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Sample records for providing self-management education

  1. Resilience-based Diabetes Self-management Education: Perspectives From African American Participants, Community Leaders, and Healthcare Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, H Matthew; Dubois, Susan K; Brown, Sharon A; Steinhardt, Mary A

    2017-08-01

    Purpose The purpose of this qualitative, focus group study was to further refine the Resilience-based Diabetes Self-management Education (RB-DSME) recruitment process and intervention, build greater trust in the community, and identify strategies to enhance its sustainability as a community-based intervention in African American church settings. Methods Six 2-hour focus groups (N = 55; 10 men and 45 women) were led by a trained moderator with a written guide to facilitate discussion. Two sessions were conducted with individuals diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who participated in previous RB-DSME pilot interventions and their family members, two sessions with local church leaders, and two sessions with community healthcare providers who care for patients with T2DM. Two independent reviewers performed content analysis to identify major themes using a grounded theory approach. The validity of core themes was enhanced by external review and subsequent discussions with two qualitative methods consultants. Results There was expressed interest and acceptability of the RB-DSME program. Church connection and pastor support were noted as key factors in building trust and enhancing recruitment, retention, and sustainability of the program. Core themes across all groups included the value of incentives, the need for foundational knowledge shared with genuine concern, teaching with visuals, dealing with denial, balancing the reality of adverse consequences with hope, the importance of social support, and addressing healthcare delivery barriers. Conclusion Focus groups documented the feasibility and potential effectiveness of RB-DSME interventions to enhance diabetes care in the African American community. In clinical practice, inclusion of these core themes may enhance T2DM self-care and treatment outcomes.

  2. Self-management education for cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Savage, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    Self-management education may help patients with cystic fibrosis and their families to choose, monitor and adjust treatment requirements for their illness, and also to manage the effects of illness on their lives. Although self-management education interventions have been developed for cystic fibrosis, no previous systematic review of the evidence of effectiveness of these interventions has been conducted.

  3. Self-management education and support in chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Patrick T

    2012-06-01

    With the changing health care environment, prevalence of chronic health conditions, and burgeoning challenges of health literacy, obesity, and homelessness, self-management support provides an opportunity for clinicians to enhance effectiveness and, at the same time, to engage patients to participate in managing their own personal care. This article reviews the differences between patient education and self-management and describes easy-to-use strategies that foster patient self-management and can be used by health care providers in the medical setting. It also highlights the importance of linking patients to nonmedical programs and services in the community. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Increasing capacity to deliver diabetes self-management education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carey, M. E.; Mandalia, P. K.; Daly, H.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To develop and test a format of delivery of diabetes self-management education by paired professional and lay educators. Methods: We conducted an equivalence trial with non-randomized participant allocation to a Diabetes Education and Self Management for Ongoing and Newly Diagnosed Type 2 di...... educator role can provide equivalent patient benefits. This could provide a method that increases capacity, maintains quality and is cost-effective, while increasing access to self-management education.......Aim: To develop and test a format of delivery of diabetes self-management education by paired professional and lay educators. Methods: We conducted an equivalence trial with non-randomized participant allocation to a Diabetes Education and Self Management for Ongoing and Newly Diagnosed Type 2...... diabetes (DESMOND) course, delivered in the standard format by two trained healthcare professional educators (to the control group) or by one trained lay educator and one professional educator (to the intervention group). A total of 260 people with Type 2 diabetes diagnosed within the previous 12 months...

  5. The Impact of a Diabetes Self-Management Education Program Provided through a Telemedicine Link to Rural California Health Care Clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Nuovo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background This project investigated the impact of a DM self-management education program provided through a telemedicine link at nine rural health clinics in Northern California. Methods Two hundred thirty nine patients were provided with a single 2-hour class on DM delivered through a live televideo connection. Patients provided pre-intervention information on: demographics and overall health, self-care behaviors, and knowledge about DM. All participants completed a post-education survey on knowledge and self-care behaviors. Results There was a significant decrease in the number of patients who felt overwhelmed with their DM; pre-intervention 18.8%; post-intervention 5.4% ( P < 0.0001. Patients increased the number of days they exercised; pre-intervention 3.4 days; post-intervention 3.9 days ( P = 0.02. Patients increased the number of days they checked their feet; pre-intervention 4.2 days; post-intervention 5.6 days ( P < 0.01. Knowledge about DM improved over the study period ( P < 0.01. Conclusions A single 2-hour class on DM administered through a telemedicine link to patients in rural health clinics resulted in feeling less overwhelmed, more knowledgeable about DM, and demonstrated an increase in self-care behavior; ie, exercise and foot care.

  6. Internet delivered diabetes self-management education: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Katherine; Phillips, Beth; Johnson, Constance; Vorderstrasse, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes self-management education is a cornerstone of successful diabetes management. Various methods have been used to reach the increasing numbers of patients with diabetes, including Internet-based education. The purpose of this article is to review various delivery methods of Internet diabetes education that have been evaluated, as well as their effectiveness in improving diabetes-related outcomes. Literature was identified in the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PubMed, Medline, EBSCO, the Cochrane Library, and the Web of Science databases through searches using the following terms: "type 2 diabetes AND internet/web based AND education" and "type 2 diabetes AND diabetes self-management education (DSME) AND web-based/internet OR technology assisted education." The search was limited to English language articles published in the last 10 years. The search yielded 111 articles; of these, 14 met criteria for inclusion in this review. Nine studies were randomized controlled trials, and study lengths varied from 2 weeks to 24 months, for a total of 2,802 participants. DSME delivered via the Internet is effective at improving measures of glycemic control and diabetes knowledge compared with usual care. In addition, results demonstrate that improved eating habits and increased attendance at clinic appointments occur after the online DSME, although engagement and usage of Internet materials waned over time. Interventions that included an element of interaction with healthcare providers were seen as attractive to participants. Internet-delivered diabetes education has the added benefit of easier access for many individuals, and patients can self-pace themselves through materials. More research on the cost-benefits of Internet diabetes education and best methods to maintain patient engagement are needed, along with more studies assessing the long-term impact of Internet-delivered DSME.

  7. [Educative programs based on self-management: an integrative review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Luciana da Silva; de Gutierrez, Maria Gaby Rivero; De Domenico, Edvane Birelo Lopes

    2010-06-01

    The objective was to identify definitions and/or explanations of the term self-management in educative programs that aim its development. The authors also aimed to describe the educative plans and results of the educative programs analyzed. As a methodology we used integrative review, with 15 published articles (2002 the 2007). The inclusion criteria was: the occurrence of the term self-management; the existence of an educative program for the development of self-management; to be related to the area of the health of the adult. Self-management means the improvement or acquisition of abilities to solve problems in biological, social and affective scopes. The review pointed to different educational methodologies. However, it also showed the predominance of traditional methods, with conceptual contents and of physiopathological nature. The learning was evaluated as favorable, with warns in relation to the application in different populations and contexts and to the increase of costs of the educative intervention. It was concluded that research has evidenced the importance of the education for self-management, but lacked in strength for not relating the biopsychosocial demands of the chronic patient and for not describing in detail the teaching and evaluation methodologies employed.

  8. Does information overload prevent chronic patients from reading self-management educational materials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chung-Feng; Kuo, Kuang-Ming

    2016-05-01

    Self-care management is becoming an important part of care for chronic patients. However, various kinds of self-management educational materials which government or healthcare institutions provide for patients may not achieve the expected outcome. One of the critical reasons affecting patients' use intention could be patients' perceived information overload regarding the self-management educational materials. This study proposed an extended model of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), which incorporated perceived information overload, to explore if information overload will prevent chronic patients from reading educational materials for self-care management. The independent variables are attitude, subject norm, perceived behavior control and perceived information overload while the dependent variable is behavior intention to use the self-management educational materials. Perceived information overload is also referred to as an antecedent variable which may has impacts on attitude and perceived behavior control. The cross-sectional study interviewed newly diagnosed chronic patients with coronary artery disease, who are the potential users of the self-management educational materials, in a medical center in Taiwan. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics of the basic information distribution of the respondents, and structural equation modeling to study the reliability and validity for testing hypotheses. A total of 110 respondents were enrolled in this study and successful interview data were collected from 106 respondents. The result indicates that the patients' perceived information overload of self-management educational materials was validated to have impacts on attitude and perceived behavioral control constructs of the TPB as well as contributing a direct impact on patients' intentions to use self-management educational materials. Besides, subjective norm and perceived behavioral control constructs were validated to have significant impacts on

  9. Self-management of chronic low back pain: Four viewpoints from patients and healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Paul; Cross, Vinnette; McCrum, Carol; McGowan, Janet; Defever, Emmanuel; Lloyd, Phil; Poole, Robert; Moore, Ann P

    2015-07-01

    A move towards self-management is central to health strategy around chronic low back pain, but its concept and meaning for those involved are poorly understood. In the reported study, four distinct and shared viewpoints on self-management were identified among people with pain and healthcare providers using Q methodology. Each construes self-management in a distinctive manner and articulates a different vision of change. Identification of similarities and differences among the viewpoints holds potential for enhancing communication between patients and healthcare providers and for better understanding the complexities of self-management in practice.

  10. Self-management of chronic low back pain: Four viewpoints from patients and healthcare providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Stenner

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A move towards self-management is central to health strategy around chronic low back pain, but its concept and meaning for those involved are poorly understood. In the reported study, four distinct and shared viewpoints on self-management were identified among people with pain and healthcare providers using Q methodology. Each construes self-management in a distinctive manner and articulates a different vision of change. Identification of similarities and differences among the viewpoints holds potential for enhancing communication between patients and healthcare providers and for better understanding the complexities of self-management in practice.

  11. Diabetes self-management support for patients with low health literacy: Perceptions of patients and providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, Mirjam P; Beune, Erik J A J; Baim-Lance, Abigail M; Bruessing, Raynold C; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore perceptions and strategies of health care providers regarding diabetes self-management support for patients with low health literacy (LHL), and to compare their self-management support with the needs of patients with LHL and type 2 diabetes. This study serves as a problem analysis for systematic intervention development to improve diabetes self-management among patients with LHL. This qualitative study used in-depth interviews with general practitioners (n = 4), nurse practitioners (n = 5), and patients with LHL (n = 31). The results of the interviews with health care providers guided the patient interviews. In addition, we observed 10 general practice consultations. Providers described patients with LHL as uninvolved and less motivated patients who do not understand self-management. Their main strategy to improve self-management was to provide standard information on a repeated basis. Patients with LHL seemed to have a different view of diabetes self-management than their providers. Most demonstrated a low awareness of what self-management involves, but did not express needing more information. They reported several practical barriers to self-management, although they seemed reluctant to use the information provided to overcome them. Providing and repeating information does not fit the needs of patients with LHL regarding diabetes self-management support. Health care providers do not seem to have the insight or the tools to systematically support diabetes self-management in this group. Systematic intervention development with a focus on skills-based approaches rather than cognition development may improve diabetes self-management support of patients with LHL. © 2014 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Diabetes self-management support for patients with low health literacy: Perceptions of patients and providers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, Mirjam P.; Beune, Erik J. A. J.; Baim-Lance, Abigail M.; Bruessing, Raynold C.; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore perceptions and strategies of health care providers regarding diabetes self-management support for patients with low health literacy (LHL), and to compare their self-management support with the needs of patients with LHL and type 2 diabetes. This study

  13. Diabetes Self-Management Education; Experience of People with Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardanian Dehkordi, Leila; Abdoli, Samereh

    2017-06-01

    Introduction: Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is a major factor which can affects quality of life of people with diabetes (PWD). Understanding the experience of PWD participating in DSME programs is an undeniable necessity in providing effective DSME to this population. The Aim of the study was to explore the experiences of PWD from a local DSME program in Iran. Methods: This study applied a descriptive phenomenological approach. The participants were PWD attending a well-established local DSME program in an endocrinology and diabetes center in Isfahan, Iran. Fifteen participants willing to share their experience about DSME were selected through purposive sampling from September 2011 to June 2012. Data were collected via unstructured interviews and analyzed using Colaizzi's approach. Results: The experience of participants were categorized under three main themes including content of diabetes education (useful versus repetitive, intensive and volatile), teaching methods (traditional, technology ignorant) and learning environment (friendly atmosphere, cramped and dark). Conclusion: It seems the current approach for DSME cannot meet the needs and expectations of PWD attending the program. Needs assessment, interactive teaching methods, multidisciplinary approach, technology as well as appropriate physical space need to be considered to improve DSME.

  14. Diabetes Self-Management Education; Experience of People with Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Mardanian Dehkordi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes self-management education (DSME is a major factor which can affects quality of life of people with diabetes (PWD. Understanding the experience of PWD participating in DSME programs is an undeniable necessity in providing effective DSME to this population. The Aim of the study was to explore the experiences of PWD from a local DSME program in Iran. Methods: This study applied a descriptive phenomenological approach. The participants were PWD attending a well-established local DSME program in an endocrinology and diabetes center in Isfahan, Iran. Fifteen participants willing to share their experience about DSME were selected through purposive sampling from September 2011 to June 2012. Data were collected via unstructured interviews and analyzed using Colaizzi's approach. Results: The experience of participants were categorized under three main themes including content of diabetes education (useful versus repetitive, intensive and volatile, teaching methods (traditional, technology ignorant and learning environment (friendly atmosphere, cramped and dark. Conclusion: It seems the current approach for DSME cannot meet the needs and expectations of PWD attending the program. Needs assessment, interactive teaching methods, multidisciplinary approach, technology as well as appropriate physical space need to be considered to improve DSME.

  15. Self-management of change processes in educational centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Inés Vázquez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the self-management processes of change, referring to a series of processes that take place in education centers undergoing change. The perspective from which the approach is proposed is educational management. The evidences integrated into the document are the result of a study conducted in Uruguay, which involved seven primary, secondary, and technical schools. The approach used has been the study of multiple cases with the intention of analyzing the phenomenon in specific contexts, integrating the possibility of studying it from a global perspective. The overall objective was to achieve greater understanding of the self-evaluation and change processes in schools. Within the specific objectives we highlight: to identify the possible links between self-assessment and decision making

  16. Diabetes self-management education in South Auckland, New Zealand, 2007-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Martha; Clinton, Janet; Appleton, Sarah; Flanagan, Pat

    2011-03-01

    Self-management education programs seek to help patients realize that they are their own principal caregivers and that health care professionals are consultants who support them in this role. The aim of this study was to evaluate a diabetes self-management education program implemented as part of a district-wide approach in South Auckland, New Zealand, which has some of the highest prevalence rates for diabetes and is one of the most ethnically diverse and deprived regions of New Zealand. Self-management attitudes and behaviors were monitored with the use of questionnaires before and after program implementation. Clinical outcomes such as hemoglobin A1c, body mass index, and blood pressure were also tracked before the program began and 3 months after the program ended. Participant focus groups and facilitator interviews were conducted to explore perceptions of the program. Participants showed improvement in attitudes toward their own ability to manage their diabetes; in diet, physical activity, and foot care; and in hemoglobin A1c levels 3 months after the end of participation. Participants also reduced their sense of isolation when dealing with their diabetes. However, catering to the needs of a multiethnic community is extremely resource-intensive because of the need to provide adequate language and cultural interpretation. Self-management education can work in multiethnic, high-needs communities in New Zealand. Programs must ensure they enable the appropriate mechanisms and have appropriate resources to support the community's needs.

  17. The social educator as manager of self- managed communities towards a didactics of group work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos G. Juliao Vargas

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to reflect upon the function of social educators as promoters of self-managing communities as well as to outline the didactic contribution which group work techniques provide for this task. Therefore, the competencies that a social educator should have been addressed from a trace concept of “community” and its relationship whit social education as a non formal process; principally insisting on its role as “leader” of the self-management community processes: how far Leadership should go and where it should stop. It can be concluded that the social educator is required to work among groups of human beings with the main purpose of arousing the collective processes of teaching and learning of knowledge, attitudes and strategies. These strategies lead communities to manage the environment in which they live in an autonomous way so that decent living conditions are guaranteed for everyone. 

  18. Self-Management Patient Education and Weight Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stombaugh, Angela M.

    2010-01-01

    Self-management of a disease is defined as "having or being able to obtain, the skills and resources necessary to best accommodate to the chronic disease and its consequences" (Holman & Lorig, 1992, p. 309). Self-management has been used in the management of several chronic conditions and this model may be useful in the management of weight loss.…

  19. Effectiveness of asthma education with and without a self-management plan in hospitalized children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza-Palma, Tatiana; Zamorano, Alejandra; Arancibia, Francisca; Bustos, María-Francisca; Silva, Maria José; Cardenas, Consuelo; De La Barra, Pedro; Puente, Victoria; Cerda, Jaime; Castro-Rodriguez, José A; Prado, Francisco

    2009-11-01

    Background. Formal education in primary care can reduce asthma exacerbations. However, there are few studies in hospitalized children, with none originating in Latin America. Methods. A prospective randomized study was designed to evaluate whether a full education with self-management plan (ESM) was more effective than an education without self-management plan (E) in reducing asthma hospitalization. Children (5 to 15 years of age) who were hospitalized for an asthma attack were divided in two groups. Children in the E group received general instructions based on a booklet. Those in the ESM group received the same booklet plus a self-management guide and a puzzle game that reinforces the lessons learned in the booklet. Patients were interviewed every 3 months, by telephone, for one year. Interviewers recording the number of hospitalizations, exacerbations, and emergency visits for asthma and oral steroid burst uses. Results. From 88 children who met the inclusion criteria, 77 (86%) completed one year of follow-up (41 from E and 36 from ESM group). Overall, after one year, the hospitalization decreased by 66% and the inhaled corticosteroids therapy increased from 36% to 79%. At the end of the study, there was no difference in exacerbations, emergency visits, oral steroid burst uses, or hospitalizations between the two groups. Conclusions. Asthma education with or without a self-management plan during asthma hospitalization were effective in reducing exacerbations, emergency visits, oral steroid burst uses, and future rehospitalizations. This evidence supports the importance of providing a complete asthma education plan in any patient who is admitted for asthma exacerbation.

  20. Diabetes Self-Management Education: Miles to Go

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    Helen Altman Klein

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This meta-analysis assessed how successfully Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME interventions help people with type 2 diabetes achieve and maintain healthy blood glucose levels. We included 52 DSME programs with 9,631 participants that reported post-intervention A1c levels in randomized controlled trials. The training conditions resulted in significant reductions in A1c levels compared to control conditions. However, the impact of intervention was modest shifting of only 7.23% more participants from diabetic to pre-diabetic or normal status, relative to the control condition. Most intervention participants did not achieve healthy A1c levels. Further, few DSME studies assessed long-term maintenance of A1c gains. Past trends suggest that gains are difficult to sustain over time. Our results suggested that interventions delivered by nurses were more successful than those delivered by non-nursing personnel. We suggest that DSME programs might do better by going beyond procedural interventions. Most DSME programs relied heavily on rules and procedures to guide decisions about diet, exercise, and weight loss. Future DSME may need to include cognitive self-monitoring, diagnosis, and planning skills to help patients detect anomalies, identify possible causes, generate corrective action, and avoid future barriers to maintaining healthy A1c levels. Finally, comprehensive descriptions of DSME programs would advance future efforts.

  1. Diabetes structured self-management education programmes: a narrative review and current innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chatterjee, Sudesna; Davies, Melanie J.; Heller, Simon; Speight, Jane; Snoek, Frank J.; Khunti, Kamlesh

    2018-01-01

    Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are associated with long-term complications that can be prevented or delayed by intensive glycaemic management. People who are empowered and skilled to self-manage their diabetes have improved health outcomes. Over the past 20 years, diabetes self-management education

  2. Implementation of a Self-Management System for Students with Disabilities in General Education Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that self-management procedures have a robust literature base attesting to their efficacy with students with disabilities, the use of these strategies in general education settings remains limited. This mixed methods study examined the implementation of self-management procedures using both quantitative and qualitative methods.…

  3. Comparative analysis of diabetes self-management education programs in the European Union Member States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sarama; Riemenschneider, Henna; Müller, Gabriele; Levin-Zamir, Diane; Van den Broucke, Stephan; Schwarz, Peter E H

    2017-12-01

    Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is generally considered as an integral part of diabetes care. The availability of different types of self-management in the European Union Member States (EUMS) remains uncertain. The aim of this study is to perform a comparative analysis of existing DSME programs (DSMEP) implemented in EUMS. Unpublished data regarding DSME in the EUMS was assessed with Diabetes Literacy Survey using wiki tool (WT) targeting patients and different stakeholders. An additional literature review (LR) was performed in PubMed to identify published studies regarding DSMEP in the EUMS from 2004 to 2014. A total of 102 DSMEP implemented in EUMS were reported in the WT and 154 programs were identified from the LR. Comparative analysis of the data indicated that a majority of programs are aimed at adults and only a minority at children and elderly. Only a small percentage of the programs utilize information technology for teaching and learning, and only one out of five programs pay attention to depression. The identified DSMEP aimed primarily to empower patients through increasing knowledge and changing attitudes and beliefs towards diabetes. This study provides an overview of the present state-of-the-art on diabetes self-management education programs in the 28 EUMS. To increase participation, existing DSMEP should be made more accessible to the patients as well as tailored to specific patient groups. Copyright © 2017 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Diabetes Educator and the Diabetes Self-management Education Engagement: The 2015 National Practice Survey.

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    Sherr, Dawn; Lipman, Ruth D

    2015-10-01

    of diabetes, education and management for those diagnosed with diabetes, prevention of secondary complications, and more complex management of diabetes and its secondary complications. While diabetes educators were found to work with those newly diagnosed with diabetes, they continue to engage with people with diabetes at various times other than the year that they were diagnosed. There are still issues with participant readiness, as evidenced by program completion rates. Nonetheless, diabetes educators are increasingly seen to be providing the integrated engagement that is needed to better ensure that people with diabetes attain and maintain competency in self-management skills. © 2015 The Author(s).

  5. Enterprising Career Education: The Power of Self-Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Anki

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an account of how people's career management is given prominence in contemporary European policy documents pertaining to career education for entrepreneurship in higher education and in vocational education and training. This study concerns the ways in which policy discourses of career management and governmental practices…

  6. Chronic disease self-management education courses: utilization by low-income, middle-aged participants.

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    Horrell, Lindsey N; Kneipp, Shawn M; Ahn, SangNam; Towne, Samuel D; Mingo, Chivon A; Ory, Marcia G; Smith, Matthew Lee

    2017-06-27

    Individuals living in lower-income areas face an increased prevalence of chronic disease and, oftentimes, greater barriers to optimal self-management. Disparities in disease management are seen across the lifespan, but are particularly notable among middle-aged adults. Although evidence-based Chronic Disease Self-management Education courses are available to enhance self-management among members of this at-risk population, little information is available to determine the extent to which these courses are reaching those at greatest risk. The purpose of this study is to compare the extent to which middle-aged adults from lower- and higher-income areas have engaged in CDSME courses, and to identify the sociodemographic characteristics of lower-income, middle aged participants. The results of this study were produced through analysis of secondary data collected during the Communities Putting Prevention to Work: Chronic Disease Self-Management Program initiative. During this initiative, data was collected from 100,000 CDSME participants across 45 states within the United States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. Of the entire sample included in this analysis (19,365 participants), 55 people lived in the most impoverished counties. While these 55 participants represented just 0.3% of the total study sample, researchers found this group completed courses more frequently than participants from less impoverished counties once enrolled. These results signal a need to enhance participation of middle-aged adults from lower-income areas in CDSME courses. The results also provide evidence that can be used to inform future program delivery choices, including decisions regarding recruitment materials, program leaders, and program delivery sites, to better engage this population.

  7. An educational intervention to promote self-management and professional socialization in graduate nurse anesthesia students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloy, Debra A.

    Traditionally, nurse anesthesia educators have utilized prior academic achievement to predict student success. However, research has indicated that prior academic achievement offers an inadequate assessment of student success in graduate healthcare programs with extensive clinical residencies. The educational literature has identified many non-cognitive factors, such as self-efficacy and locus of control, that may provide a more holistic prediction model of student success. An experimental study with pretest-posttest design and stratified random assignment was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention to promote self-management, professional socialization, and academic achievement among first semester graduate nurse anesthesia students. Participants (N = 66) were demographically similar to the national graduate nurse anesthesia student body, though Hispanics and younger students were a little over-represented in the sample (56% female, 75.8% White, 15.2% Hispanic, 6% Other, 59% ≤ 30-years-old, 67% ≤ 3 years of ICU). The results showed that most graduate anesthesia students had strong self-management and professional socialization characteristics on admission. The results did not support the effectiveness of this educational intervention. Thus, ceiling effect may have accounted in part for statistically non-significant results regarding self-efficacy (p = .190, o2 = .03), locus of control (p = .137, o2 = .04), professional socialization (p = .819, o2 = .001), and academic achievement (p = .689, o2 = .003). Future researchers may need to expand the scope of the intervention, use a more powerful and sensitive instrument, and utilize a larger sample.

  8. Design and evaluation of a personal robot playing a self-management education game with children with diabetes type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanson Henkemans, O.A.; Bierman, B.P.B.; Janssen, J.; Looije, R.; Neerincx, M.A.; Dooren, M.M.M. van; Vries, J.L.E. de; Burg, G.J. van der; Huisman, S.D.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of a personal robot, providing diabetes self-management education in a clinical setting on the pleasure, engagement and motivation to play a diabetes quiz of children (7–12) with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), and on their acquisition of knowledge about their

  9. Controlled, Constrained, or Flexible? How Self-Management Goals Are Shaped By Patient-Provider Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Marika; Lewis, Sophie; Willis, Karen; Rogers, Anne; Venville, Annie; Smith, Lorraine

    2018-06-01

    A person-centered approach to goal-setting, involving collaboration between patients and health professionals, is advocated in policy to support self-management. However, this is difficult to achieve in practice, reducing the potential effectiveness of self-management support. Drawing on observations of consultations between patients and health professionals, we examined how goal-setting is shaped in patient-provider interactions. Analysis revealed three distinct interactional styles. In controlled interactions, health professionals determine patients' goals based on biomedical reference points and present these goals as something patients should do. In constrained interactions, patients are invited to present goals, yet health professionals' language and questions orientate goals toward biomedical issues. In flexible interactions, patients and professionals both contribute to goal-setting, as health professionals use less directive language, create openings, and allow patients to decide on their goals. Findings suggest that interactional style of health professionals could be the focus of interventions when aiming to increase the effectiveness of goal-setting.

  10. Implementation of a diabetes self-management education program in primary care for adults using shared medical appointments.

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    Sanchez, Iris

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to implement diabetes self-management education in primary care using the Chronic Care Model and shared medical appointments (SMA) to provide evidence-based interventions to improve process and measure outcomes. A quality improvement project using the Plan-Do-Check-Act cycle was implemented in a primary care setting in South Texas to provide diabetes self-management education for adults. Biological measures were evaluated in 70 patients at initiation of the project and thereafter based on current practice guidelines. The results of the project were consistent with the literature regarding the benefits, sustainability, and viability of SMA. As compared with that in studies presented in the literature, the patient population who participated in SMA had similar outcomes regarding improvement in A1C, self-management skills, and satisfaction. SMA are an innovative system redesign concept with the potential to provide comprehensive and coordinated care for patients with multiple and chronic health conditions while still being an efficient, effective, financially viable, and sustainable program. As the incidence and prevalence of diabetes increase, innovative models of care can meet the growing demand for access and utilization of diabetes self-management education programs. Programs focusing on chronic conditions to improve outcomes can be replicated by health care providers in primary care settings. SMA can increase revenue and productivity, improve disease management, and increase provider and patient satisfaction.

  11. Understanding the environmental issues in diabetes self-management education research: a reexamination of 8 studies in community-based settings.

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    Jack, Leonard; Liburd, Leandris; Spencer, Tirzah; Airhihenbuwa, Collins O

    2004-06-01

    Eight studies included in a recent systematic review of the efficacy of diabetes self-management education were qualitatively reexamined to determine the presence of theoretical frameworks, methods used to ensure cultural appropriateness, and the quality of the instrument. Theoretical frameworks that help to explain complex pathways that produce health outcomes were lacking; culture indices were not incorporated into diabetes self-management education; and the instruments used to measure outcomes were inadequate. We provide recommendations to improve research on diabetes self-management education in community settings through use of a contextual framework that encourages targeting multiple levels of influence--individual, family, organizational, community, and policy.

  12. Meta-analysis of self-management education for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurley J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundChronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a common disease frequently associated with high use of health services. Self-management education is a term applied to programs aimed at teaching patients skills that promote the self-efficacy needed to carry out medical regimens specific to control their disease. In COPD, the value of self-management education is not yet clear and a recent trial was terminated early because of excess mortality in the intervention group.ObjectivesThe objective of this meta-analysis was to assess the settings, methods and efficacy of COPD self-management education programs on patient outcomes and healthcare utilization.Selection criteriaRandomized controlled trials of self-management education in patients with COPD were identified. Studies focusing primarily on comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation (education and exercise and studies without usual care as a control group were excluded.Search strategyWe searched PubMed (January 1985 to May 2012 as well as other meta-analysis and reviews.Data collection and analysisTwo reviewers (JH and RAR independently assessed study quality and extracted data. Investigators were contacted for additional information.Main resultsThe reviewers included 3 group comparisons drawn from 12 trials. The studies showed no significant change in mortality, with one study being an outlier compared to the others. However, the meta-analysis revealed a reduction in the probability of hospital admission among patients receiving self-management education compared to those receiving usual care.ConclusionsIt is likely that self-management education is associated with a reduction in hospital admissions with no change in mortality. However, because of heterogeneity in interventions, study populations, follow-up time, and outcome measures, data are still insufficient to formulate clear recommendations regarding the preferred curriculum and delivery method of self-management education programs

  13. An online lifestyle diary with a persuasive computer assistant providing feedback on self-management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanson Henkemans, O.A.; Boog, P.J.M. van der; Lindenberg, J.; Mast, C.A.P.G. van der; Neerincx, M.A.; Zwetsloot-Schonk, B.J.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    In accordance with the global trend, in The Netherlands approximately 45% of the population is overweight. Existing studies show that patient self-management can reduce these figures, but medical non-adherence is a persistent problem. eHealth can potentially increase adherence to self-management.

  14. Intervention mapping protocol for developing a theory-based diabetes self-management education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Misoon; Choi, Suyoung; Kim, Se-An; Seo, Kyoungsan; Lee, Soo Jin

    2015-01-01

    Development of behavior theory-based health promotion programs is encouraged with the paradigm shift from contents to behavior outcomes. This article describes the development process of the diabetes self-management program for older Koreans (DSME-OK) using intervention mapping (IM) protocol. The IM protocol includes needs assessment, defining goals and objectives, identifying theory and determinants, developing a matrix to form change objectives, selecting strategies and methods, structuring the program, and planning for evaluation and pilot testing. The DSME-OK adopted seven behavior objectives developed by the American Association of Diabetes Educators as behavioral outcomes. The program applied an information-motivation-behavioral skills model, and interventions were targeted to 3 determinants to change health behaviors. Specific methods were selected to achieve each objective guided by IM protocol. As the final step, program evaluation was planned including a pilot test. The DSME-OK was structured as the 3 determinants of the IMB model were intervened to achieve behavior objectives in each session. The program has 12 weekly 90-min sessions tailored for older adults. Using the IM protocol in developing a theory-based self-management program was beneficial in terms of providing a systematic guide to developing theory-based and behavior outcome-focused health education programs.

  15. Enhancing the effectiveness of diabetes self-management education: the diabetes literacy project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Broucke, S; Van der Zanden, G; Chang, P; Doyle, G; Levin, D; Pelikan, J; Schillinger, D; Schwarz, P; Sørensen, K; Yardley, L; Riemenschneider, H

    2014-12-01

    Patient empowerment through self-management education is central to improving the quality of diabetes care and preventing Type 2 Diabetes. Although national programs exist, there is no EU-wide strategy for diabetes self-management education, and patients with limited literacy face barriers to effective self-management. The Diabetes Literacy project, initiated with the support of the European Commission, aims to fill this gap. The project investigates the effectiveness of diabetes self-management education, targeting people with or at risk of Type 2 Diabetes in the 28 EU Member States, as part of a comprehensive EU-wide diabetes strategy. National diabetes strategies in the EU, US, Taiwan, and Israel are compared, and diabetes self-management programs inventorized. The costs of the diabetes care pathway are assessed on a per person basis at national level. A comparison is made of the (cost)-effectiveness of different methods for diabetes self-management support, and the moderating role of health literacy, organization of the health services, and implementation fidelity of education programs are considered. Web-based materials are developed and evaluated by randomized trials to evaluate if interactive internet delivery can enhance self-management support for people with lower levels of health literacy. The 3-year project started in December 2012. Several literature reviews have been produced and protocol development and research design are in the final stages. Primary and secondary data collection and analysis take place in 2014. The results will inform policy decisions on improving the prevention, treatment, and care for persons with diabetes across literacy levels. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. The 2017 Diabetes Educator and the Diabetes Self-Management Education National Practice Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinker, Joanne; Dickinson, Jane K; Litchman, Michelle L; Williams, Ann S; Kolb, Leslie E; Cox, Carla; Lipman, Ruth D

    2018-06-01

    Purpose The American Association of Diabetes Educators conducts the National Practice Survey (NPS) biennially to document current practice in diabetes education in the United States. The purpose of the study is to obtain insight about factors influencing the work of the diabetes educator. Method The 2017 NPS was comprised of 100 questions covering diabetes educator demographics, profile populations of people with diabetes, practice information, program accreditation, program curriculum, staffing, education delivery methods, data collection, and reporting. The basic survey consisted of 22 questions using branch logic, from which respondents were then directed to questions tailored to their particular practice setting, enabling them to answer only a relevant subset of the remaining questions. The web-based survey was sent to approximately 32 000 individuals who were either members of the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) or Certified Diabetes Educators (CDE) with the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators (NCBDE) but not AADE members. Weekly reminder e-mails were sent to recipients who had not yet responded. The outreach efforts resulted in the survey being completed by 4696 individuals, a 17% response rate yielding 95% confidence that these responses are within ±5% accuracy. Results Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support (DSMES) continues to be a field dominated by women (95%). Diabetes educators represent a diverse health care profession, with educators indicating most commonly that their primary discipline is nursing (48%), nutrition (38%), and pharmacy (7%). When asked about credentials, 82.6% indicated that they held a CDE, 3.8% held the Board Certified-Advanced Diabetes Management (BC-ADM) credential, and 16.5% held neither the CDE nor the BC-ADM. Nearly 75% characterized their role as a diabetes educator as providing direct patient care. DSMES continued to be provided in a varied array of settings to educationally

  17. Age at asthma onset and asthma self-management education among adults in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabelli, Maria C; Beavers, Suzanne F; Shepler, Samantha H; Chatterjee, Arjun B

    2015-01-01

    Asthma self-management education improves asthma-related outcomes. We conducted this analysis to evaluate variation in the percentages of adults with active asthma reporting components of asthma self-management education by age at asthma onset. Data from 2011 to 2012 Asthma Call-back Surveys were used to estimate percentages of adults with active asthma reporting six components of asthma self-management education. Components of asthma self-management education include having been taught to what to do during an asthma attack and receiving an asthma action plan. Differences in the percentages of adults reporting each component and the average number of components reported across categories of age at asthma onset were estimated using linear regression, adjusted for age, education, race/ethnicity, sex, smoking status, and years since asthma onset. Overall, an estimated 76.4% of adults with active asthma were taught what to do during an asthma attack and 28.7% reported receiving an asthma action plan. Percentages reporting each asthma self-management education component declined with increasing age at asthma onset. Compared with the referent group of adults whose asthma onset occurred at 5-14 years of age, the percentage of adults reporting being taught what to do during an asthma attack was 10% lower among those whose asthma onset occurred at 65-93 years of age (95% CI: -18.0, -2.5) and the average number of components reported decreased monotonically across categories of age at asthma onset of 35 years and older. Among adults with active asthma, reports of asthma self-management education decline with increasing age at asthma onset.

  18. Patient explanations for non-attendance at type 2 diabetes self-management education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwennesen, Nete; Henriksen, Jan Erik; Willaing, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore reasons for non-attendance at type 2 diabetes self-management education. METHODS: To elicit the main themes explaining non-attendance, 15 semi-structured interviews were conducted with persons referred to, but not attending, self-management education. Systematic text condensation...... as reasons for non-attendance. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, patients cited both individual and organisational factors as explaining non-attendance at type 2 diabetes self-management education. Further studies should take into account the importance of timing and of tailoring schedules and content...... to individuals' life situations and resources. As organisational factors are likely to vary across programmes and settings, more case studies are needed to further elucidate the dynamic relationship between individual and organisational factors to explain non-attendance at type 2 diabetes self...

  19. Diabetes education and self-management for ongoing and newly diagnosed (DESMOND)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skinner, T. Chas; Carey, Marian E.; Cradock, Sue

    2006-01-01

    diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes changes key illness beliefs and that these changes predict quality of life and metabolic control at 3-month follow-up. Practice implications: Newly diagnosed individuals are open to attending self-management programs and, if the program is theoretically driven, can......Objective: To determine the effects of a structured education program on illness beliefs, quality of life and physical activity in people newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Methods: Individuals attending a diabetes education and self-management for ongoing and newly diagnosed (DESMOND) program...... in 12 Primary Care Trusts completed questionnaire booklets assessing illness beliefs and quality of life at baseline and 3-month follow-up, metabolic control being assessed through assay of HbA1c. Results: Two hundred and thirty-six individuals attended the structured self-management education sessions...

  20. A Systematic Review of Reviews Evaluating Technology-Enabled Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Deborah A; Gee, Perry M; Fatkin, Kathy J; Peeples, Malinda

    2017-09-01

    Since the introduction of mobile phones, technology has been increasingly used to enable diabetes self-management education and support. This timely systematic review summarizes how currently available technology impacts outcomes for people living with diabetes. A systematic review of high quality review articles and meta analyses focused on utilizing technology in diabetes self-management education and support services was conducted. Articles were included if published between January 2013 and January 2017. Twenty-five studies were included for analysis. The majority evaluated the use of mobile phones and secure messaging. Most studies described healthy eating, being active and metabolic monitoring as the predominant self-care behaviors evaluated. Eighteen of 25 reviews reported significant reduction in A1c as an outcome measure. Four key elements emerged as essential for improved A1c: (1) communication, (2) patient-generated health data, (3) education, and (4) feedback. Technology-enabled diabetes self-management solutions significantly improve A1c. The most effective interventions incorporated all the components of a technology-enabled self-management feedback loop that connected people with diabetes and their health care team using 2-way communication, analyzed patient-generated health data, tailored education, and individualized feedback. The evidence from this systematic review indicates that organizations, policy makers and payers should consider integrating these solutions in the design of diabetes self-management education and support services for population health and value-based care models. With the widespread adoption of mobile phones, digital health solutions that incorporate evidence-based, behaviorally designed interventions can improve the reach and access to diabetes self-management education and ongoing support.

  1. Reducing the risks of diabetes complications through diabetes self-management education and support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Dan; D'Eramo Melkus, Gail; Stuart, Patricia Mickey W; McKoy, June M; Urbanski, Patti; Boren, Suzanne Austin; Coke, Lola; Winters, Janis E; Horsley, Neil L; Sherr, Dawn; Lipman, Ruth

    2013-04-01

    People with diabetes are at risk of developing complications that contribute to substantial morbidity and mortality. In 2011, the American Association of Diabetes Educators convened an invitational Reducing Risks Symposium, during which an interdisciplinary panel of 11 thought leaders examined current knowledge about the reduction and prevention of diabetes-related risks and translated evidence into diabetes care and self-management education. Symposium participants reviewed findings from the literature and engaged in a moderated roundtable discussion. This report summarizes the discussion and presents recommendations to incorporate into practice to improve outcomes. The objective of the symposium was to develop practical advice for diabetes educators and other members of the diabetes care team regarding the reduction of diabetes-related risks. Optimal diabetes management requires patients to actively participate in their care, which occurs most effectively with a multidisciplinary team. Diabetes education is an integral part of this team approach because it not only helps the patient understand diabetes, its progression, and possible complications, but also provides guidance and encouragement to the patient to engage in proactive risk-reduction decisions for optimal health. A variety of tools are available to help the diabetes educator develop an individualized, patient-centered plan for risk reduction. More research is needed regarding intervention efficacy, best practices to improve adherence, and quantification of benefits from ongoing diabetes support in risk reduction. Diabetes educators are urged to stay abreast of evolving models of care and to build relationships with health care providers both within and beyond the diabetes care team.

  2. Patient level cost of diabetes self-management education programmes: an international evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Gerardine; O'Donnell, Shane; Quigley, Etáin; Cullen, Kate; Gibney, Sarah; Levin-Zamir, Diane; Ganahl, Kristin; Müller, Gabriele; Muller, Ingrid; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen; Chang, Wushou Peter; Van Den Broucke, Stephan

    2017-06-04

    The objective of this study was to examine the value of time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) in understanding the process and costs of delivering diabetes self-management education (DSME) programmes in a multicountry comparative study. Outpatient settings in five European countries (Austria, Denmark, Germany, Ireland, UK) and two countries outside Europe, Taiwan and Israel. Providers of DSME programmes across participating countries (N=16) including healthcare professionals, administrators and patients taking part in DSME programmes. Primary measure: time spent by providers in the delivery of DSME and resources consumed in order to compute programme costs. Secondary measures: self-report measures of behavioural self-management and diabetes disease/health-related outcomes. We found significant variation in costs and the processes of how DSME programmes are provided across and within countries. Variations in costs were driven by a combination of price variances, mix of personnel skill and efficiency variances. Higher cost programmes were not found to have achieved better relative outcomes. The findings highlight the value of TDABC in calculating a patient level cost and potential of the methodology to identify process improvements in guiding the optimal allocation of scarce resources in diabetes care, in particular for DSME that is often underfunded. This study is the first to measure programme costs using estimates of the actual resources used to educate patients about managing their medical condition and is the first study to map such costs to self-reported behavioural and disease outcomes. The results of this study will inform clinicians, managers and policy makers seeking to enhance the delivery of DSME programmes. The findings highlight the benefits of adopting a TDABC approach to understanding the drivers of the cost of DSME programmes in a multicountry study to reveal opportunities to bend the cost curve for DSME. © Article author(s) (or their employer

  3. Intercultural paradigms of educational self-management action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Lucia Izquierdo Barrera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to tell the experience of the BA in ethno education and community development of the Universidad Tecnologica de Pereira, Colombia, with indigenous communities “Embera Chamí” in the departments of Caldas and Risaralda, here in Colombia. We begin with a sociohistorical and conceptual tour with the indigenous education emergence in order to contextualize to the readers which scope we are going to work in. the second part is a tour of the institutional context _sciences for the education faculty at Universidad Tecnologica de Pereira and the creation of the BA in ethno education and community development.For finishing telling the intercultural education process from the community education.

  4. Making and maintaining lifestyle changes after participating in group based type 2 diabetes self-management educations: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit B Rise

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disease management is crucial in type 2 diabetes. Diabetes self-management education aims to provide the knowledge necessary to make and maintain lifestyle changes. However, few studies have investigated the processes after such courses. The aim of this study was to investigate how participants make and maintain lifestyle changes after participating in group-based type 2 diabetes self-management education. METHODS: Data was collected through qualitative semi-structured interviews with 23 patients who attended educational group programs in Central Norway. The participants were asked how they had used the advice given and what they had changed after the course. RESULTS: Knowledge was essential for making lifestyle changes following education. Three factors affected whether lifestyle changes were implemented: obtaining new knowledge, taking responsibility, and receiving confirmation of an already healthy lifestyle. Four factors motivated individuals to maintain changes: support from others, experiencing an effect, fear of complications, and the formation of new habits. CONCLUSION: Knowledge was used to make and maintain changes in diet, medication and physical activity. Knowledge also acted as confirmation of an already adequate lifestyle. Knowledge led to no changes if diabetes appeared "not that scary" or if changes appeared too time consuming. Those involved in diabetes education need to be aware of the challenges in convincing asymptomatic patients about the benefits of adherence to self-management behaviour.

  5. Evidence for Therapeutic Patient Education Interventions to Promote Cardiovascular Patient Self-Management: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnason, Susan; White-Williams, Connie; Rossi, Laura P; Centeno, Mae; Crabbe, Deborah L; Lee, Kyoung Suk; McCabe, Nancy; Nauser, Julie; Schulz, Paula; Stamp, Kelly; Wood, Kathryn

    2017-06-01

    The burden of cardiovascular disease as a chronic illness increasingly requires patients to assume more responsibility for their self-management. Patient education is believed to be an essential component of cardiovascular care; however, there is limited evidence about specific therapeutic patient education approaches used and the impact on patient self-management outcomes. An integrative review of the literature was conducted to critically analyze published research studies of therapeutic patient education for self-management in selected cardiovascular conditions. There was variability in methodological approaches across settings and disease conditions. The most effective interventions were tailored to individual patient needs, used multiple components to improve self-management outcomes, and often used multidisciplinary approaches. This synthesis of evidence expands the base of knowledge related to the development of patient self-management skills and provides direction for more rigorous research. Recommendations are provided to guide the implementation of therapeutic patient education in clinical practice and the design of comprehensive self-management interventions to improve outcomes for cardiovascular patients. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Home-Based Diabetes Symptom Self-Management Education for Mexican Americans with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Alexandra A.; Brown, Sharon A.; Horner, Sharon D.; Zuñiga, Julie; Arheart, Kristopher L.

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated an innovative diabetes symptom awareness and self-management educational program for Mexican Americans, a fast growing minority population experiencing a diabetes epidemic. Patients with diabetes need assistance interpreting and managing symptoms, which are often annoying and potentially life-threatening. A repeated…

  7. Effects of a Self-Management Educational Program for the Control of Childhood Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Maria Gabriela; Feldman, Lya; Caballero, Fernan

    1999-01-01

    Evaluates the effects of a self-management educational program on 29 children and their parents. Program consists of six sessions of information giving and cognitive-behavioral strategies for the children, and two talks and a brochure for the parents. Results indicate a significant effect on children's asthma knowledge and practice of…

  8. The role of self-treatment guidelines in self-management education for adult asthmatics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Klein, J.J.; Zielhuis, G.A.; van Herwaarden, C.L.A.

    1998-01-01

    Guidelines on asthma management have changed considerably in the last two decades. Patient education has gained in popularity and especially asthma self-management training is thought to be essential in the treatment of adult asthma. Since 1989 many researchers have added self-treatment guidelines

  9. Using Self-Management Interventions to Address General Education Behavioral Needs: Assessment of Effectiveness and Feasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briesch, Amy M.; Daniels, Brian

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive self-management intervention was utilized to increase the on-task behavior of three African American students within an urban middle-school setting. The intervention was designed to necessitate minimal management on the part of the general education classroom teacher by utilizing an electronic prompting device, as well as a…

  10. Self-Management Skills: An Important Link to Successful Special Education Postsecondary Transition Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Sharon D.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative case study investigated the process of teaching the self-management strategies, self-determination, and self-monitoring to chronically misbehaved students from the perspective of a secondary special education teacher. The investigation used a purposeful sample to select an urban high school setting and a tenured special education…

  11. Self-Management of Social Initiations by Kindergarten Students with Disabilities in the General Education Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Brooke M.; Gast, David L.; Luscre, Deanna

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of a self-management intervention on social interaction behaviors was evaluated for students with disabilities and social deficits. Four students enrolled in a general education kindergarten classroom were taught to self-monitor social initiations during nonstructured social time via a digital wrist counter. The number of social…

  12. Patient education. Timeless principles of learning: a solid foundation for enhancing chronic disease self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Paula M; Suter, W Newton

    2008-02-01

    The use of evidence-based principles of learning can contribute to the empowerment of patients as they adopt self-management skills aligned with healthy behaviors. This article, jointly written by a nurse and an educator, describes these timeless principles and how home care clinicians and patients benefit from their use.

  13. Patient information, education and self-management in bronchiectasis: facilitating improvements to optimise health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Katy L M; Newton, Julia; Rapley, Tim; De Soyza, Anthony

    2018-05-22

    Bronchiectasis is an incurable lung disease characterised by irreversible airway dilatation. It causes symptoms including chronic productive cough, dyspnoea, and recurrent respiratory infections often requiring hospital admission. Fatigue and reductions in quality of life are also reported in bronchiectasis. Patients often require multi-modal treatments that can be burdensome, leading to issues with adherence. In this article we review the provision of, and requirement for, education and information in bronchiectasis. To date, little research has been undertaken to improve self-management in bronchiectasis in comparison to other chronic conditions, such as COPD, for which there has been a wealth of recent developments. Qualitative work has begun to establish that information deficit is one of the potential barriers to self-management, and that patients feel having credible information is fundamental when learning to live with and manage bronchiectasis. Emerging research offers some insights into ways of improving treatment adherence and approaches to self-management education; highlighting ways of addressing the specific unmet information needs of patients and their families who are living with bronchiectasis. We propose non-pharmacological recommendations to optimise patient self-management and symptom recognition; with the aim of facilitating measurable improvements in health outcomes for patients with bronchiectasis.

  14. Making diabetes self-management education culturally relevant for Filipino Americans in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finucane, Melissa L; McMullen, Carmit K

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the cultural values, traditions, and perceptions of diabetes risk and self-care among Filipino Americans in Hawaii with type 2 diabetes that facilitate or impede engagement in diabetes self-management behaviors and education classes. This qualitative study used 2 rounds of semistructured focus groups and interviews. Participants included 15 patients with type 2 diabetes recruited from a large health-maintenance organization in Hawaii and 7 health care and cultural experts recruited from the community. The taped and transcribed focus groups and interviews were coded thematically. Participants evaluated example materials for diabetes self-management education (DSME) with Filipino Americans. Several aspects of Filipino American culture were identified as central to understanding the challenges of engaging in self-management behaviors and DSME: (1) undertaking self-management while prioritizing the family and maintaining social relationships, (2) modifying diet while upholding valued symbolic and social meanings of food, (3) participating in storytelling in the face of stigma associated with diabetes, and (4) reconciling spiritual and biomedical interpretations of disease causality and its management. Respondents also emphasized the role of several qualitative aspects of perceived risk (eg, dread, control) in moderating their behaviors. Participants suggested ways to make DSME culturally relevant. Awareness of cultural values and qualitative aspects of perceived risk that influence Filipino Americans' engagement in diabetes self-care behaviors and classes may help to improve teaching methods, materials, and recruitment strategies.

  15. An assessment of patient education and self-management in diabetes disease management--two case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzner, Karen; Greenwood, Deborah; Payne, Hildegarde; Thomson, John; Vukovljak, Lana; McCulloch, Amber; Specker, James E

    2008-12-01

    Diabetes affects 7.8% of Americans, nearly 24 million people, and costs $174 billion yearly. People with diabetes benefit from self-management; disease management (DM) programs are effective in managing populations with diabetes. Little has been published on the intersection of diabetes education and DM. Our hypothesis was that diabetes educators and their interventions integrate well with DM and effectively support providers' care delivery. A literature review was conducted for papers published within the past 3 years and identified using the search terms "diabetes educator" and "disease management." Those that primarily addressed community health workers or the primary care/community setting were excluded. Two case studies were conducted to augment the literature. Ten of 30 manuscripts identified in the literature review were applicable and indicate that techniques and interventions based on cognitive theories and behavioral change can be effective when coupled with diabetes DM. Better diabetes self-management through diabetes education encourages participation in DM programs and adherence to recommended care in programs offered by DM organizations or those that are provider based. Improved health outcomes and reduced cost can be achieved by blending diabetes education and DM. Diabetes educators are a critical part of the management team and, with their arsenal of goal setting and behavior change techniques, are an essential component for the success of diabetes DM programs. Additional research needs to be undertaken to identify effective ways to integrate diabetes educators and education into DM and to assess clinical, behavioral, and economic outcomes arising from such programs.

  16. Pilot trial of diabetes self-management education in the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korytkowski, Mary T; Koerbel, Glory L; Kotagal, Lindsey; Donihi, Amy; DiNardo, Monica M

    2014-10-01

    Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is recommended for all patients with diabetes. Current estimates indicate that patients receive DSME, increasing risk for hospitalization which occurs more frequently with diabetes. Hospitalization presents opportunities to provide DSME, potentially decreasing readmissions. To address this, we investigated the feasibility of providing DSME to inpatients with diabetes. Patients hospitalized on four medicine units were randomized to receive DSME (Education Group) (n=9) prescribed by a certified diabetes educator and delivered by a registered nurse, or Usual Care (n=12). Participants completed Diabetes Knowledge Tests (DKT), Medical Outcomes Short Form (SF-36), Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (DTSQ), and the DTSQ-inpatient (DTSQ-IP). Bedside capillary blood glucoses (CBG) on day of admission, randomization and discharge were compared. There were no group differences in demographics, diabetes treatment, admission CBG (186±93 mg/dL vs. 219±84 mg/dL, p=0.40), DKT scores (Education vs. Usual Care 48±25 vs. 68±19, p=0.09), SF-36, and DTSQ scores (28±6 vs. 25±7, p=0.41). Patients receiving education reported more satisfaction with inpatient treatment (83±13 vs. 65±19, p=0.03), less hyperglycemia prior to (2.7±4.5 vs. 4.5±1.4, p=0.03) and during hospitalization (3.9±1.9 vs. 5.5±1.2, p=0.04); and had lower mean discharge CBG (159±38 mg/dL vs. 211±67 mg/dL, p=0.02). Inpatient diabetes education has potential to improve treatment satisfaction, and reduce CBG. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. The Impact of Arab American Culture on Diabetes Self-management Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertran, Elizabeth A; Fritz, Heather; Abbas, Malak; Tarakji, Sandra; DiZazzo-Miller, Rosanne; Pociask, Fredrick D; Lysack, Catherine L; Arnetz, Judith; Jaber, Linda A

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand barriers and facilitators of diabetes self-management education (DSME) among Arab American patients with diabetes. Little is known about the impact of Arab culture on DSME. Arab American adults (N = 23) with medically managed diabetes participated in 1 of 3 focus groups. An Arabic-speaking, trained moderator conducted video-recorded sessions. Verbatim Arabic transcripts were translated into English. Transcripts underwent a qualitative content analysis approach. Arab American cultural traditions such as food sharing, religious beliefs, and gender roles both facilitated and at times impeded DSME. Patients also held conflicting views about their interactions with their providers; some participants praised the authoritative patient-physician relationship style while others perceived the gaps in communication to be a product of Arab culture. Participants expressed that lack of available educational and supportive resources are key barriers to DSME. Arab American culture affects DSM activities, and culturally sensitive educational resources are lacking. Development of DSME programs tailored to address relevant aspects of Arab culture might improve DSME outcomes in Arab American population. © 2015 The Author(s).

  18. Increasing capacity to deliver diabetes self-management education: results of the DESMOND lay educator non-randomized controlled equivalence trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, M E; Mandalia, P K; Daly, H; Gray, L J; Hale, R; Martin Stacey, L; Taub, N; Skinner, T C; Stone, M; Heller, S; Khunti, K; Davies, M J

    2014-11-01

    To develop and test a format of delivery of diabetes self-management education by paired professional and lay educators. We conducted an equivalence trial with non-randomized participant allocation to a Diabetes Education and Self Management for Ongoing and Newly Diagnosed Type 2 diabetes (DESMOND) course, delivered in the standard format by two trained healthcare professional educators (to the control group) or by one trained lay educator and one professional educator (to the intervention group). A total of 260 people with Type 2 diabetes diagnosed within the previous 12 months were referred for self-management education as part of routine care and attended either a control or intervention format DESMOND course. The primary outcome measure was change in illness coherence score (derived from the Diabetes Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised) between baseline and 4 months after attending education sessions. Secondary outcome measures included change in HbA1c level. The trial was conducted in four primary care organizations across England and Scotland. The 95% CI for the between-group difference in positive change in coherence scores was within the pre-set limits of equivalence (difference = 0.22, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.52). Equivalent changes related to secondary outcome measures were also observed, including equivalent reductions in HbA1c levels. Diabetes education delivered jointly by a trained lay person and a healthcare professional educator with the same educator role can provide equivalent patient benefits. This could provide a method that increases capacity, maintains quality and is cost-effective, while increasing access to self-management education. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.

  19. Culturally Competent Diabetes Self-Management Education for Mexican Americans: The Starr County Border Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sharon A.; Garcia, Alexandra A.; Kouzekanani, Kamiar; Hanis, Craig L.

    2002-01-01

    In a culturally competent diabetes self-management intervention in Starr County, Texas, bilingual Mexican American nurses, dieticians, and community workers provided weekly instruction on nutrition, self-monitoring, exercise and other self-care topics. A biweekly support group promoted behavior change. Interviews and examinations with 256 Mexican…

  20. Self-Management Education Participation Among US Adults With Arthritis: Who's Attending?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Louise B; Brady, Teresa J; Boring, Michael A; Theis, Kristina A; Barbour, Kamil E; Qin, Jin; Helmick, Charles G

    2017-09-01

    Self-management education (SME) programs teach people with chronic conditions skills to manage their health conditions. We examined patterns in SME program participation among US adults with arthritis ages ≥18 years. Respondents with arthritis were those who reported ever being diagnosed with arthritis by a doctor or health care provider. We analyzed 2014 National Health Interview Survey data to estimate the percentage (unadjusted and age-standardized) who ever attended an SME program overall and for selected subgroups, representativeness of SME participants relative to all adults with arthritis, and trends in SME course participation. In 2014, 1 in 9 US adults with arthritis (11.3% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 10.4-12.3]; age-standardized 11.4% [95% CI 10.0-12.9]) had ever participated in an SME program. SME participation (age-standardized) was highest among those with ≥8 health care provider visits in the past 12 months (16.0% [95% CI 13.1-19.4]). Since 2002, the number of adults with arthritis who have ever participated in SME has increased by 1.7 million, but the percentage has remained constant. Despite its many benefits, SME participation among US adults with arthritis remains persistently low. By recommending that their patients attend SME programs, health care providers can increase the likelihood that their patients experience SME program benefits. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  1. Is diabetes self-management education still the Cinderella of diabetes care?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurley, Lorna; O'Donnell, Máire; O'Hara, Mary Clare

    2017-01-01

    This paper reflects on the status of diabetes self-management education (DSME) as a branch of diabetology in Europe and discusses some opportunities for better supporting DSME delivery. DSME (also commonly known as Therapeutic Patient Education) has been evolving as a therapy for diabetes...... Europe, for most people diabetes education is not truly embedded in routine clinical care, being seen as more of an optional add-on to conventional therapies. In comparison to drugs and devices, DSME lacks investment, and funding for DSME research lags far behind other therapies. The rigour with which...

  2. Using Exploratory Focus Groups to Inform the Development of Targeted COPD Self-Management Education DVDs for Rural Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Stellefson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory study assessed the self-management learning needs, experiences, and perspectives of COPD patients treated at a Certified Federal Rural Health Clinic to inform the development of a COPD self-management DVD. A purposive, homogeneous sample of COPD patients participated in focus group interviews. Data from these interviews were referenced to edit a library of Rvision COPD self-management DVDs into a single condensed DVD containing only the most pertinent self-management topics. Patients reported a lack of knowledge and skill development related to purse lipped breathing, controlled coughing, and stress management; while medication management skills were found to be quite adequate. Engaging rural communities in formal qualitative inquiries to describe COPD specific needs for self-management may lead to future use of educational technologies aimed at improving quality of life for these rural, hard to reach populations.

  3. Telehealth--an effective delivery method for diabetes self-management education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzner, Karen; Moss, Gail

    2013-06-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease that is often comorbid with cardiovascular disease, hypertension, kidney disease, and neuropathy. Its management is complex, requiring ongoing clinical management, lifestyle changes, and self-care. This article examines recent literature on telehealth and emerging technological tools for supporting self-management of diabetes and identifies best practices. The authors conducted a PubMed search (January 2008-2012) that was supplemented by review of meeting materials and a scan of the Internet to identify emerging technologies. Fifty-eight papers were reviewed; 12 were selected for greater analysis. This review supports earlier findings that the delivery of diabetes self-management and training (DSME/T) via telehealth is useful, appropriate, and acceptable to patients and providers. Best practices are emerging; not all technology is appropriate for all populations--interactive technology needs to be appropriate to the patient's age, abilities, and sensitivities. Telehealth is scalable and sustainable provided that it adds value, does not add to the provider's workload, and is fairly reimbursed. However, there are multiple barriers (patient, provider, health system) to remotely provided DSME/T. DSME/T delivered via telehealth offers effective, efficient, and affordable ways to reach and support underserved minorities and other people with diabetes and related comorbidities. The new generation of smartphones, apps, and other technologies increase access, and the newest interventions are designed to meet patient needs, do not increase workloads, are highly appropriate, enhance self-management, and are desired by patients.

  4. Effect of peer education on self-management and psychological status in type 2 diabetes patients with emotional disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Han, Ying; Shi, Jieli; Li, Ruixia; Li, Sufen; Jin, Nana; Gu, Yong; Guo, Honglei

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of peer education in type 2 diabetes patients with emotional disorders on the metabolic index and psychological status. Educators use psychological scales to screen type 2 diabetes patients with emotional disorders. Participants were divided into usual and peer education groups. Both groups received usual diabetes education. Peer leaders were recruited to provide support with the peer education group for 6 months. The metabolic index, diabetes knowledge, self-management, diabetes-related distress, emotional status and quality of life were compared at the end of the study. A total of 127 patients participated in the study. There were 20 peer leaders engaged in the study as volunteers for peer education. All participants completed the study and fulfilled the scales. Improvements in the peer education group were significant compared with the usual education group with respect to anxiety (49.0 ± 9.65 vs 54.0 ± 8.48), depression (51.3 ± 7.97 vs 55.8 ± 7.52), diabetes knowledge (18.8 ± 2.46 vs 16.3 ± 2.08), distress (2.67 ± 0.55 vs 3.02 ± 0.56), self-management (66.5 ± 4.26 vs 62.4 ± 5.88) and quality of life (-1.98 ± 0.82 vs -2.50 ± 0.71), whereas no significant difference existed with respect to the metabolic index. Peer education, providing more attention to diabetes patients with emotional disorders, is a preferred model for delivering care.

  5. Foot care education and self management behaviors in diverse veterans with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M Olson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan M Olson1, Molly T Hogan2, Leonard M Pogach3, Mangala Rajan3, Gregory J Raugi4, Gayle E Reiber51University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA; 2Department of Internal Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA; 3Department of Veterans Affairs, New Jersey Healthcare System, Center for Healthcare Knowledge Management, East Orange, NJ, USA; 4Division of Dermatology, VA Puget Sound Healthcare System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA, USA; 5Research and Development, VA Puget Sound Healthcare System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA, USAAbstract: The objective of this study was to examine differences in self-reported diabetes foot care education, self management behaviors, and barriers to good foot care among veterans with diabetes by race and ethnicity. Data was collected using the Veterans Health Administration Footcare Survey, a validated tool that assessed demographic, general health, diabetes and foot self-care information, barriers to foot self-care, receipt of professional foot care, and satisfaction with current care. We mailed surveys to a random sample of patients with diabetes from eight VA medical centers. Study participants were 81% White; 13% African American; 4% Asian, and 2% American Indian and Pacific Islanders. The majority of respondents felt that they did not know enough about foot self-care. There were large gaps between self-reported knowledge and actual foot care practices, even among those who reported “knowing enough” on a given topic. There were significant differences in self-reported foot care behaviors and education by race and ethnicity. These findings document the need for culturally-specific self-management education to address unique cultural preferences and barriers to care.Keywords: diabetes mellitus, diabetic foot, patient self-management, ethnic groups, education

  6. Persian Diabetes Self-Management Education (PDSME) program: evaluation of effectiveness in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibazadeh, Elham; Bartholomew, Leona Kay; Rashidian, Arash; Larijani, Bagher

    2016-09-01

    Despite increasing rate of diabetes, no standard self-management education protocol has been developed in Iran. We designed Persian Diabetes Self-Management Education (PDSME) program using intervention mapping. Effectiveness of program was assessed in newly diagnosed people with type 2 diabetes and those who had received little self-management education. Individuals aged 18 and older (n = 350) were recruited in this prospective controlled trial during 2009-2011 in Tehran, Iran. Patients were excluded if they were pregnant, were housebound or had reduced cognitive ability. Participants were randomly allocated in intervention and control groups. PDSME patients attended eight workshops over 4-week period following two follow-up sessions. Validated questionnaires assessed cognitive outcomes at baseline, 2 and 8 weeks. HbA1c was assessed before and 18-21 months after intervention in both groups. The CONSORT statement was adhered to where possible. A total of 280 individuals (80%) attended the program. By 18-21 months, the PDSME group showed significant improvements in mean HbA1c (-1.1 versus +0.2%, p =0.008, repeated measure ANOVA (RMA)). Diabetes knowledge improved more in PDSME patients treated with oral antidiabetic agents than in those receiving usual care over time (RMA, F = 67.08, p intervention mapping for planning effective interventions. Given the large number of people with diabetes and lack of affordable diabetes education, PDSME deserves consideration for implementation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. A glucocorticoid education group meeting: an effective strategy for improving self-management to prevent adrenal crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repping-Wuts, Han J W J; Stikkelbroeck, Nike M M L; Noordzij, Alida; Kerstens, Mies; Hermus, Ad R M M

    2013-07-01

    To assess self-management in patients receiving glucocorticoid replacement therapy for primary or secondary adrenal failure before and 6 months after a glucocorticoid education group meeting. All patients with primary or secondary adrenal insufficiency, treated at the Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, were invited by their endocrinologist to participate in a 3-h glucocorticoid education group meeting, consisting of a lecture about the disease and glucocorticoid doses adjustments in case of stress, followed by an instruction on how to inject hydrocortisone i.m. Finally, all participants could practise the i.m. injection and discuss their experience with (imminent) adrenal crises with other patients and the health care providers. Two weeks before the meeting and 6 months after the meeting, patients were asked to fill out a questionnaire about how they would act in six different conditions (e.g. febrile illness or vomiting). Of the 405 patients who were invited, 246 patients (61%) participated. At baseline the response by the participants on the questionnaire was 100% (n=246) and at follow-up 74% (n=183). At follow-up, significantly more participants (P≤0.005) gave the correct answers to how to act in different situations (e.g. self-administration of a glucocorticoid injection and phone contact in case of vomiting/diarrhoea without fever). Moreover, the use of self-management tools, such as having a 'medicine passport (travel document with information about disease and medication) (P=0.007) or SOS medallion (P=0.0007)', increased. A glucocorticoid education group meeting for patients with adrenal failure seems helpful to improve self-management and proper use of stress-related glucocorticoid dose adjustment.

  8. The impact of health literacy on diabetes self-management education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandenbosch, Jessica; Van den Broucke, Stephan; Schinckus, Louise

    2018-01-01

    Background: Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is generally considered to be a key determinant of the treatment outcomes and related costs of diabetes mellitus. While DSME programmes generally have positive outcomes, their effects may depend on certain factors, such as the type of programmes...... HL, but all patients described benefiting from DSME. Individual and group-based programmes resulted in more positive effects on several diabetes outcomes than self-help groups, but no interaction with HL was found. Conclusion: Our findings confirm those of previous studies showing that DSME...

  9. Why do GPs hesitate to refer diabetes patients to a self-management education program: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Maeseneer Jan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-management support is seen as a cornerstone of good diabetes care and many countries are currently engaged in initiatives to integrate self-management support in primary care. Concerning the organisation of these programs, evidence is growing that engagement of health care professionals, in particular of GPs, is critical for successful application. This paper reports on a study exploring why a substantial number of GPs was (initially reluctant to refer patients to a self-management education program in Belgium. Methods Qualitative analysis of semi-structured face-to-face interviews with a purposive sample of 20 GPs who were not regular users of the service. The Greenhalgh diffusion of innovation framework was used as background and organising framework. Results Several barriers, linked to different components of the Greenhalgh model, emerged from the interview data. One of the most striking ones was the limited readiness for innovation among GPs. Feelings of fear of further fragmentation of diabetes care and frustration and insecurity regarding their own role in diabetes care prevented them from engaging in the innovation process. GPs needed time to be reassured that the program respects their role and has an added value to usual care. Once GPs considered referring patients, it was not clear enough which of their patients would benefit from the program. Some GPs expressed the need for training in motivational skills, so that they could better motivate their patients to participate. A practical but often mentioned barrier was the distance to the centre where the program was delivered. Further, uncertainty about continuity interfered with the uptake of the offer. Conclusions The study results contribute to a better understanding of the reasons why GPs hesitate to refer patients to a self-management education program. First of all, the role of GPs and other health care providers in diabetes care needs to be clarified before

  10. Why do GPs hesitate to refer diabetes patients to a self-management education program: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunaert, Patricia; Vandekerckhove, Marie; Bastiaens, Hilde; Feyen, Luc; Bussche, Piet Vanden; De Maeseneer, Jan; De Sutter, An; Willems, Sara

    2011-09-08

    Self-management support is seen as a cornerstone of good diabetes care and many countries are currently engaged in initiatives to integrate self-management support in primary care. Concerning the organisation of these programs, evidence is growing that engagement of health care professionals, in particular of GPs, is critical for successful application. This paper reports on a study exploring why a substantial number of GPs was (initially) reluctant to refer patients to a self-management education program in Belgium. Qualitative analysis of semi-structured face-to-face interviews with a purposive sample of 20 GPs who were not regular users of the service. The Greenhalgh diffusion of innovation framework was used as background and organising framework. Several barriers, linked to different components of the Greenhalgh model, emerged from the interview data. One of the most striking ones was the limited readiness for innovation among GPs. Feelings of fear of further fragmentation of diabetes care and frustration and insecurity regarding their own role in diabetes care prevented them from engaging in the innovation process. GPs needed time to be reassured that the program respects their role and has an added value to usual care. Once GPs considered referring patients, it was not clear enough which of their patients would benefit from the program. Some GPs expressed the need for training in motivational skills, so that they could better motivate their patients to participate. A practical but often mentioned barrier was the distance to the centre where the program was delivered. Further, uncertainty about continuity interfered with the uptake of the offer. The study results contribute to a better understanding of the reasons why GPs hesitate to refer patients to a self-management education program. First of all, the role of GPs and other health care providers in diabetes care needs to be clarified before introducing new functions. Feelings of security and a basic trust

  11. Online continuing medical education as a key link for successful noncommunicable disease self-management: the CASALUD™ Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallardo-Rincón H

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Héctor Gallardo-Rincón,1 Rodrigo Saucedo-Martínez,1 Ricardo Mujica-Rosales,1 Evan M Lee,2 Amy Israel,2 Braulio Torres-Beltran,3 Úrsula Quijano-González,3 Elena Rose Atkinson,3 Pablo Kuri-Morales,4 Roberto Tapia-Conyer1 1Fundación Carlos Slim, Mexico City, Mexico; 2Lilly Global Health, Eli Lilly and Company, Vernier, Switzerland; 3C230 Consultores, Mexico City, Mexico; 4Mexican Ministry of Health, Mexico City, Mexico Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate how the benefits of online continuing medical education (CME provided to health care professionals traveled along a patient “educational chain”. In this study, the educational chain begins with the influence that CME can have on the quality of health care, with subsequent influence on patient knowledge, disease self-management, and disease biomarkers. Methods: A total of 422 patients with at least one noncommunicable disease (NCD treated in eight different Mexican public health clinics were followed over 3 years. All clinics were participants in the CASALUD Model, an NCD care model for primary care, where all clinic staff were offered CME. Data were collected through a questionnaire on health care, patient disease knowledge, and self-management behaviors; blood samples and anthropometric measurements were collected to measure patient disease biomarkers. Results: Between 2013 and 2015, the indexes measuring quality of health care, patient health knowledge, and diabetes self-management activities rose moderately but significantly (from 0.54 to 0.64, 0.80 to 0.84, and 0.62 to 0.67, respectively. Performing self-care activities – including owning and using a glucometer and belonging to a disease support group – saw the highest increase (from 0.65 to 0.75. A1C levels increased between 2013 and 2015 from 7.95 to 8.41% (63–68 mmol/mol (P<0.001, and blood pressure decreased between 2014 and 2015 from 143.7/76.8 to 137.5/74.4 (systolic/diastolic reported in mmHg (P<0

  12. Healthcare provider relational quality is associated with better self-management and less treatment burden in people with multiple chronic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eton DT

    2017-09-01

    .001, even after controlling for physical and mental health. Those reporting 100% adherence to prescribed medications had higher HPRQ scores than those reporting less than perfect adherence (P<0.001. HPRQ items showing the strongest associations with outcomes were “my healthcare provider spends enough time with me”, “my healthcare provider listens carefully to me”, and “I have trust in my healthcare provider”.Conclusion: Good communication and interpersonal skills of healthcare providers may lessen feelings of treatment burden and empower patients to feel confident in their self-management. Patient trust in the provider is an important element of HPRQ. Educating healthcare providers about the importance of interpersonal and relational skills could lead to more patient-centered care. Keywords: patient–provider relationship, multi-morbidity, adherence, patient-centered care, trust 

  13. Empowerment of diabetic patients through mHealth technologies and education: development of a pilot self-management application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustin, G.; Macq, B.; Gruson, D.; Kieffer, S.

    2017-11-01

    Diabetes is a major, global and increasing condition that occurs when the insulin-glucagon regulatory mechanism is affected, leading to uncontrolled hyper- and hypoglycaemia events that may be life-threatening. However, it has been shown that through daily monitoring, appropriate patient-specific empowerment, lifestyle behavior of diabetics can be positively influenced and the associated and costly diabetes complications significantly reduced. As personal face-to-face coaching is costly and hard to scale, mobile applications and services have now become a key driver of mobile Health (mHealth) deployment, especially as a helpful way for self-management. Despite the huge mHealth market, a major limitation of many diabetes apps is that they do not use inputted data to help patients determine their daily insulin doses. On the other hand, the majority of existing insulin dose calculator apps provide no protection against - or even may actively contribute to - incorrect or inappropriate dose recommendations that put users at risk. Besides, there is clear evidence that lack of education on insulinotherapy and carbohydrate counting is associated with higher blood glucose variability with type 1 diabetes. Hence, there is a need for an accurate modelling of glucose-insulin dynamics together as well as providing adequate educational support. The aims of this paper are: a) to highlight the usefulness of mHealth technologies in chronic disease management; b) to describe and discuss the development of an insulin bolus calculator integrated into a pilot mHealth app; c) to underline the importance of diabetes self-management education.

  14. Diabetes Self-Management Education Programs in Nonmetropolitan Counties - United States, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Stephanie A; Masalovich, Svetlana; Blacher, Rachel J; Saunders, Magon M

    2017-04-28

    Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is a clinical practice intended to improve preventive practices and behaviors with a focus on decision-making, problem-solving, and self-care. The distribution and correlates of established DSME programs in nonmetropolitan counties across the United States have not been previously described, nor have the characteristics of the nonmetropolitan counties with DSME programs. July 2016. DSME programs recognized by the American Diabetes Association or accredited by the American Association of Diabetes Educators (i.e., active programs) as of July 2016 were shared with CDC by both organizations. The U.S. Census Bureau's census geocoder was used to identify the county of each DSME program site using documented addresses. County characteristic data originated from the U.S. Census Bureau, compiled by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Economic Research Service into the 2013 Atlas of Rural and Small-Town America data set. County levels of diagnosed diabetes prevalence and incidence, as well as the number of persons with diagnosed diabetes, were previously estimated by CDC. This report defined nonmetropolitan counties using the rural-urban continuum code from the 2013 Atlas of Rural and Small-Town America data set. This code included six nonmetropolitan categories of 1,976 urban and rural counties (62% of counties) adjacent to and nonadjacent to metropolitan counties. In 2016, a total of 1,065 DSME programs were located in 38% of the 1,976 nonmetropolitan counties; 62% of nonmetropolitan counties did not have a DSME program. The total number of DSME programs for nonmetropolitan counties with at least one DSME program ranged from 1 to 8, with an average of 1.4 programs. After adjusting for county-level characteristics, the odds of a nonmetropolitan county having at least one DSME program increased as the percentage insured increased (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08-1.13), the percentage with a high

  15. Patient experience in a coordinated care model featuring diabetes self-management education integrated into the patient-centered medical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiszewski, Debra; O'Brian, Catherine A; Lipman, Ruth D

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to gain insight about patient experience of diabetes self-management education in a patient-centered medical home. Six focus groups consisting of 37 people with diabetes, diverse in race and ethnicity, were conducted at 3 sites. Participants described their experience in the program and their challenges in diabetes self-management; they also suggested services to meet their diabetes care needs. The most common theme was ongoing concerns about care and support. There was much discussion about the value of the support provided by health navigators integrated in the diabetes health care team. Frequent concerns expressed by participants centered on personal challenges in engaging in healthy lifestyle behaviors. Ongoing programmatic support of self-management goals was widely valued. Individuals who received health care in a patient-centered medical home and could participate in diabetes self-management education with integrated support valued both activities. The qualitative results from this study suggest need for more formalized exploration of effective means to meet the ongoing support needs of people with diabetes. © 2015 The Author(s).

  16. Patient-provider relationship as mediator between adult attachment and self-management in primary care patients with multiple chronic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenk-Franz, Katja; Strauß, Bernhard; Tiesler, Fabian; Fleischhauer, Christian; Schneider, Nico; Gensichen, Jochen

    2017-06-01

    The conceptual model of attachment theory has been applied to understand the predispositions of patients in medical care and the patient-provider relationship. In patients with chronic conditions insecure attachment was connected to poorer self-management. The patient-provider relationship is associated with a range of health related outcomes and self-management skills. We determined whether the quality of the patient-provider relationship mediates the link between adult attachment and self-management among primary care patients with multiple chronic diseases. 209 patients with a minimum of three chronic diseases (including type II diabetes, hypertension and at least one other chronic condition) between the ages of 50 and 85 from eight general practices were included in the APRICARE cohort study. Adult attachment was measured via self-report (ECR-RD), self-management skills by the FERUS and the patient-provider relationship by the PRA-D. The health status and chronicity were assessed by the GP. Multiple mediation analyses were used to examine whether aspects of the patient-provider relationship (communication, information, affectivity) are a mediators of associations between adult attachment and self-management. The analysis revealed that the quality of the patient-provider relationship mediated the effect of attachment on self-management in patients with multiple chronic conditions. Particularly the quality of communication and information over the course of treatment has a significant mediating influence. A personalized, attachment-related approach that promotes active patient-provider communication and gives information about the treatment to the patient may improve self-management skills in patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The impact of diabetes self-management education on glucose management and empowerment in ethnic Armenians with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccashian, Zarmine

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of diabetes self-management education on glycemic control and perceptions of empowerment in Armenian American immigrants diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. A quasi-experimental pre and post design was used to investigate the impact of using education on self-management as measured by A1C levels and empowerment scores. Nine hours of diabetes self-management education classes were offered in the Armenian language to 75 clients at 2 adult health day care centers over 6 weeks. The participants were mostly first-generation Armenian immigrants aged 65 years and older. A1C results, the 8-item Diabetes Empowerment Scale (DES), and the 15-item Armenian Ethnic Orientation Questionnaire-Revised (AEOQ-R) were used to determine the impact of education on self-care management. After institutional review board approval was obtained, 75 participants completed the study. A paired t test indicated that the postintervention mean A1C level was significantly lower than the preintervention mean A1C level. The postintervention mean DES score was significantly greater than the preintervention mean DES score. No mediating effects of age, gender, acculturation, and number of years with the disease were identified for either A1C or DES score. The findings demonstrate the efficacy of the diabetes self-management education classes in improving diabetes self-care management skills. © 2014 The Author(s).

  18. Is adherence a relevant issue in the self-management education of diabetes? A mixed narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debussche X

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Xavier Debussche Endocrinology, Diabetology and Nutrition, CHU Félix Guyon, Saint-Denis, Réunion, France Abstract: While therapeutic patient education is now recognized as essential for optimizing the control of chronic diseases and patient well-being, adherence to treatment and medical recommendations is still a matter of debate. In type 2 diabetes, the nonadherence to therapy, estimated at more than 40%, is perceived as a barrier for improving the prognosis despite recent therapeutic advances. Interventional studies have barely begun to demonstrate the effectiveness of technical and behavioral actions. The aim of this review is to question the concept of adherence in terms of therapeutic education based on quantitative and qualitative data. The research on therapeutic education has shown the effectiveness of structured actions in type 2 diabetes, but adherence is rarely an end point in randomized trials. A positive but inconsistent or moderate effect of education actions on adherence has been shown in heterogeneous studies of varying quality. Program types, outlines, theoretical bases, and curricula to set up for action effectiveness are still being discussed. Qualitative studies, including sociological studies, provide a useful and constructive focus on this perspective. Adherence is a soft and flexible tool available to the patient in his/her singular chronic disease trajectory, and as such, integrates into individual therapeutic strategies, including socio-cultural interactions, beyond the medical explanation of the disease and the patient. Four key elements for the development of structured therapeutic education are discussed: 1 the access to health literacy, 2 the contextualization of education activities, 3 the long-term chronic dimension of self-management, and 4 the organizational aspects of health and care. Rather than focusing the objective on behavioral changes, structured therapeutic education actions should attempt to provide

  19. Diabetes rehabilitation : development and first results of a Multidisciplinary Intensive Education Program for patients with prolonged self-management difficulties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keers, JC; Blaauwwiekel, EE; Hania, M; Bouma, J; Scholten-Jaegers, SMHJ; Sanderman, R; Links, TP

    For a number of diabetes patients regular care may be insufficient. A Multidisciplinary Intensive Education Program (MIEP), based on the empowerment approach, has been developed to help patients obtain their treatment goals (adequate self-management, glycemic control and quality of life). The aim of

  20. Psychological Aspects in the System of Self-Management Education for Children with Diabetes Mellitus (Literature Review and Own Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Bolshova

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the scientific data concerning self-managing education and psychological support as part of treatment and prevention of complications in children and adolescents with diabetes. There is a direct correlation between the compensation of diabetes, level of education of patients about their illness, psychological condition analysis and adequate self-control. We assessed the effectiveness of self-management training in combination with psychological help in children and adolescents with diabetes type 1. The study found that in the main group (87 patients HbA1c rate after 3 and 6 months decreased to 9.12 ± 0.86 % and 8.75 ± 1.10 % compared to 9.51 ± 0.85 % before diabetes self-managing education. We noted positive dynamics of glycemic control, respectively, in 19.5 and 36.8 % of patients (compared with 10.3 % at the beginning of training. In I group (37 children and adolescents who had psychological help HbA1c rate after 3 and 6 months decreased to 8.84 and 8.21 %, respectively (9.23 % before diabetes self-managing education.

  1. PKU Self-Management Timeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about pku UW PKU Clinic News & Events PKU Self-Management Timeline This timeline is also available as an ... Acrobat file. Click here to download. The PKU Self- Management timeline is included to provide long-term view ...

  2. The Effects and Costs of a Group-Based Education Programme for Self-Management of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes. A Community-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molsted, Stig; Tribler, Jane; Poulsen, Peter B.; Snorgaard, Ole

    2012-01-01

    The worldwide epidemic of Type 2 diabetes necessitates evidence-based self-management education programmes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects and costs of an empowerment-based structured diabetes self-management education programme in an unselected group of patients with Type 2 diabetes. Seven hundred and two patients…

  3. Improving self-management in insulin-treated adults participating in diabetes education. The role of overprotection by the partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedoorn, M; Keers, J C; Links, T P; Bouma, J; Ter Maaten, J C; Sanderman, R

    2006-03-01

    To examine the role of overprotection by the partner--i.e. excessive protection, unnecessary help, excessive praise for accomplishments, or attempts to restrict activities as a consequence of underestimating the patient's capabilities--in changes in patient self-management in the context of diabetes education. Sixty-seven insulin-treated patients with a partner completed questionnaires on admission to a Multidisciplinary Intensive Education Programme (MIEP) and 3 months after completing the core module of MIEP. Factors assessed were overprotection by their partner and three aspects of diabetes self-management, namely internal locus of control, diabetes-related distress and HbA1c. Regression analyses were used to test the independent associations of patient sex, baseline overprotection and the interaction between sex and overprotection with diabetes self-management at the follow-up stage, controlling for the baseline value of the dependent variable. The increase in internal locus of control and decrease in HbA1c were both significantly less for female patients who perceived their partner to be rather overprotective than for female patients who did not perceive their partner to be overprotective. The more patients, both male and female, perceived their partner to be overprotective, the less their diabetes-related distress decreased. Overprotection by the partner showed a negative association with improvement in diabetes self-management, especially for female patients. Thus, an intervention programme with the aim of reducing overprotection by the partner, or the perception of this, may enhance self-management in patients participating in diabetes education.

  4. A systematic literature review of diabetes self-management education features to improve diabetes education in women of Black African/Caribbean and Hispanic/Latin American ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucciardi, Enza; Chan, Vivian Wing-Sheung; Manuel, Lisa; Sidani, Souraya

    2013-08-01

    This systematic literature review aims to identify diabetes self-management education (DSME) features to improve diabetes education for Black African/Caribbean and Hispanic/Latin American women with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. We conducted a literature search in six health databases for randomized controlled trials and comparative studies. Success rates of intervention features were calculated based on effectiveness in improving glycosolated hemoglobin (HbA1c), anthropometrics, physical activity, or diet outcomes. Calculations of rate differences assessed whether an intervention feature positively or negatively affected an outcome. From 13 studies included in our analysis, we identified 38 intervention features in relation to their success with an outcome. Five intervention features had positive rate differences across at least three outcomes: hospital-based interventions, group interventions, the use of situational problem-solving, frequent sessions, and incorporating dietitians as interventionists. Six intervention features had high positive rate differences (i.e. ≥50%) on specific outcomes. Different DSME intervention features may influence broad and specific self-management outcomes for women of African/Caribbean and Hispanic/Latin ethnicity. With the emphasis on patient-centered care, patients and care providers can consider options based on DSME intervention features for its broad and specific impact on outcomes to potentially make programming more effective. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Diabetes self-management education: acceptability of using trained lay educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandalia, P K; Stone, M A; Davies, M J; Khunti, K; Carey, M E

    2014-11-01

    The use of lay people to deliver education programmes for people with chronic conditions is a potential method of addressing healthcare staff capacity and increasing the cost efficiency of delivering education. This qualitative substudy is embedded within an equivalence trial (2008-2011 including development stage). In the qualitative substudy, we aimed to elicit the views of key stakeholders (patients, educators) about using lay people to deliver education to people recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, alongside a healthcare professional educator with an equal role. In this way, we sought to explore perceptions about acceptability and also contribute to understanding the reasons underlying positive or negative quantitative findings from main trial. We conducted 27 telephone interviews with a purposive sample of patients, lay educators and healthcare professional educators involved in the main trial. Thematic analysis of transcribed data was underpinned by the constant comparative approach and structured using Framework methodology. Overall, the data suggested that the use of lay educators was acceptable to educators and patients. Perceived difference in knowledge levels between lay and healthcare professional educators did not appear to have an impact on perceived acceptability or the effectiveness of the education received. Additional themes explored were related to peer status of educators and feasibility. Some concerns were raised about lay educators with diabetes, transferring personal issues and about the impact of healthcare professional time taken up by mentoring and supporting lay educators. Positive perceptions about the use of lay educators support the positive quantitative findings from the main trial. Acceptability is an important consideration in relation to implementation of the model of delivery studied. Concerns raised within the interviews should be considered in the design of training for lay educators. ISRCTN 99350009. Published by the BMJ

  6. Digital Health Interventions for Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: Qualitative Study of Patient Perspectives on Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Kingshuk; Dack, Charlotte; Ross, Jamie; Michie, Susan; May, Carl; Stevenson, Fiona; Farmer, Andrew; Yardley, Lucy; Barnard, Maria; Murray, Elizabeth

    2018-01-29

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing globally, and health services in many countries are struggling with the morbidity, mortality, and costs associated with the complications of this long-term condition. Diabetes self-management education (DSME) and behavioral support can reduce the risks of developing diabetes-related complications and improve glycemic control. However, their uptake is low. Digital health interventions (DHI) can provide sustained support and may overcome challenges associated with attending diabetes self-management sessions. They have the potential for delivery at multiple locations at convenient times, anonymity, and presentation of content in attractive and tailored formats. This study investigates the needs and wants of patients with type 2 diabetes to inform the development of digital self-management education and support. The objective of this study was to explore patient perspectives on unmet needs for self-management and support and the role of DHI in adults living with type 2 diabetes. This study used a qualitative approach based on data generated from 4 focus groups with 20 patients. The data generated by the focus groups illustrated the significant burden that the diagnosis of diabetes places on many patients and the negative impacts on their emotional well-being, work, social life, and physical health. Although patients' experiences of the health care services varied, there was agreement that even the best services were unable to meet all users' needs to support the emotional regulation, psychological adjustment, and behavioral changes needed for successful self-management. By focusing on medical management and information provision, existing health care services and education programs may not be adequately meeting all the needs of patients with type 2 diabetes. DHIs have the potential to improve access to DSME and behavioral support and extend the range of content offered by health services to fit with a wider range of

  7. Diabetes Self-Management Education Enhanced by the Low Vision Professional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol-McKay, Debra A.

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes currently affects 20.8 million people in the United States and is the leading cause of blindness in people between the ages of 20 and 74 years. The author uses a fictional but typical example to explain the ways in which low vision specialists can improve the diabetes self-management program of a person with low vision and demonstrates…

  8. Self-management education for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monninkhof, E.; van der Valk, P.; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; van Herwaarden, C.; Partridge, M.R.; Zielhuis, G.

    2003-01-01

    Background: The idea of self-management is to teach patients how to carry out the activities of daily living optimally in the face of their physiological impairment, and to prevent or decrease the severity of exacerbations by means of life style adaptation. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

  9. Self-management education for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monninkhof, E.M.; Valk, P.D.L.P.M. van der; Palen, J.A.M. van der; Herwaarden, C.L.A. van; Partridge, M.R.; Zielhuis, G.A.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The idea of self-management is to teach patients how to carry out the activities of daily living optimally in the face of their physiological impairment, and to prevent or decrease the severity of exacerbations by means of life style adaptation. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

  10. How can structured self-management patient education improve outcomes in people with type 2 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarvis, J.; Skinner, T. C.; Carey, M. E.

    2010-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is a long-term chronic condition that is complex to manage, with the majority of management being done by the person with diabetes outside of the clinical setting. Because of its complexities, effective self-management requires skills, confidence and the ability to make dec...

  11. Incorporating Cultural Sensitivity into Interactive Entertainment-Education for Diabetes Self-Management Designed for Hispanic Audiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Kimberly N; Montealegre, Jane R; Rustveld, Luis O; Glover, Talar L; Chauca, Glori; Reed, Brian C; Jibaja-Weiss, Maria L

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes self-management education can improve outcomes in adults with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, Hispanics, a group that carries a large burden of disease, may not participate in diabetes education programs. Audience engagement with entertainment-education has been associated with improved health education outcomes and may engage and empower Hispanic users to active self-care. Successful use of entertainment-education relies on the use of characters and situations with whom the viewers can feel some sense of involvement and for Hispanic audiences is encouraged when storylines and characters are culturally sensitive. In this study, we used a mixed methods approach that included descriptive statistics of closed-ended and content analysis of open-ended questions to measure the cultural sensitivity of the telenovela portion of a novel technology-based application called Sugar, Heart, and Life (SHL). Specifically, we analyzed the responses of 123 male and female patients diagnosed with uncontrolled T2DM to determine viewer involvement with characters and situations in the telenovela, viewer perceived self-efficacy in following recommendations, as well as viewer satisfaction with the program. Our findings indicate that the SHL application achieved its goal of creating a user-friendly program that depicted realistic, culturally sensitive characters and storylines that resonated with Hispanic audiences and ultimately fostered perceived self-efficacy related to following recommendations given about healthy lifestyle changes for diabetes self-management. These findings suggest that the SHL application is a culturally sensitive health education intervention for use by Hispanic male and female individuals that may empower them in self-management of T2DM.

  12. Diabetes self-management education and support delivered by mobile health (m-health) interventions for adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boels, Anne Meike; Vos, Rimke C.; Metzendorf, Maria-Inti; Rutten, Guy E.H.M.

    2017-01-01

    This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: To assess the effects of diabetes self-management education and support delivered by mobile health interventions in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  13. Keys to successful diabetes self-management for uninsured patients: social support, observational learning, and turning points: a safety net providers' strategic alliance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Melissa Hanahan; Tomsik, Philip; Terchek, Joshua; Navracruz, Lisa; Reichsman, Ann; Clark, Terri Clemons; Cella, Peggi; Weirich, Stephen A; Munson, Michelle R; Werner, James J

    2011-03-01

    To examine how medically uninsured patients who receive health care at federally qualified health centers and free clinics are able to successfully self-manage diabetes compared to patients who are less successful. Two distinct groups of patients with diabetes for 6 months or longer were enrolled: (1) successful, defined as those with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) of 7% or less or a recent improvement of at least 2% (n=17); and (2) unsuccessful, defined as patients with HbAlc of at least 9% (n=9) and without recent improvement. Patients were interviewed about enabling factors, motivators, resources, and barriers to diabetes self-management. Data from interviews, chart reviews, and clinician surveys were analyzed using qualitative methods and statistical techniques. African Americans comprised 57.7% of the sample and whites 38.5% (N=26). No significant differences were detected between successful and unsuccessful groups in age, race, education, or employment status. Clinicians rated unsuccessful patients as having more severe diabetes and significantly lower levels of control than successful patients. Compared to unsuccessful patients, successful patients more often reported having friends or family with diabetes, more frequently sought information about the disease, used evidence-based self-management strategies, held more accurate perceptions of their own diabetes control, and experienced "turning point" events that motivated increased efforts in disease management. Patients who successfully managed diabetes learned from diabetic family members and interpreted disease-related events as motivational turning points. It may be beneficial to incorporate social learning and motivational enhancement into diabetes interventions to increase patients' motivation for improved levels of self-management.

  14. Development and feasibility of an evidence-informed self-management education program in pediatric concussion rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Anne W; De Feo, Luciano; Macintyre, Jennifer; Greenspoon, Dayna; Dick, Talia; Mah, Katherine; Paniccia, Melissa; Provvidenza, Christine; Reed, Nick

    2016-08-17

    Concussion is a considerable public health problem in youth. However, identifying, understanding and implementing best evidence informed recovery guidelines may be challenging for families given the vast amount of information available in the public domains (e.g. Internet). The objective of this study was to develop, implement and evaluate the feasibility of an evidence-informed self-management education program for concussion recovery in youth. Synthesis of best evidence, principles of knowledge translation and exchange, and expert opinion were integrated within a self-management program framework to develop a comprehensive curriculum. The program was implemented and evaluated in a children's rehabilitation hospital within a universal health care system. A retrospective secondary analysis of anonymous data from a program evaluation survey was used to evaluate program feasibility, to identify features of importance to program participants and to assess changes in participants' knowledge. The program, "Concussion & You" includes a comprehensive, evidence informed, population specific curriculum that teaches participants practical strategies for management of return to school and play, sleep, nutrition, relaxation and energy conservation. A 'wheel of health' is used to facilitate participants' self-management action plan. Results from eighty-seven participant surveys indicate that the program is feasible and participant knowledge increased in all areas of the program with the highest changes reported in knowledge about sleep hygiene, rest and energy conservation. Findings indicate that "Concussion & You" is a feasible program that is acceptable to youth and their families, and fills a health system service gap.

  15. Investigating Challenges Facing Self-Management Empowerment Education in Adolescents and Youths with Major Thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razzazan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Thalassemia is considered an important public health problem worldwide, especially in developing and poor countries. Although several advanced techniques have been developed for prevention of thalassemia in the recent years, many adolescents and youths are still living with this disease. Independence from parents, decisions about high-risk behaviors, uncovering the identity, and adapting to mental and physical effects of the disease occur together in adolescents. Objectives This study was conducted to explore challenges of self-management empowerment in adolescents and youths with major thalassemia. Materials and Methods This was a descriptive-exploratory study. The study population consisted of adolescents and youths with major thalassemia who had medical records in the Bushehr Thalassemia Center, affiliated with Bushehr University of Medical Sciences. The study samples were purposively selected. Demographic information questionnaire and empowerment questionnaire were used to collect data from the semistructured interview. We analyzed qualitative data by content analysis method and quantitative data by descriptive (mean, standard deviation and analytical (Student's t-test, ANOVA and Pearson’s correlation coefficient statistical methods, using the statistical software SPSS 18. Results In qualitative part of the study, data from semistructured in-depth interviews with 15 participants were coded and summarized in five themes including: 1 awareness of personal changes; 2 need for adaptation; 3 maintaining independence and self-management; 4 uncovering the identity and role playing; and 5 sense of control and satisfaction. Results of the quantitative part showed that the overall score of participants on empowerment was 92.46 of 149 scores, which showed a moderate situation in the empowerment of these individuals. In addition, the empowerment score showed no statistically significant correlation with demographic characteristics

  16. Holistic self-management education and support: a proposed public health model for improving women's health in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchense, Jane Handina Murigwa

    2006-08-01

    The primary health care model of public health has been implemented in many countries around the globe since the Declaration of Alma Ata in 1978, without pilot testing the primary health care model. Therefore, many public health researchers have sought methods of improving primary health care by creating evidence-based models. Many of these researchers recognize the role of behavioral models in public health. These offshoots of primary health care include the ecological, care, central human capabilities, and the SPECIES models. Holistic self-management education and support is a capacity-building philosophy that ensures active involvement of consumers of health care in the planning and implementation and evaluation of health care services. It helps consumers of health care to achieve the desired improved quality of health and life in managing and sustaining their health at the grassroots level. The care model addresses disease management ideals of the in the original primary health care model. The SPECIES model addresses those aspects of the primary health care model that include the cultural and social factors, as well as individual health education and support in the original primary health care model. The ecological model offers an improvement of the socioeconomic ideal in the original primary health care model. Improving the health of individuals will prevent illness, thereby reducing health care costs and lessening the current strain on an overburdened health care system in Zimbabwe. Holistic self-management education and support links health care delivery systems with social processes. It is a best practices model that could better serve Zimbabwean girls and women by contributing positively to the national challenges in health care, thereby meeting the Zimbabwean primary health care and safe motherhood goals. It is here recommended that holistic self-management education and support must be pilot tested before being adopted as the most appropriate model for

  17. What role could community pharmacists in Malaysia play in diabetes self-management education and support? The views of individuals with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E Lyn; Wong, Pei Se; Tan, Ming Yeong; Sheridan, Janie

    2018-04-01

    This study explored the experiences and views of individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) on their diabetes self-management and potential roles for community pharmacists in diabetes self-management education and support (DSME/S) in Malaysia. A qualitative study, using semi-structured, face-to-face interviews, was conducted with patients with T2D attending a primary care health clinic in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed inductively. Fourteen participants with T2D were interviewed. Data were coded into five main themes: experience and perception of diabetes self-management, constraints of the current healthcare system, perception of the community pharmacist and community pharmacies, perceived roles for community pharmacists in diabetes care, and challenges in utilising community pharmacies to provide DSME/S. There were misconceptions about diabetes management that may be attributed to a lack of knowledge. Although participants described potential roles for community pharmacists in education, medication review and continuity of care, these roles were mostly non-clinically oriented. Participants were not confident about community pharmacists making recommendations and changes to the prescribed treatment regimens. While participants recognised the advantages of convenience of a community pharmacy-based diabetes care service, they raised concerns over the retail nature and the community pharmacy environment for providing such services. This study highlighted the need to improve the care provision for people with T2D. Participants with T2D identified potential, but limited roles for community pharmacists in diabetes care. Participants expressed concerns that need to be addressed if effective diabetes care is to be provided from community pharmacies in Malaysia. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  18. Wellness and illness self-management skills in community corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patricia J; Ramaswamy, Megha; Chen, Hsiang-Feng; Denny, Donald

    2015-02-01

    Community corrections provide a readjustment venue for re-entry between incarceration and home for inmates in the US corrections system. Our goal was to determine how self-management skills, an important predictor of re-entry success, varied by demographic and risk factors. In this cross-sectional study, we analyzed responses of 675 clients from 57 community corrections programs run by the regional division of the Federal Bureau of Prisons. A self-administered survey collected data on self-management skills, demographics, and risk factors; significant associations were applied in four regression models: the overall self-management score and three self-management subscales: coping skills, goals, and drug use. Over one-quarter (27.2%/146) of participants had a mental health history. White race, no mental health history and high school education were associated with better overall self-management scores; mental health history and drug use in the past year were associated with lower coping scores; female gender and high school education were associated with better self-management goals; female gender was associated with better self-management drug use scores. Self-management programs may need to be individualized for different groups of clients. Lower scores for those with less education suggest an area for targeted, nurse-led interventions.

  19. Would it provide Free Education?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Would it provide Free Education? Would it provide Free Education? Would it provide Compulsory Education? Would it guarantee education of equitable quality? Would it prevent discrimination? Would it stop schools that promote inequality & discrimination? NO! NO!

  20. Prospective Higher Education Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian Government Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Since the inception of the Australian Government Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA) in January 2012, 106 organisations have submitted or indicated their intention to submit applications for initial registration to TEQSA. Of those who have submitted applications, 2 have been rejected, 10 have subsequently been withdrawn by the…

  1. A Self-Management Programme of Activity Coping and Education - SPACE for COPD(C) - in primary care: The protocol for a pragmatic trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Claire LA; Kanabar, Pratiksha; Mitchell, Katy; Schreder, Sally; Houchen-Wolloff, Linzy; Bankart, M John G; Apps, Lindsay; Hewitt, Stacey; Harvey-Dunstan, Theresa; Singh, Sally J

    2017-07-10

    National guidance for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) suggests that self-management support be provided for patients. Our institution has developed a standardised, manual-based, supported self-management programme: Self-Management Programme of Activity Coping and Education (SPACE for COPD(C)). SPACE was previously piloted on a 1-2-1 basis, delivered by researchers, to individuals with COPD. Discussions with stakeholders highlighted considerable interest in delivering the SPACE for COPD(C) intervention as a group-based self-management programme facilitated by healthcare professionals (HCPs) in primary care settings. The study aims are to explore the feasibility, acceptability and efficacy for the intervention to be delivered and supported by HCPs and to examine whether group-based delivery of SPACE for COPD(C), with sustained support, improves patient outcomes following the SPACE for COPD(C) intervention. A prospective, multi-site, single-blinded randomised controlled trial (RCT) will be conducted, with follow-up at 6 and 9 months. Participants will be randomly assigned to either the control group (usual care) or intervention group (a six-session, group-based SPACE for COPD(C)self-management programme delivered over 5 months). The primary outcome is change in COPD assessment test at 6 months.A discussion session will be conducted with HCPs who deliver the intervention to discuss and gain insight into any potential facilitators/barriers to implementing the intervention in practice. Furthermore, we will conduct semi-structured focus groups with intervention participants to understand feasibility and acceptability. All qualitative data will be analysed thematically. The project has received a favourable opinion from South Hampshire B Research Ethics Committee, REC reference: 14/SC/1169 and full R&D approval from the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust: 152408.Study results will be disseminated through appropriate peer-reviewed journals, national

  2. Arthritis self-management education programs: a meta-analysis of the effect on pain and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warsi, Asra; LaValley, Michael P; Wang, Philip S; Avorn, Jerry; Solomon, Daniel H

    2003-08-01

    Some reports suggest that education programs help arthritis patients better manage their symptoms and improve function. This review of the published literature was undertaken to assess the effect of such programs on pain and disability. Medline and HealthSTAR were searched for the period 1964-1998. The references of each article were then hand-searched for further publications. Studies were included in the meta-analysis if the intervention contained a self-management education component, a concurrent control group was included, and pain and/or disability were assessed as end points. Two authors reviewed each study. The methodologic attributes and efficacy of the interventions were assessed using a standardized abstraction tool, and the magnitude of the results was converted to a common measure, the effect size. Summary effect sizes were calculated separately for pain and disability. The search strategy yielded 35 studies, of which 17 met inclusion criteria. The mean age of study participants was 61 years, and 69% were female. On average, 19% of patients did not complete followup (range 0-53%). The summary effect size was 0.12 for pain (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.00, 0.24) and 0.07 for disability (95% CI 0.00, 0.15). Funnel plots indicated no significant evidence of bias toward the publication of studies with findings that showed reductions in pain or disability. The summary effect sizes suggest that arthritis self-management education programs result in small reductions in pain and disability.

  3. Targeting “hardly reached” people with chronic illness: a feasibility study of a person-centered self-management education approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varming AR

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Annemarie Reinhardt Varming,1 Rikke Torenholt,1 Tue Helms Andersen,2 Birgitte Lund Møller,3 Ingrid Willaing1 1Diabetes Management Research, Health Promotion, Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, The Capital Region of Denmark, 2Danish Diabetes Association, 3Department of Intersectoral Collaboration, Region of Southern Denmark, Denmark Background: Self-management education is critical to the development of successful health behavior changes related to chronic illness. However, people in high-risk groups attend less frequently or benefit less from patient education programs than do people with more socioeconomic advantages.Aim: The aim was to test the feasibility of a participatory person-centered education approach and tool-kit targeting self-management of chronic illness in hardly reached people.Methods: After participating in a training program, educators (n=77 tested the approach in practice. Data collection included online questionnaires for educators (n=65, observations of education sessions (n=7, and interviews with educators (n=11 and participants (n=22. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Transcripts of interviews and observations were analyzed using systematic text condensation. Feasibility was examined in terms of practicality, integration, suitability, and efficacy.Results: Educators had a positive response to the approach and found that the tools supported involving participants in education and support. Participant satisfaction varied, depending on the ability of educators to integrate the tools into programs in a meaningful way. The tools provided time for reflection in the education process that benefited participants and educators alike. Educators found it challenging to allow participants to help set the agenda and to exchange experiences without educator control. Barriers to use reported by educators included lack of time for both training and preparation.Limitations: The testing included varied groups of participants, some

  4. Effectiveness of a diabetes education and self management programme (DESMOND) for people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khunti, Kamlesh; Gray, Laura J.; Skinner, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To measure whether the benefits of a single education and self management structured programme for people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus are sustained at three years. Design: Three year follow-up of a multicentre cluster randomised controlled trial in primary care....... Intervention: A structured group education programme for six hours delivered in the community by two trained healthcare professional educators compared with usual care. Main outcome measures: The primary outcome was glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. The secondary outcomes were blood pressure, weight, blood...... lipid levels, smoking status, physical activity, quality of life, beliefs about illness, depression, emotional impact of diabetes, and drug use at three years. Results: HbA1c levels at three years had decreased in both groups. After adjusting for baseline and cluster the difference was not significant...

  5. Cost of illness for chronic stable angina patients enrolled in a self-management education trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillion, Michael; Croxford, Ruth; Watt-Watson, Judy; LeFort, Sandra; Stevens, Bonnie; Coyte, Peter

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic stable angina (CSA) is a major debilitating health problem in Canada. A paucity of relevant cardiovascular data sets has precluded a detailed examination of the impact of interventions on CSA-related costs and its broader economic burden. OBJECTIVES: As part of a larger clinical trial, the authors sought to determine the short-term impact of a standardized self-management training program on CSA-related costs. A secondary objective was to estimate the total annualized cost of CSA per patient from a societal perspective. METHODS: Pre- and three-month post-test cost data were collected on 117 participants using the Ambulatory Home Care Record. Mean annualized direct, indirect and system-related CSA costs (2003 to 2005) were estimated; total per-patient CSA costs from a societal perspective were calculated as the sum of these costs. RESULTS: The mean (± SD) age of participants was 68±11 years; 80% were male. The program did not impact costs in the short-term. Direct annual out-of-pocket costs, including money paid for health care, travel to appointments, medication, equipment and home support totaled $3,267. Indirect costs, reflecting the value of all unpaid time spent by those engaged in angina-related care, were $12,963. System costs, including costs paid by public and private insurers, were $2,979. Total estimated annual CSA costs from a societal perspective were $19,209 per patient. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that CSA imposes a major economic burden, comparable with other prevalent conditions such as chronic noncancer pain. Advancements in self-management training research are needed to help reduce the economic burden of CSA in Canada. PMID:18841254

  6. Effects of diabetes self-management education on glycaemic control in children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qayyum, A.A.; Lone, S.W.; Ibrahim, M.N.; Raza, J.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of diabetes self-management education (DSME) on glycaemic control (HbA1c) in Pakistani children suffering from type-1 diabetes mellitus. Study Design: Quasi-experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: This study was conducted at the Diabetic OPD of National Institute of Child Health, Karachi, from April to September 2009. Methodology: Sixty children with a mean age of 9.94 years with type-1 Diabetes mellitus (T1DM) were selected conveniently from the diabetic OPD. The patients along with their parents/caregivers attended a modular series of diabetes self-management education program consisting of 2 sessions. Customized program was designed to educate children regarding general information about the disease, basic insulin therapy, planning for hypoglycaemia, hyperglycaemia, activity, traveling and basic nutritional management. It was conducted by a multidisciplinary paediatric diabetes team including an endocrinologist, general paediatrician, nutritionist and diabetic nurse. The educational sessions were followed by monthly revision exercises. HbA1c levels were measured at baseline and after 3 months and compared using paired sample t-test. Results: Out of a total of 60 patients, 50 completed the trial. There was a significant decrease in the HbA1c levels after the DSME program. The mean pre- and post intervention HbA1c levels were 9.67 +- 0.65 and 8.49 +- 0.53 respectively with a p-value < 0.001. Conclusion: In the studied group, DSME programs helped to improve glycaemic control. It should be an integral part of patient treatment in diabetic care setups. (author)

  7. Assessing the effect of culturally specific audiovisual educational interventions on attaining self-management skills for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Mandarin- and Cantonese-speaking patients: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poureslami I

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Iraj Poureslami,1,2 Susan Kwan,3 Stephen Lam,4,5 Nadia A Khan,6,7 John Mark FitzGerald 8,9 1Respiratory Division, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada; 2Department of Graduate Studies, Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Evaluation, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, Vancouver, Canada; 3Respiratory Department, Burnaby Hospital, University of British Columbia, Burnaby, Canada; 4Respiratory Division, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada; 5Department of Integrative Oncology, BC Cancer Research Centre, Vancouver, Canada; 6Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada; 7Department of Internal Medicine, Providence Health Care Authority, Vancouver, Canada; 8VGH Divisions of Respiratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada; 9Respiratory Medicine, Vancouver Coastal Health Authority, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, Institute for Heart and Lung Health, The Lung Centre, Gordon and Leslie Diamond Health Care Centre, Vancouver, Canada Background: Patient education is a key component in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Delivering effective education to ethnic groups with COPD is a challenge. The objective of this study was to develop and assess the effectiveness of culturally and linguistically specific audiovisual educational materials in supporting self-management practices in Mandarin- and Cantonese-speaking patients. Methods: Educational materials were developed using participatory approach (patients involved in the development and pilot test of educational materials, followed by a randomized controlled trial that assigned 91 patients to three intervention groups with audiovisual educational interventions and one control group (pamphlet. The patients were recruited from outpatient clinics. The primary outcomes were improved inhaler technique and

  8. Intrinsic and extrinsic factors affecting patient engagement in diabetes self-management: perspectives of a certified diabetes educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Kellie M

    2013-02-01

    Patients with diabetes are responsible for the vast majority of management requirements of their condition. However, their ability and motivation to engage in required self-management behaviors may be mitigated by multiple intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Intrinsic barriers include attitudes and health beliefs, limited diabetes knowledge and technical skill, reduced functional health literacy, and inadequate self-efficacy to promote positive behavior change. Extrinsic barriers include financial considerations, inadequate family and community support systems, ineffective clinical relationships, and limited access to effective diabetes health care delivery. Diabetes providers have opportunities for enhancing patient engagement with clinical recommendations and diabetes self-management through effective communication, including efforts to contextually assess patients' perceptions of diabetes and how the condition fits within the context of their changing lives. This article provides a conceptual framework for establishing and building an effective clinical alliance with patients with the goal of empowering them to take more control of their diabetes and reduce their risks for poor diabetes outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of a self-management patient education program for patients with fibromyalgia syndrome: study protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musekamp, Gunda; Gerlich, Christian; Ehlebracht-König, Inge; Faller, Hermann; Reusch, Andrea

    2016-02-03

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a complex chronic condition that makes high demands on patients' self-management skills. Thus, patient education is considered an important component of multimodal therapy, although evidence regarding its effectiveness is scarce. The main objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of an advanced self-management patient education program for patients with FMS as compared to usual care in the context of inpatient rehabilitation. We conducted a multicenter cluster randomized controlled trial in 3 rehabilitation clinics. Clusters are groups of patients with FMS consecutively recruited within one week after admission. Patients of the intervention group receive the advanced multidisciplinary self-management patient education program (considering new knowledge on FMS, with a focus on transfer into everyday life), whereas patients in the control group receive standard patient education programs including information on FMS and coping with pain. A total of 566 patients are assessed at admission, at discharge and after 6 and 12 months, using patient reported questionnaires. Primary outcomes are patients' disease- and treatment-specific knowledge at discharge and self-management skills after 6 months. Secondary outcomes include satisfaction, attitudes and coping competences, health-promoting behavior, psychological distress, health impairment and participation. Treatment effects between groups are evaluated using multilevel regression analysis adjusting for baseline values. The study evaluates the effectiveness of a self-management patient education program for patients with FMS in the context of inpatient rehabilitation in a cluster randomized trial. Study results will show whether self-management patient education is beneficial for this group of patients. German Clinical Trials Register, DRKS00008782 , Registered 8 July 2015.

  10. A critique of the design, implementation, and delivery of a culturally-tailored self-management education intervention: a qualitative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Manbinder S; Gale, Nicola K; Gill, Paramjit; Marshall, Tom; Jolly, Kate

    2015-02-07

    Self-management education is at the forefront of addressing the increasing prevalence of chronic diseases. For those at greatest risk, such as minority-ethnic and/or socio-economically deprived groups, self-management education can be culturally-tailored to encourage behavioural change. Yet, the application of culturally appropriate material and expertise within health promotion services continues to be debated. We critique the design, implementation, and delivery of a culturally-tailored self-management intervention, with particular focus on the experiences of lay educators. A mixed methods qualitative evaluation was undertaken to understand self-management service provision to culturally diverse communities (i.e. how components such as lay workers, group-based design, and culturally-appropriate educational material are intended to encourage behavioural change). We interviewed lay educators delivering the Chronic Disease Educator programme along with attendees, whilst observing workshops. Data were thematically analysed using a content-based constant comparison approach through a number of interpretative analytical stages. Lay educators felt part of the local community, relating to attendees from different races and ethnicities. However, lay educators faced challenges when addressing health beliefs and changing lifestyle practices. Culturally-tailored components aided communication, with educator's cultural awareness leading to close relationships with attendees, while the group-based design facilitated discussions of the emotional impact of illness. Lay educators bring with them a number of nuanced skills and knowledge when delivering self-management education. The development and training required for this role is inhibited by financial constraints at policy-level. The interpretation of being from the 'community' links with the identity and status of the lay role, overlapping notions of race, ethnicity, and language.

  11. Background and rationale for the Society of Behavioral Medicine's position statement: expand United States health plan coverage for diabetes self-management education and support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Lisa K; Fisher, Edwin B; Gerber, Ben S

    2015-09-01

    The Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM) recognizes that diabetes self-management (DSM) education and support are fundamental to teaching people how to manage their diabetes and decrease disease-related complications. Implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act provides an opportunity to expand DSM education and support to many people who are currently excluded from such services due to lack of insurance coverage, current policy barriers, or simple failure of healthcare systems to provide them. Extending the range and provision of such services could translate into reduced diabetic complications, a reduction in unnecessary healthcare utilization, and significant health-related cost savings on a national level. SBM recommends that public and private insurers be required to reimburse for 12 h of DSM education and support annually for anyone with diabetes. Further, SBM recognizes that a range of modes and providers of DSM education and support have been shown effective, and that patient preferences and resources may influence choice. To address this, SBM urges health organizations to increase and diversify approaches toward DSM education and support they offer.

  12. Evaluation of a Web-based intervention providing tailored advice for self-management of minor respiratory symptoms: exploratory randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardley, Lucy; Joseph, Judith; Michie, Susan; Weal, Mark; Wills, Gary; Little, Paul

    2010-12-15

    There has been relatively little research on the role of web-based support for self-care in the management of minor, acute symptoms, in contrast to the wealth of recent research into Internet interventions to support self-management of long-term conditions. This study was designed as an evaluation of the usage and effects of the "Internet Doctor" website providing tailored advice on self-management of minor respiratory symptoms (eg, cough, sore throat, fever, runny nose), in preparation for a definitive trial of clinical effectiveness. The first aim was to evaluate the effects of using the Internet Doctor webpages on patient enablement and use of health services, to test whether the tailored, theory-based advice provided by the Internet Doctor was superior to providing a static webpage providing the best existing patient information (the control condition). The second aim was to gain an understanding of the processes that might mediate any change in intentions to consult the doctor, by comparing changes in relevant beliefs and illness perceptions in the intervention and control groups, and by analyzing usage of the Internet Doctor webpages and predictors of intention change. Participants (N = 714) completed baseline measures of beliefs about their symptoms and self-care online, and were then automatically randomized to the Internet Doctor or control group. These measures were completed again by 332 participants after 48 hours. Four weeks later, 214 participants completed measures of enablement and health service use. The Internet Doctor resulted in higher levels of satisfaction than the control information (mean 6.58 and 5.86, respectively; P = .002) and resulted in higher levels of enablement a month later (median 3 and 2, respectively; P = .03). Understanding of illness improved in the 48 hours following use of the Internet Doctor webpages, whereas it did not improve in the control group (mean change from baseline 0.21 and -0.06, respectively, P = .05). Decline

  13. Use of audiovisual media for education and self-management of patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease – COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína Schäfer

    Full Text Available Introduction Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD is considered a disease with high morbidity and mortality, even though it is a preventable and treatable disease. Objective To assess the effectiveness of an audiovisual educational material about the knowledge and self-management in COPD. Methods Quasi-experimental design and convenience sample was composed of COPD patients of Pulmonary Rehabilitation (PR (n = 42, in advanced stage of the disease, adults of both genders, and with low education. All subjects answered a specific questionnaire before and post-education audiovisual session, to assess their acquired knowledge about COPD. Results Positive results were obtained in the topics: COPD and its consequences, first symptom identified when the disease is aggravated and physical exercise practice. Regarding the second and third symptoms, it was observed that the education session did not improve this learning, as well as the decision facing the worsening of COPD. Conclusion COPD patients showed reasonable knowledge about the disease, its implications and symptomatology. Important aspects should be emphasized, such as identification of exacerbations of COPD and decision facing this exacerbation.

  14. Evaluation of a self-management patient education program for patients with chronic heart failure undergoing inpatient cardiac rehabilitation: study protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Karin; Musekamp, Gunda; Seekatz, Bettina; Glatz, Johannes; Karger, Gabriele; Kiwus, Ulrich; Knoglinger, Ernst; Schubmann, Rainer; Westphal, Ronja; Faller, Hermann

    2013-08-23

    Chronic heart failure requires a complex treatment regimen on a life-long basis. Therefore, self-care/self-management is an essential part of successful treatment and comprehensive patient education is warranted. However, specific information on program features and educational strategies enhancing treatment success is lacking. This trial aims to evaluate a patient-oriented and theory-based self-management educational group program as compared to usual care education during inpatient cardiac rehabilitation in Germany. The study is a multicenter cluster randomized controlled trial in four cardiac rehabilitation clinics. Clusters are patient education groups that comprise HF patients recruited within 2 weeks after commencement of inpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Cluster randomization was chosen for pragmatic reasons, i.e. to ensure a sufficient number of eligible patients to build large-enough educational groups and to prevent contamination by interaction of patients from different treatment allocations during rehabilitation. Rehabilitants with chronic systolic heart failure (n = 540) will be consecutively recruited for the study at the beginning of inpatient rehabilitation. Data will be assessed at admission, at discharge and after 6 and 12 months using patient questionnaires. In the intervention condition, patients receive the new patient-oriented self-management educational program, whereas in the control condition, patients receive a short lecture-based educational program (usual care). The primary outcome is patients' self-reported self-management competence. Secondary outcomes include behavioral determinants and self-management health behavior (symptom monitoring, physical activity, medication adherence), health-related quality of life, and treatment satisfaction. Treatment effects will be evaluated separately for each follow-up time point using multilevel regression analysis, and adjusting for baseline values. This study evaluates the effectiveness of a

  15. Limited results of group self-management education for rheumatoid arthritis patients and their partners: explanations from the patient perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bode, C.; Taal, E.; Emons, P.A.A.; Galetzka, M.; Rasker, J.J.; Laar, M.A.F.J. van de

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the reasons for limited results of group self-management for RA patients and their partners from the patient perspective. Semi-structured interviews with ten male and ten female patients who had participated in group self-management with or without their partner were

  16. Limited results of group self-management education for rheumatoid arthritis patients and their partners: Explanations from the patient perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bode, Christina; Taal, Erik; Emons, P.A.A.; Galetzka, Mirjam; Rasker, Johannes J.; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the reasons for limited results of group self-management for RA patients and their partners from the patient perspective. Semi-structured interviews with ten male and ten female patients who had participated in group self-management with or without their partner were

  17. Internet-based self-management plus education compared with usual care in asthma: a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Victor; Bakker, Moira J.; van den Hout, Wilbert B.; Rabe, Klaus F.; Sterk, Peter J.; Kievit, Job; Assendelft, Willem J. J.; Sont, Jacob K.; Assendelft, W. J. J.; Thiadens, H. A.; Bakker, M. J.; van den Hout, W. B.; Kievit, J.; van der Meer, V.; Sont, J. K.; Kaptein, A. A.; Rikkers-Mutsaerts, E. R. V. M.; Rabe, K. F.; Bel, E. H. D.; Detmar, S. B.; Otten, W.; van Stel, H. F.; Roldaan, A. C.; de Jongste, J. C.; Toussaint, P. J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Internet may support patient self-management of chronic conditions, such as asthma. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of Internet-based asthma self-management. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled trial. SETTING: 37 general practices and 1 academic outpatient department in the

  18. Even the Best Laid Plans Sometimes Go Askew: Career Self-Management Processes, Career Shocks, and the Decision to Pursue Graduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Scott E.; Kraimer, Maria L.; Holtom, Brooks C.; Pierotti, Abigail J.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on career self-management frameworks as well as image theory and the unfolding model of turnover, we developed a model predicting early career employees' decisions to pursue graduate education. Using a sample of 337 alumni from 2 universities, we found that early career individuals with intrinsic career goals, who engaged in career…

  19. 3D Simulation as a Learning Environment for Acquiring the Skill of Self-Management: An Experience Involving Spanish University Students of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cela-Ranilla, Jose María; Esteve-Gonzalez, Vanessa; Esteve-Mon, Francesc; Gisbert-Cervera, Merce

    2014-01-01

    In this study we analyze how 57 Spanish university students of Education developed a learning process in a virtual world by conducting activities that involved the skill of self-management. The learning experience comprised a serious game designed in a 3D simulation environment. Descriptive statistics and non-parametric tests were used in the…

  20. A qualitative study of patients' experiences of participating in SPACE for COPD: a Self-management Programme of Activity, Coping and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apps, Lindsay D; Harrison, Samantha L; Mitchell, Katy E; Williams, Johanna E A; Hudson, Nicky; Singh, Sally J

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to understand experiences of participation in a supported self-management programme for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). There is a wealth of clinical trials examining the outcomes of self-management interventions for individuals with COPD, but current understanding regarding patients' perspectives of such complex interventions is limited. Further insight may help to tailor self-management interventions and maximise patient engagement. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with individuals participating in a self-management programme, SPACE for COPD. Interviews took place at 6 weeks and 6 months following the programme. Data were analysed at each time point using inductive thematic analysis, and subsequently re-examined together. 40 interviews were undertaken and four themes emerged from the analysis: perceptions of the programme; lifestyle changes; social support; and disrupting factors and barriers to maintaining routines. SPACE for COPD was acceptable to participants in this study. The importance of education and social support was emphasised at both time points studied, but there were challenges such as comorbidities, ill health of family members and limited maintenance of exercise behaviours over the longer term. Further consideration of the role of carers and partners may help to improve adherence to self-management programmes once healthcare professional support has stopped.

  1. Effects of the First Line Diabetes Care (FiLDCare) self-management education and support project on knowledge, attitudes, perceptions, self-management practices and glycaemic control: a quasi-experimental study conducted in the Northern Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Grace Marie V; Kegels, Guy

    2014-08-11

    To investigate the effects of implementing a context-adapted diabetes self-management education and support (DSME/S) project based on chronic care models in the Philippines, on knowledge, attitudes, self-management practices, adiposity/obesity and glycaemia of people with diabetes. Prospective quasi-experimental before-after study. 203 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus from two local government units in the Northern Philippines fulfilling set criteria. Context-adapted DSME/S was given to a cohort of people with diabetes by trained pre-existing local government healthcare personnel. Changes in knowledge, attitudes and self-management practices, body mass index, waist circumference, waist-hip ratio (WHR) and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) were measured 1 year after full project implementation. Non-parametric and parametric descriptive and inferential statistics including logistic regression analysis were done. Complete data were collected from 164 participants. Improvements in glycaemia, waist circumference, WHR, knowledge, some attitudes, adherence to medications and exercise, and an increase in fear of diabetes were significant. Reductions in HbA1c, regardless of level of control, were noted in 60.4%. Significant increase in knowledge (pability to control blood glucose (p=0.004) and adherence to medications (p=0.001) were noted among those whose glycaemia improved. Significant differences between the subgroups whose HbA1c improved and those whose HbA1c deteriorated include male gender (p=0.042), shorter duration of diabetes (p=0.001) and increased perceived ability to control blood glucose (p=0.042). Significant correlates to improved glycaemia were male gender (OR=2.655; p=0.034), duration of diabetes >10 years (OR=0.214; p=0.003) and fear of diabetes (OR=0.490; p=0.048). Context-adapted DSME/S introduced in resource-constrained settings and making use of established human resources for health may improve knowledge, attitudes, self-management practices

  2. Audit diabetes-dependent quality of life questionnaire: usefulness in diabetes self-management education in the Slovak population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmanová, Elena; Ziaková, Katarína

    2009-05-01

    This paper reports a study to test validity and internal consistency of the audit diabetes-dependent quality of life questionnaire in the Slovak population and to evaluate its usefulness in the context of education of people with diabetes. The individualised instruments designed to measure individuals' perceptions of the impact of diabetes on their quality of life may be helpful to identify individuals' preferences, motivational deficits in diabetes management and to tailor individual treatment strategies. Survey. After linguistic validation, the structure of the questionnaire was tested using factor analysis on 104 patients who were recruited from the National Institute of Endocrinology and Diabetology in Lubochna. Internal consistency was evaluated by computing Cronbach's alpha. Clinical variables related to the quality of life were analysed using one-way ANOVA, multifactor ANOVA, Pearson's and Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. A one-dimensional scale structure was supported and internal consistency was high (alpha = 0.93). Variance in impact of diabetes on quality of life was explained by age, presence of late complications and type of insulin regimen. The audit diabetes-dependent quality of life is culturally appropriate, valid and reliable in the sample of Slovak patients attending the educational programme. Our results agreed with previous European and Asian studies supporting its usefulness in the context of diabetes self-management education. Individualised diabetes-specific quality of life measures allow better understanding of patients' treatment preferences and, consequently, more effective prioritizing and targeting of appropriate educational interventions. This instrument may be useful in routine clinical practice and as an outcome measure for international clinical research trials evaluating effectiveness of educational programmes.

  3. Professional roles in physiotherapy practice: Educating for self-management, relational matching, and coaching for everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solvang, Per Koren; Fougner, Marit

    2016-11-01

    The patient's active participation in treatment and rehabilitation represents a cultural change in clinical practice as well as a major change in physiotherapist and patient roles. This article presents findings from a study aimed at gaining a better understanding of how physiotherapists in actual practice understand their interactions with patients during the treatment process. This article reports on the findings from focus-group interviews with physiotherapists working in three different settings. Analyses of the interview data identified three modes of physiotherapy practice. In one, physiotherapists educate their patients to be self-managing in conducting exercise programs based on sound evidence. Educational films available on the Internet are included in these efforts to teach patients. In another, physiotherapists emphasize the importance of a close relationship to the patient. A good personal chemistry is believed to improve the treatment process. And finally, what physiotherapists learn about the living conditions and the biographies of their patients was shown to be very important. Understanding the importance of the life-world and taking this into consideration in the treatment process were factors considered to be central to good practice. The article concludes with a discussion linking these findings to those of other studies identifying those factors contributing to our knowledge of what is involved in biopsychosocial practice in physiotherapy.

  4. A scoping review of the literature on benefits and challenges of participating in patient education programs aimed at promoting self-management for people living with chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Una; Haaland-Øverby, Mette; Fredriksen, Kari; Westermann, Karl Fredrik; Kvisvik, Toril

    2016-11-01

    To give a comprehensive overview of benefits and challenges from participating in group based patient education programs that are carried out by health care professionals and lay participants, aimed at promoting self-management for people living with chronic illness. We searched 8 literature databases. Full text articles meeting the inclusion criteria were retrieved and reviewed. Arksey and O'Malley's framework for scoping studies guided the review process and thematic analysis was undertaken to synthesize extracted data. Of the 5935 titles identified, 47 articles were included in this review. The participants experienced the programs as beneficial according to less symptom distress and greater awareness of their own health, improved self-management strategies, peer support, learning and hope. A substantial evidence base supports the conclusion that group based self-management patient education programs in different ways have been experienced as beneficial, but more research is needed. The insights gained from this review can enable researchers, health care professionals, and participants to understand the complexity in evaluating self-management patient education programs, and constitute a basis for a more standardized and systematic evaluation. The results may also encourage health care professionals in planning and carrying out programs in cooperation with lay participants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comorbidity and lack of education countered participation in the “Ready to Act” self-management program targeted people with early dysglycaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maindal, Helle Terkildsen; Skriver, Mette Vinther; Kirkevold, Marit

    2011-01-01

    is increasingly being offered in primary care. Due to nonparticipation in self-management programs, healthcare providers often miss the opportunity to provide the basic knowledge and skills resulting in uninformed selfmanagement decisions. Methods. A prospective cohort-study was conducted in 2010 within...

  6. HIV Care Providers' Attitudes regarding Mobile Phone Applications and Web-Based Dashboards to support Patient Self-Management and Care Coordination: Results from a Qualitative Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swendeman, Dallas; Farmer, Shu; Mindry, Deborah; Lee, Sung-Jae; Medich, Melissa

    2016-10-01

    In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with healthcare providers (HCPs) from five HIV medical care coordination teams in a large Los Angeles County HIV clinic, including physicians, nurses, and psychosocial services providers. HCPs reported on the potential utility, acceptability, and barriers for patient self-monitoring and notifications via mobile phones, and web-based dashboards for HCPs. Potential benefits included: 1) enhancing patient engagement, motivation, adherence, and self-management; and 2) improving provider-patient relationships and HCP care coordination. Newly diagnosed and patients with co-morbidities were highest priorities for mobile application support. Facilitators included universal mobile phone ownership and use of smartphones or text messaging. Patient-level barriers included concerns about low motivation and financial instability for consistent use by some patients. Organizational barriers, cited primarily by physicians, included concerns about privacy protections, easy dashboard access, non-integrated electronic records, and competing burdens in limited appointment times. Psychosocial services providers were most supportive of the proposed mobile tools.

  7. The Effect of Group Discussion-based Education on Self-management of Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Compared with Usual Care: A Randomized Control Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Habibzadeh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We sought to determine the effect of group discussion-based education on the self-management capability of patients with type 2 diabetes in Iran. Methods: This randomized control trial was conducted on 90 patients with type 2 diabetes. Participants were allocated randomly into one of two groups; intervention and control. The intervention group received the group discussion-based education while the control group received routine care only. The Lin’s self-management questionnaire was completed at baseline and three months post-intervention. Results: Statistical analysis, including the use of independent t-test, identified that in comparison to the control group, significant increases were observed in the scores of self-organization (t =11.24, p < 0.001, self-adjustment (t = 7.53, p < 0.001, interaction with health experts (t = 7.31, p < 0.001, blood sugar self-monitoring (t = 6.42, p < 0.001, adherence to the proposed diet (t = 5.22, p < 0.001, and total self-management (t = 10.82, p < 0.001 in the intervention group. Conclusions: Sharing experiences through group discussions and receiving instructive feedback can improve the ability to self-manage diabetes.

  8. Comprehensive Self-Management Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbeau, J; Lavoie, K L; Sedeno, M

    2015-08-01

    In this article, we provide a review of the literature on self-management interventions and we are giving some thought to how, when, and by whom they should be offered to patients. The present literature based on randomized clinical trials has demonstrated benefits (reduced hospital admissions and improved health status) for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients undergoing self-management interventions, although there are still problems with the heterogeneity among interventions, study populations, follow-up time, and outcome measures that make generalization difficult in real life. Key to the success, self-management intervention has to target behavior change. Proper self-management support is a basic prerequisite, for example, techniques and skills used by health care providers "case manager" to instrument patients with the knowledge, confidence, and skills required to effectively self-manage their disease. To improve health behaviors and engagement in self-management, self-management interventions need to target enhancing intrinsic motivation to change. This will best be done using client-centered communication (motivational communication) that encourages patients to express what intrinsically motivates them (e.g., consistent with their values or life goals) to adopt certain health behavior, with the goal of helping them overcome their ambivalence about change. Finally, if we want to be able to design and implement self-management interventions that are integrated, coherent, and have a strong likelihood of success, we need to take a more careful look and give more attention at the case manager, the patient (patient evaluation), and the quality assurance. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  9. Can a Self-Management Education Program for Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Improve Quality of Life ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manon Labrecque

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of a self-management program on health-related quality of life (HRQoL and morbidity commonly associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD.

  10. Dissemination of Chronic Disease Self-Management Education (CDSME) Programs in the United States: Intervention Delivery by Rurality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Towne, Samuel D; Herrera-Venson, Angelica; Cameron, Kathleen; Kulinski, Kristie P; Lorig, Kate; Horel, Scott A; Ory, Marcia G

    2017-06-14

    Background : Alongside the dramatic increase of older adults in the United States (U.S.), it is projected that the aging population residing in rural areas will continue to grow. As the prevalence of chronic diseases and multiple chronic conditions among adults continues to rise, there is additional need for evidence-based interventions to assist the aging population to improve lifestyle behaviors, and self-manage their chronic conditions. The purpose of this descriptive study was to identify the geospatial dissemination of Chronic Disease Self-Management Education (CDSME) Programs across the U.S. in terms of participants enrolled, workshops delivered, and counties reached. These dissemination characteristics were compared across rurality designations (i.e., metro areas; non-metro areas adjacent to metro areas, and non-metro areas not adjacent to metro areas). Methods : This descriptive study analyzed data from a national repository including efforts from 83 grantees spanning 47 states from December 2009 to December 2016. Counts were tabulated and averages were calculated. Results : CDSME Program workshops were delivered in 56.4% of all U.S. counties one or more times during the study period. Of the counties where a workshop was conducted, 50.5% were delivered in non-metro areas. Of the 300,640 participants enrolled in CDSME Programs, 12% attended workshops in non-metro adjacent areas, and 7% attended workshops in non-metro non-adjacent areas. The majority of workshops were delivered in healthcare organizations, senior centers/Area Agencies on Aging, and residential facilities. On average, participants residing in non-metro areas had better workshop attendance and retention rates compared to participants in metro areas. Conclusions : Findings highlight the established role of traditional organizations/entities within the aging services network, to reach remote areas and serve diverse participants (e.g., senior centers). To facilitate growth in rural areas

  11. Dissemination of Chronic Disease Self-Management Education (CDSME Programs in the United States: Intervention Delivery by Rurality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Lee Smith

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alongside the dramatic increase of older adults in the United States (U.S., it is projected that the aging population residing in rural areas will continue to grow. As the prevalence of chronic diseases and multiple chronic conditions among adults continues to rise, there is additional need for evidence-based interventions to assist the aging population to improve lifestyle behaviors, and self-manage their chronic conditions. The purpose of this descriptive study was to identify the geospatial dissemination of Chronic Disease Self-Management Education (CDSME Programs across the U.S. in terms of participants enrolled, workshops delivered, and counties reached. These dissemination characteristics were compared across rurality designations (i.e., metro areas; non-metro areas adjacent to metro areas, and non-metro areas not adjacent to metro areas. Methods: This descriptive study analyzed data from a national repository including efforts from 83 grantees spanning 47 states from December 2009 to December 2016. Counts were tabulated and averages were calculated. Results: CDSME Program workshops were delivered in 56.4% of all U.S. counties one or more times during the study period. Of the counties where a workshop was conducted, 50.5% were delivered in non-metro areas. Of the 300,640 participants enrolled in CDSME Programs, 12% attended workshops in non-metro adjacent areas, and 7% attended workshops in non-metro non-adjacent areas. The majority of workshops were delivered in healthcare organizations, senior centers/Area Agencies on Aging, and residential facilities. On average, participants residing in non-metro areas had better workshop attendance and retention rates compared to participants in metro areas. Conclusions: Findings highlight the established role of traditional organizations/entities within the aging services network, to reach remote areas and serve diverse participants (e.g., senior centers. To facilitate growth in rural

  12. Telehealth for diabetes self-management education and support in an underserved, free clinic population: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threatt, Tiffaney B; Ward, Eileen D

    Primary study objectives were to (1) describe mean change in A1c from baseline of a free clinic population enrolled in telehealth diabetes self-management education and support (DSME/S) services and (2) to compare change in A1C and other clinical outcomes measures with free clinic patients enrolled in a traditional face-to-face DSME/S program. An exploratory study design and comparative evaluation of telehealth DSME/S services in a free clinic population was used. Baseline clinical measures were collected upon referral. Diabetes educators met with patients individually over 2-3 months. Clinical outcomes measures were collected within 6 months of program completion. Data from the telehealth group was assessed individually and compared to a free clinic traditional DSME/S program population. Twelve patients completed a telehealth free clinic DSME/S pilot program with a mean ± SD change in A1C from baseline of -1.03 ± 1.53% (P = 0.050). Mean ± SD change in A1C from baseline in the free clinic population participating in traditional face-to-face DSME/S services was -1.42 ± 1.80% (P = 0.001). No significant differences in secondary outcomes measures, including body mass index and blood pressure, were revealed among the study populations. Expanding access to care in populations faced with challenges of socioeconomics, limited education, and lower health literacy is a step toward reducing health disparities and positively affecting care. Mean A1C can be improved with telehealth DSME/S services in an underserved, free clinic population. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Working Together to Promote Diabetes Control: A Practical Guide for Diabetes Health Care Providers in Establishing a Working Alliance to Achieve Self-Management Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Allan; Vallis, Michael; Cooke, Debbie; Pouwer, François

    2016-01-01

    The quality of the "patient-carer" relationship is the foundation of self-management support and has been shown to influence treatment outcome in relation to psychological and somatic illness, including diabetes. It has long been accepted within applied psychology that the quality of the client-therapist relationship--termed the working alliance--is of central importance to treatment outcome and may account for a significant degree of the overall treatment effect. Diabetes healthcare providers have recently expressed a need for further training in communication techniques and in the psychological aspects of diabetes. Could we take a page from the psychological treatment manual on working alliance in therapy to guide the diabetes healthcare provider in their role of supporting the person with diabetes achieve and maintain better metabolic control? This paper examines the role of the working alliance in diabetes care and offers a practical guide to the diabetes healthcare provider in establishing a working alliance with the person with diabetes in managing diabetes.

  14. Therapeutic education among adults with type 2 diabetes: effects of a three-day intervention on perceived competence, self-management behaviours and glycaemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouilloud, David; Regnier, Jennifer

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a three-day therapeutic education programme on perceived competence, self-management behaviours (i.e. physical activity, diet and medication) and glycaemic control among adults with type 2 diabetes. A total of 120 participants were included in this randomized, wait list control group trial. The results confirm that therapeutic education may be a powerful healthcare intervention to improve lifestyle and health status of people with type 2 diabetes. We observed that the education programme used in this study generated positive changes in glycaemic control and adherence to physical activity and diet after three months follow-up. Furthermore, the intervention positively impacted participants' perceived competence towards physical activity and diet. The latter finding is of particular importance, given that perceived competence has been found to be involved in long-term adherence to self-management behaviours.

  15. The effects and costs of a group-based education programme for self-management of patients with Type 2 diabetes. A community-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølsted, Stig; Tribler, Jane; Poulsen, Peter B.

    2012-01-01

    The worldwide epidemic of Type 2 diabetes necessitates evidence-based self-management education programmes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects and costs of an empowerment-based structured diabetes self-management education programme in an unselected group of patients with Type...... training in its use. Glycemic control (HbA1c) was found to improve from 7.34 ± 1.34 to 6.88 ± 1.09%, P ... pressure, female waist circumference, lipid profile, quality of life, physical activity and the patients' knowledge of diabetes whilst the number of visits to GPs declined. This study supports the use of an empowerment vision as a basis for an interdisciplinary group-based education programme...

  16. Arthritis self-efficacy scale scores in knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing arthritis self-management education with or without exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Emily; Nyland, John; Henzman, Cameron; McGinnis, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Systematic literature review and meta-analysis. To evaluate studies that used arthritis self-management education alone or with exercise to improve Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale scores of patients with knee osteoarthritis. Increasing self-efficacy may improve patient knee osteoarthritis symptom management and function. MEDLINE (1946-March 2013), CINAHL (1981-March 2013), and PsycINFO (1967-March 2013) databases were searched. Twenty-four studies, including 3163 subjects (women, n = 2547 [80.5%]; mean ± SD age, 65.3 ± 6.5 years), met the inclusion criteria. A meta-analysis was performed to compare the standardized mean difference effect sizes (Cohen d) of randomized controlled studies that used the Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale pain (13 studies, n = 1906), other symptoms (13 studies, n = 1957), and function (5 studies, n = 399) subscales. Cohen d effect sizes were also calculated for cohort studies that used the Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale pain (10 studies, n = 1035), other symptoms (9 studies, n = 913), and function (3 studies, n = 141) subscales. Both randomized controlled studies and cohort studies were grouped by intervention type (intervention 1, arthritis self-management education alone; intervention 2, arthritis self-management education with exercise), and effect sizes were compared (Mann-Whitney U tests, Pmanagement education with exercise displayed higher methodological quality scale scores (76.8 ± 13.1 versus 61.6 ± 19.6, P = .03). Statistically significant standardized effect-size differences between intervention 1 and intervention 2 were not observed. Small to moderate effect sizes were observed regardless of whether the intervention included exercise. Exercise interventions used in conjunction with arthritis self-management education programs need to be developed to better enhance the self-efficacy of patients with knee osteoarthritis. Therapy, level 2b-.

  17. The Effect of Group Discussion-based Education on Self-management of Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Compared with Usual Care: A Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibzadeh, Hosein; Sofiani, Akbar; Alilu, Leyla; Gillespie, Mark

    2017-11-01

    We sought to determine the effect of group discussion-based education on the self-management capability of patients with type 2 diabetes in Iran. This randomized control trial was conducted on 90 patients with type 2 diabetes. Participants were allocated randomly into one of two groups; intervention and control. The intervention group received the group discussion-based education while the control group received routine care only. The Lin's self-management questionnaire was completed at baseline and three months post-intervention. Statistical analysis, including the use of independent t -test, identified that in comparison to the control group, significant increases were observed in the scores of self-organization ( t =11.24, p health experts ( t = 7.31, p diet ( t = 5.22, p diabetes.

  18. Measurement of stable changes of self-management skills after rehabilitation: a latent state-trait analysis of the Health Education Impact Questionnaire (heiQ™).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, M; Musekamp, G; Bengel, J; Schwarze, M; Spanier, K; Gutenbrunner, Chr; Ehlebracht-König, I; Nolte, S; Osborne, R H; Faller, H

    2014-11-01

    To assess stable effects of self-management programs, measurement instruments should primarily capture the attributes of interest, for example, the self-management skills of the measured persons. However, measurements of psychological constructs are always influenced by both aspects of the situation (states) and aspects of the person (traits). This study tests whether the Health Education Impact Questionnaire (heiQ™), an instrument assessing a wide range of proximal outcomes of self-management programs, is primarily influenced by person factors instead of situational factors. Furthermore, measurement invariance over time, changes in traits and predictors of change for each heiQ™ scale were examined. Subjects were N = 580 patients with rheumatism, asthma, orthopedic conditions or inflammatory bowel disease, who filled out the heiQ™ at the beginning, the end of and 3 months after a disease-specific inpatient rehabilitation program in Germany. Structural equation modeling techniques were used to estimate latent trait-change models and test for measurement invariance in each heiQ™ scale. Coefficients of consistency, occasion specificity and reliability were computed. All scales showed scalar invariance over time. Reliability coefficients were high (0.80-0.94), and consistency coefficients (0.49-0.79) were always substantially higher than occasion specificity coefficients (0.14-0.38), indicating that the heiQ™ scales primarily capture person factors. Trait-changes with small to medium effect sizes were shown in five scales and were affected by sex, age and diagnostic group. The heiQ™ can be used to assess stable effects in important outcomes of self-management programs over time, e.g., changes in self-management skills or emotional well-being.

  19. The development and pilot testing of the self-management programme of activity, coping and education for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (SPACE for COPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apps, Lindsay D; Mitchell, Katy E; Harrison, Samantha L; Sewell, Louise; Williams, Johanna E; Young, Hannah Ml; Steiner, Michael; Morgan, Mike; Singh, Sally J

    2013-01-01

    There is no independent standardized self-management approach available for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this project was to develop and test a novel self-management manual for individuals with COPD. Participants with a confirmed diagnosis of COPD were recruited from primary care. A novel self-management manual was developed with health care professionals and patients. Five focus groups were conducted with individuals with COPD (N = 24) during development to confirm and enhance the content of the prototype manual. The Self-management Programme of Activity, Coping and Education for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (SPACE for COPD) manual was developed as the focus of a comprehensive self-management approach facilitated by health care professionals. Preference for delivery was initial face-to-face consultation with telephone follow-up. The SPACE for COPD manual was piloted with 37 participants in primary care. Outcome measures included the Self-Report Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire, Incremental Shuttle Walk Test, and Endurance Shuttle Walking Test (ESWT); measurements were taken at baseline and 6 weeks. The pilot study observed statistically significant improvements for the dyspnea domain of the Self-Report Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire and ESWT. Dyspnea showed a mean change of 0.67 (95% confidence interval 0.23-1.11, P = 0.005). ESWT score increased by 302.25 seconds (95% confidence interval 161.47-443.03, P COPD. The program, incorporating the SPACE for COPD manual, appears to provoke important changes in exercise capacity and breathlessness for individuals with COPD managed in primary care.

  20. Self-management and transitions in women with advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman-Green, Dena; Bradley, Elizabeth H; Knobf, M Tish; Prigerson, Holly; DiGiovanna, Michael P; McCorkle, Ruth

    2011-10-01

    Self-management involves behaviors that individuals perform to handle health conditions. Self-management may be particularly challenging during transitions-shifts from one life phase or status to another, for example, from cure- to noncure-oriented care-because they can be disruptive and stressful. Little is known about individuals' experiences with self-management, especially during transitions. Our purpose was to describe experiences of self-management in the context of transitions among women with advanced breast cancer. We interviewed a purposive sample of 15 women with metastatic breast cancer about their self-management preferences, practices, and experiences, including how they managed transitions. Interviews were recorded and transcribed. The qualitative method of interpretive description was used to code and analyze the data. Participants' mean age was 52 years (range 37-91 years); most were White (80%), married (80%), and college educated (60%). Self-management practices related to womens' health and to communication with loved ones and providers. Participants expressed a range of preferences for participation in self-management. Self-management included developing skills, becoming empowered, and creating supportive networks. Barriers to self-management included symptom distress, difficulty obtaining information, and lack of knowledge about the cancer trajectory. Women identified transitions as shifts in physical, emotional, and social well-being, as when their cancer progressed and there was a need to change therapy. Transitions often prompted changes in how actively women self-managed and were experienced as positive, negative, and neutral. Self-management preferences can vary. Providers should explore and revisit patients' preferences and ability to self-manage over time, particularly during transitions. Copyright © 2011 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluating the Impact of Diabetes Self-Management Education Methods on Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviours of Adult Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Laura; O'Connor, Colleen; Garcia, Alicia C

    2017-11-23

    Diabetes self-management refers to all activities patients undertake to care for their illness, promote health and prevent the long- and short-term effects of diabetes. This study compared the effectiveness of 2 diabetes self-management education methods by examining changes in glycated hemoglobin (A1C) levels and knowledge, attitudes and behaviours (KABs) after traditional group education (TE) or with diabetes conversation maps (CMs). The CMs group was postulated to show greater decrease in A1C levels and improved KABs scores compared to the TE group. A sample of 21 eligible clients from Diabetes Care Guelph were randomly assigned into 2 groups, 10 receiving education through CMs and 11 through TE. Changes in knowledge and attitude were determined by using questionnaires and repeated-measures pretest and post-test design before and after the education sessions. Changes in A1C levels were determined by comparing values at baseline and at 3 months after receiving diabetes education. Two focus groups were conducted to obtain participants' perceptions of the education methods and self-reported KABs changes. Significant differences in knowledge and attitude score changes were observed from baseline/initial education and after 3 months. Both groups had significant decreases in A1C levels from baseline to 3 months afterward. Focus groups revealed themes common to both groups, such as benefits of early education, need for multiple lifestyle behaviour changes and feelings of social support. CMs had significant impact and are effective for group education. The changes observed may lead to improved diabetes self-management, thus reducing costly health complications related to poorly controlled diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Positive correlations between the health locus of control and self-management behaviors in hemodialysis patients in Xiamen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Li Fan

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: The results of this study provided evidence that there is a strong relationship between the health locus of control and self-management behaviors in hemodialysis patients. This study provides important information for medical professionals as they design strategies to educate hemodialysis patients on their health locus of control and self-management behaviors.

  3. Working together to promote diabetes control : A practical guide for diabetes health care providers in establishing a working alliance to achieve self-management support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Allan; Vallis, Michael; Cooke, Debbie; Pouwer, F.

    2016-01-01

    The quality of the "patient-carer" relationship is the foundation of self-management support and has been shown to influence treatment outcome in relation to psychological and somatic illness, including diabetes. It has long been accepted within applied psychology that the quality of the

  4. Improving self-management in insulin-treated adults participating in diabetes education. The role of overprotection by the partner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagedoorn, M.; Keers, J.C.; Links, T.P.; Bouma, J.; ter Maaten, J.C.; Sanderman, R.

    Aims To examine the role of overprotection by the partner-i.e. excessive protection, unnecessary help, excessive praise for accomplishments, or attempts to restrict activities as a consequence of underestimating the patient's capabilities-in changes in patient self-management in the context of

  5. Effectiveness of an intervention to improve diabetes self-management on clinical outcomes in patients with low educational level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Olry de Labry Lima

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: In this pragmatic study, a simple and inexpensive intervention delivered in primary care showed a modest benefit in glycaemic control compared with usual care, although no effect was observed in the secondary outcomes. Further research is needed to design and assess interventions to promote diabetes self-management in socially vulnerable patients.

  6. The Effect of Diabetes Self-Management Education on Body Weight, Glycemic Control, and Other Metabolic Markers in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To comprehensively evaluate the effect of a short-term diabetes self-management education (DSME on metabolic markers and atherosclerotic parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods. 76 patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited in this study. They were divided into the intervention group (n=36 and control group (n=40. The patients in the intervention group received a 3-month intervention, including an 8-week education on self-management of diabetes mellitus and subsequent 4 weeks of practice of the self-management guidelines. The patients in the control group received standard advice on medical nutrition therapy. Metabolic markers, carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT, and carotid arterial stiffness (CAS of the patients in both groups were assessed before and after the 3-month intervention. Results. There was a significant reduction in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, -0.2±0.56% versus 0.08±0.741%; P0.05. Conclusions. DSME can improve HbA1c and body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  7. The effect of diabetes self-management education on body weight, glycemic control, and other metabolic markers in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chuang; Lai, Christopher W K; Chan, Lawrence W C; Chow, Meyrick; Law, Helen K W; Ying, Michael

    2014-01-01

    To comprehensively evaluate the effect of a short-term diabetes self-management education (DSME) on metabolic markers and atherosclerotic parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes. 76 patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited in this study. They were divided into the intervention group (n = 36) and control group (n = 40). The patients in the intervention group received a 3-month intervention, including an 8-week education on self-management of diabetes mellitus and subsequent 4 weeks of practice of the self-management guidelines. The patients in the control group received standard advice on medical nutrition therapy. Metabolic markers, carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), and carotid arterial stiffness (CAS) of the patients in both groups were assessed before and after the 3-month intervention. There was a significant reduction in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, -0.2 ± 0.56% versus 0.08 ± 0.741%; P 0.05). DSME can improve HbA1c and body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  8. User-centered design of a web-based self-management site for individuals with type 2 diabetes - providing a sense of control and community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Catherine H; Parsons, Janet A; Hall, Susan; Newton, David; Jovicic, Aleksandra; Lottridge, Danielle; Shah, Baiju R; Straus, Sharon E

    2014-07-23

    To design and test a web-based self-management tool for patients with type 2 diabetes for its usability and feasibility. An evidence-based, theory-driven website was created for patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-three patients with type 2 diabetes aged ≥ 25 years were recruited from 2 diabetes care centers in Toronto, Canada. We employed focus group methodology to assess acceptability, sustainability, strengths and weaknesses of the self-management website. Based on these results, revisions were made to the website. Three cycles of individual usability testing sessions using cognitive task analysis were conducted with patients with type 2 diabetes. Revisions to the website were made based on results from this testing. We identified five themes concerning participants' experiences of health care and related unmet needs: 1) Desire for information and for greater access to timely and personalized care to gain a sense of control of their disease; 2) Desire for community (sharing experiences with others) to fulfill practical and emotional needs; 3) Potential roles of an online self-management website in self-empowerment, behavior change, self-management and health care delivery; 4) Importance of a patient-centered perspective in presenting content (e.g. common assumptions, medical nomenclature, language, messaging, sociocultural context); 5) Barriers and facilitators to use of a self-management website (including perceived relevance of content, incorporation into usual routine, availability for goal-directed use, usability issues). Participants outlined a series of unmet health care needs, and stated that they wanted timely access to tailored knowledge about their condition, mechanisms to control and track their disease, and opportunities to share experiences with other patients. These findings have implications for patients with type 2 diabetes of diverse ages, socioeconomic backgrounds, and disease severity, as well as to the design of other computer

  9. "And now for the good news..." the impact of negative and positive messages in self-management education for people with Type 2 diabetes: A qualitative study in an ethnically diverse population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eborall, Helen C; Virdee, Satnam K; Patel, Naina; Redwood, Sabi; Greenfield, Sheila M; Stone, Margaret A

    2016-03-01

    To explore the impact of Diabetes Education and Self Management for Ongoing and Newly Diagnosed (DESMOND) Foundation education, particularly from interviewees' narratives regarding recall of good and bad news messages and behaviour changes. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample (n=19) of people who had attended education sessions as part of a randomised controlled trial in two UK sites with ethnically diverse populations. Data collection and analysis were informed by the constant comparative approach and facilitated through charting. Findings were similar in people from different ethnic backgrounds. Exploration of levels of recall of the sessions suggested that this was variable and sometimes very limited, but that interviewees had all assimilated some relevant learning. Key themes emerged relating to the way in which interviewees recalled and had been influenced by positive (good news) and negative (bad news) messages within the education sessions, including biomedical explanations. Both types of message appeared to have an important role in terms of motivation to change behaviour, but a notable observation was that none of the interviewees recalled receiving bad news messages when diagnosed. Our findings have highlighted the importance of providing and combining both negative and positive messages within education designed to promote self-management behaviour change. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Technology and diabetes self-management: An integrative review

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, Caralise W

    2015-01-01

    Technology can be used to supplement healthcare provider diabetes care by providing both educational and motivational support. Education can be provided using technology allowing patients to learn new practices and routines related to diabetes management. Technology can support daily diabetes self-management activities including blood glucose monitoring, exercising, healthy eating, taking medication, monitoring for complications, and problem-solving. This article describes an integrative revi...

  11. Factors Influencing Self-Management in Chinese Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Luo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a major public health problem in China. Diabetes self-management is critical for patients to achieved better health outcomes, however, previous studies have shown suboptimal diabetes self-management performance. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify factors associated with diabetes self-management in Chinese adults. The results showed that confrontation, resignation, overall health beliefs, perceived susceptibility, perceived barriers, and self-efficacy were factors associated with overall diabetes self-management performance and six aspects of diabetes self-management behaviors. There is some limited evidence to suggest that provider-patient communication, married individuals, higher educational level, and higher household income level may also be linked to better diabetes self-management practice. Having healthcare insurance and utilizing chronic illness resources generally appeared to have a favorable effect on diabetes self-management performance. In addition, there were a number of factors for which the evidence is too limited to be able to ascertain its strength of association with diabetes self-management practice. The findings of this review suggest that diabetes self-management behaviors are affected by a wide range of personal and environmental factors, which allow health care providers to develop theory-based strategies to improve diabetes-self-management behaviors in this population.

  12. Educating professionals to support self-management in people with asthma or diabetes: protocol for a systematic review and scoping exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleary, Nicola; Andrews, Amanda; Morrow, Susan; Wiener-Ogilvie, Sharon; Fletcher, Monica; Steed, Liz; Taylor, Stephanie J C; Pinnock, Hilary

    2016-10-28

    Supported self-management for asthma helps people adjust their treatment in response to symptom changes. This improves day-to-day control and reduces the risk of asthma attacks and the need for emergency healthcare. However, implementation remains poor in routine clinical practice. This systematic review is part of a programme of work developing an intervention to help primary care practice teams embed self-management support into routine asthma care. The aim of the review is to synthesise the evidence regarding the effectiveness of educational interventions for professionals supporting self-management in people with asthma or diabetes (type 1 and type 2). These two conditions have the most robust evidence base for the effectiveness of implementing supported self-management. Electronic searches will be conducted in CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science, CINAHL, PsycINFO, AMED, Global Health, WHO Global Health Library, ERIC, BNI, RDRB/CME and Google Scholar. Eligible studies are randomised controlled trials or controlled clinical trials published between 1990 and 2016 which evaluated professional education interventions facilitating asthma or diabetes supported self-management. Further relevant work will be identified from trial registries, citation searching and through contact with authors of included studies. This will be supplemented by scoping potentially relevant educational packages described in English language policy literature or health service websites. Screening, data extraction and risk of bias assessment (using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool) will be completed by two independent reviewers, with a third reviewer arbitrating where necessary. We plan a theoretically informed narrative synthesis of the aggregated data as heterogeneity is likely to preclude meta-analysis. Ethical approval is not required for this systematic review. The results will be described in a paper submitted for peer-reviewed publication and will inform the development of an

  13. Assessing the effect of culturally specific audiovisual educational interventions on attaining self-management skills for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Mandarin- and Cantonese-speaking patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poureslami, Iraj; Kwan, Susan; Lam, Stephen; Khan, Nadia A; FitzGerald, John Mark

    2016-01-01

    Patient education is a key component in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Delivering effective education to ethnic groups with COPD is a challenge. The objective of this study was to develop and assess the effectiveness of culturally and linguistically specific audiovisual educational materials in supporting self-management practices in Mandarin- and Cantonese-speaking patients. Educational materials were developed using participatory approach (patients involved in the development and pilot test of educational materials), followed by a randomized controlled trial that assigned 91 patients to three intervention groups with audiovisual educational interventions and one control group (pamphlet). The patients were recruited from outpatient clinics. The primary outcomes were improved inhaler technique and perceived self-efficacy to manage COPD. The secondary outcome was improved patient understanding of pulmonary rehabilitation procedures. Subjects in all three intervention groups, compared with control subjects, demonstrated postintervention improvements in inhaler technique (PCulturally appropriate educational interventions designed specifically to meet the needs of Mandarin and Cantonese COPD patients are associated with significantly better understanding of self-management practices. Self-management education led to improved proper use of medications, ability to manage COPD exacerbations, and ability to achieve goals in managing COPD. A relatively simple culturally appropriate disease management education intervention improved inhaler techniques and self-management practices. Further research is needed to assess the effectiveness of self-management education on behavioral change and patient empowerment strategies.

  14. Self-management of vascular risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sol-de Rijk, B.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The aim of this thesis was to provide insight into the potential of a self-management approach in treatment of vascular risk factors and to develop a self-management intervention. Furthermore to examine if this intervention, based on self-efficacy promoting theory, is effective in reducing

  15. Theory-based self-management educational interventions on patients with type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fang-Fang; Suhonen, Riitta; Koskinen, Sanna; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2017-04-01

    To synthesize the effects of theory-based self-management educational interventions on patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in randomized controlled trials. Type 2 diabetes is a common chronic disease causing complications that put a heavy burden on society and reduce the quality of life of patients. Good self-management of diabetes can prevent complications and improve the quality of life of T2DM patients. Systematic review with meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials following Cochrane methods. A literature search was carried out in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PSYCINFO, and Web of Science databases (1980-April 2015). The risk of bias of these eligible studies was assessed independently by two authors using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool. The Publication bias of the main outcomes was examined. Statistical heterogeneity and random-effects model were used for meta-analysis. Twenty studies with 5802 participants met the inclusion criteria. The interventions in the studies were based on one or more theories which mostly belong to mid-range theories. The pooled main outcomes by random-effects model showed significant improvements in HbA1c, self-efficacy, and diabetes knowledge, but not in BMI. As for quality of life, no conclusions can be drawn as the pooled outcome became the opposite with reduced heterogeneity after one study was excluded. No significant publication bias was found in the main outcomes. To get theory-based interventions to produce more effects, the role of patients should be more involved and stronger and the education team should be trained beyond the primary preparation for the self-management education program. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Sustaining self-management in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell-Brown, Fay

    2014-01-01

    Successful management of diabetes depends on the individual's ability to manage and control symptoms. Self-management of diabetes is believed to play a significant role in achieving positive outcomes for patients. Adherence to self-management behaviors supports high-quality care, which reduces and delays disease complications, resulting in improved quality of life. Because self-management is so important to diabetes management and involves a lifelong commitment for all patients, health care providers should actively promote ways to maintain and sustain behavior change that support adherence to self-management. A social ecological model of behavior change (McLeroy, Bibeau, Steckler, & Glanz, 1988) helps practitioners provide evidence-based care and optimizes patients' clinical outcomes. This model supports self-management behaviors through multiple interacting interventions that can help sustain behavior change. Diabetes is a complex chronic disease; successful management must use multiple-level interventions.

  17. Patient education self-management during surgical recovery: combining mobile (iPad) and a content management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David J; Moradkhani, Anilga; Douglas, Kristin S Vickers; Prinsen, Sharon K; Fischer, Erin N; Schroeder, Darrell R

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this investigation was to assess whether a new electronic health (e-health) platform, combining mobile computing and a content management system, could effectively deliver modular and "just-in-time" education to older patients following cardiac surgery. Patients were provided with iPad(®) (Apple(®), Cupertino, CA) tablets that delivered educational modules as part of a daily "to do" list in a plan of care. The tablet communicated wirelessly to a dashboard where data were aggregated and displayed for providers. A surgical population of 149 patients with a mean age of 68 years utilized 5,267 of 6,295 (84%) of education modules delivered over a 5.3-day hospitalization. Increased age was not associated with decreased use. We demonstrate that age, hospitalization, and major surgery are not significant barriers to effective patient education if content is highly consumable and relevant to patients' daily care experience. We also show that mobile technology, even if unfamiliar to many older patients, makes this possible. The combination of mobile computing with a content management system allows for dynamic, modular, personalized, and "just-in-time" education in a highly consumable format. This approach presents a means by which patients may become informed participants in new healthcare models.

  18. Important, misunderstood, and challenging: a qualitative study of nurses' and allied health professionals' perceptions of implementing self-management for patients with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Hannah M L; Apps, Lindsay D; Harrison, Samantha L; Johnson-Warrington, Vicki L; Hudson, Nicky; Singh, Sally J

    2015-01-01

    In light of the growing burden of COPD, there is increasing focus on the role of self-management for this population. Currently, self-management varies widely. Little is known either about nurses' and allied health professionals' (AHPs') understanding and provision of self-management in clinical practice. This study explores nurses' and AHPs' understanding and implementation of supported COPD self-management within routine clinical practice. Nurses and AHPs participated in face-to-face semistructured interviews to explore their understanding and provision of COPD self-management, as well as their perceptions of the challenges to providing such care. Purposive sampling was used to select participants from a range of professions working within primary, community, and secondary care settings. Three researchers independently analyzed each transcript using a thematic approach. A total of 14 participants were interviewed. Nurses and AHPs viewed self-management as an important aspect of COPD care, but often misunderstood what it involved, leading to variation in practice. A number of challenges to supporting self-management were identified, which related to lack of time, lack of insight regarding training needs, and assumptions regarding patients' perceived self-management abilities. Nurses and AHPs delivering self-management require clear guidance, training in the use of effective self-management skills, and education that challenges their preconceptions regarding patients. The design of health care services also needs to consider the practical barriers to COPD self-management support for the implementation of such interventions to be successful.

  19. Dimensions of osteoarthritis self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Kirsty N; Bond, Malcolm J

    2004-06-01

    Our aims were to determine whether a taxonomy of self-management strategies for osteoarthritis could be identified, and whether the resultant dimensions of such a taxonomy demonstrate predictable relationships with health status indices. Participants (n = 117) from community-based self-help groups and a general rheumatology outpatient clinic completed a self-management inventory consisting of 11 items, answered for both the past 7 days and a day on which symptoms were worse than usual. Duration of symptoms, level of pain, perceived functional ability and self-rated health were recorded as indicators of health status. Three essentially identical factors were obtained for both past 7 days and worse day items. Resultant scales were labeled passive, complementary and active, respectively. Correlations with health status measures provided modest evidence for the construct validity of these self-management scales. Compared with a simple aggregate score based on the total number of strategies used, the scales provided a clearer understanding of the relationship between self-management and health. The study provided a useful extension to existing research, addressing a number of shortcomings identified by previous researchers. The identified self-management dimensions offered a greater insight into the self-management choices of patients. Suggestions for further improvements to the measurement of self-management are outlined.

  20. Comparing the effects of education using telephone follow-up and smartphone-based social networking follow-up on self-management behaviors among patients with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi Ghezeljeh, Tahereh; Sharifian, Sanaz; Nasr Isfahani, Mehdi; Haghani, Hamid

    2018-03-05

    Little is known about the benefits of social networks in the management of patients. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of self-management (SM) education using telephone follow-up and mobile phone-based social networking on SM behaviors among patients with hypertension. This randomized clinical trial was conducted with 100 patients. They were randomly allocated to four groups: (i) control, (ii) SM training without follow-up, (iii) telephone follow-up and (iv) smartphone-based social networking follow-up. The hypertension SM behavior questionnaire was used for data collection before and six weeks after the study. Those patients who underwent SM education training (with and without follow-up) had statistically significant differences from those in the control group in terms of SM behaviors (p social networking follow-up influenced SM behaviors among patients with hypertension.

  1. Deficiencies in postgraduate training for healthcare professionals who provide diabetes education and support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrne, J. L.; Davies, Melanie J; Willaing, I.

    2017-01-01

    : The present study shows that healthcare professionals report being insufficiently equipped to provide diabetes self-management education, including emotional and psychological aspects of diabetes, and many are not receiving postgraduate training in any part (including medical care) of the management......Aims: To consider the global provision of self-management diabetes education and training for healthcare professionals using data from the second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2) study. Methods: A total of 4785 healthcare professionals caring for people with diabetes were surveyed in 17.......6–70.6% variation). Training in psychological management was low (19.1%), ranging from 3.6 to 36.5%, while 20.4% (a range of 3.6–36.4% across countries) had received no postgraduate training. Overall, the greatest training need was in the management of psychological aspects of diabetes (59.5%). For some, training...

  2. Effectiveness of contextual education for self-management in Thai Muslims with type 2 diabetes mellitus during Ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilparat, Prakaitip; Pattaraarchachai, Junya; Songchitsomboon, Sriwatana; Ongroongruang, Savanit

    2014-08-01

    Fasting in Ramadan has adverse effects on health of Muslims with diabetes. Key strategies to prepare the patients are to provide appropriate health education to the patients prior to Ramadan and to adjust anti-diabetic medicines during Ramadan. To study outcomes of the specific health care services that providing health education in parallel with counseling by Islamic leader The Thai Muslims with type 2 diabetes mellitus were divided into two groups. There were 62patients in experimental group that was provided with specific health care service for Thai Muslims with diabetes in which health education prior to Ramadan and adjustment ofanti-diabetic medicine applied. The other was control group with 28patients that was provided only with original health care service. The results were monitored after Ramadan by interviews, weight and waist measurements, blood pressure measurement and blood tests. Both mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure were well controlled in both groups and slightly decreased after Ramnadan. The mean diastolic blood pressure of the experimental group decreased after Ramadan (p-value = 0.041). From behavior point of view, it was found that the patients in the experimental group had consumed less sweetenedfood (p-value = 0.002). There was no incidence ofsevere hypoglycemia in either experimental or control group. The number and portion of patients with hypoglycemic symptoms in experimental group were lower than those in controlled group (p-value = 0.013). Specific health care service by providing health education prior to Ramadan and adjustment ofanti-diabetic medicine application resulted in a positive effect as the patients tended to consume less sweetenedfood to keep blood sugar level in control. Fasting could affect the patients 'health in apositive way as it helps to control blood pressure, while in parallel, adjustment of anti-diabetic medicine application helps to prevent hypoglycemia. This health care service, which can be achieved in

  3. State of Diabetes Self-Management Education in the European Union Member States and Non-EU Countries: The Diabetes Literacy Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henna Riemenschneider

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Diabetes self-management education (DSME is considered essential for improving the prevention and care of diabetes through empowering patients to increase agency in their own health and care processes. However, existing evidence regarding DSME in the EU Member States (EU MS is insufficient to develop an EU-wide strategy. Objectives. This study presents the state of DSME in the 28 EU MS and contrasts it with 3 non-EU countries with comparable Human Development Index score: Israel, Taiwan, and the USA (ITU. Because type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM disproportionately affects minority and low-income groups, we paid particular attention to health literacy aspects of DSME for vulnerable populations. Methods. Data from multiple stakeholders involved in diabetes care were collected from Feb 2014 to Jan 2015 using an online Diabetes Literacy Survey (DLS. Of the 379 respondents (249 from EU MS and 130 from ITU, most were people with diabetes (33% in the EU MS, 15% in ITU and care providers (47% and 72%. These data were supplemented by an expert survey (ES administered to 30 key informants. Results. Access to DSME varies greatly in the EU MS: an average of 29% (range 21% to 50% of respondents report DSME programs are tailored for people with limited literacy, educational attainment, and language skills versus 63% in ITU. More than half of adult T2DM patients and children/adolescents participate in DSME in EU MS; in ITU, participation of T1DM patients and older people is lower. Prioritization of DSME (6.1 ± 2.8 out of 10 and the level of satisfaction with the current state of DSME (5.0 ± 2.4 out of 10 in the EU MS were comparable with ITU. Conclusion. Variation in availability and organization of DSME in the EU MS presents a clear rationale for developing an EU-wide diabetes strategy to improve treatment and care for people with diabetes.

  4. Supporting self-management of chronic health conditions: common approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawn, Sharon; Schoo, Adrian

    2010-08-01

    The aims of this paper are to provide a description of the principles of chronic condition self-management, common approaches to support currently used in Australian health services, and benefits and challenges associated with using these approaches. We examined literature in this field in Australia and drew also from our own practice experience of implementing these approaches and providing education and training to primary health care professionals and organizations in the field. Using common examples of programs, advantages and disadvantages of peer-led groups (Stanford Courses), care planning (The Flinders Program), a brief primary care approach (the 5As), motivational interviewing and health coaching are explored. There are a number of common approaches used to enhance self-management. No one approach is superior to other approaches; in fact, they are often complimentary. The nature and context for patients' contact with services, and patients' specific needs and preferences are what must be considered when deciding on the most appropriate support mode to effectively engage patients and promote self-management. Choice of approach will also be determined by organizational factors and service structures. Whatever self-management support approaches used, of importance is how health services work together to provide support. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Structured self-management education maintained over two years in insufficiently controlled type 2 diabetes patients: the ERMIES randomised trial in Reunion Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debussche Xavier

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-management education programs can reduce the complications and mortality in type 2 diabetes. The need to structure these programs for outpatient and community care with a vision for long-term maintenance has been recognised. In Reunion Island, an area affected by epidemiological and nutritional transition, diabetes affects 18% of the adult population over 30 years, with major social disparities, poor glycaemic control and frequent cardiovascular complications. Methods/Design ERMIES is a randomised controlled trial designed to test the efficacy of a long-term (2 years structured group self management educational intervention in improving blood glucose in non-recent, insufficiently controlled diabetes. After an initial structured educational cycle carried out blind for the intervention arm, patients will be randomised in two parallel group arms of 120 subjects: structured on-going group with educational intervention maintained over two years, versus only initial education. Education sessions are organised through a regional diabetes management network, and performed by trained registered nurses at close quarters. The educational approach is theoretically based (socio-constructivism, social contextualisation, empowerment, action planning and reproducible, thanks to curricula and handouts for educators and learners. The subjects will be recruited from five hospital outpatient settings all over Reunion Island. The main eligibility criteria include: age ≥18 years, type 2 diabetes treated for more than one year, HbA1c ≥ 7.5% for ≥3 months, without any severe evolving complication (ischaemic or proliferative retinopathy, severe renal insufficiency, coronaropathy or evolving foot lesion, and absence of any major physical or cognitive handicap. The primary outcome measure is HbA1c evolution between inclusion and 2 years. The secondary outcome measures include anthropometric indicators, blood pressure, lipids

  6. Effectiveness of two interventions based on improving patient-practitioner communication on diabetes self-management in patients with low educational level: study protocol of a clustered randomized trial in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci-Cabello, Ignacio; Olry de Labry-Lima, Antonio; Bolívar-Muñoz, Julia; Pastor-Moreno, Guadalupe; Bermudez-Tamayo, Clara; Ruiz-Pérez, Isabel; Quesada-Jiménez, Fermín; Moratalla-López, Enrique; Domínguez-Martín, Susana; de los Ríos-Álvarez, Ana M; Cruz-Vela, Pilar; Prados-Quel, Miguel A; López-De Hierro, José A

    2013-10-23

    In the last decades the presence of social inequalities in diabetes care has been observed in multiple countries, including Spain. These inequalities have been at least partially attributed to differences in diabetes self-management behaviours. Communication problems during medical consultations occur more frequently to patients with a lower educational level. The purpose of this cluster randomized trial is to determine whether an intervention implemented in a General Surgery, based in improving patient-provider communication, results in a better diabetes self-management in patients with lower educational level. A secondary objective is to assess whether telephone reinforcement enhances the effect of such intervention. We report the design and implementation of this on-going study. The study is being conducted in a General Practice located in a deprived neighbourhood of Granada, Spain. Diabetic patients 18 years old or older with a low educational level and inadequate glycaemic control (HbA1c > 7%) were recruited. General Practitioners (GPs) were randomised to three groups: intervention A, intervention B and control group. GPs allocated to intervention groups A and B received training in communication skills and are providing graphic feedback about glycosylated haemoglobin levels. Patients whose GPs were allocated to group B are additionally receiving telephone reinforcement whereas patients from the control group are receiving usual care. The described interventions are being conducted during 7 consecutive medical visits which are scheduled every three months. The main outcome measure will be HbA1c; blood pressure, lipidemia, body mass index and waist circumference will be considered as secondary outcome measures. Statistical analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of the interventions will include multilevel regression analysis with three hierarchical levels: medical visit level, patient level and GP level. The results of this study will provide new knowledge

  7. Delivering the diabetes education and self management for ongoing and newly diagnosed (DESMOND) programme for people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillett, M.; Dallosso, H. M.; Dixon, S.

    2010-01-01

    intervention is £82 (-£831 to £1010) and the mean incremental cost per QALY gained is £2092. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis indicated that the likelihood that the DESMOND programme is cost effective at a threshold of £20 000 per QALY is 66% using trial based intervention costs and 70% using "real world......Objectives: To assess the long term clinical and cost effectiveness of the diabetes education and self management for ongoing and newly diagnosed (DESMOND) intervention compared with usual care in people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Design: We undertook a cost-utility analysis that used...... data from a 12 month, multicentre, cluster randomised controlled trial and, using the Sheffield type 2 diabetes model, modelled long term outcomes in terms of use of therapies, incidence of complications, mortality, and associated effect on costs and health related quality of life. A further cost...

  8. Diabetes Self-Management Education and Medical Nutrition Therapy Improve Patient Outcomes: A Pilot Study Documenting the Efficacy of Registered Dietitian Nutritionist Interventions through Retrospective Chart Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marincic, Patricia Z; Hardin, Amie; Salazar, Maria V; Scott, Susan; Fan, Shirley X; Gaillard, Philippe R

    2017-08-01

    Diabetes self-management education (DSME) and medical nutrition therapy (MNT) improve patient outcomes; poor reimbursement limits access to care. Our aim was to develop methodology for tracking patient outcomes subsequent to registered dietitian nutritionist interventions, document outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes attending an American Diabetes Association-recognized program, and obtain outcome data to support reimbursement and public policy initiatives to improve patient access to DSME and MNT. Retrospective chart review. A random sample of 100 charts was chosen from the electronic medical records of patients with type 2 diabetes completing DSME and individualized MNT, June 2013 to 2014. Data were extracted on body mass index (calculated as kg/m 2 ), weight, hemoglobin A1c, blood glucose, and lipids. Mixed-model analysis of variance was used to determine differences between means for continuous variables; McNemar's tests and γ-statistic trend analysis were used to assess frequency of patients reaching glycemic targets. Significant weight loss was observed from baseline (94.3±21.1 kg) to end of program (91.7±21.2 kg [-1.6±3.9 kg]; P0.05). Significant hemoglobin A1c reduction was observed from baseline (8.74%±2.30%) to end of program (6.82%±1.37% [-1.92%±2.25%]; Phemoglobin A1c targets (≤7.0%) vs 27% at baseline (P=0.008). When stratified by diet alone and diet plus drug therapy, patients exhibited a 1.08%±1.20% (Phemoglobin A1c, respectively. Triglycerides decreased from baseline 181.6±75.5 mg/dL (2.0±0.9 mmol/L) to 115.8±48.1 mg/dL (1.3±0.5mmol/L) (P=0.023). High-density lipoprotein increased from 41.4±12.4 mg/dL (1.1±0.3 mmol/L) to 47.3±12.4 mg/dL (1.2±0.3 mmol/L) (P=0.007). Retrospective chart review provides an operational model for abstracting existing patient outcome data subsequent to registered dietitian nutritionist interventions. In support of universal reimbursement and patient access to DSME with supplemental individualized

  9. Supporting self-management after attending a structured education programme: a qualitative longitudinal investigation of type 1 diabetes patients’ experiences and views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rankin David

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structured education programmes for patients with diabetes and other chronic conditions are being widely adopted. However, follow-up studies suggest that course graduates may struggle to sustain the self-care practices taught on their courses over time. This study explored the support needs of patients with type 1 diabetes after attending a structured education programme promoting an empowerment approach and training in use of flexible intensive insulin therapy, a regimen now widely advocated and used to manage this condition. The objective was to inform future support offered to course graduates. Methods Repeat, in-depth interviews with 30 type 1 diabetes patients after attending Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating (DAFNE courses in the UK, and six and 12 months later. Data were analysed using an inductive, thematic approach. Results While the flexible intensive insulin treatment approach taught on DAFNE courses was seen as a logical and effective way of managing one’s diabetes, it was also considered more technically complex than other insulin regimens. To sustain effective disease self-management using flexible intensive insulin treatment over time, patients often expected, and needed, on-going input and support from health care professionals trained in the approach. This included: help determining insulin dose adjustments; reassurance; and, opportunities to trouble-shoot issues of concern. While some benefits were identified to receiving follow-up support in a group setting, most patients stated a preference or need for tailored and individualised support from appropriately-trained clinicians, accessible on an ‘as and when needed’ basis. Conclusions Our findings highlight potential limitations to group-based forms of follow-up support for sustaining diabetes self-management. To maintain the clinical benefits of structured education for patients with type 1 diabetes over time, course graduates may benefit from and

  10. The Effect of Peer-Led Self-Management Education Programmes for Adolescents with Asthma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Connie S.; Melendez-Torres, G. J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Adolescents with asthma face unique challenges due to hormonal changes, psychosocial development and healthcare transition. Peer-led self-management programmes may increase treatment adherence and social adjustment by addressing these challenges. The purpose of this study was to assess whether peer-led self-management programmes…

  11. Using Context Awareness for Self Management in Pervasive Service Middleware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Weishan; Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2011-01-01

    Context-awareness is an important feature in Ambient Intelligence environments including in pervasive middleware. In addition, there is a growing trend and demand on self-management capabilities for a pervasive middleware in order to provide high-level dependability for services. In this chapter......, we propose to make use of context-awareness features to facilitate self-management. To achieve self-management, dynamic contexts for example device and service statuses, are critical to take self-management actions. Therefore, we consider dynamic contexts in context modeling, specifically as a set...... of OWL/SWRL ontologies, called the Self-Management for Pervasive Services (SeMaPS) ontologies. Self-management rules can be developed based on the SeMaPS ontologies to achieve self-management goals. Our approach is demonstrated within the LinkSmart pervasive middleware. Finally, our experiments...

  12. The Effect of Diabetes Self-Management Education on Hba1c Level and Fasting Blood Sugar in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients in Primary Health Care in Binjai City of North Sumatera, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusdiana; Savira, Maya; Amelia, Rina

    2018-04-15

    The study aimed to evaluate the effect of short-term diabetes self-management education (DSME) on Hba1and Fasting Blood Sugar in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients attending the Primary Health Care (PHC) in Binjai city of North Sumatera, Indonesia. A quasi-experimental (pretest-posttest) study was conducted in 4 PHCs, involving 80 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The patients in received a 3-months intervention, including an 8 week education on self- management of diabetes mellitus and subsequent 4 weeks of practice of the self- management guidelines.The patients received standard advice on diet management. There was a significant reduction in Hba1c levels. The statistical analysis using t-test found that there was a significant difference of Hba1c value between pre and post education among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients (p Diabetes self-management education in PHC of Binjai city can reduce the Hba1c level in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

  13. Randomized trial of a diabetes self-management education and family teamwork intervention in adolescents with Type1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, H. R.; Wadham, C.; Hassler-Hurst, J.

    2012-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the effectiveness of a family-centred group education programme, in adolescents with Type1 diabetes. Methods Three hundred and five adolescents with Type1 diabetes; age 13.1±1.9years, diabetes duration 5.6±3.3years, BMI 20.9±3.7kg/m 2, HbA 1c 78±6mmol/mol (9.3±1.9%) were randomly...... attendance of group education sessions delivered in routine clinics was a major challenge. More personalized educational approaches may be required to support and motivate families who are struggling to integrate the demands of intensive insulin regimens into their daily lives....

  14. Online and mobile technologies for self-management in bipolar disorder: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliddon, Emma; Barnes, Steven J; Murray, Greg; Michalak, Erin E

    2017-09-01

    Internet (eHealth) and smartphone-based (mHealth) approaches to self-management for bipolar disorder are increasingly common. Evidence-based self-management strategies are available for bipolar disorder and provide a useful framework for reviewing existing eHealth/mHealth programs to determine whether these strategies are supported by current technologies. This review assesses which self-management strategies are most supported by technology. Based on 3 previous studies, 7 categories of self-management strategies related to bipolar disorder were identified, followed by a systematic literature review to identify existing eHealth and mHealth programs for this disorder. Searches were conducted by using PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for relevant peer-reviewed articles published January 2005 to May 2015. eHealth and mHealth programs were summarized and reviewed to identify which of the 7 self-management strategy categories were supported by eHealth or mHealth programs. From 1,654 publications, 15 papers were identified for inclusion. From these, 9 eHealth programs and 2 mHealth programs were identified. The most commonly supported self-management strategy categories were "ongoing monitoring," "maintaining hope," "education," and "planning for and taking action"; the least commonly supported categories were "relaxation" and "maintaining a healthy lifestyle." eHealth programs appear to provide more comprehensive coverage of self-management strategies compared with mHealth programs. Both eHealth and mHealth programs present a wide range of self-management strategies for bipolar disorder, although individuals seeking comprehensive interventions might be best served by eHealth programs, while those seeking more condensed and direct interventions might prefer mHealth programs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Self-Management Education for Rehabilitation Inpatients Suffering from Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusch, A.; Weiland, R.; Gerlich, C.; Dreger, K.; Derra, C.; Mainos, D.; Tuschhoff, T.; Berding, A.; Witte, C.; Kaltz, B.; Faller, H.

    2016-01-01

    Although inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects patients' psychological well-being, previous educational programs have failed to demonstrate effects on psychosocial outcomes and quality of life. Therefore, we developed a group-based psychoeducational program that combined provision of both medical information and psychological self-management…

  16. Mothers Value and Utilize Early Outpatient Education on Breast Massage and Hand Expression in Their Self-Management of Engorgement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Ann M; Bolman, Maya; Kredit, Sheila

    2016-11-01

    Breast engorgement is a major cause of pain and weaning in the early postpartum period. While protocols reinforce the need for anticipatory engorgement advice and continued outpatient health professional breastfeeding support, there remains limited information on the efficacy of focused postdischarge engorgement education. This study sought to explore if outpatient postpartum engorgement education changed mothers' home management and if mothers found instruction on specific massage and hand expression techniques helpful. This was a prospective descriptive cohort study. Subjects received engorgement-specific postpartum support from a healthcare professional at the posthospital discharge (PD) newborn visit. Email surveys at 1, 2, and 12 weeks postpartum collected data on engorgement home management, clinical course, and postpartum education. After the office visit, mothers changed their engorgement home management. Significantly more mothers utilized massage toward the axillae (25% versus 1%, p ≤ 0.001), reverse pressure softening (18% versus 3%, p = 0.001), and feeding more frequently (32% versus 16%, p = 0.04). Sixty-one percent would not have used massage and hand expression before education in the office. At 12 weeks, 96% of women reported massage and hand expression instruction as helpful. Mothers reported engorgement peaked at a median of 5 days postpartum, corresponding well to the office visit at a median of 4 days postpartum. Maternal engorgement symptoms are commonly present at the PD newborn visit. Education on engorgement, massage, and hand expression at this visit significantly changes home management strategies. Mothers find massage and hand expression instruction helpful.

  17. Improving Educational Outcomes by Providing Educational Services through Mobile Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Hosam Farouk El-Sofany

    2013-01-01

    The use of Computers, Networks, and Internet has successfully enabled educational institutions to provide their students and instructors with various online educational services. With the recent developments in M-learning and mobile technology, further possibilities are emerging to provide such services through mobile devices such as mobile phones and PDAs. By providing the educational services using wireless and mobile technologies, the educational institutions can potentially bring great co...

  18. Quality and Usability of Arthritic Pain Self-Management Apps for Older Adults: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Priyanka; Newton-John, T R O; Phillips, Jane L

    2018-03-01

    To appraise the quality and usability of currently available pain applications that could be used by community-dwelling older adults to self-manage their arthritic pain. A systematic review. Searches were conducted in App Store and Google Play to identify pain self-management apps relevant to arthritic pain management. English language pain management apps providing pain assessment and documentation function and pain management education were considered for inclusion. A quality evaluation audit tool based on the Stanford Arthritis Self-Management Program was developed a priori to evaluate app content quality. The usability of included apps was assessed using an established usability evaluation tool. Out of the 373 apps that were identified, four met the inclusion criteria. The included apps all included a pain assessment and documentation function and instructions on medication use, communication with health professionals, cognitive behavioral therapy-based pain management, and physical exercise. Management of mood, depression, anxiety, and sleep were featured in most apps (N = 3). Three-quarters (N = 3) of the apps fell below the acceptable moderate usability score (≥3), while one app obtained a moderate score (3.2). Few of the currently available pain apps offer a comprehensive pain self-management approach incorporating evidence-based strategies in accordance with the Stanford Arthritis Self-Management Program. The moderate-level usability across the included apps indicates a need to consider the usability needs of the older population in future pain self-management app development endeavors.

  19. A diabetes self-management program designed for urban American Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Sarah; O'Toole, Mary; Brownson, Carol; Plessel, Kimberly; Schauben, Laura

    2009-10-01

    Although the American Indian population has a disproportionately high rate of type 2 diabetes, little has been written about culturally sensitive self-management programs in this population. Community and clinic partners worked together to identify barriers to diabetes self-management and to provide activities and services as part of a holistic approach to diabetes self-management, called the Full Circle Diabetes Program. The program activities and services addressed 4 components of holistic health: body, spirit, mind, and emotion. Seven types of activities or services were available to help participants improve diabetes self-management; these included exercise classes, educational classes, and talking circles. Ninety-eight percent of program enrollees participated in at least 1 activity, and two-thirds participated in 2 or more activities. Program participation resulted in a significant improvement in knowledge of resources for managing diabetes. The Full Circle Diabetes Program developed and implemented culturally relevant resources and supports for diabetes self-management in an American Indian population. Lessons learned included that a holistic approach to diabetes self-management, community participation, and stakeholder partnerships are needed for a successful program.

  20. The effectiveness of the teach-back method on adherence and self-management in health education for people with chronic disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha Dinh, Thi Thuy; Bonner, Ann; Clark, Robyn; Ramsbotham, Joanne; Hines, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Chronic diseases are increasing worldwide and have become a significant burden to those affected by those diseases. Disease-specific education programs have demonstrated improved outcomes, although people do forget information quickly or memorize it incorrectly. The teach-back method was introduced in an attempt to reinforce education to patients. To date, the evidence regarding the effectiveness of health education employing the teach-back method in improved care has not yet been reviewed systematically. This systematic review examined the evidence on using the teach-back method in health education programs for improving adherence and self-management of people with chronic disease. Adults aged 18 years and over with one or more than one chronic disease.All types of interventions which included the teach-back method in an education program for people with chronic diseases. The comparator was chronic disease education programs that did not involve the teach-back method.Randomized and non-randomized controlled trials, cohort studies, before-after studies and case-control studies.The outcomes of interest were adherence, self-management, disease-specific knowledge, readmission, knowledge retention, self-efficacy and quality of life. Searches were conducted in CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL, Web of Science, ProQuest Nursing and Allied Health Source, and Google Scholar databases. Search terms were combined by AND or OR in search strings. Reference lists of included articles were also searched for further potential references. Two reviewers conducted quality appraisal of papers using the Joanna Briggs Institute Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument. Data were extracted using the Joanna Briggs Institute Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument data extraction instruments. There was significant heterogeneity in selected studies, hence a meta-analysis was not possible and the results were presented in narrative form. Of

  1. Overview of Self-Management Resources Used by Canadian Chronic Kidney Disease Clinics: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Maoliosa; Gil, Sarah; Kahlon, Bhavneet; Beanlands, Heather; Straus, Sharon; Herrington, Gwen; Manns, Braden; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R

    2018-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) clinics across Canada provide tailored care for patients with CKD with an aim to slow progression and prevent complications. These clinics provide CKD self-management resources; however, there is limited information about what resources are being used by clinics. We undertook a survey of CKD clinics across Canada to identify self-management resources for adults aged 18 years and over with CKD categories 1 to 5 and not requiring dialysis or transplant. To identify and collate self-management resources (eg, strategies, tools, educational materials) used by CKD clinics across Canada for adults with CKD (categories 1 to 5, not requiring kidney replacement therapy). Self-administered, semistructured electronic survey. Canadian CKD clinics with previously identified contact information. We contacted 57 CKD English-speaking clinics and invited them to complete an online survey. The survey was available from October 2016 to January 2017 and consisted of 17 questions regarding the use and attributes of self-management resources including topic, delivery format, provider, target population, where the intervention was provided, and resource languages. Forty-four clinics (77%) completed the survey. The most common topic was modality education provided in print format, by nurses. The most frequently used resource was the Kidney Foundation of Canada (KFOC) Living With Kidney Disease manual. We also identified that the majority of resources were available in English, targeting both patients and caregivers in the outpatient setting. Our survey included Canadian adult CKD clinics, which may not be generalizability to other settings, such as care of people with CKD in primary care. Adult CKD clinics across Canada provide some similar resources, but also provide many different self-management resources. Even though some of the same resources were used by multiple clinics, the way they were provided them (ie, provider, location, delivery format) varied by

  2. Effects of a self-management education program on self-efficacy in patients with COPD: a mixed-methods sequential explanatory designed study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wai I; Smith, Graeme Drummond

    2017-01-01

    Background Self-management education programs (SMEPs) are potentially effective in the symptomatic management of COPD. Little is presently known about the effectiveness of these programs in Chinese COPD patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a specifically designed SMEP on levels of self-efficacy in Chinese patients with COPD. Materials and methods Based on the Medical Research Council framework for evaluating complex interventions, an exploratory phase randomized controlled trial was employed to examine the effects of an SMEP. Self-efficacy was the primary outcome using the COPD Self-efficacy Scale, measured at baseline and 6 months after the program. Qualitative data were sequentially collected from these patients via three focus groups to supplement the quantitative findings. Results The experimental group displayed significant improvement in their general self-efficacy (Z =−2.44, P=0.015) and specifically in confronting 1) physical exertion (Z =−2.57, P=0.01), 2) weather/environment effects (Z =−2.63, PChinese patients with COPD. Further attention should be given to cultural considerations when developing this type of intervention in Chinese populations with COPD and other chronic diseases. PMID:28790816

  3. Effectiveness of disease-specific self-management education on health outcomes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: An updated systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Tan, Jing-Yu; Xiao, Lily Dongxia; Deng, Renli

    2017-08-01

    To update a previously published systematic review on the effectiveness of self-management education (SME) for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Electronic databases were accessed (from inception to July 2016) to find relevant randomized controlled trials. Studies that compared SME with routine methods of care in COPD patients were retrieved. Both data synthesis and descriptive analysis were used for outcome assessment (e.g. quality of life and healthcare utilization). Twenty-four studies were included. Data synthesis showed better quality of life among COPD patients receiving SME. Significant reductions in COPD-related hospital admissions and emergency department visits were identified in the SME group. SME may positively affect the reduction of COPD patients' emotional distress. No significant reduction in smoking rate and mortality rate was observed between groups. No clear evidence supports the improvement of pulmonary functions, dyspnea, and nutritional status in COPD patients with the use of SME. SME can be a useful strategy to improve quality of life and disease-specific knowledge in patients with COPD. It also reduces respiratory-related hospital admissions and emergency department visits in COPD patients. Inclusion of SME as one of the key components for the comprehensive management of COPD is encouraged. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The ABCs of diabetes: diabetes self-management education program for African Americans affects A1C, lipid-lowering agent prescriptions, and emergency department visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Michelle; Bowling, Andrea; Copeland, James; Fokar, Ali; Pasquale, Patricia; Youssef, Gretchen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the feasibility and impact of a concise community-based program on diabetes self-management education (DSME), according to frequency of emergency department visits and knowledge of, prescriptions for, and control of A1C, blood pressure, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. A free community-based DSME program was placed in a public library. Adults with diabetes (N, 360) consented to participate in this prospective nonrandomized cohort study with preintervention-postintervention design. The small-group interactive DSME (two 2.5-hour classes) focused on improving cardiovascular disease risk factors and facilitating communication with the primary care physician. An increase in knowledge of American Diabetes Association-recommended targets for A1C, blood pressure, and LDL cholesterol from baseline to postintervention was seen among participants. Significant clinical outcomes included reduction in self-reported emergency department visits and reduction in mean A1C. However, despite an increase in prescriptions written for lipid-lowering drugs, blood pressure and LDL cholesterol did not change. Participants who started on insulin were more likely to achieve or maintain A1C location for offering DSME programs.

  5. Empowerment-Based Diabetes Self-Management Education to Maintain Glycemic Targets During Ramadan Fasting in People With Diabetes Who Are on Conventional Insulin: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Yara M; Sahmoud, Sahar I; Abdelsalam, Mona M; Eichorst, Barbara

    2017-02-01

    This study aims to assess the feasibility of promoting safe Ramadan fasting through diabetes self-management education (DSME) and to determine the effect of such education on hypoglycemic episodes. This prospective study included subjects attending Ramadan reinforcement sessions for participants in the Educational Program for People with Diabetes (EPPWD) at the Ain-Shams University Diabetes Center in Cairo, Egypt. The DSME sessions started 2-3 weeks before Ramadan and included one experimental fasting day during the first week and one during the second week. Participants' A1C and serum fructosamine levels were measured before and after Ramadan, and they completed weekly self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) logs. Among 21 participants who were intending to fast for Ramadan, 14 completed the program. Their mean A1C was 6.7 ± 1.6%, and SMBG results showed a statistically nonsignificant difference in mean blood glucose levels before and after Ramadan (123.84 ± 39.96 and 123.84 ± 25.92 mg/dL, respectively; P >0.05). Serum fructosamine after Ramadan declined by 10% from pre-Ramadan levels. The mean number of hypoglycemic events before Ramadan was 3 ± 1.04, which declined to 1.4 ± 0.5 during Ramadan. Differences between group 1 (those without hypoglycemia, n = 8) and group 2 (those with hypoglycemia, n = 6) were nonsignificant for all variables, including A1C. Ramadan fasting is feasible for people with diabetes who are on a multiple daily injection insulin regimen and participate in the EPPWD. The number of hypoglycemic events per month declined with the attainment of DSME.

  6. Self-reported diabetes self-management competence and support from healthcare providers in achieving autonomy are negatively associated with diabetes distress in adults with Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohn, J; Graue, M; Assmus, J

    2015-01-01

    comprised blood sampling and three self-report questionnaires, the Problem Areas in Diabetes scale, the Perceived Competence in Diabetes Scale and a measure of autonomy support by healthcare providers, the Health Care Climate Questionnaire. We fitted blockwise linear regression models to assess......AIM: To investigate the associations of self-perceived competence in diabetes management and autonomy support from healthcare providers with diabetes distress in adults with Type 1 diabetes mellitus that is not optimally controlled [HbA(1c) ≥ 64 mmol/mol (8.0%)]. METHODS: This cross-sectional study...... the associations between Problem Areas in Diabetes score and the variables of interest (autonomy support and perceived diabetes competence), controlling for clinical and sociodemographic variables. RESULTS: Of the study sample [n = 178; mean age 36.7 (±10.7) years], 31.5% had long-term complications and 43...

  7. Identifying and describing patients' learning experiences towards self-management of bipolar disorders: a phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Heuvel, S C G H; Goossens, P J J; Terlouw, C; Van Achterberg, T; Schoonhoven, L

    2015-12-01

    Existing evidence suggest that patient education in promoting self-management strategies of bipolar disorder (BD) is effective. However, results across the full range of service users with BD vary. Learning experiences of service users look to be a crucial factor to take into account when designing, delivering, and evaluating effective interventions that promote self-management in chronic illness. What learning activities service users actually undertake themselves when self-managing BD that might explain varying success rates, and guide future self-management educational programmes has not been examined. Unlike previous studies that suggest that outcomes in self-management depend on individual learning activities, the current study found that learning to self-manage BD takes place in a social network that functions as a learning environment in which it is saved for service users to make mistakes and to learn from these mistakes. Especially, coping with the dormant fear of a recurrent episode and acknowledging the limitations of an individual approach are important factors that facilitate this learning process. Practitioners who provide patient education in order to promote self-management of BD should tailor future interventions that facilitate learning by reflecting on the own experiences of service users. Community psychiatric nurses should keep an open discussion with service users and caregivers, facilitate the use of a network, and re-label problems into learning situations where both play an active role in building mutual trust, thereby enhancing self-management of BD. Existing evidence suggest that self-management education of bipolar disorder (BD) is effective. However, why outcomes differ across the full range of service users has not been examined. This study describes learning experiences of service users in self-managing BD that provide a possible explanation for this varying effectiveness. We have conducted a phenomenological study via face

  8. Self-reported diabetes self-management competence and support from healthcare providers in achieving autonomy are negatively associated with diabetes distress in adults with Type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohn, J; Graue, M; Assmus, J; Zoffmann, V; B Thordarson, H; Peyrot, M; Rokne, B

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the associations of self-perceived competence in diabetes management and autonomy support from healthcare providers with diabetes distress in adults with Type 1 diabetes mellitus that is not optimally controlled [HbA(1c) ≥ 64 mmol/mol (8.0%)]. This cross-sectional study comprised blood sampling and three self-report questionnaires, the Problem Areas in Diabetes scale, the Perceived Competence in Diabetes Scale and a measure of autonomy support by healthcare providers, the Health Care Climate Questionnaire. We fitted blockwise linear regression models to assess the associations between Problem Areas in Diabetes score and the variables of interest (autonomy support and perceived diabetes competence), controlling for clinical and sociodemographic variables. Of the study sample [n = 178; mean age 36.7 (±10.7) years], 31.5% had long-term complications and 43.2% reported elevated (≥40) Problem Areas in Diabetes scores. A significant negative association was found between autonomy support and Problem Areas in Diabetes score (B = -3.61, P = 0.001), indicating that lower autonomy support was associated with greater diabetes distress. When perceived competence was controlled, it mediated the association of autonomy support with diabetes distress, reducing it to non-significance. There was a significant negative association between perceived competence and Problem Areas in Diabetes score (B = -8.89, P perceived competence was associated with greater perceived distress. There was an indirect (fully mediated) relationship between autonomy support and diabetes distress; autonomy support was associated with increased perceived competence, which, in turn, was associated with reduced distress. Healthcare providers' communication styles enhancing perceived competence through autonomy support may contribute to effective treatment for people with Type 1 diabetes and suboptimum glycaemic control. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons

  9. Comparison of a one-time educational intervention to a teach-to-goal educational intervention for self-management of heart failure: design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeWalt Darren A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heart failure (HF is common, costly and associated with significant morbidity and poor quality of life, particularly for patients with low socioeconomic status. Self-management training has been shown to reduce HF related morbidity and hospitalization rates, but there is uncertainty about how best to deliver such training and what patients benefit. This study compares a single session self-management HF training program against a multiple session training intervention and examines whether their effects differ by literacy level. Methods/Design In this randomized controlled multi-site trial, English and Spanish-speaking patients are recruited from university-affiliated General Internal Medicine and Cardiology clinics at 4 sites across the United States. Eligible patients have HF with New York Heart Association class II-IV symptoms and are prescribed a loop diuretic. Baseline data, including literacy level, are collected at enrollment and follow-up surveys are conducted at 1, 6 and 12 months Upon enrollment, both the control and intervention groups receive the same 40 minute, literacy-sensitive, in-person, HF education session covering the 4 key self-management components of daily self assessment and having a plan, salt avoidance, exercise, and medication adherence. All participants also receive a literacy-sensitive workbook and a digital bathroom scale. After the baseline education was completed, patients are randomly allocated to return to usual care or to receive ongoing education and training. The intervention group receives an additional 20 minutes of education on weight and symptom-based diuretic self-adjustment, as well as periodic follow-up phone calls from the educator over the course of 1 year. These phone calls are designed to reinforce the education, assess participant knowledge of the education and address barriers to success. The primary outcome is the combined incidence of all cause hospitalization and death

  10. Self-management through shame

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunæs, Dorthe; Bjerg, Helle

    2011-01-01

    of management of self-management in two ways. Firstly, by thinking management of self-management trough concepts from what has become known as the affective turn. Secondly, by illustrating the precise mechanisms of management of self-management in every day life and thereby pointing to how management of self...... to recognition, but is also linked to the production of shame or at least potential shame. This argument is developed theoretically from Brian Massumi's theory on affectivity and intensity combined with Silvan Tomkins's theory of shame as the most self-reflexive affect of all affects. In order to exemplify......  Critical studies on management of self-management and governmentality have primarily been occupied with the production of identities, subject positions and the reflexive elements of self-management. The aim of this article is to challenge and contribute to the field of critical studies...

  11. Strategies to improve self-management in heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toback, Mehnosh; Clark, Nancy

    2017-02-01

    Heart failure is one of the most common causes of hospitalization, hospital readmission and death. Patients with heart failure have many complications, with multiple co-existing diagnoses which result in polypharmacy. Following instructions provided by many physicians, medication adjustments based on changes in their symptoms are required. Behavioral adjustments concerning diet and exercise regime are recommended. Therefore, the patient plays a crucial role in the management of heart failure. To review the available studies on heart failure self-management, and investigate educational, behavioral and psychosocial strategies that plays an important role to improve patient self-management. A literature review was conducted based upon the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidance. The articles identified through an extensive search using PubMed and UpToDate from 1999 to 2016. Improved self-management will increase compliance, promote patient quality-of-life, advance clinical outcomes, reduce hospital re-admission and will decrease hospitalization costs.

  12. Creating Affordable Housing through self-management:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Ole; Stensgaard, Anne Gro

    The paper presents a case on self-management in the Danish social housing sector as a way of providing affordable housing. It is based on an evaluation of a Danish concept for affordable housing, Social Housing Plus (“AlmenBolig+”). The concept was introduced in 2007, and so far app 1.400 housing...

  13. Self-management in patients with psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathak SN

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Swetha Narahari Pathak,1 Pauline L Scott,1 Cameron West,1 Steven R Feldman,1–3 1Center for Dermatology Research, Departments of Dermatology, 2Center for Dermatology Research, Departments of Pathology, 3Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA Abstract: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disorder effecting the skin and joints. Additionally, multiple comorbidities exist, including cardiovascular, metabolic, and psychiatric. The chronic nature of psoriasis is often frustrating for both patients and physicians alike. Many options for treatment exist, though successful disease management rests largely on patients through the application of topical corticosteroids, Vitamin D analogs, and calcineurin inhibitors, amongst others and the administration of systemic medications such as biologics and methotrexate. Phototherapy is another option that also requires active participation from the patient. Many barriers to effective self-management of psoriasis exist. Successful treatment requires the establishment of a strong doctor-patient relationship and patient empowerment in order to maximize adherence to a treatment regimen and improve outcomes. Improving patient adherence to treatment is necessary in effective self-management. Many tools exist to educate and empower patients, including online sources such as the National Psoriasis Foundation and online support group, Talk Psoriasis, amongst others. Effective self management is critical in decreasing the physical burden of psoriasis and mitigating its multiple physical, psychological, and social comorbidities, which include obesity, cardiovascular disease, alcohol dependence, depression, anxiety, and social anxiety. Keywords: psoriasis, adherence, self management, compliance

  14. Group based diabetes self-management education compared to routine treatment for people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A systematic review with meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Diabetes self-management education (DSME) can be delivered in many forms. Group based DSME is widespread due to being a cheaper method and the added advantages of having patient meet and discuss with each other. assess effects of group-based DSME compared to routine treatment on clinical, lifestyle and psychosocial outcomes in type-2 diabetes patients. Methods A systematic review with meta-analysis. Computerised bibliographic database were searched up to January 2008 for randomised controlled trials evaluating group-based DSME for adult type-2 diabetics versus routine treatment where the intervention had at least one session and =/>6 months follow-up. At least two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed study quality. Results In total 21 studies (26 publications, 2833 participants) were included. Of all the participants 4 out of 10 were male, baseline age was 60 years, BMI 31.6, HbA1c 8.23%, diabetes duration 8 years and 82% used medication. For the main clinical outcomes, HbA1c was significantly reduced at 6 months (0.44% points; P = 0.0006, 13 studies, 1883 participants), 12 months (0.46% points; P = 0.001, 11 studies, 1503 participants) and 2 years (0.87% points; P 1, 3 studies, 397 participants) and fasting blood glucose levels were also significantly reduced at 12 months (1.26 mmol/l; P 1, 5 studies, 690 participants) but not at 6 months. For the main lifestyle outcomes, diabetes knowledge was improved significantly at 6 months (SMD 0.83; P = 0.00001, 6 studies, 768 participants), 12 months (SMD 0.85; P 1, 5 studies, 955 participants) and 2 years (SMD 1.59; P = 0.03, 2 studies, 355 participants) and self-management skills also improved significantly at 6 months (SMD 0.55; P = 0.01, 4 studies, 534 participants). For the main psychosocial outcomes, there were significant improvement for empowerment/self-efficacy (SMD 0.28, P = 0.01, 2 studies, 326 participants) after 6 months. For

  15. A patient as a self-manager of their personal data on health and disease with new technology--challenges for nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopia, Hanna; Punna, Mari; Laitinen, Teemu; Latvala, Eila

    2015-12-01

    Background: Digital technologies have transformed nearly every aspect of our lives. However, for many of us, they have not yet improved the way we receive or participate in our health services and disease care. Hostetter et al. (2014) explore in a new multimedia essay the changes occurring with the arrival of new digital tools, from mobile apps and data-driven software solutions to wearable sensors that transmit information to a patient's team of health care providers. Digitisation will revolutionise health technology to a new extent, as the self-measurement, cloud services, teleconsultation and robotics technologies are being used to get health expenditure under control. In the future, robots will dispense drugs, and treatment routines will utilise cloud services (Biesdorf and Niedermann, 2014; Grain and Sharper, 2013). According to the rationale of the Horizon 2020 (European Commission, 2013b) work programme, personalising health and care has been stated to empower citizens and patients to manage their own health and disease, which can result in more cost-effective healthcare systems by enabling the management of chronic diseases outside institutions, improving health outcomes, and by encouraging healthy citizens to remain so. Solutions should be developed and tested with the use of open innovation platforms, such as large-scale demonstrators for health and service innovation. It is a fact that ICT/new health technology and personal health applications are transforming patients' self-management in many ways. A huge amount of personal health application solutions are being offered in the marketplace, which engage in activities that promote health, monitoring the symptoms and signs of illness, and managing the impact of illness (European Commission eHealth Action Plan 2012-2020, 2012). The WHO (2011) has conducted a comprehensive study and published a report on Member States' use of mHealth (mobile Health) as well as the readiness and barriers to its use. The

  16. CSRQ Center Report on Education Service Providers: Educator's Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Data-Driven Reform in Education (NJ3), 2008

    2008-01-01

    Education service providers (ESPs), or education management organizations, are for-profit or non-profit organizations that contract with new or existing public, charter, or private schools to help them implement comprehensive reforms. Which of these ESPs have evidence that they help children in elementary and secondary school of positive effects…

  17. Providing nuclear pharmacy education via the internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilliard, N.L.; Pickett, M.; Thaxton, P.; Norenberg, J.P.; Wittstrom, K.; Rhodes, B.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: (1) Increase the nuclear pharmacy education opportunities across the United States and the around the world. (2) Establish collaborative educational agreements between colleges of pharmacy and local nuclear pharmacy preceptors. (3) Decrease the shortage of radio pharmacists. 4) Provide nuclear education courses to supplement existing educational programs. Materials and Methods: Nuclear Education Online (www.nuclearonline.org) is an educational consortium between the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and the University of New Mexico. The faculty members from each institution have collaborated to design an online didactic curriculum and experiential training materials. The didactic portion is delivered via WebCT (www.webct.com) and involves interactive studies with faculty from UNM and UAMS. The student-centered curriculum is based on the APhA Syllabus for Nuclear Pharmacy Training and includes interactive web-based course materials, discussion groups, preceptor-led activities and problem-based learning (PBL) case studies based upon actual clinical studies and real-life pharmacy situations. Individual units of study include Nuclear Physics, Radiation Biology, Radiation Safety, Instrumentation, and Radiochemistry/Radiopharmacology. Students can begin the program at anytime. Once a cohort of students is established, the students proceed through the PBL cases, working interactively as a group. Results: Since June 2001, over 26 students have completed the 10-week certificate program. These students have been located across the U.S. and in Saudi Arabia. Fifteen students have completed individual courses in nuclear physics and instrumentation through colleges of pharmacy course offerings using the NEO faculty as instructors. Student evaluations revealed that 78% of the students thought that the NEO program was a 'great way to learn' (highest rating). When comparing PBL to a traditional classroom setting, two thirds of students preferred problem

  18. Adherence to evidence-based guidelines among diabetes self-management apps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breland, Jessica Y; Yeh, Vivian M; Yu, Jessica

    2013-09-01

    Smartphone apps can provide real-time, interactive self-management aid to individuals with diabetes. It is currently unclear whether existing diabetes self-management apps follow evidence-based guidelines. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent to which existing diabetes self-management apps address the seven self-management behaviors recommended by the American Association of Diabetes Educators (the AADE7™). The term "diabetes" identified relevant self-management apps via the Apple App Store search engine in March 2012. Ratings were based on app descriptions and downloads. Chi-square analyses assessed differences in apps based on developer type. Apps promoted a median of two AADE7™ skills. Overall reliability between description and download ratings was good (kappa = .66). Reliability of individual skills was variable (kappa = .25 to .91). Most diabetes apps do not conform to evidence-based recommendations, and future app reviews would benefit from testing app performance. Future apps may also benefit from theory-based designs.

  19. Improving Educational Outcomes by Providing Educational Services through Mobile Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosam Farouk El-Sofany

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of Computers, Networks, and Internet has successfully enabled educational institutions to provide their students and instructors with various online educational services. With the recent developments in M-learning and mobile technology, further possibilities are emerging to provide such services through mobile devices such as mobile phones and PDAs. By providing the educational services using wireless and mobile technologies, the educational institutions can potentially bring great convenience to those off-campus students who do not always have time to find Internet enabled computers to get the important educational information from their academic institutions. With the mobile or M-educational services, both the students and the instructors can access the services anytime and anywhere they want. This paper discusses those M-educational services that can be moved to the mobile platform and then presents the system prototype and architecture that integrate these services into the mobile technology platform. The paper will conclude with a description of the formative evaluation of the system prototype.

  20. Economic evaluation of a brief education, self-management and upper limb exercise training in people with rheumatoid arthritis (EXTRA) programme: a trial-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Victoria L; Kaambwa, Billingsley; Ratcliffe, Julie; Scott, David L; Choy, Ernest; Hurley, Michael V; Bearne, Lindsay M

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a cost-utility analysis of the Education, Self-management and Upper Limb Exercise Training in People with RA (EXTRA) programme compared with usual care. A within-trial incremental cost-utility analysis was conducted with 108 participants randomized to either the EXTRA programme (n = 52) or usual care (n = 56). A health care perspective was assumed for the primary analysis with a 36 week follow-up. Resource use information was collected on interventions, medication, primary and secondary care contacts, private health care and social care costs. Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were calculated from the EuroQol five-dimension three-level (EQ-5D-3L) questionnaire responses at baseline, 12 and 36 weeks. Compared with usual care, total QALYs gained were higher in the EXTRA programme, leading to an increase of 0.0296 QALYs. The mean National Health Service (NHS) costs per participant were slightly higher in the EXTRA programme (by £82), resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £2770 per additional QALY gained. Thus the EXTRA programme was cost effective from an NHS perspective when assessed against the threshold of £20 000-£30 000/QALY gained. Overall, costs were lower in the EXTRA programme compared with usual care, suggesting it was the dominant treatment option from a societal perspective. At a willingness-to-pay of £20 000/QALY gained, there was a 65% probability that the EXTRA programme was the most cost-effective option. These results were robust to sensitivity analyses accounting for missing data, changing the cost perspective and removing cost outliers. The physiotherapist-led EXTRA programme represents a cost-effective use of resources compared with usual care and leads to lower health care costs and work absence. International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number Register; http://www.controlled-trials.com/isrctn/ (ISRCTN14268051). © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf

  1. Self-management support and training for patients with chronic and complex conditions improves health-related behaviour and health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Peter W; Petkov, John N; Misan, Gary; Fuller, Jeffrey; Battersby, Malcolm W; Cayetano, Teofilo N; Warren, Kate; Holmes, Paul

    2008-05-01

    The Sharing Health Care SA chronic disease self-management (CDSM) project in rural South Australia was designed to assist patients with chronic and complex conditions (diabetes, cardiovascular disease and arthritis) to learn how to participate more effectively in the management of their condition and to improve their self-management skills. Participants with chronic and complex conditions were recruited into the Sharing Health Care SA program and offered a range of education and support options (including a 6-week peer-led chronic disease self-management program) as part of the Enhanced Primary Care care planning process. Patient self-reported data were collected at baseline and subsequent 6-month intervals using the Partners in Health (PIH) scale to assess self-management skill and ability for 175 patients across four data collection points. Health providers also scored patient knowledge and self-management skills using the same scale over the same intervals. Patients also completed a modified Stanford 2000 Health Survey for the same time intervals to assess service utilisation and health-related lifestyle factors. Results show that both mean patient self-reported PIH scores and mean health provider PIH scores for patients improved significantly over time, indicating that patients demonstrated improved understanding of their condition and improved their ability to manage and deal with their symptoms. These results suggest that involvement in peer-led self-management education programs has a positive effect on patient self-management skill, confidence and health-related behaviour.

  2. Strategic self-management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Sven; Pultz, Sabina; Strøbæk, Pernille Solveig

    2017-01-01

    perspective. Based on our data analysis, this study contributes theoretically by further-developing the concept of ‘strategic self-management’ in an educational context. We conclude that this concept is suitable for encapsulating how young people make sense of, and deal with, their educational biographies...

  3. Diabetes nurse educators' experiences of providing care for women, with gestational diabetes mellitus, from disadvantaged backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan, Mary

    2014-05-01

    To explore diabetes nurse educators' experiences of providing care for women, with gestational diabetes mellitus, from disadvantaged backgrounds and to gather information which would assist with the development of an educational programme that would support both women and diabetes educators. Rates of gestational diabetes mellitus have increased dramatically in recent years. This is concerning as gestational diabetes mellitus is linked to poorer pregnancy outcomes including hypertension, stillbirth, and nursery admission. Poorest outcomes occur among disadvantaged women. gestational diabetes mellitus is also associated with maternal type 2 diabetes and with child obesity and type 2 diabetes among offspring. Effective self-management of gestational diabetes mellitus reduces these risks. Diabetes nurse educators provide most education and support for gestational diabetes mellitus self-management. An interpretative phenomenological analysis approach, as espoused by Smith and Osborn (Qualitative Psychology: A Practical Guide to Research Methods, 2008, Sage, London, 51), provided the framework for this study. The views of six diabetes educators were explored through in-depth interviewing. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed according to steps outlined by Smith and Osborn (Qualitative Psychology: A Practical Guide to Research Methods, 2008, Sage, London, 51). Three themes emerged from the data: (1) working in a suboptimal environment, (2) working to address the difficulties and (3) looking to the future. Throughout, the diabetes nurse educators sought opportunities to connect with women in their care and to make the educational content understandable and meaningful. Low literacy among disadvantaged women has a significant impact on their understanding of gestational diabetes mellitus information. In turn, catering for women with low literacy contributes to increased workloads for diabetes nurse educators, making them vulnerable to burnout. There is a need

  4. Personal discovery in diabetes self-management: Discovering cause and effect using self-monitoring data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamykina, Lena; Heitkemper, Elizabeth M; Smaldone, Arlene M; Kukafka, Rita; Cole-Lewis, Heather J; Davidson, Patricia G; Mynatt, Elizabeth D; Cassells, Andrea; Tobin, Jonathan N; Hripcsak, George

    2017-12-01

    To outline new design directions for informatics solutions that facilitate personal discovery with self-monitoring data. We investigate this question in the context of chronic disease self-management with the focus on type 2 diabetes. We conducted an observational qualitative study of discovery with personal data among adults attending a diabetes self-management education (DSME) program that utilized a discovery-based curriculum. The study included observations of class sessions, and interviews and focus groups with the educator and attendees of the program (n = 14). The main discovery in diabetes self-management evolved around discovering patterns of association between characteristics of individuals' activities and changes in their blood glucose levels that the participants referred to as "cause and effect". This discovery empowered individuals to actively engage in self-management and provided a desired flexibility in selection of personalized self-management strategies. We show that discovery of cause and effect involves four essential phases: (1) feature selection, (2) hypothesis generation, (3) feature evaluation, and (4) goal specification. Further, we identify opportunities to support discovery at each stage with informatics and data visualization solutions by providing assistance with: (1) active manipulation of collected data (e.g., grouping, filtering and side-by-side inspection), (2) hypotheses formulation (e.g., using natural language statements or constructing visual queries), (3) inference evaluation (e.g., through aggregation and visual comparison, and statistical analysis of associations), and (4) translation of discoveries into actionable goals (e.g., tailored selection from computable knowledge sources of effective diabetes self-management behaviors). The study suggests that discovery of cause and effect in diabetes can be a powerful approach to helping individuals to improve their self-management strategies, and that self-monitoring data can

  5. Self-management of gestational diabetes among Chinese migrants: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wah, Yat Yin Eric; McGill, Margaret; Wong, Jencia; Ross, Glynis P; Harding, Anna-Jane; Krass, Ines

    2018-04-21

    Gestational diabetes mellitus is one of the most common complications of pregnancy. Women with Gestational diabetes are at increased risk of serious health outcomes, such as pre-eclampsia, obstructed labor, and the development of Type 2 diabetes later in life. Chinese migrants, the third largest cultural group in Australia, are more likely to develop Gestational diabetes than Australian-born women. However, to date, Gestational diabetes self-management has not been investigated in this population. To explore the understanding and self-management experiences of Gestational diabetes among Chinese migrants. Data were collected through individual semi-structured face-to-face interviews. Participants were recruited from the antenatal clinic at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematically analyzed. Although the majority of participants demonstrated a good understanding of Gestational diabetes, some did not understand the principles behind healthcare advice and faced challenges in self-management. Confusion about self-monitoring of blood glucose and fear of insulin were also evident. Participants relied on both formal and informal sources of information. Some had difficulty obtaining adequate support. Cultural influences on self-management included meeting family needs, Chinese diet and use of Chinese medicines. To assist Chinese women with Gestational diabetes to better self-manage their condition, there is a need for clinicians to: (1) provide more effective diabetes education to ensure clear understanding of self-management principles; (2) actively elicit and respond to women's confusion and concerns; (3) provide women with adequate practical support; and (4) develop greater cultural awareness. Copyright © 2018 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Potential for Self-Management in Chronic Care: Nurses' Assessments of Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos-Touwen, Irene; Dijkkamp, Evelien; Kars, Marijke; Trappenburg, Jaap; De Wit, Niek; Schuurmans, Marieke

    2015-01-01

    Although self-management interventions are, to some extent, individualized in clinical practice, the decision-making process is not fully understood. Exploring nurses' clinical reasoning about how and to what extent they currently tailor self-management support can provide new insights, enhancing process and outcome of chronic care. The aim of this study was to explore how nurses assess chronic patients concerning the potential of self-management and clinical reasoning with regard to tailoring care to the individual patient. A qualitative study was conducted using grounded theory. Semistructured interviews were held with 15 nurses working within chronic care. All interviews were carried out from February to July 2013. All nurses provided individualized care; however, a nurse's view of self-management influenced how tailoring was performed. Substantial differences were seen in patient assessments and how care was individualized. Patients' motivation, capacities, mindset, needs, and preferences were obtained through communication, experience, intuition, and trusting relationships. A typology with four patient types emerged: the unmotivated patient, the patient with limited capacities, the oblivious patient, and the ideal patient. Nurses elaborated on using different approaches for patients in each of these groups. A nurse's perception of self-management substantially impacted how care was individualized. Patient assessment was the key driver of tailoring, which was performed in various ways, and influenced how and the extent to which care was individualized. To enable responding to the unique wishes and needs of individual patients, both scientific and educational efforts need to be directed toward systematic assessments of patient capacity to self-manage their disease.

  7. Time to question diabetes self-management support for Arabic-speaking migrants: exploring a new model of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzubaidi, H; Mc Namara, K; Browning, C

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to explore a new model for diabetes self-management support in Arabic-speaking migrants. Two qualitative methods were used: face-to-face semi-structured individual interviews and focus groups. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim and coded thematically. Arabic-speaking migrants with Type 2 diabetes were recruited from several primary, secondary and tertiary healthcare settings in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. These settings were purposefully selected to obtain a diverse group of participants. Data collection continued until saturation was reached. This is the first study that involved members of Arabic-speaking communities in Australia in a formal process of consumer and public involvement to inform research design and recruitment in order to provide evidence for a new model of diabetes self-management for Arabic-speaking migrants. No self-management support was offered to Arabic-speaking migrants beyond the initial diagnosis period. Significant knowledge gaps and skills deficits in all self-management domains were evident. The provision of tailored self-management support was considered crucial. When asked about preferred structure and delivery modalities, a strong preference was reported for face-to-face storytelling interactions over telephone- or internet-based interventions. Gender-specific group education and self-management support sessions delivered by Arabic-speaking diabetes health professionals, lay peers or social workers trained in diabetes self-management were highly regarded. A patient and public involvement approach allows genuine engagement with Arabic-speaking migrants with diabetes. There is urgent need for a new model for self-management support among Arabic-speaking migrants. Findings yielded new recommendations for diabetes health professionals working with these migrant communities to support behaviour change. © 2016 Diabetes UK.

  8. The role of comorbidities in patients' hypertension self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, Gemmae M; Cohn, Ellen S; Solomon, Jeffrey L; Cortés, Dharma E; Mueller, Nora; Kressin, Nancy R; Borzecki, Ann; Katz, Lois A; Bokhour, Barbara G

    2014-06-01

    We sought to understand barriers to hypertension self-management in patients with hypertension and comorbidities. We conducted semi-structured, qualitative interviews with 48 patients with uncontrolled hypertension and at least one comorbidity to learn about beliefs and behaviors that might affect hypertension self-management. Using a grounded theory strategy, we analyzed interview transcripts detailing patients' hypertension self-management behaviors vis-à-vis a framework including Explanatory Models-a patient's understanding of the pathophysiology, cause, course, treatment, and severity of an illness, such as hypertension. We identified four factors that interfered with hypertension self-management. (1) Interdependence: Participants saw hypertension as interconnected to their comorbidities and subsequently had difficulty separating information about their illnesses. (2) Low priority: Compared to other conditions, participants assigned hypertension a lower priority. (3) Conflicts: Participants struggled with conflicts between hypertension self-management practices and those for comorbidities. (4) Managing multiple medications: Polypharmacy led to patients' confusion and concern about taking medications as prescribed. Participants did not experience hypertension as a discreet clinical condition; rather, they self-managed hypertension concurrently with other conditions, leading to a breakdown in hypertension self-management. We provide strategies to address each of the four barriers to better equip providers in addressing their clinically salient concerns.

  9. Social Ecology and Diabetes Self-Management among Pacific Islanders in Arkansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElfish, Pearl Anna; Moore, Ramey; Woodring, David; Purvis, Rachel S; Maskarinec, Gregory G; Bing, Williamina Ioanna; Hudson, Jonell; Kohler, Peter O; Goulden, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Chronic diseases disproportionately affect ethnic and racial minorities. Pacific Islanders, including the Marshallese, experience some of the highest documented rates of type 2 diabetes. Northwest Arkansas is home to the largest population of Marshallese outside of the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and many migrants are employed by the local poultry industry. This migrant population continues to increase because of climate change, limited health care and educational infrastructure in the Marshall Islands, and the ongoing health effects of US nuclear testing. The US nuclear weapons testing program had extensive social, economic, and ecological consequences for the Marshallese and many of the health disparities they face are related to the nuclear fallout. Beginning in 2013, researchers using a community-based participatory (CBPR) approach began working with the local Marshallese community to address diabetes through the development and implementation of culturally appropriate diabetes self-management education in a family setting. Preliminary research captured numerous and significant environmental barriers that constrain self-management behaviors. At the request of our CBPR stakeholders, researchers have documented the ecological barriers faced by the Marshallese living in Arkansas through a series of qualitative research projects. Using the Social Ecological Model as a framework, this research provides an analysis of Marshallese health that expands the traditional diabetes self-management perspective. Participants identified barriers at the organizational, community, and policy levels that constrain their efforts to achieve diabetes self-management. We offer practice and policy recommendations to address barriers at the community, organizational, and policy level.

  10. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Heart Failure Self-Management Kits for Outpatient Transitions of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, Paul; Joseph, Tina; Hale, Genevieve; Moreau, Cynthia; Seamon, Matthew; Jones, Renee

    2018-03-01

    To develop heart failure (HF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) self-management kits in an accountable care organization (ACO) to facilitate patients' self-care and prevent hospital readmissions. Pharmacists practice in an outpatient-based ACO. They participate in interprofessional office visits with providers and independently manage maintenance pharmacotherapies. Pharmacists collaborate with an interprofessional team within the ACO including physicians, nurses, case managers, and paramedics. Two commonly encountered diseases are chronic COPD and HF. Reducing preventable readmissions for these conditions are important quality benchmarks and cost-saving strategies. Pharmacists were responsible for developing HF and COPD self-management kits containing patient education materials and prescriptions to facilitate self-care. Prior to kit development, pharmacists performed a literature review to determine the presence of previously published findings on these topics. The interprofessional team continually evaluates the successes and limitations of this initiative. Pharmacists developed training and instructions for ACO allied health professionals in an effort to incorporate the self-management kits in clinical practice. The initial literature search revealed no studies describing the intervention of interest. Innovative programs designed to help reduce preventable readmissions are lacking in primary care. Implementation of the self-management kits was accepted by interprofessional ACO leadership and is currently being integrated into allied health workflow. Patients at risk for having an exacerbation of COPD or HF should receive self-management strategies. Prompt therapy prior to exacerbations reduces hospital admissions and readmissions, speeds recovery, and slows disease progression. Pharmacist-facilitated implementation of self-management kits may be developed by interprofessional health care teams.

  11. Providing Higher Education to Socially Disadvantaged Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guri-Rosenblit, Sarah

    1989-01-01

    An examination of the philosophy and implementation of two special programs offered by the Open University of Israel to socially and educationally disadvantaged populations focuses on whether both values of quality and equity can be achieved in higher education. (Author/MSE)

  12. A theoretical framework for a virtual diabetes self-management community intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorderstrasse, Allison; Shaw, Ryan J; Blascovich, Jim; Johnson, Constance M

    2014-10-01

    Due to its high prevalence, chronic nature, potential complications, and self-management challenges for patients, diabetes presents significant health education and support issues. We developed and pilot-tested a virtual community for adults with type 2 diabetes to promote self-management education and provide social support. Although digital-based programs such as virtual environments can address significant barriers to reaching patients (i.e., child care, transportation, location), they must be strongly grounded in a theoretical basis to be well-developed and effective. In this article, we discuss how we synthesized behavioral and virtual environment theoretical frameworks to guide the development of SLIDES (Second Life Impacts Diabetes Education and Support). © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Using games to provide interactive perioperative education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carifa, Linda; Janiszewski Goodin, Heather

    2011-10-01

    Perioperative nurses must use critical thinking and sound clinical judgment to meet their patients' needs safely and effectively. This requires the integration and continual updating of large amounts of detailed clinical information. Innovative education strategies are designed to make teaching and learning more interesting and interactive, especially for the presentation of complex subject material. One interactive educational strategy is the use of games. Educational games can foster collaboration and critical thinking among peers and associates. An example of this was the Perioperative QuizBowl: Evidence-Based Practice presented at the annual AORN Congress from 2003 to 2010, which was used to teach and reinforce evidence-based practice in a fun, competitive way. Although AORN no longer presents this offering, the QuizBowl format demonstrates how educational games can support clinical practice. Copyright © 2011 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Challenge of Providing Gifted Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Dole

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction to Volume 4, No of Global Education Review Although there is a lack of universal consensus on a definition of giftedness there is some agreement that giftedness involves multiple qualities, not just intellectual ones. Gifted education programs vary both among and within countries and who is served in these programs depends largely on the definitions used. The topics explored in this issue include perceptions and policies of gifted education in cultures and countries across the globe; the presumed dichotomy of equity and excellence in countries as different in ideologies as the United States and China; underrepresentation of culturally diverse students, a problem that has plagued the field for decades; gifted education in rural communities; and using a virtual environment for students to pose and share mathematical problems.

  15. Ontological security and connectivity provided by pets: a study in the self-management of the everyday lives of people diagnosed with a long-term mental health condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Helen; Rushton, Kelly; Walker, Sandra; Lovell, Karina; Rogers, Anne

    2016-12-09

    Despite evidence that connecting people to relevant wellbeing-related resources brings therapeutic benefit, there is limited understanding, in the context of mental health recovery, of the potential value and contribution of pet ownership to personal support networks for self-management. This study aimed to explore the role of pets in the support and management activities in the personal networks of people with long-term mental health problems. Semi-structured interviews centred on 'ego' network mapping were conducted in two locations (in the North West and in the South of England) with 54 participants with a diagnosis of a long-term mental health problem. Interviews explored the day-to-day experience of living with a mental illness, informed by the notion of illness work undertaken by social network members within personal networks. Narratives were elicited that explored the relationship, value, utility and meaning of pets in the context of the provision of social support and management provided by other network members. Interviews were recorded, then transcribed verbatim before being analysed using a framework analysis. The majority of pets were placed in the central, most valued circle of support within the network diagrams. Pets were implicated in relational work through the provision of secure and intimate relationships not available elsewhere. Pets constituted a valuable source of illness work in managing feelings through distraction from symptoms and upsetting experiences, and provided a form of encouragement for activity. Pets were of enhanced salience where relationships with other network members were limited or difficult. Despite these benefits, pets were unanimously neither considered nor incorporated into individual mental health care plans. Drawing on a conceptual framework built on Corbin and Strauss's notion of illness 'work' and notions of a personal workforce of support undertaken within whole networks of individuals, this study contributes to our

  16. Chronic condition self-management: expectations of responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawn, Sharon; McMillan, John; Pulvirenti, Mariastella

    2011-08-01

    While self-management may be beneficial for many patients it assumes and encourages a particular conception of responsibility and self-management that may not fit with all patients' experience of their chronic conditions and their management. It therefore warrants further examination. We examine the concept of self-management and responsibility from a range of standpoints, focusing on the Australian context. Attempts to meet people's needs run the risk of imposing specific conceptions of how people should live their lives. While self-management appears to be consistent with placing patients' needs, values and priorities at the heart of healthcare, ill-defined assumptions about responsibility may confound these goals. Reflection on social determinants of health, the context in which patients seek self-management support from health services, and how their needs and preferences are listened to by health professionals, is critical for the collaborative self-management partnership between them to be effectively realized. Providing services without reflecting on the meaning of self-management for the person with chronic conditions creates unintended assumptions about responsibility, engagement and care provision which may serve to alienate and further stigmatise some patients. Often, these are the very patients with complex needs who need such service support the most. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The PLE(2)NO self-management and exercise program for knee osteoarthritis: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconcin, Priscila; Espanha, Margarida; Yázigi, Flávia; Campos, Pedro

    2016-06-07

    International recommendations suggest exercise and self-management programs, including non-pharmacological treatments, for knee osteoarthritis (KOA) because they can benefit pain relief and improve function and exercise adherence. The implementation of a combined self-management and exercise program termed PLE(2)NO may be a good method for controlling KOA symptoms because it encourages the development of self-efficacy to manage the pathology. This study will assess the effects of a self-management and exercise program in comparison to an educational intervention (control program) on symptoms, physical fitness, health-related quality of life, self-management behaviors, self-efficacy, physical activity level and coping strategies. This PLE(2)NO study is a single-blinded, randomized controlled trial of elderly (aged above 60 yrs old) patients with clinical and radiographic KOA. The patients will be allocated into either an educational group (control) or a self-management and exercise group (experimental). All participants will receive a supplement of chondroitin and glucosamine sulfates. This paper describes the protocol that will be used in the PLE(2)NO program. This program has several strengths. First, it involves a combination of self-management and exercise approaches, is available in close proximity to the patients and occurs over a short period of time. The latter two characteristics are crucial for maintaining participant adherence. Exercise components will be implemented using low-cost resources that permit their widespread application. Moreover, the program will provide guidance regarding the effectiveness of using a self-management and exercise program to control KOA symptoms and improve self-efficacy and health-related quality of life. NCT02562833 (09/23/2015).

  18. Self managing experiment resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stagni, F; Ubeda, M; Charpentier, P; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Romanovskiy, V; Roiser, S; Graciani, R

    2014-01-01

    Within this paper we present an autonomic Computing resources management system, used by LHCb for assessing the status of their Grid resources. Virtual Organizations Grids include heterogeneous resources. For example, LHC experiments very often use resources not provided by WLCG, and Cloud Computing resources will soon provide a non-negligible fraction of their computing power. The lack of standards and procedures across experiments and sites generated the appearance of multiple information systems, monitoring tools, ticket portals, etc... which nowadays coexist and represent a very precious source of information for running HEP experiments Computing systems as well as sites. These two facts lead to many particular solutions for a general problem: managing the experiment resources. In this paper we present how LHCb, via the DIRAC interware, addressed such issues. With a renewed Central Information Schema hosting all resources metadata and a Status System (Resource Status System) delivering real time information, the system controls the resources topology, independently of the resource types. The Resource Status System applies data mining techniques against all possible information sources available and assesses the status changes, that are then propagated to the topology description. Obviously, giving full control to such an automated system is not risk-free. Therefore, in order to minimise the probability of misbehavior, a battery of tests has been developed in order to certify the correctness of its assessments. We will demonstrate the performance and efficiency of such a system in terms of cost reduction and reliability.

  19. Enhancing patient engagement in chronic disease self-management support initiatives in Australia: the need for an integrated approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Joanne E; Briggs, Andrew M; Brand, Caroline A; Osborne, Richard H

    2008-11-17

    Although emphasis on the prevention of chronic disease is important, governments in Australia need to balance this with continued assistance to the 77% of Australians reported to have at least one long-term medical condition. Self-management support is provided by health care and community services to enhance patients' ability to care for their chronic conditions in a cooperative framework. In Australia, there is a range of self-management support initiatives that have targeted patients (most notably, chronic disease self-management education programs) and health professionals (financial incentives, education and training). To date, there has been little coordination or integration of these self-management initiatives to enhance the patient-health professional clinical encounter. If self-management support is to work, there is a need to better understand the infrastructure, systems and training that are required to engage the key stakeholders - patients, carers, health professionals, and health care organisations. A coordinated approach is required in implementing these elements within existing and new health service models to enhance uptake and sustainability.

  20. A randomised controlled trial of a self-management education program for osteoarthritis of the knee delivered by health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Sophie; Briffa, N Kathryn; Carroll, Graeme; Inderjeeth, Charles; Cook, Nicola; McQuade, Jean

    2012-01-27

    Our aim in the present study was to determine whether a disease-specific self-management program for primary care patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee (the Osteoarthritis of the Knee Self-Management Program (OAK)) implemented by health care professionals would achieve and maintain clinically meaningful improvements in health-related outcomes compared with a control group. Medical practitioners referred 146 primary care patients with OA of the knee. Volunteers with coexistent inflammatory joint disease or serious comorbidities were excluded. Randomisation was to either a control group or the OAK group. The OAK group completed a 6-week self-management program. The control group had a 6-month waiting period before entering the OAK program. Assessments were taken at baseline, 8 weeks and 6 months. The primary outcomes were the results measured using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) Pain and Function subscales on the Short Form 36 version 1 questionnaire (SF-36) Secondary outcomes were Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) pain, Timed Up & Go Test (TUG), knee range of motion and quadriceps and hamstring strength-isometric contraction. Responses to treatment (responders) and minimal clinically important improvements (MCIIs) were determined. In the OAK group, VAS pain improved from baseline to week 8 from mean (SEM) 5.21 (0.30) to 3.65 (0.29) (P ≤ 0.001). During this period, improvements in the OAK group compared with the control group and responses to treatment were demonstrated according to the following outcomes: WOMAC Pain, Physical Function and Total dimensions, as well as SF-36 Physical Function, Role Physical, Body Pain, Vitality and Social Functioning domains. In addition, from baseline to week 8, the proportion of MCIIs was greater among the OAK group than the control group for all outcomes. For the period between baseline and month 6, WOMAC Pain, Physical Function and Total dimensions significantly improved in the OAK group

  1. Self-management and creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, B. A.; Skaptsov, A. A.; Polikarpov, M. A.

    2008-06-01

    How to improve physicist's creativity? How one can make himself an instrument for creativity? What is the role of the humanities in initiation of intuitive moments in thinking? The problems are discussed in terms of such modern conception as Self-management, in context of the dialogue between nature and human being by Prigogine, "Farther reaches of human nature" by Maslow, and mathematical approach for modeling of mental structure elements.

  2. Tailoring Self-Management in Chronic Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touwen, ID

    2016-01-01

    Self-management is nowadays seen as an important element in chronic care and therefore, self-management is increasingly embedded in chronic care guidelines; however, implementation in clinical practice is a slow and difficult process. Evidence, from research on self-management interventions, shows

  3. A Systematic Review: Family Support Integrated with Diabetes Self-Management among Uncontrolled Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rian Adi Pamungkas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The rate of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2D is dramatically increasing worldwide. Continuing diabetes mellitus (DM care needs effective self-management education and support for both patients and family members. This study aimed to review and describe the impacts of diabetes mellitus self-management education (DSME that involve family members on patient outcomes related to patient health behaviors and perceived self-efficacy on self-management such as medication adherence, blood glucose monitoring, diet and exercise changes, health outcomes including psychological well-being and self-efficacy, and physiological markers including body mass index, level of blood pressure, cholesterol level and glycemic control. Three databases, PubMed, CINAHL, and Scopus were reviewed for relevant articles. The search terms were “type 2 diabetes,” “self-management,” “diabetes self-management education (DSME,” “family support,” “social support,” and “uncontrolled glycaemia.” Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI guidelines were used to determine which studies to include in the review. Details of the family support components of DSME intervention and the impacts of these interventions had on improving the health outcomes patients with uncontrolled glycaemia patients. A total of 22 intervention studies were identified. These studies involved different DSME strategies, different components of family support provided, and different health outcomes to be measured among T2D patients. Overall, family support had a positive impact on healthy diet, increased perceived support, higher self-efficacy, improved psychological well-being and better glycemic control. This systematic review found evidence that DSME with family support improved self-management behaviors and health outcomes among uncontrolled glycaemia T2D patients. The findings suggest DSME models that include family engagement can be a useful direction for improving diabetes care.

  4. A Systematic Review: Family Support Integrated with Diabetes Self-Management among Uncontrolled Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamungkas, Rian Adi; Chamroonsawasdi, Kanittha; Vatanasomboon, Paranee

    2017-09-15

    The rate of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is dramatically increasing worldwide. Continuing diabetes mellitus (DM) care needs effective self-management education and support for both patients and family members. This study aimed to review and describe the impacts of diabetes mellitus self-management education (DSME) that involve family members on patient outcomes related to patient health behaviors and perceived self-efficacy on self-management such as medication adherence, blood glucose monitoring, diet and exercise changes, health outcomes including psychological well-being and self-efficacy, and physiological markers including body mass index, level of blood pressure, cholesterol level and glycemic control. Three databases, PubMed, CINAHL, and Scopus were reviewed for relevant articles. The search terms were "type 2 diabetes," "self-management," "diabetes self-management education (DSME)," "family support," "social support," and "uncontrolled glycaemia." Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) guidelines were used to determine which studies to include in the review. Details of the family support components of DSME intervention and the impacts of these interventions had on improving the health outcomes patients with uncontrolled glycaemia patients. A total of 22 intervention studies were identified. These studies involved different DSME strategies, different components of family support provided, and different health outcomes to be measured among T2D patients. Overall, family support had a positive impact on healthy diet, increased perceived support, higher self-efficacy, improved psychological well-being and better glycemic control. This systematic review found evidence that DSME with family support improved self-management behaviors and health outcomes among uncontrolled glycaemia T2D patients. The findings suggest DSME models that include family engagement can be a useful direction for improving diabetes care.

  5. Important, misunderstood, and challenging: a qualitative study of nurses’ and allied health professionals’ perceptions of implementing self-management for patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young HML

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hannah ML Young,1 Lindsay D Apps,1 Samantha L Harrison,1 Vicki L Johnson-Warrington,1 Nicky Hudson,2 Sally J Singh1,3 1National Institute of Health Research CLAHRC-LNR Pulmonary Rehabilitation Research Group, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, 2School of Applied Social Sciences, De Montfort University, Leicester, 3Applied Research Centre in Health and Lifestyle Interventions, Coventry University, Coventry, UK Background: In light of the growing burden of COPD, there is increasing focus on the role of self-management for this population. Currently, self-management varies widely. Little is known either about nurses’ and allied health professionals’ (AHPs’ understanding and provision of self-management in clinical practice. This study explores nurses’ and AHPs’ understanding and implementation of supported COPD self-management within routine clinical practice. Materials and methods: Nurses and AHPs participated in face-to-face semistructured interviews to explore their understanding and provision of COPD self-management, as well as their perceptions of the challenges to providing such care. Purposive sampling was used to select participants from a range of professions working within primary, community, and secondary care settings. Three researchers independently analyzed each transcript using a thematic approach. Results: A total of 14 participants were interviewed. Nurses and AHPs viewed self-management as an important aspect of COPD care, but often misunderstood what it involved, leading to variation in practice. A number of challenges to supporting self-management were identified, which related to lack of time, lack of insight regarding training needs, and assumptions regarding patients’ perceived self-management abilities. Conclusion: Nurses and AHPs delivering self-management require clear guidance, training in the use of effective self-management skills, and education that challenges their preconceptions regarding

  6. Improving Self-Management of Type 2 Diabetes in Overweight and Inactive Patients Through an Educational and Motivational Intervention Addressing Diet and Physical Activity: A Prospective Study in Naples, South Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallé, Francesca; Di Onofrio, Valeria; Cirella, Assunta; Di Dio, Mirella; Miele, Alessandra; Spinosa, Tiziana; Liguori, Giorgio

    2017-08-01

    Nutrition and physical activity are key elements in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes. A community-based, multidisciplinary educational intervention aimed to improve quality of life and disease self-management in sedentary, overweight/obese type 2 diabetic patients was implemented in Naples, South Italy. The 9-month intervention included a motivational program, a nutrition program, and an exercise program. Satisfaction, worry, and embarrassment regarding their condition, together with disease-related behaviors and propensity towards physical activity, were evaluated through a validated questionnaire before and after the intervention; health status perception was evaluated through the short-form 12 questionnaire. Changes in HbA1c level and weight were also checked. A significant improvement (p management of hypoglycemic crisis and food choice; in nearly all the items related to living with the disease (p System.

  7. Characteristics of Chinese m-Health Applications for Diabetes Self-Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Lisa; Xie, Bo; Yang, Yan; Shan, Yan Min

    2016-07-01

    To examine the features and types of health information provided in Chinese diabetes mobile applications (apps) for patients' self-management. Through multiple rounds of screening, we identified a total of 95 relevant iOS (Apple, Cupertino, CA) and Android™ (Google, Mountain View, CA) apps and examined each app's features and health information types based on each app's description in the app stores. We used a 15-feature algorithm to evaluate the apps' abilities for supporting diabetic patients' self-management, based on U.S. national standards for diabetes self-management. We also adapted the health information wants framework to analyze the types of information that the apps provided for diabetic patients. Diabetes education was the most common feature, provided by 75% of the apps. Blood glucose checking was enabled by 65% of the apps. Diet management, insulin checking, and physical activity monitoring were enabled by 53%, 49%, and 44% of the apps, respectively. Only a small percentage of the apps enabled psychosocial support (29%) or tracking of blood pressure (14%), cholesterol (14%), or body mass index (11%). None of the apps provided all seven types of information posited by the health information wants framework. Only a small percentage of the apps provided information about psychosocial support (29%), healthcare providers (24%), or healthcare facilities (24%). Information about complementary and alternative medicine was the least likely type of information provided in the apps, with only 7% of the apps providing this type of information. Our findings have important implications for improving the quality of Chinese diabetes mobile apps to facilitate patients' self-management.

  8. Patient engagement and self-management in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graarup, Jytte; Ferrari, Pisana; Howard, Luke S

    2016-01-01

    of the patient may improve their ability to cope with pulmonary arterial hypertension, as well as help them to become effective in the self-management of their disease. Successful patient engagement can be achieved through effective education and the delivery and communication of timely, high-quality information...

  9. Health coaching in diabetes: empowering patients to self-manage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Rieger, Durhane; Rieger, Francis P

    2013-02-01

    To effectively manage diabetes mellitus, patients must adhere to treatment recommendations and healthy lifestyle behaviors, but research shows many patients do not do this. Education is effective when combined with self-management support but peer-support programs do not lead to lasting changes. Health coaching, or professional support, can be highly effective if it focuses on developing self-efficacy and skills such as goal-setting, problem-solving and managing cognitive and emotional barriers. This overview discusses the benefits of patient self-management for chronic conditions such as diabetes, core competencies for health coaching, theoretical bases and principles of health coaching interventions, delivery methods and the evidence that health coaching works for diabetes self-management. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Strategies for enhancing information, motivation, and skills for self-management behavior changes: a qualitative study of diabetes care for older adults in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Suyoung; Song, Misoon; Chang, Sun Ju; Kim, Se-An

    2014-01-01

    To describe strategies for enhancing information, motivation, and skills related to changes in diabetes self-management behavior among community-dwelling older adults in Korea. A total of five focus group interviews (three separate focus groups) were conducted with 12 older adults with type 2 diabetes and five diabetes educators. Qualitative content analysis was used. "One's own willingness and ability" emerged as a fundamental belief about the strategies for diabetes self-management. Six major themes under three categories were identified. Under the information category, the recurrent themes were: 1) repeatedly offering detailed knowledge regarding self-management, 2) providing information about current health status, and 3) identifying experiential knowledge of blood glucose control. The recurrent themes in the motivation category were: 1) ensuring a positive attitude regarding self-management, and 2) encouragement or feedback from significant others. Furthermore, in the skills category, we found that the following theme emerged: hands-on skills training with numerical standards. This study identified six tailored strategies for enhancing information, motivation, and skills for diabetes self-management behavior changes. These strategies can be used in the development of a culturally sensitive diabetes self-management program for older adults.

  11. Integrating Self-Management and Exercise for People Living with Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, A. D.; McCullough, C.; Chan, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Program for Arthritis Control through Education and Exercise, PACE-Ex[TM}, is an arthritis self-management program incorporating principles and practice of self-management, goal setting and warm water exercise. The purpose of this program review is to examine the impact of PACE-Ex on participants' self-efficacy for condition management,…

  12. Effects of a Tier 3 Self-Management Intervention Implemented with and without Treatment Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lower, Ashley; Young, K. Richard; Christensen, Lynnette; Caldarella, Paul; Williams, Leslie; Wills, Howard

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a Tier 3 peer-matching self-management intervention on two elementary school students who had previously been less responsive to Tier 1 and Tier 2 interventions. The Tier 3 self-management intervention, which was implemented in the general education classrooms, included daily electronic communication between…

  13. Evaluation of WebEase: An Epilepsy Self-Management Web Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiIorio, Colleen; Escoffery, Cam; McCarty, Frances; Yeager, Katherine A.; Henry, Thomas R.; Koganti, Archana; Reisinger, Elizabeth L.; Wexler, Bethany

    2009-01-01

    People with epilepsy have various education needs and must adopt many self-management behaviors in order to control their condition. This study evaluates WebEase, an Internet-based, theory-driven, self-management program for adults with epilepsy. Thirty-five participants took part in a 6-week pilot implementation of WebEase. The main components of…

  14. MyDiabetesMyWay: An Evolving National Data Driven Diabetes Self-Management Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wake, Deborah J; He, Jinzhang; Czesak, Anna Maria; Mughal, Fezan; Cunningham, Scott G

    2016-09-01

    MyDiabetesMyWay (MDMW) is an award-wining national electronic personal health record and self-management platform for diabetes patients in Scotland. This platform links multiple national institutional and patient-recorded data sources to provide a unique resource for patient care and self-management. This review considers the current evidence for online interventions in diabetes and discusses these in the context of current and ongoing developments for MDMW. Evaluation of MDMW through patient reported outcomes demonstrates a positive impact on self-management. User feedback has highlighted barriers to uptake and has guided platform evolution from an education resource website to an electronic personal health record now encompassing remote monitoring, communication tools and personalized education links. Challenges in delivering digital interventions for long-term conditions include integration of data between institutional and personal recorded sources to perform big data analytics and facilitating technology use in those with disabilities, low digital literacy, low socioeconomic status and in minority groups. The potential for technology supported health improvement is great, but awareness and adoption by health workers and patients remains a significant barrier. © 2016 Diabetes Technology Society.

  15. Approaches to self-management in chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Marta; Costantini, Lucia; Schneider, Sabrina; Beanlands, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Management of a chronic medical condition is a complex process and requires coordinated action between healthcare providers and patients. This process is further complicated by the fact that an increasing number of patients suffer from multiple chronic conditions. Self-management involves active participation of the patients in the everyday care of the symptoms of their illness(es) and medical treatments, as well as maintaining general health and prevention of progression of medical conditions. Managing the psychosocial consequences of illness is also an important component of self-management. Data have demonstrated that enhancing self-management improves quality of life, coping, symptom management, disability, and reduces healthcare expenditures and service utilization. To foster self-management, potential barriers to implementation as well as facilitators and supports for this approach must be acknowledged. In this article, we review various aspects of self-management in chronic illness, focusing on chronic kidney disease. Better understanding of these concepts will facilitate patient-provider collaboration, improve patient care with increased patient and staff satisfaction, and may ultimately result in better clinical outcomes and enhanced quality of life for both the patients and their families. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Levels of Interaction Provided by Online Distance Education Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhih, Mohammed; Ossiannilsson, Ebba; Berigel, Muhammet

    2017-01-01

    Interaction plays a significant role to foster usability and quality in online education. It is one of the quality standard to reveal the evidence of practice in online distance education models. This research study aims to evaluate levels of interaction in the practices of distance education centres. It is aimed to provide online distance…

  17. Pharmacist-Led Self-management Interventions to Improve Diabetes Outcomes. A Systematic Literature Review and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eikenhorst, Linda; Taxis, Katja; van Dijk, Liset; de Gier, Han

    2017-01-01

    Background: Treatment of diabetes requires a strict treatment scheme which demands patient self-management. Pharmacists are in a good position to provide self-management support. This review examines whether pharmacist-led interventions to support self-management in diabetes patients improve

  18. Pharmacist-led self-management interventions to improve diabetes outcomes. A systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikenhorst, L. van; Dijk, L. van; Taxis, K; Gier, H. de

    2017-01-01

    Background Treatment of diabetes requires a strict treatment scheme which demands patient self-management. Pharmacists are in a good position to provide self-management support. This review examines whether pharmacist-led interventions to support self-management in diabetes patients improve clinical

  19. Diabetes: Christian Worldview, Medical Distrust & Self-Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newlin Lew, Kelley; Arbuah, Nancy; Banach, Paul; Melkus, Gail

    2015-01-01

    To inform development of a combined diabetes prevention and self-management intervention in partnership with church communities, this study sampled African American church leaders and members (N=44) to qualitatively study religious beliefs and practices, diabetes prevention and self-management behaviors, and related community actions. Prior to commencing the study, internal review board approval was obtained. Although not required, community consent was officially provided by the church pastors. Individual consent was subsequently obtained from eligible community members who expressed an interest in participating in the study. Following a participatory action research approach, the inquiry group method was used. Qualitative data were analyzed with content analysis. Findings revealed Christian worldview, medical mistrust, and self-management as prominent themes. Findings suggest diabetes providers address religious orientation in the provision of care with attention to rebuilding trust with the African American community to improve health outcomes. PMID:25735754

  20. Cultural issues and other factors that affect self-management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2D) by Chinese immigrants in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eh, Kexin; McGill, Margaret; Wong, Jencia; Krass, Ines

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the influence of cultural and other factors on diabetes self-management behaviors among Australian Chinese immigrants with T2D. A cross-sectional survey was conducted between June and October 2015. The questionnaire comprised several validated scales examining aspects of self-management practice including medication adherence, acculturation and demographics. Participants were recruited from the community and Diabetes Center of the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital (RPAH), Sydney, Australia. Of the 139 participants, a majority were female, from mainland China, with high school level education and a mean age of 64 (SD±12) years. Participants were found to have poor self-management practices generally but moderate medication adherence. 13.7% of participants reported incorporating TCM into their diabetes treatment and 24% reported a cultural shame surrounding a diabetes diagnosis. Higher levels of acculturation predicted better medication adherence, whereas stronger beliefs in TCM predicted poorer medication adherence. Gender, education level and duration of diabetes were also predictors of diabetes self-management behaviors. This study provided insight into cultural influences on diabetes self-management and medication taking among Chinese immigrants in Australia. Health care providers should take these into account in delivering culturally sensitive care and advice to achieve better health outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of a chronic care ostomy self-management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Marcia; McCorkle, Ruth; Hornbrook, Mark C; Wendel, Christopher S; Krouse, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Each year a percentage of the 1.2 million men and women in the United States with a new diagnosis of colorectal cancer join the 700,000 people who have an ostomy. Education targeting the long-term, chronic care of this population is lacking. This report describes the development of a Chronic Care Ostomy Self-Management Program, which was informed by (1) evidence on published quality-of-life changes for cancer patients with ostomies, (2) educational suggestions from patients with ostomies, and (3) examination of the usual care of new ostomates to illustrate areas for continued educational emphases and areas for needed education and support. Using these materials, the Chronic Care Ostomy Self-Management Program was developed by a team of multi-disciplinary researchers accompanied by experienced ostomy nurses. Testing of the program is in process. Pilot study participants reported high satisfaction with the program syllabus, ostomy nurse leaders, and ostomate peer buddies.

  2. Development of a Chronic Care Ostomy Self Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Marcia; McCorkle, Ruth; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Wendel, Christopher S.; Krouse, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Each year a percentage of the 1.2 million men and women in the United States with a new diagnosis of colorectal cancer join the 700,000 people who have an ostomy. Education targeting the long term, chronic care of this population is lacking. This report describes the development of a Chronic Care Ostomy Self Management Program, which was informed by (1) evidence on published quality of life changes for cancer patients with ostomies, (2) educational suggestions from patients with ostomies, and (3) examination of the usual care of new ostomates to illustrate areas for continued educational emphases and areas for needed education and support. Using these materials, the Chronic Care Ostomy Self Management Program was developed by a team of multi-disciplinary researchers accompanied by experienced ostomy nurses. Testing of the program is in process. Pilot study participants reported high satisfaction with the program syllabus, ostomy nurse leaders, and ostomate peer buddies. PMID:23104143

  3. Quality assessment of websites providing educational content for patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddhanamatha, Harish Rajashekarappa; Heung, Eric; Lopez-Olivo, Maria de Los Angeles; Abdel-Wahab, Noha; Ojeda-Prias, Ana; Willcockson, Irmgard; Leong, Amye; Suarez-Almazor, Maria Eugenia

    2017-06-01

    We performed an environmental scan of currently available websites providing educational information about rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and evaluated the quality of these websites. We searched three separate search engines, Google, Bing, and Ask.com, on August 27, 2015, using two search terms, "arthritis" and "rheumatoid." Only patient education websites were included. Two independent investigators evaluated the accuracy, completeness, technical elements, design and esthetics, readability, usability, and accessibility of the websites. The navigation experience was also evaluated by an adult training expert. We identified 46 websites. Nearly all websites (98%) provided accurate information. However, no website covered all essential RA topics. Common essential topics not covered included epidemiology, pathogenesis, treatment and disease monitoring, complications, self-management, risks and benefits of treatment, prognosis, treatment adherence, questions for patients to ask their doctors, and costs. For the technical elements, all websites disclosed their ownership, but the date that the content was last updated was mentioned in only 10 websites, ranging from 2007 to 2015. The mean reading level was grade 12.1 (standard deviation ±2.3). Most websites (78%) were easy to navigate but only 33% were friendly for people with visual and/or hearing impairments. The navigation experience was rated fair or poor in 41% of the websites. Current patient information on the Internet does not comprehensively address all educational needs of patients with RA, and is often outdated. The findings from our study highlight potential areas for improvement in online education materials for patients with RA. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Chronic pain self-management for older adults: a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN11899548

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cain Kevin C

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic pain is a common and frequently disabling problem in older adults. Clinical guidelines emphasize the need to use multimodal therapies to manage persistent pain in this population. Pain self-management training is a multimodal therapy that has been found to be effective in young to middle-aged adult samples. This training includes education about pain as well as instruction and practice in several management techniques, including relaxation, physical exercise, modification of negative thoughts, and goal setting. Few studies have examined the effectiveness of this therapy in older adult samples. Methods/Design This is a randomized, controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of a pain self-management training group intervention, as compared with an education-only control condition. Participants are recruited from retirement communities in the Pacific Northwest of the United States and must be 65 years or older and experience persistent, noncancer pain that limits their activities. The primary outcome is physical disability, as measured by the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes are depression (Geriatric Depression Scale, pain intensity (Brief Pain Inventory, and pain-related interference with activities (Brief Pain Inventory. Randomization occurs by facility to minimize cross-contamination between groups. The target sample size is 273 enrolled, which assuming a 20% attrition rate at 12 months, will provide us with 84% power to detect a moderate effect size of .50 for the primary outcome. Discussion Few studies have investigated the effects of multimodal pain self-management training among older adults. This randomized controlled trial is designed to assess the efficacy of a pain self-management program that incorporates physical and psychosocial pain coping skills among adults in the mid-old to old-old range.

  5. The effect of motivational interviewing on glycaemic control and perceived competence of diabetes self-management in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus after attending a group education programme: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbek Minet, L K; Wagner, L; Lønvig, E M; Hjelmborg, J; Henriksen, J E

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the efficacy of motivational interviewing (MI) compared with usual care on changes in glycaemic control and competence of diabetes self-management in patients with diabetes mellitus. Patients were eligible if they had type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus, were over 18 years of age and had participated in a 4 day group education programme offered at a diabetes clinic at a university hospital in Denmark. Exclusion criteria included pregnancy, severe debilitating disease and cognitive deficit. Out of 469 patients who attended the group education programme, 349 patients were randomised to either a usual care control group or an intervention group, which received up to five individual counselling sessions in 1 year based on MI, in addition to usual care. A randomised parallel design was used and open-label allocation was done by random permuted blocks, with allocation concealment by sequentially numbered, sealed, opaque envelopes. The primary outcome was glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)). Analysis regarding measurements of glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) and competence of self-management (using the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale [PAID] and Perceived Competence for Diabetes Scale [PCDS]) was based on 298 participants followed for a 24 month period. Data were collected at the Department of Endocrinology at Odense University Hospital. Our hypotheses were that MI could: (1) reduce HbA(1c) levels; (2) increase self-efficacy; and (3) increase diabetes self-care, compared with usual care. Out of the 176 included in the control group and 173 in the intervention group, 153 and 145 were analysed in the groups, respectively. When using the baseline value as covariate there were no significant differences in change score between the two study groups with regard to mean level of HbA(1c) (0.131, p = 0.221), PAID scores (-1.793, p = 0.191) or PCDS scores (0.017, p = 0.903) at the 24 month follow-up, using a mixed effects regression model. The

  6. Radiographer interpretation of trauma radiographs: Issues for radiography education providers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, Maryann; Snaith, Beverly

    2009-01-01

    Background: The role of radiographers with respect to image interpretation within clinical practice is well recognised. It is the expectation of the professional, regulatory and academic bodies that upon qualification, radiographers will possess image interpretation skills. Additionally, The College of Radiographers has asserted that its aspiration is for all radiographers to be able to provide an immediate written interpretation on skeletal trauma radiographs by 2010. This paper explores the readiness of radiography education programmes in the UK to deliver this expectation. Method: A postal questionnaire was distributed to 25 Higher Education Institutions in the UK (including Northern Ireland) that provided pre-registration radiography education as identified from the Society and College of Radiographers register. Information was sought relating to the type of image interpretation education delivered at pre- and post-registration levels; the anatomical range of image interpretation education; and education delivery styles. Results: A total of 19 responses (n = 19/25; 76.0%) were received. Image interpretation education was included as part of all radiographer pre-registration programmes and offered at post-registration level at 12 academic centres (n = 12/19; 63.2%). The anatomical areas and educational delivery methods varied across institutions. Conclusion: Radiography education providers have embraced the need for image interpretation education within both pre- and post-registration radiography programmes. As a result, UK education programmes are able to meet the 2010 College of Radiographers aspiration.

  7. EMS providers do not use FOAM for education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Joshua; Donovan, Colleen; McCoy, Jonathan

    2018-05-24

    Free open access to medical education (FOAM, #FOAM) is the free availability of educational materials on various medicine topics. We hope to evaluate the use of social media and FOAM by emergency medical services (EMS) providers. We designed an online survey distributed to EMS providers with questions about demographics and social media/FOAM use by providers. The survey was sent to the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) EMS Listserv of medical directors and was asked to be distributed to their respective agencies. The survey was designed to inquire about the providers' knowledge of FOAM and social media and their use of the above for EMS education. There were 169 respondents out of a total of 523 providers yielding a response rate of 32.3%. Fifty-three percent of respondents are paramedics, 37% are EMT-Basic trained, and the remainder (16%) were "other." The minority (20%) of respondents had heard of FOAM. However, 54% of respondents had heard of "free medical education online" regarding pertinent topics. Of the total respondents who used social media for education, 31% used Facebook and 23% used blogs and podcasts as resources for online education. Only 4% of respondents stated they produced FOAM content. Seventy-six percent of respondents said they were "interested" or "very interested" in using FOAM for medical education. If FOAM provided continuing medical education (CME), 83% of respondents would be interested in using it. Social media is not used frequently by EMS providers for the purposes of FOAM. There is interest within EMS providers to use FOAM for education, even if CME was not provided. FOAM can provide a novel area of education for EMS.

  8. Self-management support for peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarian, Mari; Brault, Diane; Perreault, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic illnesses and kidney disease, in particular, makes it necessary to adopt new approaches towards their management (Wagner, 1998). Evidence suggests that promoting self-management improves the health status of peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, as they manage upwards of 90% of their own care. Patients who are unable to self-manage suffer from various complications. This project proposes an intervention aimed at improving self-management skills among PD patients. To promote self-management in peritoneal dialysis patients. This is achieved through the following objectives: (a) develop an algorithm that can improve patients' ability to solve the specific problem of fluid balance maintenance, (b) develop an educational session for patients on how to use the algorithm, and (c) develop an implementation strategy in collaboration with the PD nurse. Three measures evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. First, a telephone call log shows that participating patients call the clinic less to inquire about fluid balance maintenance. Next, a pre- and post-intervention knowledge test measures definite knowledge increase. Finally, a Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire reveals overall satisfaction with the intervention. This project, which proved beneficial to our patient population, could be duplicated in other clinics. The algorithm "How do I choose a dialysis bag" and the slides of the educational sessions can be shared with PD nurses across the country for the benefit of PD patients.

  9. A review of mobile apps for epilepsy self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoffery, Cam; McGee, Robin; Bidwell, Jonathan; Sims, Christopher; Thropp, Eliana Kovitch; Frazier, Cherise; Mynatt, Elizabeth D

    2018-04-01

    Mobile health app developers increasingly are interested in supporting the daily self-care of people with chronic conditions. The purpose of this study was to review mobile applications (apps) to promote epilepsy self-management. It investigates the following: 1) the available mobile apps for epilepsy, 2) how these apps support patient education and self-management (SM), and 3) their usefulness in supporting management of epilepsy. We conducted the review in Fall 2017 and assessed apps on the Apple App Store that related to the terms "epilepsy" and "seizure". Inclusion criteria included apps (adult and pediatric) that, as follows, were: 1) developed for patients or the community; 2) made available in English, and 3) less than $5.00. Exclusion criteria included apps that were designed for dissemination of publications, focused on healthcare providers, or were available in other languages. The search resulted in 149 apps, of which 20 met the selection criteria. A team reviewed each app in terms of three sets of criteria: 1) epilepsy-specific descriptions and SM categories employed by the apps and 2) Mobile App Rating Scale (MARS) subdomain scores for reviewing engagement, functionality, esthetics, and information; and 3) behavioral change techniques. Most apps were for adults and free. Common SM domains for the apps were treatment, seizure tracking, response, and safety. A number of epilepsy apps existed, but many offered similar functionalities and incorporated few SM domains. The findings underline the need for mobile apps to cover broader domains of SM and behavioral change techniques and to be evaluated for outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Effects of gout web based self-management program on knowledge related to disease, medication adherence, and self-management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun Soo; Park, Won; Kwon, Seong Ryul; Lim, Mie Jin; Suh, Yeon Ok; Seo, Wha Sook; Park, Jong Suk

    2013-08-01

    This study was conducted to examine the changing patterns of knowledge related to disease, medication adherence, and self-management and to determine if outcomes were more favorable in the experimental group than in the comparison group through 6 months after providing a web-based self-management intervention. A non-equivalent control group quasi-experimental design was used and 65 patients with gout, 34 in experimental group and 31 in comparison group, were selected from the rheumatic clinics of two university hospitals. Data were collected four times, at baseline, at 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after the intervention. According to the study results, the changing patterns of knowledge and self-management were more positive in the experimental group than in the control group, whereas difference in the changing pattern of medication adherence between two groups was not significant. The results indicate that the web-based self-management program has significant effect on improving knowledge and self-management for middle aged male patients with gout. However, in order to enhance medication adherence, the web-based intervention might not be sufficient and other strategies need to be added.

  11. Teaching Self-Management: The Design and Implementation of Self-Management Tutorials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Megan

    2007-01-01

    Learning the skills of self-management is an essential task for students in the 21st century. A total of 223 undergraduate students participated in 4 self-management tutorials that presented the components of understanding and mastering self-management skills including (a) self-assessment, (b) goal setting, (c) time management, and (d)…

  12. Redefining diabetes and the concept of self-management from a patient's perspective: implications for disease risk factor management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masupe, T K; Ndayi, K; Tsolekile, L; Delobelle, P; Puoane, T

    2018-02-01

    The colliding epidemics of non-communicable diseases including diabetes with chronic infectious diseases in Sub-Saharan Africa requires contextualized innovative disease management strategies. This qualitative study conducted in a peri-urban township near Cape Town, South Africa aimed to identify and gain in-depth understanding of contextual and environmental issues pertinent to the patient that could influence Type 2-diabetes mellitus (T2DM) care and self-management. Participants included purposively sampled diabetics or pre-diabetics from the community, PURE study database, facility health club and health care providers. Data collection employed in-depth interviews, focus group discussions (FGDs) using structured interviews and FGD topic guides. Thematic data analysis was done to identify recurrent themes. Themes identified: knowledge and awareness about T2DM; health-seeking behaviour; weight perceptions; healthy lifestyles; self-management; health education needs and health care provider experiences. Patients defined T2DM as a physically and emotionally dangerous disease caused by socio-cultural factors, influenced by the sufferers' food and socio-cultural environment with significance placed on physical, social and emotional effects of T2DM diagnosis. Patient-centred definition of T2DM is key to enhancing T2DM self-management. Patients suggested that personally rewarding benefits of physical activity and healthy diet such as anti-ageing, brain boosting, energy boosting which are commonly harnessed by food, tobacco and beauty industry should be considered in T2DM self-management strategies.

  13. Barriers and facilitators to diabetes self-management: perspectives of older community dwellers and health professionals in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Huixia; Edwards, Helen; Courtney, Mary; McDowell, Jan; Wei, Juan

    2013-12-01

    Little is known about self-management among people with Type 2 diabetes living in mainland China. Understanding the experiences of this target population is needed to provide socioculturally relevant education to effectively promote self-management. The aim of this study was to explore perceived barriers and facilitators to diabetes self-management for both older community dwellers and health professionals in China. Four focus groups, two for older people with diabetes and two for health professionals, were conducted. All participants were purposively sampled from two communities in Shanghai, China. Six barriers were identified: overdependence on but dislike of western medicine, family role expectations, cuisine culture, lack of trustworthy information sources, deficits in communication between clients and health professionals, and restriction of reimbursement regulations. Facilitators included family and peer support, good relationships with health professionals, simple and practical instruction and a favourable community environment. The findings provide valuable information for diabetes self-management intervention development in China, and have implications for programmes tailored to populations in similar sociocultural circumstances. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. A Systematic Review: Family Support Integrated with Diabetes Self-Management among Uncontrolled Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Pamungkas, Rian Adi; Chamroonsawasdi, Kanittha; Vatanasomboon, Paranee

    2017-01-01

    The rate of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is dramatically increasing worldwide. Continuing diabetes mellitus (DM) care needs effective self-management education and support for both patients and family members. This study aimed to review and describe the impacts of diabetes mellitus self-management education (DSME) that involve family members on patient outcomes related to patient health behaviors and perceived self-efficacy on self-management such as medication adherence, blood glucose moni...

  15. Career Self-Management and Career Capital of Mid-Level Administrators in Higher Education Who Previously Served as Professional Academic Advisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elecia Cole

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the prerequisites for career advancement helps to keep employees motivated and engaged. However, in the higher education (H.E.) workplace, where formalized career ladders are sparse and ambiguous for staff personnel--especially those in professional academic advising--employees who are interested in career advancement into mid-level…

  16. Daily self-management and work engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breevaart, K.; Bakker, A.B.; Demerouti, E.

    2014-01-01

    The present study adopts a bottom-up approach to work engagement by examining how self-management is related to employees' work engagement on a daily basis. Specifically, we hypothesized that on days that employees use more self-management strategies, they report higher resources at work and in

  17. Successful implementation of self-managing teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerheim, Wilke; Van Rossum, Lisa; Ten Have, Wouter Dirk

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Following health-care organisations, many mental health-care organisations nowadays consider starting to work with self-managing teams as their organisation structure. Although the concept could be effective, the way of implementing self-managing teams in an organisation is crucial to

  18. Successful implementation of self-managing teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerheim, W. (Wilke); Van Rossum, L. (Lisa); Ten Have, W.D. (Wouter Dirk)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Following health-care organisations, many mental health-care organisations nowadays consider starting to work with self-managing teams as their organisation structure. Although the concept could be effective, the way of implementing self-managing teams in an organisation is

  19. Motivation and Self-Management Behavior of the Individuals With Chronic Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Mi Jung; Jeong, Younhee

    2016-01-01

    Self-management behavior is an important component for successful pain management in individuals with chronic low back pain. Motivation has been considered as an effective way to change behavior. Because there are other physical, social, and psychological factors affecting individuals with pain, it is necessary to identify the main effect of motivation on self-management behavior without the influence of those factors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of motivation on self-management in controlling pain, depression, and social support. We used a nonexperimental, cross-sectional, descriptive design with mediation analysis and included 120 participants' data in the final analysis. We also used hierarchical multiple regression to test the effect of motivation, and multiple regression analysis and Sobel test were used to examine the mediating effect. Motivation itself accounted for 23.4% of the variance in self-management, F(1, 118) = 35.003, p motivation was also a significant factor for self-management. In the mediation analysis, motivation completely mediated the relationship between education and self-management, z = 2.292, p = .021. Motivation is an important part of self-management, and self-management education is not effective without motivation. The results of our study suggest that nurses incorporate motivation in nursing intervention, rather than only giving information.

  20. Modular ICT-based patient empowerment framework for self-management of diabetes: Design perspectives and validation results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprinos, Ilias; Demski, Hans; Mantwill, Sarah; Kabak, Yildiray; Hildebrand, Claudia; Ploessnig, Manuela

    2016-07-01

    professionals depends not only on the level of impact in their patients' disease management but also on the level of impact in their workflow. It is evident that a patient empowerment approach based on self-management ICT tools is useful and accepted by patients and physicians. Further, there are clear indications that ICT frameworks such as the one presented in this paper support patients in behavioral changes and in better disease management. Finally, it was realized that self-management solutions should be built around the objective not only to educate and guide patients in disease self-management, but also to assist them in exploring the decision space and to provide insight and explanations about the impact of their own values on the decision. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pharmacist-Led Self-management Interventions to Improve Diabetes Outcomes. A Systematic Literature Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda van Eikenhorst

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment of diabetes requires a strict treatment scheme which demands patient self-management. Pharmacists are in a good position to provide self-management support. This review examines whether pharmacist-led interventions to support self-management in diabetes patients improve clinical and patient-reported outcomes.Methods: This review was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines. An extended literature search was conducted with the keywords “pharmacist,” “diabetes,” and “self-management” using the electronic databases Pubmed, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library from the beginning of the database through September 2017. In addition reference lists of systematic reviews and included studies were searched. Eligibility criteria included; self-management intervention tested with an RCT, performed in an ambulatory care setting, led by a pharmacist and reporting at least one clinical- or patient-reported outcome. Primary outcomes were HbA1c (—as this is a clinical parameter for long-term diabetes follow-up, self-management and components of intervention. Secondary outcomes were blood glucose, blood pressure, BMI, lipids, adherence to medication, quality of life, and diabetes knowledge. For the meta-analysis HbA1c values were pooled with a random-effects model in Revman 5.3. Risk of bias was assessed with the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool.Results: Twenty-four studies representing 3,610 patients were included. Pharmacist-led self-management interventions included education on diabetes complications, medication, lifestyle, and teaching of self-management skills. Some studies focused on patient needs through a tailored intervention. No key components for a successful self-management intervention could be identified. Pharmacist-led self-management interventions improve HbA1c levels with a mean of 0.71% (CI −0.91, −0.51; overall effect P < 0.0001 and had a positive effect on blood pressure

  2. A systematic review of outcomes of chronic disease self-management interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Sandra; Osborne, Richard H

    2013-09-01

    To carry out a systematic review of program outcomes used in the evaluation of group-based self-management interventions aimed at people with arthritis and other chronic conditions. The systematic search was performed across databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. Both between-group and within-group effect sizes (ES) were calculated. Results were interpreted as small (ES ~ 0.2), medium (ES ~ 0.5), or large (ES ~ 0.8) effects. The majority of 18 included trials investigated the effectiveness of arthritis-specific interventions. Across most outcomes, small effects on course participants were shown. While effects on knowledge were large (between-group ES = 0.78), effects on clinical outcomes such as pain (ES = 0.10) were negligible to small. This paper is consistent with other reviews in this area, suggesting that people with arthritis receive only marginal benefits from participating in chronic disease self-management interventions. When looking at the types of outcomes that trials are based on, however, alternative explanations for these results seem probable. As evaluations heavily rely on patient self-report, current approaches to program evaluation may not be sufficient to assess the intended impact of self-management education. An in-depth investigation of the types of outcomes assessed is provided in a separate paper.

  3. Usefulness of Image Theater Workshops for Exploring Dilemmas in Diabetes Self-Management Among Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupper, Frank; Peters, Louk W H; Stuijfzand, Sarah M; den Besten, Heleen A A; van Kesteren, Nicole M C

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes treatment involves a demanding self-management regime that is particularly challenging to adolescents. There is a need for qualitative research into the specific contexts in which adolescents attempt to balance self-management demands with the needs and desires of adolescent life. This study investigates the usefulness of image theater, a participatory form of theater using the body as an expressive tool, to articulate these dilemmas in daily life contexts. We performed a qualitative analysis of two image theater workshops with 12- to 18-year-old adolescents living with diabetes. Our results show three areas of application: (a) unraveling the contextual complexity of lived experience, (b) the articulation of implicit understandings and underlying motives, and (c) the playful exploration of new behavior. We conclude that image theater is a promising method, especially with respect to the opportunities of a more contextual and action-oriented understanding of the trade-offs made in self-management provide for diabetes education and counseling.

  4. The Roles of Social Support and Health Literacy in Self-Management Among Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chi; Chang, Li-Chun; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Ho, Ya-Fang; Weng, Shuo-Chun; Tsai, Tzu-I

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the relationships among social support, health literacy, and self-management, and the factors influencing self-management of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Cross-sectional study. A random sample of 410 patients was recruited from nephrology clinics. Data were collected using structured questionnaires and chart reviews from January 2013 to February 2014. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to determine the predictive factors of self-management behaviors and ∆R 2 to determine each variable's explanatory power. Health literacy and social support were positively correlated with self-management behaviors. Furthermore, social support, health literacy, and marital status were significant predictors of self-management behaviors. Social support had a relatively greater explanatory power for self-management behaviors than did health literacy. Particularly, healthcare provider support had the greatest influence on patients' self-management behaviors. Health literacy and social support play independent positive roles in self-management behaviors of patients with CKD, with social support having a particularly dominant role. Further research using a systems approach to improving self-management behaviors is necessary to clarify the role of social support. Health literacy and social support are independently and positively related to self-management. Social support, which is a system-level factor, is a relatively stronger and crucial predictor than is health literacy. Nurses have to refine self-management programs to focus on families and adopt a systems approach to help CKD patients improve their self-management behaviors. © 2018 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  5. Statistics Report on TEQSA Registered Higher Education Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian Government Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This statistics report provides a comprehensive snapshot of national statistics on all parts of the sector for the year 2013, by bringing together data collected directly by TEQSA with data sourced from the main higher education statistics collections managed by the Australian Government Department of Education and Training. The report provides…

  6. Statistics Report on TEQSA Registered Higher Education Providers, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian Government Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This Statistics Report is the third release of selected higher education sector data held by the Australian Government Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA) for its quality assurance activities. It provides a snapshot of national statistics on all parts of the sector by bringing together data collected directly by TEQSA with data…

  7. Electronic consultation system demonstrates educational benefit for primary care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Jonas; Olayiwola, J Nwando; Knox, Margae; Murphy, Elizabeth J; Tuot, Delphine S

    2017-01-01

    Background Electronic consultation systems allow primary care providers to receive timely speciality expertise via iterative electronic communication. The use of such systems is expanding across the USA with well-documented high levels of user satisfaction. We characterise the educational impact for primary care providers of a long-standing integrated electronic consultation and referral system. Methods Primary care providers' perceptions of the educational value inherent to electronic consultation system communication and the impact on their ability to manage common speciality clinical conditions and questions were examined by electronic survey using five-point Likert scales. Differences in primary care providers' perceptions were examined overall and by primary care providers' speciality, provider type and years of experience. Results Among 221 primary care provider participants (35% response rate), 83.9% agreed or strongly agreed that the integrated electronic consultation and referral system provided educational value. There were no significant differences in educational value reported by provider type (attending physician, mid-level provider, or trainee physician), primary care providers' speciality, or years of experience. Perceived benefit of the electronic consultation and referral system in clinical management appeared stronger for laboratory-based conditions (i.e. subclinical hypothyroidism) than more diffuse conditions (i.e. abdominal pain). Nurse practitioners/physician assistants and trainee physicians were more likely to report improved abilities to manage specific clinical conditions when using the electronic consultation and/or referral system than were attending physicians, as were primary care providers with ≤10 years experience, versus those with >20 years of experience. Conclusions Primary care providers report overwhelmingly positive perceptions of the educational value of an integrated electronic consultation and referral system. Nurse

  8. Asthma Self-Management Model: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivera, Carolina M. X.; Vianna, Elcio Oliveira; Bonizio, Roni C.; de Menezes, Marcelo B.; Ferraz, Erica; Cetlin, Andrea A.; Valdevite, Laura M.; Almeida, Gustavo A.; Araujo, Ana S.; Simoneti, Christian S.; de Freitas, Amanda; Lizzi, Elisangela A.; Borges, Marcos C.; de Freitas, Osvaldo

    2016-01-01

    Information for patients provided by the pharmacist is reflected in adhesion to treatment, clinical results and patient quality of life. The objective of this study was to assess an asthma self-management model for rational medicine use. This was a randomized controlled trial with 60 asthmatic patients assigned to attend five modules presented by…

  9. Storylines of self-management: narratives of people with diabetes from a multiethnic inner city population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Collard, Anna; Campbell-Richards, Desirée; Vijayaraghavan, Shanti; Malik, Farida; Morris, Joanne; Claydon, Anne

    2011-01-01

    to analyse the narratives of people with diabetes to inform the design of culturally congruent self-management education programmes. the study was based on quasi-naturalistic story-gathering; i.e. making real-time field notes of stories shared spontaneously in diabetes self-management education groups in a socioeconomically deprived London borough. Eighty-two adults aged 25-86, from six minority ethnic groups who were in the intervention arm of a randomized controlled trial of story-sharing, participated. Stories were translated in real time by the facilitator or group members. Ethnographic field notes were transcribed, and analysed thematically (to identify self-management domains raised by participants) and interpretively for over-arching storylines (i.e. considering how self-management domains were contextualized and made meaningful in personal narratives). Analysis was informed by both biomedical and sociological theories of self-management. people with diabetes identified seven self-management domains: knowledge; diet; exercise; medication; foot care; self-monitoring; and attending check-ups. Interpretive analysis revealed eight illness storylines within which these practical issues acquired social meaning and moral worth: becoming sick; rebuilding spoiled identity; becoming a practitioner of self-management; living a disciplined and balanced life; mobilizing a care network; navigating and negotiating in the health care system; managing the micro-morality of self-management 'choices'; and taking collective action. living with diabetes involves both medically recommended behaviours and complex biographical work to make sense of and cope with illness. Self-management education programmes should take closer account of over-arching storylines that pattern experience of chronic illness and recognize that some elements of self-management knowledge cannot be pre-specified in a structured curriculum. The Royal Society of Medicine Press Ltd 2011.

  10. EMSC program manager survey on education of prehospital providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Thuy L; Belli, Karen; Shah, Manish I

    2014-01-01

    Although pediatric-specific objectives for the initial education of prehospital providers have been established, uniform implementation of these objectives and guidelines for hours of required pediatric continuing education (CE) for prehospital providers have not been established. To examine the content and number of hours of pediatric-specific education that prehospital providers receive during initial certification and recertification. Second, to identify barriers to implementing specific requirements for pediatric education of prehospital providers. Electronic surveys were sent to 55 EMS for Children (EMSC) State Partnership grantee program managers inquiring about the certification and recertification processes of prehospital providers and barriers to receiving pediatric training in each jurisdiction. We had a 91% response rate for our survey. Specified pediatric education hours exist in more states and territories for recertification (63-67%) than initial certification (41%). Limitations in funding, time, instructors, and accessibility are barriers to enhancing pediatric education. Modifying statewide policies on prehospital education and increasing hands-on training may overcome identified barriers.

  11. Exploring the perspectives of clinical professionals and support staff on implementing supported self-management for asthma in UK general practice: an IMP2ART qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Susan; Daines, Luke; Wiener-Ogilvie, Sharon; Steed, Liz; McKee, Lorna; Caress, Ann-Louise; Taylor, Stephanie J C; Pinnock, Hilary

    2017-07-18

    Despite an overwhelming evidence base, supported self-management of asthma is poorly implemented into routine practice. Strategies for implementation must address organisational routines, as well as provide resources for patients and training to improve professionals' skills. We aimed to explore the priority that primary care practices attach to asthma self-management, to describe their existing asthma management routines, and to generate innovative implementation strategies. We recruited 33 participants (23 general practitioners; seven nurses; three administrative staff) from 14 general practices. The 12 interviews and three focus groups were transcribed, coded and analysed thematically. Supported self-management was largely a nurse-led task within clinic-based annual reviews. Barriers included poor attendance at asthma clinics, lack of time, demarcation of roles, limited access to a range of tailored resources, and competing agendas in consultation, often due to multimorbidity. Suggestions for initiatives to improve the provision of supported self-management included emphasising the evidence for benefit (to influence prioritisation), improving teamwork (including team-based education), organisational strategies (including remote consulting) which need to fit within existing practice routines. Technology offers some potential solutions (e.g., improved templates, 'app'-based plans), but must be integrated with the practice information technology systems. Building on these insights, we will now develop a theoretically-based implementation strategy that will address patient, professional, and organisational buy-in, provide team-based education and offer a range of practical options and tools, which can be adapted and integrated within existing routines of individual practices.OVERCOMING THE ORGANISATIONAL BARRIERS TO IMPLEMENTING ASTHMA SELF-MANAGEMENT: Understanding the routines of primary care practices can suggest strategies to implement supported self-management

  12. Alexithymia, Illness Perception and Self-management Competency in Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie H. Larsen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Alexithymia, defined as difficulty in describing or recognizing emotions, has been shown to be connected with psoriasis, but its relationship with self-management of psoriasis has not been explored. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of alexithymia and its relationship with self-management and illness perception in the context of psoriasis. A total of 163 patients participating in 3 weeks of climate heliotherapy (CHT at Gran Canaria were assessed for alexithymia using the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20 at baseline. Self-reported measures for self-management (Health Education Impact Questionnaire; heiQ, and disease severity and illness perception (Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire; BIPQ were assessed twice. Of all patients, 14.1% were characterized as alexithymic and 22.1% scored in the intermediate range. Alexithymic patients scored significantly worse in all heiQ domains, and reported worse illness perception. However, there were no between-group differences in heiQ or BIPQ change from baseline to after CHT. In conclusion, this study shows that alexithymia indicates inferior self-management and reaffirms the associations with illness perception. Further research is required into these relationships.

  13. Managing epilepsy well: self-management needs assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Robert T; Johnson, Erica K; Miller, John W; Temkin, Nancy; Barber, Jason; Caylor, Lisa; Ciechanowski, Paul; Chaytor, Naomi

    2011-02-01

    Epilepsy self-management interventions have been investigated with respect to health care needs, medical adherence, depression, anxiety, employment, and sleep problems. Studies have been limited in terms of representative samples and inconsistent or restricted findings. The direct needs assessment of patients with epilepsy as a basis for program design has not been well used as an approach to improving program participation and outcomes. This study investigated the perceived medical and psychosocial problems of adults with epilepsy, as well as their preferences for self-management program design and delivery format. Results indicated a more psychosocially challenged subgroup of individuals with significant depressive and cognitive complaints. A self-management program that involves face-to-face individual or group meetings led by an epilepsy professional and trained peer leader for 60 minutes weekly was preferred. Six to eight sessions focused on diverse education sessions (e.g., managing disability and medical care, socializing on a budget, and leading a healthy lifestyle) and emotional coping strategies delivered on weeknights or Saturday afternoons were most highly endorsed. Emotional self-management and cognitive compensatory strategies require special emphasis given the challenges of a large subgroup. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Planning start-up: digital educational game solutions provider

    OpenAIRE

    Paschalis, Antreas; Ibironke, Fakinkunmi; Essa, Lubna; Alsatrawi, Ali Jawad

    2015-01-01

    Game-based learning is a growing field that provides education with a new perspective of teaching through games. Game based learning is still considered an emerging field due to problems that have been identified in its real applications in official education in classes. The research conducted shows a very attractive market ahead for game based learning around the world. However the businesses success in this domain lie in providing value proposition that addresses the real barriers faced tod...

  15. A multifaceted community-based asthma intervention in Chicago: effects of trigger reduction and self-management education on asthma morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turyk, Mary; Banda, Elizabeth; Chisum, Gay; Weems, Dolores; Liu, Yangyang; Damitz, Maureen; Williams, Rhonda; Persky, Victoria

    2013-09-01

    Home-based, multifaceted interventions have been effective in reducing asthma morbidity in children. However, identification of independent components that contribute to outcomes and delineating effectiveness by level of asthma symptoms would help to refine the intervention and target appropriate populations. A community health educator led asthma intervention implemented in a low-income African-American neighborhood included asthma management education, individually tailored low-cost asthma home trigger remediation, and referrals to social and medical agencies, when appropriate. Changes in asthma morbidity measures were assessed in relation to implementation of individual intervention components using multivariable logistic regression. Among the 218 children who completed the year-long program, there were significant reductions in measures of asthma morbidity, including symptoms, urgent care visits, emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations, missed school days, and missed work days for caretakers. We also found significant decreases in the prevalence of many home asthma triggers and improvements in asthma management practices. Improvement in caretaker's ability to manage the child's asthma was associated with reduction in ED visits for asthma and uncontrolled asthma. Specific home interventions, such as repair of water leaks and reduced exposure to plants, dust, clutter and stuffed toys, may be related to reduction in asthma morbidity. This program was effective in reducing asthma morbidity in low-income African-American children and identified specific interventions as possible areas to target in future projects. Furthermore, the intervention was useful in children with persistent asthma symptoms as well as those with less frequent asthma exacerbations.

  16. Effectiveness of a diabetes education and self management programme (DESMOND) for people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus: three year follow-up of a cluster randomised controlled trial in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khunti, Kamlesh; Gray, Laura J; Skinner, Timothy; Carey, Marian E; Realf, Kathryn; Dallosso, Helen; Fisher, Harriet; Campbell, Michael; Heller, Simon; Davies, Melanie J

    2012-04-26

    To measure whether the benefits of a single education and self management structured programme for people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus are sustained at three years. Three year follow-up of a multicentre cluster randomised controlled trial in primary care, with randomisation at practice level. 207 general practices in 13 primary care sites in the United Kingdom. 731 of the 824 participants included in the original trial were eligible for follow-up. Biomedical data were collected on 604 (82.6%) and questionnaire data on 513 (70.1%) participants. A structured group education programme for six hours delivered in the community by two trained healthcare professional educators compared with usual care. The primary outcome was glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) levels. The secondary outcomes were blood pressure, weight, blood lipid levels, smoking status, physical activity, quality of life, beliefs about illness, depression, emotional impact of diabetes, and drug use at three years. HbA(1c) levels at three years had decreased in both groups. After adjusting for baseline and cluster the difference was not significant (difference -0.02, 95% confidence interval -0.22 to 0.17). The groups did not differ for the other biomedical and lifestyle outcomes and drug use. The significant benefits in the intervention group across four out of five health beliefs seen at 12 months were sustained at three years (Pdiabetes mellitus showed no difference in biomedical or lifestyle outcomes at three years although there were sustained improvements in some illness beliefs. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN17844016.

  17. Factors influencing exacerbation-related self-management in patients with COPD: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpershoek, Yjg; Vervoort, Scjm; Nijssen, Lit; Trappenburg, Jca; Schuurmans, M J

    2016-01-01

    In patients with COPD, self-management skills are important to reduce the impact of exacerbations. However, both detection and adequate response to exacerbations appear to be difficult for some patients. Little is known about the underlying process of exacerbation-related self-management. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify and explain the underlying process of exacerbation-related self-management behavior. A qualitative study using semi-structured in-depth interviews was performed according to the grounded theory approach, following a cyclic process in which data collection and data analysis alternated. Fifteen patients (male n=8; age range 59-88 years) with mild to very severe COPD were recruited from primary and secondary care settings in the Netherlands, in 2015. Several patterns in exacerbation-related self-management behavior were identified, and a conceptual model describing factors influencing exacerbation-related self-management was developed. Acceptance, knowledge, experiences with exacerbations, perceived severity of symptoms and social support were important factors influencing exacerbation-related self-management. Specific factors influencing recognition of exacerbations were heterogeneity of exacerbations and habituation to symptoms. Feelings of fear, perceived influence on exacerbation course, patient beliefs, ambivalence toward treatment, trust in health care providers and self-empowerment were identified as specific factors influencing self-management actions. This study provided insight into factors influencing exacerbation-related self-management behavior in COPD patients. The conceptual model can be used as a framework for health care professionals providing self-management support. In the development of future self-management interventions, factors influencing the process of exacerbation-related self-management should be taken into account.

  18. Effectiveness of the diabetes education and self management for ongoing and newly diagnosed (DESMOND) programme for people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, M. J.; Heller, S.; Skinner, T. C.

    2008-01-01

    .001); directions of change were positive indicating greater understanding of diabetes. The intervention group had a lower depression score at 12 months: mean difference was -0.50 (95% confidence interval -0.96 to -0.04); P=0.032. A positive association was found between change in perceived personal responsibility....... Main outcome measures: Haemoglobin A1c levels, blood pressure, weight, blood lipid levels, smoking status, physical activity, quality of life, beliefs about illness, depression, and emotional impact of diabetes at baseline and up to 12 months. Main results: Haemoglobin A1c levels at 12 months had...... and weight loss at 12 months (β=0.12; P=0.008). Conclusion: A structured group education programme for patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes resulted in greater improvements in weight loss and smoking cessation and positive improvements in beliefs about illness but no difference in haemoglobin A 1c...

  19. Diabetes Camp as Continuing Education for Diabetes Self-Management in Middle-Aged and Elderly People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Park

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDespite the established benefits of diabetes camps for the continuing education of children with type 1 diabetes mellitus, little is known about the long-term metabolic benefits of diabetes camps for middle-aged and elderly people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, especially in terms of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c variability.MethodsThe 1-year mean and variability of HbA1c before and after the diabetes camp was compared between the participants of the diabetes camp (n=57; median age 65 years [range, 50 to 86 years]; median diabetes duration 14 years [range, 1 to 48 years]. Additional case-control analysis compared the metabolic outcomes of the participants of the diabetes camp and their propensity score-matched controls who underwent conventional diabetes education (n=93.ResultsThe levels of HbA1c during the first year after the diabetes camp were comparable to those of the matched controls (P=0.341. In an analysis of all participants of the diabetes camp, the 1-year mean±standard deviation (SD of HbA1c decreased (P=0.010 and P=0.041 after the diabetes camp, whereas the adjusted SD and coefficient of variance (CV of HbA1c did not decrease. The adjusted SD and CV significantly decreased after the diabetes camp in participants whose 1-year mean HbA1c was ≥6.5% before the diabetes camp (n=40 and those with a duration of diabetes less than 15 years (n=32.ConclusionThe 1-year mean and SD of HbA1c decreased after the diabetes camp, with significant reduction in the adjusted SD and CV in those with higher baseline HbA1c and a shorter duration of diabetes.

  20. Commercially Available Smartphone Apps to Support Postoperative Pain Self-Management: Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalloo, Chitra; Shah, Ushma; Birnie, Kathryn A; Davies-Chalmers, Cleo; Rivera, Jordan; Stinson, Jennifer; Campbell, Fiona

    2017-10-23

    included apps were designed exclusively for the Android platform. Education was the most common self-management feature offered (8/10, 80%), with none of the apps offering features related to goal setting or social support. Overall, no single app was comprehensive in terms of pain self-management content. Five (50%) apps reported the involvement of a health care provider in their development. However, not a single app involved end users in their development, and none of the apps underwent scientific evaluation. Additionally, none of the apps were designed for use in pediatric patients. Currently available postoperative pain apps for patients lack evidence-based content, goal setting, and social support functions. There is a need to develop and test comprehensive theory-based apps to support patients with pain self-management care following surgery. ©Chitra Lalloo, Ushma Shah, Kathryn A Birnie, Cleo Davies-Chalmers, Jordan Rivera, Jennifer Stinson, Fiona Campbell. Originally published in JMIR Mhealth and Uhealth (http://mhealth.jmir.org), 23.10.2017.

  1. Behavioural Change in Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management: Why and How?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Valerie L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether the communication process between diabetes health professionals and people intensively self-managing their type 1 diabetes influenced behavioural change. Design: Telephone interviews to provide insight into the communication process and its influence on diabetes intensive self-management behaviour. Setting:…

  2. Personalized and contextualized information in self-management systems for chronically ill patients (PERISCOPE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laverman, M.; Schonk, J.H.M.; Boog, P.J.M. van der; Neerincx, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation - It is becoming necessary to seriously consider self-management in the treatment of chronically ill patients. A number of self-management applications have already been developed, but an explicit theoretical model is lacking. The PERISCOPE-project aims to provide (1) a conceptual

  3. Self-management in daily life with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Gitte Susanne; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this integrative review is to identify and discuss patient needs for education to support self-management in daily life with psoriasis. As psoriasis increasingly gains recognition as a serious chronic autoimmune skin disease with long-term impairment on the life course, and not mainly...... a cosmetic problem, nurses are highly challenged to develop efficient education to support patient self-management. The paper includes five stages: (1) problem identification, (2) literature search, (3) data evaluation, (4) data analysis and synthesis, and (5) presentation, based on theoretic scaffolding...... around the concept "need." Nineteen of 164 original papers within nursing, medicine and psychology, and reflecting patient perspective were included. To capture the patients' cultural understanding of the implications of the disease and care, we developed an interlevel model indicating that self...

  4. An evaluation of the effectiveness of self-management interventions for people with type 2 diabetes after an acute coronary syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanash, Mu'ath Ibrahim; Fitzsimons, Donna; Coates, Vivien; Deaton, Christi

    2017-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes is highly prevalent in patients with acute coronary syndrome and impacts negatively on health outcomes and self-management. Both conditions share similar risk factors. However, there is insufficient evidence on the effectiveness of combined interventions to promote self-management behaviour for people with diabetes and cardiac problems. Identifying critical features of successful interventions will inform future integrated self-management programmes for patients with both conditions. To assess the evidence on the effectiveness of existing interventions to promote self-management behaviour for patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome and type 2 diabetes in secondary care settings and postdischarge. We searched MEDLINE, PubMed, CINAHL Plus, PsycInfo, Cochrane Library and AMED for randomised controlled trials published between January 2005-December 2014. The search was performed using the following search terms of 'acute coronary syndrome', 'type 2 diabetes' and 'self-management intervention' and their substitutes combined. Of 4275 articles that were retrieved, only four trials met all the inclusion criteria (population, intervention, comparison and outcome) and were analysed. Overall, the results show that providing combined interventions for patients with both conditions including educational sessions supported by multimedia or telecommunication technologies was partially successful in promoting self-management behaviours. Implementation of these combined interventions during patient's hospitalisation and postdischarge was feasible. Intervention group subjects reported a significant improvement in self-efficacy, level of knowledge, glycated haemoglobin, blood pressure and fasting glucose test. However, there are many threats have been noticed around internal validity of included studies that could compromise the conclusions drawn. With limited research in this area, there was no final evidence to support effectiveness of combined

  5. Medical advice and diabetes self-management reported by Mexican-American, Black- and White-non-Hispanic adults across the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaccaro Joan A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes has reached epidemic proportions in the United States, particularly among minorities, and if improperly managed can lead to medical complications and death. Healthcare providers play vital roles in communicating standards of care, which include guidance on diabetes self-management. The background of the client may play a role in the patient-provider communication process. The aim of this study was to determine the association between medical advice and diabetes self care management behaviors for a nationally representative sample of adults with diabetes. Moreover, we sought to establish whether or not race/ethnicity was a modifier for reported medical advice received and diabetes self-management behaviors. Methods We analyzed data from 654 adults aged 21 years and over with diagnosed diabetes [130 Mexican-Americans; 224 Black non-Hispanics; and, 300 White non-Hispanics] and an additional 161 with 'undiagnosed diabetes' [N = 815(171 MA, 281 BNH and 364 WNH] who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 2007-2008. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate whether medical advice to engage in particular self-management behaviors (reduce fat or calories, increase physical activity or exercise, and control or lose weight predicted actually engaging in the particular behavior and whether the impact of medical advice on engaging in the behavior differed by race/ethnicity. Additional analyses examined whether these relationships were maintained when other factors potentially related to engaging in diabetes self management such as participants' diabetes education, sociodemographics and physical characteristics were controlled. Sample weights were used to account for the complex sample design. Results Although medical advice to the patient is considered a standard of care for diabetes, approximately one-third of the sample reported not receiving dietary, weight management, or physical

  6. Relationship between personality trait and self- management in diabetic patients referred to Bushehr medical centers in 2012-13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azita Noroozi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Diabetes is a serious problem and self- management is effective factor for diabetes control. Personality trait is one of the important factors in diabetes self- management. In this study, purpose was determination of effective personality traits in self- management. Material and Methods: In this cross sectional study, data were collected from a convenience sample of 396 diabetic patients, using self- management and Big five personality Scales. For data analysis, multiple linear regression models were used. Results: Among five personality traits, the most effective traits in self- management were conscientiousness, openness, and extraversion (R2= 32%. Conscientiousness and openness were significant predictors for all of self- management aspects. Extraversion was effective factors in self- regulation, self- integration, and following treatment. Conclusion: The education for diabetic patients with neuroticism and agreeableness traits is necessary and Patients with conscientiousness, openness, and extraversion traits can be used as model in educational process.

  7. Self-management-support in dementia care: A mixed methods study among nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkaik, Renate; van Antwerpen-Hoogenraad, Paulien; de Veer, Anke; Francke, Anneke; Huis In Het Veld, Judith

    2017-11-01

    Background Self-management in patients and family caregivers confronted with dementia is not self-evident. Self-management skills may be limited because of the progressive cognitive decline of the patient and because family caregivers are often also very aged. Self-management support by nursing staff is therefore of paramount importance. Objectives To gain insight into how nursing staff perceive their self-management support tasks, and how they put them into practice. Research questions are: 'What are the opinions and experiences of Dutch nursing staff working in home care or residential elderly care regarding self-management support for people with dementia and their family caregivers?' and 'Do nursing staff feel sufficiently trained and skilled for self-management support?'. Methods A mixed methods approach was used, combining cross-sectional quantitative survey data from 206 Dutch nursing professionals with qualitative interviews among 12 nursing staff working in home care or residential elderly care in The Netherlands. Results Nursing staff working in home care experienced self-management support of people with dementia as a part of their job and as an attractive task. They consider 'helping people with dementia to maintain control over their lives by involving them in decisions in daily care' the essence of self-management support. Nursing staff saw family caregivers as their main partners in providing self-management support to the patient. They were less aware that family caregivers themselves might also need self-management support. Nursing staff often felt insufficiently trained to give adequate self-management support. RN's and CNA's did not differ in their opinions, experiences and training needs. Conclusions Nursing staff in home care do consider self-management support an important and attractive task in dementia care. Their skills for providing self-management support to patients with dementia and family caregivers need improvement. Recommendations

  8. Education for ECMO providers: Using education science to bridge the gap between clinical and educational expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Lindsay; Williams, Susan B; Ades, Anne

    2018-03-01

    A well-organized educational curriculum for the training of both novice and experienced ECMO providers is critical for the continued function of an institutional ECMO program. ELSO provides guidance for the education for ECMO specialists, physicians and staff, which incorporates "traditional" instructor-centered educational methods, such as didactic lectures and technical skill training. Novel research suggests utilization of strategies that align with principles of adult learning to promote active learner involvement and reflection on how the material can be applied to understand existing and new constructs may be more effective. Some examples include the "flipped classroom," e-learning, simulation, and interprofessional education. These methodologies have been shown to improve active participation, which can be related to improvements in understanding and long-term retention. A novel framework for ECMO training is considered. Challenges in assessment and credentialing are also discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Nurse education and willingness to provide spiritual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Fen; Tseng, Hui-Chen; Liao, Yu-Chen

    2016-03-01

    Spiritual care is a critical part of holistic care, and nurses require adequate preparation to address the spiritual needs of patients. However, nurses' willingness to provide such care has rarely been reported. Hence, nurses' education, and knowledge of spiritual care, as well as their willingness to provide it require further study. A convenience sample of 200 nurses participated in the study. Quantitative data were collected using a 21-item Spiritual Care Needs Inventory (content validity index=.87; Cronbach's alpha=.96). The majority of participants were female (96.5%, n=193) between 21 and 59years old (mean=35.1years). Moreover, the majority of participants had a Bachelor's degree (74.0%, n=148) and 1-36years of clinical experience (mean=12.13years). Regarding religious beliefs, 63 (31.5%) had no religious belief, and 93 (46.5%) did not engage in any religious activity. Overall, the nurses were willing to provide spiritual care, although only 25 (12.5%) felt that they had received adequate education. The findings of this study indicate the need for further educational preparation in spiritual care for nurses. Specifically, additional teaching materials are required that are more directly related to spiritual care. Greater emphasis should be placed on different subject areas in school-based education, continuing education, and self-learning education according to the needs of nurses. Since spiritual care education needs policy support, in-depth discussions should take place regarding the approach and cultural environment for providing spiritual care in future nursing courses. Moreover, further studies should investigate barriers in providing spiritual nursing care to patients and whether they are the results of a lack of relevant knowledge or other factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Towards Self-Managed Executable Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius; Zhang, Weishan; Ingstrup, Mads

    2008-01-01

    An issue in self-managed systems is that different abstractions and programming models are used on different architectural layers, leading to systems that are harder to build and understand. To alleviate this, we introduce a self-management approach which combines high-level Petri nets...... with the capability of distributed communication among nets. Organized in a three-layer goal management, change management, and component control architecture this allows for self-management in distributed systems. We validate the approach through the Flamenco/CPN middleware that allows for self-management of service......-oriented pervasive computing systems through the runtime interpretation of colored Petri nets. The current work focuses on the change management and component control layers....

  11. Economic evaluation of chronic disease self-management for people with diabetes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teljeur, C; Moran, P S; Walshe, S; Smith, S M; Cianci, F; Murphy, L; Harrington, P; Ryan, M

    2017-08-01

    To systematically review the evidence on the costs and cost-effectiveness of self-management support interventions for people with diabetes. Self-management support is the provision of education and supportive interventions to increase patients' skills and confidence in managing their health problems, potentially leading to improvements in HbA 1c levels in people with diabetes. Randomized controlled trials, observational studies or economic modelling studies were eligible for inclusion in the review. The target population was adults with diabetes. Interventions had to have a substantial component of self-management support and be compared with routine care. Study quality was evaluated using the Consensus on Health Economic Criteria and International Society of Pharmacoeconomic Outcomes Research questionnaires. A narrative review approach was used. A total of 16 costing and 21 cost-effectiveness studies of a range of self-management support interventions were identified. There was reasonably consistent evidence across 22 studies evaluating education self-management support programmes suggesting these interventions are cost-effective or superior to usual care. Telemedicine-type interventions were more expensive than usual care and potentially not cost-effective. There was insufficient evidence regarding the other types of self-management interventions, including pharmacist-led and behavioural interventions. The identified studies were predominantly of poor quality, with outcomes based on short-term follow-up data and study designs at high risk of bias. Self-management support education programmes may be cost-effective. There was limited evidence regarding other formats of self-management support interventions. The poor quality of many of the studies undermines the evidence base regarding the economic efficiency of self-management support interventions for people with diabetes. © 2016 Diabetes UK.

  12. Picture Good Health: A Church-Based Self-Management Intervention Among Latino Adults with Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Arshiya A; Benitez, Amanda; Locklin, Cara A; Gao, Yue; Lee, Sang Mee; Quinn, Michael T; Solomon, Marla C; Sánchez-Johnsen, Lisa; Burnet, Deborah L; Chin, Marshall H

    2015-10-01

    Churches may provide a familiar and accessible setting for chronic disease self-management education and social support for Latinos with diabetes. We assessed the impact of a multi-faceted church-based diabetes self-management intervention on diabetes outcomes among Latino adults. This was a community-based, randomized controlled, pilot study. One-hundred adults with self-reported diabetes from a Midwestern, urban, low-income Mexican-American neighborhood were included in the study. Intervention participants were enrolled in a church-based diabetes self-management program that included eight weekly group classes led by trained lay leaders. Enhanced usual care participants attended one 90-minute lecture on diabetes self-management at a local church. The primary outcome was change in glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C). Secondary outcomes included changes in low-density lipoproteins (LDL), blood pressure, weight, and diabetes self-care practices. Participants' mean age was 54 ± 12 years, 81 % were female, 98 % were Latino, and 51 % were uninsured. At 3 months, study participants in both arms decreased their A1C from baseline (-0.32 %, 95 % confidence interval [CI]: -0.62, -0.02 %). The difference in change in A1C, LDL, blood pressure and weight from baseline to 3-month and 6-month follow-up was not statistically significant between the intervention and enhanced usual care groups. Intervention participants reported fewer days of consuming high fat foods in the previous week (-1.34, 95 % CI: -2.22, -0.46) and more days of participating in exercise (1.58, 95 % CI: 0.24, 2.92) compared to enhanced usual care from baseline to 6 months. A pilot church-based diabetes self-management intervention did not reduce A1C, but resulted in decreased high fat food consumption and increased participation in exercise among low-income Latino adults with diabetes. Future church-based interventions may need to strengthen linkages to the healthcare system and provide continued support to

  13. Design Considerations for Internet-Delivered Self-Management Programs for Adults With Hearing Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preminger, Jill E; Rothpletz, Ann M

    2016-10-01

    Hearing impairment (HI) is a chronic condition; thus, even with treatment, residual participation restrictions and activity limitations typically remain. Individuals must learn to self-manage their HI. The purpose of this research note is to review components of successful Internet-based self-management programs and to evaluate group auditory rehabilitation (AR) programs with varying content, in order to make recommendations for the design of future Internet-based self-management programs. Effect sizes for changes in HI-specific quality of life following group AR activities from 4 published studies were calculated to determine if effect size varied systematically as a function of group activities. These findings are described using a self-management framework. Successful group AR activities include (a) psychosocial activities to promote role management, emotional management, and social support; (b) informational lectures and group discussion to promote education; (c) communication strategy exercises to promote self-efficacy and self-management skills; and (d) the inclusion of a frequent communication partner to promote social support and self-tailoring. It is recommended that future Internet-based self-management programs focus on the mechanisms of social support and education to promote learning and self-management skills. Future research will determine if these AR activities may be implemented effectively via the Internet.

  14. The effect of diabetes self-management education on HbA1c and quality of life in African-Americans: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Amy T; Crittendon, Denine R; White, Neva; Mills, Geoffrey D; Diaz, Victor; LaNoue, Marianna D

    2018-05-16

    Type 2 diabetes presents a major morbidity and mortality burden in the United States. Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is an intervention associated with improved hemoglobin A1c(HbA1c) and quality of life(QOL), and is recommended for all individuals with type 2 diabetes. African-Americans have disproportionate type 2 diabetes morbidity and mortality, yet no prior meta-analyses have examined DSME outcomes exclusively in this population. This systematic review and meta-analysis examined the impact of DSME on HbA1c and QOL in African-Americans compared to usual care. Randomized controlled trials, cluster-randomized trials, and quasi-experimental interventions were included. 352 citations were retrieved; 279 abstracts were reviewed, and 44 full-text articles were reviewed. Fourteen studies were eligible for systematic review and 8 for HbA1c meta-analysis; QOL measures were too heterogeneous to pool. Heterogeneity of HbA1c findings was assessed with Cochran's Q and I 2 . HbA1c weighted mean difference between intervention and usual care participants was not significant: - 0.08%[- 0.40-0.23];χ 2  = 84.79 (p < .001), I 2  = 92%, (n = 1630). Four of five studies measuring QOL reported significant improvements for intervention participants. Meta-analysis results showed non-significant effect of DSME on HbA1c in African-Americans. QOL did show improvement and is an important DSME outcome to measure in future trials. Further research is needed to understand effectiveness of DSME on HbA1c in this population. PROSPERO registration: CRD42017057282 .

  15. Toward consensus on self-management support: the international chronic condition self-management support framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Susan L; Brady, Teresa J; Jayanthan, Janaki; Ziabakhsh, Shabnam; Sargious, Peter M

    2017-12-01

    Self-management support (SMS) initiatives have been hampered by insufficient attention to underserved and disadvantaged populations, a lack of integration between health, personal and social domains, over emphasis on individual responsibility and insufficient attention to ethical issues. This paper describes a SMS framework that provides guidance in developing comprehensive and coordinated approaches to SMS that may address these gaps and provides direction for decision makers in developing and implementing SMS initiatives in key areas at local levels. The framework was developed by researchers, policy-makers, practitioners and consumers from 5 English-speaking countries and reviewed by 203 individuals in 16 countries using an e-survey process. While developments in SMS will inevitably reflect local and regional contexts and needs, the strategic framework provides an emerging consensus on how we need to move SMS conceptualization, planning and development forward. The framework provides definitions of self-management (SM) and SMS, a collective vision, eight guiding principles and seven strategic directions. The framework combines important and relevant SM issues into a strategic document that provides potential value to the SMS field by helping decision-makers plan SMS initiatives that reflect local and regional needs and by catalyzing and expanding our thinking about the SMS field in relation to system thinking; shared responsibility; health equity and ethical issues. The framework was developed with the understanding that our knowledge and experience of SMS is continually evolving and that it should be modified and adapted as more evidence is available, and approaches in SMS advance. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Inner City Providence: Implications for Education. Attachment 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Walter J.

    This is a collection of raw data and brief descriptions of the neighborhoods which compose the inner city of Providence. It was compiled so that staff, teachers, and the community leaders could think together about the implications of these data for the schools, education, and for the social studies project. Demographic data on the seven…

  17. Development of Family-Based Dietary Self-Management Support Program on Dietary Behaviors in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Indonesia: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aklima Aklima

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: WHO statistics show that Indonesia has the fourth highest number of diabetes sufferers. The International Diabetes Federation‟s 5th estimated that in 2011 there were 71.4 million people in South East Asia region were suffering with DM Purpose: To develop a family-based dietary self-management support program to improve dietary behaviors in patients with T2DM. Method: A literature review was conducted by reviewing articles related evidence-based practices. Only articles in the English and Indonesian languages were reviewed. The search found eleven published experimental studies related to the topic. Result: Even though dietary self-management has benefits for patients with diabetes, many studies have found that these patients often have difficulty in establishing or maintaining an effective program to self-manage their dietary behaviors. Lack of family support is one factor that often seems to be related to such failures. Family participation in a diabetes education program also had positive psychosocial impacts. Otherwise, another study found that family might not always have a positive impact on self-management. Therefore, this review recommends that development of a family-based support program could be a positive factor in helping to improve dietary self-management behaviors in patients with T2DM. Self-management theory by Funnell and Anderson‟s work (2004 can guide the development of a program with the goal of empowering individuals and families in improving the patient‟s dietary behaviors. The program consists of: (1 reflecting on current and/or past self-management experiences by listening to the patient about their dietary behaviors, (2 discussing the emotions and feelings of the patients, (3 engaging the patient in improving their situation by active listening and helping the patient reflect on their problems and identifying effective strategies, (4 providing information about dietary management and problem

  18. Support for self-management of cardiovascular disease by people with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Anita F; Naji, Simon; Kroll, Thilo

    2012-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the second most common cause of death among people with learning disabilities (LD), and lifestyle has been linked to risk factors. With a shift towards illness prevention and self-management support, it is important to know how people with LD can be involved in this process. To elicit the perceptions of people with LD, carers and health professionals regarding supported self-management of CVD. A qualitative approach used in-depth semi-structured interviews based on vignettes with accompanying pictures. Fourteen people with LD, 11 carers/care staff and 11 health professionals were recruited and interviewed. Thematic framework analysis was used to analyse interview data. In total, 11 men and 25 women were interviewed. All respondents contributed views of self-management with a wide range of opinions expressed within each participant group. Four key themes encompassed: strategies for self-management; understanding the prerequisites for self-management support; preferred supporters and challenges for self-management implementation. Facilitated service user involvement in self-management decision making was highly valued in all groups. Service users wished for co-ordinated incremental support from across agencies and individuals. People with LD can be effectively consulted regarding health management and their views can inform service development. Promoting joined-up support across health and social care and families will require investment in resources, education and dismantling of professional barriers.

  19. Qualitative systematic review of barriers and facilitators to self-management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: views of patients and healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Siân; Ogunbayo, Oladapo J; Newham, James J; Heslop-Marshall, Karen; Netts, Paul; Hanratty, Barbara; Beyer, Fiona; Kaner, Eileen

    2018-01-17

    Self-management interventions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can improve quality of life, reduce hospital admissions, and improve symptoms. However, many factors impede engagement for patients and practitioners. Qualitative research, with its focus on subjective experience, can provide invaluable insights into such factors. Therefore, a systematic review and synthesis of qualitative evidence on COPD self-management from the perspective of patients, carers, and practitioners was conducted. Following a systematic search and screening, 31 studies were appraised and data extracted for analysis. This review found that patients can adapt to COPD; however, learning to self-manage is often a protracted process. Emotional needs are considerable; frustration, depression, and anxiety are common. In addition, patients can face an assortment of losses and limitations on their lifestyle and social interaction. Over time, COPD can consume their existence, reducing motivation. Support from family can prove vital, yet tinged with ambivalence and burden. Practitioners may not have sufficient time, resources, or appropriate skills or confidence to provide effective self-management support, particularly in regard to patients' psychosocial needs. This can compound patients' capability to engage in self-management. For COPD self-management to be effective, patients' psychosocial needs must be prioritised alongside medication and exacerbation management. In addition, patients' personal beliefs regarding COPD and its management should be reviewed periodically to avoid problematic behaviours and enhance positive adaptions to the disease. Patients with COPD are not a homogenous group and no one intervention will prove effective for all. Finally, practitioners require greater education, training, and support to successfully assist patients.

  20. Model of Providing Assistive Technologies in Special Education Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lersilp, Suchitporn; Putthinoi, Supawadee; Chakpitak, Nopasit

    2015-05-14

    Most students diagnosed with disabilities in Thai special education schools received assistive technologies, but this did not guarantee the greatest benefits. The purpose of this study was to survey the provision, use and needs of assistive technologies, as well as the perspectives of key informants regarding a model of providing them in special education schools. The participants were selected by the purposive sampling method, and they comprised 120 students with visual, physical, hearing or intellectual disabilities from four special education schools in Chiang Mai, Thailand; and 24 key informants such as parents or caregivers, teachers, school principals and school therapists. The instruments consisted of an assistive technology checklist and a semi-structured interview. Results showed that a category of assistive technologies was provided for students with disabilities, with the highest being "services", followed by "media" and then "facilities". Furthermore, mostly students with physical disabilities were provided with assistive technologies, but those with visual disabilities needed it more. Finally, the model of providing assistive technologies was composed of 5 components: Collaboration; Holistic perspective; Independent management of schools; Learning systems and a production manual for users; and Development of an assistive technology center, driven by 3 major sources such as Government and Private organizations, and Schools.

  1. eHealth technologies to support nutrition and physical activity behaviors in diabetes self-management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rollo ME

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Megan E Rollo,1 Elroy J Aguiar,2 Rebecca L Williams,1 Katie Wynne,3 Michelle Kriss,3 Robin Callister,4 Clare E Collins1 1School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia; 2Department of Kinesiology, School of Public Health and Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, USA; 3Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, John Hunter Hospital, Hunter New England Health, New Lambton, NSW, Australia;\t4School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medicine, Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia Abstract: Diabetes is a chronic, complex condition requiring sound knowledge and self-management skills to optimize glycemic control and health outcomes. Dietary intake and physical activity are key diabetes self-management (DSM behaviors that require tailored education and support. Electronic health (eHealth technologies have a demonstrated potential for assisting individuals with DSM behaviors. This review provides examples of technologies used to support nutrition and physical activity behaviors in the context of DSM. Technologies covered include those widely used for DSM, such as web-based programs and mobile phone and smartphone applications. In addition, examples of novel tools such as virtual and augmented reality, video games, computer vision for dietary carbohydrate monitoring, and wearable devices are provided. The challenges to, and facilitators for, the use of eHealth technologies in DSM are discussed. Strategies to support the implementation of eHealth technologies within practice and suggestions for future research to enhance nutrition and physical activity behaviors as a part of broader DSM are provided. Keywords: diabetes self-management, eHealth, nutrition, physical activity, smartphones, wearables

  2. Educating Providers in Return-to-Play Suggested Guidelines Postconcussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bires, Angela Macci; Leonard, Amanda L; Thurber, Brandon

    As the awareness of concussions increases, it is imperative to be able to evaluate, diagnose, and treat concussed individuals properly to prevent further complications or death. The primary purpose of this study was to compare a provider's current awareness and comfort level as it relates to the return-to-play guidelines for concussions. A secondary aim was to evaluate current protocols that are in use and determine whether they coincide with the suggested guidelines. An educational intervention was implemented to assess the knowledge and confidence of health care providers. The study design was a quantitative, convenient sample, pretest/posttest questionnaire. The questionnaire was administered to participants who were nurse practitioners prior to an educational PowerPoint presentation. At 8 weeks, the posttest was administered. Approximately 19% of individuals were not aware of a graded return-to-play protocols. The findings suggest that the educational intervention increased their confidence levels in making a diagnosis of a concussion, in assessing danger signs, and in understanding when to refer to a specialist. Additional supporting evidence from this study indicates that the educational intervention allowed the participants to achieve a greater comfort level in finding appropriate resources for them and their patients.

  3. [Conceptual self-management analysis of hypertensive individuals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balduino, Anice de Fátima Ahmad; Mantovani, Maria de Fátima; Lacerda, Maria Ribeiro; Meier, Marineli Joaquim

    2013-12-01

    This research aimed to analyze the concept of self-management of hypertensive individuals. Theoretical and documentary study based on Walker and Avant's conceptual analysis by means of the Scientific Electronic Library Brazil and the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online in the Coordination for Higher Education Personnel Development (CAPES, in Portuguese) and the National Library of Medicine websites. Fourteen (14) articles and one (1) thesis were selected and reviewed in Portuguese and English, in the period January 2007 to September 2012. missing doctor's appointments, non-compliance to blood pressure control treatment to recommendations to proper diet standards and stress. Attributer blood pressure control and disease management Consequences home monitoring of blood pressure with control improvement, accomplishment of disease management, compliance and sharing of the creation process of self-management goals and caring activities by the interdiscplinary team through individualized actions. It was concluded that the self-management concept is a dynamic, active process which requires knowledge, attitude, discipline, determination, commitment self-regulation, empowerment and self-efficiency in order to manage the disease and achieve healthy living.

  4. Self-management and skills acquisition in boys with haemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khair, Kate; Meerabeau, Liz; Gibson, Faith

    2015-10-01

    There is an increasing prevalence of children/young people with long-term conditions (LTC) in the UK due to improvements in health-care management and delivery. These children are often involved, from an early age, in their own care and management; yet, there are little data to support how or when they develop the necessary skills and knowledge to become competent at this care. This study aimed to understand self-management of haemophilia, from a child's perspective, in the 21st century in the UK where intensive prophylactic therapy is given from early childhood. A qualitative study using grounded theory to evaluate life-experiences of children and young people with haemophilia. Thirty boys aged 4-16 with severe haemophilia treated at a single paediatric haemophilia care centre were interviewed at home or in a focus group. Multimethod qualitative research including age-appropriate research tools (draw and write, photo-elicitation and interviews) to facilitate data collection from children. Boys develop self-management skills over time. They learn from health-care professionals, their parents and other family members with haemophilia. Self-management skills (bleed recognition, self-infusion, self and medicines management, pain and risk management and conceptualizing preventative therapy) are developed through experiential learning and individualized education, and not through formalized expert patient programmes. The boys in this study have benefited from early prophylactic factor replacement therapy. They develop skills in haemophilia and self-management at a relatively young age and are experts in their own haemophilia care. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Stakeholder engagement in diabetes self-management: patient preference for peer support and other insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Bethany M; Jortberg, Bonnie; Warman, Meredith K; Kane, Ilima; Wearner, Robyn; Koren, Romona; Carrigan, Thomas; Martinez, Vincent; Nease, Donald E

    2017-06-01

    Self-management support (SMS) for patients with diabetes can improve adherence to treatment, mitigate disease-related distress, and improve health outcomes. Translating this evidence into real-world practice is needed, as it is not clear which SMS models are acceptable to patients, and feasible and sustainable for primary care practices. To use the Boot Camp Translation (BCT) method to engage patient, practice, community resource and research stakeholders in translation of evidence about SMS and diabetes distress into mutually acceptable care models and to inform patient-centred outcomes research (PCOR). Twenty-seven diabetes care stakeholders, including patients and providers from a local network of federally qualified health centres participated. Stakeholders met in-person and by conference call over the course of 8 months. Subject matter experts provided education on the diabetes SMS evidence. Facilitators engaged the group in discussions about barriers to self-management and opportunities for improving delivery of SMS. BCT participants identified lack of social support, personal resources, trust, knowledge and confidence as barriers to diabetes self-management. Intervention opportunities emphasized peer support, use of multidisciplinary care teams and centralized systems for sharing information about community and practice resources. BCT informed new services and a PCOR study proposal. Patients and family engaged in diabetes care research value peer support, group visits, and multidisciplinary care teams as key features of SMS models. SMS should be tailored to an individual patient's health literacy. BCT can be used to engage multiple stakeholders in translation of evidence into practice and to inform PCOR. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Healthcare provider education: from institutional boxes to dynamic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisler, George

    2009-01-01

    The world recognizes the need for close collaboration in planning between the healthcare system and the post-secondary education system; this has also been advocated in the lead article. Forums and mechanisms to facilitate this collaboration are being implemented from local to global environments. Beyond the focus on competency gaps, there are important functional co-dependencies between healthcare and post-secondary education, including the need for a more formalized continuous quality improvement approach at the inter-organizational system level. The case for this close and continuous collaborative relationship is based on the following: (1) a close functional relationship, (2) joint responsibility for healthcare provider education, (3) the urgent need to address the workforce and education strategies for almost all healthcare services areas and (4) the factors that characterize successful and sustained quality improvement in complex adaptive systems. A go-forward vision consisting of an integrated web of academic health networks is proposed, each with its particular shared vision and aligned with an overall vision for healthcare in each provincial jurisdiction, as well as with national and global healthcare objectives.

  7. eHealth technologies to support nutrition and physical activity behaviors in diabetes self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollo, Megan E; Aguiar, Elroy J; Williams, Rebecca L; Wynne, Katie; Kriss, Michelle; Callister, Robin; Collins, Clare E

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic, complex condition requiring sound knowledge and self-management skills to optimize glycemic control and health outcomes. Dietary intake and physical activity are key diabetes self-management (DSM) behaviors that require tailored education and support. Electronic health (eHealth) technologies have a demonstrated potential for assisting individuals with DSM behaviors. This review provides examples of technologies used to support nutrition and physical activity behaviors in the context of DSM. Technologies covered include those widely used for DSM, such as web-based programs and mobile phone and smartphone applications. In addition, examples of novel tools such as virtual and augmented reality, video games, computer vision for dietary carbohydrate monitoring, and wearable devices are provided. The challenges to, and facilitators for, the use of eHealth technologies in DSM are discussed. Strategies to support the implementation of eHealth technologies within practice and suggestions for future research to enhance nutrition and physical activity behaviors as a part of broader DSM are provided.

  8. Characteristics of Swedish Preschools That Provide Education and Care to Children with Special Educational Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, Johanna; Westling, Mara Allodi; Siljehag, Eva

    2016-01-01

    In Sweden, preschool inclusion is embraced and preschools are open for children both with and without special educational needs. The purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics of a number of preschool units in Sweden that provide education and care to children with special educational needs with regard to organisation, resources and…

  9. Computer technology for self-management: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacelon, Cynthia S; Gibbs, Molly A; Ridgway, John Ve

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this scoping review of literature is to explore the types of computer-based systems used for self-management of chronic disease, the goals and success of these systems, the value added by technology integration and the target audience for these systems. Technology is changing the way health care is provided and the way that individuals manage their health. Individuals with chronic diseases are now able to use computer-based systems to self-manage their health. These systems have the ability to remind users of daily activities, and to help them recognise when symptoms are worsening and intervention is indicated. However, there are many questions about the types of systems available, the goals of these systems and the success with which individuals with chronic illness are using them. This is a scoping review in which the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PubMed and IEEE Xplore databases were searched. A total of 303 articles were reviewed, 89 articles were read in-depth and 30 were included in the scoping review. The Substitution, Augmentation, Modification, Redefinition model was used to evaluate the value added by the technology integration. Research on technology for self-management was conducted in 13 countries. Data analysis identified five kinds of platforms on which the systems were based, some systems were focused on a specific disease management processes, others were not. For individuals to effectively use systems to maintain maximum wellness, the systems must have a strong component of self-management and provide the user with meaningful information regarding their health states. Clinicians should choose systems for their clients based on the design, components and goals of the systems. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Evaluation of patient self-management outcomes in health care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, S; Yuan, C

    2010-06-01

    The importance of self-management and its intervention for improving the ability and skill of self-management has been discussed in literatures. It is, however, unclear how to choose the fitted, objective and accurate evaluation system when assessing the outcome. The aim of this article was to establish a general evaluation system for skill and ability of self-management in chronic diseases through systematic review on different evaluation indicators and scales. A systematic search of six electronic databases was conducted. Two authors independently reviewed each qualified study for relevance and significance. Subsequently, main evaluation indicators and scales were identified and categorized into themes and sub-themes. Nineteen articles were identified in this review. Among them, six main evaluation indicators of self-management, including frequently used scales, were extracted and tabulated. Self-efficacy, health behaviour/attitude, health status, health service utilization, quality of life and psychological indicators were the main indicators in evaluating self-management outcome, and they could be used alone or in combination flexibly according to the different goals of programmes. Accurate evaluation of skill and ability of self-management is crucial not only in baseline data collection but also in proving the effectiveness of intervention. The outcomes of this study provide future researchers or caregivers with a better understanding and a series of good choices in self-management outcome evaluation.

  11. Learning to learn: self-managed learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Miranda Izquierdo

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Thi is article analyzes the potentialities and weaknesses that non directive Pedagogy presents, an example of the so called self managed pedagogy, whose postulates are good to analyze for the contributions that this position can make to the search of new ways of learning.

  12. Beyond Quality Circles: Self-Managing Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Henry P., Jr.; Dean, James W., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    This article reviews the quality circle concept, shows why its characteristics appeal to American executives, and examines some of its limitations. It looks at self-managing teams and discusses the reasons that adoptions have been relatively few. It then shows what organizational conditions are necessary for quality circles to evolve into teams.…

  13. LHCb: Self managing experiment resources

    CERN Multimedia

    Stagni, F

    2013-01-01

    Within this paper we present an autonomic Computing resources management system used by LHCb for assessing the status of their Grid resources. Virtual Organizations Grids include heterogeneous resources. For example, LHC experiments very often use resources not provided by WLCG and Cloud Computing resources will soon provide a non-negligible fraction of their computing power. The lack of standards and procedures across experiments and sites generated the appearance of multiple information systems, monitoring tools, ticket portals, etc... which nowadays coexist and represent a very precious source of information for running HEP experiments Computing systems as well as sites. These two facts lead to many particular solutions for a general problem: managing the experiment resources. In this paper we present how LHCb, via the DIRAC interware addressed such issues. With a renewed Central Information Schema hosting all resources metadata and a Status System ( Resource Status System ) delivering real time informatio...

  14. Type 2 Diabetes Self-management Among Spanish-Speaking Hispanic Immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Miller, Cheryl A; Berry, Diane C; DeWalt, Darren; Miller, Cass T

    2016-12-01

    This article describes the quantitative findings of a mixed-methods study that examined the relationship among knowledge, self-efficacy, health promoting behaviors, and type 2 diabetes self-management among recent Spanish-speaking, limited English proficient immigrants to the US. This population is at risk for both a higher incidence of disease and increased barriers to successful disease management compared to the general US population. Distinguishing aspects of this study compared to the available literature are the comprehensive nature of the data collected, the theoretical component, and the analysis and modeling approach. Social cognitive theory provides the framework for the study design and analysis. An innovative community-based recruiting strategy was used, a broad range of physiological measures related to health were observed, and instruments related to knowledge, self-efficacy, and healthy lifestyle behaviors were administered orally in Spanish to 30 participants. A broad range of statistical analysis methods was applied to the data, including a set of three structural equation models. The study results are consistent with the importance of education, health knowledge, and healthy lifestyle practices for type 2 diabetes self-management. With the usual cautions associated with applying structural equation modeling to modest sample sizes, multiple elements of the posited theoretical model were consistent with the data collected. The results of the investigation of this under-studied population indicate that, on average, participants were not effectively managing their disease. The results suggest that clinical interventions focused on improving knowledge, nutrition, and physical activity, reducing stress, and leveraging the importance of interpersonal relations could be effective intervention strategies to improve self-management among this population.

  15. Shifting mindsets: a realist synthesis of evidence from self-management support training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Freya; Wood, Fiona; Bullock, Alison; Wallace, Carolyn; Edwards, Adrian

    2018-03-01

    Accompanying the growing expectation of patient self-management is the need to ensure health care professionals (HCPs) have the required attitudes and skills to provide effective self-management support (SMS). Results from existing training interventions for HCPs in SMS have been mixed and the evidence base is weaker for certain settings, including supporting people with progressive neurological conditions (PNCs). We set out to understand how training operates, and to identify barriers and facilitators to training designed to support shifts in attitudes amongst HCPs. We undertook a realist literature synthesis focused on: (i) the influence of how HCPs, teams and organisations view and adopt self-management; and (ii) how SMS needs to be tailored for people with PNCs. A traditional database search strategy was used alongside citation tracking, grey literature searching and stakeholder recommendations. We supplemented PNC-specific literature with data from other long-term conditions. Key informant interviews and stakeholder advisory group meetings informed the synthesis process. Realist context-mechanism-outcome configurations were generated and mapped onto the stages described in Mezirow's Transformative Learning Theory. Forty-four original articles were included (19 relating to PNCs), from which seven refined theories were developed. The theories identified important training elements (evidence provision, building skills and confidence, facilitating reflection and generating empathy). The significant influence of workplace factors as possible barriers or facilitators was highlighted. Embracing SMS often required challenging traditional professional role boundaries. The integration of SMS into routine care is not an automatic outcome from training. A transformative learning process is often required to trigger the necessary mindset shift. Training should focus on how individual HCPs define and value SMS and how their work context (patient group and organisational

  16. Role of accrediting bodies in providing education leadership in medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Leinster

    2014-01-01

    Role of accreditation authorities: If accreditation authorities are to provide leadership in medical education they must undertake regular review of their standards. This should be informed by all stakeholders and include experts in medical education. The format of the standards must provide clear direction to medical schools. Accreditation should take place regularly and should result in the production of a publicly accessible report.

  17. The impact of social context on self-management in women living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webel, Allison R; Cuca, Yvette; Okonsky, Jennifer G; Asher, Alice K; Kaihura, Alphoncina; Salata, Robert A

    2013-06-01

    HIV self-management is central to the health of people living with HIV and is comprised of the daily tasks individuals employ to manage their illness. Women living with HIV are confronted with social context vulnerabilities that impede their ability to conduct HIV self-management behaviors, including demanding social roles, poverty, homelessness, decreased social capital, and limited access to health care. We examined the relationship between these vulnerabilities and HIV self-management in a cross-sectional secondary analysis of 260 women living with HIV from two U.S. sites. All social context variables were assessed using validated self-report scales. HIV Self-Management was assessed using the HIV Self-Management Scale that measures daily health practices, HIV social support, and the chronic nature of HIV. Data were analyzed using appropriate descriptive statistics and multivariable regression. Mean age was 46 years and 65% of participants were African-American. Results indicated that social context variables, particularly social capital, significantly predicted all domains of HIV self-management including daily health practices (F = 5.40, adjusted R(2) = 0.27, p traditional social roles of mother and employee on the daily health practices and the chronic nature of HIV domains of HIV self-management. Our data support the idea that women's social context influences their HIV self-management behavior. While social context has been previously identified as important, our data provide new evidence on which aspects of social context might be important targets of self-management interventions for women living with HIV. Working to improve social capital and to incorporate social roles into the daily health practices of women living with HIV may improve the health of this population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A need for otolaryngology education among primary care providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Amanda; Sardesai, Maya G.; Meyer, Tanya K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Otolaryngic disorders are very common in primary care, comprising 20–50% of presenting complaints to a primary care provider. There is limited otolaryngology training in undergraduate and postgraduate medical education for primary care. Continuing medical education may be the next opportunity to train our primary care providers (PCPs). The objective of this study was to assess the otolaryngology knowledge of a group of PCPs attending an otolaryngology update course. Methods PCPs enrolled in an otolaryngology update course completed a web-based anonymous survey on demographics and a pre-course knowledge test. This test was composed of 12 multiple choice questions with five options each. At the end of the course, they were asked to evaluate the usefulness of the course for their clinical practice. Results Thirty seven (74%) PCPs completed the survey. Mean knowledge test score out of a maximum score of 12 was 4.0±1.7 (33.3±14.0%). Sorted by area of specialty, the mean scores out of a maximum score of 12 were: family medicine 4.6±2.1 (38.3±17.3%), pediatric medicine 4.2±0.8 (35.0±7.0%), other (e.g., dentistry, emergency medicine) 4.2±2.0 (34.6±17.0%), and adult medicine 3.9±2.1 (32.3±17.5%). Ninety one percent of respondents would attend the course again. Conclusion There is a low level of otolaryngology knowledge among PCPs attending an otolaryngology update course. There is a need for otolaryngology education among PCPs. PMID:22754276

  19. Improving hypertension self-management with community health coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Cheryl J; Williams, Joel E; Evatt, Janet Hoffman

    2015-03-01

    Approximately two thirds of those older than 60 years have a hypertension diagnosis. The aim of our program, Health Coaches for Hypertension Control, is to improve hypertension self-management among rural residents older than 60 years through education and support offered by trained community volunteers called Health Coaches. Participants received baseline and follow-up health risk appraisals with blood work, educational materials, and items such as blood pressure monitors and pedometers. Data were collected at baseline, 8 weeks, and 16 weeks on 146 participants who demonstrated statistically significant increases in hypertension-related knowledge from baseline to 8 weeks that persisted at 16 weeks, as well as significant improvements in stage of readiness to change behaviors and in actual behaviors. Furthermore, clinically significant decreases in all outcome measures were observed, with statistically significant changes in systolic blood pressure (-5.781 mmHg; p = .001), weight (-2.475 lb; p definition of controlled hypertension at baseline, the proportion of participants meeting this definition at 16 weeks postintervention increased to 51.0%. This article describes a university-community-hospital system model that effectively promotes hypertension self-management in a rural Appalachian community. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  20. Development and Psychometric Testing of a Scale for Evaluating Self-Management Needs of Knee Osteoarthritis (SMNKOA) in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Mei-Hua; Tsai, Yun-Fang

    2017-06-01

    Self-management of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is important for treating this chronic disease. This study developed and psychometrically tested a new instrument for measuring adult patients' self-management needs of knee osteoarthritis (SMNKOA). The theoretical framework of self-care guided the development of the 35-item SMNKOA scale. Participants ( N = 372) were purposively sampled from orthopedic clinics at medical centers in Taiwan. The content validity index was 0.83. Principal components analysis identified a three-factor solution, accounting for 53.19% of the variance. The divergent validity was -0.67; convergent validity was -0.51. Cronbach's alpha was .95, Pearson's correlation coefficient was .88, and the intraclass correlation coefficient was .95. The scale's reliability and validity supports the SMNKOA, as a tool to measure self-management needs of adults with knee OA. Nurses and other health care providers can use this instrument to evaluate knee OA patients and identify strategies for improving health-related outcomes and patient education.

  1. Self-management strategies in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a first step toward personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrecheguren, Miriam; Bourbeau, Jean

    2018-03-01

    Self-management has gained increased relevance in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. The heterogeneity in self-management interventions has complicated the development of recommendations for clinical practice. In this review, we present the latest findings regarding conceptual definition, effectiveness of self-management interventions and self-management strategies in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as a first step toward personalized medicine: what, how and to whom? Self-management interventions have shown benefits in improving health-related quality of life and reducing hospital admissions. Favorable outcomes can only be achieved if patients have an ultimate goal, that is their desired achievements in their life. In the continuum of care, the components of the self-management program will vary to adapt to the condition of the patient (disease severity, comorbidities) and to factors such as patient motivation, confidence (self-efficacy), access to health care, family and social support. A combination of education, case management and patient-centric action plan has shown the best chance of success. The individual patient's needs, own preferences and personal goals should inform the design of any intervention with a behavioral component. A continuous loop process has to be implemented to constantly assess what work and does not work, aiming at achieving the desired outcomes for a given patient.

  2. [The use of systematic review to develop a self-management program for CKD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Chin; Wu, Shu-Fang Vivienne; Lee, Mei-Chen; Chen, Fu-An; Yao, Yen-Hong; Wang, Chin-Ling

    2014-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a public health issue of international concern due to its high prevalence. The concept of self-management has been comprehensively applied in education programs that address chronic diseases. In recent years, many studies have used self-management programs in CKD interventions and have investigated the pre- and post-intervention physiological and psychological effectiveness of this approach. However, a complete clinical application program in the self-management model has yet to be developed for use in clinical renal care settings. A systematic review is used to develop a self-management program for CKD. Three implementation steps were used in this study. These steps include: (1) A systematic literature search and review using databases including CEPS (Chinese Electronic Periodical Services) of Airiti, National Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations in Taiwan, CINAHL, Pubmed, Medline, Cochrane Library, and Joanna Briggs Institute. A total of 22 studies were identified as valid and submitted to rigorous analysis. Of these, 4 were systematic literature reviews, 10 were randomized experimental studies, and 8 were non-randomized experimental studies. (2) Empirical evidence then was used to draft relevant guidelines on clinical application. (3) Finally, expert panels tested the validity of the draft to ensure the final version was valid for application in practice. This study designed a self-management program for CKD based on the findings of empirical studies. The content of this program included: design principles, categories, elements, and the intervention measures used in the self-management program. This program and then was assessed using the content validity index (CVI) and a four-point Liker's scale. The content validity score was .98. The guideline of self-management program to CKD was thus developed. This study developed a self-management program applicable to local care of CKD. It is hoped that the guidelines

  3. SELF MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MENINGKATKAN KOPING, NIAT DAN KEPATUHAN BEROBAT PASIEN PJK SETELAH PEMBERIAN SELF MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanim mufarokhah mufarokhah

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Management coronary artery disease required lifelong treatment. The successful management of CHD requires efective coping, intention and medication adherence of CHD’s patients. This study aimed to explain the changes of coping, intention, and medication adherence in patients with CHD after giving self management programme in RSUD Jombang based on Theory Planned Behavior.Method: This study used a quasy experimental pretest-posttest control group design and 28 respondens selected by consecutive sampling. Independent variable was self management programme while dependent variables were coping, intention, medication adherence. Data were collected by using questonnaires measuring coping level, intention and medication adherence. The statistical test used was Mann Whitney, Wilcoxone Signed Rank and t-Test. Result: The result showed that 1 self management programme improve the level of coping in patients with CHD (p < 0,001, 2 self management programme improve the level of intention in patients with CHD (p < 0,001, 3 self management programme improve the level of medication adherence in patients with CHD (p < 0,001. Discussion: To change a behavior requires improvement of coping and intentions. This is in according to the Theory of Planned Behavior that behavior change is influenced by the attitude toward the behavior, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control and intention. Keywords: self management program, coping, intention, medication adherence, coronary heart disease

  4. Computer and mobile technology interventions for self-management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Catherine; McCann, Margaret; Brady, Anne Marie

    2017-05-23

    included in our review three studies (Moy 2015; Tabak 2013; Voncken-Brewster 2015) with a total of 1580 randomised participants. From Voncken-Brewster 2015, we included the subgroup of individuals with a diagnosis of COPD (284 participants) and excluded those at risk of COPD who had not received a diagnosis (1023 participants). As a result, the total population available for analysis included 557 participants; 319 received smart technology to support self-management and 238 received face-to-face verbal/written or digital information and education about self-management. The average age of participants was 64 years. We included more men than women because the sample from one of the studies consisted of war veterans, most of whom were men. These studies measured five of our nine defined outcomes. None of these studies included outcomes such as self-efficacy, cost-effectiveness, functional capacity, lung function, or anxiety and depression.All three studies included our primary outcome - health-related quality of life (HRQoL) as measured by the Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ) or St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). One study reported our other primary outcomes - hospital admissions and acute exacerbations. Two studies included our secondary outcome of physical activity as measured by daily step counts. One study addressed smoking by providing a narrative analysis. Only one study reported adverse events and noted significant differences between groups, with 43 events noted in the intervention group and eight events in the control group (P = 0.001). For studies that measured outcomes at week four, month four, and month six, the effect of smart technology on self-management and subsequent HRQoL in terms of symptoms and health status was significantly better than when participants received face-to-face/digital and/or written support for self-management of COPD (SMD -0.22, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.40 to -0.03; P = 0.02). The single study that reported HRQoL at 12

  5. Enhancing Asthma Self-Management in Rural School-Aged Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Sharon D; Brown, Adama; Brown, Sharon A; Rew, D Lynn

    2016-06-01

    To test the effects of 2 modes of delivering an asthma educational intervention on health outcomes and asthma self-management in school-aged children who live in rural areas. Longitudinal design with data collected 4 times over 12 months. The target sample was composed of children in grades 2-5 who had a provider diagnosis of asthma. Elementary schools were stratified into high or low socioeconomic status based on student enrollment in the free or reduced-cost lunch program. Schools were then randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment arms: in-school asthma class, asthma day camp, or the attention-control group. Sample retention was good (87.7%) and equally distributed by study arm. Improvements in emergency department visits and office visits were related to attending either the asthma class or asthma day camp. Asthma severity significantly decreased in both asthma treatment groups. Other factors such as hospitalizations, parent asthma management, and child asthma management improved for all groups. Both asthma class and asthma day camp yielded significant reductions in asthma severity. There were reductions in the emergency department and office visits for the 2 asthma arms, and hospitalizations declined significantly for all groups. Asthma self-management also improved in all groups, while it was somewhat higher in the asthma arms. This may be due to the attention being drawn to asthma management by study participation and the action of completing questionnaires about asthma management, asthma symptoms, and health outcomes. © 2015 National Rural Health Association.

  6. Twelve evidence-based principles for implementing self-management support in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battersby, Malcolm; Von Korff, Michael; Schaefer, Judith; Davis, Connie; Ludman, Evette; Greene, Sarah M; Parkerton, Melissa; Wagner, Edward H

    2010-12-01

    Recommendations to improve self-management support and health outcomes for people with chronic conditions in primary care settings are provided on the basis of expert opinion supported by evidence for practices and processes. Practices and processes that could improve self-management support in primary care were identified through a nominal group process. In a targeted search strategy, reviews and meta-analyses were then identifed using terms from a wide range of chronic conditions and behavioral risk factors in combination with Self-Care, Self-Management, and Primary Care. On the basis of these reviews, evidence-based principles for self-management support were developed. The evidence is organized within the framework of the Chronic Care Model. Evidence-based principles in 12 areas were associated with improved patient self-management and/or health outcomes: (1) brief targeted assessment, (2) evidence-based information to guide shared decision-making, (3) use of a nonjudgmental approach, (4) collaborative priority and goal setting, (5) collaborative problem solving, (6) self-management support by diverse providers, (7) self-management interventions delivered by diverse formats, (8) patient self-efficacy, (9) active followup, (10) guideline-based case management for selected patients, (11) linkages to evidence-based community programs, and (12) multifaceted interventions. A framework is provided for implementing these principles in three phases of the primary care visit: enhanced previsit assessment, a focused clinical encounter, and expanded postvisit options. There is a growing evidence base for how self-management support for chronic conditions can be integrated into routine health care.

  7. PUBLIC AND PRIVATE HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS IN MALAYSIA: COMPETING, COMPLEMENTARY OR CROSSBREEDS AS EDUCATION PROVIDERS

    OpenAIRE

    Wan Chang Da

    2007-01-01

    Delivery of higher education used to be exclusive to the public sector in Malaysia. However, legislative changes made in 1996 led to the coexistence of public and private higher education institutions. In 2007, there were 20 public universities compared to more than 500 private institutions, of which 30 are currently categorised as universities or university colleges. Looking at their respective roles as higher education providers, public and private institutions display characteristics of be...

  8. [Qualitative research of self-management behavior in patients with advanced schistosomiasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-ping; Wang, Xing-ju; Bao, Hui-hong; Zhang, Hong; Xu, Zheng-rong

    2013-10-01

    To explore the self-management behavior of patients with advanced schistosomiasis, so as to provide the evidence for improving clinical nursing. A total of 18 patients with advanced schistosomiasis were interviewed in depth by using a semi structured interview method. The results were analyzed with Miles and Huberman content analysis method. Most of the patients with advanced schistosomiasis had self-management control behavior and were cooperated with medical assistance because of their seriously illness. Based on data analysis, the symptom management, follow-up management, a healthy lifestyle, medication awareness, and emotional management were obtained. The patients with advanced schistosomiasis have self management control behavior. Health care workers should promote the patients, their families and social people to participate in the self-management behavior of advanced schistosomiasis patients.

  9. Self Managing the Consequences of Major Limb Trauma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    MacKenzie, Ellen J

    2008-01-01

    .... The intervention will build on widely accepted self-management programs developed for persons with arthritis as well as components of a face-to-face self-management program for civilians with long-standing limb loss...

  10. 'Educator talk' and patient change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skinner, T. C.; Carey, M. E.; Cradock, S.

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To determine whether differences in the amount of time educators talk during a self-management education programme relate to the degree of change in participants' reported beliefs about diabetes. Method: Educators trained to be facilitative and non-didactic in their approach were observed...... talking less and meeting targets for being less didactic, a greater change in reported illness beliefs of participants was seen. However, educators struggled to meet targets for most sessions of the programme. Conclusion: The amount of time educators talk in a self-management programme may provide...... change to their normal educational style....

  11. The association between health literacy and self-management abilities in adults aged 75 and older, and its moderators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geboers, Bas; de Winter, Andrea F; Spoorenberg, Sophie L W; Wynia, Klaske; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2016-11-01

    Low health literacy is an important predictor of poor health outcomes and well-being among older adults. A reason may be that low health literacy decreases older adults' self-management abilities. We therefore assessed the association between health literacy and self-management abilities among adults aged 75 and older, and the impact of demographic factors, socioeconomic factors, and health status on this association. We used data of 1052 older adults, gathered for a previously conducted randomized controlled trial on Embrace, an integrated elderly care model. These data pertained to health literacy, self-management abilities, demographic background, socioeconomic situation, and health status. Health literacy was measured by the validated three-item Brief Health Literacy Screening instrument. Self-management abilities were measured by the validated Self-Management Ability Scale (SMAS-30). After adjustment for confounders, self-management abilities were poorer in older adults with low health literacy (β = .34, p older adults than in low-educated older adults. Sex, age, living situation, income, presence of chronic illness, and mental health status did not moderate the association between health literacy and self-management abilities. Low health literacy is associated with poor self-management abilities in a wide range of older adults. Early recognition of low health literacy among adults of 75 years and older and interventions to improve health literacy might be very beneficial for older adults.

  12. Self-Management: Taking Charge of Your Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... method of taking control is called “self-management.” What is self-management of chronic illness? Self-management of chronic illness means that you take responsibility for doing what it takes to manage your illness effectively. It’s ...

  13. A couples’ based self-management program for heart failure: Results of a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranak Trivedi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heart failure (HF is associated with frequent exacerbations and shortened lifespan. Informal caregivers such as significant others often support self-management in patients with HF. However, existing programs that aim to enhance self-management seldom engage informal caregivers or provide tools that can help alleviate caregiver burden or improve collaboration between patients and their informal caregivers. Objective: To develop and pilot test a program targeting the needs of self-management support among HF patients as well as their significant others. Methods: We developed the Dyadic Health Behavior Change model and conducted semi-structured interviews to determine barriers to self-management from various perspectives. Participants’ feedback was used to develop a family-centered self-management program called SUCCEED: Self-management Using Couples’ Coping EnhancEment in Diseases. The goals of this program are to improve HF self-management, quality of life, communication within couples, relationship quality, and stress and caregiver burden. We conducted a pilot study with 17 Veterans with HF and their significant others to determine acceptability of the program. We piloted psychosocial surveys at baseline and after participants’ program completion to evaluate change in depressive symptoms, caregiver burden, self-management of HF, communication, quality of relationship, relationship mutuality, and quality of life. Results: Of the 17 couples, 14 completed at least 1 SUCCEED session. Results showed high acceptability for each of SUCCEED’s sessions. At baseline, patients reported poor quality of life, clinically significant depressive symptoms, and inadequate self-management of HF. After participating in SUCCEED, patients showed improvements in self-management of HF, communication, and relationship quality, while caregivers reported improvements in depressive symptoms and caregiver burden. Quality of life of both patients and

  14. Gamifying Self-Management of Chronic Illnesses: A Mixed-Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlMarshedi, Alaa; Wills, Gary; Ranchhod, Ashok

    2016-09-09

    Self-management of chronic illnesses is an ongoing issue in health care research. Gamification is a concept that arose in the field of computer science and has been borrowed by many other disciplines. It is perceived by many that gamification can improve the self-management experience of people with chronic illnesses. This paper discusses the validation of a framework (called The Wheel of Sukr) that was introduced to achieve this goal. This research aims to (1) discuss a gamification framework targeting the self-management of chronic illnesses and (2) validate the framework by diabetic patients, medical professionals, and game experts. A mixed-method approach was used to validate the framework. Expert interviews (N=8) were conducted in order to validate the themes of the framework. Additionally, diabetic participants completed a questionnaire (N=42) in order to measure their attitudes toward the themes of the framework. The results provide a validation of the framework. This indicates that gamification might improve the self-management of chronic illnesses, such as diabetes. Namely, the eight themes in the Wheel of Sukr (fun, esteem, socializing, self-management, self-representation, motivation, growth, sustainability) were perceived positively by 71% (30/42) of the participants with P value gamification in the self-management of diabetes.

  15. Gamifying Self-Management of Chronic Illnesses: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Gary; Ranchhod, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Background Self-management of chronic illnesses is an ongoing issue in health care research. Gamification is a concept that arose in the field of computer science and has been borrowed by many other disciplines. It is perceived by many that gamification can improve the self-management experience of people with chronic illnesses. This paper discusses the validation of a framework (called The Wheel of Sukr) that was introduced to achieve this goal. Objective This research aims to (1) discuss a gamification framework targeting the self-management of chronic illnesses and (2) validate the framework by diabetic patients, medical professionals, and game experts. Methods A mixed-method approach was used to validate the framework. Expert interviews (N=8) were conducted in order to validate the themes of the framework. Additionally, diabetic participants completed a questionnaire (N=42) in order to measure their attitudes toward the themes of the framework. Results The results provide a validation of the framework. This indicates that gamification might improve the self-management of chronic illnesses, such as diabetes. Namely, the eight themes in the Wheel of Sukr (fun, esteem, socializing, self-management, self-representation, motivation, growth, sustainability) were perceived positively by 71% (30/42) of the participants with P value gamification in the self-management of diabetes. PMID:27612632

  16. A cross-cultural comparison of the developmental evolution of expertise in diabetes self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yasuko; Paterson, Barbara L

    2007-11-01

    The authors compare the findings of two research studies, one conducted in Japan and the other in Canada, about the developmental evolution of self-management of diabetes. In this article, the authors identify the similarities and differences that exist in the research data, proposing that the differences are situated in the different cultural perspectives of self-management that exist in both countries. Researchers have acknowledged that self-management has cultural dimensions. Despite this, however, there are few studies that have provided a cross-cultural comparison of the experience of self-management among different cultural groups. The authors conducted a critical comparative analysis of two models of developing expertise in diabetes self-management. The review included an analysis of the cultural meanings of the various terms and the underlying assumptions of both models. The models shared many similarities; however, their differences were identified, such as the meaning and interpretation of various words or experiences, and shaped by the culturally bound perspectives of self and health. The findings serve as a caution to imposing ethnocentric views and interpretations in diabetes care. In addition, they remind us about the importance of asking people with diabetes about what they understand, desire and understand. The findings challenge nurses to reflect on how the development of self-management of diabetes in various national contexts is influenced by health care practices that focus on control or harmony.

  17. Self-management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Time for a paradigm shift?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nici, Linda; Bontly, Thomas D; Zuwallack, Richard; Gross, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Self-management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, centering on an action plan for the exacerbation and enhanced communication between the patient and health care providers, makes good clinical sense. However, five relatively large trials of self-management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have had inconsistent results: only two demonstrated reductions in health care utilization and one had to be discontinued prematurely because of increased mortality. Do these discordant findings require a paradigm shift in our concept of self-management? Probably not-but an analysis of the negative studies can give us valuable insights. There are data to support the idea that patients in the trial that showed increased mortality did not self-manage appropriately. Only 4.5% of these patients called in before starting treatment for their exacerbation, the time to initiation of antibiotics or steroids was unsatisfactorily long, and the intervention arm used minimally more prednisone and antibiotics than the control arm. The reasons for a higher mortality will likely never be known, but it is possible that these high-risk patients may have needed earlier assessment by a trained professional, or that self-management led to overconfidence and treatment delays. We clearly need more effective ways to implement self-management and better define which groups of patients stand to benefit (or be harmed) by this intervention. This will require an investment in well-thought-out clinical trials.

  18. Development and Feasibility of a COPD Self-Management Intervention Delivered with Motivational Interviewing Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzo, Roberto; Vickers, Kristin; Ernst, Denise; Tucker, Sharon; McEvoy, Charlene; Lorig, Kate

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Self-management (SM) is proposed as the standard of care in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but details of the process and training required to deliver effective SM are not widely available. In addition, recent data suggest that patient engagement and motivation are critical ingredients for effective self-management. This manuscript carefully describes a self-management intervention using Motivational Interviewing skills, aimed to increase engagement and commitment in severe COPD patients. METHODS The intervention was developed and pilot tested for fidelity to protocol, for patient and interventionist feedback (qualitative) and effect on quality of life. Engagement between patient and interventionists was measured by the Working Alliance Inventory. The intervention was refined based in the results of the pilot study and delivered in the active arm of a prospective randomized study. RESULTS The pilot study suggested improvements in quality of life, fidelity to theory and patient acceptability. The refined self-management intervention was delivered 540 times in the active arm of a randomized study. We observed a retention rate of 86% (patients missing or not available for only 14% the scheduled encounters). CONCLUSIONS A self-management intervention, that includes motivational interviewing as the way if guiding patient into behavior change, is feasible in severe COPD and may increase patient engagement and commitment to self-management. This provides a very detailed description of the SM process for (the specifics of training and delivering the intervention) that facilitates replicability in other settings and could be translated to cardiac rehabilitation. PMID:23434613

  19. Feasibility of a mobile and web-based intervention to support self-management in outpatients with cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstenbach, Laura M J; Zwakhalen, Sandra M G; Courtens, Annemie M; van Kleef, Maarten; de Witte, Luc P

    2016-08-01

    Cancer pain is a prevalent and distressing symptom. To enhance self-management in outpatients, a multi-component intervention was developed, integrating patient self-management and professional care through healthcare technology. This article describes feasibility of the intervention in everyday practice. Patients with moderate to severe cancer pain (n = 11) and registered nurses specialized in pain and palliative care (n = 3) participated in a four-week study. The intervention involved daily monitoring, graphical feedback, education, and advice by means of a mobile application for patients and a web application for nurses. Learnability, usability and desirability were measured in patients with a 20-item questionnaire (1-5 scale), higher scores indicating better feasibility. Patients' adherence was based on completion rates from server logs. Single semi-structured interviews with patients and a focus group interview with nurses provided insight into experiences. Questionnaire findings confirmed learnability (4.8), usability (4.8) and desirability (4.6) of the application for patients. Average completion rates were 76.8% for pain monitoring, 50.4% for medication monitoring and 100% for education sessions. Interviews revealed that patients were pleased with the simplicity of the mobile application and appreciated different components. Nurses agreed upon the added value and were mostly positive about the possibilities of the web application. Patients and nurses provided ideas for improvements relating to the content and technical performance of the intervention. Study results demonstrate feasibility of the intervention in everyday practice. Provided that content-related and technical adjustments are made, the intervention enables patients with cancer pain to practice self-management and nurses to remotely support these patients. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. US ethnic group differences in self-management in the 2nd diabetes attitudes, wishes and needs (DAWN2) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrot, Mark; Egede, Leonard E; Funnell, Martha M; Hsu, William C; Ruggiero, Laurie; Siminerio, Linda M; Stuckey, Heather L

    2018-03-08

    Understanding the relationship between ethnicity and self-management is important due to disparities in healthcare access, utilization, and outcomes among adults with type 2 diabetes from different ethnic groups in the US. Self-reports of self-management and interest in improving self-management from US people with diabetes (PWD) in the 2nd Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2) study, a multinational, multi-stakeholder survey, were analyzed, including 447 non-Hispanic White, 241 African American, 194 Hispanic American, and 173 Chinese American PWD (>18 years). Overall, self-management behavior was highest for medication taking and lowest for physical activity. Non-Hispanic Whites had lowest physical activity and highest adherence to insulin therapy. Chinese Americans had lowest foot care and highest healthy eating. Overall, interest was highest for improving healthy eating and physical activity. Chinese Americans and Hispanic Americans were more interested than non-Hispanic Whites in improving most self-management behaviors. Chinese Americans were more interested than African Americans in improving most self-management behaviors. Healthcare providers telling PWD that their A1c needs improvement was associated with lower self-rated glucose control, which was associated with higher PWD interest in improving self-management behaviors. Diabetes care providers should use patient-centered approaches and consider ethnicity in tailoring self-management support. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Tablet-Aided BehavioraL intervention EffecT on Self-management skills (TABLETS) for Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Cheryl P; Williams, Joni S; J Ruggiero, Kenneth; G Knapp, Rebecca; Egede, Leonard E

    2016-03-22

    Multiple randomized controlled trials (RCTs) show that behavioral lifestyle interventions are effective in improving diabetes management and that comprehensive risk factor management improves cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes. The role of technology has been gaining strong support as evidence builds of its potential to improve diabetes management; however, evaluation of its impact in minority populations is limited. This study intends to provide early evidence of a theory-driven intervention, Tablet-Aided BehavioraL intervention EffecT on Self-management skills (TABLETS), using real-time videoconferencing for education and skills training. We examine the potential for TABLETS to improve health risk behaviors and reduce CVD risk outcomes among a low-income African American (AA) population with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes. The study is a two-arm, pilot controlled trial that randomizes 30 participants to the TABLETS intervention and 30 participants to a usual care group. Blinded outcome assessments will be completed at baseline, 2.5 months (immediate post-intervention), and 6.5 months (follow-up). The TABLETS intervention consists of culturally tailored telephone-delivered diabetes education and skills training delivered via videoconferencing on tablet devices, with two booster sessions delivered via tablet-based videoconferencing at 3 months and 5 months to stimulate ongoing use of the tablet device with access to intervention materials via videoconferencing slides and a manual of supplementary materials. The primary outcomes are physical activity, diet, medication adherence, and self-monitoring behavior, whereas the secondary outcomes are HbA1c, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), BP, CVD risk, and quality of life. This study provides a unique opportunity to assess the feasibility and efficacy of a theory-driven, tablet-aided behavioral intervention that utilizes real-time videoconferencing technology for education and skills training on self-management

  2. Right Back at 'Cha--Boomerang Activity Provides Educational Returns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Motivating students to get actively involved in the curriculum and understand the application of academic content has been a challenge for many educators. Technology education instructors have traditionally had little difficulty showing their students the connection between their classroom and lab learning and a practical application of the skills…

  3. Efficiency of Australian Technical and Further Education Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieger, Peter; Villano, Renato; Cooksey, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Budgetary constraints on the public purse have led Australian Federal and State governments to focus increasingly on the efficiency of public institutions, including Technical and Further Education (TAFE) institutes. In this study, we define efficiency as the relationship between financial and administrative inputs and educational outputs. We…

  4. Self-management interventions for chronic disease: a systematic scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Julie; Loyola-Sanchez, Adalberto; Sinclair, Susanne; Harris, Jocelyn; Letts, Lori; MacIntyre, Norma J; Wilkins, Seanne; Burgos-Martinez, Gabriela; Wishart, Laurie; McBay, Cathy; Martin Ginis, Kathleen

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the contributions of physiotherapy and occupational therapy to self-management interventions and the theoretical models used to support these interventions in chronic disease. We conducted two literature searches to identify studies that evaluated self-management interventions involving physiotherapists and occupational therapists in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, CINAHL, EMBASE, AMED (Allied and Complementary Medicine), SPORTdiscus, and REHABDATA databases. Four investigator pairs screened article title and abstract, then full text with inclusion criteria. Selected articles (n = 57) included adults who received a chronic disease self-management intervention, developed or delivered by a physiotherapist and/or an occupational therapist compared with a control group. Four pairs of investigators performed independent reviews of each article and data extraction included: (a) participant characteristics, (b) the self-management intervention, (c) the comparison intervention, (d) outcome measures, construct measured and results. A total of 47 articles reported the involvement of physiotherapy in self-management compared with 10 occupational therapy articles. The type of chronic condition produced different yields: arthritis n = 21 articles; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic pain n = 9 articles each. The theoretical frameworks most frequently cited were social cognitive theory and self-efficacy theory. Physical activity was the predominant focus of the self-management interventions. Physiotherapy programmes included disease-specific education, fatigue, posture, and pain management, while occupational therapists concentrated on joint protection, fatigue, and stress management. Physiotherapists and occupational therapists make moderate contributions to self-management interventions. Most of these interventions are disease-specific and are most frequently based on the principles of behaviour change theories. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. The Relationship Between Individual Characteristics and Interest in Using a Mobile Phone App for HIV Self-Management: Observational Cohort Study of People Living With HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Robert James; Frimpong, Jemima A; Fehlberg, Elizabeth A; Bjarnadottir, Ragnhildur I; Weaver, Michael T; Cook, Christa; Modave, Francois; Rathore, Mobeen H; Morano, Jamie P; Ibanez, Gladys; Cook, Robert L

    2017-07-27

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) continues to be a major health issue in the United States, and an estimated 1.2 million people in the United States are living with HIV. As part of Healthy People 2020, the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion has targeted the persistent demographic and geographic disparities in HIV prevalence and management. Preliminary evidence suggests that mobile health technology (smartphone apps) may be a promising way to support HIV self-management among vulnerable populations of people living with HIV (PLWH) who lack access to appropriate health care services. This study examines the association between individual characteristics of PLWH and level of interest in using a free mobile phone app for HIV self-management. This study was conducted using cross-sectional survey data collected in the Florida Cohort Study between 2014 and 2016 (N=766). Associations between individual characteristics of PLWH and level of interest in using a free mobile phone app for HIV self-management were examined using bivariate analysis and logistic regression. Overall, 85.5% (655/766) of respondents were interested in using a free mobile phone app that supports HIV self-management. Participants expressed the highest interest in app functions that facilitate communication with health care providers (568/740, 76.8%) or help to identify relevant health care services (556/745 74.6%). Age (OR 0.959, 95% CI 0.936-0.982), education (OR 1.281, 95% CI 1.027-1.598) and disability or inability to work (OR 0.296, 95% CI 0.145-0.606) were all significantly associated with being interested in using a free mobile phone app for HIV self-management. This study indicates that a majority of PLWH are interested in using a free mobile phone app to self-manage their condition. The findings can inform the development of mobile phone apps that support effective HIV self-management. ©Robert James Lucero, Jemima A Frimpong, Elizabeth A Fehlberg, Ragnhildur I Bjarnadottir

  6. Are Private Providers more Productive and Efficient than Public Providers of International Education? Evidence from New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayal TALUKDER

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study has investigated the productivity growth and efficiency of private and public providers of international education in New Zealand. It has used secondary data to calculate the DEA-based Malmquist productivity index for measuring Total Factor Productivity (TFP-growth and efficiency of both public and private providers of international education during 1999-2010. The study has found that private providers experienced a larger TFP-growth than that of public providers during 1999-2004. However, they experienced a sharp decline in TFP-growth since 2005 through to 2010 and experienced a much smaller TFP-growth than that of public providers during this period. Conversely, public providers experienced a positive TFP-growth during 1999-2004 but they experienced a negative TFP-growth since 2005 through to 2010. Considering efficiency, both private and public providers experienced almost a constant Technical Efficiency Change (TEC having a same level of efficiency of one. Both private and public providers exhibited a constant return to scale during 1999-2010. This study argues that on an average, private providers are more productive than public providers of international education. However, they are not more efficient than public providers as both types of providers exhibited a constant return to scale during 1999-2010. This study also argues that TFP-growth of New Zealand’s international education was determined by Technological Change (TC, not by TEC during this period.

  7. Differences in Osteoarthritis Self-Management Support Intervention Outcomes According to Race and Health Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperber, Nina R.; Bosworth, Hayden B.; Coffman, Cynthia J.; Lindquist, Jennifer H.; Oddone, Eugene Z.; Weinberger, Morris; Allen, Kelli D.

    2013-01-01

    We explored whether the effects of a telephone-based osteoarthritis (OA) self-management support intervention differed by race and health literacy. Participants included 515 veterans with hip and/or knee OA. Linear mixed models assessed differential effects of the intervention compared with health education (HE) and usual care (UC) on pain…

  8. Cost-Effectiveness of the Hepatitis C Self-Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groessl, Erik J.; Sklar, Marisa; Laurent, Diana D.; Lorig, Kate; Ganiats, Theodore G.; Ho, Samuel B.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Despite the emergence of new hepatitis C virus (HCV) antiviral medications, many people with chronic HCV know little about their disease, are at risk for transmitting HCV to others, and/or are not considered good treatment candidates. Self-management interventions can educate HCV-infected persons, improve their quality of life, and…

  9. Self-Management for Children with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Lee A.

    2008-01-01

    Supporting children with autism spectrum disorders in the general education classroom presents a unique challenge to the teachers and schools that serve them. This article addresses the utility of self-management as a proactive strategy for increasing the task engagement and compliant behavior of high-functioning students with autism. The author…

  10. Assistive technologies for self-managed pressure ulcer prevention in spinal cord injury: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, James Y; Stead, Brent; Mann, William; Ba'Pham; Popovic, Milos R

    2015-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) present a persistent and costly problem. Continuing effort in developing new technologies that support self-managed care is an important prevention strategy. Specifically, the aims of this scoping review are to review the key concepts and factors related to self-managed prevention of PUs in individuals with SCI and appraise the technologies available to assist patients in self-management of PU prevention practices. There is broad consensus that sustaining long-term adherence to prevention regimens is a major concern. Recent literature highlights the interactions between behavioral and physiological risk factors. We identify four technology categories that support self-management: computer-based educational technologies demonstrated improved short-term gains in knowledge (2 studies), interface pressure mapping technologies demonstrated improved adherence to pressure-relief schedules up to 3 mo (5 studies), electrical stimulation confirmed improvements in tissue tolerance after 8 wk of training (3 studies), and telemedicine programs demonstrated improvements in independence and reduced hospital visits over 6 mo (2 studies). Overall, self-management technologies demonstrated low-to-moderate effectiveness in addressing a subset of risk factors. However, the effectiveness of technologies in preventing PUs is limited due to a lack of incidence reporting. In light of the key findings, we recommend developing integrated technologies that address multiple risk factors.

  11. Mapping publication status and exploring hotspots in a research field: chronic disease self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yang; Li, Zheng; Arthur, David

    2014-08-01

    To provide insight into the characteristics of chronic disease self-management by mapping publication status and exploring hotspots. Chronic disease is becoming a major public health issue worldwide, highlighting the importance of self-management in this area. Despite the volume and variety of publications, little is known about how 'chronic disease self-management' has developed, since the first publication 40 years ago. Such is the number of publications in the area, that there is a need for a systematic bibliographic examination to enable clinicians and researchers to navigate this literature. A bibliometric analysis of publications was used. Publication status was achieved using BICOMB software, whereas hotspots were identified with Ucinet software. A search of PubMed was conducted for papers published between 1971-2012. By 2011, the number of publications reached 696, a fourfold increase from the previous 10 years, of which 75% came from the USA and UK. There were 1284 journals, which published chronic disease self-management research, involving various disciplines. The research hotspots highlighted various self-management strategies for the following: diabetes; cardiac vascular and pulmonary chronic disease; pain relief for neoplasms; and obesity. Psychological adjustment was a permeating theme in self-management processes as was using internet-based interventions. Self-management in chronic disease publication has been most evident in developed countries. The bibliographic mapping and identification of publication hotspots provides scholars and practitioners with key target journals, as well as a rigorous overview of the field for use in further research, evidence-based practice and health policy development. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Factors influencing self-management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disler, R T; Gallagher, R D; Davidson, P M

    2012-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a common, chronic and burdensome condition requiring the individual to engage in a range of self-management strategies. The capacity to engage in self-management is dependent on a range of internal (e.g., personal) and external (e.g., health service) factors. This paper seeks to define self-management, identify the determinants which influence the individual's ability to cope and adjust to living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the community, and identify implications for clinical practice and research. Integrative review. Medline, Embase, PubMed, CINAHL, Google Scholar. Integrative review using prospective research questions. Papers were included in the review if they were published in peer reviewed journals and written in English between 2000 and 2010. Articles were accepted for inclusion if they discussed the determinants that influenced self-management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the community. Confirmation of results and discussion themes was validated by specialists in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and complex care. Self-management is less well characterised in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease compared with other chronic conditions. Functional limitation and the need to balance disease management with everyday life are the two key elements that patients face in managing their condition. Provider characteristics, socioeconomic status and health literacy are sparsely discussed yet are known to influence chronic obstructive pulmonary disease self-management. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease self-management must be a key focus internationally as the disease incidence increases. Collaborative care is required between patients and health providers in order facilitate patients in confident management of their condition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Self-management strategies in overweight and obese Canadians with arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernatsky, S; Rusu, C; O'Donnell, S; Mackay, C; Hawker, G; Canizares, M; Badley, E

    2012-02-01

    To estimate the prevalence of overweight and obese Canadians with arthritis and to describe their use of arthritis self-management strategies, as well as explore the factors associated with not engaging in any self-management strategies. Respondents to the 2009 Survey on Living with Chronic Diseases in Canada, a nationally representative sample of 4,565 Canadians age ≥20 years reporting health professional-diagnosed arthritis (including more than 100 rheumatic diseases and conditions), were asked about the impact of their arthritis and how it was managed. Among the overweight (body mass index [BMI] 25-29.9 kg/m(2)) and obese (BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)) individuals with arthritis (n = 2,869), the use of arthritis self-management strategies (i.e., exercise, weight control/loss, classes, and community-based programs) were analyzed. Log binomial regression analyses were used to examine factors associated with engaging in none versus any (≥1) of the 4 strategies. More than one-quarter (27.4%) of Canadians with arthritis were obese and an additional 39.9% were overweight. The overweight and obese individuals with arthritis were mostly female (59.5%), age ≥45 years (89.7%), and reported postsecondary education (69.0%). While most reported engagement in at least 1 self-management strategy (84.9%), less than half (45.6%) engaged in both weight control/loss and exercise. Factors independently associated with not engaging in any self-management strategies included lower education, not taking medications for arthritis, and no clinical recommendations from a health professional. Fewer than half of the overweight and obese Canadians with arthritis engaged in both weight control/loss and exercise. The provision of targeted clinical recommendations (particularly low in individuals that did not engage in any self-management strategies) may help to facilitate participation. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  14. Web 2.0 chronic disease self-management for older adults: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellefson, Michael; Chaney, Beth; Barry, Adam E; Chavarria, Enmanuel; Tennant, Bethany; Walsh-Childers, Kim; Sriram, P S; Zagora, Justin

    2013-02-14

    Participatory Web 2.0 interventions promote collaboration to support chronic disease self-management. Growth in Web 2.0 interventions has led to the emergence of e-patient communication tools that enable older adults to (1) locate and share disease management information and (2) receive interactive healthcare advice. The evolution of older e-patients contributing to Web 2.0 health and medical forums has led to greater opportunities for achieving better chronic disease outcomes. To date, there are no review articles investigating the planning, implementation, and evaluation of Web 2.0 chronic disease self-management interventions for older adults. To review the planning, implementation, and overall effectiveness of Web 2.0 self-management interventions for older adults (mean age ≥ 50) with one or more chronic disease(s). A systematic literature search was conducted using six popular health science databases. The RE-AIM (Reach, Efficacy, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance) model was used to organize findings and compute a study quality score (SQS) for 15 reviewed articles. Most interventions were adopted for delivery by multidisciplinary healthcare teams and tested among small samples of white females with diabetes. Studies indicated that Web 2.0 participants felt greater self-efficacy for managing their disease(s) and benefitted from communicating with health care providers and/or website moderators to receive feedback and social support. Participants noted asynchronous communication tools (eg, email, discussion boards) and progress tracking features (eg, graphical displays of uploaded personal data) as being particularly useful for self-management support. Despite high attrition being noted as problematic, this review suggests that greater Web 2.0 engagement may be associated with improvements in health behaviors (eg, physical activity) and health status (eg, HRQoL). However, few studies indicated statistically significant improvements in medication

  15. Patient-professional partnerships and chronic back pain self-management: a qualitative systematic review and synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yu; McNichol, Elaine; Marczewski, Kathryn; Closs, S José

    2016-05-01

    Chronic back pain is common, and its self-management may be a lifelong task for many patients. While health professionals can provide a service or support for pain, only patients can actually experience it. It is likely that optimum self-management of chronic back pain may only be achieved when patients and professionals develop effective partnerships which integrate their complementary knowledge and skills. However, at present, there is no evidence to explain how such partnerships can influence patients' self-management ability. This review aimed to explore the influence of patient-professional partnerships on patients' ability to self-manage chronic back pain, and to identify key factors within these partnerships that may influence self-management. A systematic review was undertaken, aiming to retrieve relevant studies using any research method. Five databases were searched for papers published between 1980 and 2014, including Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Medline, EMBASE and PsycINFO. Eligible studies were those reporting on patients being supported by professionals to self-manage chronic back pain; patients being actively involved for self-managing chronic back pain; and the influence of patient-professional partnerships on self-management of chronic back pain. Included studies were critically appraised for quality, and findings were extracted and analysed thematically. A total of 738 studies were screened, producing 10 studies for inclusion, all of which happened to use qualitative methods. Seven themes were identified: communication, mutual understanding, roles of health professionals, information delivery, patients' involvement, individualised care and healthcare service. These themes were developed into a model suggesting how factors within patient-professional partnerships influence self-management. Review findings suggest that a partnership between patients and professionals supports patients' self-management ability, and effective communication is a

  16. Increasing On-Task Behavior in Students in a Regular Classroom: Effectiveness of a Self-Management Procedure Using a Tactile Prompt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Dennis W.; Anderson, Angelika; Glassenbury, Michele; Lang, Russell; Didden, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Self-management strategies have been shown to be widely effective. However, limited classroom-based research exists involving low performing but developmentally normal high school-aged participants. This study examined the effectiveness of a self-management strategy aimed at increasing on-task behavior in general education classrooms with students…

  17. Ecological Factors Predict Transition Readiness/Self-Management in Youth With Chronic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javalkar, Karina; Johnson, Meredith; Kshirsagar, Abhijit V; Ocegueda, Sofia; Detwiler, Randal K; Ferris, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Health care transition readiness or self-management among adolescents and young adults (AYA) with chronic conditions may be influenced by factors related to their surrounding environment. Study participants were AYA diagnosed with a chronic condition and evaluated at pediatric- and adult-focused subspecialty clinics at the University of North Carolina Hospital Systems. All participants were administered a provider-administered self-management/transition-readiness tool, the UNC TRxANSITION Scale. Geographic area and associated characteristics (ecological factors) were identified for each participant's ZIP code using the published U.S. Census data. The Level 1 model of the hierarchical linear regression used individual-level predictors of transition readiness/self-management. The Level 2 model incorporated the ecological factors. We enrolled 511 AYA with different chronic conditions aged 12-31 years with the following characteristics: mean age of 20± 4 years, 45% white, 42% black, and 54% female. Participants represented 214 ZIP codes in or around North Carolina, USA. The Level 1 model showed that age, gender, and race were significant predictors of transition readiness/self-management. On adding the ecological factors in the Level 2 model, race was no longer significant. Participants from a geographic area with a greater percentage of females (β = .114, p = .005) and a higher median income (β = .126, p = .002) had greater overall transition readiness. Ecological factors also predicted subdomains of transition readiness/self-management. In this cohort of adolescents and young adults with different chronic conditions, ecological disparities such as sex composition, median income, and language predict self-management/transition readiness. It is important to take ecological risk factors into consideration when preparing patients for health self-management or transition. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  18. Exploring leadership in self-managed project teams in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaleha Yazid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on a longitudinal approach in exploring leadership in Self-Managed Project Teams (SMPT. SMPT has been known to contribute to organizations by improving productivity and increasing organizational performance. Therefore, understanding the dynamics of leadership in this type of team can be seen as one of the important factors to ensure the success of organizations. Leading a team which manages itself is a challenge as increased autonomy and control is given to the team which eliminates the existence of a leader. It is important to understand the extent of how the external leader is involved within SMPT and whether the external leader approaches highlighted in the literature are applicable in such a situation and how these approaches change during work processes. This study comprises of evidence collected through semi-structured interviews in two small and medium sized organizations in Malaysia. Weekly telephone interviews as well as face-to-face interviews were conducted which provides contextual data for the research. In this research, the evidence suggested that SMPT transform from self-managed toward leader-managed resulting from several factors, such as conflict handling strategies. Specifically, it was found that avoiding conflicts, rather than confronting, transform the team into being leader dependent.

  19. Coping strategies used by poorly adherent patients for self-managing bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blixen, Carol; Levin, Jennifer B; Cassidy, Kristin A; Perzynski, Adam T; Sajatovic, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic mental illness associated with reduced quality of life, high rates of suicide, and high financial costs. Evidence indicates that psychosocial stress might play an important role in the onset and course of BD. The objective of this study was to address the gap between coping theory and the clinical use of coping strategies used to self-manage BD. In-depth interviews were conducted with a sample of 21 poorly adherent patients with BD. All interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using content analysis with an emphasis on dominant themes. Transcript-based analysis generated two major domains of coping strategies used to self-manage BD: 1) problem focused (altering eating habits, managing mood-stabilizing medications, keeping psychiatric appointments, seeking knowledge, self-monitoring, and socializing) and 2) emotion focused (distracting activities, denial, isolation, modifying/avoiding, helping others, and seeking social support). Participants used both types of coping strategies to deal with stressful situations brought about by the internal and external demands associated with self-management of BD. This qualitative study provided a first step in evaluating coping strategies as a possible mediator in the self-management of BD and has implications for health care providers. Being able to characterize an individual's coping behaviors can help patients modify or replace more maladaptive coping with better coping strategies in the self-management of this chronic mental illness.

  20. An integrative review of e-learning in the delivery of self-management support training for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawn, Sharon; Zhi, Xiaojuan; Morello, Andrea

    2017-10-10

    E-learning involves delivery of education through Information and Communication Technology (ITC) using a wide variety of instructional designs, including synchronous and asynchronous formats. It can be as effective as face-to-face training for many aspects of health professional training. There are, however, particular practices and skills needed in providing patient self-management support, such as partnering with patients in goal-setting, which may challenge conventional practice norms. E-learning for the delivery of self-management support (SMS) continuing education to existing health professionals is a relatively new and growing area with limited studies identifying features associated with best acquisition of skills in self-management support. An integrative literature review examined what is known about e-learning for self-management support. This review included both qualitative and quantitative studies that focused on e-learning provided to existing health professionals for their continuing professional development. Papers were limited to those published in English between 2006 and 2016. Content analysis was used to organize and focus and describe the findings. The search returned 1505 articles, with most subsequently excluded based on their title or abstract. Fifty-two full text articles were obtained and checked, with 42 excluded because they did not meet the full criteria. Ten peer-reviewed articles were included in this review. Seven main themes emerged from the content analysis: participants and professions; time; package content; guiding theoretical framework; outcome measures; learning features or formats; and learning barriers. These themes revealed substantial heterogeneity in instructional design and other elements of e-learning applied to SMS, indicating that there is still much to understand about how best to deliver e-learning for SMS skills development. Few e-learning approaches meet the need for high levels of interactivity, reflection

  1. A case series of an off-the-shelf online health resource with integrated nurse coaching to support self-management in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Early F

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Frances Early,1 Jane S Young,2 Elizabeth Robinshaw,3 Emma Z Mi,4 Ella Z Mi,4 Jonathan P Fuld1 1Centre for Self Management Support, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK; 2Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK; 3Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Gloucester, UK; 4School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK Background: COPD has significant psychosocial impact. Self-management support improves quality of life, but programs are not universally available. IT-based self-management interventions can provide home-based support, but have mixed results. We conducted a case series of an off-the-shelf Internet-based health-promotion program, The Preventive Plan (TPP, coupled with nurse-coach support, which aimed to increase patient activation and provide self-management benefits. Materials and methods: A total of 19 COPD patients were recruited, and 14 completed 3-month follow-up in two groups: groups 1 and 2 with more and less advanced COPD, respectively. Change in patient activation was determined with paired t-tests and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Benefits and user experience were explored in semistructured interviews, analyzed thematically. Results: Only group 1 improved significantly in activation, from a lower baseline than group 2; group 1 also improved significantly in mastery and anxiety. Both groups felt significantly more informed about COPD and reported physical functioning improvements. Group 1 reported improvements in mood and confidence. Overall, group 2 reported fewer benefits than group 1. Both groups valued nurse-coach support; for group 1, it was more important than TPP in building confidence to self-manage. The design of TPP and lack of motivation to use IT were barriers to use, but disease severity and poor IT skills were not. Discussion: Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of combining

  2. PUBLIC AND PRIVATE HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS IN MALAYSIA: COMPETING, COMPLEMENTARY OR CROSSBREEDS AS EDUCATION PROVIDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Chang Da

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Delivery of higher education used to be exclusive to the public sector in Malaysia. However, legislative changes made in 1996 led to the coexistence of public and private higher education institutions. In 2007, there were 20 public universities compared to more than 500 private institutions, of which 30 are currently categorised as universities or university colleges. Looking at their respective roles as higher education providers, public and private institutions display characteristics of being substitutes while at the same time serving complementary roles to one another. This dichotomy between public and private higher education institutions can, in fact, be seen as inclining towards a hybrid model that allows both to operate within a single system of higher education provision in the country. Such a hybrid model is evident in how the clientele is being divided between public and private higher institutions. It is also evident in the different roles played by the respective faculty members as well as in the programmes being made available in either type of institutions.

  3. The environmental self-management in the university community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogelio García-Tejera

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The System of Education Cuban power to the school like center promoter of the development, their social projection includes the satisfaction of the educational necessities of the community. The community environmental education for the sustainable development is inserted in the educational administration of the school like cultural center. To consider the university space as a community, he/she gives the possibility to carry out actions of self-management with the objective of improving the atmosphere in the university community, when the experiences that characterize to the cultural practices of the university students taking advantage. For the non formal road, it is contributed to the environmental formation, when stimulating the responsibility for the planning and execution of the methods that characterize the administration of their atmosphere, to make emphasis in the critic to the not wanted behaviors, to promote the voluntary commitment of the active participation of each one of their members and to achieve the work of the juvenile organizations.

  4. Providing Nuclear Criticality Safety Analysis Education through Benchmark Experiment Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bess, John D.; Briggs, J. Blair; Nigg, David W.

    2009-01-01

    One of the challenges that today's new workforce of nuclear criticality safety engineers face is the opportunity to provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines without having received significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and/or the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) provides students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills.

  5. Considerations for the Development of Mobile Phone Apps to Support Diabetes Self-Management: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu, Mary D; Malabu, Usman H; Callander, Emily J; Malau-Aduli, Aduli Eo; Malau-Aduli, Bunmi S

    2018-06-21

    There is increased research interest in the use of mobile phone apps to support diabetes management. However, there are divergent views on what constitute the minimum standards for inclusion in the development of mobile phone apps. Mobile phone apps require an evidence-based approach to development which will consequently impact on their effectiveness. Therefore, comprehensive information on developmental considerations could help designers and researchers to develop innovative and effective patient-centered self-management mobile phone apps for diabetes patients. This systematic review examined the developmental considerations adopted in trials that engaged mobile phone applications for diabetes self-management. A comprehensive search strategy was implemented across 5 electronic databases; Medline, Scopus, Social Science Citation Index, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINALHL) and supplemented by reference list from identified studies. Study quality was evaluated using the Joanna Briggs Critical appraisal checklist for trials. Information on developmental factors (health behavioral theory, functionality, pilot testing, user and clinical expert involvements, data privacy and app security) were assessed across experimental studies using a template developed for the review. A total of 11 studies (10 randomized controlled trials and 1 quasi-experimental trial) that fitted the inclusion criteria were identified. All the included studies had the functionality of self-monitoring of blood glucose. However, only some of them included functions for data analytics (7/11, 63.6%), education (6/11, 54.5%) and reminder (6/11, 54.5%). There were 5/11(45.5%) studies with significantly improved glycosylated hemoglobin in the intervention groups where educational functionality was present in the apps used in the 5 trials. Only 1 (1/11, 9.1%) study considered health behavioral theory and user involvement

  6. Managing Epilepsy Well: Emerging e-Tools for epilepsy self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shegog, Ross; Bamps, Yvan A; Patel, Archna; Kakacek, Jody; Escoffery, Cam; Johnson, Erica K; Ilozumba, Ukwuoma O

    2013-10-01

    The Managing Epilepsy Well (MEW) Network was established in 2007 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Epilepsy Program to expand epilepsy self-management research. The network has employed collaborative research strategies to develop, test, and disseminate evidence-based, community-based, and e-Health interventions (e-Tools) for epilepsy self-management for people with epilepsy, caregivers, and health-care providers. Since its inception, MEW Network collaborators have conducted formative studies (n=7) investigating the potential of e-Health to support epilepsy self-management and intervention studies evaluating e-Tools (n=5). The MEW e-Tools (the MEW website, WebEase, UPLIFT, MINDSET, and PEARLS online training) and affiliated e-Tools (Texting 4 Control) are designed to complement self-management practices in each phase of the epilepsy care continuum. These tools exemplify a concerted research agenda, shared methodological principles and models for epilepsy self-management, and a communal knowledge base for implementing e-Health to improve quality of life for people with epilepsy. © 2013.

  7. Using an electronic self-management tool to support patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD): a CKD clinic self-care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Stephanie W; Jassal, Sarbjit V; Porter, Eveline; Logan, Alexander G; Miller, Judith A

    2013-01-01

    New healthcare delivery models are needed to enhance the patient experience and improve quality of care for individuals with chronic conditions such as kidney disease. One potential avenue is to implement self-management strategies. There is growing evidence that self-management interventions help optimize various aspects of chronic disease management. With the increasing use of information technology (IT) in health care, chronic disease management programs are incorporating IT solutions to support patient self-management practices. IT solutions have the ability to promote key principles of self-management, namely education, empowerment, and collaboration. Positive clinical outcomes have been demonstrated for a number of chronic conditions when IT solutions were incorporated into self-management programs. There is a paucity of evidence for self-management in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Furthermore, IT strategies have not been tested in this patient population to the same extent as other chronic conditions (e.g., diabetes, hypertension). Therefore, it is currently unknown if IT strategies will promote self-management behaviors and lead to improvements in overall patient care. We designed and developed an IT solution called My KidneyCare Centre to support self-management strategies for patients with CKD. In this review, we discuss the rationale and vision of incorporating an electronic self-management tool to support the care of patients with CKD. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The Influence of Health Literacy and Depression on Diabetes Self-Management: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Maneze

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite an increasing focus on health literacy in the clinical setting and in the literature, there is still ongoing debate about its influence on diabetes self-management. The aim of the study was to examine the relationships of sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological factors on health literacy and diabetes self-management. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken on 224 patients with type 2 diabetes at two diabetes centres in Sydney, Australia. Findings showed that people with low health literacy were more likely to (a have lower educational attainment; (b be migrants; and (c have depressed mood. Unexpectedly, those who met HbA1c threshold of good glucose control were more likely to have low health literacy. Predictors of low diabetes self-management included (a younger age group (AOR: 2.58, 95% CI: 1.24–4.64; (b having postsecondary education (AOR: 2.30, 95% CI: 1.05–5.01; (c low knowledge of diabetes management (AOR: 2.29, 95% CI: 1.25–4.20; and (d having depressed mood (AOR: 2.30, 95% CI: 1.30–4.06. The finding that depressed mood predicted both low health literacy and low diabetes self-management stresses the importance of screening for depression. Increasing people’s understanding of diabetes self-management and supporting those with depression are crucial to enhance participation in diabetes self-management.

  9. The Managing Epilepsy Well Network:: Advancing Epilepsy Self-Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajatovic, Martha; Jobst, Barbara C; Shegog, Ross; Bamps, Yvan A; Begley, Charles E; Fraser, Robert T; Johnson, Erica K; Pandey, Dilip K; Quarells, Rakale C; Scal, Peter; Spruill, Tanya M; Thompson, Nancy J; Kobau, Rosemarie

    2017-03-01

    Epilepsy, a complex spectrum of disorders, affects about 2.9 million people in the U.S. Similar to other chronic disorders, people with epilepsy face challenges related to management of the disorder, its treatment, co-occurring depression, disability, social disadvantages, and stigma. Two national conferences on public health and epilepsy (1997, 2003) and a 2012 IOM report on the public health dimensions of epilepsy highlighted important knowledge gaps and emphasized the need for evidence-based, scalable epilepsy self-management programs. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention translated recommendations on self-management research and dissemination into an applied research program through the Prevention Research Centers Managing Epilepsy Well (MEW) Network. MEW Network objectives are to advance epilepsy self-management research by developing effective interventions that can be broadly disseminated for use in people's homes, healthcare providers' offices, or in community settings. The aim of this report is to provide an update on the MEW Network research pipeline, which spans efficacy, effectiveness, and dissemination. Many of the interventions use e-health strategies to eliminate barriers to care (e.g., lack of transportation, functional limitations, and stigma). Strengths of this mature research network are the culture of collaboration, community-based partnerships, e-health methods, and its portfolio of prevention activities, which range from efficacy studies engaging hard-to-reach groups, to initiatives focused on provider training and knowledge translation. The MEW Network works with organizations across the country to expand its capacity, help leverage funding and other resources, and enhance the development, dissemination, and sustainability of MEW Network programs and tools. Guided by national initiatives targeting chronic disease or epilepsy burden since 2007, the MEW Network has been responsible for more than 43 scientific journal articles, two

  10. Operationalizing Surveillance of Chronic Disease Self-Management and Self-Management Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Teresa J; Sacks, Jeffrey J; Terrillion, Albert J; Colligan, Erin M

    2018-04-05

    Sixty percent of US adults have at least one chronic condition, and more than 40% have multiple conditions. Self-management (SM) by the individual, along with self-management support (SMS) by others, are nonpharmacological interventions with few side effects that are critical to optimal chronic disease control. Ruiz and colleagues laid the conceptual groundwork for surveillance of SM/SMS at 5 socio-ecological levels (individual, health system, community, policy, and media). We extend that work by proposing operationalized indicators at each socio-ecologic level and suggest that the indicators be embedded in existing surveillance systems at national, state, and local levels. Without a robust measurement system at the population level, we will not know how far we have to go or how far we have come in making SM and SMS a reality. The data can also be used to facilitate planning and service delivery strategies, monitor temporal changes, and stimulate SM/SMS-related research.

  11. New technology and illness self-management: Potential relevance for resource-poor populations in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Henry

    2015-11-01

    Advances in technology have made it possible for many standard diagnostic and health monitoring procedures, traditionally carried out by qualified personnel within medical facilities, to be reliably undertaken by patients or carers in their own homes with a minimum of basic training. There has also been a dramatic increase in the number and diversity of both sources of information on health issues and the possibilities for sharing information and experiences over ICT-based social networks. It has been suggested that these developments have the potential to 'empower' patients, reducing their dependence on providers and possibly improving their quality of care by increasing the volume and timeliness of diagnostic data and encouraging active self-management of their condition, for example through lifestyle changes. Perhaps more significantly, it is also seen by many economies with ageing populations as a way to contain high and ever rising healthcare costs. It has also been suggested that a move to greater self-management supported by expert networks and smart phone technology could improve the treatment of many millions of patients with chronic diseases in low and middle income economies that are also confronting the potential cost implications of epidemiological and demographic transitions, combined with the higher expectations of a more educated and knowledgeable population. There is now limited evidence that some fairly basic e- and mHealth interventions, for example in the areas of MNCH, malaria and HIV/AIDS can have a positive impact, even in resource-poor contexts. The aim here is to explore the extent to which further investment in technology could play a role in the development of an effective and affordable health sector strategy for at least some developing economies. It is suggested that the effectiveness of the approach may be highly dependent on the specific health conditions addressed, the nature of existing health systems and the overall socio

  12. Classroom Animals Provide More than Just Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Sandra; Lynch, Julianne

    2017-01-01

    Keeping classroom animals is a common practice in many classrooms. Their value for learning is often seen narrowly as the potential to involve children in learning biological science. They also provide opportunities for increased empathy, as well as socio-emotional development. Realization of their potential for enhancing primary children's…

  13. Growing Healthy Bodies: Nutrition Education for Day Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viebrock, Margaret A.; Berry, Holly

    This booklet discusses the important role that day care providers can play in ensuring that children eat healthy snacks and meals and learn good eating habits. Section one of the booklet examines snack foods, discusses the difference between nutritious and less-nutritious snacks, and recommends snack foods appropriate for different age groups.…

  14. Development of a peer-supported, self-management intervention for people following mental health crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Alyssa; Lloyd-Evans, Brynmor; Fullarton, Kate; Morant, Nicola; Paterson, Bethan; Hindle, David; Kelly, Kathleen; Mason, Oliver; Lambert, Marissa; Johnson, Sonia

    2017-11-09

    A documented gap in support exists for service users following discharge from acute mental health services, and structured interventions to reduce relapse are rarely provided. Peer-facilitated self-management interventions have potential to meet this need, but evidence for their effectiveness is limited. This paper describes the development of a peer-provided self-management intervention for mental health service users following discharge from crisis resolution teams (CRTs). A five-stage iterative mixed-methods approach of sequential data collection and intervention development was adopted, following the development and piloting stages of the MRC framework for developing and evaluating complex interventions. Evidence review (stage 1) included systematic reviews of both peer support and self-management literature. Interviews with CRT service users (n = 41) regarding needs and priorities for support following CRT discharge were conducted (stage 2). Focus group consultations (n = 12) were held with CRT service-users, staff and carers to assess the acceptability and feasibility of a proposed intervention, and to refine intervention organisation and content (stage 3). Qualitative evaluation of a refined, peer-provided, self-management intervention involved qualitative interviews with CRT service user participants (n = 9; n = 18) in feasibility testing (stage 4) and a pilot trial (stage 5), and a focus group at each stage with the peer worker providers (n = 4). Existing evidence suggests self-management interventions can reduce relapse and improve recovery. Initial interviews and focus groups indicated support for the overall purpose and planned content of a recovery-focused self-management intervention for people leaving CRT care adapted from an existing resource: The personal recovery plan (developed by Repper and Perkins), and for peer support workers (PSWs) as providers. Participant feedback after feasibility testing was positive regarding facilitation of

  15. The self-management experience of patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazian, Shayan; Crnosija, Natalie; Weinger, Katie; Jacobson, Alan M; Park, Joonho; Tanenbaum, Molly L; Gonzalez, Jeffrey S; Mattana, Joseph; Hammock, Amy C

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore views related to the self-management of type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. We conducted three semi-structured focus groups in participants with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Interviews were transcribed, coded, and analyzed using thematic analysis. Credibility was supported through triangulation of data sources and the use of multiple investigators from different disciplines. Twenty-three adults participated. Three major themes were identified: emotional reactions to health state, the impact of family dynamics on self-management, and the burden of self-management regimens. Family dynamics were found to be a barrier and support to self-management, while complicated self-management regimens were found to be a barrier. Additionally, participants expressed several emotional reactions related to their CKD status, including regret related to having developed CKD and distress related both to their treatment regimens and the future possibility of dialysis. This exploratory study of patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease describes barriers and supports to self-management and emotional reactions to chronic kidney disease status. Future research should confirm these findings in a larger population and should include family members and/or health care providers to help further define problems with self-management in patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Designing a self-management app for young people with type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castensøe-Seidenfaden, Pernille; Reventlov Husted, Gitte; Teilmann, Grete Katrine

    2017-01-01

    recommendations based on experiences and reflections from a 2-year research study. METHODS: A mixed methods design was used to identify user needs before designing the app and testing it in a randomized controlled trial. App design was based on qualitative, explorative, interventional, and experimental activities...... information is available to guide their selection of appropriate methods, techniques, and tools for a participatory design (PD) project in health care. OBJECTIVE: The aim of our study was to develop an mHealth app to support young people in self-managing type 1 diabetes. This paper presents our methodological......BACKGROUND: Young people with type 1 diabetes often struggle to self-manage their disease. Mobile health (mHealth) apps show promise in supporting self-management of chronic conditions such as type 1 diabetes. Many health care providers become involved in app development. Unfortunately, limited...

  17. Trial of a "credit card" asthma self-management plan in a high-risk group of patients with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, W; Burgess, C; Ayson, M; Crane, J; Pearce, N; Beasley, R

    1996-05-01

    The "credit card" asthma self-management plan provides the adult asthmatic patient with simple guidelines for the self-management of asthma, which are based on the self-assessment of peak expiratory flow rate recordings and symptoms. The study was a trial of the clinical efficacy of the credit card plan in a high-risk group of asthmatic patients. In this "before-and-after" trial, patients discharged from the emergency department of Wellington Hospital, after treatment for severe asthma were invited to attend a series of hospital outpatient clinics at which the credit card plan was introduced. Questionnaires were used to compare markers of asthma morbidity, requirement for emergency medical care, and medication use during the 6-month period before and after intervention with the credit card plan. Of the 30 patients with asthma who attended the first outpatient clinic, 26 (17 women and 9 men) completed the program. In these 26 participants, there was a reduction in both morbidity and requirement for acute medical services: specifically, the proportion waking with asthma more than once a week decreased from 65% to 23% (p = 0.005) and the proportion visiting the emergency department for treatment of severe asthma decreased from 58% to 15% (p = 0.004). The patients attending the clinics commented favorably on the plan, in particular on its usefulness as an educational tool for monitoring and treating their asthma. Although the interpretation of this study is limited by the lack of a randomized control group, the findings are consistent with other evidence that the credit card asthma self-management plan can be an effective and acceptable system for improving asthma care in a high-risk group of adult patients with asthma.

  18. Self-management as a strategy to improve the classroom behavior of adolescents with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, E S; DuPaul, G J; Bradley-Klug, K L

    1998-01-01

    This article reports on the application of a self-management strategy for improving the classroom behavior of students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Based on the work of Rhode, Morgan, and Young (1983), the intervention focuses on teaching students to systematically rate their own behavior according to the rating of their teacher. Although, historically, self-management strategies based on cognitive control have not been found to be effective for students with ADHD, strategies based on contingency management have not been widely reported in the literature. A description of the intervention and two case study illustrations are provided. Potential limitations and implications for research in using this strategy are discussed.

  19. Coping strategies used by poorly adherent patients for self-managing bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blixen C

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Carol Blixen,1,2 Jennifer B Levin,2 Kristin A Cassidy,2 Adam T Perzynski,1 Martha Sajatovic2–4 1Center for Health Care Research and Policy, MetroHealth Medical Center, 2Department of Psychiatry, 3Department of Neurology, Neurological Institute, 4Department of Biostatistics & Epidemiology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA Background: Bipolar disorder (BD is a chronic mental illness associated with reduced quality of life, high rates of suicide, and high financial costs. Evidence indicates that psychosocial stress might play an important role in the onset and course of BD. Objective: The objective of this study was to address the gap between coping theory and the clinical use of coping strategies used to self-manage BD.Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with a sample of 21 poorly adherent patients with BD. All interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using content analysis with an emphasis on dominant themes.Results: Transcript-based analysis generated two major domains of coping strategies used to self-manage BD: 1 problem focused (altering eating habits, managing mood-stabilizing medications, keeping psychiatric appointments, seeking knowledge, self-monitoring, and socializing and 2 emotion focused (distracting activities, denial, isolation, modifying/avoiding, helping others, and seeking social support. Participants used both types of coping strategies to deal with stressful situations brought about by the internal and external demands associated with self-management of BD.Conclusion: This qualitative study provided a first step in evaluating coping strategies as a possible mediator in the self-management of BD and has implications for health care providers. Being able to characterize an individual’s coping behaviors can help patients modify or replace more maladaptive coping with better coping strategies in the self-management of

  20. The complexity of shaping self-management in daily practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.M. van de Bovenkamp (Hester); J. Dwarswaard (Jolanda)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstract_Background and context:_ Many countries are giving patients a more active role in health care, on both the individual and collective level. This paper focuses on one aspect of the participation agenda on the individual level: self-management. The paper explores self-management in

  1. Internet-based self-management in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, Victor van der

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes the role of internet-based support in the delivery of an asthma self management program. First, the compliance and reliability of home lung function monitoring, one of the key features of asthma self-management, was studied and appeared to be high over a 4-week period. Second,

  2. Self-Management Strategies to Support Students with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    Self-management is a set of procedures that students can be taught to apply to their own behaviors to change them. In self-management, students are taught to observe, assess, and modify their own behavior. These procedures include such things as self-identifying and observing a target behavior and setting a goal to change it. Self-management…

  3. Corruption in a Comprehensive School: Sociological Diagnosis and Educational Providence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdas Pruskus

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is about the phenomenon of corruption in a comprehensive school. It analyses the expression forms of corruption and their peculiarities and disputes the main reasons stimulating educators to take part in corrupt interchanges thus tolerate it. On the ground of empirical research in Vilnius secondary schools it discloses attitudes of teachers, schoolchildren and parents towards corruption. The research was carried out in Vilnius Salomėja Nėris gymnasium, Vilnius Mikalojus Daukša secondary school, Mindaugas secondary school, Užupys gymnasium, Antakalnis gymnasium, Naujamiestis secondary school and Stanevičius secondary school. Overall 500 respondents were questioned: 300 pupils of ninth – twelfth forms, 100 teachers and 100 parents of schoolchildren. Difficult financial circumstances were pointed out as the main reason stimulating teachers to take part in corrupt interchanges. This answer was chosen by 42 per cent of respondents. Most of them think that raising wages would reduce corruption crimes. The research data show it is an important problem in schools though 70 per cent of respondents state it is not the biggest problem in their school. Only 15 per cent of questioned schoolchildren, 4 per cent of parents and 14 percent of teachers safely state that corruption is the main problem in their school. About 20 per cent of respondents (21.4 per cent of schoolchildren, 19 per cent of parents and 21 per cent of teachers acknowledge of making a payoff or receiving an offer to take it. Respondents state that 30 per cent of their friends and relatives made a payoff to school staff. 26.7 percent of schoolchildren and 27 per cent of parents’ acquaintances made a payoff to school staff. Only the answers of teachers did not change – 21 per cent of their colleagues were offered a payoff. These results do not let affirm that corruption is very widely spread in schools and therefore could be named as the biggest problem here. Though

  4. 75 FR 47458 - TRICARE; Diabetic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... American Diabetes Association. Coverage limitations on the provision of this benefit will be as determined... education. Diabetes self-management training (DSMT) is an interactive, collaborative process involving beneficiaries with diabetes, their physician(s), and their educators. The educational process should provide the...

  5. Diabetes Self-Management Care via Cell Phone: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Santosh; Boren, Suzanne Austin

    2008-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to evaluate the evidence on the impact of cell phone interventions for persons with diabetes and/or obesity in improving health outcomes and/or processes of care for persons with diabetes and/or obesity. Methods We searched Medline (1966–2007) and reviewed reference lists from included studies and relevant reviews to identify additional studies. We extracted descriptions of the study design, sample size, patient age, duration of study, technology, educational content and delivery environment, intervention and control groups, process and outcome measures, and statistical significance. Results In this review, we included 20 articles, representing 18 studies, evaluating the use of a cell phone for health information for persons with diabetes or obesity. Thirteen of 18 studies measured health outcomes and the remaining 5 studies evaluated processes of care. Outcomes were grouped into learning, behavior change, clinical improvement, and improved health status. Nine out of 10 studies that measured hemoglobin A1c reported significant improvement among those receiving education and care support. Cell phone and text message interventions increased patient–provider and parent–child communication and satisfaction with care. Conclusions Providing care and support with cell phones and text message interventions can improve clinically relevant diabetes-related health outcomes by increasing knowledge and self-efficacy to carry out self-management behaviors. PMID:19885219

  6. Relationship of self-management to personality types and indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R L; Verble, J S; Price, D E; Layne, B H

    1995-06-01

    This study addressed the relationship between self-management (as measured by the Lifestyle Approaches Inventory, Williams, Moore, Pettibone, & Thomas, 1992) and personality types and indexes (as measured by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, Myers & McCaulley, 1985) in a sample of 347 university students. Correlational analyses indicated that the self-management factor most consistently linked to the Myers-Briggs indices was Organization of Physical Space. The Myers-Briggs index most consistently correlated with the self-management factors was Judgment-Perception. Overall, male and female subjects showed similar patterns of relationships between the self-management and personality indices. When the self-management scores were compared for the various Myers-Briggs types, the analysis indicated that types having a J (planful and organized) or S (precise and practical) in the typology tended to score higher than those having a P (spontaneous and flexible) or N (imaginative and insightful).

  7. The Potential of Web-based Interventions for Heart Disease Self-Management: A Mixed Methods Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr, C.; Murray, E.; Noble, L.; Morris, R.; Bottomley, C.; Stevenson, F.; Patterson, D.; Peacock, R.; Turner, I.; Jackson, K.; Nazareth, I.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Existing initiatives to support patient self-management of heart disease do not appear to be reaching patients most in need. Providing self-management programs over the Internet (web-based interventions) might help reduce health disparities by reaching a greater number of patients. However, it is unclear whether they can achieve this goal and whether their effectiveness might be limited by the digital divide.Objective: To explore the effectiveness of a web-based intervention in de...

  8. The Potential of Web-based Interventions for Heart Disease Self-Management: A Mixed Methods Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr, Cicely; Murray, Elizabeth; Noble, Lorraine; Morris, Richard; Bottomley, Christian; Stevenson, Fiona; Patterson, David; Peacock, Richard; Turner, Indra; Jackson, Keith; Nazareth, Irwin

    2010-01-01

    Background: Existing initiatives to support patient self-management of heart disease do not appear to be reaching patients most in need. Providing self-management programs over the Internet (web-based interventions) might help reduce health disparities by reaching a greater number of patients. However, it is unclear whether they can achieve this goal and whether their effectiveness might be limited by the digital divide. Objective: To explore the effectiveness of a web-based intervention in d...

  9. Self-management experiences among men and women with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Rebecca

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study is to better understand differences in diabetes self-management, specifically needs, barriers and challenges among men and women living with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Methods 35 participants were recruited from a diabetes education center (DEC in Toronto, Canada. Five focus groups and nine individual interviews were conducted to explore men and women's diabetes self-management experiences. Results The average age of participants was 57 years and just over half (51.4% were female. Analyses revealed five themes: disclosure and identity as a person living with diabetes; self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG; diet struggles across varying contexts; utilization of diabetes resources; and social support. Women disclosed their diabetes more readily and integrated management into their daily lives, whereas men were more reluctant to tell friends and family about their diabetes and were less observant of self-management practices in social settings. Men focused on practical aspects of SMBG and experimented with various aspects of management to reduce reliance on medications whereas women focused on affective components of SMBG. Women restricted foods from their diets perceived as prohibited whereas many men moderated their intake of perceived unhealthy foods, except in social situations. Women used socially interactive resources, like education classes and support groups whereas men relied more on self-directed learning but also described wanting more guidance to help navigate the healthcare system. Finally, men and women reported wanting physician support for both affective and practical aspects of self-management. Conclusions Our findings highlight the differences in needs and challenges of diabetes self-management among men and women, which may inform gender-sensitive diabetes, care, counseling and support.

  10. Self-management interventions for adults with chronic kidney disease: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Maoliosa; Kahlon, Bhavneet Kaur; Beanlands, Heather; Straus, Sharon; Ronksley, Paul; Herrington, Gwen; Tong, Allison; Grill, Allan; Waldvogel, Blair; Large, Chantel A; Large, Claire L; Harwood, Lori; Novak, Marta; James, Matthew T; Elliott, Meghan; Fernandez, Nicolas; Brimble, Scott; Samuel, Susan; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R

    2018-03-22

    To systematically identify and describe self-management interventions for adult patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Community-based. Adults with CKD stages 1-5 (not requiring kidney replacement therapy). Self-management strategies for adults with CKD. Using a scoping review, electronic databases and grey literature were searched in October 2016 to identify self-management interventions for adults with CKD stages 1-5 (not requiring kidney replacement therapy). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), non-RCTs, qualitative and mixed method studies were included and study selection and data extraction were independently performed by two reviewers. Outcomes included behaviours, cognitions, physiological measures, symptoms, health status and healthcare. Fifty studies (19 RCTs, 7 quasi-experimental, 5 observational, 13 pre-post intervention, 1 mixed method and 5 qualitative) reporting 45 interventions were included. The most common intervention topic was diet/nutrition and interventions were regularly delivered face to face. Interventions were administered by a variety of providers, with nursing professionals the most common health professional group. Cognitions (ie, changes in general CKD knowledge, perceived self-management and motivation) were the most frequently reported outcome domain that showed improvement. Less than 1% of the interventions were co-developed with patients and 20% were based on a theory or framework. There was a wide range of self-management interventions with considerable variability in outcomes for adults with CKD. Major gaps in the literature include lack of patient engagement in the design of the interventions, with the majority of interventions not applying a behavioural change theory to inform their development. This work highlights the need to involve patients to co-developed and evaluate a self-management intervention based on sound theories and clinical evidence. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the

  11. Self-management interventions for young people with chronic conditions: A systematic overview.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Bal; Dr. A.L. van Staa; MSc M.I. Bal; Dr. J.N.T. Sattoe; Dr. P.D.D.M. Roelofs; Dr. H.S. Miedema

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide a systematic overview of self-management interventions (SMI) for young people with chronic conditions with respect to content, formats, theories, and evaluated outcomes. METHODS: Embase, Medline, PsycINFO, Web-of-Science, CINAHL, and Cochrane were searched. Reviews'

  12. Self-management interventions for young people with chronic conditions: a systematic overview.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sattoe, J.N.T.; Bal, M.I.; Roelofs, P.D.D.M.; Bal, R.; Miedema, H.S.; Staa, A. van

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To provide a systematic overview of self-management interventions (SMI) for young people with chronic conditions with respect to content, formats, theories, and evaluated outcomes. Methods: Embase, Medline, PsycINFO, Web-of-Science, CINAHL, and Cochrane were searched. Reviews’ reference

  13. Adapting Hypertension Self-Management Interventions to Enhance their Sustained Effectiveness among Urban African Americans

    OpenAIRE

    Ameling, Jessica M.; Ephraim, Patti L.; Bone, Lee R.; Levine, David M.; Roter, Debra L.; Wolff, Jennifer L.; Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Fitzpatrick, Stephanie L.; Noronha, Gary J.; Fagan, Peter J.; Lewis-Boyer, LaPricia; Hickman, Debra; Simmons, Michelle; Purnell, Leon; Fisher, Annette

    2014-01-01

    African Americans suffer disproportionately poor hypertension control despite the availability of efficacious interventions. Using principles of community-based participatory research and implementation science, we adapted established hypertension self-management interventions to enhance interventions’ cultural relevance and potential for sustained effectiveness among urban African Americans. We obtained input from patients and their family members, their health care providers, and community ...

  14. An educational strategy for using physician assistant students to provide health promotion education to community adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Cathy C

    2012-01-01

    involved in community education because of the experience. These presentations serve to enrich student professional development, enhance community awareness of the PA profession, and provide educational information to adolescent populations, many of whom are considered at-risk. In addition, this model serves to enhance the service-learning curriculum.

  15. A randomised trial of a 5 week, manual based, self-management programme for hypertension delivered in a cardiac patient club in Shanghai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewin Robert J

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Shanghai there are 1.2 million people with hypertension, many of whom have difficulty in affording medical treatment. Community based, anti-hypertensive clubs have been created to provide health education but education alone is often ineffective. Lifestyle change programmes have shown some potential for reducing blood pressure but in previous trials have required specialist staff and extensive contact. We have previously demonstrated that self-management programmes delivered by health professionals, such as a nurse who has had short training in self-management techniques can change health behaviour and reduce symptoms. This study was designed to evaluate the benefits of a simple, cognitive-behavioural, self-management programme for hypertension based around a hypertension manual and delivered in the setting of a community anti-hypertensive club in Shanghai. Method The method was a pragmatic randomised controlled trial with an intention-to-treat analysis. Adult patients with mild-to-moderate primary hypertension, waiting to join a neighbourhood anti-hypertension club, were randomised to the self-management programme or to an information only control procedure. They attended the group treatment sessions on 4 occasions over 5 weeks for education combined with goal setting for lifestyle change and an introduction to exercise. The main outcome measures were: changes in blood pressure; blood total cholesterol; diet; activity level and health related quality of life 1 month and 4 months after the end of treatment. Results A total of 140 adults with mild-to-moderate primary hypertension took part. All of the main outcomes showed beneficial changes. Four months after the end of treatment the mean blood pressure differences between groups were systolic 10.15 mm Hg (P Conclusion Patients with mild-to-moderate primary hypertension attending a 5 week, group and manual based, cognitive-behavioural self-management programme, delivered

  16. The Effect of Teach-Back Training on Self Management in Kidney Transplant Recipients: A Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzin Mollazadeh

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kidney transplant recipients need self-management during their lifetime, and training these patients is essential for the realization of self-management. Teach-back training (TBT was used to receive, understand, and retain information. This study aimed to determine the effect of TBT on self-management in kidney transplant recipients. Methods: In this clinical trial study, 84 kidney transplant recipients who referred to the clinic of Imam Khomeini Hospital in Urmia (a city in northwest of Iran, from January to March 2017, were selected through convenience sampling and randomly assigned to intervention and control groups. In the intervention group, educational content was presented for each patient with TBT in 5 sessions of 60 minutes. Data were collected before and after the intervention by a special Self-Management Questionnaire for Kidney Transplant Recipients in five areas as follows: self-monitoring, self-care behavior in daily living, early detecting and coping with abnormalities after kidney transplantation, stress management and the category of non-categorized area. This is a valid and reliable questionnaire (α=0.76. Collected data were analyzed by independent t-test and Mann-Whitney test. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 20 and P≤0.05 was considered as significant. Results: Independent t-test showed that the mean of self-management score between the control and intervention groups was not statistically significant before the intervention (P=0.90. The mean score of self-management increased after implementation of TBT in the intervention group compared to the control group, and the difference was statistically significant (P=0.001. Conclusion: The implementation of TBT method is effective in promoting self-management of kidney transplant recipients. Therefore, it is recommended that this method should be used to train the patients to better understand the components of self-management. Trial Registration Number

  17. Two for one: a self-management plan coupled with a prescription sheet for children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducharme, Francine M; Noya, Francisco; McGillivray, David; Resendes, Sandy; Ducharme-Bénard, Stéphanie; Zemek, Roger; Bhogal, Sanjit Kaur; Rouleau, Rachel

    2008-10-01

    Despite strong recommendations in the asthma guidelines, the use of written self-management plans remains low among asthmatic patients. To develop a written self-management plan, based on scientific evidence and expert opinions, in a format intended to facilitate its dispensing by health care professionals, and to test the perception of its relevance and clarity by asthmatic children, adolescents and adults. Inspired by previously tested self-management plans, surveys of asthma educators, expert opinions and the 2004 Canadian Asthma Guidelines, the authors simultaneously developed French and English versions of a written self-management plan that coupled with a prescription. The self-management plan was tested in parents and their asthmatic children (aged one to 17 years), and it was revised until 85% clarity and perceived relevance was achieved. Ninety-seven children and their parents were interviewed. Twenty per cent had a self-management plan. On the final revision, nearly all items were clear and perceived relevant by 85% or more of the interviewees. Two self-management plans were designed for clinics and acute care settings, respectively. The plans are divided into three control zones identified by symptoms with optional peak flow values and symbolized by traffic light colours. They are designed in triplicate format with a prescription slip, a medical chart copy and a patient copy. The written self-management plans, based on available scientific evidence and expert opinions, are clear and perceived to be relevant by children, adolescents and their parents. By incorporating the prescription and chart copies, they were designed to facilitate dispensing by physicians in both clinics and acute care settings.

  18. The Use of Videogames, Gamification, and Virtual Environments in the Self-Management of Diabetes: A Systematic Review of Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theng, Yin-Leng; Lee, Jason W Y; Patinadan, Paul V; Foo, Schubert S B

    2015-10-01

    The use of videogames in healthcare interventions is gaining popularity, but there is still a gap in the understanding on how these types of interventions are used for the management of diabetes. The purpose of this review is to examine published research on the use of videogames for diabetes management. With the increased use of mobile technology, the review was expanded to understand whether games, gamification, and virtual environments can be used for diabetes self-management. Out of the 307 articles identified, only 10 articles met the inclusion criteria of the study. The duration of most studies was short, with small sample sizes. All interventions targeted behavioral changes examining risk reduction of diabetes-related risk and promotion of healthy behavior among study participants. Videogames appeared to be helpful tools for education in some interventions, whereas gamification and virtual environments increased extrinsic motivation and provided positive reinforcement. This review concludes by discussing the potential of using videogames and gamification for the self-management of diabetes.

  19. Development of a training program to support health care professionals to deliver the SPACE for COPD self-management program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blackmore C

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Claire Blackmore,1 Vicki L Johnson-Warrington,2 Johanna EA Williams,2 Lindsay D Apps,2 Hannah ML Young,2 Claire LA Bourne,2 Sally J Singh2 1Kettering General Hospital National Health Service (NHS Trust, Kettering, Northamptonshire, 2Centre for Exercise and Rehabilitation Science, Leicester Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, UK Background: With the growing burden of COPD and associated morbidity and mortality, a need for self-management has been identified. The Self-management Programme of ­Activity, Coping and Education for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (SPACE for COPD manual was developed to support self-management in COPD patients. Currently, there is no literature available regarding health care professionals’ training needs when supporting patients with COPD on self-management.Aim: This study sought to identify these needs to inform, design and develop a training program for health care professionals being trained to deliver a self-management program in COPD.Methods: Fourteen health care professionals from both primary and secondary care COPD services participated in face-to-face semistructured interviews. Thematic analysis was used to produce a framework and identify training needs and views on delivery of the SPACE for COPD self-management program. Components of training were web-based knowledge training, with pre- and posttraining knowledge questionnaires, and a 1-day program to introduce the self-management manual. Feedback was given after training to guide the development of the training program.Results: Health care professionals were able to identify areas where they required increased knowledge to support patients. This was overwhelming in aspects of COPD seen to be outside of their current clinical role. Skills in goal setting and behavioral change were not elicited as a training need, suggesting a lack of understanding of components of supporting self-management

  20. Improvement of pain related self management for oncologic patients through a trans institutional modular nursing intervention: protocol of a cluster randomized multicenter trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thoke-Colberg Anette

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain is one of the most frequent and distressing symptoms in cancer patients. For the majority of the patients, sufficient pain relief can be obtained if adequate treatment is provided. However, pain remains often undertreated due to institutional, health care professional and patient related barriers. Patients self management skills are affected by the patients' knowledge, activities and attitude to pain management. This trial protocol is aimed to test the SCION-PAIN program, a multi modular structured intervention to improve self management in cancer patients with pain. Methods 240 patients with diagnosed malignancy and pain > 3 days and average pain ≥ 3/10 will participate in a cluster randomized trial on 18 wards in 2 German university hospitals. Patients from the intervention wards will receive, additionally to standard pain treatment, the SCION-PAIN program consisting of 3 modules: pharmacologic pain management, nonpharmacologic pain management and discharge management. The intervention will be conducted by specially trained oncology nurses and includes components of patient education, skills training and counseling to improve self care regarding pain management beginning with admission followed by booster session every 3rd day and one follow up telephone counseling within 2 to 3 days after discharge. Patients in the control group will receive standard care. Primary endpoint is the group difference in patient related barriers to management of cancer pain (BQII, 7 days after discharge. Secondary endpoints are: pain intensity & interference, adherence, coping and HRQoL. Discussion The study will determine if the acquired self management skills of the patients continue to be used after discharge from hospital. It is hypothesized that patients who receive the multi modular structured intervention will have less patient related barriers and a better self management of cancer pain. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials NCT

  1. Self-management strategies used by 'high functioning' individuals with bipolar disorder: from research to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Greg; Suto, Melinda; Hole, Rachelle; Hale, Sandra; Amari, Erica; Michalak, Erin E

    2011-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a complex mental illness that results in substantial costs, both at a personal and societal level. Research into BD has been driven by a strongly medical model conception, with a focus upon pathology and dysfunction. Little research to date has focused upon strategies used to maintain or regain wellness in BD. Here, we present results from a qualitative study of self-management strategies used by a Canadian sample of 'high-functioning' individuals with BD. The aims of the present paper are two-fold: (1) To provide a description of the self-management strategies identified as effective by this sample of high functioning individuals and 2) to explore these results from a clinical perspective. High functioning (determined as a score of either 1 or 2 on the objectively-rated Multidimensional Scale of Independent Functioning) individuals with BD type I or II (N = 33) completed quantitative scales to assess depression, mania, psychosocial functioning and quality of life, and underwent either an individual interview or focus group about the self-management strategies they used to maintain or regain wellness. The specific self-management strategies that individuals enacted are contained within the following categories: (1) sleep, diet, rest and exercise; (2) ongoing monitoring; (3) reflective and meditative practices; (4) understanding BD and educating others; (5) connecting to others and (6) enacting a plan. These strategies are discussed in the context of current treatment interventions and research findings, offering clinicians a broad range of potential techniques or tools to assist with their efforts to support individuals with BD in maintaining or regaining wellness. The strategies adopted by a sample of people coping well with their BD show remarkable overlap with the targets of existing adjunctive psychosocial interventions for BD. The clinician can use this information to motivate clients to engage with such strategies. The present

  2. A systematic review of the effectiveness of stroke self-management programs for improving function and participation outcomes: self-management programs for stroke survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, G.; Packer, T.L.; Villeneuve, M.; Audulv, A.; Versnel, J.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: A systematic review of stroke self-management programs was conducted to: (i) identify how many and what self-management support strategies were included in stroke self-management interventions and (ii) describe whether self-management programs effectively improved outcomes, focusing

  3. Strategies to reduce disparities in maternal morbidity and mortality: Patient and provider education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Joses; Moroz, Leslie

    2017-08-01

    A reduction in racial disparities in maternal morbidity and mortality requires effective education of both patients and providers. Although providers seem to recognize that disparities exist, there is a widespread need for improving our understanding differences in health care and outcomes and the factors that contribute to them. There are increasingly more educational materials available for the purpose of augmenting disparities education among patients and providers. However, it is important to incorporate contemporary learning methodologies and technologies to address our current knowledge deficit. Collaborative educational models with a multi-disciplinary approach to patient education will be essential. Ultimately, the comprehensive education of providers and patients will require efforts on the part of numerous stakeholders within patient care delivery models. Further investigation will be necessary to determine how best to disseminate this information to maximize the impact of patient and provider educations with the goal of eliminating disparities in maternal morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Attrition in Chronic Disease Self-Management Programs and self-efficacy at enrollment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verevkina, Nina; Shi, Yunfeng; Fuentes-Caceres, Veronica Alejandra; Scanlon, Dennis Patrick

    2014-12-01

    Among other goals, the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) is designed to improve self-efficacy of the chronically ill. However, a substantial proportion of the enrollees often leave CDSMPs before completing the program curriculum. This study examines factors associated with program attrition in a CDSMP implemented in a community setting. We used data from the Our Pathways to Health program, implemented in Humboldt County, California, from 2008 to 2011. Our conceptual framework is based on Bandura's self-efficacy theory, and we used logistic regression to investigate whether baseline self-efficacy and other members' efficacy are associated with participants dropping out of the CDSMP. Twenty-three percent of the participants did not complete the program similar to previous studies. Lower baseline self-efficacy increased the odds of dropout, but other members' efficacy was not associated with differential odds of dropout. Age, educational difference between the individual and the group, weekday sessions, and social/role activity limitations are also found to be associated with program attrition. Our results suggest that participants with low starting self-efficacy may need extra help to complete the program. Further research is needed to understand how to effectively provide additional support to this group. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  5. Evolution of a web-based, prototype Personal Health Application for diabetes self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonda, Stephanie J; Kedziora, Richard J; Vigersky, Robert A; Bursell, Sven-Erik

    2010-10-01

    Behaviors carried out by the person with diabetes (e.g., healthy eating, physical activity, judicious use of medication, glucose monitoring, coping and problem-solving, regular clinic visits, etc.) are of central importance in diabetes management. To assist with these behaviors, we developed a prototype PHA for diabetes self-management that was based on User-Centered Design principles and congruent with the anticipatory vision of Project Health Design (PHD). This article presents aspects of the prototype PHA's functionality as conceived under PHD and describes modifications to the PHA now being undertaken under new sponsorship, in response to user feedback and timing tests we have performed. In brief, the prototype Personal Health Application (PHA) receives data on the major diabetes management domains from a Personal Health Record (PHR) and analyzes and provides feedback based on clinically vetted educational content. The information is presented within "gadgets" within a portal-based website. The PHR used for the first implementation was the Common Platform developed by PHD. Key changes include a re-conceptualization of the gadgets by topic areas originally defined by the American Association of Diabetes Educators, a refocusing on low-cost approaches to diabetes monitoring and data entry, and synchronization with a new PHR, Microsoft® HealthVault™. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Web-based, self-management enhancing interventions with e-diaries and personalized feedback for persons with chronic illness: a tale of three studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nes, A.A.G.; Eide, H.; Kristjánsdóttir, O.B.; Dulmen, S. van

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Chronic illness places high demands on patients. Interventions supporting self-management and providing personalized feedback might help patients to gain new perspectives and enhance use of constructive self-management strategies. We developed three comparable web-based CBT-grounded

  7. Web-based self-management with and without coaching for type 2 diabetes patients in primary care : Design of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, Michael; de Wit, Maartje; Hendriks, Steven H.; Roelofsen, Yvonne; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Snoek, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Self-management is recognized as the cornerstone of overall diabetes management. Web-based self-management programs have the potential of supporting type 2 diabetes patients with managing their diabetes and reducing the workload for the care provider, where the addition of online

  8. Web-based self-management with and without coaching for type 2 diabetes patients in primary care: design of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, M.; de Wit, M.; Hendriks, S.H.; Roelofsen, Y.; Bilo, H.J.; Snoek, F.J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Self-management is recognized as the cornerstone of overall diabetes management. Web-based self-management programs have the potential of supporting type 2 diabetes patients with managing their diabetes and reducing the workload for the care provider, where the addition of online

  9. An integrative literature review to examine the provision of self-management support following transient ischaemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Dorothy; Liddy, Clare

    2017-11-01

    To identify the types of self-management support that have been provided to persons with transient ischaemic attack and the evidence for the effectiveness of these programmes. Self-management is a key element for the effective management of chronic conditions. For persons with transient ischaemic attack, secondary stroke prevention is a recognised standard of care. Best practice guidelines indicate that persons who have experienced transient ischaemic attack should be supported to develop self-management skills. However, it is not clear how best to support the development of these skills. An integrative literature review was conducted. A search was conducted using Medline, Embase, HealthSTAR, CINAHL and PsycINFO. Published quantitative and qualitative studies, abstracts or dissertations describing the provision, experience or outcomes of self-management interventions for people with transient ischaemic attack, and published in English before March 2016, were included. Articles were selected and rated separately by two reviewers. The American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine Level of Evidence and Conduct Rating tools were used for rating. Interventions were described and compared, and evidence was presented using the traffic lighting system. Sixteen interventions representing a variety of group- and individual-based interventions were identified. Interventions differed in target population, content, structure, duration and outcomes. Only four interventions were specifically designed for persons with transient ischaemic attack. While evidence to support self-management interventions is promising, there is limited evidence to support any one intervention. However, one good-quality randomised controlled trial supports the provision of a group self-management programme for improving blood pressure control. There are numerous interventions to support self-management by persons with transient ischaemic attack. More research is needed to determine

  10. Self-Management and Self-Management Support Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Mixed Research Synthesis of Stakeholder Views.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Boger

    Full Text Available Self-management has received growing attention as an effective approach for long-term condition management. Little is known about which outcomes of supported self-management are valued by patients, their families, health professionals and those who commission self-management services. This study systematically reviewed published empirical evidence in accordance with PRISMA guidelines to determine the outcomes of self-management valued by these key stakeholder groups, using three prominent exemplar conditions: colorectal cancer, diabetes and stroke.To systematically review the literature to identify which generic outcomes of self-management have been targeted and are considered important using three exemplar conditions (colorectal cancer, diabetes and stroke, which collectively have a range of features that are likely to be representative of generic self-management issues.Systematic searching of nine electronic databases was conducted in addition to hand searches of review articles. Abstracts were identified against inclusion criteria and appraised independently by two reviewers, using a critical appraisal tool. Synthesis of findings was conducted using mixed research synthesis.Over 20,536 abstracts were screened. 41 studies which met the review criteria were fully retrieved and appraised. The majority of evidence related to diabetes. Few studies directly focussed on stakeholders' views concerning desired self-management outcomes; the majority of evidence was derived from studies focusing upon the experience of self-management. The views of health care commissioners were absent from the literature. We identified that self-management outcomes embrace a range of indicators, from knowledge, skills, and bio-psychosocial markers of health through to positive social networks.Patients', families', health professionals' and commissioners' views regarding which outcomes of self-management are important have not been clearly elicited. The extent to which

  11. A Controlled Pilot Trial of PainTracker Self-Manager, a Web-Based Platform Combined With Patient Coaching, to Support Patients' Self-Management of Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Mark; Langford, Dale J; Davies, Pamela Stitzlein; Tran, Christine; Vilardaga, Roger; Cheung, Gifford; Yoo, Daisy; McReynolds, Justin; Lober, William B; Tauben, David; Vowles, Kevin E

    2018-03-29

    The objective of this study was to develop and pilot test a chronic pain empowerment and self-management platform, derived from acceptance and commitment therapy, in a pain specialty setting. A controlled, sequential, nonrandomized study design was used to accommodate intervention development and to test the efficacy of the PainTracker Self-Manager (PTSM) intervention (Web-based educational modules and outcome tracking combined with tailored patient coaching sessions and provider guidance). Generalized estimating equations evaluated changes over time (baseline, 3 months, 6 months) in pain self-efficacy (primary outcome), chronic pain acceptance (activity engagement and pain willingness), perceived efficacy in patient-provider interactions, pain intensity and interference, and overall satisfaction with pain treatment (secondary outcomes) between intervention (n = 48) and usual care control groups (n = 51). The full study sample (N = 99) showed greater improvements over time (significant Group × Time interactions) in pain self-efficacy and satisfaction with pain treatment. Among study completers (n = 82), greater improvement in activity engagement as well as pain intensity and interference were also observed. These preliminary findings support the efficacy of the PTSM intervention in a pain specialty setting. Further research is needed to refine and expand the PTSM intervention and to test it in a randomized trial in primary care settings. We developed a Web-based patient empowerment platform that combined acceptance and commitment therapy-based educational modules and tailored coaching sessions with longitudinal tracking of treatments and patient-reported outcomes, named PTSM. Pilot controlled trial results provide preliminary support for its efficacy in improving pain self-efficacy, activity engagement, pain intensity and interference, and satisfaction with pain treatment. Copyright © 2018 The American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  12. Goal setting in diabetes self-management: taking the baby steps to success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWalt, Darren A; Davis, Terry C; Wallace, Andrea S; Seligman, Hilary K; Bryant-Shilliday, Betsy; Arnold, Connie L; Freburger, Janet; Schillinger, Dean

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of a diabetes self-management guide and a brief counseling intervention in helping patients set and achieve their behavioral goals. We conducted a quasi-experimental study using a one group pretest posttest design to assess the effectiveness of a goal setting intervention along with a self-management guide. English- and Spanish-speaking patients with diabetes had one in-person session and two telephone follow-up calls with a non-clinical provider over a 12-16-week period. At each call and at the end of the study, we assessed success in achieving behavioral goals and problem solving toward those goals. Satisfaction with the self-management guide was assessed at the end of the study. We enrolled 250 patients across three sites and 229 patients completed the study. Most patients chose to set goals in diet and exercise domains. 93% of patients achieved at least one behavioral goal during the study and 73% achieved at least two behavioral goals. Many patients exhibited problem solving behavior to achieve their goals. We found no significant differences in reported achievement of behavior goals by literacy or language. Patients were very satisfied with the guide. A brief goal setting intervention along with a diabetes self-management guide helped patients set and achieve healthy behavioral goals. Non-clinical providers can successfully help a diverse range of patients with diabetes set and achieve behavioral goals.

  13. Self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy for mechanical heart valve patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas D; Attermann, Jørn; Pilegaard, Hans K

    2001-01-01

    .4%–2.9%) for the control group. Conclusion: Self-management of OAT is a feasible and safe concept for selected patients with mechanical heart valve prostheses also on a long-term basis. It provides at least as good and most likely better quality of anticoagulant therapy than conventional management assessed by time within......Objective: Self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) has shown good results on a short-term basis. We hypothesize that self-management of OAT provides a better quality of treatment than conventional management also on a long-term basis. The aim of this study was to assess the quality...... of conventionally managed heart valve patients (control group) was used as reference. Results: The median observation time was 1175 days (range: 174–1428 days). The self-managed patients were within therapeutic INR target range for a mean of 78.0% (range: 36.1%–93.9%) of the time compared with 61.0% (range 37...

  14. Definition of a COPD self-management intervention: International Expert Group consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effing, Tanja W; Vercoulen, Jan H; Bourbeau, Jean; Trappenburg, Jaap; Lenferink, Anke; Cafarella, Paul; Coultas, David; Meek, Paula; van der Valk, Paul; Bischoff, Erik W M A; Bucknall, Christine; Dewan, Naresh A; Early, Frances; Fan, Vincent; Frith, Peter; Janssen, Daisy J A; Mitchell, Katy; Morgan, Mike; Nici, Linda; Patel, Irem; Walters, Haydn; Rice, Kathryn L; Singh, Sally; Zuwallack, Richard; Benzo, Roberto; Goldstein, Roger; Partridge, Martyn R; van der Palen, Job

    2016-07-01

    There is an urgent need for consensus on what defines a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) self-management intervention. We aimed to obtain consensus regarding the conceptual definition of a COPD self-management intervention by engaging an international panel of COPD self-management experts using Delphi technique features and an additional group meeting.In each consensus round the experts were asked to provide feedback on the proposed definition and to score their level of agreement (1=totally disagree; 5=totally agree). The information provided was used to modify the definition for the next consensus round. Thematic analysis was used for free text responses and descriptive statistics were used for agreement scores.In total, 28 experts participated. The consensus round response rate varied randomly over the five rounds (ranging from 48% (n=13) to 85% (n=23)), and mean definition agreement scores increased from 3.8 (round 1) to 4.8 (round 5) with an increasing percentage of experts allocating the highest score of 5 (round 1: 14% (n=3); round 5: 83% (n=19)).In this study we reached consensus regarding a conceptual definition of what should be a COPD self-management intervention, clarifying the requisites for such an intervention. Operationalisation of this conceptual definition in the near future will be an essential next step. The content of this work is not subject to copyright. Design and branding are copyright ©ERS 2016.

  15. Barriers to health education in adolescents: health care providers' perspectives compared to high school adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedian, Kobra; Shahhosseini, Zohreh

    2015-11-01

    Although adolescence is marked by profound and dynamic changes, it is virtually neglected by health care providers, by society, and even by most parents, teachers, and health professionals. The aim of this study was to investigate barriers to health education in adolescents from health care providers' views compared to teens. The study population consisted of 72 health care providers and 402 high school female students in Northern Iran in 2012. They completed a self-administered questionnaire about their views on barriers to adolescents' health education. It is revealed that the major barrier to adolescents' health education from a health care providers' perspective is "Lack of private room for adolescents' health education", while "Lack of adolescents' interest to content of educational programs" is a significantly greater barrier to health education among adolescents. The results suggest that for adolescent health education, specific strategies should be used in adolescent health promotion programs.

  16. Psychosocial variables affecting diabetes self-management and the impact on quality of life

    OpenAIRE

    Yap, Chin Choo

    2017-01-01

    The diabetes population in Malaysia has grown and exceeded the prediction by WHO and potentially exhausts the country’s healthcare systems. Such rapid growth has directly challenged the effectiveness of existing diabetes self-management education, urging researchers to explore any overlooked elements to be included in the healthcare services, especially from psychological health aspects. Rooting itself in Social Cognitive Theory and Self-Determination Theory, this research explored psychosoc...

  17. Interactive Digital e-Health Game for Heart Failure Self-Management: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toprac, Paul; O'Hair, Matt; Bias, Randolph; Kim, Miyong T.; Bradley, Paul; Mackert, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To develop and test the prototype of a serious digital game for improving community-dwelling older adults' heart failure (HF) knowledge and self-management behaviors. The serious game innovatively incorporates evidence-based HF guidelines with contemporary game technology. Materials and Methods: The study included three phases: development of the game prototype, its usability assessment, and evaluation of the game's functionality. Usability testing included researchers' usability assessment, followed by research personnel's observations of participants playing the game, and participants' completion of a usability survey. Next, in a pretest–post-test design, validated instruments—the Atlanta Heart Failure Knowledge Test and the Self Care for Heart Failure Index—were used to measure improvement in HF self-management knowledge and behaviors related to HF self-maintenance, self-management, and self-efficacy, respectively. A postgame survey assessed participants' perceptions of the game. Results: During usability testing, with seven participants, 100%, 100%, and 86% found the game easy to play, enjoyable, and helpful for learning about HF, respectively. In the subsequent functionality testing, with 19 participants, 89% found the game interesting, enjoyable, and easy to play. Playing the game resulted in a significant improvement in HF self-management knowledge, a nonsignificant improvement in self-reported behaviors related to HF self-maintenance, and no difference in HF self-efficacy scores. Participants with lower education level and age preferred games to any other medium for receiving information. Conclusion: It is feasible to develop a serious digital game that community-dwelling older adults with HF find both satisfying and acceptable and that can improve their self-management knowledge. PMID:27976955

  18. Self-managing teams in manufacturing companies: implications for the engineering function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leede, de Jan; Stoker, Janka

    Reports on an explanatory multiple case-study of companies with self-managing teams. Reasons for introducing self-managing teams; Cooperation between self-managing teams and engineering development; Conclusion.

  19. Integrating community health workers into a patient-centered medical home to support disease self-management among Vietnamese Americans: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennerstrom, Ashley; Bui, Tap; Harden-Barrios, Jewel; Price-Haywood, Eboni G

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence that patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) and community health workers (CHWs) improve chronic disease management. There are few models for integrating CHWs into PCMHs in order to enhance disease self-management support among diverse populations. In this article, we describe how a community-based nonprofit agency, a PCMH, and academic partners collaborated to develop and implement the Patient Resource and Education Program (PREP). We employed CHWs as PCMH care team members to provide health education and support to Vietnamese American patients with uncontrolled diabetes and/or hypertension. We began by conducting focus groups to assess patient knowledge, desire for support, and availability of community resources. Based on findings, we developed PREP with CHW guidance on cultural tailoring of educational materials and methods. CHWs received training in core competencies related to self-management support principles and conducted the 4-month intervention for PCMH patients. Throughout the program, we conducted process evaluation through structured team meetings and patient satisfaction surveys. We describe successes and challenges associated with PREP delivery including patient recruitment, structuring/documenting visits, and establishing effective care team integration, work flow, and communication. Strategies for mitigating these issues are presented, and we make recommendations for other PCMHs seeking to integrate CHWs into care teams. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  20. The Obligation to Provide Free Basic Education in South Africa: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Potchefstroom Electronic Law Journal/Potchefstroomse Elektroniese Regsblad ... In South Africa many learners are denied the right to basic education because of the levying of school fees and other educational charges, in spite of the international obligation imposed on government to provide free primary education.

  1. Moderation in the Certificates of General Education for Adults. Guidelines for Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council of Adult Education, Melbourne (Australia).

    This document provides guidelines for the process of moderation and verification of assessments for educators involved in adult education. As used in the education establishment in Australia, "moderation" is the process of ensuring the standardization of assessment. Through the moderation process, assessment procedures conducted in a…

  2. Education Websites and Their Benefits to Potential International Students: A Case Study of Higher Education Service Providers in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Teik Chooi; Ho, Henry Wai Leong; Amri, Siti

    2010-01-01

    This paper looks at criteria on how education service providers' websites could benefit their potential students from overseas. Effective design of education website is important as web users are typically fastidious and want information fast--this serves as the background of this study. The study focuses on three selected education institutions'…

  3. Investigating Effective Components of Higher Education Marketing and Providing a Marketing Model for Iranian Private Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasmaee, Roya Babaee; Nadi, Mohammad Ali; Shahtalebi, Badri

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to study and identify the effective components of higher education marketing and providing a marketing model for Iranian higher education private sector institutions. Design/methodology/approach: This study is a qualitative research. For identifying the effective components of higher education marketing and…

  4. Exploring patient perception of success and benefit in self-management of breast cancer-related arm lymphoedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffs, Eunice; Ream, Emma; Shewbridge, Amanda; Cowan-Dickie, Siobhan; Crawshaw, Diana; Huit, Martine; Wiseman, Theresa

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing patient perception of success and benefit with self-management of breast cancer-related lymphoedema (BCRL) and explore how patients decide whether their swollen limb has improved or deteriorated. This qualitative study used a Grounded Theory approach. Twenty-one women in the BCRL self-management phase participated in one in-depth interview exploring their experience and perspective on self-managing their BCRL. Seven enablers and blocks to self-management were identified: routine, recognising benefit of self-management and consequences of non-treatment, owning treatment, knowledge and understanding, problem-solving, time required for treatment and aesthetics of hosiery. Women determined treatment outcome by monitoring size, appearance, texture and internal sensations within the affected arm. Women who participated in this study showed varying degrees of acceptance and adjustment to life with lymphoedema. This appears to directly impact their ability to self-manage lymphoedema. Lymphoedema practitioners and oncology nurses have a valuable role providing knowledge and support to patients transitioning to independent self-care. A better understanding of factors facilitating patients to become experts in their condition may improve longer term outcomes and reduce cost pressures on lymphoedema services. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Content of Orthopedic Patient Education Provided by Nurses in Seven European Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambous, Andreas; Papastavrou, E; Valkeapää, K; Zabalegui, A; Ingadóttir, B; Lemonidou, C; Fatkulina, N; Jouko, K; Leino-Kilpi, H

    2017-07-01

    Patients' and their significant others' education during the perioperative phase is an important and challenging aspect of care. This study explored the content of education provided by nurses to arthroplasty patients and their significant others. Data were collected with the Education of Patients-NURSE content (EPNURSE-Content), Received Knowledge of Hospital Patient (RKhp), and Received Knowledge of Significant Other (RKso) scales. The results showed that the content of education emphasized biophysiological and functional needs, differed between countries, and was related to how physically demanding nurses found their job to be and the amount of education provided. There is congruence between the received knowledge of patients and their significant others in relation to the content of education provided by nurses. The findings can support nurses in developing aid material for patients and significant others explaining the nature of education and advising them what to expect and how to optimize their participation in the process.

  6. Knowledge, Attitude and Self-management Practices of Patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge, Attitude and Self-management Practices of Patients with Type 2 ... and its complications, self-care practices to recognize and manage diabetes crisis, ... Pre-tested questionnaire was administered to 200 randomly selected type 2 ...

  7. Diabetes affects everything: Type 2 diabetes self-management among Spanish-speaking hispanic immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Miller, Cheryl A; Berry, Diane C; Miller, Cass T

    2017-12-01

    This article is a report of qualitative findings of a mixed-methods study of the relationships among knowledge, self-efficacy, health promoting behaviors, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) self-management among limited-english-proficient recent Hispanic immigrants, a population with increased incidence of T2DM and barriers to successful T2DM management. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 30 participants, and physiological and demographic data also were collected. The participants generally attributed developing the disease to strong emotions and viewed T2DM as a serious disease. Although a majority understood the importance of exercise and diet in T2DM self-management, other aspects such as medication adherence were not well-understood. Obstacles to effective T2DM self-management were negative interactions and communications with health care providers and other personnel, cultural stigma related to the disease, financial constraints, immigration status, and the complexity of the disease. Suggested interventions to improve the care and self-management of this at-risk population are discussed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Education and technology used to improve the quality of life for people with diabetes mellitus type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Brooke; Heiland, Brianne; Kohler-Rausch, Elizabeth; Kovic, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of type II diabetes mellitus (DMT2) is expected to continue to rise. Current research has analyzed various tools, strategies, programs, barriers, and support in regards to the self-management of this condition. However, past researchers have yet to analyze the education process; including the adaptation of specific strategies in activities of daily living and roles, as well as the influence of health care providers in the integration of these strategies. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to identify the strengths and limitations of the current model of diabetes education in the United States and hypothesize how technology can impact quality of life. Key informants on diabetes education were recruited from diabetes education centers through the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants. Health care practitioners convey limited knowledge of DMT2. Individuals with DMT2 often have limited understanding of the implications of poor self-management. There appears to be no consistent standard of care for how to effectively incorporate self-management strategies. There is limited education for the use of technology in self-management. Diabetes educators describe that technology could be beneficial. Findings suggest the importance of the role of care providers in emphasizing the implications of poor self-management strategies; that a multidisciplinary approach may enhance the education process; and a need for further developments in technology to address DMT2 self-management strategies.

  9. CKD Self-management: Phenotypes and Associations With Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrauben, Sarah J; Hsu, Jesse Y; Rosas, Sylvia E; Jaar, Bernard G; Zhang, Xiaoming; Deo, Rajat; Saab, Georges; Chen, Jing; Lederer, Swati; Kanthety, Radhika; Hamm, L Lee; Ricardo, Ana C; Lash, James P; Feldman, Harold I; Anderson, Amanda H

    2018-03-24

    To slow chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression and its complications, patients need to engage in self-management behaviors. The objective of this study was to classify CKD self-management behaviors into phenotypes and assess the association of these phenotypes with clinical outcomes. Prospective cohort study. Adults with mild to moderate CKD enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study. 3,939 participants in the CRIC Study recruited between 2003 and 2008 served as the derivation cohort and 1,560 participants recruited between 2013 and 2015 served as the validation cohort. CKD self-management behavior phenotypes. CKD progression, atherosclerotic events, heart failure events, death from any cause. Latent class analysis stratified by diabetes was used to identify CKD self-management phenotypes based on measures of body mass index, diet, physical activity, blood pressure, smoking status, and hemoglobin A 1c concentration (if diabetic); Cox proportional hazards models. 3 identified phenotypes varied according to the extent of implementation of recommended CKD self-management behaviors: phenotype I characterized study participants with the most recommended behaviors; phenotype II, participants with a mixture of recommended and not recommended behaviors; and phenotype III, participants with minimal recommended behaviors. In multivariable-adjusted models for those with and without diabetes, phenotype III was strongly associated with CKD progression (HRs of 1.82 and 1.49), death (HRs of 1.95 and 4.14), and atherosclerotic events (HRs of 2.54 and 1.90; each P diabetes. No consensus definition of CKD self-management; limited to baseline behavior data. There are potentially 3 CKD self-management behavior phenotypes that distinguish risk for clinical outcomes. These phenotypes may inform the development of studies and guidelines regarding optimal self-management. Copyright © 2018 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  10. Biomarkers as Common Data Elements for Symptom and Self-Management Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Gayle G; Corwin, Elizabeth J; Dorsey, Susan G; Redeker, Nancy S; McCloskey, Donna Jo; Austin, Joan K; Guthrie, Barbara J; Moore, Shirley M; Barton, Debra; Kim, Miyong T; Docherty, Sharron L; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; Bailey, Donald E; Schiffman, Rachel F; Starkweather, Angela; Ward, Teresa M; Bakken, Suzanne; Hickey, Kathleen T; Renn, Cynthia L; Grady, Patricia

    2018-05-01

    Biomarkers as common data elements (CDEs) are important for the characterization of biobehavioral symptoms given that once a biologic moderator or mediator is identified, biologically based strategies can be investigated for treatment efforts. Just as a symptom inventory reflects a symptom experience, a biomarker is an indicator of the symptom, though not the symptom per se. The purposes of this position paper are to (a) identify a "minimum set" of biomarkers for consideration as CDEs in symptom and self-management science, specifically biochemical biomarkers; (b) evaluate the benefits and limitations of such a limited array of biomarkers with implications for symptom science; (c) propose a strategy for the collection of the endorsed minimum set of biologic samples to be employed as CDEs for symptom science; and (d) conceptualize this minimum set of biomarkers consistent with National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) symptoms of fatigue, depression, cognition, pain, and sleep disturbance. From May 2016 through January 2017, a working group consisting of a subset of the Directors of the NINR Centers of Excellence funded by P20 or P30 mechanisms and NINR staff met bimonthly via telephone to develop this position paper suggesting the addition of biomarkers as CDEs. The full group of Directors reviewed drafts, provided critiques and suggestions, recommended the minimum set of biomarkers, and approved the completed document. Best practices for selecting, identifying, and using biological CDEs as well as challenges to the use of biological CDEs for symptom and self-management science are described. Current platforms for sample outcome sharing are presented. Finally, biological CDEs for symptom and self-management science are proposed along with implications for future research and use of CDEs in these areas. The recommended minimum set of biomarker CDEs include pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, a hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis marker, cortisol, the

  11. Self-management of hypertension using technology enabled interventions in primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandak, Aastha; Joshi, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Self-management of hypertension by controlling Blood Pressure (BP) through technology-based interventions can effectively reduce the burden of high BP, which affects one out of every three adults in the United States. The primary aim of this study is to explore the role of technology enabled interventions to improve or enhance self-management among individuals with hypertension. We conducted a systematic review of the literature published between July 2008 and June 2013 on the MEDLINE database (via PubMed interface) during July 2013. The search words were "hypertension" and "primary care" in combination with each of the terms of "technology", "internet", "computer" and "cell phone". Our inclusion criteria consisted of: (a) Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) (b) conducted on human subjects; (c) technology-based interventions (d) to improve self-management (e) of hypertension and if the (f) final results of the study were published in the study. Our exclusion criteria included (a) management of other conditions and (b) literature reviews. The initial search resulted in 108 results. After applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, a total of 12 studies were analyzed. Various technologies implemented in the studies included internet-based telemonitoring and education, telephone-based telemonitoring and education, internet-based education, telemedicine via videoconferencing, telehealth kiosks and automated modem device. Some studies also involved a physician intervention, in addition to patient intervention. The outcomes of proportion of subjects with BP control and change in mean SBP and DBP were better for the group of subjects who received combined physician and patient interventions. Interventions to improve BP control for self-management of hypertension should be aimed at both physicians as well as the patients. More interventions should utilize the JNC-7 guidelines and cost-effectiveness of the intervention should also be assessed.

  12. Promoting self-management in diabetes: efficacy of a collaborative care approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, William; Newsome, Alita; Lillie, Dustin

    2012-12-01

    Diabetes is a leading cause of death and is estimated to cost the United States 90 billion dollars annually. Increasing patient self-management skills has been shown to improve outcomes in patients with Type II diabetes. Promotion of shared decision-making between patient and provider is a core element of collaborative care and is especially well suited for increasing patient self-management. Research trials to date have been limited in demonstrating how self-management promotion can be fully integrated into primary care practices. Demonstration of the impact of this approach is needed. This study involves 22 randomly assigned physicians across three family medicine clinics to either provide usual care or work with a part-time collaborative care therapist in their clinic serving as an outreach health coach for their diabetic patients. Each outreach health coach met with each physician in the intervention group to identify patients most in need of intervention, sent identified patients a video on diabetes management, and called to encourage video viewing and discuss any patient-perceived barriers to self-management. Initial markers of patient activation in self-management, patients' video-viewing behavior, and health care encounters in the subsequent 6 months were compared between groups. Results showed that patients targeted by an outreach health coach were more likely to view the video, be seen by their primary care physician (PCP) within 6 months, and have disease-relevant laboratory tests performed than patients receiving usual care from their PCP (p < .05). This approach, linking PCPs with collaborative care staff, is viewed as expanding the engagement of PCPs with the collaborative team for superior patient health outcomes.

  13. Therapeutic patient education in heart failure: do studies provide sufficient information about the educational programme?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, Maria Grazia; Jourdain, Patrick; De Andrade, Vincent; Domenke, Aukse; Desnos, Michel; d'Ivernois, Jean-François

    2014-05-01

    Therapeutic patient education programmes on heart failure have been widely proposed for many years for heart failure patients, but their efficiency remains questionable, partly because most articles lack a precise programme description, which makes comparative analysis of the studies difficult. To analyse the degree of precision in describing therapeutic patient education programmes in recent randomized controlled trials. Three major recent recommendations on therapeutic patient education in heart failure inspired us to compile a list of 23 relevant items that an 'ideal' description of a therapeutic patient education programme should contain. To discover the extent to which recent studies into therapeutic patient education in heart failure included these items, we analysed 19 randomized controlled trials among 448 articles published in this field from 2005 to 2012. The major elements required to describe a therapeutic patient education programme were present, but some other very important pieces of information were missing in most of the studies we analysed: the patient's educational needs, health literacy, projects, expectations regarding therapeutic patient education and psychosocial status; the educational methodology used; outcomes evaluation; and follow-up strategies. Research into how therapeutic patient education can help heart failure patients will be improved if more precise descriptions of patients, educational methodology and evaluation protocols are given by authors, ideally in a standardized format. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Beliefs About Dysmenorrhea and Their Relationship to Self-Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen X; Kwekkeboom, Kristine L; Ward, Sandra E

    2016-08-01

    Dysmenorrhea is highly prevalent and is the leading cause of work and school absences among women of reproductive age. However, self-management of dysmenorrhea is not well understood in the US, and little evidence is available on factors that influence dysmenorrhea self-management. Guided by the Common Sense Model, we examined women's representations of dysmenorrhea (beliefs about causes, symptoms, consequences, timeline, controllability, coherence, and emotional responses), described their dysmenorrhea self-management behaviors, and investigated the relationship between representations and self-management behaviors. We conducted a cross-sectional, web-based survey of 762 adult women who had dysmenorrhea symptoms in the last six months. Participants had varied beliefs about the causes of their dysmenorrhea symptoms, which were perceived as a normal part of life. Dysmenorrhea symptoms were reported as moderately severe, with consequences that moderately affected daily life. Women believed they understood their symptoms moderately well and perceived them as moderately controllable but them to continue through menopause. Most women did not seek professional care but rather used a variety of pharmacologic and complementary health approaches. Care-seeking and use of self-management strategies were associated with common sense beliefs about dysmenorrhea cause, consequences, timeline, and controllability. The findings may inform development and testing of self-management interventions that address dysmenorrhea representations and facilitate evidence-based management. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Provider Education about Glaucoma and Glaucoma Medications during Videotaped Medical Visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betsy Sleath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine how patient, physician, and situational factors are associated with the extent to which providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications, and which patient and provider characteristics are associated with whether providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications. Methods. Patients with glaucoma who were newly prescribed or on glaucoma medications were recruited and a cross-sectional study was conducted at six ophthalmology clinics. Patients’ visits were videotape recorded and patients were interviewed after visits. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyze the data. Results. Two hundred and seventy-nine patients participated. Providers were significantly more likely to educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications if they were newly prescribed glaucoma medications. Providers were significantly less likely to educate African American patients about glaucoma. Providers were significantly less likely to educate patients of lower health literacy about glaucoma medications. Conclusion. Eye care providers did not always educate patients about glaucoma or glaucoma medications. Practice Implications. Providers should consider educating more patients about what glaucoma is and how it is treated so that glaucoma patients can better understand their disease. Even if a patient has already been educated once, it is important to reinforce what has been taught before.

  16. Building Capability in Vocational Education and Training Providers: The TAFE Cut. Occasional Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Hugh; Clayton, Berwyn

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on issues which affect the capability of technical and further education (TAFE) providers to meet their clients' and stakeholders' needs and draws extensively on the reports of the consortium research program which examined ways to help build vocational education and training (VET) provider and workforce capability. The paper…

  17. Training Informal Educators Provides Leverage for Space Science Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J. S.; Tobola, K. W.; Betrue, R.

    2004-01-01

    How do we reach the public with the exciting story of Solar System Exploration? How do we encourage girls to think about careers in science, math, engineering and technology? Why should NASA scientists make an effort to reach the public and informal education settings to tell the Solar System Exploration story? These are questions that the Solar System Exploration Forum, a part of the NASA Office of Space Science Education (SSE) and Public Outreach network, has tackled over the past few years. The SSE Forum is a group of education teams and scientists who work to share the excitement of solar system exploration with colleagues, formal educators, and informal educators like museums and youth groups. One major area of the SSE Forum outreach supports the training of Girl Scouts of the USA (GS) leaders and trainers in a suite of activities that reflect NASA missions and science research. Youth groups like Girl Scouts structure their activities as informal education.

  18. Problem Solving Interventions for Diabetes Self-management and Control: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Stephanie L.; Schumann, Kristina P.; Hill-Briggs, Felicia

    2013-01-01

    Aims Problem solving is deemed a core skill for patient diabetes self-management education. The purpose of this systematic review is to examine the published literature on the effect of problem-solving interventions on diabetes self-management and disease control. Data Sources We searched PubMed and PsychINFO electronic databases for English language articles published between November 2006 and September 2012. Reference lists from included studies were reviewed to capture additional studies. Study Selection Studies reporting problem-solving intervention or problem solving as an intervention component for diabetes self-management training and disease control were included. Twenty-four studies met inclusion criteria. Data Extraction Study design, sample characteristics, measures, and results were reviewed. Data Synthesis Sixteen intervention studies (11 adult, 5 children/adolescents) were randomized controlled trials, and 8 intervention studies (6 adult, 2 children/adolescents) were quasi-experimental designs. Conclusions Studies varied greatly in their approaches to problem-solving use in patient education. To date, 36% of adult problem-solving interventions and 42% of children/adolescent problem-solving interventions have demonstrated significant improvement in HbA1c, while psychosocial outcomes have been more promising. The next phase of problem-solving intervention research should employ intervention characteristics found to have sufficient potency and intensity to reach therapeutic levels needed to demonstrate change. PMID:23312614

  19. Factors contributing to intervention fidelity in a multi-site chronic disease self-management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Karen M; Burke, Somer Goad; O'Connor, Danielle; Walby, Gary; Shippey, Claire; Pitt, Seraphine; McDermott, Robert J; Forthofer, Melinda S

    2006-10-26

    Disease self-management programs have been a popular approach to reducing morbidity and mortality from chronic disease. Replicating an evidence-based disease management program successfully requires practitioners to ensure fidelity to the original program design. The Florida Health Literacy Study (FHLS) was conducted to investigate the implementation impact of the Pfizer, Inc. Diabetes Mellitus and Hypertension Disease Self-Management Program based on health literacy principles in 14 community health centers in Florida. The intervention components discussed include health educator recruitment and training, patient recruitment, class sessions, utilization of program materials, translation of program manuals, patient retention and follow-up, and technical assistance. This report describes challenges associated with achieving a balance between adaptation for cultural relevance and fidelity when implementing the health education program across clinic sites. This balance was necessary to achieve effectiveness of the disease self-management program. The FHLS program was implemented with a high degree of fidelity to the original design and used original program materials. Adaptations identified as advantageous to program participation are discussed, such as implementing alternate methods for recruiting patients and developing staff incentives for participation. Effective program implementation depends on the talent, skill and willing participation of clinic staff. Program adaptations that conserve staff time and resources and recognize their contribution can increase program effectiveness without jeopardizing its fidelity.

  20. Factors contributing to intervention fidelity in a multi-site chronic disease self-management program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitt Seraphine

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives Disease self-management programs have been a popular approach to reducing morbidity and mortality from chronic disease. Replicating an evidence-based disease management program successfully requires practitioners to ensure fidelity to the original program design. Methods The Florida Health Literacy Study (FHLS was conducted to investigate the implementation impact of the Pfizer, Inc. Diabetes Mellitus and Hypertension Disease Self-Management Program based on health literacy principles in 14 community health centers in Florida. The intervention components discussed include health educator recruitment and training, patient recruitment, class sessions, utilization of program materials, translation of program manuals, patient retention and follow-up, and technical assistance. Results This report describes challenges associated with achieving a balance between adaptation for cultural relevance and fidelity when implementing the health education program across clinic sites. This balance was necessary to achieve effectiveness of the disease self-management program. The FHLS program was implemented with a high degree of fidelity to the original design and used original program materials. Adaptations identified as advantageous to program participation are discussed, such as implementing alternate methods for recruiting patients and developing staff incentives for participation. Conclusion Effective program implementation depends on the talent, skill and willing participation of clinic staff. Program adaptations that conserve staff time and resources and recognize their contribution can increase program effectiveness without jeopardizing its fidelity.

  1. The effect of motivational interviewing on glycaemic control and perceived competence of diabetes self-management in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus after attending a group education programme: a randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbek Minet, L K; Wagner, L; Lønvig, E M

    2011-01-01

    education programme, 349 patients were randomised to either a usual care control group or an intervention group, which received up to five individual counselling sessions in 1 year based on MI, in addition to usual care. A randomised parallel design was used and open-label allocation was done by random...... diabetes mellitus, were over 18 years of age and had participated in a 4 day group education programme offered at a diabetes clinic at a university hospital in Denmark. Exclusion criteria included pregnancy, severe debilitating disease and cognitive deficit. Out of 469 patients who attended the group...... diabetes self-care, compared with usual care. RESULTS: Out of the 176 included in the control group and 173 in the intervention group, 153 and 145 were analysed in the groups, respectively. When using the baseline value as covariate there were no significant differences in change score between the two...

  2. Discovering successful strategies for diabetic self-management: a qualitative comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Susan C; Baer, Roberta; Nash, Anita; Perez, Noe

    2017-01-01

    This project explored lifestyles of patients in good and poor control to identify naturally occurring practices and strategies that result in successful diabetes management. Semistructured interviews with adult patients with type 2 diabetes explored diet, food preparation, physical activity, medication use and glucose monitoring. Patients (n=56) were classified into good (A1C 8.0%) control groups and matched across groups on diabetes duration (±5 years) and medication modality (none, oral, insulin±oral) to control for non-lifestyle factors. A qualitative comparative analysis identified practices that distinguished glycemic groups. Good control patients were more likely to test their glucose two or more times a day and reduce their sodium intake, as well as increase fruits and vegetables and limit portion sizes, some attaining good control without exercise. Fair control patients discussed several dietary strategies including limiting sweets, drinking non-caloric beverages, reducing carbs, 'cheating' (eating only a few sweets/limiting carbs in one meal to have more in another meal) and tested their glucose once a day. Poor control patients were more likely to skip antidiabetic medications and not test their glucose. Although clinical trials indicate most self-management practices have limited effectiveness over time, increased glucose monitoring is a valuable component in daily management. Research is needed on effectiveness of dietary strategies that emphasize sodium monitoring and allow some degree of cheating. Reoffering diabetes education classes and providing pill boxes as memory aids may help improve poor control.

  3. Establishing an independent mobile health programme for chronic disease self-management support in Bolivia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Piette

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mobile health (m-health work in low and middle-income countries (LMICs mainly consists of pilot programmes with an unclear path to scaling and dissemination. We describe the deployment and testing of an m-health platform for non-communicable disease (NCD self-management support in Bolivia. Methods: 364 primary care patients in La Paz with diabetes or hypertension completed surveys about their use of mobile phones, health and access to care. 165 of those patients then participated in a 12-week demonstration of automated telephone monitoring and self-management support. Weekly Interactive Voice Response (IVR calls were made from a platform established at a university in La Paz, under the direction of the regional health ministry. Results: 37% of survey respondents spoke indigenous languages at home, and 38% had six or fewer years of education. 82% had a mobile phone; half (45% used text messaging with a standard phone, and 9% had a smartphone. Smartphones were least common among patients who were older, spoke indigenous languages, or had less education. IVR programme participants completed 1007 self-management support calls, with an overall response rate of 51%. IVR call completion was lower among older adults, but was not related to patients’ ethnicity, health status or healthcare access. IVR health and self-care reports were consistent with information reported during baseline interviews. Patients’ likelihood of reporting excellent, very good, or good health (versus fair or poor health via IVR increased during programme participation, and was associated with better medication adherence. Patients completing follow-up interviews were satisfied with the programme, with 19/20 (95% reporting that they would recommend it to a friend. Conclusions: By collaborating with LMICs, m-health programmes can be transferred from higher-resource centres to LMICs and implemented in ways that improve access to self-management support among people

  4. Establishing an independent mobile health program for chronic disease self-management support in bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piette, John D; Valverde, Helen; Marinec, Nicolle; Jantz, Rachel; Kamis, Kevin; de la Vega, Carlos Lazo; Woolley, Timothy; Pinto, Bismarck

    2014-01-01

    Mobile health (m-health) work in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) mainly consists of small pilot programs with an unclear path to scaling and dissemination. We describe the deployment and testing of an m-health platform for non-communicable disease (NCD) self-management support in Bolivia. Three hundred sixty-four primary care patients in La Paz with diabetes or hypertension completed surveys about their use of mobile phones, health and access to care. One hundred sixty-five of those patients then participated in a 12-week demonstration of automated telephone monitoring and self-management support. Weekly interactive voice response (IVR) calls were made from a platform established at a university in La Paz, under the direction of the regional health ministry. Thirty-seven percent of survey respondents spoke indigenous languages at home and 38% had six or fewer years of education. Eighty-two percent had a mobile phone, 45% used text messaging with a standard phone, and 9% had a smartphone. Smartphones were least common among patients who were older, spoke indigenous languages, or had less education. IVR program participants completed 1007 self-management support calls with an overall response rate of 51%. IVR call completion was lower among older adults, but was not related to patients' ethnicity, health status, or healthcare access. IVR health and self-care reports were consistent with information reported during in-person baseline interviews. Patients' likelihood of reporting excellent, very good, or good health (versus fair or poor health) via IVR increased during program participation and was associated with better medication adherence. Patients completing follow-up interviews were satisfied with the program, with 19/20 (95%) reporting that they would recommend it to a friend. By collaborating with LMICs, m-health programs can be transferred from higher-resource centers to LMICs and implemented in ways that improve access to self-management support among

  5. A cross-sectional study on self-management of pressure ulcer prevention in paraplegic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, H E W; de Munter, A C; van der Burg, M J; Ulrich, D J O; Kloeters, O

    2017-02-01

    Little is known about health activation and self-management behavior in preventing pressure ulcers (PU) in paraplegic patients. Therefore this study aimed to describe the extent of health activation and self-management behavior in paraplegics to prevent PU's and associations between this behavior and patient characteristics. Furthermore, we aimed to find differences in health activation in paraplegics who never had a PU compared to paraplegics with a previous history of PU's or a new-onset PU's. A cross-sectional survey on health activation and self-management behavior was conducted among adult paraplegics recruited from two rehabilitation centers in the Netherlands. The Patient Activation Measure (PAM-score) was used to measure the extent of health activation. Patient statements on their level of self management behavior to prevent PU were evaluated. The mean PAM-score (0-100) was 54 (±8.1; n = 162) indicating a low level of health activation. Two indicators turned out to be statistically significant associated with health activation: level of education (OR = 2.2, p = 0.017) and degree of paraplegia (OR = 2.8, p = 0.036). Evaluation of health activation levels amongst paraplegics with or without a PU- history showed no significant difference. Analysis of patients statements demonstrated a large discrepancy between intended and actual behavior to prevent pressure ulcers. Level of education and level of paraplegia are significantly associated with health activation. A positive PU-history is not associated with future responsible behavior nor for compliant behavior in terms of health management. Copyright © 2016 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A User-Centered Approach: Understanding Client and Caregiver Needs and Preferences in the Development of mHealth Apps for Self-Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendixen, Roxanna M; Fairman, Andrea D; Karavolis, Meredith; Sullivan, Carly; Parmanto, Bambang

    2017-09-26

    Many adolescents and young adults with chronic illness or disability often fail to develop the self-management skills necessary to independently handle medical and self-management routines. In light of these needs, we are developing iMHere 2.0 (Interactive Mobile Health and Rehabilitation), a mobile health (mHealth) system to support a self-management program. Our objective was to gather data from persons with brain and spinal cord anomalies (BSA) and their caregivers to better understand how mHealth would be most helpful in supporting them to proactively manage daily self-care routines and to access medical care as needed. The specific purpose was not only to gather feedback and to gain increased insight into the design of the new version of iMHere, but also to gather perspectives of new groups, namely adolescents as young as 12 years and their parents and/or caregivers. Our project employed focus group sessions and surveys to collect data from participants with BSA, as well as their caregivers. A total of six focus group sessions were conducted on four separate occasions until the data gathered reached saturation. The objectives of our focus group sessions were to better understand ways to develop mHealth systems to support self-management, to promote independence, to motivate long-term system use, and to prevent medical problems that lead to hospitalizations and emergency room visits for youth and young adults with BSA. A total of 16 youth and young adults with BSA and 11 caregivers participated in the sessions. Within and among our groups, the following five overarching themes emerged from the data: (1) make it easy, (2) engage, (3) educate and prepare, (4) motivate and support, and (5) personalize. Participants shared their perspectives and detailed information about mHealth apps that would be important for independence in self-care and self-management. Our findings suggest that most individuals keep their mobile phones with them at all times and typically use

  7. Social Support for Diabetes Self-Management via eHealth Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorderstrasse, Allison; Lewinski, Allison; Melkus, Gail D'Eramo; Johnson, Constance

    2016-07-01

    eHealth interventions have been increasingly used to provide social support for self-management of type 2 diabetes. In this review, we discuss social support interventions, types of support provided, sources or providers of support, outcomes of the support interventions (clinical, behavioral, psychosocial), and logistical and clinical considerations for support interventions using eHealth technologies. Many types of eHealth interventions demonstrated improvements in self-management behaviors, psychosocial outcomes, and clinical measures, particularly HbA1c. Important factors to consider in clinical application of eHealth support interventions include participant preferences, usability of eHealth technology, and availability of personnel to orient or assist participants. Overall, eHealth is a promising adjunct to clinical care as it addresses the need for ongoing support in chronic disease management.

  8. The experience of facilitators and participants of long term condition self-management group programmes: A qualitative synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen; Lewis, Sophie; Willis, Karen; Rogers, Anne; Wyke, Sally; Smith, Lorraine

    2017-12-01

    Our aim was to systematically review the qualitative literature about the experiences of both facilitators and participants in a range of group-based programmes to support the self-management of long-term conditions. We searched 7 databases using the terms 'self-management', 'group' and 'qualitative'. Full text articles meeting the inclusion criteria were retrieved for review. A thematic synthesis approach was used to analyse the studies. 2126 articles were identified and 24 were included for review. Group participants valued being with similar others and perceived peer support benefits. Facilitators (HCP and lay) had limited group specific training, were uncertain of purpose and prioritised education and medical conformity over supportive group processes and the promotion of self-management agency and engagement. Overall, studies prioritised positive descriptions. Group programmes' medical self-management focus may reduce their ability to contribute to patient-valued outcomes. Further research is needed to explore this disconnect. This review supports broadening the scope of group-based programmes to foreground shared learning, social support and development of agency. It is of relevance to developers and facilitators of group self-management programmes and their ability to address the burden of long-term conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Motivations, Challenges, and Attitudes to Self-management in Kidney Transplant Recipients: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Nathan J; Hanson, Camilla S; Josephson, Michelle A; Gordon, Elisa J; Craig, Jonathan C; Halleck, Fabian; Budde, Klemens; Tong, Allison

    2016-03-01

    Kidney transplantation offers better outcomes compared to dialysis, but requires patients to adhere to an ongoing and complex self-management regimen. Medication nonadherence remains a leading cause of transplant loss, and inadequate self-management undermines transplantation and other health outcomes. We aimed to describe kidney transplant recipients' motivations, challenges, and attitudes toward self-management. Systematic review and thematic synthesis of qualitative studies. Kidney transplant recipients. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and CINAHL were searched to October 2014. Thematic synthesis. 50 studies involving 1,238 recipients aged 18 to 82 years across 19 countries were included. We identified 5 themes: empowerment through autonomy (achieving mastery, tracking against tangible targets, developing bodily intuition, routinizing and problem solving, and adaptive coping), prevailing fear of consequences (inescapable rejection anxiety, aversion to dialysis, minimizing future morbidity, trivialization and denial, and defining acceptable risks), burdensome treatment and responsibilities (frustrating ambiguities, inadvertent forgetfulness, intrusive side effects, reversing ingrained behaviors, and financial hardship), overmedicalizing life (dominating focus, evading patienthood, and succumbing to burnout), and social accountability and motivation (demonstrating gratitude toward medical team, indebtedness to donor, and peer learning). Non-English articles were excluded. Self-efficacy and social accountability are motivators for self-management, although adherence can be mentally and physically taxing. Multicomponent interventions incorporating personalized care planning, education, psychosocial support, decision aids, and self-monitoring tools may foster self-management capacity and improve transplantation outcomes. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Self-Management Interventions to Prevent the Secondary Condition of Pain in People with Disability Due to Mobility Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Froehlich-Grobe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction This focused review examines the use and effectiveness of self-management strategies in preventing or managing pain, which is among the most common secondary conditions faced by individuals with a mobility disability. Methods This focused review was part of a two-phase comprehensive scoping review. Phase I was a comprehensive scoping review of the literature targeting multiple outcomes of self-management interventions for those with mobility impairment, and Phase II was a focused review of the literature on self-management interventions that target pain as a primary or secondary outcome. Two authors searched CINAHL, PubMed, and PsyclNFO for papers published from January 1988 through August 2014 using specified search terms. Following the scoping review, the authors independently screened and selected the studies and reviewed the eligible studies, and the first author extracted data from the included studies. Results The scoping review yielded 40 studies that addressed pain self-management interventions for those living with mobility impairment. These 40 accumulated papers revealed a heterogeneous evidence base in terms of setting (clinic, community, and online, target populations, intervention duration (3 weeks to 24 months, and mode (health-care providers and lay leaders. Most of the reviewed studies reported that the self-management intervention led to significant reduction of pain over time, suggesting that self-management may be a promising approach for addressing pain experienced by people who live with mobility limitations. Discussion This review also reveals moderate-to-high bias across studies, and findings indicate that future research should enhance the methodological quality to provide stronger evidence about the effectiveness of self-management strategies for reducing pain among those with mobility impairments.

  11. 'That would have been beneficial': LGBTQ education for home-care service providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Andrea; MacDonnell, Judith A

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports qualitative findings from a pilot study that explored the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) education needs of home-care service providers working in one large, urban Canadian city. The pilot study builds upon research that has documented barriers to health services for diversely situated LGBTQ people, which function to limit access to good-quality healthcare. LGBTQ activists, organisations and allies have underscored the need for health provider education related to the unique health and service experiences of sexual and gender minority communities. However, the home-care sector is generally overlooked in this important body of research literature. We used purposeful convenience sampling to conduct four focus groups and two individual interviews with a total of 15 professionally diverse home-care service providers. Data collection was carried out from January 2011 to July 2012 and data were analysed using grounded theory methods towards the identification of the overarching theme, 'provider education' and it had two sub-themes: (i) experiences of LGBTQ education; and (ii) recommendations for LGBTQ education. The study findings raise important questions about limited and uneven access to adequate LGBTQ education for home-care service providers, suggest important policy implications for the education and health sectors, and point to the need for anti-oppression principles in the development of education initiatives. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Protocol for a randomised controlled trial of telemonitoring and self-management in the control of hypertension: Telemonitoring and self-management in hypertension. [ISRCTN17585681

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Little Paul

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Controlling blood pressure with drugs is a key aspect of cardiovascular disease prevention, but until recently has been the sole preserve of health professionals. Self-management of hypertension is an under researched area in which potential benefits for both patients and professionals are great. Methods and design The telemonitoring and self-management in hypertension trial (TASMINH2 will be a primary care based randomised controlled trial with embedded economic and qualitative analyses in order to evaluate the costs and effects of increasing patient involvement in blood pressure management, specifically with respect to home monitoring and self titration of antihypertensive medication compared to usual care. Provision of remote monitoring results to participating practices will ensure that practice staff are able to engage with self management and provide assistance where required. 478 patients will be recruited from general practices in the West Midlands, which is sufficient to detect clinically significant differences in systolic blood pressure between self-management and usual care of 5 mmHg with 90% power. Patients will be excluded if they demonstrate an inability to self monitor, their blood pressure is below 140/90 or above 200/100, they are on three or more antihypertensive medications, have a terminal disease or their blood pressure is not managed by their general practitioner. The primary end point is change in mean systolic blood pressure (mmHg between baseline and each follow up point (6 months and 12 months. Secondary outcomes will include change in mean diastolic blood pressure, costs, adverse events, health behaviours, illness perceptions, beliefs about medication, medication compliance and anxiety. Modelling will evaluate the impact of costs and effects on a system wide basis. The qualitative analysis will draw upon the views of users, informal carers and professionals regarding the acceptability of self-management

  13. The Kidney Awareness Registry and Education (KARE) study: protocol of a randomized controlled trial to enhance provider and patient engagement with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuot, Delphine S; Velasquez, Alexandra; McCulloch, Charles E; Banerjee, Tanushree; Zhu, Yunnuo; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Handley, Margaret; Schillinger, Dean; Powe, Neil R

    2015-10-22

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and is associated with excess mortality and morbidity. Better management could slow progression of disease, prevent metabolic complications, and reduce cardiovascular outcomes. Low patient awareness of CKD and ineffective patient-provider communication can impede such efforts. We developed provider and patient-directed interventions that harness health information technology to enhance provider recognition of CKD and delivery of guideline concordant care and augment patient understanding and engagement in CKD care. We report the design and protocol of the Kidney Awareness Registry and Education (KARE) Study, a 2x2 factorial randomized controlled trial that examines the impact of a multi-level intervention on health outcomes among low-income English, Spanish and Cantonese-speaking patients with CKD in a safety net system. The intervention includes: (1) implementation of a primary care electronic CKD registry that notifies practice teams of patients' CKD status and employs a patient profile and quarterly feedback to encourage provision of guideline-concordant care at point-of-care and via outreach; and (2) a language-concordant, culturally-sensitive self-management support program that consists of automated telephone modules, provision of low-literacy written patient-educational materials and telephone health coaching. The primary outcomes of the trial are changes in systolic blood pressure (BP) and the proportion of patients with BP control (≤ 140/90 mmHg) after one year. Secondary outcomes include patient understanding of CKD, participation in healthy behaviors, and practice team delivery of guideline-concordant CKD care. Results from the KARE study will provide data on the feasibility, effectiveness, and acceptability of technology-based interventions that support primary care efforts at improving health outcomes among vulnerable patients with CKD. ClinicalTrials.gov, number: NCT01530958.

  14. International normalized ratio self-testing and self-management: improving patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pozzi M

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Matteo Pozzi,1 Julia Mitchell,2 Anna Maria Henaine,3 Najib Hanna,4 Ola Safi,4 Roland Henaine2 1Department of Adult Cardiac Surgery, “Louis Pradel” Cardiologic Hospital, Lyon, France; 2Department of Congenital Cardiac Surgery, “Louis Pradel” Cardiologic Hospital, Lyon, France; 3Clinical Pharmacology Unit, Lebanese University, Beirut, Lebanon; 4Pediatric Unit, “Hotel Dieu de France” Hospital, Saint Joseph University, Beirut, Lebanon Abstract: Long term oral anti-coagulation with vitamin K antagonists is a risk factor of hemorrhagic or thromebomlic complications. Periodic laboratory testing of international normalized ratio (INR and a subsequent dose adjustment are therefore mandatory. The use of home testing devices to measure INR has been suggested as a potential way to improve the comfort and compliance of the patients and their families, the frequency of monitoring and, finally, the management and safety of long-term oral anticoagulation. In pediatric patients, increased doses to obtain and maintain the therapeutic target INR, more frequent adjustments and INR testing, multiple medication, inconstant nutritional intake, difficult venepunctures, and the need to go to the laboratory for testing (interruption of school and parents’ work attendance highlight those difficulties. After reviewing the most relevant published studies of self-testing and self-management of INR for adult patients and children on oral anticoagulation, it seems that these are valuable and effective strategies of INR control. Despite an unclear relationship between INR control and clinical effects, these self-strategies provide a better control of the anticoagulant effect, improve patients and their family quality of life, and are an appealing solution in term of cost-effectiveness. Structured education and knowledge evaluation by trained health care professionals is required for children, to be able to adjust their dose treatment safely and accurately. However

  15. Effectiveness of self-management training in type 2 diabetes: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, S L; Engelgau, M M; Narayan, K M

    2001-03-01

    To systematically review the effectiveness of self-management training in type 2 diabetes. MEDLINE, Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC), and Nursing and Allied Health databases were searched for English-language articles published between 1980 and 1999. Studies were original articles reporting the results of randomized controlled trials of the effectiveness of self-management training in people with type 2 diabetes. Relevant data on study design, population demographics, interventions, outcomes, methodological quality, and external validity were tabulated. Interventions were categorized based on educational focus (information, lifestyle behaviors, mechanical skills, and coping skills), and outcomes were classified as knowledge, attitudes, and self-care skills; lifestyle behaviors, psychological outcomes, and quality of life; glycemic control; cardiovascular disease risk factors; and economic measures and health service utilization. A total of 72 studies described in 84 articles were identified for this review. Positive effects of self-management training on knowledge, frequency and accuracy of self-monitoring of blood glucose, self-reported dietary habits, and glycemic control were demonstrated in studies with short follow-up (studies demonstrated the effectiveness of self-management training on cardiovascular disease-related events or mortality; no economic analyses included indirect costs; few studies examined health-care utilization. Performance, selection, attrition, and detection bias were common in studies reviewed, and external generalizability was often limited. Evidence supports the effectiveness of self-management training in type 2 diabetes, particularly in the short term. Further research is needed to assess the effectiveness of self-management interventions on sustained glycemic control, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and ultimately, microvascular and cardiovascular disease and quality of life.

  16. Determinants of activation for self-management in patients with COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korpershoek, Y. J G; Bos-Touwen, I. D.; de Man, Janneke; Lammers, J. W J; Schuurmans, M. J.; Trappenburg, J. C A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: COPD self-management is a complex behavior influenced by many factors. Despite scientific evidence that better disease outcomes can be achieved by enhancing self-management, many COPD patients do not respond to self-management interventions. To move toward more effective self-management

  17. Entering the Fray: The Role of Outdoor Education in Providing Nature-Based Experiences that Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Robbie

    2014-01-01

    This article draws on different bodies of knowledge in order to review the potential role of outdoor education in providing nature-based experiences that might contribute to sustainable living. A pragmatic perspective is adopted to critique what outdoor education is, and then what it might be. Phenomenology is used to challenge the belief that…

  18. Can "Ubuntu" Provide a Model for Citizenship Education in African Democracies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enslin, Penny; Horsthemke, Kai

    2004-01-01

    Some proponents of Africanism argue that African traditional education and the principles of "ubuntu" should provide the framework for citizenship education. While conceding that understandable concerns lie behind defences of "ubuntu" as underpinning African democracy, we argue that the Africanist perspective faces various problems and makes…

  19. Capitated payments to primary care providers and the delivery of patient education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, William S; King, Dana E; Richards, Chesley

    2013-01-01

    Patient education is a critical component of the patient-centered medical home and is a powerful and effective tool in chronic disease management. However, little is known about the effect of practice payment on rates of patient education during office encounters. For this study we took data from the 2009 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. This was a cross-sectional analysis of patient visits to primary care providers to determine whether practice payment in the form of capitated payments is associated within patient education being included more frequently during office visits compared with other payment methods. In a sample size of 9863 visits in which capitation status was available and the provider was the patient's primary care provider, the weighted percentages of visits including patient education were measured as a percentages of education (95% confidence intervals): 75% capitation, 74.0% (52.2-88.1). In an adjusted logistic model controlling for new patients (yes/no), number of chronic conditions, number of medications managed, number of previous visits within the year, and age and sex of the patients, the odds of receiving education were reported as odds ratios (95% confidence intervals): 75% capitation, 3.38 (1.23-9.30). Patients are more likely to receive education if their primary care providers receive primarily capitated payment. This association is generally important for health policymakers constructing payment strategies for patient populations who would most benefit from interventions that incorporate or depend on patient education, such as populations requiring management of chronic diseases.

  20. Functional Foods Programs Serve as a Vehicle to Provide Nutrition Education to Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirignano, Sherri M.

    2011-01-01

    An increase in consumer interest in functional foods provides an opportunity for FCS educators to use this topic in Extension programming to promote current nutrition recommendations. The Functional Foods for Life Educational Programs (FFL) are a curriculum of six evidence-based mini-seminars that highlight specific functional foods that have the…

  1. Directory of Indochinese Health Education Materials for Southeast Asian Refugees, Refugee Sponsors and Refugee Health Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota State Dept. of Health, St. Paul. Refugee Education Resource Center.

    This is a directory of (print) health education materials for Indochinese refugees, refugee sponsors, and refugee health providers. Materials listed for refugees cover dental health, diseases, family planning, infant and child health, maternal care and pregnancy, legal systems, nutrition, patient instruction, and education. The directory also…

  2. Self-management support for chronic pain in primary care: a cross-sectional study of patient experiences and nursing roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukewich, Julia; Mann, Elizabeth; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth; Tranmer, Joan

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe chronic pain self-management from the perspective of individuals living with chronic pain in the context of primary care nursing. Self-management is a key chronic pain treatment modality and support for self-managing chronic pain is mainly provided in the context of primary care. Although nurses are optimally suited to facilitate self-management in primary care, there is a need to explore opportunities for optimizing their roles. Two cross-sectional studies. The Chronic Pain Self-Management Survey was conducted in 2011-2012 to explore the epidemiology and self-management of chronic pain in Canadian adults. The questionnaire was distributed to 1504 individuals in Ontario. In 2011, the Primary Care Nursing Roles Survey was distributed to 1911 primary care nurses in Ontario to explore their roles and to determine the extent to which chronic disease management strategies, including support for self-management, were implemented in primary care. Few respondents to the pain survey identified nurses as being the 'most helpful' facilitator of self-management while physicians were most commonly cited. Seventy-six per cent of respondents used medication to manage their chronic pain. Few respondents to the nursing survey worked in practices with specific programmes for individuals with chronic pain. Individuals with chronic pain identified barriers and facilitators to self-managing their pain and nurses identified barriers and facilitators to optimizing their role in primary care. There are several opportunities for primary care practices to facilitate self-management of chronic pain, including the optimization of the primary care nursing role. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Cognitive function and living situation in COPD: is there a relationship with self-management and quality of life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulohery, Megan M; Schroeder, Darrell R; Benzo, Roberto P

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is increasingly being found to be a common comorbidity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study sought to understand the relationship of comprehensively measured cognitive function with COPD severity, quality of life, living situation, health care utilization, and self-management abilities. Subjects with COPD were recruited from the outpatient pulmonary clinic. Cognitive function was assessed using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MOCA). Self-management abilities were measured using the Self Management Ability Score 30. Quality of life was measured using the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire. Pearson correlation was used to assess the bivariate association of the MOCA with other study measures. Multivariate analysis was completed to understand the interaction of the MOCA and living situation on COPD outcomes of hospitalization, quality of life, and self-management ability. This study included 100 participants of mean age 70±9.4 years (63% male, 37% female) with COPD (mean FEV1 [forced expiratory volume in 1 second] percentage predicted 40.4±16.7). Mean MOCA score was 23.8±3.9 with 63% of patients having mild cognitive impairment. The MOCA was negatively correlated with age (r=-0.28, P=0.005) and positively correlated with education (r=+0.24, P=0.012). There was no significant correlation between cognitive function and exacerbations, emergency room (ER) visits, or hospitalizations. There was no association between the MOCA score and self-management abilities or quality of life. We tested the interaction of living situation and the MOCA with self-management abilities and found statistical significance (P=0.017), indicating that individuals living alone with higher cognitive function report lower self-management abilities. Cognitive impairment in COPD does not appear to be meaningfully associated with COPD severity, health outcomes, or self-management abilities. The routine screening for cognitive impairment due to

  4. Psychometric evaluation of a new instrument to measure disease self-management of the early stage chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiu-Chu; Wu, Chia-Chen; Wu, Li-Min; Chen, Hsing-Mei; Chang, Shu-Chen

    2013-04-01

    This study aims to develop a valid and reliable chronic kidney disease self-management instrument (CKD-SM) for assessing early stage chronic kidney disease patients' self-management behaviours. Enhancing early stage chronic kidney disease patients' self-management plays a key role in delaying the progression of chronic kidney disease. Healthcare provider understanding of early stage chronic kidney disease patients' self-management behaviours can help develop effective interventions. A valid and reliable instrument for measuring chronic kidney disease patients' self-management behaviours is needed. A cross-sectional descriptive study collected data for principal components analysis with oblique rotation. Mandarin- or Taiwanese-speaking adults with chronic kidney disease (n=252) from two medical centres and one regional hospital in Southern Taiwan completed the CKD-SM. Construct validity was evaluated by exploratory factor analysis. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were estimated by Cronbach's alpha and Pearson correlation coefficients. Four factors were extracted and labelled self-integration, problem-solving, seeking social support and adherence to recommended regimen. The four factors accounted for 60.51% of the total variance. Each factor showed acceptable internal reliability with Cronbach's alpha from 0.77-0.92. The test-retest correlations for the CKD-SM was 0.72. The psychometric quality of the CKD-SM instrument was satisfactory. Research to conduct a confirmatory factor analysis to further validate this new instrument's construct validity is recommended. The CKD-SM instrument is useful for clinicians who wish to identify the problems with self-management among chronic kidney disease patients early. Self-management assessment will be helpful to develop intervention tailored to the needs of the chronic kidney disease population. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Self-management intervention to improve self-care