WorldWideScience

Sample records for providing school nurses

  1. School Nurses' Perceptions of Self-Efficacy in Providing Diabetes Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Kelly L.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure school nurses' perceived self-efficacy in providing diabetes care and education to children and to identify factors that correlate with higher self-efficacy levels in the performance of these tasks. The results of this study revealed that the surveyed school nurses perceived a moderate level of…

  2. The Role of the School Nurse in Providing School Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of School Nursing, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The school nurse has a crucial role in the seamless provision of comprehensive health services to children and youth. Increasing numbers of students enter schools with chronic health conditions that require management during the school day. This policy statement describes for pediatricians the role of the school nurse in serving as a team member…

  3. Providing Assistance to the Victims of Adolescent Dating Violence: A National Assessment of School Nurses' Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khubchandani, Jagdish; Telljohann, Susan K.; Price, James H.; Dake, Joseph A.; Hendershot, Candace

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study assessed the perceptions and practices of school nurses regarding adolescent dating violence (ADV). Methods: The membership list of the National Association of School Nurses was used to identify a national random cross-sectional sample of high school nurses in the United States (N?=?750). A valid and reliable survey…

  4. Effectiveness of health instruction provided by student nurses in rural secondary schools of Zimbabwe: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munodawafa, D; Marty, P J; Gwede, C

    1995-02-01

    This demonstration project used student nurses (n = 12) on community deployment to provide health instruction among rural school-age populations in Zimbabwe. A quasi-experimental (pre- and post-test), non-equivalent control group design was used and consisted of 141 school pupils in the intervention group and 144 pupils in the comparison group (N = 285). The curriculum focused on prevention of STDs, HIV/AIDS and drugs (alcohol, tobacco and marijuana). A gain in health knowledge scores among the intervention group was reported at post-test. More than 70% of the pupils who received health instruction from student nurses gave a high approval rating of student nurses' performance. Further, student nurses, teachers and tutors all support school health instruction by student nurses although tutors and teachers differ on teaching about condoms.

  5. Public Health Interventions for School Nursing Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Marjorie A.; Anderson, Linda J. W.; Rising, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    School nurses (SNs) use public health nursing knowledge and skills to provide nursing services to school populations. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a practice framework that can be used to explain and guide public health nursing interventions. SNs who were also members of the National Association of School Nurses completed an electronic…

  6. The Power of Influence: School Nurse Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazyck, Donna; Cellucci, Margaret; Largent, Piper

    2015-07-01

    School nurses have influence, and this influence is ignited with school nurse stories. School nurses must tell school staff, leaders, families, and students what they do to help students access their education. School boards, city councils, and legislators need to know the knowledge, skills, and judgment school nurses use daily. NASN understands that school nurses benefit from a "how to" kit and has developed tools to empower school nurses in advocating for their important role in supporting the health and learning of students. This article provides an overview this newly developed electronic toolkit while at the same time reinforcing the power of influence when sharing your stories. © 2015 The Author(s).

  7. Perceptions of final-year nursing students on the facilities, resources and quality of education provided by schools in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güner, Perihan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the perceptions of final-year nursing students regarding the adequacy of education, resources and internships in preparation for graduation. The study design was a descriptive cross-sectional study of nursing students (n: 1804) in their final year of education and questionnaires were used to collect data. Information related to student-to-instructor ratios and internships was obtained from each institution. Most students reported receiving instruction or supervision by lecturers and clinicians who did not specialise in the field. Overall, students did not find the facilities, educational or technological resources and the quality of education offered by their respective schools adequate. The proportion of students who found the level of theoretical education, clinical practice and instructor support adequate was higher in state university colleges of nursing/faculties of health sciences than in state university schools of health sciences.

  8. School Nurse Role in Electronic School Health Records. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltz, Cynthia; Johnson, Katie; Lechtenberg, Julia Rae; Maughan, Erin; Trefry, Sharonlee

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that Electronic Health Records (EHRs) are essential for the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) to provide efficient and effective care in the school and monitor the health of the entire student population. It is also the position of…

  9. Obesity Prevention Practices of Elementary School Nurses in Minnesota: Findings from Interviews with Licensed School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison-Sandberg, Leslie F.; Kubik, Martha Y.; Johnson, Karen E.

    2011-01-01

    Elementary schools are an optimal setting to provide obesity prevention interventions, yet little is known about the obesity prevention practices of elementary school nurses. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into current obesity-related school nursing practice in elementary schools in Minnesota, opinions regarding school nurse-led…

  10. Marginalization and School Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Julia Ann

    2004-01-01

    The concept of marginalization was first analyzed by nursing researchers Hall, Stevens, and Meleis. Although nursing literature frequently refers to this concept when addressing "at risk" groups such as the homeless, gays and lesbians, and those infected with HIV/AIDS, the concept can also be applied to nursing. Analysis of current school nursing…

  11. The perceived perceptions of head school nurses in developing school nursing roles within schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morberg, Siv; Lagerström, Monica; Dellve, Lotta

    2009-11-01

    To gain a deeper understanding of how Swedish head school nurses perceive their leadership in developing school health care. A well-functioning school health care is important for promoting the health of children and young people. Constructivist-grounded theory was used to analyse 11 individual interviews with nine head school nurses. Head school nurses strive to find a balance between what they experience as vague formal goals and strong informal goals which leads to creating local goals in order to develop school health care. The head school nurse's job is experienced as a divided and pioneering job in which there is uncertainty about the leadership role. They provide individual support to school nurses, are the link between school nurses and decision makers and highlight the importance of school nurses' work to organizational leaders. This study shows that school health care needs to be founded on evidence-based methods. Therefore, a structured plan for education and training in school health care management, based on research and in cooperation with the academic world, would develop the head school nurses' profession, strengthen the position of school health care and advance the school nurses' work.

  12. Concussions--The Role of the School Nurse. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Anne L.; Wyckoff, Leah J.

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) is an essential member of the team addressing concussions. As the school-based clinical professional on the team, the school nurse has the knowledge and skills to provide concussion prevention…

  13. School Nurses Make a Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchell, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Susan Kitchell decided to become a school-based healthcare provider after working for more than twenty years in pediatrics and pediatric critical care at Roosevelt Hospital in New York City. She needed a position with daytime hours within her field of expertise that allowed her time to spend with her family. She began working as a school nurse in…

  14. School nurses: positive deviant leaders in the school setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, Victoria J

    2009-02-01

    A variety of leadership theories are examined to support the idea that school nurses can be positive deviants in the school setting. Transformational leadership, situational leadership, and complexity theory can all be used by school nurses to create positive change in the school environment because all recognize the need for flexible leadership in a changing environment. The complex and chaotic nature of the school setting requires organizational leaders to be flexible and to have the ability to recognize and address its changing needs. The school nurse can develop personal power to be used as an appropriate agent for change using Benziger's 12-step process. Conflict and cultural consonance promotion provide opportunities for the school nurse to demonstrate leadership skills within the school community. Positive deviants can be found in any setting. They demonstrate winning behaviors that can be adopted by their peers. School nurses, in their unique role, can use their leadership behaviors to promote the health of their school environment.

  15. Medicare Provider Payment Data - Skilled Nursing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Skilled Nursing Facility Utilization and Payment Public Use File (Skilled Nursing Facility PUF) provides information on services provided to Medicare...

  16. Public Health Interventions for School Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Marjorie A; Anderson, Linda J W; Rising, Shannon

    2016-06-01

    School nurses (SNs) use public health nursing knowledge and skills to provide nursing services to school populations. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a practice framework that can be used to explain and guide public health nursing interventions. SNs who were also members of the National Association of School Nurses completed an electronic survey on their use of public health interventions as defined by the wheel. Although 67% of the participants were not familiar with the Public Health Intervention Wheel, respondents reported conducting activities that were consistent with the Wheel interventions. Screening, referral and follow-up, case management, and health teaching were the most frequently performed interventions. Intervention use varied by educational level, age of nurse, years of practice, and student population. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a relevant and useful framework that provides a language to explain population-based school nursing practice. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Behind Closed Doors: School Nurses and Sexual Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewin, Dorothy; Koren, Ainat; Morgan, Betty; Shipley, Sara; Hardy, Rachel L.

    2014-01-01

    School nurses can play a key role in providing sexual education in schools. However, they often face barriers from the school administration and concerned parents. Additionally, school nurses may have limited formal preparation in managing sexual health issues. This study used a descriptive qualitative method to explore the school nurses'…

  18. Innovation and effectiveness: changing the scope of school nurses in New Zealand secondary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kool, Bridget; Thomas, David; Moore, Dennis; Anderson, Angelika; Bennetts, Phillipa; Earp, Karlynne; Dawson, Dianne; Treadwell, Nicky

    2008-04-01

    To describe the changing role of school nurses in eight New Zealand (NZ) secondary schools from low socio-economic areas with high Pacific Island and Māori rolls. An evaluation of a pilot addressing under-achievement in low-decile schools in Auckland, NZ (2002-05). Annual semi-structured school nurse interviews and analysis of routinely collected school health service data were undertaken. Two patterns of school nurse operation were identified: an embracing pattern, where nurses embraced the concept of providing school-based health services; and a Band-Aid pattern, where only the basics for student health care were provided by school nurses. School nurses with an embracing pattern of practice provided more effective school-based health services. School health services are better served by nurses with structured postgraduate education that fosters the development of a nurse-practitioner role. Co-ordination of school nurses either at a regional or national level is required.

  19. Rural school nurses' asthma education needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, K; Winkelstein, M; Calabrese, B; Nanda, J; Quartey, R; Butz, A; Resto, M; Huss, R; Rand, C S

    2001-05-01

    School nurses play an important role in identifying children with asthma and providing care during school hours. Educational programs designed to improve nurses' asthma knowledge and practices have concentrated on urban settings. The purpose of this investigation was to determine asthma-related practices and educational needs of rural school nurses. A survey about asthma was mailed to school nurses in all counties of the state of Maryland and in Washington, D.C. Responses were compared between rural Maryland counties and counties from the remainder of Maryland and Washington, D.C. The survey addressed attitudes and beliefs, function and roles, medication administration, and educational needs about asthma. We found that rural nurses used peak flow meters less often to assess and monitor asthma, requested fewer referrals for asthma, had fewer interactions with health room assistants, and had reduced access to asthma educational resources. Also, they provided less asthma education in the schools than other school nurses. These results suggest a need for comprehensive asthma educational programs in rural areas that are based on national guidelines, and that address the unique needs of rural school nurses. These programs should also emphasize the need for open communication between rural school nurses, health room assistants, primary care providers, and parents/caregivers.

  20. Should School Nurses Wear Uniforms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of School Health, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This 1958 paper questions whether school nurses should wear uniforms (specifically, white uniforms). It concludes that white uniforms are often associated with the treatment of ill people, and since many people have a fear reaction to them, they are not necessary and are even undesirable. Since school nurses are school staff members, they should…

  1. Administrator Leadership Styles and Their Impact on School Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Charles R

    2018-01-01

    In comparison to other professional staff in an educational based setting, the registered professional school nurse has unique roles, responsibilities, education, training, and scope of practice. In carrying out this unique and specialized role, school nurses operate under a building administrator, the leader of the building and often the immediate supervisor of the school nurse. In addition, many school nurses in small districts are the only registered professional nurse employed by the school. The building administrator's leadership style not only sets the tone for the day-to-day operations in the school but also impacts the school nurse functioning and program implementation. This article reviews the three most common types of leadership styles as defined by Kurt Lewin-laissez-faire, democratic, and coercive/authoritarian-and their potential impact on school nursing practice. In addition, the article provides recommendations for school nurses for successful practice with regard to supervisor leadership styles.

  2. Multicultural Nursing: Providing Better Employee Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittle, Chad

    2015-12-01

    Living in an increasingly multicultural society, nurses are regularly required to care for employees from a variety of cultural backgrounds. An awareness of cultural differences focuses occupational health nurses on those differences and results in better employee care. This article explores the concept of culturally competent employee care, some of the non-verbal communication cues among cultural groups, models associated with completing a cultural assessment, and how health disparities in the workplace can affect delivery of employee care. Self-evaluation of the occupational health nurse for personal preferences and biases is also discussed. Development of cultural competency is a process, and occupational health nurses must develop these skills. By developing cultural competence, occupational health nurses can conduct complete cultural assessments, facilitate better communication with employees from a variety of cultural backgrounds, and improve employee health and compliance with care regimens. Tips and guidelines for facilitating communication between occupational health nurses and employees are also provided. © 2015 The Author(s).

  3. ICU nurses' experiences in providing terminal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Laura; Young, Anne; Symes, Lene; Haile, Brenda; Walsh, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    At least 1 in 5 Americans die while using intensive care service-a number that is expected to increase as society ages. Many of these deaths involve withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining therapies. In these situations, the role of intensive care nurses shifts from providing aggressive care to end-of-life care. While hospice and palliative care nurses typically receive specialized support to cope with death and dying, intensive care nurses usually do not receive this support. Understanding the experiences of intensive care nurses in providing care at the end of life is an important first step to improving terminal care in the intensive care unit (ICU). This phenomenological research study explores the experiences of intensive care nurses who provide terminal care in the ICU. The sample consisted of 18 registered nurses delivering terminal care in an ICU that participated in individual interviews and focus groups. Colaizzi's steps for data analysis were used to identify themes within the context of nursing. Three major themes consisted of (1) barriers to optimal care, (2) internal conflict, and (3) coping. Providing terminal care creates significant personal and professional struggles among ICU nurses.

  4. Emergency Preparedness and Response in the School Setting--The Role of the School Nurse. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, Christine M.; Haynie, Kathey; Davis, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) provides leadership in all phases of emergency preparedness and response. School nurses are a vital part of the school team responsible for developing emergency response procedures for the…

  5. Using Nursing Languages in School Nursing Practice. Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denehy, Janice

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this updated manual is to define and describe standardized nursing languages, highlight how nursing languages are a part of the nursing process, and illustrate through case examples how nursing languages are used in school nursing practice. This manual also summarizes the history and development of three nursing classifications, the…

  6. Nursing Home Response to Nursing Home Compare: The Provider Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perraillon, Marcelo Coca; Brauner, Daniel J; Konetzka, R Tamara

    2017-08-01

    Nursing Home Compare (NHC) publishes composite quality ratings of nursing homes based on a five-star rating system, a system that has been subject to controversy about its validity. Using in-depth interviews, we assess the views of nursing home administrators and staff on NHC and unearth strategies used to improve ratings. Respondents revealed conflicting goals and strategies. Although nursing home managers monitor the ratings and expend effort to improve scores, competing goals of revenue maximization and avoidance of litigation often overshadow desire to score well on NHC. Some of the improvement strategies simply involve coding changes that have no effect on resident outcomes. Many respondents doubted the validity of the self-reported staffing data and stated that lack of risk adjustment biases ratings. Policy makers should consider nursing home incentives when refining the system, aiming to improve the validity of the self-reported domains to provide incentives for broader quality improvement.

  7. [A framework for assessing essential public health nursing skills and achievement levels required for students graduating from schools that provide education for obtaining a license as a public health nurse in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahara, Kiyomi; Omori, Junko; Kobayashi, Maasa; Hirano, Yuko; Suzuki, Yoshimi; Arakida, Mikako; Oki, Sachiko; Okamoto, Reiko; Okuyama, Noriko; Kaihara, Itsuko; Sudo, Hiroko; Nagae, Hiroko; Miyazaki, Misako; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2010-03-01

    This study aimed to develop a framework for essential skills and the achievement levels necessary for students graduating from schools that provide education for obtaining a license as a public health nurse (PHN) in Japan. Two rounds of questionnaire-based investigations using the Delphi methodology were conducted. Subjects were 197 PHNs from municipalities or companies and 146 nurse educators from universities, colleges, junior colleges, or technical nursing schools. (1) The essential skills framework consisted of three (macro, intermediate and micro) levels. Macro-level items were based on the principle of justice, a primary pillar of health care: (A) community assessment to identify health problems; (B) solving and improving particular health problems in collaboration with people to enable them to promote their own health; (C) promoting equitable access and distribution of community resources for health and daily living. Micro-level items had four achievement levels: (I) independent; (II) instructor-guided; (III) laboratory exercise; (IV) theoretical understanding. Micro-level items for A and B had two domains for achievement: individual/family and group/community. (2) In the first round over 70% of respondents said "very important," "important" or "acceptable" for all micro-level items. In the second round, over 90% said all micro-level items fit within macro and intermediate-level items. (3) In the second round, micro-level items attained 70% consensus among PHNs and nurse educators were 71 of 93 (76.3%). Micro-level expression was used for adjustment and the final framework of essential skills yielded 3 macro, 8 intermediate and 59 micro-level items and 95 levels of achievement. (4) In the final framework, the level of achievement for "individual/family" (Macro-level A and B) was almost level I, and for "group/community" almost II or III. The number of micro-level items at level IV for C was 14 of 21 (66.7%). (5) Compared with PHNs, educators generally

  8. School-Sponsored Before, After and Extended School Year Programs: The Role of the School Nurse. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Elizabeth; Buswell, Sue Ann; Morgitan, Judith; Compton, Linda; Westendorf, Georgene; Chau, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) has the educational and clinical background to coordinate the necessary school health services to provide students with the same health, nutrition, and safety needs while attending…

  9. Ethical Problems Experienced by School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solum, Linda L.; Schaffer, Marjorie A.

    2003-01-01

    This study explored school nurses' experience of ethical conflict in school nursing through interviews with six school nurses. The study examined how school nurses resolved ethical problems and the rationale used to resolve them. Emergent themes of ethical problems were professional relationship conflicts, delegation to and supervision of health…

  10. Managing Food Allergies at School: School Nurses

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-01-20

    This podcast highlights the leadership role of school nurses in the management of food allergies in schools. It also identifies CDC food allergy resources for schools.  Created: 1/20/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 1/20/2015.

  11. Tourette Syndrome and the School Nurse. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ort, Sharon I.; And Others

    Information on Tourette Syndrome (TS), as well as transient and chronic tic disorders, is provided in this pamphlet for the school nurse, who can support and educate the child, family, and other school personnel. Information is included on genetic factors and behaviors that may be connected to TS: obsessive-compulsive symptoms, hyperactivity,…

  12. Nursing Home Regulations Redefined: Implications for Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unroe, Kathleen T; Ouslander, Joseph G; Saliba, Debra

    2018-01-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) finalized a comprehensive update to nursing home requirements of participation in October 2016. Nearly 10,000 public comments were received regarding the proposed rule, and CMS made multiple modifications based on comments from providers, advocacy organizations, and others before issuing the final rule. The final rule describing nursing home requirements of participation modernizes nursing home regulation. It is being implemented in three phases-beginning in November 2016, November 2017, and November 2019. There are multiple provisions that have implications for clinicians caring for nursing home residents, particularly in terms of management of infections, medication prescribing and monitoring, and delegation of medical orders. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  13. School Nurse Evaluations: Making the Process Meaningful and Motivational

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Kathryn H.; Overman, Muriel; Guttu, Martha; Engelke, Martha Keehner

    2013-01-01

    The professional standards of school nursing practice provide a framework to help school nurses focus on their unique mission of promoting health and academic achievement for all students. Without the standards, the nurse’s role can become task oriented and limited in scope. By using an evaluation tool that reflects the standards, nurses not only…

  14. Adolescent Smoking Cessation: Development of a School Nurse Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Greg; O'Connell, Meghan; Cross, Donna

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of a range of strategies to engage and to enhance secondary school nurse involvement in teenage smoking prevention and cessation. School nurses were willing to assist students to quit smoking, but they felt unprepared. Information provided by nurses involved in a three-stage review,…

  15. Providing Continuing Education for International Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Debra L

    2015-10-01

    In an increasingly globalized world, providing continuing education (CE) for nurses is becoming a more common opportunity for U.S. educators. It is important for educators to provide CE programs in a culturally competent and sensitive environment. The challenges involved include effective communication, appropriate teaching methodologies, contextually appropriate content, and awareness of cultural-specific needs and customs. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. School-Based Health Centers + School Nurses = Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2010

    2010-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) and school nurses know that healthy students learn better. They share an important mission: providing preventive care for all students they serve, with the goal of keeping students in class learning. They both: (1) Educate students and families about healthy behaviors and nutrition; (2) Enroll students and…

  17. Ethics and the HPV Vaccine: Considerations for School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Mary P.

    2008-01-01

    School nurses are at the forefront of health care providers for many families of junior high and high school students and are used as primary sources of information and guidance about recommended student vaccinations. In the case of the relatively new vaccine for human papillomavirus (HPV), school nurses must be both knowledgeable about the…

  18. A Mentoring Program for New School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Connie

    2003-01-01

    Until recent years, school nursing practice consisted mainly of screenings and first aid. However, the changing health, social, and emotional needs of children in the school setting have brought about an expansion of school nursing services. Now school nurses must not only perform routine first aid and screenings, but they must also carry out…

  19. School nurse intention to pursue higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Lisa; White, Debra

    2014-10-01

    In 2011, the Institute of Medicine recommended that 80% of the nurses possess a minimum of a bachelor of science in nursing by 2020 and double the number of doctorally prepared nurses. This has prompted a significant number of registered nurses to advance their educational level. School nurses in Louisiana are not required to have a bachelor's degree. In many states, the bachelor's degree is required for all school nurses, and many school nurses are prepared at the masters' and doctoral levels. The purpose of this study was to examine the intention of Louisiana school nurses to pursue higher education in nursing. A survey was distributed to all members of the Louisiana School Nurses Organization, and results indicated that 65% of the participants were motivated to return to school. Incentives and barriers to pursuing higher education were identified, and strategies for overcoming these barriers were proposed. © The Author(s) 2013.

  20. Motivational Interviewing by School Nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Ane; Bentsen, Peter; Hindhede, Anette Lykke

    and children of different ages. When used for child obesity prevention, motivational interviewing was connected with dilemmas which should not be left to the individual nurse but be handled in practice by the school health service management. It is suggested to distinguish carefully between obesity prevention...... a prevention strategy targeting children with a high risk of obesity with an intervention conducted by school nurses using motivational interviewing.Motivational interviewing is a counselling method to bring about behavioural change (Miller and Rollnick 1995). Effect has been documented for a range of problem...... for what data told about motivational interviewing. Next, specifically according to the keywords of the motivational interviewing spirit and techniques. Key results : The study showed that the motivational interviewing spirit and techniques are integrated, inseparable, and adapted by the school nurses...

  1. Emergency Preparedness--The Role of the School Nurse. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagginello, Joan B.; Clark, Sandra; Compton, Linda; Davis, Catherine; Healy, Marilyn; Hoffmann, Susan; Tuck, Christine M.

    2011-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that school nurses provide leadership in all phases of emergency preparedness and management and are a vital part of the school team that develops emergency response procedures for the school setting, using an all-hazards approach. The school nurse is a vital school…

  2. School Nurse Intention to Pursue Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Lisa; White, Debra

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the Institute of Medicine recommended that 80% of the nurses possess a minimum of a bachelor of science in nursing by 2020 and double the number of doctorally prepared nurses. This has prompted a significant number of registered nurses to advance their educational level. School nurses in Louisiana are not required to have a bachelor's…

  3. Rural-urban disparities in school nursing: implications for continuing education and rural school health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Mary M; Fullerton, Lynne; Sapien, Robert; Greenberg, Cynthia; Bauer-Creegan, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the professional and educational challenges experienced by rural school nurses. We conducted this study to describe disparities between the urban and rural professional school nurse workforce in New Mexico and to identify how best to meet the continuing education needs of New Mexico's rural school nurse workforce. We analyzed state data from a 2009 New Mexico Department of Health school nurse workforce survey (71.7% response rate). We included all survey respondents who indicated working as a school nurse in a public school setting in any grade K-12 and who identified their county of employment (N = 311). Rural school nurses were twice as likely as metropolitan nurses to provide clinical services to multiple school campuses (67.3% compared to 30.1%, P Rural school nurses were less likely than metropolitan nurses to have received recent continuing education on anaphylaxis (P health (P = .0004), and suicide risk identification and prevention (P = .015). Online courses and telehealth were identified by rural school nurses as among the preferred means for receiving continuing education. Our findings support the provision of online courses and telehealth content to address urban-rural disparities in school nursing education and support rural school health. © 2014 National Rural Health Association.

  4. Duke University School of Nursing's Impact on Nursing and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Duke University School of Nursing's Impact on Nursing and Midwifery. Education in ... 1 University of Rwanda, College of medicine and health sciences Kabgayi school of Nursing and Midwifery,. 2&4 University of ... Lack of knowledge and access to current clinical practice guidelines were identified as barriers to integration.

  5. School Nurse Perspectives regarding Their Vocational Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Shirley G.; Firmin, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    This is a phenomenological, qualitative study of 25 school nurses employed in a large, urban school district in the Midwestern section of the United States. The study's participants possess histories of professional work experiences in nursing specialties other than school nursing. Thematic analysis of the data revealed three prominent factors…

  6. Individualized Healthcare Plans: The Role of the School Nurse. Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Bernadette Moran; Buswell, Sue A.; Mattern, Cheryl; Westendorf, Georgene; Clark, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse), in collaboration with the student, family and healthcare providers, shall meet nursing regulatory requirements and professional standards by developing an Individualized Healthcare Plan…

  7. Abstract: Duke University School of Nursing's Impact on Nursing and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Duke University School of Nursing's Impact on Nursing and Midwifery Education in Rwanda. Patricia Moreland, Isabelle Soule, Linda Vanhook, Linda Baxter, Claire McKinley Yoder, Michael V Relf ...

  8. Behavioral Health Emergencies Managed by School Nurses Working with Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Mary M.; Greenberg, Cynthia; Sapien, Robert; Bauer-Creegan, Judith; Hine, Beverly; Geary, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    Background: As members of interdisciplinary teams, school nurses provide behavioral health services. Studies indicate that school nurses may lack sufficient continuing education in adolescent behavioral health and in the management of behavioral health emergencies, specifically. We conducted this study to describe the adolescent behavioral health…

  9. Comparison of Administrators' and School Nurses' Perception of the School Nurse Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rebecca; Reffel, Jim

    2009-01-01

    The current tenuous status of public education funding requires that school nurses be proactive in advocacy efforts on behalf of their school nursing programs. Advocating for nursing practice within an educational setting presents unique challenges. Lack of state or national consensus for support of school nurse services creates an opportunity for…

  10. Providing support to nursing students in the clinical environment: a nursing standard requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carina; Moxham, Lorna; Broadbent, Marc

    2016-10-01

    This discussion paper poses the question 'What enables or deters Registered Nurses to take up their professional responsibility to support undergraduate nursing students through the provision of clinical education?'. Embedded within many nursing standards are expectations that Registered Nurses provide support and professional development to undergraduate nursing students undertaking clinical placements. Expectations within nursing standards that Registered Nurses provide support and professional development to nursing students are important because nursing students depend on Registered Nurses to help them to become competent practitioners. Contributing factors that enable and deter Registered Nurses from fulfilling this expectation to support nursing students in their clinical learning include; workloads, preparedness for the teaching role, confidence in teaching and awareness of the competency requirement to support students. Factors exist which can enable or deter Registered Nurses from carrying out the licence requirement to provide clinical education and support to nursing students.

  11. School nurses' perceptions of childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J H; Desmond, S M; Ruppert, E S; Stelzer, C M

    1987-10-01

    A random sample of 250 nurses from the American School Health Association membership were sent a questionnaire concerning childhood obesity; 88% responded. Most (85%) believed normal weight was important to children's health and that school nurses should be role models by maintaining normal weight (77%). Most also believed counseling children and their parents about weight loss was difficult (71%) and that schools need to do more to alleviate childhood obesity (65%). At least 75% believed all schools should offer a comprehensive health curriculum with units on nutrition and weight control. Likewise, all schools should eliminate "junk food" machines and make special low-calorie lunches available. Only 25% felt competent to prescribe weight loss programs for children, and only 30% found counseling about weight loss professionally gratifying. One-fourth believed, that with proper guidance, children could lose significant amounts of weight or maintain that weight loss. The nurses believed in the importance of normal weight, but appeared skeptical of children's abilities to lose weight as well as their own abilities to provide children with guidance to do so. Finally, they perceived a need for schools to be more active and involved in dealing with childhood obesity.

  12. School nurse experiences with prescription opioids in urban and rural schools: A cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison-Sharp, Ella; Estrada, Robin Dawson; Elio, Alice; Prendergast, Melissa; Carpenter, Delesha M

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have examined the use of prescription opioids in schools. The current study aimed to: (1) describe the context within which school nurses encounter student opioid prescriptions; (2) assess school nurses' preferences for training and student education; and (3) explore urban-rural differences in school nurses' experiences and training preferences. A convenience sample of school nurses (n = 633) from North Carolina and South Carolina participated in a brief, anonymous, online survey. Qualitative data were analyzed thematically and statistical tests (t-tests and Chi-square tests) were performed to investigate urban-rural differences. Many school nurses (40.3%) had encountered a student with an opioid prescription, but only 3.6% had naloxone available in case of an overdose. Most school nurses (69.9%), especially rural school nurses, believed students would benefit from opioid education (74.9 versus 66.6%, p = 0.03). The majority of school nurses (83.9%) were interested in opioid-related training. Many school nurses encounter students with prescription opioids and would like additional opioid-related training. The potential benefits of providing naloxone access to prevent opioid-related deaths at schools should be explored.

  13. School Nurses: Positive Deviant Leaders in the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, Victoria J.

    2009-01-01

    A variety of leadership theories are examined to support the idea that school nurses can be positive deviants in the school setting. Transformational leadership, situational leadership, and complexity theory can all be used by school nurses to create positive change in the school environment because all recognize the need for flexible leadership…

  14. Providing Relevance in Chemistry for Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Theodore H. D.

    1976-01-01

    Describes an introductory chemistry course for nurses in which students learn basic chemical principles by performing 12 chemical analyses that are routinely conducted on body fluids and listed on a patient's clinical laboratory chart. (MLH)

  15. School nurse perceptions and knowledge of pediatric toileting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlen, Angela M; Boyt, Margaret A; Cooper, Christopher S

    2012-04-01

    We surveyed school nurses on toileting conditions in schools, their level of understanding related to normal toileting patterns in school-age children, and whether they are in need of additional resources to promote healthy toilet habits for their students. An Institutional Review Board approved web-based survey with 34 questions was employed; 562 nurses completed the survey and 97% were currently employed as school nurses. Participants were invited via email blasts through national school nursing associations and the Iowa Department of Education. Only 48% and 33% of respondents suspected an underlying health problem in children with frequent urination and bladder or bowel accidents, respectively. Despite 61% reporting never receiving information about children's normal elimination patterns, 43% had been asked to provide such information to teachers. Only 42% felt they had adequate resources to respond to such requests. School nurses requested information about treatment of dysfunctional elimination (67%), health effects of childhood toileting habits (65%), fluid intake guidelines (44%) and improvement of bathroom facilities (39%); 70% were unaware of local providers specially trained to treat children with these problems. Our survey results suggest that school nurses need additional information and resources in order to promote healthy elimination patterns in school children. Copyright © 2011 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Smallpox Threat: The School Nurse's Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Mary E.; Didion, Judy

    2003-01-01

    Today, with the threat of bioterrorism and war, there is a new dimension to the traditional role of the school nurse. The smallpox threat to public health will invoke the school nurse's role as an educator, liaison, and consultant in the community. This article discusses smallpox, the vaccination process, adverse effects, and postvaccination care.…

  17. Advantages of Re-Establishing Hospital Based Schools of Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Dahl, Susan

    2006-01-01

    This study examined perceptions of hospital-based nursing schools among nursing professionals to determine whether this type of nursing education model is viable in the modern nursing context. Nursing education is faced with the twin problems of insufficient nurses, which creates a demand for rapid education of nurses, and ensuring adequate clinical quality of nurses, which creates a demand for more extensive undergraduate clinical training. Hospital-based nursing schools are three-year progr...

  18. School nurses' perceptions of empowerment and autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSisto, Marie C; DeSisto, Thomas Patrick

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore Kanter's Theory of Structural Power in Organizations, using school nurses and to answer the research question of whether there is a relationship between empowerment and autonomy in school nurses. This study found a positive relationship between the nurses' perceptions of empowerment and autonomy. The school nurses surveyed perceived themselves to have a high degree of autonomy and a moderate degree of empowerment, and they reported that their access to informal power structures was higher than their access to formal power structures in their school systems. School nurses can benefit by understanding factors that can increase their empowerment in the workplace. They need to understand the organizational structure of their workplace to increase their effectiveness and job satisfaction.

  19. Educational Preparation for the Role of the School Nurse: Perceptions of School Nurses in Washington State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative research study was to identify the perceptions of currently practicing school nurses regarding their baccalaureate nursing education and determine if they felt adequately prepared to effectively practice in the role of a school nurse. A descriptive, quantitative on-line survey was conducted of Washington State…

  20. School Nurses: Coordinating Care Through a Community/School Health Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Carolyn L; Poole, Cynthia R

    2016-11-01

    School nurses coordinate student health care for prevention and treatment to remove health barriers to learning and to school attendance. They use a team approach to manage students with chronic conditions as they transition among home, school and healthcare settings, working to develop competent self-care aligned with developmental ages of students. Care coordination ensures the continuum of care is unbroken. Meeting the health needs of low-income students can be challenging, because those students are likely to be uninsured or underinsured and often lack necessary resources, such as transportation, to access primary health care. Care coordination is a tenet of school nursing and to optimally serve low-income students, school nurses form partnerships in the community. One innovative and successful partnership is Healthy Learners, an organization that works with community healthcare providers and school district nurses to connect eligible students to needed healthcare services. Always, the goal is to keep students in school, healthy, and ready to learn.

  1. There's a New Alphabet in Town: ESSA and Its Implications for Students, Schools, and School Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackborow, Mary; Clark, Elizabeth; Combe, Laurie; Morgitan, Judith; Tupe, Anna

    2017-12-01

    The 2015 passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) provides state education agencies with more local control over educational planning, requires development of state accountability plans, and provides opportunities for advocacy surrounding school nursing sensitive indicators of student success. Federal Title I, II, and IV funds are available for state and local education agency utilization in meeting educational needs of impoverished students and for development of high-quality instructional and support personnel. As Specialized Instructional Support Personnel, school nurses can utilize ESSA Title funding to positively impact chronic absenteeism, school climate, and school nurse staffing. ESSA can be a resource for funding school health services and professional education. This article will assist school nurses in better understanding ESSA and how funding is allocated to states and local education agencies.

  2. Student views of the school nurse's role in a secondary school condom availability program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, S

    1993-10-01

    In Massachusetts, the school committee of a Boston suburb's school board agreed to start a condom availability program at the community's 2 high schools. A nurse researcher conducted 11 focus groups with 112 students to determine students' attitudes and feelings, so they can be incorporated in designing the program. Most students were White, college-bound, and professional-class. The nurse grouped most students by age, gender, and academic tracking into homogeneous groups. A common thread throughout the discussions was a need for respect from adults. Every focus group talked a lot about the risk of humiliation and loss of respect of adults if they took condoms. Students suggested that they would not use the program if it required individual counseling. Overall, the students were concerned about the school nurse's role in safer sex counseling. Sexually active females conveyed a positive relationship with the school nurse, however. The lack of consistent nursing staff contributed to students' doubts about building a relationship with the nurse. Students clearly identified an adult with whom they could feel comfortable talking about sexual matters as someone who would be relaxed, nonjudgmental, knowledgeable, and available for discussion. Based on these findings, the nurse researcher recommended that school nurses have more time to enhance skills in effective and sensitive sexuality counseling and devote more time to counseling and HIV prevention education. She also suggested that schools include more parent and student sexuality education. Developmentally appropriate HIV prevention education should be provided to all students in both junior and senior high schools each year. Final recommendations were intensive inservice education for school nurses, anonymous condom availability, and identification of other school and community personnel to support school nurses.

  3. Nursing students' self-efficacy in providing transcultural care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Janet; Downie, Jill; Nathan, Pauline

    2004-08-01

    The aim of any health care service is to provide optimal quality care to clients and families regardless of their ethnic group. As today's Australian society comprises a multicultural population that encompasses clients with different cultural norms and values, this study examined undergraduate nursing students' self-efficacy in providing transcultural nursing care. A sample of 196 nursing students enrolled in the first and fourth year of a pre-registration nursing program in a Western Australian University were invited to participate in a survey incorporating a transcultural self-efficacy tool (TSET) designed by Jeffery [Unpublished instrument copyrighted by author, 1994]. The findings revealed that fourth year students, exposed to increased theoretical information and clinical experience, had a more positive perception of their self-efficacy in providing transcultural nursing skills than the first year students. In addition, the study found that age, gender, country of birth, languages spoken at home and previous work experience did not influence the nursing students' perception of self-efficacy in performing transcultural care. The study supports the notion that educational preparation and relevant clinical experience is important in providing nursing students with the opportunity to develop self-efficacy in performing effective and efficient transcultural nursing in today's multicultural health care system. It is for this reason that educators need to focus on providing students with relevant theoretical information and ensure sufficient clinical exposure to support student learning in the undergraduate program.

  4. American Association of Colleges of Nursing Annual State of the Schools, 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Washington, DC.

    This annual report highlights the initiatives of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing to help member schools meet the nation's demand for innovative and expanded nursing care. Information is provided in the broad areas of: the state of the schools, leading through task force initiatives, working together to advance nursing education,…

  5. American Association of Colleges of Nursing Annual State of the Schools, 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Washington, DC.

    This annual report highlights the initiatives of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing to help member schools meet the nation's demand for innovative and expanded nursing care. Information is provided in the broad areas of: the state of the schools, setting curriculum standards, working together to advance nursing education, pursuing…

  6. Delegation Guided by School Nursing Values: Comprehensive Knowledge, Trust, and Empowerment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Shirley C.; Barry, Charlotte D.

    2009-01-01

    As health care institutions in the United States respond to shrinking budgets and nursing shortages by increasing the use of unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP), school nursing practice is changing from providing direct care to supervising activities delegated to UAP. Therefore, delegation is a critical area of concern for school nurses. The…

  7. The views of heads of schools of nursing about mental health nursing content in undergraduate programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; McAllister, Margaret

    2014-05-01

    Criticisms about the mental health nursing content of Bachelor of Nursing programs have been common since the introduction of comprehensive nursing education in Australia. Most criticism has come from the mental health nursing sector and the views of key stakeholders have not been systematically reported. Heads of Schools of Nursing have considerable influence over the content of nursing programs, and their perspectives must be part of ongoing discussions about the educational preparation of nurses. This article reports the findings of a qualitative exploratory study, involving in-depth interviews with Heads of Schools of Nursing from Queensland, Australia. Thematic data analysis revealed two main themes: Realising the Goal? and Influencing Factors. Overall, participants did not believe current programs were preparing graduates for beginning level practice in mental health settings. In particular, participants believed that the quality of mental health content was influenced by the overcrowded curriculum, the availability of quality clinical placements, the strength of the mental health team, and the degree of consumer focus. The findings suggest the current model of nursing education in Australia does not provide an adequate foundation for mental health nursing practice and alternative approaches should be pursued as a matter of urgency.

  8. Demystifying pediculosis: school nurses taking the lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontius, Deborah J

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of Pediculosis capitis, or head lice, is fraught with misinformation, myths, and mismanagement. Common myths include the need to exclude children from school, the need to remove all visible nits ("no-nit" policies), the need for massive environmental cleaning, that head lice live for long periods of time, and that schools are a common location for lice transmission. Head lice are a common childhood nuisance, causing embarrassment and emotional trauma in both children and families. This article explores and challenges the commonly held beliefs about the identification, management, and treatment of Pediculosis by presenting current recommended evidence-based practice. It also challenges pediatric nurses, and school nurses in particular, in alignment with the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) Position Statement on Pediculosis Management in the School Setting, to act as change agents for reasonable and effective school policies and practices.

  9. Evidence-Based Practice and School Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

    2005-01-01

    School nurses need to demonstrate that their practice is based on the best evidence available, which is usually data obtained from research. Evidence-based practice involves combining the best evidence available with nursing expertise and patient and family preferences to determine optimum care. Evidence-based practice guidelines are developed by…

  10. Correlates of cyberbullying and how school nurses can respond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ouytsel, Joris; Walrave, Michel; Vandebosch, Heidi

    2015-05-01

    Cyberbullying is one of many online risks that affect an increasing number of children and teenagers. This form of abuse often occurs under the radar of adults as it usually takes place outside of school and away from adult supervision. Moreover, bystanders and victims are often reluctant to report what they have experienced. School nurses might be among the first to witness the real-life consequences of this virtual behavior, as involvement in cyberbullying is often correlated with psychological and behavioral problems. For this reason, school nurses should know how to recognize the warning signs so that they can respond and intervene appropriately. This article provides a discussion of what cyberbullying is and a summary of research on factors associated with cyberbullying, in terms of both victimization and perpetration. It also provides school nurses with evidence-based strategies for responding effectively. © 2014 The Author(s).

  11. School Nurse Workload: Staffing for Safe Care. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolatowski, Rosemary; Endsley, Patricia; Hiltz, Cynthia; Johansen, Annette; Maughan, Erin; Minchella, Lindsey; Trefry, Sharonlee

    2015-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that daily access to a registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as a school nurse) can significantly improve students' health, safety, and abilities to learn. To meet the health and safety needs of students, families, and school communities, school nurse…

  12. Sudden cardiac arrest in schools: the role of the school nurse in AED program implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreaux, Sharon; Broussard, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    A school nurse has many obstacles to overcome when providing emergency care for an age group ranging from four to adulthood. The 21st century school nurse faces the challenges of providing care to medically fragile children at multiple sites, with high student-nurse ratios. The implementation of an Automated External Defibrillation (AED) program can assist the school nurse and staff in providing necessary life-saving services for Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) victims of all ages. The purpose of this article is to describe AED program implementation in a school setting, including the need, essential elements, benefits, and potential concerns related to this vital component of the American Heart Association five-link chain of survival.

  13. A Study of the Influence of the New Careers in Nursing Program on the Culture of Participating Schools of Nursing. New Careers in Nursing. Research Report. ETS RR-15-28

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, Catherine M.; Kevelson, Marisol J. C.

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, ETS conducted a study investigating how the New Careers in Nursing (NCIN) program may have influenced the culture of participating schools of nursing. Select schools of nursing received grants from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to provide scholarships and support services for students in accelerated nursing programs. Case studies…

  14. Empowerment in School Nursing Practice: A Grounded Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Professional empowerment is vital to nurses' productivity and job satisfaction. A grounded theory study was conducted to describe the basic social process experienced by school nurses in relation to professional empowerment. Interviews with 10 school nurses led to the development of a situation-specific theory of school nurse empowerment,…

  15. Effective Recruitment of Schools for Randomized Clinical Trials: Role of School Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petosa, R L; Smith, L

    2017-01-01

    In school settings, nurses lead efforts to improve the student health and well-being to support academic success. Nurses are guided by evidenced-based practice and data to inform care decisions. The randomized controlled trial (RCT) is considered the gold standard of scientific rigor for clinical trials. RCTs are critical to the development of evidence-based health promotion programs in schools. The purpose of this article is to present practical solutions to implementing principles of randomization to RCT trials conducted in school settings. Randomization is a powerful sampling method used to build internal and external validity. The school's daily organization and educational mission provide several barriers to randomization. Based on the authors' experience in conducting school-based RCTs, they offer a host of practical solutions to working with schools to successfully implement randomization procedures. Nurses play a critical role in implementing RCTs in schools to promote rigorous science in support of evidence-based practice.

  16. Role of nursing leadership in providing compassionate care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Barry

    2017-12-13

    This article encourages nurses to explore the concept of leadership in the constantly changing field of health and social care. All nurses have an important role in leadership, and they should consider what type of leader they want to be and what leadership skills they might wish to develop. This article examines what leadership might involve, exploring various leadership styles and characteristics and how these could be applied in nurses' practice. A core component of nursing and nursing leadership is the ability to provide compassionate care. This could correspond with the idea of servant leadership, an approach that moves the leader from a position of power to serving the team and supporting individuals to develop their potential. ©2017 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  17. The Complementary Roles of the School Nurse and School Based Health Centers. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondeck, Lynnette; Combe, Laurie; Baszler, Rita; Wright, Janet

    2015-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the unique combination of school nursing services and school-based health centers (SBHCs) facilitate positive health outcomes for students. The registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) is responsible for management of the daily health…

  18. Exploring sensitive boundaries in nursing education: attitudes of undergraduate student nurses providing intimate care to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossan, M; Mathew, T K

    2013-07-01

    Nursing students often feel challenged and intimidated to provide intimate care to patients in the health care setting. Student nurses in particular are faced with social, professional, academic and peer expectations and experience high levels of stress when providing this intimate care. Explore student nurses attitudes to providing intimate care. Year two and year three students of a three year undergraduate nursing programme completed a descriptive Nursing Students Intimate Care (NSIC) survey with open ended questions. This study discusses student responses to the question: Did you feel it was appropriate for a nurse to provide intimate care to a patient of the opposite sex? Three major themes were identified: societal and self-determined role expectations, comfort and discomfort providing intimate care, and age and gender of the carer and recipient. Student nurses face numerous challenges when having to provide intimate care to patients. These challenges are influenced by the age, gender, levels of comfort of the nurse and the patient and is related to the nature of intimate care being provided. Student nurses will benefit from pre-clinical simulated training experiences in providing intimate care. This training needs to specifically consider being sensitive to the needs of the patient, maintaining patient dignity, negotiating, accommodating and implementing plan of care while being competent and professional in their approach to providing intimate care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The International School Nurse Asthma Project: Barriers Related to Asthma Management in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svavarsdottir, Erla Kolbrun; Garwick, Ann W.; Anderson, Lori S.; Looman, Wendy S.; Seppelt, Ann; Orlygsdottir, Brynja

    2014-01-01

    Aim This paper is a report of an international study of barriers to asthma care from the perspectives of school nurses in Reykjavik, Iceland and St. Paul, Minnesota, in the context of their schools, communities and countries. Background Globally, asthma affects the health and school performance of many adolescents. School nurses play a key role by providing care to adolescents with asthma in school settings. Understanding universal barriers to asthma management in schools is important for developing interventions that are effective in multiple societal contexts. Design Exploratory, descriptive study. Methods Parallel studies were conducted from September 2008 - January 2009, through six focus groups among school nurses (N=32, in Reykjavik n=17 and St. Paul n=15) who were managing asthma in adolescents. Focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim in English or Icelandic. The Icelandic transcripts were translated into English. Descriptive content analytic techniques were used to systematically identify and categorize types of barriers to asthma care. Results School nurses in both countries identified common barriers such as time constraints, communication challenges and school staff barriers. The primary difference was that St. Paul school nurses identified more socioeconomic and health access barriers than school nurses in Reykjavik. Conclusion Greater cultural and linguistic diversity and socioeconomic differences in the student population in St. Paul and lack of universal health care coverage in the U.S. contributed to school nurses’ need to focus more on asthma management than school nurses in Reykjavik, who were able to focus more on asthma prevention and education. PMID:22897444

  20. The provision of nurse-led school based health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Sarah; Dickinson, Annette

    2017-07-12

    Internationally, nurses have been in the forefront of delivering health care services in the school environment and whilst health care delivery in secondary and high schools is evaluated, this is not the case for services delivered in primary/elementary schools. In countries such as New Zealand there is no significant inter-service collaboration between health and education; therefore, the delivery of health services remains fragmented and underdeveloped. This discussion paper reviews the history and development of nurse-led school-based health services internationally and provides an insight into the current provision of primary school-based health services in New Zealand. The initial approach to this paper was to gain an understanding of the history of school-based health services internationally and to explore the relationship between health and education in relation to this. This assisted in providing some context and comparison with the current provision of school-based health services in New Zealand. Discussion outcome: Internationally, it is acknowledged that schools provide not only a location to deliver health services to children but also the opportunity to reach entire families and communities yet surprisingly, the development of school-based health services within the primary/elementary school sector has received minimal attention in New Zealand and worldwide. This paper supports the need for further research concerning the feasibility, provision and effectiveness of school-based health services in primary/elementary schools. In order to be effective, this should incorporate the shared needs and values of all stakeholders. The authors argue the need to develop an inter-service, collaborative, national framework for the delivery of school nursing services within the primary school sector in New Zealand. Impact statement: A collaborative framework for health service delivery into primary schools can enable early establishment of supportive health

  1. School Nurses' Perceived Prevalence and Competence to Address Student Mental Health Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Sharon H.; Connors, Elizabeth H.

    2013-01-01

    Due to under-identification of student mental health problems and limited specialty mental health providers in schools, school nurses are often faced with identifying and addressing student mental health needs. This exploratory study assessed prevalence and types of student mental health problems encountered by school nurses, as well as their…

  2. Connecting Students to Mental Health Care: Pilot Findings from an Engagement Program for School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Rachel E.; Becker, Kimberly D.; Stephan, Sharon H.; Hakimian, Serop; Apocada, Dee; Escudero, Pia V.; Chorpita, Bruce F.

    2015-01-01

    Schools function as the major provider of mental health services (MHS) for youth, but can struggle with engaging them in services. School nurses are well-positioned to facilitate referrals for MHS. This pilot study examined the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of an engagement protocol (EP) designed to enhance school nurses'…

  3. Hemophilia: The Role of the School Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Mary Lou; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Care of the school student with hemophilia requires a cooperative effort by the health care team. A multidisciplinary approach is suggested for the team, whose members include a hematologist, orthopedist, oral surgeon, geneticist, physical therapist, social worker, and school nurse. (JD)

  4. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: School Nurse Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitto, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Initial symptoms and diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) usually occur between 10 and 20 years of age, although younger cases are reported. The complicated nature of IBD diagnosis and treatment can interfere with physical and emotional development that normally occurs in school-age children and adolescents. The school nurse should be…

  5. Providing nursing leadership in a community residential mental health setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Frances A; Bamford, Anita

    2011-07-01

    The worldwide burden of mental illness is increasing. Strong leadership is increasingly emerging as a core component of good mental health nursing. The aim of this article is to demonstrate the ways in which nurses can provide strong and consistent leadership in a values-based practice environment that embodies respect for individuals' dignity and self-determination within a community residential mental health service, which provides a structural foundation for effective action. This is accomplished through the presentation of two vignettes, which highlight how the seemingly impossible becomes possible when an economic paradigm such as agency theory is exchanged for a sociological and psychological paradigm found in leadership as stewardship at the point of service. It is through stronger nursing leadership in mental health that stigma and discrimination can be reduced and better access to treatments and services can be gained by those with mental illness. Nurse leadership in mental health services is not new, but it is still relatively uncommon to see residential services for "high needs" individuals being led by nurses. How nurses meet the challenges faced by mental health services are often at the heart of effective leadership skills and strategies. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Outcomes of an Australian Nursing Student-Led School Vision and Hearing Screening Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolchard, Barry; Stuhlmiller, Cynthia M.

    2018-01-01

    Nursing students typically do not undertake clinical training in school settings. However, they are well placed to have a role in providing health screening and education in schools or community health venues under supervision of qualified nurses. This study provides a description and outcomes of a vision and hearing screening programme delivered…

  7. Substance abuse prevention: the role of the school nurse across the continuum of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patestos, Chrysanthe; Patterson, Kristen; Fitzsimons, Virginia

    2014-11-01

    As a health care provider, health educator, and school/family/community liaison, the school nurse is in a unique position to act as a change agent for youth substance abuse prevention. This article discusses the roles of the school nurse as they apply to the prevention of substance abuse among school-age children, across a continuum of care model first introduced by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 1994. Through careful assessment, identification of substance abuse risk factors, and promoting the enhancement of protective factors of students, both in and out of the school setting, the school nurse can play a vital role in the prevention of substance abuse. Existing tools, including the IOM Mental Health Intervention Spectrum Model, can be easily adapted to nursing practice and may prove helpful in assisting school nurses in the evaluation and implementation of effective prevention interventions in the school setting.

  8. Do prehospital providers and emergency nurses agree on triage assignment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt-Arkil, Helene; Pontoppidan, Louise L; Laursen, Jens O

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the agreement on triage level between prehospital providers and emergency department (ED) nurses in clinical practice when using the same triage system. The objectives were as follows: (a) What is the agreement of triage between prehospital...... providers and ED nurses, when using Danish Emergency Process Triage (DEPT) correctly? (b) Which part of the triage process yields the highest agreement regarding the final triage? METHODS: The study was a prospective and observational efficacy study. Patients transported to the ED by ambulances were...... included. They were triaged by prehospital providers while being transported by ambulance to the ED, and by ED nurses upon arrival. Triage was done using the DEPT - a five-level triage system based on vital signs and a presenting complaint algorithm. An agreement analysis was performed. RESULTS: DEPT...

  9. Delivery of nursing care in Alabama public schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Allison J

    2009-02-01

    Many states, including Alabama, allow registered nurses (RNs) in school settings to delegate procedures such as assistance with medication to unlicensed assistive personnel. In Alabama, the Board of Nursing(the Board) is accountable for enforcing the regulations that allow for this action. The Alabama Board of Nursing Administrative Code addresses delegation by school nurses and lists specific tasks that cannot be delegated because they require nursing judgment. As a result of this reporting requirement, Alabama's Center for Nursing, a division of the Board of Nursing, implemented an annual survey of school nurses to determine how nursing care is delivered to students in Alabama public schools. This study investigates the results of this survey and its implications for school nursing both in Alabama and in other states.

  10. Understanding HPV Disease and Prevention: A Guide for School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood-Rayermann, Suzy; McIntyre, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) causes 99.7% of all cervical cancers. HPV Types 16 and 18 are responsible for approximately 77% of cases, and peak prevalence occurs in females younger than 25 years of age. The recent implementation of HPV vaccination provides females with the opportunity to prevent infection. School nurses are advocates of…

  11. School Nurses' Experiences with Motivational Interviewing for Preventing Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde, Ane Høstgaard; Bentsen, Peter; Hindhede, Anette Lykke

    2014-01-01

    Motivational interviewing is a counseling method used to bring about behavior change; its application by school nurses for preventing obesity in children is still new. This study, based on in-depth interviews with 12 school nurses, shows how school nurses adapted motivational interviewing and integrated it into their daily practice along with…

  12. New Dimensions in School Nursing Leadership. Proceedings of the Conference on New Dimensions in School Nursing Leadership Sponsored by the National Council for School Nurses, School Health Division of the AAHPER (Washington, D.C., Aug. 3-5, 1968).

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    This report contains the proceedings of the first National Conference for School Nurses. The 68 school nurses who participated in the conference represented 38 States, U.S. Territories, and Canada. The following papers are included: "Purposes and Plan of the Conference,""Overview of School Nursing Today,""The School Nurse in Mental Health,""The…

  13. School Nurses Who Only Care for Children with Special Needs: Working in a Teacher's World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Barbara J.; Radjenovic, Doreen; Toker, Karen H.; Comeaux, Judy M.

    2009-01-01

    Published qualitative studies have not focused on nurses who solely care for children with special health care needs. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe (a) the work of school nurses who care exclusively for these children, (b) nurses' interaction with parents, staff, or providers, and (c) the challenges, benefits, and support…

  14. The United Kingdom National Healthy School Standard: A Framework for Strengthening the School Nurse Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklander, Molly K.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to analyze the school nursing role within the National Healthy School Standard (NHSS) in the United Kingdom with a view toward clarifying and strengthening the role of school nurses globally. Within the National Healthy School Standard framework, school nurses serve an integral role in linking health and education…

  15. Providing structure. Unraveling and building a psychiatric nursing intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, L.A.

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatric nurses commonly refer to ‘providing structure’ (PS) as a key intervention. But, no consensus exists about what PS entails. PS can be understood as a complex intervention. In five studies a definition, activities and context-variables were described. On the basis of results of a

  16. Problems experienced by professional nurses providing care for HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to describe the problems experienced by professional nurses providing health care to patients living with HIV and AIDS in the public hospitals of Polokwane municipality, Limpopo province. A qualitative descriptive, contextual and phenomenology design was used to described the problems ...

  17. Clinical nurse specialist leadership in computerized provider order entry design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggow, Darla J; Solie, Carol J; Tracy, Mary Fran; Gjere, Niki

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this clinical project was to design and implement a computerized provider order entry system. Well-designed clinical computer systems can advance best practice and quality decision making, leading to improvements in patient and organizational outcomes. An Orders Design Group composed of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs), staff nurses, and information management personnel was formed. CNSs used competencies in the system sphere to lead the integration of the needs of patients, nurses, and organizations into new technologies. CNSs facilitated implementation of a collaboratively designed interdisciplinary computerized order entry process. Evaluation of the design and implementation process demonstrated greater success with the order entry system under the leadership of CNSs than past initiatives where CNSs were not in leadership roles. CNS competencies in designing and implementing innovative system-level solutions are key to clinical information systems design.

  18. School Nurses Avoid Addressing Child Sexual Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engh Kraft, Lisbet; Rahm, GullBritt; Eriksson, Ulla-Britt

    2017-01-01

    Child sexual abuse (CSA) is a global public health problem with major consequences for the individual child and society. An earlier Swedish study showed that the school nurses did not initially talk about nor mention CSA as one form of child abuse. For the child to receive adequate support, the disclosure is a precondition and is dependent on an…

  19. Preliminary testing of an asthma distance education program (ADEP) for school nurses in Appalachia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman-Casdorph, Heidi; Pinto, Susan

    2011-12-01

    Asthma remains one of the most challenging chronic illnesses faced by school nurses both nationally and in the State of West Virginia. There is a clear need to provide ongoing continuing asthma education to school nurses. However, nurses face many barriers to receiving this education. The purpose of this pilot project was to develop and evaluate distance learning technology as a method to deliver continuing asthma education to school nurses in West Virginia. A sample of 20 school nurses from 2 counties in West Virginia participated in the study using the Wimba live classroom distance learning program. Significant modest improvements were found in both the intervention groups compared to a control group postintervention. The results of this pilot study are promising and show that distance learning technology could be a viable solution for school nurses to receive asthma continuing education.

  20. Defining, Delivering, and Documenting the Outcomes of Case Management by School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelke, Martha Keehner; Guttu, Martha; Warren, Michelle B.

    2009-01-01

    Case management is a component of school nurse practice that provides an opportunity to demonstrate the contribution that school nurses make to the health and academic success of children, particularly children with chronic health conditions. However, case management programs vary in their mission and scope, leading to confusion about what it…

  1. Developing a Policy for Delegation of Nursing Care in the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spriggle, Melinda

    2009-01-01

    School nurses are in a unique position to provide care for students with special health care needs in the school setting. The incidence of chronic conditions and improved technology necessitate care of complex health care needs that had formerly been managed in inpatient settings. Delegation is a tool that may be used by registered nurses to allow…

  2. Framework for 21st Century School Nursing Practice: Framing Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Johnson, Ann

    2017-05-01

    The NASN Code of Ethics upholds that it is the responsibility of the school nurse to maintain competency and pursue personal and professional growth. Designing professional development activities that are relevant and support the needs of the school nurse can be a challenge. The Framework for 21st Century School Nursing Practice provides a model rooted in evidence-based standards of practice that can be utilized to assess an existing professional development program and identify gaps in learning opportunities. Nurse leaders can use the Framework for 21st Century Nursing Practice to provide a roadmap toward a professional development program that will be meaningful to school nurse staff, help restore or maintain joy in their practice, and allow them to achieve the goal of advancing the well-being, academic success, and lifelong achievement and health of students.

  3. Historic Leadership: One Courageous School Nurse's Heroic Journey-Part 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Ellen F; Pohlman, Katherine J

    2017-05-01

    School nursing practice establishes itself in the midst of both education and nursing philosophies, ethics, standards, laws, and regulations. Treading these two worlds is difficult at times and requires that a school nurse possess a strong foundational knowledge base, seek professional collaboration, and navigate conflicting professional demands in order to promote student and public safety. This article is Part 3 of a four-part series that recounts the inspiring story of a school nurse, Ellen Johnsen, who did just that back in the 1980s in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma. Part 3 describes the publication of the Attorney General's opinion validating the illegality of the school district's medication administration policy, the lawsuit Ellen brought against the Broken Arrow Public Schools, and the appeal of the final decision in that lawsuit. The purpose of this series is to enhance understanding of the legal parameters governing school nurse practice, provide examples of ethical decision making, and review the challenges associated with serving as a leader.

  4. Do public nursing home care providers deliver higher quality than private providers? Evidence from Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winblad, Ulrika; Blomqvist, Paula; Karlsson, Andreas

    2017-07-14

    Swedish nursing home care has undergone a transformation, where the previous virtual public monopoly on providing such services has been replaced by a system of mixed provision. This has led to a rapidly growing share of private actors, the majority of which are large, for-profit firms. In the wake of this development, concerns have been voiced regarding the implications for care quality. In this article, we investigate the relationship between ownership and care quality in nursing homes for the elderly by comparing quality levels between public, for-profit, and non-profit nursing home care providers. We also look at a special category of for-profit providers; private equity companies. The source of data is a national survey conducted by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare in 2011 at 2710 nursing homes. Data from 14 quality indicators are analyzed, including structure and process measures such as staff levels, staff competence, resident participation, and screening for pressure ulcers, nutrition status, and risk of falling. The main statistical method employed is multiple OLS regression analysis. We differentiate in the analysis between structural and processual quality measures. The results indicate that public nursing homes have higher quality than privately operated homes with regard to two structural quality measures: staffing levels and individual accommodation. Privately operated nursing homes, on the other hand, tend to score higher on process-based quality indicators such as medication review and screening for falls and malnutrition. No significant differences were found between different ownership categories of privately operated nursing homes. Ownership does appear to be related to quality outcomes in Swedish nursing home care, but the results are mixed and inconclusive. That staffing levels, which has been regarded as a key quality indicator in previous research, are higher in publicly operated homes than private is consistent with earlier

  5. The impact of school nursing on school performance: a research synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Erin

    2003-06-01

    School nurses work in an educational setting. Due to budget cuts, different goals, and confusion between educators and nurses regarding the school nurse role, school nurses are being asked to demonstrate their effectiveness and justify their presence in elementary and secondary schools. Although school nursing was first initiated 100 years ago, a review of the literature published since 1965 indicates that 15 studies have been conducted that examine the impact of school nurses on academic performance. However, today many articles have recommended more research linking school nursing to educational outcomes. This article synthesizes the results of 15 research articles. Findings from these studies indicate that nursing interventions targeted at specific populations, including parents, have had significant effects. A relationship between school nurses' interventions and absenteeism is also suggested. Limitations of these studies are discussed, along with suggestions for future research.

  6. Nursing Delegation to Unlicensed Assistive Personnel in the School Setting. Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagginello, Joan; Blackborow, Mary; Porter, Jessica; Disney, Jody; Andresen, Kathleen; Tuck, Christine

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the delegation of nursing tasks in the school setting can be a valuable tool for the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse), when based on the nursing definition of delegation (American Nurses Association [ANA], 2012) and in…

  7. Does the School Nurse-to-Student Ratio Make a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttu, Martha; Engelke, Martha Keehner; Swanson, Melvin

    2004-01-01

    Public schools must provide an appropriate education for students with complex health needs. Chronic illnesses such as asthma and diabetes, social morbidities, injuries, and conditions that limit learning such as poor vision commonly affect school-aged children. School nurses often assume a leadership role in providing services for these children.…

  8. Historic Leadership: One Courageous School Nurse's Heroic Journey-Part 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Ellen F; Pohlman, Katherine J

    2017-07-01

    School nursing practice establishes itself in the midst of both education and nursing philosophies, ethics, standards, laws, and regulations. Treading these two worlds is difficult at times and requires that a school nurse possess a strong foundational knowledge base, seek professional collaboration, and navigate conflicting professional demands in order to promote student and public safety. This article is Part 4 of a four-part series that recounts the inspiring story of a school nurse, Ellen Johnsen, who did just that back in the 1980s in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma. Part 4 offers lessons to be learned by reflecting on Ellen Johnsen's experience when she challenged the illegal and unsafe medication administration policy in the Broken Arrow Public Schools. The purpose of this series is to enhance understanding of the legal parameters governing school nurse practice, provide examples of ethical decision making, and review the challenges associated with serving as a leader.

  9. Retaining the next generation of nurses: the Wisconsin nurse residency program provides a continuum of support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratt, Marilyn Meyer

    2009-09-01

    Because of the high costs associated with new graduate nurse turnover, an academic-service partnership developed a nurse residency program that provides a comprehensive support system that spans 15 months. Now in its fourth year, involving more than 50 urban and rural hospitals of varying sizes and geographic locations, the program provides formalized preceptor training, monthly daylong educational sessions, and mentoring by clinical coaches. Key factors contributing to the success of this program are a dedicated, cohesive planning team of individuals who embrace a common agenda, stakeholder buy-in, appropriate allocation of resources, and clear articulation of measures of success, with associated data collection. Successful elements of the monthly educational sessions are the use of interactive teaching methods, inclusion of content tailored to the unique needs of the nurse residents, and storytelling to facilitate learning from practice. Finally, training to advance the skill development of preceptors, coaches, educators, and facilitators has provided organizations with enduring benefits. Copyright 2009, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. The preparedness of schools to respond to emergencies in children: a national survey of school nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olympia, Robert P; Wan, Eric; Avner, Jeffrey R

    2005-12-01

    Because children spend a significant proportion of their day in school, pediatric emergencies such as the exacerbation of medical conditions, behavioral crises, and accidental/intentional injuries are likely to occur. Recently, both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Heart Association have published guidelines stressing the need for school leaders to establish emergency-response plans to deal with life-threatening medical emergencies in children. The goals include developing an efficient and effective campus-wide communication system for each school with local emergency medical services (EMS); establishing and practicing a medical emergency-response plan (MERP) involving school nurses, physicians, athletic trainers, and the EMS system; identifying students at risk for life-threatening emergencies and ensuring the presence of individual emergency care plans; training staff and students in first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR); equipping the school for potential life-threatening emergencies; and implementing lay rescuer automated external defibrillator (AED) programs. The objective of this study was to use published guidelines by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Heart Association to examine the preparedness of schools to respond to pediatric emergencies, including those involving children with special care needs, and potential mass disasters. A 2-part questionnaire was mailed to 1000 randomly selected members of the National Association of School Nurses. The first part included 20 questions focusing on: (1) the clinical background of the school nurse (highest level of education, years practicing as a school health provider, CPR training); (2) demographic features of the school (student attendance, grades represented, inner-city or rural/suburban setting, private or public funding, presence of children with special needs); (3) self-reported frequency of medical and psychiatric emergencies (most common reported school

  11. Sports Trauma Management and the High School Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Richard J.; Shute, Robert E.

    1982-01-01

    The hypotheses that school nurses would not be able to pass a standardized test of sports trauma management and that certified athletic trainers would score higher on this test were investigated. Results revealed that athletic trainers were indeed more knowledgeable than school nurses regarding athletic injuries among the high school population.…

  12. Continuing Education: A National Imperative for School Nursing Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vought-O'Sullivan, Victoria; Meehan, Nancy K.; Havice, Pamela A.; Pruitt, Rosanne H.

    2006-01-01

    Competency-based continuing education is critical to the professional development of school nurses to ensure the application of timely, age-appropriate clinical knowledge and leadership skills in the school setting. School nurses are responsible for a large number of students with a variety of complex and diverse health care needs. Benner's theory…

  13. Refocusing research priorities in schools of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulage, Kristine M; Ardizzone, Laura; Enlow, William; Hickey, Kathleen; Jeon, Christie; Kearney, Joan; Schnall, Rebecca; Larson, Elaine L

    2013-01-01

    It is critical for schools of nursing to periodically reassess their scholarly programs to ensure that their conceptual framework and approaches address current challenges and enhance productivity. This article describes the process undertaken at Columbia University School of Nursing to evaluate scholarly enterprise so that it remains relevant and responsive to changing trends and to revise our research conceptual model to be reflective of the foci of our clinicians and researchers. As part of a larger strategic initiative, a two-phase Research Excellence Planning and Implementation Workgroup was convened, consisting of a broad representation of faculty and administrative staff, with an overall goal of expanding scholarly capacity. During Phase I, members developed measurable outcomes and tactics and revised the school's conceptual research model. In Phase II, the workgroup implemented and monitored tactics and presented final recommendations to the dean. To measure progress, faculty members completed a survey to establish baseline scholarship and collaboration with results indicating room for growth in interdisciplinary and inter-institutional collaboration. Ongoing assessment of outcomes includes Web-based tracking of scholarly activities and follow-up surveys to monitor expansion of faculty collaboration. We recommend this process to other schools committed to sustainable, increasingly relevant scholarship. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Rethinking the admission criteria to nursing school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulruf, Boaz; Wang, Ying Grace; Zhao, Yipin Jessica; Baker, Heather

    2011-11-01

    The main objective of this study was to identify the best predictors for student achievements (Undergraduate Grade Point Average (UGPA)) in their first year in an undergraduate nursing programme. Data were acquired from the Tracking Project database which is held by the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences at the University of Auckland. The data (n=134) included information on student demographics, final year secondary school achievements (National Certificate of Educational Achievement Grade Point Average (NCEAGPA) & NCEA Credits), university admission ranking scores, and achievements in first year in the undergraduate nursing programme (UGPA). Linear regression models were used to identify the best predictors for first year students' UGPA in the nursing programme. The regression models suggest that the best predictor for the first year GPA is the NCEAGPA (beta=.488; R(2)(for the entire model)=.53), followed by the admission ranking scores (beta=.308; R(2)=.40). Based on these findings, it is suggested that a Dual Admission Model (DAM) be utilised whereby students could be admitted either by the current university admission criteria or by an alternative model, which is purely based on the predictability of achievement within the nursing programme. Application of the DAM to other institutions/countries was discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Community psychiatric nurses and the care co-ordinator role: squeezed to provide 'limited nursing'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Alan

    2005-12-01

    This paper reports a study illuminating the factors that either facilitate or constrain the ability of community psychiatric nurses, in their role as care co-ordinators, to meet service users' and carers' needs. The Care Programme Approach is the key policy underpinning community-focused mental health services in England, but has been unevenly implemented and is associated with increased inpatient bed use. The care co-ordinator role is central to the Care Programme Approach and is most often held by community psychiatric nurses, but there has been little research into how this role is performed or how it affects the work of community psychiatric nurses and their ability to meet the needs of service users. A multiple case study of seven sectorised community mental health teams was employed over 2 years using predominantly qualitative methods including participant observation, semi-structured interviews and document review. The data were collected in one National Health Service trust in south England between 1999 and 2001. Additional duties and responsibilities specifically associated with the care co-ordinator role and multidisciplinary working, combined with heavy workloads, produced 'limited nursing', whereby community psychiatric nurses were unable to provide evidence-based psychosocial interventions that are recognized to reduce relapse amongst people with severe mental illness. The role of the Care Programme Approach care co-ordinator was not designed to support the provision of psychosocial interventions. Consequently, community psychiatric nurses in the co-ordinator role are faced with competing demands and are unable to provide the range of structured, evidence-based interventions required. This may partially account for the increased inpatient bed use associated with the Care Programme Approach.

  16. Identification and Comparison of Interventions Performed by Korean School Nurses and U.S. School Nurses Using the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunjoo; Park, Hyejin; Nam, Mihwa; Whyte, James

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) interventions performed by Korean school nurses. The Korean data were then compared to U.S. data from other studies in order to identify differences and similarities between Korean and U.S. school nurse practice. Of the 542 available NIC interventions, 180 were…

  17. Not choosing nursing: work experience and career choice of high academic achieving school leavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Gavin R; McNally, James G

    2010-01-01

    Work experience has been a feature of the secondary school curriculum in the United Kingdom for a number of years. Usually requested by the pupil, it aims to provide opportunities for school pupils to enhance their knowledge and understanding of an occupation. The main benefits are claimed to be that it can help pupils develop an insight into the skills and attitudes required for an occupation and an awareness of career opportunities. However the quality and choice of placements are considered to be of great importance in this process and in influencing career choice [Department for Education and Skills (DfES), 2002a. Work Experience: A Guide for Employers. Department for Education and Skills, London]. As university departments of nursing experience a decline in the number of school pupils entering student nurse education programmes, and with the competition for school leavers becoming even greater, it is important to consider whether school pupils have access to appropriate work placements in nursing and what influence their experience has on pursuing nursing as a career choice. This paper is based on interview data from 20 high academic achieving fifth and sixth year school pupils in Scotland, paradigmatic cases from a larger survey sample (n=1062), who had considered nursing as a possible career choice within their career preference cluster, but then later disregarded nursing and decided to pursue medicine or another health care profession. This was partly reported by Neilson and Lauder [Neilson, G.R., Lauder, W., 2008. What do high academic achieving school pupils really think about a career in nursing: analysis of the narrative from paradigmatic case interviews. Nurse Education Today 28(6), 680-690] which examined what high academic achieving school pupils really thought about a career in nursing. However, the data was particularly striking in revealing the poor quality of nursing work experience for the pupils, and also their proposal that there was a need

  18. Using the School Nurse to Support Your Elementary Physical Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozub, Mary L.; Kozub, Francis M.

    2012-01-01

    The roles of teachers, nurses, and other educational personnel are changing. In the case of the school nurse, the responsibilities have expanded to include health promotion and various other roles outside of the traditional duties of providing first aid, administrating medications, and monitoring the daily health status of students (Broussard,…

  19. The Impact of Comprehensive School Nursing Services on Students' Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocoglu, Deniz; Emiroglu, Oya Nuran

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: School nursing services should be evaluated through health and academic outcomes of students; however, it is observed that the number of studies in this field is limited. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of comprehensive school nursing services provided to 4th grade primary school students on academic performance of students. Methods: The quasi-experimental study was conducted with 31 students attending a randomly selected school in economic disadvantaged area in Turky. Correlation analysis, repeated measures analyses of variance, multiple regression analysis were used to analyze the data with SPSS software. Results: At the end of school nursing practices, an increase was occurred in students’ academic achievement grades whereas a decrease was occurred in absenteeism and academic procrastination behaviors. Whilst it was determined that nursing interventions including treatment/ procedure and surveillance was associated to the decrease of absenteeism, it also was discovered that the change in the health status of the student after nursing interventions was related to the increase of the academic achievement grade and the decrease of the academic procrastination behavior score. Conclusion: In this study, the conclusion that comprehensive school nursing services contributed positively to the academic performance of students has been reached. In addition, it can be suggested that effective school nursing services should include services such as acute-chronic disease treatment, first aid, health screening, health improvement-protection, health education, guidance and counseling and case management. PMID:28299293

  20. The Impact of Comprehensive School Nursing Services on Students' Academic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Kocoglu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: School nursing services should be evaluated through health and academic outcomes of students; however, it is observed that the number of studies in this field is limited. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of comprehensive school nursing services provided to 4th grade primary school students on academic performance of students. Methods: The quasi-experimental study was conducted with 31 students attending a randomly selected school in economic disadvantaged area in Turky. Correlation analysis, repeated measures analyses of variance, multiple regression analysis were used to analyze the data with SPSS software. Results: At the end of school nursing practices, an increase was occurred in students’ academic achievement grades whereas a decrease was occurred in absenteeism and academic procrastination behaviors. Whilst it was determined that nursing interventions including treatment/ procedure and surveillance was associated to the decrease of absenteeism, it also was discovered that the change in the health status of the student after nursing interventions was related to the increase of the academic achievement grade and the decrease of the academic procrastination behavior score. Conclusion: In this study, the conclusion that comprehensive school nursing services contributed positively to the academic performance of students has been reached. In addition, it can be suggested that effective school nursing services should include services such as acute-chronic disease treatment, first aid, health screening, health improvement-protection, health education, guidance and counseling and case management.

  1. The Impact of Comprehensive School Nursing Services on Students' Academic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocoglu, Deniz; Emiroglu, Oya Nuran

    2017-03-01

    Introduction: School nursing services should be evaluated through health and academic outcomes of students; however, it is observed that the number of studies in this field is limited. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of comprehensive school nursing services provided to 4th grade primary school students on academic performance of students. Methods: The quasi-experimental study was conducted with 31 students attending a randomly selected school in economic disadvantaged area in Turky. Correlation analysis, repeated measures analyses of variance, multiple regression analysis were used to analyze the data with SPSS software. Results: At the end of school nursing practices, an increase was occurred in students' academic achievement grades whereas a decrease was occurred in absenteeism and academic procrastination behaviors. Whilst it was determined that nursing interventions including treatment/ procedure and surveillance was associated to the decrease of absenteeism, it also was discovered that the change in the health status of the student after nursing interventions was related to the increase of the academic achievement grade and the decrease of the academic procrastination behavior score. Conclusion: In this study, the conclusion that comprehensive school nursing services contributed positively to the academic performance of students has been reached. In addition, it can be suggested that effective school nursing services should include services such as acute-chronic disease treatment, first aid, health screening, health improvement-protection, health education, guidance and counseling and case management.

  2. School Nurse Case Management: Achieving Health and Educational Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaiuto, Maria M.

    2007-01-01

    Educators and health care professionals alike understand that healthy students are likely to be successful learners. The goal of school nurse case management is to support students so that they are ready to learn. This article describes the outcomes of a 4-year process improvement project designed to show the impact of school nurse case management…

  3. School Nurse-Delivered Adolescent Relationship Abuse Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raible, Claire A.; Dick, Rebecca; Gilkerson, Fern; Mattern, Cheryl S.; James, Lisa; Miller, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Background: Project Connect is a national program to build partnerships among public health agencies and domestic violence services to improve the health care sector response to partner and sexual violence. Pennsylvania piloted the first school nurse-delivered adolescent relationship abuse intervention in the certified school nurses' office…

  4. Academic dishonesty in schools of nursing: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klocko, Marilyn N

    2014-03-01

    Academic dishonesty in schools of nursing is surprisingly common. The following literature review defines academic dishonesty, describes the scope of the problem, and sheds light on factors that affect student behaviors that lead to academic dishonesty in schools of nursing. Finally, barriers to and best practices for solutions to the problem will be reviewed as they appear within the literature. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. School Nurse Resilience: Experiences after Multiple Natural Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Lisa; Myers, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative descriptive study explored the experiences of school nurses in coastal Louisiana, who were affected by Hurricanes Gustav and Ike in 2008 and who had also been in the path of destruction caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005. The purpose of the study was to describe the experiences of school nurses affected by repeated…

  6. Educator Preparedness for Mental Health in Adolescents: Opportunities for School Nurse Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Fromm, Tiffany; Evans-Agnew, Robin A

    2017-11-01

    One in five adolescents will experience a mental health event in their lifetime. If left untreated, depression, anxiety, attention-deficit/hyperactivity, and anorexia/bulimia can elevate the risk of dropping out of high school. As a key principle of 21st-century nursing practice, school nurses must provide leadership in educating school staff in identifying and responding to mental health issues in high school settings. This article describes the results of an online survey assessing secondary educators' knowledge of and experience with mental health issues in one school district. Resources are suggested to assist nurses in educating school staff, providing them with ways to decrease stigma in the classroom, and partnering with the community to improve services.

  7. Business Continuity Planning for Nursing Schools: Preparation for Potential Disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerwic, Julie J; Rosen, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Nursing schools are vulnerable to disasters, ranging from pandemics to weather emergencies, fires, and acts of terrorism. To ensure minimal disruptions to teaching, provision of care, research, and other critical missions, nursing faculty and administrative leaders should develop a business continuity plan. The business continuity plan can help faculty, students, and administration identify critical functions and alternative plans if an emergency occurs. We offer our experience as a guide for other nursing schools.

  8. Sadness, socialisation and shifted perceptions: school pupils' stories of a pre-nursing scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Michelle; Smith, Annetta; Kyle, Richard G

    2014-06-01

    Providing opportunities for aspirant nurses to obtain pre-nursing experience features prominently in the UK Government's response to The Francis Inquiry. Evidence from the USA suggests that pre-nursing experiences, such as summer camps, have the potential to contribute to effective nurse recruitment, selection and retention strategies. However, few similar pre-nursing experiences exist in the UK, and none have been evaluated. This paper reports the experiences of participation in a pilot pre-nursing scholarship among secondary school pupils in Scotland. To explore pupils' experiences of a pre-nursing scholarship to inform future design and delivery of similar programmes in the UK and internationally. Qualitative focus group study. Two university campuses in Scotland. Twenty-two secondary school students (all female, aged 15-18 years). Two focus groups were facilitated through the use of 'anecdote circles' to elicit pupils' stories of their scholarship experience. Anecdote circles allowed each pupil to share their story in turn and then collectively assemble, figuratively and physically through interlocking written cards, shared stories of the scholarship. Discussions were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed thematically. Three stories emerged: 1) sadness; 2) socialisation; and, 3) shifted perceptions. Sad stories were transformative affirming the pupils' desire to become a nurse. Stories of socialisation revealed how demonstrating practical skills affirmed the pupils' ability and suitability to nurse. Perceptions of the life and work of a (student) nurse, their future career, and the lives of older adults, shifted through the scholarship, especially during practice learning experience. Storytelling revealed how a pre-nursing scholarship helped secondary school pupils to decide whether to pursue a nursing career by providing an opportunity to explore their ability, suitability and desire for nursing. The practice learning experience emerged

  9. Frequent Visitors: Somatization in School-Age Children and Implications for School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Robin Adair; Bergren, Martha Dewey; Matthews, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    There is a gap in the nursing literature regarding children who frequently visit school nurses' offices with recurrent unexplained physical symptoms. A review of the scientific health literature was undertaken to examine the clinical presentation, associated variables, and implications for school nurses regarding children who are frequent school…

  10. Leveraging Partnerships: Families, Schools, and Providers Working Together to Improve Asthma Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Melanie; Cicutto, Lisa; Haas-Howard, Christy; Raleigh, Bridget M; Szefler, Stanley J

    2016-10-01

    Asthma is one of the most common illnesses of school-aged children and can lead to both health and educational disparities. Children from low socioeconomic backgrounds and racial/ethnic minorities suffer the greatest impact. They often lack the asthma self-management skills to successfully monitor, navigate, and negotiate appropriate asthma care. School settings are a strategic point of contact for this additional support. School nurses can monitor for signs of asthma worsening, manage symptoms, provide care coordination, and reinforce self-management skills. Likewise, school-based asthma programs have the potential to reduce health and educational disparities, but it is the strong linkage to the asthma care provider that is critical to successful school-based asthma management. Healthcare providers are encouraged to establish partnerships with families through patient-centered care and schools through clear communication and care coordination to ensure asthma is well controlled so the child is in school and ready to learn.

  11. Team Crisis: School Psychologists and Nurses Working Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Kevin P.; Osher, David; Maughan, Erin D.; Tuck, Christine; Patrick, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Schools are often the geographic and sociological center of a community. Given modern community emergencies and challenges, schools should make the most of this role and best allocate their resources to maximize the positive impact they have during difficult times. This article uses the vantage point of school psychologists and school nurses from…

  12. Educators' and Parents' Perception of What School Nurses Do: The Influence of School Nurse/Student Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Erin; Adams, Rachael

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to determine how ratios influenced relationships between school nurses and the educators and parents with whom they work; and how the relationships influenced the understanding and value of the school nurse. A purposeful sampling of 33 participants from four states (New Hampshire, Vermont, Michigan, and…

  13. Cultural competence and cultural safety in Canadian schools of nursing: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Margo S; Rukholm, Ellen; Bourque-Bearskin, Lisa; Baker, Cynthia; Voyageur, Evelyn; Robitaille, Annie

    2013-04-23

    Cultural competence and cultural safety are essential knowledge in contemporary nursing care. Using a three-phase, mixed methods sequential triangulation design, this study examines the extent to which Anglophone Schools of Nursing in Canada have integrated cultural competence and/or cultural safety into the undergraduate nursing curricula. Factors that influence successful integration are identified through the lens of Donabedian's structure, process, and outcome model. Results suggest that several facilitating factors are present, such as leadership, partnerships and linkages, and educational supports for students. Of particular concern is the lack of policies to recruit and retain Aboriginal faculty, financial resources, and outcome evaluation indicators. A conceptual model of integration is offered to explain how Schools of Nursing function to support the implementation of these concepts into their curriculum. This study provides theoretical and practical implications for initiation and improvement of cultural competence and/or cultural safety integration strategies in Schools of Nursing.

  14. A Strategy to Promote Successful Transition to School Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon-Jones, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to share the findings of implementing a standardized, blended approach to school nurse orientation. This includes using classroom training, mentor/supervisory support, and skills labs to assure specific competencies that are needed for new nurses to successfully transition into this independent setting. This includes a description of the specialized skills and knowledge that are needed to successfully transition into this nursing specialty. School nurses are caring for more complex students. For example, students who were once homebound requiring tube feedings, ventilator, and tracheostomy care are now attending schools. They are responsible for triaging students with diverse needs which requires critical thinking skills. They case manage students with chronic diseases including: diabetes, asthma, life threatening food allergies and seizures. Lastly, school nurses manage students with risky behaviors related to drug usage, bullying and unprotected sex resulting in pregnancy.

  15. Having influence: faculty of color having influence in schools of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassouneh, Dena; Lutz, Kristin F

    2013-01-01

    Faculty of color (FOC) play an important role in mentoring students and other FOC in schools of nursing. However, the unique nature of mentoring that FOC provide, which includes transmission of expert knowledge of the operations of racism in nursing academe, is not well understood. Furthermore, the influence FOC have on school cultures has not been well documented. To address this gap in knowledge we conducted a critical grounded theory study with 23 FOC in predominately Euro-American schools of nursing. Findings indicate that FOC Having Influence is a key process that explicates the influence FOC wield, exposing their work, which is often taken for granted, hidden, and, unacknowledged. FOC Having Influence occurred in two areas: 1) the survival and success of students and FOC and 2) shaping practices in schools of nursing and impacting health in communities. Implications for educational practice and future research are presented, based on study findings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Enhancing the Capacity of School Nurses to Reduce Excessive Anxiety in Children: Development of the CALM Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Kelly L.; Stewart, Catherine E.; Muggeo, Michela A.; Ginsburg, Golda S.

    2015-01-01

    Problem: Excessive anxiety is among the most common psychiatric problems facing youth. Because anxious youth tend to have somatic complaints, many seek help from the school nurse. Thus, school nurses are in an ideal position to provide early intervention. This study addresses this problem and describes the plans to develop and test a new…

  17. What predicts the selection of nursing as a career choice in 5th and 6th year school students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Gavin R; Jones, Martyn C

    2012-07-01

    Demand for nursing care, and nurses, is growing in the United Kingdom given an increasingly ageing patient population with long-term co-morbidities. An ageing nursing workforce and fewer school leavers entering nursing are key barriers to student nurse recruitment. This paper aims to identify the socio-demographic and correlates nursing as a career choice in 5th and 6th year school students. This cross-sectional descriptive study gathered self-administered questionnaires from a total cohort of 5th and 6th year school students (n=1059) in one educational authority in Scotland. A response rate of 100% was achieved, with 702 students expressing a career choice. Some 71.7% (n=503) of students providing a full data set would never consider nursing, even if they obtained poor grades. Only 28.3% (n=199) would ever consider nursing. Students cited nursing as a career choice if they were female, of average to below average academic ability/achievement, expressed a positive attitude to nursing as a degree subject which was shared by their career guidance teacher. Each additional higher reduced the likelihood of nursing as a career choice by 22%. Nursing is an unpopular career choice amongst school students. Strategies are required to improve the occupational image of nursing in secondary education. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. School Nurses' Role in Asthma Management, School Absenteeism, and Cost Savings: A Demonstration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Eunice; Rivera, Diana Austria; Perlroth, Daniella; Becker, Edmund; Wang, Nancy Ewen; Landau, Melinda

    2013-01-01

    Background: With increasing budget cuts to education and social services, rigorous evaluation needs to document school nurses' impact on student health, academic outcomes, and district funding. Methods: Utilizing a quasi-experimental design, we evaluated outcomes in 4 schools with added full-time nurses and 5 matched schools with part-time nurses…

  19. Supporting Student Mental Health: The Role of the School Nurse in Coordinated School Mental Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnenkamp, Jill H.; Stephan, Sharon H.; Bobo, Nichole

    2015-01-01

    School nurses play a critical role in the provision of mental health services in the school environment and are valuable members of the coordinated student mental health team. They possess expertise to navigate in today's complicated educational and health care systems, and it is estimated that school nurses spend 33% of their time addressing…

  20. Development of a School Nursing Research Agenda in Florida: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Shirley C.; Barry, Charlotte D.

    2006-01-01

    Research is important to the image, visibility, and viability of school nursing. Each state school nursing association should evaluate member commitment to school nursing research based on their unique set of financial, educational, and organizational resources. A 3-round Delphi study was conducted in which Florida school nurses identified…

  1. Delegation decision-making by registered nurses who provide direct care for patients with spinal cord impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Lynn C

    2004-01-01

    Delegation and coordination of patient care are critical skills for registered nurses (RN). Most educational programs and clinical experiences in nursing school have not prepared nurses to function in a delegation decision-making capacity. Nurses caring for individuals with spinal cord impairment (SCI) are especially challenged to provide partial or total assistance to meet the requisite care needs of this patient population. Hospital length of stay has decreased for individuals with SCI. RNs employed in long-term care (LTC) facilities have found admissions of patients with SCI occur more frequently with the onset of managed care and the increased longevity of Americans. Capitated markets within managed care require a nursing care delivery model that safely and judiciously uses nursing personnel to their fullest potential. Conger's (1993) Delegation Decision-Making Model (DDMM) utilizes all levels of personnel to their maximum potential while staying within the confines of individuals state nurse practice acts. The ability of RNs to direct the health care team is crucial to affect positive patient outcomes. The purpose of this descriptive comparative study was to ascertain baseline information on nurse delegation decision-making knowledge, job satisfaction, and level of comfort with this skill for RNs practicing in hospital and LTC settings. After reading a case study on a patient with SCI, RNs in the hospital and LTC facilities used Conger's (1993) DDMM. Scores for delegation decision-making were determined using the Nursing Assessment Decision Grid. Delegation knowledge scores were the same for RNs practicing in the hospital and LTC settings. Of interest was that RNs practicing in LTC settings cited learning delegation skills "on the job" 50% of the time compared to hospital nurses who reported learning these skills on the job 19% of the time. Additional research in the area of nurse delegation with this patient population needs to be investigated to support the

  2. Process and Outcomes of School Nurse Case Management for Students with Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelke, Martha Keehner; Swanson, Melvin; Guttu, Martha

    2014-01-01

    There have been many studies that have examined the impact of school-based asthma programs on students with asthma. However, most studies do not provide adequate elaboration on the components of the program. Therefore, replication of these programs is difficult. This study examines the process of school nurse case management, which includes the…

  3. School Nurses' Experiences of Managing Young People with Mental Health Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravenna, Jean; Cleaver, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Prevalence of mental health disorder is increasing among young people. It is recognized that early intervention is essential in supporting young people, and care provided within schools to support emotional well-being is recommended as part of this process. A scoping review was undertaken examining school nurses' experiences of supporting the…

  4. Planning for a Violent Intruder Event: The School Nurse's Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selekman, Janice; Melvin, Joseph

    2017-05-01

    School shootings occur too frequently and often with devastating results. The key to prevention and mitigation of these events is to have a plan that is simple, up-to-date, disseminated, and practiced. This article discusses the steps that school nurses can take to work with school administration to prepare themselves, their staff, and their students.

  5. Barriers to Asthma Management as Identified by School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Judith E.; Spencer, Gale A.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma rates are increasing in children. School nurses have opportunities to care for children with asthma but need to overcome barriers impacting their ability to manage asthma in the school setting. This study (a) assessed barriers present in the school setting, (b) determined the impact of barriers on performance of asthma management behaviors,…

  6. Nurse-Led School-Based Child Obesity Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Sharon; Lanningham-Foster, Lorraine M.

    2015-01-01

    School-based childhood obesity prevention programs have grown in response to reductions in child physical activity (PA), increased sedentariness, poor diet, and soaring child obesity rates. Multiple systematic reviews indicate school-based obesity prevention/treatment interventions are effective, yet few studies have examined the school nurse role…

  7. Who enters nursing schools and why do they choose nursing? A comparison with female non-nursing students using longitudinal data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Hyun; Jung, So Young; Jang, Sunyoung

    2010-02-01

    Understanding who enters nursing schools and why they choose nursing is essential for the nursing profession to recruit and retain their successors. This study was conducted to examine the characteristics of nursing students and factors influencing their career decision, as compared with non-nursing students. We used public databases of the Korean Education & Employment Panel that followed 4000 high school students in their final year of school. Out of those students, 2456 students entered a college or university and 40 students (39 females and one male) entered a nursing school. Nursing students were compared with 1011 female non-nursing students. Nursing students had lower household income. Nursing students had better high school academic achievement overall and in science. A more studious attitude and lower absenteeism were found among nursing students. For nursing students, employability (55%) followed by aptitude (20%) were the most influential factors in choosing a nursing major, while conversely, aptitude (48%) followed by employability (23%) were most important to non-nursing students. About half of nursing students answered "herself/himself" as the most influential person in choosing nursing, whereas three quarters of non-nursing students did. Nursing students had a higher rate (75%) of satisfaction with their major than non-nursing students (60%). Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Creating effective advisory boards for schools of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Noël; Campbell, Suzanne Hetzel; Lynch, Nancy; Novotny, Jeanne M

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly, a significant priority for the dean and faculty in schools of nursing is fundraising. Raising financial resources is highly competitive and requires sophisticated approaches to building relationships with individual donors, government agencies, private foundations, and corporations. Fundraising efforts need to be designed to cultivate alumni, parents, and friends as key leaders educated in the work of the school, its vision for the future, and the nursing profession. Advisory boards, with an emphasis on development, can effectively nurture such leaders who are fully versed in the strategic vision of the school and who are willing to provide financial support and access to a broad community of interest. An integrated approach that capitalizes on the expertise and knowledge of the dean, the faculty, advancement officers, and a carefully selected board chair forms the foundation of a successful model for development-focused advisory boards. Advisory board implementation is discussed from the perspective of a clearly articulated board charge, selection and recruitment, board retreat, assessment of interest and inclination through an annual board-planning process, engagement in priority project planning with the faculty, and careful cultivation toward deepened relationships and funding.

  9. Communal child-rearing: The role of nurses in school health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulaudzi, Fhumulani M; Peu, Mmapheko D

    2014-10-16

    Child-rearing remains a concern within our communities, especially because families of today lack primary parents due to multifaceted challenges such as working mothers, diseases and violence. Health-promoting school initiatives are necessary because they allow a multifaceted approach to child-rearing. They further provide a conducive environment for continued schoolchild-rearing moving from home to school. This study promotes an integrated approach to school care using the African concept of Ubuntu - solidarity and sense of community - as a point of departure. The socio-ecological model was used, which includes the work of the school healthcare nurse in contributing to holistic health services. An integrative review was conducted in January 2013, which included methodology studies, a theory review and a variety of studies related to school health. The studies were categorised according to school health, Ubuntu and the socio-ecological model. The role of school healthcare nurses entails acting as a liaison officer between a variety of stakeholders who work together to shape the future of children. Ubuntu, together with the socio-ecological model, can assist us to involve an entire community to raise children. This knowledge serves as a background to the planning of a school health programme. The role of the nurse in school health can also assist in collaborative efforts to formulate the programme and develop the competencies that will inform school health nurse training curricula.

  10. Communal child-rearing: The role of nurses in school health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fhumulani M. Mulaudzi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Child-rearing remains a concern within our communities, especially because families of today lack primary parents due to multifaceted challenges such as working mothers, diseases and violence. Health-promoting school initiatives are necessary because they allow a multifaceted approach to child-rearing. They further provide a conducive environment for continued schoolchild-rearing moving from home to school. Objectives: This study promotes an integrated approach to school care using the African concept of Ubuntu – solidarity and sense of community – as a point of departure. The socio-ecological model was used, which includes the work of the school healthcare nurse in contributing to holistic health services. Method: An integrative review was conducted in January 2013, which included methodology studies, a theory review and a variety of studies related to school health. The studies were categorised according to school health, Ubuntu and the socio-ecological model. Findings: The role of school healthcare nurses entails acting as a liaison officer between a variety of stakeholders who work together to shape the future of children. Conclusion: Ubuntu, together with the socio-ecological model, can assist us to involve an entire community to raise children. This knowledge serves as a background to the planning of a school health programme. The role of the nurse in school health can also assist in collaborative efforts to formulate the programme and develop the competencies that will inform school health nurse training curricula.

  11. Baccalaureate education and American nursing homes: a survey of nursing schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-li; Brown, Janet W; Groves, Marni L; Spezia, Alicia M

    2007-11-01

    Approximately one-third of the people in the United States will pass through a long-term care facility before they die. However, the learning opportunities in this unique setting for baccalaureate nursing education remain unclear. This regional survey examined the use of nursing homes within baccalaureate nursing programs in nine southeastern states of the United States of America. A descriptive exploratory method and mailed questionnaires were used for data collection. Fifty-three nursing schools were included in the study. According to the survey, 83% of the nursing schools have used nursing homes as clinical sites to teach fundamental psychomotor skills, communication skills and physical assessment. Identified advantages of using nursing homes in baccalaureate education include: learning basic nursing skills, working with willing and helpful nursing home residents and staff, and developing positive attitude toward aging. On the other hand, the major problem encountered was lack of appropriate role models in nursing home staff. As the world population continues to age rapidly, nurse educators need to consider the advantages of clinical experiences for students in long-term care facilities.

  12. Health-related quality of life and working conditions among nursing providers

    OpenAIRE

    Amanda Aparecida Silva; José Maria Pacheco de Souza; Flávio Notarnicola da Silva Borges; Frida Marina Fischer

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate working conditions associated with health-related quality of life (HRQL) among nursing providers. METHODS: Cross-sectional study conducted in a university hospital in the city of São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, during 2004-2005. The study sample comprised 696 registered nurses, nurse technicians and nurse assistants, predominantly females (87.8%), who worked day and/or night shifts. Data on sociodemographic information, working and living conditions, lifestyles, and hea...

  13. Structural Intervention With School Nurses Increases Receipt of Sexual Health Care Among Male High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittus, Patricia J; Harper, Christopher R; Becasen, Jeffrey S; Donatello, Robin A; Ethier, Kathleen A

    2018-01-01

    Adolescent males are less likely to receive health care and have lower levels of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) knowledge than adolescent females. The purpose of this study was to determine if a school-based structural intervention focused on school nurses increases receipt of condoms and SRH information among male students. Interventions to improve student access to sexual and reproductive health care were implemented in six urban high schools with a matched set of comparison schools. Interventions included working with school nurses to improve access to sexual and reproductive health care, including the provision of condoms and information about pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease prevention and services. Intervention effects were assessed through five cross-sectional yearly surveys, and analyses include data from 13,740 male students. Nurses in intervention schools changed their interactions with male students who visited them for services, such that, among those who reported they went to the school nurse for any reason in the previous year, those in intervention schools reported significant increases in receipt of sexual health services over the course of the study compared with students in comparison schools. Further, these results translated into population-level effects. Among all male students surveyed, those in intervention schools were more likely than those in comparison schools to report increases in receipt of sexual health services from school nurses. With a minimal investment of resources, school nurses can become important sources of SRH information and condoms for male high school students. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. DEVELOPING INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS ON ENGLISH ORAL COMMUNICATION FOR NURSING SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sismiati Sismiati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The needs survey shows that English communication skill of the students in nursing school speaking classes is not well developed. Consequently, the speaking instructional materials used in the classes need to be advanced. Yalden’s (1987 Language Program Development covering Needs Analysis, Syllabus and Materials Development, Expert Validation, and Try-out is used to produce a speaking syllabus and textbook for nursing students preparing to work at hospitals abroad with the following characteristics: (1 the topics are based on the activities of nurses in hospitals; (2 the vocabulary exercises are based on the nurses’ needs in under- standing the nursing context; (3 the speaking activities are based on the needs to communicate in nursing settings using the principles of CTL; (4 the language functions are explained to support the nursing students to form their own sentences in their speaking practice. The product is found acceptable for nursing students.

  15. Making a Difference for Overweight Children: The School Nurse Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Nancy W.

    2005-01-01

    This manual discusses the school nurse's role in prevention and management of overweight children from an individual student perspective and, perhaps more important, from a system perspective. Manual includes the BMI (Body Mass Index) Wheel.

  16. Developing a school nursing activity demand model Staffordhire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Jo; Patel, Divya; Hansford, Karen; Sutcliffe, Kate; Forbes-Westlake, Andrea

    2014-02-01

    Activity demand models for delivery of the Healthy Child Programme (HCP) through the school nursing workforce are limited. This paper describes the application of a potentially new activity demand model for school nursing. The model identifies what the demand for school nursing is in Staffordshire, using estimated delivery times of universal and targeted components from the HCP, numbers of children and local information around targeted activity, eg, numbers of looked after children. The model suggests that the school nursing service would spend around 60% of time on individual face to face activity, 30% on public health leadership, management and evaluation and the 10% on travel in Staffordshire. It also suggests a shortfall in workforce capacity. The model can be used to underpin commissioning decisions and service redesign and changes in practice would be required to meet the full requirements of the HCP.

  17. Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010: An Opportunity for School Nurses to Make a Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Jessica L.; Galon, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Implementation of the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 will provide an opportunity for school nurses to intervene in the serious childhood obesity problem in the United States. Major changes in the management of the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) will likely challenge schools yet may provide the impetus for a collaborative effort by the…

  18. Spiritual care competence for contemporary nursing practice: A quantitative exploration of the guidance provided by fundamental nursing textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Fiona; Neill, Freda; Murphy, Maryanne; Begley, Thelma; Sheaf, Greg

    2015-11-01

    Spirituality is receiving unprecedented attention in the nursing literature. Both the volume and scope of literature on the topic is expanding, and it is clear that this topic is of interest to nurses. There is consensus that the spiritual required by clients receiving health ought to be an integrated effort across the health care team. Although undergraduate nurses receive some education on the topic, this is ad hoc and inconsistent across universities. Textbooks are clearly a key resource in this area however the extent to which they form a comprehensive guide for nursing students and nurses is unclear. This study provides a hitherto unperformed analysis of core nursing textbooks to ascertain spirituality related content. 543 books were examined and this provides a range of useful information about inclusions and omissions in this field. Findings revealed that spirituality is not strongly portrayed as a component of holistic care and specific direction for the provision of spiritual care is lacking. Fundamental textbooks used by nurses and nursing students ought to inform and guide integrated spiritual care and reflect a more holistic approach to nursing care. The religious and/or spiritual needs of an increasingly diverse community need to be taken seriously within scholarly texts so that this commitment to individual clients' needs can be mirrored in practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. AORN nurse leaders provide insight into management issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Jean J; Butz, K Penelope; Gavin, Jeanette G; Mills, Regina S; Welter, Clara J

    2004-03-01

    Different people have different ideas about what makes a good manager. No matter what managers' attributes are, they bring a unique set of talents to their organizations. This article explores what winners of AORN's Award for Outstanding Achievement in Perioperative Nursing Management have to say about managing in today's health care climate.

  20. A qualitative study on feedback provided by students in nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Zenobia C Y; Stanley, David John; Meadus, Robert J; Chien, Wai Tong

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to help nurse educators/academics understand the perspectives and expectations of students providing their feedback to educators about teaching performance and subject quality. The aim of this study is to reveal students' voices regarding their feedback in nurse education in order to shed light on how the current student feedback practice may be modified. A qualitative study using focus group inquiry. Convenience sampling was adopted and participants recruited from one school of nursing in Hong Kong. A total of 66 nursing students from two pre-registration programs were recruited for seven focus group interviews: one group of Year 1 students (n=21), two groups of Year 3 students (n=27), and four groups of Final Year students (n=18). The interviews were guided by a semi-structured interview guideline and the interview narratives were processed through content analysis. The trustworthiness of this study was guaranteed through peer checking, research meetings, and an audit trail. The participants' privacy was protected throughout the study. Four core themes were discerned based on the narratives of the focus group interviews: (1) "timing of collecting feedback at more than one time point"; (2) "modify the questions being asked in collecting student feedback"; (3) "are electronic means of collecting feedback good enough?; and (4) "what will be next for student feedback?". This study is significant in the following three domains: 1) it contributed to student feedback because it examined the issue from a student's perspective; 2) it explored the timing and channels for collecting feedback from the students' point of view; and 3) it showed the preferred uses of student feedback. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Who should provide continuous renal replacement therapies? Nephrology nurses are better prepared to provide CRRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    Although critical care nurses are fully capable of learning CRRT, there are substantial, irrefutable challenges to achieving and sustaining proficiency. There is also diminished opportunity and motivation for critical care nurses to advance CRRT practice through quality initiatives, education, or research when it is a small piece of their practice. Consequently, I believe that it is incumbent upon acute care nephrology nurses to clarify the magnitude and value of what we do and to support our critical care colleagues in doing what they do best. The debate as to who should perform CRRT began in an effort to explore the better opportunity for cost-saving; but, in the end, it really boils down to the better opportunity for life-saving. I suspect improving outcomes for patients requiring CRRT will ultimately save hospitals more money than the short-sighted gains from critical care nurses performing tasks outside of universally-applied critical care RN processes.

  2. Shared responsibility: school nurses' experience of collaborating in school-based interprofessional teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuterswärd, Marina; Hylander, Ingrid

    2017-06-01

    The Swedish Education Act (2011) mandated a new combination of services to boost students' physical health, their mental health and special education through interprofessional pupil health and well-being (PH) teams. For Swedish school nurses, providing these services presents new challenges. To describe how Swedish school nurses experience their work and collaboration within the interprofessional PH teams. Twenty-five school nurses (SNs) were interviewed in five focus groups. Content analysis was used to examine the data and to explore SNs' workplace characteristics by using the components of the sense of coherence (SOC) framework. SNs' experiences of work and collaboration within PH teams can be described using three domains: the expectations of others regarding SNs' roles, SNs' contributions to pupils' health and well-being, and collaboration among SNs within PH teams. The results indicate a discrepancy between SNs' own experiences of their contribution and their experiences of other professionals' expectations regarding those contributions. Some duties were perceived as expected, comprehensible, manageable and meaningful, while other duties - though expected - were perceived as less meaningful, taking time away from school-related matters. Other duties that were not explicitly expected - promoting general health and creating safety zones for pupils, teachers and parents, for example - were nonetheless perceived as meaningful. Collaboration within PH teams was considered meaningful, comprehensible and manageable only if the objectives of the team meetings were clear, if other professionals were available and if professional roles on the team were clearly communicated. The SNs reported a lack of clarity regarding their role in PH and its implementation in schools, indicating that professionals in PH teams need to discuss collaboration so as to find their niche given the new conditions. SOC theory emerged as a useful framework for discussing concrete work

  3. Collaborative learning and competence development in school health nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Wistoft, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the process and learning outcomes of peer collaboration in a Danish health developmental project in school health nursing. The paper explores how peer collaboration influences the school nurses’ collaborative learning and competence development...... subprojects after the project was over. In the workshops, the questionnaire surveys and the focus group interviews the school nurses were asked to reflect on the developmental process, their collaboration, own and mutual pedagogical competence development. Findings Systematic peer collaboration between school...... nurses’ qualify a) their learning and ability to reflect on practice b) their communication with colleagues and children c) the development of new and innovative approaches to school health nursing. The introduction of peer collaboration, however, takes time and energy and it can be challenge...

  4. Faculty Bullying: An Exploration of Leadership Strategies to Reduce Relational Violence in Nursing Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Melody F.

    2010-01-01

    Nurses eat their young. Bullying in nursing is well documented and an almost inherent part of the nursing subculture. There is no research exploring the origin of bullying in nursing. The basic premise of the study was that bullying is a learned behavior that begins in nursing school when nurse educators bully their students. With the…

  5. School Nurses Vis-a-Vis Athletic Trainers in Secondary School Sports Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Richard J.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews past and present views of the working relationship between a school's nurse and athletic trainer and discusses the author's own study which revealed that, compared to trainers, school nurses possess insufficient knowledge to assume adequate injury management. Offers a sample job description for a head athletic trainer. (WD)

  6. [A comparison on general education curriculum of 4-year and 3-year nursing schools in Korea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sook-Young; Joung, Sun-Ei; Hwang, Chung-Il

    2011-02-01

    This study was done to comparatively analyze the general education curriculum of 4-yr and 3-yr nursing schools in Korea. Ten university 4-yr nursing schools were selected based on universities in Korean Accreditation Board of Nursing 2010 or "2009 Korea's Best Universities-Top 10" published by Joong-Ang Daily. Ten college 3-yr nursing schools were selected based on colleges in Korean Accreditation Board of Nursing 2010. 1) Generally 4-yr nursing schools maintained the relationships between organizational philosophy/purposes and subjects in the general education curriculum. But 3-yr nursing schools did not. 2) In 4-yr nursing schools there was a relatively higher credits ratio of general education curriculum and selective courses than in 3-yr nursing schools. 3) In 4-yr nursing schools variety of courses was relatively higher than 3-yr nursing schools. 4) In 4-yr nursing schools, operating conditions were relatively better (number of tenure professors, ratio of professors to students, Identification of exclusive organization in charge of the general education curriculum) for the general education curriculum than 3-yr nursing schools. The results identify significant differences in the general education curriculum of 4-yr and 3-yr nursing schools in Korea, indicating that 3-yr nursing schools should make efforts to improve the good quality of general education curriculum.

  7. Ethical issues for nurses providing perinatal care in community settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, M L

    2000-09-01

    Ethical issues in perinatal nursing are complex in that two patients--mother and fetus--are considered. This work considers six areas of potential ethical conflict: conflict between the mother and fetus, informed consent, confidentiality, cultural conflicts, conflicts associated with managed care, and conflicts in childbirth education. Ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence, and justice are included. Strategies for resolving ethical conflicts in community practice settings are suggested.

  8. Nursing students' practice in providing oral hygiene for patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, Ann

    To explore and identify precedent factors that may influence nursing students' oral hygiene practice in hospitalised patients, by using an adaptation of the Precede Model. A quantitative approach with a descriptive design was adopted in this pilot study. A questionnaire was designed and implemented as a self-report method of data collection. A convenience sample of 37 second-year diploma nursing students in an Irish teaching hospital participated in the study. The clinical area and the practices within it are influential factors in the provision of oral hygiene. Students are exposed to and influenced by outdated and non-research-based practices. Role modelling is an effective means of motivating and reinforcing student practices. However, qualified nurses' practices need to be critically reviewed before assuming that they can act as role models in assisting students to implement research-based oral hygiene. Formal education, current practices, socialisation and role modelling may influence students' behaviour in relation to oral hygiene. The results should be tentatively reviewed by clinical staff as an indication of current practices.

  9. Empowering Nurses in Providing Palliative Care to Cancer Patients: Action Research Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taleghani, Fariba; Shahriari, Mohsen; Alimohammadi, Nasrollah

    2018-01-01

    Chronic diseases such as cancer would lead to various health needs in patients and their families. To meet needs, developing new educational nursing courses is necessary. Therefore this study was conducted to empower nurses through designing and conducting short-term educational courses for training palliative care nurses. This study was a community-based action research which was conducted at Isfahan hospitals that provide services for cancer patients during 2015 at four stages (planning, acting, reflection, and evaluation). Participants (33 samples) included nurses, head nurses, managers of nursing services, nursing professors and professors of oncology department. Data were gathered through individual and group interviews and analyzed using content analysis. Data analysis resulted in 3 categories of "professional development of nursing in palliative care" which included subcategories of: knowledge-based performance and positive change in attitude, "obstacles to provide palliative care" with subcategories of: insufficient professional responsibility, insufficient ability in managing some of patients' symptoms and inappropriate interaction between nurses and physicians and "strategies for improving provision of palliative care" with subcategories of: improving the interactions between physicians and nurses, continuous trainings for palliative care and the necessity of developing palliative care in the country. To facilitate the process of providing palliative care to cancer patients, necessary actions and measures must be conducted including improvement of interaction between the members of health team, organizing continuing educational courses on palliative care and development of providing palliative care all over the country by managers of health centers.

  10. Empowering nurses in providing palliative care to cancer patients: Action research study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Taleghani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic diseases such as cancer would lead to various health needs in patients and their families. To meet needs, developing new educational nursing courses is necessary. Therefore this study was conducted to empower nurses through designing and conducting short-term educational courses for training palliative care nurses. Materials and Methods: This study was a community-based action research which was conducted at Isfahan hospitals that provide services for cancer patients during 2015 at four stages (planning, acting, reflection, and evaluation. Participants (33 samples included nurses, head nurses, managers of nursing services, nursing professors and professors of oncology department. Data were gathered through individual and group interviews and analyzed using content analysis. Results: Data analysis resulted in 3 categories of "professional development of nursing in palliative care" which included subcategories of: knowledge-based performance and positive change in attitude, "obstacles to provide palliative care" with subcategories of: insufficient professional responsibility, insufficient ability in managing some of patients' symptoms and inappropriate interaction between nurses and physicians and "strategies for improving provision of palliative care" with subcategories of: improving the interactions between physicians and nurses, continuous trainings for palliative care and the necessity of developing palliative care in the country. Conclusions: To facilitate the process of providing palliative care to cancer patients, necessary actions and measures must be conducted including improvement of interaction between the members of health team, organizing continuing educational courses on palliative care and development of providing palliative care all over the country by managers of health centers.

  11. Why is psychiatric nursing not the preferred option for nursing students: A cross-sectional study examining pre-nursing and nursing school factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Hui Lin; Seow, Esmond; Chua, Boon Yiang; Xie, Huiting; Wang, Jia; Lau, Ying Wen; Chong, Siow Ann; Subramaniam, Mythily

    2017-05-01

    There is a shortage of nurses working in the mental health field globally. The aim of the present study was to examine Singapore nursing students' attitudes towards specializing in psychiatric nursing by examining the pre-nursing and nursing school factors as well as attitudes towards psychiatry and personality traits. A cross-sectional online survey was conducted with 500 nursing students from four nursing institutions in Singapore. Students' attitudes towards psychiatry (ATP-18), perception of psychiatric nursing career aspects relative to other fields, and personality traits (mini-IPIP) were assessed. The main outcome measure was likelihood of specializing in psychiatric nursing. Logistic regression was used to examine the combined effect of factors upon the outcome. Twenty-six students (5.2%) rated "definitely decided to do" psychiatric nursing. Pre-nursing school factors associated with choosing psychiatry included ethnicity, current education, parents' wishes, having personal/family experience of mental illness, prior work experience, interest in psychiatric nursing and psychology module taken prior to current school admission. Nursing school factors such as teaching methods and clinical exposure were not associated with choosing psychiatric nursing. Positive attitudes towards psychiatry, perception of better career aspects in psychiatric nursing relative to other fields, and the personality traits of extraversion and intellect/imagination were associated with likelihood of choosing psychiatric nursing. Logistic regression revealed Malay (OR: 1.90, 1.14-3.16, p=0.013) and Indian ethnicity (OR: 2.56, 1.32-4.96, p=0.005), interest in psychiatry (OR: 22.56, 8.22-61.92, pnursing than other fields (OR: 1.91, 1.21-3.04, p=0.006), extraversion (OR: 1.09, 1.02-1.17, p=0.012) and positive attitude towards psychiatry (OR: 2.72, 1.75-4.23, pstudents choosing psychiatric nursing. The selection of psychiatry as a specialty by nursing students was affected by pre-nursing

  12. Parent Interest in a School-Based, School Nurse-Led Weight Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubik, Martha Y.; Lee, Jiwoo

    2014-01-01

    Because one in three children is already overweight or obese, school-based interventions targeting secondary obesity prevention merit consideration. This study assessed parent interest in participating in a school-based, school nurse-led weight management program for young school-aged children. A random sample of parents ("n" = 122) of…

  13. Parents' and providers' attitudes toward school-located provision and school-entry requirements for HPV vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruysse, Jessica; Chigurupati, Nagasudha L; Fung, Leslie; Apte, Gauri; Pierre-Joseph, Natalie; Perkins, Rebecca B

    2016-06-02

    To determine parents' and providers' attitudes toward school-located provision and school-entry requirements for HPV vaccination. Parents/guardians of 11-17 y old girls and pediatric healthcare providers at one inner-city public clinic and three private practices completed semi-structured interviews in 2012-2013. Participants were asked open-ended questions regarding their attitudes toward school-located provision and school-entry requirements for HPV vaccination. Parents' answers were analyzed with relationship to whether their daughters had not initiated, initiated but not completed, or completed the HPV vaccine series. Qualitative analysis was used to identify themes related to shared views. 129 parents/guardians and 34 providers participated. 61% of parents supported providing HPV vaccinations in schools, citing reasons of convenience, improved access, and positive peer pressure. Those who opposed school-located provision raised concerns related to privacy and the capacity of school nurses to manage vaccine-related reactions. Parents whose daughters had not completed the series were more likely to intend to vaccinate their daughters in schools (70%) and support requirements (64%) than parents who had not initiated vaccination (42% would vaccinate at school, 46% support requirements) or completed the series (42% would vaccinate at school, 32% support requirements; p requirements, largely because they felt that a requirement might provoke a public backlash that could further hinder vaccination efforts. School-located provision of HPV vaccination was widely accepted by healthcare providers and parents whose children have not completed the series, indicating that this venue might be a valuable addition to improve completion rates. Support for school-entry requirements was limited among both parents and healthcare providers.

  14. PERCEPTIONS OF INDONESIAN PRACTICAL NURSES TOWARDS UPDATING CAPABILITY TO PROVIDE CARE: A QUALITATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitri Arofiati

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Capability to provide care can be recognized as the combination of nursing knowledge, skills, and attitude of care which is dynamic. Objective: This study aims to explore the perceptions of practical nurses towards updating capability to provide care. Methods: A descriptive qualitative study was conducted to explore the deep understanding of practical nurses towards updating capability to provide care. Data were gathered using in-depth interview with 25 practical nurses from different areas of practices, three times focus group discussion (FGD and participant-observation. Qualitative content analysis model was applied to anaylze the data. Result: There were two themes emerged from data: 1 Internal perceptions of updating capacity to provide care, with three subthemes: Having great expectation, Being confidence as a professional nurse, and Developing Self-Initiation, 2 External contexts driving perception of practicing nurses, with two subthemes: Giving best care and Acquiring requirement. Conclusions: The findings indicated that updating capacity to provide care supports practical nurses to provide better nursing services to patients and meet the regulation of nursing professionalism.

  15. School Nurse Summer Institute: A Model for Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neighbors, Marianne; Barta, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The components of a professional development model designed to empower school nurses to become leaders in school health services is described. The model was implemented during a 3-day professional development institute that included clinical and leadership components, especially coalition building, with two follow-up sessions in the fall and…

  16. Doctor of nursing practice by 2015: an examination of nursing schools' decisions to offer a doctor of nursing practice degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martsolf, Grant R; Auerbach, David I; Spetz, Joanne; Pearson, Marjorie L; Muchow, Ashley N

    2015-01-01

    The American Association of Colleges of Nursing recommends that nursing schools transition their advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) programs to doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs by 2015. However, most schools have not yet made this full transition. The purpose of this study was to understand schools' decisions regarding the full transition to the DNP. Key informant interviews and an online survey of nursing school deans and program directors were performed. The vast majority of schools value the DNP in preparing APRNs for the future of the health care system. However, other important factors influence many schools to fully transition or not to the postbaccalaureate DNP, including perceived student and employer demand, issues concerning accreditation and certification, and resource constraints. Multiple pathways to becoming an APRN are likely to remain until various factors (e.g., student and employer demand, certification and accreditation issues, and resource constraints) yield a more favorable environment for a full transition to the DNP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Utilization of School Nurses during the Evaluation and Identification of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcintosh, Constance E.; Thomas, Cynthia M.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored school nurses' involvement during the identification and treatment of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The extent of school nurses' collaboration with school psychologists and other educators also was studied. Participants included 100 school nurses, representing 18 states, who completed a survey on ASD. The…

  18. The Effects of Budget, Delegation, and Other Variables on the Future of School Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetuan, Theresa M.; Akagi, Cynthia G.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory research study was to survey Kansas school nurses to determine the impact of budget, delegation, and other variables on the future of school nursing. Issues of education and certification status, educational budget, delegation, school nurse-to-student ratio, number of school buildings assigned, Metropolitan…

  19. "There's rural, and then there's rural": advice from nurses providing primary healthcare in northern remote communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin Misener, Ruth; MacLeod, Martha L P; Banks, Kathy; Morton, A Michel; Vogt, Carolyn; Bentham, Donna

    2008-01-01

    Nursing practice in remote northern communities is highly complex, with unique challenges created by isolation, geography and cultural dynamics. This paper, the second of two focusing on the advice offered by nurses interviewed in the national study, The Nature of Nursing Practice in Rural and Remote Canada, considers suggestions from outpost nurses. Their advice to new nurses was: know what you are getting into; consider whether your personal qualities are suited for northern practice; learn to listen and listen to learn; expect a steep learning curve, even if you are experienced; and take action to prevent burnout. Recommendations for educators were to offer programs that prepare nurses for the realities of outpost nursing and provide opportunities for accessible, flexible, relevant continuing education. The outpost nurses in this study counselled administrators to stay in contact with and listen to the perspectives of nurses at the "grassroots," and not merely to fill positions but instead to recruit outpost nurses effectively and remunerate them fairly. The study findings highlighted the multiple interrelated strategies that nurses, educators and administrators can use to optimize practice in remote northern communities.

  20. Nursing students’ perception of clinical learning experiences as provided by the nursing staff in the wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. C. TIakula

    1993-05-01

    Full Text Available A descriptive survey was carried out, using convenience and systematic sampling in order to better understand the manner in which student nurses perceive their clinical experience in the hospital. Data were collected from 80 subjects in 4 nursing colleges using a critical incident technique. Positive and negative experiences are described,

  1. Social responsibility: conceptualization and embodiment in a school of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Maureen A; Connor, Ann; Kun, Karen E; Salmon, Marla E

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes how a school of nursing has conceptualized and embodied social responsibility in its core values, curricular design, admission standards, clinical practice, and service learning opportunities. The school's engagement in the process of practicing social responsibility and clarifying its meaning and application has made apparent the natural linkage between social responsibility and professionalism and the deep and complex relationship between social responsibility and nursing itself. It has also revealed how a commitment to social responsibility impacts and determines for whom nurses care. Claiming social responsibility as a core value and working to refine its meaning and place has increased the school's commitment to it, concomitantly impacting education, practice, and recruitment and evaluation of faculty and students. The school views the conceptualization of social responsibility as a deepening and unfolding evolution, rather than as a formulaic understanding, and expects that its ongoing work of claiming social responsibility as a core value will continue to be enriching.

  2. An observational study of providing structure as a psychiatric nursing intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, L.A.; Goossens, P.J.J.; Nugter, A.; Achterberg, T. van

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To observe the actions of psychiatric nurses when providing structure and identify results in order to better understand providing structure as a complex nursing intervention. DESIGN AND METHOD: Participant observation data were collected on a dual diagnosis ward and a crisis intervention

  3. Awareness and Attitude of Nurses in Regard to Providing Hospice Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghdam, Alireza Mohajjel; Aghaei, Mir Hossein; Hassankhani, Hadi; Rahmani, Azad

    2015-01-01

    Awareness and attitudes of nurses regarding end of life care are important factors in providing hospice care. In an extensive literature review, we found no related articles investigating Iranian nurses awareness and attitudes about providing such care. The aims of this study were to investigate the awareness and attitudes of Iranian nurses in providing hospice care. In this descriptive-correlational study, 240 nurses employed in six educational centers were selected by non-randomized stratified sampling. The data collection instruments included an awareness test and attitudes regarding providing end of life care in hospice questionnaire. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and independent sample t-tests, one-way ANOVA, and Pearson correlation tests. The nurses' awareness score was 14.3 out of 29 and 55.7% of them stated that they had not received any education in providing end of life care. Also, by obtaining the score of 91.7 out of 120 the attitudes of participants in providing end of life care in hospices were positive. In addition, the highest attitudes score of nurses were in the dimensions of benefits of implementation and health care team. Considering low awareness of nurses about end of life care in hospices, continuing education should be provided for them in this regard. Especially, by considering the positive attitude of nurses, providing such programs could help develop hospice care in Iran.

  4. Nurses Returning to School: Motivators, Inhibitors and Job Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Patrick W; Burman, Mary E

    2016-01-01

    Health care employers and national nursing organizations are placing increased emphasis on nurses earning a baccalaureate degree or higher. This study examines the impact of motivators (professional and personal motivation), inhibitors (time constraints and employer discouragement), and job satisfaction on intent to return to school. Approximately half of the employed nurses in Wyoming were surveyed using a mailed questionnaire in the summer of 2013. Perceived employer discouragement and time constraints continued to play a direct role on intent to return to school regardless of nurse motivation or job satisfaction. However, motivation and job satisfaction also contributed to a nurse's intent to return to school. These results suggest that motivation and job satisfaction are significant regarding intent to return to school but can be limited by both perceived discouragement of one's employer and perceived time constraints. In order to meet the increasing demands of a better-educated nursing workforce, a shift in workplace dynamics may be warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Partnering with community agencies to provide nursing students with cultural awareness experiences and refugee health promotion access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Catherine H

    2009-09-01

    Refugees' cultural beliefs, communication barriers, and low health literacy may lead to health disparities within the Western health care system. This article describes a teaching-learning strategy emphasizing the community partnership between a baccalaureate school of nursing, an immigrant-refugee program, and a community literacy program in a rural state. Senior community health nursing students partnered with an immigrant-refugee program and a community literacy program to provide health promotion and prevention services to recently immigrated Hmong and Russian refugees. Priority health needs were identified and culturally appropriate health promotion and prevention education modules were designed and implemented by students. Students collaborated with community agencies and businesses to increase access to health resources for these vulnerable populations. Outcomes were the provision of cultural awareness experiences for nursing students and access to health care with increased knowledge of Western health care practices and beliefs for refugees.

  6. Incorporating gerontological content in the nursing curriculum. The case of AUB School of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Hala; Adra, Marina; Huijer, Huda Abu-Saad

    2015-01-01

    In Lebanon, the proportion of older adults (over 65 years) is on the rise. This rise is associated with increased morbidity rates and the need for age-specific medical and nursing care. The number of nurses specializing in geriatric care remains very small despite the increased need for this specialty. The nursing curriculum at the Hariri School of Nursing at the American University of Beirut (AUB) has integrated gerontological content in both undergraduate and graduate programs as an essential step to prepare future nurses for the care of the growing population of older adults and consequently to support the health care system. In line with the essential competencies proposed by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), the school of nursing at AUB is preparing entry level and advanced practice nurses to care for the geriatric population. Furthermore, developing specialists in the field of gerontology and launching an interdisciplinary graduate program on 'Care of the Older Adult' is more and more becoming a desired development for the future.

  7. School nurses' role in asthma management, school absenteeism, and cost savings: a demonstration project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Eunice; Rivera, Diana Austria; Perlroth, Daniella; Becker, Edmund; Wang, Nancy Ewen; Landau, Melinda

    2013-12-01

    With increasing budget cuts to education and social services, rigorous evaluation needs to document school nurses' impact on student health, academic outcomes, and district funding. Utilizing a quasi-experimental design, we evaluated outcomes in 4 schools with added full-time nurses and 5 matched schools with part-time nurses in the San Jose Unified School District. Student data and logistic regression models were used to examine predictors of illness-related absenteeism for 2006-2007 and 2008-2009. We calculated average daily attendance (ADA) funding and parent wages associated with an improvement in illness-related absenteeism. Utilizing parent surveys, we also estimated the cost of services for asthma-related visits to the emergency room (ER; N = 2489). Children with asthma were more likely to be absent due to illness; however, mean absenteeism due to illness decreased when full-time nurses were added to demonstration schools but increased in comparison schools during 2008-2009, resulting in a potential savings of $48,518.62 in ADA funding (N = 6081). Parents in demonstration schools reported fewer ER visits, and the estimated savings in ER services and parent wages were significant. Full-time school nurses play an important role in improving asthma management among students in underserved schools, which can impact school absenteeism and attendance-related economic costs. © 2013, American School Health Association.

  8. Oncology nursing: educating advanced practice nurses to provide culturally competent care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Theresa Pluth; Phillips, Janice; Delengowski, Anne; Griffiths, Margaret; Purnell, Larry

    2011-01-01

    More than 37 million persons or 12.4% of the U.S. population are older than 65 years. These numbers are expected to reach 71.5 million (20% of the population) by 2030. This older population is becoming more racially and ethnically diverse as the overall minority and culturally diverse populations increase. Although the incidence and mortality rates from several major cancers have declined due to advances in cancer care, these advances have lagged among the underserved and more vulnerable racially and culturally diverse populations. Moreover, the disparity between the gender and the racial mix of nurses and the overall population continues to widen. Thus, a growing need for professional nurses and advanced practice nurses with formal educational preparation in all areas of oncology nursing exists. This article (a) highlights significant cancer disparities among diverse populations, (b) describes how cultural belief systems influence cancer care and decision making, and (c) explicates the need to prepare advanced practice nurses for careers that include cancer care of diverse and vulnerable populations through formal oncology educational programs. The "Top 10" reasons for becoming an advanced practice nurse specializing in the oncologic care of patients from diverse and underserved populations are presented. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cyberbullying and Social Media: Information and Interventions for School Nurses Working With Victims, Students, and Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Elizabeth; Vessey, Judith A; Pfeifer, Lauren

    2018-02-01

    Social media has become an increasingly prevalent fixture in youths' lives, with over 90% of teenagers reporting daily usage. These online sites and applications have provided many positive opportunities for youths to connect and share ideas with others; however, social media has also become a major platform for cyberbullying. Victims often experience negative health outcomes directly related to cyberbullying. For this reason, it is critical that third parties, such as school nurses, are well versed in social media and the warning signs of those being victimized by cyberbullying. Therefore, this integrative review examines school nurses' knowledge of cyberbullying and social media and identifies the implications for school nursing practice regarding prevention and intervention processes.

  10. School Nurses' Experiences in Dealing With Bullying Situations Among Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigozi, Pamela Lamarca; Jones Bartoli, Alice

    2016-06-01

    School nurses have an important role in helping students to deal with bullying. However, most of the previously undertaken studies do not have nurses as the subjects, considering their experiences around this theme. This study used a qualitative approach through in-depth interviews with 12 school nurses (SNs). The thematic analysis was employed and supported by NVivo 10 software. Five main themes arose from the analysis: (1) understanding about bullying, (2) how they identified bullying, (3) strategies, (4) support at the workplace, and (5) SNs' role. SNs have a reasonable knowledge about this issue and are capable of helping students through dialogue. However, there is a need to be trained and have more time to be able to give proper help to the students, also using other different strategies. SNs must work more actively on this issue with schools and be supported in terms of staff numbers. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Creating a Fair and Just Culture in Schools of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnsteiner, Jane; Disch, Joanne

    2017-11-01

    : In recent years, health care organizations have been moving away from a culture that responds to errors and near misses with "shame and blame" and toward a fair and just culture. Such a culture encourages and rewards people for speaking up about safety-related concerns, thus allowing the information to be used for system improvement. In part 1 of this series, we reported on findings from a study that examined how nursing schools handled student errors and near misses. We found that few nursing schools had a policy or a reporting tool concerning these events; and that when policies did exist, the majority did not reflect the principles of a fair and just culture. This article, part 2 of the series, describes several strategies that nursing schools can use for creating such a culture.

  12. Content of Orthopedic Patient Education Provided by Nurses in Seven European Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambous, Andreas; Papastavrou, E; Valkeapää, K; Zabalegui, A; Ingadóttir, B; Lemonidou, C; Fatkulina, N; Jouko, K; Leino-Kilpi, H

    2017-07-01

    Patients' and their significant others' education during the perioperative phase is an important and challenging aspect of care. This study explored the content of education provided by nurses to arthroplasty patients and their significant others. Data were collected with the Education of Patients-NURSE content (EPNURSE-Content), Received Knowledge of Hospital Patient (RKhp), and Received Knowledge of Significant Other (RKso) scales. The results showed that the content of education emphasized biophysiological and functional needs, differed between countries, and was related to how physically demanding nurses found their job to be and the amount of education provided. There is congruence between the received knowledge of patients and their significant others in relation to the content of education provided by nurses. The findings can support nurses in developing aid material for patients and significant others explaining the nature of education and advising them what to expect and how to optimize their participation in the process.

  13. Providing grief resolution as an oncology nurse retention strategy: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Lori

    2012-12-01

    Oncology nurses play a pivotal role in optimizing care provided to patients at the end of life (EOL). Although oncology nurses commonly provide EOL care and witness deaths of patients that they have maintained long-standing relationships with, they are frequently excluded from grief resolution endeavors. With a worldwide shortage of oncology nurses, retention is paramount to ensuring that the care patients with cancer receive is not jeopardized. Various strategies were identified to resolve grief and increase nurse retention, including creating supportive work environments, debriefing with colleagues, providing EOL and grief education, and altering patient care assignments. Future research on emerging technologies and their effects on oncology nurse coping and retention strategies also was suggested.

  14. [Training future nurses in providing care for patients who committed criminal acts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvest, Karina; Royer, Gilles Ripaille-Le; Dugardin, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Providing care for patients who have carried out criminal acts is a source of questioning for caregivers, who must position themselves in this specific care relationship. For three years, the nursing training institute (IFSI) in Orthez has offered students an optional module in criminology. Through discussions and critical reflection, its aim is to enable future nurses to be better prepared.

  15. Nurse-midwifery education through graduate programs to provide a sufficient number of high quality nurse-midwives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Hye Lee

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a decrease in the number of new midwives, resulting from the shutdown of midwifery education program in hospitals due to a decrease in birthrate in the Republic of Korea. To solve this problem, the current medical laws on midwifery education system in Korea should be revised; nurse-midwifery specialist programs must be established in educational institutes with nursing programs. To support this argument, the midwifery education programs of America, Europe, Australia, and Japan have been discussed, and a nurse-midwifery specialist curriculum at the master s level, based on the nurse-practitioner system of Korea, has been suggested. Since this assertion is very important and urgent for solving the future population problem of Korea and providing health care for women and children, it should be realized into action immediately.

  16. Nurse teachers' working lives: a questionnaire survey of nursing schools in Mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, L; While, A E; Chen, G; Barriball, K L; Gu, S

    2011-12-01

    The study aimed to explore Chinese nurse teachers' views and experience regarding different components of their working lives. A cross-sectional survey of 18 schools of nursing offering nationally accredited baccalaureate nursing programmes across Mainland China was conducted. A total of 227 nurse teachers completed questionnaires yielding a response rate of 72%. The sample comprised mainly female, married lecturers younger than 44 years with an average teaching experience of about 10 years. The respondents were satisfied with their overall job, work, supervision and co-workers, but dissatisfied with their pay and promotion opportunities. There were statistically significant differences in several facets of job satisfaction across the respondents of different age groups, education levels, job titles and those working in the schools of different sizes. The respondents perceived their work environment to be only somewhat empowering. Their average level of professional identification was relatively high, but their overall role conflict, role ambiguity and sense of coherence were relatively low. Chinese nurse teachers had a positive feeling towards their working lives, but strategies should be developed to enhance their sense of coherence and professional commitment. It is worth noting that there is still much adjustment to be made towards the new higher education roles, but the findings may only be generalizable to similar settings. © 2011 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  17. Screening for Usher Syndrome: A Hands-On Guide for School Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Joan; Coonts, Teresa; Jordan, Beth; Schafer, Jacqueline, Ed.

    This manual was written specifically to help school nurses conduct screenings for Usher syndrome, a genetic condition that involves deafness or hearing loss and the progressive loss of vision. It provides information on the step-by-step process of how to conduct a screening, the actual forms needed for a screening, and resources for referring…

  18. Teaching Children about Mental Health and Illness: A School Nurse Health Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSocio, Janiece; Stember, Lisa; Schrinsky, Joanne

    2006-01-01

    A mental health education program designed by school nurses for children ages 10-12 was developed in 2000-2001 and expanded with broader distribution in 2004-2005. Six classroom sessions, each 45 minutes in length, provided information and activities to increase children's awareness of mental health and illness. Education program content included…

  19. Effectiveness of health education teachers and school nurses teaching sexually transmitted infections/human immunodeficiency virus prevention knowledge and skills in high school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borawski, Elaine A; Tufts, Kimberly Adams; Trapl, Erika S; Hayman, Laura L; Yoder, Laura D; Lovegreen, Loren D

    2015-03-01

    We examined the differential impact of a well-established human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/sexually transmitted infections (STIs) curriculum, Be Proud! Be Responsible!, when taught by school nurses and health education classroom teachers within a high school curricula. Group-randomized intervention study of 1357 ninth and tenth grade students in 10 schools. Twenty-seven facilitators (6 nurses, 21 teachers) provided programming; nurse-led classrooms were randomly assigned. Students taught by teachers were more likely to report their instructor to be prepared, comfortable with the material, and challenged them to think about their health than students taught by a school nurse. Both groups reported significant improvements in HIV/STI/condom knowledge immediately following the intervention, compared to controls. Yet, those taught by school nurses reported significant and sustained changes (up to 12 months after intervention) in attitudes, beliefs, and efficacy, whereas those taught by health education teachers reported far fewer changes, with sustained improvement in condom knowledge only. Both classroom teachers and school nurses are effective in conveying reproductive health information to high school students; however, teaching the technical (eg, condom use) and interpersonal (eg, negotiation) skills needed to reduce high-risk sexual behavior may require a unique set of skills and experiences that health education teachers may not typically have. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  20. Evaluation of an Intervention Providing HPV Vaccine in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Brenda W.; Panozzo, Catherine A.; Moss, Jennifer L.; Reiter, Paul L.; Whitesell, Dianne H.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To conduct outcome and process evaluations of school-located HPV vaccination clinics in partnership with a local health department. Methods Temporary clinics provided the HPV vaccine to middle school girls in Guilford County, North Carolina, in 2009–2010. Results HPV vaccine initiation was higher among girls attending host schools than satellite schools (6% vs. 1%, OR = 6.56, CI = 3.99–10.78). Of the girls who initiated HPV vaccine, 80% received all 3 doses. Private insurance or federal programs paid for most vaccine doses. Conclusions Lessons learned for creating more effective school-health department partnerships include focusing on host schools and delivering several vaccines to adolescents, not just HPV vaccine alone. PMID:24034684

  1. Challenges of Asthma Management for School Nurses in Districts with High Asthma Hospitalization Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberatos, Penny; Leone, Jennifer; Craig, Ann Marie; Frei, Elizabeth Mary; Fuentes, Natalie; Harris, India Marie

    2013-01-01

    Background: School nurses play a central role in assisting elementary school children in managing their asthma, especially those in higher-risk school districts that are at increased risk of uncontrolled asthma. Study purposes are to (1) identify barriers to asthma management by school nurses in higher-risk school districts; and (2) assess the…

  2. Care of Victims of Child Maltreatment: The School Nurse's Role. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondeck, Lynnette; Combe, Laurie; Feeser, Cindy Jo; King, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that prevention, early recognition, intervention and treatment of child maltreatment are critical to the physical well-being and academic success of students. Registered professional school nurses (hereinafter referred to as school nurses) serve a vital role in the recognition…

  3. A Qualitative Study of Egyptian School Nurses' Attitudes and Experiences toward Sex and Relationship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrag, Shewikar; Hayter, Mark

    2014-01-01

    School nurses play a vital role in the promotion of sexual health. However, there is very limited evidence of how school nurses experience this topic in an Islamic cultural setting. Using an exploratory qualitative design, 13 in-depth interviews were conducted with Egyptian school nurses. Data were subject to thematic analysis. Four themes emerged…

  4. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: The Role of the School Nurse. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combe, Laurie G.; Sharpe, Susan; Feeser, Cynthia Jo; Ondeck, Lynnette; Fekaris, Nina

    2015-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) serves a vital role in the delivery of health care to our nation's students within the healthcare system reshaped by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, commonly known as…

  5. School Nurses' Descriptions of Concerns Arising during Pupils' Health Check-Ups: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poutiainen, Hannele; Holopainen, Arja; Hakulinen-Viitanen, Tuovi; Laatikainen, Tiina

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe the concerns and modes of action of Finnish school nurses during pupils' health check-ups. Methods: Focus group interviews with 17 school nurses were performed in 2011 and again in 2013. Data were analysed using inductive content analysis. Results: School nurses' concerns were mostly associated with the psychosocial…

  6. The meaning of providing caring to obese patients to a group of nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilly Souza Marques

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study was performed with six nurses of a public hospital, with the objective to describe their view of the meaning of providing care to obese patients. Interviews were conducted using a semi-structured script. The data were organized under themes extracted from the subjects’ statements, after being thoroughly read. Symbolic Interactionism was adopted to interpret the findings. The results from the analysis were organized under the following themes: Being obese is excessive, it is not healthy; Providing care to the obese is a structural issue; Obese patients are troublesome, they require care, no big deal; Providing care to the obese requires teamwork. The grasped meanings can interfere in the care provided. The nurses, however, recognize the need to work as a team to deliver comprehensive care. Making positive changes to the meanings found in this study is possible, thus, contributing to providing prejudice-free nursing care to obese patients. Descriptors: Obesity; Nursing Care; Hospital Care.

  7. Nurses' attitude and practice in providing tobacco cessation care to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedharan, J; Muttappallymyalil, J; Venkatramana, M

    2010-06-01

    Patients respond very positively with nurses when they talk to them about their health related problems. This cross sectional study was carried out among nurses working in Gulf Medical College hospital and Research centre, Ajman, UAE to assess the their attitude in providing tobacco cessation counselling or advise to their patients and potential barriers they face in providing tobacco cessation care. 108 nurses participated in the study. Among the nurses 87% were females, the majority were aged between 25 and 34 years, and 46.3% had a work experience of less than 5 years. Among the nurses who participated in the survey, 99.1% felt that the hospital stay was a suitable time for nurses to create awareness on tobacco and health to the patients and had a positive attitude towards creating awareness on tobacco and health to the patients. Only 0.9% had a negative attitude towards creating awareness on tobacco and health and they felt that patients might not listen to them. All nurses, irrespective of their socio-demographic characteristics had a positive attitude to motivating patients to quit tobacco use. Currently, 70.4% regularly advise their patients to avoid tobacco products. Potential barriers pointed out by nurses were: lack of time (6.3%) patients may not appreciate it (90.6%) and not part of their job (3.1%). The study concludes that nurses have a positive attitude in providing tobacco cessation care to their patients and they can utilize their unique knowledge and know-how to promote tobacco cessation and prevent the spread of this public health crisis. Providing advice and support for tobacco cessation by nurses would increase the chance of patients stopping tobacco use. This will create an enabling environment and greater potential for public health persons to fight the epidemic with greater vigour

  8. Weathering the storm: challenges to nurses providing care to nursing home residents during hurricanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, Kathryn; Brown, Lisa M; Christensen, Janelle J; Thomas, Kali S

    2009-11-01

    This article documents the experience of 291 Florida nursing homes during the 2004 hurricane season. Using quantitative and qualitative methods, the authors described and compared the challenges nurses encountered when evacuating residents with their experiences assisting residents of facilities that sheltered in place. The primary concerns for evacuating facilities were accessing appropriate evacuation sites for residents and having ambulance transportation contracts honored. The main issue for facilities that sheltered in place was the length of time it took for power to be restored. Barriers to maintaining resident health during disasters for those who evacuated or sheltered in place are identified.

  9. Underrepresented students' perspectives on institutional climate during the application and admission process to nursing school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods-Giscombe, Cheryl L; Rowsey, Pamela Johnson; Kneipp, Shawn M; Owens, Clint W; Sheffield, Karen M; Galbraith, Kayoll V; Hammad, Sama; Fowler, Tamryn; Hodges, Eric A; Kowlowitz, Vicky; Alexander, G Rumay

    2015-05-01

    A growing body of literature has focused on issues related to recruitment and retention to enhance diversity in nursing. This study was designed to identify barriers and supports encountered by underrepresented students when applying to nursing school. Twenty-two underrepresented baccalaureate nursing students participated in two focus groups. Applied thematic analysis was used to organize the data and identify major themes. Students expressed the importance of having (a) navigators in the offices of admissions and student affairs to provide encouragement, support, and information during the application process; (b) tailored programming for underrepresented students; (c) financial aid guidance; (d) timely feedback about admissions decisions; (e) a clear and easily navigated Web site; and (f) negotiation and acculturation to know the right things to do and say during the application and admissions process. Findings provide direction for developing programming and collaborations to enhance the institutional climate for underrepresented nursing applicants. [J Nurs Educ. 2015;54(5):261-269.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. The experiences of nurses in providing psychosocial support to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted in the surgical ICUs of two private hospitals and one public hospital in the Durban metropolitan area. Findings. Four main themes emerged from the data: cultural awareness, communication challenges, providing assistance, and lack of training. Conclusion. These findings provide implications for ...

  11. Evaluation of Basic Life Support Training Program Provided for Nurses in A University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Terzi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study was conducted to assess the efficiency of the basic life support (BLS training program provided for nurses in a university hospital. To evaluate the efficiency of the BLS training program provided for nurses in a university hospital. Methods: In this a quasi-experimental study, a total of 404 nurses who received BLS training were enrolled. The study was performed in two stages. In stage one, the participant nurses were given a pre-test that consisted of 25 questions, four points each, before the training on the first day of the 2-day BLS training. The post-test was conducted in addition to practical exams on manikins to determine nurses’ practice skills on BLS. Results: There was a statistically significant difference between the nurses with previous BLS training and the difference between their pre- and post-test results (p<0.05, and high statistically significant difference was found between the nurses with previous advanced life support (ALS training and the difference between their pre- and post-test results (p<0.001. Conclusion: Nurses should receive BLS training in hospitals and the training should be repeated on a regular basis. The BLS training that the nurses received in this study was effective and increased their knowledge level on BLS

  12. Nurses' experiences providing bereavement follow-up: an exploratory study using feminist poststructuralism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacConnell, Grace; Aston, Megan; Randel, Pat; Zwaagstra, Nick

    2013-04-01

    To describe the experiences of nurses who provided bereavement follow-up with families after the death of a child or a pregnancy loss and explore facilitators, barriers and challenges. Bereavement follow-up after the death of a child has been identified as an indicator of quality end of life care by families and health care professionals. Research suggests communication with bereaved families can be challenging and intimidating for nurses, particularly those who have had limited experience. In-depth information about the personal, professional and institutional experiences of nurses providing this care is lacking. Eight registered nurses with experience in providing bereavement follow-up to families were interviewed. Purposive sampling provided information rich cases. Feminist poststructuralism was the guiding theory and methodology used to uncover underlying discourses. This methodology uses the concepts of discourse analysis, subjectivity and agency to enable a critical understanding of the relationships. The nurses described complex interactions between themselves, the families, hospital practices and policy, and social norms around the discourses of death and professionalism. The importance of relationship, self-care and closure, professional boundaries, invisible nature of the practice and institutional support were prominent themes. Insights into the challenges and rewards of providing bereavement follow-up are discussed in the context of power relations, and recommendations for change are offered. Nurses in the study were strongly committed to providing ongoing care to families who had experienced the death of a child or a pregnancy loss. Relationships were important to bereavement follow-up care, and the connections with families were often emotional for the nurses. Nurses and other health professionals would benefit from increased support and education related to bereavement and communication with grieving families. Clarity related to institutional

  13. [Implementation of nurse demand managment in primary health care service providers in Catalonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugués Brugués, Alba; Cubells Asensio, Irene; Flores Mateo, Gemma

    2017-11-01

    To describe and analyse the implementaction of nurse demand managment (NDM) among health care providers in Catalonia from 2005 to 2014. Cross sectional survey. Participants All service providers in Catalonia (n=37). Main measurements Interviews with nurse manager of each health care provides about ht barriers and facilitators concerning NDM. Facilitators and barriers were classified into 3 types: (i)health professional (competence, attitudes, motivation for change and individual characteristics); (ii)social context (patients and companions), and (iii)system related factors (organization and structure, economic incentives). Of the 37 providers, 26 (70.3%) have implemented the Demand Management Nurse (NDM). The main barriers identified are the nurse prescriptin regulation, lack of knowledge and skills of nurses, and the lack of protocols at the start of implantation. Among the facilitators are the specific training of professionals, a higher ratio of nurses to doctors, consensus circuits with all professionals and linking the implementation of NDM to economic incentives. NDM is consolidated in Catalonia. However, the NDM should be included in the curricula of nursing degree and continuing education programs in primary care teams. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Occupational stress in intensive care nurses who provide direct care to critical patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Inoue, Kelly Cristina; Versa, Gelena Lucinéia Gomes da Silva; Murassaki, Ana Cláudia Yassuko; Melo, Willian Augusto de; Matsuda, Laura Misue

    2013-01-01

    In order to identify the stress level of nurses that provide direct care to critically ill patients, it was carried out a descriptive and exploratory study in five hospitals of the western region of the state of Paraná...

  15. Evaluating the impact of palliative or hospice care provided in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, Nina M; McPherson, Mary Lynn

    2014-10-01

    Palliative and hospice care are increasingly being provided in nursing home settings. The current article reviews the existing evidence relevant to nursing homes to provide practitioners with a greater understanding of the impact of palliative and hospice care on clinical care outcomes (e.g., pain, symptom management), processes of care outcomes (e.g., hospitalizations, cost of care), and family member or health care proxy perceptions of care. Overall, the provision of hospice or palliative care in nursing facilities can improve the clinical care residents receive, reduce hospitalizations, and improve family members' perception of care. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. The occupational status of the graduates of Semnan Nursing School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saberlan M

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the main missions of higher education is to train the professional manpower the society needs. Higher education institutes should know the fate of their students after graduation and that how they use their expertise. Purpose: To determine the occupational status of the graduates of Semnan Nursing School. Methods: The graduates of thefirst 11 years since thefoundation of the school were included in this study. The datagathering tool was a questionnaire consisting of 7 demographic questions and 10 questions about the place of occupation, nature of the job, continuing education and scientific activities. The questionnaires were mailed to the study group addresses and the data were analyzed after receiving the answers. Results: Of the respondents, 60.22% were female. Most of them were working in hospitals and 43.01% were practicing in fields other than nursing. Only 24.72% of the respondents were unemployed for one ye9r after graduation. Most of the graduates did not continue their education, 2.61% have continued their study infields other than nursery and 6.45% have changed their field of profession. The majority showed no interest in research and writing or translating books. Also, 77.42% have not tried to publish an article in any journal and 80.64% have not participated in any scientific conference. Of the respondents, 80.64% had no contact with their prior university and only 17.2% were employed in university-affiliated hospitals. Conclusion: Long-term unemployment after graduation, unstable occupational status, practicing infields other than nursing, showing no interest in continuing education or participating in research projects, having no contact with scientific centers and not participating in national or regional health programs indicate that the enrol/ment of students in nursing schools is not consistent with their personal interests and capabilities. It is recommended to interview the students in order to determine

  17. Exploring consumer views of care provided by the Macmillan nurse using the critical incident technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, K; Bergen, A; Norman, I J

    1993-03-01

    This study focuses on descriptive accounts of one Macmillan nurse's work, as provided by key individuals coming into contact with this specialist professional service. Twenty respondents (eight patients, five carers, five district nurses and two general practitioners) were interviewed using a variation of the critical incident technique. Data were analysed in terms of meaningful observed events (critical happenings) that were perceived as effective or ineffective with respect to the delivery of high-quality nursing care. Some variations were found between groups of respondents in their perception of the nurse's role. However, there was a general emphasis on the possession of specialist knowledge of terminal cancer care and the positive impact of interventions to both the patient and to lay and professional carers. The critical incident technique was found to be a valuable method for eliciting detailed accounts of the work of the nurse in this specialized field of practice.

  18. Teaching of communication skills in Spanish nursing schools: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, G; Tazon, P; Aseguinolaza, L; Garcia-Campayo, J J

    1998-04-01

    The main objective of this study is to review the teaching of communication skills in Spain as part of the nursing curriculum. A survey was carried out to identify the practical and theoretical issues pertinent to this question. Forty Spanish Nursing Schools took part. Our survey discovered that communication skills are not generally considered in the selection process of the students because personal interviews are rarely used. Communication skills are taught in the first and second years, mainly in Fundamentals of Nursing and subjects related to Psychology and Mental Health. Nursing and psychology were the predominant professional background of the teachers. Lectures, discussion groups and workshops were the main teaching methods. The assessment, when it existed, was often theoretical and, occasionally, using a real patient or a written case report. The authors propose that the knowledge of the teaching situation in Spain is the starting point for any future projects on communication.

  19. Increasing Access to Health Care Providers with Nurse Practitioner Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Del Marjorie

    2014-01-01

    Emergency department visits increased from 102.8 million to 136.1 million in 2009, resulting in crowding and increased wait times, affecting U.S. hospitals' ability to provide safe, timely patient care resulting in dangerous delays and serious health problems shown by research. The purpose of this project was to determine if competencies developed…

  20. Mutual Expectations of Mothers of Hospitalized Children and Pediatric Nurses Who Provided Care: Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konuk Şener, Dilek; Karaca, Aysel

    This study attempted to identify the mutual expectations of mothers whose children were hospitalized in the pediatric department of a university hospital and nurses who provided care. A descriptive phenomenological design has been used in this study. Data were obtained through tape-recorded semi-structured interviews. This study was conducted at a pediatric clinic, at a university hospital in a small city in Turkey. Participants comprised five nurses working in the children's clinic and 24 mothers who accompanied their children to the hospital. The six major themes that emerged were mothers' feelings and thoughts about the hospital experience, mothers' expectations for attention and support during hospitalization, mothers' expectations for invasive procedures, issues regarding physical comfort and hospital infrastructure, nurses' feelings and thoughts about working in the pediatric clinic, and nurses' expectations of the mothers. Mothers expected nurses to provide physical support including medication administration, and installing/applying IV and nebulizer treatments; and emotional support in terms of having a friendly, rather than critical attitude, and being approachable and receptive of mothers' questions and anxieties. Nurses stated that they were aware of these expectations but needed mothers to be understanding and tolerant, considering their difficult working conditions. Children's hospitalization is a stressful experience for parents. Open and therapeutic communication and relationships between parents and nurses contribute to improving the quality of care provided to children and their families. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Developing Instructional Materials on English Oral Communication for Nursing Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sismiati; Adnan Latief, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    The needs survey shows that English communication skill of the students in nursing school speaking classes is not well developed. Consequently, the speaking instructional materials used in the classes need to be advanced. Yalden's (1987) Language Program Development covering Needs Analysis, Syllabus and Materials Development, Expert Validation,…

  2. Multimedia technology for diabetes education of school nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) require school nurses (SN) with specific diabetes training. Multimedia learning can facilitate cost-effective, convenient education of SN by diabetes educators (DE). We conducted formative research to gather qualitative and quantitative data to inform the interven...

  3. [Addictions in schools, the role of the nurse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorraine S

    2017-06-01

    The school nurse, as the health expert, must establish a climate of trust in order to help prevent addictions and implement health education actions. She draws on the experience of the young students with regard to the demands and risks of their daily life. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. School Nurses and Health Education: The Classroom Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Julie; Sendall, Marguerite C.; Fleming, Marylou; Lidstone, John; Domocol, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study is to explore school nurses' experience of health education. Design: A qualitative approach, phenomenology was used to answer the question. Method: Sixteen participants were recruited through purposeful and snowball sampling. Participants undertook an audio-recorded interview which was transcribed and analysed.…

  5. Structure and Change of Some Role Perceptions in Nursing School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmel, Arnold

    Are new values and norms learned and internalized in professional school? This question and other related ones will be considered in the study of which this paper is a preliminary report. To specify norms and to consider the structure of relations in a set of norms, nursing students' prescriptions of what various kinds of personnel in a hospital…

  6. Providing travel health care--the nurses' role: an international comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Irmgard; Hall, Sheila; Sato, Nahoko

    2013-01-01

    In many countries, the responsibility for travel health lies with medical practitioners who delegate certain tasks to nursing staff. Elsewhere, nurses have taken a leading role and work independently in private or hospital-based clinics, occupational health departments and general practices. The purpose of this study was to examine the roles and challenges faced by nurses providing travel health care in Australia, Japan and the UK, and to compare educational and professional needs. Nurses involved in travel health care were invited to complete an online questionnaire with multiple choice, open-ended, and Likert Scale questions. SurveyMonkey's statistical facilities analysed quantitative data; thematic content analysis was applied to qualitative responses. Differences and similarities between the three countries were conveyed by 474 participants focusing on current positions, work arrangements, and educational and practical concerns. Clinical practice issues, including vaccination and medication regulations, were highlighted with the differences between countries explained by the respective history of travel health care development and the involvement within their nursing profession. The call for more educational opportunities, including more support from employers, and a refinement of the role as travel health nurse appears to be international. Nurses require support networks within the field, and the development of a specialist "travel health nurse" would give a stronger voice to their concerns and needs for specific education and training in travel health care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Enhancing Geriatric Curriculum in Nursing School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    People are living longer. The average age of the population is increasing, and is expected to keep growing. Any person age 65 and older is now considered "geriatric." However, although growing, this population is not receiving adequate nursing care, and results in increased pain, falls, and even death. Geriatric curriculum is becoming…

  8. Patients' and nurses' views on providing psychological support within cardiac rehabilitation programmes: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Katrina M; Winder, Rachel; Campbell, John L; Richards, David A; Gandhi, Manish; Dickens, Chris M; Richards, Suzanne

    2017-09-01

    To explore patients' and nurses' views on the feasibility and acceptability of providing psychological care within cardiac rehabilitation services. In-depth interviews analysed thematically. 18 patients and 7 cardiac nurses taking part in a pilot trial (CADENCE) of an enhanced psychological care intervention delivered within cardiac rehabilitation programmes by nurses to patients with symptoms of depression. Cardiac services based in the South West of England and the East Midlands, UK. Patients and nurses viewed psychological support as central to good cardiac rehabilitation. Patients' accounts highlighted the significant and immediate adverse effect a cardiac event can have on an individual's mental well-being. They also showed that patients valued nurses attending to both their mental and physical health, and felt this was essential to their overall recovery. Nurses were committed to providing psychological support, believed it benefited patients, and advocated for this support to be delivered within cardiac rehabilitation programmes rather than within a parallel healthcare service. However, nurses were time-constrained and found it challenging to provide psychological care within their existing workloads. Both patients and nurses highly value psychological support being delivered within cardiac rehabilitation programmes but resource constraints raise barriers to implementation. Consideration, therefore, should be given to alternative forms of delivery which do not rely solely on nurses to enable patients to receive psychological support during cardiac rehabilitation. ISCTRN34701576. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Experiences of Parish Nurses in Providing Diabetes Education and Preconception Counseling to Women With Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devido, Jessica A; Doswell, Willa M; Braxter, Betty J; Spatz, Diane L; Dorman, Janice S; Terry, Martha Ann; Charron-Prochownik, Denise

    To explore the role and experiences of the parish nurse in providing diabetes education and preconception counseling to women with diabetes. Mixed-methods concurrent embedded design. Focus groups of community-based parish nurses accessed from a regional database (Pennsylvania, Florida, Ohio, New York, Arizona, and Minnesota). Forty-eight parish nurses recruited from the Parish Nurse and Health Ministry Program database in Western Pennsylvania. The primary method was focus groups using face-to-face, teleconference, and videoconferencing formats. A secondary method used a quantitative descriptive design with three self-report measures (demographic, preconception counseling self-efficacy, and preconception counseling knowledge). Qualitative content analysis techniques were conducted and combined with descriptive analysis. Forty-eight parish nurses participated in 1 of 11 focus groups. Eight qualitative themes emerged: Awareness, Experience, Formal Training, Usefulness, Willingness, Confidence, "Wise Women," and Preconception Counseling Tool for Patients. Participants provided recommendations for training and resources to increase their knowledge and skills. Parish nurses' knowledge scores were low (mean = 66%, range = 40%-100%) with only moderate levels of self-efficacy (mean = 99, range = 27-164). Self-efficacy had a significantly positive association with knowledge (r = .29, p = .05). Quantitative results were consistent with participants' qualitative statements. Parish nurses were unaware of preconception counseling and lacked knowledge and teaching self-efficacy as it related to preconception counseling and diabetes education. Understanding parish nurses' experiences with women with diabetes and identifying their needs to provide education and preconception counseling will help tailor training interventions that could affect maternal and fetal outcomes. Copyright © 2017 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published

  10. Enabling overweight children to improve their food and exercise habits--school nurses' counselling in multilingual settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Maria B; Kjellgren, Karin I; Winkvist, Anna

    2012-09-01

    The study aimed at analysing school nurses' counselling of overweight and obese children in settings with many immigrants, focusing on content concerning food and physical activity and how this was communicated. For people with a predisposition for overweight, the weight control process requires cognitive skills. School nurses' counselling of overweight children has the potential to support this process by enabling personal resources in the children and their families. However, there is uncertainty among nurses about how to conduct supportive counselling. An explorative design was used when collecting and analysing data. Twenty-two counselling sessions between eight school nurses and 20 overweight children were audio-recorded and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Most of the participating schools represented areas with low socioeconomic status and a high proportion of immigrants and refugees. Less adequate skills in enabling resources in the children and their parents were observed. Concurrently, school nurses provided inadequate explanations about food and physical activity. Topics related to general nutrition models were frequently communicated as general advice instead of individually tailored counselling. Counselling families with other languages and food cultures than the traditional Swedish created additional difficulties. Improved nutritional knowledge for nurses may enhance their skills in enabling children's and families' resources. School nurses should be provided with opportunities to cooperate with other professions in counteracting overweight. Our findings demonstrate a relationship between content skills and person-centeredness in the counselling. This highlights the importance of inter-professional collaboration to ensure a high quality of lifestyle counselling. School health authorities should give high priority to facilitating school nurses' evidence-based continuing education. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Redesigning School Nursing Education in New Jersey to Address the Challenges and Opportunities of Population Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, Robin M; Conway, Sharon M; Atkins, Joy D

    2017-03-01

    School health is a specialty practice of nursing positioned at the intersection of public health and population health. This article discusses the redesign of a program's curriculum with the hope of advancing and elevating the practice of school nursing. The redesign is based on NASN's Framework for 21st Century School Nursing Practice and is the result of a New Jersey Nursing Initiative grant awarded to a trio of adjunct faculty from Rutgers University Camden in July 2016.

  12. What Barriers and Facilitators Do School Nurses Experience When Implementing an Obesity Intervention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Krista; Smaldone, Arlene

    2017-12-01

    A recent evaluation of a school nurse-led obesity intervention demonstrated a 5% implementation rate. The purpose of this study was to explore school nurses' perceived barriers to and facilitators of the intervention in order to understand reasons for the low implementation rate. Methods included semi-structured individual interviews with school nurses. Data were analyzed using content analysis and heat mapping. Nineteen nurses participated and eight themes were identified. Parental and administrative gatekeeping, heavy nurse workload, obesogenic environments, and concerns about obesity stigma were barriers to implementation. Teamwork with parents and school staff was a key facilitator of implementation. Nurses also noted the importance of cultural considerations and highlighted the need to tailor the intervention to the unique needs of their school environment and student population. These findings suggest that for school nurses to play a key role in school-based obesity interventions, barriers must be identified and addressed prior to program implementation.

  13. Personal Information Management for Nurses Returning to School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Katherine

    2015-12-01

    Registered nurses with a diploma or an associate's degree are encouraged to return to school to earn a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. Until they return to school, many RNs have little need to regularly write, store, and retrieve work-related papers, but they are expected to complete the majority of assignments using a computer when in the student role. Personal information management (PIM) is a system of organizing and managing electronic information that will reduce computer clutter, while enhancing time use, task management, and productivity. This article introduces three PIM strategies for managing school work. Nesting is the creation of a system of folders to form a hierarchy for storing and retrieving electronic documents. Each folder, subfolder, and document must be given a meaningful unique name. Numbering is used to create different versions of the same paper, while preserving the original document. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Learning about health: The pupils' and the school health nurses assessment of the health dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Ina K.

    Public health, health promotion, empowerment, experiental learning, HBSC, health survey, qualitative interviews, grounded theory, school children, adolescents, health dialogue, school health nurse......Public health, health promotion, empowerment, experiental learning, HBSC, health survey, qualitative interviews, grounded theory, school children, adolescents, health dialogue, school health nurse...

  15. Learning about health: The pupils' and the school health nurses assessment of the health dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Ina K.

    Public health, health promotion, empowerment, experiential learning, HBSC, health survey, qualitative interviews, grounded theory, school children, adolescents, health dialouge, school health nurse......Public health, health promotion, empowerment, experiential learning, HBSC, health survey, qualitative interviews, grounded theory, school children, adolescents, health dialouge, school health nurse...

  16. Developing and Establishing School-Based Sexual Health Services: Issues for School Nursing Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayter, Mark; Owen, Jenny; Cooke, Jo

    2012-01-01

    School-based sexual health clinics are emerging as one of the key ways to promote sexual health among young people, and school nurses play an important role in developing and delivering these services. This study used a qualitative design to explore the experiences of health professionals and policy makers involved in setting up such services in…

  17. School Nurses and Teachers: Attitudes regarding Inclusion of Breastfeeding Education in School Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Hila J.

    2010-01-01

    School nurses and middle and high school teachers (N = 107) participated in a survey that explored their attitudes and behaviors related to the inclusion of breastfeeding content to highlight the scientific and exceptional health advantages of breastfeeding and to promote a breastfeeding culture. Although some participants believed that…

  18. The challenges of undergraduate mental health nursing education from the perspectives of heads of schools of nursing in Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; McAllister, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The shortage of a skilled mental health nursing workforce is persistent and worsening. Research consistently demonstrates the inability of the comprehensive model of nursing education to meet nursing workforce needs in mental health. Introducing specialisation in mental health at undergraduate level has been suggested as a strategy to address this problem. Exploration of barriers to this educational approach is essential. The aim of this research is to examine with Queensland Heads of Schools of Nursing, the perceived barriers to a specialist mental health nursing stream within an undergraduate nursing programme. Qualitative exploratory methods, involving in-depth telephone interviews with Heads of Schools of Nursing in Queensland, Australia. Data were analysed thematically. Participants encountered a number of barriers revealed in five main themes: academic staffing; staff attitudes; funding and resource implications; industry support; entry points and articulation pathways. Barriers to the implementation of mental health nursing specialisation in undergraduate programmes are evident. While these barriers pose real threats, potential solutions are also evident. Most notably is the need for Schools of Nursing to become more co-operative in mounting mental health nursing specialisations in a smaller number of universities, where specialist expertise is identified. Quality mental health services rely on a sufficiently skilled and knowledgeable nursing workforce. To achieve this it is important to identify and implement the educational approach best suited to prepare nurses for practice in this field.

  19. Providing oral care in haematological oncology patients: nurses' knowledge and skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potting, Carin M J; Mank, Arno; Blijlevens, Nicole M A; Donnelly, J Peter; van Achterberg, Theo

    2008-09-01

    In the international literature, the most commonly recommended intervention for managing oral mucositis is good oral care, assuming that nurses have sufficient knowledge and skills to perform oral care correctly. The aim of the present study was to investigate if knowledge and skills about oral care improve when education in oral care is provided to nurses in charge of patients who are at risk of oral mucositis. This intervention study consists of a baseline test on the knowledge and skills of nurses of the haematology wards of two different hospitals. Oral care education sessions were given in one hospital and follow-up tests were performed in both hospitals. Nursing records were examined and observations of nurses performing oral care were made at baseline as well as at follow-up. The results show significant differences in the scores for knowledge and skills before and after the education, whereas there was no difference in scores at the two points in time for the comparison hospital, where no education had taken place. The records test showed no differences at baseline or follow-up for the two groups. Observations showed that nurses who followed the education session implemented the oral care protocol considerably better than those who did not attended. Education in oral care has a positive influence on the knowledge and skills of nurses who care for patient at risk of oral mucositis, but not on the quality of oral care documentation.

  20. Teachers' perceptions of the role of nurses: caring for children who are technology-dependent in mainstream schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Fumie; Katsuda, Hitomi

    2015-01-01

    This study explored special education teachers' perceptions of the role of nurses who specialize in providing nursing care to children who are technology-dependent in mainstream schools. Semistructured interviews with 11 teachers were conducted, and data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. The teachers surveyed thought that the most important role of nurses was to maintain good health and safety, as well as to support children's education as members of the educational team. Teachers desired that nurses give advice based on their professional knowledge to maintain the children's good health and safety. In supporting education, nurses were required to support the children's autonomy and education, and to act as members of the educational team. Study findings suggest that, for an optimal relationship with teachers, nurses who provide nursing care for children who are technology-dependent in mainstream schools need not only fulfill medical functions, but also support the education of children as members of the educational team. © 2014 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2014 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  1. Healthcare Provider Views on Transitioning From Task Shifting to Advanced Practice Nursing in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mboineki, Joanes Faustine; Zhang, Weihong

    The Tanzanian health sector suffers from shortages of healthcare workers as well as uneven distribution of healthcare workers in urban and rural areas. Task shifting-delegation of tasks from professionals to other healthcare team members with less training, such as medical attendants-is practiced, compromising quality of care. Advanced practice nursing is underutilized. The purpose of this study was to explore the views of nurses and physicians on current responses to shortages of healthcare workers and the potential for utilization of advanced practice nurses. A descriptive, qualitative design was used. Purposeful sampling was used to select 20 participants. An in-depth interview guide was used to obtain information. Interviews were conducted in Swahili or English. Content analysis was used to identify themes. Shortage of human resources in rural primary healthcare facilities was identified as a major rationale for implementation of the advanced practice nurse practitioner role because the current health providers in rural health facilities are less trained and doctors are not ready to work in these settings. Opposition from physicians is expected during the course of implementing the nurse practitioner role. Professional bodies and government should reach consensus before the implementation of this role in such a way that they should agree on scope and standards of practice of nurse practitioners in Tanzania. Shortage of human resources for health is greater in rural primary healthcare facilities. Task shifting in Tanzania is neither effective nor legally recognized. Transition to advanced practice nursing roles-particularly the nurse practitioner role-can facilitate provision of optimal care. Nurse practitioners should be prepared to work in rural primary healthcare facilities.

  2. Transition from High School to Associate Degree Nursing Education: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Kathy Jessee

    2012-01-01

    Nursing is facing a critical shortage and retention of nursing students is of paramount importance. Much research has been completed related to retention in nursing education and student success, but there is very little in current literature related to issues associated with the transition from high school to associate degree nursing (ADN)…

  3. From Vocational Training to Academic Education: The Situation of the Schools of Nursing in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ewa Pilhammar

    1999-01-01

    The success of the change from vocational training to academic education for nurses in Sweden depends on faculty competence. Observations at three Swedish nursing schools and interviews with 59 nurse educators identified strategies educators used to maintain teaching competence: being "real" nurses, being prepared in different subjects,…

  4. Comparing the Number of Ill or Injured Students Who Are Released Early from School by School Nursing and Nonnursing Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman, Linda L.

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing demand for research linking specific educational services with positive student outcomes. Little empirical evidence exists to show that school nursing services improve student success. School attendance is one of many factors that has been associated with improved learning; school nurses can affect that factor. This study…

  5. Nursing students' perceptions of caring for dying people, after one year in nursing school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Österlind, Jane; Prahl, Charlotte; Westin, Lars; Strang, Susann; Bergh, Ingrid; Henoch, Ingela; Hammarlund, Kina; Ek, Kristina

    2016-06-01

    To describe Swedish nursing students' perceptions of caring for dying people after the first year of a three year in a nursing programme at three university nursing schools in Sweden. Interviews (n=17) were undertaken with nursing students at the end of their first year. A phenomenographic approach was used to design and structure the analysis of the nursing students' perceptions. The analysis resulted in five categories: 1) from abstract to reality, 2) from scary to natural, 3) increased knowledge can give bad conscience, 4) time limits versus fear of end-of-life conversations, and 5) meeting with relatives. Nursing students need to be prepared both theoretically and within practice to encounter death and dying and to care for dying persons. By combining their theoretical knowledge of dying and death with their own encounters of death and dying people in practice, the students can be supported to develop an understanding of dying and death as a natural part of life rather than something frightening. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Portfolio in nursing school: myth or reality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, Chantal; Marchand, Claire

    2012-09-01

    The portfolio is a new tool that has been introduced for the setting up of a new program concerning the nurse training. It aims at the would-be nurse to improve their self-reliance and make them assess themselves through a critical and reflexive approach. Indeed, the portfolio is mostly made up of sheets that the student has to fill in when describing and analysing several professional conditions. This study is about the assessment of the relevance in the portfolio that each nurse student owns in order to make them improve their reflexive practical. The work will, thus, suggest different ways of thinking and improving the use of the tool. 30 portfolios were chosen randomly among the 2nd year students, because 180 analysis were assessed thanks to a grid. 10 viewpoints from volunteer students were gathered after several semi directive interviews. The qualitative and evaluative analysis shows that the students develop the reflexive practical throughout their trainings. It seems, indeed, relevant to choose the portfolio in order to help the students to develop this way of working. According to them, there are several positive points such as the distance towards an event, an awareness-raising of the acquisition, feedbacks about the quality of the text by the trainer and an ability to assess oneself. Yet, even though it was created 18 months ago, there are some limits such as the too short period of mentoring and feedback, the lack of time for the students to write their analysis, the fact that it is not a practical tool, and the unclear description of assessment criteria. In order to fulfil the needs, some solutions are to be found. The portfolio is clearly helpful for the students who wish to increase/improve gradually their reflexive practice. Thus, the trainer's role is crucial, when he is a supervisor.

  7. Nurse, physician, and consumer role responsibility perceived by health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, K; Bandak, A; Williams, M

    1999-01-01

    The article describes a study that addressed perceptions of unilateral and egalitarian role functions for nurses, physicians, and consumers in a long-term, 345-bed psychiatric facility in the western United States. Findings indicated that physicians desired to retain authority for health care decisions and that nurses, social workers, and hospital administrators preferred collaborative practice. Support for shared responsibility increased among psychiatric technicians with years of experience. Experience did not alter the attitudes of physicians, occupational therapists, and recreational therapists for physician dominance. With experience, nurses increased their belief in nurse responsibility. Despite evidence for collaborative decision making, results of this study indicate that attitudes of health care providers may prevent this tenet from being actualized.

  8. Examination of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health Care Content in North Carolina Schools of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Judith B; Enweana, Ijeoma; Alston, Celeste Kaysha; Baldwin, Dee M

    2017-04-01

    Nursing students require academic and clinical training in preparation for the increased demand for culturally competent care. One group that is in need of culturally knowledgeable health care providers is lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals. The purpose of this study was to examine how LGBT health care content is integrated into North Carolina schools of nursing curricula and to examine the existence of specific LGBT policies. A survey was mailed to 70 deans and directors of RN programs in North Carolina. Over 90% of the schools indicated that LGBT health care issues were taught in the curricula. The majority of the content was taught as an "other" course (37%). More than two thirds of the schools devoted less than 5 hours teaching LGBT content. LGBT health care content is being taught, yet the presence of specific LGBT practice policies is basically nonexistent. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(4):223-226.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. A recommendation to use the diffusion of innovations theory to understand school nurses' role in HPV vaccine uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Brittany; Goodson, Patricia

    Vaccinations represent one of the greatest public health achievements of the past century, but their success largely depends on populations' uptake. Seven years after its approval in 2006 for females, the HPV vaccination rates remain relatively low. Previous literature provides information about research examining U.S. physicians, pediatricians, and other healthcare providers' knowledge, attitudes, and professional practice toward the HPV vaccine. No research has yet investigated U.S. school nurses' role in educating the school community about the vaccine's benefits. Diffusion of Innovations theory is an appropriate perspective for examining school nurses as opinion leaders who can influence the uptake of the HPV vaccine for youth. This theory explains how innovations diffuse throughout a social system, and highlights the construct of opinion leadership. School nurses exhibit the characteristics of opinion leaders; therefore, Diffusion of Innovations can be a useful lens for assessing their role in efforts to promote HPV vaccination for youth.

  10. Mediating Effect of School Nurses' Self Efficacy between Multicultural Attitude and Cultural Sensitivity in Korean Elementary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Hyun Suk, PhD, RN

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Given the meaningful influence of positive multicultural attitude on cultural sensitivity and significant mediator effect of self efficacy as a school nurse between the two variables, the strategies to cultivate a positive multicultural attitude and enhance school nurses' self efficacy in their unique role should be considered in a training program. School nurses' health care services will benefit from the improvement of cultural sensitivity toward young children from multicultural families.

  11. A changing landscape: mapping provider organisations for community nursing services in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilsbury, Karen; Pender, Sue

    2015-01-01

    To scope the provision of community nursing services in England after implementation of the Transforming Community Services Programme. Over the past decade, significant UK policy initiatives have shaped the structure, organisation and responsibilities of community nursing services. Understanding these organisational changes is important in the context of organisations seeking to deliver 'care closer to home'. A systematic mapping exercise to scope and categorise community nursing service organisation provider models. There are 102 provider organisations representing a range of organisational models. Two-thirds of these organisations have structurally integrated with another NHS Trust. Smaller numbers reorganised to form community trusts or community interest companies. Only a few services have been tendered to an accredited willing provider while a small number have yet to establish their new service model. Local discretion appears to have dominated the choice of organisational form. National policies have driven the reorganisation of community nursing services and we have been able to describe, for the first time, these 'transformed' structures and organisations. Providing detail of these 'new' models of service provision, and where these have been introduced, is new information for nurse managers, policy makers and organisational leaders, as well as researchers. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Maximizing federal Medicaid dollars: nursing home provider tax adoption, 2000-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Edward Alan; Wang, Lili

    2009-12-01

    Since Medicaid is jointly financed by the federal and state governments, state officials have sought to offset state expenditures by maximizing federal contributions. One such strategy is to adopt a provider tax, which enables states to collect revenues from providers; those revenues are then used to pay for services rendered to Medicaid recipients, thereby leveraging federal matching dollars without concomitant increases in state expenditures. The number of states adopting a nursing home tax increased from thirteen to thirty-one between 2000 and 2004. This study seeks to identify the factors that spurred the rapid increase in nursing home provider taxes following implementation of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997. Results indicate that states with more powerful nursing home lobbies, lower proportions of private pay nursing home residents, worse fiscal health, weaker fiscal capacity, broader Medicaid eligibility, and nursing home supply restrictions were more likely to adopt. This implies that state officials react rationally to prevailing fiscal and programmatic circumstances when formulating policy under Medicaid and that providers seek relief, in part, from the adverse fiscal consequences of federal policy changes by promoting policy change at the state level.

  13. Faculty perception of bullying in schools of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Claudia A; Cannella, Barbara L; Wantland, Dean

    2013-01-01

    This article is a report of a study conducted to determine the prevalence of bullying among faculty members in schools or colleges of nursing. The issue of bullying of nursing faculty in the academic setting is of interest in terms of recruitment, retention, job satisfaction, and the overall quality of the work environment. This cross-sectional, descriptive study of faculty in three northeastern states of the United States was carried out in 2010. The Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised (NAQ-R) was used to survey faculty members in schools of nursing who award a baccalaureate degree (or higher) in nursing. A total of 473 faculty members met the inclusion criteria and responded to the NAQ-R. An iterative exploratory principal components analysis with orthogonal rotation was performed. Of the original 22 items, 13 were retained to measure the experiences of negative acts in the nursing faculty workplaces. The mean total score for the 13-item instrument was 17.90 (SD = 6.07) and ranged from 13 to 56. The resulting components structure produced three clear subscales identifying the experiences of verbal abuse, physical abuse, and devaluing. The revised 13-item instrument had a Cronbach's alpha value of .88. Experiences of bullying were reported in 169 of the 473 (36%) respondents. A significant correlation was found between meeting frequency and the report of bullying (r = .18, P ≤ .001). Administrators and senior faculty were more likely than expected to be the perpetrators of bullying. If the leaders are identified as bullies, the environment cannot be perceived as supportive and healthy. These unhealthy environments may have serious consequences related to retaining nursing faculty. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The school nursing profession in relation to Bourdieu's concepts of capital, habitus and field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morberg, Siv; Lagerström, Monica; Dellve, Lotta

    2012-06-01

    The aim was to define the work and professional role of school nurses, in terms of Bourdieu's key concepts of capital and habitus. A qualitative study with a deductive approach, based on data from six focus-group interviews with 24 school nurses and 15 individual interviews with school nurses. Thus, a total of 39 school nurses participated in the study. The data were analysed using content analysis. The results explain, in terms of Bourdieu's key concepts of capital and habitus, how school nurses experience their work in the educational setting. A model including different aspects of school nurses' work is shown. The new Swedish Education Act focuses on promoting students' general health, so that they are able to reach their academic potential. In this task, the school nurse is to be one of a group of several professionals working together. The present study shows how school nurses experience their professional role and their work in relation to Bourdieu's concepts of capital, habitus and field. To strengthen the school nursing profession, school nurses need to show their competence in promoting students' health. © 2011 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2011 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  15. Teachers' Utilization of School Facilities and Academic Achievement of Student Nurses in Human Biology in Schools of Nursing in Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usen, Onodiong Mfreke

    2016-01-01

    The study examined the relationship between teachers' utilization of school facilities and academic achievement of student nurses in Human Biology in schools of Nursing in Akwa Ibom State. Four (4) specific objectives, four (4) research questions and four (4) null hypotheses were formulated to guide the study. Ex-post facto survey design was…

  16. Developing a competency-based curriculum in HIV for nursing schools in Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knebel Elisa

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preparing health workers to confront the HIV/AIDS epidemic is an urgent challenge in Haiti, where the HIV prevalence rate is 2.2% and approximately 10 100 people are taking antiretroviral treatment. There is a critical shortage of doctors in Haiti, leaving nurses as the primary care providers for much of the population. Haiti's approximately 1000 nurses play a leading role in HIV/AIDS prevention, care and treatment. However, nurses do not receive sufficient training at the pre-service level to carry out this important work. Methods To address this issue, the Ministry of Health and Population collaborated with the International Training and Education Center on HIV over a period of 12 months to create a competency-based HIV/AIDS curriculum to be integrated into the 4-year baccalaureate programme of the four national schools of nursing. Results Using a review of the international health and education literature on HIV/AIDS competencies and various models of curriculum development, a Haiti-based curriculum committee developed expected HIV/AIDS competencies for graduating nurses and then drafted related learning objectives. The committee then mapped these learning objectives to current courses in the nursing curriculum and created an 'HIV/AIDS Teaching Guide' for faculty on how to integrate and achieve these objectives within their current courses. The curriculum committee also created an 'HIV/AIDS Reference Manual' that detailed the relevant HIV/AIDS content that should be taught for each course. Conclusion All nursing students will now need to demonstrate competency in HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, skills and attitudes during periodic assessment with direct observation of the student performing authentic tasks. Faculty will have the responsibility of developing exercises to address the required objectives and creating assessment tools to demonstrate that their graduates have met the objectives. This activity brought different

  17. National Athletic Trainers' Association Releases New Guidelines for Exertional Heat Illnesses: What School Nurses Need to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanScoy, Rachel M; DeMartini, Julie K; Casa, Douglas J

    2016-05-01

    Exertional heat illnesses (EHI) occur in various populations and settings. Within a school setting, there are student athletes who take part in physical activity where the risk of EHI is increased. The National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) released an updated position statement on EHI in September of 2015. This article is a summary of the position statement. The sports medicine team, including school nurses and athletic trainers, provides quality health care to these physically active individuals. Thus, it is important for school nurses to understand the prevention, recognition, and treatment of EHI. © 2016 The Author(s).

  18. Exploratory research to design a school nurse-delivered intervention to treat adolescent overweight and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellar, Lauren; Druker, Sue; Osganian, Stavroula K; Gapinski, Mary Ann; Lapelle, Nancy; Pbert, Lori

    2012-01-01

    In preparation for a pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of a school nurse-delivered intervention, focus groups were conducted to gain insight into the perceptions of stakeholders regarding the design and implementation of the intervention. Fifteen focus groups at participating schools. One hundred subjects, including overweight and obese high school students, parents, high school nurses, and staff. Stakeholders' perceptions. Focus groups were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Theme instances related to the research aim were identified, coded, and sorted into theme categories. Major topics discussed included teen issues, family support, intervention implementation-related concerns, and curriculum content. Teen issues included dealing with peer pressure, avoiding emotional eating, and support from friends. Many participants thought it should be the teen's choice to involve parents. Confidentiality was the most commonly identified potential barrier to implementation. Recommendations for nutrition and physical activity curriculum content focused on concrete, practical strategies. Results of this research provided insight into stakeholder's needs and perceptions regarding the content and structure of a school nurse-delivered intervention to treat adolescent overweight and obesity. Findings were used in the design and implementation of intervention protocols and materials. Copyright © 2012 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Historical trajectory of nursing school at Technical University of Babahoyo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cecibel Vera Marquez

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Bachelors of the province of the Rivers, to study the careers of health had to travel to other sectors of the country, and before this necessity the Technical University of Babahoyo opened academic spaces in formation in areas of the health creating the School of Nursing with the The mission of training nurses that meet the needs of the population is in the hospital or community, and thus contribute to the improvement of the quality of life of the population of Rio de Janeiro, acting under the ethical and moral principles that society demands. This remembrance describes its historical trajectory, and its spaces of institutional growth, as well as the population coverage, being one of the races with greater demand in the university, the statistical data delivered by the Center of Leveling and Admission of the UTB, shows a Historical evolution of the UTB academic offer of the ENES processes of September 2013 and March 2015, the nursing career is among the first five races most offered among the four periods (Equipo de Apoyo y Seguimiento Acad´emico, 2015. In this way the Nursing career of the Faculty of Health Sciences, has become a space of knowledge and lucubraci´on inspired by the desire to overcome and the permanent work of a practice that strengthens the knowledge, skills and skills that Consolidate the competencies of the nurse profile.

  20. Identifying attitudes, beliefs and reported practices of nurses and doctors as immunization providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielak, Karen L; McIntyre, Cheryl C; Tu, Andrew W; Remple, Valencia P; Halperin, Beth; Buxton, Jane A

    2010-07-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to examine the attitudes, beliefs, behavioural intentions and self-reported behaviour of nurses and physicians relating to key immunization behaviours and compare the findings for nurses and physicians. Immunization is an important and effective public health intervention. Understanding immunization providers' attitudes and beliefs toward immunization has the potential to improve educational efforts and lead to behavioural change. A postal survey was conducted with all immunization providers in British Columbia, Canada, in 2005. The survey elicited data on demographics, practice characteristics, attitudes, perceived social norms and perceived behavioural control related to key immunization behaviours. Responses were received from 344 nurses and 349 physicians. The response rate was 67% for nurses and 22% for physicians. More nurses than physicians thought that administering all recommended vaccines at one visit was important (89.2% vs. 63.2%P vaccines (82.4% vs. 48.7%P vaccines at one visit (98.8% vs. 73.8%P vaccine each year was important (88.9%, 87.1% respectively P = 0.65). The foundational work done to develop the survey tool can be used to modify it so that survey findings can be validated according to the Theory of Planned Behaviour. The results could inform the development of behavioural change interventions targeting the identified determinants of immunization provider behaviour.

  1. Mental Health First Aid: A Useful Tool for School Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Joy

    2017-11-01

    School nurses address mental health issues of youth on a daily basis. These mental health issues include substance abuse, anxiety, depression, and even suicidal ideation. Mental health first aid is a process that seeks to help medical professionals and laypeople recognize and address someone that is having a mental health or substance abuse crisis. This article will describe an experience with a student having suicidal ideations and how the mental health action plan was used.

  2. Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Clinical Competencies of Nursing Students in Tabriz Nursing and Midwifery School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahkar Farshi Mahni

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Preparing students to take over job responsibilities is one of the most challenging duties of nursing schools. The focus of nursing education should be on helping students to achieve high levels of competence in nursing care and identify factors for reinforcing it. Since desirable results have not been reported on clinical competencies of nursing students, achieving skills to control their emotions could be effective. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI and clinical competencies. Methods: In this correlational study, all nursing students in semesters 6, 7 and 8 were studied after determining the sample size in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. The data were collected using three questionnaires of demographic data, the Emotional Intelligence Sharing – Sybrya and a short clinical competence. The data analysis was done through descriptive and inferential statistics using SPSS 18. Results: The results of the present study showed that the total EI score and clinical competence of students was more than moderate. The relationship between total EI and clinical competence was significant. Among the subscales of EI, there was a significant relationship between social skills and clinical competence. Conclusion: The relationship between the total emotional intelligence score and clinical competence of students in this study indicated the necessity and importance of emotions in decision-making to act properly within a clinical setting. Therefore, taking part in courses designed for learning skills of emotion perception and stress management in the workplace seem to be essential.

  3. Pregnant and Parenting Students--The Role of the School Nurse. Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Alldritt, Linda; Bushmiaer, Margo; Desisto, Marie; Lambert, Patrice; Murphy, M. Kathleen; Roland, Sharon; Selser, Kendra; Wyckoff, Leah

    2011-01-01

    The National Association of School Nurses (NASN) believes that the school nurse is in a prime position to support the health and wellbeing of pregnant and parenting students and contribute to their lifelong success by linking them to resources and advocating for policies and practices that promote high school graduation. It is the position of NASN…

  4. Teacher Time Spent on Student Health Issues and School Nurse Presence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Nina Jean; Hollis, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Elementary school teacher time spent on student health issues and the relationship to school nurse services was the focus of this 2-year study. A cross-sectional design was used to survey traditional and exceptional (special needs) classroom teachers about the time they spent on health issues and their perception of school nurse presence. The…

  5. Teachers' Perceptions of Full- and Part-Time Nurses at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biag, Manuelito; Srivastava, Ashini; Landau, Melinda; Rodriguez, Eunice

    2015-01-01

    Teachers and school nurses partner together to help ensure students stay healthy and engaged in school. The purpose of this study is to generate a deeper understanding of teachers' perceptions on the benefits and challenges of working with full- or part-time school nurses. We conducted a qualitative analysis of open-ended survey responses from 129…

  6. Presenteeism Attitudes and Behavior among Missouri Kindergarten to Twelfth Grade (K-12) School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebmann, Terri; Turner, James Austin; Kunerth, Allison K.

    2016-01-01

    Working while ill (presenteeism) with symptoms of influenza-like illness can contribute to outbreaks, but little is known about school nurse presenteeism. Missouri Association of School Nurses members (N = 396) were sent a survey in 2013/2014. A chi square test was conducted to compare having a school culture that encourages presenteeism versus…

  7. The Integration of Counseling and Nursing Services into Schools: A Comparative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Erin; Troup, K. D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this comparative review was to examine the legislative evolution of school guidance and school nursing over the past century, in hopes of identifying reasons why guidance counselors have been more successful in compliance to recommended ratios than school nurses. A literature review was conducted including CINAHL, MEDLINE, ERIC and…

  8. The New Mexico School Nurse and Emergency Medical Services Emergency Preparedness Course: Program Description and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgie, Robert; Sapien, Robert E.; Fullerton-Gleason, Lynne

    2005-01-01

    Illness and injuries are common among students and school staff. Therefore, school nurses must be prepared. In this study, a 16-hour scenario-based emergency preparedness course for school nurses was evaluated for its effectiveness. Effectiveness was measured by (a) traditional methods (written exams and confidence surveys) and (b) skills and…

  9. Influence of Perceptions on School Nurse Practices to Prevent Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quelly, Susan B.

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive childhood obesity prevention (COP) strategies should include increasing school nurse involvement. This study was conducted to determine the influence of key school nurse perceptions (self-efficacy, perceived benefits, and perceived barriers) on participation in COP practices at the individual child and school level. Florida…

  10. Using the Health Belief Model to Understand School Nurse Asthma Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Judith E.; Spencer, Gale A.

    2015-01-01

    Ten million children in the United States have asthma. Since children are in school about 6 hr a day, school nurses are positioned to intervene and influence asthma outcomes. A descriptive correlational study was designed to investigate performance of school nurses' asthma management behaviors in relationship to asthma knowledge, asthma attitude,…

  11. Moral distress among Ugandan nurses providing HIV care: a critical ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrowing, Jean N; Mill, Judy

    2010-06-01

    The phenomenon of moral distress among nurses has been described in a variety of high-income countries and practice settings. Defined as the biopsychosocial, cognitive, and behavioural effects experienced by clinicians when their values are compromised by internal or external constraints, it results from the inability to provide the desired care to patients. No research has been reported that addresses moral distress in severely resource-challenged regions such as sub-Saharan Africa. To describe the manifestation and impact of moral distress as it was experienced by Ugandan nurses who provided care to HIV-infected or -affected people. A critical ethnography was conducted with 24 acute care and public health nurses at a large referral centre in Uganda. Data were collected through interviews, observation, and focus group discussions. Participants described their passion for nursing and commitment to patients. They experienced moral distress when a lack of resources put patients' wellbeing at risk. The trauma imposed by systemic challenges on the nursing profession was acknowledged, as was the perception that the public blamed nurses for poor patient outcomes. However, participants were determined to serve to the best of their abilities and to take satisfaction from any contributions they were able to make. They cited the importance of education in the development of their capacity to provide care with a positive attitude, and demonstrated a collective resilience as they discussed strategies for addressing issues that affected them and their colleagues. The experience of moral distress among nurses in Uganda differed somewhat from the experience of nurses in high-income countries. Constraints imposed by the inability to implement skills and knowledge to their fullest extent, as well as a lack of resources and infrastructure may result in the omission of care for patients. Moral distress appears to manifest within a relational and contextual environment and

  12. School nurses' knowledge, attitudes, perceptions of role as opinion leader, and professional practice regarding human papillomavirus vaccine for youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Brittany L; Goodson, Patricia; Thompson, Bruce; Wilson, Kelly L

    2015-02-01

    Because human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine rates remain low, we evaluated US school nurses' knowledge, attitudes, perceptions of their role as opinion leaders, and professional practice regarding HPV vaccine, and assessed whether knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions of being an opinion leader influenced their professional practice regarding the HPV vaccine. We used a cross-sectional design by recruiting members from the National Association of School Nurses. All participants (N = 505) were e-mailed a survey designed for this study. Structural equation modeling (SEM) tested direct and indirect effects. Overall, school nurses had knowledge about HPV and the vaccine, and positive attitudes toward the vaccine. They had less-than-enthusiastic perceptions of their role as opinion leaders regarding the vaccine and implemented few activities related to providing vaccine information. The model revealed a good fit (χ(2)=20.238 [df=8, popinion leaders. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  13. Rapid Health Care Improvement Science Curriculum Integration Across Programs in a School of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Brant J; Potter, Mertie; Pomerleau, Mimi; Phillips, Andrew; O'Donnell, Mimi; Cowley, Connie; Sipe, Margie

    This article describes the systematic efforts undertaken by a school of nursing in the Northeastern United States to foster innovation in health professions education. We present an application of modified team coaching and plan-do-study-act improvement methods in an educational context to rapidly integrate a quality and safety curriculum across programs. We discuss applications in generalist, advanced practice, doctoral, residency, and advanced fellowship programs and provide examples of each.

  14. The Nursing Dimension of Providing Palliative Care to Children and Adolescents with Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharron L. Docherty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Palliative care for children and adolescents with cancer includes interventions that focus on the relief of suffering, optimization of function, and improvement of quality of life at any and all stages of disease. This care is most effectively provided by a multidisciplinary team. Nurses perform an integral role on that team by identifying symptoms, providing care coordination, and assuring clear communication. Several basic tenets appear essential to the provision of optimal palliative care. First, palliative care should be administered concurrently with curative therapy beginning at diagnosis and assuming a more significant role at end of life. This treatment approach, recommended by many medical societies, has been associated with numerous benefits including longer survival. Second, realistic, objective goals of care must be developed. A clear understanding of the prognosis by the patient, family, and all members of the medical team is essential to the development of these goals. The pediatric oncology nurse is pivotal in developing these goals and assuring that they are adhered to across all specialties. Third, effective therapies to prevent and relieve the symptoms of suffering must be provided. This can only be accomplished with accurate and repeated assessments. The pediatric oncology nurse is vital in providing these assessments and must possess a working knowledge of the most common symptoms associated with suffering. With a basic understanding of these palliative care principles and competency in the core skills required for this care, the pediatric oncology nurse will optimize quality of life for children and adolescents with cancer.

  15. Development of the Psychiatric Nursing Intervention Providing Structure: An International Delphi Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, L.A.; Nugter, A.; Achterberg, T. van; Goossens, P.J.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psychiatric nurses commonly refer to "providing structure" (PS) as a key intervention. But no consensus exists about what PS entails. PS can be understood as a complex intervention. In four previous studies, a definition, activities, and context variables were described that were

  16. Delegation of School Health Services to Unlicensed Assistive Personnel: A Position Paper of the National Association of State School Nurse Consultants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of School Health, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Presents the position of the National Association of State School Nurse Consultants regarding delegation of school health services to unlicensed personnel, explaining what school health means, what safe delegation of school nursing activities requires, and how the nurse uses professional judgment to determine which activities may be delegated and…

  17. A case study of asthma care in school age children using nurse-coordinated multidisciplinary collaborative practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter, Susan; Brooks, Fiona; Wilson, Patricia; Crouchman, Carolyn; Kendall, Sally

    2015-01-01

    To describe the role of school nursing in leading and coordinating a multidisciplinary networked system of support for children with asthma, and to analyze the strengths and challenges of undertaking and supporting multiagency interprofessional practice. The growth of networked and interprofessional collaborations arises from the recognition that a number of the most pressing public health problems cannot be addressed by single-discipline or -agency interventions. This paper identifies the potential of school nursing to provide the vision and multiagency leadership required to coordinate multidisciplinary collaboration. A mixed-method single-case study design using Yin's approach, including focus groups, interviews, and analysis of policy documents and public health reports. A model that explains the integrated population approach to managing school-age asthma is described; the role of the lead school nurse coordinator was seen as critical to the development and sustainability of the model. School nurses can provide strategic multidisciplinary leadership to address pressing public health issues. Health service managers and commissioners need to understand how to support clinicians working across multiagency boundaries and to identify how to develop leadership skills for collaborative interprofessional practice so that the capacity for nursing and other health care professionals to address public health issues does not rely on individual motivation. In England, this will be of particular importance to the commissioning of public health services by local authorities from 2015.

  18. The epidemiology of skin care provided by nurses at home: a multicentre prevalence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottner, Jan; Boronat, Xavier; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Lahmann, Nils; Suhr, Ralf

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the frequencies and patterns of skin care and applied skin care products in the home care nursing setting in Germany. Skin care belongs to the core activities of nursing practice. Especially in aged and long-term care settings, clients are vulnerable to various skin conditions. Dry skin is one of the most prevalent problems. Using mild skin cleansers and the regular application of moisturizing leave-on products is recommended. Until today, there are no quantitative empirical data about nursing skin care practice at home in the community. A multicentre cross-sectional study was conducted in July 2012. Home care clients from the German home care nursing setting were randomly selected. Instructed nurse raters performed the data collection using standardized forms. Variables included demographics, skin care needs and skin caring activities. Approximately 60% of home care clients received skin care interventions. The majority were washed and two-thirds received a leave-on product once daily. There was large heterogeneity in cleansing and skin care product use. Most often the product labels were unknown or product types were selected haphazardly. Skin care interventions play a significant role in home care and nurses have a considerable responsibility for skin health. Skin care provided does not meet recent recommendations. The importance of targeted skin cleansing and care might be underestimated. There are a confusing variety of skin care products available and often the labels provide little information regarding the ingredients or guidance about how they affect skin health. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Health-risk behaviors among high school athletes and preventive services provided during sports physicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Karen E; McRee, Annie-Laurie

    2015-01-01

    Preparticipation examinations (PPEs), or sports physicals, present opportunities for health care providers to identify and discuss common adolescent health-risk behaviors. We sought to examine the prevalence of health-risk behaviors among high school athletes and the proportion of providers who address these behaviors during PPEs. For this descriptive study we used data from two statewide surveys: a survey of adolescents (n = 46,492) and a survey of nurse practitioners and physicians (n = 561). The most prevalent risk behaviors reported by student athletes were low levels of physical activity (70%), bullying perpetration (41%), and alcohol use (41%). Most providers (≥75%) addressed many common risk behaviors during PPEs but fewer addressed bullying, violence, and prescription drug use. Topics discussed differed by provider type and patient population. Many providers addressed critical threats to adolescent health during PPEs, but findings suggest potential disconnects between topics addressed during PPEs and behaviors of athletes. Copyright © 2015 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. School Nurse Workload: A Scoping Review of Acute Care, Community Health, and Mental Health Nursing Workload Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endsley, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this scoping review was to survey the most recent (5 years) acute care, community health, and mental health nursing workload literature to understand themes and research avenues that may be applicable to school nursing workload research. The search for empirical and nonempirical literature was conducted using search engines such as…

  1. Misunderstandings in multilingual counselling settings involving school nurses and obese/overweight pupils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Maria B; Hulthén, Lena; Kjellgren, Karin I

    2009-01-01

    School nurses' counselling is pivotal in stemming the obesity epidemic. Barriers for good counselling such as nurses' misunderstandings and ambiguities when relating to overweight and obesity need to be addressed. In this study, we explored misunderstandings in school nurses' counselling of overweight pupils in multilingual settings, together with how school nurses talk about the condition. Counselling sessions involving eight nurses and 20 pupils (aged 8-16 years) were audio-recorded and analysed using theme-oriented discourse analysis. Statistical methods were used as a complement. The focal themes were misunderstandings and nurses' talk about overweight and obesity. Analytical themes were framing, footing and facework. Data analyses revealed three main origins of misunderstandings occurring in school nurses' counselling of obese and overweight pupils: (1) nurses' illusion that they know what advice the pupils need; (2) nurses' insensitivity to the pupils' and parents' concerns; and (3) lack of lingual understanding. School nurses' apparent difficulties to talk about overweight and obesity suggest a need to reflect on how to name these issues during counselling. School nurses' dominance and pupils'passivity were obvious. We suggest that counselling should be regarded as learning contexts and be subjected to possible quality assurance in the future.

  2. Educating advanced practice nurses for collaborative practice in the multidisciplinary provider team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, Margaret P; DeCristofaro, Claire; Smith, Carol A

    2004-12-01

    To describe the use of a clinical decision-making work sheet as a tool to teach communication skills to advanced practice nurse (APN) students. Achievement of competencies in communication and documentation that utilize language and communication strategies that are shared with other health professionals promotes effective collaborative practice among members of the multidisciplinary provider team. Review of the recent Institute of Medicine report on health professions education and other health professional literature. The Clinical Decision-Making Work Sheet helps APN students effectively communicate in real-world clinical settings. The clinical work sheet allows nurse practitioner students to communicate more effectively and efficiently, using a vocabulary that is shared with other members of the multidisciplinary health care provider team. Use of the tool in students' clinical-rotation settings facilitates effective application and refinement of the clinical decision-making skills that students learned in the advanced health assessment course. Faculty have the responsibility to assist nurses as they transition from traditional nursing to APN roles. The work sheet facilitates learning the common language for data collection, clinical decision making, documentation, and reporting that is shared with other health professionals. Using the tool, students learn to efficiently organize information that supports communication and documentation that enhances their clinical problem-solving skills. Case presentation and documentation using the work sheet provide a basis for preceptor and student interaction and for student evaluation.

  3. Sources of moral distress for nursing staff providing care to residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spenceley, Shannon; Witcher, Chad Sg; Hagen, Brad; Hall, Barry; Kardolus-Wilson, Arron

    2017-10-01

    The World Health Organization estimates the number of people living with dementia at approximately 35.6 million; they project a doubling of this number by 2030 and tripling by 2050. Although the majority of people living with a dementia live in the community, residential facility care by nursing care providers is a significant component of the dementia journey in most countries. Research has also shown that caring for persons with dementia can be emotionally, physically, and ethically challenging, and that turnover in nursing staff in residential care settings tends to be high. Moral distress has been explored in a variety of settings where nurses provide acute or intensive care. The concept, however, has not previously been explored in residential facility care settings, particularly as related to the care of persons with dementia. In this paper, we explore moral distress in these settings, using Nathaniel's definition of moral distress: the pain or anguish affecting the mind, body, or relationships in response to a situation in which the person is aware of a moral problem, acknowledges moral responsibility, makes a moral judgment about the correct action and yet, as a result of real or perceived constraints, cannot do what is thought to be right. We report findings from a qualitative study of moral distress in a single health region in a Canadian province. Our aim in this paper is to share findings that elucidate the sources of moral distress experienced by nursing care providers in the residential care of people living with dementia.

  4. Mental health work in school health services and school nurses' involvement and attitudes, in a Norwegian context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skundberg-Kletthagen, Hege; Moen, Øyfrid Larsen

    2017-08-09

    To explore school nurses' experiences with and attitudes towards working with young people with mental health problem in the school health services. Worldwide, 10%-20% of children and adolescents are affected by mental health problems. When these occur during youth, they constitute a considerable burden and are one of the main causes of disability among adolescents. School nurses are at the forefront of care for children and adolescents, identifying pupils struggling with physical, mental, psychosocial or emotional issues. A qualitative, explorative study was performed based on open-ended questions in a cross-sectional study of 284 school nurses in Norway. Inclusion criteria were as follows: working as a school nurse in the school health services with children and adolescents between the ages of 11-18 years. A qualitative inductive content analysis was conducted. Three generic categories emerged: perception of their role and experiences with mental health: the school nurses acknowledge their important role in work with adolescents focusing on their mental health. Perception of their professional competence: the school nurses described a lack of confidence and unmet training needs concerning mental health problems. Experiences with collaboration: the school nurses requested more knowledge about inter- and multidisciplinary cooperation regarding follow-up of pupils with mental health problems. The school nurses lacked knowledge and confidence in respect of working with children and adolescents suffering from mental health problems. This may be a barrier to giving pupils adequate aid. Nurses need to acquire more knowledge about mental health problems among children and adolescents as this is a growing public health issue. Educational programmes for school nurses need to be revised to achieve this. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Does poor school satisfaction inhibit positive outcome of health promotion at school? A cross-sectional study of schoolchildren's response to health dialogues with school health nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Ina; Holstein, Bjørn E

    2006-01-01

    Students with high school satisfaction were more likely to reflect on and discuss the content of health dialogues with school health nurses, and more likely to follow the nurse's advice. This was demonstrated among 5205 students ages 11-15-years, in a random sample of schools in Denmark....

  6. Maintaining the balance: New Zealand secondary school nurses' perceptions of skin infections in young people--a grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambe, Catherine I; Hoare, Karen J

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the perceptions of New Zealand secondary school nurses regarding skin infections in young people aged 14-18 years. A constructivist grounded theory method was adopted. Ten non-structured interviews were conducted with secondary school nurses working in Auckland, New Zealand, between January and July 2013. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and analysed using all tenets of grounded theory that included writing memos, theoretical sampling and the constant comparative method. Analysis revealed the core category Maintaining the balance, which is presented as a grounded theory model. It represents the constant state of balancing the school nurse undergoes in trying to counter the risk to the student. The nurse attempts to tip the balance in favour of action, by reducing barriers to healthcare, providing youth-friendly, affordable and accessible healthcare, and following up until resolution is achieved. The nurse is aware that failing to monitor until resolution can again tip the fulcrum back to inaction, placing the young person at risk again. It is concluded that nurses are knowledgeable about the risks present in the communities they serve and are innovative in the methods they employ to ensure satisfactory outcomes for young people experiencing skin infections. School nursing is an evolving model for delivering primary healthcare to young people in New Zealand. The grounded theory model 'Maintaining the balance' describes a model of care where nursing services are delivered where young people spend time, and the nurse is immersed in the community. This model of care may be transferable to other healthcare situations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Educational opportunities: a nursing school model for medical special-needs sheltering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Belinda; Alfred, Danita; Fountain, Rebecca; Ford, Terri; Chilton, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    The devastation of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina increased the awareness of persons who were unable to self-evacuate because of physical and/or mental disabilities. From that awareness, plans emerged to provide a safe haven for those who had special needs. In this article, we describe our efforts as a school of nursing to shelter medical special needs (MSN) evacuees in the wake of a hurricane. After the shelter closed, faculty and students involved in the shelter answered a short survey that included both open- and close-ended questions. The responses are summarized to encourage other schools of nursing to consider caring for MSN evacuees and to share our successes, our failures, and our plans for the future.

  8. Experiences of Sexual Harassment among Elementary School Students in Taiwan: Implications for School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Ting; Hayter, Mark; Lin, Mei-Ling

    2010-01-01

    Sexual harassment is a significant issue in the lives of students. Understanding how young adolescents feel about sexual harassment and their coping strategies is a central element to guide school nursing interventions promoting sexual health. This study explored the sexual harassment experiences of young adolescents in Taiwan. A qualitative…

  9. The School Nurse Role in Preparing for Sudden Cardiac Arrest in the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Warna K.; Ficca, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) were introduced for first responders in 1992 to manage adult cardiac arrest and are now common in many public places. Today AEDs are capable of shocking children under 8 years of age, or less than 55 pounds. This presents a challenge for school nurses, particularly as the prevalence of chronic medical…

  10. Mental Health in Schools: New Roles for School Nurses. Addressing Barriers to Student Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Center for Mental Health in Schools.

    This set of three continuing education units is designed to be used as a professional development tool for school nurses. Each unit consists of several sections designed to stand alone. Thus, the total set can be used and taught in a straightforward sequence, or one or more units and sections can be combined into a personalized course. Each…

  11. [Experience of an interdisciplinary anesthesiology and nursing team for providing anesthesia outside the operating room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez, R; Aguilar, J L; Segura, C; Fermández, S; Mendiola, M A; Forner, J C

    2009-02-01

    To report on the creation and development of an interdisciplinary anesthesiology and nursing team to provide anesthesia outside the operating room. We describe the creation of an interdisciplinary team and preanesthesia evaluation protocols for using nurses specializing in anesthesia for procedures outside the operating room. We analyzed the anesthetic procedures performed outside the operating room, the rate of suspensions due to failure of the procedure, and their impact on the rate of associated complications, from October 2006 to October 2007. Since the start of the project, 586 procedures outside the operating room have been performed. No suspensions or delays were observed that were due to comorbidity not detected in the preanesthesia evaluation carried out by the nurses. The incidences of complications and inadequate sedations were comparable to those reported for other similar interdisciplinary groups in this area. The creation of an interdisciplinary team of anesthesiologists and specialized nurses for providing anesthesia outside the operating room optimizes resources and improves routine clinical practice. It has allowed for universal preanesthesia evaluation, improved the distribution of resources, and proven a stimulus to the care-giving process.

  12. Mediating Effect of School Nurses' Self Efficacy between Multicultural Attitude and Cultural Sensitivity in Korean Elementary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Min Hyun; Oh, Won Oak; Im, Yeo Jin; Cho, Hun Ha

    2015-09-01

    This study examined the mediating effect of school nurses' self efficacy, which is one of the significant cognitive factors influencing cultural sensitivity, on the mutual relationships between multicultural attitude and cultural sensitivity in Korean elementary schools. A cross-sectional descriptive survey design was used. Participants were 157 school nurses in elementary schools located in Gyeonggi-do, South Korea. The survey instruments included Teacher Multicultural Attitude Survey, Teacher Efficacy Scale, and Multicultural Sensitivity Scale. Data were analyzed using three regression equations to test the mediation model. The mean score of the school nurses' cultural sensitivity was relatively low. A positive correlation among multicultural attitude, self efficacy, and cultural sensitivity was noted. Self efficacy of school nurses showed a significant mediating effect on the relationships between multicultural attitude and cultural sensitivity. Given the meaningful influence of positive multicultural attitude on cultural sensitivity and significant mediator effect of self efficacy as a school nurse between the two variables, the strategies to cultivate a positive multicultural attitude and enhance school nurses' self efficacy in their unique role should be considered in a training program. School nurses' health care services will benefit from the improvement of cultural sensitivity toward young children from multicultural families. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Academic dishonesty in nursing schools: an empirical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Donald L

    2009-11-01

    Academic dishonesty, whether in the form of plagiarism or cheating on tests, has received renewed attention in the past few decades as pervasive use of the Internet and a presumed deterioration of ethics in the current generation of students has led some, perhaps many, to conclude that academic dishonesty is reaching epidemic proportions. What is lacking in many cases, including in the nursing profession, is empirical support of these trends. This article attempts to provide some of that empirical data and supports the conclusion that cheating is a significant issue in all disciplines today, including nursing. Some preliminary policy implications are also considered. Copyright 2009, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Psychiatric nursing teaching at the Ana Nery School in the first half of the 20th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique da Silva Carvalho

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the teaching of psychiatric nursing at Ana Néri Nursing School (EAN, between 1925 and 1954. Methodology: Socio-historical research whose sources were written documents and the oral statement of an ex-professor. The documentary analysis technique was used for data treatment. Results: For 27 years, the EAN did not introduce students into the psychiatric field due to the mental illness stigma, offering only theoretical disciplines, which were taught by physicians. Later there were theoretical disciplines with practical training in the classroom, and then theoretical disciplines with practice in psychiatric hospitals, taught by nurses. In conclusion, the law 775/49 lead the EAN to qualify a professor and initiate the reformulation of the nursing care provided at the Institute of Psychiatry of the University of Brazil, so as to adjust it to serve as a practical field and a model for teaching psychiatric nursing in Brazil.

  15. High School Counselors' Knowledge of Professional Nursing as a Career Option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignon, Deolinda; Cadenhead, Gerry; McKee, Adam

    2002-01-01

    A survey completed by 189 high school counselors assessed their knowledge of professional nursing in terms of educational preparation, career opportunities, and salary and mobility potential. Most felt well informed about nursing careers. Females and whites rated nursing higher as a profession than did males and African Americans. (SK)

  16. A qualitative study to assess school nurses' views on vaccinating 12–13 year old school girls against human papillomavirus without parental consent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baxter David

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the UK, parental consent for the routine vaccination of 12–13 year olds schoolgirls against human papillomavirus (HPV is recommended, although legally girls may be able to consent themselves. As part of a vaccine study conducted ahead of the National HPV Vaccine Programme we sought the views of school nurses on vaccinating girls who did not have parental consent. Methods HPV vaccination was offered to all 12 year old girls attending schools in two Primary Care Trusts in Greater Manchester. At the end of the study semi-structured, tape-recorded interviews were conducted with school nurses who had delivered the vaccine (Cervarix™. The interview template was based on concepts derived from the Theory of Planned Behaviour. Transcripts were analysed thematically in order to understand school nurses' intentions to implement vaccination based on an assessment of Gillick competency. Results School nurses knew how to assess the competency of under-16s but were still unwilling to vaccinate if parents had refused permission. If parents had not returned the consent form, school nurses were willing to contact parents, and also to negotiate with parents who had refused consent. They seemed unaware that parental involvement required the child's consent to avoid breaking confidentiality. Nurses' attitudes were influenced by the young appearance and age of the school year group rather than an individual's level of maturity. They were also confused about the legal guidelines governing consent. School nurses acknowledged the child's right to vaccination and strongly supported prevention of HPV infection but ultimately believed that it was the parents' right to give consent. Most were themselves parents and shared other parents' concerns about the vaccine's novelty and unknown long-term side effects. Rather than vaccinate without parental consent, school nurses would defer vaccination. Conclusion Health providers have a duty of care to

  17. Role development of nurses for technology-dependent children attending mainstream schools in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Fumie; Suzuki, Machiko

    2015-04-01

    To describe the role development of nurses caring for medical technology-dependent children attending Japanese mainstream schools. Semi-structured interviews with 21 nurses caring for technology-dependent children were conducted and analyzed using the modified grounded theory approach. Nurses developed roles centered on maintaining technology-dependent children's physical health to support children's learning with each other, through building relationships, learning how to interact with children, understanding the children and the school community, and realizing the meaning of supporting technology-dependent children. These findings support nurses to build relationships of mutual trust with teachers and children, and learn on the job in mainstream schools. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Nurses' attitudes toward aging and older adults--examining attitudes and practices among health services providers in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Yvonne; Foreman, Peter; Gething, Lindsay; Petralia, Walter

    2004-09-01

    Data from an applied research project on ageism among health professionals were used to examine nurses' attitudes toward aging and working with older adults. Nurses were compared with groups of other health professionals, and sources of variation within the nurses (e.g., employer, work setting, gerontology education) were examined. Nurses had less accurate knowledge of aging than other health professionals. Nurses expressed higher anxiety about aging and were more likely to believe working with older adults was associated with low esteem in the profession. Nurses were more likely to hold positive attitudes if they worked for a service provider rather than an employment agency, had gerontology education, and worked outside the residential care sector. Improving education in gerontology is an important strategy in improving the attitudes of the profession toward older adults and could help to address nursing shortages in this sector.

  19. Psychosocial Care Provided by Physicians and Nurses in Palliative Care: A Mixed Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Sheng-Yu; Lin, I-Mei; Hsieh, Jyh-Gang; Chang, Chih-Jung

    2017-02-01

    Psychosocial care is an important component of palliative care, which is also provided by physicians and nurses. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of physicians and nurses in palliative care regarding the process of psychosocial care, the difficulties, and the support needs from "psychosocial care professionals." A two-phase mixed methods study was conducted. In the first phase, 16 physicians and nurses with palliative care experience were recruited. A semi-structured interview was used to collect data about their experience of providing psychosocial care, and these were analyzed using thematic analysis. In the second phase, 88 physicians and nurses completed an online survey that was developed from the qualitative results. Qualitative results revealed three themes: 1) the contents of psychosocial care included not only disease-related events but also emotional and family support, 2) providing psychosocial care was a dynamic process including assessment, interventions, and evaluation, and 3) there were difficulties from the participants themselves, patients and families, and the system. Participants also reflected on what they did and the influences of providing care on themselves. Quantitative results showed that the most common psychosocial care was discussion about the progress of the disease and future care plan; the difficulty was the long-term problems in families; and the psychosocial care professionals most needed were social workers and clinical/counseling psychologists. Understanding the process of psychosocial care and integrating it with specialized mental health care in a team could improve the quality of psychosocial care in palliative care. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The diffusion of innovation in nursing regulatory policy: removing a barrier to medication administration training for child care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Carolyn T; Crowley, Angela A

    2011-08-01

    Safe medication administration is an essential component of high-quality child care. Its achievement in New Jersey was impeded by a controversy over whether teaching child care providers medication administration involves registered nurses in the process of nursing delegation. Through the theoretical framework of the Diffusion of Innovation, this paper examines how the interpretation of regulatory policy related to nursing practice in New Jersey was adjusted by the Board of Nursing following a similar interpretation of regulatory policy by the Board of Nursing in Connecticut. This adjustment enabled New Jersey nurses to continue medication administration training for child care providers. National data supporting the need for training child care providers in medication administration is presented, the Diffusion of Innovation paradigm is described; the Connecticut case and the New Jersey dilemma are discussed; the diffusion process between the two states is analyzed and an assessment of the need for further change is made.

  1. A School Nurse-Delivered Intervention for Anxious Children: An Open Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggeo, Michela A.; Stewart, Catherine E.; Drake, Kelly L.; Ginsburg, Golda S.

    2017-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are common in children and severely impair their functioning. Because a hallmark symptom of anxiety is somatic complaints, anxious youth often seek help from their school nurse. Thus, school nurses are in an ideal position to identify anxious children and intervene early. This study assessed the feasibility of a brief…

  2. The School Nurse's Ability to Detect and Support Abused Children: A Trust-Creating Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Lisbet Engh; Eriksson, Ulla-Britt

    2015-01-01

    Child abuse has negative health consequences. Early detection and preventive measures lead to avoidance of prolonged and more complex problems. School nurses have a child protection role and should pay attention to vulnerable children. Through health dialogues and other interactions with pupils, school nurses have the opportunity to detect child…

  3. School Nurses' Perceived Barriers to Discussing Weight with Children and Their Families: A Qualitative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Ric G.; Wu, Yelena P.; Jensen, Chad D.; Pankey, Sydni; Davis, Ann M.; Aylward, Brandon S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have documented the presence of specific barriers to school nurses' communications with families about weight-related health. The purpose of the present study was to contribute to the literature by further analyzing, using focus group methodology, school nurses' perceived barriers to addressing weight-related health…

  4. The Transformation of a Private University's School of Nursing, 1999-2009: An Historical Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selick, Sandra A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the transformation of the School of Nursing at a private university in a Middle Atlantic state during the years 1999 to 2009. The secondary purpose of this study was to determine the leadership style of the Director of the School of Nursing at this private university in a Middle Atlantic state that led this…

  5. What Barriers and Facilitators Do School Nurses Experience When Implementing an Obesity Intervention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Krista; Smaldone, Arlene

    2017-01-01

    A recent evaluation of a school nurse-led obesity intervention demonstrated a 5% implementation rate. The purpose of this study was to explore school nurses' perceived barriers to and facilitators of the intervention in order to understand reasons for the low implementation rate. Methods included semi-structured individual interviews with school…

  6. Perceptions of School Nurses in the Care of Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Many children are surviving prematurity and serious childhood illnesses due to advances in technology and medical care. As a result, more children are entering public school systems with complex health care needs and intellectual and developmental disabilities. School nurses are responsible for caring for these children; however, many nurses feel…

  7. School Nurse Online Emergency Preparedness Training: An Analysis of Knowledge, Skills, and Confidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgie, Robert; Sapien, Robert; Fullerton, Lynne; Moore, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a computer-assisted emergency preparedness course for school nurses. Participants from a convenience sample (52) of school nurses from New Mexico were randomly assigned to intervention or control groups in an experimental after-only posttest design. Intervention group participants…

  8. Health among Schoolchildren from the School Nurse's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellertsson, Ann-Sofi; Garmy, Pernilla; Clausson, Eva K.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate Swedish school nurses' perceptions of schoolchildren's health. The study is based on two national surveys in which school nurses responded to questions about schoolchildren's health in 2015 (n = 181) and 2005 (n = 129). A statistical comparison showed that physical and mental health of schoolchildren in…

  9. School Nurses on the Front Lines of Medicine: A Student With Fever and Sore Throat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olympia, Robert P

    2016-05-01

    Fever and sore throat are common chief complaints encountered by school nurses. This article explains the etiology of both fever and sore throat in children, describes the office assessment, and delineates life-threatening complications associated with fever and sore throat that may prompt the school nurse to transfer the child to a local emergency department. © 2016 The Author(s).

  10. A case study of asthma care in school age children using nurse-coordinated multidisciplinary collaborative practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Procter S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Susan Procter,1 Fiona Brooks,2 Patricia Wilson,3 Carolyn Crouchman,1 Sally Kendall21Faculty of Society and Health, Buckinghamshire New University, High Wycombe, UK; 2Centre for Research in Primary and Community Care (CRIPACC, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, UK; 3Centre for Health Services Studies, University of Kent, Canterbury, UKAim: To describe the role of school nursing in leading and coordinating a multidisciplinary networked system of support for children with asthma, and to analyze the strengths and challenges of undertaking and supporting multiagency interprofessional practice.Background: The growth of networked and interprofessional collaborations arises from the recognition that a number of the most pressing public health problems cannot be addressed by single-discipline or -agency interventions. This paper identifies the potential of school nursing to provide the vision and multiagency leadership required to coordinate multidisciplinary collaboration.Method: A mixed-method single-case study design using Yin's approach, including focus groups, interviews, and analysis of policy documents and public health reports.Results: A model that explains the integrated population approach to managing school-age asthma is described; the role of the lead school nurse coordinator was seen as critical to the development and sustainability of the model.Conclusion: School nurses can provide strategic multidisciplinary leadership to address pressing public health issues. Health service managers and commissioners need to understand how to support clinicians working across multiagency boundaries and to identify how to develop leadership skills for collaborative interprofessional practice so that the capacity for nursing and other health care professionals to address public health issues does not rely on individual motivation. In England, this will be of particular importance to the commissioning of public health services by local authorities from

  11. Australian practice nurses' perceptions of their role and competency to provide nutrition care to patients living with chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cass, Sarah; Ball, Lauren; Leveritt, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition is important in the management of chronic disease, and practice nurses in the Australian primary care setting are increasingly providing nutrition care to patients living with chronic disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate practice nurses' perceptions of their role and competency to provide nutrition care to patients living with chronic disease in Australia. Twenty practice nurses currently employed in general practice participated in an individual semi-structured telephone interview. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Practice nurses perceived themselves to be in a prime position to provide opportunistic nutrition care to patients. Participants perceived that the ideal role of a practice nurse is to advocate for nutrition and provide a basic level of nutrition care to patients; however, the interpretation of the term 'basic' varied between participants. Participants perceived that practice nurses are highly trusted and approachable, which they valued as important characteristics for the provision of nutrition care. Barriers to providing nutrition care included time constraints, lack of nutrition knowledge and lack of confidence. Participants were concerned about the availability and accessibility of nutrition education opportunities for practice nurses. The present study has demonstrated that practice nurses perceive themselves as having a significant role in the provision of nutrition care to patients with chronic disease in the Australian primary care setting. Further investigation of strategies to enhance the effectiveness of nutrition care provision by practice nurses is warranted.

  12. Academic-Community Partnership to Develop a Novel Disaster Training Tool for School Nurses: Emergency Triage Drill Kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Rita V; Goodhue, Catherine J; Berg, Bridget M; Spears, Robert; Barnes, Jill; Upperman, Jeffrey S

    2015-09-01

    As children spend approximately 28% of their day in school and disasters may strike at any time, it is important for school officials to conduct emergency preparedness activities. School nurses, teachers, and staff should be prepared to respond and provide support and first aid treatment. This article describes a collaborative effort within the Los Angeles Unified School District to enhance disaster preparedness. Specifically, the article outlines the program steps and tools developed to prepare staff in mass triage through an earthquake disaster training exercise. © 2015 The Author(s).

  13. Enhancing the Capacity of School Nurses to Reduce Excessive Anxiety in Children: Development of the CALM Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Kelly L; Stewart, Catherine E; Muggeo, Michela A; Ginsburg, Golda S

    2015-08-01

    Excessive anxiety is among the most common psychiatric problems facing youth. Because anxious youth tend to have somatic complaints, many seek help from the school nurse. Thus, school nurses are in an ideal position to provide early intervention. This study addresses this problem and describes the plans to develop and test a new intervention (Child Anxiety Learning Modules; CALM), delivered by school nurses, to reduce child anxiety and improve academic functioning. An iterative development process including consultation with an expert panel, two open trials, and a pilot randomized controlled study comparing CALM to usual care is proposed. Feedback will be solicited from all participants during each phase and data on outcome measures will be provided by children, parents, teachers, and independent evaluators. Data will be collected on intervention satisfaction and feasibility. Primary outcomes that include child anxiety symptoms, classroom behavior, and school performance (e.g., attendance, grades, standardized test scores) will be collected at pre- and post-interventions and at a 3-month follow-up evaluation. Pediatric anxiety is a common problem that school nurses frequently encounter. Consequently, they are well positioned to play a key role in enhancing access to behavioral health interventions to reduce anxiety and may therefore make a significant positive public health impact. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Implementation of a School Nurse-led Intervention for Children With Severe Obesity in New York City Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Krista; Jia, Haomiao; Wang, Y Claire; Smaldone, Arlene

    The Healthy Options and Physical Activity Program (HOP) is a school nurse-led intervention for children with severe obesity. HOP was developed by experts at the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and implemented in New York City schools beginning in 2012. The purpose of this study was to evaluate HOP implementation with the goal of informing HOP refinement and potential future HOP dissemination. This study entailed a retrospective analysis of secondary data. Analytic methods included descriptive statistics, Wilcoxon rank sum and Chi square tests, and multivariate logistic regression. During the 2012-2013 school year, 20,518 children were eligible for HOP. Of these, 1054 (5.1%) were enrolled in the program. On average, enrolled children attended one HOP session during the school year. Parent participation was low (3.2% of HOP sessions). Low nurse workload, low school poverty, higher grade level, higher BMI percentile, and chronic illness diagnosis were associated with student enrollment in HOP. As currently delivered, HOP is not likely to be efficacious. Lessons learned from this evaluation are applicable to future nurse-led obesity interventions. Prior to implementing a school nurse-led obesity intervention, nursing workload and available support must be carefully considered. Interventions should be designed to facilitate (and possibly require) parent involvement. Nurses who deliver obesity interventions may require additional training in obesity treatment. With attention to these lessons learned, evidence-based school nurse-led obesity interventions can be developed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Tools for Prevention: Building Healthy Youths. A Training Program for: School Counselors, School Nurses, School Psychologists. Trainer Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Maxie P.; Collins, Charles B., Jr.

    This training program instructor's manual is designed to assist K-12 school counselors, nurses, and psychologists in offering aid to youths at risk for substance abuse. The training objectives for participants in the workshop are to be able to demonstrate: (1) competence in knowledge of basic substance abuse information to include age-appropriate…

  16. Tools for Prevention: Building Healthy Youths. A Training Program for: School Counselors, School Nurses, School Psychologists. Participant Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Maxie P.; Collins, Charles B., Jr.

    This training program participants' manual is designed to assist K-12 school counselors, nurses, and psychologists in offering aid to youths at risk for substance abuse. The training objectives for participants in the workshop are to be able to demonstrate: (1) competence in knowledge of basic substance abuse information to include age-appropriate…

  17. School Nurses' Familiarity and Perceptions of Academic Accommodations for Student-Athletes Following Sport-Related Concussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Michelle L.; Welch, Cailee E.; Parsons, John T.; Valovich McLeod, Tamara C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate school nurses' familiarity and perceptions regarding academic accommodations for student-athletes following sport-related concussion. School nurses (N = 1,246) accessed the survey School Nurses' Beliefs, Attitudes and Knowledge of Pediatric Athletes with Concussions (BAKPAC-SN). The BAKPAC-SN contained…

  18. School Nurses on the Front Lines of Medicine: Emergencies 101 Ask the E.R. Pediatrician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olympia, Robert P

    2016-03-01

    Pediatric emergencies, such as the exacerbation of medical conditions and injuries, may occur in the school setting. This article introduces the "School Nurses on the Front Lines of Medicine" series by discussing the incidence and the most common emergencies that occur in schools as well as published guidelines for school emergency preparedness. © 2016 The Author(s).

  19. Nurse care manager collaboration with community-based physicians providing diabetes care: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiss, Roland G; Armbruster, Betty A; Gillard, Mary Lou; McClure, Leslie A

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the potential value of close collaboration at the office level of a nurse care manager with community-based primary care physicians in the care of adult patients with type 2 diabetes, particularly those physicians not affiliated with an integrated care system that some managed care organizations provide. Patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited from the general population of a large metropolitan area. Each received a comprehensive evaluation of his or her diabetes with results reported to patients and their physicians (basic intervention). A random one-half of patients were additionally assigned to individual counseling, problem identification, care planning, and management recommendations by a nurse care manager (individualized intervention). The patients receiving only the basic intervention served as the control group to those receiving the individualized intervention. Re-evaluation of all patients at 6 months after their entry into the study determined the effectiveness of the nurse-directed individualized intervention using A1C, blood pressure, and cholesterol as outcome measures. Of 220 patients recruited, 197 had type 2 diabetes, randomly assigned only the basic intervention (102 patients) or individualized intervention (95 patients). Postintervention data were obtained on 164 patients (83%). Significant improvement occurred in mean systolic blood pressure and A1C of all patients in the individualized but not the basic intervention only group. Patients with a systolic blood pressure>or=130 mm Hg at baseline showed improvement if they had more than 2 contacts with the study nurse but not if they had less than 2 contacts. A nurse care manager collaborating at the office level with community-based primary care physicians can enhance the care provided to adult patients with type 2 diabetes. For those many physicians not affiliated with an integrated care system featured by some managed care organizations, this

  20. Effects of work-family-school role conflicts and role-related social support on burnout in Registered Nurses: a structural equation modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goong, Hwasoo; Xu, Lijuan; Li, Chun-Yu

    2016-11-01

    To examine the effects of work-family-school role conflicts and role-related social support (RRSS) on burnout of nurses pursuing an advanced degree. A predictive correlational cross-sectional study design was used. Nurses were found to be a high-risk group for burnout, even more so among nurses pursuing an advanced degree. When nurses with a professional career marry and decide to become students, inter-role conflicts and burnout are possible outcomes of the resulting multiple roles. Using convenience sampling, data were collected from October 2011-May 2012. A questionnaire about work-family-school role conflicts, RRSS, burnout and general information was completed by 286 nurses pursuing an advanced degree at 12 hospitals in Korea. Data were analysed using SPSS and structural equation modelling with the Analysis of Moment Structures program. The proposed model provided a good fit to the obtained data. Work-family-school role conflicts and social support exerted significant effects on burnout. Role-related social support was found to play a partial mediating role between work-family-school role conflicts and burnout. The findings of this study imply that RRSS significantly directly and indirectly influences burnout among the nurses pursuing an advanced degree. It is necessary for nursing managers to consider implementing family- and school-friendly policies (e.g. flexible work schedules) to help nurses to manage their multiple roles and thereby decrease their burnout rate. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Nurses' perception of the quality of care they provide to hospitalized drug addicts: testing the theory of reasoned action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natan, Merav Ben; Beyil, Valery; Neta, Okev

    2009-12-01

    A correlational design was used to examine nursing staff attitudes and subjective norms manifested in intended and actual care of drug users based on the Theory of Reasoned Action. One hundred and thirty-five nursing staff from three central Israeli hospitals completed a questionnaire examining theory-based variables as well as sociodemographic and professional characteristics. Most respondents reported a high to very high level of actual or intended care of drug users. Nurses' stronger intentions to provide quality care to drug users were associated with more positive attitudes. Nursing staff members had moderately negative attitudes towards drug users. Nurses were found to hold negative stereotypes of drug addict patients and most considered the management of this group difficult. Positive attitudes towards drug users, perceived expectations of others and perceived correctness of the behaviour are important in their effect on the intention of nurses to provide high-quality care to hospitalized patients addicted to drugs.

  2. Stressors experienced by nurses providing end-of-life palliative care in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gélinas, Céline; Fillion, Lise; Robitaille, Marie-Anik; Truchon, Manon

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe stressors experienced by nurses in providing end-of-life palliative care (EoL/PC) in intensive care units (ICUs). A descriptive qualitative design was used. A total of 42 nurses from 5 ICUs in the province of Quebec, Canada, participated in 10 focus groups. Stressors were found to be clustered in 3 categories: organizational, professional, and emotional. The major organizational stressors were lack of a palliative care approach, interprofessional difficulty, lack of continuity in life-support and treatment plans, and conflicting demands. Professional stressors included lack of EoL/PC competencies and difficulty communicating with families and collaborating with the medical team. Emotional stressors were described as value conflicts, lack of emotional support, and dealing with patient and family suffering.The authors conclude that providing EoL/PC is stressful for ICU nurses and that education and support programs should be developed to ensure quality EoL/PC in the critical care environment.

  3. The School Breakfast Program Provides Needed Fuel for Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Edward; Heitman, Jennifer

    1988-01-01

    The article considers the many contributions of school breakfast programs to children's health and academic achievement and also suggests ways in which greater student and school participation in such programs can be achieved. (CB)

  4. A model program: neonatal nurse practitioners providing community health care for high-risk infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Elias Provencio; Pitts, Kathleen; Mejia, Nilson Enrique

    2008-01-01

    Perinatal drug exposure costs our communities millions of dollars each year in hospital fees and in services such as foster care, child protection, and drug treatment. Infants and their families in this group require substantial long-term health care and community resources. Neonatal health care providers should take an active role in developing and implementing home visitation programs to support early hospital discharge and continuity of care for these high-risk infants and their families. Neonatal nurse practitioners should prepare in the future to practice not only in secondary-- and tertiary--level neonatal centers, but also in follow-up clinics, long-term developmental centers, and the community This article describes a home intervention program delivered by neonatal nurse practitioners for high-risk infants and their mothers. The target population is infants exposed prenatally to drugs and/or alcohol.

  5. "Providing structure" as a psychiatric nursing intervention: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voogt, L Amar; Nugter, Annet; Goossens, Peter J J; van Achterberg, Theo

    2013-10-01

    The focus is on a nursing intervention called "providing structure" (PS). This label does not exist in the Nursing Interventions Classification. The following three questions were asked: (a) How is PS defined? (b) What are the goals of PS? and (c) What is the evidence regarding the effectiveness of PS? A systematic literature review. Forty articles, predominantly qualitative studies of PS, were selected for review. Regarding PS, three elements were mentioned: to impose and maintain rules and limits; to assess the condition of the patient; and to interact with the patient. The goals for PS related to patient security, making expectations explicit, and recovering from illness. Major findings were reviewed, but little was found about the effectiveness of PS. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. [Providing grief counseling to a major depressive elderly widower: a nurse's experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hsiu-Ching; Chow, Philip C

    2008-10-01

    The death of a spouse is both a major loss and a tremendous life stressor for the partner left behind. Such has been shown to be particularly hard on the elderly. This article describes a nurse's experience caring for an elderly patient suffering from major depression resulting from the death of his wife. While providing nursing care to the client, the author, employing holistic nursing assessment, identified a reciprocal influence between his depressive symptoms and grief reaction. In applying the Inventory of Complicated Grief to ascertain grief reaction intensity to help the client discern between major depressive symptoms and grief reaction, the author found that the client (1) could not accept the loss of his wife, (2) had difficulty adjusting to life after his wife's death, and (3) faced a tense and distant relationship with his son. Such resulted in suicidal ideation and planning and feelings of loneliness, helplessness, hopelessness and incapability, which triggered major depression and a complicated grief reaction. Therefore, the author applied grief counseling to help the client accept the loss of his spouse, communicate his grief, overcome the difficult adjustment to life after his spouse's death, bid farewell to his wife, and establish new relationships. Such counseling gradually helped the client accept the inevitability of death and his wife's passing. To help the client establish new relationships under existing circumstances of negligible external support systems, the author encouraged the client to establish a new relationship with himself and integrate the old-age stage of life cycle naturally into his daily routine. Based on this care experience, we recommend psychiatric nurses assess cautiously the loss experience and grief reaction in elderly widowers under their care in order to provide timely grief counseling intervention to help the client pass quickly through the grieving phase and free him or her from the haze of depression.

  7. Using Variables in School Mathematics: Do School Mathematics Curricula Provide Support for Teachers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogbey, James

    2016-01-01

    This study employed content analysis to examine 3 popular middle-grades mathematics curricula in the USA on the support they provide for teachers to implement concepts associated with variables in school mathematics. The results indicate that each of the 3 curricula provides some type of support for teachers, but in a varied amount and quality.…

  8. Family characteristics and health behaviour as antecedents of school nurses' concerns about adolescents' health and development: a path model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poutiainen, Hannele; Levälahti, Esko; Hakulinen-Viitanen, Tuovi; Laatikainen, Tiina

    2015-05-01

    Family socio-economic factors and parents' health behaviours have been shown to have an impact on the health and well-being of children and adolescents. Family characteristics have also been associated with school nurses' concerns, which arose during health examinations, about children's and adolescents' physical health and psychosocial development. Parental smoking has also been associated with smoking in adolescents. The aim of this study was to determine to what extent school nurses' concerns about adolescents' physical health and psychosocial development related to family characteristics are mediated through parents' and adolescents' own health behaviours (smoking). A path model approach using cross-sectional data was used. In 2008-2009, information about health and well-being of adolescents was gathered at health examinations of the Children's Health Monitoring Study. Altogether 1006 eighth and ninth grade pupils in Finland participated in the study. The associations between family characteristics, smoking among parents and adolescents and school nurses' concerns about adolescents' physical health and psychosocial development were examined using a structural equation model. Paternal education had a direct, and, through fathers' and boys' smoking, an indirect association with school nurses' concerns about the physical health of boys. Paternal labour market status and family income were only indirectly associated with concerns about the physical health of boys by having an effect on boys' smoking through paternal smoking, and a further indirect effect on concerns about boys' health. In girls, only having a single mother was strongly associated with school nurses' concerns about psychosocial development through maternal and adolescent girl smoking. Socio-economic family characteristics and parental smoking influence adolescent smoking and are associated with school nurses' concerns about adolescents' physical health and psychosocial development. The findings

  9. Factors associated with end-of-life by home-visit nursing-care providers in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Miharu; Niimura, Junko; Nishida, Atsushi

    2017-06-01

    Home-visit nursing-care services in Japan are expected to provide home hospice services for older patients with non-cancer diseases. The aim of the present study was to examine factors that contribute to the provision of end-of-life care by home-visit nursing-care providers in Japan. The present retrospective study was carried out using nationally representative cross-sectional data from the 2007, 2010, and 2013 Survey of Institutions and Establishments for Long-Term Care. A total of 138 008 randomly sampled home-visit nursing-care service users were included in this analysis. End-of-life care (study outcome) was defined as the provision of nursing-care within the last month of life. Of the 138 008 patients at home, 2280 (1.7%) received home-based nursing care within the last month of life, and end-of-life care was offered primarily to cancer patients (n = 1651; 72.4%). After accounting for patient characteristics, patients were more likely to receive end-of-life care when they used home-visit nursing-care providers that had a greater number of nursing staff or were located in a region with fewer hospital beds. Among home-visit nursing-care providers, the nursing staff ratio and the availability of hospital beds were related to the provision of end-of-life care. Home-visit nursing-care providers should establish specialist hospice care teams with enhanced staffing ratios to allow for the adequate provision of home-based end-of-life care. A community-based network between home-visit nursing-care providers and hospitals should also be established to attain an integrated end-of-life care system for elderly populations in regions with more hospital beds. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 991-998. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  10. Analysis of the organization of nursing care provided for disabled children in special education institutions in northwest Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawłowska-Lichota, Katarzyna; Wróbel, Agnieszka; Brodowski, Jacek; Karakiewicz, Beata

    2009-06-01

    It often happens that handicapped children and teenagers need to be taught in special educational centres. One of the specialists working in a special school should be a nurse having appropriate professional and methodical skills. The research involved nurses employed in 36 special education institutions in 2006/2007 in the area of North-West Poland. The organization of work was analysed on the basis of specially constructed questionnaires. The average working time of nurses employed in special education institutions was 16 hours and 12 minutes per week. In the group of nurses examined, 69% persons have completed qualifications and 5% specialty courses. Nurses cooperate mainly with speech therapists, educationalists, psychologists, rehabilitators, specialists in surdo-pedagogy and oligophreno-pedagogy. However, they attended meetings with parents very occasionally (8%) and rarely participated in staff meetings (8%). Besides, 29% of participants met with parents exclusively in case of emergency. Nurses' working time in special education institutions according to the norms or work organization. Not all nurses working with disabled pupils have the required qualifications such as the completed specialty or qualification courses. Nurses working in special education do not fully use the possibility of cooperation with the families of disabled pupils and specialists in the therapeutic team.

  11. Implementing school nursing strategies to reduce LGBTQ adolescent suicide: a randomized cluster trial study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willging, Cathleen E; Green, Amy E; Ramos, Mary M

    2016-10-22

    Reducing youth suicide in the United States (U.S.) is a national public health priority, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer or questioning (LGBTQ) youth are at elevated risk. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) endorses six evidence-based (EB) strategies that center on meeting the needs of LGBTQ youth in schools; however, fewer than 6 % of U.S. schools implement all of them. The proposed intervention model, "RLAS" (Implementing School Nursing Strategies to Reduce LGBTQ Adolescent Suicide), builds on the Exploration, Preparation, Implementation, and Sustainment (EPIS) conceptual framework and the Dynamic Adaptation Process (DAP) to implement EB strategies in U.S. high schools. The DAP accounts for the multilevel context of school settings and uses Implementation Resource Teams (IRTs) to facilitate appropriate expertise, advise on acceptable adaptations, and provide data feedback to make schools implementation ready and prepared to sustain changes. Mixed methods will be used to examine individual, school, and community factors influencing both implementation process and youth outcomes. A cluster randomized controlled trial will assess whether LGBTQ students and their peers in RLAS intervention schools (n = 20) report reductions in suicidality, depression, substance use, bullying, and truancy related to safety concerns compared to those in usual care schools (n = 20). Implementation progress and fidelity for each EB strategy in RLAS intervention schools will be examined using a modified version of the Stages of Implementation Completion checklist. During the implementation and sustainment phases, annual focus groups will be conducted with the 20 IRTs to document their experiences identifying and advancing adaptation supports to facilitate use of EB strategies and their perceptions of the DAP. The DAP represents a data-informed, collaborative, multiple stakeholder approach to progress from exploration to sustainment and obtain

  12. Implementing school nursing strategies to reduce LGBTQ adolescent suicide: a randomized cluster trial study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathleen E. Willging

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reducing youth suicide in the United States (U.S. is a national public health priority, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer or questioning (LGBTQ youth are at elevated risk. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC endorses six evidence-based (EB strategies that center on meeting the needs of LGBTQ youth in schools; however, fewer than 6 % of U.S. schools implement all of them. The proposed intervention model, “RLAS” (Implementing School Nursing Strategies to Reduce LGBTQ Adolescent Suicide, builds on the Exploration, Preparation, Implementation, and Sustainment (EPIS conceptual framework and the Dynamic Adaptation Process (DAP to implement EB strategies in U.S. high schools. The DAP accounts for the multilevel context of school settings and uses Implementation Resource Teams (IRTs to facilitate appropriate expertise, advise on acceptable adaptations, and provide data feedback to make schools implementation ready and prepared to sustain changes. Methods/Design Mixed methods will be used to examine individual, school, and community factors influencing both implementation process and youth outcomes. A cluster randomized controlled trial will assess whether LGBTQ students and their peers in RLAS intervention schools (n = 20 report reductions in suicidality, depression, substance use, bullying, and truancy related to safety concerns compared to those in usual care schools (n = 20. Implementation progress and fidelity for each EB strategy in RLAS intervention schools will be examined using a modified version of the Stages of Implementation Completion checklist. During the implementation and sustainment phases, annual focus groups will be conducted with the 20 IRTs to document their experiences identifying and advancing adaptation supports to facilitate use of EB strategies and their perceptions of the DAP. Discussion The DAP represents a data-informed, collaborative, multiple stakeholder

  13. Knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of school nurses and personnel and associations with nonmedical immunization exemptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Daniel A; Moulton, Lawrence H; Omer, Saad B; Chace, Lesley M; Klassen, Ann; Talebian, Pejman; Halsey, Neal A

    2004-06-01

    of school personnel who work with parents on immunrk with parents on immunization issues were associated with the likelihood of a child in the school having an exemption. Although respondents generally believed in vaccinations, misconceptions were common. Many school personnel seem to be unaware of the seriousness of some vaccine-preventable diseases and that unimmunized children are highly susceptible to diseases. These misperceptions were associated with an increased likelihood of a child having an exemption. This study of associations cannot determine causal associations. Nonetheless, the frequency of vaccine misconceptions among school personnel warrants vaccine communication programs for school employees who work with parents on immunization issues. An intervention study could determine whether such programs have an impact on parental decisions to claim exemptions for their children. Personnel without formal health care training who advice parents on immunization issues could be passing on misinformation to parents. Nurses or properly trained health personnel should be the primary school contacts for parents on immunization issues. Health departments and health care providers were used most often by school personnel for vaccine information. Providers, professional organizations, health departments, and the CDC were considered most credible. The CDC may be an underutilized source, given its high credibility; only 58.1% of respondents reported using the CDC for vaccine information. Greater visibility of CDC on vaccine information statements and communication efforts from the CDC directly to school personnel will likely be well received. Respondents who do not consider health departments and the CDC as credible sources were associated with a greater likelihood of a child in their school having an exemption. The CDC may need to consider working with other reliable sources to communicate with these personnel. Studies are needed to understand why some parents choose

  14. Diabetes nurse educators' experiences of providing care for women, with gestational diabetes mellitus, from disadvantaged backgrounds.

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    Carolan, Mary

    2014-05-01

    To explore diabetes nurse educators' experiences of providing care for women, with gestational diabetes mellitus, from disadvantaged backgrounds and to gather information which would assist with the development of an educational programme that would support both women and diabetes educators. Rates of gestational diabetes mellitus have increased dramatically in recent years. This is concerning as gestational diabetes mellitus is linked to poorer pregnancy outcomes including hypertension, stillbirth, and nursery admission. Poorest outcomes occur among disadvantaged women. gestational diabetes mellitus is also associated with maternal type 2 diabetes and with child obesity and type 2 diabetes among offspring. Effective self-management of gestational diabetes mellitus reduces these risks. Diabetes nurse educators provide most education and support for gestational diabetes mellitus self-management. An interpretative phenomenological analysis approach, as espoused by Smith and Osborn (Qualitative Psychology: A Practical Guide to Research Methods, 2008, Sage, London, 51), provided the framework for this study. The views of six diabetes educators were explored through in-depth interviewing. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed according to steps outlined by Smith and Osborn (Qualitative Psychology: A Practical Guide to Research Methods, 2008, Sage, London, 51). Three themes emerged from the data: (1) working in a suboptimal environment, (2) working to address the difficulties and (3) looking to the future. Throughout, the diabetes nurse educators sought opportunities to connect with women in their care and to make the educational content understandable and meaningful. Low literacy among disadvantaged women has a significant impact on their understanding of gestational diabetes mellitus information. In turn, catering for women with low literacy contributes to increased workloads for diabetes nurse educators, making them vulnerable to burnout. There is a need

  15. Does contact by a family nurse practitioner decrease early school absence?

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    Kerr, Jill; Price, Marva; Kotch, Jonathan; Willis, Stephanie; Fisher, Michael; Silva, Susan

    2012-02-01

    Chronic early school absence (preschool through third grade) is associated with school failure. The presence of school nurses may lead to fewer absences, and nurse practitioners in school-based health centers (SBHCs) can facilitate a healthier population resulting in improved attendance. Efforts to get students back to school are unexplored in nursing literature. This article describes a nursing intervention to decrease early school absence in two elementary schools K-3 (N = 449) and a Head Start program (N = 130). The Head Start Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) contacted families of chronically and excessively absent students by telephone, clinic visit at school, or home visit. The aggregate percentage attendance was evaluated by grades (preschool to third grade), schools (Head Start, Elementary Schools 1 and 2), and grades and schools and compared with publicly available school district aggregate data. There were statistically significant increases in attendance from Year 1 to Year 2 at p < .05 at the elementary level but not at the Head Start level. Student demographics, types of contacts, absence reasons (including sick child), and medical diagnoses are described.

  16. Professional quality of life of Japanese nurses/midwives providing abortion/childbirth care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Maki; Kinefuchi, Emiko; Kimura, Rumiko; Tsuda, Akiko

    2013-08-01

    This study explored the relationship between professional quality of life and emotion work and the major stress factors related to abortion care in Japanese obstetric and gynecological nurses and midwives. Between October 2011 and January 2012, questionnaires that included questions concerning eight stress factors, the Professional Quality of Life Scale, and the Japanese version of the Frankfurt Emotional Work Scale, were answered by 255 nurses and midwives working in abortion and childbirth services. Professional Quality of Life scores (compassion fatigue, compassion satisfaction, burnout) were significantly associated with stress factors and emotion work. Multiple regression analysis revealed that of all the evaluated variables, the Japanese version of the Frankfurt Emotional Work Scale score for negative emotions display was the most significant positive predictor of compassion fatigue and burnout. The stress factors "thinking that the aborted fetus deserved to live" and "difficulty in controlling emotions during abortion care" were associated with compassion fatigue. These findings indicate that providing abortion services is a highly distressing experience for nurses and midwives.

  17. Regrets associated with providing healthcare: qualitative study of experiences of hospital-based physicians and nurses.

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    Delphine S Courvoisier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regret is an unavoidable corollary of clinical practice. Physicians and nurses perform countless clinical decisions and actions, in a context characterised by time pressure, information overload, complexity and uncertainty. OBJECTIVE: To explore feelings associated with regretted clinical decisions or interventions of hospital-based physicians and nurses and to examine how these regrets are coped with. METHOD: Qualitative study of a volunteer sample of 12 physicians and 13 nurses from Swiss University Hospitals using semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis RESULTS: All interviewees reported at least one intense regret, which sometimes led to sleep problems, or taking sickness leave. Respondents also reported an accumulation effect of small and large regrets, which sometimes led to quitting one's unit or choosing another specialty. Respondents used diverse ways of coping with regrets, including changing their practices and seeking support from peers and family but also suppression of thoughts related to the situation and ruminations on the situation. Another coping strategy was acceptance of one's limits and of medicine's limits. Physicians reported that they avoided sharing with close colleagues because they felt they could lose their credibility. CONCLUSIONS: Since regret seems related to both positive and negative consequences, it is important to learn more about regret coping among healthcare providers and to determine whether training in coping strategies could help reduce negative consequences such as sleep problems, absenteeism, or turnover.

  18. Impact of advanced practice providers (nurse practitioners and physician assistants) on surgical residents' critical care experience.

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    Kahn, Steven A; Davis, Sarah A; Banes, Caroline T; Dennis, Bradley M; May, Addison K; Gunter, Oliver D

    2015-11-01

    Teaching hospitals often employ advanced practice providers (nurse practitioners and physician assistants or APPs) to counteract residents' work-hour restrictions. With increased utilization of APPs in labor-intense areas, such as intensive care units (ICUs), APPs may have an impact on resident education and experience. No studies have investigated the direct role an APP plays on the training experience of a surgical resident in the ICU. An institutional review board-approved survey was emailed to residents in Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited general surgery programs. Surveys asked about demographics, residency and/or ICU characteristics, and the effects of APPs on patient care, workflow, and educational experience. Regression analysis determined predictors of resident perception. A total of 354 of 1178 residents responded to the survey (30%). Some residents felt that nurses calling APPs preferentially for patient-care issues interfered with education (17%) and residents' ability to follow patients (12%) and was associated with overall detrimental effects to ICU experience on regression (odds ratio, 3.7; confidence interval, 1.5-9.1). Most residents reported positive effects of APPs, such as reduced resident workload (79.8%), teaching protocols and/or guidelines (60.3%), enhanced patient care (60.3%), and enhanced communication (50.5%). When asked how APPs affected their overall ICU experience, 48.4% reported positive effects, 20.6% reported "no effect," and 31% reported detrimental effects. Only a minority of residents perceived that APPs detract from training, particularly those who felt excluded when nurses preferentially contact APPs with patient-care issues. APPs have the potential to enhance training and ICU experience, as reflected in many of the responses. Strategies to maintain direct nurse and resident communication might preserve residents' perception of the educational value of APPs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All

  19. Emergency medical service, nursing, and physician providers' perspectives on delirium identification and management.

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    LaMantia, Michael A; Messina, Frank C; Jhanji, Shola; Nazir, Arif; Maina, Mungai; McGuire, Siobhan; Hobgood, Cherri D; Miller, Douglas K

    2017-04-01

    Purpose of the study The study objective was to understand providers' perceptions regarding identifying and treating older adults with delirium, a common complication of acute illness in persons with dementia, in the pre-hospital and emergency department environments. Design and methods The authors conducted structured focus group interviews with separate groups of emergency medical services staff, emergency nurses, and emergency physicians. Recordings of each session were transcribed, coded, and analyzed for themes with representative supporting quotations identified. Results Providers shared that the busy emergency department environment was the largest challenge to delirium recognition and treatment. When describing delirium, participants frequently detailed hyperactive features of delirium, rather than hypoactive features. Participants shared that they employed no clear diagnostic strategy for identifying the condition and that they used heterogeneous approaches to treat the condition. To improve care for older adults with delirium, emergency nurses identified the need for more training around the management of the condition. Emergency medical services providers identified the need for more support in managing agitated patients when in transport to the hospital and more guidance from emergency physicians on what information to collect from the patient's home environment. Emergency physicians felt that delirium care would be improved if they could have baseline mental status data on their patients and if they had access to a simple, accurate diagnostic tool for the condition. Implications Emergency medical services providers, emergency nurses, and emergency physicians frequently encounter delirious patients, but do not employ clear diagnostic strategies for identifying the condition and have varying levels of comfort in managing the condition. Clear steps should be taken to improve delirium care in the emergency department including the development of mechanisms

  20. Provider category and quality of care in the Norwegian nursing home industry

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    Astri Drange Hole

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines empirically if there is a link between quality of care in the Norwegian nursing home industry and exposure of the industry to competition. Exposing public care to competition implies that the responsibility for providing care services is shared between public authorities and private actors. In Norway, exposure to competition means tender competition. Suppliers bid for a contract issued by the Norwegian authorities for a limited number of years. Quality of care in an institution is the major competitive factor. The provider categories of elderly care are: 1 care provided by institutions run by municipalities, 2 care provided by institutions run by private companies, which have won a tender competition, 3 care provided by institutions run by private companies owned by private families, voluntary religious or idealistic organizations. Nurse-to-patient ratio is used as a proxy for quality of care. The regression analysis indicates a relationship between quality of care and exposure to competition. The quality of care in provider category 2 is significantly lower than in provider category 1, but there are more variations in the quality of care in provider category 1 than in provider category 2. We find the lowest quality of care in provider category 1. There is also a relationship between the quality of care in an institution and the educational level of the staff, the location, the workforce, and the size of an institution. Finally, there is a relationship between the quality of care in an institution and the real and the required capacity, and the financial status in a region.

  1. Attitudes of Hong Kong high school students towards the nursing profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, J C; Foong, A; Chan, P T

    1999-08-01

    The increased development of hospital services in Hong Kong over the last decade has given rise in the demand for more recruits to join the nursing profession. Despite the advancement in education and the improvement in the working conditions, the problems of attracting sufficient new recruits remain critical. This study aimed to examine high school students' attitudes towards the nursing profession and to identify the contributing factors affecting shortage of nurses within the context of Hong Kong. A convenience sample of 375 high school students was recruited. A questionnaire was used to measure their knowledge, attitudes and intention to study nursing. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to describe their career preferences and to compare knowledge, attitudes and intention scales between gender and nursing exposure groups. Results indicated that the students were generally knowledgeable about nursing but were reluctant to pursue nursing as a career. However, students who were socially acquainted with a nurse demonstrated a slightly more positive attitude towards nursing and slightly higher intention to pursue nursing as a career compared with those having no social acquaintance with a nurse. Implications for promotion of nursing profession and limitations of the study were discussed.

  2. Military nursing research by students at the Graduate School of Nursing Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellah, Faye G; Levine, Eugene; Sylvia, Barbara; Kelley, Patricia W; Saba, Virginia; Tenenbaum, Samantha

    2005-03-01

    Military nursing research has had a long and productive history. Today, much of this research is conducted under two programs, the TriService Nursing Research Program and the Graduate School of Nursing (GSN), both located at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland. This article will discuss the 150 military nursing research projects carried out by students at the GSN since its founding in 1992. Although most projects have been small in scope, they have obtained useful results. Some projects have served as the basis for larger-scale research studies, receiving funding from the TriService Nursing Research Program. Reports of all projects are available in an online database and some have been published in professional journals. This review concludes that the research produced by GSN students has been beneficial to students and to the military health system.

  3. Programs that Internationalize Nursing Curricula in Baccalaureate Schools of Nursing in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Gay J.

    1986-01-01

    Results of a national survey of baccalaureate nursing programs are presented concerning programs for study abroad, international exchange programs, and other approaches to internationalizing nursing curricula, including courses dealing with health care and nursing in foreign countries. (Author/MSE)

  4. CE: Original Research: Exploring How Nursing Schools Handle Student Errors and Near Misses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disch, Joanne; Barnsteiner, Jane; Connor, Susan; Brogren, Fabiana

    2017-10-01

    : Background: Little attention has been paid to how nursing students learn about quality and safety, and to the tools and policies that guide nursing schools in helping students respond to errors and near misses. This study sought to determine whether prelicensure nursing programs have a policy for reporting and following up on student clinical errors and near misses, a tool for such reporting, a tool or process (or both) for identifying trends, strategies for follow-up with students after errors and near misses, and strategies for follow-up with clinical agencies and individual faculty members. A national electronic survey of 1,667 schools of nursing with a prelicensure registered nursing program was conducted. Data from 494 responding schools (30%) were analyzed. Of the responding schools, 245 (50%) reported having no policy for managing students following a clinical error or near miss, and 272 (55%) reported having no tool for reporting student errors or near misses. Significant work is needed if the principles of a fair and just culture are to shape the response to nursing student errors and near misses. For nursing schools, some essential first steps are to understand the tools and policies a school has in place; the school's philosophy regarding errors and near misses; the resources needed to establish a fair and just culture; and how faculty can work together to create learning environments that eliminate or minimize the negative consequences of errors and near misses for patients, students, and faculty.

  5. Influenza vaccination and decisional conflict among regulated and unregulated direct nursing care providers in long-term-care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Shannon M; Pierrynowski-Gallant, Donna; Chambers, Larry; O'Connor, Annette; Bowman, Sherry; McNeil, Shelly; Strang, Robert; Knoefel, Frank

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether direct nursing care providers have decisional conflict about receiving influenza vaccinations and characteristics associated with decisional conflict. The researchers used a self-administered questionnaire mailed to direct nursing care providers in two long-term-care organizations. Most direct nursing care providers in both organizations (80% and 93%, respectively) intended to get the influenza vaccine. Unregulated direct nursing care providers had more decisional conflict than regulated providers, especially related to feeling uninformed about the pros and cons of influenza vaccination. Unclear valuing of the pros and cons of influenza vaccination was related to the age of the direct care providers in both organizations. Decisional conflict and influenza vaccination practices may be determined, in part, by age and by the culture of a health care organization. A decision aid to improve knowledge and clarify values may improve decision quality and increase influenza vaccination rates.

  6. Providing Professional Induction Services for Beginning School Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holifield, Mitchell L.; King, Dan L.

    This paper offers a summary of research on the professional induction needs of beginning school administrators and a report on a professional induction project conducted by Arkansas State University. The project initiation process: (1) identified and interviewed newly practicing school administrators in 25 Arkansas counties; (2) determined their…

  7. Examining childhood bullying and adolescent suicide: implications for school nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Gregory D; Clements, Paul Thomas; Holt, Karyn E

    2012-08-01

    Adolescent suicide is a preventable tragedy yet is still the third leading cause of death in young people of age 10-24. Contrary to the idea that childhood bullying is a normal part of growing up or a rite of passage, it is now correlated with adolescent suicidality. An integrative review of the contemporary, extant literature was conducted to examine the following question: Are adolescents who have been involved in childhood bullying or cyberbullying as victim, offender, or victim/offender at greater risk for suicidality than those who have not. It is important to empower school nurses with current and evidence-based information regarding childhood bullying and examine empirical science and tools to effectively address the current serious problem of adolescent suicide risk assessment and intervention.

  8. Healthy Skin: Cancer Education for School Teachers and Nurses Using a "Train and Equip" Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, E Robert

    2017-03-01

    Skin cancer, especially malignant melanoma, continues on the increase. Different interventions are attempting to impact on this problem. The approach used by the Partners in Health Sciences program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Science is to both "train" and, importantly, "equip" classroom teachers and school nurses in a "Healthy Skin" professional development curriculum. Each participant not only received face-to-face interactive content training in a workshop setting that lasted 6 h; each also received a resource kit of supplies, materials, and equipment used in the workshop and designed for the trainee to use with students in a classroom/school setting. This single "hit" professional development event then can be replicated by each trainee annually for the span of her/his teaching/school-nursing career. A total of 588 trainees participated in "Healthy Skin" workshops that were held in 17 communities throughout the state. Participants attended from 188 different towns/cities. Of those in attendance, 511 (87 %) were females, 77 (13 %) males, 81 % Caucasian, 16 % African Americans, and the remaining 3 % self-identified as "other". There were 471 teachers, 85 nurses, and 32 "others" (administrators, school counselors). Trainees completed anonymous pre/post test measures with an increase in knowledge of 28.5 %. A short-term evaluation was conducted at the end of the workshop. After a minimum of 6 months had elapsed, a long-term evaluation was used to capture data on how the workshop experience transferred into new curricular/learning activities for the students of the workshop participants. There was a high level of satisfaction with the workshop experience and use of workshop content and resource kits. Our experiences in this type of professional development outreach provide a model of how institutions of higher education could contribute to the professional development of K-12 teachers and their students in any content area.

  9. What factors influence Hong Kong school students in their choice of a career in nursing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, W; Arthur, D

    2003-01-01

    Chronic and recurrent shortages of nurses, coupled with the increasing demand for high quality and motivated nurses and competition for secondary school leavers from other professions, are issues which prompted this investigation of senior school students' career choice. Using a descriptive survey design, and a questionnaire developed for the study, 1246 Form 6 students in Hong Kong were surveyed, of these 28% respondents reported that they were interested in studying nursing. The findings indicated that students' decision to choose or not choose nursing was significantly influenced by the demographic factors: gender (chi(2) = 42.72, p career score (t = 14.21, df = 1237, p Students' intention to study nursing was also significantly affected by social influence: parents (chi(2) = 11.53, p = 0.001), school career masters (chi(2) = 5.52, p = 0.019) and friends (chi(2) = 4.83, p = 0.028); past experience with career activities (chi(2) = 84.479, p career activities (p students' intention to study nursing. Results of this study can be used by nurse leaders and recruiters to develop strategies and help school leavers perceive nursing in a more positive way. Expanding the informational sources about nursing can facilitate the recruitment process. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  10. School-based blood drive: successful nurse collaboration with parents, students, and the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Diane Cody; Taylor, Mary Ellen; Pyle, Audrey

    2015-05-01

    The nurses at an independent Pre-K through 12 educational institution in Houston, Texas (The Kinkaid School), expanded the blood drive program to include innovative collaboration with high school student leaders, parents, and school faculty. Methods implemented in this endeavor included technology utilization, science education, and an enhanced parent workforce. By focusing on community involvement and an altruistic reason for donating, the Kinkaid school nurses helped their community break school donation records 2 years in a row. © 2015 The Author(s).

  11. Striving to Make a Positive Difference: School Nurses' Experiences of Promoting the Health and Well-Being of Adolescent Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Margaretha; Björk, Maria; Ekebergh, Margaretha; Sundler, Annelie Johansson

    2014-01-01

    In Sweden, school nurses are part of the School Health Service with the main objective of health promotion to support students' health and attainment of educational goals. The aim in this phenomenological study was to illuminate the experiences of school nurses in promoting the health and well-being of adolescent girls. Seventeen school nurses…

  12. Academic-related stress among graduate students in nursing in a Jamaican school of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kimarie; Anderson-Johnson, Pauline; McPherson, Andrea Norman

    2016-09-01

    Graduate students perceive their education as highly stressful, have consistently rated their stress levels as above average and have consistently scored above average on stress scales. The consequences of stress include negative academic outcomes, reduction in cognitive ability, impaired coping and incompletion of graduate studies. Stress is also associated with physical and psychological symptoms such as altered appetite, sleep pattern disturbances and headache. A descriptive correlational design was used to determine the perceived levels and sources of academic-related stress among students enrolled in a Master of Science in Nursing (MScN) degree programme at school of nursing in urban section of Jamaica. The Perceived Stress Scale-14 and Stress Survey were used to collect data from the 81 students enrolled in full or part time study in the MScN programme. Univariate and bivariate analyses were conducted using SPSS version 20. The majority (50.9%) were moderately stressed while 22.8% and 24.6% had high and low levels of stress respectively. Stress associated with the preparation for and prospect of final examinations received the highest overall mean stress rating, causing "a lot of stress". Attendances at classes and relationships with lecturers received the lowest mean stress rating. Research was not listed as a stressor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Peace and Power Conceptual Model: An Assessment Guide for School Nurses Regarding Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraley, Hannah E; Aronowitz, Teri

    2017-10-01

    Human trafficking is a global problem; more than half of all victims are children. In the United States (US), at-risk youth continue to attend school. School nurses are on the frontlines, presenting a window of opportunity to identify and prevent exploitation. Available papers targeting school nurses report that school nurses may lack awareness of commercial sexual exploitation and may have attitudes and misperceptions about behaviors of school children at risk. This is a theoretical paper applying the Peace and Power Conceptual Model to understand the role of school nurses in commercial sexual exploitation of children.

  14. Implementation of Symptom Protocols for Nurses Providing Telephone‐Based Cancer Symptom Management: A Comparative Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Esther; Ballantyne, Barbara; Tarasuk, Joy; Skrutkowski, Myriam; Carley, Meg; Chapman, Kim; Kuziemsky, Craig; Kolari, Erin; Sabo, Brenda; Saucier, Andréanne; Shaw, Tara; Tardif, Lucie; Truant, Tracy; Cummings, Greta G.; Howell, Doris

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The pan‐Canadian Oncology Symptom Triage and Remote Support (COSTaRS) team developed 13 evidence‐informed protocols for symptom management. Aim To build an effective and sustainable approach for implementing the COSTaRS protocols for nurses providing telephone‐based symptom support to cancer patients. Methods A comparative case study was guided by the Knowledge to Action Framework. Three cases were created for three Canadian oncology programs that have nurses providing telephone support. Teams of researchers and knowledge users: (a) assessed barriers and facilitators influencing protocol use, (b) adapted protocols for local use, (c) intervened to address barriers, (d) monitored use, and (e) assessed barriers and facilitators influencing sustained use. Analysis was within and across cases. Results At baseline, >85% nurses rated protocols positively but barriers were identified (64‐80% needed training). Patients and families identified similar barriers and thought protocols would enhance consistency among nurses teaching self‐management. Twenty‐two COSTaRS workshops reached 85% to 97% of targeted nurses (N = 119). Nurses felt more confident with symptom management and using the COSTaRS protocols (p nursing requires a tailored approach. A multifaceted intervention approach increased nurses’ use of evidence‐informed protocols during telephone calls with patients about symptoms. Training and other interventions improved nurses’ confidence with using COSTaRS protocols and their uptake was evident in some documented telephone calls. Protocols could be adapted for use by patients and nurses globally. PMID:27243574

  15. [Living With Tolerable Burden: Exploring the Ethical Self of Nurses Who Provide End-of-Life Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying-Chun; Tai, Yu-Lun; Chiang, Hsien-Hsien

    2017-04-01

    Providing end-of-life (EOL) care elicits complex emotions in nurses in the context of modern medicine. Nurses must not only watch their patients succumb to disease and death but also witness their suffering. This qualitative study adopted the perspective of "the other", as proposed by Emmanuel Levinas, to understand the experience of nurses who provide EOL care and the possibilities of nurses build up their ethical selves within the context of modern medicine. The study used interpretative phenomenology and group dialogue. Thirteen nurses who had EOL care experience were included. Data were drawn from the six transcripts of the group sessions, the researcher's diaries, and participants' feedback sheets. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to analyze the data. The findings showed that nurses not only execute medical procedures but are also capable of self-molding into ethical subjects. The categories of participant experiences included: (1) encountering the death; (2) encountering my inner self; and (3) greeting the death. EOL nursing does not require abstract or decontextualized knowledge, but rather requires more experiential knowledge. EOL care may inspire nurses to become ethical persons and to gain wisdom if they shift away from a self-centered perspective to receive "the other". This study illustrates that EOL care should not depend solely on ethical codes or principles but should also adopt the attitudes of "for the other".

  16. Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity/Expression (Sexual Minority Students): School Nurse Practice. Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Beverly

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that all students, regardless of their sexual orientation or the sexual orientation of their parents and family members, are entitled to a safe school environment and equal opportunities for a high level of academic achievement and school participation/involvement. Establishment of…

  17. Corruption in a Comprehensive School: Sociological Diagnosis and Educational Providence

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    Valdas Pruskus

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is about the phenomenon of corruption in a comprehensive school. It analyses the expression forms of corruption and their peculiarities and disputes the main reasons stimulating educators to take part in corrupt interchanges thus tolerate it. On the ground of empirical research in Vilnius secondary schools it discloses attitudes of teachers, schoolchildren and parents towards corruption. The research was carried out in Vilnius Salomėja Nėris gymnasium, Vilnius Mikalojus Daukša secondary school, Mindaugas secondary school, Užupys gymnasium, Antakalnis gymnasium, Naujamiestis secondary school and Stanevičius secondary school. Overall 500 respondents were questioned: 300 pupils of ninth – twelfth forms, 100 teachers and 100 parents of schoolchildren. Difficult financial circumstances were pointed out as the main reason stimulating teachers to take part in corrupt interchanges. This answer was chosen by 42 per cent of respondents. Most of them think that raising wages would reduce corruption crimes. The research data show it is an important problem in schools though 70 per cent of respondents state it is not the biggest problem in their school. Only 15 per cent of questioned schoolchildren, 4 per cent of parents and 14 percent of teachers safely state that corruption is the main problem in their school. About 20 per cent of respondents (21.4 per cent of schoolchildren, 19 per cent of parents and 21 per cent of teachers acknowledge of making a payoff or receiving an offer to take it. Respondents state that 30 per cent of their friends and relatives made a payoff to school staff. 26.7 percent of schoolchildren and 27 per cent of parents’ acquaintances made a payoff to school staff. Only the answers of teachers did not change – 21 per cent of their colleagues were offered a payoff. These results do not let affirm that corruption is very widely spread in schools and therefore could be named as the biggest problem here. Though

  18. Knowledge of nursing students about the care provided to people with neoplastic wounds

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    Roseane Ferreira Gomes

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the knowledge of nursing students about the care provided to patients with neoplastic wound. Method: This is an exploratory research of a qualitative nature, which was attended by 15 students of the Bachelor's Degree in Nursing from the Center of Education and Health of the Federal University of Campina Grande, campus Cuité - PB, in the period from October to November 2015. For data collection, we used a form for an interview. The data were analyzed through the Technique of Thematic Analysis of Minayo. Results: From the analysis of the empirical material emerged the following thematic categories: Category 1 - Defining neoplastic wounds; Category 2 - Knowledge incipient on ‘neoplastic wounds’ for academic and professional practice; Category 3 - Envisioning the theme "neoplastic wound" in the Academy; Category 4 - Knowledge about methods of evaluation of neoplastic wounds and Category 5 - Knowledge of therapeutic modalities of neoplastic wounds. Conclusions: The academics know the evaluative method of a patient with neoplastic wound as integralizadora unit of care process; recognize palliative care as the best therapeutic modality for these customers, especially when they are in completion and indicate the products contraindicated in the treatment of these lesions; however, do not mention the covers and recommended substances for the control of the signs and symptoms of these injuries. In this context, it is believed that the creation of academic projects of extension, with the aim of creating opportunities for integration between theory and practice, is one of the ways to improve the knowledge.   Keywords: Knowledge; Students of Nursing; Skin Neoplasms.

  19. Effects of Provided Trainings Regarding Non-Invasive Mechanical Ventilation on the Knowledge Level of Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonay Göktaş

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Having experienced members in the team for obtaining successful outcomes in non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV is important. The aim of our study is to determine the effectiveness of training on nurse’s level of knowledge about NIMV Methods: This study was done with 70 nurses who were working at an university hospital. The data collection tools that were used were form for individual characteristics and knowledge test questions form consisting of multiple-choice for NIMV. Firstly, Pre-tests have been collected in the survey. Secondly, courses regarding NIMV indications, contraindications and patients management topics were given verbally by researchers. Finally, final tests were performed and data were collected. Analyzing for data were used frequency, percentage, wilcoxon and dependent samples Mc Nemar tests. Results: Mean age were 33.2±7.3, 87.1% were female, 68.6% had bachelor degrees. Of 47.1% were working in intensive care. 54.3% often provide care to NIMV applied patients. 94.7% mentioned that they don’t have any knowledge of NIMV applications. The differences between the pre-post training scores were higher statistically (p<0.001. It was determined that knowledge levels of nurses about NIMV indications and contraindications after training increased statistically significantly. (p<0.05. Conclusion: In our research it was understood that nurses’ knowledge has increased significantly after the training for non-invasive applications. By means of these trainings that will develop the affective, cognitive and psychomotor skills of nurses, it is expected to reveal the results of the extensive research and successful outcomes for NIMV applications will increase.

  20. Assessment of the Nurses Performance in Providing Care to Patients Undergoing Nasogastric Tube in Suez Canal University Hospital

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Magda Abdelaziz Mohammed; Mahmoud el Prince Mahmoud; Hamdy A Sleem; Mariam Sabry Shehab

    2017-01-01

    .... In general, tube feeding is a technique used for those who are unable to eat on their own. The aim of the present study is to assess nurses' performance in providing care to patients undergoing nasogastric tube...

  1. Factors That Impact Registered Nurses' Decisions to Continue Providing Care to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosfield, Saundra

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if there is a significant difference in the following: (a) nurses' likelihood to remain in geriatrics between age groups (those over 40 years of age and those under 40 years of age); (b) nurses' likelihood to remain in geriatrics and personality traits; (c) nurses' likelihood to remain in geriatrics…

  2. TQM/CQI: providing a steady supply of nurses for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhs, H P

    1994-01-01

    The recent emphasis on total quality management and continuous quality improvement (TQM/CQI) is a positive way to improve the professional status of nurses and minimize repetitive cycles of nursing shortages. The author reviews the history and the current status of the supply and demand for nursing personnel, and suggests solutions for preventing shortages that incorporate TQM/CQI strategies.

  3. Interdisciplinary Education from a College of Nursing and School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, Sarah; Nacht, Amy

    2015-01-01

    We examine a newly designed, interdisciplinary education program and clinical rotation for the first-year obstetrics and gynecology resident, implemented at the University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado, between the College of Nursing midwifery faculty and the School of Medicine Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. The barriers to program development, along with the advantages and disadvantages of collaboration between nursing and medical schools, are reviewed. The clinical experience, consisting of 5 clinical shifts, was designed using the conceptual model of collaborative intelligence. A formal rotation with the midwife was constructed for the first-year resident on the labor and delivery unit, providing care to intrapartum and postpartum women and families. The program included didactic and clinical teaching, with an emphasis on the normal physiologic process of birth and introduction to the midwifery scope of practice and philosophy of care. Formative evaluation of the clinical rotation demonstrated strong interest for continuation of the program and an ability to appreciate midwifery components of care in a limited exposure. Moreover, program development was successful without requiring large curricular changes for the resident. Future planning includes expansion of the program with increased emphasis on the postpartum and breastfeeding woman and continued program evaluation. The long-term success of such collaborations will depend on the continued support of the American College of Nurse-Midwives and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists in developing and improving interdisciplinary educational teams. This article is part of a special series of articles that address midwifery innovations in clinical practice, education, interprofessional collaboration, health policy, and global health. © 2015 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  4. Back to the future? Views of heads of schools of nursing about undergraduate specialization in mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; McAllister, Margaret

    2014-12-01

    Preparation of nursing students for practice in mental health settings in Australia has been criticized since comprehensive education replaced preregistration specialist education. Current and projected workforce shortages have given rise to considering the reintroduction of specialization at preregistration level as a potential solution. Support of heads of schools of nursing would be essential for such an initiative to be considered. A qualitative exploratory study was undertaken involving in-depth telephone interviews with heads of schools of nursing in Queensland. Participants generally favoured the concept of specialization in mental health nursing at undergraduate level. Data analysis revealed the following themes: meeting workforce needs, improving quality of care, employability of graduates, an attractive option for students, and what would have to go. Participants identified many benefits to mental health service delivery and consumer outcomes. How the initiative could be developed within an already overcrowded curriculum was identified as the major barrier. This level of support is encouraging if necessary changes to the educational preparation for mental health nursing practice are to be considered. © 2014 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  5. Achieving transformational change: using appreciative inquiry for strategic planning in a school of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Rebecca Bouterie; Fontaine, Dorrie; Plews-Ogan, Margaret; Williams, Anne

    2012-01-01

    To achieve transformational change, a transformational approach is needed. The Appreciative Inquiry (AI) summit is a method that has been used to achieve transformational change in business for at least 20 years, but this innovative alternative approach is unknown to nursing. At the University of Virginia School of Nursing, an AI Summit was designed to bring all staff, faculty, student representatives, and members of the community together to rewrite the school's strategic plan. New connections within the school, the university, and the community were made when 135 participants engaged in the appreciative, 4-step AI process of discovering, dreaming, designing, and creating the school's future. During the summit, 7 strategic teams formed to move the school toward the best possible future while building on the existing positive core. This article describes 10 steps needed to design an AI summit and implications for using this method at other schools of nursing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Research Collaboration between a Catholic University School of Nursing and Healthcare System: Process and Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, Jane M.; Gonzales, Lucia; Aube, Patti; Connelly, Cynthia D.

    2013-01-01

    Collaborations between diverse Catholic organizations will be important in fulfilling the goals contained in the Institute of Medicine (IOM) 2010 document, "The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health." This article describes a qualitative research study examining the partnership between a graduate-level school of nursing in…

  7. School nurses' perspectives on managing mental health problems in children and young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryjmachuk, Steven; Graham, Tanya; Haddad, Mark; Tylee, Andre

    2012-03-01

    To explore the views of school nurses regarding mental health problems in young people and their potential for engaging in mental health work with this client group. Mental health problems in children and young people are an important public health issue. Universal children's services play a key role in identifying and managing these problems and, while school nurses have an important function in this work, little is known about their views on this aspect of their role. A qualitative research design employing focus group methodology. School nurses (n = 33) were purposively sampled from four school nursing teams in two English cities for a series of focus groups. The focus group data were audio-recorded, transcribed and subsequently analysed using 'framework'. Four principal themes emerged from the data. In these themes, school nurses were found to value their involvement with the mental health of young people, recognising this as an important area of practice. Several obstacles to their work in this area were identified: heavy workloads, professional rivalries, a lack of confidence and limited education and training opportunities. The importance of support from local specialist mental health teams was emphasised. School nurses can be engaged in mental health work though, as public health specialists, their role should focus on health promotion, assessment, signposting and early intervention activities. To facilitate mental health work, school nurses are able to draw on established interpersonal skills and supportive networks; however, workload and a lack of confidence need to be managed and it is important that they are supported by constructive relationships with local specialist mental health teams. This study has implications for nurses and healthcare practitioners interested in enhancing the mental health of children and young people in school settings. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. The process of implementing an ISO 9001 quality management system in a school of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lett, M

    2000-01-01

    This paper documents the process undertaken during the establishment of an ISO 9000 series quality management system by a School of Nursing. Further discussion centres around the reasons why an ISO quality management system was implemented, the lessons learnt during the process and the benefits that accreditation has brought to the School of Nursing. The lessons learnt during the process could be of help to other organisations wishing to achieve a similar accreditation status.

  9. Conflict in schools: student nurses' conflict management styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantek, Filiz; Gezer, Nurdan

    2009-01-01

    Unless conflicts between the students and the instructors can be successfully managed, they will certainly result in negative outcomes for the students. The conflict management styles of the students should be recognized in detail in order to attain positive outcomes in regard to the conflict management styles. The purpose of this study was to examine the conflict management styles used by nursing students in conflict with faculty members and the differences in use of style from the aspect of some variables. This study was conducted with 151 students in a public university nursing school. Data were collected using a personal information form and the Rahim Organizational Conflict Inventory II (ROCI II). The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, ANOVA, Tukey test, Kruskal Wallis test, Mann-Whitney U test and Cronbach alpha coefficient analyses. The students were found to use integrating (X=3.82) and obliging (X=3.81) styles the most, and dominating style (X=3.02) the least. In addition there were differences determined in management style between classes, frequency of experiencing conflict, and feeling of success in the conflict (pstyles were used more by those who evaluated themselves as successful in conflict management, but the avoiding and compromising styles were used more by students who evaluated themselves as unsuccessful. It was determined that the students preferred to use styles that produced positive results in conflict resolution and that the frequency of experiencing conflict and the feeling of success in conflict had an effect on choice of style. It will be helpful to analyze the relationship between the causes of conflict between the student and the instructor in the practice field and the uses of conflict management styles.

  10. High School Child Development Courses Provide a Valuable Apprenticeship

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCombie, Sally M.

    2009-01-01

    The current media are laden with reports of the many significant problems facing today's youth. In fact, parenting has become a national topic of discussion. Parenting instruction, a responsibility that had previously rested in the home, has become part of educational curricula. Courses in child development are offered for high school students in…

  11. The role of UK district nurses in providing care for adult patients with a terminal diagnosis: a meta-ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offen, John

    2015-03-01

    To explore the role of UK district nurses in providing care for adult patients with a terminal diagnosis by reviewing qualitative research. Meta-ethnography was used to conduct the synthesis. CINAHL, MEDLINE and British Nursing Index (BNI) were searched comprehensively for primary research relating to the role of UK district nurses in palliative care. The abstracts and titles of 700 papers were screened against inclusion criteria, of these 97 full papers were appraised. Some 24 studies reported in 25 papers were selected for inclusion in the synthesis. In total, five key themes were identified: valuing the role; practical role; relationships with patients and families; providing psychological support; and role uncertainty. Further synthesis yielded two 'lines of argument'. The concept of the 'expert friend' argues that the atypical relationship district nurses cultivate with patients underpins district nurses' provision of palliative care and profoundly influences the nature of psychological support given. Secondly, the concept of 'threat and opportunity' encapsulates the threat district nurses can feel to their traditional role in palliative care through changing health and social policy, while recognising the benefits that access to specialist knowledge and better training can bring. The findings have implications for understanding the motivators and barriers experienced by district nurses delivering palliative care in a time of unprecedented change to community health services.

  12. Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines and School Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

    2007-01-01

    The use of evidence-based practice (EBP) has become the standard of health care practice. Nurses are expected to use best evidence on a wide range of topics, yet most nurses have limited time, resources, and/or skills to access and evaluate the quality of research and evidence needed to practice evidence-based nursing. EBP guidelines allow nurses…

  13. Frequent attenders in general practice: problem solving treatment provided by nurses [ISRCTN51021015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Oppen P

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a need for assistance from primary care mental health workers in general practice in the Netherlands. General practitioners (GPs experience an overload of frequent attenders suffering from psychological problems. Problem Solving Treatment (PST is a brief psychological treatment tailored for use in a primary care setting. PST is provided by nurses, and earlier research has shown that it is a treatment at least as effective as usual care. However, research outcomes are not totally satisfying. This protocol describes a randomized clinical trial on the effectiveness of PST provided by nurses for patients in general practice. The results of this study, which currently being carried out, will be presented as soon as they are available. Methods/design This study protocol describes the design of a randomized controlled trial to investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of PST and usual care compared to usual care only. Patients, 18 years and older, who present psychological problems and are frequent attenders in general practice are recruited by the research assistant. The participants receive questionnaires at baseline, after the intervention, and again after 3 months and 9 months. Primary outcome is the reduction of symptoms, and other outcomes measured are improvement in problem solving skills, psychological and physical well being, daily functioning, social support, coping styles, problem evaluation and health care utilization. Discussion Our results may either confirm that PST in primary care is an effective way of dealing with emotional disorders and a promising addition to the primary care in the UK and USA, or may question this assumption. This trial will allow an evaluation of the effects of PST in practical circumstances and in a rather heterogeneous group of primary care patients. This study delivers scientific support for this use and therefore indications for optimal treatment and referral.

  14. Physicians' and Nurses' Opinions about the Impact of a Computerized Provider Order Entry System on Their Workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayatollahi, Haleh; Roozbehi, Masoud; Haghani, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    In clinical practices, the use of information technology, especially computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems, has been found to be an effective strategy to improve patient care. This study aimed to compare physicians' and nurses' views about the impact of CPOE on their workflow. This case study was conducted in 2012. The potential participants included all physicians (n = 28) and nurses (n = 145) who worked in a teaching hospital. Data were collected using a five-point Likert-scale questionnaire and were analyzed using SPSS version 18.0. The results showed a significant difference between physicians' and nurses' views about the impact of the system on interorganizational workflow (p = .001) and working relationships between physicians and nurses (p = .017). Interorganizational workflow and working relationships between care providers are important issues that require more attention. Before a CPOE system is designed, it is necessary to identify workflow patterns and hidden structures to avoid compromising quality of care and patient safety.

  15. A road not taken: the proposal for a Harvard School of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Frances

    2010-06-01

    The modernist orientation of nurse leaders in the late nineteenth century directly impacted the future of nursing in the USA. Their orientation is explored in this article as a factor that may have contributed to the failure of the Harvard School of Nursing proposal - a road not taken in nursing education, a road that would have afforded nursing an early central role within the Harvardization of American post-secondary education. The backlash resulting from the attention that was given to Alfred Worcester and Annette Fiske's radical call for contextualization is explored. Modernist tropes of thought that enabled early nurse leaders to weld nursing education to hospitals through the actions of nursing superintendents are described. Outcomes resulting from this welding are delineated, including idolatry of the hospital as nursing's icon, subservience to physicians, a monastic on-duty mantra, the development of a standardized curriculum linked to hospitals, and the framing of state registration within a philosophy that disenfranchised nurses. A non-teleological, narrative analysis of this case is offered to enable nursing to heighten the tensions between the tropes of modernism and those of contextualism, and thus, to empower leaders in the re-invention of America's twenty-first century healthcare delivery system.

  16. Determinants of the intention of elementary school nurses to adopt a redefined role in health promotion at school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godin Gaston

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quest for greater efficiency in the provision of primary healthcare services and the implementation of a "health-promoting school" approach encourage the optimal redefinition of the role of school nurses. School nurses are viewed as professionals who might be significant actors in the promotion of youth health. The aim of this study was to identify the determinants of the intention of elementary school nurses to adopt a new health-promotion role as a strategic option for the health-promoting school. Methods This study was based on an extended version of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB. A total of 251 respondents (response rate of 70% from 42 school health programs across the Province of Québec completed a mail survey regarding their intention to adopt the proposed health-promotion role. Multiple hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to assess the relationship between key independent variables and intention. A discriminant analysis of the beliefs was performed to identify the main targets of action. Results A total of 73% of respondents expressed a positive intention to accept to play the proposed role. The main predictors were perceived behavioural control (β = 0.36, moral norm (β = 0.27, attitude (β = 0.24, and subjective norm (β = 0.21 (ps Conclusions Results suggest that leadership is a skill that should be addressed to increase the ability of school nurses to assume the proposed role. Findings also indicate that public health administrators need to ensure adequate nurse staffing in the schools in order to increase the proportion of nurses willing to play such a role and avoid burnout among these human resources.

  17. Delegation of Care: Overview for the RN Practicing in the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of School Nurses (NJ3), 2006

    2006-01-01

    This manual is intended to provide the school nurse, school staff, school administration, and parents with a general understanding of the legal and nursing considerations and responsibilities that accompany delegation of nursing tasks in the school setting. With the increased need for health services in school, nurses are increasingly using the…

  18. Partnership working by default: district nurses and care home staff providing care for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Claire; Robb, Nadia; Drennan, Vari; Woolley, Rosemary

    2005-11-01

    Older people residents in care homes that only offer residential care rely on primary health care services for medical and nursing needs. Research has investigated the demands that care homes staff and residents make on general practice, but not the involvement of other members of the primary health care team. This paper describes two consecutive studies completed in 2001 and 2003 that involved focus groups and survey methods of enquiry conducted in two settings: an England shire and inner London. The research questions that both studies had in common were (1) What is the contribution of district nursing and other primary care services to care homes that do not have on-site nursing provision? (2) What strategies promote participation and collaboration between residents, care home staff and NHS primary care nursing staff? and (3) What are the current obstacles and aids to effective partnership working and learning? A total of 74 community-based nurses and care home managers and staff took part in 10 focus groups, while 124 care home managers (73% of the 171 surveyed) and 113 district nurse team leaders (80% of the 142 surveyed) participated in the surveys. Findings from both studies demonstrated that nurses were the most frequent NHS professional visiting care homes. Although care home managers and district nurses believed that they had a good working relationship, they had differing expectations of what the nursing contribution should be and how personal and nursing care were defined. This influenced the range of services that older people had access to and the amount of training and support care home staff received from district nurses and the extent to which they were able to develop collaborative and reciprocal patterns of working. Findings indicate that there is a need for community-based nursing services to adopt a more strategic approach that ensures older people in care homes can access the services they are entitled to and receive equivalent health care to

  19. Does the Use of Nursing-Care Services Reduce the Information about Dementia Patients Provided by Their Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Nakamura

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The rate of use of nursing-care services has been increasing dramatically in recent years with the upgrading of the public long-term care insurance system in Japan. We addressed how the increased use of the nursing-care services might affect the information on the patients provided by their caregivers. Methods: A questionnaire survey of 531 family caregivers caring for dementia patients at home was carried out to investigate how the use of these services might affect the information about the patients provided by the caregivers. The survey revealed that the use of the nursing-care services reduced the burden (quality, quantity, time of nursing care, and feeling on the caregivers. Results: According to the observation provided by the caregivers, the patients’ behaviors and activities at home tended to decrease. These results indicated that the use of the nursing-care services resulted in a reduction in the opportunity for and the time spent on observation of the patients by the caregivers, making it more difficult for the caregiver to provide an appropriate assessment of the patient’s condition. Conclusions: We discussed the impact of the use of the nursing-care services on the Clinician’s Interview-Based Impression of Change plus (CIBIC-plus rating. Due to the reduction in the time spent on nursing care and in the opportunity for observation of the patient’s activities of daily living by the caregiver resulting from the use of the nursing-care services, it is difficult to obtain an accurate picture of the patient’s clinical condition using the CIBIC-plus, probably leading to an inappropriate CIBIC-plus rating.

  20. Attitudes of Saudi Nursing Students on AIDS and Predictors of Willingness to Provide Care for Patients in Central Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Abolfotouh, Mostafa A.; Samar A. Al Saleh; Mahfouz, Aisha A.; Sherif M. Abolfotouh; Haya M. Al Fozan

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related knowledge, attitudes, and risk perception among Saudi nursing students, and to identify predictors of their willingness to provide care for patients with AIDS. A cross-sectional study of 260 baccalaureate nursing students at King Saud bin-Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, was done using a previously validated ins...

  1. Using Tailored Videos to Teach Inhaler Technique to Children With Asthma: Results From a School Nurse-Led Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Delesha M; Alexander, Dayna S; Elio, Alice; DeWalt, Darren; Lee, Charles; Sleath, Betsy L

    2016-01-01

    Our purpose was to test whether a tailored inhaler technique video intervention: (1) could be feasibly implemented by school nurses and (2) improve the inhaler technique of children with asthma. School nurses recruited a convenience sample of 25 children with asthma (ages 7-17) and assessed their inhaler technique. Children then watched a tailored video that provided: (1) step-by-step feedback on which steps (out of 8) they performed correctly, (2) praise for correctly-performed steps, and (3) statements about why incorrectly-performed steps are important. Nurses reassessed the child's inhaler technique immediately after watching the video and again 1month later. Non-parametric Wilcoxon signed rank tests were calculated to assess whether children's technique significantly improved from baseline to post-video and baseline to 1-month follow-up. A focus group with the school nurses was conducted post-intervention to discuss feasibility issues. Children's inhaler technique improved by 1.2 steps (with spacer; p=0.03) and 2.7 steps (without spacer; ptechnique. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A qualitative study of science education in nursing school: Narratives of Hispanic female nurses' sense of identity and participation in science learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensemer, Patricia S.

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to learn from Hispanic nursing students regarding their experiences as participants in science learning. The participants were four female nursing students of Hispanic origin attending a small, rural community college in a southeastern state. The overarching question of this study was "In what ways does being Hispanic mediate the science-related learning and practices of nursing students?" The following questions more specifically provided focal points for the research: (1) In what ways do students perceive being Hispanic as relevant to their science education experiences? (a) What does it mean to be Hispanic in the participants' home community? (b) What has it meant to be Hispanic in the science classroom? (2) In what ways might students' everyday knowledge (at home) relate to the knowledge or ways of knowing they practice in the nursing school community? The study took place in Alabama, which offered a rural context where Hispanic populations are rapidly increasing. A series of four interviews was conducted with each participant, followed by one focus group interview session. Results of the study were re presented in terms of portrayals of participant's narratives of identity and science learning, and then as a thematic interpretation collectively woven across the individuals' narratives. Portraitures of each participant draw upon the individual experiences of the four nursing students involved in this study in order to provide a beginning point towards exploring "community" as both personal and social aspects of science practices. Themes explored broader interpretations of communities of practice in relation to guiding questions of the study. Three themes emerged through the study, which included the following: Importance of Science to Nurses, Crossing with a Nurturing and Caring Identity, and Different Modes of Participation. Implications were discussed with regard to participation in a community of practice and

  3. Making healthy connections: introducing nursing as a career choice to middle school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Margaret; Abdallah, Lisa; Findeisen, Mary; Melillo, Karen Devereaux; Dowling, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    The current economic climate has resulted in many experienced nurses returning to the workforce. Despite this, the nursing shortage is looming in our future and the recruitment of a diverse nursing workforce reflective of the population remains a high priority. The Merrimack Valley in northeastern Massachusetts has two large cities, Lawrence and Lowell, in which the Hispanic and the Southeast Asian populations are disproportionately higher than state and national levels. Through the University of Massachusetts Lowell's Bring Diversity to Nursing Project, partnerships with both city school systems were developed and after-school programs aimed at highlighting nursing as a career choice were initiated. Mr. Thompson's Heart is the focus of a middle school, pre-entry program developed by faculty. Introducing career choices in middle school gives students fundamental information about careers and how to begin investigating them. Mr. Thompson's Heart introduces nursing as a career choice combining career information with a focus on developing healthy lifestyle habits. Multiple hands on activities create excitement and interest in the nursing profession. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. [Nutrition education in schools: potential resources for a teacher/nurse partnership].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arboix-Calas, France; Lemonnier, Geneviève

    2016-01-01

    Nutrition education in schools must be based on a collaborative approach between teachers and school nurses. The objective of this study was to compare the nutrition education representations and practices of primary school teachers and school nurses in the Languedoc-Roussillon region in the South of France. We used the theoretical framework of complexity, which is particularly suited to multifactorial phenomena such as nutrition education. We interviewed 112 primary school teachers and 33 school nurses about three aspects of their nutrition education representations and practices: actors, content and place of nutrition education at school. Nurses had a more comprehensive and complex approach to nutrition education, including a collaborative approach. However, teachers had a fairly simplistic view of nutrition education and their practice took little account of the psychosocial dimensions of nutrition and a collaborative approach. Nurses could be resources for teachers to help them change their approach to health by transforming a purely biomedical approach to health and nutrition into a more comprehensive approach, particularly taking into account in its psychological and social dimensions, which would be more appropriate to address the growing prevalence of diet-related chronic diseases in France today.

  5. Parent and Teacher Perceptions of the Impact of School Nurse Interventions on Children's Self-Management of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peery, Annette I.; Engelke, Martha Keehner; Swanson, Melvin S.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is a common chronic illness among school-age children. The school nurse collaborates with the student, parents, and teachers to help the child manage their diabetes effectively. Very little is known about the relationship between school nurse interventions and parent/teacher perceptions of the child's self-management. We examined this…

  6. Food Allergy Education for School Nurses: A Needs Assessment Survey by the Consortium of Food Allergy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Suzanna K.; Vargas, Perla A.; Noone, Sally; Steele, Pam; Sicherer, Scott H.; Burks, A. Wesley; Jones, Stacie M.

    2010-01-01

    Food allergy is increasing in school-age children. School nurses are a primary health care resource for children with food allergy and must be prepared to manage allergen avoidance and respond in the event of an allergic reaction. An anonymous survey was administered to school nurses attending their association meetings to determine their…

  7. Comparing doctors' and nurses' accounts of how they provide emotional care for parents of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsey, Mary; Salmon, Peter; Eden, Tim; Young, Bridget

    2013-02-01

    Despite the emphasis that communication skills training (CST) programmes place on attending to the emotional care of patients, evidence suggests that practitioners neglect this aspect of patient care. We describe and compare doctors' and nurses' accounts of managing the emotional care of parents of children with leukaemia, with the overall objective of examining how their accounts might inform training and policy. Audio-recorded qualitative interviews with 30 doctors and nurses working in six UK paediatric oncology and haematology treatment centres were analysed interpretatively, drawing on the constant comparative method. Doctors' and nurses' descriptions of managing emotional care differed markedly. Doctors described reassuring parents through their ongoing clinical care of the child and by explaining the potentially curative nature of treatment. Doctors did not think they could reassure parents by eliciting and explicitly discussing parents' fears. In contrast, nurses relied on psychological skills and explicit discussion of parents' emotions to provide reassurance. Both doctors and nurses relied on each other to ensure that parents' emotional needs were met by the multidisciplinary team rather than by individual practitioners. Nurses' accounts of providing emotional care resembled the emphasis on explicit emotional talk in CST. However, doctors' accounts indicated that they provided emotional care in ways that diverged markedly from expectations in CST but that were more consistent with their biomedical and authoritative role in patient care. These findings may have implications for CST in future revisions of guidelines, but work is first needed to explore parents' perspectives on emotional care. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Community-based health and schools of nursing: supporting health promotion and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Crystal

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the role of community-based schools of nursing in the promotion of public health and research in poverty-stricken areas. This was a three-phase study (questionnaire and key-informants' interviews) that surveyed representatives of prelicensure associate and baccalaureate nursing schools (n=17), nursing-school key informants (n=6) and community leaders (n=10). A 13-question web-based survey and semi-structured interview of key informants elicited data on demographics, nursing program design, exposure of faculty and students to various research and health promotion methods, and beliefs about student involvement. Nursing schools participated minimally in community-based health promotion (CBHP) and community-based participatory research saw reduced need for student involvement in such activities, cited multiple barriers to active community collaboration, and reported restricted community partnerships. CBHP was recognized to be a valuable element of health care and student education, but is obstructed by many barriers. This study suggests that nursing schools are not taking full advantage of relationships with community leaders. Recommendations for action are given. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Collaboration with Community Mental Health Service Providers: A Necessity in Contemporary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Victor; Castro-Villarreal, Felicia

    2016-01-01

    Schools have played an increasingly central role in providing mental health services to youth, but there are limitations to the services that are available through school-based mental health professionals. Thus, collaboration with non-school-based community mental health providers is oftentimes necessary. As collaboration can address limitations…

  10. Challenges in Providing Trainings for English Teachers of Elementary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nury Supriyanti

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary English provision in Indonesia has started in 1994 in which English has the position as the local content subject in the elementary schools. English has then been part of the Indonesian elementary schoolchildren’s daily routines in many different ways. In the major cities, which are geographically then educationally more privileged,  the children might enjoy their English lessons because they have the qualified teachers who know English and how to teach it to young learners, they have appropriate and interesting materials as well as  appropriate techniques  to learn by. The case is quite different for the children of the less privileged areas where access to qualified teachers, appropriate materials and fun learning is almost impossible. These children have to be content with teachers with no English or child teaching background who are hired because only them who are available. The paper  describes the struggle of  the English Education department of the Yogyakarta State University  in the development of the EFC courses  in order to contribute to the provision of  English to elementary schools in Indonesia.

  11. Service Learning: Providing the Building Blocks for a Socially Responsible Nursing Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Judith M.

    2013-01-01

    An explanatory correlational study was conducted to explore whether and to what extent a relationship between hours of participation in service learning and commitment to social responsibility exists for students enrolled in pre-licensure baccalaureate-nursing programs currently participating in the Nursing Licensure Compact. The convenience…

  12. Windows to the Future: Can the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals Provide Opportunities for Nursing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, David C; Ferguson, Stephanie L

    2016-01-01

    Windows of opportunity are wide open for the nursing profession to actively participate and engage in the policy implementation, evaluation, and achievement of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Nurses bring valuable perspectives as members of diverse governance structures and offer a range of solutions that can help governments pursue and achieve the Sustainable Development Goals and targets by 2030.

  13. Educational needs of nurses to provide genetic services in prenatal care: A cross-sectional study from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seven, Memnun; Eroglu, Kafiye; Akyüz, Aygül; Ingvoldstad, Charlotta

    2017-09-01

    The latest advances in genetics/genomics have significantly impacted prenatal screening and diagnostic tests. This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in inpatient and outpatient obstetric clinics in 24 hospitals in Turkey to determine knowledge of genetics related to prenatal care and the educational needs of perinatal nurses. A total of 116 nurses working in these clinics agreed to participate. The results included the level of knowledge among nurses was not affected by sociodemographic factors. Also, there is a lack of knowledge and interest in genetics among prenatal nurses and in clinical practice to provide education and counseling related to genetics in prenatal settings as a part of prenatal care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Impact of computerised provider order entry system on nursing workflow, patient safety, and medication errors: perspectives from the front line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsweed, Fatimah; Alshaikh, Anwar; Ahmed, Anwar; Yunus, Faisel; Househ, Mowafa

    2014-01-01

    There is a paucity of research on the impact of computerised provider order entry (CPOE) system on the front line staff. We assessed nurses perspectives of the impact of CPOE system implementation on their workflow, patient safety and medication errors in a Saudi Arabian hospital. We conducted a cross-sectional survey involving 112 nurses between April and May 2012. The workflow was easy to manage for nurses who rated CPOE training as of good quality (p = 0.001) and they found that CPOE helped in reducing medication errors (p = 0.001). The nurses who rated CPOE training as of good quality also stated that patient safety was better with CPOE implementation and its use (p workflow, patient safety and medication errors, and is critical in the success of CPOE use and its long-term adoption.

  15. The nurse's role in providing information to surgical patients and family members in Turkey: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayin, Yazile; Aksoy, Güler

    2012-06-01

    In 2008, we conducted a nonexperimental, cross-sectional, descriptive study in the surgical services department of a hospital in Istanbul, Turkey, with the aim of determining how much information was required by perioperative patients and their family members, the extent to which this information was provided, and the role that nurses play in this process. We included a total of 394 outpatients and inpatients and their family members (ie, 197 patients, 197 family members) and 30 nurses in the study. We collected the research data by using one questionnaire for patients, a second for family members of patients, and a third for nurses. We discovered that the patients and their family members wanted to be given more information about the surgical process than they had received. Patients wanted more information about the intraoperative period, whereas their family members wanted more information about the postoperative period. We also found that nurses were aware that they did not play an effective role in providing information to patients and their family members because of a lack of knowledge about what information they were responsible for providing and insufficient staffing. We concluded that nurses should know what education they are responsible for providing, put more effort into understanding patient and family member information needs, and plan a better means of providing information to meet those needs. Copyright © 2012 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Exploratory Research to Design a School Nurse-Delivered Intervention to Treat Adolescent Overweight and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellar, Lauren; Druker, Sue; Osganian, Stavroula K.; Gapinski, Mary Ann; LaPelle, Nancy; Pbert, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Objective: In preparation for a pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of a school nurse-delivered intervention, focus groups were conducted to gain insight into the perceptions of stakeholders regarding the design and implementation of the intervention. Setting and Participants: Fifteen focus groups at participating schools. One hundred subjects,…

  17. Overweight children's response to an annual health dialogue with the school nurse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Ina K; Holstein, Bjørn Evald

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare overweight and normal weight pupils' perceived outcome of the health dialogue with the school nurse. A random sample of schools in Denmark, where pupils age 11.6, 13.6 and 15.6 years old, answered a questionnaire (response rate 88%, n = 5205). The indepe...

  18. Re-Visit to the School Nurse and Adolescents' Medicine Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borup, Ina K.; Andersen, Anette; Holstein, Bjorn E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine if students who re-visit the school nurse use medicines differently than other students when exposed to aches and psychological problems. Methods: The study includes all 11-, 13- and 15-year-old students from a random sample of schools in Denmark, response rate 87 per cent, n = 5,205. The data collection followed the…

  19. School Nurses' Perceptions and Practices of Assisting Students in Obtaining Public Health Insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Megan L.; Hendershot, Candace; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Price, James H.; Thompson, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Background: From January through June 2009, 6.1 million children were uninsured in the United States. On average, students with health insurance are healthier and as a result are more likely to be academically successful. Some schools help students obtain health insurance with the help of school nurses. Methods: This study assessed public school…

  20. Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes among Youth: A Systematic Review, Implications for the School Nurse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackney, Dana E.; Cutshall, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity and the early development of type 2 diabetes (T2 DM) place students at risk for chronic health problems. The school nurse is uniquely situated to promote school health initiatives that influence health behavior. The purpose of this review was to determine effective nonpharmacological interventions for prevention of T2 DM in…

  1. Health Promotion Practices and Attitudes among Nurses in Special Education Schools in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandropoulou, Marianthi; Sourtzi, Panayota; Kalokerinou, Athena

    2010-01-01

    Published research concerning health promotion in Greek schools is limited. The aim of the study was to evaluate special education school nurses' involvement in health promotion activities, examine their attitudes toward it, and to explore the factors influencing their practices. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in 2005 by mailed…

  2. Perception of primary care doctors and nurses about care provided to sickle cell disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier Gomes, Ludmila Mourão; de Andrade Barbosa, Thiago Luis; Souza Vieira, Elen Débora; Caldeira, Antônio Prates; de Carvalho Torres, Heloísa; Viana, Marcos Borato

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the perception of primary care physicians and nurses about access to services and routine health care provided to sickle cell disease patients. Methods This descriptive exploratory study took a qualitative approach by surveying thirteen primary care health professionals who participated in a focus group to discuss access to services and assistance provided to sickle cell disease patients. The data were submitted to thematic content analysis. Results Access to primary care services and routine care for sickle cell disease patients were the categories that emerged from the analysis. Interaction between people with sickle cell disease and primary care health clinics was found to be minimal and limited mainly to scheduling appointments. Patients sought care from the primary care health clinics only in some situations, such as for pain episodes and vaccinations. The professionals noted that patients do not recognize primary care as the gateway to the system, and reported that they feel unprepared to assist sickle cell disease patients. Conclusion In the perception of these professionals, there are restrictions to accessing primary care health clinics and the primary care assistance for sickle cell disease patients is affected. PMID:26190428

  3. LGBT Cultural Competence and Interventions to Help Oncology Nurses and Other Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radix, Asa; Maingi, Shail

    2018-02-01

    To define and give an overview of the importance of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) cultural competency and offer some initial steps on how to improve the quality of care provided by oncology nurses and other health care professionals. A review of the existing literature on cultural competency. LGBT patients experience cancer and several other diseases at higher rates than the rest of the population. The reasons for these health care disparities are complex and include minority stress, fear of discrimination, lower rates of insurance, and lack of access to quality, culturally competent care. Addressing the health care disparities experienced by LGBT individuals and families requires attention to the actual needs, language, and support networks used by patients in these communities. Training on how to provide quality care in a welcoming and non-judgmental way is available and can improve health equity. Health care professionals and institutions that acquire cultural competency training can improve the overall health of LGBT patients who currently experience significant health care disparities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The negative influence of significant others on high academic achieving school pupils' choice of nursing as a career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Gavin R; McNally, Jim

    2013-03-01

    The International Council of Nurses proposes that the shortage of nurses is global in scale and is expected to become much worse in the years ahead. A major factor impacting on the worldwide nursing shortage is the diminishing number of young people choosing nursing as a career (International Council of Nurses, 2008). One important dimension of the school pupils' career choice process is their interactions with significant others and the influence of these significant others (Hodkinson and Sparkes, 1997). As Schools/Departments of Nursing endeavour to attract more intellectual school leavers it is important to examine what advice and opinions are significant others giving regarding nursing as a career choice and how influential is this advice. This paper is based on interview data from 20 high academic achieving 5th and 6th year school pupils in Scotland, paradigmatic cases from a larger sample, who had considered nursing as a possible career choice within their career preference cluster, but then later disregarded nursing and decided to pursue medicine or another health care profession. The data was particularly striking in revealing the negative influence of significant others on high academic achieving school pupils' choice of nursing as a career. The influence of significant others, these being specifically parents, guardians, guidance teachers and career advisors was very apparent in the data in that they had a very negative view regarding nursing as a career choice for high academic achieving school pupils. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Education and information for practicing school nurses: which technology-supported resources meet their needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lori S; Enge, Karmin J

    2012-10-01

    School nurses care for children with a variety of health-related conditions and they need information about managing these conditions, which is accessible, current, and useful. The goal of this literature review was to gather and synthesize information on technology-supported resources and to determine which met the educational needs of school nurses. Successful online educational programs were interactive and self-directed. The most common barriers were lack of time to find educational information, lack of knowledge about computers, technology, the Internet and specific programs, and lack of administrative support from school officials to use technology to access information and evidence for practice. Recommendations for successful use of technology to meet practicing school nurse's educational needs are offered.

  6. An Integrated Curriculum of Nursing, Nutrition, Exercise, and Drugs for Health Care Providers of the Elderly (Project NNED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summit-Portage Area Health Education Network, Akron, OH.

    This document is intended to give health care providers interdisciplinary information concerning drugs, nutrition, and exercise to help them enhance health maintenance of the elderly. Prepared as part of Project NNED, (Nursing, Nutrition, Exercise, and Drugs), an integrated curriculum for health care providers of the elderly, the document includes…

  7. Air for learning. School of healthcare and nursing of Vienna; Luft zum Lernen. Gesundheits- und Krankenpflegeschule der Stadt Wien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtblau, Andreas; Wagner, Susanna [lichtblauwagner architekten, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-07-01

    Due to the generously and light volume of space, the self-regulating shading system as well as the energy efficient ventilation, the energy optimized school of healthcare and nursing of the Kaiser-Franz-Josef-Hospital (Vienna, Austria) provides significant innovative steps in school buildings. The heterogeneous space on offer as well as the four-story, open hall with a maximum natural lighting and acoustics, which is attuned to the classrooms, enable a learning and working in a friendly atmosphere. With the open space structure and the row of trees as a technical shading system the building upgrades the traffic-exposed environment.

  8. [Understanding a hospitalized, school-aged child's stress in the PICU: the application of picture books in nursing care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-Ju; Feng, Jui-Ying

    2013-06-01

    Hospitalization in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) can be a very stressful and sometimes traumatic experience for school-aged children due to illness, painful procedures, unfamiliar environment, and separation from family. We incorporated picture books into PICU nursing care to explore the stress response in a school-aged child with compartment syndrome who was hospitalized in the PICU. Observation, interview and communication with the patient were used to assess her psychological reactions and emotional and behavioral responses to stress related to hospitalization and medical treatment. Autonomy and control were provided and strengthened by giving the patient choices and purposive life plans. Picture books were used to establish rapport and help the patient express her feelings, needs, and desires for parental love and company. This case report highlights the importance of nurses' awareness of children's stresses and needs during hospitalization in the PICU as well as the value of picture books or other age-appropriate tools for this patient population.

  9. Workplace health and safety issues among community nurses: a study regarding the impact on providing care to rural consumers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Daniel; Lê, Quynh; Nguyen, Uyen; Hoang, Ha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of the study was to investigate the types of workplace health and safety issues rural community nurses encounter and the impact these issues have on providing care to rural consumers. Methods The study undertook a narrative inquiry underpinned by a phenomenological approach. Community nursing staff who worked exclusively in rural areas and employed in a permanent capacity were contacted among 13 of the 16 consenting healthcare services. All community nurses who expressed a desire to participate were interviewed. Data were collected using semistructured interviews with 15 community nurses in rural and remote communities. Thematic analysis was used to analyse interview data. Results The role, function and structures of community nursing services varied greatly from site to site and were developed and centred on meeting the needs of individual communities. In addition, a number of workplace health and safety challenges were identified and were centred on the geographical, physical and organisational environment that community nurses work across. The workplace health and safety challenges within these environments included driving large distances between client’s homes and their office which lead to working in isolation for long periods and without adequate communication. In addition, other issues included encountering, managing and developing strategies to deal with poor client and carer behaviour; working within and negotiating working environments such as the poor condition of patient homes and clients smoking; navigating animals in the workplace; vertical and horizontal violence; and issues around workload, burnout and work-related stress. Conclusions Many nurses achieved good outcomes to meet the needs of rural community health consumers. Managers were vital to ensure that service objectives were met. Despite the positive outcomes, many processes were considered unsafe by community nurses. It was identified that greater training and

  10. The meaning of mental health nurses experience of providing one-to-one observations: a phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, C

    2009-02-01

    There has been much recent literature about the need for appropriate policies and approaches to ensure that patient's rights and standards of care are safeguarded. The focus from national policy is on suicide reduction and prevention, and the nursing literature has concentrated on the importance of engaging the patient and ensuring that there is the least amount of restriction possible. A research study was carried out to explore the perspective of mental health nurses working in these intensive situations, using a purposive sample of nursing staff from the local National Health Service Trust's acute units. A phenomenological approach to the study was chosen to allow an in-depth exploration of the issues--'seeing things up close'--using the philosophy of Husserl as a base. The key areas of enquiry were: to explore and amplify the experiences of nurses undertaking constant observations, including any effects that may have on nurses; to gain further understanding of the dynamics and processes involved; to discover information that can inform and support development needs. Individual taped interviews were carried out with six nurses working in an acute admission ward, and these were then transcribed and analysed using Giorgi's method of analysis. The results of this analysis showed that nurses are keenly aware of some of the professional and ethical tensions involved in the process of keeping patients safe while trying to promote recovery. Results have implications for policies, preparation and support of staff, and provide some further insights into the nature of this experience for nursing staff who are caring for patients who are presenting with risks to themselves.

  11. Understanding factors influencing foreign-born students' success in nursing school: a case study of East Indian nursing students and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Janelle

    2005-01-01

    The retention and graduation of foreign-born nursing students is essential to meet the needs of our growing racial and ethnic minority population in the United States with their health care needs. Little research has explored factors contributing to the high attrition rate of racial and ethnic minority nursing students. The author describes a case study of East Indian nursing students and examines factors influencing foreign-born students' success in nursing school. Culturally competent teaching strategies for all foreign-born nursing students are presented.

  12. What support do nurses need to provide palliative care for people with dementia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Elizabeth

    2017-08-31

    The aim of this project was to identify the support required by registered nurses and unregistered healthcare support workers to provide palliative care for people with dementia in an acute hospital in England. A quantitative approach was taken and participants were asked to fill in a questionnaire. Data were collated and analysed to identify support needs and any emerging themes. Respondents were confident in identifying the different stages of dementia. There was less confidence in identifying a patient with dementia for palliative care referral compared with a patient without dementia. Further needs were identified by respondents in supporting the family/carer of the person with dementia and being aware of available support to facilitate palliative care for people with dementia and support for end of life care (EoLC) planning. The findings suggest that further work is required in relation to dementia and EoLC. Practical and educational collaboration with EoLC/palliative care practitioners and dementia leads would be beneficial.

  13. Implementing school nursing strategies to reduce LGBTQ adolescent suicide: a randomized cluster trial study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Willging, Cathleen E; Green, Amy E; Ramos, Mary M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Reducing youth suicide in the United States (U.S.) is a national public health priority, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer or questioning (LGBTQ) youth are at elevated risk. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) endorses six evidence-based (EB) strategies that center on meeting the needs of LGBTQ youth in schools; however, fewer than 6?% of U.S. schools implement all of them. The proposed intervention model, ?RLAS? (Implementing School Nursing Strate...

  14. Negative life events and school adjustment among Chinese nursing students: The mediating role of psychological capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunqin; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Tian, Xiaohong; Zou, Guiyuan; Li, Ping

    2015-06-01

    Adjustment difficulties of college students are common and their school adjustment has gained wide concern in recent years. Negative life events and psychological capital (PsyCap) have been associated with school adjustment. However, the potential impact of negative life events on PsyCap, and whether PsyCap mediates the relationship between negative life events and school adjustment among nursing students have not been studied. To investigate the relationship among negative life events, PsyCap, and school adjustment among five-year vocational high school nursing students in China and the mediating role of PsyCap between negative life events and school adjustment. A cross-sectional survey design was conducted. 643 five-year vocational high school nursing students were recruited from three public high vocational colleges in Shandong of China. Adolescent Self-Rating Life Event Checklist (ASLEC), the Psychological Capital Questionnaire for Adolescent Students scale (PCQAS), and the Chinese College Student Adjustment Scale (CCSAS) were used in this study. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to explore the mediating role of PsyCap. Negative life events were negatively associated with the dimensions of school adjustment (interpersonal relationship adaptation, learning adaptation, campus life adaptation, career adaptation, emotional adaptation, self-adaptation, and degree of satisfaction). PsyCap was positively associated with the dimensions of school adjustment and negatively associated with negative life events. PsyCap partially mediated the relationship between negative life events and school adjustment. Negative life events may increase the risk of school maladjustment in individuals with low PsyCap. Interventions designed to increase nursing students' PsyCap might buffer the stress of adverse life events, and thereby, enhance students' positive adjustment to school. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. MDS 3.0 for Nursing Homes and Swing Bed Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The MDS is a powerful tool for implementing standardized assessment and for facilitating care management in nursing homes (NHs) and non-critical access hospital...

  16. The mediating role of psychological empowerment on job satisfaction and organizational commitment for school health nurses: a cross-sectional questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Li-Chun; Shih, Chia-Hui; Lin, Shu-Man

    2010-04-01

    The importance of the professional role of school health nurses in promoting children's health in their school environment is widely recognized. However, studies of their working experience have revealed feelings of disempowerment that appear to be related to insufficient support from school managers. In these unsupportive working environments, it seems possible that psychological empowerment may play a mediating role to strengthen employees' satisfaction and commitment to their employing organization. The aim of this study is to test an exploratory model of empowerment in a Taiwanese sample of school health nurses by examining the mediating role of psychological empowerment in the relationship between external factors and work-related attitudes, specifically job satisfaction and organizational commitment. A cross-sectional survey with self-reported questionnaires. Probability proportional sampling was used to generate a randomly selected sample of 500 school health nurses in elementary and junior high schools in Taiwan. A total of 330 valid questionnaires were returned, yielding a response rate of 66%. The exploratory model including all hypothesized variables provided an adequate fit (chi(2)=29.24; df=17; p=.052; adjusted goodness-of-fit index [AGFI]=.96; goodness-of-fit index [GFI]=.98; root-mean-square error of approximation [RMSEA]=.05) for the data and indicated that psychological empowerment did not fully mediate the relationship between organizational empowerment and job satisfaction because of the strong direct effects of organizational empowerment on job satisfaction. The influence of empowerment on organizational commitment was mediated through job satisfaction. Psychological empowerment did not mediate the relationship between external factors and work attitudes, and job satisfaction emerged as an important factor. If school leaders can improve the job satisfaction of school health nurses, this will help them achieve greater commitment and loyalty of

  17. Education related to organ donation and transplantation in undergraduate nursing schools: 1993 versus 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabalewski, Franki L; Ellis, James M; McGaw, Lin Johnson

    2002-12-01

    To evaluate the change in the amount and type of content related to organ donation and transplantation in US nursing schools from 1993 to 2000. A survey of 700 nursing schools was conducted in 2000, and its results were compared with results of a similar survey conducted in 1993. Three hundred fifty schools (53.3%) completed the 2000 survey, and 426 (61%) completed the 1993 survey. Although the amount of time dedicated to donation (P = .82) and transplantation (P = .26) issues did not change significantly, the number and types of topics presented, such as minority concerns and cultural issues, increased significantly. There was also a significant increase (P = .002) in faculty ratings of whether it is important to expose new graduates to this content. A significant increase was also observed in the number of schools that reported that organ procurement professionals presented such content to students (31% to 42%, P = .006). Although the amount of time spent on these issues has not increased, the number of topics that are now included in the nursing curriculum has increased. In 2000, nursing faculty perceived such content as more important to include in the school's curriculum than in 1993. This change in perception may be a first step in creating a nursing workforce that is knowledgeable about organ donation and transplantation.

  18. Moral Distress in Nurses Providing Direct Patient Care at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirilla, Janet; Thompson, Kathrynn; Yamokoski, Todd; Risser, Mark D; Chipps, Esther

    2017-04-01

    Moral distress is the psychological response to knowing the appropriate action but not being able to act due to constraints. Previous authors reported moral distress among nurses, especially those that work in critical care units. The aims of this study were: (1) to examine the level of moral distress among nurses who work at an academic health system, (2) to compare the level of moral distress in nurses who work across specialty units at an academic health system, (3) to compare moral distress by the demographic characteristics of nurses and work experience variables, and (4) to identify demographic characteristics and type of clinical setting that may predict which nurses are at high risk for moral distress. A cross-sectional survey design was used with staff nurses who work on inpatient units and ambulatory units at an academic medical center. The moral distress scale-revised (MDS-R) was used to assess the intensity and frequency of moral distress. The overall mean MDS-R score in this project was low at 94.97 with mean scores in the low to moderate range (44.57 to 134.58). Nurses who work in critical care, perioperative services, and procedure areas had the highest mean MDS-R scores. There have been no previous reports of higher scores for nurses working in perioperative and procedure areas. There was weak positive correlation between MDS-R scores and years of experience (Rho = .17, p = .003) but no correlation between age (Rho = .02, p = .78) or education (Rho = .05, p = .802) and moral distress. Three variables were found useful in predicting moral distress: the type of unit and responses to two qualitative questions related to quitting their job. Identification of these variables allows organizations to focus their interventions. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  19. Nursing care provided to young people in two health centers compared with Watson Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Alejandra Pichardo Meza

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This article has as objective to present the analysis of the care given by the nursing personnel to the young adult population in the Clinic of Pain Control and Palliative Care and in the Onco-hematology Service of the Max Peralta Hospital, related to Jean Watson’s theoretical proposal. The study corresponds to a joint research of parallel type with concurrent triangulation. The study populations were made up by twenty-six young adult people (who face morbid process health or chronic pain condition and four nursing professionals who worked in the Clinic of Pain Control and Palliative Care and in the Onco-hematology Service of the Max Peralta Hospital. A self-executed questionnaire and a semi-structured interview were used to collect the information, which was analyzed using the “SPSS” program and the qualitative categories, respectively. Results: The ten elements of the “Human Care Theory” can be included in the care given by the nursing personnel to the young adult population who faces morbid process health or chronic pain condition. The nursing care mainly focuses on the young adult population quality of life throughout education and pain management. The young adult population perceives a warm, pleasant and human nursing care. Conclusion: Nursing personnel put into practice elements of the Jean Watson’s theoretical proposal even when they do not know it.

  20. Knowledge and perceptions on toxoplasmosis among pregnant women and nurses who provide prenatal in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Jayra Adrianna da Silva; Corrêa, Rita da Graça Carvalhal Frazão; Aquino, Dorlene Maria Cardoso de; Coutinho, Nair Portela Silva; Silva, Marcos Antonio Custódio Neto da; Nascimento, Maria do Desterro Soares Brandão

    2017-06-01

    Toxoplasmosis is an infection that affects almost a third of the world population. In adults, it is often asymptomatic, although having important manifestation in children- infected by placental transmission. The prenatal is an important moment, requiring actions in women's care during pregnancy, in order to prevent diseases that could compromise the mother and the child's life. This is a descriptive study of qualitative approach aimed to understand the perception of nurses and pregnant women about toxoplasmosis during primary - prenatal care. The study was conducted in five selected primary health care units, in the municipality of São Luis - MA. The sample consisted of 15 nurses working in nursing consultation and 15 pregnant women attended in prenatal care. For data collection, a semi-structured questionnaire and an interview guide covering issues related to knowledge and conduct on toxoplasmosis were used. For analysis, the content analysis technique was used. The answers were transcribed, organized and grouped thematically, where the following categories emerged: knowledge about examination requests; knowledge about toxoplasmosis; guidance during prenatal consultation; knowledge of nurses about the avidity test; procedures and guidelines on reagent cases. Pregnant women showed unawareness about toxoplasmosis and its effects. Nurses, although having basic knowledge about the subject, showed little applicability regarding pregnant women's guidance. The nurse plays an important role in educational activities regarding pregnant women, contributing to the quality of prenatal care. Pregnant women were shown to have some knowledge about toxoplasmosis, although they said they did not have assurance about prevention.

  1. Moral distress in nurses providing direct care on inpatient oncology units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirilla, Janet

    2014-10-01

    Moral distress is defined as knowing the right thing to do when policy constraints do not allow for appropriate choices. The purpose of the current study was to explore the existence of moral distress in oncology nurses with a cross-sectional survey completed by nurses working on inpatient units at a midwestern cancer hospital. Investigators distributed the Moral Distress Scale-Revised to all direct care staff nurses. The main research variables were moral distress, level of education, age, and type of unit. Most of the 73 nurses had low to moderate scores, and two had high scores. No significant correlations were observed among age or years of experience. Type of unit and level of moral distress were correlated, and an inverse relationship between level of education and moral distress was found. Moral distress exists in nurses who work on oncology units irrespective of experience in oncology or the specific unit. Nurses must be aware of the existence of moral distress and finds ways to reduce potential emotional problems.

  2. Integration/Inclusion Needs Assessment: Providing Education for Everyone in Regular Schools (PEERS). Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Ann T.; And Others

    This needs assessment instrument was developed as part of the PEERS (Providing Education for Everyone in Regular Schools) Project, a California project to integrate students with severe disabilities who were previously at special centers into services at regular school sites and students who were in special classes in regular schools into general…

  3. Urban Service Providers' Perspectives on School Responses to Gay, Lesbian, and Questioning Students: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varjas, Kris; Graybill, Emily; Mahan, Will; Meyers, Joel; Dew, Brian; Marshall, Megan; Singh, Anneliese; Birckbichler, Lamar

    2007-01-01

    Perspectives regarding bullying of gay, lesbian, and questioning (GLQ) students were obtained from 16 school and community service providers in this exploratory study. Insights were gained regarding in-school responses to homophobic bullying threats beyond traditional punishments (e.g., suspension). Barriers to developing safe schools for GLQ…

  4. School Lunch Consumption among 3 Food Service Providers in New Orleans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canterberry, Melanie; Francois, Samantha; van Hattum, Taslim; Rudov, Lindsey; Carton, Thomas W.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Louisiana has one of the highest rates of overweight and obese children in the United States. The Healthy School Food Collaborative (HSFC) was created to allow New Orleans's schools to select their own healthy school Food Service Provider (FSP) with requirements for higher nutritional standards than traditional options. The goal of…

  5. Internationalising university schools of nursing in South Africa through a Community of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uys, L R; Middleton, L

    2011-03-01

    International nursing experiences in higher education have traditionally enabled and continue to enable nurses to appreciate '...the richness of the nursing mosaic...and the realities of nursing in many different cultural contexts'. This article describes a case study of the Collaboration for Higher Education of Nurses and Midwives in Africa in terms of its success in internationalising the nursing schools involved. Different types of international contact have led to a limited pattern of internationalization in the universities of Southern Africa, which often places African academics in a secondary or dependent position. Opportunities for truly equal international partnerships have been limited. A qualitative analysis of the views of participants from the consortium of universities was carried out based on the conceptual framework of communities of practice. An effective community of practice had been established, focused on the major knowledge domain of nursing and midwifery in Africa, and sharing the perception that their work was empowering and collaborative. The community had established its own ways of working, and articulated major institutional and individual benefits. © 2011 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  6. Parents' experiences of family functioning, health and social support provided by nurses--a pilot study in paediatric intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakio, Nora; Rantanen, Anja; Åstedt-Kurki, Päivi; Suominen, Tarja

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to describe parents' experiences of family functioning, health and social support provided by nursing personnel, while their child was in intensive care, and to determine how social support was associated with family functioning and family health. Cross-sectional study. The data were collected by a self-administered questionnaire from 31 parents of critically ill children from 2010 to 2011. The data were analysed statistically. The parents considered their family functioning, health and social support provided by the nursing personnel to be good. The sub-area of family functioning that rated the lowest was strengths of family, whereas the lowest rated sub-area of family health was ill-being. Child's previous hospital treatments were associated with family health. Parents, whose child had already been in hospital care, reported more well-being and less ill-being than parents with children hospitalised for the first time. Parents' education was associated with family functioning, family health and social support given by the nurses. Weak positive correlation was also found between social support given by nurses and family health experienced by parents. There is a need to discuss how nursing care can further support parental resources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Newly graduated nurses' job satisfaction: comparison with allied hospital professionals, social workers, and elementary school teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mihyun; Lee, Ji Yun; Cho, Sung-Hyun

    2012-09-01

    The purposes of this study are to examine differences in job satisfaction among professional groups including nurses, allied hospital professionals, social workers, and elementary school teachers, and to identify specific characteristics of job satisfaction of nurses. The study design was a cross-sectional exploratory study using secondary data analysis with the 2009 Graduates Occupational Mobility Survey. The sample was female new graduates. The differences in job satisfaction among professional groups were analyzed using logistic regression (satisfied vs. not satisfied). Overall, 41.5% of nurses, 50.1% of allied hospital professionals, 58.2% of social workers, and 89% of elementary school teachers were satisfied with their job. Nurses were significantly less satisfied than the other professionals in 5 of the 11 job characteristics and had the lowest odds ratio (OR) when compared with elementary school teachers: work content (OR = 0.197, 95% CI [0.128, 0.304]), physical work environment (OR = 0.353, 95% CI [0.236, 0.529]), working hours (OR = 0.054, 95% CI [0.033, 0.088]), personal growth (OR = 0.242, 95% CI [0.160, 0.366]), and autonomy (OR = 0.188, 95% CI [0.123, 0.288]). Work content, physical work environment, interpersonal relationship, advancement system, and autonomy were significantly associated with the overall job satisfaction of nurses. Relatively dissatisfying job characteristics in nursing work environment that were significant predictors for nurses' job satisfaction should be improved. Newly graduated nurses are at risk for job dissatisfaction. This can result in high turnover rates and can exacerbate the nursing shortage. Efforts to improve the work environment are needed. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Victimization, aggression, and visits to the school nurse for somatic complaints, illnesses, and physical injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernberg, Eric M; Nelson, Timothy D; Fonagy, Peter; Twemlow, Stuart W

    2011-05-01

    To examine how involvement in aggressor-victim interactions is linked to somatic complaints, illnesses, and physical injuries among elementary school-aged children. This study was composed of a school-based sample of 590 children in grades 3 through 5. Independent sources were used to assess victimization (self-report) and aggression (peer report) in the fall semester. School nursing logs for the entire school year were collected in May and coded for the number of times each child presented with a somatic complaint, illness, or injury. Both aggression and victimization were significantly related to all 3 reasons for nurse visits, controlling for demographic variables. Higher levels of aggression and victimization each were independently associated with more frequent visits to the school nurse for somatic complaints, illnesses, and injuries. A significant victimization-times-aggression interaction was found for illnesses, with nonaggressive victimized children presenting most frequently for illness visits. Involvement in aggressor-victim interactions, as either aggressor, victim, or both, is associated with more frequent health complaints, based on school nursing logs. Prevention, early identification, and treatment of problems with victimization and aggression may have important health implications for children.

  9. Using transformational change to improve organizational culture and climate in a school of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Pamela J; Clark, Cynthia M; Strohfus, Pamela; Belcheir, Marcia

    2012-02-01

    A positive organizational culture and climate is closely associated with an affirming workplace and job satisfaction. Especially during a time of faculty shortages, academic leaders need to be cognizant of the culture and climate in schools of nursing. The culture of an organization affects employees, systems, and processes, and if the culture becomes problematic, transformational leadership is essential to create change. The purpose of this article is to describe an 8-year journey to change the culture and climate of a school of nursing from one of dissatisfaction and distrust to one of high employee satisfaction and trust. Kotter's model for transformational change was used to frame a longitudinal study using the Cultural and Climate Assessment Scale to transform the organizational culture and climate of a school of nursing. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Building nurse leaders through the Institute for Healthcare Improvement Open School Student Quality Leadership Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Cattleya; Cutting, Katharine N

    2014-01-01

    The Institute for Healthcare Improvement is an independent not-for-profit organization based in Cambridge, Massachusetts. It is a leading innovator in health and health care improvement with a global following.One important part of the IHI is the development and evolution of the "Open School." Launched in September 2008, the online community currently includes hundreds of thousands of students worldwide. The goals of the Open School are consistent with the IHI initial concepts: to build will for change, seek out innovation, share expertise, and build leaders. Each year, the Open School awards scholarships to select students to attend a Leadership Academy.The Student Quality Leadership Academy allows students to network with other future nurses, physicians, and health care administrators and explores how they feel about leadership. This is important to nursing as we will need to replace many leadership positions in the future, but often new nurses are uncertain about leadership roles.

  11. Barriers to nurses providing psychosocial care in the Australian rural context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Amanda; Allenby, Ann

    2013-06-01

    This study in Victoria, Australia examined issues that rural nurses face in the provision of psychosocial care. Researchers, across a diversity of fields, have argued that psychosocial care is inadequate. Current knowledge of psychosocial care in rural areas is limited, despite the centrality of nurses in the provision of this care. Using an interpretive descriptive design, four focus groups were conducted with 22 nurses from five rural hospitals. Thematic analysis resulted in the emergence of five organising themes that impact on the provision of psychosocial care: constructive relationships, professional isolation, multiskilling expectations, client interaction, and competing demands. The global theme, "Managing multiple roles, demands and relationships" reflected the notion that the provision of psychosocial care is impacted on by the multiple roles and tasks that rural nurses undertake and the impact of contextual and interpersonal relationships. Strategies are needed to support nurses in their role and while clinical supervision has been identified as potentially useful, attention must be given to strong leadership, the development of a positive culture, recognition of the centrality of client care, and evidence-based education. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Teachers' Accounts of Their Perceptions and Practices of Providing Written Feedback to Nursing Students on Their Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Sajid; Gul, Raisa; Lakhani, Arusa; Rizvi, Nusrat Fatima

    2014-01-01

    Written feedback can facilitate students' learning in several ways. However, the teachers' practices of written feedback may be affected by various factors. This study aimed to explore the nurse teachers' accounts of their perceptions and practices of providing written feedback. A descriptive exploratory design was employed in the study. A…

  13. Missouri K-12 school disaster and biological event preparedness and seasonal influenza vaccination among school nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebmann, Terri; Elliott, Michael B; Artman, Deborah; VanNatta, Matthew; Wakefield, Mary

    2015-10-01

    School preparedness for bioevents, such as emerging infectious diseases, bioterrorism, and pandemics, is imperative, but historically has been low. The Missouri Association of School Nurses members were sent an online survey during the 2013-2014 school year to assess current bioevent readiness. There were 15 and 35 indicators of school disaster and bioevent preparedness, respectively. Multivariate linear regressions were conducted to delineate factors associated with higher school disaster and bioevent preparedness scores. In total, 133 school nurses participated, with a 33.6% response rate. On average, schools had fewer than half of the disaster or bioevent indicators. Disaster and bioevent preparedness scores ranged from 1-12.5 (mean, 6.0) and 5-25 (mean, 13.8), respectively. The least frequently reported plan components included bioterrorism-specific psychological needs addressed (1.5%, n = 2), having a foodservice biosecurity plan (8.3%, n = 11), and having a liberal sick leave policy for bioevents (22.6%, n = 30). Determinants of better bioevent preparedness include perception that the school is well prepared for a pandemic (P = .001) or natural disaster (P < .05), nurse being on the disaster planning committee (P = .001), and school being a closed point of dispensing (P < .05). Schools are underprepared for biological events and are not on track to meet state and national biological preparedness goals. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. End-of-Life and Palliative Care Issues in Medical and Nursing Schools in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, George E.

    2007-01-01

    Medical and nursing schools in the United States have traditionally had a limited emphasis on end-of-life care. The present study is a comparison of these 2 professional programs' current offerings on death education. Data were gathered via a mailed survey from the 122 medical schools in 2005 and the 580 baccalaureate nursing programs in 2006.…

  15. Barriers Identified by Swedish School Nurses in Giving Information about Testicular Cancer and Testicular Self-Examination to Adolescent Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudberg, Lennart; Nilsson, Sten; Wikblad, Karin; Carlsson, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate to what extent school nurses in Sweden inform adolescent men about testicular cancer (TC) and testicular self-examination (TSE). A questionnaire was completed by 129 school nurses from 29 randomly selected municipalities. All respondents were women, with a mean age of 42 years. The results showed that…

  16. Attitudes of Saudi Nursing Students on AIDS and Predictors of Willingness to Provide Care for Patients in Central Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa A. Abolfotouh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes, and risk perception among Saudi nursing students, and to identify predictors of their willingness to provide care for patients with AIDS. A cross-sectional study of 260 baccalaureate nursing students at King Saud bin-Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, was done using a previously validated instrument. Students’ knowledge percentage mean score (PMS on AIDS was 72.93 ± 10.67 reflecting an average level of knowledge. There were many misconceptions about how AIDS is transmitted, for example, use of same toilets and bathrooms and washing clothes together (24.9%, swimming (53.7%, and coughing and sneezing (49.6%. Nursing students reported an overall negative attitude toward AIDS, with a PMS of 43.48 ± 9.21. The majority of students agreed that AIDS patients should be isolated from other patients (83%, and should not share the room with other noninfected patients (81.8%, and some reported that people living with AIDS deserve what has happened to them (24.7%. After controlling for confounders, students’ poor knowledge and negative attitude were associated only with having never been given nursing education as their primary university education “Stream 2 students” (p = .012 and p = .01, respectively. These findings have implications for development of teaching strategies and curricular approaches for nursing to address this health care issue.

  17. Knowledge and perceptions on toxoplasmosis among pregnant women and nurses who provide prenatal in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayra Adrianna da Silva Sousa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Toxoplasmosis is an infection that affects almost a third of the world population. In adults, it is often asymptomatic, although having important manifestation in children- infected by placental transmission. The prenatal is an important moment, requiring actions in women’s care during pregnancy, in order to prevent diseases that could compromise the mother and the child’s life. Methods This is a descriptive study of qualitative approach aimed to understand the perception of nurses and pregnant women about toxoplasmosis during primary – prenatal care. The study was conducted in five selected primary health care units, in the municipality of São Luis - MA. The sample consisted of 15 nurses working in nursing consultation and 15 pregnant women attended in prenatal care. For data collection, a semi-structured questionnaire and an interview guide covering issues related to knowledge and conduct on toxoplasmosis were used. For analysis, the content analysis technique was used. Results The answers were transcribed, organized and grouped thematically, where the following categories emerged: knowledge about examination requests; knowledge about toxoplasmosis; guidance during prenatal consultation; knowledge of nurses about the avidity test; procedures and guidelines on reagent cases. Pregnant women showed unawareness about toxoplasmosis and its effects. Nurses, although having basic knowledge about the subject, showed little applicability regarding pregnant women’s guidance. Conclusion The nurse plays an important role in educational activities regarding pregnant women, contributing to the quality of prenatal care. Pregnant women were shown to have some knowledge about toxoplasmosis, although they said they did not have assurance about prevention.

  18. [Training in patient safety in medical and nursing schools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, J J; Guilabert, M; Vitaller, J; Ignacio, E

    2016-01-01

    To compare the information on patient safety received by students of medicine and nursing. Cross-sectional study was conducted using a convenience sample of medical and nursing students of 3 Universities. The Latin Patient Safety Student Information and a test of 5 questions with 5 options were used. A sample of 79 students in each group was enrolled to detect differences of .3 units (bilateral estimation), considering 80% statistical power and 95% confidence interval. A total of 144 students replied (74 nursing and 70 medicine students). Nursing students achieved higher scores in the communication with patients factor (3.8 vs 3.2, P<.001) and proactive attitude to identify risks for patient safety (4.3 vs 3.8, P<.001). Medical students were more aware of the inevitability of adverse events (2.3 vs 3.1, P<.001). Ten (7%) students had only one fault in the test, and only one (1%) answered all questions correctly. The training in patient safety should be improved both in nursing and medicine, although nursing students receive more information. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Educational audit on drug dose calculation learning in a Tanzanian school of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Angela Ruth

    2015-06-01

    Patient safety is a key concern for nurses; ability to calculate drug doses correctly is an essential skill to prevent and reduce medication errors. Literature suggests that nurses' drug calculation skills should be monitored. The aim of the study was to conduct an educational audit on drug dose calculation learning in a Tanzanian school of nursing. Specific objectives were to assess learning from targeted teaching, to identify problem areas in performance and to identify ways in which these problem areas might be addressed. A total of 268 registered nurses and nursing students in two year groups of a nursing degree programme were the subjects for the audit; they were given a pretest, then four hours of teaching, a post-test after two weeks and a second post-test after eight weeks. There was a statistically significant improvement in correct answers in the first post-test, but none between the first and second post-tests. Particular problems with drug calculations were identified by the nurses / students, and the teacher; these identified problems were not congruent. Further studies in different settings using different methods of teaching, planned continuing education for all qualified nurses, and appropriate pass marks for students in critical skills are recommended.

  20. Lessons from an Urban School Readiness Initiative: Including Family, Friend, and Neighbor Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Anne; Taj, Kira; Coonan, Mary; Friedman, Donna Haig

    2017-01-01

    Research Findings: Using a structured qualitative case study method, this study examined one urban school readiness initiative's efforts to identify and engage family, friend, and neighbor (FFN) care providers to promote school readiness in underserved and immigrant communities. Interviews and focus groups were conducted with 23 FFN providers, 14…

  1. Polish school nurses' knowledge of the first-aid in tooth avulsion of permanent teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginska, Joanna; Rodakowska, Ewa; Milewski, Robert; Wilczynska-Borawska, Magdalena; Kierklo, Anna

    2016-03-09

    The frequency of dental trauma in schools is secondary only to accidents at home. The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge of first aid in the avulsion of permanent teeth presented by Polish school nurses from different areas. A cross-sectional study with the use of a structured self-administrative questionnaire was conducted in 2014 on school nurses working in randomly selected Polish provinces. The instrument consisted of demographic questions, questions referring to nurses' experience and training in dental trauma and questions checking knowledge of first-aid in the avulsion of permanent teeth. The maximum number of points to be scored was eight. Data were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis, the Mann-Whitney U and Chi(2) tests with the level of statistical significance at p nurses of which 70.1 % had experience with dental injuries and 45.7 % witnessed a tooth avulsion in pupils. 10.4 % nurses participated in training courses concerning tooth avulsion and 67.1 % of them independently broadened their knowledge. The knowledge of the first-aid management of an avulsed tooth was moderate (4.72 ± 1.95 points). 78.1 % of nurses chose a correct definition of the term of 'tooth avulsion'. Only 7.3 % of them were aware that the replantation could be conducted by any witness of an accident. Saline was most often chosen as a proper transport medium for an avulsed tooth (57.9 %), whereas 16.1 % of nurses indicated milk. 13.4 % of evaluated nurses showed readiness to conduct an immediate replantation. Most respondents preferred calling child's parents and advising them to bring the child to a dentist (63.4 %). The main factor influencing nurses' level of knowledge was self-education (p sports classes (p = 0.0423) were positive determinants of improved knowledge. Nurses from large agglomerations had significantly lower knowledge (p = 0.005). The main source of information for self-education was the Internet. The evaluated nurses were in need of education with regard

  2. Practice nurses mental health provide space to patients to discuss unpleasant emotions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griep, E.C.; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, S. van

    2016-01-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: A core skill of practice nurses' mental health is to recognize and explore patients' unpleasant emotions. Patients rarely express their unpleasant emotions directly and spontaneously, but instead give indirect signs that something is worrying them. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS

  3. Practice nurses mental health provide space to patients to discuss unpleasant emotions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griep, E.C.M.; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, A.M. van

    2016-01-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? A core skill of practice nurses' mental health is to recognize and explore patients' unpleasant emotions. Patients rarely express their unpleasant emotions directly and spontaneously, but instead give indirect signs that something is worrying them.

  4. Providing oral care in haematological oncology patients: nurses' knowledge and skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potting, Carin M. J.; Mank, Arno; Blijlevens, Nicole M. A.; Donnelly, J. Peter; van Achterberg, Theo

    2008-01-01

    In the international literature, the most commonly recommended intervention for managing oral mucositis is good oral care, assuming that nurses have sufficient knowledge and skills to perform oral care correctly. The aim of the present study was to investigate if knowledge and skills about oral care

  5. Providing oral care in haematological oncology patients: nurses' knowledge and skills.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potting, C.M.J.; Mank, A.; Blijlevens, N.M.A.; Donnelly, J.P.; Achterberg, T. van

    2008-01-01

    In the international literature, the most commonly recommended intervention for managing oral mucositis is good oral care, assuming that nurses have sufficient knowledge and skills to perform oral care correctly. The aim of the present study was to investigate if knowledge and skills about oral care

  6. Social Media Providing an International Virtual Elective Experience for Student Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula M. Procter

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The advances in social media offer many opportunities for developing understanding of different countries and cultures without any implications of travel. Nursing has a global presence and yet it appears as though students have little knowledge of the health and social care needs and provision outside their local environment. Our collaboration across three countries, New Zealand, United Kingdom, and the United States of America, brought the two themes together with the aim of senior student nurses having a communication channel to explore public health issues in each country. Using a closed Facebook™ page, third year undergraduate adult nursing students were invited to take part in a three month pilot study to test the feasibility of virtual collaboration through exchanging public health issues. Here we report upon the collaboration, operation of the social media, and main findings of the study. Three core areas will be reported upon, these being the student’s views of using social media for learning about international perspectives of health, seeing nursing as a global profession and recommendations for future development of this positively reviewed learning technique. To conclude consideration will be given to further development of this work by the collaborative team expanding the countries involved.

  7. Development of skills-based competencies for forensic nurse examiners providing elder abuse care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Mont, Janice; Kosa, Daisy; Macdonald, Sheila; Elliot, Shannon; Yaffe, Mark

    2016-02-10

    As a critical step in advancing a comprehensive response to elder abuse built on existing forensic nursing-led hospital-based programmes, we developed a list of skills-based competencies for use in an Elder Abuse Nurse Examiner curriculum. Programme leaders of 30 hospital-based forensic nursing-led sexual assault and domestic violence treatment centres. 149 verbatim recommendations for components of an elder abuse response were identified from a systematic scoping review. In 2 online Delphi consensus survey rounds, these components of care were evaluated by an expert panel for their overall importance to the elder abuse intervention under development and for their appropriateness to the scope of practice of an elder abuse nurse examiner. The components retained after evaluation were translated into skills-based competencies using Bloom's Taxonomy of Learning and, using the Nominal Group Technique, were subsequently reviewed and revised by a subset of members of the expert panel in a consensus meeting. Of the 148 recommendations evaluated, 119 were rated as important and achieved consensus or high level of agreement. Of these, 101 were determined to be within the scope of practice of an Elder Abuse Nurse Examiner and were translated into skills-based competencies. Following review and revision by meeting experts, 47 final competencies were organised by content into 5 metacompetencies: documentation, legal and legislative issues; interview with older adult, caregiver and other relevant contacts; assessment; medical and forensic examination; and case summary, discharge plan and follow-up care. We determined the skills-based competencies of importance to training forensic nurse examiners to respond to elder abuse in the context of a hospital-based intervention. These findings may have implications for violence and abuse treatment programmes with a forensic nursing component that are considering the provision of a dedicated response to the abuse of older women and men

  8. Determinants of Social Accountability in Iranian Nursing and Midwifery Schools: A Delphi Study

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    Amir Reza Salehmoghaddam

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Revising the medical education programs to meet the needs of society has become both a necessity and an important priority due to the considerable increase of population, changing patterns of diseases, and new health priorities. While this necessity has been highlighted in Iran’s Fifth Development Plan as well as its National 2025 Vision Plan, the determinants of social accountability have not been explained yet. This study aimed to develop determinants of social accountability in the Iranian Nursing and Midwifery Schools. Methods: This classic Delphi study included thirty experts in Nursing and Midwifery Education, Research and Services selected based on purposive sampling and three rounds of Delphi technique and conducted in Nursing and Midwifery School of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. The primary data were collected using an initial structured questionnaire prepared through extensive review of literature. SPSS 11.5 software was used to analyze the data. The interquartile deviation and percentage of agreement were also used to study the consensus of opinion by experts. Results: Finding obtained from the rounds of Delphi resulted in selecting 69 determinants out of the initial pool of 128 primary determinants of social accountability. The items were selected based on experts’ consensus and categorized under three main activities of Nursing and Midwifery School, namely education, research, and service. Conclusion: Social accountability determinants were explained by 69 items for Schools of Nursing and Midwifery in Iran. The proposed determinants can be used by managers and authorities of Nursing and Midwifery School, policy makers, and evaluating institutions associated with them to ensure realizing social accountability goals.

  9. Determinants of Social Accountability in Iranian Nursing and Midwifery Schools: A Delphi Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehmoghaddam, Amir Reza; Mazloom, Seyed Reza; Sharafkhani, Mohammad; Gholami, Hassan; Emami Zeydi, Amir; Khorashadizadeh, Fatemeh; Emadzadeh, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Revising the medical education programs to meet the needs of society has become both a necessity and an important priority due to the considerable increase of population, changing patterns of diseases, and new health priorities. While this necessity has been highlighted in Iran's Fifth Development Plan as well as its National 2025 Vision Plan, the determinants of social accountability have not been explained yet. This study aimed to develop determinants of social accountability in the Iranian Nursing and Midwifery Schools. This classic Delphi study included thirty experts in Nursing and Midwifery Education, Research and Services selected based on purposive sampling and three rounds of Delphi technique and conducted in Nursing and Midwifery School of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. The primary data were collected using an initial structured questionnaire prepared through extensive review of literature. SPSS 11.5 software was used to analyze the data. The interquartile deviation and percentage of agreement were also used to study the consensus of opinion by experts. Finding obtained from the rounds of Delphi resulted in selecting 69 determinants out of the initial pool of 128 primary determinants of social accountability. The items were selected based on experts' consensus and categorized under three main activities of Nursing and Midwifery School, namely education, research, and service. Social accountability determinants were explained by 69 items for Schools of Nursing and Midwifery in Iran. The proposed determinants can be used by managers and authorities of Nursing and Midwifery School, policy makers, and evaluating institutions associated with them to ensure realizing social accountability goals.

  10. A High School Counselor's Leadership in Providing School-Wide Screenings for Depression and Enhancing Suicide Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Anne; Abel, Nicholas R.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of mental health issues and suicidal thoughts and actions among school-aged children and adolescents is a serious issue. This article examines the scope of the problem nationwide and provides a brief overview of the literature regarding the effectiveness of school-wide screening programs for depression and suicide risk. The authors…

  11. Undergraduate nursing students' perceptions of service-learning through a school-based community project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Sherry

    2011-01-01

    Service-learning (SL) is an experiential teaching method that combines instruction with community service, with the aim of enriching students' academic learning, interpersonal skills and sense of responsibility while making meaningful contributions to the community. However, measuring outcomes of service-learning projects is difficult. This article reports on the perceptions of 18 third-year undergraduate nursing students who took part in a pilot service-learning project targeting tobacco use in a local elementary school. Faculty members evaluated the program's outcomes by engaging students in structured reflection on the program about its relevance to their future careers as practicing professionals, especially in community-based settings. The students' perceptions were elicited through three sets of reflective assignments following the project. Findings from the reflective assignments suggest that the pilot program was successful in enhancing the students' academic, social, and personal development while building a partnership between the school of nursing and key players in the community, including school-based nurses, teachers, administrators, families, and community leaders. The author suggests that service-learning projects can help nursing students accomplish key developmental tasks of the college years (such as building their competence, autonomy, and integrity), while helping impart the skills and values they will need as they graduate and seek professional nursing roles.

  12. Lecturers' and students' perceptions of portfolios in an English School of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Glenn A; Park, Jennifer R; Traynor, Victoria; Nairn, Stuart; O'Brien, Elisabeth; Chapple, Mary; Johnson, Stacy

    2009-04-01

    This study was aimed at comparing perceptions of portfolios between student nurses at the early and latter stages of their training and how they compare with their lecturers' perceptions. Portfolios are used widely in nurse education. There has been research into how portfolios are perceived and understood, but there is little evidence into how student nurses and lecturers compare quantitatively in perceptions of portfolio use. Survey. Forty-eight nursing lecturers and 413 nursing students, from a multi-centred School of Nursing in the UK, completed a questionnaire. Data were analysed with exploratory factor analysis, varimax rotation of the factor solution, internal consistency analysis, and analysis of variance. Five factors were extracted, which were labelled: (1) portfolios as a means of skills acquisition, (2) other means of teaching and learning beyond using portfolios, (3) processes of showing the portfolio to others, (4) having favourable attitudes towards portfolios and (5) lecturers' ability to share knowledge about portfolios. Scales developed from these five factors had high levels of internal consistency. Lecturers were the most positive of the three respondent groups in their views of portfolios, whereas third- and fourth-year students were the least positive. There were significant differences between student nurses and their lecturers, concerning how information on portfolios is communicated by the lecturer. There were significant discrepancies between lecturers and student nurses in their views on how portfolios are used. The value of portfolios becomes less salient to student nurses towards the end of their training. Lecturers and clinical mentors need to look at students' perceptions and why some nursing students' views on portfolios deteriorate. There could be regular discussions with students to see how and why the students begin to see portfolios as less useful for their education and continual professional development.

  13. Providence school asthma partnership: school-based asthma program for inner-city families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePue, Judith D; McQuaid, Elizabeth L; Koinis-Mitchell, Daphne; Camillo, Christopher; Alario, Anthony; Klein, Robert B

    2007-01-01

    Over 3 years, 972 families participated in an after-school asthma program at their child's school. Parents and children attended concurrent 2(1/2)-hour workshops. Parents were 74% Latino; 45% non-English speaking, with 77% of children on Medicaid. Asthma symptoms were significantly reduced, from multiple times per week to less than once per week on average. Oral steroid use decreased to one third of baseline use. Hospital days decreased from 11% to 2%; emergency visits decreased 35% to 4%; and school days missed decreased 48% to 20%. This program has now become sustainable with both private and Medicaid insurance coverage.

  14. Public health nurses' perceptions of mobile computing in a school program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valaitis, Ruta K; O'Mara, Linda M

    2005-01-01

    The use of mobile computing (MC) in healthcare practice has grown substantially in recent years, yet little is known about its impact. This descriptive, exploratory, qualitative study explored the perceptions of public health nurses (PHNs) in a school health program about their use of MC. Public health nurses participated in focus group interviews and completed weekly reflections. They perceived that MC (a) increased PHNs' flexibility although they were constrained by work rules, (b) increased peer and employer connectedness yet increased isolation, (c) and increased PHNs' status while creating a wider gap between PHNs and their clients. Public health nurses described their practice as being more efficient and client-focused with MC. Over time, PHNs grew more comfortable with the tool, developed a dependence on it, and learned to deal with technological problems. Although this new technology shows promise, there is a need for further research to examine its impact as a tool to promote public health nursing practice.

  15. Skin infections in high school wrestlers: a nurse practitioner's guide to diagnosis, treatment, and return to participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Krista R

    2015-01-01

    To provide nurse practitioners (NPs) with a current guide for the diagnosis and treatment of high school wrestlers who present with common skin infections and to familiarize NPs with the National Federation of High School Associations Sports Medicine Advisory Committee return to participation guide and medical release form. Literature review of evidence-based research, journal articles, and reference texts related to skin lesions and high school wrestlers. High school wrestlers with skin infections present in a variety of clinical settings. Improperly diagnosed and/or managed skin infections have the potential to get worse and continue to spread among teammates. Accurate diagnosis and treatment in combination with the use of a return to participation guide can improve outcomes and return the wrestler to participation sooner. NPs have a responsibility to accurately diagnose and treat skin lesions in a timely, safe, and efficient manner. In wrestling, athletes are exposed to unique opportunities to develop skin infections. With a working knowledge of the clinical presentation, diagnostic testing, and return to participation recommendations for common skin diseases, spread of skin infections to other wrestlers can be prevented and the athlete can return to play safely. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  16. International programs in United States schools of nursing: driving forces, obstacles, and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Tamara H; McNelis, Angela M

    2013-01-01

    To understand the development of international programs in United States schools of nursing from the perspective of driving forces, obstacles, and opportunities. Despite increasing philosophical support for international programs, significant obstacles to their development, integration, and sustainability exist in schools of nursing across the United States. A National League for Nursing (NLN) survey collected information on the number and type of international programs being offered, with an emphasis on obstacles to integration. Driving forces for international programs, identified by 487 responding institutions, included valued program outcomes, a global focus, and limited availability of clinical sites. Obstacles, such as cost, safety, and lack of credit toward a major, were identified. Suggestions for addressing and overcoming the obstacles are proposed, including the sharing of resources and utilization of the NLN Faculty Preparation for Global Experiences Toolkit. More research is needed to understand the implications for curricula, logistics, development, costs, and sustainability.

  17. INTERNAL QUALITY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: CASE STUDY AT THREE INDONESIAN NURSING SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Sundari

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes internal quality system petformance at three Indonesian nursing schools and examines the match of the existing accreditation programmes with the developing internal quality system. A cross sectional study is used with self-administered questionnaires and applied to selected nursing schools. The questionnaire was designed according tocategories of framework of total quality management model. Interview and discussion with respondents including snowball sampling to other teachers and staffs were petformed to clarify and validate data and to enriched the information The activities measured were the enabling and the results factors. The enablers were including Leaderships, strategy, resources, human resources, educational management, teaching teaming process, research and development and also evaluation mechanism, while the results were covering students and personnel satisfaction and partnership.Results shows that some enabling factors were not included in the accreditation, while several indicators in the sub component of accreditation did not explicitly reflect internal quality system petformance. The school stratum as the outcome result of a quality measure is analogue to customer satisfaction, which would depend on direct influence of internal factors such as quality of schools leadership, strategy and educational management. Since the total accreditation score affects school strata and public recognition, it is necessary to use more objectives and relevant indicators by incorporating the internal and external factors as a measure of school quality petformances. Key words: accreditation, education, quality system evaluation, nursing

  18. [Do nursing homes with higher quality ratings provide a better quality of care? : Empirical study based on administrative data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przylog, Adam; Stroka, Magdalena A; Engel, Susanne; Linder, Roland

    2016-06-01

    In 2009 a new system for the objective evaluation of nursing homes was introduced in Germany. The so-called nursing transparency agreement (Pflege-Transparenzvereinbarungen) was introduced to provide a reliable tool for an objective comparison of inpatient (PTVS) and outpatient (PTVA) care; however, the new regulations have been the subject of a broad discussion regarding reliability, efficiency and objectivity. To overcome the lack of objective health outcomes, this study used administrative data from Germany's largest health insurance fund, the Techniker Krankenkasse, in order to analyze the association between the quality ratings and objective quality measures on an individual level. This is the first study that provides empirical evidence on this topic using administrative data. The administrative dataset contained information on several individual characteristics as well as data on injuries, poisoning and other extrinsic effects on care-dependent individuals over the age of 64 years who were living in a nursing home in 2009. Based on these data an objective measure was constructed to test whether higher quality ratings of nursing homes led to a better quality of care of the respective patients using non-linear regression models. The results of the estimated models showed no significant evidence of such a relationship, neither considering the probability nor the number of injuries, poisoning and other extrinsic effects. Significant effects were only observed for gender and specific diseases. The results of this study support the argument that the current rating procedure for nursing homes has to be refined. Using quality indicators in combination with the administrative data could possibly contribute to such an enhancement.

  19. Perception and Needs in Health Education Curriculum among School Nurses as Health Teachers in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gyu Young; Ham, Ok Kyung

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated perceived effectiveness and perceived barriers to health education curriculum targeting school nurses as health teachers in Korea. A total of 741 health teachers participated. The questionnaire included perceived effectiveness and perceived barriers to health education curriculum, future roles of health teachers, and needs…

  20. Teaching of Family Planning at Medical Nursing and Midwifery Schools in Certain Countries of the Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    A review is given of the status of family planning education at medical, nursing, and midwifery schools in seven European countries. The report is presented in 11 sections. Section one, an introduction, explains the scope of the study and defines family planning to include birth control, pregnancy and delivery, problems of adolescents, family life…

  1. Emergency Nurses' Perceptions of Providing End-of-Life Care in a Hong Kong Emergency Department: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Johnson Wai Keung; Hung, Maria Shuk Yu; Pang, Samantha Mei Che

    2016-05-01

    Provision of end-of-life (EOL) care in the emergency department has improved globally in recent years and has a different scope of interventions than traditional emergency medicine. In 2010, a regional hospital established the first ED EOL service in Hong Kong. The aim of this study was to understand emergency nurses' perceptions regarding the provision of EOL care in the emergency department. A qualitative approach was used with purposive sampling of 16 nurses who had experience in providing EOL care. Semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were conducted from May to October, 2014. All the interviews were transcribed verbatim for content analysis. Four themes were identified: (1) doing good for the dying patients, (2) facilitating family engagement and involvement, (3) enhancing personal growth and professionalism, and (4) expressing ambiguity toward resource deployment. Provision of EOL care in the emergency department can enhance patients' last moment of life, facilitate the grief and bereavement process of families, and enhance the professional development of staff in emergency department. It is substantiated that EOL service in the emergency department enriches EOL care in the health care system. Findings from this study integrated the perspectives on ED EOL services from emergency nurses. The integration of EOL service in other emergency departments locally and worldwide is encouraged. Copyright © 2016 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Communication between office-based primary care providers and nurses working within patients' homes: an analysis of process data from CAPABLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patrick D; Boyd, Cynthia; Bellantoni, Julia; Roth, Jill; Becker, Kathleen L; Savage, Jessica; Nkimbeng, Manka; Szanton, Sarah L

    2016-02-01

    To examine themes of communication between office-based primary care providers and nurses working in private residences; to assess which methods of communication elicit fruitful responses to nurses' concerns. Lack of effective communication between home health care nurses and primary care providers contributes to clinical errors, inefficient care delivery and decreased patient safety. Few studies have described best practices related to frequency, methods and reasons for communication between community-based nurses and primary care providers. Secondary analysis of process data from 'Community Aging in Place: Advancing Better Living for Elders (CAPABLE)'. Independent reviewers analysed nurse documentation of communication (phone calls, letters and client coaching) initiated for 70 patients and analysed 45 letters to primary care providers to identify common concerns and recommendations raised by CAPABLE nurses. Primary care providers responded to 86% of phone calls, 56% of letters and 50% of client coaching efforts. Primary care providers addressed 86% of concerns communicated by phone, 34% of concerns communicated by letter and 41% of client-raised concerns. Nurses' letters addressed five key concerns: medication safety, pain, change in activities of daily living, fall safety and mental health. In letters, CAPABLE nurses recommended 58 interventions: medication change; referral to a specialist; patient education; and further diagnostic evaluation. Effective communication between home-based nurses and primary care providers enhances care coordination and improves outcomes for home-dwelling elders. Various methods of contact show promise for addressing specific communication needs. Nurses practicing within patients' homes can improve care coordination by using phone calls to address minor matters and written letters for detailed communication. Future research should explore implementation of Situation, Background, Assessment and Recommendation in home care to promote

  3. image of nursing profession as viewed by secondary school

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    included 50 male and 50 female students who were opting for Physics, Chemistry and Biology from form III to form VI in the above ... Factors that were pointed out included: social, economical, educational and individual perceptions of different students. ... The perception of nurses being not as professional as the other ...

  4. Providing a Full Circle of Support to Teachers in an Inclusive Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Nancy L.; Redd, Lacy

    2011-01-01

    Providing a full circle of support to teachers in an inclusive elementary school, the Newberry Elementary School (NES) principal and staff have worked for 5 years to ensure the inclusion of students with disabilities in general education classrooms. The authors would like to share their perceptions of how this full circle (the multiple systems) of…

  5. Intent to Sustain Use of a Mental Health Innovation by School Providers: What Matters Most?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livet, Melanie; Yannayon, Mary; Kocher, Kelly; McMillen, Janey

    2017-01-01

    Despite innovations being routinely introduced in schools to support the mental health of students, few are successfully maintained over time. This study explores the role of innovation characteristics, individual attitudes and skills, and organizational factors in school providers' decisions to continue use of "Centervention," a…

  6. Use of Robotic Pets in Providing Stimulation for Nursing Home Residents with Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganuma, M; Ohkubo, E; Kato, N

    2015-01-01

    Trial experiments utilized robotic pets to facilitate self-reliance in nursing home residents. A remote-control robot modeled clear and meaningful behaviors to elderly residents. Special attention was paid to its effects on mental and social domains. Employing the robot as a gaze target and center of attention created a cue to initiate a communication channel between residents who normally show no interest in each other. The Sony AIBO robot in this study uses commercially available wireless equipment, and all its components are easily accessible to any medical or welfare institution interested in additional practice of these activities.

  7. Nursing care provided to young people in two health centers compared with Watson Theory

    OpenAIRE

    María Alejandra Pichardo Meza; María Catalina Zúñiga Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    This article has as objective to present the analysis of the care given by the nursing personnel to the young adult population in the Clinic of Pain Control and Palliative Care and in the Onco-hematology Service of the Max Peralta Hospital, related to Jean Watson’s theoretical proposal. The study corresponds to a joint research of parallel type with concurrent triangulation. The study populations were made up by twenty-six young adult people (who face morbid process health or chronic p...

  8. Training School Mental Health Providers to Deliver Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beidas, Rinad S; Mychailyszyn, Matthew P; Edmunds, Julie M; Khanna, Muniya S; Downey, Margaret Mary; Kendall, Philip C

    2012-12-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent mental health difficulties experienced by youth. A well-established literature has identified cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) as the gold-standard psychosocial treatment for youth anxiety disorders. Access to CBT in community clinics is limited, but a potential venue for the provision of CBT for child anxiety disorders is the school setting. The present study examined a subset of data from a larger study in which therapists from a variety of settings, including schools, were trained in CBT for child anxiety (N = 17). The study investigated the relationship between provider- and organizational-level variables associated with training and implementation among school mental health providers. The present findings indicate a positive relationship between provider attitudes and adherence to CBT. Self-reported barriers to implementation were also identified. Integrating CBT into school mental health providers' repertoires through training and consultation is a critical step for dissemination and implementation of empirically supported psychosocial treatments.

  9. School nurses' familiarity and perceptions of academic accommodations for student-athletes following sport-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Michelle L; Welch, Cailee E; Parsons, John T; Valovich McLeod, Tamara C

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate school nurses' familiarity and perceptions regarding academic accommodations for student-athletes following sport-related concussion. School nurses (N = 1,246) accessed the survey School Nurses' Beliefs, Attitudes and Knowledge of Pediatric Athletes with Concussions (BAKPAC-SN). The BAKPAC-SN contained several questions pertaining to concussion management and academic accommodations. There were significant differences regarding personal experience as well as familiarity of academic accommodations (p academic accommodations (r = .210, p academic accommodations (p = .027) and 504 plans (p = .001) than school nurses employed at multiple schools. Health care professionals should collaborate to effectively manage a concussed patient and should consider academic accommodations to ensure whole-person health care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. The Role of the School Nurse in the Special Education Process: Part 2: Eligibility Determination and the Individualized Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Robin Adair; Yonkaitis, Catherine Falusi

    2017-07-01

    This is the second of two articles outlining the professional school nurse's role in the special education process for students with disabilities. The Individuals with Disabilities in Education Improvement Act of 2004 mandates the special education process: identification, full and individual evaluation, eligibility determination, and development of the individual education program (IEP), including special education placement. Part 1 focused on the importance of the school nurse's role in student identification, response to intervention, and the full and individual evaluation. Part 2 highlights the school nurse's vital and unique contribution to the subsequent special education steps of eligibility determination, IEP development, and special education services placement and minutes.

  11. Iranian nursing students’ experiences of nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motlagh, Farzaneh Gholami; Karimi, Mahboubeh; Hasanpour, Marzieh

    2012-01-01

    Background: The negative attitudes and behaviors of Iranian nursing students impede learning and threaten their progression and retention in nursing programs. The need to understand students’ perception and experiences of nursing provide knowledge about effectiveness of nursing education program as well as their professional identity. The purpose of this study was to discover experiences of nursing students. Materials and Methods: In a descriptive, exploratory and qualitative study, twelve senior nursing students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (School of Nursing and Midwifery) were participated. Data was collected via unstructured in-depth interview, and thematic analysis method was used for analyzing the data. Findings: The findings from this study revealed that the nursing students in Iran experienced altered experiences during their education program as positive and negative. Two major themes were constructed from the thematic analysis of the transcripts: professional dimensions and professional conflicts. Conclusions: Regarding the findings, positive experiences of students have leaded them to acceptance and satisfaction of nursing and negative experiences to rejection and hating of nursing and lack of adaptation with their professional roles. Therefore, it is recommended that revision and improvement in nursing education program is essential to facilitate positive experiences and remove negative experiences of nursing student’s educational environment. PMID:23833591

  12. Nurses as information providers: facilitating understanding and communication of statistical information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanoch, Yaniv; Pachur, Thorsten

    2004-04-01

    Nurses are increasingly being called upon to be the conveyers of important statistical information to patients. This trend is particularly evident in the domains of genetics and cancer screening. These new roles, however, demand new competencies, such as the ability to solve statistical problems, and the skill to communicate the answers effectively, as effective communication is an important ingredient in shared decision making. Genetic testing, perhaps more than other medical domains, relies heavily on the use of statistics. Being able to convey statistical information effectively is vital. In this paper, we illustrate the problems health care professionals have had in tackling and communicating statistical information. We introduce the natural frequencies method of solving Bayesian inference problems and review empirical evidence that shows the superiority of this format. Being able to transform probabilities into natural frequencies facilitates correct Bayesian inferences. It is argued that the conventional approach to educating nurses in Bayesian problem solving should be reconsidered and their statistical curriculum should be supplemented with instruction in using the natural frequency format.

  13. Sun protection provided by regulation school uniforms in Australian schools: an opportunity to improve personal sun protection during childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Denise; Harrison, Simone L

    2014-01-01

    Childhood sun exposure is linked to excessive pigmented mole development and melanoma risk. Clothing provides a physical barrier, protecting skin from ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Extending sleeves to elbow length and shorts to knee length has been shown to significantly reduce mole acquisition in preschoolers from tropical Queensland. We used publicly available uniform images and guidelines from primary schools in Townsville (latitude 19.25°S, n = 43 schools), Cairns (16.87°S, n = 46) and the Atherton Tablelands (17.26°S, n = 23) in tropical Australia to objectively determine the body surface proportion covered by regulation school uniforms. Uniforms of nongovernment, large (≥800 students), urban, educationally advantaged schools with comprehensive sun protection policies covered more skin than those of government schools (63.2% vs 62.0%; P schools (63.4% vs 62.3%; P = 0.009), rural (62.7% vs 61.9%; P = 0.002) and educationally disadvantaged schools (62.8% vs 62.3%; P school uniforms covered identical body surface proportions (62.4%, P = 0.084). Although wearing regulation school uniforms is mandatory at most Australian primary schools, this opportunity to improve children's sun protection is largely overlooked. Recent evidence suggests that even encouraging minor alterations to school uniforms (e.g. slightly longer sleeves/dresses/skirts/shorts) to increase skin coverage may reduce mole acquisition and melanoma risk, especially in high-risk populations. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  14. Current Practices for Providing School Field Trip Meals: Perspectives of School Nutrition Managers and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneed, Jeannie; Vaterlaus Patten, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010 extended the requirements for a school food safety program to wherever food is stored, prepared, or served, including meals for field trips. The purpose of this study was to determine what foods are used for field trip meals, how those foods are transported and stored, and what standard…

  15. Pure tone audiometry and impedance screening of school entrant children by nurses: evaluation in a practical setting.

    OpenAIRE

    Holtby, I; Forster, D P; Kumar, U

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Screening for hearing loss in English children at entry to school (age 5-6 years) is usually by pure tone audiometry sweep undertaken by school nurses. This study aimed to compare the validity and screening rates of pure tone audiometry with impedance screening in these children. METHODS: Two stage pure tone audiometry and impedance methods of screening were compared in 610 school entry children from 19 infant schools in north east England. Both procedures were completed by school...

  16. Community environmental quality knowledge and awareness among nurses: developing and piloting an assessment survey in schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shendell, Derek G; Alexander, Melannie S; Huang, Yuqi

    2010-01-01

    About one in five Americans spends a considerable number of hours in school each week, and thus, is exposed to a variety of environmental agents. Community health nursing professionals require resources and specific training to acquire the environmental knowledge needed to raise personal and community awareness as an enhancement of their practice. Given limited resources for schools and local public health education initiatives, identifying and prioritizing environmental concerns comes before actions to prevent or reduce exposures. With the rise in prevalence of childhood asthma, of special concern are those agents within the school environment that may serve as asthma triggers. This pilot project, within a larger study in a large school district in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, developed and piloted an environmental health priorities survey with school nurses and other school staff about indoor and outdoor microenvironments relevant to school-aged children. Findings indicate that participants (N = 34) could prioritize environmental issues to inform future intervention activities (such as continuing education training), and distinguish predominantly indoor from typical outdoor exposure agents and their major sources.

  17. Urban high school students' perceptions of nursing as a career choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degazon, Cynthia E; Shaw, Holly K

    2007-07-01

    One hundred and fourteen high school students (n = 114) completed the Attitudes, Values, and Beliefs Questionnaire. A two-sided Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test revealed that students perceived an ideal career as having more power, more positive evaluation, and less activity than a career in nursing would. The areas of greatest perceived disparity and those that showed nursing less favorably were making decisions for one's self, always having a job, working in a safe place, making a lot of money, and earning appreciation and respect. Areas in which nursing appeared more favorable were working with one's hands and being very busy. Caring for others and working hard were valued equally for both careers. Students' perceptions of nursing may have been based on misinformation, on a lack of awareness about the options available within the profession, or based simply on a higher regard for a different career. Future endeavors to recruit these students into nursing must include exposure to the multiple opportunities that await them as experienced by contemporary nursing professionals.

  18. Diabetes Mellitus Care Provided by Nurse Practitioners vs Primary Care Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yong-Fang; Goodwin, James S; Chen, Nai-Wei; Lwin, Kyaw K; Baillargeon, Jacques; Raji, Mukaila A

    2015-10-01

    To compare processes and cost of care of older adults with diabetes mellitus cared for by nurse practitioners (NPs) with processes and cost of those cared for by primary care physicians (PCPs). Retrospective cohort study. Primary care in communities. Individuals with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in 2009 who received all their primary care from NPs or PCPs were selected from a national sample of Medicare beneficiaries (N = 64,354). Propensity score matching within each state was used to compare these two cohorts with regard to rate of eye examinations, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) testing, nephropathy monitoring, specialist consultation, and Medicare costs. The two groups were also compared regarding medication adherence and use of statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (for individuals with a diagnosis of hypertension), and potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs). Nurse practitioners and PCPs had similar rates of LDL-C testing (odds ratio (OR) = 1.01, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.94-1.09) and nephropathy monitoring (OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 0.98-1.03), but NPs had lower rates of eye examinations (OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.84-0.93) and HbA1C testing (OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.79-0.98). NPs were more likely to have consulted cardiologists (OR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.21-1.37), endocrinologists (OR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.48-1.82), and nephrologists (OR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.67-2.17) and more likely to have prescribed PIMs (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.01-1.12). There was no statistically significant difference in adjusted Medicare spending between the two groups (P = .56). Nurse practitioners were similar to PCPs or slightly lower in their rates of diabetes mellitus guideline-concordant care. NPs used specialist consultations more often but had similar overall costs of care to PCPs. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. [Burn out in health care providers: a Tunisian study about 142 nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloulou, Jihen; Damak, Rahma; Masmoudi, Fatma; Sidhom, Oussama; Amami, Othman

    2013-01-01

    Burnout is a syndrome which affects preferentially help professions, having a strong emotional interpersonal implication. To assess the prevalence of burn out in a sample of Tunisian nurses, and to determine its causes and perceived repercussions. In a first step, we assessed the work conditions, the perceived burn out and its possible consequences in 142 nurses from 12 different wards. In a second step, we used the Malasch Burn Inventory to assess the burn out symptoms in ours ample. More than two thirds (69%) of our sample had a burn out. Forty five point eight percent of the affected professionals had a high level of emotional distress, 36.6% had a high level of depersonalization and 22.5% had a low level of professional fulfillment. The high caseload was the first cause of burn out (72.5% of professionals) and was associated to a moderate level of burn out (OR=3.80; 95%IC: 1.079-13.420 ; p = 0.038). Role ambiguity and undefined responsibilities were associated to a high level of emotional distress (p=0.04) and depersonalization (p=0.03), and a low level of professional fulfillment (p=0.0001). High scores of emotional distress were associated to a high number of work hours (p=0.006) and less than 10 years in carrier duration (p=0.008). In our study, feelings of uselessness were associated to high levels of emotional distress (p=0.05) and depersonalization (p=0.002) on the one hand, and to a lower level of personal fulfillment on the other hand (p=0.04). Moreover, we found that cases with suicide ideations had a higher level of burn out (p=0.04). Concerning physical symptoms, emotional distress was associated to multiples somatic complains. Our results corroborate partially with those of the literature and illustrate some parameters that can be the cause of burnout, such as working conditions, role ambiguity, and lack of experience among the young nurse. Therefore, it is important to take into consideration this various factors had their impact on quality of life

  20. Evaluation of the Effect of Nursing Services Provided in a Correctional Institution on the Physical Health Levels and Health Behaviors of Female Inmates

    OpenAIRE

    Şenay Pehli̇van; Gülümser Kublay

    2017-01-01

    Female inmates placed in a Correctional Institution (CI) have more physical health problems than other women and their male counterparts. Thus, they require more health care services in the CI and nursing services in particular. CI nurses also have the opportunity to teach behaviors which will protect and improve their health to these women who are difficult to reach in the community. The aim of this study was to evaluate effect of nursing services provided in a CI on the physical health leve...

  1. Personal Communication Device Use by Nurses Providing In-Patient Care: Survey of Prevalence, Patterns, and Distraction Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Deborah L; LeVasseur, Sandra A

    2017-04-13

    Coincident with the proliferation of employer-provided mobile communication devices, personal communication devices, including basic and enhanced mobile phones (smartphones) and tablet computers that are owned by the user, have become ubiquitous among registered nurses working in hospitals. While there are numerous benefits of personal communication device use by nurses at work, little is known about the impact of these devices on in-patient care. Our aim was to examine how hospital-registered nurses use their personal communication devices while doing both work-related and non‒work-related activities and to assess the impact of these devices on in-patient care. A previously validated survey was emailed to 14,797 members of two national nursing organizations. Participants were asked about personal communication device use and their opinions about the impact of these devices on their own and their colleagues' work. Of the 1268 respondents (8.57% response rate), only 5.65% (70/1237) never used their personal communication device at work (excluding lunch and breaks). Respondents self-reported using their personal communication devices at work for work-related activities including checking or sending text messages or emails to health care team members (29.02%, 363/1251), as a calculator (25.34%, 316/1247), and to access work-related medical information (20.13%, 251/1247). Fewer nurses reported using their devices for non‒work-related activities including checking or sending text messages or emails to friends and family (18.75%, 235/1253), shopping (5.14%, 64/1244), or playing games (2.73%, 34/1249). A minority of respondents believe that their personal device use at work had a positive effect on their work including reducing stress (29.88%, 369/1235), benefiting patient care (28.74%, 357/1242), improving coordination of patient care among the health care team (25.34%, 315/1243), or increasing unit teamwork (17.70%, 220/1243). A majority (69.06%, 848/1228) of

  2. Multi-ethnic high school students' perceptions of nursing in the USA and Israel: a descriptive quantitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degazon, Cynthia E; Ben Natan, Merav; Shaw, Holly K; Ehrenfeld, Mally

    2015-01-01

    In order to target new recruits or future generation of ethnic minority nurses about their potential fit in nursing, it is necessary to understand their perceptions of the profession. Successful recruitment of high school students into nursing in part requires congruency between perceptions of an ideal career and perceptions of nursing as a career. The purposes of this study were to compare ethnic minority high school students in the USA and in Israel on their perceptions of nursing as a career, and to understand how those perceptions compare to their perceptions of an ideal career. A descriptive quantitative design was employed to study a sample of 330 ethnic minority high school students from the USA and from Israel. The Mann-Whitney U procedure was used to compare the groups' perceptions; a two-sided Wilcoxon Signed-Ranks test was used to determine the differences between their perceptions of an ideal career and of nursing as a career. The USA students had more positive perceptions of nursing as a career than did the Israeli students. Both groups of students did not perceive nursing as an ideal career: They perceived nurses as hard workers, performing arduous tasks and busy work, not academically challenged, with limited opportunity for leadership and autonomy, and earning less money than they would want in an ideal career. Caring for others was a highly valued attribute for an ideal career and for nursing as a career. A minority career development plan that underscores the positive attributes of nursing should be designed in both the USA and in Israel for ethnic minority high school students. The plan should effectively communicate nursing as a caring profession that is academically rigorous and intellectually challenging with available leadership opportunities in institutions and society. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nursing and Midwifery Education in Rwanda: Telling our Story ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article reviewed the development of the education of nurses and midwives in Rwanda. Nursing and midwifery education started with missionaries providing general nursing education and later evolved into the integration of nursing education in public and private schools. The establishment of the Kigali Health Institute ...

  4. Experiences of mental health nursing staff at occupational stressors in a service provider institution in Cali, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Ruíz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nursing staff, who attend psychiatric patients, are confronted with differentiated occupational stressors. Objective: Interpret the experiences of mental health nursing staff when facing occupational stressors, ranging from three transactional cut stress models and Goffman paper theory. Materials and methods: A qualitative and phenomenological study was conducted. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with nurses from a health care institution. The analysis of content and map of the association of ideas was employed for the analysis. Results: The main occupational stressors found were: unfavorable physical resources and absence of others, patient characteristics, labor overload, interpersonal conflicts, lack of preparation and unpunctuality in salary. As a result, changes in the mental health of the staff and the provision of the services provided were found. Conclusions: The way in which the system of work is configured in the institution presents occupational stressors that affect all the participants, who confront them through their personal capacities, the available resources, the networks of support and the experience acquired; all this is permeated by the ways in which they understand and interpret their role in the framework of work.

  5. Providing Behavioral Feedback to Students in an Alternative High School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, Sara A.; Hefter, Sheera; Barker, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This column provides an example method for improving the consistency and quality of daily behavioral feedback provided to students in an alternative high school setting. Often, homeroom or advisory periods are prime points in the day for students to review their behavior from the previous day and set goals for a successful day to come. The method…

  6. An Evaluation of the Quality of Nursing Care Provided for Vascular Access in Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Chamanzari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Care for vascular access of patients undergoing hemodialysis is a critical issue. Inflammation and subsequent infection are the major factors which threaten patients' health and diminish effectiveness of hemodialysis. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the severity and incidence of inflammation of vascular access in hemodialysis patients. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 90 patients undergoing hemodialysis in Emam Reza and Montazerie Hospitals in Mashhad, June, 2014. Evaluation of inflammation severity over the course of one month (12 hemodialysis sessions was performed by means of an inflammation tool designed by the Board of Nursing. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16, and performing descriptive and Chi-square tests.  Results:The mean and standard deviation of incidence of inflammation in the first session of hemodialysis was 3.2±1.3 cases. The mean and standard deviation of the intensity of inflammation was 12.5±4.7. Conclusion: Since inflammation of vascular access in hemodialysis patients impairs their safety and health improvement, necessary measures to reduce this complication must be taken.

  7. [A major game in the re-organization of the Professional Nursing School].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Amorin, Wellington Mendonça; Barreira, Ieda de Alencar

    2007-01-01

    This is a historical-social description study supported on the thought of Pierre Bourdieu based on documental analysis. It describes the sanitarists and psychiatrists' actions from the reformulation of Education and Public Health Ministry into Education and Health Ministry in the beginning of New State and analyse the fight's strategies of the main agents to take advantage on their proposals of Professional Nursing School's reorganization. The fight's strategies that psychiatrists, sanitarists and certificated nurses had used to stake their projects, characterized a difficult battle inserted in a hard major game. The analyse of the ten course's months of the main document shows the conflict between those agents to impose a new rule to the school.

  8. [Analysis of nursing-related content portrayed in middle and high school textbooks under the national common basic curriculum in Korea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Myun Sook; Choi, Hyeong Wook; Li, Dong Mei

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze nursing-related content in middle, and high school textbooks under the National Common Basic Curriculum in Korea. Nursing-related content from 43 middle school textbooks and 13 high school textbooks was analyzed. There were 28 items of nursing-related content in the selected textbooks. Among them, 13 items were in the 'nursing activity' area, 6 items were in the 'nurse as an occupation' area, 2 items were in the 'major and career choice' area, 6 items were 'just one word' and 1 item in 'others'. The main nursing related content which portrayed in the middle and high school textbooks were caring for patients (7 items accounting for 46.5%), nurses working in hospitals (6 items accounting for 21.4%). In terms of gender perspective, female nurses (15 items accounting for 53.6%) were most prevalent.

  9. Image of nursing profession as viewed by secondary schools ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The sample size included 50 male and 50 female students who were opting for Physics, Chemistry and Biology from form III to form VI in the above mentioned schools. Results: Awareness ... Factors that were pointed out included: social, economical, educational and individual perceptions of different students. Although ...

  10. Relationship between life satisfaction and quality of life in Turkish nursing school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Yasemin; Kilic, Serap Parlar; Akyol, Asiye Durmaz

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between life satisfaction and quality of life of nursing students. This descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted with a research population of 396 nursing students who received education at a school of nursing. The research data were collected between May and June of the 2007-2008 academic year. The data collection tools included "Student Description Form," Life Satisfaction Scale, and WHOQOL-BREF (TR) Quality of Life (QOL) Scale. The mean score of life satisfaction was 22.90 ± 5.74. Participants' QOL mean scores were 67.16 ± 15.29 in the physical domain, 64.33 ± 14.72 in the psychological domain, 62.81 ± 19.12 in the social relationships domain, and 60.59 ± 12.59 in the environmental domain. There was a significant correlation between life satisfaction and the four main domains of quality of life scores (P life satisfaction and quality of life among nursing students. In addition, it was determined that being a nursing student had a positive effect on students' life satisfaction and quality of life. Therefore, the education system is recommended to be redesigned in such a way as to make students more active and to improve their life satisfaction and quality of life. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. CHILD WELFARE AGENCY TIES TO PROVIDERS AND SCHOOLS AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT USE BY ADOLESCENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Rebecca; Chuang, Emmeline; Haynes, Lindsey E.; Lee, I-Heng; Bai, Yu

    2010-01-01

    Policy makers and advocates are increasingly encouraging child-serving organizations to work together. The current study examined how child welfare agency ties with substance abuse treatment providers and schools correlated with substance abuse treatment for adolescents receiving child protective services. A sample of adolescents with substance use risk was extracted from a national survey of families engaged with child welfare. Logistic regressions with adjustments for complex survey design used child welfare agency ties to substance abuse treatment providers and schools to predict treatment. As expected, adolescents were more likely to report treatment when child protective services and substance abuse treatment were in the same agency and when child welfare agency directors reported joint planning with schools. However, child welfare agency agreements with substance abuse treatment providers were negatively associated with treatment. This unexpected finding implies that agencies may sometimes cooperate to address problems as well as to improve service utilization. PMID:20870374

  12. Four Lessons Learned From School Nurses in New Jersey About Building a Culture of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Robert

    2017-11-01

    Building a Culture of Health will give all members of our society the opportunity to lead healthier lives. To achieve this aim, more stakeholders in the community-residents, elected officials, community-based nonprofits, law enforcement, and schools-need to be engaged in addressing the health challenges in our communities. Moreover, all community stakeholders have to think and act "upstream" by addressing the social determinants of health in their communities. Discussed in this article are some of the lessons that are being learned from the "upstream" actions of school nurses in New Jersey about building a Culture of Health.

  13. Does a multi-disciplinary health degree provide a satisfactory post-registration course for nurses? A follow-up survey of health science studies graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S E

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to find out if nurses who had chosen to take a particular post-registration health science studies degree (rather than a nursing degree) were satisfied, retrospectively, with the usefulness of this type of degree to their professional development and career progress. The investigation also examined if these graduates were remaining in nursing, if they were active in nursing research, and the role of their employers in the choice of degree course. Questionnaires were sent to 10 cohorts of nurse graduates from one health science studies course. The idea to study for a degree had usually come from the nurses themselves, and most employers had taken little interest in the course content. The nurses showed a high level of satisfaction with their chosen course and considered that it had significantly improved their job performance. Almost all the graduates had remained in nursing; many had been involved in carrying out research, or hoped to be research-active in future. More than half the respondents had gained a post-graduate qualification or were in the process of studying for one. It is suggested from the evidence gathered that in this case a broad health degree seems to have provided a useful and satisfactory educational experience for nurses.

  14. Dimensions of leadership of assistant/associate deans in collegiate schools of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, M A

    1989-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to discover whether there were differences in the perceptions of deans, assistant/associate deans, and faculty of leadership styles, initiating structure and consideration, and position power of assistant/associate deans in selected collegiate schools of nursing. In addition, the effect of leadership styles on performance as perceived by the three groups related to the position power of assistant/associate deans was also examined. Collegiate schools of nursing, identified as having a hierarchal organization structure with persons identified by the title "assistant/associate dean," were invited to participate. Data were collected from a sample of 36 collegiate nursing schools. The tools used were the Ohio State Leadership Behavior Description Questionnaire, and the Fiedler Position Power Scale. Three questions were posed. A multi-variate analysis of testing the three hypotheses showed a significant difference between the three groups' perceptions of initiating structure, consideration, and position power. A main effect for initiating structure was found in the deans' perceptions of position power. A main effect for consideration was found in the perception of the faculty sampled.

  15. Relationship between attendance at breakfast and school achievement among nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Yen; Liao, Jenny C

    2002-03-01

    This survey by correlation study with partial qualitative design examined the effect of attendance at breakfast with school achievement in 710 first-year nursing students at a nursing institute in Northern Taiwan. Dietary attendance cards were scanned by computer before each meal. Since the school is located at a geographically isolated suburban area, this program was compulsory for all first-year nursing students and was included in the tuition fee. Comparison of attendance at breakfast over the four-month semester (from September 1999 to January 2000) and final semester class ranking showed a lower attending rate of breakfast (attendance at breakfast equal to or under 60% of mean times in a 4-month semester) was significantly associated with lower scores on tests in six individual classes and a class rank; while a higher frequency of breakfast attendance (attendance at breakfast equal to or over 85% of mean times in a 4-month semester) was significantly associated with higher scores on tests in six individual classes and a higher class rank (p breakfast and practicing health promotion behaviors, the Chinese Health Promoting Scale was used. We also found that those who skipped breakfast frequently had more negative health promotion behaviors than those who attended breakfast more regularly (p breakfast. The research outcome supports the importance of breakfast in school achievement.

  16. A Nurse-Led School-Based Sun Protection Programme in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkin, Özüm; Temel, Ayla Bayık

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a nurse-led school-based sun protection programme in Turkey. A randomized controlled trial was performed at two public schools between February and October 2014. Children with written consent from their parents were screened by nurses for skin type, and 80 children at moderate to high risk for skin cancer were included in the study. The sample was randomized by age, gender and skin type. Stratified and block randomizations were used. The participants were separated into an intervention group (n=40) and control group (n=40). Data were collected using a personal information form and two scales for sun protection behaviour and self-efficacy. In the intervention group, the pretest mean score for sun protection behaviour was 19.25±5.44 and increased significantly in the posttest assessment (33.05±4.23, pprotection behaviour or self-efficacy scores in the control group (p>0.05). A nurse-led school-based sun protection programme effectively promoted children's self-efficacy and sun protection behaviour.

  17. Why patient summaries in electronic health records do not provide the cognitive support necessary for nurses' handoffs on medical and surgical units: insights from interviews and observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staggers, Nancy; Clark, Lauren; Blaz, Jacquelyn W; Kapsandoy, Seraphine

    2011-09-01

    Patient care handoffs are cognitively intense activities, especially on medical and surgical units where nurses synthesize information across an average of four to five patients every shift. The objective of this study was to examine handoffs and nurses' use of computerized patient summary reports in an electronic health record after computerized provider order entry (CPOE) was installed. We observed and audio taped 93 patient handoffs on 25 occasions on 5 acute care units in 2 different facilities sharing a vendor's electronic health record. We found that the computerized patient summary report and the electronic health record were minimally used during the handoff and that the existing patient summary reports did not provide adequate cognitive support for nurses. The patient summary reports were incomplete, rigid and did not offer "at a glance" information, or help nurses encode information. We make recommendations about a redesign of patient summary reports and technology to support the cognitive needs of nurses during handoffs at the change of shift.

  18. Consumption of benzodiazepines without prescription among first-year nursing students at the University of Guayaquil, school of nursing, Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Nivia Pinos; Miasso, Adriana Inocenti; Tirapelli, Carlos Renato

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the consumption of benzodiazepines without prescription among first-year students from a nursing school of a public University in Ecuador. This is a descriptive, transversal and explanatory study with a quantitative approach. A questionnaire was used for data collection. The population studied was of 181 students. The results showed that 10.5% of the students had consumed benzodiazepine without prescription once in their lives. Of these, 6.1% consumed benzodiazepine in the last year, and 3.9% are currently consuming it. The diazepam was the most consumed BZD without prescription and pharmacies, were the place of higher access. The main reasons for the benzodiazepine consumption were: insomnia, anxiety, stress, depression, family and economical problems. The use of benzodiazepines with non-medicinal purposes is related to problems such as memory loss, retirement syndrome and sedation. When benzodiazepines are consumed jointly with alcohol or other drugs they can lead to coma or death. This study shows the serious consequences benzodiazepines cause when used by nursing students in Ecuador.

  19. Listening for commissioning: A participatory study exploring young people's experiences, views and preferences of school-based sexual health and school nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Kay; Coleman, Lester; Sherriff, Nigel S; Cocking, Chris; Zeeman, Laetitia; Cunningham, Liz

    2017-06-21

    To explore the experiences, views and preferences of young people aged 11-19 years regarding school-based sexual health and school nursing to inform commissioning and delivery for one local authority area in England during 2015. Promoting sexual health for young people remains a challenging, even controversial, but important public health issue. Concerns regarding accessibility, acceptability and efficacy in school-based sexual health and school nursing are evident in the literature. Additionally, a complex public health policy context now governs the funding, provision and delivery of sexual health and school nursing, which potentially presents further challenges. A qualitative, participatory design was used to explore sexual health and school nursing. Data were generated from 15 focus groups (n = 74), with young people aged 11-19 years, in educational-based settings in one local authority area in England. The resultant themes of visibility in relation to sexual health education and school nursing revealed both the complex tensions in designing and delivering acceptable and appropriate sexual health services for young people and the significance of participatory approaches. Our study shows the importance of participatory approaches in working with young people to clearly identify what they want and need in relation to sexual health. The findings also confirm the ways in which school-based sexual health remains challenging but requires a theoretical and conceptual shift. This we argue must be underpinned by participatory approaches. School nurses have always had a significant role to play in promoting positive sexual health for young people and they are exceptionally well placed to challenge the risk-based cultures that frequently dominate school-based sexual health. A shift of debates and practices towards the promotion of positive sexual health cultures though previously argued for now requires the active engagement and involvement of young people. © 2017

  20. 77 FR 72738 - Contracts and Provider Agreements for State Home Nursing Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    ... payment system), does not permit rate negotiation. In this manner, provider agreements are not contractual... rest of 38 CFR part 51, unless part 51 conflicts with paragraph (c). It also states that the term ``per... (or State Medicaid payment system), which does not permit rate negotiation. In this manner, provider...