WorldWideScience

Sample records for providing safe healthy

  1. Staying Healthy and Safe at Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... don't have to get up in the middle of the night to go to the bathroom. Eat healthy foods , especially foods that are rich in iron and protein. Relax and avoid stressful situations when possible. How can you keep a safe work environment? It's important that the environment around you is ...

  2. Have a Safe and Healthy Fall

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-14

    Fall is a great time to try new and healthy activities with your parents! Have a food tasting or a leaf raking contest! Whatever your plans, make sure to have fun and be safe!  Created: 10/14/2010 by CDC Office of Women’s Health.   Date Released: 10/14/2010.

  3. Safe and Healthy Travel to China

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-10-09

    In this podcast, Dr. Phyllis Kozarsky, CDC Travel Medicine expert, discusses what travelers should do to ensure a safe and healthy trip to China.  Created: 10/9/2008 by National Center for Preparedness, Detection, and Control of Infectious Diseases (NCPDCID), Division of Global Migration and Quarantine (DGMQ).   Date Released: 10/9/2008.

  4. Stay Safe and Healthy This Winter!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-11-23

    In this podcast for kids, the Kidtastics offer some simple ways to stay safe and healthy during the winter holiday season.  Created: 11/23/2010 by CDC Office of Women’s Health.   Date Released: 11/23/2010.

  5. Perioperative Care of Prisoners: Providing Safe Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Francis Duval

    2016-03-01

    Correctional nurses are trained to care for prisoners in a controlled security environment; however, when a convict is transferred to a noncorrectional health care facility, the nurses there are often unfamiliar with custody requirements or how to safely care for these patients. The care of prisoners outside of prison has not been adequately investigated, and a gap exists between research and nursing education and practice. Nurses rarely have to consider how providing care for a prisoner in custody affects their practice, the potential dissonance between routine nursing care and the requirements to maintain security, or that care of prisoners in unsecured clinical areas places the nurse and other personnel at risk for physical assault or prisoner escape. Educating perioperative nurses in the care of prisoners in a public hospital environment is important for the provision of safe care and prevention of physical and emotional repercussions to personnel. Copyright © 2016 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Halloween: Have Fun and Stay Safe and Healthy!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-25

    Halloween is a fun time for kids, but it's no fun if you get sick or hurt. In this podcast for kids, the Kidtastics offer some simple ways to stay safe and healthy on Halloween.  Created: 10/25/2010 by CDC Office of Women’s Health.   Date Released: 10/25/2010.

  7. Health Providers' Perception towards Safe Abortion Service at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Ethiopia, unsafe abortion accounts up to 32% of maternal deaths. The perception of health providers towards safe abortion provision at selected health facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia was assessed. A stratified random sampling was used to select 431 health providers. A cross-sectional study was conducted from ...

  8. Why Oats Are Safe and Healthy for Celiac Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luud J. W. J. Gilissen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The water-insoluble storage proteins of cereals (prolamins are called “gluten” in wheat, barley, and rye, and “avenins” in oat. Gluten can provoke celiac disease (CD in genetically susceptible individuals (those with human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 serotypes. Avenins are present at a lower concentration (10%–15% of total protein content in oat as compared to gluten in wheat (80%–85%. The avenins in the genus Avena (cultivated oat as well as various wild species of which gene bank accessions were analyzed are free of the known CD immunogenic epitopes from wheat, barley, and rye. T cells that recognize avenin-specific epitopes have been found very rarely in CD patients. CD patients that consume oats daily do not show significantly increased levels of intraepithelial lymphocyte (EIL cells. The safety and the positive health effects of the long-term inclusion of oats in the gluten-free diet have been confirmed in long-term studies. Since 2009 (EC 41/2009 and 2013 (FDA oat products may be sold as gluten-free in several countries provided a gluten contamination level below 20 ppm. Introduction of oats in the gluten-free diet of celiac patients is advised after the recovery of the intestine. Health effects of oat consumption are reflected in European Food Safety Authority (EFSA- and Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved health claims. Oats can form a healthy, nutritious, fiber-rich, and safe complement to the gluten-free diet.

  9. Why don?t humanitarian organizations provide safe abortion services?

    OpenAIRE

    McGinn, Therese; Casey, Sara E

    2016-01-01

    Background Although sexual and reproductive health services have become more available in humanitarian settings over the last decade, safe abortion services are still rarely provided. The authors? observations suggest that four reasons are typically given for this gap: ?There?s no need?; ?Abortion is too complicated to provide in crises?; ?Donors don?t fund abortion services?; and ?Abortion is illegal?. Discussion However, each of these reasons is based on false premises. Unsafe abortion is a...

  10. Safe Implementation of Computerized Provider Order Entry for Adult Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D B; Kaemingk, D; Frieze, D; Hendrie, P; Payne, T H

    2015-01-01

    Oncology has lagged in CPOE adoption due to the narrow therapeutic index of chemotherapy drugs, individualized dosing based on weight and height, regimen complexity, and workflows that include hard stops where safety checks are performed and documented. We sought to establish CPOE for chemotherapy ordering and administration in an academic teaching institution using a commercially available CPOE system. A commercially available CPOE system was implemented throughout the hospital. A multidisciplinary team identified key safety gaps that required the development of a customized complex order display and a verification documentation workflow. Staff reported safety events were monitored for two years and compared to the year prior to go live. A workflow was enabled to capture real-time provider verification status during the time from ordering to the administration of chemotherapy. A customized display system was embedded in the EMR to provide a single screen view of the relevant parameters of chemotherapy doses including current and previous patient measurements of height and weight, dose adjustments, provider verifications, prior chemotherapy regimens, and a synopsis of the standard regimen for reference. Our system went live with 127 chemotherapy plans and has been expanded to 189. Staff reported safety events decreased following implementation, particularly in the area of prescribing and transcribing by the second year of use. We observed reduced staff reported safety events following implementation of CPOE for inpatient chemotherapy using an electronic verification workflow and an embedded custom clinical decision support page. This implementation demonstrates that CPOE can be safely used for inpatient chemotherapy, even in an extremely complex environment.

  11. Caring for Cattle to Provide Safe and Wholesome Meat

    OpenAIRE

    Larson, Stephanie; Barry, Sheila; Bush, Lisa; Sweet, Darrel

    2015-01-01

    The care and feeding of livestock has a cyclic rhythm tied to the animals' reproductive cycle and seasonal health needs. Ranchers must perform numerous tasks to keep their animals healthy and reproducing. This publication covers a variety of common tasks and their typical timing; referred to by ranchers as “working” cattle or sheep.

  12. 76 FR 78250 - Final Priority; Safe and Healthy Students Discretionary Grant Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... Elementary and Secondary Education's Office of Safe and Healthy Students (OSHS): Grants to Reduce Alcohol... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION... Secondary Education, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice. Overview Information Final Priority; Safe and...

  13. Keeping Kids Safe: A Guide for Safe Food Handling & Sanitation for Child Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Because children under age 5 are susceptible to food-borne illnesses and children in diapers present special sanitation and health problems, food safety and sanitation are emerging as important issues for child care providers. This booklet is designed to give providers and parents a quick and easy reference for food safety and sanitation. The…

  14. Tips for a Healthy and Safe Trip to South Africa

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-11

    This podcast provides health and safety recommendations for travelers to South Africa.  Created: 8/11/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/11/2010.

  15. A Mixed-Method Exploration of Functioning in Safe Schools/Healthy Students Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Marina L.; Taylor, Nicole L.; Martin, Alison J.; Maxim, Lauren A.; D'Ambrosio, Ryan; Gabriel, Roy M.; Wendt, Staci J.; Mannix, Danyelle; Wells, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a mixed-method approach to measuring the functioning of Safe Schools/Healthy Students (SS/HS) Initiative partnerships. The SS/HS national evaluation team developed a survey to collect partners' perceptions of functioning within SS/HS partnerships. Average partnership functioning scores were used to rank each site from lowest to…

  16. Safe, Healthy and Ready to Succeed: Arizona School Readiness Key Performance Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliore, Donna E.

    2006-01-01

    "Safe, Healthy and Ready to Succeed: Arizona School Readiness Key Performance Indicators" presents a set of baseline measurements that gauge how well a statewide system of school readiness supports is addressing issues that affect Arizona children's readiness for school. The Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) measure the system, rather…

  17. Providing safe drinking water to 1.2 billion unserved people

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadgil, Ashok J.; Derby, Elisabeth A.

    2003-06-01

    Despite substantial advances in the past 100 years in public health, technology and medicine, 20% of the world population, mostly comprised of the poor population segments in developing countries (DCs), still does not have access to safe drinking water. To reach the United Nations (UN) Millennium Goal of halving the number of people without access to safe water by 2015, the global community will need to provide an additional one billion urban residents and 600 million rural residents with safe water within the next twelve years. This paper examines current water treatment measures and implementation methods for delivery of safe drinking water, and offers suggestions for making progress towards the goal of providing a timely and equitable solution for safe water provision. For water treatment, based on the serious limitations of boiling water and chlorination, we suggest an approach based on filtration coupled with ultraviolet (UV) disinfection, combined with public education. Additionally, owing to the capacity limitations for non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to take on this task primarily on their own, we suggest a strategy based on financially sustainable models that include the private sector as well as NGOs.

  18. EMS providers' perceptions of safety climate and adherence to safe work practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliseo, Laura J; Murray, Kate A; White, Laura F; Dyer, Sophia; Mitchell, Patricia A; Fernandez, William G

    2012-01-01

    Occupational injuries are an important source of morbidity for emergency medical services (EMS) providers. Previous work has shown that employee perceptions of an organization's commitment to safety (i.e., safety climate) correlate with adherence to safe practices. To assess the association between perceived safety climate and compliance with safety procedures in an urban EMS system with >100,000 calls/year. EMS providers were issued a self-administered survey that included questions on demographics, years of experience, perceived safety climate, and adherence to safety procedures. Safety climate was assessed with a 20-item validated instrument. Adherence to safety procedures was assessed with a nine-item list of safety behaviors. Strict adherence to safety procedures was defined as endorsing "agree" or "strongly agree" on 80% of items. The effect of safety climate on compliance with safe practices was estimated using multiple logistic regression. One hundred ninety-six of 221 providers (89%) completed surveys; 74% were male; the median age was 36-40 years; and the median amount of experience was 8 years. One hundred twenty-seven of 196 respondents (65%) reported strict adherence to safe work practice. Factor analysis confirmed the original six-factor grouping of questions; frequent safety-related feedback/training was significantly associated with safe practices (odds ratio [OR] = 2.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-4.51). EMS workers perceiving a high degree of perceived safety climate was associated with twofold greater odds of self-reported level of strict adherence to safe work practices. Frequent safety-related feedback/training was the one dimension of safety climate that had the strongest association with adherence to safe workplace behaviors.

  19. More than standards and regulations are needed to provide safe and effective devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, M

    2001-01-01

    Medical devices that met standards have been recalled. Quality systems that were said by internal audits to be in compliance with FDA regulations or ISO quality standards received serious questions after external auditing. Devices meeting standards or produced by quality systems felt to be in compliance have put patients at risk by failing at critical moments. Something more than just meeting standards and regulations is needed to provide safe and effective medical devices.

  20. The Challenge of Providing Safe Water with an Intermittently Supplied Piped Water Distribution System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumpel, E.; Nelson, K. L.

    2012-12-01

    An increasing number of urban residents in low- and middle-income countries have access to piped water; however, this water is often not available continuously. 84% of reporting utilities in low-income countries provide piped water for fewer than 24 hours per day (van den Berg and Danilenko, 2010), while no major city in India has continuous piped water supply. Intermittent water supply leaves pipes vulnerable to contamination and forces households to store water or rely on alternative unsafe sources, posing a health threat to consumers. In these systems, pipes are empty for long periods of time and experience low or negative pressure even when water is being supplied, leaving them susceptible to intrusion from sewage, soil, or groundwater. Households with a non-continuous supply must collect and store water, presenting more opportunities for recontamination. Upgrading to a continuous water supply, while an obvious solution to these challenges, is currently out of reach for many resource-constrained utilities. Despite its widespread prevalence, there are few data on the mechanisms causing contamination in an intermittent supply and the frequency with which it occurs. Understanding the impact of intermittent operation on water quality can lead to strategies to improve access to safe piped water for the millions of people currently served by these systems. We collected over 100 hours of continuous measurements of pressure and physico-chemical water quality indicators and tested over 1,000 grab samples for indicator bacteria over 14 months throughout the distribution system in Hubli-Dharwad, India. This data set is used to explore and explain the mechanisms influencing water quality when piped water is provided for a few hours every 3-5 days. These data indicate that contamination occurs along the distribution system as water travels from the treatment plant to reservoirs and through intermittently supplied pipes to household storage containers, while real

  1. VegeSafe: A community science program measuring soil-metal contamination, evaluating risk and providing advice for safe gardening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouillon, Marek; Harvey, Paul J; Kristensen, Louise J; George, Steven G; Taylor, Mark P

    2017-03-01

    The extent of metal contamination in Sydney residential garden soils was evaluated using data collected during a three-year Macquarie University community science program called VegeSafe. Despite knowledge of industrial and urban contamination amongst scientists, the general public remains under-informed about the potential risks of exposure from legacy contaminants in their home garden environment. The community was offered free soil metal screening, allowing access to soil samples for research purposes. Participants followed specific soil sampling instructions and posted samples to the University for analysis with a field portable X-ray Fluorescence (pXRF) spectrometer. Over the three-year study period, >5200 soil samples, primarily from vegetable gardens, were collected from >1200 Australian homes. As anticipated, the primary soil metal of concern was lead; mean concentrations were 413 mg/kg (front yard), 707 mg/kg (drip line), 226 mg/kg (back yard) and 301 mg/kg (vegetable garden). The Australian soil lead guideline of 300 mg/kg for residential gardens was exceeded at 40% of Sydney homes, while concentrations >1000 mg/kg were identified at 15% of homes. The incidence of highest soil lead contamination was greatest in the inner city area with concentrations declining towards background values of 20-30 mg/kg at 30-40 km distance from the city. Community engagement with VegeSafe participants has resulted in useful outcomes: dissemination of knowledge related to contamination legacies and health risks; owners building raised beds containing uncontaminated soil and in numerous cases, owners replacing all of their contaminated soil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Subcutaneous placement of lap band port without fascial fixation provides safe and durable access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkary, Ehab; Olgers, Forrest

    2014-11-01

    Laparoscopic adjustable gastric band access port has been routinely sutured to the anterior fascia of the abdominal wall using nonabsorbable sutures. We present our technique demonstrating that nonfascial fixation with using a mesh allows for a safe and durable placement of the port in the superficial subcutaneous tissue. Retrospective chart review included 102 consecutive patients who had Lap band surgery performed by single surgeon (EA) from June 2011 until April 2013. The port was sutured to a piece of polypropylene mesh and tunneled in the subcutaneous tissue away from the incision. Patients' demographics were analyzed as well as the following parameters: OR time for port placement, follow-up, port complications requiring revision, difficult access facilitated by fluoroscopy imaging, port infection, and skin erosion. The study included 102 consecutive patients (23 males and 79 females), mean age was 49 years old, mean weight was 284.7 lb, mean height was 66.2 in., and mean body mass index (BMI) was 46.3 kg/m(2). The average operative time for port placement was 4 min, mean follow-up was 12 months, port complications occurred in 2 % of the patients while fluoroscopy for difficult port access was required in 3 %. No cases of port infections or skin erosions occurred. Superficial subcutaneous placement of Lap Band Port using mesh fixation without anchoring the port to the fascia provides safe and durable access. Deep incisions to secure the port directly to the fascia might not be necessary.

  3. Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) and Student Benefits: Implications for the Safe Schools/Healthy Students Core Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    This brief shares the latest research on the effects of social and emotional learning (SEL) on students and includes strategies for implementing SEL. It explains how SEL works, elaborates on how SEL can be an integrative prevention framework that addresses the Safe Schools/Healthy Students (SS/HS) core elements, and spells out implications of the…

  4. Intravehicular, Short- and Long-Range Communication Information Fusion for Providing Safe Speed Warnings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Felipe; Naranjo, Jose Eugenio; Serradilla, Francisco; Pérez, Elisa; Hernández, María Jose; Ruiz, Trinidad; Anaya, José Javier; Díaz, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Inappropriate speed is a relevant concurrent factor in many traffic accidents. Moreover, in recent years, traffic accidents numbers in Spain have fallen sharply, but this reduction has not been so significant on single carriageway roads. These infrastructures have less equipment than high-capacity roads, therefore measures to reduce accidents on them should be implemented in vehicles. This article describes the development and analysis of the impact on the driver of a warning system for the safe speed on each road section in terms of geometry, the presence of traffic jams, weather conditions, type of vehicle and actual driving conditions. This system is based on an application for smartphones and includes knowledge of the vehicle position via Ground Positioning System (GPS), access to intravehicular information from onboard sensors through the Controller Area Network (CAN) bus, vehicle data entry by the driver, access to roadside information (short-range communications) and access to a centralized server with information about the road in the current and following sections of the route (long-range communications). Using this information, the system calculates the safe speed, recommends the appropriate speed in advance in the following sections and provides warnings to the driver. Finally, data are sent from vehicles to a server to generate new information to disseminate to other users or to supervise drivers’ behaviour. Tests in a driving simulator have been used to define the system warnings and Human Machine Interface (HMI) and final tests have been performed on real roads in order to analyze the effect of the system on driver behavior. PMID:26805839

  5. Intravehicular, Short- and Long-Range Communication Information Fusion for Providing Safe Speed Warnings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Jiménez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inappropriate speed is a relevant concurrent factor in many traffic accidents. Moreover, in recent years, traffic accidents numbers in Spain have fallen sharply, but this reduction has not been so significant on single carriageway roads. These infrastructures have less equipment than high-capacity roads, therefore measures to reduce accidents on them should be implemented in vehicles. This article describes the development and analysis of the impact on the driver of a warning system for the safe speed on each road section in terms of geometry, the presence of traffic jams, weather conditions, type of vehicle and actual driving conditions. This system is based on an application for smartphones and includes knowledge of the vehicle position via Ground Positioning System (GPS, access to intravehicular information from onboard sensors through the Controller Area Network (CAN bus, vehicle data entry by the driver, access to roadside information (short-range communications and access to a centralized server with information about the road in the current and following sections of the route (long-range communications. Using this information, the system calculates the safe speed, recommends the appropriate speed in advance in the following sections and provides warnings to the driver. Finally, data are sent from vehicles to a server to generate new information to disseminate to other users or to supervise drivers’ behaviour. Tests in a driving simulator have been used to define the system warnings and Human Machine Interface (HMI and final tests have been performed on real roads in order to analyze the effect of the system on driver behavior.

  6. Intravehicular, Short- and Long-Range Communication Information Fusion for Providing Safe Speed Warnings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Felipe; Naranjo, Jose Eugenio; Serradilla, Francisco; Pérez, Elisa; Hernández, María Jose; Ruiz, Trinidad; Anaya, José Javier; Díaz, Alberto

    2016-01-21

    Inappropriate speed is a relevant concurrent factor in many traffic accidents. Moreover, in recent years, traffic accidents numbers in Spain have fallen sharply, but this reduction has not been so significant on single carriageway roads. These infrastructures have less equipment than high-capacity roads, therefore measures to reduce accidents on them should be implemented in vehicles. This article describes the development and analysis of the impact on the driver of a warning system for the safe speed on each road section in terms of geometry, the presence of traffic jams, weather conditions, type of vehicle and actual driving conditions. This system is based on an application for smartphones and includes knowledge of the vehicle position via Ground Positioning System (GPS), access to intravehicular information from onboard sensors through the Controller Area Network (CAN) bus, vehicle data entry by the driver, access to roadside information (short-range communications) and access to a centralized server with information about the road in the current and following sections of the route (long-range communications). Using this information, the system calculates the safe speed, recommends the appropriate speed in advance in the following sections and provides warnings to the driver. Finally, data are sent from vehicles to a server to generate new information to disseminate to other users or to supervise drivers' behaviour. Tests in a driving simulator have been used to define the system warnings and Human Machine Interface (HMI) and final tests have been performed on real roads in order to analyze the effect of the system on driver behavior.

  7. Consuming a multi-ingredient thermogenic supplement for 28 days is apparently safe in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Roxanne M; Joy, Jordan M; Falcone, Paul H; Mosman, Matt M; Kim, Michael P; Moon, Jordan R

    2015-01-01

    diastolic BP, creatinine, eGFR, globulin, A/G, and HDL, all remained within accepted physiological ranges and were not clinically significant. In sum, it appears as though daily supplementation with a multi-ingredient TRM is safe for consumption by healthy adults for a 28-day period.

  8. Consuming a multi-ingredient thermogenic supplement for 28 days is apparently safe in healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxanne M. Vogel

    2015-07-01

    differences in SUP from pre- to postsupplementation for diastolic BP, creatinine, eGFR, globulin, A/G, and HDL, all remained within accepted physiological ranges and were not clinically significant. In sum, it appears as though daily supplementation with a multi-ingredient TRM is safe for consumption by healthy adults for a 28-day period.

  9. Dental Care as a Safe and Essential Part of a Healthy Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragan, Irina F; Veglia, Valery; Geisinger, Maria L; Alexander, David C

    2018-02-01

    Oral health is essential for general health and well-being, and this is especially so during pregnancy. Pregnancy may present challenges to the oral health of the mother, mainly because of adaptations in basic physiology. However, many mothers-to-be and their health professionals, both prenatal and dental, are unsure as to the safety of providing dental care during pregnancy. National guidelines, together with recommendations from numerous state-level and professional organizations, consistently indicate that provision of dental care is both safe and essential during pregnancy. Pregnancy also provides opportunities for the oral health of both infant and new mother after delivery that can set the infant on a lifetime pathway that minimizes preventable oral disease. This review summarizes guidelines for dental care during pregnancy, provides an overview of physiologic changes that occur and their relevance to oral health and dental care delivery, outlines risk factors for oral conditions, and considers timely preventive strategies. It also underscores the need for interprofessional collaboration with the perinatal team to optimize the quality of healthcare and ensure positive outcomes.

  10. Nitrous oxide provides safe and effective analgesia for minor paediatric procedures--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Rie S; Bayat, Allan; Steen, Nick Phaff; Jacobsson, Marie-Laure Bouchy

    2013-06-01

    Pain and distress during minor hospital-related procedures is a familiar problem in many children. Inadequate relief of children's procedural pain and distress not only affects the experience of the children and their parents, but also adversely impacts procedural success. We aimed to review the safety and efficacy of nitrous oxide during brief, but painful paediatric procedures and to compare nitrous oxide with some of the commonly used pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for relieving anxiety and mild to moderate pain in Denmark. We searched MEDLINE (PubMed) and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews with the MeSH term nitrous oxide combined with midazolam, surgical procedures minor, analgesia or conscious sedation. The references in the articles acquired that were not found in the MEDLINE search were further investigated. Only articles written in English and published after 1980 were included to ensure optimal data collection. Nitrous oxide is an effective sedative/analgesic for mildly to moderately painful paediatric procedures. Furthermore, it is safely administrated, particularly for short procedures (Nitrous oxide is a safe and effective method to achieve analgesia and sedation during minor, but painful procedures. It can be safely administered by a dedicated staff member. This helpful method is still underused in Denmark, and we believe that it could be an alternative or the first choice of treatment in emergency and paediatric departments.

  11. What is on our plate? : Safe, healthy and sustainable diets in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocke MC; Toxopeus IB; Geurts M; Mengelers MJB; Temme EHM; Hoeymans N; V&G; V&Z

    2017-01-01

    Huge challenges and ambitions
    Most Dutch people are healthy and life expectancy is growing. Simultaneously, half of the Dutch population is overweight and this rate is even higher in lower socioeconomic groups. In addition, 9 out of 10 people eat too little fruit and vegetables, and nearly 30

  12. Providing a Safe Learning Environment for Queer Students in Canadian Schools: A Legal Analysis of Homophobic Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews Canadian administrative law regarding homophobic bullying and school board decision making. Depending on the provincial legislation, school boards either have a mandatory or a discretionary duty to provide queer students with a safe learning environment. However, Canadian case law has arguably limited that discretion. Recent…

  13. Safe Delivery Posts: an intervention to provide equitable childbirth care services to vulnerable groups in Zahedan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moudi, Zahra; Ghazi Tabatabaie, Mahmood; Mahdi Tabatabaei, Seyed; Vedadhir, AbouAli

    2014-10-01

    Recently, there has been a shift towards alternative childbirth services to increase access to skilled care during childbirth. This study aims to assess the past 10 years of experience of the first Safe Delivery Posts (SDPs) established in Zahedan, Iran to determine the number of deliveries and the intrapartum transfer rates, and to examine the reasons why women choose to give birth at a Safe Delivery Post and not in one of the four large hospitals in Zahedan. A mixed-methods research strategy was used for this study. In the quantitative phase, an analysis was performed on the existing data that are routinely collected in the health-care sector. In the qualitative phase, a grounded theory approach was used to collect and analyse narrative data from in-depth interviews with women who had given birth to their children at the Safe Delivery Posts. Women were selected from two Safe Delivery Posts in Zahedan city in southeast Iran. Nineteen mothers who had given birth in the Safe Delivery Posts were interviewed. During the 10-year period, 22,753 low-risk women gave birth in the Safe Delivery Posts, according to the records. Of all the women who were admitted to the Safe Delivery Posts, on average 2.1% were transferred to the hospital during labour or the postpartum period. Three key categories emerged from the analysis: barriers to hospital use, opposition to home birth and finally, reasons for choosing the childbirth care provided by the SDPs. Implementing a model of midwifery care that offers the benefits of modern medical care and meets the needs of the local population is feasible and sustainable. This model of care reduces the cost of giving birth and ensures equitable access to care among vulnerable groups in Zahedan. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. School-Based Health Centers Make Sense: Ensuring All Kids Have Access to the Health Care They Need to Be Healthy and Safe, and to Do Their Best in School. Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children Now, 2014

    2014-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) are an innovative and effective way to address California's severe health care access problem among children. By providing critical health care services to kids in school, SBHCs ensure children get the medical, mental health, and dental care they need to be healthy and safe, and to support their ability to…

  15. Communication Between Low Income Hispanic Patients and Their Healthcare Providers Regarding Physical Activity and Healthy Eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauri, Aliyah; Rodriguez, Xeniamaria; Gaona, Patricia; Maestri, Stephanie; Dietz, Noella; Stoutenberg, Mark

    2017-05-20

    U.S. Hispanics disproportionately show health burdens that may be decreased by discussing physical activity (PA) and healthy eating with their healthcare providers (HCPs). We examined the perceptions of both HCPs and low-income Hispanic patients regarding the dynamics of these communications. We surveyed 295 low-income Hispanic patients and interviewed 14 HCPs at three community health clinics. Patients were asked about their comfort level with HCPs, how often their HCP discussed PA and healthy eating, and the likelihood of following advice on PA and healthy eating. HCPs were asked about their delivery (frequency/duration) and perceived effectiveness in providing such advice. Patients reported feeling "most comfortable" with their physicians (57%) with a lower proportion (19%) feeling "most comfortable" with nurses. Nearly all patients (95%) reported being very likely to follow the advice of their physician. On average, HCPs (physicians and nurses) reported discussing PA and healthy eating with 85% and 80% of their patients, respectively. In contrast, a fewer proportion of patients (65.8%) reported that their physician discussed PA and healthy eating "some" or "a lot" of the time. Overall, physicians reported discussing PA and healthy eating for an average of 5 and 6 min, respectively; whereas nurses reported discussing PA and healthy eating for an average of 12 and 19 min, respectively. Further study on the content and delivery of conversations between HCPs and their low-income Hispanic patients regarding PA and healthy eating could be vital to optimally impact health behaviors.

  16. Parent and child care provider partnerships: Protocol for the Healthy Me, Healthy We (HMHW) cluster randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennink-Kaminski, Heidi; Vaughn, Amber E; Hales, Derek; Moore, Reneé H; Luecking, Courtney T; Ward, Dianne S

    2018-01-01

    Formation of diet and physical activity habits begins during early childhood. However, many preschool-aged children in the United States do not achieve recommendations for a nutritious diet or active lifestyle. Two important spheres of influence, home and child care, could ensure that children receive consistent health messages. Innovative approaches that engage both parents and child care providers in a substantial way are needed. Social marketing, a promising approach for health promotion targeting children, uses principles that recognize the need to engage multiple stakeholders and to emphasize benefits and overcome barriers associated with behavior change. Yet, application of social marketing principles in interventions for preschool-age children is limited. Healthy Me, Healthy We (HMHW) is 2-arm, cluster randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effect of a 8-month social marketing campaign on the diet and physical activity behaviors of preschool children (3-4years old), their parents, and child care providers. The campaign is delivered by the child care center and includes branded classroom and at-home activities and materials. Primary outcomes are children's diet quality (assessed with Healthy Eating Index scores) and minutes of non-sedentary activity (measured via accelerometers). Secondary outcomes assess children's body mass index, nutrition and physical activity practices at the child care center and at home, and health behaviors of child care providers and parents. HMHW is an innovative approach to promoting healthy eating and physical activity in preschool children. The campaign targets children during a key developmental period and leverages a partnership between providers and parents to affect behavior change. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Do clinical examination gloves provide adequate electrical insulation for safe hands-on defibrillation? I: Resistive properties of nitrile gloves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deakin, Charles D; Lee-Shrewsbury, Victoria; Hogg, Kitwani; Petley, Graham W

    2013-07-01

    Uninterrupted chest compressions are a key factor in determining resuscitation success. Interruptions to chest compression are often associated with defibrillation, particularly the need to stand clear from the patient during defibrillation. It has been suggested that clinical examination gloves may provide adequate electrical resistance to enable safe hands-on defibrillation in order to minimise interruptions. We therefore examined whether commonly used nitrile clinical examination gloves provide adequate resistance to current flow to enable safe hands-on defibrillation. Clinical examination gloves (Kimberly Clark KC300 Sterling nitrile) worn by members of hospital cardiac arrest teams were collected immediately following termination of resuscitation. To determine the level of protection afforded by visually intact gloves, electrical resistance across the glove was measured by applying a DC voltage across the glove and measuring subsequent resistance. Forty new unused gloves (control) were compared with 28 clinical (non-CPR) gloves and 128 clinical (CPR) gloves. One glove in each group had a visible tear and was excluded from analysis. Control gloves had a minimum resistance of 120 kΩ (median 190 kΩ) compared with 60 kΩ in clinical gloves (both CPR (median 140 kΩ) and non-CPR groups (median 160 kΩ)). Nitrile clinical examination gloves do not provide adequate electrical insulation for the rescuer to safely undertake 'hands-on' defibrillation and when exposed to the physical forces of external chest compression, even greater resistive degradation occurs. Further work is required to identify gloves suitable for safe use for 'hands-on' defibrillation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A multi-ingredient, pre-workout supplement is apparently safe in healthy males and females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Jordan M; Lowery, Ryan P; Falcone, Paul H; Vogel, Roxanne M; Mosman, Matt M; Tai, Chih-Yin; Carson, Laura R; Kimber, Dylan; Choate, David; Kim, Michael P; Wilson, Jacob M; Moon, Jordan R

    2015-01-01

    Pre-workout supplements (PWS) have become increasingly popular with recreational and competitive athletes. While many ingredients used in PWS have had their safety assessed, the interactions when combined are less understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the safety of 1 and 2 servings of a PWS. Forty-four males and females (24.4±4.6 years; 174.7±9.3 cm; 78.9±18.6 kg) from two laboratories participated in this study. Subjects were randomly assigned to consume either one serving (G1; n=14) or two servings (G2; n=18) of PWS or serve as an unsupplemented control (CRL; n=12). Blood draws for safety panels were conducted by a trained phlebotomist before and after the supplementation period. Pooled data from both laboratories revealed significant group×time interactions (p<0.05) for mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH; CRL: 30.9±0.8-31.0±0.9 pg; G1: 30.7±1.1-30.2±0.7 pg; G2: 30.9±1.2-30.9±1.1 pg), MCH concentration (CRL: 34.0±0.9-34.4±0.7 g/dL; G1: 34.1±0.9-33.8±0.6 g/dL; G2: 34.0±1.0-33.8±0.8 g/dL), platelets (CRL: 261.9±45.7-255.2±41.2×10(3)/µL; G1: 223.8±47.7-238.7±49.6×10(3)/µL; G2: 239.1±28.3-230.8±34.5×10(3)/µL), serum glucose (CRL: 84.1±5.2-83.3±5.8 mg/dL; G1: 86.5±7.9-89.7±5.6 mg/dL; G2: 87.4±7.2-89.9±6.6 mg/dL), sodium (CRL: 137.0±2.7-136.4±2.4 mmol/L; 139.6±1.4-140.0±2.2 mmol/L; G2: 139.0±2.2-138.7±1.7 mmol/L), albumin (CRL: 4.4±0.15-4.4±0.22 g/dL; G1: 4.5±0.19-4.5±0.13 g/dL; G2: 4.6±0.28-4.3±0.13 g/dL), and albumin:globulin (CRL: 1.8±0.30-1.8±0.28; G1: 1.9±0.30-2.0±0.31; G2: 1.8±0.34-1.8±0.34). Each of these variables remained within the clinical reference ranges. The PWS appears to be safe for heart, liver, and kidney function in both one-serving and two-serving doses when consumed daily for 28 days. Despite the changes observed for select variables, no variable reached clinical significance.

  19. A multi-ingredient, pre-workout supplement is apparently safe in healthy males and females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan M. Joy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pre-workout supplements (PWS have become increasingly popular with recreational and competitive athletes. While many ingredients used in PWS have had their safety assessed, the interactions when combined are less understood. Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the safety of 1 and 2 servings of a PWS. Design: Forty-four males and females (24.4±4.6 years; 174.7±9.3 cm; 78.9±18.6 kg from two laboratories participated in this study. Subjects were randomly assigned to consume either one serving (G1; n=14 or two servings (G2; n=18 of PWS or serve as an unsupplemented control (CRL; n=12. Blood draws for safety panels were conducted by a trained phlebotomist before and after the supplementation period. Results: Pooled data from both laboratories revealed significant group×time interactions (p<0.05 for mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH; CRL: 30.9±0.8–31.0±0.9 pg; G1: 30.7±1.1–30.2±0.7 pg; G2: 30.9±1.2–30.9±1.1 pg, MCH concentration (CRL: 34.0±0.9–34.4±0.7 g/dL; G1: 34.1±0.9–33.8±0.6 g/dL; G2: 34.0±1.0–33.8±0.8 g/dL, platelets (CRL: 261.9±45.7–255.2±41.2×103/µL; G1: 223.8±47.7–238.7±49.6×103/µL; G2: 239.1±28.3–230.8±34.5×103/µL, serum glucose (CRL: 84.1±5.2–83.3±5.8 mg/dL; G1: 86.5±7.9–89.7±5.6 mg/dL; G2: 87.4±7.2–89.9±6.6 mg/dL, sodium (CRL: 137.0±2.7–136.4±2.4 mmol/L; 139.6±1.4–140.0±2.2 mmol/L; G2: 139.0±2.2–138.7±1.7 mmol/L, albumin (CRL: 4.4±0.15–4.4±0.22 g/dL; G1: 4.5±0.19–4.5±0.13 g/dL; G2: 4.6±0.28–4.3±0.13 g/dL, and albumin:globulin (CRL: 1.8±0.30–1.8±0.28; G1: 1.9±0.30–2.0±0.31; G2: 1.8±0.34–1.8±0.34. Each of these variables remained within the clinical reference ranges. Conclusions: The PWS appears to be safe for heart, liver, and kidney function in both one-serving and two-serving doses when consumed daily for 28 days. Despite the changes observed for select variables, no variable reached clinical significance.

  20. High stakes and high emotions: providing safe care in Canadian emergency departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali S

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Samina Ali,1,2 Denise Thomson,3 Timothy A D Graham,4 Sean E Rickard,3 Antonia S Stang5 1Women and Children’s Health Research Institute, 2Department of Pediatrics, 3Cochrane Child Health Field, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, 4Department of Emergency Medicine, 5Section of Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada Background: The high-paced, unpredictable environment of the emergency department (ED contributes to errors in patient safety. The ED setting becomes even more challenging when dealing with critically ill patients, particularly with children, where variations in size, weight, and form present practical difficulties in many aspects of care. In this commentary, we will explore the impact of the health care providers’ emotional reactions while caring for critically ill patients, and how this can be interpreted and addressed as a patient safety issue. Discussion: ED health care providers encounter high-stakes, high-stress clinical scenarios, such as pediatric cardiac arrest or resuscitation. This health care providers’ stress, and at times, distress, and its potential contribution to medical error, is underrepresented in the current medical literature. Most patient safety research is limited to error reporting systems, especially medication-related ones, an approach that ignores the effects of health care provider stress as a source of error, and limits our ability to learn from the event. Ways to mitigate this stress and avoid this type of patient safety concern might include simulation training for rare, high-acuity events, use of pre-determined clinical order sets, and post-event debriefing. Conclusion: While there are physiologic and anatomic differences that contribute to patient safety, we believe that they are insufficient to explain the need to address critical life-threatening event-related patient safety issues for both adults and, especially, children

  1. Prophage Provide a Safe Haven for Adaptive Exploration in Temperate Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Lindi M; Pattenden, Tyler

    2017-05-01

    Prophage sequences constitute a substantial fraction of the temperate virus gene pool. Although subject to mutational decay, prophage sequences can also be an important source of adaptive mutations for these viral populations. Here we develop a life-history model for temperate viruses, including both the virulent (lytic) and the temperate phases of the life cycle. We then examine the survival of mutations that increase fitness during the lytic phase (attachment rate, burst size), increase fitness in the temperate phase (increasing host survival), or affect transitions between the two phases (integration or induction probability). We find that beneficial mutations are much more likely to survive, ultimately, if they first occur in the prophage state. This conclusion applies even to traits that are only expressed during the lytic phase, and arises due to the substantially lower variance in the offspring distribution during the temperate cycle. This observation, however, is balanced by the fact that many more mutations can be generated during lytic replication. Overall we predict that the prophage state provides a refuge, relatively shielded from genetic drift, in which temperate viruses can explore possible adaptive steps. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  2. A decade of progress providing safe abortion services in Ethiopia: results of national assessments in 2008 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibaba, Yohannes; Dijkerman, Sally; Fetters, Tamara; Moore, Ann; Gebreselassie, Hailemichael; Gebrehiwot, Yirgu; Benson, Janie

    2017-03-04

    Ethiopia has one of the highest maternal mortality ratios in the world (420 per 100,000 live births in 2013), and unsafe abortion continues to be one of the major causes. To reduce deaths and disabilities from unsafe abortion, Ethiopia liberalized its abortion law in 2005 to allow safe abortion under certain conditions. This study aimed to measure how availability and utilization of safe abortion services has changed in the last decade in Ethiopia. This paper draws on results from nationally representative health facility studies conducted in Ethiopia in 2008 and 2014. The data come from three sources at two points in time: 1) interviews with 335 health providers in 2008 and 822 health care providers in 2014, 2) review of facility logbooks, and 3) prospective data on 3092 women in 2008 and 5604 women in 2014 seeking treatment for abortion complications or induced abortion over a one month period. The Safe Abortion Care Model was used as a framework of analysis. There has been a rapid expansion of health facilities eligible to provide legal abortion services in Ethiopia since 2008. Between 2008 and 2014, the number of facilities reporting basic and comprehensive signal functions for abortion care increased. In 2014, access to basic abortion care services exceeded the recommended level of available facilities providing the service, increasing from 25 to 117%, with more than half of regions meeting the recommended level. Comprehensive abortion services increased from 20% of the recommended level in 2008 to 38% in 2014. Smaller regions and city administrations achieved or exceeded the recommended level of comprehensive service facilities, yet larger regions fall short. Between 2008 and 2014, the use of appropriate technology for conducting first and second trimester abortion and the provision of post abortion family planning has increased at the same time that abortion-related obstetric complications have decreased. Ten years after the change in abortion law, service

  3. Feasibility of an Online and Mobile Videogame Curriculum for Teaching Children Safe and Healthy Cellphone and Internet Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hswen, Yulin; Rubenzahl, Lauren; Bickham, David S

    2014-08-01

    Increased prevalence and penetration of cellphone and mobile Internet use have raised significant concerns about children's health and safety by offering new spaces for cyberbullying, harassment, and sexual misconduct. "Cyberhero Mobile Safety" is a videogame-based education program designed using tenets of the capacity model with the goal of instilling the knowledge and skills necessary to safely and productively navigate the mobile online environment. This study evaluates its usability, appeal, and perceived impact and usefulness. Six educational videogames were part of a program delivered to 3rd-6th grade students (n=108) across six public schools in Upstate New York. Videogame play was electronically captured to evaluate usability. Likeability, acceptability, and perceived usefulness of videogame content were evaluated through postgame questionnaires. Videogame usability criteria were achieved on 82.7 percent of the students' gameplays. On a scale from 1 (low) to 5 (high), mean ratings were 4.09 (standard deviation [SD]=1.28) for likeability, 3.54 (SD=1.61) for acceptability, and 4.16 (SD=1.33) for perceived message usefulness. The "Cyberhero Mobile Safety" program is a feasible and potentially effective platform for delivering information about safe and healthy cellphone and Internet use to children. Results support the use of the capacity model to design educational videogames because games that aligned with theory principles were reported as having the most impact and being the most useful at shifting children's online behaviors. Future research should directly test the individual components of the capacity model to inform educational game design.

  4. The impact of coaches providing healthy snacks at junior sport training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belski, Regina; Staley, Kiera; Keenan, Stephen; Skiadopoulos, Anne; Randle, Erica; Donaldson, Alex; O'Halloran, Paul; Kappelides, Pam; O'Neil, Stacey; Nicholson, Matthew

    2017-12-01

    Sports clubs provide an opportunity to tackle childhood obesity rates through targeted interventions. Our study aimed to investigate if coaches providing healthy snacks to participants before junior netball sessions at five clubs in Melbourne, Australia, increased consumption of healthy foods and influenced coach perceptions of participants' attention/participation levels. Coaches provided healthy snacks to participants before each netball session for one school term. Children's food consumption was observed at one session before, during and after the intervention. Parents attending the observed session completed pre- and post-intervention questionnaires. Coaches rated participants' attention/participation at the observed sessions before and during the intervention, and completed a questionnaire post-intervention. Baseline: Ice cream and cake were the most frequently consumed snacks. During intervention: Fruit, cheese and crackers and vegetables were the most frequently consumed snacks. Coaches ratings of participants' attention/participation increased significantly (baseline: 6.4 ± 0.17, intervention: 7.5 ± 0.36; p=0.02) where the same coach undertook ratings at both time points. Coaches providing healthy snacks before sessions at sports clubs increased consumption of nutrient-dense foods at the session, and may have positively affected participants' attention/participation. Implications for public health: This study highlights how a simple intervention could improve the diet of Australian children. © 2017 The Authors.

  5. Staying Healthy and Safe

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... t Miss a Beat National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day National Women's Health Week Supporting Nursing Moms ... t Miss a Beat National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day National Women's Health Week Supporting Nursing Moms ...

  6. Food-specific sublingual immunotherapy is well tolerated and safe in healthy dogs: a blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, E; Pelst, M; Hesta, M; Cox, E

    2017-01-18

    were sterile. Our results demonstrate that the used peanut-SLIT protocol is well tolerated and safe in healthy dogs. Further studies should evaluate tolerability, safety and efficacy in dogs with food allergy.

  7. Intensive medical student involvement in short-term surgical trips provides safe and effective patient care: a case review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macleod Jana B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hierarchical nature of medical education has been thought necessary for the safe care of patients. In this setting, medical students in particular have limited opportunities for experiential learning. We report on a student-faculty collaboration that has successfully operated an annual, short-term surgical intervention in Haiti for the last three years. Medical students were responsible for logistics and were overseen by faculty members for patient care. Substantial planning with local partners ensured that trip activities supplemented existing surgical services. A case review was performed hypothesizing that such trips could provide effective surgical care while also providing a suitable educational experience. Findings Over three week-long trips, 64 cases were performed without any reported complications, and no immediate perioperative morbidity or mortality. A plurality of cases were complex urological procedures that required surgical skills that were locally unavailable (43%. Surgical productivity was twice that of comparable peer institutions in the region. Student roles in patient care were greatly expanded in comparison to those at U.S. academic medical centers and appropriate supervision was maintained. Discussion This demonstration project suggests that a properly designed surgical trip model can effectively balance the surgical needs of the community with an opportunity to expose young trainees to a clinical and cross-cultural experience rarely provided at this early stage of medical education. Few formalized programs currently exist although the experience above suggests the rewarding potential for broad-based adoption.

  8. The responsibility of gynecologists and obstetricians in providing safe abortion services within the limits of the law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faúndes, Anibal

    2017-10-01

    Approximately 47 000 women die each year worldwide as a result of the complications of unsafe abortion, almost exclusively in low- and middle-income countries with restrictive abortion laws. In these countries, very few women who comply with the conditions imposed by the law can access safe abortion services in the public health system. The main obstacle is the unwillingness of gynecologists and obstetricians to provide abortion services by claiming conscientious objection, which is often used to hide their fear of the stigma associated with abortion. This happens because many colleagues are unaware that without access to legal services these women will resort to an unsafe abortion and its consequences. This violates the statement from FIGO's Committee for the Ethical Aspects of Human Reproduction and Women's Health, which asserts that: "The primary conscientious duty of obstetrician-gynecologists is at all times to treat, or provide benefit and prevent harm, to the patients for whose care they are responsible. Any conscientious objection to treating a patient is secondary to this primary duty." © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  9. Parenting a child with medically diagnosed severe food allergies in New Zealand: the experience of being unsupported in keeping their children healthy and safe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Charissa; McBride-Henry, Karen; van Wissen, Kim

    2010-01-01

    To explore parental experiences of caring for a child with medically diagnosed severe food allergies (MDSFA) in New Zealand. This study employed a qualitative methodology, interpretive descriptive analysis, and involved interviews with four parents of children with MDSFA from two different regions in New Zealand. The analysis of the interviews revealed that the experience of parenting a child with MDSFA is an experience of feeling unsupported in the effort to keep the child healthy and safe. Three major themes emerge from this study: the experience of isolation, the burden of accessing resources, and the cost of living with MDSFA. The general lack of support experienced by these families from health care professionals is a significant concern both for primary and tertiary health care providers. Multi-disciplinary support is required for these families, and currently there is a lack of health care professionals with the knowledge to support these families. This research highlights that there is a significant need for both workforce development and further research in the area of MDSFA in New Zealand.

  10. How music and social engagement provides healthy aging and prevents behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2018-01-01

    engagement and learning, and further affects cognitive reserve and the way we age. Music and musical elements affect listeners differently but seem to regulate our body and brain at a much deeper level than we are aware of. When music touches and engages us, a release of the neurotransmitter Norepinephrine....... In addition, through musical interaction, meaningful expression of psychosocial needs may indirectly lead to a reduction of behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia. For the person with severe dementia, with sensory and cognitive decline, this offers a healthy means of remaining active, autonomous......Music is much more than a simple stimulus bringing individual pleasure; it also facilitates interpersonal synchrony. In this chapter professor of music therapy, Hanne Mette Ridder, brings together evidence from various disciplines to provide a new perspective on how music stimulates social...

  11. Providing appropriate genetic information to healthy multi-ethnic carriers of hemoglobinopathy in The Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero C. Giordano

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study are: i to enquire whether informing healthy hemoglobinopathy carriers about their condition is a welcome initiative in The Netherlands; ii to study whether using information letters and thorough explanation is associated with presence or absence of undesired feelings or emotions. We have approached 100 multi-ethnic carriers previously diagnosed in our lab. All subjects had previously received our information letter through their physician who was supposed to have provided an explanation of the letter if required. We have enquired whether the subjects had experienced negative or positive emotions after receiving our diagnosis and explanation and to which degree, if they were sufficiently informed and satisfied and if they would have considered prevention in case of risk. The rate negative versus positive feelings was calculated using a numerical distribution. We have registered negative feelings in a rate that was directly proportional to the lack of information. While the number of registered negative feelings in well-informed carriers was very low it was more present in badly informed. Nevertheless, all participants found carrier information a welcome initiative and over 80% of them declared to be in favor of prenatal diagnosis in case of risk.

  12. Does organic school food service provide more healthy eating environments than their non organic counterparts?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Chen; Mikkelsen, Bent Egberg

    Organic food strategies are increasingly developing within European school food services at the same time as these services are being involved in measures aiming at promoting healthy eating at school and counter acting obesity. Schools have an important role to play in teaching children fundamental...... life skills, including good food habits according to a number of authoritative policy papers from Council of Europe, the WHO and the EU platform. Although there are great national differences, European school food culture seems to be in a transitional state in which both healthy eating as well...... as sustainable consumption strategies are contributing to shaping the future school food culture. It is therefore imperative to study how these changes in agendas influences each other and to study the associations between healthy eating and organic supply strategies at school....

  13. Sustainability of arsenic mitigation interventions – an evaluation of different alternative safe drinking water options provided in Matlab, an arsenic hot spot in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMED eHOSSAIN

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The wide spread occurrence of geogenic arsenic (As in Bangladesh groundwater drastically reduced the safe water access across the country. Since its discovery in 1993, different mitigation options tested at household and community scale have resulted in limited success. In an arsenic hotspot of southeastern Bangladesh, 841 arsenic removal filter (ARF, 190 surface water filter membrane, 23 pond sand filter (PSF, 147 rain water harvester (RWH and 59 As-safe tubewell were distributed among the severely exposed population by AsMat, a Sida supported project. After three-four years of providing these safe water options, this study was carried out during 2010-2011 for performance analysis of these options, in terms of technical viability and effectiveness and thus to evaluate the preference of different options to the end users. Household and community based surveys were done to make an assessment of the current water use pattern as impact of the distributed options, overall condition of the options provided and to identify the reasons why these options are in use and/or abandoned. In total, 284 households were surveyed and information was collected for 23 PSF, 147 RWH and 59 tubewells. None of the filters was found in use. Among other options distributed, 13% of PSF, 40% RWH and 93% of tubewell were found functioning. In all cases, tubewells were found As-safe. About 89% of households are currently using tubewell water which was 58% before. Filter was abandoned for high cost and complicated maintenance. The use of RWH and PSF was not found user friendly and ensuring year round water quality is a big challenge. Arsenic-safe tubewell was found as a widely accepted option mainly because of its easy operation and availability of water, good water quality and negligible maintenance. This study validated tubewell as the most feasible option and holds significance for planning water supply projects, improving mitigation policy as well as developing awareness

  14. Improving the United States airline industry's capacity to provide safe and dignified services to travelers with disabilities: focus group findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    As a component of a training development project for intercity air travel providers, we investigated the capacity of the airline industry to meet the needs of travelers with disabilities by exploring: (1) the level of sensitivity among personnel to travelers' needs, (2) training currently provided, (3) areas in which additional training might be beneficial, and (4) organisational/systems-level commitment to dignified assistance to all travelers. Forty-four airline/vendor employees participated in nine focus groups in four US cities. Groups were audio recorded and transcribed. A grounded-theory approach was used to develop a coding system which was then applied to transcripts to identify themes. Factors influencing capacity grouped broadly into four areas: characteristics of the job/system, characteristics of current training, characteristics of providers themselves, and characteristics of travelers. At an interpersonal level, providers were empathetic and desired to provide dignified services. They lacked training and adequate equipment in some cases, however, and organisational commitment varied between companies. Traveler characteristics were also shown to impact service delivery. Results are promising but additional regulatory and organisational policies are needed to ensure quality services. Providers and consumers of intercity air travel services may benefit from the findings and recommendations of this study.

  15. Safe sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sex; Sexually transmitted - safe sex; GC - safe sex; Gonorrhea - safe sex; Herpes - safe sex; HIV - safe sex; ... contact. STIs include: Chlamydia Genital herpes Genital warts Gonorrhea Hepatitis HIV HPV Syphilis STIs are also called ...

  16. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 228 - Guidelines for Clean, Safe, and Sanitary Railroad Provided Camp Cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... should be equipped with a tap. (3) Open containers such as barrels, pails, or tanks for drinking water... meets the quality standards prescribed in the U.S. Public Health Service Drinking Water Standards... service rooms where such facilities are provided. (2) Potable drinking water dispensers should be designed...

  17. Promoting the healthy, safe use of recreational waters Por un uso saludable y seguro de las aguas de recreo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Las actividades acuáticas recreativas pueden ofrecer beneficios considerables para la salud y el bienestar de las personas. Por ejemplo, los lagos y los ríos pueden brindar un ambiente adecuado para el descanso, la actividad física y el esparcimiento. Además, muchos países de todas las latitudes dependen de sus extensas playas cubiertas de arena para atraer a los turistas, y los desembolsos de esos visitantes contribuyen a la economía local. Sin embargo, esas actividades acuáticas también pueden representar riesgos para la salud, ya que aguas contaminadas o poco seguras en lugares de recreo pueden conducir a infecciones y enfermedades, lesiones e incluso la muerte. Para ayudar a lidiar con este tipo de problemas, la Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS emitió recientemente un informe titulado Directrices para un Medio Acuático Recreativo Seguro (Guidelines for Safe Recreational Water Environments. El texto está dirigido a reducir las muertes y lesiones de los bañistas, así como a hacer las playas y los espacios recreativos acuáticos más seguros para el descanso, los ejercicios y el esparcimiento. El nuevo informe de la OMS trata sobre riesgos tales como el de ahogarse y recibir lesiones; la exposición al frío, el calor y las radiaciones solares; la calidad del agua; la contaminación de la arena de las playas; y la exposición a algas, agentes químicos y físicos, así como a organismos acuáticos peligrosos. Las directrices propuestas en el informe de la OMS deben servir de base para desarrollar estrategias nacionales e internacionales -como estándares y regulaciones-, para controlar los riesgos para la salud que se pueden encontrar en los medios acuáticos de recreo y, al mismo tiempo, deben ofrecer un marco de trabajo para las autoridades locales encargadas de tomar decisiones. Estas directrices también se pueden utilizar como material de referencia para las industrias y los operadores que preparan proyectos de

  18. Safe greywater reuse to augment water supply and provide sanitation in semi-arid areas of rural India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, S; Labhasetwar, P; Wate, S; Jimenez, B

    2010-01-01

    Water reuse is recognized as a tool to increase water supply in peri-urban areas of semi-arid and arid regions of the world. However, it is an option rarely explored for rural areas in developing countries, and has not been documented extensively in the scientific literature. This paper presents results from 6 greywater reuse systems which were built with the objective to augment water supply and to provide sanitation in rural low income areas of Madhya Pradesh, India. The systems are based on reclaiming greywater from bathing for the use in toilet flushing and kitchen garden irrigation. The reuse systems were implemented based on the scientific rationale presented in the WHO (2006) guidelines. The paper presents evidence from the operation and evaluation of the greywater treatment plants under field conditions between 2005 and 2008. The paper concludes that greywater is a highly cost effective solution for water scarcity. In this study, reusing greywater resulted in a 60% increase in water availability, a reduction in open defecation and a fourfold increase in food availability.

  19. NETWORK COOPERATION OF EDUCATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS FOR BUILDING A CULTURE OF HEALTHY AND SAFE LIFESTYLE: THEORETICAL-METHODOLOGICAL ASPECT OF VOCATIONAL STAFF TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana N. Levan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to consider network cooperation as a resource of the renewal and innovative development of education.Methods. Systemization of existing practices of network partnership in the sphere of education for decision of pupils’ health protection problems; monitoring of health and physical readiness of the trainees of general educational establishments; modelling of network interaction.Results and scientific novelty. It is shown that network cooperation in the field of building a culture of healthy and safe lifestyle of pupils has a considerable potential. If educational organizations are closed to cooperation, isolated on the infrastructure in their district, city, region, the task of building a healthy lifestyle of pupils can not be solved. In general, teaching staff is unprepared for this activity and require additional preparation, methodological and methodical information materials on its realisation. The author theoretically proves and describes substantive provisions of network interaction of the educational establishments with social partners aimed at pupils’ health culture formation, which is presented as one of socialisation directions, i.e. realisation of social function of education – especially organized educational activity that is directed on development of pupils’ social competence. Thus, the model of network cooperation of educational organizations for building a culture of healthy and safe lifestyle (as one of the areas of socialization of pupils is presented in the presented study. It is considered as a theoretical and methodological basis for the development of process of establishing partnerships of educational organizations not only with other organizations of the education system (basic, professional and additional, but also with organizations of health care, physical culture and sport, culture and recreation, and other social spheres.Practical significance. Results of research will help the

  20. Child Care Providers' Strategies for Supporting Healthy Eating: A Qualitative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Meghan; Batal, Malek

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has revealed child care settings and providers to be important influences on children's developing behaviors. Yet most research on children's nutritional development has focused on home settings and parents. Thus, through semistructured interviews with child care providers, this study aimed to develop a better understanding of the…

  1. Provision of medical abortion by midlevel healthcare providers in Kyrgyzstan: testing an intervention to expand safe abortion services to underserved rural and periurban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brooke Ronald; Maksutova, Elmira; Boobekova, Aigul; Davletova, Ainura; Kazakbaeva, Chinara; Kondrateva, Yelena; Landoulsi, Sihem; Lazdane, Gunta; Monolbaev, Kubanychbek; Seuc Jo, Armando H

    2017-11-10

    To demonstrate the feasibility and safety of training midlevel healthcare providers (midwives and family nurses) to provide medical abortion and postabortion contraception in underserved areas in Kyrgyzstan. This was an implementation study at four referral facilities and 28 Felsher Obstetric Points in two districts to train their midwives and family nurses to deliver safe and effective abortion care with co-packaged mifepristone-misoprostol and provide contraceptives postabortion. The outcome of abortion - complete abortion, incomplete abortion or o-going pregnancy - was the primary end point measured. An international consultant trained 18 midwives and 14 family nurses (with midwifery diplomas) to provide medical abortion care. Supervising gynecologists based in the referral centers and study investigators based in Bishkek provided monthly monitoring of services and collection of patient management forms. A voluntary self-administered questionnaire at the follow-up visit documented women's acceptability of medical abortion services. All study data were cross-checked and entered into an online data management system for descriptive analysis. Between August 2014 and September 2015, midwives provided medical abortion to 554 women with a complete abortion rate of 97.8%, of whom 62% chose to use misoprostol at home. No women were lost to follow-up. Nearly all women (99.5%) chose a contraceptive method postabortion; 61% of women receiving services completed the acceptability form, of whom more than 99% indicated a high level of satisfaction with the service and would recommend it to a friend. This study demonstrates that trained Kyrgyz midwives and nurses can provide medical abortion safely and effectively. This locally generated evidence can be used by the Kyrgyz Ministry of Health to reduce unintended pregnancy and expand safe abortion care to women in underserved periurban and rural settings. Success in scaling up midwife/nurse provision of medical abortion in

  2. Safe and healthy school environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frumkin, Howard

    2006-01-01

    ...-being, their education, their transportation from place to place, their food and shelter, and their health care. These adults need to be advocates for children. This book is the first to address the school setting utilizing the principles of environmental health. Written by leading experts in topics from noise to crowding, from indoor air quality to saf...

  3. Safe, timely, convenient, and cost-effective: a single-center experience with bedside placement of enteral feeding tubes by midlevel providers using fluoroscopic guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauschild, Tricia B; Fu, Katy Y; Hipwell, Randall C; Baraghoshi, Gabriele; Mone, Mary C; Nirula, Raminder; Kimball, Edward J; Barton, Richard G

    2012-12-01

    Enteral feeding tube placement has been performed by nurses, gastroenterologists using endoscopy, and interventional radiologists. We hypothesized that midlevel providers placed feeding tubes at bedside using fluoroscopy safely, rapidly, and cost-effectively. We retrospectively analyzed bedside feeding tube placement under fluoroscopy by trained nurse practitioners. We compared charges for this method with charges for placement by other practitioners. Nurse practitioners placed 632 feeding tubes in 462 patients. Three hundred seventy-nine placements took place in mechanically ventilated placements. Ninety-seven percent of tubes were positioned past the pylorus. The mean fluoroscopy time was 0.7 ± 1.2 minutes. The mean procedure time was 7.0 ± 5.1 minutes. All tubes were placed within 24 hours of the request. There were no complications. Institutional charges for tube placement were $149 for nurse practitioners, $226 for gastroenterologists, and $328 for interventional radiologists. The placement of feeding tubes under fluoroscopy by nurse practitioners is safe, timely, and cost-effective. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. The novel tuberculosis vaccine, AERAS-402, is safe in healthy infants previously vaccinated with BCG, and induces dose-dependent CD4 and CD8T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagina, Benjamin M N; Tameris, Michele D; Geldenhuys, Hennie; Hatherill, Mark; Abel, Brian; Hussey, Gregory D; Scriba, Thomas J; Mahomed, Hassan; Sadoff, Jerald C; Hanekom, Willem A; Mansoor, Nazma; Hughes, Jane; de Kock, Marwou; Whatney, Wendy; Africa, Hadn; Krohn, Colleen; Veldsman, Ashley; Kany, Angelique Luabeya Kany; Douoguih, Macaya; Pau, Maria Grazia; Hendriks, Jenny; McClainc, Bruce; Benko, Jacqueline; Snowden, Margaret A; Hokey, David A

    2014-10-14

    Efforts to reduce risk of tuberculosis disease in children include development of effective vaccines. Our aim was to test safety and immunogenicity of the new adenovirus 35-vectored tuberculosis vaccine candidate AERAS-402 in infants, administered as a boost following a prime with the Bacille Calmette-Guerin vaccine. In a phase 1 randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation trial, BCG-vaccinated infants aged 6-9 months were sequentially assigned to four study groups, then randomized to receive an increasing dose-strength of AERAS-402, or placebo. The highest dose group received a second dose of vaccine or placebo 56 days after the first. The primary study outcome was safety. Whole blood intracellular cytokine staining assessed immunogenicity. Forty-two infants received AERAS-402 and 15 infants received placebo. During follow-up of 182 days, an acceptable safety profile was shown with no serious adverse events or discontinuations related to the vaccine. AERAS-402 induced a specific T cell response. A single dose of AERAS-402 induced CD4T cells predominantly expressing single IFN-γ whereas two doses induced CD4T cells predominantly expressing IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 together. CD8T cells were induced and were more likely to be present after 2 doses of AERAS-402. AERAS-402 was safe and immunogenic in healthy infants previously vaccinated with BCG at birth. Administration of the highest dose twice may be the most optimal vaccination strategy, based on the induced immunity. Multiple differences in T cell responses when infants are compared with adults vaccinated with AERAS-402, in the same setting and using the same whole blood intracellular cytokine assay, suggest specific strategies may be important for vaccination for each population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Newcastle Disease Virus-Vectored Rabies Vaccine Is Safe, Highly Immunogenic, and Provides Long-Lasting Protection in Dogs and Cats ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jinying; Wang, Xijun; Tao, Lihong; Wen, Zhiyuan; Feng, Na; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu; Yang, Chinglai; Chen, Hualan; Bu, Zhigao

    2011-01-01

    Effective, safe, and affordable rabies vaccines are still being sought. Newcastle disease virus (NDV), an avian paramyxovirus, has shown promise as a vaccine vector for mammals. Here, we generated a recombinant avirulent NDV La Sota strain expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG) and evaluated its potential to serve as a vaccine against rabies. The recombinant virus, rL-RVG, retained its high-growth property in chicken eggs, with titers of up to 109.8 50% egg infective doses (EID50)/ml of allantoic fluid. RVG expression enabled rL-RVG to spread from cell to cell in a rabies virus-like manner, and RVG was incorporated on the surface of the rL-RVG viral particle. RVG incorporation did not alter the trypsin-dependent infectivity of the NDV vector in mammalian cells. rL-RVG and La Sota NDV showed similar levels of sensitivity to a neutralization antibody against NDV and similar levels of resistance to a neutralization antibody against rabies virus. Animal studies demonstrated that rL-RVG is safe in several species, including cats and dogs, when administered as multiple high doses of recombinant vaccine. Intramuscular vaccination with rL-RVG induced a substantial rabies virus neutralization antibody response and provided complete protection from challenge with circulating rabies virus strains. Most importantly, rL-RVG induced strong and long-lasting protective neutralization antibody responses to rabies virus in dogs and cats. A low vaccine dose of 108.3 EID50 completely protected dogs from challenge with a circulating strain of rabies virus for more than a year. This is the first study to demonstrate that immunization with an NDV-vectored vaccine can induce long-lasting, systemic protective immunity against rabies. PMID:21632762

  6. Safe sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, G; Ghosh, T K

    1994-01-01

    The main objectives of health care for people with AIDS are to help them adjust to changing sexual status and to provide them with information on safe sex. Sections consider the risks of various types of sexual activity and safe sex education. With regard to the risk of transmitting or contracting HIV, sexual activities may be high risk, medium risk, low risk, or no risk. High-risk activities include unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse, oral-anal sexual contact, sharing sex toys, and traumatic sexual activity. Medium-risk activities include anal and vaginal intercourse using a latex condom with or without spermicide, and sex using a vaginal diaphragm or contraceptive vaginal sponge. Oral sex on a woman or oral sex on a man without ejaculation into the mouth are low-risk activities. Mutual masturbation, erotic touching, caressing and massage, kissing and non-genital licking pose no risk of infection. All general practitioners and family physicians should teach about safe sex. Prevention messages may be conveyed through individual and social counseling as well as with printed media and other forms of mass media. Messages should definitely reach prostitutes and brothel owners, as well as pre-pubertal children and older youths.

  7. Bibliotherapy-based Wellness Program for Healthcare Providers: Using Books and Reading to Create a Healthy Workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Tukhareli

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Within the context of benefits of a healthy workplace, bibliotherapy is seen as an effective way of promoting health and wellness to hospital employees. The paper will present a detailed description of an innovative informational and recreational bibliotherapy-based reading program for healthcare providers developed and implemented by a Health Sciences library, in collaboration with the Occupational Health department. The methodology involved an extensive review of the bibliotherapy research and best practices in the UK and North America. The mechanics, benefits, and challenges of the program will be discussed. The program evaluation included an internal survey to the hospital employees. The evaluation results show that the bibliotherapy program has provided a new venue to address work-related stress and promote health, well-being, and resilience within the organization. Moreover, it helped to expand opportunities for collaborative projects and partnerships for the library as well as increase visibility of the library within the organization.

  8. Does video-assisted thoracic surgery provide a safe alternative to conventional techniques in patients with limited pulmonary function who are otherwise suitable for lung resection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oparka, Jonathan; Yan, Tristan D; Ryan, Eilise; Dunning, Joel

    2013-07-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: does video-assisted thoracic surgery provide a safe alternative to conventional techniques in patients with limited pulmonary function who are otherwise suitable for lung resection? Altogether, more than 280 papers were found using the reported search, of which 7 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. One of the largest studies reviewed was a retrospective review of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons database. The authors compared 4531 patients who underwent lobectomy by video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) with 8431 patients who had thoracotomy. In patients with a predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 s (ppoFEV1%) of surgery is performed via VATS compared with traditional open techniques. The literature also suggests that patients in whom pulmonary function is poor have similar perioperative outcomes to those with normal function when a VATS approach to resection is adopted.

  9. Latino family childcare providers' beliefs, attitudes, and practices related to promotion of healthy behaviors among preschool children: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Ana C; Salkeld, Judith A; Greaney, Mary L; Sands, Faith D

    2015-01-01

    The continuing rise of obesity among Latinos is a public health concern with an immediate need for early prevention. Changes in family structures have increased demand and reliance for child care for young children. Latino children are the fastest-growing segment of the child population in the United States, and research shows that Latino families use preschools and day care centers much less than those of other ethnic groups, apparently because of cultural preferences for family-like care. Given that many low income Latino children attend family child care homes (FCCHs), there is a need to explore the role that FCCH providers may play in establishing and reinforcing children's early healthful eating and physical activity behaviors and consequently in the prevention of childhood obesity. Using purposive sampling, six focus groups were conducted in Spanish with licensed Latino FCCH providers (n = 44). Data was analyzed to identify recurrent themes. Latino FCCH providers described how they play an influential role in promoting healthful eating and physical activity behaviors of preschool children in their care. They also identified many barriers and challenges in establishing and maintaining healthful nutrition and physical activity behaviors, including high cost of healthy foods, cold weather, and physical environment of FCCH. Latino FCCH providers can have a strong impact in promoting healthful behaviors in low-income, Latino communities. They may be able to effectively deliver interventions targeting low-income, minority families to promote healthful eating and physical activity behaviors and prevent child obesity.

  10. Advanced care nurse practitioners can safely provide sole resident cover for level three patients: impact on outcomes, cost and work patterns in a cardiac surgery programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Henry; Skoyles, Julian; Redfearn, Sue; Jutley, Raj; Mitchell, Ian; Richens, David

    2013-01-01

    There are significant pressures on resident medical rotas on intensive care. We have evaluated the safety and feasibility of nurse practitioners (NPs) delivering first-line care on an intensive care unit with all doctors becoming non-resident. Previously, resident doctors on a 1:8 full-shift rota supported by NPs delivered first-line care to patients after cardiac surgery. Subsequently, junior doctors changed to a 1:5 non-resident rota and NPs onto a 1:7 full-shift rota provided first-line care. A single centre before-and-after service evaluation on cardiac intensive care. mortality rates, surgical trainee attendance in theatre and cost before and after the change. After-hour calls by NPs to doctors and subsequent actions were also audited after the change. The overall mortality rates in the 12 months before the change were 2.8 and 2.2% in the 12 months after (P = 0.43). The median [range] logistic EuroSCORE was 5.3 [0.9-84] before and 5.0 [0.9-85] after the change (P = 0.16). After accounting for the risk profile, the odds ratio for death after the change relative to before was 0.83, 95% confidence interval 0.41-1.69. Before the change, a surgical trainee attended theatre 467 of 702 (68%) cases. This increased to 539 of 677 (80%) cases after the change (P cost of staffing the junior doctor and NP programme before the change was £933 344 and £764 691 after. In the year after the change, 192 after-hour calls were made to doctors. In 57% of cases telephone advice sufficed and doctors attended in 43%. With adequate training and appropriate support, resident NPs can provide a safe, sustainable alternative to traditional staffing models of cardiac intensive care. Training opportunities for junior surgeons increased and costs were reduced.

  11. Can Ambu self-inflating bag and Neopuff infant resuscitator provide adequate and safe manual inflations for infants up to 10 kg weight?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Mark; Maheshwari, Rajesh; Shah, Dharmesh; Hinder, Murray

    2017-07-01

    Manual resuscitation devices for infants and newborns must be able to provide adequate ventilation in a safe and consistent manner across a wide range of patient sizes (0.5-10 kg) and differing clinical states. There are little comparative data assessing biomechanical performance of common infant manual resuscitation devices across the manufacturers' recommended operating weight ranges. We aimed to compare performance of the Ambu self-inflating bag (SIB) with the Neopuff T-piece resuscitator in three resuscitation models. Five experienced clinicians delivered targeted ventilation to three lung models differing in compliance, delivery pressures and inflation rates; Preterm (0.5 mL/cmH2O, 25/5 cmH2O, 60 per minute), Term (3 mL/cmH2O, 30/5 cmH2O, 40 per minute) and Infant (9 mL/cmH2O, 35/5 cmH2O, 30 per minute). The Neopuff was examined with three gas inflow rates (5 litres per minute (LPM), 10 LPM and 15 LPM) and the Ambu with no gas inflow. 3309 inflations were collected and analysed with analysis of variance for repeated measures. The Neopuff was unable to reach set peak inflation pressures and exhibited seriously elevated positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) with all inflow gas rates (p<0.001) in this infant model. The Ambu SIB accurately delivered targeted pressures in all three models. The Ambu SIB was able to accurately deliver targeted pressures across all three models from preterm to infant. The Neopuff infant resuscitator was unable to deliver the targeted pressures in the infant model developing clinically significant levels of inadvertent PEEP which may pose risk during infant resuscitation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Counseling about gestational weight gain and healthy lifestyle during pregnancy: Canadian maternity care providers' self-evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferraro ZM

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Zachary M Ferraro,1 Kaitlin S Boehm,1 Laura M Gaudet,2,3 Kristi B Adamo1,4,5 1Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; 2Horizon Health Network, Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada; 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; 4School of Human Kinetics, Faculty of Health Sciences, 5Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Introduction: There is discord between the recall of maternity care providers and patients when it comes to discussion of gestational weight gain (GWG and obesity management. Few women report being advised on GWG, physical activity (PA, and nutrition, yet the majority of health care providers report discussing these topics with patients. We evaluated whether various Canadian maternal health care providers can identify appropriate GWG targets for patients with obesity and determine if providers report counseling on GWG, physical activity, and nutrition. Methods: A valid and reliable e-survey was created using SurveyMonkey software and distributed by the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada listserve. A total of 174 health care providers finished the survey. Respondents self-identified as general practitioners, obstetricians, maternal-fetal medicine specialists, midwives, or registered nurses. Results: GWG recommendations between disciplines for all body mass index categories were similar and fell within Health Canada/Institute of Medicine (IOM guidelines. Of those who answered this question, 110/160 (68.8% were able to correctly identify the maximum IOM GWG recommended for patients with obesity, yet midwives tended to recommend 0.5–1 kg more GWG (P = 0.05. PA counseling during pregnancy differed between disciplines (P < 0.01, as did nutrition counseling during pregnancy (P < 0.05. Conclusion: In

  13. The costs and cost effectiveness of providing first-trimester, medical and surgical safe abortion services in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Lince-Deroche

    Full Text Available Despite a liberal abortion law, access to safe abortion services in South Africa is challenging for many women. Medication abortion was introduced in 2013, but its reach remains limited. We aimed to estimate the costs and cost effectiveness of providing first-trimester medication abortion and manual vacuum aspiration (MVA services to inform planning for first-trimester service provision in South Africa and similar settings.We obtained data on service provision and outcomes from an operations research study where medication abortion was introduced alongside existing MVA services in public hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal province. Clinical data were collected through interviews with first-trimester abortion clients and summaries completed by nurses performing the procedures. In parallel, we performed micro-costing at three of the study hospitals. Using a model built in Excel, we estimated the average cost per medical and surgical procedure and determined the cost per complete abortion performed. Results are presented in 2015 US dollars.A total of 1,129 women were eligible for a first trimester abortion at the three study sites. The majority (886, 78.5% were eligible to choose their abortion procedure; 94.1% (n = 834 chose medication abortion. The total average cost per medication abortion was $63.91 (52.32-75.51. The total average cost per MVA was higher at $69.60 (52.62-86.57; though the cost ranges for the two procedures overlapped. Given average costs, the cost per complete medication abortion was lower than the cost per complete MVA despite three (0.4% medication abortion women being hospitalized and two (0.3% having ongoing pregnancies at study exit. Personnel costs were the largest component of the total average cost of both abortion methods.This analysis supports the scale-up of medication abortion alongside existing MVA services in South Africa. Women can be offered a choice of methods, including medication abortion with MVA as a back

  14. Young, Healthy Subjects Can Reduce the Activity of Calf Muscles When Provided with EMG Biofeedback in Upright Stance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Taian M.; Baudry, Stéphane; Botter, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests the minimization of muscular effort rather than of the size of bodily sway may be the primary, nervous system goal when regulating the human, standing posture. Different programs have been proposed for balance training; none however has been focused on the activation of postural muscles during standing. In this study we investigated the possibility of minimizing the activation of the calf muscles during standing through biofeedback. By providing subjects with an audio signal that varied in amplitude and frequency with the amplitude of surface electromyograms (EMG) recorded from different regions of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, we expected them to be able to minimize the level of muscle activation during standing without increasing the excursion of the center of pressure (CoP). CoP data and surface EMG from gastrocnemii, soleus and tibialis anterior muscles were obtained from 10 healthy participants while standing at ease and while standing with EMG biofeedback. Four sensitivities were used to test subjects' responsiveness to the EMG biofeedback. Compared with standing at ease, the two most sensitive feedback conditions induced a decrease in plantar flexor activity (~15%; P < 0.05) and an increase in tibialis anterior EMG (~10%; P < 0.05). Furthermore, CoP mean position significantly shifted backward (~30 mm). In contrast, the use of less sensitive EMG biofeedback resulted in a significant decrease in EMG activity of ankle plantar flexors with a marginal increase in TA activity compared with standing at ease. These changes were not accompanied by greater CoP displacements or significant changes in mean CoP position. Key results revealed subjects were able to keep standing stability while reducing the activity of gastrocnemius and soleus without loading their tibialis anterior muscle when standing with EMG biofeedback. These results may therefore posit the basis for the development of training protocols aimed at assisting subjects in

  15. Young, healthy subjects can reduce the activity of calf muscles when provided with EMG biofeedback in upright stance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taian M. Vieira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests the minimisation of muscular effort rather than of the size of bodily sway may be the primary, nervous system goal when regulating the human, standing posture. Different programs have been proposed for balance training; none however has been focused on the activation of postural muscles during standing. In this study we investigated the possibility of minimising the activation of the calf muscles during standing through biofeedback. By providing subjects with an audio signal that varied in amplitude and frequency with the amplitude of surface electromyograms (EMG recorded from different regions of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, we expected them to be able to minimise the level of muscle activation during standing without increasing the excursion of the centre of pressure (CoP. CoP data and surface EMG from gastrocnemii, soleus and tibialis anterior muscles were obtained from ten healthy participants while standing at ease and while standing with EMG biofeedback. Four sensitivities were used to test subjects’ responsiveness to the EMG biofeedback. Compared with standing at ease, the two most sensitive feedback conditions induced a decrease in plantar flexor activity (~15%; P<0.05 and an increase in tibialis anterior EMG (~10%; P<0.05. Furthermore, CoP mean position significantly shifted backward (~30 mm. In contrast, the use of less sensitive EMG biofeedback resulted in a significant decrease in EMG activity of ankle plantar flexors with a marginal increase in TA activity compared with standing at ease. These changes were not accompanied by greater CoP displacements or significant changes in mean CoP position. Key results revealed subjects were able to keep standing stability while reducing the activity of gastrocnemius and soleus without loading their tibialis anterior muscle when standing with EMG biofeedback. These results may therefore posit the basis for the development of training protocols aimed at

  16. SAFE Newsletter

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The Center of Excellence SAFE – “Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe” – is a cooperation of the Center for Financial Studies and Goethe University Frankfurt. It is funded by the LOEWE initiative of the State of Hessen (Landes-Offensive zur Entwicklung wissenschaftlich-ökonomischer Exzellenz). SAFE brings together more than 40 professors and just as many junior researchers who are all dedicated to conducting research in support of a sustainable financial architecture. The Center has...

  17. Safe havens in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paldam, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Eleven safe havens exist in Europe providing offshore banking and low taxes. Ten of these states are very small while Switzerland is moderately small. All 11 countries are richer than their large neighbors. It is shown that causality is from small to safe haven to wealth, and that theoretically...... equilibriums are likely to exist where a certain regulation is substantially lower in a small country than in its big neighbor. This generates a large capital inflow to the safe havens. The pool of funds that may reach the safe havens is shown to be huge. It is far in excess of the absorptive capacity...... of the safe havens, but it still explains, why they are rich. Microstates offer a veil of anonymity to funds passing through, and Switzerland offers safe storage of funds....

  18. Feasibility of Providing Safe Mouth Care and Collecting Oral and Fecal Microbiome Samples from Nursing Home Residents with Dysphagia: Proof of Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Rita A; Winstead, Vicki; Azuero, Andres; Ptacek, Travis; Jones-Townsend, Corteza; Byrd, Elizabeth; Geisinger, Maria L; Morrow, Casey

    2017-09-01

    Individuals with dysphagia who reside in nursing homes often receive inadequate mouth care and experience poor oral health. From a policy perspective, the combination of absent evidence-based mouth care protocols coupled with insufficient dental coverage create a pool of individuals at great risk for preventable infectious illnesses that contribute to high health care costs. The purpose of the current study was to determine (a) the safety of a mouth care protocol tailored for individuals with dysphagia residing in nursing homes without access to suction equipment, and (b) the feasibility of collecting oral and fecal samples for microbiota analyses. The mouth care protocol resulted in improved oral hygiene without aspiration, and oral and fecal samples were safely collected from participants. Policies supporting ongoing testing of evidence-based mouth care protocols for individuals with dysphagia are important to improve quality, demonstrate efficacy, and save health care costs. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 43(9), 9-15.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. [Impact of a brief educational intervention about nutrition and healthy lifestyles to school students given by a healthcare provider].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva Rodríguez, Rosario; Tous Romero, María; Gil Barcenilla, Begoña; Longo Abril, Guadalupe; Pereira Cunill, José Luis; García Luna, Pedro Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is an important health concern worldwide. Spain has one of the highest pediatric obesity rates among European countries, and they are increasing, which mandates the development of innovative strategies aimed at reverting this trend and decreasing the health problems related to obesity and the considerable waste of resources foreseen for the upcoming years. To determine if an educational intervention from a health professional would yield an additional benefit in the acquisition of knowledge on nutrition. A second objective was to determine the prevalence of weight excess as well as the lifestyle habits in a sample of school students. Analytical, interventional, random, longitudinal, pilot study in a sample of 107 students aged 9-15 years. The weight, height, adherence to the Mediterranean diet, level of physical activity and sedentarism, and knowledge on feeding and healthy lifestyles were estimated through a questionnaire. In an intervention group (54 students) a short educational intervention was carried out by a health professional. Two months later, the knowledge on diet and lifestyle habits was reassessed in all the students. After the educational intervention, the students in the intervention group had better knowledge regarding feeding and healthy lifestyles than the control students, and this difference was statistically significant. the additional educational activities on healthy lifestyles within the scholar program given by a health professional may represent an additional benefit to the strategies aimed at decreasing pediatric obesity in our setting. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  20. Safe exercise prescription for children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Alleyne, Julia MK

    1998-01-01

    This article provides practical advice on healthy exercise prescription for children. There is growing scientific evidence about the abilities and limits of child athletes in both recreational and competitive environments. As exercise becomes essential for the prevention of illness and maintenance of health, the counselling for an exercise prescription requires enhanced knowledge. The latest recommendations on safe strength, resistance and weight training are presented in a concise format for...

  1. Safe exercise prescription for children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleyne, J M

    1998-09-01

    This article provides practical advice on healthy exercise prescription for children. There is growing scientific evidence about the abilities and limits of child athletes in both recreational and competitive environments. As exercise becomes essential for the prevention of illness and maintenance of health, the counselling for an exercise prescription requires enhanced knowledge. The latest recommendations on safe strength, resistance and weight training are presented in a concise format for office use.

  2. Xenon-enhanced cerebral blood flow at 28% xenon provides uniquely safe access to quantitative, clinically useful cerebral blood flow information: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, A P; Brown, A M; Zager, E; Uchino, K; Marks, M P; Robertson, C; Sinson, G P; Marmarou, A; Yonas, H

    2011-08-01

    Xe-CT measures CBF and can be used to make clinical treatment decisions. Availability has been limited, in part due to safety concerns. Due to improvements in CT technology, the concentration of inhaled xenon gas has been decreased from 32% to 28%. To our knowledge, no data exist regarding the safety profile of this concentration. We sought to better determine the safety profile of this lower concentration through a multicenter evaluation of adverse events reported by all centers currently performing xenon/CT studies in the US. Patients were prospectively recruited at 7 centers to obtain safety and efficacy information. All studies were performed to answer a clinical question. All centers used the same xenon delivery system. CT imaging was used during a 4.3-minute inhalation of 28% xenon gas. Vital signs were monitored on all patients throughout each procedure. Occurrence and severity of adverse events were recorded by the principal investigator at each site. At 7 centers, 2003 studies were performed, 1486 (74.2%) in nonventilated patients. The most common indications were occlusive vascular disease and ischemic stroke; 93% of studies were considered clinically useful. Thirty-nine studies (1.9%) caused respiratory suppression of >20 seconds, all of which resolved spontaneously. Shorter respiratory pauses occurred in 119 (5.9%), and hyperventilation, in 34 (1.7%). There were 53 additional adverse events (2.9%), 7 of which were classified as severe. No adverse event resulted in any persistent neurologic change or other sequelae. Xe-CT CBF can be performed safely, with a very low risk of adverse events and, to date, no risk of permanent morbidity or sequelae. On the basis of the importance of the clinical information gained, Xe-CT should be made widely available.

  3. Karate: Keep It Safe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, David

    1981-01-01

    Safety guidelines for each phase of a karate practice session are presented to provide an accident-free and safe environment for teaching karate in a physical education or traditional karate training program. (JMF)

  4. Aspirin during Pregnancy: Is It Safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Pregnancy week by week Is it safe to take aspirin during pregnancy? Answers from Yvonne Butler Tobah, M. ... 2015 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/pregnancy-week-by-week/expert-answers/aspirin-during-pregnancy/ ...

  5. Pregnancy and Fish: What's Safe to Eat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Pregnancy week by week If you're unsure about whether it's safe to eat seafood during your pregnancy, ... 2016 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/pregnancy-week-by-week/in-depth/pregnancy-and-fish/ ...

  6. Pregnancy Constipation: Are Stool Softeners Safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Pregnancy week by week Is it safe to take stool softeners to treat pregnancy constipation? Answers from Yvonne ... 2017 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/pregnancy-week-by-week/expert-answers/pregnancy-constipation/faq- ...

  7. Big Impact on Small Children: Child-Care Providers' Perceptions of Their Role in Early Childhood Healthy Lifestyle Behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisson, Susan B.; Smith, Chelsea L.; Cheney, Marshall

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine childcare providers' perceptions of their role in child health behaviors and attitudes pertaining to physical activity and nutrition. Part and full-time providers in a childcare center or family childcare home were interviewed (n = 30) in this cross-sectional, qualitative study. Transcripts were digitally…

  8. Caught in a 'spiral'. Barriers to healthy eating and dietary health promotion needs from the perspective of unemployed young people and their service providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Jenny; Share, Michelle; Hennessy, Marita; Knox, Barbara Stewart

    2015-02-01

    The number of young people in Europe who are not in education, employment or training (NEET) is increasing. Given that young people from disadvantaged backgrounds tend to have diets of poor nutritional quality, this exploratory study sought to understand barriers and facilitators to healthy eating and dietary health promotion needs of unemployed young people aged 16-20 years. Three focus group discussions were held with young people (n = 14). Six individual interviews and one paired interview with service providers (n = 7). Data were recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematically content analysed. Themes were then fitted to social cognitive theory (SCT). Despite understanding of the principles of healthy eating, a 'spiral' of interrelated social, economic and associated psychological problems was perceived to render food and health of little value and low priority for the young people. The story related by the young people and corroborated by the service providers was of a lack of personal and vicarious experience with food. The proliferation and proximity of fast food outlets and the high perceived cost of 'healthy' compared to 'junk' food rendered the young people low in self-efficacy and perceived control to make healthier food choices. Agency was instead expressed through consumption of junk food and drugs. Both the young people and service providers agreed that for dietary health promotion efforts to succeed, social problems needed to be addressed and agency encouraged through (individual and collective) active engagement of the young people themselves. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A Randomized Trial Testing the Impact of Narrative Vignettes vs. Guideline Summaries on Provider Response to a Professional Organization Clinical Policy for Safe Opioid Prescribing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, Zachary F.; Metlay, Joshua P.; Sinnenberg, Lauren; Kilaru, Austin S.; Grossestreuer, Anne; Barg, Frances K.; Shofer, Frances S.; Rhodes, Karin V.; Perrone, Jeanmarie

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical guidelines are known to be underused by practitioners. In response to the challenges of treating pain amidst a prescription opioid epidemic, the American College of Emergency Physicians published an evidence-based clinical policy for opioid prescribing in 2012. Evidence-based narratives, an effective method of communicating health information in a variety of settings, offer a novel strategy for disseminating guidelines to physicians and engaging providers with clinical evidence. Objectives To compare whether narrative vignettes embedded in the American College of Emergency Physician (ACEP) daily e-newsletter improved dissemination of the clinical policy to ACEP members, and engagement of members with the clinical policy, compared to traditional summary text. Methods A prospective randomized controlled study, entitled Stories to Promote Information using Narrative (SPIN) trial, was performed. Derived from qualitative interviews with 61 ACEP physicians, 4 narrative vignettes were selected and refined, using a consensus panel of clinical and implementation experts. All ACEP members were then block randomized by state of residence to receive alternative versions of a daily emailed newsletter for a total of 24 days during a 9 week period. Narrative newsletters contained a selection of vignettes that referenced opioid prescription dilemmas. Control newsletters contained a selection of descriptive text about the clinical policy using similar length and appearance to the narrative vignettes. Embedded in the newsletters were web links to the complete vignette or traditional summary text, as well as additional links to the full ACEP clinical policy and a website providing assistance with prescription drug monitoring program enrollment. The newsletters were otherwise identical. Outcomes measured were the percentage of subjects who visited any of the web pages that contained additional guideline related information and the odds of any unique physician

  10. Healthy Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... recreational water activities like swimming, also helps promote healthy living. Often, water’s vital role is most apparent during an emergency or disaster. We launched the Healthy Water website to provide answers to your water- ...

  11. Safe cycling!

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    The HSE Unit will be running a cycling safety campaign at the entrances to CERN's restaurants on 14, 15 and 16 May. Pop along to see if they can persuade you to get back in the saddle!   With summer on its way, you might feel like getting your bike out of winter storage. Well, the HSE Unit has come up with some original ideas to remind you of some of the most basic safety rules. This year, the prevention campaign will be focussing on three themes: "Cyclists and their equipment", "The bicycle on the road", and "Other road users". This is an opportunity to think about the condition of your bike as well as how you ride it. From 14 to 16 May, representatives of the Swiss Office of Accident Prevention and the Touring Club Suisse will join members of the HSE Unit at the entrances to CERN's restaurants to give you advice on safe cycling (see box). They will also be organising three activity stands where you can test your knowle...

  12. Irradiation: Making Produce Healthy and Safe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahed, Masooma

    2008-01-01

    One of the core competencies in the IFT education standards for students is to achieve competency in communications skills (that is, oral and written communication, listening, interviewing, and so on). According to the IFT guidelines, by the time students graduate, they should not only be able to search for and condense information but also be…

  13. Perceived effective and feasible strategies to promote healthy eating in young children: focus groups with parents, family child care providers and daycare assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeweghe, Laura; Moens, Ellen; Braet, Caroline; Van Lippevelde, Wendy; Vervoort, Leentje; Verbeken, Sandra

    2016-10-04

    The aim of the current study is to identify strategies to promote healthy eating in young children that can be applied by caregivers, based on their own perceptions of effectiveness and feasibility. Whereas previous research mainly focused on parental influences on children's eating behavior, the growing role of other caregivers in the upbringing of children can no longer be denied. Four focus groups were conducted with three types of caregivers of post-weaning children under 6 years old: parents (n = 14), family child care providers (n = 9), and daycare assistants (n = 10). The audiotaped focus group discussions were transcribed and imported into Nvivo 10.0 for thematic analysis. The behaviors put forward by the caregivers were categorized within three broad dimensions: global influences, general behaviors, and specific feeding practices. Perceived effective strategies to promote healthy eating behavior in children included rewards, verbal encouragement, a taste-rule, sensory sensations, involvement, variation, modeling, repeated exposure, and a peaceful atmosphere. Participants mainly disagreed on the perceived feasibility of each strategy, which largely depended on the characteristics of the caregiving setting (e.g. infrastructure, policy). Based on former research and the current results, an intervention to promote healthy eating behaviors in young children should be adapted to the caregiving setting or focus on specific feeding practices, since these involve simple behaviors that are not hindered by the limitations of the caregiving setting. Due to various misconceptions regarding health-promoting strategies, clear instructions about when and how to use these strategies are necessary.

  14. Perceived effective and feasible strategies to promote healthy eating in young children: focus groups with parents, family child care providers and daycare assistants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Vandeweghe

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the current study is to identify strategies to promote healthy eating in young children that can be applied by caregivers, based on their own perceptions of effectiveness and feasibility. Whereas previous research mainly focused on parental influences on children’s eating behavior, the growing role of other caregivers in the upbringing of children can no longer be denied. Methods Four focus groups were conducted with three types of caregivers of post-weaning children under 6 years old: parents (n = 14, family child care providers (n = 9, and daycare assistants (n = 10. The audiotaped focus group discussions were transcribed and imported into Nvivo 10.0 for thematic analysis. The behaviors put forward by the caregivers were categorized within three broad dimensions: global influences, general behaviors, and specific feeding practices. Results Perceived effective strategies to promote healthy eating behavior in children included rewards, verbal encouragement, a taste-rule, sensory sensations, involvement, variation, modeling, repeated exposure, and a peaceful atmosphere. Participants mainly disagreed on the perceived feasibility of each strategy, which largely depended on the characteristics of the caregiving setting (e.g. infrastructure, policy. Conclusions Based on former research and the current results, an intervention to promote healthy eating behaviors in young children should be adapted to the caregiving setting or focus on specific feeding practices, since these involve simple behaviors that are not hindered by the limitations of the caregiving setting. Due to various misconceptions regarding health-promoting strategies, clear instructions about when and how to use these strategies are necessary.

  15. Age-related changes of healthy bone marrow cell signaling in response to growth factors provide insight into low risk MDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornblau, Steven M; Cohen, Aileen C; Soper, David; Huang, Ying-Wen; Cesano, Alessandra

    2014-11-01

    Single Cell Network Profiling (SCNP) is a multiparametric flow cytometry-based assay that quantifiably and simultaneously measures changes in intracellular signaling proteins in response to in vitro extracellular modulators at the single cell level. Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a heterogeneous clonal disorder of hematopoietic stem cells that occurs in elderly subjects and is characterized by dysplasia and ineffective hematopoiesis. The functional responsiveness of MDS bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic cells, including functionally distinct myeloid and erythroid precursor subsets, to hematopoietic growth factors (HGF) and the relationship of modulated signaling to disease characteristics is poorly understood. SCNP was used first to examine the effects of age on erythropoietin (EPO) and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF)-induced signaling in myeloid, nucleated red blood cells (nRBC), and CD34 expressing cell subsets in healthy BM (n = 15). SCNP was then used to map functional signaling profiles in low risk (LR) MDS (n = 7) for comparison to signaling in samples from healthy donors and to probe signaling associations within clinically defined subgroups. In healthy BM samples, signaling responses to HGF were quite homogeneous (i.e., tightly regulated) with age-dependent effects observed in response to EPO but not to GCSF. Despite the relatively small number of samples assayed in the study, LR MDS could be classified into distinct subgroups based on both cell subset frequency and signaling profiles. As a correlate of underlying genetic abnormalities, signal transduction analyses may provide a functional and potentially clinically relevant classification of MDS. Further evaluation in a larger cohort is warranted. © 2013 Clinical Cytometry Society.

  16. ABCD of Safe Dental Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, K Sunil; Reddy B, V Thimma; Reddy, C Pujita; Lalita, Sree

    2011-01-01

    Dental practice is the integral component of the oral health. Though the dental practice is in close relation with that of the medical practice, it has its own distinctiveness in relation to safe practice. The safe dental practice should not only assure good oral and general health but also improve social interaction by enhancing physical appearance, esthetics, etc. For the safe dental practice, dentists must excel in patient care and standard of treatment. The interlocking missions of education, research, and patient care are the cornerstones for the safe and healthy dental practice. This paper is designed to bridge the gap between the educational preparation of the dentist and the reality of the working world in a simple way.

  17. Healthy pets, healthy people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, S K; Feinstein, L H; Heidmann, P

    1999-08-01

    Zoonoses, diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans, can pose serious health risks to immunocompromised people. Although pets can carry zoonoses, owning and caring for animals can benefit human health. Information exists about preventing transmission of zoonoses, but not all physicians and veterinarians provide adequate and accurate information to immunocompromised pet owners. This disease prevention/health promotion project provides physicians and veterinarians with information, created specifically to share with patients and clients, about the health risks and benefits of pet ownership. Further, "Healthy Pets, Healthy People" encourages communication between veterinarians, physicians, clients, and patients and can serve as a model program for a nation-wide effort to aid health professionals in making recommendations about pet ownership for immunocompromised people.

  18. How Can I Lose Weight Safely?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abuse Love and Romance Understanding Other People How Can I Lose Weight Safely? KidsHealth > For Teens > How Can I Lose Weight Safely? Print A A A ... to talk to a doctor or dietitian, who can compare your weight with healthy norms to help ...

  19. Escola segura Safe school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Ferreira Liberal

    2005-11-01

    growing evidence that intervention has multiple components, focusing on health education practices, with the participation of the whole community. The aim of those interventions is to help students and community members to adopt healthy and safe behaviors. Schools are taking on an increasing role in health promotion, disease prevention, and injury prevention. In the context of prevention of external causes of morbidity and mortality, it is important to recognize a risky environment, places, and risk behaviors as favorable to injury and violence, as well as the concept of accident as something one can avoid. CONCLUSION: Implementation of safe schools represents a promising new direction for school-based preventive work. It is important to note that a safe school should intervene not only in its physical structure, but it should also make it as safe as possible by gathering the school community through health education, and mainly encouraging healthy behavior.

  20. Safe use of nanomaterials

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The use of nanomaterials  is on the increase worldwide, including at CERN. The HSE Unit has established a safety guideline to inform you of the main requirements for the safe handling and disposal of nanomaterials at CERN.   A risk assessment tool has also been developed which guides the user through the process of evaluating the risk for his or her activity. Based on the calculated risk level, the tool provides a list of recommended control measures.   We would therefore like to draw your attention to: Safety Guideline C-0-0-5 - Safe handling and disposal of nanomaterials; and Safety Form C-0-0-2 - Nanomaterial Risk Assessment   You can consult all of CERN’s safety rules and guidelines here. Please contact the HSE Unit for any questions you may have.   The HSE Unit

  1. Microelectromechanical safe arm device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesler, Alexander W [Tijeras, NM

    2012-06-05

    Microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus and methods for operating, for preventing unintentional detonation of energetic components comprising pyrotechnic and explosive materials, such as air bag deployment systems, munitions and pyrotechnics. The MEM apparatus comprises an interrupting member that can be moved to block (interrupt) or complete (uninterrupt) an explosive train that is part of an energetic component. One or more latching members are provided that engage and prevent the movement of the interrupting member, until the one or more latching members are disengaged from the interrupting member. The MEM apparatus can be utilized as a safe and arm device (SAD) and electronic safe and arm device (ESAD) in preventing unintentional detonations. Methods for operating the MEM apparatus include independently applying drive signals to the actuators coupled to the latching members, and an actuator coupled to the interrupting member.

  2. A serum-free, purified vero cell rabies vaccine is safe and as immunogenic as the reference vaccine Verorab for pre-exposure use in healthy adults: results from a randomized controlled phase-II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichon, Sylvie; Guinet-Morlot, Françoise; Minutello, Maria; Donazzolo, Yves; Rouzier, Regine; Chassard, Didier; Fitoussi, Serge; Hou, Victor

    2013-04-26

    Verorab was licensed in 1985 for both pre- and post-exposure prophylaxis of rabies. The next generation purified Vero cell rabies vaccine (PVRV-NG) is a highly purified vaccine. We performed a phase II clinical study in adults in France to assess its immunological non-inferiority and clinical safety for pre-exposure prophylaxis. In a randomized phase-II trial, 384 healthy adult subjects were randomized (2:1) to receive a three-dose primary series of PVRV-NG or Verorab. One year later, the PVRV-NG group received a PVRV-NG booster while the Verorab group participants were randomized to receive a booster of PVRV-NG or Verorab for. Rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (RVNA) were evaluated on days 0, 28 (subgroup), 42, months 6, 12 and 12+14 days. Safety was evaluated for seven days after each dose. Adverse event between doses, until 28 days after the final dose was recorded. Serious adverse events were recorded up to 6 months after the last dose. The criterion for non-inferiority was met in the per-protocol analysis set and confirmed in the full analysis set (FAS). In the FAS, 99.6% and 100% of subjects had RVNA titers ≥0.5 IU/mL in PVRV-NG and Verorab groups, respectively. While RVNA levels gradually decreased over the 12-month period, at 6 and 12 months after vaccination >89% and >77%, respectively, in both groups had RVNA titers ≥0.5 IU/mL. The PVRV-NG booster induced a strong response, irrespective of the vaccine given for the primary series. PVRV-NG was safe and well tolerated and its safety profile was similar to Verorab for unsolicited adverse events and solicited systemic reactions. The incidence of solicited injection-site reactions was lower with PVRV-NG than with Verorab after the primary series and the booster dose. PVRV-NG was shown to be at least as immunogenic as Verorab and to present a similar safety profile. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Safe Anesthesia For Every Tot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss, Markus; Vutskits, Laszlo; Hansen, Tom G

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The term 'safe use of anesthesia in children is ill-defined and requires definition of and focus on the 'safe conduct of pediatric anesthesia'. RECENT FINDINGS: The Safe Anesthesia For Every Tot initiative (www.safetots.org) has been set up during the last year to focus...... on the safe conduct of pediatric anesthesia. This initiative aims to provide guidance on markers of quality anesthesia care. The introduction and implementation of national regulations of 'who, where, when and how' are required and will result in an improved perioperative outcome in vulnerable children....... The improvement of teaching, training, education and supervision of the safe conduct of pediatric anesthesia are the main goals of the safetots.org initiative. SUMMARY: This initiative addresses the well known perioperative risks in young children, perioperative causes for cerebral morbidity as well as gaps...

  4. Meals for Good: An innovative community project to provide healthy meals to children in early care and education programs through food bank catering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Leah R; Smith, Teresa M; Stern, Katherine; Boyd, Lisa Weissenburger-Moser; Rasmussen, Cristy Geno; Schaffer, Kelly; Shuell, Julie; Broussard, Karen; Yaroch, Amy L

    2017-12-01

    Innovative approaches to childhood obesity prevention are warranted in early care and education (ECE) settings, since intervening early among youth is recommended to promote and maintain healthy behaviors. The objective of the Meals for Good pilot was to explore feasibility of implementing a food bank-based catering model to ECE programs to provide more nutritious meals, compared to meals brought from home (a parent-prepared model). In 2014-2015, a 12-month project was implemented by a food bank in central Florida in four privately-owned ECE programs. An explanatory sequential design of a mixed-methods evaluation approach was utilized, including a pre-post menu analysis comparing parent-prepared meals to the catered meals, and stakeholder interviews to determine benefits and barriers. The menu analysis of lunches showed daily reductions in calories, fat, and saturated fat, but an increase in sodium in catered meals when compared to parent-prepared meals. Interviews with ECE directors, teachers, parents, and food bank project staff, identified several benefits of the catered meals, including healthfulness of meals, convenience to parents, and the ECE program's ability to market this meal service. Barriers of the catered meals included the increased cost to parents, transportation and delivery logistics, and change from a 5 to a 2-week menu cycle during summer food service. This pilot demonstrated potential feasibility of a food bank-ECE program partnership, by capitalizing on the food bank's existing facilities and culinary programming, and interest in implementing strategies focused on younger children. The food bank has since leveraged lessons learned and expanded to additional ECE programs.

  5. Meals for Good: An innovative community project to provide healthy meals to children in early care and education programs through food bank catering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah R. Carpenter

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Innovative approaches to childhood obesity prevention are warranted in early care and education (ECE settings, since intervening early among youth is recommended to promote and maintain healthy behaviors. The objective of the Meals for Good pilot was to explore feasibility of implementing a food bank-based catering model to ECE programs to provide more nutritious meals, compared to meals brought from home (a parent-prepared model. In 2014–2015, a 12-month project was implemented by a food bank in central Florida in four privately-owned ECE programs. An explanatory sequential design of a mixed-methods evaluation approach was utilized, including a pre-post menu analysis comparing parent-prepared meals to the catered meals, and stakeholder interviews to determine benefits and barriers. The menu analysis of lunches showed daily reductions in calories, fat, and saturated fat, but an increase in sodium in catered meals when compared to parent-prepared meals. Interviews with ECE directors, teachers, parents, and food bank project staff, identified several benefits of the catered meals, including healthfulness of meals, convenience to parents, and the ECE program's ability to market this meal service. Barriers of the catered meals included the increased cost to parents, transportation and delivery logistics, and change from a 5 to a 2-week menu cycle during summer food service. This pilot demonstrated potential feasibility of a food bank-ECE program partnership, by capitalizing on the food bank's existing facilities and culinary programming, and interest in implementing strategies focused on younger children. The food bank has since leveraged lessons learned and expanded to additional ECE programs.

  6. Eating Healthy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Eating Healthy Eating Healthy Contact Us Resources Eating Healthy Eating healthy is part of living a healthy life. Healthy eating is a responsibility of our communities, schools, clinics, ...

  7. Identifying transportation solutions that promote healthy aging for Texas : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    As the population of Texans who are aging continues to grow, the role that transportation plays in the promotion of healthy aging is useful information for policy makers to plan and provide for the safe and healthy aging of Texass population. Tran...

  8. Many Healthy Returns

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-02-08

    International travel is usually very safe but there are things you should do to stay safe and healthy. Experts show you how to avoid problems when visiting developing nations. This includes being cautious about the food you eat and the water you drink, and to be aware of vehicles and road conditions to prevent problems.  Created: 2/8/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Disease (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/8/2010.

  9. Antidepressants: Safe during Pregnancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Pregnancy week by week Taking antidepressants during pregnancy might pose health risks for your baby — but stopping might ... 2017 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/pregnancy-week-by-week/in-depth/antidepressants/art-20046420 . ...

  10. Safe and Liquid Mortgage Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Jens; Gyntelberg, Jacob; Lund, Jesper

    eliminates credit risk from the investor's perspective. Similar to other safe bonds, funding liquidity becomes the main driver of mortgage bond liquidity and this creates commonality in liquidity across markets and countries. These findings have implications for how to design a robust mortgage bond system......This paper shows that strict match pass-through funding of covered bonds provides safe and liquid mortgage bonds. Despite a 30% drop in house prices during the 2008 global crisis Danish mortgage bonds remained as liquid as most European government bonds. The Danish pass-through system effectively...... and for the treatment of covered bonds in capital regulation....

  11. Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra provides reduced effect of scanner for cortex volumetry with atlas-based method in healthy subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Masami; Ino, Kenji; Yano, Keiichi [University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Radiological Technology, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Abe, Osamu [Nihon University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Aoki, Shigeki [Juntendo University, Department of Radiology, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Hayashi, Naoto [University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Computational Diagnostic Radiology and Preventive Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Miyati, Tosiaki [Kanazawa University, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa (Japan); Takao, Hidemasa; Mori, Harushi; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni [University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Radiology and Department of Computational Diagnostic Radiology and Preventive Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Iwatsubo, Takeshi [University of Tokyo, Department of Neuropathology, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Yamashita, Fumio [Iwate Medical University, Department of Radiology, Yahaba, Iwate (Japan); Matsuda, Hiroshi [Integrative Brain Imaging Center National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Collaboration: Japanese Alzheimer' s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    2013-07-15

    This study aimed to investigate whether the effect of scanner for cortex volumetry with atlas-based method is reduced using Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra (DARTEL) normalization compared with standard normalization. Three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (3D-T1WIs) of 21 healthy subjects were obtained and evaluated for effect of scanner in cortex volumetry. 3D-T1WIs of the 21 subjects were obtained with five MRI systems. Imaging of each subject was performed on each of five different MRI scanners. We used the Voxel-Based Morphometry 8 tool implemented in Statistical Parametric Mapping 8 and WFU PickAtlas software (Talairach brain atlas theory). The following software default settings were used as bilateral region-of-interest labels: ''Frontal Lobe,'' ''Hippocampus,'' ''Occipital Lobe,'' ''Orbital Gyrus,'' ''Parietal Lobe,'' ''Putamen,'' and ''Temporal Lobe.'' Effect of scanner for cortex volumetry using the atlas-based method was reduced with DARTEL normalization compared with standard normalization in Frontal Lobe, Occipital Lobe, Orbital Gyrus, Putamen, and Temporal Lobe; was the same in Hippocampus and Parietal Lobe; and showed no increase with DARTEL normalization for any region of interest (ROI). DARTEL normalization reduces the effect of scanner, which is a major problem in multicenter studies. (orig.)

  12. Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra provides reduced effect of scanner for cortex volumetry with atlas-based method in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Masami; Abe, Osamu; Aoki, Shigeki; Hayashi, Naoto; Miyati, Tosiaki; Takao, Hidemasa; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Yamashita, Fumio; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Mori, Harushi; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ino, Kenji; Yano, Keiichi; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether the effect of scanner for cortex volumetry with atlas-based method is reduced using Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra (DARTEL) normalization compared with standard normalization. Three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (3D-T1WIs) of 21 healthy subjects were obtained and evaluated for effect of scanner in cortex volumetry. 3D-T1WIs of the 21 subjects were obtained with five MRI systems. Imaging of each subject was performed on each of five different MRI scanners. We used the Voxel-Based Morphometry 8 tool implemented in Statistical Parametric Mapping 8 and WFU PickAtlas software (Talairach brain atlas theory). The following software default settings were used as bilateral region-of-interest labels: "Frontal Lobe," "Hippocampus," "Occipital Lobe," "Orbital Gyrus," "Parietal Lobe," "Putamen," and "Temporal Lobe." Effect of scanner for cortex volumetry using the atlas-based method was reduced with DARTEL normalization compared with standard normalization in Frontal Lobe, Occipital Lobe, Orbital Gyrus, Putamen, and Temporal Lobe; was the same in Hippocampus and Parietal Lobe; and showed no increase with DARTEL normalization for any region of interest (ROI). DARTEL normalization reduces the effect of scanner, which is a major problem in multicenter studies.

  13. Healthy Places

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-04-10

    Every person has a stake in environmental public health. As the environment deteriorates, so does the physical and mental health of the people within it. Healthy places are those designed and built to improve the quality of life for all people who live, work, worship, learn, and play within their borders -- where every person is free to make choices amid a variety of healthy, available, accessible, and affordable options. The CDC recognizes significant health issues and places that are vital in developing the Healthy Places program and provides examples in this report.  Created: 4/10/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 4/13/2007.

  14. Asymptotically Safe Dark Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco; Shoemaker, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new paradigm for dark matter (DM) interactions in which the interaction strength is asymptotically safe. In models of this type, the coupling strength is small at low energies but increases at higher energies, and asymptotically approaches a finite constant value. The resulting...... searches are the primary ways to constrain or discover asymptotically safe dark matter....

  15. Healthy Places for Healthy People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Describes the Healthy Places for Healthy People technical assistance program that helps communities create walkable, healthy, economically vibrant places by engaging with local health care facility partners

  16. Can providing a morning healthy snack help to reduce hunger during school time? Experimental evidence from an elementary school in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellari, Elena; Berning, Joshua P

    2016-11-01

    While children may be naturally inclined to regulate their hunger, they are also guided by adults and influenced by environmental constraints regarding when and how much to eat. As such, the timing and availability of meals could alter a child's natural eating habits. This could impact the nutritional quality of what they eat as well. We conducted a field experiment with three fourth grade classes at a public elementary school in Eastern Connecticut to analyze if providing a nutritious snack one hour prior to lunch effects a child's level of hunger and consequently their lunch-time consumption. We found students shift their caloric and nutrient intake from lunch to snack time. In addition, we found a significant reduction in student hunger. Our results highlight the importance in considering the timing and quality of meals provided during school time. In our sample, current snack and lunch schedule may not be optimal and changing it can have an impact on the wellbeing of students. Providing healthful options for snack could be an effective way to improve student diets while preserving their ability to make their own choices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Safe Streets in Tacoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebgen, Mary

    1990-01-01

    In Tacoma, Washington, the Safe Street Campaign united the schools, government agencies, labor groups, community and religious organizations, businesses, youth, and substance abuse agencies in responding to gangs and drugs. (MLF)

  18. Safe Sleep for Babies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... serve mothers and babies to deliver culturally appropriate messaging about safe sleep for babies. Monitoring and evaluating ... RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs Funding LEGAL Policies Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road ...

  19. The first safe country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaela Puggioni

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Dublin II Regulation makes the first safe country of refuge solelyresponsible for refugees and asylum seekers. In the case of Italy, thefirst responsible country has not been acting responsibly.

  20. Vitamins, Are They Safe?

    OpenAIRE

    Hadi Hamishehkar; Farhad Ranjdoost; Parina Asgharian; Ata Mahmoodpoor; Sarvin Sanaie

    2016-01-01

    The consumption of a daily multivitamin among people all over the world is dramatically increasing in recent years. Most of the people believe that if vitamins are not effective, at least they are safe. However, the long term health consequences of vitamins consumption are unknown. This study aimed to assess the side effects and possible harmful and detrimental properties of vitamins and to discuss whether vitamins can be used as safe health products or dietary supplements. We performed a MED...

  1. Prepare Healthy Foods with Toddlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi-Taylor, Satomi; Rike, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    Toddlers--from about 16 to 36 months--can learn a variety of skills as they prepare food and follow recipes in developmentally appropriate ways. Early childhood teachers are encouraged to support young children's healthy eating habits by offering simple food preparation experiences. When toddlers--and preschoolers--safely prepare healthy snacks,…

  2. An audit of a diverse community for safe routes to age in place: environmental policy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Adriana; Garces, Anamarie; Hunter, Rebecca H; Marquez, David X

    2015-03-01

    Physical and cognitive limitations often accompany aging, increasing the importance of a safe and supportive environment to help older adults maintain mobility. Neighborhood design and maintenance must be evaluated to promote physical activity, mobility, and safety. Audit tools, geographic information system data, and resident interviews are used for this purpose, but often fail to provide information that can be translated to practice. The current project is part of a larger Miami-Dade Age-Friendly Initiative to create a metropolitan area that fosters a healthy environment for diverse adults of all ages and abilities. Safe Routes uses a toolkit based on the 5-E model providing practical resources to guide stakeholders in meeting the needs of the community. Findings include the Centers for Disease Control Healthy Aging Research Network Audit Tool assessment for environmental walkability factors. Results from street segment audits along with input from residents can be used to inform sound environmental policies. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Healthy Pets and People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Pet Healthy Whether you have a dog, cat, horse, parakeet, gerbil, or bearded dragon, providing regular, life-long veterinary care is important to having a healthy pet and a healthy family. Regular veterinary visits are essential to good pet health. Talk to your pet’s veterinarian about ...

  4. Safe Surgery Trainer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-15

    CDRL A001 For: Safe Surgery Trainer Prime Contract: N00014-14-C-0066 For the Period July 1, 2015 to July 31, 2015 Submitted: 15 Aug 2015...DATE 15 AUG 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 01-07-2015 to 31-07-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Safe Surgery Trainer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b... Surgery Trainer ONR N00014-14-C-0066 Unclassified Unclassified Use or disclosure of the data contained on this page is subject to the restriction

  5. Healthy Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... changes to your lifestyle. By taking steps toward healthy living, you can help reduce your risk of ... Get the screening tests you need Maintain a healthy weight Eat a variety of healthy foods, and ...

  6. Providing a Healthy Environment for Interracial Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladner, Joyce

    1984-01-01

    Children of intermarriages have special needs. They often encounter prejudice from other family members such as grandparents, and, in general, society does not know how to regard them. A bicultural approach to childbearing is necessary; it is most important that a child learn about the culture of the parent of color. (KH)

  7. Safe Halloween Thrills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuersten, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Two PTAs sponsored events that capitalized on Halloween themes, engaged their communities in fall celebrations, and were safe, wholesome, and fun. With help from local volunteers, one school turned its gymnasium into a 19th-century British town with a fall/Halloween theme. Another PTA hosted a carnival, Spooktacular, that involved community…

  8. Safe Motherhood in Malawi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    very important that midwives be available for the well being of these women. However, mere presence of ... nurse-midwives in working towards safe motherhood in Malawi and some recommendations in an attempt ... hospitals, the working conditions worsen for the remaining nurs- es and as a result they are also tempted to ...

  9. Keeping Food Safe

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-27

    This CDC Kidtastics podcast discusses things kids and parents can do to help prevent illness by keeping food safe.  Created: 5/27/2009 by National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED).   Date Released: 5/27/2009.

  10. The safe spinal anaesthetic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and complications. To perform a safe procedure, the anaesthetist must have adequate knowledge of the indications and contra-indications, and of the relevant anatomy, physiology and pharmacology of spinal anaesthesia. The patient must be assessed before administration of the spinal anaesthetic and the theatre must be.

  11. A Randomized Trial Testing the Effect of Narrative Vignettes Versus Guideline Summaries on Provider Response to a Professional Organization Clinical Policy for Safe Opioid Prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, Zachary F; Metlay, Joshua P; Sinnenberg, Lauren; Kilaru, Austin S; Grossestreuer, Anne; Barg, Frances K; Shofer, Frances S; Rhodes, Karin V; Perrone, Jeanmarie

    2016-12-01

    Clinical guidelines are known to be underused by practitioners. In response to the challenges of treating pain amid a prescription opioid epidemic, the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) published an evidence-based clinical policy for opioid prescribing in 2012. Evidence-based narratives, an effective method of communicating health information in a variety of settings, offer a novel strategy for disseminating guidelines to physicians and engaging providers with clinical evidence. We compare whether narrative vignettes embedded in the ACEP daily e-newsletter improved dissemination of the clinical policy to ACEP members, and engagement of members with the clinical policy, compared with traditional summary text. A prospective randomized controlled study, titled Stories to Promote Information Using Narrative trial, was performed. Derived from qualitative interviews with 61 ACEP physicians, 4 narrative vignettes were selected and refined, using a consensus panel of clinical and implementation experts. All ACEP members were then block randomized by state of residence to receive alternative versions of a daily e-mailed newsletter for a total of 24 days during a 9-week period. Narrative newsletters contained a selection of vignettes that referenced opioid prescription dilemmas. Control newsletters contained a selection of descriptive text about the clinical policy, using length and appearance similar to that of the narrative vignettes. Embedded in the newsletters were Web links to the complete vignette or traditional summary text, as well as additional links to the full ACEP clinical policy and a Web site providing assistance with prescription drug monitoring program enrollment. The newsletters were otherwise identical. Outcomes measured were the percentage of subjects who visited any of the Web pages that contained additional guideline-related information and the odds of any unique physician visiting these Web pages during the study. There were 27

  12. A peripherally inserted central catheter line, inserted the day before surgery, decreases the time from induction to incision for spinal deformity surgery and safely provides central venous access during surgery: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuedemann, Anne E; Schwend, Richard M; Thomas, Valorie K; Leamon, Julia M; Lightner, Tammy S

    2018-03-01

    Pediatric patients undergoing surgery for spinal deformity may benefit from central venous access to provide intraoperative monitoring and fluid resuscitation. For pediatric surgical patients requiring central access, we hypothesized that placing a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line preoperatively should decrease time from induction of anesthesia to incision and result in improved patient safety and decreased operating room charges. This was a retrospective, nonrandomized, and case comparison study. Clinical records of all children with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis or neuromuscular scoliosis treated surgically by the senior author between December 2007 and April 2012 were reviewed. Control group patients had a central venous catheter (CVC) placed by the anesthesiologist after induction of anesthesia. The trial group had a PICC placed under local anesthesia the day before surgery by an experienced vascular access team. The time from induction of anesthesia to the time for the surgical incision was determined for each study group. The CVC line placement charges were determined by the operating room time charges at $214/min. Charges saved were the mean time difference multiplied by the operating room time charge, less the charge for PICC line insertion ($1282). There were 29 neuromuscular patients, the mean age was 13 years (SD: 4 years). The mean time from induction to incision for the PICC group was 91 min [95% confidence interval (CI): 67-115 min] and for the CVC group 113 min (95% CI: 99-127 min, P=0.083). For this mean time difference of 22 min, the estimated cost savings would be $3426 per patient. There were 59 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, the mean age was 14 years (SD: 2 years). The mean time from induction to incision for the PICC group was 78 min (95% CI: 74-82 min) and for the CVC group 106 min (95% CI: 96-116  min, P≤0.001). For this mean time difference of 28 min, the estimated cost savings would

  13. Providing safe medicines for children in Nigeria: The impediments ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... research network in collaborations with developed countries, reviewing the undergraduate and postgraduate curriculum in pediatric to include teaching of basic elements of rational prescribing, drug dose calculations, adverse drug reactions and pharmacovigilance, increasing access to essential medicines for children, ...

  14. Health Providers' Perception towards Safe Abortion Service at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    unhygienic condition1. Death due to unsafe abortion accounts a significant proportion (13%) of global maternal mortality. Each year an estimated 36 million to. 53 million abortions are performed worldwide. Of this figure, around 20 million are considered unsafe 1. In ..... Knowledge, Attitude and practice in six Latin America.

  15. Providing safe medicines for children in Nigeria: The impediments ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    that development and provision of a pediatric national drug formulary for health professionals in Nigeria, creating a comprehensive national ... undergraduate and postgraduate curriculum in pediatrics to include teaching of basic elements of rational prescribing, drug dose ..... Nigerian Medical and Dental Council, Paediatric.

  16. Providing a Safe Environment for Students with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Janet H.; Jackson, Crystal C.; Bobo, Nichole; Kaufman, Francine R.; Butler, Sarah; Marschilok, Katie

    2009-01-01

    Current diabetes regimens require more effort than ever before. The level of diabetes control students are able to maintain is affected greatly by their ability to care for their diabetes during the school day. This article reviews use of School Health Plans and Diabetes Medical Management Plans in schools. Students with diabetes, their families,…

  17. Neutralizing blood-borne polyphosphate in vivo provides safe thromboprotection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Labberton, Linda; Kenne, Ellinor; Long, Andy T; Nickel, Katrin F; Di Gennaro, Antonio; Rigg, Rachel A; Hernandez, James S; Butler, Lynn; Maas, Coen; Stavrou, Evi X; Renné, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Polyphosphate is an inorganic procoagulant polymer. Here we develop specific inhibitors of polyphosphate and show that this strategy confers thromboprotection in a factor XII-dependent manner. Recombinant Escherichia coli exopolyphosphatase (PPX) specifically degrades polyphosphate, while a PPX

  18. Critical thinking at the bedside: providing safe passage to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Ruth R; Petersen, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    The critical thinking ability of health care professionals can affect patient safety directly (Buerhaus, Donelan, Ulrich, Norman, & Dittus, 2005). The National League for Nursing (NLN, 2006) expects nursing graduates to be able to demonstrate critical thinking. Nursing programs are required to measure critical thinking as an outcome criterion for accreditation. This process of program accreditation is considered an indicator that a professional program offers a quality product. Based on NLN expectations, health care disciplines should diligently seek opportunities to enhance critical thinking by promoting qualitative and quantitative research that focuses on curriculum evaluation, enhancing educators' and faculty knowledge, and improving patient care outcomes.

  19. The SafeCOP ECSEL Project: Safe Cooperating Cyber-Physical Systems Using Wireless Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pop, Paul; Scholle, Detlef; Hansson, Hans

    2016-01-01

    communication, multiple stakeholders, dynamic system definitions (openness), and unpredictable operating environments. SafeCOP will provide an approach to the safety assurance of CO-CPS, enabling thus their certification and development. The project will define a runtime manager architecture for runtime......This paper presents an overview of the ECSEL project entitled "Safe Cooperating Cyber-Physical Systems using Wireless Communication" (SafeCOP), which runs during the period 2016 -- 2019. SafeCOP targets safety-related Cooperating Cyber-Physical Systems (CO-CPS) characterised by use of wireless...

  20. Effective and safe anesthesia for Yorkshire and Yucatan swine with and without cardiovascular injury and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkenhoker, Jan R; Burkholder, Tanya H; Linton, Cg Garry; Walden, April; Abusakran-Monday, Kim A; Rosero, Ana P; Foltz, Charmaine J

    2010-05-01

    The goal of this study was to identify an injectable anesthetic protocol that provides sedation sufficient for peripheral vascular catheterization, intubation, and transport while minimizing cardiovascular changes in Yorkshire and Yucatan pigs with and without cardiovascular injury and intervention (CI). Phase 1 examined the safety and efficacy of acepromazine-ketamine, diazepam-ketamine, midazolam-ketamine, and medetomidine-ketamine in 5 healthy Yorkshire pigs. For each drug combination, we obtained multiple measurements of heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, temperature, sedation score, ability to catheterize and intubate, and recovery score. Phase 2 evaluated and refined the dose of the most effective Phase 1 anesthetic combination (midazolam-ketamine) in healthy and CI Yorkshire pigs (n = 53 trials). Phase 3 mirrored Phase 2 but tested midazolam-ketamine in healthy and CI Yucatan pigs (n = 34 trials). Midazolam (0.5 mg/kg)-ketamine (25 to 27 mg/kg) was the most effective anesthetic combination in healthy Yorkshire pigs, but this dose was less effective in healthy Yucatan pigs and CI Yorkshire and Yucatan pigs. Midazolam-ketamine resulted in tachycardia and apnea more frequently in CI pigs than healthy pigs. This combination also caused vomiting in one CI Yucatan pig. Overall, midazolam-ketamine provided safe and effective sedation for catheterization and intubation of both healthy and CI pigs. This study suggests Yucatan pigs may require a higher dose midazolam-ketamine to achieve the same level of sedation as that in Yorkshire pigs. Although anesthetic complication rates were higher in CI pigs, our results indicate that midazolam-ketamine can be safely used for sedation of both pig breeds with and without CI.

  1. Teaching Child Care Providers to Reduce the Risk of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byington, Teresa; Martin, Sally; Reilly, Jackie; Weigel, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Keeping children safe and healthy is one of the main concerns of parents and child care providers. SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) is the leading cause of death in infants 1 month to 12 months of age. Over 2,000 infants die from SIDS every year in the United States, and almost 15% of these deaths occur in child care settings. A targeted…

  2. Prepare to protect: Operating and maintaining a tornado safe room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herseth, Andrew; Goldsmith-Grinspoon, Jennifer; Scott, Pataya

    2017-06-01

    Operating and maintaining a tornado safe room can be critical to the effective continuity of business operations because a firm's most valuable asset is its people. This paper describes aspects of operations and maintenance (O&M) for existing tornado safe rooms as well as a few planning and design aspects that affect the ultimate operation of a safe room for situations where a safe room is planned, but not yet constructed. The information is based on several Federal Emergency Management Agency safe room publications that provide guidance on emergency management and operations, as well as the design and construction of tornado safe rooms.

  3. [Community health building: the safe community promotion experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Lu

    2011-02-01

    Safety and health promotion at the community level involves special concerns and approaches. A community may develop into a safe community or healthy city depending on the focus of relevant promotion efforts. Neither area nor population size should be factors affecting an initial decision to start safe community or healthy city programs. However, one should consider the diversity of issues that may have the potential impact on people with different gender and age or on different environments and situations, and whether a planned program is sustainable. While safe communities and healthy cities may be linked to international networks, the qualifications for joining such networks differ. The Healthy City Alliance emphasizes outcome measures and the International Safe Community Network emphasizes the appropriateness of sustainability mechanisms. While Taiwan communities are eligible for designation as international safe communities, they may are eligible for associate membership only in the Healthy City Alliance. The author has the following recommendations with regard to sustainability in community health building in Taiwan: 1) The relevant infrastructure must involve both public and private sectors; 2) The community should try to receive financial support from diverse sources; 3) involve significant numbers of active volunteers; and 4) charge local health centers with data collection and analysis responsibilities.

  4. Safe venting of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, W.F.; Dewart, J.M.; Edeskuty, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The disposal of hydrogen is often required in the operation of an experimental facility that contains hydrogen. Whether the vented hydrogen can be discharged to the atmosphere safely depends upon a number of factors such as the flow rate and atmospheric conditions. Calculations have been made that predict the distance a combustible mixture can extend from the point of release under some specified atmospheric conditions. Also the quantity of hydrogen in the combustible cloud is estimated. These results can be helpful in deciding of the hydrogen can be released directly to the atmosphere, or if it must be intentionally ignited. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Introducing new technology safely.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mytton, Oliver T; Velazquez, Adriana; Banken, Reiner; Mathew, Joseph L; Ikonen, Tuija S; Taylor, Kevin; Painter, Frank; Jean-Baptiste, Rachel; Poon, Albert; Ruelas, Enrique

    2010-08-01

    This report considers the introduction of new technology and the implications for patient safety. A distinction is made between 'conceptually' new and 'contextually' new technology. The life cycle of technology from development to routine use is discussed and the key role for regulation, health technology assessment, clinical engineering and surveillance in this life cycle considered. The limitations of each of these disciplines are also discussed. Special consideration is given to the needs of developing countries. Case study examples of particular challenges in the safe introduction of technology are presented.

  6. Creating Safe and Healthy Futures: Michigan Youth Violence Prevention Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrel-Samuels, Susan; Zimmerman, Marc A.; Reischl, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Youth are in the cross-fire of gun violence, and the highest rate in the nation is in Flint, Michigan. This article highlights six innovative strategies that prepare youth to solve problems at home and in their communities in peaceful ways. The Michigan Youth Violence Prevention Center (MI-YVPC) works with community groups to strengthen…

  7. The Three P's of Safe and Healthy Travel

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-02-01

    This podcast gives international travelers simple tips on how they can be proactive, prepared, and protected when planning a trip abroad.  Created: 2/1/2008 by National Center for the Prevention, Detection and Control of Infectious Diseases (NCPDCID).   Date Released: 2/8/2008.

  8. Wearable electronics sensors for safe and healthy living

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This edited book contains invited papers from renowned experts working in the field of Wearable Electronics Sensors. It includes 14 chapters describing recent advancements in the area of Wearable Sensors, Wireless Sensors and Sensor Networks, Protocols, Topologies, Instrumentation architectures, Measurement techniques, Energy harvesting and scavenging, Signal processing, Design and Prototyping. The book will be useful for engineers, scientist and post-graduate students as a reference book for their research on wearable sensors, devices and technologies which is experiencing a period of rapid growth driven by new applications such as heart rate monitors, smart watches, tracking devices and smart glasses.  .

  9. Healthy Weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weight Gain Losing Weight Getting Started Improving Your Eating Habits Keeping It Off Healthy Eating for a Healthy ... or "program". It's about lifestyle changes in daily eating and exercise habits. Success Stories They did it. So can you! ...

  10. Household water treatment and safe storage-effectiveness and economics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stubbé, Stefanie M L; Pelgrim-Adams, Alida; Szántó, Gabor L.; van Halem, D.

    2016-01-01

    Household Water Treatment and safe Storage (HWTS) systems aim to provide safe drinking water in an affordable manner to users where safe piped water supply is either not feasible or not reliable. In this study the effectiveness, economic parameters and costs of three selected HWTS systems were

  11. Is Daycare Tonsillectomy Safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hui Tong; Sien Hui, Tan; Chong, Aun Wee

    2016-05-01

    Tonsillectomy is one of the most common procedures performed by Ear, Nose, and Throat surgeon. Usually, the procedure is carried out as an inpatient surgery. With the increasing need to reduce healthcare costs, spare precious hospital beds, and shorten elective surgery lists, there is currently a trend towards performing tonsillectomy on a daycare basis. A prospective review of all tonsillectomies performed at the University Malaya Medical Center was undertaken for the year 2013. Demographic details, qualifying indications, and complication rates were evaluated. There was no incidence of primary hemorrhage among the 96 tonsillectomies performed. There was no significant correlation in terms of secondary hemorrhage between inpatient and day-case tonsillectomy (P=0.54). Only two patients required revision surgery to stop post-tonsillectomy bleeding. None of the patients required blood transfusion, and there were no mortalities. Daycare tonsillectomy is safe as long as the patient is carefully selected. Both medical and social aspects should be taken into consideration. A post-operative observation period of at least 6 to 8 hours is important. The surgeon should personally review the patient post-operatively and decides if he or she should be hospitalized for observation, or safe for discharge.

  12. Vitamins, Are They Safe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Hamishehkar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of a daily multivitamin among people all over the world is dramatically increasing in recent years. Most of the people believe that if vitamins are not effective, at least they are safe. However, the long term health consequences of vitamins consumption are unknown. This study aimed to assess the side effects and possible harmful and detrimental properties of vitamins and to discuss whether vitamins can be used as safe health products or dietary supplements. We performed a MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus and Google Scholar search and assessed reference lists of the included studies which were published from 1993 through 2015. The studies, with an emphasis on RCTs (randomized controlled clinical trials, were reviewed. As some vitamins such as fat-soluble vitamins (vitamin A, vitamin D, vitamin E, and also some of the water-soluble vitamins like folic acid may cause adverse events and some like vitamin C is widely taken assuming that it has so many benefits and no harm, we included relevant studies with negative or undesired results regarding the effect of these vitamins on health. Our recommendation is that taking high-dose supplements of vitamins A, E, D, C, and folic acid is not always effective for prevention of disease, and it can even be harmful to the health.

  13. ADOLESCENTS’ HEALTHY EATING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne

    This PhD thesis contributes with knowledge about adolescent healthy eating by studying consumer socialisation, social influence and behavioural change in relation to adolescent healthy eating. The introduction provides the important reasons for studying adolescents and healthy eating and explains...... that a more holistic approach is needed in order to respond to the rising levels of overweight among adolescents. It is important to understand the development of and influences on adolescent healthy eating behaviour and the possibilities for promoting healthy eating through interventions. By reviewing...... relevant literature on consumer socialisation, social influence and behaviour change through interventions employing feedback in relation to adolescent healthy eating, it is argued that a socio-cognitive approach to consumer socialisation and behaviour change provides a richer and more nuanced...

  14. Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart Safe steps in food handling, cooking, and ... from other foods. Cook —Cook to the right temperature. Chill —Refrigerate food promptly. Cook all food to ...

  15. How to Safely Give Acetaminophen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Term Complications of Diabetes How to Safely Give Acetaminophen KidsHealth > For Parents > How to Safely Give Acetaminophen ... without getting a doctor's OK first. What Is Acetaminophen Also Called? Acetaminophen is the generic name of ...

  16. Effective and Safe Ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Amdahl, Jørgen; Rutgersson, Olle

    1996-01-01

    is given in the appendices. The project is planned to take three years from the start. There are 28 tasks and the total volume is 18 personyears, or 6.3 MFIM. A scientific approach will be used in performing the tasks and some of them may be subjects for post graduate studies. A close co-operation between......A Joint Nordic Research project "Effecive and Safe Ships" is presented. The project is aiming to develop methods and tools for quantitative evaluation fo ship safety. This report is the report of the preliminary phase where the plan for the main project is developed. The objectives of the project...... are described. The areas of safety that are presented are collisions, groundings, cargo shifting and ship fire. The areas of lack of knowledge are identified and the tasks within each subproject suggested. The proposal for the main project is presented in the summary. Background material of the state-of-the art...

  17. Keeping you safe by making machine tools safe

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    CERN’s third safety objective for 2012 concerns the safety of equipment - and machine tools in particular.   There are three prerequisites for ensuring that a machine tool can be used safely: ·      the machine tool must comply with Directive 2009/104/EC, ·      the layout of the workshop must be compliant, and ·      everyone who uses the machine tool must be trained. Provided these conditions are met, the workshop head can grant authorisation to use the machine tool. To fulfil this objective, an inventory of the machine tools must be drawn up and the people responsible for them identified. The HSE Unit's Safety Inspection Service produces compliance reports for the machine tools. In order to meet the third objective set by the Director-General, the section has doubled its capacity to carry out inspections: ...

  18. A Safe Protocol for Amalgam Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana G. Colson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Today's environment has different impacts on our body than previous generations. Heavy metals are a growing concern in medicine. Doctors and individuals request the removal of their amalgam (silver mercury restorations due to the high mercury content. A safe protocol to replace the silver mercury filling will ensure that there is minimal if any absorption of materials while being removed. Strong alternative white composite and lab-processed materials are available today to create a healthy and functioning mouth. Preparation of the patient prior to the procedure and after treatment is vital to establish the excretion of the mercury from the body.

  19. Healthy Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the Flu Vaccine? Eating Disorders Arrhythmias Healthy Eating KidsHealth > For Parents > Healthy Eating Print A A A What's in this article? ... best strategies to improve nutrition and encourage smart eating habits: Have regular family meals . Serve a variety ...

  20. Healthy Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... there are many healthy ways to cope with stress. A diabetes educator will help you find healthy ways to ... you figure out a plan for coping with stress, here: English Version Spanish Version In This Section Living with Diabetes How a Diabetes Educator Can Help You Been ...

  1. Short Form 36 (SF-36) Health Survey questionnaire: which normative data should be used? Comparisons between the norms provided by the Omnibus Survey in Britain, the Health Survey for England and the Oxford Healthy Life Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, A; Bond, M; Jenkinson, C; Lamping, D L

    1999-09-01

    Population norms for the attributes included in measurement scales are required to provide a standard with which scores from other study populations can be compared. This study aimed to obtain population norms for the Short Form 36 (SF-36) Health Survey Questionnaire, derived from a random sample of the population in Britain who were interviewed at home, and to make comparisons with other commonly used norms. The method was a face-to-face interview survey of a random sample of 2056 adults living at home in Britain (response rate 78 per cent). Comparisons of the SF-36 scores derived from this sample were made with the Health Survey for England and the Oxford Healthy Life Survey. Controlling for age and sex, many of mean scores on the SF-36 dimensions differed between the three datasets. The British interview sample had better total means for Physical Functioning, Social Functioning, Mental Health, Energy/Vitality, and General Health Perceptions. The Health (interview) Survey for England had the lowest (worst) total mean scores for Physical Functioning, Social Functioning, Role Limitations (physical), Bodily Pain, and Health Perceptions. The postal sample in central England had the lowest (worst) total mean scores for Role Limitations (emotional), Mental Health and Energy/Vitality. Responses obtained from interview methods may suffer more from social desirability bias (resulting in inflated SF-36 scores) than postal surveys. Differences in SF-36 means between surveys are also likely to reflect question order and contextual effects of the questionnaires. This indicates the importance of providing mode-specific population norms for the various methods of questionnaire administration.

  2. ABCD of Safe Dental Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Babu, K Sunil; Reddy B, V Thimma; Reddy, C Pujita; Lalita, Sree

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dental practice is the integral component of the oral health. Though the dental practice is in close relation with that of the medical practice, it has its own distinctiveness in relation to safe practice. The safe dental practice should not only assure good oral and general health but also improve social interaction by enhancing physical appearance, esthetics, etc. For the safe dental practice, dentists must excel in patient care and standard of treatment. The interlocking missions ...

  3. Creating Safe Neighborhoods, Safe Streets, Safe Schools, [and] Safe Workplaces: Using Illinois' Drug Laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority, Chicago.

    This handbook provides renters, homeowners, teachers, parents, and workers with tools for ridding their communities of illegal drugs. The booklet describes relevant anti-drug laws, and provides examples of how they are being used successfully in one state. The case studies cited almost always involve individuals and community groups working…

  4. PENGEMBANGAN MODEL SAFE COMMUNITY BERBASIS MASYARAKAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niniek Lely Pratiwi

    2012-11-01

    and support to the preventive, promotive safe and healthy communities in the entire cycle of human life in the state of emergency and disaster daily. Networks formed a partnership that is expected to be a  shared responsibility between the cross-cutting. Key words: Model Safe community. community empowerment, preparedness among village ("desa siaga"

  5. Safe Zones: Creating LGBT Safe Space Ally Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poynter, Kerry John; Tubbs, Nancy Jean

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses model LGBT Safe Space Ally programs. These programs, often called "Safe Zones," include self selected students, faculty, and employees who publicly show support by displaying stickers, signs, and other identifiable items. Issues covered in the article include history, development, training, membership, assessment, and…

  6. A Safe Ride to School; A Safe Ride Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

    Text and illustrations are used to teach safe school bus riding practices. The guide begins with instructions to parents or guardians to set a good example of safe behavior, and to help children learn safety rules and be on time. Instructions to children concern obeying the bus driver, boarding the bus, riding the bus, crossing the road, and using…

  7. Safe motherhood: the FIGO initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benagiano, G; Thomas, B

    2003-09-01

    Over the last twenty years the international community-realizing that the tragedy of women dying during pregnancy and in childbirth could no longer be tolerated-launched a series of initiatives aimed at making safe motherhood a cornerstone of health services in all countries. Making pregnancy and delivery safe events is particularly complex, as it involves infrastructural and logistic, as well as technical, issues. Women die because they have no access to skilled personnel during pregnancy and at the time of delivery and because--if an emergency situation arises--they cannot reach a facility where emergency obstetric services are available. FIGO, the International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology-as the only global organization representing the Obstetricians of the world-decided some time ago that it could not limit its activities to proposing technical guidelines and debating scientific issues. It had to move into the field and, through its affiliated societies, help change the ability of the multitude of women in the developing world to obtain skilled attendance at birth. In 1997, plans were made to launch activities in five areas where maternal mortality was particularly high: Central America (Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and El Salvador), Ethiopia, Mozambique, Pakistan, and Uganda. Five member societies from the developed world (the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Canada, the Italian Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of the United Kingdom; and the Swedish Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology) agreed to provide support to their counterparts in these five selected areas. The project is now in its final stage. Results are, by and large, positive, demonstrating that, by motivating health professionals in the field and for a relatively modest financial outlay, more efficient use of existing services could be made in a sustainable

  8. A Practical Seedless Infrared Safe Cone Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Salam, Gavin P.

    2007-01-01

    This writeup highlights the infrared unsafety of the "midpoint" cone jet-algorithm and provides a brief overview of why this is a serious issue. It then shows how one can build a safe (seedless) cone algorithm and discusses the potential impact on measurements.

  9. 76 FR 12719 - Safe Schools/Healthy Students Program; Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools; Safe Schools/Healthy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ... notice does not propose a definition for social marketing. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Karen Dorsey...; Notice of proposed priorities, requirements, and definitions. SUMMARY: On February 18, 2011, we published in the Federal Register (76 FR 9562) a notice proposing priorities, requirements, and definitions...

  10. Safe disposal of municipal wastes in Nigeria: perspectives on a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The safe disposal of municipal waste is imperative for the realisation of several fundamental human rights, most especially the right to life and the right to a healthy environment. Nigeria is a signatory to and has ratified the African Charter on Human and People's Rights (ACHPR). Ratification of the ACHPR comes with the ...

  11. Safe Swimming (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-06-01

    Most outbreaks linked to pools and water playgrounds are caused by Cryptosporidium. This podcast discusses ways to keep you healthy and safe while swimming.  Created: 6/1/2017 by MMWR.   Date Released: 6/1/2017.

  12. Shock Safe Nepal: team one

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhof, A.J.; Düzgün, B.C.; Spelt, C.J.; De Stoppelaar, A.O.; Van Wijnbergen, E.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    As a response to the 2015 Nepal earthquakes Shock Safe Nepal was founded to function as platform intended to contribute to the development of knowledge on earthquake safe housing. The project started on initiative of the Consul General of Nepal to The Netherlands Cas de Stoppelaar and the faculty of

  13. Basics for Handling Food Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Basics for Handling Food Safely Safe steps in food handling, cooking, and storage are essential to prevent foodborne illness. You can’t see, smell, or taste harmful bacteria that may cause illness. In every step of food preparation, follow the four Fight BAC! ® guidelines to ...

  14. Teaching safe sex practices to psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladyk, K

    1990-03-01

    An occupational therapist presented her 45-minute program called AIDS Education and Safe Sex 5 times to female mental patients in the locked ward of Cedarcrest Regional Hospital in Newington, Connecticut, to inform them about safe-sex practices and AIDS. She first administered a pretest then spoke briefly about AIDS and safe-sex practices. The lecture emphasized various important points such as no cure for AIDS exist, casual contact (e.g., kiss on the cheek, handshake) cannot transmit HIV, and effectiveness of using latex condoms. The occupational therapist spent much of her time addressing myths about AIDS and what safe-sex practices are. The patients discussed sexual abuse and dishonest partners. She administered a posttest which was the same as the pretest. Some sessions attracted more people than did other sessions. Test scores increased for every patient and for every session. They ranged from a 5% (68-73%) increase for the 3rd session to a 24% (67-91%) increase for the last session. She was not able to determine, however, whether the increased knowledge would translate into positive behavioral changes. Patients' psychiatric symptoms may have interfered with learning resulting in less than ideal improvements in knowledge. These symptoms were hypomanic behavior, restlessness, and distractibility. Perhaps other sessions with experiential techniques (e.g., putting condoms on dummies) would increase their understanding. This program helps fill the information gap not provided by the mass media which avoid mentioning safe-sex practices.

  15. Healthy Ageing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. C.P. van der Schans

    2015-01-01

    Presentatie gehouden bij de bijeenkomst voor het Regionaal Genootschap Fysiotherapie Het Noorden op 10 februari te Marum, over het belang van fysieke activiteit voor healthy ageing en de rol van de fysiotherapeut hierin

  16. Empowering a healthy practice environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Jodi; Ruffin, Tasha

    2015-03-01

    This article provides frontline nurses a tool kit so they can advocate a healthy practice environment. The healthy nurse, healthy work hours, job satisfaction, adequate sleep, power naps at work, and balancing family/work are discussed. The overweight nurse, nurse fatigue, compassion fatigue, shift work sleep disorder, and role strain are discussed as barriers to a healthy practice environment. Case reports with analysis and recommendations are discussed to overcome these barriers. Resources are presented for frontline nurses to develop a tool kit for transforming their environment to a healthy practice environment and to empower them to become healthy nurses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Safe disposal of prescribed medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, Phillip J; Hussainy, Safeera Y; George, Johnson; Kong, David Cm; Kirkpatrick, Carl Mj

    2015-06-01

    The National Return and Disposal of Unwanted Medicines Program provides a free and safe method for the disposal of unwanted and expired medicines. This stops drugs being dumped in landfill and waterways. An audit showed that over 600 tonnes of medicines are returned through the program. A substantial proportion of these medicines were still within their expiry dates. Salbutamol, insulin and frusemide are the most commonly discarded medicines. More than $2 million of public money is wasted each year. Hoarding and non-adherence to treatment contribute to waste. Health professionals may be able to help minimise waste by informing patients about the importance of completing prescribed courses of treatment, and discouraging them from hoarding medicines after reaching the safety net threshold on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme. Prescribe no more than the required quantity of medicines. When starting a new therapy, prescribe a minimal quantity in case the drug is unsuitable for the patient. Advise patients to return all unwanted medicines to a pharmacy for disposal.

  18. Safe genetically engineered plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosellini, D.; Veronesi, F.

    2007-10-01

    The application of genetic engineering to plants has provided genetically modified plants (GMPs, or transgenic plants) that are cultivated worldwide on increasing areas. The most widespread GMPs are herbicide-resistant soybean and canola and insect-resistant corn and cotton. New GMPs that produce vaccines, pharmaceutical or industrial proteins, and fortified food are approaching the market. The techniques employed to introduce foreign genes into plants allow a quite good degree of predictability of the results, and their genome is minimally modified. However, some aspects of GMPs have raised concern: (a) control of the insertion site of the introduced DNA sequences into the plant genome and of its mutagenic effect; (b) presence of selectable marker genes conferring resistance to an antibiotic or an herbicide, linked to the useful gene; (c) insertion of undesired bacterial plasmid sequences; and (d) gene flow from transgenic plants to non-transgenic crops or wild plants. In response to public concerns, genetic engineering techniques are continuously being improved. Techniques to direct foreign gene integration into chosen genomic sites, to avoid the use of selectable genes or to remove them from the cultivated plants, to reduce the transfer of undesired bacterial sequences, and make use of alternative, safer selectable genes, are all fields of active research. In our laboratory, some of these new techniques are applied to alfalfa, an important forage plant. These emerging methods for plant genetic engineering are briefly reviewed in this work.

  19. Staying Safe in the Water

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-05-15

    In this podcast, Dr. Julie Gilchrist, a pediatrician and medical epidemiologist from CDC’s Injury Center, talks about staying safe in the water. Tips are for all audiences, with a focus on preventing drownings and keeping children safe in and around the pool, lake, or ocean.  Created: 5/15/2008 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 5/19/2008.

  20. Safe Cooperating Cyber-Physical Systems using Wireless Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pop, Paul; Scholle, Detlef; Sljivo, Irfan

    2017-01-01

    communication, multiple stakeholders, dynamic system definitions (openness), and unpredictable operating environments. SafeCOP will provide an approach to the safety assurance of CO-CPS, enabling thus their certification and development. The project will define a runtime manager architecture for runtime......This paper presents an overview of the ECSEL project entitled ―Safe Cooperating Cyber-Physical Systems using Wireless Communication‖ (SafeCOP), which runs during the period 2016–2019. SafeCOP targets safety-related Cooperating Cyber-Physical Systems (CO-CPS) characterised by use of wireless...

  1. Facilitating safe care: a qualitative study of Iranian nurse leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Bondas, Terese; Salsali, Mahvash; Jasper, Melanie; Turunen, Hannele

    2014-01-01

    Aim  The purpose of this study was to explore and describe how nurse leaders facilitate safe care from the perspectives of both nurses and nurse leaders. Background  The health-care system's success in improving patient safety pivots on nursing leadership. However, there is a lack of knowledge in the international literature about how nurse leaders facilitate provision of safe care and reaching the goal of a safe health-care system. Method  A qualitative design using a content analysis approach was applied for data gathering and analysis. In this study, 20 nurses (16 nurses and four head nurses) working in a referral teaching hospital in Tehran, Iran, were recruited through purposive sampling. Semi-structured interviews and 10 hours of structured observations were conducted to collect data. Results  The data analysis resulted in three main themes: 'providing environmental prerequisites for safe nursing practice', 'uniting and integrating health-care providers', and 'creating an atmosphere of safe care'. Conclusion  The results indicate that to facilitate providing safe care, nurse leaders should improve nurses' working conditions, develop the nurses' practical competencies, assign duties to nurses according to their skills and capabilities, administer appropriate supervision, improve health-care providers' professional relationships and encourage their collaboration, empower nurses and reward their safe practice. Implications for nursing management  Approaching the challenge of patient safety requires the health-care system to combine its efforts and strategies with nursing leadership in its vital role of facilitating safe care and improving patient safety. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Healthy Weight: Healthy Weight Loss Starts With a Plan You Can Stick To

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Healthy Weight Healthy Weight Loss Starts With a Plan You Can ... providers don't always address issues such as healthy eating, physical activity, and weight management during general ...

  3. Midwifery education for safe motherhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Heir, J M

    1997-09-01

    To determine the useability (relevance, clarity and quality of content), applicability (ease of use) and accessibility (structure and form) of a series of new safe motherhood midwifery education modules. Questionnaire survey and focus group discussions, preceded by a two week clinical skills course and an eight day orientation to using the modules. Nursing and midwifery education institutions, regional training centres, acute-care hospital facilities and community settings in Ethiopia, Fiji, Lesotho, Mozambique and Nepal. Thirty-six teachers, 82 midwives, nurse-midwives and auxiliary nurse-midwives from practice settings, and 60 post basic midwifery students. Overall it was found that the introductory information and the technical content of the modules were easy to understand and use as were the instructions for both teachers and students. The presentation of the material was orderly and easy to follow; the language was comprehensible; and the illustrations were appropriate, clear and facilitated teaching. The teachers found that they were able to use most of the teaching/learning methods, teach most of the skills in the modules, and use the guidelines for assessing competence. The main difficulties encountered included adherence to the recommended time frame for some of the classroom sessions; the limited availability of clinical cases for teaching the specific skills in the modules and time limitations in the clinical area for practising the skills; and the provision of transport for community visits, data to complete community profiles, and time to complete other planned community activities. The students identified the need for a set of learning materials which they could take with them for future reference, and both teachers and students expressed concern about resources to support, and legislation to cover, the application of the skills taught/learned. The modules have the potential to strengthen and support the education of midwives in developing countries

  4. HEALTHY AGEING AT HOME: ERGONOMICS ADAPTATIONS OF INTERIOR DESIGN AND SELF-ASSESED QUALITY OF LIFE OF OLDER ADULTS OF THE MUNICIPALITY OF LJUBLJANA

    OpenAIRE

    Jasna Hrovatin; Saša Pišot; Matej Plevnik

    2017-01-01

    Population is ageing and many nations already respond by developing and promoting special strategies of healthy ageing. Living environment is one of the factors that can contribute to healthy and safe ageing at home, providing that it is well adapted to the needs of older adults. On the contrary, it can cause stress, discomfort and lead to injuries, resulting in the loss of independence and autonomy. With the use of a questionnaire, conducting a survey and an analysis regarding the adaptabili...

  5. Medicare Provider Data - Hospice Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Hospice Utilization and Payment Public Use File provides information on services provided to Medicare beneficiaries by hospice providers. The Hospice PUF...

  6. How Safe Are Kid-Safe Search Engines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson-Krum, Hope

    2001-01-01

    Examines search tools available to elementary and secondary school students, both human-compiled and crawler-based, to help direct them to age-appropriate Web sites; analyzes the procedures of search engines labeled family-friendly or kid safe that use filters; and tests the effectiveness of these services to students in school libraries. (LRW)

  7. Bellagio report on healthy agriculture, healthy nutrition, healthy people

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simopoulos, Artemis P; Bourne, Peter G; Faergeman, Ole

    2013-01-01

    The Bellagio Report on Healthy Agriculture, Healthy Nutrition, Healthy People is the result of the meeting held at the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center in Lake Como, Italy, 29 October-2 November 2012...

  8. Bellagio Report on Healthy Agriculture, Healthy Nutrition, Healthy People

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simopoulos, Artemis P; Bourne, Peter G; Faergeman, Ole

    2013-01-01

    The Bellagio Report on Healthy Agriculture, Healthy Nutrition, Healthy People is the result of the meeting held at the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center in Lake Como, Italy, 29 October-2 November 2012...

  9. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Beauheim, Richard Louis; Brady, Patrick Vane; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2009-05-01

    Expansion of uranium mining in the United States is a concern to some environmental groups and sovereign Native American Nations. An approach which may alleviate some problems is to develop inherently safe in situ uranium recovery ('ISR') technologies. Current ISR technology relies on chemical extraction of trace levels of uranium from aquifers that, once mined, can still contain dissolved uranium and other trace metals that are a health concern. Existing ISR operations are few in number; however, high uranium prices are driving the industry to consider expanding operations nation-wide. Environmental concerns and enforcement of the new 30 ppb uranium drinking water standard may make opening new mining operations more difficult and costly. Here we propose a technological fix: the development of inherently safe in situ recovery (ISISR) methods. The four central features of an ISISR approach are: (1) New 'green' leachants that break down predictably in the subsurface, leaving uranium, and associated trace metals, in an immobile form; (2) Post-leachant uranium/metals-immobilizing washes that provide a backup decontamination process; (3) An optimized well-field design that increases uranium recovery efficiency and minimizes excursions of contaminated water; and (4) A combined hydrologic/geochemical protocol for designing low-cost post-extraction long-term monitoring. ISISR would bring larger amounts of uranium to the surface, leave fewer toxic metals in the aquifer, and cost less to monitor safely - thus providing a 'win-win-win' solution to all stakeholders.

  10. The Tripler Army Medical Center LEAN Program: a healthy lifestyle model for the treatment of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, L C; Folen, R A; Garland, F N; Edwards, C; Noce, M; Gohdes, D; Williams, D; Bowles, S; Kellar, M A; Supplee, E

    1997-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Tripler Army Medical Center LEAN Program for the treatment of obesity, hypercholesterolemia, and essential hypertension. The LEAN Program, a multi-disciplinary prevention program, emphasizes healthy Lifestyles, Exercise and Emotions, Attitudes, and Nutrition for active duty service members. The treatment model offers a medically healthy, emotionally safe, and reasonable, low-intensity exercise program to facilitate weight loss. We will discuss the philosophy behind the LEAN Program and the major components. Thereafter, we will briefly discuss the preliminary results.

  11. Thermodynamics of asymptotically safe theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rischke, Dirk H.; Sannino, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the thermodynamic properties of a novel class of gauge-Yukawa theories that have recently been shown to be completely asymptotically safe, because their short-distance behaviour is determined by the presence of an interacting fixed point. Not only do all the coupling constants freeze...

  12. Staying Safe on the Water

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-06-05

    In this podcast for all audiences, Dr. Julie Gilchrist from CDC's Injury Center outlines tips for safe boating.  Created: 6/5/2008 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 6/8/2008.

  13. Baby Sling: Is It Safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... safe. In: Caring for Your Baby and Young Child: Birth to Age 5. 6th ed. New York, N.Y.: Bantam Books; 2014. Goldenberg RL, et al. Low birth weight in the United States. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2007;85:584S. Jana ...

  14. The Assumption of Adequacy: Operation Safe Haven, A Chaplain's View

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neske, Robert

    1999-01-01

    .... This operation took place between 8 Sept. 1994 and 15 Mar. 1995, in the Republic of Panama, and provided a safe haven for up to 10,000 Cuban migrants who had sought to enter the U.S. illegally...

  15. Healthy Children, Healthy Minds: Creating a Brighter Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Children struggle with life today. Being children in the 21st century is both taxing and exciting, and yet trying to cope with all of the technology and media that surrounds them. How do we as adults provide good models? Mindfulness, exercise, focus and attention, and healthy living strategies need to play a role in shaping healthy children.…

  16. Safe Distribution of Declarative Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Thomas; Mukkamala, Raghava Rao; Slaats, Tijs

    2011-01-01

    process model generalizing labelled prime event structures to a systems model able to finitely represent ω-regular languages. An operational semantics given as a transition semantics between markings of the graph allows DCR Graphs to be conveniently used as both specification and execution model......We give a general technique for safe distribution of a declarative (global) process as a network of (local) synchronously communicating declarative processes. Both the global and local processes are given as Dynamic Condition Response (DCR) Graphs. DCR Graphs is a recently introduced declarative....... The technique for distribution is based on a new general notion of projection of DCR Graphs relative to a subset of labels and events identifying the set of external events that must be communicated from the other processes in the network in order for the distribution to be safe.We prove that for any vector...

  17. Inflation from Asymptotically Safe Theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niklas Grønlund; Sannino, Francesco; Svendsen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    We investigate models in which inflation is driven by an ultraviolet safe and interacting scalar sector stemming from a new class of nonsupersymmetric gauge field theories. These new theories, differently from generic scalar models, are well defined to arbitrary short distances because of the exi......We investigate models in which inflation is driven by an ultraviolet safe and interacting scalar sector stemming from a new class of nonsupersymmetric gauge field theories. These new theories, differently from generic scalar models, are well defined to arbitrary short distances because...... for inflation. In the minimal coupling case the theory requires large non-perturbative quantum corrections to the quantum potential for the theory to agree with data, while in the non- minimal coupling case the perturbative regime in the couplings of the theory is preferred. Requiring the theory to reproduce...

  18. Transfer pricing and safe harbours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Solilová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfer prices are significant for both taxpayers and tax administrations because they determine in large part taxable profits of associated enterprises in different tax jurisdictions. Moreover, in the context of taxation, transfer prices must be complied with the arm’s length principle. However, Multinational Enterprises have been faced daily by conflicting rules and approaches to applying the arm’s length principle, burdensome documentation requirements, inconsistent audit standards and unpredictable competent authority outcomes. Therefore, the Committee on Fiscal Affairs launched another project on the administrative aspects of transfer pricing in 2010. On 16 May 2013 as a partial solution of this project was approved by the OECD Council the Revised Section E on Safe Harbours in Chapter IV of the Transfer Pricing Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises and Tax Authorities. The paper is focused on significant changes of newly approved chapter IV of the Transfer Pricing Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises and Tax Authorities, further on analysis of practice in this area, on advantages and disadvantages of safe harbours for taxpayers and competent authorities with aim to suggest recommendations on use of safe harbours in the Czech Republic.

  19. Parenteral nutrition: indications and safe management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyer, Nicky

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this article is to provide an overview of what parenteral nutrition (PN) is and when its use is required. It will describe the process of nutritional assessment, and considerations when choosing venous access. The different approaches to provision of PN solutions in hospital will be discussed. Catheter-related and metabolic complications can occur during delivery of PN; there will be a discussion of the different types of complications and how these can be avoided or minimised. Finally, the pivotal role of the nurse in the assessment and ongoing care of patients who require PN will be highlighted, including skills required to administer PN safely.

  20. Healthy Cooking Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Nutrition and healthy eating Healthy-cooking techniques capture the flavor and nutrients of food without ... in expensive cookware. You can use basic cooking techniques to prepare food in healthy ways. By using ...

  1. Flywheel Rotor Safe-Life Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, J. K. H.; Chang, J. B.; Christopher, D. A.; McLallin, Kerry L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since the 1960s, research has been conducted into the use of flywheels as energy storage systems. The-proposed applications include energy storage for hybrid and electric automobiles, attitude control and energy storage for satellites, and uninterruptible power supplies for hospitals and computer centers. For many years, however, the use of flywheels for space applications was restricted by the total weight of a system employing a metal rotor. With recent technological advances in the manufacturing of composite materials, however, lightweight composite rotors have begun to be proposed for such applications. Flywheels with composite rotors provide much higher power and energy storage capabilities than conventional chemical batteries. However, the failure of a high speed flywheel rotor could be a catastrophic event. For this reason, flywheel rotors are classified by the NASA Fracture Control Requirements Standard as fracture critical parts. Currently, there is no industry standard to certify a composite rotor for safe and reliable operation forth( required lifetime of the flywheel. Technical problems hindering the development of this standard include composite manufacturing inconsistencies, insufficient nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for detecting defects and/or impact damage, lack of standard material test methods for characterizing composite rotor design allowables, and no unified proof (over-spin) test for flight rotors. As part of a flywheel rotor safe-life certification pro-ram funded b the government, a review of the state of the art in composite rotors is in progress. The goal of the review is to provide a clear picture of composite flywheel rotor technologies. The literature review has concentrated on the following topics concerning composites and composite rotors: durability (fatigue) and damage tolerance (safe-life) analysis/test methods, in-service NDE and health monitoring techniques, spin test methods/ procedures, and containment options

  2. Safe-haven CDS Premia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingler, Sven; Lando, David

    We argue that Credit Default Swap (CDS) premia for safe-haven sovereigns, like Germany and the United States, are driven to a large extent by regulatory requirements under which derivatives dealing banks have an incentive to buy CDS to hedge counterparty credit risk of their counterparties. We...... explain the mechanics of the regulatory requirements and develop a model in which derivatives dealers, who have a derivatives exposure with sovereigns, need CDS for capital relief. End users without exposure to the sovereigns sell the CDS and require a positive premium equivalent to the capital...

  3. Surgery aboard ship: is it safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, M; Lucha, P; Snyder, M; Liston, W

    1999-09-01

    A retrospective review was performed on 684 surgical procedures done aboard U.S. Atlantic Fleet ships during a 3-year period from 1994 to 1996. These procedures were compared with similar procedures performed at the Naval Medical Center in Portsmouth, Virginia. Morbidity and mortality rates were calculated and compared. A very low morbidity rate (0.43%) was reported for surgical procedures performed while deployed compared with 1.69% for procedures at the Naval Medical Center. One mortality was reported. These extremely low rates are felt to be attributable to multiple causes, including a highly selected, healthy patient population, performance of only low-risk procedures, early presentation of surgical problems, and early medical evacuation of patients with complex medical and surgical problems. We feel that elective surgical procedures such as vasectomy, circumcision, inguinal hernia repair, and hemorrhoidectomy can be performed safely aboard ship. This would increase the training opportunity for all members of the medical department and at the same time decrease the costs and risks associated with medical evacuation.

  4. Healthy Buildings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubb, Deborah

    Health problems related to school buildings can be categorized in five major areas: sick-building syndrome; health-threatening building materials; environmental hazards such as radon gas and asbestos; lead poisoning; and poor indoor air quality due to smoke, chemicals, and other pollutants. This paper provides an overview of these areas,…

  5. Staying Healthy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Be The Match® is a global leader in bone marrow transplantation. We conduct research to improve transplant outcomes provide support and resources for patients, and partner with a global network. Learn more. ... stories Valerie Sun - bone marrow transplant patient advocate Jeff and Kim take ...

  6. Narratives of Ghanaian abortion providers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Michigan, Department of Women's Studies, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 7University of Michigan, Department of Obstetrics and. Gynaecology, Ann Arbor, MI USA ..... personal spending habits of physicians who were known to provide abortion – a new ..... characterized by safe space for speaking can improve physician's resilience to ...

  7. The Difference Safe Spaces Make

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendric Coleman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT students have become very visible at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs, but this visibility is not reflected in some colleges’ student programs and activities. Only a few notable HBCUs, such as Howard University and Spelman College, have made a concerted effort. Acknowledging that the LGBT community is significant and exists, and fostering such support, comes up against a steep wall of religious tradition and doctrines, and conservative administrations. It is imperative that HBCUs address LGBT issues and create and support a safe space for students to articulate their identity. Meanwhile, many LGBT students on these campuses find voice and understanding in Black scholars and writers such as Audre Lorde’s Zami: A New Spelling of My Name and Charles Michael Smith’s Fighting Words: Personal Essays by Black Gay Men.

  8. Working safely with electronics racks

    CERN Multimedia

    Simon Baird, HSE Unit Head

    2016-01-01

    Think of CERN and you’ll probably think of particle accelerators and detectors. These are the tools of the trade in particle physics, but behind them are the racks of electronics that include power supplies, control systems and data acquisition networks.   Inside an electronics rack: danger could be lurking if the rack is not powered off. In routine operation, these are no more harmful than the home entertainment system in your living room. But unscrew the cover and it’s a different matter. Even after following appropriate training, and with formal authorisation from your group leader or equivalent to carry out electrical work or any work in the vicinity of electrical hazards, and even with extensive experience of carrying out such operations, it’s important to incorporate safe working practices into your routine. At CERN, before the racks of electronics reach their operational configurations for the accelerators and detectors, they play a vital role in test set-ups ...

  9. Is herniography useful and safe?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hureibi, K.A., E-mail: alhureibi@gmail.com [Musgrove Park Hospital, Taunton TA1 5DA (United Kingdom); McLatchie, Gregor R., E-mail: Gregor.McLatchie@nth.nhs.uk [University Hospital of Hartlepool, Holdforth Road, Hartlepool TS24 9AH (United Kingdom); Kidambi, Ananta V., E-mail: Ananta.Kidambi@nth.nhs.uk [University Hospital of Hartlepool, Holdforth Road, Hartlepool TS24 9AH (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    117 consecutive herniograms were reviewed for patients who had symptoms suggestive of hernia but with no evidence or inconclusive findings on physical examination. The traditional approach has been to explore patients with suspected occult hernias. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of herniography in minimizing needless groin exploration and to evaluate its safety. Thirty-three herniograms were positive and showed unilateral and bilateral inguinal hernias. There were no false positive examinations and two false negative examinations. No complications were present. Patients with positive herniograms were explored, and operative findings correlated well with herniographic findings. Twenty-four patients were referred to other specialities. Follow-up in clinic and telephone interviews showed symptomatic improvement in the majority of patients. Herniography is useful in evaluating obscure groin pain and occult hernias. It is a safe procedure and more cost effective than a negative exploration or diagnostic laparoscopy.

  10. Healthy Family 2009: Assuring Healthy Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Healthy Family 2009 Assuring Healthy Aging Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... please turn Javascript on. 7 Smart Steps to Aging Well 1. Control Blood Pressure You can have ...

  11. Healthy Family 2009: Practicing Healthy Adult Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Healthy Family 2009 Practicing Healthy Adult Living Past Issues / Winter ... diabetes, or if heart disease runs in your family, begin checking cholesterol at age 20. Colorectal Cancer : ...

  12. Emergency Response Virtual Environment for Safe Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasfy, Ayman; Walker, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    An intelligent emergency response virtual environment (ERVE) that provides emergency first responders, response planners, and managers with situational awareness as well as training and support for safe schools is presented. ERVE incorporates an intelligent agent facility for guiding and assisting the user in the context of the emergency response operations. Response information folders capture key information about the school. The system enables interactive 3D visualization of schools and academic campuses, including the terrain and the buildings' exteriors and interiors in an easy to use Web..based interface. ERVE incorporates live camera and sensors feeds and can be integrated with other simulations such as chemical plume simulation. The system is integrated with a Geographical Information System (GIS) to enable situational awareness of emergency events and assessment of their effect on schools in a geographic area. ERVE can also be integrated with emergency text messaging notification systems. Using ERVE, it is now possible to address safe schools' emergency management needs with a scaleable, seamlessly integrated and fully interactive intelligent and visually compelling solution.

  13. Teamwork: building healthier workplaces and providing safer patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Paul R

    2009-01-01

    A changing healthcare landscape requires nurses to care for more patients with higher acuity during their shift than ever before. These more austere working conditions are leading to increased burnout. In addition, patient safety is not of the quality or level that is required. To build healthier workplaces where safe care is provided, formal teamwork training is recommended. Formal teamwork training programs, such as that provided by the MedTeams group, TeamSTEPPS (Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety), or participatory action research programs such as the Healthy Workplace Intervention, have decreased errors in the workplace, increased nurse satisfaction and retention rates, and decreased staff turnover. This article includes necessary determinants of teamwork, brief overviews of team-building programs, and examples of research programs that demonstrate how teamwork brings about healthier workplaces that are safer for patients. Teamwork programs can bring about these positive results when implemented and supported by the hospital system.

  14. Healthy eating at school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruselius-Jensen, Maria Louisa; Egberg Mikkelsen, Bent

    provision were selected. All schools had a framework for student participation, a policy for including nutrition in the curriculum as well as canteen facilities. Schools were sampled to represent different social layers, different regions and different sizes of schools. The study investigated the attitudes......Unhealthy eating are common among adolescents and the school is a well suited setting for promoting healthy eating. For the school to play a role here, however an environment must be created, in which the school and the students develop a sense of ownership for a healthy food and nutrition "regime......". This paper highlights the role that the organisation of food provision plays by comparing the attitudes of students towards in-school food provision as opposed to out-of-school provision where food is provided by outside caterers. Schools having internal food production and schools having external food...

  15. Safe handling of vaccines: the rewards of rigorous routines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefti, Kelly; David, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    A recent report published by the Office of Inspector General (OIG) entitled Vaccines for Children Program: Vulnerabilities in Vaccine Management has brought to public awareness the need for increased attention to safe handling of vaccines. The maximum benefit of receiving vaccines for vaccine-preventable diseases can only be attained when we ensure that safe storage and handling occurs through strict adherence to the vaccine cold chain. This compliance can best be accomplished by identifying a vaccine coordinator that is intimately familiar with the components of the vaccine cold chain and provides the necessary oversight to ensure that all links in the chain are maintained. Utilization of helpful resources, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) resources related to safe handling of vaccines, is central to a well defined process for vaccine handling. This adherence provides reassurance, both to patients receiving vaccine and providers administering it, that the safest and most effective vaccine is being delivered.

  16. Safe and Secure Services Based on NGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukazawa, Tomoo; Nisase, Takemi; Kawashima, Masahisa; Hariu, Takeo; Oshima, Yoshihito

    Next Generation Network (NGN), which has been undergoing standardization as it has developed, is expected to create new services that converge the fixed and mobile networks. This paper introduces the basic requirements for NGN in terms of security and explains the standardization activities, in particular, the requirements for the security function described in Y.2701 discussed in ITU-T SG-13. In addition to the basic NGN security function, requirements for NGN authentication are also described from three aspects: security, deployability, and service. As examples of authentication implementation, three profiles-namely, fixed, nomadic, and mobile-are defined in this paper. That is, the “fixed profile” is typically for fixed-line subscribers, the “nomadic profile” basically utilizes WiFi access points, and the “mobile profile” provides ideal NGN mobility for mobile subscribers. All three of these profiles satisfy the requirements from security aspects. The three profiles are compared from the viewpoint of requirements for deployability and service. After showing that none of the three profiles can fulfill all of the requirements, we propose that multiple profiles should be used by NGN providers. As service and application examples, two promising NGN applications are proposed. The first is a strong authentication mechanism that makes Web applications more safe and secure even against password theft. It is based on NGN ID federation function. The second provides an easy peer-to-peer broadband virtual private network service aimed at safe and secure communication for personal/SOHO (small office, home office) users, based on NGN SIP (session initiation protocol) session control.

  17. Healthy Vision Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NEI for Kids > Healthy Vision Tips All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series ... Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables Healthy Vision Tips Healthy vision starts with you! Use these ...

  18. Eating Healthy Ethnic Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents/Families ( We Can! ) Health Professional Resources Tipsheet: Eating Healthy Ethnic Food Trying different ethnic cuisines to ... Aim for a Healthy Weight Pocket Guide to Eating Healthy on the Go features tips on ordering ...

  19. Healthy Lifestyle: Children's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Children's health You want your child to eat healthy foods, but do you know which nutrients are ... 2017 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/childrens-health/in-depth/nutrition-for-kids/art- ...

  20. Healthy food trends -- kale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy food trends - borecole; Healthy snacks - kale; Weight loss - kale; Healthy diet - kale; Wellness - kale ... drugs), you may need to limit vitamin K foods. Vitamin K can affect how these medicines work. ...

  1. Keeping Your Voice Healthy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Keeping Your Voice Healthy Keeping Your Voice Healthy Patient Health Information News ... voice-related. Key Steps for Keeping Your Voice Healthy Drink plenty of water. Moisture is good for ...

  2. What is a safe lift?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Kathy

    2013-09-01

    In a perfect world, a "safe" lift would be 51 pounds if the object is within 7 inches from the front of the body, if it is at waist height, if it is directly in front of the person, if there is a handle on the object, and if the load inside the box/bucket doesn't shift once lifted. If the load to be lifted does not meet all of these criteria, then it is an unsafe lift, and modifications must be made. Modifications would include lightening the load, getting help, or using a mechanical lifting device. There is always a way to turn an unsafe lift into a safer lift. An excellent resource for anyone interested in eliminating some of the hazards associated with lifting is the "Easy Ergonomics" publication from Cal/OSHA. This booklet offers practical advice on how to improve the workplace using engineering and administrative controls, problem-solving strategies and solutions, and a vast amount of ergonomics information and resources. "Easy Ergonomics" can be obtained by calling Cal/OSHA's education and training unit in Sacramento at 800-963-9424. A free copy can be obtained via www.dir.ca.gov/dosh/puborder.asp.

  3. SAFE Testing Nuclear Rockets Economically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Steven D.; Travis, Bryan; Zerkle, David K.

    2003-01-01

    Several studies over the past few decades have recognized the need for advanced propulsion to explore the solar system. As early as the 1960s, Werner Von Braun and others recognized the need for a nuclear rocket for sending humans to Mars. The great distances, the intense radiation levels, and the physiological response to zero-gravity all supported the concept of using a nuclear rocket to decrease mission time. These same needs have been recognized in later studies, especially in the Space Exploration Initiative in 1989. One of the key questions that has arisen in later studies, however, is the ability to test a nuclear rocket engine in the current societal environment. Unlike the Rover/NERVA programs in the 1960s, the rocket exhaust can no longer be vented to the open atmosphere. As a consequence, previous studies have examined the feasibility of building a large-scale version of the Nuclear Furnace Scrubber that was demonstrated in 1971. We have investigated an alternative that would deposit the rocket exhaust along with any entrained fission products directly into the ground. The Subsurface Active Filtering of Exhaust, or SAFE, concept would allow variable sized engines to be tested for long times at a modest expense. A system overview, results of preliminary calculations, and cost estimates of proof of concept demonstrations are presented. The results indicate that a nuclear rocket could be tested at the Nevada Test Site for under $20 M.

  4. Safe spaces for youth "At Risk"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Kromann; Wistoft, Karen

    for learning, democratic participation and citizenship education through farming and gardening. Keywords: Food Systems, Transformative Learning, Youth Empowerment Stream: Food Policies, Politics and Cultures Presentation Type: Paper Presentation in a Themed Session in English Paper: A paper has not yet been......The paper will discuss how farm based empowerment programs directed at youth "at risk" through the construction of "safe spaces" around farming, cooking and different workshops, and with a critical approach to the food system can provide a framework for transformative learning. Data in the research...... as different motivations, strategies and outcomes from participation in the program activities that can be identified in two main trajectories: network building and job training and emerging activist identities engaging youth in food justice issues and movement building in local communities. The research shows...

  5. Innovative approach to safely induce controlled lipolysis by superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles-mediated hyperthermic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinozzi, Maria Rosaria; Pandolfi, Laura; Malatesta, Manuela; Colombo, Miriam; Collico, Veronica; Lievens, Patricia Marie-Jeanne; Tambalo, Stefano; Lasconi, Chiara; Vurro, Federica; Boschi, Federico; Mannucci, Silvia; Sbarbati, Andrea; Prosperi, Davide; Calderan, Laura

    2017-10-27

    During last years, evidence has been provided on the involvement of overweight and obesity in the pathogenesis and aggravation of several life-threatening diseases. Here, we demonstrate that, under appropriate administration conditions, polyhedral iron oxide nanoparticles are efficiently and safely taken up by 3T3 cell line-derived adipocytes (3T3 adipocytes) in vitro. Since these nanoparticles proved to effectively produce heat when subjected to alternating magnetic field, 3T3 adipocytes were submitted to superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles-mediated hyperthermia treatment (SMHT), with the aim of modulating their lipid content. Notably, the treatment resulted in a significant delipidation persisting for at least 24h, and in the absence of cell death, damage or dedifferentiation. Interestingly, transcript expression of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), a key gene involved in canonical lipolysis, was not modulated upon SMHT, suggesting the involvement of a novel/alternative mechanism in the effective lipolysis observed. By applying the same experimental conditions successfully used for 3T3 adipocytes, SMHT was able to induce delipidation also in primary cultures of human adipose-derived adult stem cells. The success of this pioneering approach in vitro opens promising perspectives for the application of SMHT in vivo as an innovative safe and physiologically mild strategy against obesity, potentially useful in association with balanced diet and healthy lifestyle. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Pectus tunneloscopy: making Nuss procedure for pectus excavatum safe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlong, Laleng M

    2013-08-01

    The Nuss procedure for pectus excavatum involves the risk of cardiac injury during the creation of the retrosternal tunnel and during bar introduction or removal across the tunnel. A modified novel real-time technique for the safe introduction of the Nuss bar across the crucial retrosternal tunnel blind spot during introduction and removal is described. In 2012, we devised a technique for real-time endovision-guided introduction of the Nuss bar called pectus tunneloscopy. Between February 2012 and December 2012, 6 patients with pectus excavatum had their bar introduced across the tunnel using this technique. This technique provided safe introduction and removal of the bar during the multiple times the bar is remodelled before final fixation. Pectus tunneloscopy is a real-time endovision surgical technique, providing safe introduction of the bar across the crucial retrosternal tunnel blind spot.

  7. The World Health Organization's safe abortion guidance document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Look, Paul F A; Cottingham, Jane

    2013-04-01

    We discuss the history of the World Health Organization's (WHO's) development of guidelines for governments on providing safe abortion services, which WHO published as Safe Abortion: Technical and Policy Guidance for Health Systems in 2003 and updated in 2012. We show how the recognition of the devastating impact of unsafe abortion on women's health and survival, the impetus of the International Conference on Population and Development and its five-year follow-up, and WHO's progressive leadership at the end of the century enabled the organization to elaborate guidance on providing safe abortion services. Guideline formulation involved extensive review of published evidence, an international technical expert meeting to review the draft document, and a protracted in-house review by senior WHO management.

  8. A comunidade segura Safe community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Jesus C. S Harada

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar a efetividade de programas de prevenção de injúrias intencionais e não intencionais, em crianças e adolescentes, embasados nos princípios da comunidade segura. FONTES DE DADOS: Pesquisa eletrônica nas bases de dados MEDLINE e LILACS, correspondendo ao período de 2000 a 2005. Para prevenção de injúrias não intencionais, usaram-se os descritores: injury and prevention and community or population and intervention; para prevenção de injúrias intencionais, violence and prevention and community or population and intervention; foi tomada como limite a faixa etária de 0 a 18 anos. Critérios de inclusão: artigos originais, que estudaram a efetividade de intervenções utilizando mais de uma estratégia e abrangendo toda uma comunidade ou grupo, abordando injúrias intencionais e não intencionais, publicados em português, inglês ou espanhol. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: Foram obtidos 152 estudos como resultado. Considerando os critérios de inclusão, foram encontrados cinco artigos sobre prevenção de injúrias não intencionais, um sobre prevenção de injúrias intencionais e um artigo que aborda as duas questões. As pesquisas analisadas evidenciam benefícios para crianças e adolescentes, em diferentes proporções. CONCLUSÕES: Os programas que trabalham com o conceito de comunidade segura ainda são em número restrito. As investigações analisadas neste estudo apresentam resultados positivos. É preciso aumentar esforços para o desenvolvimento dessa base de evidência, respeitando as características locais, desenvolvendo indicadores de avaliação que permitam melhor comparação entre diferentes trabalhos.ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE:To analyze the effectiveness of prevention programs for intentional and unintentional injuries, based on safe community principles, in children and adolescents. SOURCES OF DATA: An electronic search was performed in the MEDLINE and LILACS database, corresponding to the period from 2000 to

  9. Safe prescribing: a titanic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routledge, Philip A

    2012-10-01

    The challenge to achieve safe prescribing merits the adjective 'titanic'. The organisational and human errors leading to poor prescribing (e.g. underprescribing, overprescribing, misprescribing or medication errors) have parallels in the organisational and human errors that led to the loss of the Titanic 100 years ago this year. Prescribing can be adversely affected by communication failures, critical conditions, complacency, corner cutting, callowness and a lack of courage of conviction, all of which were also factors leading to the Titanic tragedy. These issues need to be addressed by a commitment to excellence, the final component of the 'Seven C's'. Optimal prescribing is dependent upon close communication and collaborative working between highly trained health professionals, whose role is to ensure maximum clinical effectiveness, whilst also protecting their patients from avoidable harm. Since humans are prone to error, and the environments in which they work are imperfect, it is not surprising that medication errors are common, occurring more often during the prescribing stage than during dispensing or administration. A commitment to excellence in prescribing includes a continued focus on lifelong learning (including interprofessional learning) in pharmacology and therapeutics. This should be accompanied by improvements in the clinical working environment of prescribers, and the encouragement of a strong safety culture (including reporting of adverse incidents as well as suspected adverse drug reactions whenever appropriate). Finally, members of the clinical team must be prepared to challenge each other, when necessary, to ensure that prescribing combines the highest likelihood of benefit with the lowest potential for harm. © 2012 The Author. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Achieving pregnancy safely for HIV-serodiscordant couples: a social ecological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haneefa T Saleem

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The recognition and fulfilment of the sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR of all individuals and couples affected by HIV, including HIV-serodiscordant couples, requires intervention strategies aimed at achieving safe and healthy pregnancies and preventing undesired pregnancies. Reducing risk of horizontal and vertical transmission and addressing HIV-related infertility are key components of such interventions. In this commentary, we present challenges and opportunities for achieving safe pregnancies for serodiscordant couples through a social ecological lens. At the individual level, knowledge (e.g. of HIV status, assisted reproductive technologies and skills (e.g. adhering to antiretroviral therapy or pre-exposure prophylaxis are important. At the couple level, communication between partners around HIV status disclosure, fertility desires and safer pregnancy is required. Within the structural domain, social norms, stigma and discrimination from families, community and social networks influence individual and couple experiences. The availability and quality of safer conception and fertility support services within the healthcare system remains essential, including training for healthcare providers and strengthening integration of SRHR and HIV services. Policies, legislation and funding can improve access to SRHR services. A social ecological framework allows us to examine interactions between levels and how interventions at multiple levels can better support HIV-serodiscordant couples to achieve safe pregnancies. Strategies to achieve safer pregnancies should consider interrelated challenges at different levels of a social ecological framework. Interventions across multiple levels, implemented concurrently, have the potential to maximize impact and ensure the full SRHR of HIV-serodiscordant couples.

  11. Working Safe and Feeling Fine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milshtein, Amy

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the problem of repetitive stress disorders in the administrative workplace and shares some quick fixes to aid ergonomics. Some thoughts on the ergonomics of office chairs are provided as is the use of professional guidance in furniture purchasing. (GR)

  12. Knowledge and practice of safe injection among nurses in tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Risks associated with unsafe injection practices among the health care providers necessitated this study to determine the knowledge and practice of safe injection among nurses in university of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar. The specific objectives were to assess injection safety knowledge by the nurses and to ...

  13. Rust-Bio: a fast and safe bioinformatics library

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Köster (Johannes)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWe present Rust-Bio, the first general purpose bioinformatics library for the innovative Rust programming language. Rust-Bio leverages the unique combination of speed, memory safety and high-level syntax offered by Rust to provide a fast and safe set of bioinformatics algorithms and data

  14. Achievements of the EC network of excellence HySafe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordan, T.; Adams, P.; Azkarate, I.; Baraldi, D.; Barthelemy, H.; Bauwens, L.; Bengaouer, A.; Brennan, S.; Carcassi, M.; Dahoe, A.; Eisenreich, N.; Engebo, A.; Funnemark, E.; Gallego, E.; Gavrikov, A.; Haland, E.; Hansen, A.M.; Haugom, G.P.; Hawksworth, S.; Jedicke, O.; Kessler, A.; Kotchourko, A.; Kumar, S.; Langer, G.; Ledin, S.; Makarov, D.; Marangon, A.; Markert, F.; Middha, P.; Molkov, V.; Nilsen, S.; Papanikolaou, E.; Perrette, L.; Reinecke, E.-A.; Schmidtchen, U.; Serre-Combe, P.; Stöcklin, M.; Sully, A.; Teodorczyk, A.; Tigreat, D.; Venetsanos, A.; Verfondern, K.; Versloot, N.A.H.; Vetere, A.; Wilms, M.; Zaretskiy, N.

    2009-01-01

    In many areas European research has been largely fragmented. To support the required integration and to focus and coordinate related research efforts the European Commission created a new instrument, the Networks of Excellences (NoEs). The goal of the NoE HySafe has been to provide the basis to

  15. Creating Safe Spaces for Music Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Karin S.; Smith, Tawnya D.; Stanuch, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a practical model for fostering emotionally safe learning environments that instill in music students a positive sense of self-belief, freedom, and purpose. The authors examine the implications for music educators of creating effective learning environments and present recommendations for creating a safe space for learning,…

  16. Virus Alert: Ten Steps to Safe Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Glenda A.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses computer viruses and explains how to detect them; discusses virus protection and the need to update antivirus software; and offers 10 safe computing tips, including scanning floppy disks and commercial software, how to safely download files from the Internet, avoiding pirated software copies, and backing up files. (LRW)

  17. A fail-safe CMOS logic gate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobin, V.; Whitaker, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports a design technique to make Complex CMOS Gates fail-safe for a class of faults. Two classes of faults are defined. The fail-safe design presented has limited fault-tolerance capability. Multiple faults are also covered.

  18. Improved water does not mean safe water

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, L. H.; Guo, Y.; Schwab, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    This work presents a model for estimating global access to drinking water that meets World Health Organization (WHO) water quality guidelines. The currently accepted international estimate of global access to safe water, the WHO and United Nations Children's Fund's (UNICEF) Joint Monitoring Program (JMP) report, estimates the population with access to water service infrastructure that is classified as improved and unimproved. The JMP report uses access to improved water sources as a proxy for access to safe water, but improved water sources do not always meet drinking water quality guidelines. Therefore, this report likely overestimates the number of people with access to safe water. Based on the JMP estimate, the United Nations has recently announced that the world has reached the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) target for access to safe water. Our new framework employs a statistical model that incorporates source water quality, water supply interruptions, water storage practices, and point of use water treatment to estimate access to safe water, resulting in a figure that is lower than the JMP estimate of global access to safe water. We estimate that at least 28% of the world does not have access to safe water today, as compared to the JMP estimate of 12%. These findings indicate that much more work is needed on the international scale to meet the MDG target for access to safe water.

  19. Commercial experience with facility deactivation to safe storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sype, T.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fischer, S.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Lee, J.H. Jr.; Sanchez, L.C.; Ottinger, C.A.; Pirtle, G.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has shutdown many production reactors; the Department has begun a major effort to also shutdown a wide variety of other nuclear facilities. Because so many facilities are being closed, it is necessary to place many of them into a safe- storage status, i.e., deactivation, before conducting decommissioning- for perhaps as long as 20 years. The challenge is to achieve this safe-storage condition in a cost-effective manner while remaining in compliance with applicable regulations. The DOE Office of Environmental Management, Office of Transition and Management, commissioned a lessons-learned study of commercial experience with safe storage and decommissioning. Although the majority of the commercial experience has been with reactors, many of the lessons learned presented in this document can provide insight into transitioning challenges that Will be faced by the DOE weapons complex.

  20. Energy Innovations for Healthy Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogucz, Edward A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)

    2016-09-23

    Healthy buildings provide high indoor environmental quality for occupants while simultaneously reducing energy consumption. This project advanced the development and marketability of envisioned healthy, energy-efficient buildings through studies that evaluated the use of emerging technologies in commercial and residential buildings. The project also provided resources required for homebuilders to participate in DOE’s Builders Challenge, concomitant with the goal to reduce energy consumption in homes by at least 30% as a first step toward achieving envisioned widespread availability of net-zero energy homes by 2030. In addition, the project included outreach and education concerning energy efficiency in buildings.

  1. Secure, safe, and sensitive solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughan, Tina

    2012-04-01

    Tabloid sensationalism aside, the increase in attacks on health service workers has led to many hospitals and healthcare facilities re-assessing their security systems. Here, Tina Hughan, head of marketing for specialist in door opening systems, Assa Abloy, gives her view on how security providers can help healthcare estates and facilities teams to cope with this disturbing trend.

  2. TodaysBaby Quality Improvement: Safe Sleep Teaching and Role Modeling in 8 US Maternity Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellams, Ann; Parker, Margaret G; Geller, Nicole L; Moon, Rachel Y; Colson, Eve R; Drake, Emily; Corwin, Michael J; McClain, Mary; Golden, W Christopher; Hauck, Fern R

    2017-11-01

    Nursing education and role modeling can increase adherence to safe sleep practices. Eight US hospital maternity units with variable baseline approaches to education participated in a national multicenter nursing quality improvement (QI) intervention to promote safe sleep practices. The goals at participating maternity units were to (1) increase the rate of mothers who reported receiving safe sleep information from nurses to ≥90% and (2) increase the rates of infants observed sleeping supine in a safe environment to ≥90%. A safe sleep QI toolkit, designed for and provided to all sites, included an educational curriculum and tools to use for staff and parent education. Local teams implemented safe sleep education using the tools as plan-do-study-act cycles. After each cycle, audits assessing maternal report of nursing education on safe sleep and inpatient infant sleep position and environment were performed. The QI interventions lasted a median of 160 days (range, 101-273). Mothers reported receiving information on 4 primary safe sleep topics 72% to 95% of the time (a 24%-57% increase over the baseline). Additionally, 93% of infants were observed in a supine sleep position, and 88% of infants were observed in a safe sleep environment (a 24% and 33% increase over baseline, respectively). These rates were sustained up to 12 months later. Implementation of a multisite QI intervention for safe sleep parenting education and role modeling led to increased knowledge of and compliance with safe sleep practices during postpartum hospitalization. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. Safe Configuration of TLS Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-16

    The hash algorithm itself is another potential source of vulnerability: use of MD5 , for example, is discouraged as known collision attacks exist [25...across cipher suites. While most practical implementations do, the cipher specification must employ a hash algorithm to provide integrity assurances...http://www.isg.rhul.ac.uk/tls/ [25] Stevens, Marc. "On collisions for MD5 ." TU Eindhoven MSc thesis, [Online]. Available: http://www. win. tue

  4. Repatriation: How Safe Is It?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Davy

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This article provides updated information on the human rightsclimate in Laos as it pertains to the repatriation of Hmongrefugees from Thailand. The disappearance of Vue Mai and thearrests or demotions of Hmong officals in the Lao governmentare an indication of the problems faced by Hmong both asrepatriates and residents in Laos. The recent abuses againstseveral hundred Hmong at the Ban Phan Thao repatriation siteare described in detail.

  5. A next-generation, serum-free, highly purified Vero cell rabies vaccine is safe and as immunogenic as the reference vaccine Verorab® when administered according to a post-exposure regimen in healthy children and adults in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongcheng; Huang, Lirong; Li, Jia; Mo, Zhaojun; He, Bin; Wang, Yunpeng; Wu, Xiaohong; Minutello, Maria; Guinet-Morlot, Françoise; Pichon, Sylvie

    2013-12-05

    As an evolution of its currently licensed rabies vaccine Verorab(®), Sanofi Pasteur has developed a next-generation, serum-free, highly purified Vero rabies vaccine (PVRV-NG). Through this Phase III clinical trial, we aimed to demonstrate the non-inferiority of PVRV-NG over Verorab when administered according to a post-exposure regimen and to assess its clinical safety. A total of 816 healthy subjects aged ≥10 years were randomized according to a 2:1 ratio to receive PVRV-NG or Verorab. Half of the subjects were aged 10-17 years, the other half were aged ≥18 years. All subjects were to receive 5 injections on days 0, 3, 7, 14 and 28. Three blood samples were taken for rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (RVNA) assessment, at baseline, on day 14 and day 42. Solicited adverse reactions (between injections 1, 2 and 3, and within 7 days post-injections 4 and 5) and adverse events (up to 28 days after the last injection) were collected for clinical safety assessment; serious adverse events were reported up to 6-months after the last injection. The proportion of subjects with an RVNA titer ≥0.5 IU/mL after the third injection of PVRV-NG was non-inferior to the proportion of those who received Verorab. PVRV-NG was shown to be as immunogenic as Verorab in each age range in the per-protocol and full analysis sets. PVRV-NG induced a strong immune response in both age ranges, with high RVNA levels and increased geometric mean titers compared to baseline after each measured time point. PVRV-NG had a satisfactory safety profile after each injection, similar to Verorab with regards to the nature, frequency, duration and severity of adverse events. Two serious adverse events were reported, none was related to vaccination. This trial demonstrated the immunogenic non-inferiority of PVRV-NG over Verorab and showed that both vaccines have similar safety profiles. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01339312). This manuscript is the first full report of the

  6. Healthy Eating for Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Men Women Home Health Wellness Healthy Aging Healthy Aging 4 Types of Foods to Help Boost Your ... clean plate, there are many negative long-term consequences. Try these rewards instead. View More Articles Freshly ...

  7. Healthy Lifestyle: Women's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reduce menopausal symptoms, such as hot flashes and sleep disturbances. However, regular exercise can help you maintain a healthy weight, relieve stress and improve your quality of life. For most healthy women, the Department ...

  8. Having a Healthy Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stones Brain and Nervous System Having a Healthy Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Teens > Having a Healthy Pregnancy Print ... or she can help you to get treatment. Pregnancy Discomforts Pregnancy can cause some uncomfortable side effects. ...

  9. From Safe Systems to Patient Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarts, J.; Nøhr, C.

    2010-01-01

    for the third conference with the theme: The ability to design, implement and evaluate safe, useable and effective systems within complex health care organizations. The theme for this conference was "Designing and Implementing Health IT: from safe systems to patient safety". The contributions have reflected...... and implementation of safe systems and thus contribute to the agenda of patient safety? The contributions demonstrate how the health informatics community has contributed to the performance of significant research and to translating research findings to develop health care delivery and improve patient safety...

  10. Healthy Weight for Life: Actions for Communities, Individuals, and Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Providers Resources Contact Us Healthy Weight for Life Download These Healthy Weight Guides and Take Action A Vision for Healthy ... innovative nutrition, physical activity, and weight management programs. Download the two-page flyer about Healthy Weight for Life [PDF - 278 KB] . Indian Health Service ( ...

  11. Cigarette Alternatives: Are they Safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantakumari, Nisha; Muttappallymyalil, Jayakumary; John, Lisha Jenny; Sreedharan, Jayadevan

    2015-01-01

    In spite of limited data regarding the safety or effectiveness of electronic cigarette introduced into the market as a healthier alternative to tobacco smoking, its popularity has increased enormously. E-cigarettes have penetrated the market rapidly owing to the elaborate marketing network and attractive marketing strategies. Stated advantages include the claim that they help quit smoking and produce less exposure than conventional smoking. The list of disadvantages is even more elaborate. While the majority of the studies supporting health claims and efficacy for quitting smoking are not scientifically sound, they are also challenged by studies providing contradictory results. Owing to the limited evidence on the potential advantages and disadvantages of e-cigarettes, the debate on their safety continues.

  12. Distributed Programming via Safe Closure Passing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Haller

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Programming systems incorporating aspects of functional programming, e.g., higher-order functions, are becoming increasingly popular for large-scale distributed programming. New frameworks such as Apache Spark leverage functional techniques to provide high-level, declarative APIs for in-memory data analytics, often outperforming traditional "big data" frameworks like Hadoop MapReduce. However, widely-used programming models remain rather ad-hoc; aspects such as implementation trade-offs, static typing, and semantics are not yet well-understood. We present a new asynchronous programming model that has at its core several principles facilitating functional processing of distributed data. The emphasis of our model is on simplicity, performance, and expressiveness. The primary means of communication is by passing functions (closures to distributed, immutable data. To ensure safe and efficient distribution of closures, our model leverages both syntactic and type-based restrictions. We report on a prototype implementation in Scala. Finally, we present preliminary experimental results evaluating the performance impact of a static, type-based optimization of serialization.

  13. Thyroidectomy under local anaesthesia: how safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misauno, M A; Yilkudi, M G; Akwaras, A L; Embu, H Y; Ojo, E O; Dakum, N K; Sule, A Z; Ugwu, B T

    2008-03-01

    In order to compliment the inadequate health facilities in the rural areas in Nigeria, nongovernmental organisations provide adhoc outreach health camps that offer treatment in various medical specialties including surgery. Rural outreach health camps. To evaluate the safety of thyroidectomy under local anaesthesia at rural outreach setting with inadequate facilities for general anaesthesia. This was a prospective descriptive study of 33 consecutive cases of thyroidectomy performed using field block with 1% lignocaine and adrenaline 1: 200,000 dilution during two free medical outreaches that held at Jos, Nigeria in March and October 2005 respectively, lasting two weeks each. A total of 33 primary thyroid operations were performed consisting of 30 subtotal thyroidectomies (91%), 2 lobectomies (6%) and one total thyroidectomy (3%), The patients were aged between 23 and 62 years with a mean age of 45.8 years. There were 3 males and 30 females with a male: female ratio of 1:10. There was no mortality but morbidity was 2/33 (6%) Two complications were recorded in 2 patients and were superficial surgical site infection (3%) and reactionary haemorrhage (3%). We conclude that thyroidectomy under local anaesthesia is a safe procedure in experienced hands at rural settings with inadequate facilities for general anaesthesia.

  14. Safe Care to Knee Injuries in Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Águila Tejeda

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: the guarantee of sporting success lies in the appropriate functioning of the musculoskeletal system, given that its vulnerability hinders the performance of each athlete. Being timely is critical to provide safe care to the affections of knee; late diagnosis in this system may lead to the development of complications and hinder sport practice. Objective: to characterize knee injuries in athletes of the sport system in the province of Cienfuegos.Methods: an observational, quantitative and qualitative, longitudinal and retrospective study was conducted. It included 104 athletes who attended the Traumatology Consultation from 2009 to 2011, presenting different types of knee injuries in various stages of training. Variables such as age, sex, sport, site of injury, stage of training, kilocalories consumed, type of training, quality of equipment and diagnosis were analyzed. The procedure used consists of a comprehensive review of case notes and medical records of all patients that attended consultation during the period analyzed, from which the necessary data was collected. Interviews with coaches and technical staff were carried out as well. Results: knee injuries occur in all ages of athletes, with a slight predominance of males. Highest frequencies are those of the ligament and meniscus, with the highest incidence in athletics, volleyball and judo. Conservative treatment predominated.Conclusions: knee injuries require a timely treatment in order to achieve athlete's success and safety.

  15. Aluminum vaccine adjuvants: are they safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomljenovic, L; Shaw, C A

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum is an experimentally demonstrated neurotoxin and the most commonly used vaccine adjuvant. Despite almost 90 years of widespread use of aluminum adjuvants, medical science's understanding about their mechanisms of action is still remarkably poor. There is also a concerning scarcity of data on toxicology and pharmacokinetics of these compounds. In spite of this, the notion that aluminum in vaccines is safe appears to be widely accepted. Experimental research, however, clearly shows that aluminum adjuvants have a potential to induce serious immunological disorders in humans. In particular, aluminum in adjuvant form carries a risk for autoimmunity, long-term brain inflammation and associated neurological complications and may thus have profound and widespread adverse health consequences. In our opinion, the possibility that vaccine benefits may have been overrated and the risk of potential adverse effects underestimated, has not been rigorously evaluated in the medical and scientific community. We hope that the present paper will provide a framework for a much needed and long overdue assessment of this highly contentious medical issue.

  16. Cardiovascular aging and exercise in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, George A; McKelvie, Robert S

    2008-11-01

    Physical inactivity in an aging population is a major contributing factor to the rising numbers of older persons with chronic illnesses and disabilities. The purpose of this article is to review the relationship between physical inactivity and age-associated changes to the cardiovascular system, and provide guidance on prescribing exercise to healthy older persons in order to mitigate the adverse effects of cardiovascular aging. Interpretive review of the literature. A number of structural and functional changes occur in the cardiovascular system with advancing age, many of which are mediated by changes in vascular stiffness. These changes lead not only to cardiovascular events and strokes, but also to frailty, functional decline, and cognitive impairment. A substantial proportion of the decline in aerobic capacity with age may result from physical inactivity. Guidelines for the prescription of aerobic, resistance, and balance training for otherwise healthy older persons are provided. Lack of physical activity is a major risk factor for the epidemic of chronic disease and disability facing an aging population. Many age-associated changes in cardiovascular function result from physical inactivity. The benefits of regular exercise include prevention of cardiovascular events, disability, and cognitive impairment. Age is not a contraindication to exercise, which can usually be initiated safely in older persons.

  17. Think Before You Ink: Are Tattoos Safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Consumer Updates Think Before You Ink: Are Tattoos Safe? Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... I be concerned about unsafe practices, or the tattoo ink itself? Both. While you can get serious ...

  18. How to Safely Use Nail Care Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates How to Safely Use Nail Care Products Share Tweet Linkedin ... more than 10 minutes per hand, per session. How to Report Problems with Nail Care Products If you ...

  19. When Is an Opioid Safe to Take?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/news/fullstory_166872.html When Is an Opioid Safe to Take? Doctors say it can treat ... Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA): Why was I prescribed opioids? Did the doctor assume opioids are the strongest ...

  20. AFSC/REFM: Groundfish SAFE Economic Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Groundfish SAFE Economic Report, published annually as a supplement to the Stock Assessment and Fishery Evaluation Reports for Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands...

  1. Implicit attitudes towards risky and safe driving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Laila Marianne; Sømhovd, Mikael Julius; Møller, Mette

    ; further, self-reports of the intention to drive safely (or not) are socially sensitive. Therefore, we examined automatic preferences towards safe and risky driving with a Go/No-go Association Task (GNAT). The results suggest that (1) implicit attitudes towards driving behavior can be measured reliably...... with the GNAT; (2) implicit attitudes towards safe driving versus towards risky driving may be separable constructs. We propose that research on driving behavior may benefit from routinely including measures of implicit cognition. A practical advantage is a lesser susceptibility to social desirability biases......, compared to self-report methods. Pending replication in future research, the apparent dissociation between implicit attitudes towards safe versus risky driving that we observed may contribute to a greater theoretical understanding of the causes of unsafe and risky driving behavior....

  2. Safe disposal of surplus plutonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, W. L.; Naz, S.; Lutze, W.; Busch, R.; Prinja, A.; Stoll, W.

    2001-06-01

    About 150 tons of weapons grade and weapons usable plutonium (metal, oxide, and in residues) have been declared surplus in the USA and Russia. Both countries plan to convert the metal and oxide into mixed oxide fuel for nuclear power reactors. Russia has not yet decided what to do with the residues. The US will convert residues into a ceramic, which will then be over-poured with highly radioactive borosilicate glass. The radioactive glass is meant to provide a deterrent to recovery of plutonium, as required by a US standard. Here we show a waste form for plutonium residues, zirconia/boron carbide (ZrO 2/B 4C), with an unprecedented combination of properties: a single, radiation-resistant, and chemically durable phase contains the residues; billion-year-old natural analogs are available; and criticality safety is given under all conceivable disposal conditions. ZrO 2/B 4C can be disposed of directly, without further processing, making it attractive to all countries facing the task of plutonium disposal. The US standard for protection against recovery can be met by disposal of the waste form together with used reactor fuel.

  3. Healthy eating at schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabinsky, Marianne

    . The present PhD thesis is based on evaluation of the dietary effect of this project. There is room for improvement of the dietary habits of Danish children. Dietary habits are influenced by multiple factors across different contexts. The school setting is known as a suitable arena for promotion of healthy...... into account the multiple factors and environments which affect the dietary habits of children. The focus of such an intervention could be implementation of a sustainable school food programme. Another focus could be improvement of the packed lunches brought from home with the purpose to contribute......Background and aim In 2007, the Danish Food Industry Agency announced a project where Danish schools could apply for funds to establish a school food programme to provide the school children with free school meals for two months during 2008. This school food programme should be tested and evaluated...

  4. Capturing Essential Information to Achieve Safe Interoperability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weininger, Sandy; Jaffe, Michael B; Rausch, Tracy; Goldman, Julian M

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we describe the role of "clinical scenario" information to assure the safety of interoperable systems, as well as the system's ability to deliver the requisite clinical functionality to improve clinical care. Described are methods and rationale for capturing the clinical needs, workflow, hazards, and device interactions in the clinical environment. Key user (clinician and clinical engineer) needs and system requirements can be derived from this information, therefore, improving the communication from clinicians to medical device and information technology system developers. This methodology is intended to assist the health care community, including researchers, standards developers, regulators, and manufacturers, by providing clinical definition to support requirements in the systems engineering process, particularly those focusing on development of Integrated Clinical Environments described in standard ASTM F2761. Our focus is on identifying and documenting relevant interactions and medical device capabilities within the system using a documentation tool called medical device interface data sheets and mitigating hazardous situations related to workflow, product usability, data integration, and the lack of effective medical device-health information technology system integration to achieve safe interoperability. Portions of the analysis of a clinical scenario for a "patient-controlled analgesia safety interlock" are provided to illustrate the method. Collecting better clinical adverse event information and proposed solutions can help identify opportunities to improve current device capabilities and interoperability and support a learning health system to improve health care delivery. Developing and analyzing clinical scenarios are the first steps in creating solutions to address vexing patient safety problems and enable clinical innovation. A Web-based research tool for implementing a means of acquiring and managing this information, the Clinical

  5. Managing Cassini Safe Mode Attitude at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft was launched on October 15, 1997 and arrived at Saturn on June 30, 2004. It has performed detailed observations and remote sensing of Saturn, its rings, and its satellites since that time. In the event safe mode interrupts normal orbital operations, Cassini has flight software fault protection algorithms to detect, isolate, and recover to a thermally safe and commandable attitude and then wait for further instructions from the ground. But the Saturn environment is complex, and safety hazards change depending on where Cassini is in its orbital trajectory around Saturn. Selecting an appropriate safe mode attitude that insures safe operation in the Saturn environment, including keeping the star tracker field of view clear of bright bodies, while maintaining a quiescent, commandable attitude, is a significant challenge. This paper discusses the Cassini safe table management strategy and the key criteria that must be considered, especially during low altitude flybys of Titan, in deciding what spacecraft attitude should be used in the event of safe mode.

  6. Curiosity's Autonomous Surface Safing Behavior Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Tracy A.; Manning, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    The safing routines on all robotic deep-space vehicles are designed to put the vehicle in a power and thermally safe configuration, enabling communication with the mission operators on Earth. Achieving this goal is made a little more difficult on Curiosity because the power requirements for the core avionics and the telecommunication equipment exceed the capability of the single power source, the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator. This drove the system design to create an operational mode, called "sleep mode", where the vehicle turns off most of the loads in order to charge the two Li-ion batteries. The system must keep the vehicle safe from over-heat and under-heat conditions, battery cell failures, under-voltage conditions, and clock failures, both while the computer is running and while the system is sleeping. The other goal of a safing routine is to communicate. On most spacecraft, this simply involves turning on the receiver and transmitter continuously. For Curiosity, Earth is above the horizon only a part of the day for direct communication to the Earth, and the orbiter overpass opportunities only occur a few times a day. The design must robustly place the Rover in a communicable condition at the correct time. This paper discusses Curiosity's autonomous safing behavior and describes how the vehicle remains power and thermally safe while sleeping, as well as a description of how the Rover communicates with the orbiters and Earth at specific times.

  7. Safe haven laws as crime control theater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Michelle; Miller, Monica K; Griffin, Timothy

    2010-07-01

    This article examines safe haven laws, which allow parents to legally abandon their infants. The main objective is to determine whether safe haven laws fit the criteria of crime control theater, a term used to describe public policies that produce the appearance, but not the effect, of crime control, and as such are essentially socially constructed "solutions" to socially constructed crime "problems." The analysis will apply the principles of crime control theater to safe haven laws. Specifically, the term crime control theater applies to laws that are reactionary responses to perceived criminal threats and are often widely supported as a way to address the crime in question. Such laws are attractive because they appeal to mythic narratives (i.e., saving an innocent child from a predator); however they are likely ineffective due to the complexity of the crime. These laws can have deleterious effects when policymakers make false claims of success and stunt public discourse (e.g., drawing attention away from more frequent and preventable crimes). This analysis applies these criteria to safe haven laws to determine whether such laws can be classified as crime control theater. Many qualities inherent to crime control theater are present in safe haven laws. For example, the laws are highly publicized, their intentions lack moral ambiguity, rare cases of success legitimize law enforcement and other agencies, and they appeal to the public sense of responsibility in preventing crime. Yet the goal of saving infant lives may be unattainable. These qualities make the effectiveness of the laws questionable and suggest they may be counterproductive. This analysis determined that safe haven laws are socially constructed solutions to the socially constructed problem of child abandonment. Safe haven laws are appropriately classified as crime control theater. It is imperative that further research be conducted to examine the effectiveness and collateral effects of safe haven laws

  8. Household's willingness to pay for arsenic safe drinking water in Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, N.A.; Brouwer, R.; Yang, H.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines willingness to pay (WTP) in Bangladesh for arsenic (As) safe drinking water across different As-risk zones, applying a double bound discrete choice value elicitation approach. The study aims to provide a robust estimate of the benefits of As safe drinking water supply, which is

  9. Spermicidal Activity of the Safe Natural Antimicrobial Peptide Subtilosin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Chikindas

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis (BV, a condition affecting millions of women each year, is primarily caused by the gram-variable organism Gardnerella vaginalis. A number of organisms associated with BV cases have been reported to develop multidrug resistance, leading to the need for alternative therapies. Previously, we reported the antimicrobial peptide subtilosin has proven antimicrobial activity against G. vaginalis, but not against the tested healthy vaginal microbiota of lactobacilli. After conducting tissue sensitivity assays using an ectocervical tissue model, we determined that human cells remained viable after prolonged exposures to partially-purified subtilosin, indicating the compound is safe for human use. Subtilosin was shown to eliminate the motility and forward progression of human spermatozoa in a dose-dependent manner, and can therefore be considered a general spermicidal agent. These results suggest subtilosin would be a valuable component in topical personal care products aimed at contraception and BV prophylaxis and treatment.

  10. Embracing Safe Ground Test Facility Operations and Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Steven C.; Green, Donald R.

    2010-01-01

    Conducting integrated operations and maintenance in wind tunnel ground test facilities requires a balance of meeting due dates, efficient operation, responsiveness to the test customer, data quality, effective maintenance (relating to readiness and reliability), and personnel and facility safety. Safety is non-negotiable, so the balance must be an "and" with other requirements and needs. Pressure to deliver services faster at increasing levels of quality in under-maintained facilities is typical. A challenge for management is to balance the "need for speed" with safety and quality. It s especially important to communicate this balance across the organization - workers, with a desire to perform, can be tempted to cut corners on defined processes to increase speed. Having a lean staff can extend the time required for pre-test preparations, so providing a safe work environment for facility personnel and providing good stewardship for expensive National capabilities can be put at risk by one well-intending person using at-risk behavior. This paper documents a specific, though typical, operational environment and cites management and worker safety initiatives and tools used to provide a safe work environment. Results are presented and clearly show that the work environment is a relatively safe one, though still not good enough to keep from preventing injury. So, the journey to a zero injury work environment - both in measured reality and in the minds of each employee - continues. The intent of this paper is to provide a benchmark for others with operational environments and stimulate additional sharing and discussion on having and keeping a safe work environment.

  11. Promoting Healthy Body Image in Middle School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akos, Patrick; Levitt, Dana Heller

    2002-01-01

    Provides advice for school counselors on promoting healthy body image among middle school students. Interventions for the promotion of healthy body image at individual, group, and systemic levels can offer students a protective factor for common disruptions associated with puberty and the transition into middle school. Outlines issues for…

  12. Are there healthy obese?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griera Borrás, José Luis; Contreras Gilbert, José

    2014-01-01

    It is currently postulated that not all obese individuals have to be considered as pathological subjects. From 10% to 20% of obese people studied do not show the metabolic changes common in obese patients. The term "healthy obese" has been coined to refer to these patients and differentiate them from the larger and more common group of pathological obese subjects. However, the definition of "healthy obese" is not clear. Use of "healthy obese" as a synonym for obese without metabolic complications is risky. Clinical markers such as insulin resistance are used to identify this pathology. It is not clear that healthy obese subjects have lower morbidity and mortality than pathologically obese patients. According to some authors, healthy obese would represent an early stage in evolution towards pathological obesity. There is no agreement as to the need to treat healthy obese subjects. Copyright © 2012 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Safe Detection System for Hydrogen Leaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lieberman, Robert A. [Intelligent Optical Systems, Inc., Torrance, CA (United States); Beshay, Manal [Intelligent Optical Systems, Inc., Torrance, CA (United States)

    2012-02-29

    Hydrogen is an "environmentally friendly" fuel for future transportation and other applications, since it produces only pure ("distilled") water when it is consumed. Thus, hydrogen-powered vehicles are beginning to proliferate, with the total number of such vehicles expected to rise to nearly 100,000 within the next few years. However, hydrogen is also an odorless, colorless, highly flammable gas. Because of this, there is an important need for hydrogen safety monitors that can warn of hazardous conditions in vehicles, storage facilities, and hydrogen production plants. To address this need, IOS has developed a unique intrinsically safe optical hydrogen sensing technology, and has embodied it in detector systems specifically developed for safety applications. The challenge of using light to detect a colorless substance was met by creating chemically-sensitized optical materials whose color changes in the presence of hydrogen. This reversible reaction provides a sensitive, reliable, way of detecting hydrogen and measuring its concentration using light from low-cost LEDs. Hydrogen sensors based on this material were developed in three completely different optical formats: point sensors ("optrodes"), integrated optic sensors ("optical chips"), and optical fibers ("distributed sensors") whose entire length responds to hydrogen. After comparing performance, cost, time-to-market, and relative market need for these sensor types, the project focused on designing a compact optrode-based single-point hydrogen safety monitor. The project ended with the fabrication of fifteen prototype units, and the selection of two specific markets: fuel cell enclosure monitoring, and refueling/storage safety. Final testing and development of control software for these markets await future support.

  14. Monitoring moving queries inside a safe region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khalidi, Haidar; Taniar, David; Betts, John; Alamri, Sultan

    2014-01-01

    With mobile moving range queries, there is a need to recalculate the relevant surrounding objects of interest whenever the query moves. Therefore, monitoring the moving query is very costly. The safe region is one method that has been proposed to minimise the communication and computation cost of continuously monitoring a moving range query. Inside the safe region the set of objects of interest to the query do not change; thus there is no need to update the query while it is inside its safe region. However, when the query leaves its safe region the mobile device has to reevaluate the query, necessitating communication with the server. Knowing when and where the mobile device will leave a safe region is widely known as a difficult problem. To solve this problem, we propose a novel method to monitor the position of the query over time using a linear function based on the direction of the query obtained by periodic monitoring of its position. Periodic monitoring ensures that the query is aware of its location all the time. This method reduces the costs associated with communications in client-server architecture. Computational results show that our method is successful in handling moving query patterns.

  15. Use of non-carbonated soft drinks to provide safe drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracey, M; Burke, V; Robinson, J

    1985-03-01

    Non-carbonated, low-calorie soft drink concentrates (cordials), when diluted according to manufacturers' instructions, had significant antibacterial effects in vitro. Bacteria affected include Vibrio cholerae, Aeromonas hydrophila, Shigella sonnei, Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli. With vibrios, bacterial counts were reduced from 10(6)/ml to undetectable numbers in less than 10 min. Escherichia coli in an initial concentration of 10(6)/ml became undetectable after incubation for 1 h with one brand of cordial. Naturally contaminated water can be rendered potable by incubation with cordials at room temperature for 1 h. This may be a way to reduce the risk of water-borne diarrhoea, particularly where the cleanliness of drinking waters cannot be otherwise assured, for example when making up oral rehydration fluids and for travellers in high-risk areas.

  16. Voter comparator switch provides fail safe data communications system - A concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczela, L. J.; Wilgus, D. S.

    1971-01-01

    System indicates status of computers and controls operational modes. Two matrices are used - one relating to permissible system states, the other relating to requested system states. Concept is useful to designers of digital data transmission systems and time shared computer systems.

  17. Nitrous oxide provides safe and effective analgesia for minor paediatric procedures - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rie S; Bayat, Allan; Steen, Nick Phaff

    2013-01-01

    Pain and distress during minor hospital-related procedures is a familiar problem in many children. Inadequate relief of children's procedural pain and distress not only affects the experience of the children and their parents, but also adversely impacts procedural success. We aimed to review the ...... the safety and efficacy of nitrous oxide during brief, but painful paediatric procedures and to compare nitrous oxide with some of the commonly used pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for relieving anxiety and mild to moderate pain in Denmark....

  18. The Dutch secret : How to provide safe drinking water without chlorine in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.W.M.H.; Medema, G.J.; Van Dijk, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    The Netherlands is one of the few countries where chlorine is not used at all, neither for primary disinfection nor to maintain a residual disinfectant in the distribution network. The Dutch approach that allows production and distribution of drinking water without the use of chlorine while not

  19. SEAFOODplus - how to provide health promoting, safe seafood of high eating quality to consumers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børresen, Torger

    2008-01-01

    of raw materials from aquaculture and from traditional fisheries. The aquaculture component will study the effects of dietary modulation, husbandry, fish physiology, genetics and pre-slaughter conditions. Validated traceability systems are assessed to make it possible to apply a total chain approach from......, by identifying risk factors and avoiding risks caused by viral and bacterial contamination and biogenic amines in seafood. The total value chain is addressed by developing consumer driven tailor-made, functional seafood products to improve health and to ensure nutritional quality and safety by full utilisation...

  20. Safe and Encouraging Home Providing the Countdown to Leadership? Finnish Female Leaders' Childhood Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyvärinen, Sanna; Uusiautti, Satu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to dissect the connection between childhood homes and leadership. The study forms a part of a larger study on Finnish female leaders and their life paths. The following research question was set for this study: how did Finnish female leaders describe their childhood and home environment? It was studied through two…

  1. Dietary Recommendations for Healthy Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Preschoolers Infographic How to Make a Healthy Home Dietary Recommendations for Healthy Children Top 10 Tips to Help Children Develop Healthy Habits Fruit and Veggie Toolkit for Kids Healthy Foods ...

  2. Resistant starch: safe intakes and legal status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldring, Jay M

    2004-01-01

    Resistant starch (RS) can provide added values such as health benefits and fiber content to many processed foods without compromising taste and product quality. RS is defined as the total amount of starch and the products of starch degradation that resists digestion in the small intestine of healthy people, and the class is comprised of many chemically and physically distinct entities. Some forms of RS are present naturally in many foods, and average global consumption is estimated at 3-10 g/day. Among the best-characterized forms of RS are those derived from high-amylose maize (HAM). Animal and human studies confirm the health benefits and safety of HAM-derived RS as a food ingredient. Legally, RS can be sold in most countries if it falls under current food classifications. However, approved fiber measurements vary throughout the world, and different methods are required to measure RS derived from specific sources. A particular RS can only be claimed as fiber on the nutrition label (and as a source for a high-fiber claim) if the method appropriate to that product is approved in the country of interest. Similarly, each individual country's regulations must be consulted prior to developing health or other nutrition label claims, such as calorie content for RS-containing products, as these regulations vary widely around the world.

  3. Safe play areas on farms in New South Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depczynski, Julie; Herde, Emily; Fragar, Lyn; Lower, Tony

    2013-08-01

    To assess the prevalence and security of fenced house yards on NSW farms and rural properties with a view to providing information to increase the development of safe play areas on farms. A cross-sectional stratified study using computer-assisted telephone interviewing. Interviews were conducted in the four rural Area Health Services throughout February to December 2008. Randomly selected sample of 1117 adults living on a farm or rural property in the study areas. Self-reported issues involving fenced house yards or safe play areas for children. Overall, 79.8% of farm respondents reported that they had a fenced house yard or safe play area. For those respondents with a fenced house yard, 66.6% reported that it was secure enough to prevent /make it difficult for a young child to wander away unsupervised. Based on these figures, it is estimated that only 53.1% of all farms or rural properties have a secure fenced house yard or safe play area. There were statistically significant variations between geographic locations, with the North Coast (37.7%) being lower. This study illustrates a need across rural NSW to further promote, install or upgrade secure fenced house yards or safe play areas. While all geographic regions of the state could improve provision to protect children, there may also be some that are in need of more intensive intervention programs to enhance compliance. Such a proposition may also be relevant on a national level. © 2013 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  4. Sun Safe Mode Controller Design for LADEE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Jesse C.; Swei, Sean S. M.; Nakamura, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of sun safe controllers which are designed to keep the spacecraft power positive and thermally balanced in the event an anomaly is detected. Employed by NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE), the controllers utilize the measured sun vector and the spacecraft body rates for feedback control. To improve the accuracy of sun vector estimation, the least square minimization approach is applied to process the sensor data, which is proven to be effective and accurate. To validate the controllers, the LADEE spacecraft model engaging the sun safe mode was first simulated and then compared with the actual LADEE orbital fight data. The results demonstrated the applicability of the proposed sun safe controllers.

  5. The safe transport of radioactive materials

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, R

    1966-01-01

    The Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials is a handbook that details the safety guidelines in transporting radioactive materials. The title covers the various regulations and policies, along with the safety measures and procedures of radioactive material transport. The text first details the 1963 version of the IAEA regulation for the safe transport of radioactive materials; the regulation covers the classification of radionuclides for transport purposes and the control of external radiation hazards during the transport of radioactive materials. The next chapter deals with concerns in the im

  6. Spousal Abuse in Nicholas Spark's Safe Haven

    OpenAIRE

    Sudargo, Laura M; Riyanto, Theophilus J

    2014-01-01

    Kevin Tierney is the male main character in Safe Haven who does spousal abuse toward his wife, Erin. The analysis is on what spousal abusive behavior is and what the effects of the spousal abuse are in Nicholas Spark's Safe Haven. The concept of spousal abuse proposed by Tina de Benedictis, Ph. D. is applied to reveal the spousal abuse done by Kevin and its effects on his spouse, Erin. In this research, I discover that Kevin does spousal abuse toward Erin that categorized into seven which are...

  7. Landscape planning for a safe city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ishikawa

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available To create a safe city free from natural disasters has been one of the important criteria in city planning. Since large cities have suffered from large fires caused by earthquakes, the planning of open spaces to prevent the spread of fires is part of the basic structure of city planning in Japan. Even in the feudal city of Edo, the former name of Tokyo, there had been open spaces to prevent fire disasters along canals and rivers. This paper discusses the historical evolution of open space planning, that we call landscape planning, through the experiences in Tokyo, and clarifies the characteristics and problems for achieving a safe city.

  8. Ergonomics: safe patient handling and mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmark, Beth; Mechan, Patricia; Shores, Lynne

    2015-03-01

    This article reviews and investigates the issues surrounding ergonomics, with a specific focus on safe patient handling and mobility. The health care worker of today faces many challenges, one of which is related to the safety of patients. Safe patient handling and mobility is on the forefront of the movement to improve patient safety. This article reviews the risks associated with patient handling and mobility, and informs the reader of current evidence-based practice relevant to this area of care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Now, It's Your Turn: How You Can Take Medicine Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Taking Medicines Safely Now, It's Your Turn: How You Can Take Medicine Safely ... medicine. The pharmacist has filled the prescription. Now it's up to you to take the medicine safely. ...

  10. Celebra Halloween de manera segura (Halloween: Have Fun and Stay Safe and Healthy)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-10-15

    Las celebraciones de Halloween son muy divertidas para los niños, pero enfermarse o lastimarse por esta causa no debe ser parte de la diversión. En este podcast para niños, los personajes de Kidtastics ofrecen algunos consejos sencillos para mantenerse seguro y saludable en Halloween.  Created: 10/15/2012 by CDC Office of Women’s Health.   Date Released: 10/15/2012.

  11. Ergonomics as a practice for safe and healthy mining in South African mines

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schutte, S

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available significant occupational health and safety risks. In short, the application of ergonomics has the potential to promote the maintenance of health, efficiency and well-being among mine workers....

  12. Making the "new American workplace" safe and healthy: a joint labor-management-researcher approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurman, S J

    1996-04-01

    The American workplace is now in the midst of the most significant change since the advent of mass production. Whether these changes will lead to improvements in worker health and safety is not clear. This paper describes an approach to intervention and research-participatory action research (PAR)-that has the potential to redesign work organizations to improve performance while also improving health and safety. In the PAR method, researchers, managers, workers, and unions collaborate in a process of data-guided problem solving intended both to improve the system's performance and to contribute to general scientific knowledge. A case study example illustrates the use of a PAR approach in an automobile parts facility where labor, management, and researchers jointly conducted a longitudinal project aimed at reducing the major sources of stress and enhancing employee well-being. Results from the 6 year project suggest that, properly implemented, PAR has the potential to both lead to improved intervention and contribute to theoretical advances in occupational safety and health. The PAR approach to intervention research is contrasted with the total quality approach (TQA), and some suggestions are made for improving PAR research designs.

  13. Salud y seguridad en las fiestas del invierno (Stay Safe and Healthy This Winter!)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-11-23

    En este podcast para niños, Kidtastics ofrece ideas sencillas sobre cómo mantenerse seguros y saludables durante las fiestas de fin de año.  Created: 11/23/2010 by CDC Office of Women’s Health.   Date Released: 12/27/2011.

  14. Salud y seguridad en el otoño (Have a Safe and Healthy Fall)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-14

    El otoño es una gran época para hacer nuevas actividades saludables con tus papás. Invita a tus amigos a la casa para probar nuevos alimentos o para competir a ver quién rastrilla más hojas. Para todo lo que planees, ¡asegúrate de divertirte manteniéndote seguro!  Created: 10/14/2010 by CDC Office of Women’s Health.   Date Released: 1/10/2012.

  15. Coordination and Collaboration in European Research towards Healthy and Safe Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riediker, Michael

    2011-07-01

    Nanotechnology is becoming part of our daily life in a wide range of products such as computers, bicycles, sunscreens or nanomedicines. While these applications already become reality, considerable work awaits scientists, engineers, and policy makers, who want such nanotechnological products to yield a maximum of benefit at a minimum of social, environmental, economic and (occupational) health cost. Considerable efforts for coordination and collaboration in research are needed if one wants to reach these goals in a reasonable time frame and an affordable price tag. This is recognized in Europe by the European Commission which funds not only research projects but also supports the coordination of research efforts. One of these coordination efforts is NanoImpactNet, a researcher-operated network, which started in 2008 promote scientific cross-talk across all disciplines on the health and environmental impact of nanomaterials. Stakeholders contribute to these activities, notably the definition of research and knowledge needs. Initial discussions in this domain focused on finding an agreement on common metrics, and which elements are needed for standardized approaches for hazard and exposure identification. There are many nanomaterial properties that may play a role. Hence, to gain the time needed to study this complex matter full of uncertainties, researchers and stakeholders unanimously called for simple, easy and fast risk assessment tools that can support decision making in this rapidly moving and growing domain. Today, several projects are starting or already running that will develop such assessment tools. At the same time, other projects investigate in depth which factors and material properties can lead to unwanted toxicity or exposure, what mechanisms are involved and how such responses can be predicted and modelled. A vision for the future is that once these factors, properties and mechanisms are understood, they can and will be accounted for in the development of new products and production processes following the idea of "Safety by Design". The promise of all these efforts is a future with nanomaterials where most of their risks are recognized and addressed before they even reach the market.

  16. Food Safety Challenges towards Safe, Healthy, and Nutritious Street Foods in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Khairuzzaman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The street foods play an important socioeconomic role in meeting food and nutritional requirements of city consumers at affordable prices to the lower and middle income people. The number of food poisoning notifications rose steadily worldwide since the inception of E. coli O157:H7 outbreak in the 1980s to date. This may be partly attributed to improved surveillance, increased global trade and travel, changes in modern food production, the impact of modern lifestyles, changes in food consumption, and the emergence of new pathogens. Consumer’s knowledge and attitude may influence food safety behavior and practice. For the sake of public health, it is important to understand the epidemiology of foodborne illnesses that help in prevention and control efforts, appropriately allocating resources to control foodborne illness, monitoring and evaluation of food safety measures, development of new food safety standards, and assessment of the cost-effectiveness of interventions. This review paper described the sociodemographic characteristics, common hazards, and occupational hazards of street food vendors, microbial risk associated with street food, food safety interventions and control measures, regulatory aspects and legal requirements, financial constraints, and attitudes.

  17. Healthy Beginnings: Lead Safe Families. An English as a Second Language Curriculum on Lead Poisoning Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Development Center, Inc., Newton, MA.

    The materials are designed to help teachers of English as a Second Language (ESL) at all levels educate adult students about hazards and prevention of lead poisoning, and to encourage use of English within the context of daily living situations. The materials consist of: a teacher's guide that describes the instructional units and lists resources…

  18. Measuring Dutch meals, Healthy diet and safe food in the Netherlands, Summary and Key messages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreijl CF van; Knaap AGAC; VTV

    2004-01-01

    Food in the Netherlands is safer than ever before, but the Dutch eat too much and the wrong types of food. This causes a substantial health loss and shortens life-expectancy by an average 2 years. These are some important conclusions from a report that was originally written in Dutch, entitled "Ons

  19. Our food, our health - Healthy diet and safe food in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreijl CF van; Knaap AGAC; Raaij JMA van; SIR; CVG

    2006-01-01

    Food in the Netherlands is safer than ever before, but the Dutch eat too much and the wrong types of food. This causes a substantial health loss and shortens life-expectancy with on average 2 years. These are some important conclusions from a report that was originally written in Dutch, entitled

  20. Food Safety Challenges towards Safe, Healthy, and Nutritious Street Foods in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairuzzaman, Md; Chowdhury, Fatema Moni; Zaman, Sharmin; Al Mamun, Arafat; Bari, Md Latiful

    2014-01-01

    The street foods play an important socioeconomic role in meeting food and nutritional requirements of city consumers at affordable prices to the lower and middle income people. The number of food poisoning notifications rose steadily worldwide since the inception of E. coli O157:H7 outbreak in the 1980s to date. This may be partly attributed to improved surveillance, increased global trade and travel, changes in modern food production, the impact of modern lifestyles, changes in food consumption, and the emergence of new pathogens. Consumer's knowledge and attitude may influence food safety behavior and practice. For the sake of public health, it is important to understand the epidemiology of foodborne illnesses that help in prevention and control efforts, appropriately allocating resources to control foodborne illness, monitoring and evaluation of food safety measures, development of new food safety standards, and assessment of the cost-effectiveness of interventions. This review paper described the sociodemographic characteristics, common hazards, and occupational hazards of street food vendors, microbial risk associated with street food, food safety interventions and control measures, regulatory aspects and legal requirements, financial constraints, and attitudes.

  1. Creating an Environment for Safe and Healthy Sleep in Child Care Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Bobbie

    2012-01-01

    Along with nutrition, physical activity, and secure attachments, sleep is a basic requirement for a child's growth and brain development. Sleep is important for health and wellness, especially for growing infants and young children. Unfortunately, the amount of time children spend sleeping seems to be declining. If only sleep-deprived children…

  2. 76 FR 56784 - Safe and Healthy Homes Investment Partnerships: Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... 20410, telephone number 202-708-0310 (this is not a toll-free number). Persons with hearing or speech... superior to addressing these problems one by one.'' \\2\\ In the report commissioned by Congress as a part of... job-experience with units, and/or requirements that a specific number of units are treated on an...

  3. Intelligence and safe and healthy behavior in a small sample of students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cramer, J.S.; Hoogendoorn, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    There is ample evidence in the epidemiological literature that intelligence (like education and affluence) is related with reduced mortality rates and a longer life. This may be the direct result of safer and healthier behavior of more intelligent people. We have tried to test this hypothesis by a

  4. "Healthy" Human Development Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineer, Merwan; Roy, Nilanjana; Fink, Sari

    2010-01-01

    In the Human Development Index (HDI), life expectancy is the only indicator used in modeling the dimension "a long and healthy life". Whereas life expectancy is a direct measure of quantity of life, it is only an indirect measure of healthy years lived. In this paper we attempt to remedy this omission by introducing into the HDI the morbidity…

  5. Healthy Homes Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Gina; Lyon, Melinda; Russ, Randall

    2012-01-01

    Extension is focusing on healthy homes programming. Extension educators are not qualified to diagnose consumers' medical problems as they relate to housing. We cannot give medical advice. Instead, we can help educate consumers about home conditions that may affect their well-being. Extension educators need appropriate healthy homes tools to…

  6. Effectiveness of Interventions to Promote Safe Firearm Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowhani-Rahbar, Ali; Simonetti, Joseph A; Rivara, Frederick P

    2016-01-01

    Despite supportive evidence for an association between safe firearm storage and lower risk of firearm injury, the effectiveness of interventions that promote such practices remains unclear. Guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) checklist, we conducted a systematic review of randomized and quasi-experimental controlled studies of safe firearm storage interventions using a prespecified search of 9 electronic databases with no restrictions on language, year, or location from inception through May 27, 2015. Study selection and data extraction were independently performed by 2 investigators. The Cochrane Collaboration's domain-specific tool for assessing risk of bias was used to evaluate the quality of included studies. Seven clinic- and community-based studies published in 2000-2012 using counseling with or without safety device provision met the inclusion criteria. All 3 studies that provided a safety device significantly improved firearm storage practices, while 3 of 4 studies that provided no safety device failed to show an effect. Heterogeneity of studies precluded conducting a meta-analysis. We discuss methodological considerations, gaps in the literature, and recommendations for conducting future studies. Although additional studies are needed, the totality of evidence suggests that counseling augmented by device provision can effectively encourage individuals to store their firearms safely. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Preference for safe over risky options in binge eating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémi eNeveu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Binge eating has been usually viewed as a preference for risky over safe appetitive rewards although this view has been drawn without manipulating stressing-inducing food cues. In healthy women, stressful cues bias behavior for safer options, raising the question of whether food cues modulate binging patients’ behaviors towards safer options.Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted with binging patients (20 bulimia nervosa (BN and 23 binging anorexia nervosa (ANB patients and two control groups (22 non-binging restrictive (ANR anorexia nervosa patients and 20 healthy participants, without any concomitant impulsive disorder. We assessed decisions under risk with a gambling task with known probabilities and decisions under uncertainty with the balloon analog risk taking task (BART with unknown probabilities of winning, in three cued-conditions including neutral, binge food and stressful cues.Results: In the gambling task, binging patients and ANR patients adopted similar safer attitudes and coherently elicited a higher aversion to losses when primed by food as compared to neutral cues. This differential behavior was also observed in the BART in BN and ANR patients only, aligning with the behavior of healthy controls when primed with stressful cues. In ANB patients, similar safer behaviors were observed in food and neutral conditions in the BART but with a higher variability in their choices in food condition. This higher variability was associated with higher difficulties to discard irrelevant information. Conclusion: Decision making under risk and under uncertainty is not fundamentally altered in binging patients but might be disturbed by a concomitant task.

  8. SafeDroid: A Distributed Malware Detection Service for Android

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goyal, Rohit; Spognardi, Angelo; Dragoni, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    static analysis and machine learning techniques. SafeDroid has been designed as a user friendly service, providing detailed feedback in case of malware detection. The detection service is optimized to be lightweight and easily updated. The feature set on which the micro-service of detection relies......Android platform has become a primary target for malware. In this paper we present SafeDroid, an open source distributed service to detect malicious apps on Android by combining static analysis and machine learning techniques. It is composed by three micro-services, working together, combining...... on on has been selected and optimized in order to focus only on the most distinguishing characteristics of the Android apps. We present a prototype to show the effectiveness of the detection mechanism service and the feasibility of the approach....

  9. How to encourage children to use mobile phones safely.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyse, Karen

    2011-12-01

    The safe use of mobile phones is part of the health promotion duty of children's nurses and those nurses working in schools. In this article the author advocates that children and young people should be encouraged to keep and use their mobiles in a safe place, avoid lengthy and incessant calls, provide their number only to those they feel they can trust and switch off the phone as soon as possible. They need to take care with the type of messages they send and to tell someone they can trust about any cyberbullying. The nurse can also help with school policies and can attend groups in schools and youth organisations to discuss the positive and negative aspects of mobile phone technology.

  10. Updated Guidance for Safe and Effective Use of Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, Naomi K; Curtis, Kathryn M; Jatlaoui, Tara C; Whiteman, Maura K

    2016-11-01

    Progress has been made in efforts to reduce unintended pregnancy; however, unintended pregnancy remains a public health issue in the United States. A key component of reducing unintended pregnancy is to increase correct and consistent use of contraception by reducing barriers to access and use. The CDC has recently updated its guidance for the safe and effective use of contraception. The U.S. Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use (US MEC), 2016, and U.S. Selected Practice Recommendations for Contraceptive Use (US SPR), 2016, are intended for healthcare providers to help patients choose a method that is safe and can be used effectively. The recommendations aim to reduce certain barriers to contraception and thus help women, men, and couples to control timing of pregnancies.

  11. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: nutrition and lifestyle for a healthy pregnancy outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter, Sandra B; Campbell, Christina G

    2014-07-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that women of childbearing age should adopt a lifestyle optimizing health and reducing risk of birth defects, suboptimal fetal development, and chronic health problems in both mother and child. Components leading to a healthy pregnancy outcome include healthy prepregnancy weight, appropriate weight gain and physical activity during pregnancy, consumption of a wide variety of foods, appropriate vitamin and mineral supplementation, avoidance of alcohol and other harmful substances, and safe food handling. Pregnancy is a critical period during which maternal nutrition and lifestyle choices are major influences on mother and child health. Inadequate levels of key nutrients during crucial periods of fetal development may lead to reprogramming within fetal tissues, predisposing the infant to chronic conditions in later life. Improving the well-being of mothers, infants, and children is key to the health of the next generation. This position paper and the accompanying practice paper (www.eatright.org/members/practicepapers) on the same topic provide registered dietitian nutritionists and dietetic technicians, registered; other professional associations; government agencies; industry; and the public with the Academy's stance on factors determined to influence healthy pregnancy, as well as an overview of best practices in nutrition and healthy lifestyles during pregnancy. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Safe purging of natural gas pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, T.K. (Arco Oil and Gas Co. (US)); Euchner, J.A. (Nynex Corp. (US))

    1988-11-01

    When a newly constructed natural gas pipeline is put into service, it can be safely purged of air by injection of a slug of inert gas, such as N/sub 2/. The method of sizing the required slug is based on a model of dispersion in turbulent flow in conjunction with flammability limits.

  13. Bike Maintenance Makes for a Safe Ride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PTA Today, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Parents and children need to learn about bicycle maintenance and safety to keep bicycles fit and safe. The article presents a checklist of important bicycle equipment safety items and makes suggestions about how parents and children can learn more about bicycle safety and maintenance. (SM)

  14. Bottled Water Everywhere: Keeping it Safe

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... water also comes from municipal sources—in other words, the tap. Municipal water is usually treated before it is bottled. Examples ... regulations put in place and enforced by FDA. Water must be sampled, analyzed, and found to be safe and sanitary. These regulations also ...

  15. Safe laparoscopic colorectal surgery performed by trainees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhoff, Peter Koch; Schultz, Martin; Harvald, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer is safe, but there have been hesitations to implement the technique in all departments. One of the reasons for this may be suboptimal learning possibilities since supervised trainees have not been allowed to do the operations to an adequate extent...

  16. Have Diabetes? Get Tips for Safe Travels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit Button Past Emails Have Diabetes? Get Tips for Safe Travels Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel file Audio/Video file Apple Quicktime file RealPlayer ...

  17. How safe are South African schools?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    South African Journal of Education. Copyright © 2005 EASA. Vol 25(1) 5–10 ... reports have indicated that children's rights are neither promoted nor protected in certain schools. The purpose in this study was to determine ... determine the right of learners to a safe school environment and the obligations of educators and ...

  18. Is Your Child's School Really Safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, James

    2002-01-01

    Presents a brief quiz for parents to see if their child's school building is taking basic steps to ensure a safe learning environment (e.g., Is the building locked? Are strict guidelines in place when students participate in field trips? Is adult supervision always maintained on playgrounds?). Suggested action plans are included. A sidebar offers…

  19. DQO Summary Report for 105-N/109-N Interim Safe Storage Project Waste Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. A. Lee

    2005-09-15

    The DQO summary report provides the results of the DQO process completed for waste characterization activities for the 105-N/109-N Reactor Interim Safe Storage Project including decommission, deactivate, decontaminate, and demolish activities for six associated buildings.

  20. Are You Thinking about Suicide? How to Stay Safe and Find Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Are you thinking about suicide? How to stay safe and find treatment Hopelessness may lead you to think about suicide. Learn ... support to overcome the problems linked to suicidal thinking. Your doctor or mental health provider can help ...

  1. Understanding the genesis of mass transport deposits (MTDs) for safe mining planning : Anhovo Quarry, Western Slovenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pogačnik, Željko; Ogata, K.; Pini, Gian Andrea; Tunis, G.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the factors that contribute to anisotropic slopes instability provides important information for safe mining operations in flysch-type units. This work presents the results of sedimentological and structural analyses performed in the Anhovo Quarry (Western Slovenia), where

  2. Safe and Sustainable Water Resources Strategic Research Action Plan 2012-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document represents a strategic guide to EPA’s research actions, alone and in part-nership with the broader federal, industry and scientific research community, to provide the science and engineering necessary for safe and sustainable water resources.

  3. Safe Use of Pesticides, Guidelines. Occupational Safety and Health Series No. 38.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Labour Office, Geneva (Switzerland).

    This document provides guidance on the safe use of pesticides in agricultural work. General principles are given and followed by more detailed safety requirements for the various pesticide application techniques. Finally, the medical aspects of pesticides are considered. (BB)

  4. Making operations on standard-library containers strongly exception safe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katajainen, Jyrki

    2007-01-01

    An operation on an element container is said to provide a strong guarantee of exception safety if, in case an exception is thrown, the operation leaves the container in the state in which it was before the operation. In this paper, we explore how to adjust operations on C++ standard......-library containers to provide the strong guarantee of exception safety, instead of the default guarantee, without violating the stringent performance requirements specified in the C++ standard. In particular, we show that every strongly exception-safe operation on dynamic arrays and ordered dictionaries is only...

  5. Developing a state-wide infrastructure for safe sleep promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlers-Schmidt, Carolyn R; Schunn, Christy; Kuhlmann, Stephanie; Kuhlmann, Zachary; Engel, Matthew

    2017-08-01

    Sleep-related deaths are the third leading cause of infant death in Kansas. This manuscript describes implementation of an infrastructure of regional trainers to educate on the American Academy of Pediatrics safe sleep recommendations. Prospective evaluation of training program on knowledge transfer. Instructors were recruited from throughout the state of Kansas and trained to provide safe sleep education in their communities. Instructors were a mix of healthcare workers and community members. Their trainees encompassed both professionals and caregivers. Instructors attended a 2-day training, including completing 18-item pre and post-training knowledge tests, a training evaluation survey, and performing a portion of the structured safe sleep presentation and crib demonstration for feedback. Instructors were evaluated before and after training. After conducting trainings in their region, instructors submitted trainees' pre and post-test results. Scores were compared using t-test. Twenty-three instructors were trained. Scores averaged 13.5 (SD=2.4) for the pre-test and 15.3 (SD=2.4) for the post-test. Those scoring sleep education at 21 events to a total of 378 trainees. Trainee scores averaged 11.4 (SD=2.7) on the pre-test and increased to 13.9 (SD=2.5) on the post-test (Psleep instructors can be trained to disseminate safe sleep guidelines; however, only half provided at least 1 training within 1 year. Future recommendations include over-recruiting potential instructors, incorporating trainings into existing positions or otherwise incentivizing trainers. Copyright © 2017 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. EFFICIENT BUREAUCRACY IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR FOR SAFE ENVIRONMENT IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminita IONESCU

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bureaucracy is an important phenomenon in all European countries, with significant consequences over the public and private systems. After the recent economic crises, European governments made efforts to reduce bureaucracy and to speed up the process of absorbing European funds and to encourage the business environment. The aim of this paper is to present some particular aspects of positive bureaucracy and how efficient bureaucracy is facilitating a healthy business sector, a modern public administration and a safe environment in Romania.

  7. Vitamin D Status, Bone Mineral Density and Mental Health in Young Australian Women: The Safe-D Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callegari, Emma T; Reavley, Nicola; Garland, Suzanne M; Gorelik, Alexandra; Wark, John D

    2015-11-17

    Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with both poor bone health and mental ill-health. More recently, a number of studies have found individuals with depressive symptoms tend to have reduced bone mineral density. To explore the interrelationships between vitamin D status, bone mineral density and mental-ill health we are assessing a range of clinical, behavioural and lifestyle factors in young women (Part A of the Safe-D study). Part A of the Safe-D study is a cross-sectional study aiming to recruit 468 young females aged 16-25 years living in Victoria, Australia, through Facebook advertising. Participants are required to complete an extensive, online questionnaire, wear an ultra-violet dosimeter for 14 consecutive days and attend a study site visit. Outcome measures include areal bone mineral measures at the lumbar spine, total hip and whole body, as well as soft tissue composition using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Trabecular and cortical volumetric bone density at the tibia is measured using peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Other tests include serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, serum biochemistry and a range of health markers. Details of mood disorder/s and depressive and anxiety symptoms are obtained by self-report. Cutaneous melanin density is measured by spectrophotometry. The findings of this cross-sectional study will have implications for health promotion in young women and for clinical care of those with vitamin D deficiency and/or mental ill-health. Optimising both vitamin D status and mental health may protect against poor bone health and fractures in later life. Significance for public healthVitamin D deficiency, depression and osteoporosis are all major public health issues. Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with both reduced bone mineral density and depressive symptoms. Moreover, cohort studies have found that subjects with depression have lower bone mineral density when compared to healthy controls. Early adulthood is a critical

  8. Patient Involvement in Safe Delivery: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olfati, Forozun; Asefzadeh, Saeid; Changizi, Nasrin; Keramat, Afsaneh; Yunesian, Masud

    2015-09-28

    Patient involvement in safe delivery planning is considered important yet not widely practiced. The present study aimed at identifythe factors that affect patient involvementin safe delivery, as recommended by parturient women. This study was part of a qualitative research conducted by content analysis method and purposive sampling in 2013.The data were collected through 63 semi-structured interviews in4 hospitalsand analyzed using thematic content analysis. The participants in this research were women before discharge and after delivery. Findings were analyzed using Colaizzi's method. Four categories of factors that could affect patient involvement in safe delivery emerged from our analysis: patient-related (true and false beliefs, literacy, privacy, respect for patient), illness-related (pain, type of delivery, patient safety incidents), health care professional-relatedand task-related factors (behavior, monitoring &training), health care setting-related (financial aspects, facilities). More research is needed to explore the factors affecting the participation of mothers. It is therefore, recommended to: 1) take notice of mother education, their husbands, midwives and specialists; 2) provide pregnant women with insurance coverage from the outset of pregnancy, especially during prenatal period; 3) form a labor pain committee consisting of midwives, obstetricians, and anesthesiologists in order to identify the preferred painless labor methods based on the existing facilities and conditions, 4) carry out research on observing patients' privacy and dignity; 5) pay more attention on the factors affecting cesarean.

  9. Healthy eating design guidelines for school architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Terry T-K; Sorensen, Dina; Davis, Steven; Frerichs, Leah; Brittin, Jeri; Celentano, Joseph; Callahan, Kelly; Trowbridge, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    We developed a new tool, Healthy Eating Design Guidelines for School Architecture, to provide practitioners in architecture and public health with a practical set of spatially organized and theory-based strategies for making school environments more conducive to learning about and practicing healthy eating by optimizing physical resources and learning spaces. The design guidelines, developed through multidisciplinary collaboration, cover 10 domains of the school food environment (eg, cafeteria, kitchen, garden) and 5 core healthy eating design principles. A school redesign project in Dillwyn, Virginia, used the tool to improve the schools' ability to adopt a healthy nutrition curriculum and promote healthy eating. The new tool, now in a pilot version, is expected to evolve as its components are tested and evaluated through public health and design research.

  10. Healthy Conflict Management

    OpenAIRE

    Brower, Naomi

    2012-01-01

    Without healthy conflict management skills, conflict can often escalate or intensify over time. This fact sheet gives tips on utilizing key negotiation skills to help individuals effectively address and cope with conflict and potentially build stronger relationships with others.

  11. Healthy Living after Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Stroke Heroes Among Us Healthy Living After Stroke Nutrition Good nutrition is one way to reduce ... the hospital. Thank goodness, she did. Subscribe to Stroke Connection Get quarterly digital issues plus our monthly ...

  12. Healthy Eating for Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workout Nutrition Timing Your Pre- and Post-Workout Nutrition weights and fruits Building Muscle on a Vegetarian Diet For Kids For Parents For Men For Women For Seniors Healthy Eating for Men Published June 23, 2014 ...

  13. Antioxidants: Protecting Healthy Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workout Nutrition Timing Your Pre- and Post-Workout Nutrition weights and fruits Building Muscle on a Vegetarian Diet For Kids For Parents For Men For Women For Seniors Antioxidants - Protecting Healthy Cells Reviewed by Wendy Marcason, ...

  14. Healthy grocery shopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obesity - grocery shopping; Overweight - grocery shopping; Weight loss - grocery shopping; Healthy diet - grocery shopping ... Avoid buying snack foods in bulk and shopping in warehouse-type ... deal can lead to overeating. If you do buy large amounts of a ...

  15. Healthy Ride Trip Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — A dataset that shows trips taken using the Healthy Ride system by quarter. The dataset includes bike number, membership type, trip start and end timestamp, and...

  16. Healthy food trends -- quinoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000731.htm Healthy food trends -- quinoa To use the sharing features on ... Nutrition Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the ...

  17. Healthy food trends -- flaxseeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000728.htm Healthy food trends -- flaxseeds To use the sharing features on ... Nutrition Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the ...

  18. Planning For a Healthy School Year: Healthy Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feature: Planning For A Healthy School Year Healthy Eating Past Issues / Fall 2015 Table of Contents How ... government releases a set of guidelines on healthy eating. The guidelines suggest balancing calories with physical activity. ...

  19. Healthy Lean Through HRD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frances

    2008-01-01

    The paper reports on findings from the initial, exploratory phase of a longitudinal research study aimed at developing a framework for implementing lean while ensuring employee well-being. Data from observations and in-depth dialogues with persons involved in lean implementation, along...... with relevant theory, are used to construct a tentative framework for implementing "healthy lean". The role of HRD in facilitating implementation of healthy lean is central to the framework, which is presented and discussed....

  20. Afterschool Programs: Making a Difference in America's Communities by Improving Academic Achievement, Keeping Kids Safe and Helping Working Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afterschool Alliance, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This 2-page resource describes the benefits of afterschool programs for children, youth, and families, including evidence of improved school attendance and engagement learning, improved test scores and grades, and students at greatest risk showing the greatest gains. Additional benefits of afterschool programs include keeping kids safe, healthy,…

  1. Enabling employees to work safely: the influence of motivation and ability in the design of safety instructions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, Pieter August; van Hoof, Joris Jasper; van Vuuren, Hubrecht A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: One of the major challenges for modern organizations is to create healthy and safe work environments, as evidenced by the number of occupational deaths (worldwide: four per minute), and an even higher number of injuries. This study explores different levels of motivation and ability, to

  2. Human cloning: can it be made safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhind, Susan M; Taylor, Jane E; De Sousa, Paul A; King, Tim J; McGarry, Michelle; Wilmut, Ian

    2003-11-01

    There are continued claims of attempts to clone humans using nuclear transfer, despite the serious problems that have been encountered in cloning other mammals. It is known that epigenetic and genetic mechanisms are involved in clone failure, but we still do not know exactly how. Human reproductive cloning is unethical, but the production of cells from cloned embryos could offer many potential benefits. So, can human cloning be made safe?

  3. Safe Sleep for Babies PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2018-01-09

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the January 2018 CDC Vital Signs report. Every year, there are about 3,500 sleep-related deaths among U.S. babies. Learn how to create a safe sleep environment for babies.  Created: 1/9/2018 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 1/9/2018.

  4. Vulnerabilities Classification for Safe Development on Android

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Luis D. M. Ferreira; Anderson F. P. dos Santos; Ricardo Choren

    2016-01-01

    The global sales market is currently led by devices with the Android operating system. In 2015, more than 1 billion smartphones were sold, of which 81.5% were operated by the Android platform. In 2017, it is estimated that 267.78 billion applications will be downloaded from Google Play. According to Qian, 90% of applications are vulnerable, despite the recommendations of rules and standards for the safe software development. This study presents a classification of vulnerabilities, indicating ...

  5. Healthy hair: what is it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Rodney D

    2007-12-01

    Shiny hair with a smooth texture and clean-cut ends or tapered tips is generally perceived to be healthy. Hair texture and shine relate to hair surface properties, whereas the integrity of hair ends relates to the hair cortex. Hair can be straight, wavy or curly, blonde, black, brown, red, gray white, and its natural variations are important to our identity. Manipulation of the normal structure of the hair shaft is epidemic and dictated by culture, fashion, and above all, celebrity. Although cosmetic procedures are intrinsically safe, there is potential for damage to the hair. Loss of lustre, frizz, split ends, and other hair problems are particularly prevalent among people who repeatedly alter the natural style of their hair or among people with hair that is intrinsically weak. This may be due to individual or racial variation or less commonly an inherited structural abnormality in hair fiber formation. Hair health is also affected by common afflictions of the scalp as well as age-related phenomena such as graying and androgenetic alopecia. Hair products that improve the structural integrity of hair fibers and increase tensile strength are available, as are products that increase hair volume, reduce frizz, improve hair manageability, and stimulate new hair growth.

  6. Have a Healthy Pregnancy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-09-21

    This podcast lists 10 things you can do to help prevent infection during pregnancy and keep your unborn baby safe.  Created: 9/21/2009 by National Center For Birth Defects and Develeopmental Disabilities (NCBDDD).   Date Released: 9/21/2009.

  7. Healthy Children, Healthy Lives: The Wellness Guide for Early Childhood Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, Sharon; Robertson, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Early childhood is a critical time in human development. Understanding and supporting children's wellness early on can make the greatest impact on physical, social and emotional, and cognitive health throughout childhood and adulthood. "Healthy Children, Healthy Lives" provides a comprehensive collection of checklists and research ­based…

  8. A new safe and cost-effective percutaneous dilatational tracheotomy: SafeTrach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Johan; Karling, Jonas; Margolin, Gregori

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion SafeTrach is a new simplified and safe technique to perform percutaneous dilatational tracheotomy (PDT) that eliminates known risk factors compared with existing percutaneous techniques. In the present clinical study, also patients with disadvantageous anatomy not suitable for conventional PDT (CPDT) were treated without complications using SafeTrach. PDT with SafeTrach (STPDT) offers an excellent solution for patients who need tracheotomy in connection with elective ear, nose, and throat (ENT) surgery. Objectives To assess a new technique for percutaneous tracheotomy. Methods Seventeen patients were tracheotomized with STPDT using SafeTrach for the initial penetration sequence and single step dilatational techniques for the dilatational sequence. The patients represented a variety of different neck anatomies. Fifteen patients were head- and neck cancer patients that were subjects of free flap transplants. Results This study showed that STPDT was safe and easy to perform and time-efficient. The median duration of the procedure was 11.5 min and the puncture was in all cases located in the midline of the trachea either between the 2nd and 3rd tracheal ring (n = 13) or between the 3rd and 4th ring (n = 4).

  9. Stay Healthy on the Road

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and travel > Stay healthy on the road Stay healthy on the road ☷ ▾ Page contents Tips to keep ... use sunscreen Use repellent Tips to keep you healthy when traveling Whether at home or on the ...

  10. Is phototherapy safe for HIV-infected individuals?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, M.L.; Houpt, K.R.; Cruz, P.D. Jr. [Texas Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Southwestern Medical Center

    1996-08-01

    Patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have a high prevalence of UV radiation-responsive skin diseases including psoriasis, pruitus, eosinophillic folliculitis and eczemas. On the other hand, UV has been shown to suppress T cell-mediated immune responses and to induce activation and replication of HIV. These developments have prompted clinicians and investigators to question whether phototherapy is safe for HIV-infected individuals. We have reviewed these issues and hereby provide a summary and critique of relevant laboratory and clinical evidence. (Author).

  11. Tools for Healthy Tribes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischhacker, Sheila; Byrd, Randi R.; Ramachandran, Gowri; Vu, Maihan; Ries, Amy; Bell, Ronny A.; Evenson, Kelly R.

    2012-01-01

    There is growing recognition that policymakers can promote access to healthy, affordable foods within neighborhoods, schools, childcare centers, and workplaces. Despite the disproportionate risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes among American Indian children and adults, comparatively little attention has been focused on the opportunities tribal policymakers have to implement policies or resolutions to promote access to healthy, affordable foods. This paper presents an approach for integrating formative research into an action-oriented strategy of developing and disseminating tribally led environmental and policy strategies to promote access to and consumption of healthy, affordable foods. This paper explains how the American Indian Healthy Eating Project evolved through five phases and discusses each phase’s essential steps involved, outcomes derived, and lessons learned. Using community-based participatory research and informed by the Social Cognitve Theory and ecologic frameworks, the American Indian Healthy Eating Project was started in fall 2008 and has evolved through five phases: (1) starting the conversation; (2) conducting multidisciplinary formative research; (3) strengthening partnerships and tailoring policy options; (4) disseminating community-generated ideas; and (5) accelerating action while fostering sustainability. Collectively, these phases helped develop and disseminate Tools for Healthy Tribes—a toolkit used to raise awareness among participating tribal policymakers of their opportunities to improve access to healthy, affordable foods. Formal and informal strategies can engage tribal leaders in the development of culturally appropriate and tribe-specific sustainable strategies to improve such access, as well as empower tribal leaders to leverage their authority toward raising a healthier generation of American Indian children. PMID:22898161

  12. Microarray analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes from ALS patients and the SAFE detection of the KEGG ALS pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (sALS) is a motor neuron disease with poorly understood etiology. Results of gene expression profiling studies of whole blood from ALS patients have not been validated and are difficult to relate to ALS pathogenesis because gene expression profiles depend on the relative abundance of the different cell types present in whole blood. We conducted microarray analyses using Agilent Human Whole Genome 4 × 44k Arrays on a more homogeneous cell population, namely purified peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs), from ALS patients and healthy controls to identify molecular signatures possibly relevant to ALS pathogenesis. Methods Differentially expressed genes were determined by LIMMA (Linear Models for MicroArray) and SAM (Significance Analysis of Microarrays) analyses. The SAFE (Significance Analysis of Function and Expression) procedure was used to identify molecular pathway perturbations. Proteasome inhibition assays were conducted on cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from ALS patients to confirm alteration of the Ubiquitin/Proteasome System (UPS). Results For the first time, using SAFE in a global gene ontology analysis (gene set size 5-100), we show significant perturbation of the KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) ALS pathway of motor neuron degeneration in PBLs from ALS patients. This was the only KEGG disease pathway significantly upregulated among 25, and contributing genes, including SOD1, represented 54% of the encoded proteins or protein complexes of the KEGG ALS pathway. Further SAFE analysis, including gene set sizes >100, showed that only neurodegenerative diseases (4 out of 34 disease pathways) including ALS were significantly upregulated. Changes in UBR2 expression correlated inversely with time since onset of disease and directly with ALSFRS-R, implying that UBR2 was increased early in the course of ALS. Cultured PBMCs from ALS patients accumulated more ubiquitinated proteins

  13. New Developments in FPGA Devices: SEUs and Fail-Safe Strategies from the NASA Goddard Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Melanie; LaBel, Kenneth; Pellish, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that, when exposed to radiation environments, each Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) device has unique error signatures. Subsequently, fail-safe and mitigation strategies will differ per FPGA type. In this session several design approaches for safe systems will be presented. It will also explore the benefits and limitations of several mitigation techniques. The intention of the presentation is to provide information regarding FPGA types, their susceptibilities, and proven fail-safe strategies; so that users can select appropriate mitigation and perform the required trade for system insertion. The presentation will describe three types of FPGA devices and their susceptibilities in radiation environments.

  14. New Developments in FPGA: SEUs and Fail-Safe Strategies from the NASA Goddard Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Melanie D.; Label, Kenneth A.; Pellish, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that, when exposed to radiation environments, each Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) device has unique error signatures. Subsequently, fail-safe and mitigation strategies will differ per FPGA type. In this session several design approaches for safe systems will be presented. It will also explore the benefits and limitations of several mitigation techniques. The intention of the presentation is to provide information regarding FPGA types, their susceptibilities, and proven fail-safe strategies; so that users can select appropriate mitigation and perform the required trade for system insertion. The presentation will describe three types of FPGA devices and their susceptibilities in radiation environments.

  15. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and mental health in young Australian women: Results from the Safe-D study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callegari, Emma T; Reavley, Nicola; Gorelik, Alexandra; Garland, Suzanne M; Wark, John D

    2017-12-15

    While there is evidence linking vitamin D status with mood, this association and its clinical significance remain uncertain. Moreover, few studies have focused on young, community-dwelling females. The Safe-D study examined the association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels and mental health in young women. Participants completed an online questionnaire, wore a UV dosimeter to measure personal sun exposure and underwent a comprehensive health assessment. Serum 25OHD was measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in 353 healthy women aged 16-25 years, living in Victoria, Australia. Mental health measures included: Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7), Kessler psychological distress scale (K10) and 12-item short-form health survey (SF-12), plus any self-reported mental disorder diagnoses or medication use. The prevalence of self-reported mental disorder was 26% and of vitamin D deficiency 27%. The median (Q1, Q3) scores for the PHQ-9, GAD-7, K10 and SF-12 MCS were 6 (3, 9), 5 (2, 8), 19 (15, 25) and 43 (34, 49), respectively. Serum 25OHD levels were not associated with mental health scores. Vitamin D status was not associated with a reported diagnosis of depression or anxiety. There was a low prevalence of severe vitamin D deficiency and mental health symptoms, which may reduce study power. Our findings do not support an association between serum 25OHD levels and mental health status in young women. Longitudinal studies and randomized clinical trials investigating vitamin D and mood in young women are needed to confirm and extend these results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. SAFE: SPARQL Federation over RDF Data Cubes with Access Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Yasar; Saleem, Muhammad; Mehdi, Muntazir; Hogan, Aidan; Mehmood, Qaiser; Rebholz-Schuhmann, Dietrich; Sahay, Ratnesh

    2017-02-01

    Several query federation engines have been proposed for accessing public Linked Open Data sources. However, in many domains, resources are sensitive and access to these resources is tightly controlled by stakeholders; consequently, privacy is a major concern when federating queries over such datasets. In the Healthcare and Life Sciences (HCLS) domain real-world datasets contain sensitive statistical information: strict ownership is granted to individuals working in hospitals, research labs, clinical trial organisers, etc. Therefore, the legal and ethical concerns on (i) preserving the anonymity of patients (or clinical subjects); and (ii) respecting data ownership through access control; are key challenges faced by the data analytics community working within the HCLS domain. Likewise statistical data play a key role in the domain, where the RDF Data Cube Vocabulary has been proposed as a standard format to enable the exchange of such data. However, to the best of our knowledge, no existing approach has looked to optimise federated queries over such statistical data. We present SAFE: a query federation engine that enables policy-aware access to sensitive statistical datasets represented as RDF data cubes. SAFE is designed specifically to query statistical RDF data cubes in a distributed setting, where access control is coupled with source selection, user profiles and their access rights. SAFE proposes a join-aware source selection method that avoids wasteful requests to irrelevant and unauthorised data sources. In order to preserve anonymity and enforce stricter access control, SAFE's indexing system does not hold any data instances-it stores only predicates and endpoints. The resulting data summary has a significantly lower index generation time and size compared to existing engines, which allows for faster updates when sources change. We validate the performance of the system with experiments over real-world datasets provided by three clinical organisations as

  17. Healthy Eating Design Guidelines for School Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Terry T-K; Sorensen, Dina; Davis, Steven; Frerichs, Leah; Brittin, Jeri; Celentano, Joseph; Callahan, Kelly; Trowbridge, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    We developed a new tool, Healthy Eating Design Guidelines for School Architecture, to provide practitioners in architecture and public health with a practical set of spatially organized and theory-based strategies for making school environments more conducive to learning about and practicing healthy eating by optimizing physical resources and learning spaces. The design guidelines, developed through multidisciplinary collaboration, cover 10 domains of the school food environment (eg, cafeteri...

  18. Infant Safe Sleep Interventions, 1990-2015: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salm Ward, Trina C; Balfour, Giselle M

    2016-02-01

    Sleep-related infant deaths remain a major public health issue. Multiple interventions have been implemented in efforts to increase adherence to safe sleep recommendations. We conducted a systematic review of the international research literature to synthesize research on interventions to reduce the risk of sleep-related deaths and their effectiveness in changing infant sleep practices. We searched PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Google Scholar for peer-reviewed articles published between 1990 and 2015 which described an intervention and reported results. Twenty-nine articles were included for review. Studies focused on infant caregivers, health care professionals, peers, and child care professionals. Targeted behaviors included sleep position, location, removing items from the crib, breastfeeding, smoke exposure, clothing, pacifier use, and knowledge of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Most articles described multi-faceted interventions, including: one-on-one or group education, printed materials, visual displays, videos, and providing resources such as cribs, pacifiers, wearable blankets, and infant t-shirts. Two described public education campaigns, one used an educative questionnaire, and one encouraged maternal note taking. Health professional interventions included implementing safe sleep policies, in-service training, printed provider materials, eliciting agreement on a Declaration of Safe Sleep Practice, and sharing adherence data. Data collection methods included self-report via surveys and observational crib audits. Over half of the studies utilized comparison groups which helped determine effectiveness. Most articles reported some degree of success in changing some of the targeted behaviors; no studies reported complete adherence to recommendations. Future studies should incorporate rigorous evaluation plans, utilize comparison groups, and collect demographic and collect follow-up data.

  19. Laser patterning of platinum electrodes for safe neurostimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, R. A.; Matteucci, P. B.; Dodds, C. W. D.; Palmer, J.; Dueck, W. F.; Hassarati, R. T.; Byrnes-Preston, P. J.; Lovell, N. H.; Suaning, G. J.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Laser surface modification of platinum (Pt) electrodes was investigated for use in neuroprosthetics. Surface modification was applied to increase the surface area of the electrode and improve its ability to transfer charge within safe electrochemical stimulation limits. Approach. Electrode arrays were laser micromachined to produce Pt electrodes with smooth surfaces, which were then modified with four laser patterning techniques to produce surface structures which were nanosecond patterned, square profile, triangular profile and roughened on the micron scale through structured laser interference patterning (SLIP). Improvements in charge transfer were shown through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and biphasic stimulation at clinically relevant levels. A new method was investigated and validated which enabled the assessment of in vivo electrochemically safe charge injection limits. Main results. All of the modified surfaces provided electrical advantage over the smooth Pt. The SLIP surface provided the greatest benefit both in vitro and in vivo, and this surface was the only type which had injection limits above the threshold for neural stimulation, at a level shown to produce a response in the feline visual cortex when using an electrode array implanted in the suprachoroidal space of the eye. This surface was found to be stable when stimulated with more than 150 million clinically relevant pulses in physiological saline. Significance. Critical to the assessment of implant devices is accurate determination of safe usage limits in an in vivo environment. Laser patterning, in particular SLIP, is a superior technique for improving the performance of implant electrodes without altering the interfacial electrode chemistry through coating. Future work will require chronic in vivo assessment of these electrode patterns.

  20. A Healthy Person

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høye, Sevald; Kvigne, Kari; Aiyub, Ilyas; Gillund, Margrethe V.; Hermansyah, Hasan; Nordström, Gun; Rystedt, Ingrid; Suwarni, Abubakar; Trollvik, Anne; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Hov, Reidun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate how nursing students in Indonesia and Scandinavia characterize a healthy person. Two hundred thirty-two nursing students from Indonesia, 50 students from Sweden, and 119 students from Norway participated by answering an open-ended question. Qualitative content analysis was used to identify patterns of health in a cultural and national context. The characteristics of a healthy person were summarized in the theme “external and inner balance,” which are intertwined because of the wholeness of self-image and appearance. The subcategories were having a strong and positive body image, feeling well and having inner harmony, following the rules of life, coping with challenges, and acting in unison with the environment. There were more similarities than differences between the Indonesian and Scandinavian nursing students’ understanding of being a healthy person. The difference is that the Scandinavian students mentioned individuality, whereas the Indonesian students referred to collective values. PMID:28462342

  1. Asymptotically safe inflation from quadratic gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bonanno, Alfio

    2015-01-01

    Asymptotically Safe theories of gravity have recently received much attention. In this work we discuss a class of inflationary models derived from quantum-gravity modification of quadratic gravity according to the induced scaling around the non-Gaussian fixed point at very high energies. It is argued that the presence of a three dimensional ultraviolet critical surface generates operators of non-integer power of the type $R^{2-\\theta/2}$ in the effective Lagrangian, where $\\theta>0$ is a critical exponent. The requirement of a successful inflationary model in agreement with the recent Planck 2015 data puts important constraints on the strenght of this new type of couplings.

  2. Water Management: Communities rise to the challenge of providing ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-02-02

    Feb 2, 2011 ... Providing clean water for everyone is a global concern. But nowhere is this more challenging than in developing countries where one in five people has no access to safe drinking water.

  3. The EASE Quality Improvement Project: Improving Safe Sleep Practices in Ohio Children's Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macklin, Jamie R; Gittelman, Michael A; Denny, Sarah A; Southworth, Hayley; Arnold, Melissa Wervey

    2016-10-01

    Despite American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommendations, many hospitalized infants are not observed in the appropriate safe sleep environment. Caregivers tend to model sleep patterns observed in a hospital setting. This project assessed the change in infant safe sleep practices within 6 children's hospitals after the implementation of a statewide quality improvement program. The AAP recruited hospitalists from each of the state's children's hospitals and asked them to form "safe sleep teams" within their institutions. Teams used a standardized data tool to collect information on the infant's age and sleep position/environment. They collected baseline data and then weekly for the duration of the 12-month project. Teams were required to implement at least 3 Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles. We calculated changes in safe sleep practices over time. Providers received Maintenance of Certification Part IV credit for participation. Teams collected 5343 audits at all participating sites. At baseline, only 279 (32.6%) of 856 of the sleeping infants were observed to follow AAP recommendations, compared with 110 (58.2%) of 189 (P sleep practices from 48.2% to 75.4% (P hospitals improved observed infant safe sleep behaviors and family report of safe sleep education. These behavior changes may lead to more appropriate safe sleep practices at home. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Cancer pain management: safe and effective use of opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruera, Eduardo; Paice, Judith A

    2015-01-01

    Pain remains a serious consequence of cancer and its treatment. Although significant advances have been made in providing effective cancer pain control, barriers persist. Lack of knowledge, limited time, financial restrictions, and diminished availability of necessary medications serve as significant obstacles. Safe and effective opioid use in a patient with cancer requires skill to overcome these challenges. Understanding the mechanism of action, along with the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, of opioids will lead to appropriate selection, dosing, and titration of these agents. Rotation from one opioid or route to another is an essential proficiency for oncologists. As opioid-related adverse effects often occur, the oncology team must be expert in preventing and managing constipation, nausea, sedation, and neurotoxicities. An emerging concern is overtreatment-the excessive and prolonged use of opioids in patients when these agents may produce more harm than benefit. This can occur when opioids are used inappropriately to treat comorbid psychologic issues such as anxiety and depression. Recognizing risk factors for overuse along with key components of universal precautions will promote safe use of these medications, supporting adherence and preventing diversion, thereby protecting the patient, the prescriber, and the community. Because substance use disorders are not rare in the oncology setting, attention must be given to the balance of providing analgesia while limiting harm. Caring for patients with substance misuse requires compassionate, multidisciplinary care, with input from supportive oncology/palliative care as well as addiction specialists.

  5. Safe to Fly: Certifying COTS Hardware for Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichuk, Jessica L.

    2011-01-01

    Providing hardware for the astronauts to use on board the Space Shuttle or International Space Station (ISS) involves a certification process that entails evaluating hardware safety, weighing risks, providing mitigation, and verifying requirements. Upon completion of this certification process, the hardware is deemed safe to fly. This process from start to finish can be completed as quickly as 1 week or can take several years in length depending on the complexity of the hardware and whether the item is a unique custom design. One area of cost and schedule savings that NASA implements is buying Commercial Off the Shelf (COTS) hardware and certifying it for human spaceflight as safe to fly. By utilizing commercial hardware, NASA saves time not having to develop, design and build the hardware from scratch, as well as a timesaving in the certification process. By utilizing COTS hardware, the current detailed certification process can be simplified which results in schedule savings. Cost savings is another important benefit of flying COTS hardware. Procuring COTS hardware for space use can be more economical than custom building the hardware. This paper will investigate the cost savings associated with certifying COTS hardware to NASA s standards rather than performing a custom build.

  6. Organizing Safe Transitions from Intensive Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Häggström

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Organizing and performing patient transfers in the continuum of care is part of the work of nurses and other staff of a multiprofessional healthcare team. An understanding of discharge practices is needed in order to ultimate patients’ transfers from high technological intensive care units (ICU to general wards. Aim. To describe, as experienced by intensive care and general ward staff, what strategies could be used when organizing patient’s care before, during, and after transfer from intensive care. Method. Interviews of 15 participants were conducted, audio-taped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results. The results showed that the categories secure, encourage, and collaborate are strategies used in the three phases of the ICU transitional care process. The main category; a safe, interactive rehabilitation process, illustrated how all strategies were characterized by an intention to create and maintain safety during the process. A three-way interaction was described: between staff and patient/families, between team members and involved units, and between patient/family and environment. Discussion/Conclusions. The findings highlight that ICU transitional care implies critical care rehabilitation. Discharge procedures need to be safe and structured and involve collaboration, encouraging support, optimal timing, early mobilization, and a multidiscipline approach.

  7. Healthy Schools Network, 2011 Yearbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the 2011 Yearbook of the Healthy Schools Network. This yearbook contains: (1) Tough Time To Be a Child: Parents and Taxpayers Should Be Enraged; (2) National Coalition For Healthier Schools: Healthy Schools 2015--Sustaining Momentum In Tough Times; (3) Healthy Schools Heroes Award Program; (4) National Healthy Schools Day…

  8. Healthy Heart Quizzes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... State SELECT YOUR LANGUAGE Español (Spanish) 简体中文 (Traditional Chinese) 繁体中文 (Simplified Chinese) Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese) Healthy Living for Heart.org ... Tools For Your Heart Health • Watch, Learn & Live Animations Library Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings ...

  9. Enjoy healthy eating

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2010-01-01

    This leaflet aims to increase public awareness and understanding of healthy eating messages. The leaflet includes the new eatwell plate, information on the five main food groups, along with top tips for cutting down on fat and what to choose when eating out. It also includes sections on the importance of breakfast and cutting down on salt.

  10. Eating Healthy for Two

    Science.gov (United States)

    You are what you eat—and so is your baby. In addition to being smokefree, eating well during pregnancy is one of the best and most important things you can do for yourself and your baby. But healthy “eating for two” is more than just eating more.

  11. A concept test of novel healthy snacks among adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Maria Kümpel; Sørensen, Bjarne Taulo; Brunsø, Karen

    2014-01-01

    development processes and sales forecasts. Moreover, it is recommended that marketers first focus their distribution of novel healthy snacks targeted at adolescents on school canteens and later on food stores, as it may be easier to make adolescents buy novel healthy snacks in safe environments among peers...... of the snack attributes is perceived to be, the higher the willingness to try new snacks among best friends at school and the lower the willingness to try new snacks among other peers outside school. The findings indicate the importance of considering both preferences and buying intentions in future product...... such as at school....

  12. Immunotherapy Shown Safe in Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Immunotherapy Shown Safe in Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Trial Next step is to see if it works ... Aug. 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A small clinical trial showed an immune system therapy was safe for ...

  13. Soft Contact Lenses Safe for Kids and Teens, Review Finds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167037.html Soft Contact Lenses Safe for Kids and Teens, Review Finds Infection ... 2017 WEDNESDAY, July 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Soft contact lenses are as safe for children and teens as ...

  14. Nurses' clinical reasoning practices that support safe medication administration: An integrative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Emily; Domm, Elizabeth

    2017-09-19

    To review the current literature about nurses' clinical reasoning practices that support safe medication administration. The literature about medication administration frequently focuses on avoiding medication errors. Nurses' clinical reasoning used during medication administration to maintain medication safety receives less attention in the literature. As healthcare professionals, nurses work closely with patients, assessing and intervening to promote mediation safety prior to, during and after medication administration. They also provide discharge teaching about using medication safely. Nurses' clinical reasoning and practices that support medication safety are often invisible when the focus is medication errors avoidance. An integrative literature review was guided by Whittemore and Knafl's (Journal of Advanced Nursing, 5, 2005 and 546) five-stage review of the 11 articles that met review criteria. This review is modelled after Gaffney et al.'s (Journal of Clinical Nursing, 25, 2016 and 906) integrative review on medical error recovery. Health databases were accessed and systematically searched for research reporting nurses' clinical reasoning practices that supported safe medication administration. The level and quality of evidence of the included research articles were assessed using The Johns Hopkins Nursing Evidence-Based Practice Rating Scale©. Nurses have a central role in safe medication administration, including but not limited to risk awareness about the potential for medication errors. Nurses assess patients and their medication and use knowledge and clinical reasoning to administer medication safely. Results indicated nurses' use of clinical reasoning to maintain safe medication administration was inadequately articulated in 10 of 11 studies reviewed. Nurses are primarily responsible for safe medication administration. Nurses draw from their foundational knowledge of patient conditions and organisational processes and use clinical reasoning that

  15. Clinical Practice Guideline: Safe Medication Use in the ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane-Gill, Sandra L; Dasta, Joseph F; Buckley, Mitchell S; Devabhakthuni, Sandeep; Liu, Michael; Cohen, Henry; George, Elisabeth L; Pohlman, Anne S; Agarwal, Swati; Henneman, Elizabeth A; Bejian, Sharon M; Berenholtz, Sean M; Pepin, Jodie L; Scanlon, Mathew C; Smith, Brian S

    2017-09-01

    To provide ICU clinicians with evidence-based guidance on safe medication use practices for the critically ill. PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Scopus, and ISI Web of Science for relevant material to December 2015. Based on three key components: 1) environment and patients, 2) the medication use process, and 3) the patient safety surveillance system. The committee collectively developed Population, Intervention, Comparator, Outcome questions and quality of evidence statements pertaining to medication errors and adverse drug events addressing the key components. A total of 34 Population, Intervention, Comparator, Outcome questions, five quality of evidence statements, and one commentary on disclosure was developed. Subcommittee members were assigned selected Population, Intervention, Comparator, Outcome questions or quality of evidence statements. Subcommittee members completed their Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation of the question with his/her quality of evidence assessment and proposed strength of recommendation, then the draft was reviewed by the relevant subcommittee. The subcommittee collectively reviewed the evidence profiles for each question they developed. After the draft was discussed and approved by the entire committee, then the document was circulated among all members for voting on the quality of evidence and strength of recommendation. The committee followed the principles of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system to determine quality of evidence and strength of recommendations. This guideline evaluates the ICU environment as a risk for medication-related events and the environmental changes that are possible to improve safe medication use. Prevention strategies for medication-related events are reviewed by medication use process node (prescribing, distribution, administration, monitoring). Detailed

  16. The safe use of spinal drains in thoracic aortic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Mark; Doolan, Jim; Safar, Maria; Kuduvalli, Manoj; Oo, Aung; Mills, Keith; Kendall, Jonathan; Desmond, Michael

    2011-12-01

    Paraplegia is a devastating complication which may occur following surgery on the thoracic aorta. The use of a cerebrospinal fluid drain (CSFD) has helped reduce the incidence of neurological deficit; however, the management of patients with a CSFD postsurgery requires nurses and doctors to have expertise and awareness of the associated complications. The National Patient Safety Agency (UK) has highlighted a number of cases involving inadvertent spinal injections throughout the UK National Health Service (NHS). To this end we have introduced a protocol or 'care bundle' for safe CSFD care as well as drain management. The protocol was developed by medical and nursing staff at our institution based on clinical experience and literature reviews over a two-year period (2008-2010). Interventions undertaken during the development of the protocol included discussion with the UK National Patient Safety Agency (NPSA). Content of the protocol was reviewed by internal regulatory bodies within the hospital prior to ratification and general dissemination. Clear guidance is given within the policy on the standards expected when caring for the line and managing drainage according to agreed parameters of spinal cord perfusion pressure. The protocol constitutes five documents which guide staff in the care of CSFD, its routine management, documentation and interventions necessary once neurological deficit is detected. Document 1 which is a checklist, communication tool and aide-memoire was developed to ensure effective management, when the patient arrives in intensive care unit (ICU) from theatre. Document 2 ensures that early detection of a neurological deficit is noted and with Document 3 is acted upon immediately to reverse the injury. Document 4 provides information on the safe administration of analgesia via the spinal drain and has reference to the Glasgow Coma Scale. Document 5 is a bespoke observation chart for documenting CSFD pressure and cerebrospinal fluid drainage. In

  17. Safe abortion information hotlines: An effective strategy for increasing women's access to safe abortions in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drovetta, Raquel Irene

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the implementation of five Safe Abortion Information Hotlines (SAIH), a strategy developed by feminist collectives in a growing number of countries where abortion is legally restricted and unsafe. These hotlines have a range of goals and take different forms, but they all offer information by telephone to women about how to terminate a pregnancy using misoprostol. The paper is based on a qualitative study carried out in 2012-2014 of the structure, goals and experiences of hotlines in five Latin American countries: Argentina, Chile, Ecuador, Peru and Venezuela. The methodology included participatory observation of activities of the SAIH, and in-depth interviews with feminist activists who offer these services and with 14 women who used information provided by these hotlines to induce their own abortions. The findings are also based on a review of materials obtained from the five hotline collectives involved: documents and reports, social media posts, and details of public demonstrations and statements. These hotlines have had a positive impact on access to safe abortions for women whom they help. Providing these services requires knowledge and information skills, but little infrastructure. They have the potential to reduce the risk to women's health and lives of unsafe abortion, and should be promoted as part of public health policy, not only in Latin America but also other countries. Additionally, they promote women's autonomy and right to decide whether to continue or terminate a pregnancy. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Healthy Eating in Jamaica: The Cost Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, F J; Caines, D; Eyre, S

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to determine the importance of food cost in securing a healthy diet to combat non-communicable diseases. Several studies have evaluated whether healthier foods or diets cost more but a full range of health criteria has rarely been explored. Rather than merely comparing high and low energy dense foods, this study also included type of fat, vitamin, mineral and fibre content of foods in classifying them as healthy and less healthy. Both 'commonly consumed' and 'all available' foods were ranked according to their nutritional value and potential positive or negative contribution to the development of major health problems in Jamaica such as obesity and chronic diseases. The costs of 158 food items were averaged from supermarkets, municipal markets and wholesale outlets in six parishes across Jamaica. Cost differentials were then assessed in comparing healthy and less healthy foods. The study found that among the commonly consumed foods in Jamaica, healthy options cost J$88 (US$0.78) more than less healthy ones. However, when all the available food items were considered, the less healthy options cost more. The cheapest daily cost of a nutritionally balanced diet in Jamaica varied considerably by parish but was on average J$269 (US$2.40) per person. For a family of three, this translates approximately to the total minimum wage per week. Eating healthy in Jamaica can be achieved at low cost if appropriate information on nutrient content/value for money is provided to consumers. Effective promotions by public and private sector agencies are essential for consumer choice to be optimal.

  19. Sandia SWiFT Site Safe Work Planning Manual.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    The Department of Energy's Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility provides research site with multiple wind turbines at a scale useful for the experimental study of wake dynamics, advanced rotor development, turbine control, and advanced sensing for production-scale wind farms. Safety of workers and the public is the top and overriding priority at SWiFT. Central to safe operations are formal planning processes . This manual provides an overview of test planning and work planning processes and requirements in adherence with the Sandia corporate Engineered Safety Work Planning and Control process. It is required reading for all SWiFT site staff, Sandia workers, and collaborators who oversee, conduct, or participate in test activities or who are involved in modifying Sandia SWiFT site assets.

  20. Operation Safe Haven: the needs of nurses caring for refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Rhonda; Emrys, Elisabeth; Finney Lamb, Cathryn; Eagar, Sandy; Smith, Mitchell

    2003-06-01

    Nurses played a significant role in providing care to Kosovar and East Timorese refugees at the East Hills Reception Centre in Sydney, Australia, during Operation Safe Haven in 1999-2000. To ascertain the needs of nurses in this setting, 13 nurses participated in two focus group interviews, and two in-depth interviews were conducted with nursing managers. Qualitative thematic analysis was conducted on the resulting transcripts. Nurses reported that, overall, they had the necessary clinical skills but needed specific refugee health profiles and training in culturally competent and trauma-sensitive care. The nurses experienced trauma-related, cultural, environmental and role-related stressors. They used a variety of informal psychosocial supports but reported the need for ongoing counselling and debriefing. While clinical skills were considered important, nurses identified other factors as having more impact on their ability to provide comprehensive care for traumatized refugees, particularly their role as client advocates.

  1. Subscale Validation of the Subsurface Active Filtration of Exhaust (SAFE) Approach to the NTP Ground Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, William M.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Bulman, Mel; Joyner, Russell; Martin, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) has been recognized as an enabling technology for missions to Mars and beyond. However, one of the key challenges of developing a nuclear thermal rocket is conducting verification and development tests on the ground. A number of ground test options are presented, with the Sub-surface Active Filtration of Exhaust (SAFE) method identified as a preferred path forward for the NTP program. The SAFE concept utilizes the natural soil characteristics present at the Nevada National Security Site to provide a natural filter for nuclear rocket exhaust during ground testing. A validation method of the SAFE concept is presented, utilizing a non-nuclear sub-scale hydrogen/oxygen rocket seeded with detectible radioisotopes. Additionally, some alternative ground test concepts, based upon the SAFE concept, are presented. Finally, an overview of the ongoing discussions of developing a ground test campaign are presented.

  2. Identifying best practices for "Safe Harbor" legislation to protect child sex trafficking victims: Decriminalization alone is not sufficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnert, Elizabeth S; Abrams, Susan; Azzi, Veronica F; Ryan, Gery; Brook, Robert; Chung, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Several states have recently enacted "Safe Harbor" laws to redirect child victims of commercial sexual exploitation and child sex trafficking from the criminal justice system and into the child welfare system. No comprehensive studies of Safe Harbor law implementation exist. The nine state Safe Harbor laws enacted by 2012 were analyzed to guide state legislators, health professionals, law enforcement agents, child welfare providers, and other responders to the commercial sexual exploitation of children on the development and implementation of state Safe Harbor laws. The authors conducted 32 semi-structured interviews with Safe Harbor experts in these states. Participants conveyed that Safe Harbor legislation signified a critical paradigm shift, treating commercially sexually exploited youth not as criminals but as vulnerable children in need of services. However, Safe Harbor legislation varied widely and significant gaps in laws exist. Such laws alone were considered insufficient without adequate funding for necessary services. As a result, many well-meaning providers were going around the Safe Harbor laws by continuing to incarcerate commercially sexually exploited youth in the juvenile justice system regardless of Safe Harbor laws in place. This was done, to act, in their view, in what was the best interest of the victimized children. With imperfect laws and implementation, these findings suggest an important role for local and state responders to act together to protect victims from unnecessary criminalization and potential further traumatization. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. 77 FR 61027 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act On... Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act at mobile home parks operated by defendants in Pennsylvania, Delaware and Virginia. The defendants treat sewage and provide drinking water at a number of its mobile...

  4. 50 CFR 216.91 - Dolphin-safe labeling standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dolphin-safe labeling standards. 216.91... MAMMALS Dolphin Safe Tuna Labeling § 216.91 Dolphin-safe labeling standards. (a) It is a violation of... include on the label of those products the term “dolphin-safe” or any other term or symbol that claims or...

  5. 31 CFR 515.326 - Custody of safe deposit boxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Custody of safe deposit boxes. 515... Definitions § 515.326 Custody of safe deposit boxes. Safe deposit boxes shall be deemed to be in the custody... upon the meaning of the term custody. ...

  6. 31 CFR 500.326 - Custody of safe deposit boxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Custody of safe deposit boxes. 500... Definitions § 500.326 Custody of safe deposit boxes. Safe deposit boxes shall be deemed to be in the custody... upon the meaning of the term custody. ...

  7. Safe Laser Beam Propagation for Interplanetary Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Keith E.

    2011-01-01

    Ground-to-space laser uplinks to Earth–orbiting satellites and deep space probes serve both as a beacon and an uplink command channel for deep space probes and Earth-orbiting satellites. An acquisition and tracking point design to support a high bandwidth downlink from a 20-cm optical terminal on an orbiting Mars spacecraft typically calls for 2.5 kW of 1030-nm uplink optical power in 40 micro-radians divergent beams.2 The NOHD (nominal ocular hazard distance) of the 1030nm uplink is in excess of 2E5 km, approximately half the distance to the moon. Recognizing the possible threat of high power laser uplinks to the flying public and to sensitive Earth-orbiting satellites, JPL developed a three-tiered system at its Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) to ensure safe laser beam propagation through navigational and near-Earth space.

  8. Safe drinking water and waterborne outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, N A; Bondelind, M

    2017-02-01

    The present work compiles a review on drinking waterborne outbreaks, with the perspective of production and distribution of microbiologically safe water, during 2000-2014. The outbreaks are categorised in raw water contamination, treatment deficiencies and distribution network failure. The main causes for contamination were: for groundwater, intrusion of animal faeces or wastewater due to heavy rain; in surface water, discharge of wastewater into the water source and increased turbidity and colour; at treatment plants, malfunctioning of the disinfection equipment; and for distribution systems, cross-connections, pipe breaks and wastewater intrusion into the network. Pathogens causing the largest number of affected consumers were Cryptosporidium, norovirus, Giardia, Campylobacter, and rotavirus. The largest number of different pathogens was found for the treatment works and the distribution network. The largest number of affected consumers with gastrointestinal illness was for contamination events from a surface water source, while the largest number of individual events occurred for the distribution network.

  9. Towards Safe Navigation by Formalizing Navigation Rules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Kreutzmann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available One crucial aspect of safe navigation is to obey all navigation regulations applicable, in particular the collision regulations issued by the International Maritime Organization (IMO Colregs. Therefore, decision support systems for navigation need to respect Colregs and this feature should be verifiably correct. We tackle compliancy of navigation regulations from a perspective of software verification. One common approach is to use formal logic, but it requires to bridge a wide gap between navigation concepts and simple logic. We introduce a novel domain specification language based on a spatio-temporal logic that allows us to overcome this gap. We are able to capture complex navigation concepts in an easily comprehensible representation that can direcly be utilized by various bridge systems and that allows for software verification.

  10. Vulnerabilities Classification for Safe Development on Android

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Luis D. M. Ferreira

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The global sales market is currently led by devices with the Android operating system. In 2015, more than 1 billion smartphones were sold, of which 81.5% were operated by the Android platform. In 2017, it is estimated that 267.78 billion applications will be downloaded from Google Play. According to Qian, 90% of applications are vulnerable, despite the recommendations of rules and standards for the safe software development. This study presents a classification of vulnerabilities, indicating the vulnerability, the safety aspect defined by the Brazilian Association of Technical Standards (Associação Brasileira de Normas Técnicas - ABNT norm NBR ISO/IEC 27002 which will be violated, which lines of code generate the vulnerability and what should be done to avoid it, and the threat agent used by each of them. This classification allows the identification of possible points of vulnerability, allowing the developer to correct the identified gaps.

  11. The safe road transport system approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vollpracht Hans-Joachim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available More than 1,24 million people die each year on the worlds roads and between 20 to 50 million suffer from nonfatal injuries. The UN Road Safety Collaboration Meetings under the leadership of WHO developed the Programme for the Decade of Actions for road safety taking nations into the responsibility of improving their accident figures by the five pillars of a national Road Safety Policy, safer Roads, safer Vehicles, safer Road Users and Post Crash Care. It is this Safe System Approach that takes into consideration the land use, infrastructure and transport planning, road user’s abilities and limitations and the close cooperation of all governmental and none governmental stakeholders involved.

  12. Therapy Provider Phase Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Therapy Provider Phase Information dataset is a tool for providers to search by their National Provider Identifier (NPI) number to determine their phase for...

  13. Safe operation of a batch reactor: Safe storage of organic peroxides in supply vessels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steensma, M.; Steensma, Metske; Westerterp, K.R.

    1991-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the limits of safe operation for a cooled reactor, operated batchwise. As an example of a single-phase reaction, we studied the decomposition of t-butyl peroxypivalate, a well-known organic peroxide, undergoing self-heating at relatively low temperatures. If

  14. Safe Schools for LGBTQI Students: How Do Teachers View Their Role in Promoting Safe Schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Stephanie; Crawford, Heather Glynn; Van Pelt, J-Lynn

    2012-01-01

    This literature review presents insights from existing research on how teachers view their role in creating safe schools for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning, and intersex (LGBTQI) students. Analysis of the literature shows that there are concerns for LGBTQI students' safety in schools, that educational settings operate from…

  15. Estimated Maximal Safe Dosages of Tumescent Lidocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeske, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumescent lidocaine anesthesia consists of subcutaneous injection of relatively large volumes (up to 4 L or more) of dilute lidocaine (≤1 g/L) and epinephrine (≤1 mg/L). Although tumescent lidocaine anesthesia is used for an increasing variety of surgical procedures, the maximum safe dosage is unknown. Our primary aim in this study was to measure serum lidocaine concentrations after subcutaneous administration of tumescent lidocaine with and without liposuction. Our hypotheses were that even with large doses (i.e., >30 mg/kg), serum lidocaine concentrations would be below levels associated with mild toxicity and that the concentration-time profile would be lower after liposuction than without liposuction. METHODS: Volunteers participated in 1 to 2 infiltration studies without liposuction and then one study with tumescent liposuction totally by local anesthesia. Serum lidocaine concentrations were measured at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, and 24 hours after each tumescent lidocaine infiltration. Area under the curve (AUC∞) of the serum lidocaine concentration-time profiles and peak serum lidocaine concentrations (Cmax) were determined with and without liposuction. For any given milligram per kilogram dosage, the probability that Cmax >6 μg/mL, the threshold for mild lidocaine toxicity was estimated using tolerance interval analysis. RESULTS: In 41 tumescent infiltration procedures among 14 volunteer subjects, tumescent lidocaine dosages ranged from 19.2 to 52 mg/kg. Measured serum lidocaine concentrations were all lidocaine toxicity without liposuction at a dose of 28 mg/kg and with liposuction at a dose of 45 mg/kg was ≤1 per 2000. CONCLUSIONS: Preliminary estimates for maximum safe dosages of tumescent lidocaine are 28 mg/kg without liposuction and 45 mg/kg with liposuction. As a result of delayed systemic absorption, these dosages yield serum lidocaine concentrations below levels associated with mild toxicity and are a nonsignificant

  16. 75 FR 7149 - SAFE Mortgage Licensing Act: HUD Responsibilities Under the SAFE Act; Extension of Public Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-17

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 24 CFR Parts 30 and 3400 RIN 2502-A170 SAFE Mortgage Licensing... responsibilities under the Secure and Fair Enforcement Mortgage Licensing Act of 2008 (SAFE Act), which was...

  17. Moving beyond safe sex to women-controlled safe sex: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Kamila A; Coleman, Christopher L; Deatrick, Janet A; Jemmott, Loretta S

    2012-08-01

    This paper is a report of a conceptual analysis of women-controlled safe sex. Women bear disproportionate burdens from sexually related health compromising outcomes. Imbalanced societal gender and power positions contribute to high morbidities. The expression, women-controlled safe sex, aims to empower women to gain control of their sexual lives. Few researchers focus on contextualized socio-cultural definitions of sexual safety among women. The sample included scientific literature from Scopus, CINAHL, PubMed, PsychINFO and Sociological Abstracts. Papers were published 2000-2010. Critical analyses of literature about women-controlled safe sex were performed in May 2011 using Rodgers' evolutionary concept analysis methods. The search focused on social and cultural influences on sexual practices aimed at increasing women's control over their sexual safety. The analysis uncovered five attributes of women-controlled safe sex: technology; access to choices; women at-risk; 'condom migration' panic; and communication. Three antecedents included: male partner influence; body awareness; and self-efficacy. Consequences were categorized as positive or negative. Nine surrogate terms included: empowerment; gender power; female-controlled sexual barrier method; microbicides; diaphragm; sexual negotiation and communication; female condom; women-initiated disease transmission prevention; and spermicides. Finally, a consensus definition was identified: a socio-culturally influenced multi-level process for initiating sexual safety by women deemed at-risk for sexually related dangers, usually sexually transmitted infections and/or HIV/AIDS. This concept analysis described current significance, uses, and applications of women-controlled safe sex in the scientific literature. The authors clarified its limited nature and conclude that additional conceptual refinement in nursing is necessary to influence women's health. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. A systematic review of the use of financial incentives and penalties to encourage uptake of healthy behaviors: protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jean; Giles, Emma L; Robalino, Shannon; McColl, Elaine; Sniehotta, Falko F

    2012-10-31

    The use of financial incentives and penalties to encourage uptake of healthy behaviors is increasingly seen as a viable intervention in developed countries. Previous reviews of the effectiveness of financial incentives and penalties for encouraging the uptake of healthy behaviors have focused on individual behaviors making it difficult to draw overall conclusions about the effectiveness of such interventions. This systematic review will explore the effectiveness of financial incentives and penalties for encouraging a wide range of behaviors, including: smoking cessation, increased physical activity, healthier dietary intake, sensible patterns of alcohol consumption, safe sun, safe sex, and primary preventive clinical behaviors. Systematic methods will be used to search existing literature and screen studies for inclusion. All studies that meet the following inclusion criteria will be included in the review: participants were 18 years old or older and living in high-income countries; interventions included cash or cash-like incentives to promote the uptake of healthy behaviors, or cash or cash-like penalties to discourage unhealthy behaviors; the comparator was usual care or no intervention; study design was randomized controlled trial, cluster randomized controlled trial, controlled before and after study, or interrupted time series analysis. Two reviewers will independently screen the publications to ensure they meet the inclusion criteria. Quality will be assessed by two researchers, working independently, using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Meta-analysis will be conducted, if appropriate. Any studies identified as at 'high risk of bias' will be excluded from meta-analysis. This systematic review will provide policy-relevant recommendations for the use of financial incentives and penalties as a method of encouraging uptake of healthy behaviors.

  19. HEALTHY AND SAFETY SWIMMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleyman CEYLAN

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Swimming is a sport which has own rules, styles, and fields, however, is one of the most performed avocation as amateur and a joke especially at summer months. Although one of the most beneficial sports, swimming can cause a number of several health problems such as infectious diseases, allergic events, or traumas, if it is not done at adequate conditions and eligible style. In this paper, the factors such as preparing to swimming, health and safety features of swimming areas, important health behavior, wearing, feeding etc. that effected healthy swimming will be reviewed and evaluated. At the last part of the paper, it will be made some proposals to readers on healthy and safety swimming. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2005; 4(4.000: 209-221

  20. Artificial sweeteners as a sugar substitute: Are they really safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Arun; Amarnath, S; Thulasimani, M; Ramaswamy, S

    2016-01-01

    Nonnutritive sweeteners (NNS) have become an important part of everyday life and are increasingly used nowadays in a variety of dietary and medicinal products. They provide fewer calories and far more intense sweetness than sugar-containing products and are used by a plethora of population subsets for varying objectives. Six of these agents (aspartame, saccharine, sucralose, neotame, acesulfame-K, and stevia) have previously received a generally recognized as safe status from the United States Food and Drug Administration, and two more (Swingle fruit extract and advantame) have been added in the recent years to this ever growing list. They are claimed to promote weight loss and deemed safe for consumption by diabetics; however, there is inconclusive evidence to support most of their uses and some recent studies even hint that these earlier established benefits regarding NNS use might not be true. There is a lack of properly designed randomized controlled studies to assess their efficacy in different populations, whereas observational studies often remain confounded due to reverse causality and often yield opposite findings. Pregnant and lactating women, children, diabetics, migraine, and epilepsy patients represent the susceptible population to the adverse effects of NNS-containing products and should use these products with utmost caution. The overall use of NNS remains controversial, and consumers should be amply informed about the potential risks of using them, based on current evidence-based dietary guidelines.

  1. Progress in hardware development for the SAFE heatpipe reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, P. J.; Sayre, E. D.; van Dyke, Melissa; Houts, Mike

    2002-01-01

    Advanced Methods & Materials Company (AMM) previously fabricated the stainless steel modules for the SAFE 30 system. These earlier modules consisting of five fuel pins surrounding a heat pipe, were brazed together using a tricusp insert in the gaps between tubes to ensure maximum braze coverage. It was decided that if possible the next generations of modules, both stainless steel and refractory alloy, would be diffusion bonded together using a Hot Issostatic Pressing (HIP) process. This process was very successfully used in producing the bonded rhenium Nb-lZr fuel cladding and the heat exchanger for the SP-100 Nuclear Space System Ref. 1 & 2. In addition AMM have since refined the technology enabling them to produce very high temperature rocket thrust chambers. Despite this background the complex geometry required for the SAFE module was quite challenging. It was necessary to develop a method which could be applied for both stainless steel and refractory alloy systems. In addition the interstices between tubes had to be completely filled with the tricusp insert to avoid causing distortion of the tube shape during HIPing and provide thermal conductivity from the fuel tubes to the heat pipes. Nevertheless it was considered worth the effort since Hot Isostatic Pressing, if successful, will produce an assembly with the heat pipe completely embedded within the module such that the diffusion bonded assembly has the thermal conduction and strength equivalent to a solid structure. .

  2. Environmentally safe system for treatment of bio corrosion of ETICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minarovičová Katarína

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of microorganisms on building facades are responsible for aesthetic, bio-geophysical and biogeochemical deterioration. The process of cleaning of contaminated facades involves the removal and eradication of micro flora on the surface of insulation using chemical products, killing cells and eliminating all living mass, including organic ingredients. The removal of bio corrosion coating from ETICS structure by means of chemical and preservative substances (biocides is currently the only effective and most used technology. Uncontrolled leaching of the used biocides is unacceptable. Meantime, new technology for environmentally safe maintenance of ETICS is needed. Scientists have been working on replacement the biocides currently used in facades treatment with eco-friendly biocides that have no negative effects on the environment or human beings. While the eco- treatment will be available, safe dewatering of chemicals being leached from the surface of the facade could be provided by e.g. special drain systems adjusted to the building type, use and age. The paper gives an overview of the problem in context of Slovakia and examples of leaching systems designed for new and renovated buildings.

  3. Selfies, Healthies, Usies, Felfies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    2014-01-01

    Spejlet hører til en af de skelsættende nyopfindelser, der udbredes i renæssancen og sætter selvet og subjektet i centrum. Det samme gør den såkaldte selfie, der siden den for alvor blev populær i løbet af sidste halvdel af 2013 har udmøntet sig i adskillige underkategorier: Healthies, Usies...

  4. Healthy Sport Monitoring System

    OpenAIRE

    ABBASOV, Parviz

    2014-01-01

    Every individual responses differently to physical activity. Working out more than body endures can cause serious health problems. Rapid developments in information and communication technologies affects the whole area of health. Recently developed wearable wireless non-invasive health sensors allow us to create healthcare application. This research aims to give an idea for implementation of healthcare systems in sports area. This system will improve healthy and social life and encourage peop...

  5. A Healthy Person

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevald Høye

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate how nursing students in Indonesia and Scandinavia characterize a healthy person. Two hundred thirty-two nursing students from Indonesia, 50 students from Sweden, and 119 students from Norway participated by answering an open-ended question. Qualitative content analysis was used to identify patterns of health in a cultural and national context. The characteristics of a healthy person were summarized in the theme “external and inner balance,” which are intertwined because of the wholeness of self-image and appearance. The subcategories were having a strong and positive body image, feeling well and having inner harmony, following the rules of life, coping with challenges, and acting in unison with the environment. There were more similarities than differences between the Indonesian and Scandinavian nursing students’ understanding of being a healthy person. The difference is that the Scandinavian students mentioned individuality, whereas the Indonesian students referred to collective values.

  6. Dietary restriction with and without caloric restriction for healthy aging [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changhan Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Caloric restriction is the most effective and reproducible dietary intervention known to regulate aging and increase the healthy lifespan in various model organisms, ranging from the unicellular yeast to worms, flies, rodents, and primates. However, caloric restriction, which in most cases entails a 20–40% reduction of food consumption relative to normal intake, is a severe intervention that results in both beneficial and detrimental effects. Specific types of chronic, intermittent, or periodic dietary restrictions without chronic caloric restriction have instead the potential to provide a significant healthspan increase while minimizing adverse effects. Improved periodic or targeted dietary restriction regimens that uncouple the challenge of food deprivation from the beneficial effects will allow a safe intervention feasible for a major portion of the population. Here we focus on healthspan interventions that are not chronic or do not require calorie restriction.

  7. Safe patient care - safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Pierre, Michael

    2013-12-13

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organization's vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture ("top-down process"). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organization's maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization's general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed "informed culture". An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. "Incident reporting systems" are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organization's safe surgery checklist" is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality. Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate stimulation based team trainings into their

  8. [Safe patient care: safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Pierre, M

    2013-04-01

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organisation's vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture ("top-down process"). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organizations maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization's general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed "informed culture". An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. "Incident reporting systems" are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organisation's "safe surgery checklist" is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality.Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate simulation based team trainings into their curriculum

  9. Relationships Analysis and Public Perception of the Healthy Plastic as One Solution to Healthy Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartatik; Hartono, R.; Purnomo, A.; Riasti, B. K.; Munawaroh, H.

    2017-02-01

    Direct Plastics are used for various human purposes, ranging from household to industry. Tableware and drink made of plastic is very practical to use, easy to clean, durable and cost far less than tableware made of the other material. However, must also be considered in terms of security in the use of plastic containers for food storage because there are adverse effects. There are seven types of plastic based material used, namely Polyethylene, Terephthalate, High Density Polyethylene, Polyvinyl Chloride or V/PVC, Low Density Polyethylene or LDPE, Polypropylene, Polystyrene, Plastics others including polycarbonate. Experts claims that the plastic code numbers 2, 4 and 5 are used for equipment safely eat/drink because it is more stable and safe if used correctly. In this study will analyze the relationship between the recent education, family income to perception and behavior in the use of plastics in food storage daily as one solution to healthy living. The population of this research is all the people in the Solo area particularly housewife and all the people in the productive age. Data were obtained through a survey with cluster random sampling method. Statistical method used is a parametric method and Chi Square test This method is used as an alternative method of parametric when some assumptions are not met. Based on the results of Chi Square test with α = 15% was concluded that recent education and income related to the behavior of people using plastic products as one of the solutions to Healthy Living.

  10. A feasibility study to assess the effectiveness of safe dates for teen mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrman, Judith W; Waterhouse, Julie K

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of the adapted Safe Dates curriculum as an intervention for pregnant and/or parenting teens to prevent teen dating violence (TDV). This pre-/posttest, single-sample study provided a means to assess the effectiveness of an adapted Safe Dates curriculum for teen mothers. The adapted Safe Dates curriculum was implemented in three schools designed for the unique needs of teens who are pregnant and/or parenting. The final sample of 41 teen participants, with a mean age of 16.27, completed 80% of the curriculum and two of the three assessments. Most of the teens were pregnant during participation in the curriculum, and six had infants between age 1 and 3 months. The teen mothers completed the pretest, participated in the 10-session adapted Safe Dates curriculum, and completed the posttest at the end of the program and 1 month after program completion. The pre/posttest was adapted from the Safe Dates curriculum-specific evaluation instrument. Senior, undergraduate nursing students were trained in and implemented the curriculum. Participation in the adapted Safe Dates program yielded significant differences in the areas of responses to anger, gender stereotyping, awareness of resources for perpetrators and victims, and psychological violence perpetration. This adapted program may be effective in changing selected outcomes. The implementation of a larger scale, experimental/control group study may demonstrate the program's efficacy at reducing the incidence of TDV among teen mothers. © 2014 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  11. Design of an integrated information management system for safe management of radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Dong Chan; Hong, Suk Young; An, Kyoung Il [Daesang Information Technology Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2003-05-15

    An integrated data management system for the safe management of radioactive waste and spent fuel in Korea is developed to collect basic information, provide the framework for national regulation, and improve national competition and efficiency in the management of radioactive waste and spent fuel. This system can also provide public access to information such as a statistical graphs and integrated data from various waste generators to meet increased public needs and interests. Objectives can be summarized as: the five principles (independence, openness, clearance, efficiency and reliance) of safety regulation can be realized. Public understanding and reliance on the safety of spent fuel and radioactive waste management can be promoted by providing reliable information. Ensure an openness within the international nuclear community and efficiently support international agreements among contracting parties by operating safe and efficient management of spent fuel and radioactive waste (IAEA joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management). The system can compensate for the imperfections in safe regulation of radioactive waste and spent fuel management related to waste generation, storage and disposal, and make it possible to holistic control. Re-organize the basic framework of KINS's intermediate and long term research organization and trends, regarding waste management policy is to integrate safe management and unit safe disposal.

  12. Development and design of an integrated information management system for safe management of radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Dong Chan; Hong, Suk Young; An, Kyoung Il [Daesang Information Technology Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-05-15

    An integrated data management system for the safe management of radioactive waste and spent fuel in Korea is developed to collect basic information, provide the framework for national regulation, and improve national competition and efficiency in the management of radioactive waste and spent fuel. This system can also provide public access to information such as a statistical graphs and integrated data from various waste generators to meet increased public needs and interests. Objectives can be summarized as; the five principles (independence, openness, clearance, efficiency and reliance) of safety regulation can be realized. Public understanding and reliance on the safety of spent fuel and radioactive waste management can be promoted by providing reliable information. Ensure an openness within the international nuclear community and efficiently support international agreements among contracting parties by operating safe and efficient management of spent fuel and radioactive waste (IAEA joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management). The system can compensate for the imperfections In safe regulation of radioactive waste and spent fuel management related to waste generation, storage and disposal, and make it possible to holistic control. Re-organize the basic framework of KINS's intermediate and long term research organization and trends, regarding waste management policy is to integrate safe management and unit safe disposal.

  13. Obesity in Pregnancy: A Qualitative Approach to Inform an Intervention for Patients and Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kominiarek, Michelle A; Gay, Franklin; Peacock, Nadine

    2015-08-01

    To investigate perceptions of minority pregnant women and providers about obesity and gestational weight gain (GWG), and to explore strategies to improve management of obesity in pregnancy with an emphasis on group prenatal care. Sixteen primarily non-Hispanic black pregnant women with a body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m(2) and 19 prenatal care providers participated in focus groups. Discussion topics included GWG goals, body image, health behaviors, and group prenatal care with additional emphasis on provider training needs. Women frequently stated a GWG goal >20 lbs. Women described a body image not in line with clinical recommendations ("200 pounds is not that big."). They avoided the term "obese". They were interested in learning about nutrition and culturally-acceptable healthy cooking. Women would enjoy massage and exercise in group settings, though definitions of "exercise" varied. Family members could help, but generational differences posed challenges. Most had to "encourage myself" and "do this for me and the baby". Providers expressed discomfort discussing GWG and difficulty finding the right words for obesity, which was partially attributed to their own weight. They noted the challenges they faced during prenatal care including time constraints, cultural myths, and system issues. Providers considered a group setting with social support an ideal environment to address health behaviors in obese women. Culturally-tailored programs that use acceptable terms for obesity, provide education regarding healthy eating and safe exercise, and encourage support from social networks may be effective in addressing GWG in obese minority women. Provider training in communication skills is necessary to address obesity in pregnancy.

  14. How safe is your neighborhood? Perceived neighborhood safety and functional decline in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Vivien K; Stijacic Cenzer, Irena; Kao, Helen; Ahalt, Cyrus; Williams, Brie A

    2012-05-01

    Neighborhood characteristics are associated with health and the perception of safety is particularly important to exercise and health among older adults. Little is known about the relationship between perception of neighborhood safety and functional decline in older adults. To determine the relationship between perceived neighborhood safety and functional decline in older adults. Longitudinal, community-based. 18,043 persons, 50 years or older, who participated in the 1998 and 2008 Health and Retirement Study. The primary outcome was 10-year functional decline (new difficulty or dependence in any Activity of Daily Living, new mobility difficulty, and/or death). The primary predictor was perceived neighborhood safety categorized into three groups: "very safe", "moderately safe", and "unsafe." We evaluated the association between perceived neighborhood safety and 10-year functional decline using a modified Poisson regression to generate unadjusted and adjusted relative risks (ARR). At baseline 11,742 (68.0%) participants perceived their neighborhood to be very safe, 4,477 (23.3%) moderately safe, and 1,824 (8.7%) unsafe. Over 10 years, 10,338 (53.9%) participants experienced functional decline, including 6,266 (50.2%) who had perceived their neighborhood to be very safe, 2,839 (61.2%) moderately safe, and 1,233 (63.6%) unsafe, P neighborhood safety was associated with 10-year functional decline (moderately safe ARR 1.15 95% CI 1.09-1.20; unsafe ARR 1.21 95% CI: 1.03-1.31 compared to very safe group). The relationship between perceived neighborhood safety and 10-year functional decline was not statistically significant for participants who had baseline functional impairment. Asking older adults about their perceived neighborhood safety may provide important information about their risk of future functional decline. These findings also suggest that future studies might focus on assessing whether interventions that promote physical activity while addressing safety

  15. Acceptance and use of eight arsenic-safe drinking water options in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inauen, Jennifer; Hossain, Mohammad Mojahidul; Johnston, Richard B; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of drinking water is a serious public health threat. In Bangladesh, eight major safe water options provide an alternative to contaminated shallow tubewells: piped water supply, deep tubewells, pond sand filters, community arsenic-removal, household arsenic removal, dug wells, well-sharing, and rainwater harvesting. However, it is uncertain how well these options are accepted and used by the at-risk population. Based on the RANAS model (risk, attitudes, norms, ability, and self-regulation) this study aimed to identify the acceptance and use of available safe water options. Cross-sectional face-to-face interviews were used to survey 1,268 households in Bangladesh in November 2009 (n = 872), and December 2010 (n = 396). The questionnaire assessed water consumption, acceptance factors from the RANAS model, and socioeconomic factors. Although all respondents had access to at least one arsenic-safe drinking water option, only 62.1% of participants were currently using these alternatives. The most regularly used options were household arsenic removal filters (92.9%) and piped water supply (85.6%). However, the former result may be positively biased due to high refusal rates of household filter owners. The least used option was household rainwater harvesting (36.6%). Those who reported not using an arsenic-safe source differed in terms of numerous acceptance factors from those who reported using arsenic-safe sources: non-users were characterized by greater vulnerability; showed less preference for the taste and temperature of alternative sources; found collecting safe water quite time-consuming; had lower levels of social norms, self-efficacy, and coping planning; and demonstrated lower levels of commitment to collecting safe water. Acceptance was particularly high for piped water supplies and deep tubewells, whereas dug wells and well-sharing were the least accepted sources. Intervention strategies were derived from the results in order to

  16. Aim For a Healthy Weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Institutes of Health Contact Us Get Email Alerts Font Size Accessible Search Form Search the NHLBI, use ... Be Physically Active Healthy Weight Tools BMI Calculator Menu Plans Portion Distortion Key Recommendations Healthy Weight Resources ...

  17. Vitamin Supplements: Healthy or Hoax?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It Works Healthy Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Vitamin Supplements: Healthy or Hoax? Updated:Jun 12,2015 Can ... Don’t do this: Don’t take antioxidant vitamin supplements such as A, C and E . Scientific evidence ...

  18. Evaluation of efalizumab using safe psoriasis control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henninger Eric

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Safe Psoriasis Control (SPC is an important comprehensive measure that is validated for the assessment of benefit:risk of psoriasis treatments, combining efficacy, quality of life, and safety measures. The objective of this analysis was to assess the benefit:risk of efalizumab, a novel biologic agent indicated for the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis, by applying the SPC to data from randomized, placebo-controlled clinical studies of efalizumab. Methods SPC was applied to week 12 data from four placebo-controlled, Phase III studies: three retrospective and one prospective, the latter including a cohort of "high-need" patients for whom existing therapies were inadequate or unsuitable. Results In the retrospective analysis, 39.4% of patients achieved SPC after 12 weeks of treatment with efalizumab, compared with 10.4% for placebo. In the prospective analysis, 34.3% of patients achieved SPC after 12 weeks of treatment with efalizumab, compared with 7.3% on placebo. Among high-need patients, 33.0% achieved SPC, compared with 3.4% on placebo. Conclusion Efalizumab has a favorable benefit:risk profile using the comprehensive outcome measure SPC.

  19. Conceptual design of inherently safe integral reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. I.; Chang, M. H.; Lee, D. J. and others

    1999-03-01

    The design concept of a 300 MWt inherently safe integral reactor(ISIR) for the propulsion of extra large and superhigh speed container ship was developed in this report. The scope and contents of this report are as follows : 1. The state of the art of the technology for ship-mounted reactor 2. Design requirements for ISIR 3. Fuel and core design 4. Conceptual design of fluid system 5. Conceptual design of reactor vessel assembly and primary components 6. Performance analyses and safety analyses. Installation of two ISIRs with total thermal power of 600MWt and efficiency of 21% is capable of generating shaft power of 126,000kW which is sufficient to power a container ship of 8,000TEU with 30knot cruise speed. Larger and speedier ship can be considered by installing 4 ISIRs. Even though the ISIR was developed for ship propulsion, it can be used also for a multi-purpose nuclear power plant for electricity generation, local heating, or seawater desalination by mounting on a movable floating barge. (author)

  20. CarbonSAFE Illinois - Macon County

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittaker, Steve [University of Illinois; Illinois State Geological Survey

    2017-08-03

    CarbonSAFE Illinois is a a Feasibility study to develop an established geologic storage complex in Macon County, Illinois, for commercial-scale storage of industrially sourced CO2. Feasibility activities are focused on the Mt. Simon Storage Complex; a step-out well will be drilled near existing storage sites (i.e., the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium’s Illinois Basin – Decatur Project and the Illinois Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Project) to further establish commercial viability of this complex and to evaluate EOR potential in a co-located oil-field trend. The Archer Daniels Midland facility (ethanol plant), City Water, Light, and Power in Springfield, Illinois (coal-fired power station), and other regional industries are potential sources of anthropogenic CO2 for storage at this complex. Site feasibility will be evaluated through drilling results, static and dynamic modeling, and quantitative risk assessment. Both studies will entail stakeholder engagement, consideration of infrastructure requirements, existing policy, and business models. Project data will help calibrate the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) Toolkit to better understand the risks of commercial-scale carbon storage.

  1. Safe and optimized used fuel management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiguer, M.; Casablanca, J. L.

    2012-07-01

    A Post-Fukushima perspective This paper lists and briefly describes challenges and issues at stake that used Fuel Management will be facing at existing spent fuel p001 at reactors in operation or permanently shutdown in the aftermath of Fukushima and upcoming stress tests and beyond. It is also an attempt to jet from the perspective of AREVA, existing and proven products and services going along risk reduction strategies that may be of value to adequate protection that appropriately balances defence-in-depth and risk considerations as far as Used Fuel Management is considered and this from the very starting point namely the unloading of used fuel at SFP. Over the past decades, AREVA never stops enhancing used fuel recycling performances and developing innovative solutions to respond to plant, utility or country related constraints. This will be illustrated through a few business cases that best describe the various proven solutions and implemented contractual schemes for the safe and optimized management of used fuel today.

  2. Drainless mastectomy: Is it safe and effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Elizabeth; Piper, Jennifer

    2017-10-01

    Practice regarding the use of post operative drains after simple mastectomy varies widely. This project aimed to establish if not using a drain lead to an increase in post-operative seroma formation or other complications. Women undergoing simple mastectomy ± sentinel node biopsy were included. Patients were allocated to drain/no drain group via operating surgeon. Data was collected retrospectively from computer based records. Drain output, length of stay, seroma formation and volume and post-operative complications were recorded. There were 39 patients in the drain group and 24 patients in the no drain group. Patients did not differ significantly in terms of age, BMI or specimen weight. Seroma was more prevalent in the no drain group (62 v 83%) and required more clinic attendances for aspiration with larger volumes drained (360 vs 725 ml, p = 0.0096). There was no difference in overall complication rate. There did not appear to be a correlation between seroma formation and age, BMI or mastectomy weight. The use of a drain after simple mastectomy may confer lower rates of seroma formation as well as lower overall volumes. Therefore drainless mastectomy appears to be safe but may require more post-operative intervention. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. How to Observe the Sun Safely

    CERN Document Server

    Macdonald, Lee

    2012-01-01

    How to Observe the Sun Safely, Second Edition gives all the basic information and advice the amateur astronomer needs to get started in observing our own ever-fascinating star. Unlike many other astronomical objects, you do not need a large telescope or expensive equipment to observe the Sun. And it is possible to take excellent pictures of the Sun with today's low-cost digital cameras! This book surveys what is visible on the Sun and then describes how to record solar features and measure solar activity levels. There is also an account of how to use H-alpha and Calcium-K filters to observe and record prominences and other features of the solar chromosphere, the Sun's inner atmosphere. Because we are just entering a period of high activity on the Sun, following a long, quiet period, this is a great time to get involved with solar observing. Still emphasizing safety first, this Second Edition reflects recent and exciting advances in solar observing equipment. Chapters 6 through 8 have been completely revised ...

  4. Is percutaneous nephrolithotomy in solitary kidneys safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kathie Alexina; Sahai, Arun; Patel, Amit; Thomas, Kay; Bultitude, Matthew; Glass, Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    To review our experience from a high volume stone center with a focus on efficacy, safety, and renal function. Stones requiring percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in patients with solitary kidneys can pose significant anxiety to the urologist. Limited data are available in published reports in this setting. A comprehensive retrospective review of medical records was performed on patients who underwent PCNL and had a solitary kidney or a single functioning renal unit. Data were collected on patient demographics, stone burden, outcomes, complications, and renal function. Of 378 PCNLs performed between January 2003 and September 2011, 22 were performed in 17 patients with a single functioning kidney. Three procedures were performed in a transplanted kidney. In those with solitary calculus, the longest mean length and stone surface area were 37 mm and 825 mm(2), respectively. Stone-free rate was 59%. Auxiliary procedures were required in 6 cases, resulting in a stone-free rate of 77%. Median inpatient stay was 4 days. Serum creatinine values improved from 144 to 126 umol/L before and after the procedure and mean estimated glomerular filtration rate improved similarly from 51 to 59 mls/minute, respectively. Blood transfusion was required in 1 patient, sepsis developed in 3, and 2 patients required a stent for obstruction. PCNL in solitary kidneys is safe with an acceptable complication rate if performed in a high volume center. Outcomes are good, although auxiliary procedures may be necessary. Renal function remains stable or improves after procedure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Acellular pertussis vaccines--safe alternative].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szenborn, L; Saraczyńska, E

    2000-09-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the safety of various acellular vaccines (ACV) TripAcel, PacMarieux--Pasteur Merieux, Infanrix-SKB, Acel-P-Lederle and DTaP-SSI in 355 children, aged 7 weeks to 7 years, dismissed from immunization against pertussis with a whole-cell vaccine. All ACV contained varying concentrations of pertussis toxin; some vaccines contained filamentous hemagglutinin, pertactin and/or agglutinogens. The indication of using ACV were adverse effects following immunization (AEFI) after wP vaccine (n = 29) and others reasons, mostly underlying perinatal and CNS pathology (n = 277). The 564 doses of ACV were given in 4 to 1 doses. Reaction forms and clinical follow-up were uniform throughout the study. Serious AEFI cases were not observed not only among children with CNS damage, but also in children with previous AEFI after DTwP vaccine. All ACV recipients consistently reported low rates of reactions in the 48 hours following immunization. We concluded that all investigated ACV were safe and well tolerated even in the group of high-risk children.

  6. Topological characterization of safe coordinated vehicle motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MILGRAM.R. JAMES; KAUFMAN,STEPHEN G.

    2000-04-03

    This paper characterizes the homotopy properties and the global topology of the space of positions of vehicles which are constrained to travel without intersecting on a network of paths. The space is determined by the number of vehicles and the network. Paths in the space correspond to simultaneous non-intersecting motions of all vehicles. The authors therefore focus on computing the homotopy type of the space, and show how to do so in the general case. Understanding the homotopy type of the space is the central issue in controlling the vehicles, as it gives a complete description of the distinct ways that vehicles may move safely on the network. The authors exhibit graphs, products of graphs, and amalgamations of products of graphs that are homotopy equivalent to the full configuration space, and are far simpler than might be expected. The results indicate how a control system for such a network of vehicles (such as a fleet of automatically guided vehicles guided by wires buried in a factory floor) may be implemented.

  7. Bike to work safely (follow-up)

    CERN Multimedia

    Simon Baird, HSE Unit Head

    2016-01-01

    Following a recent article about safe cycling (see here), the Bulletin received a request for more details on the type of accidents that are reported.   An analysis of the 38 accidents involving bicycles reported this year up to the end of August reveals that the most common single cause of accidents is slippery surfaces: ice, snow, water and gravel, so the message here is to take extra care, particularly when cycling in bad weather. The second item on the list is obstacles of various kinds: collisions with kerbs, potholes and even the transition from roads to cycle paths. The lesson here is to pay close attention to the surface you’re cycling over, and if you do spot a pothole, even if it does not lead to an accident, report it so that it can be repaired. It’s also worth remembering that you’re more likely to avoid coming off your bike if you keep your hands on the handlebars. The third highest cause is collisions with other vehicles, and here there are lessons for ...

  8. Tactile thresholds in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metka Moharić

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The assessment of sensory thresholds provides a method of examining the function of peripheral nerve fibers and their central connections. Quantitative sensory testing is a variant of conventional sensory testing wherein the goal is the quantification of the level of stimulation needed to produce a particular sensation. While thermal and vibratory testing are established methods in assessment of sensory thresholds, assessment of tactile thresholds with monofilaments is not used routinely. The purpose of this study was to assess the tactile thresholds in normal healthy population.Methods: In 39 healthy volunteers (19 men aged 21 to 71 years, tactile thresholds were assessed with von Frey’s hair in 7 parts of the body bilaterally.Results: We found touch sensitivity not to be dependent on age or gender. The right side was significantly more sensitive in the lateral part of the leg (p=0.011 and the left side in the medial part of the arm (p=0.022. There were also significant differences between sites (p<0.001, whereby distal parts of the body were more sensitive.Conclusions: Von Frey filaments allow the estimation of tactile thresholds without the need for complicated instrumentation.

  9. A flavor-safe composite explanation of $R_K$

    CERN Document Server

    Carmona, Adrian

    2017-05-04

    In these proceedings we discuss a flavor-safe explanation of the anomaly found in $R_K= {\\cal B}(B \\to K \\mu^+ \\mu^-)/{\\cal B}(B \\to K e^+ e^-)$ by LHCb, within the framework of composite Higgs models. We present a model featuring a non-negligible degree of compositeness for all three generations of right-handed leptons, which leads to a violation of lepton-flavor universality in neutral current interactions while other constraints from quark- and lepton-flavor physics are met. Moreoever, the particular embedding of the lepton sector considered in this setup provides a parametrically enhanded contribution to the Higgs mass that can weak considerably the need for ultra-light top partners.

  10. Bully Prevention: Creating Safe and Inclusive Environments for Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Allen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bullying is a major issue facing youth of all ages, backgrounds, and walks of life. In fact, 30% of youth report experiencing bullying on a monthly basis (Nansel, Overpeck, Pilla, Ruan, Simons-Murton & Scheidt, 2001. As a consequence, these youth are at much greater risk for a host of mental and physical problems (Ttofi & Farrington, 2008. Parents, teachers, educators and youth advocates all agree that this issue merits time and attention, yet many professionals are at a loss for understanding the issue or what resources might be most effective with their young audience. With the increased rates of bullying behaviors and growing research about effective prevention and intervention strategies, youth development professionals need guidance for creating and sustaining bully prevention efforts. The purpose of this article is to highlight the growing research on bully prevention and provide information for practitioners working to create safe and inclusive environments for youth.

  11. Healthy Volunteer 2020: Comparing Peace Corps Volunteers' health metrics with Healthy People 2020 national objectives

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, Susan J.; Newman, Jeannette; Ferguson, Rennie W.; Jung, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Healthy People 2020 (HP2020) provides a set of quantifiable objectives for improving the health and well-being of Americans. This study examines Peace Corps Volunteers' health metrics in comparison with the Leading Health Indicators (LHIs) in order to set baseline measures for Volunteers' health care and align our measurements with Healthy People 2020 standards. Health data from multiple internal Peace Corps datasets were compared with relevant LHIs and analyzed using descriptive statistics. ...

  12. How safe is our food? : Background report to 'What is on our plate? Safe, healthy and sustainable diets in the Netherlands'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mengelers M; de Wit L; Boon PE; Franz E; Bouwknegt M; de Jonge R; Bulder A,; Havelaar A; DCZ; V&Z

    2017-01-01

    Over het algemeen is voedsel in Nederland veilig. De veiligheid kan echter worden bedreigd door microbiologische besmetting en schadelijke chemische stoffen. Het RIVM heeft de huidige stand van zaken beschreven over de voedselveiligheid in Nederland en de maatregelen die nodig zijn om het hoge

  13. [Food additives and healthiness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects.

  14. Pressures and procedures for the design of safe consumer products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J R

    1983-06-01

    An assessment is provided of the current position regarding changes in UK or EEC civil law under which injured parties can obtain redress in respect of injuries caused by defective products. One effect of proposed systems of strict liability in tort will be to shift some of the burden of proof from the injured party on to the producer of the product claimed to have caused injury. It is argued that this is a just and logical change, given the unfairness and anomalies in present systems and the relative abilities of consumers and producers to avoid such incidents and to bear or to offset the cost of the consequences. Cases of apparent misuse of a product by a consumer may frequently be induced by the design of that product and could thus be prevented by more thoughtful design. In order that producers can ensure their own viability and satisfy the consumer market, their products must be safe, efficient, comfortable and satisfying to use, as well as durable, serviceable and realistically priced. One requirement for achieving this has been said to be the input of accident and ergonomics data early in the product development process; the present paper examines this proposition. Evidence is provided by research into the design and manufacture of consumer products for the UK market, carried out at Birmingham University. Examined in particular are the extent to which formal development processes and design safety review procedures are used, and the degree of utilisation of accident, ergonomics, user testing and market feedback data, identifying barriers to the widespread use of these. Safe and ergonomic design of products must aim to be seen as a positive business activity, rather than as a cost-centre. The benefits to a company of a comprehensive design safety programme will more than outweigh the costs given the pressures identified earlier.

  15. Personal Trainer Perceptions of Providing Nutrition Care to Clients: A Qualitative Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Katelyn; Ball, Lauren; Desbrow, Ben

    2017-04-01

    Personal trainers are well placed to provide basic nutrition care in line with national dietary guidelines. However, many personal trainers provide nutrition care beyond their scope of practice and this has been identified as a major industry risk due to a perceived lack of competence in nutrition. This paper explores the context in which personal trainers provide nutrition care, by understanding personal trainers' perceptions of nutrition care in relation to their role and scope of practice. Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with 15 personal trainers working within Australia. Thematic analysis was used to identify key themes. All personal trainers reported to provide nutrition care and reported that nutrition care was an important component of their role. Despite this, many were unaware or uncertain of the scope of practice for personal trainers. Some personal trainers reported a gap between the nutrition knowledge they received in their formal education, and the knowledge they needed to optimally support their clients to adopt healthy dietary behaviors. Overall, the personal training context is likely to be conducive to providing nutrition care. Despite concerns about competence personal trainers have not modified their nutrition care practices. To ensure personal trainers provide nutrition care in a safe and effective manner, greater enforcement of the scope of practice is required as well as clear nutrition competencies or standards to be developed during training.

  16. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing in healthy children and adolescents at moderately high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilarraza-Lomelí, Hermes; Castañeda-López, Javier; Myers, Jonathan; Miranda, Irma; Quiroga, Paula; Rius, María-Dolores; Lopez-de-la-Vega, César; Vallejo, Enrique; Calderón, Juan; Figueroa, Javier; Buendía, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing is a tool that helps clinicians to establish diagnosis and calculate risk stratification in adults. However, the utility of this test among children with congenital heart disease has not been fully explored. The goal of this study was to describe reference values for cardiopulmonary performance of healthy children. This study included 103 apparently healthy children (aged from 4 to 18 years; 61 boys), who underwent cardiopulmonary test using a treadmill protocol. All tests took place at 2240m above sea level (Mexico City). Exercise time was 11±4min. There were no complications. Peak oxygen uptake correlated closely with height in both genders (girls r=0.84; boys r=0.84, p<0.001). A multivariable linear regression model showed that body surface area, exercise time, gender and heart rate reserve were significant predictors of peak oxygen uptake (R(2)=0.815, p<0.001). Peak oxygen uptake was strongly associated with age even among children younger than thirteen years (r=0.74, p<0.001). This study provides physiological values for the major cardiopulmonary variables obtained from exercise testing using a treadmill among healthy children. Cardiopulmonary exercise test can be safely and effectively performed in young children even as young as 4 years old. Variables including age, gender and height are strongly associated with exercise time, peak heart rate and peak oxygen uptake. Regression equations for predicting peak heart rate and peak oxygen uptake are presented as reference values that allow researchers to compare children with heart disease versus those who are healthy. Copyright © 2013 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  17. Nurturing Healthy Eating Habits from the Start

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Daniel B.

    2012-01-01

    Daniel B. Kessler, MD, a developmental and behavioral pediatrician, provides guidance on establishing healthy eating patterns in the early years. He emphasizes the importance of the feeding relationship as an important part of a child's social and emotional development. How parents approach feeding and mealtime is about so much more than physical…

  18. Keeping Active and Healthy Eating for Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Guide for Teenagers Talking with Patients about Weight Loss: Tips for Primary Care Providers Tips to Help You Get Active Benefits Starting Physical Activity Keep Moving Clinical Trials Understanding Adult Overweight and Obesity Using the World Around You to Stay Healthy ...

  19. Risk assessments and safe machinery ensuring compliance with the EU directives

    CERN Document Server

    Jespen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the prerequisites for the placing on the market and the safe use of machinery in compliance with the relevant EU Directives, especially the Machinery Directive 2006/42. It provides readers with high-level knowledge concerning the Essential Health and Safety Requirements (EHSR) that machinery must fulfill. The approach and principles of the Machinery Directive were most recently made worldwide acknowledged in the ILO code of practice on safe machinery, released in 2013. The book addresses that code, as well as providing valuable insight into other EU Product and Workplace legislation. Focusing on the key aspect of safe machinery, the “machinery safety risk assessment”, which allows readers to better understand the more difficult aspects of risk assessments, the book equips readers to tackle problems at the manufacturing stage and in different use scenarios, introducing them to risk reduction techniques and functional safety aspects.

  20. Safe handling of potential peroxide forming compounds and their corresponding peroxide yielded derivatives.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, Jeremiah Matthew; Boyle, Timothy J.; Dean, Christopher J.

    2013-06-01

    This report addresses recent developments concerning the identification and handling of potential peroxide forming (PPF) and peroxide yielded derivative (PYD) chemicals. PPF chemicals are described in terms of labeling, shelf lives, and safe handling requirements as required at SNL. The general peroxide chemistry concerning formation, prevention, and identification is cursorily presented to give some perspective to the generation of peroxides. The procedure for determining peroxide concentrations and the proper disposal methods established by the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility are also provided. Techniques such as neutralization and dilution are provided for the safe handling of any PYD chemicals to allow for safe handling. The appendices are a collection of all available SNL documentation pertaining to PPF/PYD chemicals to serve as a single reference.

  1. Foodomics for healthy nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoni, Alessandra; Capozzi, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    To understand how the principles of foodomics could improve the assessment of the nutritional status and needs. The knowledge that metabolic pathways may be altered in individuals with genetic variants in the presence of certain dietary exposures offers great potential for personalized nutrition advice, and epigenetics and nutrigenetics have been used to assess the need and status of specific nutrients. MicroRNAs profiling and genome-wide association studies have also contributed. Since nutritional effects of complex diets emerge only if dietary assessments are validated, nutrimetabolomics offers the validation tools on the basis of food intake biomarkers. Apart from the provision, via a high-throughput approach, of objective measurable parameters to be used as biomarkers, a consensus must be reached on the definition of health and wellness. Health (and wellness) can be considered a position having specific coordinates in a multiple-dimension space, and many factors contribute to our movements in this space. Foodomics is the science aiming at studying, through the evaluation of different biomarkers, the entity and the direction of the movements across the healthy or unhealthy space, developing models that are able to explain how food components, food, diet and lifestyle can influence our trajectory toward the healthy condition. Only considering the 'health space' as a multidimensional one, we have the possibility of understanding the complex relationship linking nutrition and health, and of reaching healthier conditions by personalized balanced diets in a foodomics vision.

  2. Preferred provider organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, J D

    1984-05-01

    The 1980s has marked the beginning of a new alternative health care delivery system: the preferred provider organization ( PPO ). This system has developed from the health maintenance organization model and is predominant in California and Colorado. A PPO is a group of providers, usually hospitals and doctors, who agree to provide health care to subscribers for a negotiated fee that is usually discounted. Preferred provider organizations are subject to peer review and strict use controls in exchange for a consistent volume of patients and speedy turnaround on claims payments. This article describes the factors leading to the development of PPOs and the implications for occupational therapy.

  3. Healthy lifestyles and school life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Circe Sánchez-Rodríguez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Promoting a culture in health not only towards the physical but mental health of the human being is a priority in the training of the professionals of the Preschool Education, evidenced in the diagnosis implemented, that provided the necessary information of the real and desired state in terms of the insufficiencies that present the students of 1st, 2nd and 3rd year of the day course of the Degree in Pre-school Education; in their lifestyles for the formation of coexistence in the university context. It demonstrates the need to develop an educational strategy that contributes to the formation of coexistence based on the promotion of healthy lifestyles, which in the hands of teachers will help to transform the behavioral attitudes of students, which will allow them to interact in a positive way with society and be better people and professionals.

  4. Environmentally safe health care agencies: nursing's responsibility, Nightingale's Legacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner-McRae, Hollie; McRae, Glenn; Jas, Victoria

    2007-05-31

    Florence Nightingale and subsequent nurse scholars have written about the impact of the environment on human health. Nightingale described, and staked out, the nurse's role in optimizing environments for healing. Since Nightingale's time numerous scholars have documented that environmental conditions play a major role in the health of individuals and populations. As nurses become more informed about the environment as a determinant of human health, they will be able to advocate more effectively for environmental conditions that promote health. This article provides both theoretical and practical perspectives to integrate environmental concerns into nursing practice. It recommends specific actions nurses can undertake to improve the environment within the health care setting. In particular the article provides a historical review of an environmental focus in nursing, discusses ways to manage both upstream waste and downstream waste (solid, biohazard, and hazardous chemical wastes) so as to decrease environmental pollution, and recommends specific nursing actions to promote a healthy environment within our health care agencies.

  5. Safe staffing for the post anesthesia care unit: weighing the evidence and identifying the gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamaril, Myrna E; Sullivan, Ellen; Clifford, Theresa L; Newhouse, Robin; Windle, Pamela E

    2007-12-01

    Postanesthesia nursing care and standards are continually evolving. ASPAN has the professional responsibility to develop standards of nursing practice to promote a safe environment of care. Currently, ASPAN's recommended staffing ratios are based on the best available evidence: expert opinion and consensus. Our Society believes that these nurse-to-patient ratios have served to provide safe, quality patient care. In 2006, the ASPAN Safe Staffing Strategic Work Team was charged with conducting a national PACU Safe Staffing Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) project. The purpose of this EBP staffing project was to search the scientific staffing evidence in an attempt to validate ASPAN's staffing ratios. This expert panel critically weighed the nursing evidence on staffing ratios, workload intensity, patient acuity, nursing-sensitive outcomes, and nursing-sensitive indicators, including appropriate critical care studies because of the scarce number of postanesthesia studies. The outcome of this dynamic initiative revealed the need to develop nursing-sensitive perianesthesia indicators that can provide patient outcomes used to assess the effectiveness of staffing ratios. Finally, research gaps were identified and the next steps in the generation of knowledge needed to build safe staffing evidence were identified in ASPAN's Strategic Research Staffing Plan.

  6. Building Service Provider Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandl, Kristin; Jaura, Manya; Ørberg Jensen, Peter D.

    In this paper we study whether and how the interaction between clients and the service providers contributes to the development of capabilities in service provider firms. In situations where such a contribution occurs, we analyze how different types of activities in the production process...

  7. Providing free autopoweroff plugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten Lynge; Hansen, Lars Gårn; Fjordbak, Troels

    2012-01-01

    Experimental evidence of the effect of providing households with cheap energy saving technology is sparse. We present results from a field experiment in which autopoweroff plugs were provided free of charge to randomly selected households. We use propensity score matching to find treatment effects...

  8. Inherently safe reactors and a second nuclear era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, A M; Spiewak, I

    1984-06-29

    The Swedish PIUS reactor and the German-American small modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor are inherently safe-that is, their safety relies not upon intervention of humans or of electromechanical devices but on immutable principles of physics and chemistry. A second nuclear era may require commercialization and deployment of such inherently safe reactors, even though existing light-water reactors appear to be as safe as other well-accepted sources of central electricity, particularly hydroelectric dams.

  9. An Automated Safe-to-Mate (ASTM) Tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phuc; Scott, Michelle; Leung, Alan; Lin, Michael; Johnson, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Safe-to-mate testing is a common hardware safety practice where impedance measurements are made on unpowered hardware to verify isolation, continuity, or impedance between pins of an interface connector. A computer-based instrumentation solution has been developed to resolve issues. The ASTM is connected to the circuit under test, and can then quickly, safely, and reliably safe-to-mate the entire connector, or even multiple connectors, at the same time.

  10. Ungoverned Areas and Threats from Safe Havens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    operations. The report has three main sections. Section 1: Framework sifts through the byzantine terminology of ungoverned areas and presents a...Hizballah provides social services to some Lebanese civilians, competing with the government of Lebanon for legitimacy and influence). Few places in the...governments, private companies, cooperatives, churches , charities, non-governmental agencies, and other bodies commonly provide economic opportunities or

  11. Considerations for Safe Innovation: The Case of Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Margriet V D Z; Bleeker, Eric A J; Brand, Walter; Cassee, Flemming R; van Elk, Merel; Gosens, Ilse; de Jong, Wim H; Meesters, Johannes A J; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Quik, Joris T K; Vandebriel, Rob J; Sips, Adriënne J A M

    2017-10-24

    The terms "Safe innovation" and "Safe(r)-by-design" are currently popular in the field of nanotechnology. These terms are used to describe approaches that advocate the consideration of safety aspects already at an early stage of the innovation process of (nano)materials and nanoenabled products. Here, we investigate the possibilities of considering safety aspects during various stages of the innovation process of graphene, outlining what information is already available for assessing potential hazard, exposure, and risks. In addition, we recommend further steps to be taken by various stakeholders to promote the safe production and safe use of graphene.

  12. Points-Based Safe Path Planning of Continuum Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khuram Shahzad

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Continuum robots exhibit great potential in a number of challenging applications where traditional rigid link robots pose certain limitations, e.g., working in unstructured environments. In order to enable the usage of continuum robots in safety-critical applications, such as surgery and nuclear decontamination, it is extremely important to ensure a safe path for the robot's movement. Existing algorithms for continuum robot path planning have certain limitations that need to be addressed. These include the fact that none of the algorithms provide safety assurance parameters and control for path planning. They are computationally expensive, applicable to a specific type of continuum robots, and mostly they do not incorporate design and kinematics constraints. In this paper, we propose a points-based path planning (PoPP algorithm for continuum robots that computes the path by imposing safety constraints and improves upon the limitations of existing approaches. In the algorithm, we exploit the constant curvature-bending property of continuum robots in their path planning process. The algorithm is computationally efficient and provides a good tradeoff between accuracy and efficiency that can be implemented to enable the safety-critical application of continuum robots. This algorithm also provides information regarding path volume and flexibility in movement. Simulation results confirm that the algorithm possesses promising potential for all types of continuum robots (following the constant curvature-bending property. We believe that this effectively balances the desired safety and efficiency requirements.

  13. Registered nurses' perceptions of safe care in overcrowded emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Julia; Gellerstedt, Linda; Hillerås, Pernilla; Craftman, Åsa Gransjön

    2017-10-27

    To explore registered nurses' perceptions of safe practice in care for patients with an extended length of stay in the emergency department. Extended length of stay and overcrowding in emergency departments are described internationally as one of the most comprehensive challenges of modern emergency care. An emergency department is not designed, equipped or staffed to provide care for prolonged periods of time. This context, combined with a high workload, poses a risk to patient safety, with additional medical errors and an increased number of adverse events. From this perspective, it is important to extend our knowledge and to describe registered nurses' experiences of safe practice. A qualitative, inductive and descriptive study. Qualitative interview study carried out in five emergency departments. Data were analysed using a qualitative content analysis with a latent approach. Patient safety meets obstacles in the clinical environment involving experiencing deficiencies regarding patient safety in the clinical setting and the impact of working procedures and routines. Moreover, nurses are challenged in their professional responsibilities involving balancing essential nursing care and actual workload; it is common to experience emotional reactions based on feelings of loss of control. From the nurses' perspective, a prolonged stay in the emergency department may lead to negative consequences for both patient safety and care as well as registered nurses' psychosocial experiences. An extended length of stay significantly reduces the level of nursing and caring that registered nurses can perform in the emergency department. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Making Healthy Choices Easier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldborg Hansen, Pelle; Skov, Laurits Rohden; Lund Skov, Katrine

    2016-01-01

    In recent years the nudge approach to behavior change has emerged from the behavioral sciences to challenge the traditional use of regulation in public health strategies for dealing with modifiable individual level behaviors related to the rise of noncommunicable diseases and their treatment....... However, integration and testing of the nudge approach as part of more comprehensive public health strategies aimed at making healthy choices easier is being threatened by inadequate understandings of its scientific character, relationship with regulation and its ethical implications. This article reviews...... this character and its ethical implication with a special emphasis on the compatibility of nudging with traditional regulation, special domains of experience, and the need for a more nuanced approach to the ethical debate. The aim is to advance readers understanding and give guidance to those who consider...

  15. The Healthy Start project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nanna J; Buch-Andersen, Tine; Händel, Mina N

    2012-01-01

    , and to intervene not only by improving diet and physical activity, but also reduce stress and improve sleep quality and quantity. METHODS: Based on information from the Danish national birth registry and administrative birth forms, children were selected based on having either high birth weight, a mother who......-going, but it is estimated that 394 children will be included. The intervention took place over on average 11/2 year, between 2009 and 2011, and consisted of optional individual guidance in optimizing diet and physical activity habits, reducing chronic stress and stressful events and improving sleep quality and quantity....... The intervention also included participation in cooking classes and play arrangements. Information on dietary intake, meal habits, physical activity, sleep habits, and overall stress level was obtained by 4-7 day questionnaire dairies and objective measurements. DISCUSSION: If the Healthy Start project...

  16. Fire-safe polymers and polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiqing

    The intrinsic relationships between polymer structure, composition and fire behavior have been explored to develop new fire-safe polymeric materials. Different experimental techniques, especially three milligram-scale methods---pyrolysis-combustion flow calorimetry (PCFC), simultaneous thermal analysis (STA) and pyrolysis GC/MS---have been combined to fully characterize the thermal decomposition and flammability of polymers and polymer composites. Thermal stability, mass loss rate, char yield and properties of decomposition volatiles were found to be the most important parameters in determining polymer flammability. Most polymers decompose by either an unzipping or a random chain scission mechanism with an endothermic decomposition of 100--900 J/g. Aromatic or heteroaromatic rings, conjugated double or triple bonds and heteroatoms such as halogens, N, O, S, P and Si are the basic structural units for fire-resistant polymers. The flammability of polymers can also be successfully estimated by combining pyrolysis GC/MS results or chemical structures with TGA results. The thermal decomposition and flammability of two groups of inherently fire-resistant polymers---poly(hydroxyamide) (PHA) and its derivatives, and bisphenol C (BPC II) polyarylates---have been systematically studied. PHA and most of its derivatives have extremely low heat release rates and very high char yields upon combustion. PHA and its halogen derivatives can completely cyclize into quasi-polybenzoxazole (PBO) structures at low temperatures. However, the methoxy and phosphate derivatives show a very different behavior during decomposition and combustion. Molecular modeling shows that the formation of an enol intermediate is the rate-determining step in the thermal cyclization of PHA. BPC II-polyarylate is another extremely flame-resistant polymer. It can be used as an efficient flame-retardant agent in copolymers and blends. From PCFC results, the total heat of combustion of these copolymers or blends

  17. What promotes sustainability in Safe Community programmes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindqvist Kent

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The theory and practice of safety promotion has traditionally focused on the safety of individuals. This study also includes systems, environments, and organizations. Safety promotion programmes are designed to support community health initiatives taking a bottom-up approach. This is a long-term and complex process. The aim of this study was to try to empirically identify factors that promote sustainability in the structures of programmes that are managed and coordinated by the local government. Methods Four focus group sessions with local government politicians and administrators in designated Safe Communities were conducted and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results Collaboration was found to be the basis for sustainability. Networks, enabling municipalities to exchange ideas, were reported to positively influence the programmes. Personal contacts rather than organizations themselves, determine whether collaboration is sustained. Participants reported an increase in cross-disciplinary collaboration among staff categories. Administrators and politicians were reported to collaborate well, which was perceived to speed up decision-making and thus to facilitate the programme work. Support from the politicians and the county council was seen as a prerequisite. Participants reported an increased willingness to share information between units, which, in their view, supports sustainability. A structure in which all local authorities' offices were located in close proximity to one another was considered to support collaboration. Appointing a public health coordinator responsible for the programme was seen as a way to strengthen the relational resources of the programme. Conclusion With a public health coordinator, the 'external' negotiating power was concentrated in one person. Also, the 'internal' programme strength increased when the coordination was based on a bureaucratic function rather than on one individual

  18. What promotes sustainability in Safe Community programmes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordqvist, Cecilia; Timpka, Toomas; Lindqvist, Kent

    2009-01-08

    The theory and practice of safety promotion has traditionally focused on the safety of individuals. This study also includes systems, environments, and organizations. Safety promotion programmes are designed to support community health initiatives taking a bottom-up approach. This is a long-term and complex process. The aim of this study was to try to empirically identify factors that promote sustainability in the structures of programmes that are managed and coordinated by the local government. Four focus group sessions with local government politicians and administrators in designated Safe Communities were conducted and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Collaboration was found to be the basis for sustainability. Networks, enabling municipalities to exchange ideas, were reported to positively influence the programmes. Personal contacts rather than organizations themselves, determine whether collaboration is sustained. Participants reported an increase in cross-disciplinary collaboration among staff categories. Administrators and politicians were reported to collaborate well, which was perceived to speed up decision-making and thus to facilitate the programme work. Support from the politicians and the county council was seen as a prerequisite. Participants reported an increased willingness to share information between units, which, in their view, supports sustainability. A structure in which all local authorities' offices were located in close proximity to one another was considered to support collaboration. Appointing a public health coordinator responsible for the programme was seen as a way to strengthen the relational resources of the programme. With a public health coordinator, the 'external' negotiating power was concentrated in one person. Also, the 'internal' programme strength increased when the coordination was based on a bureaucratic function rather than on one individual. Increased relational resources facilitated the transfer of information

  19. Perspectives on healthy eating among Appalachian residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenberg, Nancy E; Howell, Britteny M; Swanson, Mark; Grosh, Christopher; Bardach, Shoshana

    2013-08-01

    Extensive attention has been focused on improving the dietary intake of Americans. Such focus is warranted due to increasing rates of overweight, obesity, and other dietary-related disease. To address suboptimal dietary intake requires an improved, contextualized understanding of the multiple and intersecting influences on healthy eating, particularly among those populations at greatest risk of and from poor diet, including rural residents. During 8 focus groups (N = 99) and 6 group key informant interviews (N = 20), diverse Appalachian rural residents were queried about their perceptions of healthy eating, determinants of healthy food intake, and recommendations for improving the dietary intake of people in their communities. Participants included church members and other laypeople, public health officials, social service providers, health care professionals, and others. Participants offered insights on healthy eating consistent with the categories of individual, interpersonal, community, physical, environmental, and society-level influences described in the socioecological model. Although many participants identified gaps in dietary knowledge as a persistent problem, informants also identified extraindividual factors, including the influence of family, fellow church members, and schools, policy, advertising and media, and general societal trends, as challenges to healthy dietary intake. We highlight Appalachian residents' recommendations for promoting healthier diets, including support groups, educational workshops, cooking classes, and community gardening. We discuss the implications of these findings for programmatic development in the Appalachian context. © 2013 National Rural Health Association.

  20. Drinking water safely during cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from. This includes water for drinking, cooking, and brushing your teeth. Ask your health care provider about special care ... drink it or use it for cooking or brushing your teeth. Running well water through a filter or adding ...

  1. 77 FR 46633 - Parts and Accessories Necessary for Safe Operation: Brakes; Adjustment Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ... risk and removed from revenue service until the brake adjustment problems are resolved. With respect to... RIN 2126-AB28 Parts and Accessories Necessary for Safe Operation: Brakes; Adjustment Limits AGENCY... the operators . The rule provides improved guidance concerning CMV brake adjustment limits. The...

  2. Could martial arts fall training be safe for persons with osteoporosis? : a feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, B.E.; Smulders, E.; Duysens, J.E.J.; Lankveld, W.G.J.M. van; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Osteoporosis is a well-established risk factor for fall-related hip fractures. Training fall arrest strategies, such as martial arts (MA) fall techniques, might be useful to prevent hip fractures in persons with osteoporosis, provided that the training itself is safe. This

  3. Semantically Aware Foundation Environment (SAFE) for Clean-Slate Design of Resilient, Adaptive Secure Hosts (CRASH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    and application) implementations. In many contemporary machine architectures any breech of intended operation is sufficient to compromise arbitrary...hardware and OS architectures . Security protections must be provided that are robust against individual design faults (using defense-in-depth and... architecture and design principles that were established. This section reviews those decisions and the individual components and tools of the SAFE project are

  4. 40 CFR 23.7 - Timing of Administrator's action under Safe Drinking Water Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Safe Drinking Water Act. 23.7 Section 23.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Drinking Water Act. Unless the Administrator otherwise explicitly provides in a particular promulgation...

  5. SAFE MOVEMENT OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS THROUGH HEURISTIC HYBRID APPROACH: TABU SEARCH AND GAME THEORY APLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan ASLAN

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The safe movement of hazardous materials is receiving increased attention due to growing environmental awareness of the potential health affects of a release causing incident. A novel approach developed in this paper through a game theory interpretation provides a risk-averse solution to the hazardous materials transportation problem. The dispatcher minimizes the expected maximum disutility subject to worst possible set of link failure probabilities, assuming that one link in the network fails. The expected cost at the Nash equilibrium is a useful measure to evaluate the routing strategies for the safe movement of hazardous materials.

  6. How to Make a Healthy Change in Your Community Today

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-15

    In this podcast, the speakers will discuss how to create healthy changes that benefit residents and businesses in local communities, as well as provide inspiration for other communities to make healthy living a priority.  Created: 4/15/2012 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 8/28/2012.

  7. Ten Things Gay Men Should Discuss with Their Health Care Provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... does not seem comfortable with you as a gay man, find another provider. 2. HIV/AIDS, Safe Sex Many men who have sex with men are ... rate of HIV infection is one of the gay community’s great success stories. ... a good HIV provider. Safe sex is proven to reduce the risk of receiving ...

  8. Safe School: A Planning Guide for Action. 1995 Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Office of the Attorney General, Sacramento. Crime Prevention Center.

    This guidebook shows how schools can form partnerships with law-enforcement agencies and communities to develop a comprehensive safe-school plan. The planning guide is based on four principles: that safe schools are caring schools, are built through cooperative efforts of all stakeholders, communicate high standards, and stress prevention. This…

  9. Save lives, make hospital safe in emergencies: framework for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Save lives, make hospital safe in emergencies: framework for disaster preparedness in hospitals in Nigeria. ... Nigerian Journal of Postgraduate Medicine ... All over the world, it is becoming obvious that there is a need to make hospitals safe at times of disasters and emergencies, when the need for their services become ...

  10. "Safe Zone" Classrooms: The Individual Student versus the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, Amber

    2013-01-01

    Independence Day School is a small college preparatory school serving grades 9-12, in rural Illinois. As part of its commitment to creating a safe school for all students, it adopted a "safe zone" classrooms policy. The policy states that classrooms where conversation about homosexuality is permitted are marked with inverted pink…

  11. SAFE HANDLING LABELS AND CONSUMER BEHAVIOR IN THE SOUTHERN US

    OpenAIRE

    Adu-Nyako, Kofi; Kunda, Danny; Ralston, Katherine L.

    2003-01-01

    The impact of safe handling labels on food handling practices is assesed using a two step procedure to adjust for sample selection bias in the label use decision. A significant positive influence of labels on safe handling practices is found. Food safety knowledge, consumer risk perception, and illness experience impacted handling practices positively.

  12. Peacekeeper ICBM PBPS (Stage IV) Safing and Demilitarization Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Topics covered include: Overview of White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) and Capabilities. History of the Peacekeeper Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) Program. Introduction to Safing & Demilitarization Project. Requirements for Safing Project. Approach Constellation Program. Need for Qualified Flight Hardware to Support Constellation. Ability to Use Peacekeeper Hardware to Support Constellation. Additional Uses for the Peacekeeper Post-Boost Propulsion System (PBPS) Hardware.

  13. original article predictors of safe delivery service utilization in arsi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abrham

    education and communication on safe delivery service utilization, expansion of health service and empowerment of women are needed. KEY WORDS: safe delivery, skilled attendants, and .... mean or median of 11 knowledge questions and not knowledgeable if otherwise. Favourable attitude: women were considered as.

  14. Safe corridors for K-wiring in phalangeal fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Rex

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: K-wiring through the safe corridor has proved to yield the best clinical results because of least tethering of soft tissues as evidenced by performing "on-table active finger movement test" at the time of surgery. We strongly recommend K-wiring through safe portals in all phalangeal fractures.

  15. Be Food Safe: Protect Yourself from Food Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Be Food Safe: Protect Yourself from Food Poisoning Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... illness that lasts more than 3 days. Be Food Safe: Learn the Risks and Rules Anyone can ...

  16. Examination of a University-Affiliated Safe Ride Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieck, D. Joseph; Slagle, David M.

    2010-01-01

    A university-affiliated safe ride program was evaluated to determine whether these programs can reduce drunk-driving related costs. Data was collected from 187 safe ride passengers during three nights of operation. Among the passengers, 93% were enrolled at a local University, 31% were younger than 21, and 40% reported a prior alcohol-related…

  17. Swimming Safely (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-05-22

    In the summertime, families will be flocking to pools for relaxation and relief from the heat. A few simple precautions can help ensure a safe day in the water. In this podcast, Michele Hlavsa discusses ways to stay safe at the pool.  Created: 5/22/2014 by MMWR.   Date Released: 5/22/2014.

  18. Well Connected, a platform for safe online communication and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postel, Marloes Gerda; van Regteren, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    Well Connected, a platform for safe online communication and therapy Introduction Well Connected is a flexible, safe and user friendly e-health platform with a wide range of applications. Over the last 7 years 5000 patients were treated or a variety of addiction related problems. Besides creating an

  19. A Study on Visibility Rating of Several Representative Web-Safe Colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Daisuke; Saito, Keiichi; Notomi, Kazuhiro; Saito, Masao

    This paper presents the visibility ordering of several web-safe colors. The research of web site visibility is important because of the rapid dissemination of the World Wide Web. The combination of a foreground color and a background color is an important factor in providing sufficient visibility. Therefore, the rating of color combination visibility is necessary when developing accessible web sites. In this study, the visibility of several web-safe color combinations was examined using psychological methodology, i.e., a paired comparison. Eighteen chromatic web-safe colors were employed for visual stimuli. Nine students ranging from ages 21 to 29 (average 23.7) were recruited, and all were with normal color sensation. These nine subjects looked at two different colored characters simultaneously on the white background and were instructed to identify which one enabled them to see more clearly. In examining the relationship between the psychological rankings of the color combinations and the visual sensations, each color combination was first scored as to the visibility by Thurstone's paired comparisons technique. Secondly, the visual sensation was deduced by applying Weber-Fechner's law to the luminance of the foreground colors. As results, the luminance of a foreground color influenced the visibility; however the visibility rating is difficult only using the luminance of web-safe colors. These indicate that the chromaticity and chroma saturation are necessary in rating of chromatic web-safe color visibility.

  20. A Study on Visibility Estimation of Web-Safe Colors using Paired Comparison and Discriminant Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Daisuke; Saito, Keiichi; Notomi, Kazuhiro; Saito, Masao

    This paper presents the visibility ordering of several web safe colors. The research of web page visibility is important because of the rapid dissemination of the World Wide Web. The combination of a foreground color and a background color is an important factor in providing sufficient visibility. Therefore, the rating of color combination visibility is necessary when developing accessible web sites. In this study, the visibility of several web-safe color combinations was examined using psychological methodology, i.e., paired comparison. Eighteen chromatic and 3 achromatic web-safe colors were employed for visual stimuli. Twenty-eight subjects ranging from ages 21 to 75 were recruited, and all were with normal color sensation. They looked at two different colored characters simultaneously on the white background and were instructed to identify which one enabled them to see more clearly. In examining the relationship between the psychological rankings of the color combinations and the visual sensations, each color combination was first scored as to the visibility by Thurstone's paired comparison technique. Secondly, the visual sensation was deduced by applying Weber-Fechner's law to the luminance of the foreground colors. As results, the luminance of a foreground color influenced the visibility; however the visibility rating is difficult only using the luminance of web-safe colors. These indicate that the chromaticity and chroma saturation are necessary in rating of chromatic web-safe color visibility.

  1. Fail-safe system for activity cooled supersonic and hypersonic aircraft. [using liquid hydrogen fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. A.; Braswell, D. O.; Richie, C. B.

    1975-01-01

    A fail-safe-system concept was studied as an alternative to a redundant active cooling system for supersonic and hypersonic aircraft which use the heat sink of liquid-hydrogen fuel for cooling the aircraft structure. This concept consists of an abort maneuver by the aircraft and a passive thermal protection system (TPS) for the aircraft skin. The abort manuever provides a low-heat-load descent from normal cruise speed to a lower speed at which cooling is unnecessary, and the passive TPS allows the aircraft skin to absorb the abort heat load without exceeding critical skin temperature. On the basis of results obtained, it appears that this fail-safe-system concept warrants further consideration, inasmuch as a fail-safe system could possibly replace a redundant active cooling system with no increase in weight and would offer other potential advantages.

  2. On the fail-safe design of tendon-driven manipulators with redundant tendons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheu, Jinn Biau; Liu, Tyng; Lee, Jyh Jone [National Taiwan University, Taipei (China)

    2012-06-15

    A tendon-driven manipulator having redundant tendons may possess more flexibility in operation, such as optimizing the performance of tendons, reducing the burden of each tendon, and providing fail-safe features. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the design of tendon-driven manipulators with a fail-safe feature, that is, to synthesize a system that may still remain controllable as any of the tendons have broken down or malfunctioned. Characteristics of tendon-driven manipulators are briefly discussed. Criteria for tendon-driven manipulators with redundant tendons and fail-safe feature are then established. Subsequently, constraints for such system are derived from the structure of tendon-driven manipulator. Associated with the criteria, manipulators can remain controllable when any of the tendons fails to function. Finally, a geometric method for determining the structure is developed. Examples of two-DOF and three-DOF tendondriven manipulators are demonstrated.

  3. Medication abortion knowledge among adolescent medicine providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Mandy S; Makino, Kevin K; Phelps, Rachael

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Adolescents are at high risk for unintended pregnancy and abortion. The purpose of this study is to understand if providers caring for adolescents have the knowledge to counsel accurately on medication abortion, a suitable option for many teens seeking to terminate a pregnancy. Methods Using an online questionnaire, we surveyed US providers in the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine on medication abortion. We conducted chi-squared analyses to evaluate medication abortion knowledge by adolescent medicine fellowship training, and to compare responses to specific knowledge questions by medication abortion counseling. Further, we examined the relationship between providers’ self-assessed and actual knowledge using ANOVA. Results We surveyed 797 providers, with a 54% response rate. Almost a quarter of respondents incorrectly believed medication abortion was not very safe, 40% misidentified that it was pregnant teens receive accurate counseling on all options, adolescent medicine providers need better education on medication abortion. PMID:22443843

  4. Healthy Foods under $1 Per Serving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Preschoolers Infographic How to Make a Healthy Home Dietary Recommendations for Healthy Children Top 10 Tips to Help Children Develop Healthy Habits Fruit and Veggie Toolkit for Kids Healthy Foods ...

  5. A safe, high-power-density lithium battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, F.

    1985-03-01

    The Li/SOCl2 battery has received attention because of its high theoretical energy/power density. However, practical Li/SOCl2 cells have not provided the desired power density and have suffered from concerns with cell safety on discharge. In previous work, ECO has shown that the use of a TAA-type catalyst significantly improves the safety of the Li/S0Cl2 cell at high rate. The objective of this Phase 1 program was to determine whether a stacked disk electrode configuration with TAA-catalyzed cathodes would meet a high power-density design goal. Under the program, the effects of cathode thickness, preparation pressure, electrolyte gap and solute concentration on stacked-electrode cell performance and capacity were measured. The results of the Phase 1 program included the demonstration of stacked-electrode cell performance and capacity at levels suitable to meet a design goal of 400 W/kg with high energy density. Further work in a Phase 2 program will be required to demonstrate in laser-sealed fully-packaged cells that the results of Phase 1 can be practically applied to provide a safe high-rate, energy-dense power source for military applications.

  6. Provider of Services File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The POS file consists of two data files, one for CLIA labs and one for 18 other provider types. The file names are CLIA and OTHER. If downloading the file, note it...

  7. The Provident Principal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, John R.

    This monograph offers leadership approaches for school principals. Discussion applies the business leadership theory of Warren Bennis and Burt Nanus to the role of the principal. Each of the booklet's three parts concludes with discussion questions. Part 1, "Visions and Values for the Provident Principal," demonstrates the importance of…

  8. What HERA may provide?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hannes [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); De Roeck, Albert [CERN, Genf (Switzerland); Bartles, Jochen [Univ. Hamburg (DE). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II] (and others)

    2008-09-15

    More than 100 people participated in a discussion session at the DIS08 workshop on the topic What HERA may provide. A summary of the discussion with a structured outlook and list of desirable measurements and theory calculations is given. (orig.)

  9. care Providers in Ibadan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three hundred and eighty six respondents (77.7%) were aware of intermittent preventive treatment (IPT). Awareness ... Key Words: malaria in pregnancy, intermittent preventive treatment, malaria control, health care providers. Department of Obstetrics .... Auxiliary nurses do not have formal training prior to employment.

  10. Safe spaces: gay-straight alliances in high schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetner, Tina; Elafros, Athena; Bortolin, Sandra; Drechsler, Coralee

    2012-05-01

    In activists' circles as in sociology, the concept "safe space" has been applied to all sorts of programs, organizations, and practices. Few studies have specified clearly what safe spaces are and how they support the people who occupy them. We examine one social location typically understood to be a safe space: gay-straight alliance groups in high schools. Using qualitative interviews with young adults in the United States and Canada who have participated in gay-straight alliances, we unpack this complex concept to consider some of the dimensions along which safe spaces might vary. Based on interviews with participants, we derive three interrelated dimensions of safe space: social context, membership, and activity.

  11. Balance artistry: the healthy parent's role in the family when the other parent is in the palliative phase of cancer--challenges and coping in parenting young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamotsmo, Trude; Bugge, Kari E

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this review was to provide a systematic overview of knowledge on how advanced cancer in a parent impacts the healthy parent's role in a family with children aged 6-12 years, and the types of help that they require in order to cope. Despite the large number of families living with a parent affected by cancer, the literature is limited concerning the needs and outcomes for the healthy parents and their need for support in managing their children's needs, when the partner is seriously ill or is in the palliative phase of cancer. Comprehensive literature searches were undertaken by systematically searching for qualitative articles published during the period 1989-2009. The quality assessment was evaluated using a predefined "checklist to assess qualitative research." Seven articles met our eligibility criteria. Four distinct themes emerged that describe the healthy parent's role in the family, whose life is now characterized by uncertainty and who is attempting to maintain a balance between the needs of their children, the patient, and themselves: (1) new roles without a script, (2) attempting to maintain a safe and normal life, (3) feeling alone even within the family, and (4) support to help young family members. The present review provides new knowledge and insight into how healthy parents manage the challenges in parenting young children, coping with their everyday lives, and taking on new roles when their partner has advanced cancer or is dying. The healthy parent cannot balance the needs of all family members. To reach the goals of palliative care, nurses and other health professionals are encouraged to offer the patient, the healthy parent, and the children practical and emotional support.

  12. Main corrective measures in an early phase of nuclear power plants’ preparation for safe long term operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krivanek, Robert, E-mail: r.krivanek@iaea.org [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Department of Nuclear Safety and Security, Operational Safety Section, Vienna 1400 (Austria); Fiedler, Jan, E-mail: fiedler@fme.vutbr.cz [University of Technology Brno, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Energy Institute, Technická 2896/2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Results of SALTO missions provide the most important issues for safe long term operation (LTO) of nuclear power plants. • The most important technical corrective measures in an early phase of preparation for safe LTO are described. • Their satisfactory resolution creates a basis for further activities to demonstrate preparedness for safe LTO. - Abstract: This paper presents the analysis of main technical deficiencies of nuclear power plants (NPPs) in preparedness for safe long term operation (LTO) and the main corrective measures in an early phase of preparation for safe LTO of NPPs. It focuses on technical aspects connected with management of physical ageing of NPP structures, systems and components (SSCs). It uses as a basis results of IAEA SALTO missions performed between 2005 and 2016 (see also paper NED8805 in Nuclear Engineering and Design in May 2016) and the personal experiences of the authors with preparation of NPPs for safe LTO. This paper does not discuss other important aspects of safe LTO of NPPs, e.g. national nuclear energy policies, compliance of NPPs with the latest international requirements on design, obsolescence, environmental impact and economic aspects of LTO. Chapter 1 provides a brief introduction of the current status of the NPP’ fleet in connection with LTO. Chapter 2 provides an overview of SALTO peer review service results with a focus on deficiencies related to physical ageing of safety SSCs and a demonstration that SSCs will perform their safety function during the intended period of LTO. Chapter 3 discusses the main corrective measures which NPPs typically face during the preparation for demonstration of safe LTO. Chapter 4 summarizes the current status of the NPP’ fleet in connection with LTO and outlines further steps needed in preparation for safe LTO.

  13. Staying Healthy on a Cruise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency Preparedness & Response Environmental Health Healthy Living Injury, Violence & Safety Life Stages & Populations Travelers’ Health Workplace Safety & Health Features Media Sign up for Features Get Email Updates To ...

  14. Safety of Bifidobacterium animalis Subsp. Lactis (B. lactis) Strain BB-12-Supplemented Yogurt in Healthy Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tina P; Ba, Zhaoyong; Sanders, Mary E; D'Amico, Frank J; Roberts, Robert F; Smith, Keisha H; Merenstein, Daniel J

    2017-02-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that may provide health benefits to the individual when consumed in sufficient quantities. For studies conducted on health or disease endpoints on probiotics in the United States, the Food and Administration has required those studies to be conducted as investigational new drugs. This phase I, double-blinded, randomized, controlled safety study represents the first requirement of this pathway. The purpose of the study was to determine the safety of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (B lactis) strain BB-12 (BB-12)-supplemented yogurt when consumed by a generally healthy group of children. The secondary aim was to assess the effect of BB-12-supplemented yogurt on the gut microbiota of the children. Sixty children ages 1 to 5 years were randomly assigned to consume 4 ounces of either BB-12-supplemented yogurt or nonsupplemented control yogurt daily for 10 days. The primary outcome was to assess safety and tolerability, as determined by the number of reported adverse events. A total of 186 nonserious adverse events were reported, with no significant differences between the control and BB-12 groups. No significant changes due to probiotic treatment were observed in the gut microbiota of the study cohort. BB-12-supplemented yogurt is safe and well-tolerated when consumed by healthy children. The present study will form the basis for future randomized clinical trials investigating the potential effects of BB-12-supplemented yogurt in different disease states.

  15. Stakeholder Perspectives on Barriers for Healthy Living for Low-income African American Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronnie Faye Jones

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Childhood obesity is a growing problem for children in the United States, especially for children from low-income, African American families. Objective: The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand facilitators and barriers to engaging in healthy lifestyles faced by low-income African American children and their families. Methods: This qualitative study used semi-structured focus group interviews with eight African American children clinically identified as overweight or obese (BMI > 85 and their parents. An expert panel provided insights in developing culturally appropriate intervention strategies. Results: Child and parent focus group analysis revealed eleven barriers and no definitive facilitators for healthy eating and lifestyles. Parents reported confusion regarding what constitutes nutritional eating, varying needs of family members in terms of issues with weight, and difficulty in engaging the family in appropriate and safe physical activities; to name a few themes. Community experts independently suggested that nutritional information is confusing and, often, contradictory. Additionally, they recommended simple messaging and practical interventions such as helping with shopping lists, meal planning, and identifying simple and inexpensive physical activities.Conclusions: Childhood obesity in the context of low-resource families is a complex problem with no simple solutions. Culturally sensitive and family-informed interventions are needed to support low-income African American families in dealing with childhood obesity.

  16. Safe delivery, Service utilization, Metekel Zone

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A multi-stage sampling technique was used in providing delivery service within 2 hours distance on ... Abortion in life time. Yes 122 11.8. NO 916 S8.2. RESULTS. One thousand thirty eight (1038) women, who gave at least one delivery in the past five years prior to this survey, were ..... maternal mortality: A new approach,.

  17. Public health communications for safe motherhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, E

    1994-03-30

    Public health communication aims to influence health practices of large populations, including maternal health care providers (traditional birth attendants, (TBAs), nurse-midwives, other indigenous practitioners, and physicians). A quality assurance process is needed to give public sector health providers feedback. Computerized record keeping is needing for quality assurance of maternal health programs. The Indian Rural Medical Association has trained more than 20,000 rural indigenous practitioners in West Bengal. Training of TBAs is expensive and rarely successful. However, trained health professional leading group discussions of TBAs is successful at teaching them about correct maternity care. Health education messages integrated into popular songs and drama is a way to reach large illiterate audiences. Even though a few donor agencies and governments provide time and technical assistance to take advantage of the mass media as a means to communicate health messages, the private sector has most of the potential. Commercial advertisements pay for Video on Wheels, which, with 100 medium-sized trucks each fitted with a 100-inch screen, plays movies for rural citizens of India. They are exposed to public and family planning messages. Jain Satellite Television (JST) broadcasts 24 hours a day and plans to broadcast programs on development, health and family planning, women's issues, and continuing education for all health care providers (physicians, nurses, TBAs, community workers, and indigenous practitioners). JST and the International Federation for Family Health plan to telecast courses as part of an Open University of Health Sciences.

  18. Thyroidectomy under local anaesthesia: how safe? | Misauno ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to compliment the inadequate health facilities in the rural areas in Nigeria, nongovernmental organisations provide adhoc outreach health camps that offer treatment in various medical specialties including surgery. Rural outreach health camps. To evaluate the safety of thyroidectomy under local anaesthesia at rural ...

  19. Safe and inclusive cities | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The program focuses on re-socializing children between the ages of 14 and 21 who belong to youth gangs, providing them with skills as well as civic and ... More than 200,000 participants (75% women) have been employed, and researchers found that the program has helped to strengthen social bonds and reduce crime.

  20. Testing a Model of Healthy Marriage/Healthy Relationships: The Prediction of Parenting and Child Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shambleau, Krista M.

    2010-01-01

    Federally funded Healthy Marriage Initiative (HMI) programs provide marriage education as well as other services to low-income diverse individuals and couples at many points along the marital continuum with improving children's well-being as the overarching purpose. These programs need appropriate measures of healthy marriage for couples with…