01-01

    This research investigates the oft-criticised segment of the vocational education and training (VET) sector in Australia--private, for-profit registered training organisations (RTOs)--with the aim of gaining a clearer understanding of the approaches they adopt in training 15 to 19-year-olds who have left school early. Through a nationwide survey…

  2. Comfort level of emergency medical service providers in responding to weapons of mass destruction events: impact of training and equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Michael J; Markenson, David; DiMaggio, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that emergency medical services (EMS) providers are ill-prepared in the areas of training and equipment for response to events due to weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and other public health emergencies (epidemics, etc.). A nationally representative sample of basic and paramedic EMS providers in the United States was surveyed to assess whether they had received training in WMD and/or public health emergencies as part of their initial provider training and as continuing medical education within the past 24 months. Providers also were surveyed as to whether their primary EMS agency had the necessary specialty equipment to respond to these specific events. More than half of EMS providers had some training in WMD response. Hands-on training was associated with EMS provider comfort in responding to chemical, biological, and/or radiological events and public health emergencies (odds ratio (OR) = 3.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.1, 3.3). Only 18.1% of providers surveyed indicated that their agencies had the necessary equipment to respond to a WMD event. Emergency medical service providers who only received WMD training reported higher comfort levels than those who had equipment, but no training. Lack of training and education as well as the lack of necessary equipment to respond to WMD events is associated with decreased comfort among emergency medical services providers in responding to chemical, biological, and/or radiological incidents. Better training and access to appropriate equipment may increase provider comfort in responding to these types of incidents.

  3. Staff Specialist Survival Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The syllabus for this 4.5-day course addresses the challenges for today’s staff specialists and provides not only hands-on review of actual artifacts...but also case studies to enhance learners’ actual experiences. Background The course was designed to magnify the staff specialist’s skills in

  4. 76 FR 50359 - Hours of Service of Railroad Employees; Substantive Regulations for Train Employees Providing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ..., Section-by-Section Analysis, below. III. Scientific Background Most mammals, including human beings, have... between human physiology and work times, something that would be very difficult to specify through other... 20590 (telephone: 202-493-6350); Dr. Thomas G. Raslear, Staff Director, Human Factors Research Program...

  5. Men who have sex with men sensitivity training reduces homoprejudice and increases knowledge among Kenyan healthcare providers in coastal Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Elst, Elise M; Smith, Adrian D; Gichuru, Evanson; Wahome, Elizabeth; Musyoki, Helgar; Muraguri, Nicolas; Fegan, Greg; Duby, Zoe; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Bender, Bonnie; Graham, Susan M; Operario, Don; Sanders, Eduard J

    2013-12-02

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) in Africa typically receive little or no training in the healthcare needs of men who have sex with men (MSM), limiting the effectiveness and reach of population-based HIV control measures among this group. We assessed the effect of a web-based, self-directed sensitivity training on MSM for HCWs (www.marps-africa.org), combined with facilitated group discussions on knowledge and homophobic attitudes among HCWs in four districts of coastal Kenya. We trained four district "AIDS coordinators" to provide a two-day training to local HCWs working at antiretroviral therapy-providing facilities in coastal Kenya. Self-directed learning supported by group discussions focused on MSM sexual risk practices, HIV prevention and healthcare needs. Knowledge was assessed prior to training, immediately after training and three months after training. The Homophobia Scale assessed homophobic attitudes and was measured before and three months after training. Seventy-four HCWs (68% female; 74% clinical officers or nurses; 84% working in government facilities) from 49 health facilities were trained, of whom 71 (96%) completed all measures. At baseline, few HCWs reported any prior training on MSM anal sexual practices, and most HCWs had limited knowledge of MSM sexual health needs. Homophobic attitudes were most pronounced among HCWs who were male, under 30 years of age, and working in clinical roles or government facilities. Three months after training, more HCWs had adequate knowledge compared to baseline (49% vs. 13%, McNemar's test phomophobic attitudes had decreased significantly three months after training, particularly among HCWs with high homophobia scores at baseline, and there was some evidence of correlation between improvements in knowledge and reduction in homophobic sentiment. Scaling up MSM sensitivity training for African HCWs is likely to be a timely, effective and practical means to improve relevant sexual health knowledge and reduce personal

  6. The importance of sensory-motor control in providing core stability: implications for measurement and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghuis, Jan; Hof, At L; Lemmink, Koen A P M

    2008-01-01

    Although the hip musculature is found to be very important in connecting the core to the lower extremities and in transferring forces from and to the core, it is proposed to leave the hip musculature out of consideration when talking about the concept of core stability. A low level of co-contraction of the trunk muscles is important for core stability. It provides a level of stiffness, which gives sufficient stability against minor perturbations. Next to this stiffness, direction-specific muscle reflex responses are also important in providing core stability, particularly when encountering sudden perturbations. It appears that most trunk muscles, both the local and global stabilization system, must work coherently to achieve core stability. The contributions of the various trunk muscles depend on the task being performed. In the search for a precise balance between the amount of stability and mobility, the role of sensory-motor control is much more important than the role of strength or endurance of the trunk muscles. The CNS creates a stable foundation for movement of the extremities through co-contraction of particular muscles. Appropriate muscle recruitment and timing is extremely important in providing core stability. No clear evidence has been found for a positive relationship between core stability and physical performance and more research in this area is needed. On the other hand, with respect to the relationship between core stability and injury, several studies have found an association between a decreased stability and a higher risk of sustaining a low back or knee injury. Subjects with such injuries have been shown to demonstrate impaired postural control, delayed muscle reflex responses following sudden trunk unloading and abnormal trunk muscle recruitment patterns. In addition, various relationships have been demonstrated between core stability, balance performance and activation characteristics of the trunk muscles. Most importantly, a significant

  7. Staff training and outreach support for Cognitive Stimulation Therapy and its implementation in practice: a cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streater, Amy; Spector, Aimee; Hoare, Zoe; Aguirre, Elisa; Russell, Ian; Orrell, Martin

    2017-12-01

    There is evidence that Cognitive Stimulation Therapy and maintenance Cognitive Stimulation Therapy are effective in mild to moderate dementia. There is, however, little evidence available for its implementation in practice and the impact of outreach support on the sustainability of the programme. Two hundred and forty-one staff members were randomised from 63 dementia care settings between outreach support including an online forum, email, and telephone support, compared to usual Cognitive Stimulation Therapy control group. The primary outcome was average number of attendees to the Cognitive Stimulation Therapy and maintenance Cognitive Stimulation Therapy programmes. There was no difference in average number of attendees between the intervention and usual Cognitive Stimulation Therapy control groups for the Cognitive Stimulation Therapy (p = 0.82) or the maintenance Cognitive Stimulation Therapy programme (p = 0.97). Outreach support does not affect the average number of people with dementia attending the Cognitive Stimulation Therapy or maintenance Cognitive Stimulation Therapy programme. Irrespective of outreach support, the programmes remain widely implemented and yield perceived benefits for people with dementia. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Is there a difference between center and home care providers' training, perceptions, and practices related to obesity prevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juhee; Shim, Jae Eun; Wiley, Angela R; Kim, Keunsei; McBride, Brent A

    2012-11-01

    To compare the obesity related training, practices, and perceptions of home child care providers and center care providers. A self-administered survey was collected from child care providers who attended local child care training workshops in east central Illinois from March 2009 to August 2010. Study results were based on responses from 88 home care providers and 94 center providers. The survey questions addressed child care providers' training in the prior year, their obesity prevention practices including written policies, their perceptions of influences on children's health, and factors determining food menu selection. Paired t tests and Chi-square tests were used to compare the difference by child care type. 81.9% of home care providers and 58.6% of center care providers received nutrition training, while 66.7 and 43.0% of these providers received physical activity training, respectively. Nutrition content, guidelines or state regulations, and food availability were the most important factors that influenced both types of care providers' food service menus. Both care provider types perceived they have less influence on children's food preferences, eating habits, and weight status compared to the home environment. However, home care providers perceived a smaller discrepancy between the influences of child care and home environments compared to center care providers. Compared to center providers, home care providers were more likely to have had training, be involved with health promotion activities, and rate their influence higher on children's health behaviors. Findings underscore the need for obesity prevention efforts in both types of child care settings.

  9. Educational technologies in the system of managerial staff mentoring

    OpenAIRE

    L. P. Gancharik

    2016-01-01

    Investigations related to educational technologies, ensuring the Investigations are related to the educational technologies, ensuring the formation and support of a system of mentoring of managerial staff on the basis of the «cascade» technology training. A new form of cascade training – academic cascade training when the educational institutions create a large-scale information and educational environment on the basis of telecommunication technologies to provide the institute mentoring suppo...

  10. Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Remove of the staff association office   The Staff Association offices are going to be renovated during the coming four months, February to May 2014. The physical move from our current premises 64/R-002 to our temporary office in  510/R-010 will take place on Friday January 31st, so the Secretariat will be closed on that day. Hence, from Monday February 3rd until the end of May 2014 the Staff Association Secretariat will be located in 510/R-010 (entrance just across the CERN Printshop).    

  11. Staff Acceptance of Tele-ICU Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Paul S.; Cram, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background: Remote coverage of ICUs is increasing, but staff acceptance of this new technology is incompletely characterized. We conducted a systematic review to summarize existing research on acceptance of tele-ICU coverage among ICU staff. Methods: We searched for published articles pertaining to critical care telemedicine systems (aka, tele-ICU) between January 1950 and March 2010 using PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Global Health, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library and abstracts and presentations delivered at national conferences. Studies were included if they provided original qualitative or quantitative data on staff perceptions of tele-ICU coverage. Studies were imported into content analysis software and coded by tele-ICU configuration, methodology, participants, and findings (eg, positive and negative staff evaluations). Results: Review of 3,086 citations yielded 23 eligible studies. Findings were grouped into four categories of staff evaluation: overall acceptance level of tele-ICU coverage (measured in 70% of studies), impact on patient care (measured in 96%), impact on staff (measured in 100%), and organizational impact (measured in 48%). Overall acceptance was high, despite initial ambivalence. Favorable impact on patient care was perceived by > 82% of participants. Staff impact referenced enhanced collaboration, autonomy, and training, although scrutiny, malfunctions, and contradictory advice were cited as potential barriers. Staff perceived the organizational impact to vary. An important limitation of available studies was a lack of rigorous methodology and validated survey instruments in many studies. Conclusions: Initial reports suggest high levels of staff acceptance of tele-ICU coverage, but more rigorous methodologic study is required. PMID:21051386

  12. A train the trainer program for healthcare professionals tasked with providing psychosocial support to breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eunyoung; Yoon, Junghee; Choi, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Im Ryung; Kang, Danbee; Lee, Se-Kyung; Lee, Jeong Eon; Nam, Seok Jin; Ahn, Jin Seok; Visser, Adriaan; Cho, Juhee

    2018-01-06

    The objective of this study is to develop, implement, and evaluate a training program for healthcare providers to improve ability to provide psychosocial support to breast cancer survivors in Korea. Based on a needs assessment survey and in-depth interviews with breast cancer survivors, a multidisciplinary team developed two-day intensive training program as well as education materials and counseling notes. Participants' overall satisfaction was evaluated after the training. The training program included a total of 16 lectures held over the course of seven sessions. Forty-one nurses and 3 social workers participated in the training program. Mean age was 37.5(± 6.4) years, and on average, they had 11.1 (± 5.6) years of experience. Participants' overall satisfaction was good as following: program contents (4.04), trainee guidebook (3.82), location and environment (4.10), and program organization (4.19). Among the participants, 31 (70.4%) received certification after submitting real consultation cases after the training. Two day intensive training can provide a comprehensive and coordinated education to healthcare professionals for implementing survivorship care with an emphasis on psychosocial support. Furthermore, the program should resume as a periodic continuing education course for healthcare providers. Similar education for graduate students in oncology nursing would be beneficial.

  13. The travel industry in Russia as a promising social phenomenon of economic crisis overcoming (in the context of staff training for tourism)

    OpenAIRE

    GERNESHY V.V.

    2015-01-01

    The article considers the possibility of creating a unified conception of human resources training for the travel industry, which could provide improvement of educational programs quality realization in educational institutions of travel industry. The existing educational system for specialists training, the effectiveness of which can be increased through planning and realization of action plan, including multiregion education projects is supposed to be taken as a basis of conception.

  14. Strategies business of the unit providing services of virtual training – unipanamericana compensar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Marcela Cardona Bedoya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of processes thesis of "Master in Management and Marketing Management and Global New Markets" for the University Camilo José Cela. The data collection is done through an exploratory research and the study of business unit Unit Providing Services of Virtual Training Unipanamericana - Compensate. Considering secondary sources we identified: 1 The most important in the world and in Colombia at the level of new technologies, 2 The development trends of the array Mic Mac establishes the relationship between trends and portfolio of the business unit. And 3 Identify the growth of applications and the impact of E-learning. The collection and analysis of information on the qualitative method developed through interviews, aiming to identify trends that impact the marketing plan. In the analysis were found four trends that impact the line of business: The joint educational levels, The new educational experiences, Changes in learning models and Strengthening education systems. These trends were explored in an evaluative context, to identify new technologies that are necessary for professional development.   

  15. New staff contract policy

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Following discussion at TREF and on the recommendation of the Finance Committee, Council approved a new staff contract policy, which became effective on 1 January 2006. Its application is covered by a new Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 3) 'Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members'. The revised circular replaces the previous Circulars No. 9 (Rev. 3) 'Staff contracts' and No. 2 (Rev. 2) 'Guidelines and procedures concerning recruitment and probation period for staff members'. The main features of the new contract policy are as follows: The new policy provides chances for long-term employment for all staff recruits staying for four years without distinguishing between those assigned to long-term or short-term activities when joining CERN. In addition, it presents a number of simplifications for the award of ICs. There are henceforth only 2 types of contract: Limited Duration (LD) contracts for all recruitment and Indefinite Contracts (IC) for...

  16. The Importance and Prevalence of Modern Forms of Staff Training in the Corporate Environments of Transition Countries: The Case of Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markovič-Hribernik Tanja

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Compared with traditional forms of education and training, e-learning is gaining increasing importance not only within the academic setting of formal education, but also in the corporate environment. Concerning the latter, it is evident that with increasing pressure on cost efficiency and competitiveness, in addition to the current harsh financial and economic conditions, companies are being challenged and this tends to change their behaviour patterns. In this article, the results of a survey are presented. The survey focused on the current status and possible future trends of corporate e-learning methods in Slovenia, which is among the so-called transition countries. This survey brings more than one aspect of this issue to light. The findings show increasing rates of acceptance of the e-learning education model by the local corporate environment. Nevertheless, significant gaps are evident when compared with the most advanced European and worldwide economies in terms of the widespread use of comprehensive e-learning models and the latest e-learning technologies, such as LMS systems. Furthermore, the survey reveals that e-learning is perceived by companies as cost efficient and flexible, but on the other hand it is not yet perceived to contribute to a higher quality level of staff training when compared with traditional methods.

  17. Editorial: Advances in healthcare provider and patient training to improve the quality and safety of patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Borycki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of the Knowledge Management & E-Learning: An International Journal is dedicated to describing “Advances in Healthcare Provider and Patient Training to Improve the Quality and Safety of Patient Care.” Patient safety is an important and fundamental requirement of ensuring the quality of patient care. Training and education has been identified as a key to improving healthcare provider patient safety competencies especially when working with new technologies such as electronic health records and mobile health applications. Such technologies can be harnessed to improve patient safety; however, if not used properly they can negatively impact on patient safety. In this issue we focus on advances in training that can improve patient safety and the optimal use of new technologies in healthcare. For example, use of clinical simulations and online computer based training can be employed both to facilitate learning about new clinical discoveries as well as to integrate technology into day to day healthcare practices. In this issue we are publishing papers that describe advances in healthcare provider and patient training to improve patient safety as it relates to the use of educational technologies, health information technology and on-line health resources. In addition, in the special issue we describe new approaches to training and patient safety including, online communities, clinical simulations, on-the-job training, computer based training and health information systems that educate about and support safer patient care in real-time (i.e. when health professionals are providing care to patients. These educational and technological initiatives can be aimed at health professionals (i.e. students and those who are currently working in the field. The outcomes of this work are significant as they lead to safer care for patients and their family members. The issue has both theoretical and applied papers that describe advances in patient

  18. Extra-curricular methods for improving the quality of the staff training in the university of civil engineering (psychological content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magera Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High technologies in architecture and construction change the world around. Professional trainings for the creators of the artificial environment (engineers and architects have an effect on people’s life but practically they don’t take into account the human nature of the final user and his own psychological features. In this article there are presented the results of the psychological services in the University of civil engineering from 2006 to 2017 as extra-curricular methods for the general competences formation and development. There are also described the methods of works and their specifics, some difficulties and perspectives. There are explained the reasons for psychological service at the university of civil engineering. There are also taken into account the global risks and dangers affecting the study content of civil engineering.

  19. Managing Custodial and Maintenance Staffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickes, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Presents some basic maintenance management techniques that can help schools meet their budgets, preserve staffing levels, meet productivity needs, and sustain quality services. Tips for staff recruitment, training, and retention are explored. (GR)

  20. Formal Mediation and Negotiation Training, Providing Greater Skills for Commanders in Bosnia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McConnell, G

    1999-01-01

    .... However, the training is not optimized for the environment that they will encounter. The Bosnia environment requires battalion and brigade commanders to possess and utilize mediation and negotiation skills...

  1. Training pediatric residents to provide parent education: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Erin; Kerns, Suzanne E U; McPhillips, Heather; Wright, Jeffrey; Christakis, Dimitri A; Rivara, Frederick P

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of Primary Care Positive Parenting Program (Triple P) training on pediatric residents and the families they serve to test 2 hypotheses: first, training would significantly improve resident skill in identifying and addressing discrete parenting and child behavior problems; and second, parents would report an improvement in their sense of self-efficacy, use of positive discipline strategies, and their child's behavior. Study participants included pediatric residents from 3 community clinics of a pediatric residency program, as well as English-speaking parents of children aged 18 months to 12 years without a diagnosed behavior disorder cared for by study residents. Residents were randomized to receive Primary Care Triple P training either at the beginning or end of the study period. The measured resident outcomes were self-assessed confidence and skills in giving parenting advice. The measured family outcomes were parent sense of self-efficacy, child externalizing behavior, and discipline strategies. Primary Care Triple P training had a positive, significant, and persistent impact on residents' parenting consultation skills (mean increase on Parent Consultation Skills Checklist 48.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] 40.07, 57.36). Parents visiting intervention-trained residents demonstrated improved disciplinary practices compared to parents visiting control residents (mean change in Child Discipline Survey 0.322, 95% CI 0.02, 0.71), with stronger differential effects for parents with lower baseline skills (mean Child Discipline Survey change 0.822, 95% CI 0.48, 1.83). No differences were found for child behavior or parenting sense of confidence. Training residents in Primary Care Triple P can have a positive impact on consultation skills and parent disciplinary practices. This finding adds strength to the call for increased residency training in behavioral pediatrics. Copyright © 2014 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc

  2. Training in Integrative Therapies Increases Self-Efficacy in Providing Nondrug Therapies and Self-Confidence in Offering Compassionate Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Kathi J; Hill, Ellie

    2017-10-01

    Patient demand and clinician interest have driven professional training in integrative therapies, but few rigorous evaluations have been published. This project evaluated the proof of concept of training in acupressure, guided imagery, massage, and Reiki on clinicians' sense of self-efficacy in providing nondrug therapies, self-confidence in providing compassionate care, and engagement with work. Three out of 4 topics met minimum enrollment numbers; 22 of 24 participants completed follow-up as well as pretraining surveys. All would recommend the training to others and planned changes in personal and professional care. There were significant improvements in self-efficacy in using nondrug therapies, confidence in providing compassionate care, and unplanned absenteeism ( P self-efficacy, confidence in providing compassionate care, and engagement with work. Additional studies are needed to determine the impact on quality of care and long-term workforce engagement.

  3. 20 CFR 670.300 - What entities are eligible to receive funds to operate centers and provide training and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What entities are eligible to receive funds to operate centers and provide training and operational support services? 670.300 Section 670.300... OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Funding and Selection of Service Providers § 670.300 What entities...

  4. Providing Competency Training to Clinical Supervisors through an Interactional Supervision Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebes, Jacob Kraemer; Matlin, Samantha L.; Migdole, Scott J.; Farkas, Melanie S.; Money, Roy W.; Shulman, Lawrence; Hoge, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Training in supervisory competencies is essential to effective clinical practice and helps address the current national crisis in the behavioral health workforce. Interactional supervision, the approach used in the current study, is well established in clinical social work and focuses the task of the supervisee on the interpersonal exchanges…

  5. The Effects of Facilitation Training Provided Correctional Officers Stationed at the Atlanta Federal Penitentiary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megathlin, William Latimer

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of 80 hours of facilitation training on the communication of empathy, respect, and genuineness; the dimension of authoritarianism; the interpersonal areas of inclusion, control, and affection; attitude ratings; and the personality factors of anxiety, alert poise, extraversion, and independence of…

  6. Training Probation and Parole Officers to Provide Substance Abuse Treatment: A Field Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, John A.; Herie, Marilyn; Martin, Garth; Turner, Bonnie J.

    1998-01-01

    The results of field-testing a substance-abuse treatment protocol are reported. Ten probation and parole officers were trained in Structured Relapse Prevention, and 55 clients were treated. Incentives and barriers to treatment are highlighted. The use of this type of field test as a dissemination technique is discussed. (EMK)

  7. Providing Demonstrable Return-on-Investment for Organisational Learning and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Michael; Dawson, Ray; Edwards, Janet

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to present a holistic approach to training, that clearly demonstrates cost savings with improved effectiveness and efficiencies that are aligned to business objectives. Design/methodology/approach: Extending Kirkpatrick's evaluation framework with Phillips's return-on-investment (ROI) concepts, the paper conveys a…

  8. Effectiveness of a training program in supervisors' ability to provide feedback on residents' communication skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junod Perron, N.; Nendaz, M.; Louis-Simonet, M.; Sommer, J.; Gut, A.; Baroffio, A.; Dolmans, D.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    Teaching communication skills (CS) to residents during clinical practice remains problematic. Direct observation followed by feedback is a powerful way to teach CS in clinical practice. However, little is known about the effect of training on feedback skills in this field. Controlled studies are

  9. Providing Training Enhances the Biomechanical Improvements of an Alternative Computer Mouse Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwink, A.; Oude Hengel, K.M.; Odell, D.; Dennerlein, J.T.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to determine if an alternative mouse promotes more neutral postures and decreases forearm muscle activity and if training enhances these biomechanical benefits. Background: Computer mouse use is a risk factor for developing musculoskeletal disorders;

  10. Supply-related drivers of staff motivation for providing intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy in Tanzania: evidence from two rural districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubyazi, Godfrey M; Bloch, Paul; Byskov, Jens; Magnussen, Pascal; Bygbjerg, Ib C; Hansen, Kristian S

    2012-02-18

    Since its introduction in the national antenatal care (ANC) system in Tanzania in 2001, little evidence is documented regarding the motivation and performance of health workers (HWs) in the provision of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy (IPTp) services in the national ANC clinics and the implications such motivation and performance might have had on HWs and services' compliance with the recommended IPTp delivery guidelines. This paper describes the supply-related drivers of motivation and performance of HWs in administering IPTp doses among other ANC services delivered in public and private health facilities (HFs) in Tanzania, using a case study of Mkuranga and Mufindi districts. Interviews were conducted with 78 HWs participating in the delivery of ANC services in private and public HFs and were supplemented by personal communications with the members of the district council health management team. The research instrument used in the data collection process contained a mixture of closed and open-ended questions. Some of the open-ended questions had to be coded in the form that allowed their analysis quantitatively. In both districts, respondents acknowledged IPTp as an essential intervention, but expressed dissatisfaction with their working environments constraining their performance, including health facility (HF) unit understaffing; unsystematic and unfriendly supervision by CHMT members; limited opportunities for HW career development; and poor (HF) infrastructure and staff houses. Data also suggest that poor working conditions negatively affect health workers' motivation to perform for ANC (including IPTp) services. Similarities and differences were noted in terms of motivational factors for ANC service delivery between the HWs employed in private HFs and those in public HFs: those in private facilities were more comfortable with staff residential houses, HF buildings, equipment, availability of water, electricity and cups for

  11. Supply-related drivers of staff motivation for providing intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy in Tanzania: evidence from two rural districts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mubyazi Godfrey M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since its introduction in the national antenatal care (ANC system in Tanzania in 2001, little evidence is documented regarding the motivation and performance of health workers (HWs in the provision of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy (IPTp services in the national ANC clinics and the implications such motivation and performance might have had on HWs and services' compliance with the recommended IPTp delivery guidelines. This paper describes the supply-related drivers of motivation and performance of HWs in administering IPTp doses among other ANC services delivered in public and private health facilities (HFs in Tanzania, using a case study of Mkuranga and Mufindi districts. Methods Interviews were conducted with 78 HWs participating in the delivery of ANC services in private and public HFs and were supplemented by personal communications with the members of the district council health management team. The research instrument used in the data collection process contained a mixture of closed and open-ended questions. Some of the open-ended questions had to be coded in the form that allowed their analysis quantitatively. Results In both districts, respondents acknowledged IPTp as an essential intervention, but expressed dissatisfaction with their working environments constraining their performance, including health facility (HF unit understaffing; unsystematic and unfriendly supervision by CHMT members; limited opportunities for HW career development; and poor (HF infrastructure and staff houses. Data also suggest that poor working conditions negatively affect health workers' motivation to perform for ANC (including IPTp services. Similarities and differences were noted in terms of motivational factors for ANC service delivery between the HWs employed in private HFs and those in public HFs: those in private facilities were more comfortable with staff residential houses, HF buildings, equipment

  12. IMPROVING STUDENTS’ METHODOLOGICAL AND MATHEMATICAL TRAINING TO PROVIDING CONTINUITY BETWEEN PRESCHOOL AND PRIMARY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Bondarenko

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of implementing the principle of continuity in the mathematical education of pre-school and primary school children in terms of restarting the primary school that caused the need to update the future teachers’ training. Integration into European and world educational space actualized the problem of creating conditions for development and personal fulfillment, search for effective ways of increasing future teachers’ training quality. The article aims to examine normative support and ways of improving students’ methodological and mathematical training for realization of continuity between pre-school and primary education. At the zeroth educational level the summarized results of learning (competence are to become child's readiness to learn at primary school. At the first level it is the ability to select and search for knowledge and ways of action to solve learning problems; learning and developing through mastery of the common ways of organizing learning activities; awareness of the need to continue their education and develop individual experience knowledge. The use of ICT, including methodological web quests, blended learning in the course of improving future specialists’ methodological and mathematical training to implement continuity between preschool and primary education leads to a sense of success, develops students’ ability to self-education. In authors’ view, a perspective area of future research is the development and selection of new tasks for using methodological web quests in order to improve the future specialists’ methodological and mathematical training to implement continuity between preschool and primary education, insurance in effective conditions of organizational and methodological support of the process.

  13. Effectiveness of a training program in supervisors' ability to provide feedback on residents' communication skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod Perron, Noelle; Nendaz, Mathieu; Louis-Simonet, Martine; Sommer, Johanna; Gut, Anne; Baroffio, Anne; Dolmans, Diana; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2013-12-01

    Teaching communication skills (CS) to residents during clinical practice remains problematic. Direct observation followed by feedback is a powerful way to teach CS in clinical practice. However, little is known about the effect of training on feedback skills in this field. Controlled studies are scarce as well as studies that go beyond self-reported data. The aim of the study was to develop and assess the effectiveness of a training program for clinical supervisors on how to give feedback on residents' CS in clinical practice. The authors designed a pretest-posttest controlled study in which clinical supervisors working in two different medical services were invited to attend a sequenced and multifaceted program in teaching CS over a period of 6-9 months. Outcome measures were self-perceived and observed feedback skills collected during questionnaires and three videotaped objective structured teaching encounters. The videotaped feedbacks made by the supervisors were analysed using a 20-item feedback rating instrument. Forty-eight clinical supervisors participated (28 in the intervention, 20 in the control group). After training, a higher percentage of trained participants self-reported and demonstrated statistically significant improvement in making residents more active by exploring residents' needs, stimulating self-assessment, and using role playing to test strategies and checking understanding, with effect sizes ranging from 0.93 to 4.94. A training program on how to give feedback on residents' communication skills was successful in improving clinical supervisors' feedback skills and in helping them operate a shift from a teacher-centered to a more learner-centered approach.

  14. Providing competency-based family medicine residency training in substance abuse in the new millennium: a model curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shellenberger Sylvia

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article, developed for the Betty Ford Institute Consensus Conference on Graduate Medical Education (December, 2008, presents a model curriculum for Family Medicine residency training in substance abuse. Methods The authors reviewed reports of past Family Medicine curriculum development efforts, previously-identified barriers to education in high risk substance use, approaches to overcoming these barriers, and current training guidelines of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME and their Family Medicine Residency Review Committee. A proposed eight-module curriculum was developed, based on substance abuse competencies defined by Project MAINSTREAM and linked to core competencies defined by the ACGME. The curriculum provides basic training in high risk substance use to all residents, while also addressing current training challenges presented by U.S. work hour regulations, increasing international diversity of Family Medicine resident trainees, and emerging new primary care practice models. Results This paper offers a core curriculum, focused on screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment, which can be adapted by residency programs to meet their individual needs. The curriculum encourages direct observation of residents to ensure that core skills are learned and trains residents with several "new skills" that will expand the basket of substance abuse services they will be equipped to provide as they enter practice. Conclusions Broad-based implementation of a comprehensive Family Medicine residency curriculum should increase the ability of family physicians to provide basic substance abuse services in a primary care context. Such efforts should be coupled with faculty development initiatives which ensure that sufficient trained faculty are available to teach these concepts and with efforts by major Family Medicine organizations to implement and enforce residency requirements for

  15. Training Veterans to Provide Peer Support in a Weight-Management Program: MOVE!

    OpenAIRE

    Allicock, Marlyn; Haynes-Maslow, Lindsey; Carr, Carol; Orr, Melinda; Kahwati, Leila C; Weiner, Bryan J.; Kinsinger, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has implemented MOVE!, a weight-management program for veterans designed to address the increasing proportion of overweight and obese veterans. The objective of our study was to determine whether peer support employing motivational interviewing (MI) could positively influence lifestyle changes, thus expanding the reach of the MOVE! program. We describe the initial evaluation of the peer training program. Methods We developed an MI peer cou...

  16. Can UK undergraduate dental programmes provide training in non-surgical facial aesthetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, T W M; Gately, F; Stagnell, S; Kerai, A; Mills, C; Thomas, S

    2017-06-23

    Aim Recently, more and more dentists have found themselves engaging in the delivery of non-surgical facial aesthetics (NSFA) as part of their regular practice routine. NSFA is a growing field in aesthetic medicine that is practised by a range of clinicians including doctors, dentists and registered prescriber nurses and is an industry estimated to be worth over £3 billion in the UK alone. In the past few years, several public scandals in aesthetic medicine have prompted reactions by several bodies including the Government and Royal Colleges. With Health Education England (HEE) having recently released standards in education, it is clear that a shift in attitude towards training is imminent. With a large volume of dentists making up this NSFA workforce it is reasonable to consider the stance of undergraduate training and the relevance of the existing knowledge within dentistry in the context of the HEE standards.Method All dental schools in the UK were contacted to establish the range of subjects taught within the curriculum, with particular reference to those relevant to NSFA. The two largest aesthetic pharmacies were contacted regarding numbers of registered dentists they serve.Results Twelve out of 16 dental schools responded. Two-thirds of responding dental schools do not cover NSFA in their curricula. However, many dental schools cover related subjects including: facial anatomy/material science/neuromuscular junction physiology (100%), anatomy of the aging face (66%), pharmacology of botulinum toxin (25%) and ethical-legal implications of aesthetic dentistry/NSFA (50%/42% respectively).Conclusion Dentists are well placed to deliver NSFA given their background in relevant subjects and surgical training. With the emergence and growth of such a large multi-disciplinary field it is crucial that dentistry is not left behind. Just as most dental schools have embraced the evolution of cosmetic dentistry and implantology, it would be prudent to consider that training

  17. New program of initial training for staff of engineering ANAV The training required for a particular job in ANAV is divided into three sections; Nuevo programa de formacion inicial para el personal de ingenieria en ANAV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Rabasa, D.

    2013-07-01

    - Common Primary Education - Initial training specific job - Training in the workplace For engineering has detected an area for improvement in the described model, consisting of providing the initial formation of a common engineering approach rather than the current operational approach. In preparing this plan takes into account the INPO standards, a functional analysis of the different jobs, the managers and supervisors of the observations and feedback from students, among others.

  18. Does training on performance based financing make a difference in performance and quality of health care delivery? Health care provider's perspective in Rungwe Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manongi, Rachel; Mushi, Declare; Kessy, Joachim; Salome, Saria; Njau, Bernard

    2014-04-04

    In recent years, Performance Based Financing (PBF); a form of result based financing, has attracted a global attention in health systems in developing countries. PBF promotes autonomous health facilities, motivates and introduces financial incentives to motivate health facilities and health workers to attain pre-determined targets. To achieve this, the Tanzanian government through the Christian Social Services Commission initiated a PBF pilot project in Rungwe district, Mbeya region. Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Center was given the role of training health workers on PBF principles in Rungwe. The aim of this study was to explore health care providers' perception on a three years training on PBF principles in a PBF pilot project at Rungwe District in Mbeya, Tanzania. This was an explorative qualitative study, which took place at Rungwe PBF pilot area in October 2012. Twenty six (26) participants were purposively selected. Six took part in- depth interviews (IDIs) and twenty (20) in the group discussions. Both the IDIs and the GDs explored the perceived benefit and challenges of implementing PBF in their workplace. Data were manually analyzed using content analysis approach. Overall informants had positive perspectives on PBF training. Most of the health facilities were able to implement some of the PBF concepts in their work places after the training, such as developing job descriptions for their staff, creating quarterly business plans for their facilities, costing for their services and entering service agreement with the government, improved record keeping, customer care and involving community as partners in running their facilities. The most common principle of paying individual performance bonuses was mentioned as a major challenge due to inadequate funding and poor design of Rungwe PBF pilot project. Despite poor design and inadequate funding, our findings have shown some promising results after PBF training in the study area. The findings have highlighted

  19. Cognitive Adaptation Training Provided to Chronically Hospitalized Patients with Schizophrenia in The Netherlands: Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr J. Quee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive adaptation training (CAT improves functional outcome in outpatients with schizophrenia living in the United States of America. The efficacy of CAT has never been demonstrated for patients living in a residential facility. We describe how CAT was delivered to two chronically hospitalized patients with schizophrenia living in The Netherlands. CAT was delivered for 8 months, and consisted of weekly home visits by a psychiatric nurse. Both patients improved on measures of functional outcome used in the US studies. These results indicate that CAT may improve outcomes, even in patients that have been hospitalized for several years.

  20. Mobile technology intervention to improve care coordination between HIV and substance use treatment providers: development, training, and evaluation protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claborn, Kasey; Becker, Sara; Ramsey, Susan; Rich, Josiah; Friedmann, Peter D

    2017-03-14

    People living with HIV (PLWH) with a substance use disorder (SUD) tend to receive inadequate medical care in part because of a siloed healthcare system in which HIV and substance use services are delivered separately. Ideal treatment requires an interdisciplinary, team-based coordinated care approach, but many structural and systemic barriers impede the integration of HIV and SUD services. The current protocol describes the development and preliminary evaluation of a care coordination intervention (CCI), consisting of a tablet-based mobile platform for HIV and SUD treatment providers, an interagency communication protocol, and a training protocol. We hypothesize that HIV and SUD treatment providers will find the CCI to be acceptable, and that after receipt of the CCI, providers will: exhibit higher retention in dual care among patients, report increased frequency and quality of communication, and report increased rates of relational coordination. A three phase approach is used to refine and evaluate the CCI. Phase 1 consists of in-depth qualitative interviews with 8 key stakeholders as well as clinical audits of participating HIV and SUD treatment agencies. Phase 2 contains functionality testing of the mobile platform with frontline HIV and SUD treatment providers, followed by refinement of the CCI. Phase 3 consists of a pre-, post-test trial with 30 SUD and 30 HIV treatment providers. Data will be collected at the provider, organization, and patient levels. Providers will complete assessments at baseline, immediately post-training, and at 1-, 3-, and 6-months post-training. Organizational data will be collected at baseline, 1-, 3-, and 6-months post training, while patient data will be collected at baseline and 6-months post training. This study will develop and evaluate a CCI consisting of a tablet-based mobile platform for treatment providers, an interagency communication protocol, and a training protocol as a means of improving the integration of care for PLWH

  1. 75 FR 19978 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Web Based Training for Pain Management Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... Management Providers, via the Web site PainAndAddictionTreatment.com , to positively impact the knowledge... health care providers to improve their ability to treat pain and addiction co-occurring in the provider's... information technology. Direct Comments to OMB: Written comments and/or suggestions regarding the item(s...

  2. Guidelines for staff administering laser therapy in an office setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plauntz, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    Advances in laser technology provide not only new opportunities, but an increase in laser applications. Many independent clinics now offer laser treatments. Use of laser treatment and related services should only be provided to patients by appropriately trained and qualified personnel. This article outlines the roles and responsibilities of the healthcare team working in independent laser healthcare facilities. The article is meant to assist clinics in developing their own quality management programs and is intended only to act as a guide to ensure that treatment is provided by qualified professionals in the safest, most effective manner. Staff working in laser clinics are responsible for the operation of lasers during treatment. They are also responsible for patient and staff safety, implementation of standards of care, and providing only procedures that meet and follow strict safety parameters. Accidents will occur with lasers when providers do not have the proper skills, training, and education on laser treatments. Regardless of many safety regulations involving laser use, little is written on the qualifications, selection, and ongoing education of the professional and technical staff working in independent healthcare facilities offering laser services. This article provides a detailed outline of the necessary skills and knowledge the nurses and the support staff need to possess to use lasers for patient treatment in laser treatment centers. Staff educated in laser science and safety can recognize potential hazards and ensure that safety standards are actively integrated into the daily practice of patient care.

  3. Perception of CPR quality: Influence of CPR feedback, Just-in-Time CPR training and provider role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Adam; Overly, Frank; Kessler, David; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Lin, Yiqun; Doan, Quynh; Duff, Jonathan P; Tofil, Nancy M; Bhanji, Farhan; Adler, Mark; Charnovich, Alex; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Brown, Linda L

    2015-02-01

    Many healthcare providers rely on visual perception to guide cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), but little is known about the accuracy of provider perceptions of CPR quality. We aimed to describe the difference between perceived versus measured CPR quality, and to determine the impact of provider role, real-time visual CPR feedback and Just-in-Time (JIT) CPR training on provider perceptions. We conducted secondary analyses of data collected from a prospective, multicenter, randomized trial of 324 healthcare providers who participated in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario between July 2012 and April 2014. Participants were randomized to one of four permutations of: JIT CPR training and real-time visual CPR feedback. We calculated the difference between perceived and measured quality of CPR and reported the proportion of subjects accurately estimating the quality of CPR within each study arm. Participants overestimated achieving adequate chest compression depth (mean difference range: 16.1-60.6%) and rate (range: 0.2-51%), and underestimated chest compression fraction (0.2-2.9%) across all arms. Compared to no intervention, the use of real-time feedback and JIT CPR training (alone or in combination) improved perception of depth (pPerception of depth is more accurate in CPR providers versus team leaders (27.8% vs. 7.4%; p=0.043) when using real-time feedback. Healthcare providers' visual perception of CPR quality is poor. Perceptions of CPR depth are improved by using real-time visual feedback and with prior JIT CPR training. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. PHMC post-NPH emergency response training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrads, T.J.

    1997-04-08

    This document describes post-Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) emergency response training that was provided to two teams of Project Hanford Management Contractors (PHMC) staff that will be used to assess potential structural damage that may occur as a result of a significant natural phenomena event. This training supports recent plans and procedures to use trained staff to inspect structures following an NPH event on the Hanford Site.

  5. Training Informal Educators Provides Leverage for Space Science Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J. S.; Tobola, K. W.; Betrue, R.

    2004-01-01

    How do we reach the public with the exciting story of Solar System Exploration? How do we encourage girls to think about careers in science, math, engineering and technology? Why should NASA scientists make an effort to reach the public and informal education settings to tell the Solar System Exploration story? These are questions that the Solar System Exploration Forum, a part of the NASA Office of Space Science Education (SSE) and Public Outreach network, has tackled over the past few years. The SSE Forum is a group of education teams and scientists who work to share the excitement of solar system exploration with colleagues, formal educators, and informal educators like museums and youth groups. One major area of the SSE Forum outreach supports the training of Girl Scouts of the USA (GS) leaders and trainers in a suite of activities that reflect NASA missions and science research. Youth groups like Girl Scouts structure their activities as informal education.

  6. The diffusion of innovation in nursing regulatory policy: removing a barrier to medication administration training for child care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Carolyn T; Crowley, Angela A

    2011-08-01

    Safe medication administration is an essential component of high-quality child care. Its achievement in New Jersey was impeded by a controversy over whether teaching child care providers medication administration involves registered nurses in the process of nursing delegation. Through the theoretical framework of the Diffusion of Innovation, this paper examines how the interpretation of regulatory policy related to nursing practice in New Jersey was adjusted by the Board of Nursing following a similar interpretation of regulatory policy by the Board of Nursing in Connecticut. This adjustment enabled New Jersey nurses to continue medication administration training for child care providers. National data supporting the need for training child care providers in medication administration is presented, the Diffusion of Innovation paradigm is described; the Connecticut case and the New Jersey dilemma are discussed; the diffusion process between the two states is analyzed and an assessment of the need for further change is made.

  7. The Staff Association and you

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2013-01-01

    The Staff Association, your representative with the Management and the Member States The article VII 1.01 of the Staff Rules and Regulations (SR&R) provides that “the relations between the Director-General and the personnel shall be established either on an individual basis or on a collective basis with the Staff Association as intermediary”. This essential role of the Staff representatives, of being the spokesperson of the entire staff of the Organization vis-à-vis the Director-General and the Members States, is achieved through regular participation in the various joint advisory committees defined in the SR&R. The most important are the Standing Concertation Committee and the TREF, tripartite forum where your representatives meet with the Member States delegates, in the presence of the Management, to explain the position of the staff on the various issues concerning employment conditions. The Finance Committee also gives the opportunity to the Staff Association to ...

  8. Clinical training alone is not sufficient for reducing barriers to IUD provision among private providers in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agha Sohail

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background IUD uptake remains low in Pakistan, in spite of three major efforts to introduce the IUD since the 1960s, the most recent of these being through the private sector. This study examines barriers to IUD recommendation and provision among private providers in Pakistan. Methods A facility-based survey was conducted among randomly selected private providers who were members of the Greenstar network and among similar providers located within 2 Kilometers. In total, 566 providers were interviewed in 54 districts of Pakistan. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine whether correct knowledge regarding the IUD, self-confidence in being able to insert the IUD, attitudes towards suitability of candidates for the IUD and medical safety concerns were influenced by provider type (physician vs. Lady Health Visitor, whether the provider had received clinical training in IUD insertion in the last three years, membership of the Greenstar network and experience in IUD insertion. OLS regression was used to identify predictors of provider productivity (measured by IUD insertions conducted in the month before the survey. Results Private providers consider women with children and in their peak reproductive years to be ideal candidates for the IUD. Women below age 19, above age 40 and nulliparous women are not considered suitable IUD candidates. Provider concerns about medical safety, side-effects and client satisfaction associated with the IUD are substantial. Providers' experience in terms of the number of IUDs inserted in their careers, appears to improve knowledge, self-confidence in the ability provide the IUD and to lower age-related attitudinal barriers towards IUD recommendation. Physicians have greater medical safety concerns about the IUD than Lady Health Visitors. Clinical training does not have a consistent positive effect on lowering barriers to IUD recommendation. Membership of the Greenstar network also has little

  9. Clinical training alone is not sufficient for reducing barriers to IUD provision among private providers in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, Sohail; Fareed, Aslam; Keating, Joseph

    2011-12-30

    IUD uptake remains low in Pakistan, in spite of three major efforts to introduce the IUD since the 1960s, the most recent of these being through the private sector. This study examines barriers to IUD recommendation and provision among private providers in Pakistan. A facility-based survey was conducted among randomly selected private providers who were members of the Greenstar network and among similar providers located within 2 Kilometers. In total, 566 providers were interviewed in 54 districts of Pakistan.Logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine whether correct knowledge regarding the IUD, self-confidence in being able to insert the IUD, attitudes towards suitability of candidates for the IUD and medical safety concerns were influenced by provider type (physician vs. Lady Health Visitor), whether the provider had received clinical training in IUD insertion in the last three years, membership of the Greenstar network and experience in IUD insertion. OLS regression was used to identify predictors of provider productivity (measured by IUD insertions conducted in the month before the survey). Private providers consider women with children and in their peak reproductive years to be ideal candidates for the IUD. Women below age 19, above age 40 and nulliparous women are not considered suitable IUD candidates. Provider concerns about medical safety, side-effects and client satisfaction associated with the IUD are substantial. Providers' experience in terms of the number of IUDs inserted in their careers, appears to improve knowledge, self-confidence in the ability provide the IUD and to lower age-related attitudinal barriers towards IUD recommendation. Physicians have greater medical safety concerns about the IUD than Lady Health Visitors. Clinical training does not have a consistent positive effect on lowering barriers to IUD recommendation. Membership of the Greenstar network also has little effect on lowering these barriers. Providers' barriers to

  10. Implementing UK Autism Policy & National Institute for Health and Care Excellence Guidance--Assessing the Impact of Autism Training for Frontline Staff in Community Learning Disabilities Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Alex; Browne, Sarah; Boardman, Liz; Hewitt, Lealah; Light, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    UK National Autism Strategy (Department of Health, 2010 and National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance (NICE, 2012) states that frontline staff should have a good understanding of Autism. Fifty-six clinical and administrative staff from a multidisciplinary community Learning Disability service completed an electronic questionnaire…

  11. Training Family Child Care Providers To Work with Children Who Have Special Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Abby L. Winkler

    1999-01-01

    Notes the difficulty of finding quality day care for special needs children. Discusses Project Specialcare, designed to support family child-care providers who accept such children into their programs. Describes how providers participated in Saturday sessions focused on a topic followed by open discussion and how the advice and counsel of a…

  12. 78 FR 30956 - Cruise Vessel Security and Safety Training Provider Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ... States Coast Guard, in consultation with MarAd and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. A copy of the... of each lesson and indicate whether the lesson is presented through a classroom lecture, distance E... provided by the manufacturer. 10. Provide the maximum class size for classroom lessons and, if appropriate...

  13. NICU staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... training in caring for babies in the NICU. Nurses play a very important role in monitoring the baby and supporting and educating the family. Of all the caregivers in the NICU, nurses often spend the most time at a baby's ...

  14. The Century Club: a model for staff-supported medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C T

    1990-05-01

    Osteopathic teaching hospitals are frequently criticized by house staff officers for not being sufficiently didactic or academically oriented. A model for providing academic training for students, interns, and residents as well as continuing medical education for attending staff physicians is described. This model may be administered by a department of medical education at community hospitals. Tax-deductible financial contributions from medical staff physicians and grants from pharmaceutical companies will be adequate to support this model. Benefits include enhancement of teaching rounds, increased medical staff support, improved compliance with CME requirements, and development of a useful recruitment tool.

  15. Improving support for parents of children with hearing loss: provider training on use of targeted communication strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Karen; Nelson, Lauri; Blaiser, Kristina; Price, Tanner; Twohig, Michael

    2015-02-01

    When proper protocols are followed, children who are identified with a permanent hearing loss early in life have opportunities to develop language on par with their typical hearing peers. Young children with hearing loss are dependent on their parents to manage intervention during early years critical to their development, and parents' ability to effectively integrate recommendations in daily life is foundational for intervention success. Audiologists and early intervention professionals not only need to provide current evidence-based services, but also must address parents' emotional and learning needs related to their child's hearing loss. This study explored practice patterns related to education and support provided to parents of children with hearing loss and the influence of an in-service training on provider attitudes. This study used a prepost design with a self-report questionnaire to identify practice patterns related to communication skills and support used by providers when working with parents of children with hearing loss. A total of 45 participants (21 professionals and 24 graduate students) currently working with children completed the pretraining questionnaire, and 29 participants (13 professionals and 16 graduate students) completed the postquestionnaire. Data were collected using an online questionnaire before the training and 1 mo after training. Descriptive analyses were done to identify trends, and paired-samples t-tests were used to determine changes pretraining to posttraining. Findings revealed that professionals most frequently teach skills to mothers (91%) and infrequently teach skills to fathers (19%) and other caregivers (10%). Professionals reported frequently collaborating with other intervention providers (76%) and infrequently collaborating with primary care physicians (19%). One-third of the professionals reported addressing symptoms of depression and anxiety as an interfering factor with the ability to implement management

  16. Staff Rostering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A.E. Thompson

    1978-09-01

    Full Text Available Staff rostering is a key factor in nursing management with potential to bring life to, or to paralyse the system. This places immense responsibility on those in charge of rostering, and an all but intolerable load if the task is incumbent upon any one person. Nurse administrators (managers who have handled such a task, are to be congratulated on the order they have created out of potential ‘chaos’. It would seem, however, that the time is surely ripe for regular appraisals of the situation with a resultant increased participation in the policy and decision-making process.

  17. A comprehensive systematic review of the use of simulation in the continuing education and training of qualified medical, nursing and midwifery staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Sharon; Murrell, Karen; Harper, Peter; Stephens, Tim; Pellowe, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Simulation can be defined as a person, device or set of conditions made to resemble a real life situation. It is used in many high-risk industries particularly when reality is dangerous, critical events are rare and errors are costly in human and/or financial terms. The use of simulation in the UK is now considered an essential component of education programmes designed for healthcare practitioners. However the use of simulation in undergraduate education has been studied in depth but little is known about its use in postgraduate education. The aim of this systematic review was to establish: where and in which context is simulation an effective educational medium in post qualifying/continuing education; what is the benefit to learners of using simulation in respect of their knowledge, skills and confidence and what are the implications for future research in this area? This review looked for both quantitative and qualitative evidence in the form of primary research.The review focused on post qualification medical, nursing and midwifery staff undertaking educational development programmes utilising simulation. Types of interventions: the intervention explored in this review is simulation in the form of the re-creation of a patient centred scenario / event in a realistic context. The review explicitly excluded simulation designed to specifically to improve motor skills in isolation from context, such as part task trainers. The outcome measures to be explored in this review were: demonstration of the application of knowledge to the simulated clinical situation; demonstrable improvement in knowledge of the environment and equipment; demonstration of risk assessment; safe working practice in relation to the clinical environment; recognition of own limitations and knowing when to call for help; effective communication; team working and leadership skills; evidence from learners in relation to the educational experience; evidence of increased learner confidence following

  18. Building capacity in mental health interventions in low resource countries: an apprenticeship model for training local providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Laura K; Dorsey, Shannon; Bolton, Paul; Jordans, Mark Jd; Rahman, Atif; Bass, Judith; Verdeli, Helena

    2011-11-18

    Recent global mental health research suggests that mental health interventions can be adapted for use across cultures and in low resource environments. As evidence for the feasibility and effectiveness of certain specific interventions begins to accumulate, guidelines are needed for how to train, supervise, and ideally sustain mental health treatment delivery by local providers in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). MODEL AND CASE PRESENTATIONS: This paper presents an apprenticeship model for lay counselor training and supervision in mental health treatments in LMIC, developed and used by the authors in a range of mental health intervention studies conducted over the last decade in various low-resource settings. We describe the elements of this approach, the underlying logic, and provide examples drawn from our experiences working in 12 countries, with over 100 lay counselors. We review the challenges experienced with this model, and propose some possible solutions. We describe and discuss how this model is consistent with, and draws on, the broader dissemination and implementation (DI) literature. In our experience, the apprenticeship model provides a useful framework for implementation of mental health interventions in LMIC. Our goal in this paper is to provide sufficient details about the apprenticeship model to guide other training efforts in mental health interventions.

  19. Providing a setup and opportunities for better training of postdoctoral research fellows in an academic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghayur Muhammad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Thousands of young researchers come from different parts of the world every year to take up postdoctoral (postdoc research fellowship positions in the developed countries. In the US alone, there were 48,601 postdocs in the year 2005 working in different labs in the fields of science, health and engineering. Many pursue this option for lack of other alternatives. Expectedly, these individuals face a lot of difficulties in making this transition from being a student to becoming an employee of an institution. Many institutions are prepared to make this transition and period of stay easy for their fellows while others are not equipped at all. The presence of a postdoc office (established by an institution or an association (formed by the fellows can be of immense help to postdocs. Additionally, the availability of institutional professional development and leadership programs can also help to nurture and polish postdoc fellows into future faculty members and valuable members of the community at large. To name a few, these professional development programs can focus on communication and presentation skills, medical education, teaching and learning, bioethics and mentorship. There is an urgent need to address some or all of these issues so that better training environment and opportunities are available to this group of postdoc fellows.

  20. Early Intervention and Perinatal Depression: Is There a Need for Provider Training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Elizabeth; Stacks, Ann M.; McComish, Judith Fry

    2010-01-01

    An estimated 5-25% of women suffer from perinatal depression (PD). If left untreated, PD can have negative consequences for maternal and child mental health. During pregnancy and the postpartum period, women are in contact with a variety of professionals and paraprofessionals such as public health nurses, early childhood providers and home…

  1. School Mental Health Professionals' Training, Comfort, and Attitudes toward Interprofessional Collaboration with Pediatric Primary Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Prerna G.; Connors, Elizabeth H.; Biscardi, Krystin A.; Hill, Allison M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the well-documented need for interprofessional collaboration (IPC) between school mental health (SMH) professionals and pediatric primary care providers (PCPs), research on current collaborative practices of these professionals is limited. Accordingly, using survey methodology, this study investigated SMH professionals' previous training…

  2. The impact of coaches providing healthy snacks at junior sport training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belski, Regina; Staley, Kiera; Keenan, Stephen; Skiadopoulos, Anne; Randle, Erica; Donaldson, Alex; O'Halloran, Paul; Kappelides, Pam; O'Neil, Stacey; Nicholson, Matthew

    2017-12-01

    Sports clubs provide an opportunity to tackle childhood obesity rates through targeted interventions. Our study aimed to investigate if coaches providing healthy snacks to participants before junior netball sessions at five clubs in Melbourne, Australia, increased consumption of healthy foods and influenced coach perceptions of participants' attention/participation levels. Coaches provided healthy snacks to participants before each netball session for one school term. Children's food consumption was observed at one session before, during and after the intervention. Parents attending the observed session completed pre- and post-intervention questionnaires. Coaches rated participants' attention/participation at the observed sessions before and during the intervention, and completed a questionnaire post-intervention. Baseline: Ice cream and cake were the most frequently consumed snacks. During intervention: Fruit, cheese and crackers and vegetables were the most frequently consumed snacks. Coaches ratings of participants' attention/participation increased significantly (baseline: 6.4 ± 0.17, intervention: 7.5 ± 0.36; p=0.02) where the same coach undertook ratings at both time points. Coaches providing healthy snacks before sessions at sports clubs increased consumption of nutrient-dense foods at the session, and may have positively affected participants' attention/participation. Implications for public health: This study highlights how a simple intervention could improve the diet of Australian children. © 2017 The Authors.

  3. Sexual Abuse Prevention: A Training Program for Developmental Disabilities Service Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Rachel A.; Scotti, Joseph R.; Morris, Tracy L.

    2010-01-01

    Persons with developmental disabilities are at an increased risk for becoming victims of sexual abuse. Research has revealed that the largest group of identified perpetrators of sexual abuse is developmental disability service providers. The purpose of the present study was to develop, implement, and evaluate the effectiveness of a sexual abuse…

  4. Asthma education for school staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kew, Kayleigh M; Carr, Robin; Donovan, Tim; Gordon, Morris

    2017-04-12

    Teachers and school staff should be competent in managing asthma in schools. Demonstrated low levels of asthma knowledge mean that staff may not know how best to protect a child with asthma in their care, or may fail to take appropriate action in the event of a serious attack. Education about asthma could help to improve this knowledge and lead to better asthma outcomes for children. To assess the effectiveness and safety of asthma education programmes for school staff, and to identify content and attributes underpinning them. We conducted the most recent searches on 29 November 2016. We included randomised controlled trials comparing an intervention to educate school staff about asthma versus a control group. We included studies reported as full text, those published as abstract only and unpublished data. At least two review authors screened the searches, extracted outcome data and intervention characteristics from included studies and assessed risk of bias. Primary outcomes for the quantitative synthesis were emergency department (ED) or hospital visits, mortality and asthma control; we graded the main results and presented evidence in a 'Summary of findings' table. We planned a qualitative synthesis of intervention characteristics, but study authors were unable to provide the necessary information.We analysed dichotomous data as odds ratios, and continuous data as mean differences or standardised mean differences, all with a random-effects model. We assessed clinical, methodological and statistical heterogeneity when performing meta-analyses, and we narratively described skewed data. Five cluster-RCTs of 111 schools met the review eligibility criteria. Investigators measured outcomes in participating staff and often in children or parents, most often at between 1 and 12 months.All interventions were educational programmes but duration, content and delivery varied; some involved elements of training for pupils or primary care providers. We noted risk of selection

  5. Competency in Chaos: Lifesaving Performance of Care Providers Utilizing a Competency-Based, Multi-Actor Emergency Preparedness Training Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lancer A.; Swartzentruber, Derrick A.; Davis, Christopher Ashby; Maddux, P. Tim; Schnellman, Jennifer; Wahlquist, Amy E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Providing comprehensive emergency preparedness training (EPT) to care providers is important to the future success of disaster operations in the US. Few EPT programs possess both competency-driven goals and metrics to measure performance during a multi-patient simulated disaster. Methods A 1-day (8-hour) EPT course for care providers was developed to enhance provider knowledge, skill, and comfort necessary to save lives during a simulated disaster. Nine learning objectives, 18 competencies, and 34 performance objectives were developed. During the 2-year demonstration of the curriculum, 24 fourth-year medical students and 17 Veterans Hospital Administration (VHA) providers were recruited and volunteered to take the course (two did not fully complete the research materials). An online pre-test, two post-tests, course assessment, didactic and small group content, and a 6-minute clinical casualty scenario were developed. During the scenario, trainees working in teams were confronted with three human simulators and 10 actor patients simultaneously. Unless appropriate performance objectives were met, the simulators “died” and the team was exposed to “anthrax.” After the scenario, team members participated in a facilitator-led debriefing using digital video and then repeated the scenario. Results Trainees (N = 39) included 24 (62%) medical students; seven (18%) physicians; seven (18%) nurses; and one (3%) emergency manager. Forty-seven percent of the VHA providers reported greater than 16 annual hours of disaster training, while 15 (63%) of the medical students reported no annual disaster training. The mean (SD) score for the pre-test was 12.3 (3.8), or 51% correct, and after the training, the mean (SD) score was 18.5 (2.2), or 77% (P <.01). The overall rating for the course was 96 out of 100. Trainee self-assessment of “Overall Skill” increased from 63.3 out of 100 to 83.4 out of 100 and “Overall Knowledge” increased from 49.3 out of 100 to 78

  6. The Impact of Learning Style on Healthcare Providers' Preference for Voice Advisory Manikins versus Live Instructors in Basic Life Support Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiovanni, Lisa Marie

    2013-01-01

    The American Heart Association's HeartCode[TM] Healthcare Provider (HCP) Basic Life Support (BLS) e-learning program with voice-advisory manikins was implemented in an acute care hospital as the only teaching method offered for BLS certification. On course evaluations, healthcare provider staff commented that the VAM technology for skills practice…

  7. An investigation of residential facility staff usage of touchscreen technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, Samantha M; Westphal, Alissa; Lautenschlager, Nicola T

    2017-04-24

    Older adults may become more familiar and interested in using touchscreen technology (TT). TT can be used to engage older adults living in residential aged care facilities (RACFs) and staff there can play an important role in supporting residents to use TT. However, before these are introduced, it is crucial to investigate their opinions in using TT with residents. A questionnaire based on the Technology Acceptance Model was administered to assess staff usage and confidence in using TT, their perceptions in TT ease-of-use and usefulness in helping them care for their residents. Perhaps unsurprisingly, results found that respondents were familiar using TT. More importantly, staff reported that they were interested in engaging residents with TT and nominated different training methods to support them such as group in-services. This project provides information about staff experience and acceptance of the use of TT for residents in RACFs.

  8. Using an established telehealth model to train urban primary care providers on hypertension management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Christopher; Hamlish, Tamara; Davis, Andrew; Bordenave, Kristine; Brown, Stephen; Perea, Brenda; Aduana, Glen; Wolfe, Marcus; Bakris, George; Johnson, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether a videoconference-based telehealth network can increase hypertension management knowledge and self-assessed competency among primary care providers (PCPs) working in urban Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs). We created a telehealth network among 6 urban FQHCs and our institution to support a 12-session educational program designed to teach state-of-the-art hypertension management. Each 1-hour session included a brief lecture by a university-based hypertension specialist, case presentations by PCPs, and interactive discussions among the specialist and PCPs. Twelve PCPs (9 intervention and 3 controls) were surveyed at baseline and immediately following the curriculum. The mean number of correct answers on the 26-item hypertension knowledge questionnaire increased in the intervention group (13.11 [standard deviation (SD)]=3.06) to 17.44 [SD=1.59], Phypertension management self-assessed competency scale increased in the intervention group (4.68 [SD=0.94] to 5.41 [SD=0.89], Phypertension care provided by urban FQHC providers. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The effects of behavioral skills training on instructor and learner behavior across responses and skill sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetherston, Anne M; Sturmey, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Behavioral skills training (BST) is effective to train staff to provide intervention to people with developmental disabilities. The purpose of this study was to assess whether: (a) prior studies demonstrating the effectiveness of BST could be systematically replicated while teaching multiple teaching instructors to implement discrete trial teaching, incidental teaching and activity schedules; (b) instructional skills that staff acquired during training on one response generalized to a variety of instructional programs, (c) positive changes in staff performance produced positive behavior change in learners; and (d) positive changes in learner behavior generalized to novel programs. BST resulted in positive behavior change across staff, learners, instructional programs, and various teaching skills. Further, staff generalized teaching skills to novel responses and learners displayed increases in correct responding for all three instructional procedures. Social validity data indicated they these staff training procedures were highly acceptable and effective. Thus, BST is an effective and acceptable staff training procedure. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Violence to staff in a general hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, R; Shuttleworth, S; Hill, L

    1996-08-01

    The problem of aggression to staff in a general hospital was examined from the perspective of Poyner & Warne's (1986) model of workplace violence. A total of 396 staff (39% response rate) provided information on their experience of violence in the past year and a subsample were additionally interviewed about their current levels of mental health (GHQ). Some 72 staff (21% of respondents had been physically assaulted and 90% of these assaulted staff worked beyond the accident and emergency department, e.g. in medical wards. Nurses were physically assaulted, threatened and verbally abused at higher rates than other professionals. Employee factors (younger age, shorter National Health Service experience and attendance at violence training) were significantly associated with assault (P < 0.05). Postoperative confusion, receiving treatment and delayed treatment were common precursors of aggression. Mental health was significantly worse amongst staff exposed to threats (P < 0.01). This exploratory study establishes that violence is a problem across a number of general hospital departments and occupations and we argue that effective training should be made more available for staff at risk of assault.

  11. Integration of CERN staff

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    An example of the integration of CERN staff in the neighbouring communes is provided by the hamlet of Bugnon at St-Genis-Pouilly (Ain), FRance. The CERN installation on the Swiss site are visible on the left in the background. Behind them the Saleve mountain in Haute-Savoie.

  12. Building Reference Strengths through Peer Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankert, Holly Stec; Dempsey, Paula R.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses types of peer training and describes the development of peer training instruction for reference/instruction librarians at DePaul University (Illinois) to keep communication open among staff members, share subject expertise, sharpen skills needed in group and one-on-one instruction, train new librarians, and provide ongoing professional…

  13. Training and deployment of lay refugee/internally displaced persons to provide basic health services in camps: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Ehiri

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Training of lay refugees/internally displaced persons (IDPs and deploying them to provide basic health services to other women, children, and families in camps is perceived to be associated with public health benefits. However, there is limited evidence to support this hypothesis. Objectives: To assess the effects of interventions to train and deploy lay refugees and/or IDPs for the provision of basic health service to other women, children, and families in camps. Methods: PubMed, Science and Social Science Citation Indices, PsycINFO, EMBASE, POPLINE, CINAHL, and reference lists of relevant articles were searched (from inception to June 30, 2014 with the aim of identifying studies that reported the effects of interventions that trained and deployed lay refugees and/or IDPs for the provision of basic health service to other women, children, and families in camps. Two investigators independently reviewed all titles and abstracts to identify potentially relevant articles. Discrepancies were resolved by repeated review, discussion, and consensus. Study quality assessment was undertaken using standard protocols. Results: Ten studies (five cross-sectional, four pre-post, and one post-test only conducted in Africa (Guinea and Tanzania, Central America (Belize, and Asia (Myanmar were included. The studies demonstrated some positive impact on population health associated with training and deployment of trained lay refugees/IDPs as health workers in camps. Reported effects included increased service coverage, increased knowledge about disease symptoms and prevention, increased adoption of improved treatment seeking and protective behaviors, increased uptake of services, and improved access to reproductive health information. One study, which assessed the effect of peer refugee health education on sexual and reproductive health, did not demonstrate a marked reduction in unintended pregnancies among refugee/IDP women. Conclusion: Although

  14. Training and deployment of lay refugee/internally displaced persons to provide basic health services in camps: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehiri, John E; Gunn, Jayleen K L; Center, Katherine E; Li, Ying; Rouhani, Mae; Ezeanolue, Echezona E

    2014-01-01

    Training of lay refugees/internally displaced persons (IDPs) and deploying them to provide basic health services to other women, children, and families in camps is perceived to be associated with public health benefits. However, there is limited evidence to support this hypothesis. To assess the effects of interventions to train and deploy lay refugees and/or IDPs for the provision of basic health service to other women, children, and families in camps. PubMed, Science and Social Science Citation Indices, PsycINFO, EMBASE, POPLINE, CINAHL, and reference lists of relevant articles were searched (from inception to June 30, 2014) with the aim of identifying studies that reported the effects of interventions that trained and deployed lay refugees and/or IDPs for the provision of basic health service to other women, children, and families in camps. Two investigators independently reviewed all titles and abstracts to identify potentially relevant articles. Discrepancies were resolved by repeated review, discussion, and consensus. Study quality assessment was undertaken using standard protocols. Ten studies (five cross-sectional, four pre-post, and one post-test only) conducted in Africa (Guinea and Tanzania), Central America (Belize), and Asia (Myanmar) were included. The studies demonstrated some positive impact on population health associated with training and deployment of trained lay refugees/IDPs as health workers in camps. Reported effects included increased service coverage, increased knowledge about disease symptoms and prevention, increased adoption of improved treatment seeking and protective behaviors, increased uptake of services, and improved access to reproductive health information. One study, which assessed the effect of peer refugee health education on sexual and reproductive health, did not demonstrate a marked reduction in unintended pregnancies among refugee/IDP women. Although available evidence suggests a positive impact of training and deployment

  15. Perceptions regarding the ease of use and usefulness of health information exchange systems among medical providers, case managers and non-clinical staff members working in HIV care and community settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Janet J; Koester, Kimberly A; Chakravarty, Deepalika; Pearson, Charles; Maiorana, Andres; Shade, Starley B; Steward, Wayne T

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe how members of HIV patients' care teams perceived the usefulness and ease of use of newly implemented, innovative health information exchange systems (HIEs) in diverse HIV treatment settings. Five settings with existing electronic medical records (EMRs) received special funding to test enhancements to their systems. Participating clinics and community-based organizations added HIEs permitting bi-directional exchange of information across multiple provider sites serving the same HIV patient population. We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews and quantitative web-based surveys with case managers, medical providers, and non-clinical staff members to assess the systems' perceived usefulness and ease of use shortly after the HIEs were implemented. Our approach to data analysis was iterative. We first conducted a thematic analysis of the qualitative data and discovered that there were key differences in perceptions and actual use of HIEs across occupational groups. We used these results to guide our analysis of the quantitative survey data, stratifying by occupational group. We found differences in reports of how useful and how well-used HIEs were, by occupation. Medical providers were more likely to use HIEs if they provided easier access to clinical information than was present in existing EMRs. Case managers working inside medical clinics found HIEs to be less helpful because they already had access to the clinical data. In contrast, case managers working in community settings appreciated the new access to patient information that the HIEs provided. Non-clinical staff uniformly found the HIEs useful for a broad range of tasks including clinic administration, grant writing and generating reports for funders. Our study offers insights into the use and potential benefits of HIE in the context of HIV care across occupational groups. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Innovative T&E that Balances Risk with Resources for Future Army Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buck, Sean; Rhinesmith, Frank; Pagan, Jose; Metivier, Timothy; Daughtry, Clayton; McGlynn, Lana

    2005-01-01

    What is the ACTF? The Army Constructive Training Federation (ACTF) is a collection of Simulations, Sim/C4I interfaces and tools which provide post exercise drivers designed for training land component commanders and their staffs...

  17. [Dietary training for school food service providers in support of the Acuerdo Nacional para la Salud Alimentaria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Dávila, Carolina; Rangel-Peniche, Diana Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    To address the problem of overweight and obesity in Mexico, in 2010 the Acuerdo Nacional para la Salud Alimentaria was published. At school level, food service providers were considered essential to comply with certain commitments. The goal of this intervention was to train school food service providers in school eating establishments (SEE) as to the criteria in the general guidelines for the sale and distribution of food in schools of basic education. 13 SEE in San Luis Potosi participated. Based on an initial diagnosis, a class-workshop of 5 sessions was designed. Knowledge regarding food was evaluated at the beginning and end of the sessions. The percentage of adherence regarding general hygiene and food preparation and distribution was obtained at the beginning, one month, and two months post-intervention. School food service providers had little knowledge on the objectives of the Acuerdo in food groups and combination, as well as reading labels; there were significant changes in the last two after intervention. The initial percentage of overall hygiene compliance was 60 %, with an increase of almost 20 % post-training. The preparation and distribution of food did not show significant changes. School food service providers acquired knowledge about the guidelines that a SEE comply with, without putting them into practice, given the economic impact that it implies.

  18. Perceived barriers, resources, and training needs of rural primary care providers relevant to the management of childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findholt, Nancy E; Davis, Melinda M; Michael, Yvonne L

    2013-08-01

    To explore the perceived barriers, resources, and training needs of rural primary care providers in relation to implementing the American Medical Association Expert Committee recommendations for assessment, treatment, and prevention of childhood obesity. In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 rural primary care providers in Oregon. Transcribed interviews were thematically coded. Barriers to addressing childhood obesity fell into 5 categories: barriers related to the practice (time constraints, lack of reimbursement, few opportunities to detect obesity), the clinician (limited knowledge), the family/patient (family lifestyle and lack of parent motivation to change, low family income and lack of health insurance, sensitivity of the issue), the community (lack of pediatric subspecialists and multidisciplinary/tertiary care services, few community resources), and the broader sociocultural environment (sociocultural influences, high prevalence of childhood obesity). There were very few clinic and community resources to assist clinicians in addressing weight issues. Clinicians had received little previous training relevant to childhood obesity, and they expressed an interest in several topics. Rural primary care providers face extensive barriers in relation to implementing recommended practices for assessment, treatment, and prevention of childhood obesity. Particularly problematic is the lack of local and regional resources. Employing nurses to provide case management and behavior counseling, group visits, and telehealth and other technological communications are strategies that could improve the management of childhood obesity in rural primary care settings. © 2013 National Rural Health Association.

  19. Focus on Dementia Care: Continuing Education Preferences, Challenges, and Catalysts among Rural Home Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosteniuk, Julie G.; Morgan, Debra G.; O'Connell, Megan E.; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina; Stewart, Norma J.

    2016-01-01

    Home care staff who provide housekeeping and personal care to individuals with dementia generally have lower levels of dementia care training compared with other health care providers. The study's purposes were to determine whether the professional role of home care staff in a predominantly rural region was associated with preferences for delivery…

  20. Methodological Issues of Providing Training in Prevention of Behavioural and Developmental Disorders within Master’s Programme in School Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanovich N. V.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article explores features of providing training in the approbated module “Prevention of Behavioural and Developmental Disorders” within the master’s programme in School Psychology. The programme was developed in accordance with the professional standard for educational psychologists. The article outlines the aims of the module and its place in the context of the programme in general and reveals the main ways of developing competencies specified in the educational standard but selected with respect to professional activities defined by the professional standard. The article also suggests some methodological principles of designing an educational module in practice-oriented training, among which the basic one is reflective activity-based networking. An activity-based content of the module is proposed basing on the psychological definition of prevention as one of the core activities in a psychologist’s work. Finally, the article describes educational outcomes in graduate students upon successful completion of the training, and reflects upon certain problems revealed during the approbation of the module.

  1. Corporate e-Learning: Justification for Implementation and Evaluation of Benefits. A Study Examining the Views of Training Managers and Training Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Robert; Doonga, Nitin

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the experience and perceptions of training managers and training suppliers with respect to provision of e-training to corporate clients--a rapidly growing area of commercial activity. In particular the study explores the justification for implementing e-training and the consequent benefits which are anticipated by training…

  2. Evaluation of a thoracic ultrasound training module for the detection of pneumothorax and pulmonary edema by prehospital physician care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Vicki E; Lamhaut, Lionel; Capp, Roberta; Bosson, Nichole; Liteplo, Andrew; Marx, Jean-Sebastian; Carli, Pierre

    2009-01-12

    While ultrasound (US) has continued to expedite diagnosis and therapy for critical care physicians inside the hospital system, the technology has been slow to diffuse into the pre-hospital system. Given the diagnostic benefits of thoracic ultrasound (TUS), we sought to evaluate image recognition skills for two important TUS applications; the identification of B-lines (used in the US diagnosis of pulmonary edema) and the identification of lung sliding and comet tails (used in the US diagnosis of pneumothorax). In particular we evaluated the impact of a focused training module in a pre-hospital system that utilizes physicians as pre-hospital providers. 27 Paris Service D'Aide Médicale Urgente (SAMU) physicians at the Hôpital Necker with varying levels of US experience were given two twenty-five image recognition pre-tests; the first test had examples of both normal and pneumothorax lung US and the second had examples of both normal and pulmonary edema lung US. All 27 physicians then underwent the same didactic training modules. A post-test was administered upon completing the training module and results were recorded. Pre and post-test scores were compared for both the pneumothorax and the pulmonary edema modules. For the pneumothorax module, mean test scores increased from 10.3 +/- 4.1 before the training to 20.1 +/- 3.5 after (p image recognition skills for physicians both with and without previous ultrasound experience. Given that rapid diagnosis of these conditions in the pre-hospital system can change therapy, especially in systems where physicians can integrate this information into treatment decisions, the further diffusion of this technology would seem to be beneficial and deserves further study.

  3. Evaluation of Skill-oriented Training on Enhanced Syndromic Case Management (ESCM) of Reproductive Tract Infections / Sexually Transmitted Infections (RTI/STIs) of Care Providers from Three-tier Health-care System of Gujarat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rashmi; Prajapati, Shailesh; Patel, Brijesh; Kumar, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced syndromic case management (ESCM) deals with reproductive tract and sexually transmitted infections. Capacity building of service providers not only boosts the program but also inputs from them improve the quality of services. To (1) identify problem areas from providers' perspectives and the gaps in knowledge and application and (2) assess the gains (if any) through pre and post-training evaluation. A total of 121 participants (medical/para medical) from various medical colleges, district/sub-district hospitals/ community health centers, and urban dispensaries across Gujarat were trained at a teaching institute. Trainings were of 2-3 days duration involving different learning methodology. Pre- and post-training evaluation were done on a designed pro forma and data were entered in MS office Excel 2007. Gains in knowledge/skills if any were assessed by comparing pre-/post-evaluation responses and applying test of significance (x(2) test). Out of total 121 participants, half (60) were doctors and the rest were paramedics [staff nurse (SN) and lab technicians (LT)]. Doctors revealed significant gain in basics of reproductive tract infections (RTI) and sexually transmitted infections (STI), syndrome identification, STI/HIV co-infection, and ESCM and less gain in asymptomatic STI/ complications, vulnerability, male reproductive organs, causes of vaginal/urethral discharge, STI complications, cervical cancer screening, and limitation of syndromic management. Gain was statistically significant in basics of RTI/STI amongst adolescent in paramedics; lab technicians showed significant gain in knowledge of laboratory-related areas. Assessment revealed (1) poor baseline knowledge and (2) gains following training sometimes significant and other times not significant even in core areas. Quality monitoring and contents/ methodologies modification are essential for robust trainings. Gains in skills could not be assessed through this evaluation.

  4. Evaluation of skill-oriented training on enhanced syndromic case management (ESCM of reproductive tract infections / sexually transmitted infections (RTI/STIs of care providers from three-tier health-care system of Gujarat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enhanced syndromic case management (ESCM deals with reproductive tract and sexually transmitted infections. Capacity building of service providers not only boosts the program but also inputs from them improve the quality of services. Objectives: To (1 identify problem areas from providers' perspectives and the gaps in knowledge and application and (2 assess the gains (if any through pre and post-training evaluation. Materials and Methods: A total of 121 participants (medical/para medical from various medical colleges, district/sub-district hospitals/ community health centers, and urban dispensaries across Gujarat were trained at a teaching institute. Trainings were of 2-3 days duration involving different learning methodology. Pre- and post-training evaluation were done on a designed pro forma and data were entered in MS office Excel 2007. Gains in knowledge/skills if any were assessed by comparing pre-/post-evaluation responses and applying test of significance (x2 test. Observations: Out of total 121 participants, half (60 were doctors and the rest were paramedics [staff nurse (SN and lab technicians (LT]. Doctors revealed significant gain in basics of reproductive tract infections (RTI and sexually transmitted infections (STI, syndrome identification, STI/HIV co-infection, and ESCM and less gain in asymptomatic STI/ complications, vulnerability, male reproductive organs, causes of vaginal/urethral discharge, STI complications, cervical cancer screening, and limitation of syndromic management. Gain was statistically significant in basics of RTI/STI amongst adolescent in paramedics; lab technicians showed significant gain in knowledge of laboratory-related areas. Conclusion: Assessment revealed (1 poor baseline knowledge and (2 gains following training sometimes significant and other times not significant even in core areas. Quality monitoring and contents/ methodologies modification are essential for robust trainings. Gains in

  5. An Analysis of Social Skills Instruction Provided in Teacher Education and In-Service Training Programs for General and Special Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbins, Nicole; Higgins, Kyle; Pierce, Tom; Tandy, Richard D.; Tincani, Matt

    2010-01-01

    An adapted version of the "Teacher/Staff Skillstreaming Checklist" was used to determine the level, type, and area of social skills instruction provided to general and special education teachers. Nine universities participated in the study in which facilitators advertised the adapted questionnaire to licensed general and special education teachers…

  6. Autonomic providing cardiac rhythm of middle-aged women with long-term regular training experience of aerobic orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evdokiya Dolgier

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the influence of regular training with aerobic orientation on heart rate variability of middle-aged women with long-term training experience.Materials and methods. In the work the results of research autonomic providing cardiac rhythm of 19 women, who were divided into two studied groups are presented. The first study group consisted of 10 women who had experience of regular training (3 times a week aerobic orientation from 3 to 5 years, the average age of this group of women was 37,9±5,9 years. The second study group consisted of 9 women with regular training experience with aerobic orientation over 10 years, the average age of women – 44,6±5,5 years. At this stage we defined the specific features autonomic heart providing, that was characterized on the basis of the analysis of heart rhythm variability results. For this purpose it was used the device – spiroarteriocardiorhythmography, which in simultaneous mode register defines the parameters of heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure for each heart reduction. According to data the measuring of sequences cardiac rhythm, systolic and diastolic blood pressure variability and data respiratory ventilation was conducted by Fourier's spectral analysis, which determines the capacity of regulatory influences on three frequency ranges: very-low-frequency (VLF, 0–0,04 Hz, low-frequency (LF, 0,04–0,15 Hz and high-frequency (HF, 0,15–0,4 Hz, what are measured in the absolute values of power (ms2. Additionally there was a spectral method determined by data of sensitivity arterial baroreflex (SBR, ms/mmHg – α-coefficient, what calculated in ranges high (SBRHF and low (SBR LF frequencies, connecting with a total activity, activity of over-segmental structures, parasympathetic and sympathetic branches of autonomic nervous system.Results. Research results showed difference in heart rate variability of parameters observed only for high-frequency components, which was

  7. Training May Affect Primary Care Staff Access to the Biomedical Electronic Evidence Base. A review of: Doney, Liz, Helen Barlow, and Joe West. “Use of Libraries and Electronic Information Resources by Primary Care Staff: Outcomes from a Survey.” Health Information and Libraries Journal 22.3 (September 2005: 182-188.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcy L. Brown

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To assess use of existing local libraries, the Internet, and biomedical databases by primary care staff prior to implementation of the Primary Care Knowledge Management Projects. Additionally, to assess the need to train primary care staff to use the Internet and biomedical databases. Design – Cross‐sectional postal questionnaire survey. Setting – Nottingham and Rotherham, two cities in the Trent region of the UK. Subjects – Questionnaires were analyzed from 243 general practitioners, practice nurses, and practice managers in four Nottingham primary care trusts as well as practices in the Rotherham Health Authority area. Methods – Questionnaires and cover letters were sent between May 2001 and February 2002. To encourage response, a postage‐paid envelope was enclosed. A total of 709 questionnaires were sent in Nottingham, and 169 were returned for a response rate of 24%. In Rotherham, 179 questionnaires were sent and 61 returned, for a 34% response rate. Thirteen responses from a May 2001 pilot in Rotherham were also included in the data analysis. Survey questions included a variety of formats, including tick boxes and open‐ended questions. Data was entered into an Access database and analysis was performed using Stata software. Main results – Reported use of libraries was low overall, with only 30% of respondents claiming to have used library facilities. However, there was significant variation among professional groups. Practice nurses (PNs had significantly higher usage of libraries than general practitioners (GPs and practice managers (P Conclusion – Based on the results of this admittedly small study, additional training is needed – and desired – by primary care staff in both Nottingham and Rotherham. Developing and offering training in Internet searching and evaluation as well as use of the biomedical databases is one important way in which libraries can build partnerships with primary care practitioners

  8. Training Teachers in Complex Classroom Organizations (Mixed-Age Classes) To Improve Instruction and Classroom Management Behaviour. Effects of a Staff Development Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Erik; And Others

    A quasi-experimental, treatment-control group investigation was designed to test the effects on Dutch primary school teachers of the staff development program "Dealing with Mixed-Age Classes." Research findings from mixed-age classes, effective teaching, and classroom management and organization were translated into teaching behaviors.…

  9. Staff acceptance of tele-ICU coverage: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lance Brendan; Chan, Paul S; Cram, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Remote coverage of ICUs is increasing, but staff acceptance of this new technology is incompletely characterized. We conducted a systematic review to summarize existing research on acceptance of tele-ICU coverage among ICU staff. We searched for published articles pertaining to critical care telemedicine systems (aka, tele-ICU) between January 1950 and March 2010 using PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Global Health, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library and abstracts and presentations delivered at national conferences. Studies were included if they provided original qualitative or quantitative data on staff perceptions of tele-ICU coverage. Studies were imported into content analysis software and coded by tele-ICU configuration, methodology, participants, and findings (eg, positive and negative staff evaluations). Review of 3,086 citations yielded 23 eligible studies. Findings were grouped into four categories of staff evaluation: overall acceptance level of tele-ICU coverage (measured in 70% of studies), impact on patient care (measured in 96%), impact on staff (measured in 100%), and organizational impact (measured in 48%). Overall acceptance was high, despite initial ambivalence. Favorable impact on patient care was perceived by > 82% of participants. Staff impact referenced enhanced collaboration, autonomy, and training, although scrutiny, malfunctions, and contradictory advice were cited as potential barriers. Staff perceived the organizational impact to vary. An important limitation of available studies was a lack of rigorous methodology and validated survey instruments in many studies. Initial reports suggest high levels of staff acceptance of tele-ICU coverage, but more rigorous methodologic study is required.

  10. Humanistic Patient Care Training: Content and Methodology. Interdisciplinary Team Training and Humanistic Patient Care for Hospices. Monograph 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Kathleen A.; Wilson, Dottie C.

    This monograph, the fifth in a series of five, provides training information for hospice staff in improving interdisciplinary team functions and humanistic care provisions. Its purpose is to provide a skilled group trainer with the hospice-specific insights necessary to conduct training in humanistic patient care. Chapter 1 covers training program…

  11. Costs of a Staff Communication Intervention to Reduce Dementia Behaviors in Nursing Home Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kristine N; Ayyagari, Padmaja; Perkhounkova, Yelena; Bott, Marjorie J; Herman, Ruth; Bossen, Ann

    2017-01-01

    Persons with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias experience behavioral symptoms that frequently result in nursing home (NH) placement. Managing behavioral symptoms in the NH increases staff time required to complete care, and adds to staff stress and turnover, with estimated cost increases of 30%. The Changing Talk to Reduce Resistivenes to Dementia Care (CHAT) study found that an intervention that improved staff communication by reducing elderspeak led to reduced behavioral symptoms of dementia or resistiveness to care (RTC). This analysis evaluates the cost-effectiveness of the CHAT intervention to reduce elderspeak communication by staff and RTC behaviors of NH residents with dementia. Costs to provide the intervention were determined in eleven NHs that participated in the CHAT study during 2011-2013 using process-based costing. Each NH provided data on staff wages for the quarter before and for two quarters after the CHAT intervention. An incremental cost-effectiveness analysis was completed. An average cost per participant was calculated based on the number and type of staff attending the CHAT training, plus materials and interventionist time. Regression estimates from the parent study then were applied to determine costs per unit reduction in staff elderspeak communication and resident RTC. A one percentage point reduction in elderspeak costs $6.75 per staff member with average baseline elderspeak usage. Assuming that each staff cares for 2 residents with RTC, a one percentage point reduction in RTC costs $4.31 per resident using average baseline RTC. Costs to reduce elderspeak and RTC depend on baseline levels of elderspeak and RTC, as well as the number of staff participating in CHAT training and numbers of residents with dementia-related behaviors. Overall, the 3-session CHAT training program is a cost-effective intervention for reducing RTC behaviors in dementia care.

  12. Mapping Staff Competencies for Information Literacy Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Corrall

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Information literacy (IL is a key strategic objective for academic libraries. Many academic librarians are involved in designing, developing and delivering IL programmes, using both classroom teaching and e-learning methods. IL has also become a priority at institutional level and some universities and colleges have formal policies and strategies to integrate and embed IL in the curriculum. IL interventions also happen informally at enquiry points and reference desks, when queries offer ‘teachable moments’ for library staff to help students develop information skills and understanding while solving their information problems. Research shows that such instruction features strongly in both face-to-face and virtual reference transactions, but few IL policies and strategies cover this frontline personalised IL support. Similarly, most discussion of staff training and development for IL education has centred on the teaching roles and pedagogical knowledge of professional librarians, with limited discussion of the competencies needed for frontline interventions by paraprofessionals or assistants. This workshop promotes an inclusive holistic model of IL education and library workforce development. It will investigate the skills and knowledge needed by frontline staff to contribute effectively to the IL mission of academic libraries. It will focus on the learning support needed by students from different educational, social, ethnic and cultural backgrounds, with particular reference to postgraduate students, as a group typifying this diversity. The facilitator will review IL interventions and library staff competencies discussed in the literature. Participants will discuss typical queries or problems presented by different categories of postgraduate students and then identify the skills, knowledge and understanding required by frontline staff to provide an appropriate service response. The skillsets identified will be compared with those of teaching

  13. Staff Cuts Remake the Custodial Closet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickes, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Suggests that new cleaning and finishing materials and new equipment can help school facility departments cope with staff cuts, focusing on: chemicals and dispensers, safety training and information for custodial staff, cleaning tools and power equipment, and cleaner and more efficient schools. (SM)

  14. Experiences of staff in dealing with client sexuality in services for teenagers and adults with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConkey, R; Ryan, D

    2001-02-01

    Previous studies have focused on staff attitudes to sexuality rather than their experience of dealing with sexual incidents. A self-completion questionnaire was devised in which seven scenarios were proposed relating to client sexuality (e.g. public masturbation and accusation of sexual abuse). Staff noted whether or not they had encountered this type of incident, and if so, how confident they felt (or would feel) in dealing with it, and whether or not they would enlist the help of colleagues. Questionnaires were sent to all statutory, voluntary and private service providers (including schools) within one community health and social services trust area in Northern Ireland, and 150 staff responded. Around two-thirds of staff reported having dealt with at least one of the seven incidents listed. Staff with previous experience of the incident listed, felt that they could deal with it more confidently in future, as did staff working in residential services rather than day services. The latter group of staff were more likely to enlist the help of colleagues than were residential staff. Nearly 50% of staff identified more training and clear policy guidelines as the two means of increasing their confidence in dealing with issues of client sexuality. These results highlight the need for staff training that spans agencies and results in common approaches to client sexuality. Suggestions for further research are noted.

  15. “We have to what?”: lessons learned about engaging support staff in an interprofessional intervention to implement MVA for management of spontaneous abortion☆,☆☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darney, Blair G.; VanDerhei, Deborah; Weaver, Marcia R.; Stevens, Nancy G.; Prager, Sarah W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Including support staff in practice change initiatives is a promising strategy to successfully implement new reproductive health services. The Resident Training Initiative in Miscarriage Management (RTI-MM) is an intervention designed to facilitate implementation of manual vacuum aspiration (MVA) for management of spontaneous abortion. The purpose of this study was to identify training program components that enhanced interprofessional training and provide lessons learned for engaging support staff in implementing uterine evacuation services. Study design We conducted a secondary analysis of qualitative data to identify themes within three broad areas: interprofessional education, the role of support staff, and RTI-MM program components that facilitated support staff engagement in the process of implementing MVA services. Results We identified three key themes around interprofessional training and the role of support staff: “Training together is rare,” “Support staff are crucial to practice change,” and “Transparency, peers and champions.” Conclusions We present lessons learned that may be transferrable to other clinic sites: engage site leadership in a commitment to interprofessional training; engage support staff as teachers and learners and in shared values and building professionalism. Implications This manuscript adds to what is known about how to employ interprofessional education and training to engage support staff in reproductive health services practice change initiatives. Lessons learned may provide guidance to clinical sites interested in interprofessional training, improving service delivery, or implementing new services. PMID:23876430

  16. Can providing feedback on driving behavior and training on parental vigilant care affect male teen drivers and their parents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Haneen; Musicant, Oren; Shimshoni, Yaara; Toledo, Tomer; Grimberg, Einat; Omer, Haim; Lotan, Tsippy

    2014-08-01

    This study focuses on investigating the driving behavior of young novice male drivers during the first year of driving (three months of accompanied driving and the following nine months of solo driving). The study's objective is to examine the potential of various feedback forms on driving to affect young drivers' behavior and to mitigate the transition from accompanied to solo driving. The study examines also the utility of providing parents with guidance on how to exercise vigilant care regarding their teens' driving. Driving behavior was evaluated using data collected by In-Vehicle Data Recorders (IVDR), which document events of extreme g-forces measured in the vehicles. IVDR systems were installed in 242 cars of the families of young male drivers, however, only 217 families of young drivers aged 17-22 (M=17.5; SD=0.8) completed the one year period. The families were randomly allocated into 4 groups: (1) Family feedback: In which all the members of the family were exposed to feedback on their own driving and on that of the other family members; (2) Parental training: in which in addition to the family feedback, parents received personal guidance on ways to enhance vigilant care regarding their sons' driving; (3) Individual feedback: In which family members received feedback only on their own driving behavior (and were not exposed to the data on other family members); (4) CONTROL: Group that received no feedback at all. The feedback was provided to the different groups starting from the solo period, thus, the feedback was not provided during the supervised period. The data collected by the IVDRs was first analyzed using analysis of variance in order to compare the groups with respect to their monthly event rates. Events' rates are defined as the number of events in a trip divided by its duration. This was followed by the development and estimation of random effect negative binomial models that explain the monthly event rates of young drivers and their parents

  17. Development of a National Consensus for Tactical Emergency Medical Support (TEMS) Training Programs--Operators and Medical Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Richard; Lerner, Brooke; Llwewllyn, Craig; Pennardt, Andre; Wedmore, Ian; Callaway, David; Wightman, John; Casillas, Raymond; Eastman, Alex; Gerold, Kevin; Giebner, Stephen; Davidson, Robert; Kamin, Richard; Piazza, Gina; Bollard, Glenn; Carmona, Phillip; Sonstrom, Ben; Seifarth, William; Nicely, Barbara; Croushorn, John; Carmona, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Tactical teams are at high risk of sustaining injuries. Caring for these casualties in the field involves unique requirements beyond what is provided by traditional civilian emergency medical services (EMS) systems. Despite this need, the training objectives and competencies are not uniformly agreed to or taught. An expert panel was convened that included members from the Departments of Defense, Homeland Security, Justice, and Health and Human Services, as well as federal, state, and local law-enforcement officers who were recruited through requests to stakeholder agencies and open invitations to individuals involved in Tactical Emergency Medical Services (TEMS) or its oversight. Two face-to-face meetings took place. Using a modified Delphi technique, previously published TEMS competencies were reviewed and updated. The original 17 competency domains were modified and the most significant changes were the addition of Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (TECC), Tactical Familiarization, Legal Aspects of TEMS, and Mass Casualty Triage to the competency domains. Additionally, enabling and terminal learning objectives were developed for each competency domain. This project has developed a minimum set of medical competencies and learning objectives for both tactical medical providers and operators. This work should serve as a platform for ensuring minimum knowledge among providers, which will serve enhance team interoperability and improve the health and safety of tactical teams and the public. 2014.

  18. Guide for Hospices. Interdisciplinary Team Training and Humanistic Patient Care for Hospices. Monograph 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, David J.; Mortenson, Lee E.

    This monograph, the first in a series of five, provides training information for hospice staff in improving interdisciplinary team functions and humanistic care provisions. Its purpose is to assist hospice directors, educators, and other administrative staff members to understand the focus of the proposed training and its applicability to their…

  19. Improving the quality of paediatric malaria diagnosis and treatment by rural providers in Myanmar: an evaluation of a training and support intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Tin; Longfield, Kim; Aye, Nyo Me; San, Aung Kyaw; Sutton, Thea S; Montagu, Dominic

    2015-10-09

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of a training programme for improving the diagnostic and treatment quality of the most complex service offered by Sun Primary Health (SPH) providers, paediatric malaria. The study further assesses whether any quality improvements were sustained over the following 12 months. The study took place in 13 townships in central Myanmar between January 2011 and October 2012. A total of 251 community health workers were recruited and trained in the provision of paediatric and adult malaria diagnosis and treatment; 197 were surveyed in all three rounds: baseline, 6 and 12 months. Townships were selected based on a lack of alterative sources of medical care, averaging 20 km from government or private professional health care treatment facilities. Seventy percent of recruits were assistant nurse midwives or had other basic health training; the rest had no health training experience. Recruits were evaluated on their ability to properly diagnosis and treat a simulated 5-year-old patient using a previously validated method known as Observed Simulated Patient. A trained observer scored SPH providers on a scale of 1-100, based on WHO and Myanmar MOH established best practices. During a pilot test, 20 established private physicians operating in malaria-endemic areas of Myanmar scored an average of 70/100. Average quality scores of newly recruited SPH providers prior to training (baseline) were 12/100. Six months after training, average quality scores were 48/100. This increase was statistically significant (p training, providers were retested and average quality scores were 45/100 (R3-R1, p training programme was able to improve the quality of paediatric malaria care significantly, and to maintain that improvement over time. Quality of care remains lower than that of trained physicians; however, SPH providers operate in rural areas where no trained physicians operate. More research is needed to establish acceptable and achievable levels of

  20. Attachment and coping of dementia care staff: The role of staff attachment style, geriatric nursing self-efficacy, and approaches to dementia in burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkonen, Taru-Maija; Cheston, Richard I L; Dallos, Rudi; Smart, Cordet A

    2014-07-01

    Past research suggests that dementia care staff are vulnerable to the development of burnout, which has implications for staff well-being and hence the quality of care for people with dementia. Studying personal vulnerability factors in burnout is important as it can guide staff training and support. Attachment theory suggests that adult attachment styles affect caregiving relationships and individuals' responses to stress, providing a framework for understanding caregivers' styles of coping. This cross-sectional survey study examined relationships between staff attachment styles, geriatric nursing self-efficacy, and approaches to dementia in burnout. Seventy-seven members of dementia care staff working on inpatient wards for older people completed self-report questionnaires. Insecure attachment, lower levels of self-efficacy, and more optimistic attitudes in staff were related to higher levels of burnout. Staff training on the role of attachment in dementia care is recommended. Further research is required to explore mediating factors between adult attachment styles and burnout. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  1. The importance of continuing education for transplant coordination staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokalak, Ibrahim; Emiroğlu, Remzi; Karakayali, Hamdi; Bilgin, Nevzat; Haberal, Mehmet

    2005-06-01

    Continuous quality improvement activities are necessary to achieve excellence at any institution. The Başkent University Hospitals have implemented continuous in-service training programs to improve all health services provided. Also, continuing medical education programs are being instituted in organ procurement and transplantation centers. In addition to receiving basic orientation and training upon hiring, transplant coordination staff complete forms that detail their current training status, further job training needed, and other courses of interest. The information is used to monitor skill levels, to determine the success of educational programs, and to identify further education that is needed. Our aim is to improve the quality of transplant coordination activities and increase organ donation at the hospitals in our network through effective monitoring and evaluation of continuous in-service training. These training programs enhance staff members' understanding of and participation in procedures related to transplantation and improves the total quality of the transplantation process. In the near future, this training model may be used to improve the donor hospital education program in Turkey.

  2. 14 CFR 61.419 - How do I obtain privileges to provide training in an additional category or class of light-sport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... training in an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? 61.419 Section 61.419 Aeronautics and...: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.419 How do I obtain privileges to provide training in an additional category or class of light-sport...

  3. Office support staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choat, Dennis E

    2005-11-01

    The pace at which we live and practice in this new century leaves little time to manage many of the menial tasks of day-to-day survival. This is especially true in the field of medicine. With today's insurance policies and procedures, Health Information Privacy Protection Act (HIPPA) regulations, and the low return of payment for time invested, it is crucial to have a supportive group of people around you to help make your valuable time as meaningful as possible. This article will describe an arrangement of ancillary office staff for a colorectal practice. There will be detailed information on job descriptions, expectations, and level of training required for each. Upon completion of this article, one should be able to identify the personnel needed to establish and manage an efficient office from the front desk to the billing department and ultimately the practice manager.

  4. Decentralized Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M. D.; Clausen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Typically, ground staff scheduling is centrally planned for each terminal in an airport. The advantage of this is that the staff is efficiently utilized, but a disadvantage is that staff spends considerable time walking between stands. In this paper a decentralized approach for ground staff...

  5. Nurse-led sexually transmitted disease clinics: staff perceptions concerning the quality of the service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindel, A; Fennema, J S A; Christie, E; van Leent, E

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate staff perception of a nurse-led sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinical service. The staff at the Amsterdam STI clinic were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. A series of eight questions was designed to determine the perceived advantages or disadvantages of nurse-led clinics, based on personal experience, using a Likert scale. After completion of the structured interview, the staff were offered the opportunity of providing comments. All 36 members of staff completed the survey. Twenty-seven (75%) agreed or strongly agreed that nurse-led clinics provided more time with patients. Sixty-four percent agreed or strongly agreed that such a service provided greater confidentiality and 94% agreed or strongly agreed that 'nurse-led clinics provided a high level of job satisfaction for nurses.' In contrast, only 64% agreed or strongly agreed that nurse-led clinics provided a high level of job satisfaction for doctors. When staff comments were evaluated, four common themes emerged. First, that this was an efficient way of providing services; second, that the clinic was a pleasant environment, there was excellent teamwork and greater job satisfaction; third, that a good deal of rivalry existed between doctors and nurses and finally, that there was a need for and importance of protocols, rules and staff training and development. In conclusion, there was a high level of staff satisfaction with the service. Nurse-led STI clinics may be a useful adjunct to existing STI facilities.

  6. EPA Optimal Corrosion Control Treatment Regional Training Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is hosting face-to-face regional training workshops throughout 2016-2017 on optimal corrosion control treatment (OCCT). These will be held at each of the Regions and is intended for primacy agency staff and technical assistance providers.

  7. Information and Training Needs Regarding Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Cross-sectional Study of Cancer Care Providers in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Gudrun E; Guethlin, Corina

    2016-09-01

    Among cancer care providers (CCPs), lack of knowledge constitutes an important barrier to the discussion of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use with patients. This study assessed CCPs' needs and preferences regarding CAM information and training (I&T). An online survey was completed by 209 general practitioners, 437 medical specialists, 159 oncology nurses and medical assistants, and 244 psychologists and social workers engaged in cancer care. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to identify subgroups of individuals with distinct preference patterns regarding I&T content. CCPs prefer CAM I&T to be provided as lectures, information platforms on the internet, workshops, and e-mail newsletters. Concerning subject matters, many CCPs considered CAM therapy options for the treatment of a variety of cancer disease- and therapy-related symptoms to be very important (75%-72% of the sample); the same applies to an "overview of different CAM therapies" (74%). LCA identified 5 latent classes (LCs) of CCPs. All of them attached considerable importance to "medical indication," "potential side effects," and "tips for usage." LCs differed, however, in terms of overall importance ratings, the perceived importance of "patients' reasons" for using specific CAM therapies, "case examples," and "scientific evidence." Notably, the 5 LCs were clearly present in all 4 occupational groups. CAM I&T should provide CCPs with an overview of different CAM therapies and show how CAM might help in treating symptoms cancer patients frequently demonstrate (eg, fatigue). Moreover, I&T programs should be flexible and take into account that individual information needs vary even within the same occupational group. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Culinary Arts Food Service Training Program. Summary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Bo; And Others

    Special Vocational Services in Salt Lake City has provided food service training, using the facilities of a local high school and the University of Utah, to special needs youth meeting Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) guidelines. The use of industry-based equipment, a formal dining room, and a qualified staff have assured relevant training to…

  9. Foreign Language Training in U.S. Undergraduate IB Programs: Are We Providing Students What They Need to Be Successful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jim

    2017-01-01

    A growing number of U.S. business schools now offer an undergraduate degree in international business (IB), for which training in a foreign language is a requirement. However, there appears to be considerable variance in the minimum requirements for foreign language training across U.S. business schools, including the provision of…

  10. Emergency medical services response to active shooter incidents: provider comfort level and attitudes before and after participation in a focused response training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jerrilyn; Kue, Ricky; Mitchell, Patricia; Eblan, Gary; Dyer, K Sophia

    2014-08-01

    Emergency Medical Services (EMS) routinely stage in a secure area in response to active shooter incidents until the scene is declared safe by law enforcement. Due to the time-sensitive nature of injuries at these incidents, some EMS systems have adopted response tactics utilizing law enforcement protection to expedite life-saving medical care. Describe EMS provider perceptions of preparedness, adequacy of training, and general attitudes toward active shooter incident response after completing a tactical awareness training program. An unmatched, anonymous, closed-format survey utilizing a five-point Likert scale was distributed to participating EMS providers before and after a focused training session on joint EMS/police active shooter rescue team response. Descriptive statistics were used to compare survey results. Secondary analysis of responses based on prior military or tactical medicine training was performed using a chi-squared analysis. Two hundred fifty-six providers participated with 88% (225/256) pretraining and 88% (224/256) post-training surveys completed. Post-training, provider agreement that they felt adequately prepared to respond to an active shooter incident changed from 41% (92/225) to 89% (199/224), while agreement they felt adequately trained to provide medical care during an active shooter incident changed from 36% (82/225) to 87% (194/224). Post-training provider agreement that they should never enter a building with an active shooter changed from 73% (165/225) to 61% (137/224). Among the pretraining surveys, significantly more providers without prior military or tactical experience agreed they should never enter a building with an active shooter until the scene was declared safe (78% vs 50%, P = .002), while significantly more providers with prior experience felt both adequately trained to provide medical care in an active shooter environment (56% vs 31%, P = .007) and comfortable working jointly with law enforcement within a building if a

  11. Science Research 4: A New Curriculum Providing Student Mentorship and Teacher Training Facilitated by High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danch, J. M.; Aker, K.

    2013-12-01

    As part of a continuing comprehensive plan to include authentic scientific research in the science curricula of the Woodbridge Township School District, a new curriculum was developed to expanding the current 3-year Science Research Program to include a 4th year class. As with the previous 3 levels, the objectives of this curriculum include the development, implementation and dissemination of authentic scientific research by students. New objectives make use of the students advanced knowledge of the methods of science and electronic laboratory technology to provide mentorship to students performing scientific research or other inquiry-based science activities. Mentored students include those enrolled in high school Science Research 1, 8th Grade Honors Geoscience, and other high school science classes where scientific methods, inquiry-based learning and electronic data acquisition tools are utilized. Student mentors will also assist in the facilitation of a district-wide K-12 science symposium. The curriculum also calls for the creation of educational materials by students to enhance the teaching of scientific research and inquiry-based learning. Finally, students enrolled in Science Research 4 will conduct teacher-training sessions where their advanced expertise in the utilization of electronic sensors and data acquisition and analysis devices will be used to expand the use of such technology by teachers not only involved in research-based courses, but all areas of science education throughout the school district.

  12. Organizational and provider level factors in implementation of trauma-informed care after a city-wide training: an explanatory mixed methods assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April Joy Damian

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While there is increasing support for training youth-serving providers in trauma-informed care (TIC as a means of addressing high prevalence of U.S. childhood trauma, we know little about the effects of TIC training on organizational culture and providers’ professional quality of life. This mixed-methods study evaluated changes in organizational- and provider-level factors following participation in a citywide TIC training. Methods Government workers and nonprofit professionals (N = 90 who participated in a nine-month citywide TIC training completed a survey before and after the training to assess organizational culture and professional quality of life. Survey data were analyzed using multiple regression analyses. A subset of participants (n = 16 was interviewed using a semi-structured format, and themes related to organizational and provider factors were identified using qualitative methods. Results Analysis of survey data indicated significant improvements in participants’ organizational culture and professional satisfaction at training completion. Participants’ perceptions of their own burnout and secondary traumatic stress also increased. Four themes emerged from analysis of the interview data, including “Implementation of more flexible, less-punitive policies towards clients,” “Adoption of trauma-informed workplace design,” “Heightened awareness of own traumatic stress and need for self-care,” and “Greater sense of camaraderie and empathy for colleagues.” Conclusion Use of a mixed-methods approach provided a nuanced understanding of the impact of TIC training and suggested potential benefits of the training on organizational and provider-level factors associated with implementation of trauma-informed policies and practices. Future trainings should explicitly address organizational factors such as safety climate and morale, managerial support, teamwork climate and collaboration, and

  13. Staff Factors Contributing to Family Satisfaction with Long-Term Dementia Care: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Katharine; Patterson, Tom G; Muers, Jane

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present review was to critically evaluate empirical evidence regarding staff factors that contribute to families' satisfaction with ongoing care provision for their relatives with dementia in long-term care. Four databases were systematically searched using search terms informed by the aim of the present systematic review. The resulting 14 relevant articles comprised both qualitative and quantitative studies. The findings highlighted three broad areas relating to staff factors that appeared to contribute to families' satisfaction with care provision: family related factors, relating to staff interaction with families; staffing related factors, focusing on staffing organization and composition; and client related factors, focusing on staff interaction with clients and the quality of care provided. The findings have important implications for care staff and managers working in such settings regarding staffing organization, staff training, recruitment and retention. Future research directions are discussed. Families want consistent, knowledgeable staff that interact well and respond appropriately to the needs of their relative as well as their own needs as family members. Staff training in such settings should therefore focus not only on staff education but also on the importance of establishing effective relationships with both clients and families.

  14. Competencies Setup for Nuclear Regulatory Staff in Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pingish, Panupong; Siripirom, Lopchai; Nakkaew, Pongpan; Manuwong, Theerapatt; Wongsamarn, Vichian [Office of Atoms for Peace, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2010-05-15

    Competencies setup for regulatory bodies oversee a research reactor and nuclear power reactors in Thailand, concentrating on staff development in areas of review and assessment, inspection and enforcement, authorization, and development of regulations and guides. The regulatory body in Thailand is the Bureau of Nuclear Safety Regulation (BNSR) which belongs to the Office of Atoms for Peace (OAP). The BNSR is divided into 4 groups according to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). These groups are the nuclear safety administration group, nuclear safety technical support group, nuclear safety assessment and licensing group, and the nuclear installations inspection group. Each group is divided into senior and junior positions. The competencies model was used for implementation of staff qualification, career planning and professional progression by BNSR. Competencies are related to knowledge, skills and attitudes (KSAs) needed to perform their job. A key issue is obtaining competencies for the regulatory bodies. The systematic approach to training (SAT) has been used in several countries for improvement regulator performance. The SAT contains 5 steps, including analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation, to achieve competencies. The SAT provides a logical progression from the identification of competencies required to perform a job to the design, development and implementation of training using the competencies model. In the first step, BNSR performs an operating analysis of training needs assessment (TNA) by using gap analysis technique, as suggested by IAEA. Individual regulatory bodies address the gap using appropriate training program, after comparing the actual and desired competency profiles to determine the gap. This paper examines competencies setup for regulatory staff of BNSR as a result of gaps analysis to establish a scheme for design characteristics of regulatory staff and training courses, thereby enhancing the regulatory

  15. Approaching the vulnerability of refugees: evaluation of cross-cultural psychiatric training of staff in mental health care and refugee reception in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäärnhielm, Sofie; Edlund, Ann-Sofie; Ioannou, Michael; Dahlin, Marie

    2014-09-27

    This study evaluates the outcomes of cross-cultural mental health training given to professionals in health care and refugee reception in Stockholm, Sweden. A mixed method approach, with quantitative data from questionnaires (n = 232) and ten qualitative focus group interviews, was used. After training, the participants reported that the hindering effect of lack of knowledge on their work decreased significantly from 2.81 (SD1.22) before, to 2.29 (SD1.00) (p refugees with mental ill-health. Training resulted in an increased experienced capacity among participants to understand the social vulnerability of newly-arrived refugees with mental distress. However, the lack of collaboration and the structural barriers between the different organisations were not affected.

  16. Virtual Reality Simulation Training for Ebola Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragazzoni, Luca; Ingrassia, Pier Luigi; Echeverri, Lina; Maccapani, Fabio; Berryman, Lizzy; Burkle, Frederick M; Della Corte, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Both virtual and hybrid simulation training offer a realistic and effective educational framework and opportunity to provide virtual exposure to operational public health skills that are essential for infection control and Ebola treatment management. This training is designed to increase staff safety and create a safe and realistic environment where trainees can gain essential basic and advanced skills.

  17. Competency-based Education and Training of medical staff. A Programm of the Medical Academy Waldbreitbach: Concept – Implementation – Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasske, Eva

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the Medical Academy Waldbreitbach is to connect individual and organisational requirements in order to promote an appropriate and multi-locational development of medical competency in the face of the continuously evolving challenges of clinical practice. Integral processes in this are the reduction of organisational learning barriers and the successive integration of competency-oriented learning events in the structures of personnel and organisational development. The modular system for the further development of doctors’ skills serves here as a supplementary and recommendation system for both existing curricula and those defined by regulatory organisations and professional associations.Methods: The Medical Academy’s modular system has a two-dimensional structure. In addition to the axis of biography orientation, the model orients itself around issues relating to the needs of a doctor in any individual professional position, as well as with whom he comes into contact and where his primary challenges lie. In order to achieve better integration in day-to-day routine and a needs-specific orientation of content, the modular system provides a combination of “one, two or three day and two- three- or four-hour training units” depending upon the topic. The transfer of experiential knowledge with the aid of practical exercises is a central element of the didactic model.Results: Through the combined use of summative and formative assessment, the significance of a dialogue-orientated approach in both planning and in the organisational process was highlighted. In feedback discussions and quantitative evaluation sheets, participants identified in particular cross-generational knowledge sharing as a central element for the development of personal values alongside the interdisciplinary transfer of knowledge. The combination of specialist and interdisciplinary topics, for example on team processes or communication, is frequently

  18. Competency-based Education and Training of medical staff. A Programm of the Medical Academy Waldbreitbach: Concept – Implementation – Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasske, Eva; Beil, Michael; Keller, Katrin

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the Medical Academy Waldbreitbach is to connect individual and organisational requirements in order to promote an appropriate and multi-locational development of medical competency in the face of the continuously evolving challenges of clinical practice. Integral processes in this are the reduction of organisational learning barriers and the successive integration of competency-oriented learning events in the structures of personnel and organisational development. The modular system for the further development of doctors’ skills serves here as a supplementary and recommendation system for both existing curricula and those defined by regulatory organisations and professional associations. Methods: The Medical Academy’s modular system has a two-dimensional structure. In addition to the axis of biography orientation, the model orients itself around issues relating to the needs of a doctor in any individual professional position, as well as with whom he comes into contact and where his primary challenges lie. In order to achieve better integration in day-to-day routine and a needs-specific orientation of content, the modular system provides a combination of “one, two or three day and two- three- or four-hour training units” depending upon the topic. The transfer of experiential knowledge with the aid of practical exercises is a central element of the didactic model. Results: Through the combined use of summative and formative assessment, the significance of a dialogue-orientated approach in both planning and in the organisational process was highlighted. In feedback discussions and quantitative evaluation sheets, participants identified in particular cross-generational knowledge sharing as a central element for the development of personal values alongside the interdisciplinary transfer of knowledge. The combination of specialist and interdisciplinary topics, for example on team processes or communication, is frequently emphasised

  19. Best Practices in Relational Skills Training for Medical Trainees and Providers: An Essential Element of Addressing Adverse Childhood Experiences and Promoting Resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magen, Eran; DeLisser, Horace M

    Medical providers' ability to form strong therapeutic alliances with patients is an essential clinical skill that is associated with a higher quality of care and improved provider well-being. However, comparatively few medical providers exhibit adequate relational skills, which serve to convey respect, communicate caring, and build trust between the medical provider and the patient. A growing number of medical training programs and continuing medical education programs have begun to incorporate relational skills training, but the results have been highly variable in terms of training methods and effect. To support administrators who are considering the implementation (or improvement) of relational skills training in their organization, we provide a set of best practices for relational skills training, in the basis of a review of the literature and on our experience as clinical educators, and show the application of these best practices through a case study. We conclude with a discussion of challenges for implementing a high-quality relational skills training program, policy-level solutions for these challenges, and recommendations for future research. Copyright © 2017 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Functions within the Naval Air Training Command

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-15

    number. For X = N: Chief of Naval Air Training (CNATRA) Staff W: Training Air Wing ( TRAWING ) A: Naval Air Station (NAS) 3; Training Squadron...Provide assistance as required to TRAWING commands in preparation and execution of budget within the framework of guidance provided by CNATRA and...higher authority, WOO-69 Establish monetary controls as required to effectively monitor budget execution for TRAWING commands. WOO-70 Maintain

  1. Workshop-based training in trauma-focused CBT: an in-depth analysis of impact on provider practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen-Doss, Amanda; Cusack, Karen J; de Arellano, Michael A

    2008-08-01

    Despite evidence that more intensive methods are more effective, many clinical settings continue to train practitioners using workshops. To more fully understand the strengths and limitations of workshops, the present investigation studied changes in practitioner behavior following a workshop in trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy (TF-CBT). A chart review indicated no changes in TF-CBT use following the training, although therapists indicated that CBT was the most effective treatment for traumatized youths and was their primary approach to treating trauma. Analysis of client factors indicated weak relationships between technique use and treatment need. Implications of these findings for future training efforts are discussed.

  2. Effect of Stress Management Training Based on PRECEDE Model on Prehospital Emergency Staff Occupational Tension in Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Esmailzadeh Gatabi

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: The findings showed that education based on PRECEDE model increases the predisposing factor (knowledge and attitude, reinforcing factor, and enhancer factor. These factors have the potential to affect the behavior more effectively. According to this, educational intervention based on PRECEDE model structures is effective on job stress and behavior. Researchers have suggested training on this pattern.

  3. Training hospital staff on spiritual care in palliative care influences patient-reported outcomes: Results of a quasi-experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geer, J. van de; Groot, M.; Andela, R.; Leget, C.; Prins, J.; Vissers, K.; Zock, H.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spiritual care is reported to be important to palliative patients. There is an increasing need for education in spiritual care. AIM: To measure the effects of a specific spiritual care training on patients' reports of their perceived care and treatment. DESIGN: A pragmatic controlled

  4. Training hospital staff on spiritual care in palliative care influences patient-reported outcomes: Results of a quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Geer, Joep; Groot, Marieke; Andela, Richtsje; Leget, Carlo; Prins, Jelle; Vissers, Kris; Zock, Hetty

    2017-09-01

    Spiritual care is reported to be important to palliative patients. There is an increasing need for education in spiritual care. To measure the effects of a specific spiritual care training on patients' reports of their perceived care and treatment. A pragmatic controlled trial conducted between February 2014 and March 2015. The intervention was a specific spiritual care training implemented by healthcare chaplains to eight multidisciplinary teams in six hospitals on regular wards in which patients resided in both curative and palliative trajectories. In total, 85 patients were included based on the Dutch translation of the Supportive and Palliative Care Indicators Tool. Data were collected in the intervention and control wards pre- and post-training using questionnaires on physical symptoms, spiritual distress, involvement and attitudes (Spiritual Attitude and Involvement List) and on the perceived focus of healthcare professionals on patients' spiritual needs. All 85 patients had high scores on spiritual themes and involvement. Patients reported that attention to their spiritual needs was very important. We found a significant ( p = 0.008) effect on healthcare professionals' attention to patients' spiritual and existential needs and a significant ( p = 0.020) effect in favour of patients' sleep. No effect on the spiritual distress of patients or their proxies was found. The effects of spiritual care training can be measured using patient-reported outcomes and seemed to indicate a positive effect on the quality of care. Future research should focus on optimizing the spiritual care training to identify the most effective elements and developing strategies to ensure long-term positive effects. This study was registered at the Dutch Trial Register: NTR4559.

  5. Men who have sex with men sensitivity training reduces homoprejudice and increases knowledge among Kenyan healthcare providers in coastal Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    van der Elst, Elise M; Smith, Adrian D.; Evanson Gichuru; Elizabeth Wahome; Helgar Musyoki; Nicolas Muraguri; Greg Fegan; Zoe Duby; Linda-Gail Bekker; Bonnie Bender; Graham, Susan M; Don Operario; Sanders, Eduard J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Healthcare workers (HCWs) in Africa typically receive little or no training in the healthcare needs of men who have sex with men (MSM), limiting the effectiveness and reach of population-based HIV control measures among this group. We assessed the effect of a web-based, self-directed sensitivity training on MSM for HCWs (www.marps-africa.org), combined with facilitated group discussions on knowledge and homophobic attitudes among HCWs in four districts of coastal Kenya. Methods:...

  6. Staff attitudes and expectations about music therapy: pediatric oncology versus neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhairie, Annie; Kemper, Kathi J; Martin, Kathleen; Woods, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Music is commonly used to reduce stress, but it has not been universally adopted in inpatient and outpatient settings. We compared the attitudes of staff in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and the pediatric outpatient hematology oncology unit (PEDS ONC) toward music therapy. A cross-sectional survey of NICU staff was performed in the winter of 2003 and of PEDS ONC staff in the summer of 2005. Eligible subjects were 187 NICU and 20 PEDS ONC staff members. Surveys were distributed by e-mail, in person, and in staff mail boxes. Data were analyzed using simple descriptive statistics, chi-square test, and logistic regression. t-Tests and chi-square test were used to compare responses in the two units. The response rate was 75% in the NICU and 100% in PEDS ONC unit. Staff in the two locations were similar: the mean age of the staff was 37 years in NICU and 40 years in the PEDS ONC (p>.1); over 80% of the staff were female in both units and most (70% in the NICU, 75% in PEDS ONC) reported some previous musical training . Most agreed that music enjoyed by patients could reduce stress (86% in the NICU, 100% in PEDS ONC) and improve sleep (79% in the NICU, 95% in PEDS ONC). Attitudes toward music in both clinical settings were significantly associated with prior musical training , experience, and profession. Staff in both the NICU and PEDS ONC hold favorable attitudes toward music for patients. Staff attitudes in both inpatient and outpatient settings are not barriers to providing music therapy.

  7. MEDXVIEWER: PROVIDING A WEB-ENABLED WORKSTATION ENVIRONMENT FOR COLLABORATIVE AND REMOTE MEDICAL IMAGING VIEWING, PERCEPTION STUDIES AND READER TRAINING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looney, P T; Young, K C; Halling-Brown, M D

    2016-06-01

    MedXViewer (Medical eXtensible Viewer) has been developed to address the need for workstation-independent, picture archiving and communication system (PACS)-less viewing and interaction with anonymised medical images. The aim of this paper is to describe the design and features of MedXViewer as well as to introduce the new features available in the latest release (version 1.2). MedXViewer currently supports digital mammography and tomosynthesis. The flexible software design used to develop MedXViewer allows it to be easily extended to support other imaging modalities. Regions of interest can be drawn by a user, and any associated information about a mark, an image or a study can be added. The questions and settings can be easily configured depending on the need of the research allowing both ROC and FROC studies to be performed. Complex tree-like questions can be asked where a given answer presents the user to new questions. The hanging protocol can be specified for each study. Panning, windowing, zooming and moving through slices are all available while modality-specific features can be easily enabled, e.g. quadrant zooming in digital mammography and tomosynthesis studies. MedXViewer can integrate with a web-based image database OPTIMAM Medical Image Database allowing results and images to be stored centrally. The software can, alternatively, run without a network connection where the images and results can be encrypted and stored locally on a machine or external drive. MedXViewer has been used for running remote paper-less observer studies and is capable of providing a training infrastructure and coordinating remote collaborative viewing sessions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Alternative considerations for environmental oversight training: Results from a needs assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, C.; Hensley, J.

    1995-11-01

    For staff to perform their jobs effectively and efficiently, they must be adequately trained. Well-trained staff are also more likely to be satisfied with their jobs and to remain with a given organization. In addition to hiring staff with relevant backgrounds and skills, critical steps in maintaining adequately trained staff are to analyze skill levels needed for the various tasks that personnel are required to perform and to provide training to improve staff s skill base. This first analysis is commonly referred to as a training needs assessment. Training needs are usually determined by defining the tasks required for a particular job and the associated knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to adequately accomplish these tasks. The Office of Northwestern Area Programs of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Management (EM) oversees environmental remediation activities in the Chicago, Idaho, Oakland, and Richland Operations Offices. For this organization to effectively carry out its mission, its staff need to be as proficient as possible in the appropriate knowledge and skills. Therefore, a training needs assessment was conducted to determine staff`s level of knowledge and proficiency in various skills. The purpose of the assessment was to: (1) Examine the types of activities or tasks in which staff are involved, (2) Determine the skills needed to perform relevant tasks, and (3) Assess gaps in knowledge and skills for the tasks performed in order to suggest opportunities for skill development.

  9. The results of a survey highlighting issues with feedback on medical training in the United Kingdom and how a Smartphone App could provide a solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Thomas G; Hood, Gill; Farrell, Tom

    2015-11-06

    Feedback drives learning in medical education. Healthcare Supervision Logbook (HSL) is a Smartphone App developed at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals for providing feedback on medical training, from both a trainee's and a supervisor's perspective. In order to establish a mandate for the role of HSL in clinical practice, a large survey was carried out. Two surveys (one for doctors undertaking specialty training and a second for consultants supervising their training) were designed. The survey for doctors-in-training was distributed to all specialty trainees in the South and West localities of the Health Education Yorkshire and the Humber UK region. The survey for supervisors was distributed to all consultants involved in educational and clinical supervision of specialty trainees at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals. The results confirm that specialty trainees provide feedback on their training infrequently-66 % do so only annually. 96 % of the specialty trainees owned a Smartphone and 45 % said that they would be willing to use a Smartphone App to provide daily feedback on the clinical and educational supervision they receive. Consultant supervisors do not receive regular feedback on the educational and clinical supervision they provide to trainees-56 % said they never received such feedback and 33 % said it was only on an annual basis. 86 % of consultants surveyed owned a Smartphone and 41 % said they would be willing to use a Smartphone App to provide feedback on the performance of trainees they were supervising. Feedback on medical training is recorded by specialty trainees infrequently and consultants providing educational and clinical supervision often do not receive any feedback on their performance in this area. HSL is a simple, quick and efficient way to collect and collate feedback on medical training to improve this situation. Good support and education needs to be provided when implementing this new technology.

  10. A comparison of leadership vs. renovation in changing staff values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, G E; Fiedler, F E

    1999-01-01

    The authors compared the effects of the staff's perceptions of the culture in a LTC facility pre and post-intervention(s). One unit had significant architectural modification (physical intervention). On the second unit, efforts were directed toward culture change through management modification (social intervention through goal setting and role modeling). Lastly, both were compared to a third control unit where there was no planned change. On the unit with the social intervention model there was an attempt to support a "neighborhood" sense for residents and staff that would encourage residents to become more self-directed and self-sufficient rather than remain in the passive "good patient" role. Significant staff training resources and time were devoted to this effort. On the second unit, the architectural renovation sought to provide a distinctly home-like open, and relaxed atmosphere with a large, well-equipped day room. This encouraged closer resident and staff interactions and included a staff workstation that was part of the day room. On a third control unit, no changes were made.

  11. A Systematic Review of End-of-Life Care Communication Skills Training for Generalist Palliative Care Providers: Research Quality and Reporting Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighton, Lisa Jane; Koffman, Jonathan; Hawkins, Amy; McDonald, Christine; O'Brien, Suzanne; Robinson, Vicky; Khan, Shaheen A; George, Rob; Higginson, Irene J; Selman, Lucy Ellen

    2017-09-01

    End-of-life care (EoLC) communication skills training for generalist palliative care providers is recommended in policy guidance globally. Although many training programs now exist, there has been no comprehensive evidence synthesis to inform future training delivery and evaluation. To identify and appraise how EoLC communication skills training interventions for generalist palliative care providers are developed, delivered, evaluated, and reported. Systematic review. Ten electronic databases (inception to December 2015) and five relevant journals (January 2004 to December 2015) were searched. Studies testing the effectiveness of EoLC communication skills training for generalists were included. Two independent authors assessed study quality. Descriptive statistics and narrative synthesis are used to summarize the findings. From 11,441 unique records, 170 reports were identified (157 published, 13 unpublished), representing 160 evaluation studies of 153 training interventions. Of published papers, eight were of low quality, 108 medium, and 41 high. Few interventions were developed with service user involvement (n = 7), and most were taught using a mixture of didactics (n = 123), reflection and discussion (n = 105), and role play (n = 86). Evaluation designs were weak: skills training interventions in the literature, evidence is limited by poor reporting and weak methodology. Based on our findings, we present a CONSORT statement supplement to improve future reporting and encourage more rigorous testing. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. IUPUI's Leadership in Dynamic Organizations Program: Translating Leadership into Application for Staff and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Daniel; Bedford, Marilyn; Hundley, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Traditional leadership development programs for higher education staff are challenged to blend theory with a real-world context that is meaningful to participants' work. Standard student leadership curriculum is strong on theory, but often thin on providing this real-world context. Both HR training departments and academic units charged with…

  13. Military, University, and Police Agency Command and Staff Colleges in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Richard H.

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses three models of command and staff colleges (CSC). Five university models, five United States Military models, and one police agency model are discussed. The 11 CSCs provide leadership development in various training and education programs all leading to the increased capabilities of leaders and potential leaders for public…

  14. Short-term moderate intensive high volume training program provides aerobic endurance benefit in wheelchair basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skucas, Kestutis; Pokvytyte, Vaida

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the effect of short-term period, moderate intensity and high volume endurance training on physiological variables in elite wheelchair basketball players. Eight wheelchair basketball players were examined. The subjects participated in a two-week intervention program of mainly two training types: wheelchair basketball and wheelchair driving endurance training. The subjects performed the continuously increasing cycling exercise (CCE) at the constant 60 rpm arm cranking speed at the beginning of the program and after two weeks of the program. The initial workload was 20 W, then the workload was increased by 2 W every 5 seconds until fatigue. The post training of the wheelchair basketball group in the study showed a significant improvement in the peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) and the peak power output (POpeak). VO2peak increased by 9% from 2.32±0.16 L/min to 2.53±0.2 L/min (Ptraining and post training test power output (PO [w]), relative power output (PO [w/kg]) increased significantly in all zones of energy production. In conclusion, this study indicated that the wheelchair basketball squad had relatively high levels of aerobic fitness prior to participating in the endurance training program. Nevertheless, the high-volume, moderate-intensity, short-term training program, which evolved over the two-weeks period, resulted in the improvement of the athlete's aerobic endurance. The ventilatory threshold (VT) and the second ventilatory threshold (VT2) are good markers for aerobic capacity of wheelchair athletes.

  15. E3 Staff Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — E3 Staff database is maintained by E3 PDMS (Professional Development & Management Services) office. The database is Mysql. It is manually updated by E3 staff as...

  16. Justification of the conceptual construct "readiness to the labour organization staff sports schools" in the context of vocational training future professionals of physical culture and sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perepletchikov D.A.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Was analyzed literature devoted to the preparation of students of physical education to administrative activities. In the context of their training we held a comparative analysis of the approaches to organize the pedagogical process. As a reference point for the formation of professional preparedness specialist physical education and sports identified qualifying characteristics posts in this industry. Based on the analysis of literature given the definition of the concept of "readiness for organization of the Youth sports school.

  17. NETWORK COOPERATION OF EDUCATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS FOR BUILDING A CULTURE OF HEALTHY AND SAFE LIFESTYLE: THEORETICAL-METHODOLOGICAL ASPECT OF VOCATIONAL STAFF TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana N. Levan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to consider network cooperation as a resource of the renewal and innovative development of education.Methods. Systemization of existing practices of network partnership in the sphere of education for decision of pupils’ health protection problems; monitoring of health and physical readiness of the trainees of general educational establishments; modelling of network interaction.Results and scientific novelty. It is shown that network cooperation in the field of building a culture of healthy and safe lifestyle of pupils has a considerable potential. If educational organizations are closed to cooperation, isolated on the infrastructure in their district, city, region, the task of building a healthy lifestyle of pupils can not be solved. In general, teaching staff is unprepared for this activity and require additional preparation, methodological and methodical information materials on its realisation. The author theoretically proves and describes substantive provisions of network interaction of the educational establishments with social partners aimed at pupils’ health culture formation, which is presented as one of socialisation directions, i.e. realisation of social function of education – especially organized educational activity that is directed on development of pupils’ social competence. Thus, the model of network cooperation of educational organizations for building a culture of healthy and safe lifestyle (as one of the areas of socialization of pupils is presented in the presented study. It is considered as a theoretical and methodological basis for the development of process of establishing partnerships of educational organizations not only with other organizations of the education system (basic, professional and additional, but also with organizations of health care, physical culture and sport, culture and recreation, and other social spheres.Practical significance. Results of research will help the

  18. The oppressive nature of work in healthcare: predictors of aggression against nurses and administrative staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodwell, John; Demir, Defne; Flower, Rebecca L

    2013-09-01

    To assess the antecedents of workplace aggression (bullying and violence) among nurses and administration staff. As a result of power structures within the healthcare industry, nurses and administration staff may be more vulnerable to workplace aggression. Environmental and individual characteristics have been linked to the occurrence of such aggression among other groups. However, most research focuses on bullying, rarely extending these ideas to violence or nurses and administration staff specifically. Surveys were distributed to nurses and administration staff employed by an Australian healthcare organisation. Aggression types (bullying and violence), as well as environmental (demands, control and support) and individual (negative affectivity, NA) characteristics were measured. External emotional abuse was most frequently reported for nurses (29%) and bullying for administration staff (27%). Demands, support and NA were associated with different aggression types in nurses, whereas for administration staff, control, support and NA were linked. Low support and high NA are particularly important to nurses and administration staff and their experiences of aggression. Appropriate training for managers in providing support and acknowledging individual factors associated with aggression is essential. Further, managers should monitor aggression risk from patients and their associations towards staff in busy times. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Validation of a patient-centered culturally sensitive health care office staff inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Carolyn M; Wall, Whitney; Marsiske, Michael; Nghiem, Khanh; Roncoroni, Julia

    2015-09-01

    Research suggests that patient-perceived culturally sensitive health care encompasses multiple components of the health care delivery system including the cultural sensitivity of front desk office staff. Despite this, research on culturally sensitive health care focuses almost exclusively on provider behaviors, attitudes, and knowledge. This is due in part to the paucity of instruments available to assess the cultural sensitivity of front desk office staff. Thus, the objective of the present study is to determine the psychometric properties of the pilot Tucker-Culturally Sensitive Health Care Office Staff Inventory-Patient Form (T-CSHCOSI-PF), which is an instrument designed to enable patients to evaluate the patient-defined cultural sensitivity of their front desk office staff. A sample of 1648 adult patients was recruited by staff at 67 health care sites across the United States. These patients anonymously completed the T-CSHCOSI-PF, a demographic data questionnaire, and a patient satisfaction questionnaire. Findings Confirmatory factor analyses of the TCSHCOSI-PF revealed that this inventory has two factors with high internal consistency reliability and validity (Cronbach's αs=0.97 and 0.95). It is concluded that the T-CSHCOSI-PF is a psychometrically strong and useful inventory for assessing the cultural sensitivity of front desk office staff. This inventory can be used to support culturally sensitive health care research, evaluate the job performance of front desk office staff, and aid in the development of trainings designed to improve the cultural sensitivity of these office staff.

  20. staff/bed and staff/patient ratios in south african public sector mental

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To document staff/bed and staff/patient ratios in public. sector mental health services in South Africa. Design. Cross-sectional survey. Method. Aquestionnaire was distributed to provincial mental health co-ordinators requesting numbers of full-time equivalent (FTE) staff who provide mental health care at all service levels ...

  1. Staff/bed and staff/patient ratios in South African public sector mental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To document staff/bed and staff/patient ratios in public. sector mental health services in South Africa. Design. Cross-sectional survey. Method. Aquestionnaire was distributed to provincial mental health co-ordinators requesting numbers of full-time equivalent (FTE) staff who provide mental health care at all ...

  2. Comparison of three-dimensional, assist-as-needed robotic arm/hand movement training provided with Pneu-WREX to conventional tabletop therapy after chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinkensmeyer, David J; Wolbrecht, Eric T; Chan, Vicky; Chou, Cathy; Cramer, Steven C; Bobrow, James E

    2012-11-01

    Robot-assisted movement training can help individuals with stroke reduce arm and hand impairment, but robot therapy is typically only about as effective as conventional therapy. Refining the way that robots assist during training may make them more effective than conventional therapy. Here, the authors measured the therapeutic effect of a robot that required individuals with a stroke to achieve virtual tasks in three dimensions against gravity. The robot continuously estimated how much assistance patients needed to perform the tasks and provided slightly less assistance than needed to reduce patient slacking. Individuals with a chronic stroke (n = 26; baseline upper limb Fugl-Meyer score, 23 ± 8) were randomized into two groups and underwent 24 one-hour training sessions over 2 mos. One group received the assist-as-needed robot training and the other received conventional tabletop therapy with the supervision of a physical therapist. Training helped both groups significantly reduce their motor impairment, as measured by the primary outcome measure, the Fugl-Meyer score, but the improvement was small (3.0 ± 4.9 points for robot therapy vs. 0.9 ± 1.7 for conventional therapy). There was a trend for greater reduction for the robot-trained group (P = 0.07). The robot group largely sustained this gain at the 3-mo follow-up. The robot-trained group also experienced significant improvements in Box and Blocks score and hand grip strength, whereas the control group did not, but these improvements were not sustained at follow-up. In addition, the robot-trained group showed a trend toward greater improvement in sensory function, as measured by the Nottingham Sensory Test (P = 0.06). These results suggest that in patients with chronic stroke and moderate-severe deficits, assisting in three-dimensional virtual tasks with an assist-as-needed controller may make robotic training more effective than conventional tabletop training.

  3. Practical Staff Management Techniques for Distance Education Coordinators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Toccara D.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the author's enrollment in the SuccessfUL Supervisor Series course. As a new distance education library coordinator the author sought out formal supervisor training to address staff misconduct and establish staff training initiatives for distance library service needs. Structured as a case study, the author discusses how…

  4. Training Program Design. Interdisciplinary Team Training and Humanistic Patient Care for Hospices. Monograph 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, David J.; Mortenson, Lee E.

    This monograph, the third in a series of five, provides training information for hospice staff in improving interdisciplinary team functions and humanistic care provisions. Its purpose is to describe the steps in designing a training program for a particular hospice and the activities undertaken between the selection of the trainers and the…

  5. Managing Contract Training Programs: Progress and Proposals. Institute for Studies in Higher Education Policy Paper No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, William L.

    An overview is provided of community college involvement in providing job training for industry on a contract basis. Part 1 provides background on the changing role of community colleges and the introduction of contract training as a means of addressing the growing need of organizations to train and retrain staff. Part 2 offers a national…

  6. Providing Preventive Dental Care in the Community Using the Team Approach: A Comparison of Five Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzer, Jay A.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Five dental schools were given grants to design and implement a training program for dental students in planning and delivering preventive dental services. These programs are described and compared, and it is concluded that all were generally successful and worthy of continuation. (JSR)

  7. Effectiveness of a Training Program in Supervisors' Ability to Provide Feedback on Residents' Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod Perron, Noelle; Nendaz, Mathieu; Louis-Simonet, Martine; Sommer, Johanna; Gut, Anne; Baroffio, Anne; Dolmans, Diana; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2013-01-01

    Teaching communication skills (CS) to residents during clinical practice remains problematic. Direct observation followed by feedback is a powerful way to teach CS in clinical practice. However, little is known about the effect of training on feedback skills in this field. Controlled studies are scarce as well as studies that go beyond…

  8. From the Provider-Led to an Employer-Led System: Implications of Apprenticeship Reform on the Private Training Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chankseliani, Maia; Relly, Susan James

    2015-01-01

    Despite expending a great deal of public money, and after many government-led "reforms" to develop an apprenticeship system that rivals those found in other countries, the apprenticeship system in England still faces a number of challenges and failings, not least in the private training market. This paper explores the landscape of…

  9. Men who have sex with men sensitivity training reduces homoprejudice and increases knowledge among Kenyan healthcare providers in coastal Kenya

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elst, Elise M; Smith, Adrian D; Gichuru, Evanson; Wahome, Elizabeth; Musyoki, Helgar; Muraguri, Nicolas; Fegan, Greg; Duby, Zoe; Bekker, Linda‐Gail; Bender, Bonnie; Graham, Susan M; Operario, Don; Sanders, Eduard J

    2013-01-01

    .... We assessed the effect of a web-based, self-directed sensitivity training on MSM for HCWs (www.marps-africa.org), combined with facilitated group discussions on knowledge and homophobic attitudes among HCWs in four districts of coastal Kenya...

  10. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Saff Association

    2013-01-01

    2013 Elections to Staff Council   Vote! Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site (https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2013).   Timetable elections Monday 28 October to Monday 11 November, 12:00 am voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November, Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee.

  11. The effect of staff training on agitation and use of restraint in nursing home residents with dementia: a single-blind, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testad, Ingelin; Ballard, Clive; Brønnick, Kolbjørn; Aarsland, Dag

    2010-01-01

    Agitation is common in dementia and is associated with use of restraints and use of psychotropic drugs. The aim of this study was to determine whether an education and supervision intervention could reduce agitation and the use of restraints and antipsychotic drugs in nursing homes. Four Norwegian nursing homes were randomly allocated to receive either treatment as usual or an intervention consisting of a 2-day educational seminar and monthly group guidance for 6 months. One hundred forty-five residents with dementia (based on medical records and corroborated with a Functional Assessment Staging score >or= 4) completed baseline and 6-month intervention assessments and were included in the analyses. The co-primary outcome measures were the proportion of residents subject to interactional restraint and the severity of agitation using the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI). Patients were assessed at baseline, immediately after completion of the intervention at 6 months, and 12 months after baseline. Comparison of change in the 2 groups was made using repeated-measures analysis of variance (CMAI) and Mann-Whitney test (restraints). The study was conducted from 2003 to 2004. The proportion of residents starting new restraint was lower in the intervention than in the control group at 6-month evaluation (P = .02), but no statistically significant differences were found at 12-month assessment (P = .57). The total CMAI score declined from baseline to 6 and 12 months' follow-up in the intervention homes compared to a small increase in the control homes (F2,176 = 3.46, P = .034). There were no statistically significant differences in use of antipsychotic drugs. A brief 2-day staff education program followed by continued monthly guidance was able both to improve quality of care by reducing the frequency of interactional restraints and to reduce severity of agitation. ©Copyright 2010 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  12. Strength training with repetitions to failure does not provide additional strength and muscle hypertrophy gains in young women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo Martorelli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of a 10-week resistance training to failure on neuromuscular adaptations in young women. Eighty-nine active young women were randomly assigned to one of three groups: 1 repetitions to failure (RF; three sets of repetitions to failure; 2 repetitions not to failure with equalized volume (RNFV; four sets of 7 repetitions; and 3 repetitions not to failure (RNF; three sets of 7 repetitions. All groups performed the elbow flexor exercise (bilateral biceps curl and trained 2 days per week using 70% of 1RM. There were significant increases (p<0.05 in muscle strength after 5 (15.9% for RF, 18.4% for RNF, and 19.9% for RNFV and 10 (28.3% for RF, 26.8% for RNF, and 28.3% for RNFV weeks of training, with no significant differences between groups. Additionally, muscular endurance increased after 5 and 10 weeks, with no differences between groups. However, peak torque (PT increased significantly at 180°.s-1 in the RNFV (13.7% and RNF (4.1% groups (p<0.05, whereas no changes were observed in the RF group (-0.5%. Muscle thickness increased significantly (p<0.05 in the RF and RNFV groups after 5 (RF: 8.4% and RNFV: 2.3% and 10 weeks of training (RF: 17.5%, and RNFV: 8.5%, whereas no significant changes were observed in the RNF group (3.9 and 2.1% after 5 and 10 weeks, respectively. These data suggest that short-term training of repetitions to failure do not yield additional overall neuromuscular improvements in young women.

  13. Strength Training with Repetitions to Failure does not Provide Additional Strength and Muscle Hypertrophy Gains in Young Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorelli, Saulo; Cadore, Eduardo Lusa; Izquierdo, Mikel; Celes, Rodrigo; Martorelli, André; Cleto, Vitor Alonso; Alvarenga, José Gustavo; Bottaro, Martim

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a 10-week resistance training to failure on neuromuscular adaptations in young women. Eighty-nine active young women were randomly assigned to one of three groups: 1) repetitions to failure (RF; three sets of repetitions to failure); 2) repetitions not to failure with equalized volume (RNFV; four sets of 7 repetitions); and 3) repetitions not to failure (RNF; three sets of 7 repetitions). All groups performed the elbow flexor exercise (bilateral biceps curl) and trained 2 days per week using 70% of 1RM. There were significant increases (p<0.05) in muscle strength after 5 (15.9% for RF, 18.4% for RNF, and 19.9% for RNFV) and 10 (28.3% for RF, 26.8% for RNF, and 28.3% for RNFV) weeks of training, with no significant differences between groups. Additionally, muscular endurance increased after 5 and 10 weeks, with no differences between groups. However, peak torque (PT) increased significantly at 180°.s-1 in the RNFV (13.7%) and RNF (4.1%) groups (p<0.05), whereas no changes were observed in the RF group (-0.5%). Muscle thickness increased significantly (p<0.05) in the RF and RNFV groups after 5 (RF: 8.4% and RNFV: 2.3%) and 10 weeks of training (RF: 17.5%, and RNFV: 8.5%), whereas no significant changes were observed in the RNF group (3.9 and 2.1% after 5 and 10 weeks, respectively). These data suggest that short-term training of repetitions to failure do not yield additional overall neuromuscular improvements in young women. PMID:28713535

  14. Should Dental Schools Train Dentists to Routinely Provide Limited Preventive Primary Medical Care? Two Viewpoints: Viewpoint 1: Dentists Should Be Trained to Routinely Provide Limited Preventive Primary Care and Viewpoint 2: Dentists Should Be Trained in Primary Care Medicine to Enable Comprehensive Patient Management Within Their Scope of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddon, Donald B; Donoff, R Bruce; Edwards, Paul C; Goldblatt, Lawrence I

    2017-05-01

    This Point/Counterpoint acknowledges the transformation of dental practice from a predominantly technically based profession with primary emphasis on restoration of the tooth and its supporting structures to that of a more medically based specialty focusing on the oral and maxillofacial complex. While both viewpoints accept the importance of this transformation, they differ on the ultimate desired outcome and how changes should be implemented during training of dentists as oral health professionals. Viewpoint 1 argues that, in response to a shortage of both primary care providers and access to affordable oral health care, dentists need to be able and willing to provide limited preventive primary care (LPPC), and dental educators should develop and implement training models to prepare them. Among changes proposed are consideration of three types of practitioners: oral physicians with sufficient training to provide LPPC; dentists with excellent technical proficiency but minimal medical and surgical training; and mid-level providers to provide simple restorative and uncomplicated surgical care. Viewpoint 2 argues that the objective of dentists' education in primary care medicine is to help them safely and effectively provide all aspects of oral health care, including appropriate preventive medical care, that already fall within their scope of knowledge and practice. Dental educators should encourage students to use this knowledge to take full ownership of non-tooth-related pathologic conditions of the oral and maxillofacial complex not currently managed in the dental setting, but encouraging graduates to expand into non-dental LPPC outside the recognized scope of practice will only further exacerbate fragmentation of care.

  15. Nursing unit managers, staff retention and the work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Christine M; Roche, Michael A; Blay, Nicole; Stasa, Helen

    2011-01-01

    This paper examined the impact of leadership characteristics of nursing unit managers, as perceived by staff nurses, on staff satisfaction and retention. A positive work environment will increase levels of job satisfaction and staff retention. Nurse leaders play a critical role in creating a positive work environment. Important leadership characteristics of the front-line nurse manager include visibility, accessibility, consultation, recognition and support. Secondary analysis of data collected on 94 randomly selected wards in 21 public hospitals across two Australian states between 2004-2006. All nurses (n = 2488, 80·3% response rate) on the selected wards were asked to complete a survey that included the 49-item Nursing Work Index-Revised [NWI-R] together with measures of job satisfaction, satisfaction with nursing and intention to leave. Subscales of the NWI-R were calculated. Leadership, the domain of interest, consisted of 12 items. Wards were divided into those reporting either positive or negative leadership. Data were analysed at the nurse level using spss version 16. A nursing manager who was perceived to be a good leader, was visible, consulted with staff, provided praise and recognition and where flexible work schedules were available was found to distinguish the positive and negative wards. However, for a ward to be rated as positive overall, nurse leaders need to perform well on all the leadership items. An effective nursing unit manager who consults with staff and provides positive feedback and who is rated highly on a broad range of leadership items is instrumental in increasing job satisfaction and satisfaction with nursing. Good nurse managers play an important role in staff retention and satisfaction. Improved retention will lead to savings for the organisation, which may be allocated to activities such as training and mentorship to assist nurse leaders in developing these critical leadership skills. Strategies also need to be put in place to

  16. SIMPRO, a practical tool for training the staff of Laguna Verde nuclear power plant; El SIMPRO, una herramienta practica para la capacitacion y entrenamiento del personal de la CNLV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Valdez, Guillermo Omar; Gomez Camargo, Octavio; Castelo Cuevas, Luis; Vazquez Bustos, Jesus [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2012-06-22

    Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant (LVNPP) has implemented a real physical model, which represents several parts of a simplified version of its process. This development has proved to be very useful to improve the compliance with training programs and staff training maintenance in the different disciplines of engineering. Such programs are required by regulations and standards applicable for Nuclear Power Plants (NPP), so that the personnel working in these facilities can be able to respond on time to any contingency that might arise. This paper outlines the creation of the real physical model, how it is integrated and some of the practices that can be performed on this model. [Spanish] La Central Nucleoelectrica de Laguna Verde ha implementado un modelo fisico real que representa varias partes de una version simplificada de su proceso. Este desarrollo ha demostrado ser muy util para mejorar el cumplimiento de programas de adiestramiento, incluidos los del personal de mantenimiento, en diferentes disciplinas de ingenieria. Dichos programas son requeridos por las regulaciones y normas aplicables a las centrales nucleoelectricas, de manera que el personal que trabaja en estas instalaciones pueda ser capaz de responder oportunamente a cualquier contingencia que pudiera surgir. Este articulo describe la creacion del modelo fisico real, como se integra y algunas de las practicas que pueden llevarse a cabo con el.

  17. 杭州市社区医务人员控烟培训与控烟意识及行为的关联研究%Relations between attitude and practice of smoking and the training program regarding tobacco control among community medical staff members in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘庆敏; 任艳军; 曹承建; 刘冰; 吕筠; 李立明

    2013-01-01

    chi-square statistics.Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to study the relationships among knowledge,attitude and practice related to smoking control programs,targeted to the community medical staff members.Results Eight hundred forty-six community medical workers were involved.Sixty-five percent of the community medical staff members had learned related knowledge on smoking control.Proportion of the community medical staff who had taken lessons on smoking control with 3-10 working years was 1.77 times more than the ones with experience less than two years (OR=1.77,95%CI:1.25-2.51).Eighty-eight point seven percent of the medical staff who had received smoking control training programs were identified with the consciousness that they should advise the patients to quit smoking,comparing to the proportion 81.60% (Z=-2.87,P=0.00) in the control group.In terms of the practice regarding smoking control,data showed that 21.62% of the medical staff who had received smoking control training programs would provide ‘how to quit smoking' to more than 90% of the smoking patients,while the proportion in the control group was 10.65% (Z=-5.68,P=0.00).The use of drugs,traditional Chinese medicine therapy and the smoking cessation hotline rate were all less than 30%.Conclusion The training programs being used on smoking control seemed useful in improving the consciousness and practice towards the smoking control programs during their medical activities among the community medical staff members.

  18. Hospital staff experiences of their relationships with adults who self-harm: A meta-synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Sophie; Glover, Lesley

    2017-09-01

    This review aimed to synthesize qualitative literature exploring inpatient hospital staff experiences of their relationships with people who self-harm. Nine studies were identified from a systematic search of five research databases. Papers included the experiences of physical health and mental health staff working in inpatient settings. The studies employed various qualitative research methods and were appraised using an adapted quality assessment tool (Tong, Sainsbury, & Craig, 2007). A meta-synthesis was conducted using traditional qualitative analysis methods including coding and categorizing data into themes. Three main themes derived from the data. 'The impact of the system' influenced the extent to which staff were 'Fearing the harm from self-harm', or were 'Working alongside the whole person'. A fear-based relationship occurred across mental health and physical health settings despite differences in training; however, 'Working alongside the whole person' primarily emerged from mental health staff experiences. Systemic factors provided either an inhibitory or facilitative influence on the relational process. Staff experiences of their relationship with people who self-harm were highlighted to have an important impact on the delivery and outcome of care. Increasing support for staff with a focus on distress tolerance, managing relational issues, and developing self-awareness within the relationship may lead to a more mutually beneficial experience of care. Equally, structure, clarity, and support within inpatient systems may empower staff to feel more confident in utilizing their existing skills. Working with people who self-harm can be emotionally challenging and how staff cope with this can significantly impact on the engagement of staff and patients. Increasing the skills of staff in managing relational issues and tolerating distress, as well as providing support and reflective practice groups may be useful in managing emotional responses to working with

  19. The difficulties experienced by nurses and healthcare staff involved in the process of breaking bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, Clare; Buchanan, Jean; Tod, Angela Mary

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the difficulties experienced by nurses and healthcare professionals when engaging in the process of breaking bad news. The challenges faced by staff when breaking bad news have previously been researched in relation to particular settings or participants. This study involved staff from diverse settings and roles to develop broader insights into the range of difficulties experienced in clinical practice. The study used a descriptive survey design involving self-reported written accounts and framework analysis. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire containing a free text section that asked participants to describe a difficult experience they had encountered when involved in the process of breaking bad news. Data were collected from healthcare staff from hospital, community, hospice and care home settings attending training days on breaking bad news between April 2011 and April 2014. Multiple inter-related factors presented challenges to staff engaging in activities associated with breaking bad news. Traditional subjects such as diagnostic and treatment information were described but additional topics were identified such as the impact of illness and care at the end of life. A descriptive framework was developed that summarizes the factors that contribute to creating difficult experiences for staff when breaking bad news. The framework provides insights into the scope of the challenges faced by staff when they engage in the process of breaking bad news. This provides the foundation for developing interventions to support staff that more closely matches their experiences in clinical practice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The Relationship between the Training of the Hotel Staff and Their Level of Organizational Commitment: A Study in Five-Star Hotels in Belek Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Tayfun

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is highly hard to gol on the life of the enterprises in a dense competition conditions day by day. New perspectives emerge in the organizations with the competition process. There is a constant and rapid change and progress in some positions such as job satisfaction, motivation, communication and the organizational commitment. In this developing process, the organizations are in search for competition without stopping. In this context, the contributions of the servers have been analyzed for years and still go on their consistency. In addition to the contributions of the servers to the organizations, the expectations of the servers are examined and according to the survey results, the individuals who get positive reply to their expectations buckle down to their duties. One of the methods that are applied for increasing the benefit from the servers becomes education in time and the most important motive for prefer for organizations. The main aim of our study is underlying the level of the relationship between the organizational commitment and education; and the lower dimension of the organizational commitment such as the permanence, the normative and the emotional commitment and education. Whether the stated organizational commitment and the lower dimensions level change or not according to the general education, tourism education and service training is examined. The Belek region is chosen as a field of application of the study. The application is carried out at five star hotels in the Belek region. The study underlines the relationship between the training and organizational commitment and put emphasis on the importance for increasing thee emotional commitment.